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Sample records for vivo cytokine release

  1. Respiratory symptoms and ex vivo cytokine release are associated in workers processing herring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bønløkke, Jakob Hjort; Thomassen, Mads; Viskum, Sven

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of respiratory symptoms among workers processing herring and assess ex vivo cytokine release in response to agents at their workplace. METHODS: We applied a questionnaire, and performed skin prick testing and pulmonary investigations in 36 workers at two...... in the plasma by chemiluminescence ELISA. RESULTS: Among smoking fish-factory workers the forced vital capacity (FVC) was higher (per cent predicted 92.0 vs 85.0; P=0.028) than among municipal workers. Fish rinsing water induced WBA IL-8 release to higher levels than LPS and glucan. Among non...... was the IL-8 release for rinsing water ( P=0.008). CONCLUSIONS: Assessing the cytokine release by use of the WBA we identified substances in the occupational environment with a pro-inflammatory potential comparable to that of LPS. The cytokine release for fish constituents was highest among non-smoking fish...

  2. Inhibition of adenosine deaminase attenuates endotoxin-induced release of cytokines in vivo in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tofovic, S P; Zacharia, L; Carcillo, J A; Jackson, E K

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate in vivo the effects of modulating the adenosine system on endotoxin-induced release of cytokines and changes in heart performance and neurohumoral status in early, profound endotoxemia in rats. Time/pressure variables of heart performance and blood pressure were recorded continuously, and plasma levels of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha), interleukin 1-beta (IL-1beta), plasma renin activity (PRA), and catecholamines were determined before and 90 min after administration of endotoxin (30 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide, i.v.). Erythro-9[2-hydroxyl-3-nonyl] adenine (EHNA; an adenosine deaminase inhibitor) had no effects on measured time-pressure variables of heart performance under baseline conditions and during endotoxemia, yet significantly attenuated endotoxin-induced release of cytokines and PRA. Pretreatment with the non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist DPSPX not only prevented the effects of EHNA but also increased the basal release of cytokines and augmented PRA. At baseline, caffeine (a non-selective adenosine receptor antagonist) increased HR, +dP/dtmax, heart rate x ventricular pressure product (HR x VPSP) and +dP/dtmax normalized by pressure (+dP/dtmax/VPSP), and these changes persisted during endotoxemia. Caffeine attenuated endotoxin-induced release of cytokines and augmented endotoxin-induced increases in plasma catecholamines and PRA. Pretreatment with propranolol abolished the effects of caffeine on heart performance and neurohumoral activation during the early phase of endotoxemia. 6N-cyclopentyladenosine (CPA; selective A1 adenosine receptor agonist) induced bradicardia and negative inotropic effects, reduced work load (i.e., decreased HR, VPSP, +dP/dtmax, +dP/dtmax/VPSP and HR x VPSP) and inhibited endotoxin-induced tachycardia and renin release. CGS 21680 (selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist) decreased blood pressure under basal condition but did not potentiate decreases in blood pressure

  3. Adrenergic Effect on Cytokine Release After Ex Vivo Healthy Volunteers' Whole Blood LPS Stimulation.

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    Papandreou, Vasiliki; Kavrochorianou, Nadia; Katsoulas, Theodoros; Myrianthefs, Pavlos; Venetsanou, Kyriaki; Baltopoulos, George

    2016-06-01

    Catecholamines are molecules with immunomodulatory properties in health and disease. Several studies showed the effect of catecholamines when administered to restore hemodynamic stability in septic patients. This study investigates the effect of norepinephrine and dobutamine on whole blood cytokine release after ex vivo lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation. Whole blood collected from healthy individuals was stimulated with LPS, in the presence of norepinephrine or dobutamine at different concentrations, with or without metoprolol, a β1 receptor antagonist. Cytokine measurement was performed in isolated cell culture supernatants with ELISA. Results are expressed as mean ± SEM and compared with Mann-Whitney rank-sum test. Both norepinephrine and dobutamine significantly reduced TNF-α and IL-6 production after ex vivo LPS stimulation of whole blood in a dose-dependent manner, and this effect was partially reversed by the presence of metoprolol. Norepinephrine and dobutamine reduce the LPS-induced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, thus possibly contributing to altered balance between the inflammatory and anti-inflammatory responses, which are vital for a successful host response to severe disease, shock, and sepsis.

  4. Blockade of Toll-like receptor 2 prevents spontaneous cytokine release from rheumatoid arthritis ex vivo synovial explant cultures

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nic An Ultaigh, Sinead

    2011-02-23

    Abstract Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the effect of blocking Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovial cells. Methods RA synovial tissue biopsies, obtained under direct visualization at arthroscopy, were established as synovial explant cultures ex vivo or snap frozen for immunohistology. Mononuclear cell cultures were isolated from peripheral blood and synovial fluid of RA patients. Cultures were incubated with the TLR1\\/2 ligand, Pam3CSK4 (200 ng, 1 and 10 μg\\/ml), an anti-TLR2 antibody (OPN301, 1 μg\\/ml) or an immunoglobulin G (IgG) (1 μg\\/ml) matched control. The comparative effect of OPN301 and adalimumab (anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha) on spontaneous release of proinflammatory cytokines from RA synovial explants was determined using quantitative cytokine MSD multiplex assays or ELISA. OPN301 penetration into RA synovial tissue explants cultures was assessed by immunohistology. Results Pam3CSK4 significantly upregulated interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 in RA peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), RA synovial fluid mononuclear cells (SFMCs) and RA synovial explant cultures (P < 0.05). OPN301 significantly decreased Pam3CSK4-induced cytokine production of tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), IL-1β, IL-6, interferon (IFN)-γ and IL-8 compared to IgG control in RA PBMCs and SFMCs cultures (all P < 0.05). OPN301 penetration of RA synovial tissue cultures was detected in the lining layer and perivascular regions. OPN301 significantly decreased spontaneous cytokine production of TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ and IL-8 from RA synovial tissue explant cultures (all P < 0.05). Importantly, the inhibitory effect of OPN on spontaneous cytokine secretion was comparable to inhibition by anti-TNFα monoclonal antibody adalimumab. Conclusions These findings further support targeting TLR2 as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of RA.

  5. Anti-inflammatory homoeopathic drug dilutions restrain lipopolysaccharide-induced release of pro-inflammatory cytokines: In vitro and in vivo evidence

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    Umesh B Mahajan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced cytokine release and oxidative stress are validated experimental parameters used to test anti-inflammatory activity. We investigated the effects of homoeopathic mother tinctures, 6 CH, 30 CH and 200 CH dilutions of Arnica montana, Thuja occidentalis and Bryonia alba against LPS (1 μg/ml-induced cytokine release from RAW-264.7 cells and human whole-blood culture. Materials and Methods: For in vivo evaluations, mice were orally treated with 0.1 ml drug dilutions twice a day for 5 days followed by an intraperitoneal injection of 0.5 mg/kg LPS. After 24 h, the mice were sacrificed and serum levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines and nitric oxide were determined. The extent of oxidative stress was determined in the liver homogenates as contents of reduced glutathione, malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase. Results: The tested drug dilutions significantly reduced in vitro LPS-induced release of tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1 (IL-1 and IL-6 from the RAW-264.7 cells and human whole blood culture. Similar suppression of cytokines was evident in mice serum samples. These drugs also protected mice from the LPS-induced oxidative stress in liver tissue. Conclusions: Our findings substantiate the protective effects of Arnica, Thuja and Bryonia homoeopathic dilutions against LPS-induced cytokine elevations and oxidative stress. This study authenticates the claims of anti-inflammatory efficacy of these homoeopathic drugs.

  6. 5-hydroxytryptamine modulates migration, cytokine and chemokine release and T-cell priming capacity of dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

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    Tobias Müller

    Full Text Available Beside its well described role in the central and peripheral nervous system 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, commonly known as serotonin, is also a potent immuno-modulator. Serotoninergic receptors (5-HTR are expressed by a broad range of inflammatory cell types, including dendritic cells (DCs. In this study, we aimed to further characterize the immuno-biological properties of serotoninergic receptors on human monocyte-derived DCs. 5-HT was able to induce oriented migration in immature but not in LPS-matured DCs via activation of 5-HTR(1 and 5-HTR(2 receptor subtypes. Accordingly, 5-HT also increased migration of pulmonary DCs to draining lymph nodes in vivo. By binding to 5-HTR(3, 5-HTR(4 and 5-HTR(7 receptors, 5-HT up-regulated production of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-6. Additionally, 5-HT influenced chemokine release by human monocyte-derived DCs: production of the potent Th1 chemoattractant IP-10/CXCL10 was inhibited in mature DCs, whereas CCL22/MDC secretion was up-regulated in both immature and mature DCs. Furthermore, DCs matured in the presence of 5-HT switched to a high IL-10 and low IL-12p70 secreting phenotype. Consistently, 5-HT favoured the outcome of a Th2 immune response both in vitro and in vivo. In summary, our study shows that 5-HT is a potent regulator of human dendritic cell function, and that targeting serotoninergic receptors might be a promising approach for the treatment of inflammatory disorders.

  7. Measuring histamine and cytokine release from basophils and mast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bettina M; Falkencrone, Sidsel; Skov, Per S

    2014-01-01

    Basophils and mast cells are known for their capability to release both preformed and newly synthesized inflammatory mediators. In this chapter we describe how to stimulate and detect histamine released from basophils in whole blood, purified basophils, in vitro cultured mast cells, and in situ s...... skin mast cells. We also give an example of an activation protocol for basophil and mast cell cytokine release and discuss approaches for cytokine detection....

  8. After TGN1412: recent developments in cytokine release assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebbings, R; Eastwood, D; Poole, S; Thorpe, R

    2013-01-01

    The failure of regulatory science to keep pace with and support the development of new biological medicines was very publically highlighted in March 2006 when the first-in-man Phase I clinical trial of the immunomodulatory CD28-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb) TGN1412 ended in disaster when all six volunteers suffered a life-threatening adverse reaction termed a 'Cytokine Storm'. The poor predictive value of standard pre-clinical safety tests and animal models applied to TGN1412 demonstrated the need for a new generation of immunotoxicity assays and animal models that are both sensitive and predictive of clinical outcome in man. The non-predictive result obtained from pre-clinical safety testing in cynomolgus macaques has now been attributed to a lack of CD28 expression on CD4+ effector memory T-cells that therefore cannot be stimulated by TGN1412. In contrast, high levels of CD28 are expressed on human CD4+ effector memory T-cells, the source of most TGN1412-stimulated pro-inflammatory cytokines. Standard in vitro safety tests with human cells were also non-predictive as they did not replicate in vivo presentation of TGN1412. It was subsequently shown that, if an immobilized therapeutic mAb-based assay or endothelial cell co-culture assay was used to evaluate TGN1412, then these would have predicted a pro-inflammatory response in man. New in vitro assays based on these approaches are now being applied to emerging therapeutics to hopefully prevent a repeat of the TGN1412 incident. It has emerged that the mechanism of pro-inflammatory cytokine release stimulated by TGN1412 is different to that of other therapeutic mAbs, such that standard pro-inflammatory markers such as TNFα and IL-8 are not discriminatory. Rather, IL-2 release and lymphoproliferation are optimal readouts of a TGN1412-like pro-inflammatory response.

  9. Th17 cytokines induce pro-fibrotic cytokines release from human eosinophils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Subepithelial fibrosis is one of the most critical structural changes affecting bronchial airway function during asthma. Eosinophils have been shown to contribute to the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, TGF-β and IL-11, however, the mechanism regulating this process is not fully understood. Objective In this report, we investigated whether cytokines associated with inflammation during asthma may induce eosinophils to produce pro-fibrotic cytokines. Methods Eosinophils were isolated from peripheral blood of 10 asthmatics and 10 normal control subjects. Eosinophils were stimulated with Th1, Th2 and Th17 cytokines and the production of TGF-β and IL-11 was determined using real time PCR and ELISA assays. Results The basal expression levels of eosinophil derived TGF-β and IL-11 cytokines were comparable between asthmatic and healthy individuals. Stimulating eosinophils with Th1 and Th2 cytokines did not induce expression of pro-fibrotic cytokines. However, stimulating eosinophils with Th17 cytokines resulted in the enhancement of TGF-β and IL-11 expression in asthmatic but not healthy individuals. This effect of IL-17 on eosinophils was dependent on p38 MAPK activation as inhibiting the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but not other kinases, inhibited IL-17 induced pro-fibrotic cytokine release. Conclusions Th17 cytokines might contribute to airway fibrosis during asthma by enhancing production of eosinophil derived pro-fibrotic cytokines. Preventing the release of pro-fibrotic cytokines by blocking the effect of Th17 cytokines on eosinophils may prove to be beneficial in controlling fibrosis for disorders with IL-17 driven inflammation such as allergic and autoimmune diseases. PMID:23496774

  10. Cytokine release assays: current practices and future directions.

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    Finco, D; Grimaldi, C; Fort, M; Walker, M; Kiessling, A; Wolf, B; Salcedo, T; Faggioni, R; Schneider, A; Ibraghimov, A; Scesney, S; Serna, D; Prell, R; Stebbings, R; Narayanan, P K

    2014-04-01

    As a result of the CD28 superagonist biotherapeutic monoclonal antibody (TGN 1412) "cytokine storm" incident, cytokine release assays (CRA) have become hazard identification and prospective risk assessment tools for screening novel biotherapeutics directed against targets having a potential risk for eliciting adverse pro-inflammatory clinical infusion reactions. Different laboratories may have different strategies, assay formats, and approaches to the reporting, interpretation, and use of data for either decision making or risk assessment. Additionally, many independent contract research organizations (CROs), academic and government laboratories are involved in some aspect of CRA work. As a result, while some pharmaceutical companies are providing CRA data as part of the regulatory submissions when necessary, technical and regulatory practices are still evolving to provide data predictive of cytokine release in humans and that are relevant to safety. This manuscript provides an overview of different approaches employed by the pharmaceutical industry and CROs, for the use and application of CRA based upon a survey and post survey follow up conducted by ILSI-Health and Environmental Sciences Institute (HESI) Immunotoxicology Committee CRA Working Group. Also discussed is ongoing research in the academic sector, the regulatory environment, current limitations of the assays, and future directions and recommendations for cytokine release assays. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The Influence of Methylsulfonylmethane on Inflammation-Associated Cytokine Release before and following Strenuous Exercise

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    Mariè van der Merwe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation is associated with strenuous exercise and methylsulfonylmethane (MSM has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties. Methods. Physically active men were supplemented with either placebo or MSM (3 grams per day for 28 days before performing 100 repetitions of eccentric knee extension exercise. Ex vivo and in vitro testing consisted of evaluating cytokine production in blood (whole blood and isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS, before and through 72 hours after exercise, while in vivo testing included the evaluation of cytokines before and through 72 hours after exercise. Results. LPS stimulation of whole blood after MSM supplementation resulted in decreased induction of IL-1β, with no effect on IL-6, TNF-α, or IL-8. After exercise, there was a reduced response to LPS in the placebo, but MSM resulted in robust release of IL-6 and TNF-α. A small decrease in resting levels of proinflammatory cytokines was noted with MSM, while an acute postexercise increase in IL-10 was observed with MSM. Conclusion. Strenuous exercise causes a robust inflammatory reaction that precludes the cells from efficiently responding to additional stimuli. MSM appears to dampen the release of inflammatory molecules in response to exercise, resulting in a less incendiary environment, allowing cells to still have the capacity to mount an appropriate response to an additional stimulus after exercise.

  12. Human skeletal muscle releases leptin in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolsk, Emil; Grøndahl, Thomas Sahl; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2012-01-01

    Leptin is considered an adipokine, however, cultured myocytes have also been found to release leptin. Therefore, as proof-of-concept we investigated if human skeletal muscle synthesized leptin by measuring leptin in skeletal muscle biopsies. Following this, we quantified human skeletal muscle...... and adipose tissue leptin release in vivo. We recruited 16 healthy male human participants. Catheters were inserted into the femoral artery and vein draining skeletal muscle, as well as an epigastric vein draining the abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue. By combining the veno-arterial differences in plasma...... leptin with measurements of blood flow, leptin release from both tissues was quantified. To induce changes in leptin, the participants were infused with either saline or adrenaline in normo-physiological concentrations. The presence of leptin in skeletal muscle was confirmed by western blotting. Leptin...

  13. Catch and Release of Cytokines Mediated by Tumor Phosphatidylserine Converts Transient Exposure into Long-Lived Inflammation.

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    Oyler-Yaniv, Jennifer; Oyler-Yaniv, Alon; Shakiba, Mojdeh; Min, Nina K; Chen, Ying-Han; Cheng, Sheue-Yann; Krichevsky, Oleg; Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Altan-Bonnet, Grégoire

    2017-06-01

    Immune cells constantly survey the host for pathogens or tumors and secrete cytokines to alert surrounding cells of these threats. In vivo, activated immune cells secrete cytokines for several hours, yet an acute immune reaction occurs over days. Given these divergent timescales, we addressed how cytokine-responsive cells translate brief cytokine exposure into phenotypic changes that persist over long timescales. We studied melanoma cell responses to transient exposure to the cytokine interferon γ (IFNγ) by combining a systems-scale analysis of gene expression dynamics with computational modeling and experiments. We discovered that IFNγ is captured by phosphatidylserine (PS) on the surface of viable cells both in vitro and in vivo then slowly released to drive long-term transcription of cytokine-response genes. This mechanism introduces an additional function for PS in dynamically regulating inflammation across diverse cancer and primary cell types and has potential to usher in new immunotherapies targeting PS and inflammatory pathways. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. TGN1412 Induces Lymphopenia and Human Cytokine Release in a Humanized Mouse Model: e0149093

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sabrina Weißmüller; Stefanie Kronhart; Dorothea Kreuz; Barbara Schnierle; Ulrich Kalinke; Jörg Kirberg; Kay-Martin Hanschmann; Zoe Waibler

    2016-01-01

      Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as the superagonistic, CD28-specific antibody TGN1412, or OKT3, an anti-CD3 mAb, can cause severe adverse events including cytokine release syndrome...

  15. Synovial microparticles from arthritic patients modulate chemokine and cytokine release by synoviocytes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berckmans, René J.; Nieuwland, Rienk; Kraan, Maarten C.; Schaap, Marianne C. L.; Pots, Desirée; Smeets, Tom J. M.; Sturk, Augueste; Tak, Paul P.

    2005-01-01

    Synovial fluid from patients with various arthritides contains procoagulant, cell-derived microparticles. Here we studied whether synovial microparticles modulate the release of chemokines and cytokines by fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS). Microparticles, isolated from the synovial fluid of

  16. The role of substrate morphology for the cytokine release profile of immature human primary macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartneck, Matthias [Department of Medicine III, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Heffels, Karl-Heinz [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Bovi, Manfred [Electron Microscopic Facility, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen (Germany); Groll, Jürgen [Department and Chair of Functional Materials in Medicine and Dentistry, University of Würzburg, Pleicherwall 2, 97070 Würzburg (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [Interdisciplinary Center for Clinical Research and Dept. of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstr. 30, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2013-12-01

    There is increasing evidence that the physicochemical nature of any given material is a dominant factor for the release of cytokines by innate immune cells, specifically of macrophages, and thus majorly influences their interaction with other cell types. Recently, we could show that the 3D structure of star shaped polytheylene oxide–polypropylene oxide co-polymers (sP(EO-stat-PO))-hydrogel coated substrates has a stronger influence on the release pattern of cytokines after 7 days of culture than surface chemistry. Here, we focused on the analysis of cytokine release over time and a more detailed analysis of cell morphology by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Therefore, we compared different strategies for SEM sample preparation and found that using osmium tetroxide combined with aqua bidest led to best preparation results. For cytokine release we show significant changes from day 3 to day 7 of cell culture. After 3 days, the sP(EO-stat-PO)-coated substrates led to an induction of pro-angiogenic CCL3 and CCL4, and of low amounts of the anti-inflammatory IL10, which declined at day 7. In contrast, pleiotropic IL6 and the pro-inflammatory TNFα and IL1β were expressed stronger at day 7 than at day 3. - Highlights: • Strategies for the preparation of macrophages on hydrogel materials (Fig. 1) • Cytokine release of immature macrophages on the substrates (Fig. 2 and Table 1) • Changes in cytokine release during macrophage maturation (Table 2)

  17. Mixed chimerism induction influences cytokine release from chimeric mice cells.

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    Baśkiewicz-Hałasa, M; Hałasa, M; Grzegrzółka, R; Piecyk, K; Rogińska, D; Lejkowska, R; Machaliński, B

    2013-12-01

    Interest in mixed chimerism has evolved from its role in the induction of alloantigen tolerance. However, its precise impact on the host organism remains to be elucidated. In the present work, we analyzed cytokine secretion from chimeric mice cells to assess the influence of different mixed chimerism induction protocols on immune system function in recipient mice. To our knowledge, there have been no reports on using this parameter for the optimization of the mixed chimerism induction method. B6.SJL-PtprcaPep3b or C57BL/6J mice were used as recipients and Balb/c as donors. We utilized four protocols which consisted of: 3Gy total body irradiation (day -1), the injection of 20-30×10(6) bone marrow cells (day 0), and a combination of CD40L (days 0 and 4), CD8 (day -2), and NK1.1 (day -3) blocking antibodies and cyclophosphamide (175mg/kg - day 2). The concentrations of cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, and TNF) were evaluated in the supernatants of unstimulated or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated chimeric spleen, bone marrow and peripheral blood cells in the 8th week of experiment. The induction of tolerance to Balb/c mouse antigens was initially tested in chimeric mice by assessing the presence of Vβ5 and Vβ11 TCR-expressing lymphocytes. The cytokine production was considerably increased, especially in chimeric mice treated by cyclophosphamide. Also the mixed chimerism itself seems to affect IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-17A, and TNF secretion. Using the optimized induction protocol, we established that chimeric mice cells secreted lower IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and higher IL-6, IL-17A, and TNF levels as compared to control animals. We found that both donor and recipient cells markedly participated in the cytokine production. In conclusion, our optimization study based on cytokine assessment contributes to establishing an effective protocol of mixed chimerism induction with no cyclophosphamide use and better understanding of the influence of this

  18. Inhibitory Effect of Natural Anti-Inflammatory Compounds on Cytokines Released by Chronic Venous Disease Patient-Derived Endothelial Cells

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    Veronica Tisato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Large vein endothelium plays important roles in clinical diseases such as chronic venous disease (CVD and thrombosis; thus to characterize CVD vein endothelial cells (VEC has a strategic role in identifying specific therapeutic targets. On these bases we evaluated the effect of the natural anti-inflammatory compounds α-Lipoic acid and Ginkgoselect phytosome on cytokines/chemokines released by CVD patient-derived VEC. For this purpose, we characterized the levels of a panel of cytokines/chemokines (n=31 in CVD patients’ plasma compared to healthy controls and their release by VEC purified from the same patients, in unstimulated and TNF-α stimulated conditions. Among the cytokines/chemokines released by VEC, which recapitulated the systemic profile (IL-8, TNF-α, GM-CSF, INF-α2, G-CSF, MIP-1β, VEGF, EGF, Eotaxin, MCP-1, CXCL10, PDGF, and RANTES, we identified those targeted by ex vivo treatment with α-Lipoic acid and/or Ginkgoselect phytosome (GM-CSF, G-CSF, CXCL10, PDGF, and RANTES. Finally, by investigating the intracellular pathways involved in promoting the VEC release of cytokines/chemokines, which are targeted by natural anti-inflammatory compounds, we documented that α-Lipoic acid significantly counteracted TNF-α-induced NF-κB and p38/MAPK activation while the effects of Ginkgo biloba appeared to be predominantly mediated by Akt. Our data provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of CVD pathogenesis, highlighting new potential therapeutic targets.

  19. Stretch induces cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells in vitro.

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    Vlahakis, N E; Schroeder, M A; Limper, A H; Hubmayr, R D

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, causing edema and alveolar inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in this inflammatory response. We postulated that cyclic cell stretch upregulates the production and release of IL-8 by human alveolar epithelium in the absence of structural cell damage or paracrine stimulation. To test this hypothesis, alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells) were cultured on a deformable silicoelastic membrane. When stretched by 30% for up to 48 h, the cells released 49 +/- 34% more IL-8 (P static controls. Smaller deformations (20% stretch) produced no consistent increase in IL-8. Stretch of 4 h duration increased IL-8 gene transcription fourfold above baseline. Stretch had no effect on cell proliferation, cell viability as assessed by (51)Cr release assay, or the release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We conclude that deformation per se can trigger inflammatory signaling and that alveolar epithelial cells may be active participants in the alveolitis associated with ventilator-induced lung injury.

  20. Experimental endotoxemia in humans: analysis of cytokine release and coagulation, fibrinolytic, and complement pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deventer, S. J.; Büller, H. R.; ten Cate, J. W.; Aarden, L. A.; Hack, C. E.; Sturk, A.

    1990-01-01

    Endotoxemia was evoked by bolus injection of Escherichia coli endotoxin (2 ng/kg body weight) in six healthy subjects to investigate the early kinetics of cytokine release in relation to the development of clinical and hematologic abnormalities frequently seen in gram-negative septicemia. The plasma

  1. Dosed myofascial release in three-dimensional bioengineered tendons: effects on human fibroblast hyperplasia, hypertrophy, and cytokine secretion.

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    Cao, Thanh V; Hicks, Michael R; Campbell, David; Standley, Paul R

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate potential differences of magnitudes and durations associated with dosed myofascial release (MFR) on human fibroblast proliferation, hypertrophy, and cytokine secretions. Bioengineered tendons (BETs) attached to nylon mesh anchors were strained uniaxially using a vacuum pressure designed to model MFR varying in magnitudes (0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, and 12% elongation) and durations (0.5 and 1-5 minutes). Conditioned media were analyzed for cytokine secretion via protein microarray (n = 2). Bioengineered tendons were weighted and fibroblasts extracted from the BET were assessed for total cell protein and proliferation via double-stranded DNA quantification (n = 5). All data were compared by a 1-way analysis of variance with post hoc Dunnett test and Student t test. Changing MFR magnitude and duration did not have an effect on total fibroblast cellular protein or DNA accumulation. However, we observed a stepwise increase in BET weight with higher-magnitude MFR treatments. Longer durations of MFR resulted in progressive increase in the secretions of angiogenin, interleukin (IL)-3, IL-8, growth colony-stimulating factor, and thymus activation-regulated chemokine. Alternatively, increasing strain magnitude induced secretions of IL-1β, monocyte chemoattractant cytokine, and regulated and normal T cell expressed and secreted chemotactic cytokine. Cellular proliferation and hypertrophy were not significantly changed by any treatment. However, the change in total BET dry weight suggests that production of extracellular matrix protein may be up-regulated. Different MFR parameters induce secretions of a unique subset of cytokines and growth factors that can be further enhanced by increasing the magnitude and duration of treatment. If clinically translatable, these results suggest that variations to manual therapy biomechanical parameters may differentially affect physiological responses in vivo. © 2013. Published by National University of

  2. Effect of short-term hyperglycemia on adipose tissue fluxes of selected cytokines in vivo during multiple phases of diet-induced weight loss in obese women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siklova, Michaela; Simonsen, Lene; Polak, Jan

    2015-01-01

    released in response to short-term hyperglycemia and whether this secretion capacity could be influenced by weight loss. DESIGN, PATIENTS, AND INTERVENTIONS: Output of cytokines and proteins of acute phase from scAT in response to a 3-hours hyperglycemic clamp was evaluated in nine obese women in vivo...... was assessed. RESULTS: Hyperglycemia increased the output of cytokines IL-6, MCP-1, and IL-1Ra from scAT. This effect had a tendency to be reduced after weight loss. The output of other proinflammatory substances from scAT into circulation was not detected. The diet-induced weight loss was associated...... using Fick's principle. Moreover, the output of cytokines was analyzed during a multiphase dietary intervention consisting of 1 month on a very low-calorie diet and subsequent 5-month weight-stabilization phase. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE(S): The levels of cytokines and proteins of acute phase [IL-6, IL-8, IL...

  3. Exposure of human islets to cytokines can result in disproportionately elevated proinsulin release.

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    Hostens, K; Pavlovic, D; Zambre, Y; Ling, Z; Van Schravendijk, C; Eizirik, D L; Pipeleers, D G

    1999-07-01

    Infiltration of immunocytes into pancreatic islets precedes loss of beta cells in type 1 diabetes. It is conceivable that local release of cytokines affects the function of beta cells before their apoptosis. This study examines whether the elevated proinsulin levels that have been described in prediabetes can result from exposure of beta cells to cytokines. Human beta-cell preparations were cultured for 48 or 72 hours with or without IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, or IFN-gamma, alone or in combination. None of these conditions were cytotoxic, nor did they reduce insulin biosynthetic activity. Single cytokines did not alter medium or cellular content in insulin or proinsulin. Cytokine combinations, in particular IL-1beta plus IFN-gamma, disproportionately elevated medium proinsulin levels. This effect expresses an altered functional state of the beta cells characterized by preserved proinsulin synthesis, a slower hormone conversion, and an increased ratio of cellular proinsulin over insulin content. The delay in proinsulin conversion can be attributed to lower expression of PC1 and PC2 convertases. It is concluded that disproportionately elevated proinsulin levels in pre-type 1 diabetic patients might result from exposure of their beta cells to cytokines released from infiltrating immunocytes. This hormonal alteration expresses an altered functional state of the beta cells that can occur independently of beta-cell death.

  4. Comparative study of the effect of rivaroxaban and fondaparinux on monocyte's coagulant activity and cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, Marc; Joimel, Ulrich; Varin, Rémi; Cazin, Lionel; Gest, Caroline; Le-Cam-Duchez, Veronique; Jin, Jian; Liu, Jielin; Vannier, Jean-Pierre; Lu, He; Soria, Jeannette; Li, Hong; Soria, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) exposed on activated monocytes and macrophages is involved in thrombosis through activation of factor X and cytokine release, responsible for inflammation and thrombosis. We investigated the effect of two anti-factor Xa drugs: rivaroxaban, a direct anti-Xa inhibitor, and fondaparinux, an antithrombin dependent anti-Xa inhibitor, on monocyte/macrophage procoagulant activity and cytokine release. Rivaroxaban and fondaparinux were tested at pharmacological concentrations on LPS-activated monocytes and on THP-1 cells, a human monocytic cell line, to assess 1) TF expression by flow cytometry 2) prothrombinase activity by its coagulant activity and 3) cytokine release in cell supernatants by antibody based cytokine array and ELISA for IL-8 and TNFα. Rivaroxaban and fondaparinux did not modify TF expression level on activated cells. In contrast procoagulant activity associated to monocytes and macrophages was dose dependently inhibited by rivaroxaban, but not significantly by fondaparinux. These results could explain why patients undergoing major orthopedic surgery with rivaroxaban prophylaxis were able to achieve significant reductions in venous thromboembolism, compared with drugs commonly used, i.e. fondaparinux and low molecular weight heparin. In addition, rivaroxaban and fondaparinux suppressed some chemokine secretion produced by activated macrophages. This may also contribute to their antithrombotic effect in clinic.

  5. In vitro and in vivo metal ion release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, S A; Farnsworth, L J; Merritt, K; Crowe, T D

    1988-04-01

    A series of experiments was conducted to study in vitro and in vivo metal ion release and the urine excretion of metal ions. Metal salts were injected and urine analyzed. Anodic potentials were applied to stainless steel and cobalt-chromium-molybdenum (CCM) specimens to cause an acceleration of corrosion rates. Corrosion experiments were done in saline, 10% serum and in a subcutaneous space in hamsters. Corrosion rates were determined by measurements of weight loss and calculations of net charge transfer. Metal ion concentrations were determined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy, and were calculated from total charge using Faraday's law. The results with stainless steel showed that the weight loss and metal ion release from stainless steel in vitro and in vivo can be calculated using Faraday's Law, assuming release in proportion to alloy composition. The results with CCM indicated that release rates in vitro can be used to determine the proportionality of release in vivo. All the nickel and most of the cobalt was rapidly excreted, while less than 50% of the chromium was excreted. The excretion of metals following salt injection or in vivo corrosion were very similar.

  6. Inhibitory effects of chloroform extracts derived from Corbicula fluminea on the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Min; Lin, Yu-Ling; Tsai, Nu-Man; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Ho, Shu-Yi; Chen, Chia-Hung; Liu, Yen-Ku; Chiu, Yi-Han; Ho, Li-Ping; Lee, Ru-Ping; Liao, Kuang-Wen

    2012-04-25

    Corbicula fluminea, the primary freshwater bivalve cultivated in Taiwan, was formerly used as a remedy for hepatitis. Recent reports indicate that C. fluminea has many bioactivities, but it remains unknown whether C. fluminea affects inflammation. This study explored the anti-inflammatory activity of C. fluminea. C. fluminea was first treated with chloroform to obtain clam chloroform extracts (CCEs). On the basis of the assay for the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vitro and in vivo, the results show that the CCEs significantly lowered the release of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines. Additionally, the CCEs reduced LPS-induced organ damage. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that CCEs inhibit the LPS-induced mRNA expression of interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α. Western blot analysis indicated that the CCEs increased expression of IκB and attenuated the phosphorylation of IκB. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry suggests that phytosterols and fatty acids are responsible for the anti-inflammatory properties of CCEs. Taken together, CCEs have the potential to be developed as an anti-inflammatory functional food.

  7. Multiple cytokines are released when blood from patients with tuberculosis is stimulated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens.

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    Kathryn L Kellar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb infection may cause overt disease or remain latent. Interferon gamma release assays (IGRAs detect Mtb infection, both latent infection and infection manifesting as overt disease, by measuring whole-blood interferon gamma (IFN-γ responses to Mtb antigens such as early secreted antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6, culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10, and TB7.7. Due to a lack of adequate diagnostic standards for confirming latent Mtb infection, IGRA sensitivity for detecting Mtb infection has been estimated using patients with culture-confirmed tuberculosis (CCTB for whom recovery of Mtb confirms the infection. In this study, cytokines in addition to IFN-γ were assessed for potential to provide robust measures of Mtb infection. METHODS: Cytokine responses to ESAT-6, CFP-10, TB7.7, or combinations of these Mtb antigens, for patients with CCTB were compared with responses for subjects at low risk for Mtb infection (controls. Three different multiplexed immunoassays were used to measure concentrations of 9 to 20 different cytokines. Responses were calculated by subtracting background cytokine concentrations from cytokine concentrations in plasma from blood stimulated with Mtb antigens. RESULTS: Two assays demonstrated that ESAT-6, CFP-10, ESAT-6+CFP-10, and ESAT-6+CFP-10+TB7.7 stimulated the release of significantly greater amounts of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-8, MCP-1 and MIP-1β for CCTB patients than for controls. Responses to combination antigens were, or tended to be, greater than responses to individual antigens. A third assay, using whole blood stimulation with ESAT-6+CFP-10+TB7.7, revealed significantly greater IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IP-10, MCP-1, MIP-1β, and TNF-α responses among patients compared with controls. One CCTB patient with a falsely negative IFN-γ response had elevated responses with other cytokines. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple cytokines are released when whole blood from patients with CCTB is stimulated

  8. Ex vivo and in vitro production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Blau syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Galozzi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to study both ex vivo and in vitro secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients affected by Blau syndrome (BS and carrying p.E383K mutation in the CARD15/NOD2 gene associated with the disease. For ex vivo studies, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, serum from three patients and healthy controls have been collected. PBMCs have been cultured in the presence or absence of inflammatory enhancers, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS and muramyl dipeptide (MDP. The levels of interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α and interferon (IFN-γ were assayed by either immunoassay or array-based system. For in vitro studies, different constructs were created cloning human wild-type and p.E383K-mutated NOD2 cDNA into the expression vector pCMV-Tag2c. HEK293 cell lines were stably transfected, cultured with or without MDP and IL-8 level was assayed in their surnatants. Statistical analysis in both studies was performed using non-parametric tests. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies have not identified a significant increase in secretion of the analyzed proinflammatory cytokines. p.E383K-mutated NOD2 transfected cells express low level of IL-8. The ex vivo basal level results from both serum and PBMCs surnatants present similar levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ in patients and controls. The presence of the stimulant agents (LPS and MDP, either individual or paired, does not lead to significant increases in all cytokines concentrations in patients compared to controls. Taken together, the ex vivo and in vitro data suggest that there is not a primary mediation of IL-1β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in BS patients carrying p.E383K.

  9. Ex vivo and in vitro production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in Blau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galozzi, P; Negm, O; Greco, E; Alkhattabi, N; Gava, A; Sfriso, P; Fairclough, L; Todd, I; Tighe, P; Punzi, L

    2015-03-31

    The objective was to study both ex vivo and in vitro secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in patients affected by Blau syndrome (BS) and carrying p.E383K mutation in the CARD15/NOD2 gene associated with the disease. For ex vivo studies, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), serum from three patients and healthy controls have been collected. PBMCs have been cultured in the presence or absence of inflammatory enhancers, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and muramyl dipeptide (MDP). The levels of interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were assayed by either immunoassay or array-based system. For in vitro studies, different constructs were created cloning human wild-type and p.E383K-mutated NOD2 cDNA into the expression vector pCMV-Tag2c. HEK293 cell lines were stably transfected, cultured with or without MDP and IL-8 level was assayed in their surnatants. Statistical analysis in both studies was performed using non-parametric tests. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies have not identified a significant increase in secretion of the analyzed proinflammatory cytokines. p.E383K-mutated NOD2 transfected cells express low level of IL-8. The ex vivo basal level results from both serum and PBMCs surnatants present similar levels of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IFN-γ in patients and controls. The presence of the stimulant agents (LPS and MDP), either individual or paired, does not lead to significant increases in all cytokines concentrations in patients compared to controls. Taken together, the ex vivo and in vitro data suggest that there is not a primary mediation of IL-1β and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in BS patients carrying p.E383K.

  10. Generation of anti-inflammatory macrophages for implants and regenerative medicine using self-standing release systems with a phenotype-fixing cytokine cocktail formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riabov, Vladimir; Salazar, Fabián; Htwe, Su Su; Gudima, Alexandru; Schmuttermaier, Christina; Barthes, Julien; Knopf-Marques, Helena; Klüter, Harald; Ghaemmaghami, Amir M; Vrana, Nihal Engin; Kzhyshkowska, Julia

    2017-04-15

    The immediate tissue microenvironment of implanted biomedical devices and engineered tissues is highly influential on their long term fate and efficacy. The creation of a long-term anti-inflammatory microenvironment around implants and artificial tissues can facilitate their integration. Macrophages are highly plastic cells that define the tissue reactions on the implanted material. Local control of macrophage phenotype by long-term fixation of their healing activities and suppression of inflammatory reactions are required to improve implant acceptance. Herein, we describe the development of a cytokine cocktail (M2Ct) that induces stable M2-like macrophage phenotype with significantly decreased pro-inflammatory cytokine and increased anti-inflammatory cytokine secretion profile. The positive effect of the M2Ct was shown in an in vitro wound healing model; where M2Ct facilitated wound closure by human fibroblasts in co-culture conditions. Using a model for induction of inflammation by LPS we have shown that the M2Ct phenotype is stable for 12days. However, in the absence of M2Ct in the medium macrophages underwent rapid pro-inflammatory re-programming upon IFNg stimulation. Therefore, loading and release of the cytokine cocktail from a self-standing, transferable gelatin/tyraminated hyaluronic acid based release system was developed to stabilize macrophage phenotype for in vivo applications in implantation and tissue engineering. The M2Ct cytokine cocktail retained its anti-inflammatory activity in controlled release conditions. Our data indicate that the direct application of a potent M2 inducing cytokine cocktail in a transferable release system can significantly improve the long term functionality of biomedical devices by decreasing pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion and increasing the rate of wound healing. Uncontrollable activation of macrophages in the microenvironment of implants and engineered tissues is a significant problem leading to poor integration of

  11. Cytokine involvement in stress may depend on corticotrophin releasing factor to sensitize ethanol withdrawal anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Darin J.; Whitman, Buddy A.; Wills, Tiffany A.; Angel, Robert A.; Overstreet, David H.; Criswell, Hugh E.; Ming, Zhen; Breese, George R.

    2011-01-01

    Stress has been shown to facilitate ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety. Defining neurobiological mechanisms through which stress has such actions is important given the associated risk of relapse. While CRF has long been implicated in the action of stress, current results show that stress elevates the cytokine TNFα in the rat brain and thereby implicates cytokines in stress effects. In support of this view, prior TNFα microinjection into the central amygdala (CeA) of rats facilitated ethanol withdrawal-induced anxiety—a response that could not be attributed to an increase in plasma corticosterone. To test for a possible interaction between cytokines and CRF, a CRF1-receptor antagonist (SSR125543) administered prior to the repeated administration of TNFα or MCP-1/CCL2 reduced the magnitude of the withdrawal-induced anxiety. This finding provided evidence for cytokine action being dependent upon CRF. Additionally, the sensitizing effect of stress on withdrawal-induced anxiety was reduced by treating the repeated stress exposure prior to ethanol with the MEK inhibitor SL327. Consistent with cytokines having a neuromediator function distinct from a neuroimmune action, TNFα increased firing rate and GABA release from CeA neurons. Thus, an interaction of glial and neuronal function is proposed to contribute to the interaction of stress and chronic ethanol. Interrupting this potential glial-neuronal interaction could provide a novel means by which to alter the development of emotional states induced by stress that predict relapse in the alcoholic. PMID:21377524

  12. Controlled release of cytokines using silk-biomaterials for macrophage polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Andrew R D; Spiller, Kara L; Freytes, Donald O; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana; Kaplan, David L

    2015-12-01

    Polarization of macrophages into an inflammatory (M1) or anti-inflammatory (M2) phenotype is important for clearing pathogens and wound repair, however chronic activation of either type of macrophage has been implicated in several diseases. Methods to locally control the polarization of macrophages is of great interest for biomedical implants and tissue engineering. To that end, silk protein was used to form biopolymer films that release either IFN-γ or IL-4 to control the polarization of macrophages. Modulation of the solubility of the silk films through regulation of β-sheet (crystalline) content enabled a short-term release (4-8 h) of either cytokine, with smaller amounts released out to 24 h. Altering the solubility of the films was accomplished by varying the time that the films were exposed to water vapor. The released IFN-γ or IL-4 induced polarization of THP-1 derived macrophages into the M1 or M2 phenotypes, respectively. The silk biomaterials were able to release enough IFN-γ or IL-4 to repolarize the macrophage from M1 to M2 and vice versa, demonstrating the well-established plasticity of macrophages. High β-sheet content films that are not soluble and do not release the trapped cytokines were also able to polarize macrophages that adhered to the surface through degradation of the silk protein. Chemically conjugating IFN-γ to silk films through disulfide bonds allowed for longer-term release to 10 days. The release of covalently attached IFN-γ from the films was also able to polarize M1 macrophages in vitro. Thus, the strategy described here offers new approaches to utilizing biomaterials for directing the polarization of macrophages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Normothermic Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion in Brain-dead Donors Reduces Inflammatory Cytokines and Toll-like Receptor Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaghi, Shadi; Mortaz, Esmaeil; Abbasi Dezfuli, Azizollah; Godarzi, Hoda; Sheikhy, Kambiz; Ansari Aval, Zahra; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Emami, Habib; Hosseini-Baharanchi, Fatemeh Sadat; Najafizadeh, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Inflammatory responses and innate immunologic reactions play an important role in the respiratory system. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) is considered a novel method in the evaluation and reconditioning of donor lungs prior to transplantation. However, EVLP's effect on inflammatory and metabolic markers of human lung tissue is unknown.  This study investigated how the performance of EVLP on brain-dead (BD) donor lungs affects the production and release of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a), inflammatory cells and toll-like receptors (TLR) -2, 4. This study was conducted with an animal subject for qualification of EVLP team and then EVLP was performed on 4 human cases referred to Masih Daneshvari Hospital (Tehran,Iran), from May 2013 to July 2015. Two of these cases, who had acceptable lung function parameters, were enrolled in this study for immunologic investigations. Bronchoalveolar lavages (BAL) were taken before and after EVLP. Cytokines were quantitatively measured before lung retrieval, at the end of the lung removal, at the start of EVLP, and at the end of the each hour of EVLP. TLR expression was measured on the cells obtained by flow cytometry. TNF-a, IL-6 and IL-8 decreased in each stage of washing perfusate in both cases, and the level of cytokines in serum was in the normal range. Flow cytometry analysis revealed a decreasing expression of CD3, CD4/8, CD19, and CD16+56, as well as TLR-2 and TLR-4 in both cases. Intra-capillary pools of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-a) were determined to contribute to the lung injury during prolonged lung perfusion. This raises the possibility that EVLP donor lungs could be less immunogenic than standard lungs. However, to assess EVLP's effects on lung grafts and optimize recipient outcomes, further studies with a sufficient number of lungs are required.

  14. Different particle determinants induce apoptosis and cytokine release in primary alveolar macrophage cultures

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    Schwarze Per E

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Particles are known to induce both cytokine release (MIP-2, TNF-α, a reduction in cell viability and an increased apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. To examine whether these responses are triggered by the same particle determinants, alveolar macrophages were exposed in vitro to mineral particles of different physical-chemical properties. Results The crystalline particles of the different stone types mylonite, gabbro, basalt, feldspar, quartz, hornfels and fine grain syenite porphyr (porphyr, with a relatively equal size distribution (≤ 10 μm, but different chemical/mineral composition, all induced low and relatively similar levels of apoptosis. In contrast, mylonite and gabbro induced a marked MIP-2 response compared to the other particles. For particles of smaller size, quartz (≤ 2 μm seemed to induce a somewhat stronger apoptotic response than even smaller quartz (≤ 0.5 μm and larger quartz (≤ 10 μm in relation to surface area, and was more potent than hornfels and porphyr (≤ 2 μm. The reduction in cell viability induced by quartz of the different sizes was roughly similar when adjusted to surface area. With respect to cytokines, the release was more marked after exposure to quartz ≤ 0.5 μm than to quartz ≤ 2 μm and ≤ 10 μm. Furthermore, hornfels (≤ 2 μm was more potent than the corresponding hornfels (≤ 10 μm and quartz (≤ 2 μm to induce cytokine responses. Pre-treatment of hornfels and quartz particles ≤ 2 μm with aluminium lactate, to diminish the surface reactivity, did significantly reduce the MIP-2 response to hornfels. In contrast, the apoptotic responses to the particles were not affected. Conclusion These results indicate that different determinants of mineral/stone particles are critical for inducing cytokine responses, reduction in cell viability and apoptosis in alveolar macrophages. The data suggest that the particle surface reactivity was critical for cytokine responses

  15. An Appropriate Modulation of Lymphoproliferative Response and Cytokine Release as Possible Contributors to Longevity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez de Toda, Irene; Vida, Carmen; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2017-01-01

    The decrease in the proliferative response of lymphocytes is one of the most evident among the age-related changes of the immune system. This has been linked to a higher risk of mortality in both humans and experimental animals. However, long-lived individuals, in spite of optimally maintaining most of the functions of the immune system, also seem to show an impaired proliferative response. Thus, it was hypothesized that these individuals may have distinct evolution times in this proliferation and a different modulatory capacity through their cytokine release profiles. An individualized longitudinal study was performed on female ICR-CD1 mice, starting at the adult age (40 weeks old), analyzing the proliferation of peritoneal leukocytes at different ages in both basal conditions and in the presence of the mitogen Concanavalin A, for 4, 24 and 48 h of culture. The cytokine secretions (IL-2, IL-17, IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α and IL-10) in the same cultures were also studied. Long-lived mice show a high proliferative capacity after short incubation times and, despite experiencing a functional decline when they are old, are able to compensate this decrease with an appropriate modulation of the lymphoproliferative response and cytokine release. This could explain their elevated resistance to infections and high longevity. PMID:28737707

  16. Effects of ethylene oxide and steam sterilization on dialysis-induced cytokine release by cuprophan membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aucella, Filippo; Vigilante, Mimmo; Gatta, Giuseppe; Grandone, Elvira; Colaizzo, Donatella; Margaglione, Maurizio; Modoni, Sergio; Stallone, Carmine

    2002-06-01

    The effects of sterilization modalities on dialysis-induced cytokine release are still unknown. To investigate these effects, 8 patients on chronic hemodialysis were enrolled for evaluating at different intervals interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production (pg/ml/106). They were using a 1.3 m2 ethylene oxide (E3) or steam (E3S) sterilized Cuprophan membrane. The patients underwent a basal test with E3 (A1) and 2 following tests after 1 (B1) and 2 (B2) months of E3S treatment, respectively. Finally, the last test was performed 1 month after the switch to E3 (A2). Il-1beta predialysis release by mononuclear cells was 162 +/- 114 pg/ml/106 in A1, 185 +/- 129 pg/ml/106 in B1, and 226 +/- 138 pg/ml/106 in B2, then decreased to 123 +/- 134 in A2 (p sterilization seems to induce a higher cytokine release by mononuclear cells when a Cuprophan membrane is used. This finding may be related to a less physiologic action of the steam in the case of Cuprophan membranes. Further studies are needed to clarify this hypothesis.

  17. Sex differences in the pro-inflammatory cytokine response to endotoxin unfold in vivo but not ex vivo in healthy humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegner, Alexander; Benson, Sven; Rebernik, Laura; Spreitzer, Ingo; Jäger, Marcus; Schedlowski, Manfred; Elsenbruch, Sigrid; Engler, Harald

    2017-07-01

    Clinical data indicate that inflammatory responses differ across sexes, but the mechanisms remain elusive. Herein, we assessed in vivo and ex vivo cytokine responses to bacterial endotoxin in healthy men and women to elucidate the role of systemic and cellular factors underlying sex differences in inflammatory responses. Participants received an i.v. injection of low-dose endotoxin (0.4 ng/kg body mass), and plasma TNF-α and IL-6 responses were analyzed over a period of 6 h. In parallel, ex vivo cytokine production was measured in endotoxin-stimulated blood samples obtained immediately before in vivo endotoxin administration. As glucocorticoids (GCs) play an important role in the negative feedback regulation of the inflammatory response, we additionally analyzed plasma cortisol concentrations and ex vivo GC sensitivity of cytokine production. Results revealed greater in vivo pro-inflammatory responses in women compared with men, with significantly higher increases in plasma TNF-α and IL-6 concentrations. In addition, the endotoxin-induced rise in plasma cortisol was more pronounced in women. In contrast, no sex differences in ex vivo cytokine production and GC sensitivity were observed. Together, these findings demonstrate major differences in in vivo and ex vivo responses to endotoxin and underscore the importance of systemic factors underlying sex differences in the inflammatory response.

  18. Ex Vivo Innate Immune Cytokine Signature of Enhanced Risk of Relapsing Brucellosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kristyn E.; Loriaux, Paul M.; Saito, Mayuko; Tuero, Iskra; Villaverde, Homarh; Siva, Tenaya; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Gilman, Robert H.; Hoffmann, Alexander; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brucellosis, a zoonotic infection caused by one of the Gram-negative intracellular bacteria of the Brucella genus, is an ongoing public health problem in Perú. While most patients who receive standard antibiotic treatment recover, 5–40% suffer a brucellosis relapse. In this study, we examined the ex vivo immune cytokine profiles of recovered patients with a history of acute and relapsing brucellosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Blood was taken from healthy control donors, patients with a history of acute brucellosis, or patients with a history of relapsing brucellosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and remained in culture without stimulation or were stimulated with a panel of toll-like receptor agonists or heat-killed Brucella melitensis (HKBM) isolates. Innate immune cytokine gene expression and protein secretion were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and a multiplex bead-based immunoassay, respectively. Acute and relapse patients demonstrated consistently elevated cytokine gene expression and secretion levels compared to controls. Notably, these include: basal and stimulus-induced expression of GM-CSF, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in response to LPS and HKBM; basal secretion of IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α; and HKBM or Rev1-induced secretion of IL-1β, IL-2, GM-CSF, IFN-Υ, and TNF-α. Although acute and relapse patients were largely indistinguishable by their cytokine gene expression profiles, we identified a robust cytokine secretion signature that accurately discriminates acute from relapse patients. This signature consists of basal IL-6 secretion, IL-1β, IL-2, and TNF-α secretion in response to LPS and HKBM, and IFN-γ secretion in response to HKBM. Conclusions/Significance This work demonstrates that informative cytokine variations in brucellosis patients can be detected using an ex vivo assay system and used to identify patients with differing infection histories. Targeted diagnosis of this signature may

  19. EFFECT OF PIDOTIMOD ON PRODUCTION OF PRO- AND ANTI-INFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES EX VIVO

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    S.S. Grigoryan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pidotimod is per oral immunomodulator; its efficacy is conditioned by activation of different components of immune system. The efficacy of pidotimod was studied in frequently sick children; its influence on the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines with leucocytes in peripheral blood was evaluated. The study was performed ex vivo with 15 samples of peripheral blood of frequently sick children 4 years old. The rate of interferon (IFN status, sensitivity to pidotimod, concentration of pro-inflammatory (IFN , Interleukin [Il] 18 and anti-inflammatory (Il 4, 10 cytokines were detected before and after processing the samples with the drug. Pidotimodex vivo induced more than 4 times increase of initially low production of IFN with leucocytes of peripheral blood (from 11.5 ± 3.4 to 51.8 ± 8.3 U/ml. It did not influence the production of IFN _ (432 ± 49 and 448 ± 30 U/ml — before and after processing the samples correspondingly. The drug stimulated production of IFN ex vivo; the concentration of IFN compared to its spontaneous production increased from 2.3 ± 0.9 to 11.8 ± 1.6 picogram/ml correspondingly. Stimulation of PGA-induced production of IFN was less expressed; it increased in correlation with the time of exposition 1.5–2.5 times higher compared to induction of IFN synthesis without the drug. The drug favored to increase of Il 18 level (spontaneous — from 23.5 ± 3.5 to 49.1 ± 2.2 pg/ml, induced — from 34.2 ± 2.4 to 47.8 ± 4.4 pg/ml and Il 10 (from 6.7 ± 1.3 to 15.5 ± 0.9 pg/ml and from 20.6 ± 1.2 to 42.7 ± 2.5 pg/ml correspondingly. As the production of cytokines increased because of pidotimod, the level of Il 4 (as spontaneous, as induced one decreased from 2.6 ± 0.8 to 0.5 ± 0.2 pg/ml correspondingly. Thus, pidotimod ex vivo stimulates the synthesis of IFN , Il 10 and 18 and decreases the level of Il 4. These effects favor to the activation of Th1 immune response of organism.Key words: frequently sick

  20. From Space to the Patient: A New Cytokine Release Assay to Monitor the Immune Status of HIV Infected Patients and Sepsis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, I.; Draenert, R.; Gruber, M.; Feuerecker, M.; Crucian, B. E.; Mehta, S. L.; Roider, J.; Pierson, D. L.; Briegel, J. M.; Schelling, G.; hide

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring of humans either in the healthy men under extreme environmental stress like space flight, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients or in sepsis is of critical importance with regard to the timing of adequate therapeutic (counter-)measures. The in vivo skin delayed-type hypersensitivity test (DTH) served for many years as a tool to evaluate cell mediated immunity. However, this standardised in vivo test was removed from the market in 2002 due to the risk of antigen stabilization. To the best of our knowledge an alternative test as monitoring tool to determine cell mediated immunity is not available so far. For this purpose we tested a new alternative assay using elements of the skin DTH which is based on an ex vivo cytokine release from whole blood and asked if it is suitable and applicable to monitor immune changes in HIV infected patients and in patients with septic shock.

  1. In vivo quantification of intraarticular cytokines in knees during natural and surgically induced cartilage repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmal, Hagen; Mehlhorn, Alexander; Stoffel, Fabian

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: Cartilage defects are considered to be an initial event in the progress of osteoarthritis. Reliable data about in vivo regulation of cytokines in natural and surgically induced cartilage repair are still missing. METHODS: Knee lavage fluids of 47 patients were collected prospecti......BACKGROUND AIMS: Cartilage defects are considered to be an initial event in the progress of osteoarthritis. Reliable data about in vivo regulation of cytokines in natural and surgically induced cartilage repair are still missing. METHODS: Knee lavage fluids of 47 patients were collected...... significantly higher compared with the control group (Psurgical cartilage repair, whereas concentrations of bFGF, IL-1beta and IGF-I significantly increased (P... significantly correlated with systemic C-reactive protein (CRP). The Lysholm score showed a medium significant negative correlation with IGF-I levels. CONCLUSIONS: Aggrecan is constitutively expressed in knee joints. bFGF and IGF-I seem to play a pivotal role in natural and surgical cartilage repair. Operative...

  2. In vivo confocal microscopy and tear cytokine analysis in post-LASIK ectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahuja, Natasha Kishore; Shetty, Rohit; Deshmukh, Rashmi; Sharma, Anupam; Nuijts, Rudy M M A; Jhanji, Vishal; Sethu, Swaminathan; Ghosh, Arkasubhra

    2017-04-27

    Corneal keratectasia is one of the complications associated with laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) that results in vision impairment. The pathogenesis of post-LASIK ectasia (PLE) remains underexplored. We report the tear cytokine profile and in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) findings in eyes with PLE. This retrospective study included age-matched 7 (14 eyes) post-LASIK controls (PLCs) and 6 (12 eyes) PLE subjects. Corneal topography was used to categorise the subjects into PLC and PLE groups. Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) scores obtained were based on standard questionnaire and IVCM images were used to determine corneal dendritic cells density (DCD) and sub-basal nerve plexus morphology. Inflammatory cytokines/chemokines in the tears were quantified using flow cytometry based cytometric bead array. Pentacam-based scores, OSDI scores and corneal DCD were significantly (pPLE compared with PLC. Discomfort-related subscale of OSDI score exhibited a positive correlation with total corneal DCD in the PLE cohort. The fold difference of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand/monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (CCL2/MCP1) (3.4±0.6) was found to be significantly (pPLE cohorts and a positive correlation between CCL2/MCP1 levels and total corneal DCD was also observed in the PLE cohort. The current study found a significant difference in the tear film cytokine profile between normal and PLE eyes. Presence of increased corneal dendritic cells and altered tear cytokines suggests an ongoing inflammatory response in PLE. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs as Mediators of Inflammation, Release of Cytokines and Lytic Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noha Mousaad Elemam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are an emerging group of immune cells that provide the first line of defense against various pathogens as well as contributing to tissue repair and inflammation. ILCs have been classically divided into three subgroups based on their cytokine secretion and transcription factor profiles. ILC nomenclature is analogous to that of T helper cells. Group 1 ILCs composed of natural killer (NK cells as well as IFN-γ secreting ILC1s. ILC2s have the capability to produce TH2 cytokines while ILC3s and lymphoid tissue inducer (LTis are subsets of cells that are able to secrete IL-17 and/or IL-22. A recent subset of ILC known as ILC4 was discovered, and the cells of this subset were designated as NK17/NK1 due to their release of IL-17 and IFN-γ. In this review, we sought to explain the subclasses of ILCs and their roles as mediators of lytic enzymes and inflammation.

  4. Innate Lymphoid Cells (ILCs) as Mediators of Inflammation, Release of Cytokines and Lytic Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elemam, Noha Mousaad; Hannawi, Suad; Maghazachi, Azzam A

    2017-12-10

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are an emerging group of immune cells that provide the first line of defense against various pathogens as well as contributing to tissue repair and inflammation. ILCs have been classically divided into three subgroups based on their cytokine secretion and transcription factor profiles. ILC nomenclature is analogous to that of T helper cells. Group 1 ILCs composed of natural killer (NK) cells as well as IFN-γ secreting ILC1s. ILC2s have the capability to produce T H 2 cytokines while ILC3s and lymphoid tissue inducer (LTis) are subsets of cells that are able to secrete IL-17 and/or IL-22. A recent subset of ILC known as ILC4 was discovered, and the cells of this subset were designated as NK17/NK1 due to their release of IL-17 and IFN-γ. In this review, we sought to explain the subclasses of ILCs and their roles as mediators of lytic enzymes and inflammation.

  5. Ceramide-enriched LDL induces cytokine release through TLR4 and CD14 in monocytes. Similarities with electronegative LDL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Montserrat; Sánchez-Quesada, Jose Luis; Ordóñez-Llanos, Jordi; Benítez, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    In vitro ceramide-enriched LDL (CER-LDL) reproduces most of the properties of electronegative LDL (LDL(-)), a heterogeneous subfraction of LDL found in plasma. LDL(-) comprises several modifications of LDL and has an increased content in ceramide (CER). It promotes cytokine release in monocytes through CD14 and TLR4. CER-LDL also induces cytokine release in these cells but the mechanism is unknown. To evaluate TLR4 and CD14 as the putative receptors involved in cytokine release induced by CER-LDL. CER-LDL was obtained by incubating native LDL with CER-enriched liposomes. CER content in CER-LDL was assessed by thin layer chromatography of lipid extracts. CER-LDL and LDL(-) were incubated for 20 h with human monocytes in the presence or absence of a TLR4 signaling inhibitor. Both LDLs were also incubated with two human monocytic cell lines, normal and THP1 overexpressing CD14 (THP1-CD14) cells. The release of IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 was evaluated by ELISA in culture medium. The release of IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 induced by CER-LDL in monocytes was inhibited by VIPER (90% inhibition), a specific TLR4 inhibitor. The cytokine release induced by CER-LDL was negligible in THP1, cells presenting a very low CD14 expression. In contrast, the induction of cytokine release in THP1-CD14 was high and dependent on the CER content in LDL. CER-LDL induces IL-6, IL-10 and MCP-1 release through the activation of CD14 and TLR4 in monocytes, reproducing the behavior of LDL(-). The increased content of CER in LDL(-) is then related to the inflammatory action of LDL(-). Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Glutathione peroxidase-1 primes pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS challenge in vivo.

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    Steven Bozinovski

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species produced during the innate immune response to LPS are important agents of anti-pathogen defence but may also cause oxidative lung damage. Glutathione peroxidase-1 (gpx-1 is an anti-oxidant enzyme that may protect lungs from such damage. We assessed the in vivo importance of gpx-1 in LPS-induced lung inflammation. Male wild-type (WT or gpx-1 deficient (gpx-1(-/- mice were treated intranasally with PBS or 10 µg LPS and killed 3 and 24 h post LPS. Lungs were lavaged with PBS and then harvested for inflammatory marker expression. LPS caused an intense neutrophilia in WT BALF evident 3 and 24 h post challenge that was reduced in gpx-1(-/- mice. In addition, LPS-treated gpx-1(-/- mice had significantly fewer macrophages than LPS-treated WT mice. To understand the basis for this paradoxical reduction we assessed inflammatory cytokines and proteases at protein and transcript levels. MMP-9 expression and net gelatinase activity in BALF of gpx-1(-/- mice treated with LPS for 3 and 24 h was no different to that found in LPS-treated WT mice. BALF from LPS-treated gpx-1(-/- mice (3 h had less TNF-α, MIP-2 and GM-CSF protein than LPS-treated WT mice. In contrast, LPS-induced increases in TNF-α, MIP-2 and GM-CSF mRNA expression in WT mice were similar to those observed in gpx-1(-/- mice. These attenuated protein levels were unexpectedly not mirrored by reduced mRNA transcripts but were associated with increased 20S proteasome expression. Thus, these data suggest that gpx-1 primes pro-inflammatory cytokine production after LPS challenge in vivo.

  7. Novel role of curcumin in the prevention of cytokine-induced islet death in vitro and diabetogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanitkar, M; Gokhale, K; Galande, S; Bhonde, R R

    2008-11-01

    Oxidative stress caused by cytokine exposure is a major cause of pancreatic islet death in vitro and of diabetogenesis. Antioxidant compounds may prevent cytokine-induced damage to islet cells. Hence, we studied the potential of curcumin, an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound, in vitro to protect islets against pro-inflammatory cytokines and in vivo to prevent the progression of diabetes induced by multiple low doses of streptozotocin (MLD-STZ). Pancreatic islets from C57/BL6J mice were pretreated with curcumin (10 microM) and then exposed to a combination of cytokines. Islet viability, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NO, inducible NO synthase and NF-kappaB translocation were studied. Curcumin pretreated (7.5 mg kg(-1) day(-1)) C57/BL6J mice were given MLD-STZ (40 mg kg(-1)), and various parameters of diabetes induction and progression were monitored. Curcumin protected islets from cytokine-induced islet death in vitro by scavenging ROS and normalized cytokine-induced NF-kappaB translocation by inhibiting phosphorylation of inhibitor of kappa B alpha (IkappaBalpha). In vivo, curcumin also prevented MLD-STZ, as revealed by sustained normoglycaemia, normal glucose clearance and maintained pancreatic GLUT2 levels. Pro-inflammatory cytokine concentrations in the serum and pancreas were raised in STZ-treated animals, but not in animals pretreated with curcumin before STZ. Here, we have demonstrated for the first time that curcumin in vitro protects pancreatic islets against cytokine-induced death and dysfunction and in vivo prevents STZ-induced diabetes.

  8. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong, E-mail: fanglr@mail.hzau.edu.cn; Xiao, Shaobo, E-mail: vet@mail.hzau.edu.cn

    2014-11-15

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. - Highlights: • PRRSV infection triggers HMGB1 release from MARC-145 cells and PAMs. • HMGB1 does not significantly affect PRRSV proliferation. • HMGB1 is involved in PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and inflammatory responses. • HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced inflammatory responses through TLR2/4 and RAGE.

  9. A novel compound C12 inhibits inflammatory cytokine production and protects from inflammatory injury in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Wang

    Full Text Available Inflammation is a hallmark of many diseases. Although steroids and cyclooxygenase inhibitors are main anti-inflammatory therapeutical agents, they may cause serious side effects. Therefore, developing non-steroid anti-inflammatory agents is urgently needed. A novel hydrosoluble compound, C12 (2,6-bis(4-(3-(dimethylamino-propoxybenzylidenecyclohexanone, has been designed and synthesized as an anti-inflammatory agent in our previous study. In the present study, we investigated whether C12 can affect inflammatory processes in vitro and in vivo. In mouse primary peritoneal macrophages, C12 potently inhibited the production of the proinflammatory gene expression including TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, iNOS, COX-2 and PGE synthase. The activity of C12 was partly dependent on inhibition of ERK/JNK (but p38 phosphorylation and NF-κB activation. In vivo, C12 suppressed proinflammatory cytokine production in plasma and liver, attenuated lung histopathology, and significantly reduced mortality in endotoxemic mice. In addition, the pre-treatment with C12 reduced the inflammatory pain in the acetic acid and formalin models and reduced the carrageenan-induced paw oedema and acetic acid-increased vascular permeability. Taken together, C12 has multiple anti-inflammatory effects. These findings, coupled with the low toxicity and hydrosolubility of C12, suggests that this agent may be useful in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  10. Naegleria fowleri lysate induces strong cytopathic effects and pro-inflammatory cytokine release in rat microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yang-Jin; Park, Chang-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Lee, Jinyoung; Jung, Suk-Yul; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2011-09-01

    Naegleria fowleri, a ubiquitous free-living ameba, causes fatal primary amebic meningoencephalitis in humans. N. fowleri trophozoites are known to induce cytopathic changes upon contact with microglial cells, including necrotic and apoptotic cell death and pro-inflammatory cytokine release. In this study, we treated rat microglial cells with amebic lysate to probe contact-independent mechanisms for cytotoxicity, determining through a combination of light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy whether N. fowleri lysate could effect on both necrosis and apoptosis on microglia in a time- as well as dose-dependent fashion. A (51)Cr release assay demonstrated pronounced lysate induction of cytotoxicity (71.5%) toward microglial cells by 24 hr after its addition to cultures. In an assay of pro-inflammatory cytokine release, microglial cells treated with N. fowleri lysate produced TNF-α, IL-6, and IL-1β, though generation of the former 2 cytokines was reduced with time, and that of the last increased throughout the experimental period. In summary, N. fowleri lysate exerted strong cytopathic effects on microglial cells, and elicited pro-inflammatory cytokine release as a primary immune response.

  11. Release of proinflammatory cytokines related to luteolysis and the periparturient acute phase response in prostaglandin-induced parturition in cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koets, A P; de Schwartz, N; Tooten, P; Kankofer, M; Broekhuijsen-Davies, J M; Rutten, V P; van Leengoed, L A; Taverne, M A; Gruys, E

    1998-01-01

    An acute phase response was previously found in cows at parturition, which might be associated with uterine cytokine release. Five late pregnant cows were implanted with vascular catheters in both the maternal aorta and uterine vein. Blood samples were taken to study temporal relationships between

  12. Insulin Modulates Cytokine Release, Collagen and Mucus Secretion in Lung Remodeling of Allergic Diabetic Mice

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    Sabrina S. Ferreira

    2017-06-01

    cytokines, and collagen deposition and mucus secretion into the lungs.ConclusionThe results suggest that insulin modulates the production/release of cytokines, cell migration, deposition of collagen, and mucus secretion in lung remodeling of a mouse model of asthma.

  13. Insulin Modulates Cytokine Release, Collagen and Mucus Secretion in Lung Remodeling of Allergic Diabetic Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Sabrina S; Nunes, Fernanda P B; Casagrande, Felipe B; Martins, Joilson O

    2017-01-01

    secretion into the lungs. The results suggest that insulin modulates the production/release of cytokines, cell migration, deposition of collagen, and mucus secretion in lung remodeling of a mouse model of asthma.

  14. Cytokines release and oxidative status in semen samples from rabbits treated with bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collodel, G; Moretti, E; Brecchia, G; Kuželová, L; Arruda, J; Mourvaki, E; Castellini, C

    2015-04-15

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effects of a lipopolysaccharide- (LPS) induced inflammation on cytokines release and oxidative status of semen samples from buck rabbits at different times after treatment. Semen analysis was performed by optical microscopy and sperm motility evaluation by the computer-assisted sperm analyzer. The presence of activated macrophages and apoptotic/necrotic sperm was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy. A panel of cytokines, interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were detected and quantified in seminal plasma using the Bio-Plex Cytokine assay. Reactive oxygen metabolite and thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance determinations were carried out by spectrophotometry and tocopherol analysis by high performance liquid chromatography. The sperm motility and track speed were reduced in LPS-treated rabbits. The activated macrophages in LPS-treated buck rabbits significantly increased from 0.50 × 10(6)/mL (baseline) to 27 × 10(6)/mL on Day 21; successively, there was a progressive reduction. Apoptotic and necrotic sperm in LPS rabbits followed more or less the same trend. The reactive oxygen metabolite levels in semen from LPS-treated rabbits showed higher values compared with those evaluated in controls, particularly during the lag time, Days 1 to 3. The sperm thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances highlighted a peak in LPS-treated rabbits compared with those of controls on Day 1 after LPS treatment, and the different T isoforms (α, δ, and γ+β) showed a similar trend with a significant decrease on Day 1 after injection and a recovery on Days 30 to 56. Until Days 3 to 21 from the treatment, higher levels of IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α were detected in seminal plasma of LPS-treated rabbits. Interleukin-6 showed a peak on Day 3 after LPS treatment, and on Day 7, the value was similar to the control group. In conclusion, this study confirms that the buck rabbit is a good model for mimicking and

  15. Monozygotic twins are discordant for chronic periodontitis: white blood cells counts and cytokine production after ex vivo stimulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres de Heens, G.L.; Loos, B.G.; van der Velden, U.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the extent of concordance in the number of leucocytes and their cytokine secretion after ex vivo stimulation in a twin population discordant for the amount of periodontal breakdown. Material and Methods: Venous blood was collected from 18 adult

  16. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection triggers HMGB1 release to promote inflammatory cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Erzhen; Wang, Dang; Luo, Rui; Luo, Jingyi; Gao, Li; Chen, Huanchun; Fang, Liurong; Xiao, Shaobo

    2014-11-01

    The high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein is an endogenous damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) molecule involved in the pathogenesis of various infectious agents. Based on meta-analysis of all publicly available microarray datasets, HMGB1 has recently been proposed as the most significant immune modulator during the porcine response to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. However, the function of HMGB1 in PRRSV pathogenesis is unclear. In this study, we found that PRRSV infection triggers the translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the extracellular milieu in MARC-145 cells and porcine alveolar macrophages. Although HMGB1 has no effect on PRRSV replication, HMGB1 promotes PRRSV-induced NF-κB activation and subsequent expression of inflammatory cytokines through receptors RAGE, TLR2 and TLR4. Our findings show that HMGB1 release, triggered by PRRSV infection, enhances the efficiency of virus-induced inflammatory responses, thereby providing new insights into the pathogenesis of PRRSV infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytokines inducing bone marrow SCA+ cells migration into pancreatic islet and conversion into insulin-positive cells in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LuGuang Luo

    Full Text Available We hypothesize that specific bone marrow lineages and cytokine treatment may facilitate bone marrow migration into islets, leading to a conversion into insulin producing cells in vivo. In this study we focused on identifying which bone marrow subpopulations and cytokine treatments play a role in bone marrow supporting islet function in vivo by evaluating whether bone marrow is capable of migrating into islets as well as converting into insulin positive cells. We approached this aim by utilizing several bone marrow lineages and cytokine-treated bone marrow from green fluorescent protein (GFP positive bone marrow donors. Sorted lineages of Mac-1(+, Mac-1(-, Sca(+, Sca(-, Sca(-/Mac-1(+ and Sca(+/Mac-1(- from GFP positive mice were transplanted to irradiated C57BL6 GFP negative mice. Bone marrow from transgenic human ubiquitin C promoter GFP (uGFP, with strong signal C57BL6 mice was transplanted into GFP negative C57BL6 recipients. After eight weeks, migration of GFP positive donor' bone marrow to the recipient's pancreatic islets was evaluated as the percentage of positive GFP islets/total islets. The results show that the most effective migration comes from the Sca(+/Mac(- lineage and these cells, treated with cytokines for 48 hours, were found to have converted into insulin positive cells in pancreatic islets in vivo. This study suggests that bone marrow lineage positive cells and cytokine treatments are critical factors in determining whether bone marrow is able to migrate and form insulin producing cells in vivo. The mechanisms causing this facilitation as well as bone marrow converting to pancreatic beta cells still need to be investigated.

  18. In vivo Th1 and Th2 cytokine modulation effects of Rhodiola rosea standardised solution and its major constituent, salidroside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Shen Chou; Chin, Lengsu William; Chao, Pei-Chun; Lai, Ya-Yun; Lin, Long-Yau; Chou, Ming-Yung; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wei, James Cheng-Chung; Yang, Chi-Chiang

    2011-11-01

    Although Rhodiola rosea (L.) is used widely and disseminated in Oriental medicine, its in vivo effects on cytokine modulation remain unclear. Among the biologically active components of Rhodiola rosea, salidroside was suggested to be the most active compound. The objectives of this study were to assess the toxicity and cytokine modulation effects of Rhodiola rosea standardised solution (RRSS) and salidroside. Quantitative high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis determined the content of salidroside in RRSS to be 4.39% (w/v). Groups of Balb/c mice were fed daily with different doses of RRSS or salidroside, with CAPE or distilled water used as positive and negative controls, respectively. The acute and subacute toxicity tests did not reveal weight differences, pathological changes, or abnormalities in liver or kidney function indices among the treated groups. Ovalbumin-primed mouse cytokine assays demonstrated that both T helper (Th1) (IL-2 and IFN-γ) and Th2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines were significantly increased by feeding with RRSS in a dose- and time-dependent manner (p < 0.05). Moreover, the cytokine modulation effects of salidroside were less prominent than that of RRSS treatment and not dose-dependent. These findings suggest that increased secretion of both Th1- and Th2-pattern cytokines can be achieved with RRSS and salidroside treatment. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. In-vivo/in-vitro correlation of four extended release formulations of pseudoephedrine sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojaverian, P; Rosen, J; Vadino, W A; Liebowitz, S; Radwanski, E

    1997-01-01

    An in-vivo/in-vitro correlation was established for four formulations of pseudoephedrine sulfate modified release tablets exhibiting different in-vivo and in-vitro release rate and absorption characteristics. In-vitro release rate data were obtained for 12 individual tablets of each formulation using the USP Apparatus 2 paddle stirrer at 50 rev min-1 in 1000 ml 0.1 N hydrochloric acid for the first hour followed by 0.1 M phosphate buffer at pH 7.5 for hours 2-16. Inspection of the individual and mean release rate data indicated that the in-vitro release rate of pseudoephedrine sulfate was consistent with the intended design of the four extended release formulations. The in-vivo bioavailability and pharmacokinetics of these formulations were evaluated in 20 healthy volunteers under fasted conditions. Wagner-Nelson analyses of the in-vivo data revealed extended release absorption profiles for all four formulations. Linear regression analyses of the mean percentage of dose absorbed versus the mean in-vitro release resulted in statistically significant correlations (r2 > 0.99, p < 0.0001) for each formulation. Qualitative rank order correlations were observed among all combinations of in-vivo and in-vitro parameters. These data support a Level A correlation between in-vivo absorption profiles and in-vitro release rates of four pseudoephedrine sulfate extended release formulations determined in fasted healthy volunteers.

  20. CONTROLLED-RELEASE OF PARACETAMOL FROM AMYLODEXTRIN TABLETS - IN-VITRO AND IN-VIVO RESULTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERVEEN, J; EISSENS, AC; LERK, CF

    Amylodextrin is a suitable excipient for the design of solid controlled-release systems. The release of paracetamol from tablets containing 30% drug and 70% amylodextrin was studied in vitro and in vivo. In vitro dissolution profiles showed almost-constant drug release rates during 8 hr, when

  1. Vibrio vulnificus MO6-24/O Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Superoxide Anion, Thromboxane B2, Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Cytokine and Chemokine Release by Rat Brain Microglia in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro M. S. Mayer

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although human exposure to Gram-negative Vibrio vulnificus (V. vulnificus lipopolysaccharide (LPS has been reported to result in septic shock, its impact on the central nervous system’s innate immunity remains undetermined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether V. vulnificus MO6-24/O LPS might activate rat microglia in vitro and stimulate the release of superoxide anion (O2−, a reactive oxygen species known to cause oxidative stress and neuronal injury in vivo. Brain microglia were isolated from neonatal rats, and then treated with either V. vulnificus MO6-24/O LPS or Escherichia coli O26:B6 LPS for 17 hours in vitro. O2− was determined by cytochrome C reduction, and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2 and MMP-9 by gelatinase zymography. Generation of cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, interleukin-1 alpha (IL-1α, IL-6, and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1, chemokines macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP-1α/chemokine (C-C motif ligand 3 (CCL3, MIP-2/chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 2 (CXCL2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2, and cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant-2alpha/beta (CINC-2α/β/CXCL3, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, were determined by specific immunoassays. Priming of rat microglia by V. vulnificus MO6-24/O LPS in vitro yielded a bell-shaped dose-response curve for PMA (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated O2− generation: (1 0.1–1 ng/mL V. vulnificus LPS enhanced O2− generation significantly but with limited inflammatory mediator generation; (2 10–100 ng/mL V. vulnificus LPS maximized O2− generation with concomitant release of thromboxane B2 (TXB2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and several cytokines and chemokines; (3 1000–100,000 ng/mL V. vulnificus LPS, with the exception of TXB2, yielded both attenuated O2− production, and a progressive decrease in MMP-9, cytokines and chemokines investigated. Thus concentration-dependent treatment of

  2. Exposure to wear particles generated from studded tires and pavement induces inflammatory cytokine release from human macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindbom, John; Gustafsson, Mats; Blomqvist, Göran; Dahl, Andreas; Gudmundsson, Anders; Swietlicki, Erik; Ljungman, Anders G

    2006-04-01

    Health risks associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter (PM) have been shown epidemiologically as well as experimentally, pointing to both respiratory and cardiovascular effects. Lately, wear particles generated from traffic have been recognized to be a major contributing source to the overall particle load, especially in the Nordic countries were studded tires are used. In this work, we investigated the inflammatory effect of PM10 generated from the wear of studded tires on two different types of pavement. As comparison, we also investigated PM10 from a traffic-intensive street, a subway station, and diesel exhaust particles (DEP). Human monocyte-derived macrophages, nasal epithelial cells (RPMI 2650), and bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) were exposed to the different types of particles, and the secretion of IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and TNF-alpha into the culture medium was measured. The results show a significant release of cytokines from macrophages after exposure for all types of particles. When particles generated from asphalt/granite pavement were compared to asphalt/quartzite pavement, the granite pavement had a significantly higher capacity to induce the release of cytokines. The granite pavement particles induced cytokine release at the same magnitude as the street particles did, which was higher than what particles from both a subway station and DEP did. Exposure of epithelial cells to PM10 resulted in a significant increase of TNF-alpha secreted from BEAS-2B cells for all types of particles used (DEP was not tested), and the highest levels were induced by subway particles. None of the particle types were able to evoke detectable cytokine release from RPMI 2650 cells. The results indicate that PM10 generated by the wear of studded tires on the street surface is a large contributor to the cytokine-releasing ability of particles in traffic-intensive areas and that the type of pavement used is important for the level of this contribution

  3. Blood cytokines as biomarkers of in vivo toxicity in preclinical safety assessment: considerations for their use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrant, Jacqueline M

    2010-09-01

    In the drive to develop drugs with well-characterized and clinically monitorable safety profiles, there is incentive to expand the repertoire of safety biomarkers for toxicities without routine markers or premonitory detection. Biomarkers in blood are pursued because of specimen accessibility, opportunity for serial monitoring, quantitative measurement, and the availability of assay platforms. Cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors (here referred to collectively as cytokines) show robust modulation in proximal events of inflammation, immune response, and repair. These are key general processes in many toxicities; therefore, cytokines are commonly identified during biomarker discovery studies. In addition, multiplexed cytokine immunoassays are easily applied to biomarker discovery and routine toxicity studies to measure blood cytokines. However, cytokines pose several challenges as safety biomarkers because of a short serum half-life; low to undetectable baseline levels; lack of tissue-specific or toxicity-specific expression; complexities related to cytokine expression with multiorgan involvement; and species, strain, and interindividual differences. Additional challenges to their application are caused by analytical, methodological, and study design-related variables. A final consideration is the strength of the relationship between changes in cytokine levels and the development of phenotypic or functional manifestations of toxicity. These factors should inform the integrated judgment-based qualification of novel biomarkers in preclinical, and potentially clinical, risk assessment. The dearth of robust, predictive cytokine biomarkers for specific toxicities is an indication of the significant complexity of these challenges. This review will consider the current state of the science and recommendations for appropriate application of cytokines in preclinical safety assessment.

  4. Differential response to dexamethasone on the TXB2 release in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages induced by zymosan and cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Salgueiro

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticosteroids reduce the production of inflammatory mediators but this effect may depend on the stimulus. We have compared the time course of the effect of dexamethasone on the thromboxane B2 (TXB2 release induced by cytokine stimulation and zymosan in guinea-pig alveolar macrophages. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β, tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α and opsonized zymosan (OZ, all stimulate TXB2 release. High concentrations of dexamethasone (1–10 μM inhibit the TXB2 production induced by both cytokines and OZ, but the time course of this response is different. Four hours of incubation with dexamethasone reduce the basal TXB2 release and that induced by IL-1β and TNF-α, but do not modify the TXB2 release induced by OZ. However, this stimulus was reduced after 24 h incubation. Our results suggest that the antiinflammatory activity of glucocorticosteroids shows some dependence on stimulus and, therefore, may have more than one mechanism involved.

  5. Identification of Predictive Biomarkers for Cytokine Release Syndrome after Chimeric Antigen Receptor T cell Therapy for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teachey, David T.; Lacey, Simon F.; Shaw, Pamela A.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; Maude, Shannon L.; Frey, Noelle; Pequignot, Edward; Gonzalez, Vanessa E.; Chen, Fang; Finklestein, Jeffrey; Barrett, David M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Berg, Robert A.; Aplenc, Richard; Callahan, Colleen; Rheingold, Susan R.; Zheng, Zhaohui; Rose-John, Stefan; White, Jason C.; Nazimuddin, Farzana; Wertheim, Gerald; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Porter, David L.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2017-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells with anti-CD19 specificity are a highly effective novel immune therapy for relapsed/refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Cytokine release syndrome (CRS) is the most significant and life-threatening toxicity. To improve understanding of CRS, we measured cytokines and clinical biomarkers in 51 CTL019-treated patients. Peak levels of 24 cytokines, including IFNγ, IL6, sgp130, and sIL6R in the first month after infusion were highly associated with severe CRS. Using regression modeling, we could accurately predict which patients would develop severe CRS with a signature composed of three cytokines. Results validated in an independent cohort. Changes in serum biochemical markers, including C-reactive protein and ferritin, were associated with CRS but failed to predict development of severe CRS. These comprehensive profiling data provide novel insights into CRS biology, and importantly represent the first data that can accurately predict which patients have a high probability of becoming critically ill. PMID:27076371

  6. Effects of exogenous vitamins A, C, and E and NADH supplementation on proliferation, cytokines release, and cell redox status of lymphocytes from healthy aged subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouamama, Samia; Merzouk, Hafida; Medjdoub, Amel; Merzouk-Saidi, Amel; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed

    2017-06-01

    Aging is an inevitable biological event that is associated with immune alterations. These alterations are related to increased cellular oxidative stress and micronutrient deficiency. Antioxidant supplementation could improve these age-related abnormalities. The aim of this study was to determine in vitro effects of vitamin A, vitamin C, vitamin E, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) on T cell proliferation, cytokine release, and cell redox status in the elderly compared with young adults. Peripheral blood lymphocytes were isolated using a density gradient of Histopaque. They were cultured in vitro and stimulated with concanavalin A in the presence or absence of vitamins. Cell proliferation was determined by conducting MTT assays, and based on interleukin-2 and interleukin-4 secretions. Cell oxidant/antioxidant balance was assessed by assaying reduced glutathione (GSH), malondialdehyde, carbonyl protein levels, and catalase activity. The present study demonstrated that T-lymphocyte proliferation was decreased with aging and was associated with cytokine secretion alterations, GSH depletion, and intracellular oxidative stress. In the elderly, vitamin C, vitamin E, and NADH significantly improved lymphocyte proliferation and mitigated cellular oxidative stress, whereas vitamin A did not affect cell proliferation or cell redox status. In conclusion, vitamin C, vitamin E, and NADH supplementation improved T-lymphocytes response in the elderly, and could contribute to the prevention of age-related immune alterations. Consumption of food items containing these vitamins is recommended, and further investigation is necessary to evaluate the effect of vitamin supplementation in vivo.

  7. Pharmacokinetics and in vivo scintigraphic monitoring of a sustained release acetylsalicylic acid formulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, C.G.; Hardy, J.C. (Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (UK)); Parr, G.D.; Kennerley, J.W.; Taylor, M.J.; Davis, S.S. (Nottingham Univ. (UK)); Rees, J.A. (Boots Research Laboratories, Nottingham (UK))

    1984-01-01

    The in vivo dissolution and pharmacokinetics of a sustained release aspirin formulation labelled with (sup(99m)Tc)diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid has been monitored in 5 subjects by the use of gamma scintigraphy and drug analysis undertaken of blood and urine samples. The data obtained enabled the position of the tablet in vivo to be related to the plasma and urinary salicylate levels. The study confirms the sustained release properties of the cellulose acetate phthalate formulation.

  8. Ex vivo induction of cytokines by mould components in whole blood of atopic and non-atopic volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krüger, Tanja; Sigsgaard, Torben; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the time-course release of IL-1beta and IL-8 protein as well as the steady state mRNA level of their genes in human whole blood after stimulation with LPS, beta-1,3-D-glucan and mould extracts. We compared the response of 10 non-atopic and 10 atopic individuals. In parallel......, cytokine protein release and the corresponding steady state mRNA level was determined by the standard ELISA and real-time on-line RT-PCR methods, respectively. Glucan induced the highest level of IL-1beta mRNA and protein release after 3 h. IL-8 was induced at 3 h after glucan, but not after LPS, induction......RNA steady state to lower levels in the atopics compared to the non-atopics. In contrast, no differences were found between the two groups in their capacity to induce cytokine protein release. These findings persisted after correction for the percentage of mononuclear cells. The data supported our hypothesis...

  9. Plasma Cytokine Concentrations Indicate In-vivo Hormonal Regulation of Immunity is Altered During Long-Duration Spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crician, Brian E.; Zwart, Sara R.; Mehta, Satish; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather A.; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarence F.; Smith, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Aspects of immune system dysregulation associated with long-duration spaceflight have yet to be fully characterized, and may represent a clinical risk to crewmembers during deep space missions. Plasma cytokine concentration may serve as an indicator of in vivo physiological changes or immune system mobilization. Methods: The plasma concentrations of 22 cytokines were monitored in 28 astronauts during long-duration spaceflight onboard the International Space Station. Blood samples were collected three times before flight, 3-5 times during flight (depending on mission duration), at landing and 30 days post-landing. Analysis was performed by bead array immunoassay. Results: With few exceptions, minimal detectable mean plasma levels (inflammation, leukocyte recruitment, angiogenesis and thrombocyte regulation.

  10. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Release in Mice Injected with Crotalus durissus terrificus Venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernández Cruz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (Cdt were analyzed with respect to the susceptibility and the inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of severe envenomation. BALB/c female mice injected intraperitoneally presented sensibility to Cdt, with changes in specific signs, blood biochemical and inflammatory mediators. The venom induced reduction of glucose and urea levels and an increment of creatinine levels in serum from mice. Significant differences were observed in the time-course of mediator levels in sera from mice injected with Cdt. The maximum levels of IL-6, NO, IL-5, TNF, IL-4 and IL-10 were observed 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-injection, respectively. No difference was observed for levels of IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that the envenomation by Cdt is regulated both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses at time-dependent manner. In serum from mice injected with Cdt at the two first hours revealed of pro-inflammatory dominance. However, with an increment of time an increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines was observed and the balance toward to anti-inflammatory dominance. In conclusion, the observation that Cdt affects the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines provides further evidence for the role played by Cdt in modulating pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance.

  11. Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cytokines Release in Mice Injected with Crotalus durissus terrificus Venom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Cruz, A.; Garcia-Jimenez, S.; Zucatelli Mendonça, R.; Petricevich, V. L.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus venom (Cdt) were analyzed with respect to the susceptibility and the inflammatory mediators in an experimental model of severe envenomation. BALB/c female mice injected intraperitoneally presented sensibility to Cdt, with changes in specific signs, blood biochemical and inflammatory mediators. The venom induced reduction of glucose and urea levels and an increment of creatinine levels in serum from mice. Significant differences were observed in the time-course of mediator levels in sera from mice injected with Cdt. The maximum levels of IL-6, NO, IL-5, TNF, IL-4 and IL-10 were observed 15 min, 30 min, 1, 2 and 4 hours post-injection, respectively. No difference was observed for levels of IFN-γ. Taken together, these data indicate that the envenomation by Cdt is regulated both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine responses at time-dependent manner. In serum from mice injected with Cdt at the two first hours revealed of pro-inflammatory dominance. However, with an increment of time an increase of anti-inflammatory cytokines was observed and the balance toward to anti-inflammatory dominance. In conclusion, the observation that Cdt affects the production of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines provides further evidence for the role played by Cdt in modulating pro/anti-inflammatory cytokine balance. PMID:18604304

  12. Generation and sustained expansion of mouse spleen invariant NKT cell lines with preserved cytokine releasing capacity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Molling, J.W.; Moreno, M.; Vliet, H.J. van der; Blomberg, B.M.E. von; Eertwegh, A.J. van den; Scheper, R.J.; Bontkes, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are CD1d restricted innate lymphoid cells with an invariant T cell receptor (TCR) alpha chain gene rearrangement (Valpha24-Jalpha18 in human and Valpha14-Jalpha18 in mouse). iNKT cells play a pivotal role in anti-tumor immune responses via cytokine mediated

  13. Inflammatory Cytokines Stimulate Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2 Expression and Release from Pancreatic Beta Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Urizar, Adriana Ibarra; Friberg, Josefine; Christensen, Dan Ploug

    2016-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4 are expre......The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) play important roles in the progressive loss of beta-cell mass and function during development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. We have recently showed that bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2 and -4...... 6- and 3-fold in isolated islets of Langerhans from neonatal rat and human. Downstream target genes of the BMP pathway were also increased by cytokine treatment and could be reversed by neutralization of endogenous BMP activity. Nuclear factor kappa B- (NFκB) binding sites were identified in the rat...... BMP-2 promoter, and reporter assays verified the role of NFκB in cytokine-induced BMP-2 expression. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed NFκB binding to BMP-2 promoter upon IL-1β stimulation in beta cells. In conclusion, we suggest that NFκ...

  14. Mechanisms of in vivo release of triamcinolone acetonide from PLGA microspheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Amy C; Weinstein, David G; Hirota, Keiji; Olsen, Karl F; Ackermann, Rose; Wang, Yan; Choi, Stephanie; Schwendeman, Steven P

    2017-06-28

    Little is known about the underlying effects controlling in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) for biodegradable controlled release microspheres. Most reports of IVIVCs that exist are empirical in nature, typically based on a mathematical relationship between in vitro and in vivo drug release, with the latter often estimated by deconvolution of pharmacokinetic data. In order to improve the ability of in vitro release tests to predict microsphere behavior in vivo and develop more meaningful IVIVCs, the in vivo release mechanisms need to be characterized. Here, two poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) microsphere formulations encapsulating the model steroid triamcinolone acetonide (Tr-A) were implanted subcutaneously in rats by using a validated cage model, allowing for free fluid and cellular exchange and microsphere retrieval during release. Release kinetics, as well as mechanistic indicators of release such as hydrolysis and mass loss, was measured by direct analysis of the recovered microspheres. Release of Tr-A from both formulations was greatly accelerated in vivo compared to in vitro using agitated phosphate buffered saline +0.02% Tween 80 pH7.4, including rate of PLGA hydrolysis, mass loss and water uptake. Both microsphere formulations exhibited erosion-controlled release in vitro, indicated by similar polymer mass loss kinetics, but only one of the formulations (low molecular weight, free acid terminated) exhibited the same mechanism in vivo. The in vivo release of Tr-A from microspheres made of a higher molecular weight, ester end-capped PLGA displayed an osmotically induced/pore diffusion mechanism based on confocal micrographs of percolating pores in the polymer, not previously observed in vitro. This research indicates the need to fully understand the in vivo environment and how it causes drug release from biodegradable microspheres. This understanding can then be applied to develop in vitro release tests which better mimic this environment and cause

  15. Formulation and In vitro/In vivo Evaluation of Sustained Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2013-07-15

    Jul 15, 2013 ... Purpose: To develop and optimise sustained release (SR) matrix tablets of diltiazem hydrochloride (DHL). Methods: ... Keywords: Diltiazem, Matrix tablet, Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose Eudragit, In vitro/in vivo correlation, Optimization. Tropical ..... Makhija S, Vavia P. Once daily sustained release tablets.

  16. Forced expression of stabilized c-Fos in dendritic cells reduces cytokine production and immune responses in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, Ryoko; Suzuki, Mayu; Sakaguchi, Ryota; Hasegawa, Eiichi; Kimura, Akihiro; Shichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan); Shiraishi, Hiroshi [Division of Medical Biochemistry, Department of Biomolecular Sciences, Saga Medical School, Saga (Japan); Shimoda, Kouji [Department of Laboratory Animal Center, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshimura, Akihiko, E-mail: yoshimura@a6.keio.jp [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Keio University School of Medicine, 35 Shinanomachi, Shinjyuku-ku, Tokyo 160-8582 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, CREST, Chiyoda-ku 102-0075 (Japan)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos produced less inflammatory cytokines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dendritic cells expressing stabilized c-Fos activated T cells less efficiently. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transgenic mice expressing stabilized c-Fos were resistant to EAE model. -- Abstract: Intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) suppresses innate immunity by inhibiting proinflammatory cytokine production by monocytic cells. We have shown that the transcription factor c-Fos is responsible for cAMP-mediated suppression of inflammatory cytokine production, and that c-Fos protein is stabilized by IKK{beta}-mediated phosphorylation. We found that S308 is one of the major phosphorylation sites, and that the S308D mutation prolongs c-Fos halflife. To investigate the role of stabilized c-Fos protein in dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo, we generated CD11c-promoter-deriven c-FosS308D transgenic mice. As expected, bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) from these Tg mice produced smaller amounts of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-{alpha}, IL-12, and IL-23, but higher levels of IL-10, in response to LPS, than those from wild-type (Wt) mice. When T cells were co-cultured with BMDCs from Tg mice, production of Th1 and Th17 cytokines was reduced, although T cell proliferation was not affected. Tg mice demonstrated more resistance to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) than did Wt mice. These data suggest that c-Fos in DCs plays a suppressive role in certain innate and adaptive immune responses.

  17. Effects of Ex Vivo Infection with ETEC on Jejunal Barrier Properties and Cytokine Expression in Probiotic-Supplemented Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodemann, Ulrike; Amasheh, Salah; Radloff, Judith; Kern, Martina; Bethe, Astrid; Wieler, Lothar H; Pieper, Robert; Zentek, Jürgen; Aschenbach, Jörg R

    2017-04-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are involved in piglet post-weaning diarrhea. Prophylactic measures including probiotics have been examined in infection experiments with live piglets. In the present study, we have tested whether the early effects of ETEC infection can also be evoked and studied in a model in which ETEC is added to whole mucosal tissues ex vivo, and whether this response can be modulated by prior supplementation of the piglets with probiotics. Jejunal barrier and transport properties of Enterococcus faecium-supplemented or control piglets were assessed in Ussing chambers. Part of the epithelia was challenged with an ETEC strain at the mucosal side. Fluxes of fluorescein as a marker of paracellular permeability, and the expression of selected tight junction (TJ) proteins and of proinflammatory cytokines were measured. The addition of ETEC ex vivo induced an increase in transepithelial resistance peaking in the first 2 h with a concomitant reduction in fluorescein fluxes, indicating tightening effects on barrier function. The response of short-circuit current after stimulation with PGE2 or glucose was reduced in epithelia treated with ETEC. ETEC induced a decrease in the TJ protein claudin-4 in the control diet group after 280 min and an increase in the mRNA expression of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 and TNF-α in both groups after 180 min. The addition of ETEC ex vivo affected barrier function and transport properties of the jejunal tissues and enhanced cytokine expression. The differences in claudin-4 expression in the jejunum might indicate a beneficial effect of E. faecium prefeeding.

  18. The Effect of a Bio-Behavioral Intervention on the Release of Cytokines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    preoperative anxiety levels as measured by the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety Information Scale (APAIS) were associated with increased IL-6 and IL-8...care. All participants completed the anxiety and pain scales in the preoperative holding area, immediately postoperatively, and at scheduled...minutes after transfer to the post anesthesia care unit) to monitor IL-6, IL-8, and Substance P levels. Anxiety scale , pain scale , cytokines IL6 and

  19. Effects of smoking on the ex vivo cytokine production in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heens, G. L. Torres; Kikkert, R.; Aarden, L. A.; van der Velden, U.; Loos, B. G.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Smoking is associated with increased severity of periodontitis. The underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to compare the monocyte-derived T cell directing (Th1/Th2) response and pro-inflammatory cytokine

  20. Effects of smoking on the ex vivo cytokine production in periodontitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres de Heens, G.L.; Kikkert, R.; Aarden, L.A.; van der Velden, U.; Loos, B.G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objective:  Smoking is associated with increased severity of periodontitis. The underlying mechanisms of this phenomenon are not well understood. The purpose of the present study was to compare the monocyte-derived T cell directing (Th1/Th2) response and pro-inflammatory cytokine

  1. Measurement of histamine release from human lung tissue ex vivo by microdialysis technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nissen, Dan; Petersen, Lars Jelstrup; Nolte, H

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: Currently no method is available for measurement of mediator release from intact human lung. In this study, a microdialysis technique was used to measure histamine release from mast cells in human lung tissue ex vivo. MATERIAL: Microdialysis fibers of 216 microm were inserted...... responses were observed but data could be reproduced within individual donors. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, a potent basophil secretagogue, did not induce histamine release in lung tissue which indicated mast cells to be the histamine source. Substance P did not release histamine in the lung tissue....... CONCLUSIONS: The microdialysis technique allowed measurements of histamine release from mast cells in intact lung ex vivo. The method may prove useful since a number of experiments can be performed in a few hours in intact lung tissue without any dispersion or enzymatic treatment....

  2. Release of IL-1β Triggered by Milan Summer PM10: Molecular Pathways Involved in the Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bengalli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter (PM exposure is related to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, with increased inflammatory status. The release of the proinflammatory interleukin- (IL- 1β, is controlled by a dual pathway, the formation of inactive pro-IL-1β, through Toll-like receptors (TLRs activation, and its cleavage by NLRP3 inflammasome. THP-1-derived macrophages were exposed for 6 h to 2.5 μg/cm2 of Milan PM10, and the potential to promote IL-1β release by binding TLRs and activating NLRP3 has been examined. Summer PM10, induced a marked IL-1β response in the absence of LPS priming (50-fold increase compared to unexposed cells, which was reduced by caspase-1 inhibition (91% of inhibition respect summer PM10-treated cells and by TLR-2 and TLR-4 inhibitors (66% and 53% of inhibition, resp.. Furthermore, summer PM10 increased the number of early endosomes, and oxidative stress inhibition nearly abolished PM10-induced IL-1β response (90% of inhibition. These findings suggest that summer PM10 contains constituents both related to the activation of membrane TLRs and activation of the inflammasome NLPR3 and that TLRs activation is of pivotal importance for the magnitude of the response. ROS formation seems important for PM10-induced IL-1β response, but further investigations are needed to elucidate the molecular pathway by which this effect is mediated.

  3. Granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) reduces not only gram-negative but also gram-positive infection-associated proinflammatory cytokine release by interaction between Kupffer cells and leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, C J; Wanner, G A; Menger, M D; Vollmar, B

    2004-05-01

    An important principle for the beneficial effects of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), a central mediator in the endogenous host response, is the reduction of systemic cytokine levels in various gram-negative models of sepsis and septic shock. There is debate, however, on whether G-CSF is protective also in gram-positive sepsis and acts directly or indirectly on macrophages and hepatic Kupffer cells (KC). KC were harvested from either G-CSF-(200 microg/kg bw i.v.) or saline-pretreated Sprague-Dawley rats and stimulated in vitro for subsequent assessment of cytokine release over 24 h. Pretreatment with G-CSF led to a significant (prelease of TNF-alpha (-81%), IL-6 (-82%) and IL-1 beta (-57%). Exposure of KC to heat-killed Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus/SAC) caused a 2- to 3-fold higher TNF-alpha release, but similar IL-6 levels when compared with those after LPS stimulation. Still, G-CSF proved to significantly reduce the release of both TNF-alpha and IL-6 upon KC exposure with SAC for 24h. Interestingly, in neutropenic animals (100mg/kg cyclophosphamide), G-CSF was not capable to blunt the LPS-induced cytokine release, indicating that the action of G-CSF on KC is not direct in nature but targets cellular communication and function of neutrophils. The present results demonstrate that pretreatment with G-CSF in vivo effectively prevents the overactivation of KC by both gram-negative and gram-positive bacterial substances, probably via modulation of neutrophil function. Thus, inhibition of proinflammatory cytokine response through G-CSF may represent a promising hepatoprotective approach during systemic inflammation.

  4. Transit time of leukocytes rolling through venules controls cytokine-induced inflammatory cell recruitment in vivo.

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, U; Norman, K E; Scharffetter-Kochanek, K; Beaudet, A L; Ley, K

    1998-01-01

    Leukocyte recruitment requires leukocyte rolling, activation, firm adhesion, and transmigration. Injection of the proinflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha induces expression of E-selectin, interleukin-8, and other adhesion molecules and chemoattractants on the endothelial surface. TNF-alpha- treated CD18 null mouse cremaster muscle venules show increased leukocyte rolling velocity and reduced leukocyte recruitment efficiency. Leukocyte recruitment in CD18 null but not wild-type mice is significantl...

  5. INFLUENCE OF PROBIOTICS ON CYTOKINE PRODUCTION IN THE IN VITRO AND IN VIVO SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. V. Averina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulatory effects of three probiotic bacterial strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus K32 (L, Bifidobacterium longum GT15 (B, Enterococcus faecium L-3 (E on expression level and contents of key cytokines were studied using PCR techniques with reverse transcription, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Both cell cultures and an experimental model of intestinal dysbiosis were used in this study.The genes encoding bacteriocins, surface membrane component, pili and exopolysaccharides involved in host immune system modulation were previously identified in the B and Ebacterial strains.Investigation of probiotic strains and effects of their supernatants expression of cytokines in cell cultures of promonocyte origin (HTP-1 showed increased expression of TNFα, due to E and L supernatants. Moreover, the Bl culture induced IL-8 and IL-10 expression.In a model of Wistar rats with ampicillinand metronidazole-induced intestinal dysbiosis corrected with probiotics we have shown that the dysbiosis was accompanied by sufficient alterations in microbiota composition (Klebsiella spp. overgrowth and low contents of Faecalobacterium prausnitzii that were observed only in the animals untreated with probiotics (control, or after administration of L.In contrast to these results, the animals treated with E and B, the following changes were revealed: 1 low expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-8, TNFα, MCP-1 inmesenteric lymph nodes and appropriate changes of their serum contents, 2 increased serum content of the anti-inflammatory TGFβ cytokine. Hence, the present study, having used two complementary models, has detected some individual features of immune modulation produced by the probiotictic strains of L. rhamnosus K32, B. longum GT15 и E. faecium L-3 which exert differential effects upon the intestinal microbiota. 

  6. Esomeprazole immediate release tablets: Gastric mucosa ex vivo permeation, absorption and antisecretory activity in conscious rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetti, Camillo; Flammini, Lisa; Vivo, Valentina; Colombo, Paolo; Colombo, Gaia; Elviri, Lisa; Scarpignato, Carmelo; Buttini, Francesca; Bettini, Ruggero; Barocelli, Elisabetta; Rossi, Alessandra

    2016-10-10

    The aim of this work was to study the esomeprazole activity on the control of gastric secretion after administration of a novel immediate release tablet. The ex vivo permeation of esomeprazole across porcine gastric mucosa from immediate release tablets, containing sodium carbonate or magnesium oxide as alkalinizing agents, was firstly assessed. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics studies in conscious rats following the administration of immediate release tablets with sodium carbonate, in comparison with delayed-release tablets having the same formula, were also conducted. The results showed an important effect of sodium carbonate and magnesium oxide on the drug release, on the ex vivo trans-mucosal transport and the stability in acid environment. In particular, the presence of sodium carbonate in esomeprazole tablet formulation provided the maximum increase of the drug in vitro transport across the mucosa. Then, the absorption and the antisecretory activity of this proton pump inhibitor orally administered in rats as immediate release tablets containing Na2CO3, was superior but not significantly different compared to delayed-release tablets having the same formula. In the adopted animal model, an activity of esomeprazole from immediate release alkaline formulation was seen also in presence of partial gastric absorption allowing inhibition of proton pumps reached via systemic circulation. This esomeprazole immediate release formulation could be used for the on-demand treatment of acid-related disorders such as gastro-esophageal reflux disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Heat-killed Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG modulates urocortin and cytokine release in primary trophoblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloise, E; Torricelli, M; Novembri, R; Borges, L E; Carrarelli, P; Reis, F M; Petraglia, F

    2010-10-01

    A number of studies are showing that probiotic treatment induces an anti-inflammatory state. Intrauterine infection can lead to preterm delivery by modulating immune function and efforts to prevent this condition are ongoing nowadays. Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG) is a probiotic known to ameliorate inflammation by increasing local anti-inflammatory mediators in urinary and gastrointestinal tracts. The present study then analyzed the effect of heat-killed LGG over β-hCG, progesterone, interleukins (IL) 4 and 10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and urocortin (Ucn) release by primary trophoblast cells. Normal human term placentas (n = 6) were collected and purified trophoblast cells were incubated in the presence of LGG, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or either LGG + LPS during 3 h, after which the target substances were quantified by ELISA and real-time PCR. LGG did not affect β-hCG, progesterone, or CRH secretion. Conversely, LGG increased IL-4 protein and mRNA expression (P release at both protein (P release from trophoblast cells, with no change in β-hCG or progesterone release, suggesting that this probiotic may play a role as an immunomodulatory agent in human placenta without altering basic trophoblast functions. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Modelling of Cr and Ni ions release during orthodontic treatment: in vitro and in vivo methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojnacka, Katarzyna; Mikulewicz, Marcin

    2014-11-01

    The kinetics of metal ions release from orthodontic appliances in in vitro, in in vivo on pigs, and in vivo trials on patients (where hair samples were taken) was discussed. We have evaluated (by means of ICP-OES and ISO 17025) and compared the mass of Cr and Ni ions released. Not all the metal ions released from the appliance were transferred to hair tissue. The transfer factor was expressed as coefficient ω and evaluated as: ωCr(patients) 33.0%, ωCr(pigs) 17.2%, ωNi(patients) 49.8%, ωNi(pigs) 0.553%. The kinetics was described by a power function. Coefficient ω was used to combine the models: the in vitro and in vivo on animals on the one hand and the in vitro and in vivo on human on the other, which enabled the extrapolation of in vitro and translation of the results into in vivo conditions. The dose of metal ions released during orthodontic treatment was estimated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Exercise-induced release of cytokines in patients with major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, Ludvig; Janelidze, Shorena; Engstrom, Gunnar; Wisén, Anita G M; Westrin, Asa; Brundin, Lena

    2010-10-01

    Patients with major depressive disorder (MDD) may display elevated plasma levels of pro-inflammatory substances. Although the underlying mechanisms are unknown, inflammation has been proposed to play a direct role in the generation of depressive symptoms. Skeletal muscle is a potent producer of cytokines, and physical exercise has been suggested to alleviate symptoms of depression. In this study we therefore addressed the question of whether MDD patients display altered levels of pro-, anti-inflammatory and regulatory factors in the blood in response to acute exercise. Eighteen MDD patients and 18 healthy controls performed a maximal-workload exercise challenge. Blood samples were taken before the test, at sub-maximal and maximal workload, as well as 30 and 60 min after testing. The plasma levels of SAA, TNF-alpha, S-VCAM, S-ICAM, CRP, IFN-gamma, IL-1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-13 were assayed using multiplex sandwich ELISA. Exercise-induced significant changes in the plasma levels of inflammatory substances in both MDD patients and controls. IL-8, IL-6 and TNF-alpha increased, and IL-4 decreased during the challenge in both groups. In addition, IFN-gamma decreased in the controls. There was a significant difference in IL-6 reactivity between the groups at the sub-max timepoint. Group sizes are comparably limited. Exercise induces changes in the blood levels of cytokines in unmedicated MDD patients. Whether these changes affect symptoms of depression should be evaluated in long-term studies of the anti-depressive effects of exercise. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matera, Giovanni; Quirino, Angela; Giancotti, Aida; Pulicari, Maria Concetta; Rametti, Linda; Rodríguez, Maria Luz; Liberto, Maria Carla; Focà, Alfredo

    2012-05-08

    Procalcitonin (PCT) is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS), reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. PCT significantly decreased (p cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators.

  11. Immune cell activation and cytokine release after stimulation of whole blood with pneumococcal C-polysaccharide and capsular polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg-Kövamees, Marianne; Grunewald, Johan; Wahlström, Jan

    2016-11-01

    Streptococcus pneumonia is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children and adults worldwide. Lack of fully effective pneumococcal vaccines is a problem. Streptococcus pneumoniae exposes on its surface C-polysaccharide (cell wall polysaccharide, CWPS) and serospecific capsular polysaccharides, used in pneumococcal vaccines. We investigated the effect of CWPS and individual capsular polysaccharides, with regard to activation of subsets of immune cells of healthy controls. Three different capsular polysaccharides, CWPS and LPS were used for in vitro stimulation of whole blood. Cell activation (CD69 expression) was assessed in CD4+ and CD4- T cells, NK-like T cells, NK cells and monocytes by flow cytometry. Cytokine levels in supernatants were quantified by Cytometric Bead Array (CBA). CWPS and the capsules activated immune cell subsets, but to different degrees. NK cells and NK-like T cells showed the strongest activation, followed by monocytes. Among the three capsules, capsule type 23 induced the strongest activation and cytokine release, followed by type 9 and type 3. This study increases the understanding of how the human immune system reacts to pneumococcal vaccine components. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo release of bupivacaine from subcutaneously administered oily solution. Comparison with in vitro release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Dorrit Bjerg; Joergensen, Stig; Olsen, Niels Vidiendal

    2002-01-01

    administration of oily solution showed a prolonged bupivacaine release with lower peak plasma levels as compared to administration of an aqueous formulation applied in the same compartment. t(1/2), t(max), C(max) and AUC(0-infinity) for the aqueous solution were 63+/-8 min, 19+/-16 min, 194+/-46 ng x ml(-1...

  13. Reactive oxygen species mediate inflammatory cytokine release and EGFR-dependent mucin secretion in airway epithelial cells exposed to Pseudomonas pyocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rada, B; Gardina, P; Myers, T G; Leto, T L

    2011-03-01

    Despite the long-appreciated in vivo role of the redox-active virulence factor pyocyanin in Pseudomonas airway infections and the importance of airway epithelial cells in combating bacterial pathogens, little is known about pyocyanin's effect on airway epithelial cells. We find that exposure of bronchiolar epithelial cells to pyocyanin results in MUC2/MUC5AC induction and mucin secretion through release of inflammatory cytokines and growth factors (interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, heparin-bound epidermal growth factor, tissue growth factor-α, tumor necrosis factor-α) that activate the epidermal growth factor receptor pathway. These changes are mediated by reactive oxygen species produced by pyocyanin. Microarray analysis identified 286 pyocyanin-induced genes in airway epithelial cells, including many inflammatory mediators elevated in cystic fibrosis (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-monocyte CSF, chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CXCL1), serum amyloid, IL-23) and several novel pyocyanin-responsive genes of potential importance in the infection process (IL-24, CXCL2, CXCL3, CCL20, CXCR4). This comprehensive study uncovers numerous details of pyocyanin's proinflammatory action and establishes airway epithelial cells as key responders to this microbial toxin.

  14. Influence of in vivo hypobaric hypoxia on function of lymphocytes, neutrocytes, natural killer cells, and cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klokker, M; Kharazmi, A; Galbo, H

    1993-01-01

    We have investigated the effects of short-term hypoxia in vivo on the human cellular immune system. Seven young healthy volunteers were placed in a decompression chamber (380 Torr) for 20 min with or without supplemental O2. The leukocyte concentration increased during hypobaric conditions becaus...

  15. GABA receptors and benzodiazepine binding sites modulate hippocampal acetylcholine release in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moor, E; de Boer, P; Westerink, B.H.C.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, the regulation of acetylcholine release from the ventral hippocampus by gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) was investigated in vivo. GABA receptor agonists and antagonists were administered locally in the medial septum and the adjacent vertical limb of the diagonal band of Broca,

  16. In vivo measurement of the series elasticity release curve of human triceps surae muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hof, AL

    The force-extension characteristic of the series-elastic component of the human triceps surae muscle has been measured in vivo by means of a hydraulic controlled-release ergometer in 12 subjects. The SEC characteristic can be described by a linear relation between muscle moment and extension, with a

  17. In Vivo Release Kinetics and Antibacterial Activity of Novel Polyphenols-Enriched Chewing Gums

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianmaria Fabrizio Ferrazzano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Chewing gums may be particularly effective means for delivering and maintaining bioactive molecules, included in the gum formulation, able to have an anti-cariogenic effect. The purposes of this study were: to develop novel chewing gums containing quercetin (Qt; to evaluate their release using in vivo trial; finally, to test their in vivo antibacterial effect against oral Streptococcus mutans strains. A preliminary study was performed to produce new gums, enriched with the polyphenol quercetin. Then, a first in vivo experimental study was assessed to test the percentages of Qt released in the saliva of young volunteers. Moreover, a second clinical trial was performed to analyze the antibacterial capability of these enriched chewing gums against S. mutans strains after 14 days of daily consumption. The release analysis showed that a more effective release of Qt occurs in the first minutes of chewing, and it does not change saliva pH values. Moreover, Qt included in gums demonstrates an effective antibacterial activity, showing a reduction of the concentration of S. mutans strains in saliva samples, especially after 7 days. Qt included in experimental chewing gums could be efficiently released into the oral cavity and could promote an effective anti-caries concentration in volunteer’s saliva, without changing salivary pH values.

  18. Immunogenicity of intrathecal plasmid gene delivery: cytokine release and effects on transgene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Travis S.; Langer, Stephen J.; Virtanen, Salla I.; Chavez, Raymond A.; Watkins, Linda R.; Milligan, Erin D.; Leinwand, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Background One method for the delivery of therapeutic proteins to the spinal cord is to inject nonviral gene vectors including plasmid DNA into the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that surrounds the spinal cord (intrathecal space). This approach has produced therapeutic benefits in animal models of disease and several months of protein expression; however, there is little information available on the immune response to these treatments in the intrathecal space, the relevance of plasmid CpG sequences to any plasmid-induced immune response, or the effect of this immune response on transgene expression. Methods In the present study, coding or noncoding plasmids were delivered to the intrathecal space of the lumbar spinal region in rats. Lumbosacral CSF was then collected at various time points afterwards for monitoring of cytokines and transgene expression. Results This work demonstrates, for the first time, increased tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1 in response to intrathecal plasmid vector injection and provides evidence indicating that this response is largely absent in a CpG-depleted vector. Transgene expression in the CSF is not significantly affected by this immune response. Expression after intrathecal plasmid injection is variable across rats but correlates with the amount of tissue associated plasmid and is increased by disrupting normal CSF flow. Conclusions The data obtained in the present study indicate that plasmid immunogenicity may affect intrathecal plasmid gene therapy safety but not transgene expression in the CSF. Furthermore, the development of methods to prevent loss of plasmid via CSF flow out of the central nervous system through the injection hole and/or natural outflow routes may increase intrathecal plasmid gene delivery efficacy. PMID:19533588

  19. Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 modulates NOD2-induced cytokine release and autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne R Spalinger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Variations within the gene locus encoding protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22 are associated with the risk to develop inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. PTPN22 is involved in the regulation of T- and B-cell receptor signaling, but although it is highly expressed in innate immune cells, its function in other signaling pathways is less clear. Here, we study whether loss of PTPN22 controls muramyl-dipeptide (MDP-induced signaling and effects in immune cells. MATERIAL & METHODS: Stable knockdown of PTPN22 was induced in THP-1 cells by shRNA transduction prior to stimulation with the NOD2 ligand MDP. Cells were analyzed for signaling protein activation and mRNA expression by Western blot and quantitative PCR; cytokine secretion was assessed by ELISA, autophagosome induction by Western blot and immunofluorescence staining. Bone marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC were obtained from PTPN22 knockout mice or wild-type animals. RESULTS: MDP-treatment induced PTPN22 expression and activity in human and mouse cells. Knockdown of PTPN22 enhanced MDP-induced activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK-isoforms p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase as well as canonical NF-κB signaling molecules in THP-1 cells and BMDC derived from PTPN22 knockout mice. Loss of PTPN22 enhanced mRNA levels and secretion of interleukin (IL-6, IL-8 and TNF in THP-1 cells and PTPN22 knockout BMDC. Additionally, loss of PTPN22 resulted in increased, MDP-mediated autophagy in human and mouse cells. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that PTPN22 controls NOD2 signaling, and loss of PTPN22 renders monocytes more reactive towards bacterial products, what might explain the association of PTPN22 variants with IBD pathogenesis.

  20. Local inflammation, lethality and cytokine release in mice injected with Bothrops atrox venom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. F. Barros

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available We have provided evidence that: (a lethality of mice to crude Bothrops venom varies according the isogenic strain (A/J > C57Bl/6 > A/Sn > BALB/c > C3H/ HePas > DBA/2 > C3H/He; (bBALB/c mice (LD50=100.0 μg were injected i.p. with 50 μg of venom produced IL-6, IL-10, INF-γ, TNF-α and NO in the serum. In vitro the cells from the mice injected and challenged with the venom only released IL-10 while peritoneal macrophages released IL-10, INF-γ and less amounts of IL-6; (c establishment of local inflammation and necrosis induced by the venom, coincides with the peaks of TNF-α, IFN-γ and NO and the damage was neutralized when the venom was incubated with a monoclonal antibody against a 60 kDa haemorrhagic factor. These results suggest that susceptibility to Bothrops a trox venom is genetically dependent but MHC independent; that IL-6, IL10, TNF-α, IFN-γ and NO can be involved in the mediation of tissue damage; and that the major venom component inducers of the lesions are haemorrhagins.

  1. Bioanalytical Chemistry of Cytokines-A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenken, Julie A.; Poschenrieder, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Cytokines are bioactive proteins produced by many different cells of the immune system. Due to their role in different inflammatory disease states and maintaining homeostasis, there is enormous clinical interest in the quantitation of cytokines. The typical standard methods for quantitation of cytokines are immunoassay-based techniques including enzyme-linked immusorbent assays (ELISA) and bead-based immunoassays read by either standard or modified flow cytometers. A review of recent developments in analytical methods for measurements of cytokine proteins is provided. This review briefly covers cytokine biology and the analysis challenges associated with measurement of these biomarker proteins for understanding both health and disease. New techniques applied to immunoassay-based assays are presented along with the uses of aptamers, electrochemistry, mass spectrometry, optical resonator-based methods. Methods used for elucidating the release of cytokines from single cells as well as in vivo collection methods are described. PMID:25467452

  2. Human conjunctival epithelial cell responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF): signal transduction and release of proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, Najam A; Xu, Shouxi; Hellberg, Peggy E; Pang, Iok-Hou; Gamache, Daniel A; Yanni, John M

    2009-06-06

    The aims of the study were to characterize the signal transduction responses to platelet-activating factor (PAF) and to monitor the downstream effects of PAF on the production of proinflammatory cytokines in human conjunctival epithelial cells (HCECs). The generation of inositol phosphates ([(3)H]IPs) from [(3)H]phosphoinositide (PI) hydrolysis and the mobilization of intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) were evaluated using ion exchange chromatography and Fura-2 fluorescence techniques, respectively. The production of the cytokines (interleukin-6 [IL-6], interleukin-8 [IL-8], and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]) from PAF-stimulated HCECs was quantified using specific ELISA assays. Specific PAF antagonists were used to study the pharmacological aspects of PAF actions in HCECs. PAF (100 nM) maximally stimulated PI turnover in HCECs by 2.3+/-0.02 fold (n=21) above basal levels and with a potency (EC(50)) of 5.9+/-1.7 nM (n=4). PAF or its stabilized analog, methyl carbamyl (mc)PAF (EC(50)=0.8 nM), rapidly mobilized [Ca(2+)](i), which peaked within 30-60 s and remained elevated for 3 min. PAF (10 nM-1 microM) stimulated the release of the proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF, 1.4-3.5 fold above basal levels. The effects of PAF (100 nM) on PI turnover and [Ca(2+)](i) were potently antagonized by the PAF antagonists, 1-o-hexadecyl-2-o-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho (N,N,N-trimethyl) hexanolamine (IC(50)=0.69 microM; K(i)=38 nM), methyl 2-(phenylthio)ethyl-1,4-dihydro-2,4,6-trimethyl-pyridine-3,5-dicsrboxylate (PCA-42481; IC(50)=0.89 microM; K(i)=50 nM), rac-3-(N-octadecylcarbomoyl)-2-methoxy) propyl-(2-thiazolioethyl) phosphate (CV-3988; IC(50)=13 microM; K(i)=771 nM), and (+/-)-cis-3,5-dimethyl-2-(3-pyridyl)thiazolidin-4-one HCl (SM-10661; IC(50)=14 microM; K(i)=789 nM [n=3 for each antagonist]). PAF-induced production of IL-6, IL-8, and GM-CSF from HCECs was also blocked by these PAF antagonists (IC(50)=4.6- 8.6 microM). HCECs respond

  3. Bordetella Pertussis Toxin does not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human whole blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bache, Christina; Spreitzer, Ingo; Becker, Bjoern; Loeschner, Bettina; Rosskopf, Ute; Hanschmann, Kay-Martin; Schwanig, Michael; Schneider, Christian K; Lieb, Bernhard; Montag, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Pertussis Toxin (PTx) is one of the most important virulence factors of Bordetella pertussis, the cause of whooping cough. Therefore, the inactivated toxin is an obligatory constituent of acellular pertussis vaccines. It is described in the literature that both native PTx and recombinant Pertussis Toxin (PTg) activate human monocytes whereas others report an inhibition of mammalian monocytes during pertussis infection. B. pertussis, as a Gram-negative bacterium, harbours naturally lipopolysaccharide (LPS, also known as endotoxin), one of the strongest stimulators of monocytes. The latter is triggered via the interaction of endotoxin with inter alia the surface receptor CD14. Consequently, it is necessary to consider a potential contamination of Pertussis Toxin preparations with LPS. First, we determined the LPS content in different preparations of PTx and PTg. All preparations examined were contaminated with LPS; therefore, possible PTx- and PTg-driven monocyte activation independently of LPS was investigated. To meet these aims, we examined monocyte response to PTx and PTg while blocking the LPS receptor CD14 with a specific monoclonal antibody (anti-CD14 mAb). In addition, all toxin preparations examined underwent an LPS depletion. Our results show that it is contaminating LPS, not Pertussis Toxin, which activates human monocytes. Blocking the CD14 receptor prevents Pertussis Toxin-mediated induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human monocytes. The depletion of LPS from Pertussis Toxin leads to the same effect. Additionally, the PTx toxicity after LPS depletion procedure was confirmed by animal tests. In contrast, the original Pertussis Toxin preparations not treated as mentioned above generate strong monocyte activation. The results in this publication allow the conclusion that purified Pertussis Toxin preparations do not induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human whole blood.

  4. CD47 does not mediate amyloid-β(1-42) protofibril-stimulated microglial cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Sanjib; Nichols, Michael R

    2014-11-07

    Neuroinflammation triggered by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ) is a significant component of the Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain. Senile plaques composed of Aβ attract and activate microglia cells resulting in cytokine secretion and a proinflammatory environment. The mechanism by which Aβ activates microglia is complex and involves numerous cellular components. One receptor potentially involved in Aβ recognition and the ensuing microglia proinflammatory response is CD47. Since there is significant interest in soluble aggregated Aβ species, we sought to determine if CD47 plays a key role in microglia cytokine release stimulated by soluble Aβ(1-42) protofibrils. Pretreatment of primary murine microglia with the CD47 antagonist peptide 4N1K significantly and potently inhibited both tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) secretion stimulated by Aβ(1-42) protofibrils. 4N1K displayed toxicity to the microglia but only at concentrations much higher than the observed inhibition. Surprisingly, 4N1K also potently inhibited TNFα secretion triggered by lipopolysaccharide which is not known to signal through CD47. Treatment of the microglia with a neutralizing anti-CD47 antibody failed to block the Aβ protofibril response even though comparable samples were completely inhibited by 4N1K. Finally, Aβ(1-42) protofibrils stimulated similar levels of secreted TNFα production in both wild-type and CD47(-/-) microglia and 4N1K still potently inhibited the Aβ protofibril response even in the CD47(-/-) microglia. The overall findings demonstrated that the microglial proinflammatory response to Aβ(1-42) protofibril is not dependent on CD47 and that 4N1K exhibits CD47-independent inhibitory activity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Transdermal delivery of oleanolic acid attenuates pro-inflammatory cytokine release and ameliorates anaemia in P. berghei malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibiya, Happiness; Musabayane, Cephas T; Mabandla, Musa V

    2017-07-01

    Malaria remains a major health problem in many tropical areas. Severe malaria infection is associated with secondary complications including anaemia leading to a need for the search of affordable antimalarial agents that can clear the parasitaemia and ameliorate anaemia during infection. The current study investigated the effects of transdermally delivered OA on malaria parasites, HCT and selected plasma cytokine concentrations in P. berghei-infected male Sprague-Dawley rats. The study was carried out over a period of 21days, divided into pre-treatment (day 0-7), treatment (day 8-12) and post-treatment (day 13-21) periods. Parasitaemia, HCT, RBC count, Hgb, plasma TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 concentrations were monitored in non-infected and infected rats following a once-off application of an OA-pectin patch (34mg/kg). Animals treated with drug-free pectin and CHQ (30mg/kg, p.o) twice daily for 5 consecutive days acted as negative and positive controls respectively. Infected control animals exhibited increased percentage parasitaemia, TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and a reduction in HCT. Interestingly, OA-pectin patch application cleared the malaria parasites and increased HCT values back to normalcy. Furthermore, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 were reduced by day 12 of the study. These findings suggest that the OA-pectin patch delivers therapeutic doses of OA which are able to attenuate cytokine release and ameliorate anaemia during malaria infection. Therefore, transdermally delivered OA may be a potent therapeutic agent for malaria and amelioration of anaemia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Preparation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of esomeprazole magnesium-modified release pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kan, Shu-Ling; Lu, Jing; Liu, Jian-Ping; Zhao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To reduce the drug plasma concentration fluctuation without being destroyed by gastric fluid, novel Esomeprazole magnesium modified-release pellets (EMZ-MRPs) with suitable in vitro release profiles and good in vitro and in vivo correlation (IVIVC) were developed. Fluid-bed was used to obtain EMZ-loaded pellets by spraying drug suspension onto blank sugar pellets. The drug-loaded pellets were subsequently coated with Eudragit® RS30D/RL30D (ERS/ERL) aqueous dispersion to achieve sustained-release (SR) characteristics. Furthermore, the SR pellets were coated with Eudragit® L30D-55 (EL-55) aqueous dispersion to achieve enteric properties. Besides, isolated coating film was necessary between drug layer and SR layer, as well as SR and enteric-coated layer to protect from their possible reaction. The resulting pellets were filled into the hard gelatin capsules for in vitro release processing and single-dose pharmacokinetic study in rats. The optimal formulation achieved good SR feature both in vitro and in vivo with a relative bioavailability of 103.50%. A good IVIVC was characterized by a high coefficient of determination (r = 0.9945) by deconvolution method. Compared to those of EMZ enteric-coated pellets (EMZ-ECPs, trade name NEXIUM), the in vivo study make known that the EMZ-MRPs with decreased maximum plasma concentration (Cmax), prolonged peak concentration time (Tmax) and mean residence time (MRT), and similar values both area under concentration-time curve from 0 to t (AUC0-t) and 0 to infinity (AUC0-∞). Collectively, these results manifested EMZ-MRPs had a satisfactory sustained-release behavior, a desired pharmacokinetic property, improved in vivo retention and decreased plasma drug concentration fluctuation.

  7. Release of rosmarinic acid from semisolid formulations and its penetration through human skin ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelmakienė Ada

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the release of rosmarinic acid (RA from the experimental topical formulations with the Melissa officinalis L. extract and to evaluate its penetration through undamaged human skin ex vivo. The results of the in vitro release study showed that higher amounts of RA were released from the emulsion vehicle when lemon balm extract was added in its dry form. An inverse correlation was detected between the released amount of RA and the consistency index of the formulation. Different penetration of RA into the skin may be influenced by the characteristics of the vehicle as well as by the form of the extract. The results of penetration assessment showed that the intensity of RA penetration was influenced by its lipophilic properties: RA was accumulating in the epidermis, while the dermis served as a barrier, impeding its deeper penetration.

  8. EGFR or HER2 inhibition modulates the tumor microenvironment by suppression of PD-L1 and cytokines release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Koung Jin; Sung, Ji Hea; Kim, Jin Won; Han, Song-Hee; Lee, Hye Seung; Min, Ahrum; Kang, Mi Hyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Ji-Won; Kim, Se Hyun; Lee, Jeong-Ok; Kim, Yu Jung; Lee, Keun-Wook; Kim, Jee Hyun; Bang, Soo-Mee; Im, Seock-Ah; Lee, Jong Seok

    2017-09-08

    Characteristics of tumor microenvironment have been suggested as predictive markers of anti-EGFR or anti-HER2 treatment response. However, the effect of EGFR/HER2 signal blockade on the tumor immune microenvironment is unclear. EGFR/HER2 pathway signaling and PD-L1 expression in gastric cancer cell lines were screened by western blot analysis. PD-L1 and HER2 expressions in 251 resected gastric tumors were determined by immunohistochemistry, and changes in EFGR, HER2, and PD-L1 expression in paired specimens between pre- and post-chemotherapy were evaluated. PD-L1 expression in HER2-amplified cell lines was evaluated by western blotting, fluorescence-activated cell sorting, reverse transcription, and real-time quantitative PCR analyses before and after afatinib, lapatinib, pictilisib and trametinib treatment. Changes in cytokines were evaluated by reverse transcription, real-time quantitative PCR, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay after EGFR/HER2 inhibition. Cell lines with pEGFR or pHER2 overexpression showed higher PD-L1 expression. In resected gastric tumors, HER2 expression was significantly associated with PD-L1 expression ( p =0.030). PD-L1 overexpression accompanied by increased HER2 expression was identified in a post-chemotherapy specimen from a patient with an initial HER2/PD-L1-negative tumor. In HER2-overexpressing cell lines, PD-L1 expression was decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after afatinib and lapatinib treatment. PI3K pathway inhibition by pictilisib, but not MEK pathway inhibition by trametinib, resulted in PD-L1 suppression. After lapatinib treatment, the release of CCL2, CCL21, VEGF and CXCL1 decreased in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibition of the EGFR/HER2 signaling pathway, particularly of downstream PI3K activity, suppressed PD-L1 and release of cytokines, suggesting that EGFR/HER2 inhibition may create a more favorable milieu for tumor immunotherapy.

  9. VEGF-releasing suture material for enhancement of vascularization: development, in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigalke, Christian; Luderer, Frank; Wulf, Katharina; Storm, Thilo; Löbler, Marian; Arbeiter, Daniela; Rau, Bettina M; Nizze, Horst; Vollmar, Brigitte; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Klar, Ernst; Sternberg, Katrin

    2014-12-01

    As it has been demonstrated that bioactive substances can be delivered locally using coated surgical suture materials, the authors developed a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-releasing suture material that should promote vascularization and potentially wound healing. In this context, the study focused on the characterization of the developed suture material and the verification of its biological activity, as well as establishing a coating process that allows reproducible and stable coating of a commercially available polydioxanone suture material with poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) and 0.1μg and 1.0μg VEGF. The in vitro VEGF release kinetics was studied using a Sandwich ELISA. The biological activity of the released VEGF was investigated in vitro using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The potential of the VEGF-releasing suture material was also studied in vivo 5days after implantation in the hind limb of Wistar rats, when the histological findings were analyzed. The essential results, enhanced cell viability in vitro as well as significantly increased vascularization in vivo, were achieved using PLLA/1.0μg VEGF-coated suture material. Furthermore, ELISA measurements revealed a high reproducibility of the VEGF release behavior. Based on the results achieved regarding the dose-effect relationship of VEGF, the stability during its processing and the release behavior, it can be predicted that a bioactive suture material would be successful in later in vivo studies. Therefore, this knowledge could be the basis for future studies, where bioactive substances with different modes of action are combined for targeted, overall enhancement of wound healing. Copyright © 2014 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Confirmation of high cytokine clearance by hemofiltration with a cellulose triacetate membrane with large pores: an in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delanaye, P; Lambermont, B; Dogné, J-M; Dubois, B; Ghuysen, A; Janssen, N; Desaive, T; Kolh, P; D'Orio, V; Krzesinski, J-M

    2006-10-01

    To confirm in vivo the hypothesis that hemofiltration with a large pore membrane can achieve significant cytokine clearance. We used a well-known animal model of endotoxinic shock (0.5 mg/kg of lipopolysaccharide from Escherichia Coli over a period of 30 mins). Six pigs were hemofiltrated for 3 hours with a large pore membrane (78 A pore, 80 kDa cut off) (Sureflux FH 70, Nipro, Osaka, Japan). The ultrafiltration rate was 45 ml/kg/min. Samples were taken from arterial, venous line and in the ultrafiltrate at T120 and T240. We measured concentrations of interleukin 6, interleukin 10 and albumin. At T120 and T240, the IL-6 clearances were 22 +/- 7 and 15 +/- 3 ml/min, respectively. The IL-6 sieving coefficients were 0.97 and 0.7 at T120 and T240, respectively. At T120 and T240, the IL-10 clearances were 14 +/- 4 and 10 +/- 7 ml/min, respectively. The sieving coefficients were 0.63 and 0.45 at T120 and T240, respectively. The concentrations of IL-6 and IL-10 were the same at T0 and T240. At T60 and T240, the plasmatic albumin concentrations were 24 +/- 4 g/L and 23 +/- 4 g/L, respectively (p = 0.13). In this animal model of endotoxinic shock, we confirm the high cytokine clearance observed when hemofiltration is applied to a large pore membrane. The loss of albumin seems negligible. The impact of such clearances on hemodynamic stability and survival remains to be proved.

  11. In vivo measurement of somatodendritic release of dopamine in the ventral tegmental area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kita, Justin M; Kile, Brian M; Parker, Lauren E; Wightman, R Mark

    2009-11-01

    The ventral tegmental area (VTA), the locus of mesolimbic dopamine cell bodies, contains dopamine. Experiments in brain slices have demonstrated that VTA dopamine can be released by local electrical stimulation. Measurements with both push-pull cannula and microdialysis in intact animals have also obtained evidence for releasable dopamine. Here we demonstrate that dopamine release in the VTA can be evoked by remote stimulations of the medial forebrain bundle (MFB) in the anesthetized rat. In initial experiments, the MFB was electrically stimulated while a carbon-fiber electrode was lowered to the VTA, with recording by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. While release was not observed with the carbon fiber 4-6 mm below dura, a voltammetric response was observed at 6-8 mm below dura, but the voltammogram was poorly defined. At lower depths, in the VTA, dopamine release was evoked. Immunohistochemistry experiments with antibodies for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) confirmed that dopamine processes were primarily found below 8 mm. Similarly, tissue content determined by liquid chromatography revealed serotonin but not dopamine dorsal to 8 mm with both dopamine and serotonin at lower depths. Evaluation of the VTA signal by pharmacological means showed that it increased with inhibitors of dopamine uptake, but release was not altered by D2 agents. Dopamine release in the VTA was frequency dependent and could be exhausted by stimulations longer than 5 s. Thus, VTA dopamine release can be evoked in vivo by remote stimulations and it resembles release in terminal regions, possessing a similar uptake mechanism and a finite releasable storage pool.

  12. Synaptic vesicle release regulates myelin sheath number of individual oligodendrocytes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensch, Sigrid; Baraban, Marion; Almeida, Rafael; Czopka, Tim; Ausborn, Jessica; El Manira, Abdeljabbar; Lyons, David A

    2015-05-01

    The myelination of axons by oligodendrocytes markedly affects CNS function, but how this is regulated by neuronal activity in vivo is not known. We found that blocking synaptic vesicle release impaired CNS myelination by reducing the number of myelin sheaths made by individual oligodendrocytes during their short period of formation. We also found that stimulating neuronal activity increased myelin sheath formation by individual oligodendrocytes. These data indicate that neuronal activity regulates the myelinating capacity of single oligodendrocytes.

  13. Pegylated interferons Lambda-1a and alfa-2a display different gene induction and cytokine and chemokine release profiles in whole blood, human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, J; Baglino, S; Friborg, J; Kraft, Z; Gray, T; Hill, M; McPhee, F; Hillson, J; Lopez-Talavera, J C; Wind-Rotolo, M

    2014-06-01

    Pegylated interferon-lambda-1a (Lambda), a type III interferon (IFN) in clinical development for the treatment of chronic HCV infection, has shown comparable efficacy and an improved safety profile to a regimen based on pegylated IFN alfa-2a (alfa). To establish a mechanistic context for this improved profile, we investigated the ex vivo effects of Lambda and alfa on cytokine and chemokine release, and on expression of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in primary human hepatocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy subjects. Our findings were further compared with changes observed in blood analysed from HCV-infected patients treated with Lambda or alfa in clinical studies. mRNA transcript and protein expression of the IFN-λ-limiting receptor subunit was lower compared with IFN-α receptor subunits in all cell types. Upon stimulation, alfa and Lambda induced ISG expression in hepatocytes and PBMCs, although in PBMCs Lambda-induced ISG expression was modest. Furthermore, alfa and Lambda induced release of cytokines and chemokines from hepatocytes and PBMCs, although differences in their kinetics of induction were observed. In HCV-infected patients, alfa treatment induced ISG expression in whole blood after single and repeat dosing. Lambda treatment induced modest ISG expression after single dosing and showed no induction after repeat dosing. Alfa and Lambda treatment increased IP-10, iTAC, IL-6, MCP-1 and MIP-1β levels in serum, with alfa inducing higher levels of all mediators compared with Lambda. Overall, ex vivo and in vivo induction profiles reported in this analysis strongly correlate with clinical observations of fewer related adverse events for Lambda vs those typically associated with alfa. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Comparative effects of pesticides on in vivo dopamine release in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faro, Lilian R F; Alfonso, Miguel; Cervantes, Rosa; Durán, Rafael

    2009-12-01

    The effects of different types of pesticides on the in vivo striatal dopamine release were investigated by using in vivo brain microdialysis technique. MPTP, paraquat, maneb, dicofol, DDT, lindane and flutriafol (1 mM) were administered directly into the striatum, and levels of dopamine and its metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovallinic acid (HVA) were measured using HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of pesticides induced the following maximal effects on the dopamine levels: maneb 791 +/- 87%, dicofol 101 +/- 1%, DDT 779 +/- 32%, paraquat 956 +/- 80%, lindane 281 +/- 28% and flutriafol 218 +/- 51% with respect to basal levels. Infusion of pesticides also produced alterations in extracellular DOPAC and HVA levels. A comparative scale of potency was developed to estimate the relative potency of pesticides to induce striatal dopamine release in vivo, using the same concentration and experimental conditions. According to this comparative scale of potency, paraquat is 10 times more potent (in a scale of 10) than dicofol, which did not induce any effect on dopamine release. The second more potent pesticide is maneb, followed by DDT, the organochlorine which has the highest potential to produce alterations on dopaminergic neurotransmission; flutriafol and the organochlorine lindane produced moderate increases in dopamine levels. These results suggest that different classes of pesticides, with different structures and biochemical activities, may affect the striatal dopaminergic system differently, inducing neurotoxicity.

  15. In vivo aging of orthodontic alloys: implications for corrosion potential, nickel release, and biocompatibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliades, Theodore; Athanasiou, Athanasios E

    2002-06-01

    Despite the large number of studies investigating nickel release from orthodontic stainless steel and nickel-titanium alloys, there is a lack of conclusive evidence with respect to the composition and kinetics of the corrosive products released. The objective of this review is to address the critical issues of corrosion potential and nickel leaching from alloys by investigating the effect of intraoral conditions on the surface reactivity of the materials. After an overview of fundamentals of metallurgical structure of orthodontic alloys, we provide an analysis of corrosion processes occurring in vivo. We present recent evidence suggesting the formation of a proteinaceous biofilm on retrieved orthodontic materials that later undergoes calcification. We illustrate the vastly irrelevant surface structure of in vivo- vs in vitro-aged alloys and discuss the potential implications of this pattern in the reactivity of the materials. Finally, we present a comprehensive review of the issue of nickel release, based on three perspectives: its biologic effects, the methods used for studying its release, and nickel-induced hypersensitivity in orthodontic patients.

  16. Controlled release of dutasteride from biodegradable microspheres: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyang Xie

    Full Text Available The aim of the present work was to study the in vitro/in vivo characteristics of dutasteride loaded biodegradable microspheres designed for sustained release of dutasteride over four weeks. An O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method was used to incorporate dutasteride, which is of interest in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH, into poly(lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA. A response surface method (RSM with central composite design (CCD was employed to optimize the formulation variables. A prolonged in vitro drug release profile was observed, with a complete release of the entrapped drug within 28 days. The pharmacokinetics study showed sustained plasma drug concentration-time profile of dutasteride loaded microspheres after subcutaneous injection into rats. The in vitro drug release in rats correlated well with the in vivo pharmacokinetics profile. The pharmacodynamics evaluated by determination of the BPH inhibition in the rat models also showed a prolonged pharmacological response. These results suggest the potential use of dutasteride loaded biodegradable microspheres for the management of BPH over long periods.

  17. Biointerfacing polymeric microcapsules for in vivo near-infrared light-triggered drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingxin; Xuan, Mingjun; Si, Tieyan; Dai, Luru; He, Qiang

    2015-11-01

    Seeking safe and effective water-soluble drug carriers is of great significance in nanomedicine. To achieve this goal, we present a novel drug delivery system based on biointerfacing hollow polymeric microcapsules for effectively encapsulating water-soluble antitumor drug and gold nanorod (GNR) functionalization for triggered release of therapeutic drugs on-demand using low power near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The surface of polymeric microcapsules is covered with fluidic lipid bilayers to decrease the permeability of the wall of polymeric capsules. The temperature increase upon NIR illumination deconstructs the structure of the lipid membrane and polyelectrolyte multilayers, which in turn results in the rapid release of encapsulated water-soluble drug. In vivo antitumor tests demonstrate that this microcapsule has the effective ability of inhibiting tumor growth and preventing metastases. Real time in vivo fluorescence imaging results confirm that capsules can be excreted gradually from the animal body which in turn demonstrates the biocompatibility and biodegradation of these biointerfacing GNR-microcapsules. This intelligent system provides a novel anticancer platform with the advantages of controlled release, biological friendliness and credible biosafety.Seeking safe and effective water-soluble drug carriers is of great significance in nanomedicine. To achieve this goal, we present a novel drug delivery system based on biointerfacing hollow polymeric microcapsules for effectively encapsulating water-soluble antitumor drug and gold nanorod (GNR) functionalization for triggered release of therapeutic drugs on-demand using low power near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The surface of polymeric microcapsules is covered with fluidic lipid bilayers to decrease the permeability of the wall of polymeric capsules. The temperature increase upon NIR illumination deconstructs the structure of the lipid membrane and polyelectrolyte multilayers, which in turn results in the rapid

  18. Expansion and homing of adoptively transferred human natural killer cells in immunodeficient mice varies with product preparation and in vivo cytokine administration: implications for clinical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeffrey S; Rooney, Cliona M; Curtsinger, Julie; McElmurry, Ron; McCullar, Valarie; Verneris, Michael R; Lapteva, Natalia; McKenna, David; Wagner, John E; Blazar, Bruce R; Tolar, Jakub

    2014-08-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell efficacy correlates with in vivo proliferation, and we hypothesize that NK cell product manipulations may optimize this endpoint. Xenotransplantation was used to compare good manufacturing practice (GMP) grade freshly activated NK cells (FA-NK) and ex vivo expanded NK cells (Ex-NK). Cells were infused into NOD scid IL2 receptor gamma chain knockout (NSG) mice followed by IL-2, IL-15, or no cytokines. Evaluation of blood, spleen, and marrow showed that persistence and expansion was cytokine dependent, IL-15 being superior to IL-2. Cryopreservation and immediate infusion resulted in less cytotoxicity and fewer NK cells in vivo, and this could be rescued in FA-NK by overnight culture and testing the next day. Marked differences in the kinetics and homing of FA-NK versus Ex-NK were apparent: FA-NK cells preferentially homed to spleen and persisted longer after cytokine withdrawal. These data suggest that cryopreservation of FA-NK and Ex-NK is detrimental and that culture conditions profoundly affect homing, persistence, and expansion of NK cells in vivo. The NSG mouse model is an adjuvant to in vitro assays before clinical testing. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of Sanguis draconis (a dragon's blood resin) on streptozotocin- and cytokine-induced β-cell damage, in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Chien-Ming; Li, Joe-Sharg; Cheah, Khoot-Peng; Lin, Che-Wei; Yu, Wen-Yu; Chang, Ming-Long; Yeh, Geng-Chang; Chen, Sheng-Hsuan; Cheng, Hui-Wen; Choy, Cheuk-Sing

    2011-12-01

    The study was to examine the effects of Sanguis draconis ethanol extract (SDEE) on streptozotocin (STZ)- and cytokine-induced β-cell damage. In vitro, SDEE did not cause cytotoxicity below 200 μg/ml, and can prevent STZ (5mM)-induced cell death and apoptosis below 100 μg/ml on RIN-m5F cells. SDEE inhibits IL-1β/IFN-γ-stimulated NO, TNF-α release, and iNOS expression. Furthermore, SDEE suppressed the IL-1β/IFN-γ- or STZ-induced p65 expression of NF-κB, which is associated with inhibition of IκB-α degradation. In vivo, treatment of ICR mice with STZ (100 mg/kg, i.p. single injection) resulted in hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia, which was further evidenced by blood glucose and plasma insulin. The diabetogenic effects of STZ were completely prevented when mice were orally administered with SDEE for 3 weeks, however, the blood glucose and plasma insulin showed no significant change after SDEE administration alone. In addition, SDEE also can inhibit STZ-induced iNOS protein expression, pancreatic injury and lipid peroxidation. In conclusions, the molecular mechanism by which SDEE inhibits iNOS gene expression appears to involve the inhibition of NF-κB activation. These results suggest the possible therapeutic value of S. draconis and could be potentially developed into a novel drug for preventing the progression of diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In-vitro/In-vivo comparison of leuprolide acetate release from an in-situ forming plga system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashayekhi, Roya; Mobedi, Hamid; Najafi, Jamal; Enayati, Marjan

    2013-07-15

    A poly (lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) implant was used to control the release profile of leuprolide acetate (LA) drug. The system is an in-situ polymeric precipitation system. And the formulation consisted of PLGA polymer, LA drug and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidon solvent with no additives. First, the formulation was injected into PBS solution for in-vitro studies and then it was administered to the animal models (female rats) for in-vivo release studies. The release profiles of leuprolide acetate were measured by UV spectrophotometry for a period of 28 days. The initial burst release of LA was 14% in in-vitro whereas it was 7% in in-vivo. In-vitro and in-vivo release profiles of LA had similar trends after 72 hours. However, the rate of LA release was slower in-vivo. This might be attributed to the limited diffusion process of solvent and the drug molecules. This could be due to presence of an additional pressure caused by the surrounding tissue and also the presence of small amount of water between cells in the subcutaneous site. Cross-section and surface of the implants were studied via scanning electron microscopy. Morphology of both in-vitro and in-vivo implants confirmed the release behaviours. No toxicity effects were reported in the histopathological assay. Furthermore, the pharmacological analysis showed more inactive ovaries due to release of LA.

  1. In-vitro/In-vivo Comparison of Leuprolide Acetate Release from an in-situ Forming Plga System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roya Mashayekhi

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available A poly (lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA implant was used to control the release profile of leuprolide acetate (LA drug. The system is an in-situ polymeric precipitation system. And the formulation consisted of PLGA polymer, LA drug and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidon solvent with no additives. First, the formulation was injected into PBS solution for in-vitro studies and then it was administered to the animal models (female rats for in-vivo release studies. The release profiles of leuprolide acetate were measured by UV spectrophotometry for a period of 28 days. The initial burst release of LA was 14% in in-vitro whereas it was 7% in in-vivo. In-vitro and in-vivo release profiles of LA had similar trends after 72 hours. However, the rate of LA release was slower in-vivo. This might be attributed to the limited diffusion process of solvent and the drug molecules. This could be due to presence of an additional pressure caused by the surrounding tissue and also the presence of small amount of water between cells in the subcutaneous site. Cross-section and surface of the implants were studied via scanning electron microscopy. Morphology of both in-vitro and in-vivo implants confirmed the release behaviours. No toxicity effects were reported in the histopathological assay. Furthermore, the pharmacological analysis showed more inactive ovaries due to release of LA.

  2. Subcutaneous adipose tissue from obese and lean adults does not release hepcidin in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tussing-Humphreys, Lisa; Frayn, Keith N; Smith, Steven R; Westerman, Mark; Dennis, A Louise; Nemeth, Elizabeta; Thomson, Jessica; Pusatcioglu, Cenk

    2011-01-01

    Hepcidin is the main regulator of systemic iron homeostasis and is primarily produced by the liver but is also expressed, at the mRNA-level, in periphery tissues including the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. Obesity is associated with elevated hepcidin concentrations and iron depletion suggesting that the exaggerated fat mass in obesity could contribute significantly to circulating hepcidin levels consequently altering iron homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine if abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AbScAT) releases hepcidin in vivo and if release is modified by obesity. Arterio-venous differences in concentrations of hepcidin were measured across AbScAT in 9 obese and 9 lean adults. Overall (n = 18), mean plasma hepcidin concentrations were significantly higher in arterialized compared to AbScAT venous samples [mean difference (arterialized-AbScAT venous plasma hepcidin) = 4.9 ± 9.6 ng/mL, P = 0.04]. Net regional release was not calculated because mean venous plasma hepcidin concentrations were lower than mean arterialized concentrations indicating no net release. Significant correlations between AbScAT venous and arterialized plasma hepcidin concentrations with anthropometric variables were not observed. Findings from this vein drainage study suggest there is no net release of hepcidin from the AbScAT depot and thereby no ability to signal systemically, even in obesity.

  3. Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue from Obese and Lean Adults Does Not Release Hepcidin In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Tussing-Humphreys

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepcidin is the main regulator of systemic iron homeostasis and is primarily produced by the liver but is also expressed, at the mRNA-level, in periphery tissues including the subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue. Obesity is associated with elevated hepcidin concentrations and iron depletion suggesting that the exaggerated fat mass in obesity could contribute significantly to circulating hepcidin levels consequently altering iron homeostasis. The objective of this study was to determine if abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (AbScAT releases hepcidin in vivo and if release is modified by obesity. Arterio-venous differences in concentrations of hepcidin were measured across AbScAT in 9 obese and 9 lean adults. Overall (n=18, mean plasma hepcidin concentrations were significantly higher in arterialized compared to AbScAT venous samples [mean difference (arterialized-AbScAT venous plasma hepcidin = 4.9±9.6 ng/mL, P=0.04]. Net regional release was not calculated because mean venous plasma hepcidin concentrations were lower than mean arterialized concentrations indicating no net release. Significant correlations between AbScAT venous and arterialized plasma hepcidin concentrations with anthropometric variables were not observed. Findings from this vein drainage study suggest there is no net release of hepcidin from the AbScAT depot and thereby no ability to signal systemically, even in obesity.

  4. Sustained release donepezil loaded PLGA microspheres for injection: Preparation, in vitro and in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjia Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to develop a PLGA microspheres-based donepezil (DP formulation which was expected to sustain release of DP for one week with high encapsulation efficiency (EE. DP derived from donepezil hydrochloride was encapsulated in PLGA microspheres by the O/W emulsion-solvent evaporation method. The optimized formulation which avoided the crushing of microspheres during the preparation process was characterized in terms of particle size, morphology, drug loading and EE, physical state of DP in the matrix and in vitro and in vivo release behavior. DP microspheres were prepared successfully with average diameter of 30 µm, drug loading of 15.92 ± 0.31% and EE up to 78.79 ± 2.56%. Scanning electron microscope image showed it has integrated spherical shape with no drug crystal and porous on its surface. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction results suggested DP was in amorphous state or molecularly dispersed in microspheres. The Tg of PLGA was increased with the addition of DP. The release profile in vitro was characterized with slow but continuous release that lasted for about one week and fitted well with first-order model, which suggested the diffusion governing release mechanism. After single-dose administration of DP microspheres via subcutaneous injection in rats, the plasma concentration of DP reached peak concentration at 0.50 d, and then declined gradually, but was still detectable at 15 d. A good correlation between in vitro and in vivo data was obtained. The results suggest the potential use of DP microspheres for treatment of Alzheimer's disease over long periods.

  5. Preparation, Characterization and in vivo Evaluation of Simple Monolithic Ethylcellulose-coated Pellets Containing Topiramate with Biphasic Release Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Wei; Wang, Yuli; Shao, Shuai; Xie, Si; Shan, Li; Yang, Meiyan; Gao, Chunsheng; Zhong, Wu

    2016-01-01

    In our previous study, polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) was used both as a binder and a pore-former to prepare ethylcellulose (EC)-coated pellets to deliver topiramate (TPM) for a controlled release profile. The objective of this work was to further optimize the formulation and evaluate the in vivo profiles of TPM sustained-release pellets. Similar to the previous formulation with no binder, the in vitro drug release of TPM sustained-release pellets with 50% PVP binder in drug layer was sensitive to pore-former PVP level ranged from 27.0% to 29.0%. The higher the level of PVP was, the quicker release rate in vitro was. Moreover, when the proportion of poreformer PVP decreased, the Cmax decreased, and the tmax and mean residence time of TPM coated pellets were both prolonged. The in vitro release profile of optimal formulation showed biphasic release characteristics similar to reference formulation Trokendi XR(®), i.e., involving immediate release of TPM in initial release stage followed by a sustained release up to 24 h. Moreover, the impact of the pH of release medium on the drug release rate of TPM sustained-release pellets was not significant. The release mechanism of TPM from the sustained-release pellets might be the interaction of diffusion (coating-film) and corrosion (drug layer). The in vivo pharmacokinetics results showed the TPM sustained-release pellets had the similar in vivo pattern compared with Trokendi XR(®). These studies provide valuable basis for further development of TPM sustained-release pellets.

  6. Biointerfacing polymeric microcapsules for in vivo near-infrared light-triggered drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jingxin; Xuan, Mingjun; Si, Tieyan; Dai, Luru; He, Qiang

    2015-12-07

    Seeking safe and effective water-soluble drug carriers is of great significance in nanomedicine. To achieve this goal, we present a novel drug delivery system based on biointerfacing hollow polymeric microcapsules for effectively encapsulating water-soluble antitumor drug and gold nanorod (GNR) functionalization for triggered release of therapeutic drugs on-demand using low power near-infrared (NIR) radiation. The surface of polymeric microcapsules is covered with fluidic lipid bilayers to decrease the permeability of the wall of polymeric capsules. The temperature increase upon NIR illumination deconstructs the structure of the lipid membrane and polyelectrolyte multilayers, which in turn results in the rapid release of encapsulated water-soluble drug. In vivo antitumor tests demonstrate that this microcapsule has the effective ability of inhibiting tumor growth and preventing metastases. Real time in vivo fluorescence imaging results confirm that capsules can be excreted gradually from the animal body which in turn demonstrates the biocompatibility and biodegradation of these biointerfacing GNR-microcapsules. This intelligent system provides a novel anticancer platform with the advantages of controlled release, biological friendliness and credible biosafety.

  7. Evaluation of a topical herbal drug for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatt, Vaibhav D.; Shah, Tejas M.; Nauriyal, Dev S.; Kunjadia, Anju P.; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-01-01

    Background: Antibiotics have been in use in the treatment of bovine mastitis since decades; however, their use is associated with cost issues and human health concern. Use of herbal drugs does not generally carry these disadvantages. Many plants/herbs have been evaluated in the treatment of bovine mastitis with additional property of immunomodulation in affected mammary gland. Aim: To evaluate a topical herbal drug in two breeds of cattle for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines p...

  8. Ethanol inhibits LPS-induced signaling and modulates cytokine production in peritoneal macrophages in vivo in a model for binge drinking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pruett Stephen B

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous reports indicate that ethanol, in a binge drinking model in mice, inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines in vivo. However, the inhibition of signaling through TLR4 has not been investigated in this experimental model in vivo. Considering evidence that signaling can be very different in vitro and in vivo, the present study was conducted to determine if effects of ethanol on TLR4 signaling reported for cells in culture or cells removed from ethanol treated mice and stimulated in culture also occur when ethanol treatment and TLR4 activation occur in vivo. Results Phosphorylated p38, ERK, and c-Jun (nuclear were quantified with kits or by western blot using samples taken 15, 30, and 60 min after stimulation of peritoneal macrophages with lipopolysaccharide in vivo. Effects of ethanol were assessed by administering ethanol by gavage at 6 g/kg 30 min before administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Cytokine concentrations in the samples of peritoneal lavage fluid and in serum were determined at 1, 2, and 6 hr after lipopolysaccharide administration. All of these data were used to measure the area under the concentration vs time curve, which provided an indication of the overall effects of ethanol in this system. Ethanol suppressed production of most pro-inflammatory cytokines to a similar degree as it inhibited key TLR4 signaling events. However, NF-κB (p65 translocation to the nucleus was not inhibited by ethanol. To determine if NF-κB composed of other subunits was inhibited, transgenic mice with a luciferase reporter were used. This revealed a reproducible inhibition of NF-κB activity, which is consistent with the observed inhibition of cytokines whose expression is known to be NF-κB dependent. Conclusion Overall, the effects of ethanol on signalling in vivo were similar to those reported for in vitro exposure to ethanol and/or lipopolysaccharide. However, inhibition of the activation of NF-κB was

  9. Aroma release and retronasal perception during and after consumption of flavored whey protein gels with different textures. 1. in vivo release analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestres, Montserrat; Moran, Noelia; Jordan, Alfons; Buettner, Andrea

    2005-01-26

    The influence of gel texture on retronasal aroma release during mastication was followed by means of real-time proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry and compared to sensory perception of overall aroma intensity. A clear correlation was found between individual-specific consumption patterns and the respective physicochemical release patterns in vivo. A modified data analysis approach was used to monitor the aroma changes during the mastication process. It was found that the temporal resolution of the release profile played an important role in adequate description of the release processes. On the basis of this observation, a hypothesis is presented for the observed differences in intensity rating.

  10. Evaluation of the Doxycycline Release from AH26 Sealer-Doxycycline Combination: An ex vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Ashofteh Yazdi, Kazem; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Moazeni, Esmaeil; Mirzayi Rad, Sina

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The purpose of this ex vivo study was to determine the releasing characteristics and doxycycline dentinal diffusion of AH26 sealer-doxycycline combination from apical 3mm of tooth root and apical foramen. MATERIALS AND METHODS One-hundred and two recently extracted single-rooted human teeth were decoronated and prepared with #3 and #4 Gates-Glidden drills and rotary Mtwo files. Smear layer was removed; all surfaces except for apical 3mm of each root were sealed with two coats of ...

  11. Formulation and in vivo evaluation of diclofenac sodium sustained release matrix tablet: effect of compression force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Ehab Ibrahim; Shazly, Gamal Abdel-Ghany; Harisa, Gamaleldin Ibrahim; Barakat, Nahla Sedik; Al-Enazi, Fouza Kayem; Elbagory, Ibrahim Mostafa

    2015-03-01

    In the present study, Diclofenac Sodium (DS) matrix tablets were prepared by direct compression method under different compression forces (5, 10, 15 and 20 KN), using ethylcellulose as matrix forming material. The produced tablets were characterized on the foundation of satisfactory tablet properties such as hardness, friability, drug content, weight variations and in vitro drug release rate. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction have been used to investigate any incompatibilities of the tablet's ingredients. Additionally, in vivo bioavailability has been investigated on beagle dogs. Data obtained revealed that, upon increasing compression force the in vitro drug release was sustained and the T(max) value was four hours (for formulations compressed at 15 and 20 kN) compared to the conventional voltarine(®) 50 tablets (T(max) value of 2 hours).

  12. Generic sustained release tablets of trimetazidine hydrochloride: Preparation and in vitro–in vivo correlation studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longmei Wang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the current work was to develop generic sustained-release tablets containing 35 mg trimetazidine dihydrochloride and to establish an in vitro–in vivo correlation that could predict the bioavailability. The marketed sustained release tablet (Vastarel MR used as reference, a sustained-release matrix tablet was prepared using hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC as matrix by wet granulation and the in vitro dissolution profiles of the self-made tablets were determined in four different dissolution media (0.1 M HCl, pH 4.5 PBS, pH 6.8 PBS and water. A higher similarity between prepared tablets and Vastarel MR was established, with similarity factor (f2 ranging from 60 to 75 in the four media. The in vivo pharmacokinetics was studied in six healthy beagles. Compared with Vastarel MR, the Cmax of self-made tablets was slightly decreased, while the Tmax and MRT0–t were slightly prolonged, but with no significant difference (P > 0.05. The average of relative bioavailability (F was 102.52% based on AUC0–t. For log-transformed AUC0–t and Cmax, the upper confidence limit on the appropriate criterion is <0, indicating these two formulations were population bioequivalent. The in vivo–in vitro correlation coefficient obtained from point-to-point analysis of self-made tablets was 0.9720. In conclusion, the prepared tablets were bioequivalent to the marketed tablets, according to both the in vitro release rate and extent of absorption, and a good in vivo–in vitro correlation was established for the self-made tablets that indicated in vitro dissolution tests could be used as a surrogate for bioavailability studies.

  13. Pulse release of doxazosin from hydroxyethylcellulose compression coated tablet: mechanistic and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Nikhil; Guha, Arijit; Sahoo, Ranjan Kumar; Kuotsu, Ketousetuo

    2015-01-01

    Chronotherapeutically programmed hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) based compression coated doxazosin tablets were prepared and the influence of disintegrants croscarmellose sodium, L-hydroxypropylcellulose (L-HPC), gellan gum on drug release and in vivo performance were investigated. Infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetric studies did not indicate any excipient incompatibility in the tablets. The disintegrants induced a continuous water influx resulting in a rapid expansion of the membrane. The subsequent formation of fractures into the coats leads to a fast drug release after an initial lag time. Release rates indicated that croscarmellose sodium and L-HPC were directly proportional to their concentration in the formulations. In vitro optimized croscarmellose sodium-HEC matrix showed significantly faster (p 0.99). The mechanism involved in release was anomalous transport and super case II transport with matrix swelling. The pulsatile tablets showed no changes either in physicochemical appearance, drug content or in dissolution pattern during its accelerated stability studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of the Doxycycline Release from AH26 Sealer-Doxycycline Combination: An ex vivo Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashofteh Yazdi, Kazem; Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Moazeni, Esmaeil; Mirzayi Rad, Sina

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this ex vivo study was to determine the releasing characteristics and doxycycline dentinal diffusion of AH26 sealer-doxycycline combination from apical 3mm of tooth root and apical foramen. One-hundred and two recently extracted single-rooted human teeth were decoronated and prepared with #3 and #4 Gates-Glidden drills and rotary Mtwo files. Smear layer was removed; all surfaces except for apical 3mm of each root were sealed with two coats of nail polish. To quantify the release and diffusion of the doxycycline at different time intervals (30 min, 48 and 72 h) after root canal obturation, the samples were randomly divided into three groups (n=30; 0.5 h, 48 h, 72 h). To evaluate the release of doxycycline from AH26 sealer-doxycycline combination at six concentrations of antibiotic including 0.5%, 1%, 2%, 5%, 10% and 20%; each experimental group was divided into six equal subgroups (n=5). Root canals were filled with gutta-percha and AH26-doxycycline combinations and then were placed in vials containing 1.25mL of phosphate buffer saline solution (PBS). After 30 min, 48 and 72 h, the amount of doxycycline released from specimens into PBS were determined by measuring the absorbance values using UV spectrophotometry at λ(max)=350 nm. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA. The findings of this study revealed that AH26 sealer-doxycycline combination released variable measures of antibiotic at each time interval and in the various concentrations. At 30 min, no statistically significant differences were obtained between the results of subgroups, but at 48 and 72 h these differences were significant (P<0.001). The results also showed that differences between 0.5 h, 48 h and 72 h were significant within subgroups (P<0.01). Under the conditions of this ex vivo study, doxycycline can be released from AH26 sealer-antibiotic combination through 3mm of apical root and apical foramen at 30 min, 48 and 72 h after mixing the sealer with doxycycline at concentrations

  15. Plant immunity triggered by engineered in vivo release of oligogalacturonides, damage-associated molecular patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Manuel; Pontiggia, Daniela; Raggi, Sara; Cheng, Zhenyu; Scaloni, Flavio; Ferrari, Simone; Ausubel, Frederick M; Cervone, Felice; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2015-04-28

    Oligogalacturonides (OGs) are fragments of pectin that activate plant innate immunity by functioning as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). We set out to test the hypothesis that OGs are generated in planta by partial inhibition of pathogen-encoded polygalacturonases (PGs). A gene encoding a fungal PG was fused with a gene encoding a plant polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (PGIP) and expressed in transgenic Arabidopsis plants. We show that expression of the PGIP-PG chimera results in the in vivo production of OGs that can be detected by mass spectrometric analysis. Transgenic plants expressing the chimera under control of a pathogen-inducible promoter are more resistant to the phytopathogens Botrytis cinerea, Pectobacterium carotovorum, and Pseudomonas syringae. These data provide strong evidence for the hypothesis that OGs released in vivo act as a DAMP signal to trigger plant immunity and suggest that controlled release of these molecules upon infection may be a valuable tool to protect plants against infectious diseases. On the other hand, elevated levels of expression of the chimera cause the accumulation of salicylic acid, reduced growth, and eventually lead to plant death, consistent with the current notion that trade-off occurs between growth and defense.

  16. Differential effects of cigarette smoke on oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine release in primary human airway epithelial cells and in a variety of transformed alveolar epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Irfan

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke mediated oxidative stress and inflammatory events in the airway and alveolar epithelium are important processes in the pathogenesis of smoking related pulmonary diseases. Previously, individual cell lines were used to assess the oxidative and proinflammatory effects of cigarette smoke with confounding results. In this study, a panel of human and rodent transformed epithelial cell lines were used to determine the effects of cigarette smoke extract (CSE on oxidative stress markers, cell toxicity and proinflammatory cytokine release and compared the effects with that of primary human small airway epithelial cells (SAEC. Methods Primary human SAEC, transformed human (A549, H1299, H441, and rodent (murine MLE-15, rat L2 alveolar epithelial cells were treated with different concentrations of CSE (0.2–10% ranging from 20 min to 24 hr. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase release assay, trypan blue exclusion method and double staining with acridine orange and ethidium bromide. Glutathione concentration was measured by enzymatic recycling assay and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal levels by using lipid peroxidation assay kit. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g. IL-8 and IL-6 were measured by ELISA. Nuclear translocation of the transcription factor, NF-κB was assessed by immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting. Results Cigarette smoke extract dose-dependently depleted glutathione concentration, increased 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (4-HNE levels, and caused necrosis in the transformed cell lines as well as in SAEC. None of the transformed cell lines showed any significant release of cytokines in response to CSE. CSE, however, induced IL-8 and IL-6 release in primary cell lines in a dose-dependent manner, which was associated with the nuclear translocation of NF-κB in SAEC. Conclusion This study suggests that primary, but not transformed, lung epithelial cells are an appropriate model to study the inflammatory

  17. Acute blood glucose fluctuation enhances rat aorta endothelial cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Na; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Henan; Wang, Yanjun; Bai, Yu; Han, Ping

    2016-08-05

    Complications of diabetes mellitus (DM) are related not only to elevated plasma glucose, but also plasma glucose fluctuations. However, the specific mechanism underlying the role of plasma glucose fluctuation in the pathogenesis of DM complications remains poorly understood. In the present study, the influence of acute fluctuant hyperglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, function, oxidative stress and inflammation was examined in vivo. Rats were assigned to three different groups (n = 10/group) that received 48-h infusions of saline (SAL group), continuous 50 % glucose (constant high glucose group [CHG]), or intermittent 50 % glucose (acute blood glucose fluctuation group [AFG]). Plasma 8-isoprostaglandin, interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) levels were quantified by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) commercial kits. Plasma insulin levels were measured by radioimmunoassays (RIAs) using kits. The aortic segment was collected. The levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and activity of glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX) were measured in endothelial homogenates prepared from endothelial cells harvested from the aorta using colorimetric kits. Apoptosis of vascular endothelial cells was determined with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL). Endothelial dysfunction was assessed by isometric tension recording to evaluate the endothelial function. The expression of B cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 Associated X protein (Bax), pro caspase-3, caspase-3 p17, 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) and p47phox protein in rat aortic endothelial cells were tested with Western blot analysis. Endothelial cells reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation was determined using dihydroethidium-dependent fluorescence microtopography in aortic cryo-sections. Expression of IL-6, TNF-α and ICAM-1 mRNAs in vascular endothelial cells were determined by real

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of carbonate apatite-collagen scaffolds with some cytokines for bone tissue engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherman Salim

    2015-01-01

    Results and Conclusion: By histological observation and measurement of bone area ratio, CA-CS with cytokines showed higher bone formation ability (bFGF/CA-CS: 50.7 ± 7.3%, rh-BMP2/CA-CS: 54.2 ± 5.0% than other groups. From the limited results of this study, it is suggested that CA collagen scaffolds with some cytokines may become an attractive scaffold for bone regeneration.

  19. Short-term simvastatin treatment has no effect on plasma cytokine response in a human in vivo model of low-grade inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erikstrup, C; Ullum, H; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund

    2006-01-01

    Statins reduce plasma cholesterol, but clinical trials and in vitro studies indicate that they might also possess anti-inflammatory properties. The effect of simvastatin on circulating cytokines and leucocytes was evaluated in a human in vivo model of low-grade inflammation. Thirty young healthy...... male participants received an injection of the bacterial cell wall product endotoxin (0.06 ng/kg) to induce systemic inflammation. Participants were then randomized into a control and a simvastatin group. The simvastatin group received simvastatin 20 mg daily for 14 days. All participants returned...... as well as total leucocyte counts increased in all participants upon endotoxin challenge but were not affected by simvastatin treatment. Tolerance to endotoxin was observed in both groups after 14 days. Short-term treatment with simvastatin (20 mg/day) did not influence circulating cytokine levels during...

  20. HPMA copolymer conjugate with pirarubicin: In vitro and ex vivo stability and drug release study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Waliul; Fang, Jun; Etrych, Tomas; Chytil, Petr; Ulbrich, Karel; Sakoguchi, Akihiro; Kusakabe, Katsuki; Maeda, Hiroshi

    2017-11-10

    We have developed a tumor environment-responsive polymeric anticancer prodrug containing pirarubicin (THP) conjugated to N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide copolymer (PHPMA), [P-THP], through a spacer containing pH-sensitive hydrazone bond, that showed remarkable therapeutic effect against various tumor models and in a human pilot study. Toward clinical development, here we report THP release profile from its HPMA copolymer conjugate, the conjugate stability, protein and cell-binding and solubility of P-THP. Size exclusion chromatography of P-THP (molecular weight 38 kDa) showed similar hydrodynamic volume as bovine serum albumin (BSA) in aqueous solution, with no apparent interactions with BSA, nor aggregation by itself. pH-responsive release of free THP was reconfirmed at pHs 6.5 and lower. The drug release was significantly affected by a type of used buffer. Phosphate buffer seems to facilitate faster hydrazone bond cleavage at pH 7.4 whereas higher stability was achieved in L-arginine solution which yielded only little cleavage and THP release, approx. 15% within 2 weeks at the same pH at 25 °C. Furthermore, ex vivo study using sera of different animal species showed very high stability of P-THP. Incubation with blood showed high stability of P-THP during circulation, without binding to blood cells. These findings revealed that L-arginine solution provides appropriate media for formulation of P-THP infusion solution as tumor-targeted polymeric anticancer drug based on EPR effect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Cytokine responses and regulation of interferon-gamma release by human mononuclear cells to Aspergillus fumigatus and other filamentous fungi.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Warris, A.; Netea, M.G.; Verweij, P.E.; Gaustad, P.; Kullberg, B.J.; Weemaes, C.M.R.; Abrahamsen, T.G.

    2005-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that the production of proinflammatory cytokines is important in host resistance to invasive aspergillosis. Knowledge of the host response towards other filamentous fungi is scarce, as most studies have focused on Aspergillus fumigatus. In addition, interferon-gamma

  2. Cytokine release from human peripheral blood leucocytes incubated with endotoxin with and without prior infection with influenza virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banner, Jytte; Smith, H; Sweet, C

    1993-01-01

    Previous work with a neonatal ferret model for human SIDS had indicated that inflammation caused by a combination of influenza virus and bacterial endotoxin may be a cause of human SIDS. To determine whether cytokines may be involved in this inflammatory response, levels of interleukin (IL)-1 beta...

  3. Osteopathic Manipulative Therapy Induces Early Plasma Cytokine Release and Mobilization of a Population of Blood Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Manindra; Puertas, Juan; Pate, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is able to enhance the immune response of individuals. In particular, it has been reported that OMT has the capability to increase antibody titers, enhance the efficacy of vaccination, and upregulate the numbers of circulating leukocytes. Recently, it has been shown in human patients suffering chronic low back pain, that OMT is able to modify the levels of cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in blood upon repeated treatment. Further, experimental animal models show that lymphatic pump techniques can induce a transient increase of cytokines in the lymphatic circulation. Taking into account all these data, we decided to investigate in healthy individuals the capacity of OMT to induce a rapid modification of the levels of cytokines and leukocytes in circulation. Human volunteers were subjected to a mixture of lymphatic and thoracic OMT, and shortly after the levels of several cytokines were evaluated by protein array technology and ELISA multiplex analysis, while the profile and activation status of circulating leukocytes was extensively evaluated by multicolor flow cytometry. In addition, the levels of nitric oxide and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were determined. In this study, our results show that OMT was not able to induce a rapid modification in the levels of plasma nitrites or CRP or in the proportion or activation status of central memory, effector memory or naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells. A significant decrease in the proportion of a subpopulation of blood dendritic cells was detected in OMT patients. Significant differences were also detected in the levels of immune molecules such as IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α and most notably, G-CSF. Thus, OMT is able to induce a rapid change in the immunological profile of particular circulating cytokines and leukocytes. PMID:24614605

  4. Osteopathic manipulative therapy induces early plasma cytokine release and mobilization of a population of blood dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walkowski, Stevan; Singh, Manindra; Puertas, Juan; Pate, Michelle; Goodrum, Kenneth; Benencia, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    It has been claimed that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) is able to enhance the immune response of individuals. In particular, it has been reported that OMT has the capability to increase antibody titers, enhance the efficacy of vaccination, and upregulate the numbers of circulating leukocytes. Recently, it has been shown in human patients suffering chronic low back pain, that OMT is able to modify the levels of cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in blood upon repeated treatment. Further, experimental animal models show that lymphatic pump techniques can induce a transient increase of cytokines in the lymphatic circulation. Taking into account all these data, we decided to investigate in healthy individuals the capacity of OMT to induce a rapid modification of the levels of cytokines and leukocytes in circulation. Human volunteers were subjected to a mixture of lymphatic and thoracic OMT, and shortly after the levels of several cytokines were evaluated by protein array technology and ELISA multiplex analysis, while the profile and activation status of circulating leukocytes was extensively evaluated by multicolor flow cytometry. In addition, the levels of nitric oxide and C-reactive protein (CRP) in plasma were determined. In this study, our results show that OMT was not able to induce a rapid modification in the levels of plasma nitrites or CRP or in the proportion or activation status of central memory, effector memory or naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells. A significant decrease in the proportion of a subpopulation of blood dendritic cells was detected in OMT patients. Significant differences were also detected in the levels of immune molecules such as IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α and most notably, G-CSF. Thus, OMT is able to induce a rapid change in the immunological profile of particular circulating cytokines and leukocytes.

  5. Osteopathic manipulative therapy induces early plasma cytokine release and mobilization of a population of blood dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevan Walkowski

    Full Text Available It has been claimed that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT is able to enhance the immune response of individuals. In particular, it has been reported that OMT has the capability to increase antibody titers, enhance the efficacy of vaccination, and upregulate the numbers of circulating leukocytes. Recently, it has been shown in human patients suffering chronic low back pain, that OMT is able to modify the levels of cytokines such as IL-6 and TNF-α in blood upon repeated treatment. Further, experimental animal models show that lymphatic pump techniques can induce a transient increase of cytokines in the lymphatic circulation. Taking into account all these data, we decided to investigate in healthy individuals the capacity of OMT to induce a rapid modification of the levels of cytokines and leukocytes in circulation. Human volunteers were subjected to a mixture of lymphatic and thoracic OMT, and shortly after the levels of several cytokines were evaluated by protein array technology and ELISA multiplex analysis, while the profile and activation status of circulating leukocytes was extensively evaluated by multicolor flow cytometry. In addition, the levels of nitric oxide and C-reactive protein (CRP in plasma were determined. In this study, our results show that OMT was not able to induce a rapid modification in the levels of plasma nitrites or CRP or in the proportion or activation status of central memory, effector memory or naïve CD4 and CD8 T cells. A significant decrease in the proportion of a subpopulation of blood dendritic cells was detected in OMT patients. Significant differences were also detected in the levels of immune molecules such as IL-8, MCP-1, MIP-1α and most notably, G-CSF. Thus, OMT is able to induce a rapid change in the immunological profile of particular circulating cytokines and leukocytes.

  6. Inhibitory effects of adlay bran (Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) on chemical mediator release and cytokine production in rat basophilic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Jhang; Lo, Yi-Chen; Chiang, Wenchang

    2012-05-07

    Adlay (Job's tears, Coix lachryma-jobi L. var. ma-yuen Stapf) has long been used in China to treat rheumatism. We investigated the anti-allergic effects of adlay bran on rat basophilic leukemia (RBL)-2H3 cells. To evaluate the anti-allergic effects of adlay bran, the release of histamines and cytokines were measured using ELISA. To explore the mechanism of these effects, the protein expression levels were determined using western blotting. A 40.8μg/mL concentration of the ethyl acetate fraction of the ethanolic extracts of adlay bran (ABE-EtOAc) effectively inhibited mast cell degranulation. The 40-100% EtOAc/Hex subfractions of ABE-EtOAc inhibited histamine release with an IC(50) of 71-87μg/mL. Moreover, the ABE-EtOAc subfractions suppressed the secretion of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α in the RBL-2H3 cells, indicating that adlay bran can inhibit cytokine secretion in the late phase of the allergic reaction. In addition, adlay bran reduced the intracellular production of reactive oxygen species, inhibited the phosphorylation of Akt and decreased the expression of protein kinase C. Furthermore, six phenolic acids and one flavone were isolated. Of these compounds, luteolin showed the most potent inhibitory activity (IC(50)=1.5μg/mL). Adlay bran extract reduced the release of histamines and cytokines and suppressed the production of Akt. These combined effects influenced the signal transduction in RBL-2H3 cells, thereby revealing the mechanisms of the anti-allergic effects of adlay. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Capreomycin oleate microparticles for intramuscular administration: Preparation, in vitro release and preliminary in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambronero-Rojas, Adrián; Torres-Vergara, Pablo; Godoy, Ricardo; von Plessing, Carlos; Sepúlveda, Jacqueline; Gómez-Gaete, Carolina

    2015-07-10

    Capreomycin sulfate (CS) is a second-line drug used for the treatment of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The adverse effects profile and uncomfortable administration scheme of CS has led to the development of formulations based on liposomes and polymeric microparticles. However, as CS is a water-soluble peptide that does not encapsulate properly into hydrophobic particulate matrices, it was necessary to reduce its aqueous solubility by forming the pharmacologically active capreomycin oleate (CO) ion pair. The aim of this research was to develop a new formulation of CO for intramuscular injection, based on biodegradable microparticles that encapsulate CO in order to provide a controlled release of the drug with reduced local and systemic adverse effects. The CO-loaded microparticles prepared by spray drying or solvent emulsion-evaporation were characterized in their morphology, encapsulation efficiency, in vitro/in vivo kinetics and tissue tolerance. Through scanning electron microscopy it was confirmed that the microparticles were monodisperse and spherical, with an optimal size for intramuscular administration. The interaction between CO and the components of the microparticle matrix was confirmed on both formulations by X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry analyses. The encapsulation efficiencies for the spray-dried and emulsion-evaporation microparticles were 92% and 56%, respectively. The in vitro kinetics performed on both formulations demonstrated a controlled and continuous release of CO from the microparticles, which was successfully reproduced on an in vivo rodent model. The results of the histological analysis demonstrated that none of the formulations produced significant tissue damage on the site of injection. Therefore, the results suggest that injectable CO microparticles obtained by spray drying and solvent emulsion-evaporation could represent an interesting therapeutic alternative for the treatment of MDR

  8. Effects of the neonicotinoids thiametoxam and clothianidin on in vivo dopamine release in rat striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Nunes, Brenda Viviane Ferreira; Barbosa, Durán Rafael; Pallares, Alfonso Miguel; Faro, Lilian Rosana Ferreira

    2010-02-15

    Thiamethoxam (TMX) and clothianidin (CLO) are neonicotinoids insecticides. The main characteristic of these pesticides is their agonist action on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). In the present work it was studied and characterized the effects of TMX and CLO, in different concentrations, on dopaminergic system of rat striatum using in vivo brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of 1mM or 5mM TMX has not produced significant increases on dopamine (DA) levels, nonetheless the infusion of 10mM TMX increases the DA output to 841+/-132%, when compared to basal levels. Infusion of 1mM CLO has not induced a significant increase in DA levels, even so 2, 3.5 and 5mM CLO have produced an increase of 438+/-8%, 2778+/-598% and 4604+/-516%, respectively, every compared to basal levels. Mecamylamine (MEC), a non-competitive nAChRs antagonist, was used to investigate the role of nAChRs on DA release induced by TMX and CLO. The increases in extracellular DA levels induced by TMX and CLO when associated to MEC are 80% and 68% lower than the effect produced by CLO and TMX isolated. These results confirm that TMX and CLO appear to induce in vivo DA increased release in striatum of rats and it seems to be concentration dependent. Moreover, these results indicate that this effect might be related to nAChRs. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dose-rate effects of protons on in vivo activation of nuclear factor-kappa B and cytokines in mouse bone marrow cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rithidech, K.N.; Rusek, A.; Reungpatthanaphong, P.; Honikel, L.; Simon, S.R.

    2010-05-28

    The objective of this study was to determine the kinetics of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation and cytokine expression in bone marrow (BM) cells of exposed mice as a function of the dose rate of protons. The cytokines included in this study are pro-inflammatory [i.e., tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-{alpha}), interleukin-1beta (IL-1{beta}), and IL-6] and anti-inflammatory cytokines (i.e., IL-4 and IL-10). We gave male BALB/cJ mice a whole-body exposure to 0 (sham-controls) or 1.0 Gy of 100 MeV protons, delivered at 5 or 10 mGy min{sup -1}, the dose and dose rates found during solar particle events in space. As a reference radiation, groups of mice were exposed to 0 (sham-controls) or 1 Gy of {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays (10 mGy min{sup -1}). After irradiation, BM cells were collected at 1.5, 3, 24 h, and 1 month for analyses (five mice per treatment group per harvest time). The results indicated that the in vivo time course of effects induced by a single dose of 1 Gy of 100 MeV protons or {sup 137}Cs {gamma} rays, delivered at 10 mGy min{sup -1}, was similar. Although statistically significant levels of NF-{kappa}B activation and pro-inflammatory cytokines in BM cells of exposed mice when compared to those in the corresponding sham controls (Student's t-test, p < 0.05 or < 0.01) were induced by either dose rate, these levels varied over time for each protein. Further, only a dose rate of 5 mGy min{sup -1} induced significant levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines. The results indicate dose-rate effects of protons.

  10. A sustained release formulation of novel quininib-hyaluronan microneedles inhibits angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Orla; Srivastava, Akshay; Carroll, Oliver; Kulkarni, Rajiv; Dykes, Steve; Vickers, Steven; Dickinson, Keith; Reynolds, Alison L; Kilty, Claire; Redmond, Gareth; Jones, Rob; Cheetham, Sharon; Pandit, Abhay; Kennedy, Breandán N

    2016-07-10

    Pathologic neovascularisation and ocular permeability are hallmarks of proliferative diabetic retinopathy and age-related macular degeneration. Current pharmacologic interventions targeting VEGF are effective in only 30-60% of patients and require multiple intraocular injections associated with iatrogenic infection. Thus, our goal is to develop novel small molecule drugs that are VEGF-independent are amenable to sustained ocular-release, and which reduce retinal angiogenesis and retinal vascular permeability. Here, the anti-angiogenic drug quininib was formulated into hyaluronan (HA) microneedles whose safety and efficacy was evaluated in vivo. Quininib-HA microneedles were formulated via desolvation from quininib-HA solution and subsequent cross-linking with 4-arm-PEG-amine prior to freeze-drying. Scanning electron microscopy revealed hollow needle-shaped particle ultrastructure, with a zeta potential of -35.5mV determined by electrophoretic light scattering. The incorporation efficiency and pharmacokinetic profile of quininib released in vitro from the microneedles was quantified by HPLC. Quininib incorporation into these microneedles was 90%. In vitro, 20% quininib was released over 4months; or in the presence of increasing concentrations of hyaluronidase, 60% incorporated quininib was released over 4months. Zebrafish hyaloid vasculature assays demonstrated quininib released from these microneedles significantly (pmicroneedles allow for sustained release of quininib; are safe in vivo and quininib released from these microneedles effectively inhibits angiogenesis and RVP in vivo. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein and leptin are associated with stress-induced interleukin-6 cytokine expression ex vivo in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Jung; Stewart, Jennifer K; Shibata, Yoshimi; Slusher, Aaron L; Acevedo, Edmund O

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is associated with enhanced inflammation and mental stress, but limited information has addressed the potential additive effect of psychological stress on obesity-associated inflammation. This study examined whether obese subjects would elicit a greater host immune response (IL-6 mRNA and cytokine) to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in response to mental stress. Blood samples for LPS-stimulated IL-6 mRNA and cytokine were collected prior to and following mental stress. Results showed that obese subjects elicited a greater LPS-induced IL-6 along with its mRNA expression following mental stress compared to normal-weight subjects. Stress-induced IL-6 cytokine response to LPS was correlated with the baseline levels of plasma LPS binding protein (LBP) and leptin. These findings are consistent with the idea that endogenous inflammatory agents (e.g., LBP and leptin), often elevated with obesity, enhance inflammatory responses to psychological stress. © 2014 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  12. Effector/memory T cells of the weanling mouse exhibit Type 2 cytokine polarization in vitro and in vivo in the advanced stages of acute energy deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steevels, Tessa A M; Hillyer, Lyn M; Monk, Jennifer M; Fisher, Megan E; Woodward, Bill D

    2010-06-01

    Our objective was to determine whether the polarizing cytokine profile of the effector/memory T-cell compartment reflects the profound decline of cell-mediated inflammatory competence that characterizes acute prepubescent malnutrition. Weanling C57BL/6J mice were permitted free access to a complete purified diet, free access to an isocaloric low-protein diet or restricted intake of the complete diet for 14 days. First, interleukin (IL)-4 and interferon (IFN)-gamma concentrations generated in vitro by splenic and nodal effector/memory T cells were assessed following exposure to plate-bound anti-CD3. Second, net systemic production of IFN-gamma and IL-4 by the effector/memory T-cell compartment was assessed by the in vivo cytokine capture assay following anti-CD3 stimulation. In vitro stimulation generated less IFN-gamma (P=.002) but more IL-4 (P=.05) by T cells from the restricted-intake group relative to the age-matched control group. Similarly, in vivo stimulation generated low serum levels of antibody-captured IFN-gamma in the restricted-intake group vis-à-vis the age-matched control group (P=.01), while the IL-4 response was sustained (P=.39). By contrast, the 14-day low-protein model exhibited no change in T-cell cytokine signature either in vitro or in vivo. However, following extended consumption of the low-protein diet (26 days), carcass energy losses exceeded those of the 14-day protocol and serum levels of in vivo antibody-captured IFN-gamma were low after anti-CD3 challenge relative to the age-matched control group (P=.02), while levels of captured IL-4 remained unaffected (P=.07). Acute weanling malnutrition elicits a Type 2 polarizing cytokine character on the part of the effector/memory T-cell compartment, but only in the most advanced stages of energy decrement. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. In Vitro – In Vivo Evaluation of Sustained – Release Lithium Carbonate Matrix Tablets: Influence of Hydrophilic Matrix Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Emami

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Conventional Lithium carbonate (LC tablets produce rapid and relatively high peak blood levels resulting in adverse effects. These drawbacks can be overcome by designing a suitable sustained or controlled-release LC preparation. Methods: Sustained-release matrix tablets were therefore developed using different types and ratios of polymers including carbomer (CP, Na carboxymethylcellulose (Na CMC and hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC, to assess the release profiles and in vivo performance of the formulations. The tablets were prepared by either direct compression (DC or wet granulation (WG. In the DC method, 69% (450 mg LC, 5, 10 or 15% CP or Na CMC (of total tablet weight, lactose and /or Avicel (to maintain constant tablet weight were mixed and directly compressed. In the WG method, 450 mg LC and 10, 20, or 30% HPMC were granulated with Eudragit S100 solution, dried, and then compressed to formulate the tablets. In vitro and in vivo, newly formulated sustained-release LC tablets were compared with sustained-release commercial tablets (Eskalith and Priadel. In vivo studies were conducted in nine healthy subjects in a cross-over design, with a 3x3 Latin square sequence, and pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using classical methods. Results: The matrix tablets containing 15% CP exhibited suitable release kinetics and uniform absorption characteristics comparable to that of Eskalith. In vivo, this formulation produced a smooth and extended absorption phase very much similar to that of Eskalith with the identical elimination half-life and extent of absorption. Conclusion: The matrix tablets containing 15% CP reduces the incidence of side effects often associated with high serum concentration of Lithium and blood level variations. Direct correlation between the dissolution profiles and the relative bioavailability of the formulations could be observed. Keywords: Lithium carbonate, Matrix tablets, Sustained-release, In vitro

  14. Nrf2 protects the lung against inflammation induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles: A positive regulator role of Nrf2 on cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Buenrostro, Norma L; Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Lastres-Becker, Isabel; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Ji, Zhaoxia; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Marquina, Brenda; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Espada, Sandra; Cuadrado, Antonio; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-07-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have been classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans and they are an important nanomaterial widely used in pharmaceutical and paint industries. Inhalation is one of the most important routes of exposure in occupational settings. Several experimental models have shown that oxidative stress and inflammation are key mediators of cell damage. In this regard, Nrf2 modulates cytoprotection against oxidative stress and inflammation, however, its role in inflammation induced by TiO2 NPs exposure has been less investigated. The aim of this work was to investigate the role of Nrf2 in the cytokines produced after 4 weeks of TiO2 NPs exposure (5 mg/kg/2 days/week) using wild-type and Nrf2 knockout C57bl6 mice. Results showed that Nrf2 protects against inflammation and oxidative damage induced by TiO2 NPs exposure, however, Nrf2 is a positive mediator in the expression of IFN-γ, TNF-α, and TGF-β in bronchial epithelium and alveolar space after 4 weeks of exposure. These results suggest that Nrf2 has a central role in up-regulation of cytokines released during inflammation induced by TiO2 NPs and those cytokines are needed to cope with histological alterations in lung tissue. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Acute blood glucose fluctuation enhances rat aorta endothelial cell apoptosis, oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wu, Na; Shen, Haitao; Liu, Henan; Wang, Yanjun; Bai, Yu; Han, Ping

    2016-01-01

    .... In the present study, the influence of acute fluctuant hyperglycemia and persistent hyperglycemia on vascular endothelial cell apoptosis, function, oxidative stress and inflammation was examined in vivo...

  16. Human periodontal ligament cells facilitate leukocyte recruitment and are influenced in their immunomodulatory function by Th17 cytokine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konermann, A; Beyer, M; Deschner, J; Allam, J P; Novak, N; Winter, J; Jepsen, S; Jäger, A

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to examine the immunomodulatory impact of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells on the nature and magnitude of the leukocyte infiltrate in periodontal inflammation, particularly with regard to Th17 cells. PDL cells were challenged with pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1ß, IL-17A, and IFN-γ) and analyzed for the expression of cytokines involved in periodontal immunoinflammatory processes (IL-6, MIP-3 alpha, IL-23A, TGFß1, IDO, and CD274). In order to further investigate a direct involvement of PDL cells in leukocyte function, co-culture experiments were conducted. The expression of the immunomodulatory cytokines studied was significantly increased under pro-inflammatory conditions in PDL cells. Although PDL cells did not stimulate leukocyte proliferation or Th17 differentiation, these cells induced the recruitment of leukocytes. The results of our study suggest that PDL cells might be involved in chronic inflammatory mechanisms in periodontal tissues and thus in the transition to an adaptive immune response in periodontitis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cytokines and T-lymphocyte subsets in healthy post-menopausal women: estrogen retards bone loss without affecting the release of IL-1 or IL-1ra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Bendtzen, Klaus; Beck-Nielsen, H

    1997-01-01

    . There was no association between cytokine release and bone mass or loss assessed over 2 yrs. The only exception was a weak estrogen-independent correlation between basal IL-1ra secretion and bone loss (r = -0.21, p bone density or loss...... cells may be important in the pathophysiology of post-menopausal bone loss. The possibility that IL-1ra acts as an independent bone-sparing factor unrelated to estrogen withdrawal warrants further investigation. In conclusion, ERT maintains bone without affecting the release of the IL-1 family......Interleukin (IL)-1 is a potent inducer of bone resorption, and an increased secretion of the IL-1 agonists IL-1 alpha and IL-1 beta relative to the IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) has been proposed as a mechanism leading to post-menopausal osteoporosis. T-lymphocytes are capable of secreting bone...

  18. Gastroretentive Pulsatile Release Tablets of Lercanidipine HCl: Development, Statistical Optimization, and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gagganapalli Santhoshi Reddy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was aimed at the development of gastroretentive floating pulsatile release tablets (FPRTs of lercanidipine HCl to enhance the bioavailability and treat early morning surge in blood pressure. Immediate release core tablets containing lercanidipine HCl were prepared and optimized core tablets were compression-coated using buoyant layer containing polyethylene oxide (PEO WSR coagulant, sodium bicarbonate, and directly compressible lactose. FPRTs were evaluated for various in vitro physicochemical parameters, drug-excipient compatibility, buoyancy, swelling, and release studies. The optimized FPRTs were tested in vivo in New Zealand white rabbits for buoyancy and pharmacokinetics. DoE optimization of data revealed FPRTs containing PEO (20% w/w with coat weight 480 mg were promising systems exhibiting good floating behavior and lag time in drug release. Abdominal X-ray imaging of rabbits after oral administration of the tablets, confirmed the floating behavior and lag time. A quadratic model was suggested for release at 7th and 12th h and a linear model was suggested for release lag time. The FPRT formulation improved pharmacokinetic parameters compared to immediate release tablet formulation in terms of extent of absorption in rabbits. As the formulation showed delay in drug release both in vitro and in vivo, nighttime administration could be beneficial to reduce the cardiovascular complications due to early morning surge in blood pressure.

  19. Cold stress equally enhances in vivo pro-inflammatory cytokine gene expression in chicken lines divergently selected for antibody responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hangalapura, B.N.; Kaiser, M.G.; Poel, van der J.J.; Parmentier, H.K.; Lamont, S.J.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of cold stress, immunization and genetic selection on the expression of mRNA for cytokine genes in poultry have not been completely elucidated. Therefore, in the present experiment, using real-time quantitative RT-PCR, we evaluated the effect of cold stress and immunization with complete

  20. Constitutive, but Not Challenge-Induced, Interleukin-10 Production Is Robust in Acute Pre-Pubescent Protein and Energy Deficits: New Support for the Tolerance Hypothesis of Malnutrition-Associated Immune Depression Based on Cytokine Production in vivo

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    Bill Woodward

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance model of acute (i.e., wasting pre-pubescent protein and energy deficits proposes that the immune depression characteristic of these pathologies reflects an intact anti-inflammatory form of immune competence that reduces the risk of autoimmune reactions to catabolically released self antigens. A cornerstone of this proposition is the finding that constitutive (first-tier interleukin(IL-10 production is sustained even into the advanced stages of acute malnutrition. The IL-10 response to inflammatory challenge constitutes a second tier of anti-inflammatory regulation and was the focus of this investigation. Weanling mice consumed a complete diet ad libitum, a low-protein diet ad libitum (mimicking incipient kwashiorkor, or the complete diet in restricted daily quantities (mimicking marasmus, and their second-tier IL-10 production was determined both in vitro and in vivo using lipopolysaccharide (LPS and anti-CD3 as stimulants of innate and adaptive defences, respectively. Both early (3 days and advanced (14 days stages of wasting pathology were examined and three main outcomes emerged. First, classic in vitro systems are unreliable for discerning cytokine production in vivo. Secondly, in diverse forms of acute malnutrition declining challenge-induced IL-10 production may provide an early sign that anti-inflammatory control over immune competence is failing. Thirdly, and most fundamentally, the investigation provides new support for the tolerance model of malnutrition-associated inflammatory immune depression.

  1. Nanocarriers for DNA Vaccines: Co-Delivery of TLR-9 and NLR-2 Ligands Leads to Synergistic Enhancement of Proinflammatory Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Poecheim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Adjuvants enhance immunogenicity of vaccines through either targeted antigen delivery or stimulation of immune receptors. Three cationic nanoparticle formulations were evaluated for their potential as carriers for a DNA vaccine, and muramyl dipeptide (MDP as immunostimulatory agent, to induce and increase immunogenicity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigen encoding plasmid DNA (pDNA. The formulations included (1 trimethyl chitosan (TMC nanoparticles, (2 a squalene-in-water nanoemulsion, and (3 a mineral oil-in-water nanoemulsion. The adjuvant effect of the pDNA-nanocomplexes was evaluated by serum antibody analysis in immunized mice. All three carriers display a strong adjuvant effect, however, only TMC nanoparticles were capable to bias immune responses towards Th1. pDNA naturally contains immunostimulatory unmethylated CpG motifs that are recognized by Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR-9. In mechanistic in vitro studies, activation of TLR-9 and the ability to enhance immunogenicity by simultaneously targeting TLR-9 and NOD-like receptor 2 (NLR-2 was determined by proinflammatory cytokine release in RAW264.7 macrophages. pDNA in combination with MDP was shown to significantly increase proinflammatory cytokine release in a synergistic manner, dependent on NLR-2 activation. In summary, novel pDNA-Ag85A loaded nanoparticle formulations, which induce antigen specific immune responses in mice were developed, taking advantage of the synergistic combinations of TLR and NLR agonists to increase the adjuvanticity of the carriers used.

  2. Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 induces type 1 cytokine production by mouse cells in vitro and in vivo

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    E. Neumann

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Lactobacillus delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 has been shown to increase clearance of bacteria injected into the blood of germ-free mice. Moreover, it induces the production of type 1 cytokines by human peripheral mononuclear cells. The objective of the present study was to investigate the production of inflammatory cytokines [interleukin-12 (IL-12 p40, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ] triggered in vitro by live, heat-killed or lysozyme-treated L. delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 and in vivo by a live preparation. Germ-free, L. delbrueckii-monoassociated and lipopolysaccharide (LPS-resistant C3H/HeJ mice were used as experimental models. UFV-H2b20 induced the production of IL-12 p40 and TNF-α by peritoneal cells and IFN-γ by spleen cells from germ-free or monoassociated Swiss/NIH mice and LPS-hyporesponsive mice (around 40 ng/mL for IL-12 p40, 200 pg/mL for TNF-α and 10 ng/mL for IFN-γ. Heat treatment of L. delbrueckii did not affect the production of these cytokines. Lysozyme treatment decreased IL-12 p40 production by peritoneal cells from C3H/HeJ mice, but did not affect TNF-α production by these cells or IFN-γ production by spleen cells from the same mouse strain. TNF-α production by peritoneal cells from Swiss/NIH L. delbrueckii-monoassociated mice was inhibited by lysozyme treatment. When testing IL-12 p40 and IFN-γ levels in sera from germ-free or monoassociated Swiss/NIH mice systemically challenged with Escherichia coli we observed that IL-12 p40 was produced at marginally higher levels by monoassociated mice than by germ-free mice (40 vs 60 ng/mL, but IFN-γ was produced earlier and at higher levels by monoassociated mice (monoassociated 4 and 14 ng/mL 4 and 8 h after infection, germfree 0 and 7.5 ng/mL at the same times. These results show that L. delbrueckii UFV-H2b20 stimulates the production of type 1 cytokines in vitro and in vivo, therefore suggesting that L. delbrueckii might have adjuvant properties in infection

  3. Long-term cytokine and growth factor release from equine platelet-rich fibrin clots obtained with two different centrifugation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Aristizabal, Román F; López, Catalina; Álvarez, María E; Giraldo, Carlos; Prades, Marta; Carmona, Jorge U

    2017-09-01

    To compare the temporal release (over three weeks) of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 4 (IL-4), IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) from two platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) preparations from equine blood obtained at either 240g/8min or 416g/10min. Whole blood from 10 horses was used to obtain PRF clots by two different centrifugation protocols. After 1h of rest, PRF clots were deposited in wells with culture medium, which was changed at 6h, 24h and then every 48h to 21days. Cytokines and GFs were measured by ELISA at 1h (serum supernatants from PRF clots) and all time points of culture medium change. A negative control (plasma) and a positive control (blood lysate) were also included. There were no relevant differences between the two protocols for the temporal release of proteins. However, a significant (p=0.01) effect of time was noted. All cytokines were detected after 6h of PRF clot culture until day 21. GF were detected at 1h until day 21. The concentrations for these proteins diminished gradually over time. A highly significant (p=0.01) correlation was noticed between all the proteins evaluated. Leukocytes enmeshed in PRF clots were able to produce cytokines, TGF-β1 and PDGF-BB. These findings demonstrate a paramount role of leukocytes in wound healing induced or modified by PRF clots in mammals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Ex vivo expansion of bovine corneal endothelial cells in xeno-free medium supplemented with platelet releasate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Li Chou

    Full Text Available Clinical-grade ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelial cells can increase the availability of corneal tissues for transplantation and treatment of corneal blindness. However, these cells have very limited proliferative capacity. Successful propagation has required so far to use very complex growth media supplemented with fetal bovine serum and other xenocomponents. We hypothesized that human platelet releasates rich in multiple growth factors, and in particular neurotrophins, could potentially be a useful supplement for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells due to their neural crest origin. Platelet releasates were prepared by calcium salt activation of apheresis platelet concentrates, subjected or not to complement inactivation by heat treatment at 56°C for 30 minutes. Platelet releasates were characterized for their content in proteins and were found to contain high amount of growth factors including platelet-derived growth factor-AB (30.56 to 39.08 ng/ml and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (30.57 to 37.11 ng/ml neurotrophins. We compared the growth and viability of corneal endothelium cells in DMEM-F12 medium supplemented with different combinations of components, including 2.5%∼10% of the platelet releasates. Corneal endothelium cells expanded in platelet releasates exhibited good adhesion and a typical hexagonal morphology. Their growth and viability were enhanced when using the complement-inactivated platelet releasate at a concentration of 10%. Immunostaining and Western blots showed that CECs maintained the expressions of four important membrane markers: Na-K ATPase α1, zona occludens-1, phospho-connexin 43 and N-cadherin. In conclusion, our study provides the first proof-of-concept that human platelet releasates can be used for ex vivo expansion of corneal endothelium cells. These findings open a new paradigm for ex vivo propagation protocols of corneal endothelium cells in compliance with good tissue culture practices

  5. Pharmacokinetics and correlation between in vitro release and in vivo absorption of bio-adhesive pellets of panax notoginseng saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying; Zhang, Yun; Zhu, Chun-Yan

    2017-02-01

    The present study was designed to prepare and compare bio-adhesive pellets of panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) with hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC), chitosan, and chitosan : carbomer, explore the influence of different bio-adhesive materials on pharmacokinetics behaviors of PNSbio-adhesive pellets, and evaluate the correlation between in vivo absorption and in vitro release (IVIVC). In order to predict the in vivo concentration-time profile by the in vitro release data of bio-adhesive pellets, the release experiment was performed using the rotating basket method in pH 6.8 phosphate buffer. The PNS concentrations in rat plasma were analyzed by HPLC-MS-MS method and the relative bioavailability and other pharmacokinetic parameters were estimated using Kinetica4.4 pharmacokinetic software. Numerical deconvolution method was used to evaluate IVIVC. Our results indicated that, compared with ordinary pellets, PNS bio-adhesive pellets showed increased oral bioavailability by 1.45 to 3.20 times, increased Cmax, and extended MRT. What's more, the release behavior of drug in HPMC pellets was shown to follow a Fickian diffusion mechanism, a synergetic function of diffusion and skeleton corrosion. The in vitro release and the in vivo biological activity had a good correlation, demonstrating that the PNS bio-adhesive pellets had a better sustained release. Numerical deconvolution technique showed the advantage in evaluation of IVIVC for self-designed bio-adhesive pellets with HPMC. In conclusion, the in vitro release data of bio-adhesive pellets with HPMC can predict its concentration-time profile in vivo. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Human Intestinal Dendritic Cells Decrease Cytokine Release against Salmonella Infection in the Presence of Lactobacillus paracasei upon TLR Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez-Brito, Miriam; Muñoz-Quezada, Sergio; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina; Matencio, Esther; Bernal, María J.; Romero, Fernando; Gil, Angel

    2012-01-01

    Probiotic bacteria have been shown to modulate immune responses and could have therapeutic effects in allergic and inflammatory disorders. However, little is known about the signalling pathways that are engaged by probiotics. Dendritic cells (DCs) are antigen-presenting cells that are involved in immunity and tolerance. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MoDCs) and murine DCs are different from human gut DCs; therefore, in this study, we used human DCs generated from CD34+ progenitor cells (hematopoietic stem cells) harvested from umbilical cord blood; those DCs exhibited surface antigens of dendritic Langerhans cells, similar to the lamina propria DCs in the gut. We report that both a novel probiotic strain isolated from faeces of exclusively breast-fed newborn infants, Lactobacillus paracasei CNCM I-4034, and its cell-free culture supernatant (CFS) decreased pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in human intestinal DCs challenged with Salmonella. Interestingly, the supernatant was as effective as the bacteria in reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. In contrast, the bacterium was a potent inducer of TGF-β2 secretion, whereas the supernatant increased the secretion of TGF-β1 in response to Salmonella. We also showed that both the bacteria and its supernatant enhanced innate immunity through the activation of Toll-like receptor (TLR) signalling. These treatments strongly induced the transcription of the TLR9 gene. In addition, upregulation of the CASP8 and TOLLIP genes was observed. This work demonstrates that L. paracasei CNCM I-4034 enhanced innate immune responses, as evidenced by the activation of TLR signalling and the downregulation of a broad array of pro-inflammatory cytokines. The use of supernatants like the one described in this paper could be an effective and safe alternative to using live bacteria in functional foods. PMID:22905233

  7. Norepinephrine release in the rat pineal gland : The input from the biological clock measured by in vivo microdialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, W.J; van der Linde, A.G; Kooi, S.E; Grol, Cor; Westerink, B.H.C.

    The sympathetic innervation of the rat pineal gland was investigated, measuring the norepinephrine (NE) release by on-line in vivo microdialysis, NE was assayed using an HPLC method with precolumn derivatization and fluorescence detection. Its high sensitivity and reliability made it very suitable

  8. In vivo gastrointestinal drug-release monitoring through second near-infrared window fluorescent bioimaging with orally delivered microcarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Zhou, Lei; Wang, Wenxing; Li, Xiaomin; Zhang, Fan

    2017-03-01

    Non-invasive monitoring of gastrointestinal drug release in vivo is extremely challenging because of the limited spatial resolution and long scanning time of existing bioimaging modalities, such as X-ray radiation and magnetic resonance. Here, we report a novel microcarrier that can retain drugs and withstand the harsh conditions of gastrointestinal tract. Significantly, we can track the microcarrier fate and semi-quantitatively monitor the content of drug released in vivo in real time by measuring the fluorescence signals in the second near-infrared window of lanthanide-based downconversion nanoparticles with an absorption competition-induced emission bioimaging system. The microcarriers show a prolonged residence time of up to 72 h in the gastrointestinal tract, releasing up to 62% of their content. Moreover, minimal deposition of the microcarriers is found in non-target organs, such as the liver, spleen and kidney. These findings provide novel insights for the development of therapeutic and bioimaging strategies of orally administered drugs.

  9. Prediction of in-vivo pharmacokinetic profile for immediate and modified release oral dosage forms of furosemide using an in-vitro-in-silico-in-vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Keiichi; Wagner, Christian; Selen, Arzu; Dressman, Jennifer

    2015-05-01

    To develop a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model for furosemide immediate release (IR) tablets and modified release (MR) capsules by coupling biorelevant dissolution testing results with pharmacokinetic (PK) and physiologic parameters, and to investigate the key factors influencing furosemide absorption using simulation approaches and the PBPK model. Using solubility, dissolution kinetics, gastrointestinal (GI) parameters and disposition parameters, a PBPK model for furosemide was developed with STELLA software. Solubility and dissolution profiles for both formulations were evaluated in biorelevant and compendial media. The simulated plasma profiles were compared with in-vivo profiles using point estimates of area under plasma concentration-time curve, maximal concentration after the dose and time to maximal concentration after the dose. Simulated plasma profiles of both furosemide IR tablets and MR capsules were similar to the observed in-vivo profile in terms of PK parameters. Sensitivity analysis of the IR tablet model indicated that both the gastric emptying and absorption rate have an influence on the plasma profile. For the MR capsules, the sensitivity analysis suggested that the release rate in the small intestine, gastric emptying and the absorption rate all have an influence on the plasma profile. A predictive model to describe both IR and MR dosage forms containing furosemide was attained. Because sensitivity analysis of the model is able to identify key factors influencing the plasma profile, this in-vitro-in-silico-in-vivo approach could be a useful tool for facilitating formulation development of drug products. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Gastro-floating bilayer tablets for the sustained release of metformin and immediate release of pioglitazone: preparation and in vitro/in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Li, Yongji; Zhang, Rao; Wu, Zhannan; Yin, Lifang

    2014-12-10

    Owing to the complementary mechanisms of action of metformin hydrochloride (MH) and pioglitazone hydrochloride (PG), combination therapy for type 2 diabetes mellitus using the two drugs is highly desired; on the other hand, MH is not well absorbed in lower gastrointestinal tract and has a short half-life, therefore compromising the therapeutic effects. Herein, the present study was to develop gastro-floating bilayer matrix tablets in which the two drugs were incorporated into two separate layers, aiming at sustaining MH release with enhanced absorption and achieving immediate release of PG. The tablets of the optimized formulation floated on the test medium for more than 24 h with 5 min of floating lag time, and sustained MH release for 12 h via a diffusion-dependent manner; and complete release of PG within 5 min were achieved. Moreover, a steady plasma concentration of MH with a 1.5-fold increase in bioavailability, decreased C(max) and reduced T(max) was obtained, and the in vivo behavior of PG was similar to the marked product. Summarily, sustained MH release with improved absorption and immediate release of PG were obtained simultaneously using the gastro-floating bilayer tablet, allowing strengthened combination therapy for diabetes mellitus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cross-Linking Mast Cell Specific Gangliosides Stimulates the Release of Newly Formed Lipid Mediators and Newly Synthesized Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edismauro Garcia Freitas Filho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are immunoregulatory cells that participate in inflammatory processes. Cross-linking mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides by mAbAA4 results in partial activation of mast cells without the release of preformed mediators. The present study examines the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators following ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking the gangliosides with mAbAA4 released the newly formed lipid mediators, prostaglandins D2 and E2, without release of leukotrienes B4 and C4. The effect of cross-linking these gangliosides on the activation of enzymes in the arachidonate cascade was then investigated. Ganglioside cross-linking resulted in phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 and increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2. Translocation of 5-lipoxygenase from the cytosol to the nucleus was not induced by ganglioside cross-linking. Cross-linking of GD1b derived gangliosides also resulted in the release of the newly synthesized mediators, interleukin-4, interleukin-6, and TNF-α. The effect of cross-linking the gangliosides on the MAP kinase pathway was then investigated. Cross-linking the gangliosides induced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38 as well as activating both NFκB and NFAT in a Syk-dependent manner. Therefore, cross-linking the mast cell specific GD1b derived gangliosides results in the activation of signaling pathways that culminate with the release of newly formed and newly synthesized mediators.

  12. Novel peptides prevent alcohol-induced spatial learning deficits and proinflammatory cytokine release in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Joy; Auth, Jonathan; Abebe, Daniel T; Brenneman, Douglas E; Spong, Catherine Y

    2005-09-01

    Previously, the novel peptides NAPVSIPQ and SALLRSIPA were shown to prevent alcohol-induced fetal death and growth abnormalities in a mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome. This study evaluated whether these peptides could prevent long-term alcohol-induced learning abnormalities. In addition, because specific cytokines are known to effect long-term potentiation, a model of learning at the molecular level, we studied the effect of these novel peptides on tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interferon-gamma levels. We used a well-characterized mouse model of fetal alcohol syndrome. Pregnant mice were injected on day 8 with alcohol (0.03 mL/kg) or placebo. Pretreatment with NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA (20 mug) or placebo was given 30 minutes before alcohol. Embryos were removed after 6 hours, at which time cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and interferon-gamma levels were measured with enzyme-linked immunoassays. To test spatial learning, adult offspring from litters that were treated with alcohol, control, NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA then alcohol, or NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA alone were evaluated for latency to find a hidden platform in the Morris water maze. Alcohol treatment increased tumor necrosis factor-alpha levels versus control levels (50.0 +/- 3.5 pg/mL vs 32.7 +/- 2.4 pg/mL; P learn over the 7-day trial compared with the control group (P=.001). Groups that were pretreated with NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA then alcohol learned significantly, which was similar to the control group. Groups that were treated with only NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA learned significantly earlier, with the shortest latency once learning commenced. The peptides, NAPVSIPQ+SALLRSIPA, prevented the alcohol-induced spatial learning deficits and attenuated alcohol-induced proinflammatory cytokine increase in a model of fetal alcohol syndrome. This study demonstrates the peptides' significant in vivo efficacy with long-lasting effects obtained after prenatal administration.

  13. Modulation of cytokine release by differentiated CACO-2 cells in a compartmentalized coculture model with mononuclear leucocytes and nonpathogenic bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Haller, D.; Brinz, S.

    2004-01-01

    cells when leucocytes were stimulated directly with bacteria. This suppression was not paralleled by changes in the production of IL-10, IL-6 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta. When the bacteria were applied apically to the CACO-2 cell layer, the production of TNF-alpha, IL-12, IL-1beta, IL-8......, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-beta and interferon-gamma was pronouncedly lower as compared to the bacterial stimulation of leucocytes beneath the CACO-2 cells. In the latter experiments, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-alpha were the cytokines being mostly induced by apical addition of E. coli. Quantitative mRNA expression...... was investigated. Nonpathogenic Escherichia coli were added either to the apical or the basolateral compartment of this transwell cell culture system, the latter of which contained human leucocytes. The synthesis of tumour necrosis factor (TNF-alpha) and interleukin (IL)-12 was significantly suppressed by CACO-2...

  14. Nanostructure of liquid crystalline matrix determines in vitro sustained release and in vivo oral absorption kinetics for hydrophilic model drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kathy W Y; Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Hanley, Tracey; Boyd, Ben J

    2009-01-05

    Nanostructured lipid-based liquid crystalline systems have been proposed as sustained oral drug delivery systems, but the interplay between their intrinsic release rates, susceptibility to digestive processes, and the manner in which these effects impact on their application in vivo, are not well understood. In this study, two different bicontinuous cubic phases, prepared from glyceryl monooleate and phytantriol, and a reversed hexagonal phase formed by addition of a small amount of vitamin E to phytantriol (Q(II GMO), Q(II PHYT) and H(II PHYT+VitEA), respectively) were prepared. The release kinetics for a number of model hydrophilic drugs with increasing molecular weights (glucose, Allura Red and FITC-dextrans) was determined in in vitro release experiments. Diffusion-controlled release was observed in all cases as anticipated from previous studies with liquid crystalline systems, and it was discovered that the release rates of each drug decreased as the matrix was changed from Q(II GMO) to Q(II PHYT) to H(II PHYT+VitEA). Formulations containing (14)C-glucose, utilized as a rapidly absorbed marker of drug release, were then orally administered to rats to determine the relative in vivo absorption rates from the different formulations. The results showed a trend by which the rate of absorption of (14)C-glucose followed that observed in the corresponding in vitro release studies, providing the first indication that the nanostructure of these materials may provide the ability to tailor the absorption kinetics of hydrophilic drugs in vivo, and hence form the basis of a new drug delivery system.

  15. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampena, María B.; Barrio, María M.; Juliá, Estefanía P.; Blanco, Paula A.; von Euw, Erika M.; Mordoh, José; Levy, Estrella Mariel

    2017-01-01

    In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags). In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells. PMID:29109725

  16. Early Events of the Reaction Elicited by CSF-470 Melanoma Vaccine Plus Adjuvants: An In Vitro Analysis of Immune Recruitment and Cytokine Release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María B. Pampena

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In a previous work, we showed that CSF-470 vaccine plus bacillus Calmette–Guerin (BCG and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF as adjuvants resulted in a significant benefit in the distant metastasis-free survival when comparing vaccinated vs. IFN-α2b-treated high-risk cutaneous melanoma patients in a Phase II study. Immune monitoring demonstrated an increase in anti-tumor innate and adaptive immunities of vaccinated patients, with a striking increase in IFN-γ secreting lymphocytes specific for melanoma antigens (Ags. In an effort to dissect the first steps of the immune response elicited by CSF-470 vaccine plus adjuvants, we evaluated, in an in vitro model, leukocyte migration, cytokine production, and monocyte phagocytosis of vaccine cells. Our results demonstrate that leukocytes recruitment, mostly from the innate immune system, is an early event after CSF-470 vaccine plus BCG plus GM-CSF interaction with immune cells, possibly explained by the high expression of CCL2/MCP-1 and other chemokines by vaccine cells. Early release of TNF-α and IL-1β pro-inflammatory cytokines and efficient tumor Ags phagocytosis by monocytes take place and would probably create a favorable context for Ag processing and presentation. Although the presence of the vaccine cells hampered cytokines production stimulated by BCG in a mechanism partially mediated by TGF-β and IL-10, still significant levels of TNF-α and IL-1β could be detected. Thus, BCG was required to induce local inflammation in the presence of CSF-470 vaccine cells.

  17. Thymol attenuates inflammation in isoproterenol induced myocardial infarcted rats by inhibiting the release of lysosomal enzymes and downregulating the expressions of proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagoor Meeran, Mohamed Fizur; Jagadeesh, Govindan Sangaran; Selvaraj, Palanisamy

    2015-05-05

    Inflammation plays an important role in the development of myocardial infarction (MI). The current study dealt with the protective effects of thymol on inflammation in isoproterenol (ISO) induced myocardial infarcted rats. Male albino Wistar rats were pre and co-treated with thymol (7.5mg/kg body weight) daily for 7 days. ISO (100mg/kg body weight) was injected subcutaneously into rats at an interval of 24h for two days (6th and 7th day) to induce MI. ISO induced myocardial infarcted rats showed increased levels of serum cardiac troponin-T, high sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP), lysosomal thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and elevated ST-segments. Also, the activities of lysosomal enzymes such as β-glucuronidase, β-galactosidase, cathepsin-B and D, the stimulators of inflammatory mediators were increased in the serum and heart of ISO induced myocardial infarcted rats. Furthermore, ISO up regulates the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) genes in the myocardium of rats analyzed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Pre and co-treatment with thymol (7.5mg/kg body weight) near normalized the levels of lysosomal TBARS, activities of serum and heart lysosomal enzymes and downregulates the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines in the myocardium of ISO induced myocardial infarcted rats. Histopathological and transmission electron microscopic findings were also found in line with biochemical findings. Thus, the results of our study revealed that thymol attenuates inflammation by inhibiting the release of lysosomal enzymes and downregulates the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines by its potent anti-inflammatory effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines from Muscle and Bone Causes Tenocyte Death in a Novel Rotator Cuff In Vitro Explant Culture Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connizzo, Brianne K; Grodzinsky, Alan J

    2018-02-15

    Tendinopathy is a significant clinical problem thought to be associated with altered mechanical loading. Explant culture models allow researchers to alter mechanical loading in a controlled in vitro environment while maintaining tenocytes in their native matrix. However, current models do not accurately represent commonly injured tendons, ignoring contributions of associated musculature and bone, as well as regional collagen structure. This study details the characterization of a mouse rotator cuff explant culture model, including bone, tendon, and muscle (BTM). Following harvest, BTM explants were maintained in stress-deprived culture for one week and tendon was then assessed for changes in cell viability, metabolism, matrix structure and content. Matrix turnover occurred throughout culture as manifested in both gene expression and biosynthesis, but this did not translate to net changes in total collagen or sulfated glycosaminoglycan content. Furthermore, tendon structure was not significantly altered throughout culture. However, we found significant cell death in BTM tendons after 3 days in culture, which we hypothesize is cytokine-induced. Using a targeted multiplex assay, we found high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines released to the culture medium from muscle and bone, levels that did cause cell death in tendon-alone controls. Overall, this model presents an innovative approach to understanding rotator cuff injury and tenocyte mechanobiology in a clinically-relevant tendon structure. Our model can be a powerful tool to investigate how mechanical and biological stimuli can alter normal tendon health and lead to tendon degeneration, and may provide a testbed for therapeutics for tendon repair.

  19. In vivo expression profiles of cytokine and iNOS mRNAs in rats infected with Eimeria separata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, M Q; Hirzmann, J; Dafa'alla, T H; Zahner, H

    2001-05-22

    Studies on cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-10) and inducible NO-synthase (iNOS) gene transcription in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and the caecum wall were performed 0, 48, and 72h after primary and challenge infections of rats with Eimeria separata using RT-PCR. The amount of IFN-gamma mRNA was elevated in MLN and caeca 72h after primary and 48-72h after challenge infection when compared with uninfected controls. Increased amounts of IL-2 mRNA were only found in MLN of infected rats 72h post-infection (p.i.). In case of IL-10, infections did not affect the amount of mRNA in MLN, but led to markedly increased levels in the caecum wall of both infected groups 48 and 72h p.i. Levels of IL-4 mRNA remained unchanged after infections and IL-5 gene transcripts were undetectable. Amounts of iNOS mRNA (not investigated in MLN) were found strongly enhanced 48 and 72h p.i. in the caecum walls of all infected animals when compared with naive controls. The data are discussed in regard of the cellular source of the cytokines and their immunological role.

  20. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin modulates xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Nath, Niharika; Street, Cherease R; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Boring, Daniel; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-15

    The balance between phase-I carcinogen-activating and phase-II detoxifying xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes is critical to determining an individual's risk for cancer. We evaluated the effect of Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin (HS-ASA) on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in HT-29 human colon and Hepa 1c1c7 mouse liver adenocarcinoma cells and in Wistar rats. HS-ASA inhibited the growth of HT-29 and Hepa 1c1c7 cells, with an IC(50) of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM and 4.2 ± 0.4 μM, respectively. The IC(50) for ASA in both cell lines was greater than 5000 μM at 24h. In these cell lines, HS-ASA caused a dose-dependent increase in activity and expression of the phase-II enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinoneoxireductase (NQO1). It also caused an increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression. The levels of CYP 1A1 a phase-I enzyme was increased by HS-ASA in both cell lines. Pretreatment of cells with NaF, an esterase inhibitor, abrogated the HS-ASA-mediated increases in NQO1 enzyme activity. HS-ASA increased the protein levels of the transcription factor Nrf2, which is a regulator of the phase-II enzymes. In vivo, HS-ASA at 100mg/kg/day had no effect on rat's weights; it induced a 3.4-fold and 1.4-fold increase in hepatic GST and NQO1 enzyme activities, respectively. GST and NQO1 protein levels were also increased. In contrast to that in cultured cells, CYP 1A1 protein levels were not altered in vivo. Therefore, HS-ASA induces phase-II enzymes, at least in part, through the action of H(2)S and by modulating Nrf2; these effects may be part of its mechanism of action against carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Cell-surface trafficking and release of flt3 ligand from T lymphocytes is induced by common cytokine receptor gamma-chain signaling and inhibited by cyclosporin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chklovskaia, E; Nissen, C; Landmann, L; Rahner, C; Pfister, O; Wodnar-Filipowicz, A

    2001-02-15

    The flt3 ligand (FL) is a growth and differentiation factor for primitive hematopoietic precursors, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. Human T lymphocytes express FL constitutively, but the cytokine is retained intracellularly within the Golgi complex. FL is mobilized from the cytoplasmic stores and its serum levels are massively increased during the period of bone marrow aplasia after stem cell transplantation (SCT). Signals that trigger the release of FL by T cells remain unknown. This study shows that interleukin (IL)-2, IL-4, IL-7, and IL-15, acting through a common receptor gamma chain (gammac), but not cytokines interacting with other receptor families, are efficient inducers of cell surface expression of membrane-bound FL (mFL) and secretion of soluble FL (sFL) by human peripheral blood T lymphocytes. The gammac-mediated signaling up-regulated FL in a T-cell receptor-independent manner. IL-2 and IL-7 stimulated both FL messenger RNA (mRNA) expression and translocation of FL protein to the cell surface. Cyclosporin A (CsA) inhibited gammac-mediated trafficking of FL at the level of transition from the Golgi to the trans-Golgi network. Accordingly, serum levels of sFL and expression of mFL by T cells of CsA-treated recipients of stem cell allografts were reduced approximately 2-fold (P <.01) compared to patients receiving autologous grafts. The conclusion is that FL expression is controlled by gammac receptor signaling and that CsA interferes with FL release by T cells. The link between gammac-dependent T-cell activation and FL expression might be important for T-cell effector functions in graft acceptance and antitumor immunity after SCT.

  2. Release of tumor necrosis factor-α and prostanoids in whole blood cultures after in vivo exposure to low-dose aspirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilse Beckmann

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The preventive effect of low-dose aspirin in cardiovascular disease is generally attributed to its antiplatelet action caused by differential inhibition of platelet cyclooxygenase-1. However, there is evidence that aspirin also affects release of inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. It is not known whether this is caused by direct action on the cytokine pathway or indirectly through cyclooxygenase inhibition and altered prostanoid synthesis, or both.

  3. Evaluation of a topical herbal drug for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Vaibhav D; Shah, Tejas M; Nauriyal, Dev S; Kunjadia, Anju P; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-04-01

    Antibiotics have been in use in the treatment of bovine mastitis since decades; however, their use is associated with cost issues and human health concern. Use of herbal drugs does not generally carry these disadvantages. Many plants/herbs have been evaluated in the treatment of bovine mastitis with additional property of immunomodulation in affected mammary gland. To evaluate a topical herbal drug in two breeds of cattle for its in-vivo immunomodulatory effect on cytokines production and antibacterial activity in bovine subclinical mastitis. The response to treatment was evaluated by enumerating somatic cell count (SCC), determining total bacterial load, and studying the expression of different cytokines (interleukin [IL]-6, IL-8, IL-12, granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor, interferon (IFN)-γ and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α). The pre- and post-treatment SCC in mastitic quarters statistically did not differ significantly, however, total bacterial load declined significantly from day 0 onwards in both the breeds. Highly significant differences (P subclinical mastitis and thus the work supports its use as alternative herbal therapy against subclinical udder infection in bovines.

  4. Molecular identification and immunological characteristics of goose suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) in vitro and vivo following DTMUV challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Shun; Zhang, Jingyue; Wu, Zhen; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Zhu, Dekang; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue; Cheng, Anchun

    2017-05-01

    Purpose suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 (SOCS-1) is inducible feedback inhibitors of cytokine signaling and involved in viral infection through regulation of both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we firstly cloned SOCS-1 (goSOCS-1) from duck Tembusu virus (DTMUV) infected goose. The full-length sequence of goSOCS-1 ORF is 624bp and encoded 108 amino acids. Structurally, the mainly functional regions (KIR, SH2, SOCS-box) were conserved between avian and mammalian. The tissues distribution data showed SOCS-1 highly expressed in immune related tissues (SP, LU, HG) of both gosling and adult goose. Moreover, the goSOCS-1 transcripts were induced by goIFNs in GEFs and by TLR ligands in PBMCs. Notably, upon DTMUV infection, highly expression level of goSOCS-1 was detected in vitro and in vivo with high viral load. Our results indicated that goSOCS-1 might involve in both innate and adaptive antiviral immunity of waterfowl. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Once-daily propranolol extended-release tablet dosage form: formulation design and in vitro/in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaw-Bin; Tsai, Yi-Hung; Yang, Wan-Chiech; Chang, Jui-Sheng; Wu, Pao-Chu; Takayama, Kozo

    2004-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and optimize the propranolol once-daily extended release formulations containing HPMC, Microcrystalline cellulose (MCC) and lactose. In vitro studies, the response surface methodology and multiple response optimization utilizing the polynomial equation were used to search for the optimal formulation with specific release rate at different time intervals. The constrained mixture experimental design was used to prepare systematic model formulations, which were composed of three formulation variables: the content of HPMC (X(1)) MCC (X(2)) and lactose (X(3)). The drug release percent at 1.5, 4, 8, 14 and 24 h were the target responses and were restricted to 15-30, 35-55, 55-75, 75-90 and 90-110%, respectively. The results showed that the optimized formulation provided a dissolution pattern equivalent to the predicted curve, which indicated that the optimal formulation could be obtained using response surface methodology. The mechanism of drug release from HMPC matrix tablets followed non-Fickian diffusion. In the vivo study, the MRT was prolonged for matrix tablets when compared with commercial immediate release tablets. Furthermore, a linear relationship between in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption was observed in the beagle dogs.

  6. A Salmonella typhimurium ghost vaccine induces cytokine expression in vitro and immune responses in vivo and protects rats against homologous and heterologous challenges.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagarajan Vinod

    Full Text Available Salmonella enteritidis and Salmonella typhimurium are important food-borne bacterial pathogens, which are responsible for diarrhea and gastroenteritis in humans and animals. In this study, S. typhimurium bacterial ghost (STG was generated based on minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC of sodium hydroxide (NaOH. Experimental studies performed using in vitro and in vivo experimental model systems to characterize effects of STG as a vaccine candidate. When compared with murine macrophages (RAW 264.7 exposed to PBS buffer (98.1%, the macrophages exposed to formalin-killed inactivated cells (FKC, live wild-type bacterial cells and NaOH-induced STG at 1 × 108 CFU/mL showed 85.6%, 66.5% and 84.6% cell viability, respectively. It suggests that STG significantly reduces the cytotoxic effect of wild-type bacterial cells. Furthermore, STG is an excellent inducer for mRNAs of pro-inflammatory cytokine (TNF-α, IL-1β and factor (iNOS, anti-inflammatory cytokine (IL-10 and dual activities (IL-6 in the stimulated macrophage cells. In vivo, STG vaccine induced humoral and cellular immune responses and protection against homologous and heterologous challenges in rats. Furthermore, the immunogenicity and protective efficacy of STG vaccine were compared with those of FKC and non-vaccinated PBS control groups. The vaccinated rats from STG group exhibited higher levels of serum IgG antibody responses, serum bactericidal antibodies, and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell populations than those of the FKC and PBS control groups. Most importantly, after challenge with homologous and heterologous strains, the bacterial loads in the STG group were markedly lower than the FKC and PBS control groups. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the STG vaccine induces protective immunity against homologous and heterologous challenges.

  7. Mechanisms and functions of extracellular vesicle release in vivo-What we can learn from flies and worms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Katharina B; Wehman, Ann Marie

    2017-03-04

    Cells from bacteria to man release extracellular vesicles (EVs) that contain signaling molecules like proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The content, formation, and signaling roles of these conserved vesicles are diverse, but the physiological relevance of EV signaling in vivo is still debated. Studies in classical genetic model organisms like C. elegans and Drosophila have begun to reveal the developmental and behavioral roles for EVs. In this review, we discuss the emerging evidence for the in vivo signaling roles of EVs. Significant effort has also been made to understand the mechanisms behind the formation and release of EVs, specifically of exosomes derived from exocytosis of multivesicular bodies and of microvesicles derived from plasma membrane budding called ectocytosis. In this review, we detail the impact of flies and worms on understanding the proteins and lipids involved in EV biogenesis and highlight the open questions in the field.

  8. Activation of protease-activated receptors (PARs)-1 and -2 promotes alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and release of cytokines from human lung fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asokananthan, Nithiananthan; Lan, Rommel S; Graham, Peter T; Bakker, Anthony J; Tokanović, Ana; Stewart, Geoffrey A

    2015-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that protease-activated receptors (PARs) play an important role in various physiological processes. In the present investigation, we determined the expression of PARs on human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) and whether they were involved in cellular differentiation and pro-inflammatory cytokine and prostaglandin (PGE2) secretion. PAR-1, PAR-2, PAR-3, and PAR-4 were detected in fibroblasts using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry. Increased expression of PAR-4, but not other PARs, was observed in fibroblasts stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate. The archetypical activators of PARs, namely, thrombin and trypsin, as well as PAR-1 and PAR-2 agonist peptides, stimulated transient increases in intracellular Ca(2+), and promoted increased α-smooth muscle actin expression. The proteolytic and peptidic PAR activators also stimulated the release of IL-6 and IL-8, as well as PGE2, with a rank order of potency of PAR-1 > PAR-2. The combined stimulation of PAR-1 and PAR-2 resulted in an additive release of both IL-6 and IL-8. In contrast, PAR-3 and PAR-4 agonist peptides, as well as all the PAR control peptides examined, were inactive. These results suggest an important role for PARs associated with fibroblasts in the modulation of inflammation and remodeling in the airway. © 2015 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American Physiological Society and The Physiological Society.

  9. Hybrid wound dressings with controlled release of antibiotics: Structure-release profile effects and in vivo study in a guinea pig burn model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman, Meital; Egozi, Dana; Shemesh, Maoz; Keren, Aviad; Mazor, Eytan; Baranes-Zeevi, Maya; Goldstein, Nyra; Berdicevsky, Israela; Gilhar, Amos; Ullmann, Yehuda

    2015-08-01

    Over the last decades, wound dressings have evolved from a crude traditional gauze dressing to tissue-engineered scaffolds. Many types of wound dressing formats are commercially available or have been investigated. We developed and studied hybrid bilayer wound dressings which combine a drug-loaded porous poly(dl-lactic-co-glycolic acid) top layer with a spongy collagen sublayer. Such a structure is very promising because it combines the advantageous properties of both layers. The antibiotic drug gentamicin was incorporated into the top layer for preventing and/or defeating infections. In this study, we examined the effect of the top layer's structure on the gentamicin release profile and on the resulting in vivo wound healing. The latter was tested on a guinea pig burn model, compared to the neutral non-adherent dressing material Melolin® (Smith & Nephew) and Aquacel® Ag (ConvaTec). The release kinetics of gentamicin from the various studied formulations exhibited burst release values between 8% and 38%, followed by a drug elution rate that decreased with time and lasted for at least 7 weeks. The hybrid dressing, with relatively slow gentamicin release, enabled the highest degree of wound healing (28%), which is at least double that obtained by the other dressing formats (8-12%). It resulted in the lowest degree of wound contraction and a relatively low amount of inflammatory cells compared to the controls. This dressing was found to be superior to hybrid wound dressings with fast gentamicin release and to the neat hybrid dressing without drug release. Since this dressing exhibited promising results and does not require frequent bandage changes, it offers a potentially valuable concept for treating large infected burns. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effect of conjugated linoleic acid on proliferation and cytokine expression of bovine peripheral blood mononuclear cells and splenocytes ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lydia; von Soosten, Dirk; Sipka, Anja; Döll, Susanne; Beineke, Andreas; Schuberth, Hans-Joachim; Dänicke, Sven

    2012-04-01

    Twenty-five primiparous Holstein cows were divided into five experimental groups (five animals per group) by different feeding (control fat preparation [CON] or conjugated linoleic acid [CLA] supplement) and slaughtering times. The daily consumption of CLA was 6.0 g of the trans-10, cis-12 CLA-isomer and 5.7 g cis-9, trans-11 CLA isomer. An initial group (IG) was slaughtered one day post partum (pp) and the remaining 20 animals after 42 and 105 days pp, respectively. Blood for peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) separation was taken seven days ante partum and immediately before slaughter. The spleen was removed during dissection for isolation of splenocytes and samples for histopathological examination. Cell viability and Concanavalin A-stimulated proliferation was analysed by MTT and Alamar Blue assay. Basal expression of cytokines (interleukin [IL]-4, IL-10, IL-12, tumour necrosis factor alpha [TNF-alpha] and interferon gamma [IFN-gamma]) was measured by quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in unstimulated PMBC and splenocytes. With PBMC, stimulation indices increased from 1 day pp to 105 days pp with no differences between CLA and CON groups. With splenocytes, the stimulation index of the CLA group was lower compared to CON group 105 days pp. Baseline expression of cytokines was not effected by CLA feeding comparing similar time points. Also, no differences occurred in the expression of IL-4 in PBMC and IL-10 as well as TNF-alpha in both cell populations, when comparing the feeding groups separately with IG. IL-4 was more frequently expressed in CLA group 42 days pp in splenocytes. IFN-gamma expression was increased 105 days pp in CLA group in splenocytes and PBMC. IL-12 was higher expressed 105 days (PBMC) or 42 days pp (splenocytes) when compared to IG. There was no effect of CLA feeding or slaughter time on histopathology of the spleen. In conclusion, the present results demonstrate an inhibiting effect of CLA on the mitogen

  11. The in vivo release characteristics of a multi-compartment vaginal ring releasing 3-keto-desogestrel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R; Newton, J R

    1989-11-01

    The results of a stage I study of a new vaginal ring releasing 3-keto-Desogestrel [3kDOG] is reported. The study design consisted of one study cycle, where the ring was used continuously for 21 days and then removed. Twenty healthy volunteers were randomly allocated to each of two study groups. On day 5 of the menstrual cycle, group A used a vaginal ring releasing 30 micrograms 3kDOG per 24 hours and group B used a 15 micrograms 3kDOG per 24 hours ring. After initial absorption of the 3kDOG a plateau phase was reached in 46 hours [group A] and 49 hours [group B]. On reaching the plateau phase, the overall decline in plasma levels during the 21 days of use was 5.24% for group A and 5.27% for group B. This represents a daily decline in plasma levels of 0.27% and 0.28% for the 30 micrograms and 15 micrograms per 24 hours rings, respectively. The plasma levels achieved by the rings were significantly different throughout (p = 0.011). On removal after 21 days, the mean removal half-life for both ring types was similar at 20.9 hours for group A and 21.1 hours for group B. It is concluded that the characteristics of the delivery system are worthy of further study as a potential means of contraception using 3kDOG delivered from a vaginal ring.

  12. Administration of noradrenaline in the autonomic ganglia modifies the testosterone release from the testis using an ex vivo system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa, Zulema Y; Palmada, Miguel N; Fóscolo, Mabel R; Capani, Francisco; Conill, Alberto; Cavicchia, Juan Carlos

    2009-08-01

    The male gonad receives nerve fibres from the autonomic ganglionic system. These fibres converge on the testis along two pathways, the superior and the inferior spermatic nerves. The superior spermatic nerve runs from the superior mesenteric ganglion alongside the testicular artery, whereas the inferior spermatic nerve originates in inferior mesenteric ganglion, accompanies the vas deferens and penetrates the inferior pole of the testis. The aim of this work was to evaluate androgen release after the addition of noradrenaline or adrenoreceptor antagonists (propranolol or phentolamine) to the ganglionic compartment. An ex vivo system used in a previous work was incubated in two separate containers, one for the testis and the other for the ganglion. Both organs remain interconnected (as in vivo) by the respective spermatic nerve. When noradrenaline was added to the inferior mesenteric ganglion, testosterone release in the gonad container underwent a progressive and significant increment. Propranolol diminishes and phentolamine increases the androgen release. When using the superior mesenteric ganglion, no changes were observed. These results indicate that the ganglionic stimulation of the autonomic system clearly participates in testosterone release from the testis. This effect depends on the ganglion involved. These results make it evident that not only the classical and well-known hypothalamus-hypophysial axis, but also the peripheral nervous system, via the autonomic ganglia, are directly involved in the endocrine control of the testis.

  13. Improved in Vivo Performance of Amperometric Oxygen (PO2) Sensing Catheters via Electrochemical Nitric Oxide Generation/Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    A novel electrochemically controlled release method for nitric oxide (NO) (based on electrochemical reduction of nitrite ions) is combined with an amperometric oxygen sensor within a dual lumen catheter configuration for the continuous in vivo sensing of the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) in blood. The on-demand electrochemical NO generation/release method is shown to be fully compatible with amperometric PO2 sensing. The performance of the sensors is evaluated in rabbit veins and pig arteries for 7 and 21 h, respectively. Overall, the NO releasing sensors measure both venous and arterial PO2 values more accurately with an average deviation of −2 ± 11% and good correlation (R2 = 0.97) with in vitro blood measurements, whereas the corresponding control sensors without NO release show an average deviation of −31 ± 28% and poor correlation (R2 = 0.43) at time points >4 h after implantation in veins and >6 h in arteries. The NO releasing sensors induce less thrombus formation on the catheter surface in both veins and arteries (p < 0.05). This electrochemical NO generation/release method could offer a new and attractive means to improve the biocompatibility and performance of implantable chemical sensors. PMID:26201351

  14. Human osteoarthritic cartilage shows reduced in vivo expression of IL-4, a chondroprotective cytokine that differentially modulates IL-1β-stimulated production of chemokines and matrix-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Assirelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In osteoarthritis (OA, an inflammatory environment is responsible for the imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic activity of chondrocytes and, thus, for articular cartilage derangement. This study was aimed at providing further insight into the impairment of the anabolic cytokine IL-4 and its receptors in human OA cartilage, as well as the potential ability of IL-4 to antagonize the catabolic phenotype induced by IL-1β. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The in vivo expression of IL-4 and IL-4 receptor subunits (IL-4R, IL-2Rγ, IL-13Rα1 was investigated on full thickness OA or normal knee cartilage. IL-4 expression was found to be significantly lower in OA, both in terms of the percentage of positive cells and the amount of signal per cell. IL-4 receptor type I and II were mostly expressed in mid-deep cartilage layers. No significant difference for each IL-4 receptor subunit was noted. IL-4 anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic activity was assessed in vitro in the presence of IL-1β and/or IL-4 for 24 hours using differentiated high density primary OA chondrocyte also exhibiting the three IL-4 R subunits found in vivo. Chemokines, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes and their inhibitors were evaluated at mRNA (real time PCR and protein (ELISA or western blot levels. IL-4 did not affect IL-1β-induced mRNA expression of GRO-α/CXCL1, IL-8/CXCL8, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-1 or TIMP-3. Conversely, IL-4 significantly inhibited RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. These results were confirmed at protein level for RANTES/CCL5 and MMP-13. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate for the first time that OA cartilage has a significantly lower expression of IL-4. Furthermore, we found differences in the spectrum of biological effects of IL-4. The findings that IL-4 has the ability to hamper the IL-1β-induced release of both MMP-13 and CCL5/RANTES, both markers of OA chondrocytes, strongly indicates IL-4 as a

  15. Human osteoarthritic cartilage shows reduced in vivo expression of IL-4, a chondroprotective cytokine that differentially modulates IL-1β-stimulated production of chemokines and matrix-degrading enzymes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assirelli, Elisa; Pulsatelli, Lia; Dolzani, Paolo; Platano, Daniela; Olivotto, Eleonora; Filardo, Giuseppe; Trisolino, Giovanni; Facchini, Andrea; Borzì, Rosa Maria; Meliconi, Riccardo

    2014-01-01

    In osteoarthritis (OA), an inflammatory environment is responsible for the imbalance between the anabolic and catabolic activity of chondrocytes and, thus, for articular cartilage derangement. This study was aimed at providing further insight into the impairment of the anabolic cytokine IL-4 and its receptors in human OA cartilage, as well as the potential ability of IL-4 to antagonize the catabolic phenotype induced by IL-1β. The in vivo expression of IL-4 and IL-4 receptor subunits (IL-4R, IL-2Rγ, IL-13Rα1) was investigated on full thickness OA or normal knee cartilage. IL-4 expression was found to be significantly lower in OA, both in terms of the percentage of positive cells and the amount of signal per cell. IL-4 receptor type I and II were mostly expressed in mid-deep cartilage layers. No significant difference for each IL-4 receptor subunit was noted. IL-4 anti-inflammatory and anti-catabolic activity was assessed in vitro in the presence of IL-1β and/or IL-4 for 24 hours using differentiated high density primary OA chondrocyte also exhibiting the three IL-4 R subunits found in vivo. Chemokines, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes and their inhibitors were evaluated at mRNA (real time PCR) and protein (ELISA or western blot) levels. IL-4 did not affect IL-1β-induced mRNA expression of GRO-α/CXCL1, IL-8/CXCL8, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-1 or TIMP-3. Conversely, IL-4 significantly inhibited RANTES/CCL5, MIP-1α/CCL3, MIP-1β/CCL4, MMP-13 and ADAMTS-4. These results were confirmed at protein level for RANTES/CCL5 and MMP-13. Our results indicate for the first time that OA cartilage has a significantly lower expression of IL-4. Furthermore, we found differences in the spectrum of biological effects of IL-4. The findings that IL-4 has the ability to hamper the IL-1β-induced release of both MMP-13 and CCL5/RANTES, both markers of OA chondrocytes, strongly indicates IL-4 as a pivotal anabolic cytokine in cartilage whose impairment impacts on OA pathogenesis.

  16. Anti-inflammatory potential of Capparis spinosa L. in vivo in mice through inhibition of cell infiltration and cytokine gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Azhary, Khadija; Tahiri Jouti, Nadia; El Khachibi, Meryam; Moutia, Mouna; Tabyaoui, Imane; El Hou, Abdelhalim; Achtak, Hafid; Nadifi, Sellama; Habti, Norddine; Badou, Abdallah

    2017-01-31

    Several chronic inflammatory diseases are characterized by inappropriate CD4+ T cell response. In the present study, we assessed the ability of Capparis spinosa L. (CS) preparation to orientate, in vivo, the immune response mediated by CD4+ T cells towards an anti-inflammatory response. The in vivo study was carried out by using the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model in Swiss mice. Then we performed a histological analysis followed by molecular study by using real time RT-PCR. We also realized a phytochemical screening and a liquid-liquid separation of CS preparation. Our study allowed us to detect a significantly reduced edema in mice treated with CS preparations relative to control. CS effect was dose dependent, statistically similar to that observed with indomethacin, independent of the plant genotype and of the period of treatment. Furthermore, our histology studies revealed that CS induced a significant decrease in immune cell infiltration, in vasodilatation and in dermis thickness in the inflammatory site. Interestingly, we showed that CS operated by inhibiting cytokine gene expression including IFNγ, IL-17 and IL-4. Besides, phytochemical screening of CS extract showed the presence of several chemical families such as saponins, flavonoids and alkaloids. One (hexane fraction) out of the three distinct prepared fractions, exhibited an anti-inflammatory effect similar to that of the raw preparation, and would likely contain the bioactive(s) molecule(s). Altogether, our data indicate that CS regulates inflammation induced in vivo in mice and thus could be a source of anti-inflammatory molecules, which could be used in some T lymphocyte-dependent inflammatory diseases.

  17. Inducement of cytokine release by GFPBW2, a novel polysaccharide from fruit bodies of Grifola frondosa , through dectin-1 in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Fang, Jianping; Ni, Xinyan; Li, Jie; Liu, Qin; Dong, Qun; Duan, Jinyou; Ding, Kan

    2013-11-27

    Polysaccharides, especially β-glucans isolated from various species of mushrooms, are considered as biological response modifiers (BRMs) to be widely used in the treatment of cancer, especially due to their immunostimulatory activity. We herein characterized the structure of a novel water-soluble homogeneous polysaccharide (GFPBW2) from the fruit bodies of mushroom Grifola frondosa and investigated its immunomodulatory activity in vitro. GFPBW2 was purified from the alkali-extracted fractions by stepwise elution with a molecular weight of 26.2 kDa. On the basis of infrared and NMR spectroscopy, methylation and monosaccharide composition analysis, partial acid hydrolysis, and Smith degradation, its structure was elucidated to possess a backbone consisting of β-d-1,3- and β-d-1,4-linked glucopyranosyl residues, with branches attached to O-6 of β-d-1,3-linked glucopyranosyl residues. Functionally, it is an effective inducer of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) secretion in murine resident peritoneal macrophages. Using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) analysis, we found that GFPBW2 could bind dendritic cell-associated C-type lectin-1 (Dectin-1) with an affinity constant (Kd) value of 1.08 × 10 (-7) M, while it could activate Syk and enhance TNF-α production in RAW264.7 cells overexpressing wild type but not mutant Dectin-1. Furthermore, Syk, NF-κB signaling, and cytokine release in resident peritoneal macrophages induced by GFPBW2 could be significantly inhibited by a specific Dectin-1 blocking reagent, Laminarin. These data suggested that GFPBW2 might be a potential ligand of Dectin-1, and the potential of GFPBW2 to activate macrophage through triggering cytokine secretion might be attributed, at least in part, to the involvement of Dectin-1.

  18. Kinetics of chemotaxis, cytokine, and chemokine release of NR8383 macrophages after exposure to inflammatory and inert granular insoluble particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schremmer, I; Brik, A; Weber, D G; Rosenkranz, N; Rostek, A; Loza, K; Brüning, T; Johnen, G; Epple, M; Bünger, J; Westphal, G A

    2016-11-30

    Accumulation of macrophages and neutrophil granulocytes in the lung are key events in the inflammatory response to inhaled particles. The present study aims at the time course of chemotaxis in vitro in response to the challenge of various biopersistent particles and its functional relation to the transcription of inflammatory mediators. NR8383 rat alveolar macrophages were challenged with particles of coarse quartz, barium sulfate, and nanosized silica for one, four, and 16h and with coarse and nanosized titanium dioxide particles (rutile and anatase) for 16h only. The cell supernatants were used to investigate the chemotaxis of unexposed NR8383 macrophages. The transcription of inflammatory mediators in cells exposed to quartz, silica, and barium sulfate was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Challenge with quartz, silica, and rutile particles induced significant chemotaxis of unexposed NR8383 macrophages. Chemotaxis caused by quartz and silica was accompanied by an elevated transcription of CCL3, CCL4, CXCL1, CXCL3, and TNFα. Quartz exposure showed an earlier onset of both effects compared to the nanosized silica. The strength of this response roughly paralleled the cytotoxic effects. Barium sulfate and anatase did not induce chemotaxis and barium sulfate as well caused no elevated transcription. In conclusion, NR8383 macrophages respond to the challenge with inflammatory particles with the release of chemotactic compounds that act on unexposed macrophages. The kinetics of the response differs between the various particles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cryptotanshinone-Loaded Cerasomes Formulation: In Vitro Drug Release, in Vivo Pharmacokinetics, and in Vivo Efficacy for Topical Therapy of Acne

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zuo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cerasomes (CS, evolved from liposomes, are novel drug-delivery systems that have potential medical application as carriers for drugs or active ingredients. Although many studies have been conducted on the pharmaceutical and physicochemical properties of CS, the role of CS in influencing the in vivo plasma and topical pharmacokinetics and efficacy of topical drug delivery remain unclear. In this context, we chose cryptotanshinone (CTS as a model drug for the preparation of CTS-CS by means of the ethanol injection method to investigate their in vitro/in vivo drug-release behavior and in vivo efficacy. (1 In in vitro studies, CTS-CS gel was proven to be capable of achieving a higher permeation rate and significant accumulation in the dermis of isolated rat skin using Franz diffusion cells. (2 In in vivo studies, microdialysis experiments used to measure the plasma and topical pharmacokinetics demonstrated that the CS had a high drug concentration, short peak time, and slow elimination. Meanwhile, the plasma area under the concentration–time curve of CTS-CS gel was less than half that for the CTS gel in 12 h, which indicates that the drug bioavailability dramatically increased in the experiments. (3 In in vivo efficacy studies, we duplicated a rat acne model and performed antiacne efficacy experiments. The CTS-CS gel improved the antiacne efficacy compared to that of ordinary CTS gel. Moreover, it inhibited the expression of interleukin-1α and androgen receptors effectively. All of these results show that CTS-CS gel has significant potential for the treatment of acne induced by inflammation and excessive secretion of androgen, suggesting that CS formulations were designed as a good therapeutic option for skin disease.

  20. Calyptranthes grandifolia O.Berg (Myrtaceae) ethanolic extract inhibits TNF-α gene expression and cytokine release in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dexheimer, Geórgia Muccillo; Becker Delving, Luciana Knabben de Oliveira; de Oliveira, Henrique Sulzbach; Biolchi, Vanderlei; Goettert, Márcia Inês; Pozzobon, Adriane

    2017-05-01

    Anti-tumor therapies based on anti-inflammatory effects have been considered in cancer treatment. Survival, proliferation and, resultantly, invasion and metastasis of tumor cells are regulated by local inflammatory mediators. Primary inflammatory cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF), are targets for anticancer therapy. Several anti‑inflammatory agents isolated from natural products are becoming important chemopreventive and therapeutic agents for cancer. The present study aimed to investigate the expression of TNF‑α, nuclear factor‑κΒ (NF‑κΒ) and p38α mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38α) genes, associated with proliferation and inflammation in the Caco‑2 cell line treated with ethanolic and hexanic extracts of Calyptranthes grandifolia O.Berg (Myrtaceae). Caco‑2 cells were cultured and treated with plant extract at different concentrations (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml) and stimulated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). For gene expression, analysis was performed by total RNA extraction followed by synthesis of complementary DNA and analysis by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The release of TNF‑α cytokine was evaluated by ELISA in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages activated by LPS. Among the evaluated genes, there was a decrease in TNF-α expression at 100 and 200 µg/ml concentrations only with the ethanolic extract (P<0.025). The p38α gene exhibited a tendency to increase expression only when treated with ethanolic extract and the NF‑κΒ gene did not significantly differ compared with the positive control when treated with either analyzed extract. The inhibition of TNF-α cytokine in the RAW 264.7 cell line was significant (P<0.05) in ethanolic extract at 200 µg/ml compared with the positive control (LPS 1 µg/ml). In conclusion, the ethanolic extract may exhibit an anti‑inflammatory activity by inhibiting TNF‑α. However, further studies are required to confirm its potential anti-inflammatory effects.

  1. Insulin and IGF-I inhibit GH synthesis and release in vitro and in vivo by separate mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahete, Manuel D; Córdoba-Chacón, José; Lin, Qing; Brüning, Jens C; Kahn, C Ronald; Castaño, Justo P; Christian, Helen; Luque, Raúl M; Kineman, Rhonda D

    2013-07-01

    IGF-I is considered a primary inhibitor of GH secretion. Insulin may also play an important role in regulating GH levels because insulin, like IGF-I, can suppress GH synthesis and release in primary pituitary cell cultures and insulin is negatively correlated with GH levels in vivo. However, understanding the relative contribution insulin and IGF-I exert on controlling GH secretion has been hampered by the fact that circulating insulin and IGF-I are regulated in parallel and insulin (INSR) and IGF-I (IGFIR) receptors are structurally/functionally related and ubiquitously expressed. To evaluate the separate roles of insulin and IGF-I in directly regulating GH secretion, we used the Cre/loxP system to knock down the INSR and IGFIR in primary mouse pituitary cell cultures and found insulin-mediated suppression of GH is independent of the IGFIR. In addition, pharmacological blockade of intracellular signals in both mouse and baboon cultures revealed insulin requires different pathways from IGF-I to exert a maximal inhibitory effect on GH expression/release. In vivo, somatotrope-specific knockout of INSR (SIRKO) or IGFIR (SIGFRKO) increased GH levels. However, comparison of the pattern of GH release, GH expression, somatotrope morphometry, and pituitary explant sensitivity to acute GHRH challenge in lean SIRKO and SIGFRKO mice strongly suggests the primary role of insulin in vivo is to suppress GH release, whereas IGF-I serves to regulate GH synthesis. Finally, SIRKO and/or SIGFRKO could not prevent high-fat, diet-induced suppression of pituitary GH expression, indicating other factors/tissues are involved in the decline of GH observed with weight gain.

  2. A low molecular weight ES-20 protein released in vivo and in vitro with diagnostic potential in lymph node tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shende N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine role of antigens released in vivo and in vitro in immunodiagnosis of tuberculosis (TB. Methods: In vivo released circulating tuberculosis antigen (CTA was obtained from TB sera by ammonium sulphate precipitation and in vitro released excretory-secretory (ES antigens from Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture filtrate. CTA and ES antigens were fractionated by SDS-PAGE and electro-eluted gel fractions were analysed for antigen by ELISA. Results: Low molecular weight proteins CTA-9 and ES-9 showed high titre of antigen activity. To explore the diagnostic potential of low molecular weight ES antigen, M. tuberculosis ES antigen was further fractionated by gel filtration chromatography followed by purification on anion exchange column using fast protein liquid chromatography and a highly seroreactive ESG-5D (ES-20 antigen was obtained. Competitive inhibition showed that CTA-9 and ES-9 antigens inhibit the binding of ES-20 antigen to its antibody. Seroanalysis showed sensitivity of 83 and 80% for ES-20 antigen and antibody detection, respectively, in pulmonary TB and 90% in lymph node TB. Conclusions: Seroreactivity studies using M. tuberculosis ES-20 antigen showed usefulness in detection of TB; in particular, lymph node TB.

  3. In vivo and in vitro taste masking of ofloxacin and sustained release by forming interpenetrating polymer network beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajesh, A Michael; Popat, Kiritkumar Mangaldas

    2017-02-01

    Drug-resin complexes (DRCs) of ofloxacin and ion-exchange resins (IERs) were prepared in different ratios of drug/IERs, that is, 1:1, 1:2 and 1:4 (w/w) and investigated for taste masking by in vivo and in vitro release studies. Human volunteers graded AD1:4 (DRC) as tasteless with an average value of 0.3 ± 0.03 and in vitro study showed that AD 1:4 released only 1.70 ± 0.86% of drug at salivary pH within 30s. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), powder X-ray diffraction (P-XRD) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) studies of AD 1:4 showed the change in the morphology of the drug, that is, from crystalline phase to amorphous phase during complex formation. The release of drug from AD 1:4 was completed within 30 min at gastric pH 1.2 and to extend the release time of drug at gastric pH, it was entrapped with different biopolymers, such as sodium alginate (SA) and sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (SCMC), in the presence of ferric chloride and glutaraldehyde (GA) to form interpenetrating polymer network (IPN) beads. FTIR studies revealed that IPN beads were crosslinked with Fe3+ and GA. The release of drug at gastric and intestinal pH was 14.53 ± 1.52% and 65.86 ± 1.29%, respectively, for a contact time of 10 h. The kinetics release study shows fickian diffusion for ionically crosslinked beads and zero-order release for GA crosslinking beads.

  4. An attempt to establish an in vitro-in vivo correlation: case of paracetamol immediate-release tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, J; Durić, Z; Jovanović, M; Ibrić, S; Petrović, M

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the possibility of developing different levels of in vitro-in vivo correlation for immediate-release paracetamol tablets using in vitro dissolution data obtained under various experimental conditions. The influence of agitation intensity and pH value of the dissolution media was investigated. The level B approach, using statistical moment analysis led to poor correlation results. The results obtained by numerical deconvolution in order to study level A correlation indicated that good correlation should be sought with moderate levels of agitation (beyond 50 rpm in rotating basket apparatus). Results obtained by numerical convolution showed the highest level of correlation, level A, with one-to-one relationship between observed and predicted in vivo profiles.

  5. Detection of autoantibodies to cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtzen, K; Hansen, M B; Ross, C

    2000-01-01

    Autoantibodies to various cytokines have been reported in normal individuals and in patients with various infectious and immunoinflammatory disorders, and similar antibodies (Ab) may be induced in patients receiving human recombinant cytokines. The clinical relevance of these Ab is often difficult...... to evaluate. Not only are in vitro neutralizing cytokine Ab not necessarily neutralizing in vivo, but assays for binding and neutralizing Ab to cytokines are often difficult to interpret. For example, denaturation of immobilized cytokines in immunoblotting techniques and immunometric assays may leave Ab...

  6. Cytotoxic effects and changes in cytokine gene expression induced by microcystin-containing extract in fish immune cells--an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rymuszka, Anna; Adaszek, Łukasz

    2013-06-01

    Blooms of cyanobacteria producing very toxic secondary metabolites (especially microcystins) are potent environmental stressors, hazardous not only to aquatic animals but also to public health. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of an extract containing microcystins on immune cells isolated from the common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.). In the present study it has been found that the extract induced apoptosis and inhibited in vitro lymphocyte proliferation. In addition, the results indicated the possible role of oxidative stress in this cytotoxicity and apoptosis. The in vivo investigations showed that the extract containing microcystins had greater suppressive effects on the essential functions of immune cells (intracellular reactive oxygen species production and lymphocyte proliferation) than the pure toxin alone. Moreover, immersion of fish in the toxic extract caused changes in the mRNA levels of various pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in carp leukocytes, while after exposure to the pure toxin, only IL1-β expression was markedly up-regulated. The observed modulatory effects on immune cells could have important implications for the health of planktivorous fish, which feed more frequently on toxic cyanobacteria. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Consumption of selenium-enriched broccoli increases cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated ex vivo, a preliminary human intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley-Hewitt, Kerry L; Chen, Ronan K-Y; Lill, Ross E; Hedderley, Duncan I; Herath, Thanuja D; Matich, Adam J; McKenzie, Marian J

    2014-12-01

    Selenium (Se) is a micronutrient essential for human health, including immune function. Previous research indicates that Se supplementation may cause a shift from T helper (Th)1- to Th2-type immune responses. We aim to test the potential health promoting effects of Se-enriched broccoli. In a human trial, 18 participants consumed control broccoli daily for 3 days. After a 3-day wash-out period, the participants were provided with Se-enriched broccoli containing 200 μg of Se per serving for 3 days. Plasma and peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) samples were collected at the start and end of each broccoli feeding period for analysis of total Se and measurement of cytokine production from PBMC stimulated with antigens ex vivo. Plasma Se content remained consistent throughout the control broccoli feeding period and the baseline of the Se-enriched broccoli period (1.22 μmol/L) and then significantly increased following 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding. Interleukin (IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-13, and IL-22) production from PBMC significantly increased after 3 days of Se-enriched broccoli feeding compared with baseline. This study indicates that consumption of Se-enriched broccoli may increase immune responses toward a range of immune challenges. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Formulation and in vitro, in vivo evaluation of effervescent floating sustained-release imatinib mesylate tablet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Kadivar

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is an antineoplastic agent which has high absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT. Conventional imatinib mesylate (Gleevec tablets produce rapid and relatively high peak blood levels and requires frequent administration to keep the plasma drug level at an effective range. This might cause side effects, reduced effectiveness and poor therapeutic management. Therefore, floating sustained-release Imatinib tablets were developed to allow the tablets to be released in the upper part of the GIT and overcome the inadequacy of conventional tablets.Floating sustained-release Imatinib mesylate tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method. Tablets were formulated using Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC K4M, with Sodium alginate (SA and Carbomer 934P (CP as release-retarding polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3 as the effervescent agent and lactose as a filler. Floating behavior, in vitro drug release, and swelling index studies were conducted. Initial and total drug release duration was compared with a commercial tablet (Gleevec in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2 at 37 ± 0.5°C for 24 hours. Tablets were then evaluated for various physical parameters, including weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, and drug content. Consequently, 6 months of physical stability studies and in vitro gastro-retentive studies were conducted.Statistical data analysis revealed that tablets containing a composition of 14.67% w/w HPMC K4M, 10.67%, w/w Na alginate, 1.33%, w/w Carbomer 934P and 9.33%, w/w NaHCO3 produced the most favorable formulation to develop 24-hour sustained-release tablets with optimum floating behavior and satisfactory physicochemical characteristics. Furthermore, in vitro release study revealed that the formulated SR tablet had significantly lower Cmax and higher Tmax compared to the conventional tablet (Gleevec. Thus, formulated SR tablets preserved persistent concentration of plasma up to 24 hours

  9. Formulation and in vitro, in vivo evaluation of effervescent floating sustained-release imatinib mesylate tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadivar, Ali; Kamalidehghan, Behnam; Javar, Hamid Akbari; Davoudi, Ehsan Taghizadeh; Zaharuddin, Nurul Dhania; Sabeti, Bahareh; Chung, Lip Yong; Noordin, Mohamed Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Imatinib mesylate is an antineoplastic agent which has high absorption in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT). Conventional imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) tablets produce rapid and relatively high peak blood levels and requires frequent administration to keep the plasma drug level at an effective range. This might cause side effects, reduced effectiveness and poor therapeutic management. Therefore, floating sustained-release Imatinib tablets were developed to allow the tablets to be released in the upper part of the GIT and overcome the inadequacy of conventional tablets. Floating sustained-release Imatinib mesylate tablets were prepared using the wet granulation method. Tablets were formulated using Hydroxypropyl Methylcellulose (HPMC K4M), with Sodium alginate (SA) and Carbomer 934P (CP) as release-retarding polymers, sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as the effervescent agent and lactose as a filler. Floating behavior, in vitro drug release, and swelling index studies were conducted. Initial and total drug release duration was compared with a commercial tablet (Gleevec) in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) at 37 ± 0.5°C for 24 hours. Tablets were then evaluated for various physical parameters, including weight variation, thickness, hardness, friability, and drug content. Consequently, 6 months of physical stability studies and in vitro gastro-retentive studies were conducted. Statistical data analysis revealed that tablets containing a composition of 14.67% w/w HPMC K4M, 10.67%, w/w Na alginate, 1.33%, w/w Carbomer 934P and 9.33%, w/w NaHCO3 produced the most favorable formulation to develop 24-hour sustained-release tablets with optimum floating behavior and satisfactory physicochemical characteristics. Furthermore, in vitro release study revealed that the formulated SR tablet had significantly lower Cmax and higher Tmax compared to the conventional tablet (Gleevec). Thus, formulated SR tablets preserved persistent concentration of plasma up to 24 hours. In conclusion

  10. Evidence for lysosomal exocytosis and release of aggrecan-degrading hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward R. Bastow

    2012-02-01

    The abundant proteoglycan, aggrecan, is resorbed from growth plate cartilage during endochondral bone ossification, yet mice with genetically-ablated aggrecan-degrading activity have no defects in bone formation. To account for this apparent anomaly, we propose that lysosomal hydrolases degrade extracellular, hyaluronan-bound aggrecan aggregates in growth plate cartilage, and that lysosomal hydrolases are released from hypertrophic chondrocytes into growth plate cartilage via Ca2+-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. In this study we confirm that hypertrophic chondrocytes release hydrolases via lysosomal exocytosis in vitro and we show in vivo evidence for lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes during skeletal development. We show that lysosome-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1 is detected at the cell surface following in vitro treatment of epiphyseal chondrocytes with the calcium ionophore, ionomycin. Furthermore, we show that in addition to the lysosomal exocytosis markers, cathepsin D and β-hexosaminidase, ionomycin induces release of aggrecan- and hyaluronan-degrading activity from cultured epiphyseal chondrocytes. We identify VAMP-8 and VAMP7 as v-SNARE proteins with potential roles in lysosomal exocytosis in hypertrophic chondrocytes, based on their colocalisation with LAMP1 at the cell surface in secondary ossification centers in mouse tibiae. We propose that resorbing growth plate cartilage involves release of destructive hydrolases from hypertrophic chondrocytes, via lysosomal exocytosis.

  11. Paclitaxel-loaded polymeric microparticles: Quantitative relationships between in vitro drug release rate and in vivo pharmacodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Max; Lu, Ze; Wientjes, M. Guillaume; Au, Jessie L.-S.

    2013-01-01

    Intraperitoneal therapy (IP) has demonstrated survival advantages in patients with peritoneal cancers, but has not become a widely practiced standard-of-care in part due to local toxicity and sub-optimal drug delivery. Paclitaxel-loaded, polymeric microparticles were developed to overcome these limitations. The present study evaluated the effects of microparticle properties on paclitaxel release (extent and rate) and in vivo pharmacodynamics. In vitro paclitaxel release from microparticles with varying physical characteristics (i.e., particle size, copolymer viscosity and composition) was evaluated. A method was developed to simulate the dosing rate and cumulative dose released in the peritoneal cavity based on the in vitro release data. The relationship between the simulated drug delivery and treatment outcomes of seven microparticle compositions was studied in mice bearing IP human pancreatic tumors, and compared to that of the intravenous Cremophor micellar paclitaxel solution used off-label in previous IP studies. Paclitaxel release from polymeric microparticles in vitro was multi-phasic; release was greater and more rapid from microparticles with lower polymer viscosities and smaller diameters (e.g., viscosity of 0.17 vs. 0.67 dl/g and diameter of 5–6 vs. 50–60 μm). The simulated drug release in the peritoneal cavity linearly correlated with treatment efficacy in mice (r2>0.8, pmicroparticles, which distribute more evenly in the peritoneal cavity compared to the large microparticles, showed greater dose efficiency. For single treatment, the microparticles demonstrated up to 2-times longer survival extension and 4-times higher dose efficiency, relative to the paclitaxel/Cremophor micellar solution. Upon repeated dosing, the paclitaxel/Cremophor micellar solution showed cumulative toxicity whereas the microparticle that yielded 2-times longer survival did not display cumulative toxicity. The efficacy of IP therapy depended on both temporal and spatial

  12. Histamine is not released in acute thermal injury in human skin in vivo: a microdialysis study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Lars J; Pedersen, Juri L; Skov, Per S

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Animal models have shown histamine to be released from the skin during the acute phase of a burn injury. The role of histamine during the early phase of thermal injuries in humans remains unclear. PURPOSE: The objectives of this trial were to study histamine release in human skin during...... the acute phase of a standardized thermal injury in healthy volunteers. METHODS: Histamine concentrations in human skin were measured by skin microdialysis technique. Microdialysis fibers were inserted into the dermis in the lower leg in male healthy volunteers. A standardized superficial thermal injury...... was elicited by a heating thermode (49 degrees C) applied to the skin for 5 min. Histamine in dialysate was analyzed for up to 2 h after the injury using two different analytical methods. RESULTS: Spectrofluorometric assay of histamine showed no histamine release in separate studies using 2-min samples over 20...

  13. In vivo effect of antibacterial and fluoride-releasing adhesives on enamel demineralization around brackets: A micro-CT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Aslihan Zeynep; Oz, Abdullah Alper; Yazıcıoglu, Sabahat

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this in vivo study was to investigate the preventive effect of two different adhesives on enamel demineralization and compare these adhesives with a conventional one. Fifteen patients requiring the extraction of their first four premolars for orthodontic treatment were included in the study. One premolar was randomly selected, and an antibacterial monomer-containing and fluoride-releasing adhesive (Clearfil Protect Bond, Kuraray Medical, Okayama, Japan) was used for orthodontic bracket bonding. Another premolar was randomly selected, and a fluoride-releasing and recharging orthodontic adhesive (Opal Seal, Ultradent Products, South Jordan, Utah) was used. One premolar was assigned as a control, and a conventional adhesive (Transbond XT, 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) was used. The teeth were extracted after 8 weeks, and the demineralization areas of the 45 extracted teeth were analyzed using microcomputed tomography with software. There was no significant difference between the white spot lesion (WSL) rates of the adhesives (P > .05). The volumes of the WSLs varied from 0 to 0.019349 mm3. Although Opal Seal showed the smallest lesion volumes, there was no significant difference in volumetric measurements of the lesions among the groups (P > .05). The findings indicated no significant differences between the preventive effects of the adhesives used in this in vivo study over 8 weeks.

  14. The in-vivo use of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles to detect inflammation elicits a cytokine response but does not aggravate experimental arthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline A Vermeij

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPION are used in diagnostic imaging of a variety of different diseases. For such in-vivo application, an additional coating with a polymer, for example polyvinyl alcohol (PVA, is needed to stabilize the SPION and prevent aggregation. As the particles are foreign to the body, reaction against the SPION could occur. In this study we investigated the effects that SPION may have on experimental arthritis after intra-articular (i.a. or intravenous (i.v. injection.PVA-coated SPION were injected either i.a. (6 or 24 μg iron or i.v. (100 μg or 1 mg iron into naïve Toll-like receptor-4 deficient (TLR4-/- or wild-type C57Bl/6 mice, or C57Bl/6 mice with antigen-induced arthritis. As control, some mice were injected with PVA or PBS. MR imaging was performed at 1 and 7 days after injection. Mice were sacrificed 2 hours and 1, 2, 7, 10 and 14 days after injection of the SPION, and RNA from synovium and liver was isolated for pro-inflammatory gene expression analysis. Serum cytokine measurements and whole knee joint histology were also performed.Injection of a high dose of SPION or PVA into naïve knee joints resulted in an immediate upregulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression in the synovium. A similar gene expression profile was observed after SPION or PVA injection into knee joints of TLR4-/- mice, indicating that this effect is not due to LPS contamination. Histological analysis of the knee joints also revealed synovial inflammation after SPION injection. Two hours after i.v. injection of SPION or PVA into naïve mice, an upregulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression was detected in the liver. Administration of SPION or PVA into arthritic mice via i.a. injection did not result in an upregulation in gene expression and also no additional effects were observed on histology. MR imaging and histology showed long-term retention of SPION in the inflamed joint. However, 14 days after the injections no long

  15. Formulation and In vitro/In vivo Evaluation of Sustained Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To develop and optimise sustained release (SR) matrix tablets of diltiazem hydrochloride (DHL). Methods: DHL tablets were prepared by direct compression and consisted of hydroxyprpoylmethyl cellulose, Kollidon SR and Eudragit RSPO. A 32 full factorial design was applied to study the effect of polymers used ...

  16. Formulation and In vitro/In vivo Evaluation of Sustained Release ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HP

    2013-07-15

    Jul 15, 2013 ... Purpose: To develop and optimise sustained release (SR) matrix tablets of diltiazem hydrochloride (DHL). Methods: DHL tablets were prepared by direct compression and consisted of hydroxyprpoylmethyl cellulose,. Kollidon SR and Eudragit RSPO. A 32 full factorial design was applied to study the effect of ...

  17. Endothelial cells are able to synthesize and release catecholamines both in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorriento, Daniela; Santulli, Gaetano; Del Giudice, Carmine; Anastasio, Antonio; Trimarco, Bruno; Iaccarino, Guido

    2012-07-01

    Recently it has been demonstrated that catecholamines are produced and used by macrophages and mediate immune response. The aim of this study is to verify whether endothelial cells (ECs), which are of myeloid origin, can produce catecholamines. We demonstrated that genes coding for tyrosine hydroxylase, Dopa decarboxylase, dopamine β hydroxylase (DβH), and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase, enzymes involved in the synthesis of catecholamines, are all expressed in basal conditions in bovine aorta ECs, and their expression is enhanced in response to hypoxia. Moreover, hypoxia enhances catecholamine release. To evaluate the signal transduction pathway that regulates catecholamine synthesis in ECs, we overexpressed in bovine aorta ECs either protein kinase A (PKA) or the transcription factor cAMP response element binding, because PKA/cAMP response element binding activation induces tyrosine hydroxylase transcription and activity in response to stress. Both cAMP response element binding and PKA overexpression enhance DβH and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase gene expression and catecholamine release, whereas H89, inhibitor of PKA, exerts the opposite effect, evidencing the role of PKA/cAMP response element binding transduction pathway in the regulation of catecholamine release in bovine aorta ECs. We then evaluated by immunohistochemistry the expression of tyrosine hydroxylase, Dopa decarboxylase, DβH, and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase in femoral arteries from hindlimbs of C57Bl/6 mice 3 days after removal of the common femoral artery to induce chronic ischemia. Ischemia evokes tyrosine hydroxylase, Dopa decarboxylase, DβH, and phenylethanolamine-N-methyl transferase expression in the endothelium. Finally, the pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine release by fusaric acid, an inhibitor of DβH, reduces the ability of ECs to form network-like structures on Matrigel matrix. In conclusion, our study demonstrates for the first time that ECs

  18. In vivo and in situ imaging of controlled-release dissolving silk microneedles into the skin by optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Zhang, Mingtian; Jin, Cuiyun

    2017-06-01

    Nowadays, transdermal drug delivery has become a hot topic with regard to delivery. Also, the percutaneous microneedle patch made of water-soluble material makes this technique one step closer to clinical application. The process of the microneedle patch penetrates and dissolves in the animal skin can directly reflect the efficiency of drug delivery. Hence, it is important to reflect the situation of microneedles dissolution and drug release by in vivo and in situ imaging in real time. This paper's purpose is to use the means of OCT (optical coherence tomography) to realize assessment of dissolving microneedles delivery efficiency in vivo and in situ imaging. This is the first study to utilize OCT to observe the dissolving process of silk microneedles (SFM) in different carriers. Dissolving process es of silk fibroin microneedles in different carriers were captured by the OCT system. The solution rate of silk fibroin microneedles in water is rapid. It also has good solution in the skin of mouse in vivo. OCT is a noncontact, noninvasive imaging technique with high resolution, the detecting depth of which is generally 1-3 mm under the skin. OCT has great potential to observe the solution process of dissolving microneedles in the skin. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Multifunctional halloysite nanotubes for targeted delivery and controlled release of doxorubicin in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuwei; Chen, Jian; Li, Xiufang; Sun, Yanhua; Huang, Shen; Li, Yuqing; Liu, Hui; Xu, Jiangfeng; Zhong, Shian

    2017-09-01

    The current state of cancer therapy encourages researchers to develop novel efficient nanocarriers. Halloysite nanotubes (HNTs) are good nanocarrier candidates due to their unique nanoscale (40-80 nm in diamter and 200-500 nm in length) and hollow lumen, as well as good biocompatibility and low cost. In our study, we prepared a type of folate-mediated targeting and redox-triggered anticancer drug delivery system, so that Doxorubicin (DOX) can be specifically transported to tumor sites due to the over-expressed folate-receptors on the surface of cancer cells. Furthermore, it can then be released by the reductive agent glutathione (GSH) in cancer cells where the content of GSH is nearly 103-fold higher than in the extracellular matrix. A series of methods have demonstrated that per-thiol-β-cyclodextrin (β-CD-(SH)7) was successfully combined with HNTs via a redox-responsive disulfide bond, and folic acid-polyethylene glycol-adamantane (FA-PEG-Ad) was immobilized on the HNTs through the strong complexation between β-CD/Ad. In vitro studies indicated that the release rate of DOX raised sharply in dithiothreitol (DTT) reducing environment and the amount of released DOX reached 70% in 10 mM DTT within the first 10 h, while only 40% of DOX was released in phosphate buffer solution (PBS) even after 79 h. Furthermore, the targeted HNTs could be specifically endocytosed by over-expressed folate-receptor cancer cells and significantly accelerate the apoptosis of cancer cells compared to non-targeted HNTs. In vivo studies further verified that the targeted HNTs had the best therapeutic efficacy and no obvious side effects for tumor-bearing nude mice, while free DOX showed damaging effects on normal tissues. In summary, this novel nanocarrier system shows excellent potential for targeted delivery and controlled release of anticancer drugs and provides a potential platform for tumor therapy.

  20. Compression-coated tablets of glipizide using hydroxypropylcellulose for zero-order release: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiqin; Wu, Zhenghong; Qi, Xiaole; Zhang, Huiting; Chen, Qin; Xing, Jiayu; Chen, Haiyan; Rui, Yao

    2013-03-25

    Compression coating, which presents some advantages like short manufacturing process and non-solvent residue over liquid coating, has been introduced to the oral administration systems for decades. The purpose of this study was to design a zero-order release of compression-coated tablets using hydroxypropylcellulose (HPC) as the coating layer and glipizide which was solubilized by manufacturing the inclusion complex of β-cyclodextrin as a model drug. The effects of the weight ratio of drug and the viscosity of HPC on the release profile were investigated by "f2" factor with Glucotrol XL(®). The uptake and erosion study, the correlation coefficient (R) and the exponent (n) were used as indicators to justify drug release mechanism. Bioavailability in vivo was determined by administering the compression-coated tablets to rabbits in contrast with Glucotrol XL(®). It was found that the formulation presented a well zero-order behavior at the weight ratio of drug 11:14 (core:layer) and the combination of HPC-L (8.0 mPa s) and HPC-M (350 mPa s) (8:9), with the "f2" of 66.90. The mechanism for zero-order release of these compression-coated tablets was solvent penetration into the dosage form and drug dissolution from the erosion of the gelled HPC matrix. The parameter AUC0-∞ of the compression coated tablets and the market tablets were 37,255.93±1474.08 h ng/ml and 43265.40±1015.28 h ng/ml, while the relative bioavailability was 87.66±1.56%. These studies demonstrate that the designed compression-coated tablets may be a promising strategy for peroral controlled release delivery system of water-insoluble drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Withania somnifera aqueous extract facilitates the expression and release of GnRH: In vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataria, Hardeep; Gupta, Muskan; Lakhman, Sukhwinder; Kaur, Gurcharan

    2015-10-01

    Ashwagandha (Withania somnifera) has a long history in traditional medicines as an aphrodisiac. It has been known to influence sexual behaviour in animal models but mechanism of action is still unknown. The present study was aimed to investigate the mechanisms by which Ashwagandha extract exert its gonadotropic activities. Due to the complexity of neuroendocrine pathways, there are limited in vitro models available despite the strong demand for such systems to study and predict neuroendocrine effects of chemicals or natural products. Immortalized rat hypothalamic GnV-3 cell line was investigated as a model to screen for neuroendocrine effects of Ashwagandha extract. GnV-3 cells were cultured under different media conditions and evaluated after treatment with Ashwagandha water extract, for GnRH expression and release by immunostaining and ELISA respectively. These cells acquired differentiated morphology, characteristic shape displayed by preoptic GnRH neurons in vivo. In addition, GnV-3 cells exhibited upregulation of plasticity related polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) and mature dendrite marker microtubule associated protein (MAP2) as well as GnRH expression and release. Chloroform fraction of the extract proved to exhibit all the bioactive properties as it induced differentiation and upregulated GnRH and MAP2 expression in GnV-3 cells, similar to Ashwagandha extract. Withanone and Withaferin A were found to be present in ASH-WEX and chloroform fraction while Withanone came out to be the major constituent of chloroform fraction. The preliminary in vivo studies in adult male animals showed that ASH-WEX was able to upregulate the GnRH levels although non-significantly. Taken together, this data demonstrate significant morphological and physiological changes in GnV-3 cells after treatment with Ashwagandha extract and may suggest the potential beneficial effects of Ashwagandha on reproductive functions in vivo. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd

  2. Effects of zinc-fortified drinking skim milk (as functional food) on cytokine release and thymic hormone activity in very old persons: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costarelli, Laura; Giacconi, Robertina; Malavolta, Marco; Basso, Andrea; Piacenza, Francesco; DeMartiis, MariLuisa; Giannandrea, Elvio; Renieri, Carlo; Busco, Franco; Galeazzi, Roberta; Mocchegiani, Eugenio

    2014-06-01

    Zinc is a relevant nutritional factor for the whole life of an organism because it affects the inflammatory/immune response and antioxidant activity, leading to a healthy state. Despite its important function, the dietary intake of zinc is inadequate in elderly. Possible interventions include food fortification because it does not require changes in dietary patterns, the cost is low and it can reach a large portion of the elderly population, including very old subjects. Studies evaluating the impact of Zn-fortified foods on functional parameters in elderly, in particular, in very old individuals, are missing. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of consumption of a zinc-fortified drinking skim milk (Zn-FMilk) for a period of 2 months in comparison to standard non-fortified milk (No-FMilk) on some biochemical parameters, zinc status, inflammatory/immune response and on a key parameter of the T cell-mediated immunity (thymulin hormone) in healthy very old subjects. The treatment with zinc-fortified milk (Zn-FMilk) is a good omen to increase the cell-mediated immunity in very old age represented by thymulin activity and some cytokine (IL-12p70, IFN-γ) release. At clinical level, a good healthy state occurs in 70 % of the subjects with no hospitalization after 1 year of the follow-up in comparison to very old control subjects that did not participate to crossover design. In conclusion, the Zn-FMilk can be considered a good functional food for elderly, including older people. It might be a good replacement to the zinc tablets or lozenges taking into account the attitude of old people to uptake milk as a preferential food.

  3. Methylene blue treatment for cytokine release syndrome-associated vasoplegia following a renal transplant with rATG infusion: A case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, John T; Burr, Andrew T; Balzer, Fred; Tse, James T; Denny, Julia E; Chyu, Darrick

    2015-05-01

    Rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin (rATG) is an infusion of polyclonal rabbit-derived antibodies against human thymocyte markers, which can be used to prevent and treat acute rejection following organ transplantation. However, the product monograph issued by the manufacturer (Sanofi Canada) reports that serious immune-mediated reactions have been observed following the use of rATG, consisting of anaphylaxis or severe cytokine release syndrome (CRS), which is a form of vasoplegic syndrome (VS), in which distributive shock occurs refractory to norepinephrine (NE) and vasopressin (VP). Severe infusion-associated reactions are consistent with CRS and can cause serious cardiac or respiratory problems, or in certain cases, mortality. CRS is a form of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). In SIRS, the substantial activation of endothelial inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and smooth muscle guanylate cyclase (GC) is observed, which can produce severe hypotension that is unresponsive to conventional vasopressors. Methylene blue (MB) is a direct inhibitor of iNOS and GC and has been used as an effective treatment for VS following cardiothoracic surgery. In the present study, the successful use of MB as a rescue therapy for CRS in a patient receiving rATG following a renal transplant was reported. Following an uneventful cadaveric kidney transplant involving the intravenous (IV) administration of rATG for the induction of immunological tolerance, the patient became markedly hypotensive and tachycardic. The patient required high doses of VP and NE infusions. Following the protocol described for treating refractory VS in post-cardiac surgery patients, the decision was made to initiate the patient on an IV MB infusion. This treatment protocol was shown to improve the hemodynamic status of the patient, which enabled the withdrawal of vasopressors and suggests an important role for methylene blue in the management of refractory VS.

  4. Preparation, Characterization and In Vitro / In Vivo Evaluation of Oral Time-Controlled Release Etodolac Pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Qi; Ye, Mingzhu; Zhao, Zhinan; Sun, Jiayi; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare time-controlled release etodolac pellets to facilitate drug administration according to the body's biological rhythm, optimize the drug's desired effects, and minimize adverse effects. The preparation consisted of three laminal layers from center to outside: the core, the swelling layer, and the insoluble polymer membrane. Factors influenced the core and the coating films were investigated in this study. The core pellets formulated with etodolac, lactose, and sodium carboxymethyl starch (CMS-Na) were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and then coated by a fluidized bed coater. Croscarmellose sodium (CC-Na) was selected as the swelling agent, and ethyl cellulose (EC) as the controlled release layer. The prepared pellets were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and evaluated by a dissolution test and a pharmacokinetic study. Compared with commercial available capsules, pharmacokinetics studies in beagle dogs indicated that the prepared pellets release the drug within a short period of time, immediately after a predetermined lag time. A good correlation between in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of the pellets was exhibited in the analysis.

  5. Sustained release of antibiotic complexed by multivalent ion: in vitro and in vivo study for the treatment of peritonitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Na, Seung Yeon; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Tae Ho; Yoon, Jin A; Lee, In Soo; Lee, Jin Ho

    2014-12-10

    The main aims of this study are (i) the development of an antibiotic complexed with multivalent ion, which can allow sustained release of the antibiotic without any additional matrix or difficult process and (ii) the feasibility study of the ion-complexed antibiotic as a therapeutic technique for peritonitis treatment. An ion-complexed antibiotic is prepared by simple mixing of two aqueous solutions containing an ionized (water-soluble) drug (tetracycline) and a multivalent counter ionic compound. The ion-complexed antibiotic shows a continuous release of the antibiotic up to 21 days, and thus prolonged anti-bacterial effect by gradual ionic exchange between the multivalent ions in the complex and same-charged monovalent ions in surrounding medium. From the in vivo animal study using a cecum perforated peritonitis mouse model, the ion-complexed antibiotic group shows sufficient anti-bacterial effect and thus effectively treat the peritonitis because of the extermination of the contaminated enteric bacteria in the peritoneum during wound healing of injury cecum (by the sustained release of antibiotic from the ion complex). These results suggest that the ion-complexed antibiotic system may be promising for the effective treatment of the peritonitis caused by frequent gastrointestinal defect in clinical fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. DESIGN, IN VITRO EVALUATION AND IN VIVO STUDIES OF NOVEL DELAYED RELEASE TABLETS OF PANTOPRAZOLE

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhry, Pooja; patel, kuldeep singh; jain, Prince kumar; Arora, Monika; nagar, Mona; nagar, mayank; sinde, sandeep; TRIVEDI, PIYUSH

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to reduce production costs, a simple, direct compression delayed release formulation consisting of pantoprazole was investigated. Pantoprazole is a proton pump inhibitor belongs to group of benzimidazole. It is very efficient for the treatment of gastric and duodenum ulcers. Even in solid state pantoprazole is sensitive to heat, humidity, light and especially to substances containing an acidic group. For such types of drugs, enteric coating added to the formulation tends to avoid...

  7. In vivo pharmacological evaluation of a lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Shayli Varasteh; Varamini, Pegah; Steyn, Frederik; Toth, Istvan

    2015-11-10

    In the current study, the efficacy and pharmacokinetic profile of lactose-conjugated luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH) was examined following oral administration in male rats. A rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry technique was developed and applied for measuring the concentration of lactose[Q(1)][w(6)]LHRH (compound 1) in rat plasma in order to allow measurement of pharmacokinetic parameters. LH release was evaluated using a sandwich ELISA. Maximum serum concentration (Cmax = 0.11 μg/ml) was reached at 2h (Tmax) following oral administration of the compound at 10mg/kg. The half-life was determined to be 2.6h. The absolute bioavailability of the orally administered compound was found to be 14%, which was a remarkable improvement compared to zero-to-low oral bioavailability of the native peptide. Compound 1 was effective in stimulating LH release at 20mg/kg after oral administration. The method was validated at a linear range of 0.01-20.0 μg/ml and a correlation coefficient of r(2) ≥ 0.999. The accuracy and precision values showed the reliability and reproducibility of the method for evaluation of the pharmacokinetic parameters. These findings showed that the lactose derivative of LHRH has a therapeutic potential to be further developed as an orally active therapeutics for the treatment of hormone-dependent diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Absence of the Adaptor Protein PEA-15 Is Associated with Altered Pattern of Th Cytokines Production by Activated CD4+ T Lymphocytes In Vitro, and Defective Red Blood Cell Alloimmune Response In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Kerbrat

    Full Text Available TCR-dependent and costimulation signaling, cell division, and cytokine environment are major factors driving cytokines expression induced by CD4(+ T cell activation. PEA-15 15 (Protein Enriched in Astrocyte / 15 kDa is an adaptor protein that regulates death receptor-induced apoptosis and proliferation signaling by binding to FADD and relocating ERK1/2 to the cytosol, respectively. By using PEA-15-deficient mice, we examined the role of PEA-15 in TCR-dependent cytokine production in CD4(+ T cells. TCR-stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+ T cells exhibited defective progression through the cell cycle associated with impaired expression of cyclin E and phosphoRb, two ERK1/2-dependent proteins of the cell cycle. Accordingly, expression of the division cycle-dependent cytokines IL-2 and IFNγ, a Th1 cytokine, was reduced in stimulated PEA-15-deficient CD4(+ T cells. This was associated with abnormal subcellular compartmentalization of activated ERK1/2 in PEA-15-deficient T cells. Furthermore, in vitro TCR-dependent differentiation of naive CD4(+ CD62L(+ PEA-15-deficient T cells was associated with a lower production of the Th2 cytokine, IL-4, whereas expression of the Th17-associated molecule IL4I1 was enhanced. Finally, a defective humoral response was shown in PEA-15-deficient mice in a model of red blood cell alloimmunization performed with Poly IC, a classical adjuvant of Th1 response in vivo. Collectively, our data suggest that PEA-15 contributes to the specification of the cytokine pattern of activated Th cells, thus highlighting a potential new target to interfere with T cell functional polarization and subsequent immune response.

  9. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of controlled-release matrix tablets of highly water-soluble drug applying different Mw polyethylene oxides (PEO) as retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Haoyang; Li, Xue; Li, Yuenan; Wang, Haiying; Yanyan, Wang; Tuanjie, Wang; Pan, Weisan; Yang, Xinggang

    2017-11-13

    The aim of the work presented is to prepare a controlled-release hydrophilic matrix tablet (CMT) controlling release of highly water-soluble drug applying pure combination of high and low Mw PEO as matrix materials, to avoid the lag time of drug release, and to overcome incomplete release in later stages. The influences of types and amounts of different Mw PEOs used, drug loading, pH of release medium and agitation rate on drug release were evaluated. The study of uptake and erosion of matrix was conducted and mechanism of improving drug release was discussed. In vivo pharmacokinetics of the CMT and reference preparation self-made controlled-release osmotic pump tablets (COPT) were performed in beagle dogs. The optimized formulation containing 43% PEO WSR 303 and 32% PEO N750 showed a zero order release from 1h to 12h. In vivo results demonstrated that the CMT had similar AUC0-48h and Cmax with the COPT but smaller Tmax than the COPT and provided a more stable therapeutic concentration compared to the COPT. In conclusion, hydrophilic matrix tablet combining only different Mw PEOs as matrix materials had very good potential to be developed into a controlled-release drug delivery system for highly water-soluble drug. Besides, its manufacturing processes were succinct which would be preferable for modern medicine industry.

  10. Bimatoprost-loaded ocular inserts as sustained release drug delivery systems for glaucoma treatment: in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juçara Ribeiro Franca

    Full Text Available The purpose of the present study was to develop and assess a novel sustained-release drug delivery system of Bimatoprost (BIM. Chitosan polymeric inserts were prepared using the solvent casting method and characterized by swelling studies, infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, drug content, scanning electron microscopy and in vitro drug release. Biodistribution of 99mTc-BIM eye drops and 99mTc-BIM-loaded inserts, after ocular administration in Wistar rats, was accessed by ex vivo radiation counting. The inserts were evaluated for their therapeutic efficacy in glaucomatous Wistar rats. Glaucoma was induced by weekly intracameral injection of hyaluronic acid. BIM-loaded inserts (equivalent to 9.0 µg BIM were administered once into conjunctival sac, after ocular hypertension confirmation. BIM eye drop was topically instilled in a second group of glaucomatous rats for 15 days days, while placebo inserts were administered once in a third group. An untreated glaucomatous group was used as control. Intraocular pressure (IOP was monitored for four consecutive weeks after treatment began. At the end of the experiment, retinal ganglion cells and optic nerve head cupping were evaluated in the histological eye sections. Characterization results revealed that the drug physically interacted, but did not chemically react with the polymeric matrix. Inserts sustainedly released BIM in vitro during 8 hours. Biodistribution studies showed that the amount of 99mTc-BIM that remained in the eye was significantly lower after eye drop instillation than after chitosan insert implantation. BIM-loaded inserts lowered IOP for 4 weeks, after one application, while IOP values remained significantly high for the placebo and untreated groups. Eye drops were only effective during the daily treatment period. IOP results were reflected in RGC counting and optic nerve head cupping damage. BIM-loaded inserts provided sustained release of BIM and seem to be a

  11. In vivo comparison of norepinephrine and dopamine release in rat brain by simultaneous measurements with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinwoo; Takmakov, Pavel; Wightman, R Mark

    2011-12-01

    Brain norepinephrine and dopamine regulate a variety of critical behaviors such as stress, learning, memory, and drug addiction. In this study, we demonstrate differences in the regulation of in vivo neurotransmission for dopamine in the anterior nucleus accumbens (NAc) and norepinephrine in the ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vBNST) of the anesthetized rat. Release of the two catecholamines was measured simultaneously using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry at two different carbon-fiber microelectrodes, each implanted in the brain region of interest. Simultaneous dopamine and norepinephrine release was evoked by electrical stimulation of a region where the ventral noradrenergic bundle, the pathway of noradrenergic neurons, courses through the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, the origin of dopaminergic cell bodies. The release and uptake of norepinephrine in the vBNST were both significantly slower than for dopamine in the NAc. Pharmacological manipulations in the same animal demonstrated that the two catecholamines are differently regulated. The combination of a dopamine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine significantly increased basal extracellular dopamine whereas a norepinephrine autoreceptor antagonist and amphetamine did not change basal norepinephrine concentration. α-Methyl-p-tyrosine, a tyrosine hydroxylase inhibitor, decreased electrically evoked dopamine release faster than norepinephrine. The dual-microelectrode fast-scan cyclic voltammetry technique along with anatomical and pharmacological evidence confirms that dopamine in the NAc and norepinephrine in the vBNST can be monitored selectively and simultaneously in the same animal. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the technique enabled us to examine differences in the dynamics of extracellular norepinephrine and dopamine concurrently in two different limbic structures. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2011 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  12. Lutzomyia longipalpis salivary peptide maxadilan alters murine dendritic cell expression of CD80/86, CCR7, and cytokine secretion and reprograms dendritic cell-mediated cytokine release from cultures containing allogeneic T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheat, William H; Pauken, Kristen E; Morris, Robin V; Titus, Richard G

    2008-06-15

    Leishmania protozoan parasites, the etiologic agent of leishmaniasis, are transmitted exclusively by phlebotomine sand flies of the genera Phlebotomus and Lutzomyia. In addition to parasites, the infectious bite inoculum contains arthropod salivary components. One well-characterized salivary component from Lutzomyia longipalpis is maxadilan (MAX), a vasodilator acting via the type I receptor for the pituitary cyclic AMP activating peptide. MAX has been shown to elicit immunomodulatory effects potentially dictating immune responses to Leishmania parasites. When exposed to MAX, both resting and LPS-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) show reduced CD80 and CD86 expression on most DCs in vitro. However, CD86 expression is increased significantly on a subpopulation of DCs. Furthermore, MAX treatment promoted secretion of type 2 cytokines (IL-6 and IL-10) while reducing production of type 1 cytokines (IL-12p40, TNF-alpha, and IFN-gamma) by LPS-stimulated DCs. A similar trend was observed in cultures of MAX-treated DCs containing naive allogeneic CD4(+) T cells: type 2 cytokines (IL-6 and IL-13) increased while type 1 cytokines (TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma) decreased. Additionally, the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta was increased in cultures containing MAX-treated mature DCs. MAX treatment of LPS-stimulated DCs also prevented optimal surface expression of CCR7 in vitro. These MAX-dependent effects were evident in DCs from both Leishmania major-susceptible (BALB/c) and -resistant (C3H/HeN) murine strains. These data suggest that modification of DC phenotype and function by MAX likely affects crucial cellular components that determine the pathological response to infection with Leishmania.

  13. Cytokine production by lymphocytes in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szereday, L; Varga, P; Szekeres-Bartho, J

    1997-12-01

    In the presence of progesterone lymphocytes of pregnant women release a 34-kDa protein named the progesterone-induced blocking factor (PIBF). PIBF mediates the immunomodulatory and anti-abortive effects of progesterone and its presence is related to the outcome of pregnancy. PIBF induces production of Th2 type cytokines by activated lymphocytes. The in vivo relationship between PIBF- and cytokine production of pregnancy lymphocytes and the outcome of pregnancy was investigated. Interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-10 production and PIBF expression in peripheral lymphocytes of 111 healthy pregnant women and 120 women at risk for premature pregnancy termination were detected by immunocytochemistry. We found increased IL-12 and low PIBF and IL-10 expression on lymphocytes of "risk" patients, and a high rate of IL-10 and PIBF positivity on lymphocytes from healthy pregnant women. The cytokine production pattern of the lymphocytes was related to the presence or absence of previous abortions as well as to the outcome of pregnancy. These data suggest the involvement of an altered cytokine production pattern in the immunologic effects of progesterone.

  14. Ca2+ released from calcium alginate gels can promote inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gail; Mooney, David J.

    2013-01-01

    In general, alginate hydrogels are considered to be biologically inert and are commonly used for biomedical purposes that require minimum inflammation. However, Ca2+, which is commonly used to crosslink alginate, is a critical second messenger in immune cell signaling, and little has been done to understand its effect on immune cell fate when delivered as a component of alginate gels. We found that dendritic cells (DCs) encapsulated in Ca2+-crosslinked alginate (calcium alginate) secreted at least fivefold more of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β when compared to DCs encapsulated in agarose and collagen gels, as well as DCs plated on tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). Plating cells on TCPS with the alginate polymer could not reproduce these results, whereas culturing DCs on TCPS with increasing concentrations of Ca2+ increased IL-1β, MHC class II and CD86 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with these findings, calcium alginate gels induced greater maturation of encapsulated DCs compared to barium alginate gels. When injected subcutaneously in mice, calcium alginate gels significantly upregulated IL-1β secretion from surrounding tissue relative to barium alginate gels, and similarly, the inflammatory effects of LPS were enhanced when it was delivered from calcium alginate gels rather than barium alginate gels. These results confirm that the Ca2+ used to crosslink alginate gels can be immunostimulatory and suggest that it is important to take into account Ca2+’s bioactive effects on all exposed cells (both immune and non-immune) when using calcium alginate gels for biomedical purposes. This work may strongly impact the way people use alginate gels in the future as well as provide insights into past work utilizing alginate gels. PMID:23938198

  15. Ca(2+) released from calcium alginate gels can promote inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Gail; Mooney, David J

    2013-12-01

    In general, alginate hydrogels are considered to be biologically inert and are commonly used for biomedical purposes that require minimum inflammation. However, Ca(2+), which is commonly used to crosslink alginate, is a critical second messenger in immune cell signaling, and little has been done to understand its effect on immune cell fate when delivered as a component of alginate gels. We found that dendritic cells (DCs) encapsulated in Ca(2+)-crosslinked alginate (calcium alginate) secreted at least fivefold more of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1β when compared to DCs encapsulated in agarose and collagen gels, as well as DCs plated on tissue-culture polystyrene (TCPS). Plating cells on TCPS with the alginate polymer could not reproduce these results, whereas culturing DCs on TCPS with increasing concentrations of Ca(2+) increased IL-1β, MHC class II and CD86 expression in a dose-dependent manner. In agreement with these findings, calcium alginate gels induced greater maturation of encapsulated DCs compared to barium alginate gels. When injected subcutaneously in mice, calcium alginate gels significantly upregulated IL-1β secretion from surrounding tissue relative to barium alginate gels, and similarly, the inflammatory effects of LPS were enhanced when it was delivered from calcium alginate gels rather than barium alginate gels. These results confirm that the Ca(2+) used to crosslink alginate gels can be immunostimulatory and suggest that it is important to take into account Ca(2+)'s bioactive effects on all exposed cells (both immune and non-immune) when using calcium alginate gels for biomedical purposes. This work may strongly impact the way people use alginate gels in the future as well as provide insights into past work utilizing alginate gels. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Alginate Microencapsulation for Oral Immunisation of Finfish: Release Characteristics, Ex Vivo Intestinal Uptake and In Vivo Administration in Atlantic Salmon, Salmo salar L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Bikramjit; Nowak, Barbara F; Bridle, Andrew R

    2015-12-01

    This study examined the feasibility of alginate microcapsules manufactured using a low-impact technology and reagents to protect orally delivered immunogens for use as immunoprophylactics for fish. Physical characteristics and protein release kinetics of the microcapsules were examined at different pH and temperature levels using a microencapsulated model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA). Impact of the microencapsulation process on contents was determined by analysing change in bioactivity of microencapsulated lysozyme. Feasibility of the method for oral immunoprophylaxis of finfish was assessed using FITC-labelled microcapsules. These were applied to distal intestinal explants of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) to investigate uptake ex vivo. Systemic distribution of microcapsules was investigated by oral administration of FITC-labelled microcapsules to Atlantic salmon fry by incorporating into feed. The microcapsules produced were structurally robust and retained surface integrity, with a modal size distribution of 250-750 nm and a tendency to aggregate. Entrapment efficiency of microencapsulation was 51.2 % for BSA and 43.2 % in the case of lysozyme. Microcapsules demonstrated controlled release of protein, which increased with increasing pH or temperature, and the process had no significant negative effect on bioactivity of lysozyme. Uptake of fluorescent-labelled microcapsules was clearly demonstrated by intestinal explants over a 24-h period. Evidence of microcapsules was found in the intestine, spleen, kidney and liver of fry following oral administration. Amenability of the microcapsules to intestinal uptake and distribution reinforced the strong potential for use of this microencapsulation method in oral immunoprophylaxis of finfish using sensitive immunogenic substances.

  17. Influence of drug property and product design on in vitro-in vivo correlation of complex modified-release dosage forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yihong; Li, Xia; Duan, John Z

    2014-02-01

    The present study examines how drug's inherent properties and product design influence the evaluation and applications of in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) for modified-release (MR) dosage forms consisting of extended-release (ER) and immediate-release (IR) components with bimodal drug release. Three analgesic drugs were used as model compounds, and simulations of in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles were conducted using different release rates of the ER component and various IR percentages. Plasma concentration-time profiles exhibiting a wide range of tmax and maximum observed plasma concentration (Cmax) were obtained from superposition of the simulated IR and ER profiles based on a linear IVIVC. It was found that depending on the drug and dosage form design, direct use of the superposed IR and ER data for IVIVC modeling and prediction may (1) be acceptable within errors, (2) become unreliable and less meaningful because of the confounding effect from the non-negligible IR contribution to Cmax, or (3) be meaningless because of the insensitivity of Cmax to release rate change of the ER component. Therefore, understanding the drug, design and drug release characteristics of the product is essential for assessing the validity, accuracy, and reliability of IVIVC of complex MR products obtained via directly modeling of in vivo data. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  18. Radiation-induced surge of macrophage foam cell formation, oxidative damage, and cytokine release is attenuated by a nanoformulation of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Behrooz; Bodaghabadi, Narges; Ghaemi, Nasser; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2017-03-01

    We examined the potential of a dendrosomal nanoformulation of curcumin (DNC) for intervention of ionizing radiation (IR)-induced damage (particularly leading to atherosclerosis), employing an irradiated THP-1 macrophage model. Differentiated THP-1 macrophages were irradiated and treated with curcumin or DNC nanoformulation (and oxidized low density lipoprotein, ox-LDL, to promote foam cells). Chemical, biochemical, and genetics tools including viability and apoptosis, multiple ELISA, real-time PCR, Western blotting, enzyme activity, and fluorimetry assays were employed to illustrate IR damage as well as the DNC intervention potential. DNC per se at 10 μM exerted no cytotoxic effects on macrophages. However, it caused apoptosis in 2 Gy-irradiated macrophages which were treated with ox-LDL, chiefly through a caspase-dependent pathway involving caspase-3. Concurrently, 10 μM DNC prevented the IR-induced rise in lipid accumulation (72% decrease compared to IR control, p < .0001), dil-oxLDL uptake (78% decrease, p < .005), protein and mRNA expression of cholesterol influx genes, CD36 and SR-A, NF-κB activation (81% less binding activity, p < .001; and lower nuclear presence of p65), cytokine (monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and interleukin-1β) release, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and oxidative damage to DNA (37% decrease in 8-OHdG, p < .05) and lipids (62% decrease in 8-isoprostane, p < .005). DNC facilitated the uptake of curcumin in irradiated macrophages, increased glutathione peroxidase expression and activity, restored glutathione (GSH) level, and upregulated the expression of a cholesterol efflux gene, ABCA1. Two other antioxidants, resveratrol and N-acetyl cycteine (NAC), could simulate some of the beneficial effects of DNC against IR-induced CD36 expression and lipid accumulation, which were obviated by buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) pre-treatment of macrophages. However, some modulatory effects of DNC, particularly on lipid accumulation and

  19. In vivo release of aflatoxin B1 bound to different sequestering agents in dairy cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Diaz

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Nine lactating dairy cows, producing 31.08±5.00 kg of milk/cow/day and fed with a Total Mixed Ration (TMR with an intake of 22.3±0.8 Kg s.s./cow, were used to investigate the resistance of the AFs-SA complex in the rumen and in the gastro-intestinal tract. Two commercial sequestering agents Atox® and Mycosorb® were used. The AFB1 was also mixed to a rumen fluid (R-SA. AFB1 sequestered by Atox®, Mycosorb® and by R-SA were then fed to cows before the morning meal. Milk samples were collected for 6 consecutive milkings and analyzed for AFM1 content. The in vitro binding capacity of the two SA were 94.2% for Atox®, 84.3% for Mycosorb® and 71.86% for the R-SA. Both Atox® and Mycosorb® released some of the sequestered AFB1 determining an increase of the AFM1 in milk as soon as in the 1st milking from oral drenching (4.23±7.33; 23.60±8.23 and 46.06±39.84 ppt for Atox®, Mycosorb® and R-SA respectively. The AFM1 (ng/cow in milk at the 4th milking was lower (66.04, 661.77 and 1613.04; P<0.05 in Atox® and Mycosorb® than R-SA, respectively. The percentage release of bound AFB1 were 1.63% for Atox®, 20.27% for Mycosorb® and 50.48% for R-SA.

  20. Sustained release ophthalmic dexamethasone: In vitro in vivo correlations derived from the PK-Eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwad, Sahar; Day, Richard M; Khaw, Peng T; Brocchini, Steve; Fadda, Hala M

    2017-04-30

    Corticosteroids have long been used to treat intraocular inflammation by intravitreal injection. We describe dexamethasone loaded poly-DL-lactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) microparticles that were fabricated by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS). The dexamethasone loaded microparticles were evaluated using a two-compartment, in vitro aqueous outflow model of the eye (PK-Eye) that estimates drug clearance time from the back of the eye via aqueous outflow by the anterior route. A dexamethasone dose of 0.20±0.02mg in a 50μL volume of TIPS microparticles resulted in a clearance t1/2 of 9.6±0.3days using simulated vitreous in the PK-Eye. Since corticosteroids can also clear through the retina, it is necessary to account for clearance through the back of the eye. Retinal permeability data, published human ocular pharmacokinetics (PK) and the PK-Eye clearance times were then used to establish in vitro in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) for intraocular clearance times of corticosteroid formulations. A t1/2 of 48h was estimated for the dexamethasone-TIPS microparticles, which is almost 9 times longer than that reported for dexamethasone suspension in humans. The prediction of human clearance times of permeable molecules from the vitreous compartment can be determined by accounting for drug retinal permeation and determining the experimental clearance via the anterior aqueous outflow pathway using the PK-Eye. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Influence of dissolution media composition on drug release and in-vitro/in-vivo correlation for paracetamol matrix tablets prepared with novel carbomer polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parojcić, J; Ethurić, Z; Jovanović, M; Ibrić, S; Jovanović, D

    2004-06-01

    The influence of dissolution media composition on drug release kinetics and in-vitro/in-vivo correlation (IVIVC) for hydrophilic matrix tablets based on Carbopol 971P and Carbopol 71G was investigated. A number of buffered and unbuffered media differing with respect to their pH value, ionic strength and ionic species was evaluated. The observed in-vitro drug release profiles were compared with the hypothetical drug release profiles in-vivo calculated by numerical deconvolution from the results of an in-vivo study. The obtained IVIVC plots were examined using linear and non-linear (proportional odds, proportional hazards and proportional reversed hazards) mathematical models. Although the studied sustained release agents were chemically identical, they exhibited pronounced differences in drug product behaviour both in-vitro and in-vivo. The use of non-linear modelling resulted in an improved level of correlation, especially in the case of Carbopol 71G matrices. The obtained results indicated the susceptibility of drug release kinetics and hence IVIVC in the case of anionic polymer matrices to media composition, and emphasized the need for thorough evaluation of applied media during the development of biorelevant dissolution methodology. Although the use of non-linear modelling could be advantageous, the need for a simple and meaningful non-linear relationship is pointed out. Copyright 2004 The Authors

  2. Methylation of bacterial release factors RF1 and RF2 is required for normal translation termination in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Liliana; Heurgué-Hamard, Valérie; de Zamaroczy, Miklos; Kervestin, Stephanie; Buckingham, Richard H

    2007-12-07

    Bacterial release factors RF1 and RF2 are methylated on the Gln residue of a universally conserved tripeptide motif GGQ, which interacts with the peptidyl transferase center of the large ribosomal subunit, triggering hydrolysis of the ester bond in peptidyl-tRNA and releasing the newly synthesized polypeptide from the ribosome. In vitro experiments have shown that the activity of RF2 is stimulated by Gln methylation. The viability of Escherichia coli K12 strains depends on the integrity of the release factor methyltransferase PrmC, because K12 strains are partially deficient in RF2 activity due to the presence of a Thr residue at position 246 instead of Ala. Here, we study in vivo RF1 and RF2 activity at termination codons in competition with programmed frameshifting and the effect of the Ala-246 --> Thr mutation. PrmC inactivation reduces the specific termination activity of RF1 and RF2(Ala-246) by approximately 3- to 4-fold. The mutation Ala-246 --> Thr in RF2 reduces the termination activity in cells approximately 5-fold. After correction for the decrease in level of RF2 due to the autocontrol of RF2 synthesis, the mutation Ala-246 --> Thr reduced RF2 termination activity by approximately 10-fold at UGA codons and UAA codons. PrmC inactivation had no effect on cell growth in rich media but reduced growth considerably on poor carbon sources. This suggests that the expression of some genes needed for optimal growth under such conditions can become growth limiting as a result of inefficient translation termination.

  3. A new formulation of controlled release amitriptyline pellets and its in vivo/in vitro assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eun-Seok; Lee, Dong-Soo; Kwon, Seok-Young; Chi, Sang-Cheol

    2003-07-01

    Controlled-release amitriptyline pellets (ATP) were formulated and its oral bioavailability was assessed in human volunteers after oral administration under fasting conditions. Core pellets were prepared using a CF granulator by two different methods (powder layering and solvent spraying) and coated with Eudragit RS or RL 100. Physical characteristics and dissolution rates of core pellets and coated pellets were evaluated to optimize the formulation. Powder layering method resulted in a better surface morphology than solvent spraying method. However, physical properties of the products were poorer when prepared by powder layering method with respect to hardness, friability and density. The dissolution profile of amitriptyline coated with Eudragit RS 100 was comparable to that of commercially available amitriptyline enteric-coated pellets (Saroten retard). After the oral administration of both products at the dose of 50 mg, the mean maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 36.4 and 29.7 ng/mL, and the mean areas under the concentration-time curve (AUC(0-96)) were 1180.2 and 1010.7 ng.h/mL for ATP and Saroten retard, respectively. The time to reach the maximum concentrations (Tmax) was 6 h for both formulations. Statistical evaluation suggested that ATP was bioequivalent to Saroten retard.

  4. Effects of Amanita phalloides toxins on insulin release: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Carlo, Eugenio; Milanesi, Anna; Martini, Chiara; Maffei, Pietro; Tamagno, Gianluca; Parnigotto, Pier Paolo; Scandellari, Cesare; Sicolo, Nicola

    2003-08-01

    The clinical picture of Amanita phalloides poisoning includes hypoglycaemia, usually related to hepatic damage. In fact, Amanita toxins induce hepatic glycogen depletion in humans and animals. However, in animals morphological changes of pancreatic beta cells are reported, suggesting that an alteration of insulin secretion might be involved in the pathogenesis of hypoglycaemia. Therefore, we determined fasting glucose, insulin and C-peptide levels in ten patients intoxicated by Amanita phalloides and in ten control subjects. Fasting blood samples were drawn on 3 consecutive days, beginning 48-72 h after mushroom ingestion, and glucose, insulin and C-peptide concentrations were determined by routine methods. Serum glucose concentrations did not differ between poisoned subjects and controls, whereas insulin and C-peptide concentrations were significantly higher in poisoned subjects ( PAmanita toxins might play a role in the clinical context of Amanita poisoning. We demonstrate, for the first time, that alpha-amanitin induces insulin release and may exert a cytotoxic effect on beta cells.

  5. A self-immolative prodrug nanosystem capable of releasing a drug and a NIR reporter for in vivo imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ziqian; Wu, Hao; Liu, Peilian; Zeng, Fang; Wu, Shuizhu

    2017-09-01

    In vivo monitoring of the biodistribution and activation of prodrugs is highly attractive, and the self-immolative dendritic architecture is deemed as a promising approach for constructing theranostic prodrug in which the release/activation of different payloads is needed. Herein, A GSH-triggered and self-immolative dendritic platform comprising an anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT), a cleavable linker and a two-photon NIR fluorophore (dicyanomethylene-4H-pyran, DCM) has been developed for in situ tracking of drug release and antitumour therapy. In vitro experiments demonstrate that, the presence of glutathione (GSH) induces the cleavage of the self-immolative linker, resulting in comitant release of the drug and the dye. Upon cell internalization and under one- or two-photon excitation, prominent intracellular fluorescence can be observed, indicating the release of the payloads in live cells. Upon loaded in phospholipid vesicles, the prodrug has also been successfully utilized for in vivo and in situ tracking of drug release and cancer therapy in a mouse model. Several hours post injection, the prodrug generates strong fluorescence on tumour sites, demonstrating the prodrug's capability of monitoring the on-site drug release. Moreover, the prodrug shows considerable high activity and exerts obvious inhibition towards tumour growth. This work suggests that the prodrug with self-immolative dendritic structure can work well in vivo and this strategy may provide an alternative approach for designing theranostic drug delivery systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Developmental increase in kisspeptin-54 release in vivo is independent of the pubertal increase in estradiol in female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Kathryn A; Keen, Kim L; Terasawa, Ei

    2012-04-01

    Kisspeptin (KP) signaling has been proposed as an important regulator in the mechanism of puberty. In this study, to determine the role of KP in puberty, we assessed the in vivo release pattern of KP-54 from the basal hypothalamus/stalk-median eminence in prepubertal and pubertal ovarian-intact female rhesus monkeys. We found that there was a developmental increase in mean KP-54 release, pulse frequency, and pulse amplitude, which is parallel to the developmental changes in GnRH release that we previously reported. Moreover, a nocturnal increase in KP-54 release becomes prominent after the onset of puberty. Because the pubertal increase in GnRH release occurs independent of the pubertal increase in circulating gonadal steroids, we further examined whether ovariectomy (OVX) modifies the release pattern of KP-54. Results show that OVX in pubertal monkeys enhanced mean KP-54 release and pulse amplitude but not pulse frequency, whereas OVX did not alter the release pattern of KP-54 in prepubertal monkeys. Estradiol replacement in OVX pubertal monkeys suppressed mean KP-54 release and pulse amplitude but not pulse frequency. Estradiol replacement in OVX prepubertal monkeys did not alter the KP-54 release pattern. Collectively these results suggest that the pubertal increase in KP release occurs independent of the pubertal increase in circulating estradiol. Nevertheless, the pubertal increase in KP release is not likely responsible for the initiation of the pubertal increase in GnRH release. Rather, after puberty onset, the increase in KP release contributes to further increase GnRH release during the progression of puberty.

  7. The Combined Utility of Ex vivo IFN-γ Release Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot Assay and In vivo Skin Testing in Patients With Antibiotic-Associated Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Strautins, Kaija; Redwood, Alec J; Pavlos, Rebecca; Konvinse, Katherine C; Aung, Ar Kar; Slavin, Monica A; Thursky, Karin A; Grayson, M Lindsay; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2017-10-31

    For severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) associated with multiple antibiotics dosed concurrently, clinical causality is challenging and diagnostic approaches are limited, leading to constricted future antibiotic choices. To examine the combined utility of in vivo and ex vivo diagnostic approaches at assigning drug causality in a cohort of patients with antibiotic-associated (AA)-SCARs. Patients with AA-SCARs were prospectively recruited between April 2015 and February 2017. In vivo testing (patch testing or delayed intradermal testing) was performed to the implicated antibiotic(s) at the highest nonirritating concentration and read at 24 hours through 1 week. Ex vivo testing used patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with a range of pharmacologically relevant concentrations of implicated antibiotics to measure dose-dependent IFN-γ release from CD4+ and CD8+ T cells via an enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay. In 19 patients with AA-SCARs, combined in vivo and ex vivo testing assigned antibiotic causality in 15 (79%) patients. Ten patients (53%) with AA-SCARs were positive on IFN-γ release enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay, with an overall reported sensitivity of 52% (95% CI, 29-76) and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 79-100), with improved sensitivity noted in acute (within 1 day to 6 weeks after SCAR onset) testing (75%) and in patients with higher phenotypic scores (59%). There was increased use of narrow-spectrum beta-lactams and antibiotics from within the implicated class following testing in patients with a positive ex vivo or in vivo test result. We demonstrate the potential utility of combined in vivo and ex vivo testing in patients with AA-SCARs to assign drug causality with high specificity. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Up-regulation of T lymphocyte and antibody production by inflammatory cytokines released by macrophage exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Ana Carolina P; Paula, Rosemeire F O; Mizutani, Erica; Sartorelli, Juliana C; Milani, Ana M; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Oliveira, Elaine C; Pradella, Fernando; Silva, Vania D R; Moraes, Adriel S; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C; Farias, Alessandro S; Ceragioli, Helder J; Santos, Leonilda M B; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-07-01

    Our data demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are internalized by macrophages, subsequently activating them to produce interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12). This cytokine induced the proliferative response of T lymphocytes to a nonspecific mitogen and to ovalbumin (OVA). This increase in the proliferative response was accompanied by an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and IL-6, in mice inoculated with MWCNTs, whether or not they had been immunized with OVA. A decrease in the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) was observed in the mice treated with MWCNTs, whereas the suppression of the expression of both TGFβ and IL-10 was observed in mice that had been both treated and immunized. The activation of the T lymphocyte response by the pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to an increase in antibody production to OVA, suggesting the important immunostimulatory effect of carbon nanotubes.

  9. Up-regulation of T lymphocyte and antibody production by inflammatory cytokines released by macrophage exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecco, Ana Carolina P.; Paula, Rosemeire F. O.; Mizutani, Erica; Sartorelli, Juliana C.; Milani, Ana M.; Longhini, Ana Leda F.; Oliveira, Elaine C.; Pradella, Fernando; Silva, Vania D. R.; Moraes, Adriel S.; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C.; Farias, Alessandro S.; Ceragioli, Helder J.; Santos, Leonilda M. B.; Baranauskas, Vitor

    2011-07-01

    Our data demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are internalized by macrophages, subsequently activating them to produce interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12). This cytokine induced the proliferative response of T lymphocytes to a nonspecific mitogen and to ovalbumin (OVA). This increase in the proliferative response was accompanied by an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFNγ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) and IL-6, in mice inoculated with MWCNTs, whether or not they had been immunized with OVA. A decrease in the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) was observed in the mice treated with MWCNTs, whereas the suppression of the expression of both TGFβ and IL-10 was observed in mice that had been both treated and immunized. The activation of the T lymphocyte response by the pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to an increase in antibody production to OVA, suggesting the important immunostimulatory effect of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Effect of emulsion properties on release of esters under static headspace, in vivo, and artificial throat conditions in relation to sensory intensity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weel, K.G.C.; Boelrijk, A.E.M.; Burger, J.J.; Jacobs, M.A.; Gruppen, H.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Smit, G.

    2004-01-01

    The effects of oil content and droplet size distributions of dilute oil-in-water emulsions on release of four esters with different hydrophobicities were studied under in vivo, static headspace, and artificial throat conditions. The effect of oil content on orthonasal and retronasal perceived

  11. The interaction of TAK1 and TAB1 enhances LPS-induced cytokine release via modulating NF-κB activation (Larimichthys crocea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Shi-Yuan; Sun, Qing-Xue; Yao, Cui-Luan

    2018-01-08

    significantly in co-overexpressed HEK293T cells following LPS and poly I:C stimulation. However, the expression levels of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and IL-8 were induced only after LPS challenge (p < .05). These findings suggested that the TAK1-TAB1 complex of large yellow croaker might play an important role in pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokine release after LPS stimulation via inducing NF-κB activation. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Effects of ethylenediamine--a putative GABA-releasing agent--on rat hippocampal slices and neocortical activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Trevor W; Lui, Caleb; Addae, Jonas I

    2011-01-15

    The simple diamine diaminoethane (ethylenediamine, EDA) has been shown to activate GABA receptors in the central and peripheral nervous systems, partly by a direct action and partly by releasing endogenous GABA. These effects have been shown to be produced by the complexation of EDA with bicarbonate to form a carbamate. The present work has compared EDA, GABA and β-alanine responses in rat CA1 neurons using extracellular and intracellular recordings, as well as neocortical evoked potentials in vivo. Superfusion of GABA onto hippocampal slices produced depolarisation and a decrease of field epsps, both effects fading rapidly, but showing sensitivity to blockade by bicuculline. EDA produced an initial hyperpolarisation and increase of extracellular field epsp size with no fade and only partial sensitivity to bicuculline, with subsequent depolarisation, while β-alanine produces a much larger underlying hyperpolarisation and increase in fepsps, followed by depolarisation and inhibition of fepsps. The responses to β-alanine, but not GABA or EDA, were blocked by strychnine. In vivo experiments, recording somatosensory evoked potentials, confirmed that EDA produced an initial increase followed by depression, and that this effect was not fully blocked by bicuculline. Overall the results indicate that EDA has actions in addition to the activation of GABA receptors. These actions are not attributable to activation of β-alanine-sensitive glycine receptors, but may involve the activation of sites sensitive to adipic acid, which is structurally equivalent to the dicarbamate of EDA. The results emphasise the complex pharmacology of simple amines in bicarbonate-containing solutions. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. An in vivo animal study assessing long-term changes in hypothalamic cytokines following perinatal exposure to a chemical mixture based on Arctic maternal body burden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Nanqin

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The geographic distribution of environmental toxins is generally not uniform, with certain northern regions showing a particularly high concentration of pesticides, heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants. For instance, Northern Canadians are exposed to high levels of persistent organic pollutants like polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB, organochlorine pesticides (OCs and methylmercury (MeHg, primarily through country foods. Previous studies have reported associations between neuronal pathology and exposure to such toxins. The present investigation assessed whether perinatal exposure (gestation and lactation of rats to a chemical mixture (27 constituents comprised of PCBs, OCs and MeHg based on Arctic maternal exposure profiles at concentrations near human exposure levels, would affect brain levels of several inflammatory cytokines Methods Rats were dosed during gestation and lactation and cytokine levels were measured in the brains of offspring at five months of age. Hypothalamic cytokine protein levels were measured with a suspension-based array system and differences were determined using ANOVA and post hoc statistical tests. Results The early life PCB treatment alone significantly elevated hypothalamic interleukin-6 (IL-6 levels in rats at five months of age to a degree comparable to that of the entire chemical mixture. Similarly, the full mixture (and to a lesser degree PCBs alone elevated levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine, IL-1b, as well as the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. The full mixture of chemicals also moderately increased (in an additive fashion hypothalamic levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-12 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α. Challenge with bacterial endotoxin at adulthood generally increased hypothalamic levels to such a degree that differences between the perinatally treated chemical groups were no longer detectable. Conclusions These data suggest that exposure at critical

  14. Sustained-release study on Exenatide loaded into mesoporous silica nanoparticles: in vitro characterization and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cuiwei; Zheng, Hongyue; Xu, Junjun; Shi, Xiaowei; Li, Fanzhu; Wang, Xuanshen

    2017-09-04

    Exenatide (EXT), the first glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonist, has been approved as an adjunctive therapy for patients with type 2 diabetes. Due to EXT's short half-life, EXT must be administrated by continuous subcutaneous (s.c.) injection twice daily. In previous studies, many studies on EXT loaded into polymer materials carriers for sustained release had been reported. However, these carriers have some defects, such as hydrophobicity, low surface energy, low mechanical strength, and poor chemical stability. Therefore, this study aims to develop a novel drug delivery system, which is EXT loaded into well-ordered hexagonal mesoporous silica structures (EXT-SBA-15), to control the sustainability of EXT. SBA-15 was prepared by hydrothermal method with uniform size. Morphology of SBA-15 was employed by transmission electron microscopy. The pore size of SBA-15 was characterized by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherms. The in vitro drug release behavior and pharmacokinetics of EXT-SBA-15 were investigated. Furthermore, the blood glucose levels of diabetic mice were monitored after subcutaneous injection of EXT-Sol and EXT-SBA-15 to evaluate further the stable hypoglycemic effect of EXT-SBA-15. EXT-SBA-15 showed a higher drug loading efficiency (15.2 ± 2.0%) and sustained-release features in vitro. In addition, pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the EXT-SBA-15 treatment group extended the half-life t 1/2(β) to 14.53 ± 0.70 h compared with that of the EXT solution (EXT-Sol) treatment group (0.60 ± 0.08 h) in vivo. Results of the pharmacodynamics study show that the EXT-SBA-15 treatment group had inhibited blood glucose levels below 20 mmol/L for 25 days, and the lowest blood glucose level was 13 mmol/L on the 10th day. This study demonstrates that the EXT-SBA-15 delivery system can control the sustainability of EXT and contribute to improve EXT clinical use.

  15. Effects of Topical Tacrolimus and Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on In Vivo Release of Eicosanoids in Atopic Dermatitis During Dermal Microdialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quist, Sven R; Wiswedel, Ingrid; Doering, Ines; Quist, Jennifer; Gollnick, Harald P

    2016-11-02

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a multifactorial inflammatory skin disease with release of distinct inflammatory signals. This study investigated the presence of eicosanoids in AD skin and the effect of topical agents with potential to suppress inflammation. Twelve patients with moderate AD received topical treatment on either arm with tacrolimus 0.1% ointment or a lotion containing 12% ω-6 fatty acids (polyunsaturated fatty acids; PUFA) twice daily for 5 consecutive days. Interstitial fluid was collected in vivo via dermal microdialysis from 4 defined skin areas: lesional, non-lesional and topically treated skin (tacrolimus or PUFA). Markers of oxidative stress (F2-isoprostanes; 5- and 8-prostaglandin F2α) and inflammation (9α,11α-prostaglandin F2α; and prostaglandin E2) were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. All eicosanoid levels were reduced in non-lesional and tacrolimus-treated skin. A significant reduction was observed in total F2-isoprostanes; 9α,11α-prostaglandin F2α; and prostaglandin E2 in non-lesional skin and in 9α,11α-prostaglandin F2α in tacrolimus-treated compared with untreated AD skin. In conclusion, treatment with tacrolimus compared with PUFA appears to suppress eicosanoids more efficiently in AD skin.

  16. Release Characteristics In Vitro and In Vivo of In Situ Gels for a Novel Peptide Compared with Low-Molecular-Weight Hydrophilic Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guiying; Hu, Jie; Meng, Qingbin; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xi; Gao, Lijun; Quan, Dongqin

    2017-01-01

    The thermo-sensitive in situ gels based on copolymers are attractive as an injectable drug delivery carriers for sustained releasing of hydrophilic drugs. The purposes of this work are to investigate the release behavior in vitro and pharmacokinetic profiles in vivo of peptide and lowmolecular- weight hydrophilic drug loaded in the in situ gels. A triblock copolymer PLGA-PEG-PLGA (1402-1000-1402) 1115A (1115A) was synthesized and its rheological and gelatin properties were evaluated. The temperature-sensitive in situ gels based on 1115A of LXT-101, a polypeptide drug, were prepared and the release characteristics in vitro and pharmacokinetic behavior in vivo were investigated. Meanwhile, naltrexone hydrochloride (NTX), a water-soluble low-molecular-weight drug was chosen as the model drug and the in situ gels were also prepared and studied comparatively. Slow-release characteristics were observed in vitro with in situ gels of LXT-101 and NTX. The release profiles and the mechanisms were different manifested by that NTX was released from in situ gels faster and more completely than LXT-101. Otherwise, the release pattern of LXT-101 showed a biphasic mechanism, an initial Fickian diffusion followed by a combination of degradation and diffusion at a later stage. The results of pharmacokinetic study indicated that a sustained release behavior could be obtained with MRT0-t (30.34 ± 12.47) h for LXT-101 and MRT0-t (2.37 ± 0.876) h for NTX, about 10 and 4 times longer than those of aqueous solution respectively. The pharmacodynamics studies in vivo further showed that in situ gel formulations of LXT-101 could sustain efficacy 6 days compared with only 1 day for aqueous solutions. The results of release behavior in vitro and in vivo indicated that in situ gels with copolymer 1115A could be served as carriers for delay-released drug delivery systems and might be more suitable for polypeptide drugs compared to low-molecular-weight hydrophilic drugs. Copyright© Bentham

  17. Preparation, Characterization, and In Vivo Pharmacoscintigraphy Evaluation of an Intestinal Release Delivery System of Prussian Blue for Decorporation of Cesium and Thallium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nidhi Sandal

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Prussian blue (PB, ferric hexacyanoferrate is approved by US-FDA for internal decorporation of Cesium-137 (137Cs and Thallium-201 (201Tl. Aim. Since PB is a costly drug, pH-dependent oral delivery system of PB was developed using calcium alginate matrix system. Methods. Alginate (Alg beads containing PB were optimized by gelation of sodium alginate with calcium ions and effect of varying polymer concentration on encapsulation efficiency and release profile was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM was carried out to study surface morphology. Adsorption efficacy of Alg-PB beads for 201Tl was evaluated and compared with native PB. In vivo pH-dependent release of the formulation was studied in humans using gamma scintigraphy. Results. Encapsulation efficiencies of Alg-PB beads with 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0% polymer solution were 99.9, 91, 92, and 93%, respectively. SEM and particle size analysis revealed differences between formulations in their appearance and size distribution. No drug release was seen in acidic media (pH of 1-2 while complete release was observed at pH of 6.8. Dissolution data was fitted to various mathematical models and beads were found to follow Hixson-Crowell mechanism of release. The pH-dependent release of beads was confirmed in vivo by pharmacoscintigraphy in humans.

  18. Modulation of Cartilage Degradation Biomarkers Reflect the Activation and Inhibition of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Signaling in an Ex Vivo Model of Bovine Cartilage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjelgaard-Petersen, Cecilie Freja; Sharma, Neha; Kayed, Ashref

    2017-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Several inflammatory cytokines and intracellular signaling pathways have been targeted in drug development with varying clinical results. Improved understanding of the intracellular signaling’s modulation of the extracellular matrix turnover could aid in selecting novel anti-i...

  19. Delta 9-THC and N-arachidonoyl glycine regulate BV-2 microglial morphology and cytokine release plasticity: implications for signaling at GPR18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas eMcHugh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microglial cells are extremely plastic and undergo a variety of CNS-prompted shape changes relative to their location and current role. Signaling molecules from neurons also regulate microglial cytokine production. Neurons are known to employ the endogenous cannabinoid system to communicate with other cells of the CNS. N-arachidonoyl glycine (NAGly and Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC signaling via GPR18 has been introduced as an important new target in microglial-neuronal communication. Our hypothesis is that endogenous NAGly-GPR18 signaling regulates phenotypic shape and cytokine production in microglia, and is mimicked by Δ9-THC in the BV-2 microglia model system. BV-2 microglia were exposed to NAGly and Δ9-THC or Vh for 12 hours, which resulted in significant differences in the cell morphologies expressed. Cannabidiol (CBD was effective at antagonizing the effects of both NAGly and Δ9-THC. Using ELISA-based microarrays, BV-2 microglia were exposed to NAGly and Δ9-THC or Vh for 3 hours and the presence of 40 cytokines in the culture media quantified. Production of Axl, CD40, IGF-I, OPN and Pro-MMP-9 were significantly altered by NAGly and Δ9-THC, and antagonized by CBD. These data add to an emerging profile that emphasizes NAGly as a component of an endogenous system present in the CNS that tightly integrates microglial proliferation, recruitment and adhesion with neuron-glia interactivity and tissue remodeling.

  20. Up-regulation of T lymphocyte and antibody production by inflammatory cytokines released by macrophage exposure to multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grecco, Ana Carolina P; Mizutani, Erica; Peterlevitz, Alfredo C; Ceragioli, Helder J; Baranauskas, Vitor [Faculdade de Engenharia Eletrica e Computacao, Universidade de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Paula, Rosemeire F O; Sartorelli, Juliana C; Milani, Ana M; Longhini, Ana Leda F; Oliveira, Elaine C; Pradella, Fernando; Silva, Vania D R; Moraes, Adriel S; Farias, Alessandro S; Santos, Leonilda M B, E-mail: leonilda@unicamp.br [Laboratorio de Neuroimunologia, Departamento Genetica, Evolucao e Bioagentes, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Our data demonstrate that multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are internalized by macrophages, subsequently activating them to produce interleukin (IL)-12 (IL-12). This cytokine induced the proliferative response of T lymphocytes to a nonspecific mitogen and to ovalbumin (OVA). This increase in the proliferative response was accompanied by an increase in the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as interferon-gamma (IFN{gamma}), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF{alpha}) and IL-6, in mice inoculated with MWCNTs, whether or not they had been immunized with OVA. A decrease in the expression of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF{beta}) was observed in the mice treated with MWCNTs, whereas the suppression of the expression of both TGF{beta} and IL-10 was observed in mice that had been both treated and immunized. The activation of the T lymphocyte response by the pro-inflammatory cytokines leads to an increase in antibody production to OVA, suggesting the important immunostimulatory effect of carbon nanotubes.

  1. Non-invasive screening method for simultaneous evaluation of in vivo growth factor release profiles from multiple ectopic bone tissue engineering implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempen, Diederik H.R.; Lu, Lichun; Classic, Kelly L.; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Creemers, Laura B.; Maran, Avudaiappan; Dhert, Wouter J.A.; Yaszemski, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate a screening method based on scintillation probes for the simultaneous evaluation of in vivo growth factor release profiles of multiple implants in the same animal. First, we characterized the scintillation probes in a series of in vitro experiments to optimize the accuracy of the measurement setup. The scintillation probes were found to have a strong geometric dependence and experience saturation effects at high activities. In vitro simulation of 4 subcutaneous limb implants in a rat showed minimal interference of surrounding implants on local measurements at close to parallel positioning of the probes. These characteristics were taken into consideration for the design of the probe setup and in vivo experiment. The measurement setup was then validated in a rat subcutaneous implantation model using 4 different sustained release carriers loaded with 125I-BMP-2 per animal. The implants were removed after 42 or 84 days of implantation, for comparison of the non-invasive method to ex-vivo radioisotope counting. The non-invasive method demonstrated a good correlation with the ex-vivo counting method at both time-points of all 4 carriers. Overall, this study showed that scintillation probes could be successfully used for paired measurement of 4 release profiles with minimal interference of the surrounding implants, and may find use as non-invasive screening tools for various drug delivery applications. PMID:18554743

  2. Improvement of penile erection, sperm count and seminal fructose levels in vivo and nitric oxide release in vitro by ayurvedic herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, M; Thompson, D; Connellan, P; Deseo, M A; Morris, C; Dixit, V K

    2011-08-01

    In the present study, the effect of four Vajikaran Rasayana herbs on penile erection, sperm count, seminal fructose content in vivo and nitric oxide (NO) release in vitro was assessed. Lyophilised aqueous extracts of Asparagus racemosus Willd. (AR), Chlorophytum borivilianum Sant. F. (CB), Curculigo orchioides Gaertn. (CO), and Dactylorhiza hatagirea (D. Don) Soo (DH) were orally administered at 100 mg/kg body weight to Wistar strain male albino rats. Penile erection index and sperm count were determined by visual observation; the seminal fructose concentration was measured spectrophotometrically using resorcinol reagent; and NO release was assessed in a mouse macrophage cell line (RAW264) spectrophotometrically using a commercial Griess reagent kit. Penile erection index, sperm count, seminal fructose concentration and in vitro NO release were the parameters measured. A significant effect on the sperm count, seminal fructose content and penile erection index was observed upon treatment with the extracts. The effect of extracts on inducible NO release in vitro directly correlated with the enhanced erectile function in vivo. The aphrodisiac claims attributed to the four Vajikaran Rasayana herbs were tested and a distinctive effect of all extracts tested was observed, with C. borivilianum showing a highly significant response for all parameters measured in vivo and in vitro. The present study also provides a good correlation between the in vivo improvement of penile erection and in vitro NO releasing activity of the extracts. Increase in seminal fructose levels and sperm count further validates the role of these herbs in improving reproductive function. © 2011 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  3. Lipid-cytokine-chemokine cascades orchestrate leukocyte recruitment in inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, Christian D; Luster, Andrew D

    2012-02-01

    Chemoattractants are pivotal mediators of host defense, orchestrating the recruitment of immune cells into sites of infection and inflammation. Chemoattractants display vast chemical diversity and include bioactive lipids, proteolytic fragments of serum proteins, and chemokines (chemotactic cytokines). All chemoattractants induce chemotaxis by activating seven-transmembrane-spanning GPCRs expressed on immune cells, establishing the concept that all chemoattractants are related in function. However, although chemoattractants have overlapping functions in vitro, recent in vivo data have revealed that they function, in many cases, nonredundantly in vivo. The chemically diverse nature of chemoattractants contributes to the fine control of leukocyte trafficking in vivo, with sequential chemoattractant use guiding immune cell recruitment into inflammatory sites. Lipid mediators frequently function as initiators of leukocyte recruitment, attracting the first immune cells into tissues. These initial responding immune cells produce cytokines locally, which in turn, induce the local release of chemokines. Local chemokine production then markedly amplifies subsequent waves of leukocyte recruitment. These new discoveries establish a paradigm for leukocyte recruitment in inflammation--described as lipid-cytokine-chemokine cascades--as a driving force in the effector phase of immune responses.

  4. Polycaprolactone-coated 3D printed tricalcium phosphate scaffolds for bone tissue engineering: in vitro alendronate release behavior and local delivery effect on in vivo osteogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Bose, Susmita

    2014-07-09

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of in vitro alendronate (AD) release behavior through polycaprolactone (PCL) coating on in vivo bone formation using PCL-coated 3D printed interconnected porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds. Higher AD and Ca(2+) ion release was observed at lower pH (5.0) than that at higher pH (7.4). AD and Ca(2+) release, surface morphology, and phase analysis after release indicated a matrix degradation dominated AD release caused by TCP dissolution. PCL coating showed its effectiveness for controlled and sustained AD release. Six different scaffold compositions, namely, (i) TCP (bare TCP), (ii) TCP + AD (AD-coated TCP), (iii) TCP + PCL (PCL-coated TCP), (iv) TCP + PCL + AD, (v) TCP + AD + PCL, and (vi) TCP + AD + PCL + AD were tested in the distal femoral defect of Sprague-Dawley rats for 6 and 10 weeks. An excellent bone formation inside the micro and macro pores of the scaffolds was observed from histomorphology. Histomorphometric analysis revealed maximum new bone formation in TCP + AD + PCL scaffolds after 6 weeks. No adverse effect of PCL on bioactivity of TCP and in vivo bone formation was observed. All scaffolds with AD showed higher bone formation and reduced TRAP (tartrate resistant acid phosphatase) positive cells activity compared to bare TCP and TCP coated with only PCL. Bare TCP scaffolds showed the highest TRAP positive cells activity followed by TCP + PCL scaffolds, whereas TCP + AD scaffolds showed the lowest TRAP activity. A higher TRAP positive cells activity was observed in TCP + AD + PCL compared to TCP + AD scaffolds after 6 weeks. Our results show that in vivo local AD delivery from PCL-coated 3DP TCP scaffolds could further induce increased early bone formation.

  5. Prolonged Helium Postconditioning Protocols during Early Reperfusion Do Not Induce Cardioprotection in the Rat Heart In Vivo: Role of Inflammatory Cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gezina Tanya Mei Ling Oei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Postconditioning of myocardial tissue employs short cycles of ischemia or pharmacologic agents during early reperfusion. Effects of helium postconditioning protocols on infarct size and the ischemia/reperfusion-induced immune response were investigated by measurement of protein and mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Rats were anesthetized with S-ketamine (150 mg/kg and diazepam (1.5 mg/kg. Regional myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was induced; additional groups inhaled 15, 30, or 60 min of 70% helium during reperfusion. Fifteen minutes of helium reduced infarct size from 43% in control to 21%, whereas 30 and 60 minutes of helium inhalation led to an infarct size of 47% and 39%, respectively. Increased protein levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-3 and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β were found after 30 or 60 min of helium inhalation, in comparison to control. 30 min of helium increased mRNA levels of CINC-3, IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α in myocardial tissue not directly subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that the effectiveness of the helium postconditioning protocol is very sensitive to duration of noble gas application. Additionally, helium was associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines; however, it is not clear whether this is causative of nature or part of an epiphenomenon.

  6. Prolonged helium postconditioning protocols during early reperfusion do not induce cardioprotection in the rat heart in vivo: role of inflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oei, Gezina Tanya Mei Ling; Aslami, Hamid; Kerindongo, Raphaela Priscilla; Steenstra, Renske Johanna; Beurskens, Charlotte Jacqueline Peter; Tuip-de Boer, Anita Maria; Juffermans, Nicole Petra; Hollmann, Markus Werner; Preckel, Benedikt; Weber, Nina Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Postconditioning of myocardial tissue employs short cycles of ischemia or pharmacologic agents during early reperfusion. Effects of helium postconditioning protocols on infarct size and the ischemia/reperfusion-induced immune response were investigated by measurement of protein and mRNA levels of proinflammatory cytokines. Rats were anesthetized with S-ketamine (150 mg/kg) and diazepam (1.5 mg/kg). Regional myocardial ischemia/reperfusion was induced; additional groups inhaled 15, 30, or 60 min of 70% helium during reperfusion. Fifteen minutes of helium reduced infarct size from 43% in control to 21%, whereas 30 and 60 minutes of helium inhalation led to an infarct size of 47% and 39%, respectively. Increased protein levels of cytokine-induced neutrophil chemoattractant (CINC-3) and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) were found after 30 or 60 min of helium inhalation, in comparison to control. 30 min of helium increased mRNA levels of CINC-3, IL-1β, interleukin 6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) in myocardial tissue not directly subjected to ischemia/reperfusion. These results suggest that the effectiveness of the helium postconditioning protocol is very sensitive to duration of noble gas application. Additionally, helium was associated with higher levels of inflammatory cytokines; however, it is not clear whether this is causative of nature or part of an epiphenomenon.

  7. Regulating drug release behavior and kinetics from matrix tablets based on fine particle-sized ethyl cellulose ether derivatives: an in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kifayat Ullah; Khan, Gul Majid

    2012-01-01

    The design and fabrication of sustained/controlled release dosage forms, employing new excipients capable of extending/controlling the release of drugs from the dosage forms over prolonged periods, has worked well in achieving optimally enhanced therapeutic levels of the drugs. In this sense, the objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of selected cellulose ether derivatives for use in direct compression (DC) and as efficient drug release controlling agents. Controlled release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin were prepared at different drug-to-polymer (D : P) ratios by direct compression using a fine particle sized ethylcellulose ether derivative (ETHOCEL Standard Premium 7FP) as rate controlling polymer. The tablets obtained were evaluated for various physico-chemical characteristics and in-vitro drug release studies were conducted in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) using PharmaTest dissolution apparatus at constant temperature of 37 °C ± 0.1. Similarity factor f(2) was employed to the release profiles of test formulations and were compared with marketed ciprofloxacin conventional tablets. Drug release mechanism and the kinetics involved were investigated by fitting the release profile data to various kinetic models. It was found that with increasing the proportion of ethylcellulose ether derivative in the matrix, the drug release was significantly extended up to 24 hours. The tablets exhibited zero order or nearly zero order drug transport mechanism. In vivo drug release performance of the developed controlled release tablets and reference conventional tablets containing ciprofloxacin were determined in rabbit serum according to randomized two-way crossover study design using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Several bioavailability parameters of both the test tablets and conventional tablets including C(max⁡), T(max⁡) and AUC(0-t) were compared which showed an optimized C(max⁡) and T(max⁡) (P < 0.05). A good correlation was obtained

  8. Regulating Drug Release Behavior and Kinetics from Matrix Tablets Based on Fine Particle-Sized Ethyl Cellulose Ether Derivatives: An In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kifayat Ullah Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The design and fabrication of sustained/controlled release dosage forms, employing new excipients capable of extending/controlling the release of drugs from the dosage forms over prolonged periods, has worked well in achieving optimally enhanced therapeutic levels of the drugs. In this sense, the objective of this study was to investigate the suitability of selected cellulose ether derivatives for use in direct compression (DC and as efficient drug release controlling agents. Controlled release matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin were prepared at different drug-to-polymer (D : P ratios by direct compression using a fine particle sized ethylcellulose ether derivative (ETHOCEL Standard Premium 7FP as rate controlling polymer. The tablets obtained were evaluated for various physico-chemical characteristics and in-vitro drug release studies were conducted in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4 using PharmaTest dissolution apparatus at constant temperature of 37∘C±0.1. Similarity factor 2 was employed to the release profiles of test formulations and were compared with marketed ciprofloxacin conventional tablets. Drug release mechanism and the kinetics involved were investigated by fitting the release profile data to various kinetic models. It was found that with increasing the proportion of ethylcellulose ether derivative in the matrix, the drug release was significantly extended up to 24 hours. The tablets exhibited zero order or nearly zero order drug transport mechanism. In vivo drug release performance of the developed controlled release tablets and reference conventional tablets containing ciprofloxacin were determined in rabbit serum according to randomized two-way crossover study design using High Performance Liquid Chromatography. Several bioavailability parameters of both the test tablets and conventional tablets including max, max and AUC0- were compared which showed an optimized max and max (<0.05. A good correlation was obtained between in vitro

  9. Methacholine induces wheal-and-flare reactions in human skin but does not release histamine in vivo as assessed by the skin microdialysis technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Skov, P S

    1995-12-01

    A number of investigations have indicated that cholinergic agonists release histamine from isolated mast cells and suggested that cholinergic stimulation releases histamine in vivo. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether the cutaneous wheal-and-flare reaction induced by methacholine challenge in human skin involves histamine release as measured by the skin microdialysis technique. Five hollow dialysis fibers were inserted intradermally in forearm skin in eight healthy subjects. Each fiber was perfused with Kreb's-Ringer bicarbonate at a rate of 3 microliters/min. Dialysates were collected in 2-min fractions before skin challenge and for 20 min after intradermal injection of methacholine 10(-3)-10(-1) M, the vehicle, and a positive control, codeine phosphate 0.3 mg/ml. Histamine was assayed spectrofluorometrically. Methacholine caused a statistically significant dose-related wheal-and-flare reaction, the flare reaction to methacholine 10(-1) M being comparable with that seen with codeine 0.3 mg/ml. No significant histamine release was observed with methacholine, cumulative histamine release of 16 +/- 8 nM by methacholine 10(-1) M being similar to vehicle responses of 15 +/- 9 nM. Histamine release by codeine was 2524 +/- 435 nM. In conclusion, methacholine-induced wheal-and-flare reactions in human skin appeared not to involve histamine release from skin mast cells.

  10. In vivo stabilization of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist enhances pet imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer in preclinical studies

    OpenAIRE

    Chatalic, Kristell; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; Gent, Dik; Nock, Berthold; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP)...

  11. Effect of Bee Venom and Its Fractions on the Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in PMA-Differentiated U937 Cells Co-Stimulated with LPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonans Tusiimire

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The venom of Apis mellifera (honey bee has been reported to play a role in immunotherapy, but existing evidence to support its immuno-modulatory claims is insufficient. Four fractions from whole bee venom (BV were separated using medium pressure liquid chromatography. Their ability to induce the production of cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA-treated U937 cells was assessed. The levels of the three cytokines produced by stimulation with the four fractions and crude BV without LPS were not significantly different from negative control values. However, co-stimulation of the cells with LPS and Fraction 4 (F-4 induced a 1.6-fold increase in TNF-α level (p < 0.05 compared to LPS alone. Likewise, LPS-induced IL-1β production was significantly synergised in the presence of F-1 (nine-fold, F-2 (six-fold, F-3 (four-fold and F-4 (two-fold fractions, but was only slightly enhanced with crude BV (1.5-fold relative to LPS. Furthermore, the LPS-stimulated production of IL-6 was not significantly increased in cells co-treated with F-2 and F-3, but the organic fraction (F-4 showed an inhibitory effect (p < 0.05 on IL-6 production. The latter was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and found to contain(Z-9-eicosen-1-ol. The effects observed with the purified BV fractions were more marked than those obtained with the crude sample.

  12. Effect of Bee Venom and Its Fractions on the Release of Pro-Inflammatory Cytokines in PMA-Differentiated U937 Cells Co-Stimulated with LPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tusiimire, Jonans; Wallace, Jennifer; Woods, Nicola; Dufton, Mark J; Parkinson, John A; Abbott, Grainne; Clements, Carol J; Young, Louise; Park, Jin Kyu; Jeon, Jong Woon; Ferro, Valerie A; Watson, David G

    2016-04-19

    The venom of Apis mellifera (honey bee) has been reported to play a role in immunotherapy, but existing evidence to support its immuno-modulatory claims is insufficient. Four fractions from whole bee venom (BV) were separated using medium pressure liquid chromatography. Their ability to induce the production of cytokines TNFα, IL-1β and IL-6 in phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-treated U937 cells was assessed. The levels of the three cytokines produced by stimulation with the four fractions and crude BV without LPS were not significantly different from negative control values. However, co-stimulation of the cells with LPS and Fraction 4 (F-4) induced a 1.6-fold increase in TNF-α level (p < 0.05) compared to LPS alone. Likewise, LPS-induced IL-1β production was significantly synergised in the presence of F-1 (nine-fold), F-2 (six-fold), F-3 (four-fold) and F-4 (two-fold) fractions, but was only slightly enhanced with crude BV (1.5-fold) relative to LPS. Furthermore, the LPS-stimulated production of IL-6 was not significantly increased in cells co-treated with F-2 and F-3, but the organic fraction (F-4) showed an inhibitory effect (p < 0.05) on IL-6 production. The latter was elucidated by NMR spectroscopy and found to contain(Z)-9-eicosen-1-ol. The effects observed with the purified BV fractions were more marked than those obtained with the crude sample.

  13. Green tea polyphenols change the profile of inflammatory cytokine release from lymphocytes of obese and lean rats and protect against oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, N; Bolin, A P; Otton, R

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether green tea polyphenols (GT) modulate some functional parameters of lymphocytes from obese rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with GT by gavage (12 weeks/5 days/week; 500 mg/kg of body weight) and obesity was induced by cafeteria diet (8 weeks). Lymphocytes were obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes for analyses. In response to the cafeteria diet we observed an increase in activity of the metabolic enzyme hexokinase, ROS production, MnSOD, CuZnSOD and GR enzyme activities and proliferation capacity of the cells (baseline), whereas IL-10 production was decreased. Obese rats treated with GT decreased cell proliferation (under ConA stimulation). Hexokinase and G6PDH activity, ROS production and MnSOD, CuZnSOD, GPx and GR enzymes remained increased, accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 mRNA level. There was a decrease in pro-inflammatory IL-2, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α cytokines that were accompanied by a decrease in the mRNA level of TRL4 while IL-10 production was increased in obese rats treated with GT. GT treatment of lean rats showed similar results to that of obese rats treated with GT, indicating that the effects of GT are independent of diet. Foxp3 and IRF4 mRNA levels were increased by GT. In conclusion, cafeteria diet modulated the function of lymphocytes from lymph nodes, increasing ROS production and decreasing anti-inflammatory IL-10, which could contribute to the inflammatory state in obesity. GT reduced ROS production, improving the redox status and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production by lymphocytes, suggesting that GT treatment may be driving lymphocytes to a more anti-inflammatory than pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of coating layer and release medium on release profile from coated capsules with Eudragit FS 30D: an in vitro and in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghimipour, Eskandar; Rezaei, Mohsen; Kouchak, Maryam; Fatahiasl, Jafar; Angali, Kambiz Ahmadi; Ramezani, Zahra; Amini, Mohsen; Dorkoosh, Farid Abedin; Handali, Somayeh

    2018-05-01

    The aim of the present research was to evaluate the impact of coating layers on release profile from enteric coated dosage forms. Capsules were coated with Eudragit FS 30D using dipping method. The drug profile was evaluated in both phosphate buffer and Hank's solutions. Utilization X-ray imaging, gastrointestinal transmission of enteric coated capsules was traced in rats. According to the results, no release of the drug was found at pH 1.2, and the extent of release drug in pH 6.8 medium was decreased by adding the coating layers. The results indicated single-layer coated capsules in phosphate buffer were significantly higher than that in Hank's solution. However, no significant difference was observed from capsules with three coating layers in two different dissolution media. X-ray imaging showed that enteric coated capsules were intact in the stomach and in the small intestine, while disintegrated in the colon.

  15. Self-carried curcumin nanoparticles for in vitro and in vivo cancer therapy with real-time monitoring of drug release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Li, Shengliang; An, Fei-Fei; Liu, Juan; Jin, Shubin; Zhang, Jin-Chao; Wang, Paul C.; Zhang, Xiaohong; Lee, Chun-Sing; Liang, Xing-Jie

    2015-08-01

    The use of different nanocarriers for delivering hydrophobic pharmaceutical agents to tumor sites has garnered major attention. Despite the merits of these nanocarriers, further studies are needed to improve their drug loading capacities (which are typically self-carried nanodrug delivery strategies without using inert carriers is highly desirable. In this study, we developed a self-carried curcumin (Cur) nanodrug for highly effective cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo with real-time monitoring of drug release. With a biocompatible C18PMH-PEG functionalization, the Cur nanoparticles (NPs) showed excellent dispersibility and outstanding stability in physiological environments with drug loading capacities >78 wt%. Both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed the cellular fluorescence ``OFF-ON'' activation and real-time monitoring of the Cur molecule release. In vitro and in vivo experiments clearly show that the therapeutic efficacy of the PEGylated Cur NPs is considerably better than that of free Cur. This self-carried strategy with real-time monitoring of drug release may open a new way for simultaneous cancer therapy and monitoring.The use of different nanocarriers for delivering hydrophobic pharmaceutical agents to tumor sites has garnered major attention. Despite the merits of these nanocarriers, further studies are needed to improve their drug loading capacities (which are typically self-carried nanodrug delivery strategies without using inert carriers is highly desirable. In this study, we developed a self-carried curcumin (Cur) nanodrug for highly effective cancer therapy in vitro and in vivo with real-time monitoring of drug release. With a biocompatible C18PMH-PEG functionalization, the Cur nanoparticles (NPs) showed excellent dispersibility and outstanding stability in physiological environments with drug loading capacities >78 wt%. Both confocal microscopy and flow cytometry confirmed the cellular fluorescence ``OFF-ON'' activation and real

  16. Inflammasome-independent regulation of IL-1-family cytokines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Netea, M.G.; Veerdonk, F.L. van de; Meer, J.W.M. van der; Dinarello, C.A.; Joosten, L.A.B.

    2015-01-01

    Induction, production, and release of proinflammatory cytokines are essential steps to establish an effective host defense. Cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family induce inflammation and regulate T lymphocyte responses while also displaying homeostatic and metabolic activities. With the

  17. Cytokine expression profile over time in severely burned pediatric patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Przkora, Rene; Pereira, Clifford T; Oliveira, Hermes M; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Andreia M C; Jeschke, Marc G

    2006-01-01

    .... The massive release of cytokines is implicated in this hypermetabolic response. The aim of the present study was to compare cytokine expression profiles from severely burned children without signs of infections or inhalation injury (n = 19...

  18. In vivo processing and release into the circulation of GFP fusion protein in arginine vasopressin enhanced GFP transgenic rats: response to osmotic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Keita; Oti, Takumi; Katoh, Akiko; Ueta, Yoichi; Morris, John F; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2015-07-01

    Arginine vasopressin (AVP) is a neurohypophysial hormone synthesized as a part of a prepropeptide precursor containing the signal peptide, AVP hormone, AVP-associated neurophysin II and copeptin in the hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons. A transgenic (Tg) rat line expressing the AVP-eGFP fusion gene has been generated. To establish the AVP-eGFP Tg rat as a unique model for an analysis of AVP dynamics in vivo, we first examined the in vivo molecular dynamics of the AVP-eGFP fusion gene, and then the release of GFP in response to physiological stimuli. Double immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that GFP was specifically localized in neurosecretory vesicles of AVP neurons in this Tg rat. After stimulation of the posterior pituitary with high potassium we demonstrated the exocytosis of AVP neurosecretory vesicles containing GFP at the ultrastructural level. Biochemical analyses indicated that the AVP-eGFP fusion gene is subjected to in vivo post-translational modifications like the native AVP gene, and is packaged into neurosecretory vesicles as a fusion protein: copeptin1-14 -GFP. Moreover, GFP release into the circulating blood appeared to be augmented after osmotic stimulation, like native AVP. Thus, here we show for the first time the in vivo molecular processing of the AVP-eGFP fusion gene and stimulated secretion after osmotic stimulation in rats. Because GFP behaved like native AVP in the hypothalamo-pituitary axis, and in particular was released into the circulation in response to a physiological stimulus, the AVP-eGFP Tg rat model appears to be a powerful tool for analyzing neuroendocrine systems at the organismal level. © 2015 FEBS.

  19. Platelet-activating factor induces histamine release from human skin mast cells in vivo, which is reduced by local nerve blockade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, L J; Church, M K; Skov, P S

    1997-05-01

    Intradermal injection of platelet-activating factor (PAF) causes wheal and flare reactions, which are inhibited by antihistamines. However, PAF does not release histamine from human dispersed skin mast cells in vitro. The purpose of this study was to investigate the extent and possible mechanisms of PAF-induced histamine release in human skin in vivo with the use of dermal microdialysis. Hollow dialysis fibers were inserted into the upper dermis in forearm skin and each fiber was perfused with Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate solution at a rate of 3.0 microliters/min. PAF (4.5 to 36 mumol/L), lyso-PAF (36 mumol/L), vehicle (negative control), and codeine 750 or 250 mumol/L (positive control) were injected intradermally above separate fibers. Dialysate was collected in 2-minute fractions for 20 minutes and histamine analyzed spectrofluorometrically. PAF, but not lyso-PAF, caused statistically significant dose-related histamine release and wheal and flare reactions. Intradermal mepivacaine administration significantly abrogated flare reactions by PAF and codeine and inhibited histamine release and wheal reactions by PAF but not by codeine. Long-term topical capsaicin administration inhibited histamine release and wheal reactions by PAF but not by codeine. It inhibited flare reactions induced by both compounds. PAF did not release histamine from blood basophils. These data suggest that PAF induced histamine release from mast cells in intact human skin indirectly via neurogenic activation. Further, on the intradermal injection of PAF histamine release and the skin responses, the wheal and the flare, are differentially regulated by neurogenic components.

  20. Potential Use of Polyvinyl Acetate-Polyvinylpyrrolidone Mixture for the Development of Atenolol Sustained Release Matrix Tablets: Optimization of Formulation through in Vitro-in Vivo Assessment Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owayez, Ali Saeed; Abd El-Ghany, Galal Mahmoud; Abu Hashim, Irhan Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop sustained release matrix tablets of atenolol (AT) using different concentrations of polyvinyl acetate-polyvinylpyrrolidone mixture (KSR) (20, 30, or 40%) with various types of fillers such as spray dried lactose (SP.D.L), avicel pH 101 (AV), and emcompress (EMS). The physical characteristics of the prepared tablets were evaluated. Characterization of the optimized formulation was performed using Fourier transform (FT)-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Moreover, the in vitro release profiles of AT formulations were investigated in different pH dissolution media. Drug release kinetics and mechanisms were also determined. The results revealed that there was no potential incompatibility of the drug with the polymer. The release profiles of AT were affected by the concentration of KSR, fillers used, and pH of the dissolution media. The drug release kinetic from most of the formulations obeyed Higuchi diffusion model. The selected formulae were investigated for their stability by storage at 30 and 40°C with atmospheric humidity and 75% relative humidity (RH), respectively. The results demonstrated that no change in the physicochemical properties of the tablets stored at 30°C/atmospheric RH in comparison with some changes at 40°C/75% RH. Finally, the in vivo study provided an evidence that the optimized AT tablet containing 40% KSR and SP.D.L exhibited prominent higher oral bioavailability and more efficient sustained-release effect than the drug alone or the commercial tablet product. It is noteworthy that KSR could be considered as a promising useful release retardant for the production of AT sustained release matrix tablets.

  1. New Genome-Wide Algorithm Identifies Novel In-Vivo Expressed Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Antigens Inducing Human T-Cell Responses with Classical and Unconventional Cytokine Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Coppola, Mariateresa; van Meijgaarden, Krista E.; Franken, Kees L. M. C.

    2016-01-01

    New strategies are needed to develop better tools to control TB, including identification of novel antigens for vaccination. Such Mtb antigens must be expressed during Mtb infection in the major target organ, the lung, and must be capable of eliciting human immune responses. Using genome......-wide transcriptomics of Mtb infected lungs we developed data sets and methods to identify IVE-TB (in-vivo expressed Mtb) antigens expressed in the lung. Quantitative expression analysis of 2,068 Mtb genes from the predicted first operons identified the most upregulated IVE-TB genes during in-vivo pulmonary infection....... By further analysing high-level conservation among whole-genome sequenced Mtb-complex strains (n = 219) and algorithms predicting HLA-class-Ia and II presented epitopes, we selected the most promising IVE-TB candidate antigens. Several of these were recognized by T-cells from in-vitro Mtb-PPD and ESAT6/CFP10...

  2. Evaluation of the effects and mechanisms of action of glufosinate, an organophosphate insecticide, on striatal dopamine release by using in vivo microdialysis in freely moving rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Nunes, Brenda V; Durán, Rafael; Alfonso, Miguel; de Oliveira, Iris Machado; Ferreira Faro, Lilian R

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the present work was to assess the effects of glufosinate ammonium (GLA), an aminoacid structurally related to glutamate, on in vivo dopamine (DA) release from rat striatum, using brain microdialysis coupled to HPLC-EC. Intrastriatal administration of GLA produced significant concentration-dependent increases in DA levels. At least two mechanisms can be proposed to explain these increases: GLA could be inducing DA release from synaptic vesicles or producing an inhibition of DA transporter (DAT). Thus, we investigated the effects of GLA under Ca(++)-free condition, and after pretreatment with reserpine and TTX. It was observed that the pretreatment with Ca(++)-free Ringer, reserpine or TTX significantly reduced the DA release induced by GLA. Coinfusion of GLA and nomifensine shows that the GLA-induced DA release did not involve the DAT. These results show that GLA-induced striatal DA release is probably mediated by an exocytotic-, Ca(++)-, action potential-dependent mechanism, being independent of DAT.

  3. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  4. In vivo evaluation of copper release and acute local tissue reactions after implantation of copper-coated titanium implants in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoene, Andreas; Prinz, Cornelia; Walschus, Uwe; Lucke, Silke; Patrzyk, Maciej; Wilhelm, Lutz; Neumann, Hans-Georg; Schlosser, Michael

    2013-06-01

    Copper (Cu) based coatings can reduce infections for titanium (Ti) implants. However, Cu is also cytotoxic. To examine the balance of antibacterial versus adverse tissue effects, this study aimed at evaluating a Cu coating regarding in vivo Cu release and local inflammatory reactions for 72 h. TiAl6V4 plates received either plasma electrolytic oxidation only (Ti), or an additional galvanic Cu deposition (Ti-Cu). No Staphylococcus aureus were found in vitro on Ti-Cu after 24 h. Following simultaneous intramuscular implantation of two Ti and two Ti-Cu plates into nine rats, serum Cu was elevated until 48 h and residual Cu on explanted samples reduced accordingly after 48 h. Total and tissue macrophages around implants increased until 72 h for both series, and were increased for Ti-Cu. As numbers of total and tissue macrophages were comparable, macrophages were probably tissue-derived. MHC-class-II-positive cells increased for Ti-Cu only. T-lymphocytes had considerably lower numbers than macrophages, did not increase or differ between both series, and thus had minor importance. Tissue reactions increased beyond Cu release, indicating effects of either surface-bound Cu or more likely the implants themselves. Altogether, Ti-Cu samples possessed antibacterial effectiveness in vitro, released measurable Cu amounts in vivo and caused a moderately increased local inflammatory response, demonstrating anti-infective potential of Cu coatings.

  5. The inflammatory cytokine effect of Pam3CSK4 TLR2 agonist alone or in combination with Leishmania infantum antigen on ex-vivo whole blood from sick and resistant dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Orellana, Pamela; Quirola-Amores, Paulina; Montserrat-Sangrà, Sara; Ordeix, Laura; Llull, Joan; Álvarez-Fernández, Alejandra; Solano-Gallego, Laia

    2017-03-13

    A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations and immune responses exist in canine L. infantum infection. Ibizan hounds are more "resistant" to disease than other dog breeds. Recognition of pathogen-associated molecule patterns by toll like receptors (TLRs) rapidly triggers a variety of anti-microbial immune responses through the induction of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-6 which may play an important role in controlling Leishmania infection. The main objective of this study was to investigate and compare the effect of a TLR2 agonist (TLR2a) alone or in combination with L. infantum antigen (LSA) on ex vivo whole blood cytokine production from healthy seronegative IFN-γ non-producer dogs from an area of low in canine leishmaniosis endemicity (n = 11); sick seropositive dogs with low production of IFN-γ (n = 17) and healthy seronegative or low positive Ibizan hounds with a predominant IFN-γ production (n = 21) from a highly endemic area. Whole blood was stimulated with medium alone (Ø), LSA, concanavalin A, TLR2 (Pam3CSK4) receptor agonist (Ø + TLR2a) and TLR2a and LSA (LSA + TLR2a) for 48 h. Supernatants were harvested for measurement of canine TNF-α and IL-6 cytokines by ELISA. A significant increase of TNF-α was found in the supernatants of stimulated blood from all groups (Ø + TLR2a and LSA + TLR2a) when compared with medium alone. A similar pattern was observed for IL-6. Interestingly, a significant increase of TNF-α production was only observed when stimulation with LSA + TLR2a was compared with TLR2a alone in Ibizan hounds. A significant increase of TNF-α production was observed with stimulation of LSA + TLR2a when compared with LSA in all groups. Significantly higher concentrations of TNF-α and IL-6 were detected in Ibizan hounds, especially for the Ø + TLR2a and LSA + TLR2a treatments compared with other groups. This study demonstrated that TLR2a alone enhances the production of the

  6. Effect of synthetic protease inhibitor gabexate mesilate on attenuation of coagulant activity and cytokine release in a rat model of islet transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokodai, K; Goto, M; Inagaki, A; Imura, T; Satomi, S

    2011-11-01

    The instant blood-mediated inflammatory reaction (IBMIR), in which the activation of coagulation cascade plays a key role, is one of the serious obstacles to successful islet engraftment. Gabexate mesilate (GM) is well known to elicit anticoagulant and antiinflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of GM on syngeneic IBMIR. Syngeneic rat islet grafts (2.5 IEQ/g) were transplanted intraportally into 2 groups (control group and GM group; n = 10-11) of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. The GM group was injected intravenously with GM for 30 minutes before islet infusion to 1 hour after. The control group was injected with equivalent amount of saline solution. Plasma samples were collected before and 0.5, 1, 3, 6, and 24 hours after transplantation, and several proinflammatory mediators, including interleukin-6 and high-mobility group Box 1 were measured. Curative rate, intravenous glucose tolerance test, and insulin amount in the recipients' livers were also evaluated. Little difference was observed in any proinflammatory mediators. Whereas none of the animals in the control group became normoglycemic, 2 of 6 rats transplanted with the same number of islets in the GM group became normoglycemic during the study period. The glucose tolerance response was significantly ameliorated in the GM group compared with the control group (P < 0.001). The insulin amount in the liver of the recipients was considerably higher in the GM group (5.6 ± 4.1 vs 12.6 ± 5.3 ng/IEQ; P < .05). These data suggest that GM improves islet engraftment not through suppressing the proinflammatory cytokines but as an anticoagulant. We therefore think that GM could be a useful anticoagulant to control IBMIR induced in clinical islet transplantation, although antiinflammatory reagents are considered to be needed for the ideal regimen. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA + solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens.

  8. Design and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of sustained-release floating tablets of itopride hydrochloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sayed M; Ahmed Ali, Adel; Ali, Ahmed Ma; Hassan, Omiya A

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to improve the bioavailability of itopride (ITO) and sustain its action by formulating as a floating dosage form. Sustained-release floating tablets of ITO hydrochloride (HCl) were prepared by direct compression using different hydrocolloid polymers such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and ethylcellulose and/or methacrylic acid polymers Eudragit RSPM and Carbopol 934P. The floating property was achieved using an effervescent mixture of sodium bicarbonate and anhydrous citric acid (1:1 mol/mol). Hardness, friability, content uniformity, and dissolution rate of the prepared floating tablets were evaluated. The formulation F10 composed of 28.5% Eudragit RSPM, 3% NaHCO3, and 7% citric acid provided sustained drug release. In vitro results showed sustained release of F10 where the drug release percentage was 96.51%±1.75% after 24 hours (P=0.031). The pharmacokinetic results indicated that the area under the curve (AUC0-∞) of the prepared sustained-release floating tablets at infinity achieved 93.69 µg·h/mL compared to 49.89 µg·h/mL for the reference formulation (Ganaton(®)) and the relative bioavailability of the sustained-release formulation F10 increased to 187.80% (P=0.022). The prepared floating tablets of ITO HCl (F10) could be a promising drug delivery system with sustained-release action and enhanced drug bioavailability.

  9. Fluoride uptake in human teeth from fluoride-releasing restorative material in vivo and in vitro: two-dimensional mapping by EPMA-WDX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H; Iwami, Y; Unezaki, T; Tomii, Y; Ebisu, S

    2001-01-01

    Class V cavities were prepared in the upper and lower left second premolars from an individual under infiltration anesthesia. The cavities were filled with fluoride- releasing resin (TF). One month later, the teeth were extracted. As a control (in vitro), the upper and lower right second premolars were extracted at the time of the cavity preparation in vivo. Immediately after extraction, class V cavities were prepared and filled with TF, and immersed in normal saline solution for 1 month at 37 degrees C. All four premolars were bisected longitudinally and the fluoride uptake around the cavity wall on the cut surface was measured using an electron probe microanalyzer-wavelength dispersive X-ray method. The fluoride uptake was given in the form of a two-dimensional map. Comparison of the observed values of each corresponding part of the tooth in vivo and in vitro revealed no characteristic differences. The maps were quite analogous as a whole.

  10. Design and in vitro and in vivo evaluation of mucoadhesive microcapsules of glipizide for oral controlled release: A technical note

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdary, K. P. R.; Rao, Y. Srinivasa

    2003-01-01

    Thus, large spherical microcapsules with a coat consisting of alginate and a mucoadhesive polymer (sodium CMC, methylcellulose, Carbopol, or HPMC) could be prepared by an orifice-ionic gelation process. The microcapsules exhibited good mucoadhesive properties in an in vitro test. Glipizide release from these mucoadhesive microcapsules was slow and extended over longer periods of time and depended on composition of the coat. Drug release was diffusion controlled and followed zero-order kinetic...

  11. Direct effect of hypothalamic neuropeptides on the release of catecholamines by adrenal medulla in sheep - study ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrońska, D; Kania, B F; Błachuta, M

    2017-03-01

    Stress causes the activation of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and sympatho-adrenal system, thus leading to the release from the adrenal medulla of catecholamines: adrenaline and, to a lesser degree, noradrenaline. It has been established that in addition to catecholamines, the adrenomedullary cells produce a variety of neuropeptides, including corticoliberine (CRH), vasopressin (AVP), oxytocin (OXY) and proopiomelanocortine (POMC) - a precursor of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). The aim of this study was to investigate adrenal medulla activity in vitro depending, on a dose of CRH, AVP and OXY on adrenaline and noradrenaline release. Pieces of sheep adrenal medulla tissue (about 50 mg) were put on 24-well plates and were incubated in 1 mL of Eagle medium without hormone (control) or supplemented only once with CRH, AVP and OXY in three doses (10-7, 10-8 and 10-9 M) in a volume of 10 μL. The results showed that CRH stimulates adrenaline and noradrenaline release from the adrenal medulla tissue. The stimulating influence of AVP on adrenaline release was visible after the application of the two lower doses of this neuropeptide; however, AVP reduced noradrenaline release from the adrenal medulla tissue. A strong, inhibitory OXY effect on catecholamine release was observed, regardless of the dose of this hormone. Our results indicate the important role of OXY in the inhibition of adrenal gland activity and thus a better adaptation to stress on the adrenal gland level.

  12. Microspheres prepared with biodegradable PHBV and PLA polymers as prolonged-release system for ibuprofen: in vitro drug release and in vivo evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovana Carolina Bazzo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate (PHBV and poly(l-lactide (PLA microspheres containing ibuprofen were prepared with the aim of prolonging the drug release. The oil-in-water (O/W emulsion solvent evaporation technique was used, varying the polymer ratio. All formulations provided spherical particles with drug crystals on the surface and a porous and rough polymeric matrix when PHBV was used and smooth external surface when prepared with PLA. The in vitro dissolution profiles show that the formulation containing PHBV/PLA at the proportion of 30/70 presented the best results in terms of prolonging the ibuprofen release. The analysis of the concentration of ibuprofen in the blood of rats showed that maximum levels were achieved at between one and two hours after administration of the immediate-release form (pure drug, while the prolonged microspheres led to a small amount of the drug being released within the first two hours and reached the maximum level after six hours of administration. It was concluded that it is possible to prolong the release of ibuprofen through its incorporation into PHBV/PLA microspheres.No presente estudo foram preparadas microesferas de poli(hidroxibutirato-co-hidroxivalerato (PHBV e poli(ácido láctico (PLA com o objetivo de prolongar a liberação do ibuprofeno, utilizado como fármaco modelo. Empregou-se o método de emulsificação e evaporação do solvente óleo em água (O/A, variando-se a proporção entre os polímeros. Todas as formulações originaram partículas esféricas com cristais de fármaco aderidos à superfície externa. As microesferas apresentaram superfície rugosa e porosa, quando o PHBV foi utilizado, e superfície externa lisa, quando preparadas com o PLA. Os perfis de dissolução in vitro evidenciaram que a formulação que continha PHBV/PLA na proporção de 30/70 apresentou melhores resultados para prolongar a liberação do ibuprofeno. Através da análise da concentra

  13. Preparation and in vitro-in vivo evaluation of none gastric resident dipyridamole (DIP) sustained-release pellets with enhanced bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lishuang; Luo, Yanfei; Feng, Jia; Xu, Ming; Tao, Xiaoguang; He, Haibing; Tang, Xing

    2012-01-17

    The objective of this study was to develop none gastric resident sustained-release pellets loaded with dipyridamole with a high bioavailability. Two different kinds of core pellets, one containing citric acid as a pH-modifier (CAP) and, the other without pH-modifier (NCAP) were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and then coated with mixtures of enteric soluble and insoluble polymers (referred to as CAP(1) and NCAP(1)) or insoluble polymer alone (referred to as CAP(2) and NCAP(2)). The relative bioavailability of the sustained-release pellets was studied in fasted beagle dogs after oral administration using a commercially available immediate release tablet (IRT) as a reference. The in vitro release, in vivo absorption and in vitro-in vivo correlation were also evaluated. Results revealed that the plasma drug concentrations after administration of CAP(2), NCAP(1) and NCAP(2) were undetectable, indicating that the drug release was almost zero from the preparations throughout the gastro-intestinal tract. The C(max), T(max) and AUC((0→24)) of CAP(1) were 0.78 ± 0.23 (μg/ml), 3.80 ± 0.30 (h), and 6.74 ± 0.47 (μg/mlh), respectively. While the corresponding values were 2.23 ± 0.32 (μg/ml), 3.00 ± 0.44 (h) and 9.42 ± 0.69 (μg/mlh) for IRT. The relative bioavailability of CAP(1) was 71.55% compared with IRT. By combined incorporation of a pH-modifier into the core of pellets to modify the inner micro-environment and employing mixtures of enteric soluble and insoluble polymers as a retarding layer, drugs with high solubility in stomach and limited solubility in small intestine, such as DIP, could be successfully formulated as sustained release preparations with no pH-dependence in drug release and enhanced bioavailability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Visualizing the Acute Effects of Vascular-Targeted Therapy In Vivo Using Intravital Microscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Correlation with Endothelial Apoptosis, Cytokine Induction, and Treatment Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund Seshadri

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The acute effects of the vascular-disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA were investigated in vivo using intravital microscopy (IVM and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Changes in vascular permeability and blood flow of syngeneic CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinomas were assessed at 4 and 24 hours after DMXAA treatment (30 mg/kg, i.p. and correlated with induction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, endothelial damage [CD31/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT], and treatment outcome. Intravital imaging revealed a marked increase in vascular permeability 4 hours after treatment, consistent with increases in intratumoral mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α. Parallel contrast-enhanced MRI studies showed a ~ 4-fold increase in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1, indicative of increased contrast agent accumulation within the tumor. Dualimmunostained tumor sections (CD31/TdT revealed evidence of endothelial apoptosis at this time point. Twenty-four hours after treatment, extensive hemorrhage and complete disruption of vascular architecture were observed with IVM, along with a significant reduction in ΔR1 and virtual absence of CD31 immunostaining. DMXAA-induced tumor vascular damage resulted in significant long-term (60-day cures compared to untreated controls. Multimodality imaging approaches are useful in visualizing the effects of antivascular therapy in vivo. Such approaches allow cross validation and correlation of findings with underlying molecular changes contributing to treatment outcome.

  15. Hypoxia-increased RAGE expression regulates chemotaxis and pro-inflammatory cytokines release through nuclear translocation of NF-κ B and HIF1α in THP-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Wei; Zhou, Jing; Zhou, Na; Liu, Qin; Cui, Jian; Zou, Wei; Zhang, Wei

    2018-01-15

    The potential role of hypoxia in mediating the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) expression deserves to be confirmed. And the role of RAGE in hypoxia-induced chemotaxis and inflammation is still unclear. In present study, THP-1 cells were pretreated with siRNA to block HIF1α, NF-κ B, or RAGE, followed by exposed to hypoxia (combined with H 2 O 2 or SNP), and then RAGE expression, nuclear translocation of HIF1α and NF-κ B, release of TNF-α and IL-1β, as well as expression of MCP-1 and CCR2 were measured. The results revealed that RAGE mRNA and protein in THP-1 cells were significantly increased after exposed into hypoxia atmosphere, especially into the solution containing SNP or H 2 O 2 . Moreover, SNP or H 2 O 2 exposure could further amplify hypoxia-induced nuclear translocation of HIF-1α and NF-κ B. Knockdown HIF-1α or NF-κ B by siRNAs could reduce hypoxia- and oxidative stress-induced RAGE hyper-expression. And pretreatment THP-1 cells with RAGE siRNA or NF-κ B siRNA could reduce hypoxia- and oxidative stress-induced expression of MCP-1 and CCR2, and release of TNF-α and IL-1β. Thus, hypoxia not only increases RAGE expression in THP-1 cells by promoting nuclear translocation of NF-κ B and HIF1α, but also regulates chemotaxis and pro-inflammatory cytokines release, which may be partially mediated through upregulation of RAGE expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of in vitro-in vivo correlation for extended-release niacin after administration of hypromellose-based matrix formulations to healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesisoglou, Filippos; Rossenu, Stefaan; Farrell, Colm; Van Den Heuvel, Michiel; Prohn, Marita; Fitzpatrick, Shaun; De Kam, Pieter-Jan; Vargo, Ryan

    2014-11-01

    Development of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVCs) for extended-release (ER) products is commonly pursued during pharmaceutical development to increase product understanding, set release specifications, and support biowaivers. This manuscript details the development of Level C and Level A IVIVCs for ER formulations of niacin, a highly variable and extensively metabolized compound. Three ER formulations were screened in a cross-over study against immediate-release niacin. A Multiple Level C IVIVC was established for both niacin and its primary metabolite nicotinuric acid (NUA) as well as total niacin metabolites urinary excretion. For NUA, but not for niacin, Level A IVIVC models with acceptable prediction errors were achievable via a modified IVIVC rather than a traditional deconvolution/convolution approach. Hence, this is in contradiction with current regulatory guidelines that suggest that when a Multiple Level C IVIVC is established, Level A models should also be readily achievable. We demonstrate that for a highly variable, highly metabolized compound such as niacin, development of a Level A IVIVC model fully validated according to agency guidelines may be challenging. However, Multiple Level C models are achievable and could be used to guide release specifications and formulation/manufacturing changes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  17. Novel methods of cytokine detection: Real-time PCR, ELISPOT, and intracellular cytokine staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Turlej

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are small hormone-like proteins that play important roles in immune system control. Cytokines regulate the proliferation and differentiation of cells and hematopoiesis and act as mediators in the inflammatory reaction. Changes in cytokine levels are found in many diseases, such as sepsis, bowel inflammatory disease, autoimmune diseases, as well as graft-versus-host disease. Cytokines levels can be detected using in vivo, in vitro, and ex vivo techniques. The level of cytokine produced can be measured by immunoenzymatic test (ELISA in supernatant after cell culture with the addition of stimulant and in plasma by techniques that measure the level of cytokine secretion in cells (e.g. immunohistochemical staining, ELISPOT, and intracellular cytokine staining, and by molecular biological methods (RPA, real-time PCR, in situ hybridization, and Northern blot. Detection of cytokine mRNA in tissues is useful in the direct determination of heterogenic populations of cytokine-producing cells. Nowadays the most frequently used methods for measuring cytokine level are ELISPOT, intracellular cytokine staining with flow cytometry detection, and real-time PCR. These methods have an important clinical role in vaccine efficacy, in viral, bacterial, and verminous diagnostics, and in determining the efficacy of cancer treatment.

  18. Th2 cytokines inhibit lymphangiogenesis.

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    Ira L Savetsky

    Full Text Available Lymphangiogenesis is the process by which new lymphatic vessels grow in response to pathologic stimuli such as wound healing, inflammation, and tumor metastasis. It is well-recognized that growth factors and cytokines regulate lymphangiogenesis by promoting or inhibiting lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC proliferation, migration and differentiation. Our group has shown that the expression of T-helper 2 (Th2 cytokines is markedly increased in lymphedema, and that these cytokines inhibit lymphatic function by increasing fibrosis and promoting changes in the extracellular matrix. However, while the evidence supporting a role for T cells and Th2 cytokines as negative regulators of lymphatic function is clear, the direct effects of Th2 cytokines on isolated LECs remains poorly understood. Using in vitro and in vivo studies, we show that physiologic doses of interleukin-4 (IL-4 and interleukin-13 (IL-13 have profound anti-lymphangiogenic effects and potently impair LEC survival, proliferation, migration, and tubule formation. Inhibition of these cytokines with targeted monoclonal antibodies in the cornea suture model specifically increases inflammatory lymphangiogenesis without concomitant changes in angiogenesis. These findings suggest that manipulation of anti-lymphangiogenic pathways may represent a novel and potent means of improving lymphangiogenesis.

  19. Development of a Physiologically Relevant Population Pharmacokinetic in Vitro-in Vivo Correlation Approach for Designing Extended-Release Oral Dosage Formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae Hwan; Shin, Soyoung; Bulitta, Jürgen B; Youn, Yu Seok; Yoo, Sun Dong; Shin, Beom Soo

    2017-01-03

    Establishing a level A in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) for a drug with complex absorption kinetics is challenging. The objective of the present study was to develop an IVIVC approach based on population pharmacokinetic (POP-PK) modeling that incorporated physiologically relevant absorption kinetics. To prepare three extended release (ER) tablets of loxoprofen, three types of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC 100, 4000, and 15000 cps) were used as drug release modifiers, while lactose and magnesium stearate were used as the diluent and lubricant, respectively. An in vitro dissolution test in various pH conditions showed that loxoprofen dissolution was faster at higher pH. The in vivo pharmacokinetics of loxoprofen was assessed following oral administration of the different loxoprofen formulations to Beagle dogs (n = 22 in total). Secondary peaks or shoulders were observed in many of the individual plasma concentration vs time profiles after ER tablet administration, which may result from secondary absorption in the intestine due to a dissolution rate increase under intestinal pH compared to that observed at stomach pH. In addition, in vivo oral bioavailability was found to decrease with prolonged drug dissolution, indicating site-specific absorption. Based on the in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption data, a POP-PK IVIVC model was developed using S-ADAPT software. pH-dependent biphasic dissolution kinetics, described using modified Michaelis-Menten kinetics with varying Vmax, and site-specific absorption, modeled using a changeable absorbed fraction parameter, were applied to the POP-PK IVIVC model. To experimentally determine the biphasic dissolution profiles of the ER tablets, another in vitro dissolution test was conducted by switching dissolution medium pH based on an in vivo estimate of gastric emptying time. The model estimated, using linear regression, that in vivo initial maximum dissolution rate (Vmax(0)in vivo) was highly correlated (r2 > 0

  20. Activation of kynurenine pathway in ex vivo fibroblasts from patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia: cytokine challenge increases production of 3-hydroxykynurenine.

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    Johansson, Anne-Sofie; Owe-Larsson, Björn; Asp, Linnéa; Kocki, Tomasz; Adler, Mats; Hetta, Jerker; Gardner, Renee; Lundkvist, Gabriella B S; Urbanska, Ewa M; Karlsson, Håkan

    2013-11-01

    Accumulating data suggest a causative link between immune stimulation, disturbed metabolism of tryptophan, and pathogenesis of bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The goal of this study was to examine the production of kynurenic acid (KYNA), 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK) and the expression of kynurenine pathway enzymes involved in their synthesis and metabolism in cultured skin fibroblasts obtained from patients with bipolar disorder, schizophrenia or from healthy control individuals. The assessment was performed under basal conditions or following treatment with interferon (IFN)-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, or their combinations, in cells exposed to exogenous kynurenine. In both groups of patients, the baseline production of KYNA and 3-HK was increased, as compared to control subjects. Case-treatment analyses revealed significant interactions between bipolar case status and IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ + TNF-α, or IFN-γ + IL-1β, as well as between schizophrenia case status and IL-1β, IFN-γ + TNF-α, or IFN-γ + IL-1β, in terms of higher 3-HK. Noteworthy, no case-treatment interactions in terms of KYNA production were found. Observed changes did not appear to correlate with the expression of genes encoding kynurenine aminotransferases (KATs), kynureninase (KYNU) or kynurenine-3-monooxygenase (KMO). The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs1053230 and rs2275163, in KMO influenced KYNA levels yet did not explain the case-treatment discrepancies. In conclusion, our present findings indicate the utility of skin-derived fibroblasts for kynurenines research and support the concept of kynurenine pathway alterations in bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. The increase in ratio between neurotoxic 3-HK and neuroinhibitory/neuroprotective KYNA following exposure to cytokines may account for altered neurogenesis and structural abnormalities characteristic for both diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Loureirin B, an essential component of Sanguis Draxonis, inhibits Kv1.3 channel and suppresses cytokine release from Jurkat T cells.

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    Yin, Shijin; Hu, Qinglan; Luo, Jialie; Li, Yuxin; Lu, Chunlan; Chen, Xuan; Hu, Hongzhen

    2014-01-01

    Sanguis draxonis (SD), also known as "Dragon's Blood", is a traditional herb medicine that has been used to treat a variety of complications with unknown mechanisms. Recent studies show that SD displays immunosuppressive activities and improves symptoms of type I diabetes in animal models. However, the mechanisms underlying SD's immunosuppressive actions are not completely understood. The voltage-gated Kv1.3 channel plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases by regulating the functions of both T cells and B cells. Here we investigated the effect of SD and one of its active components loureirin B (LrB) on Kv1.3. Both SD and LrB inhibited Kv1.3-mediated currents, produced a membrane depolarization, and reduced Ca(2+) influx in Jurkat T cells. In addition, application of LrB inhibited phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-induced IL-2 release from activated Jurkat T cells. Furthermore, point mutations in the selective filter region significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of LrB on Kv1.3. The results of these experiments provide evidence that LrB is a channel blocker of Kv1.3 by interacting with amino acid residues in its selective filter region. Direct inhibition of Kv1.3 in T cells by SD and LrB might be the cellular and molecular basis of SD-mediated immunosuppression.

  2. Formulation and evaluation of controlled-release of telmisartan microspheres: In vitro/in vivo study

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    Praveen Kumar Gaur

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to design a controlled-release drug-delivery system for the angiotensin-II receptor antagonist drug telmisartan. Telmisartan was encapsulated with different EUDRAGIT polymers by an emulsion solvent evaporation technique and the physicochemical properties of the formulations were characterized. Using a solvent evaporation method, white spherical microspheres with particle sizes of 629.9–792.1 μm were produced. The in vitro drug release was studied in three different pH media (pH 1.2 for 2 hours, pH 6.8 for 4 hours, and pH 7.4 for 18 hours. The formulations were then evaluated for their pharmacokinetic parameters. The entrapment efficiency of these microspheres was between 58.6% and 90.56%. The obtained microspheres showed good flow properties, which were evaluated in terms of angle of repose (15.29–26.32, bulk and tapped densities (0.37–0.53 and 0.43–0.64, respectively, Carr indices and Hausner ratio (12.94–19.14% and 1.14–1.23, respectively. No drug release was observed in the simulated gastric medium up to 2 hours; however, a change in pH from 1.2 to 6.8 increased the drug release. At pH 7.4, formulations with EUDRAGIT RS 100 showed a steady drug release. The microsphere formulation TMRS-3 (i.e., microspheres containing 2-mg telmisartan gave the highest Cmax value (6.8641 μg/mL at 6 hours, which was three times higher than Cmax for telmisartan oral suspension (TOS. Correspondingly, the area under the curve for TMRS-3 was 8.5 times higher than TOS. Particle size and drug release depended on the nature and content of polymer used. The drug release mechanism of the TMRS-3 formulation can be explained using the Higuchi model. The controlled release of drug from TMRS-3 also provides for higher plasma drug content and improved bioavailability.

  3. Effects of β2 Agonists, Corticosteroids, and Novel Therapies on Rhinovirus-Induced Cytokine Release and Rhinovirus Replication in Primary Airway Fibroblasts

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    David Van Ly

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhinovirus-(RV- induced asthma exacerbations account for high asthma-related health costs and morbidity in Australia. The cellular mechanism underlying this pathology is likely the result of RV-induced nuclear-factor-kappa-B-(NF-κB- dependent inflammation. NF-κB may also be important in RV replication as inhibition of NF-κB inhibits replication of other viruses such as human immunodeficiency virus and cytomegalovirus. To establish the role of NF-κB inhibitors in RV-induced IL- 6 and IL-8 and RV replication, we used pharmacological inhibitors of NF-κB, and steroids and/or β2 agonists were used for comparison. Primary human lung fibroblasts were infected with RV-16 in the presence of NF-κB inhibitors: BAY-117085 and dimethyl fumarate; β2 agonist: salmeterol; and/or corticosteroids: dexamethasone; fluticasone. RV-induced IL-6 and IL-8 and RV replication were assessed using ELISAs and virus titration assays. RV replicated and increased IL-6 and IL-8 release. Salmeterol increased, while dexamethasone and fluticasone decreased RV-induced IL-6 and IL-8 (P<0.05. The NF-κB inhibitor BAY-117085 inhibited only RV-induced IL-6 (P<0.05 and dimethyl fumarate did not alter RV-induced IL-6 and IL-8. Dimethylfumarate increased RV replication whilst other drugs did not alter RV replication. These data suggest that inhibition of NF-κB alone is unlikely to be an effective treatment compared to current asthma therapeutics.

  4. Design and in vitro and in vivo characterization of mucoadhesive matrix pellets of metformin hydrochloride for oral controlled release: a technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ige, Pradum Pundlikrao; Gattani, Surendra Ganeshlal

    2012-03-01

    The aim of the current work was to design and develop matrix pellets of hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K200M and microcrystalline cellulose in an admixture for a mucoadhesive gastroretentive drug delivery system. Pellets containing metformin hydrochloride (500 mg) were prepared by the pelletization technique using an extruder-spheronizer. Pellets were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), circularity, roundness, percent drug content, percent production yield, in vitro swelling, ex vivo mucoadhesion, in vitro drug release and in vivo x-ray imaging studies. Optimized pellets were sufficiently porous spheroids, free flowing, had smooth surfaces, had yields up to 75.45 ± 0.52% and had drug content up to 96.45 ± 0.19%. The average particle size of formulations MF2 and MF6 were 1.13 ± 0.41 mm and 1.22 ± 0.18 mm, respectively. Formulation MF6 exhibited strong adhesion, about 94.67%, to goat mucosal tissue, and the desired in vitro swelling, with a sustained drug release profile for 12 h and with retention in the upper small intestine of rabbits for 10 h. We conclude that hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose K200M and microcrystalline cellulose at a 2.80:1.00 w/w ratio could be an effective carrier for multiple unit controlled delivery of metformin hydrochloride.

  5. [18F]FDG Labeling of Neural Stem Cells for in Vivo Cell Tracking with Positron Emission Tomography: Inhibition of Tracer Release by Phloretin

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    Katica Stojanov

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of neural stem cells into the brain has promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To monitor the cellular replacement therapy, that is, to determine stem cell migration, survival, and differentiation, in vivo tracking methods are needed. Ideally, these tracking methods are noninvasive. Noninvasive tracking methods that have been successfully used for the visualization of blood-derived progenitor cells include magnetic resonance imaging and radionuclide imaging using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT and positron emission tomography (PET. The SPECT tracer In-111-oxine is suitable for stem cell labeling, but for studies in small animals, the higher sensitivity and facile quantification that can be obtained with PET are preferred. Here the potential of 2′-[18F]fluoro-2′-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F]-FDG, a PET tracer, for tracking of neural stem cell (NSCs trafficking toward an inflammation site was investigated. [18F]-FDG turns out to be a poor radiopharmaceutical to label NSCs owing to the low labeling efficiency and substantial release of radioactivity from these cells. Efflux of [18F]-FDG from NSCs can be effectively reduced by phloretin in vitro, but inhibition of tracer release is insufficient in vivo for accurate monitoring of stem cell trafficking.

  6. Fluvastatin and atorvastatin affect calcium homeostasis of rat skeletal muscle fibers in vivo and in vitro by impairing the sarcoplasmic reticulum/mitochondria Ca2+-release system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liantonio, Antonella; Giannuzzi, Viviana; Cippone, Valentina; Camerino, Giulia Maria; Pierno, Sabata; Camerino, Diana Conte

    2007-05-01

    The mechanism by which the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) induce skeletal muscle injury is still under debate. By using fura-2 cytofluorimetry on intact extensor digitorum longus muscle fibers, here we provided the first evidence that 2 months in vivo chronic treatment of rats with fluvastatin (5 and 20 mg kg-1) and atorvastatin (5 and 10 mg kg-1) caused an alteration of calcium homeostasis. All treated animals showed a significant increase of resting cytosolic calcium [Ca2+]i, up to 60% with the higher fluvastatin dose and up to 20% with the other treatments. The [Ca2+]i rise induced by statin administration was not due to an increase of sarcolemmal permeability to calcium. Furthermore, the treatments reduced caffeine responsiveness. In vitro application of fluvastatin caused changes of [Ca2+]i, resembling the effect obtained after the in vivo administration. Indeed, fluvastatin produced a shift of mechanical threshold for contraction toward negative potentials and an increase of resting [Ca2+]i. By using ruthenium red and cyclosporine A, we determined the sequence of the statin-induced Ca2+ release mechanism. Mitochondria appeared as the cellular structure responsible for the earlier event leading to a subsequent large sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ release. In conclusion, we suggest that calcium homeostasis alteration may be a crucial event for myotoxicity induced by this widely used class of hypolipidemic drugs.

  7. Cytokine Response to Exercise and Its Modulation

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    Katsuhiko Suzuki

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Strenuous exercise induces such inflammatory responses as leukocytosis (neutrophilia and symptoms as delayed-onset muscle soreness and swelling. However, the association between inflammatory mediator cytokines and oxidative stress is not fully delineated. Herein, in addition to basic background information on cytokines, research findings on exertional effects on cytokine release and the underlying mechanisms and triggers are introduced. Then, the associations among cytokine responses, oxidative stress, and tissue damage are described not only in overloaded skeletal muscle, but also in other internal organs. Furthermore, we introduce preventive countermeasures against the exhaustive exercise-induced pathogenesis together with the possibility of antioxidant interventions.

  8. Host gene expression profiling and in vivo cytokine studies to characterize the role of linezolid and vancomycin in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA murine sepsis model.

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    Batu K Sharma-Kuinkel

    Full Text Available Linezolid (L, a potent antibiotic for Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA, inhibits bacterial protein synthesis. By contrast, vancomycin (V is a cell wall active agent. Here, we used a murine sepsis model to test the hypothesis that L treatment is associated with differences in bacterial and host characteristics as compared to V. Mice were injected with S. aureus USA300, and then intravenously treated with 25 mg/kg of either L or V at 2 hours post infection (hpi. In vivo alpha-hemolysin production was reduced in both L and V-treated mice compared to untreated mice but the reduction did not reach the statistical significance [P = 0.12 for L; P = 0.70 for V. PVL was significantly reduced in L-treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.02. However the reduction of in vivo PVL did not reach the statistical significance in V- treated mice compared to untreated mice (P = 0.27. Both antibiotics significantly reduced IL-1β production [P = 0.001 for L; P = 0.006 for V]. IL-6 was significantly reduced with L but not V antibiotic treatment [P<0.001 for L; P = 0.11 for V]. Neither treatment significantly reduced production of TNF-α. Whole-blood gene expression profiling showed no significant effect of L and V on uninfected mice. In S. aureus-infected mice, L altered the expression of a greater number of genes than V (95 vs. 42; P = 0.001. Pathway analysis for the differentially expressed genes identified toll-like receptor signaling pathway to be common to each S. aureus-infected comparison. Expression of immunomodulatory genes like Cxcl9, Cxcl10, Il1r2, Cd14 and Nfkbia was different among the treatment groups. Glycerolipid metabolism pathway was uniquely associated with L treatment in S. aureus infection. This study demonstrates that, as compared to V, treatment with L is associated with reduced levels of toxin production, differences in host inflammatory response, and distinct host gene expression

  9. Design and in vitro/in vivo evaluation of sustained-release floating tablets of itopride hydrochloride

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    Ahmed SM

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Sayed M Ahmed,1 Adel Ahmed Ali,2 Ahmed MA Ali,2,3 Omiya A Hassan2,4 1Department of Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Assiut University, Assiut, 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Beni-Suef University, Beni-Suef, Egypt; 3Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Taif University, Taif, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Deraya University, El-Minia Gadida, Egypt Purpose: The aim of the present study was to improve the bioavailability of itopride (ITO and sustain its action by formulating as a floating dosage form. Materials and methods: Sustained-release floating tablets of ITO hydrochloride (HCl were prepared by direct compression using different hydrocolloid polymers such as hydroxypropyl methylcellulose and ethylcellulose and/or methacrylic acid polymers Eudragit RSPM and Carbopol 934P. The floating property was achieved using an effervescent mixture of sodium bicarbonate and anhydrous citric acid (1:1 mol/mol. Hardness, friability, content uniformity, and dissolution rate of the prepared floating tablets were evaluated. The formulation F10 composed of 28.5% Eudragit RSPM, 3% NaHCO3, and 7% citric acid provided sustained drug release. Results: In vitro results showed sustained release of F10 where the drug release percentage was 96.51%±1.75% after 24 hours (P=0.031.The pharmacokinetic results indicated that the area under the curve (AUC0–∞ of the prepared sustained-release floating tablets at infinity achieved 93.69 µg·h/mL compared to 49.89 µg·h/mL for the reference formulation (Ganaton® and the relative bioavailability of the sustained-release formulation F10 increased to 187.80% (P=0.022. Conclusion: The prepared floating tablets of ITO HCl (F10 could be a promising drug delivery system with sustained-release action and enhanced drug bioavailability. Keywords: itopride HCl, oral drug delivery, stability study, bioavailability

  10. Replication of H9 influenza viruses in the human ex vivo respiratory tract, and the influence of neuraminidase on virus release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Renee W Y; Chan, Louisa L Y; Mok, Chris K P; Lai, Jimmy; Tao, Kin P; Obadan, Adebimpe; Chan, Michael C W; Perez, Daniel R; Peiris, J S Malik; Nicholls, John M

    2017-07-24

    H9N2 viruses are the most widespread influenza viruses in poultry in Asia. We evaluated the infection and tropism of human and avian H9 influenza virus in the human respiratory tract using ex vivo respiratory organ culture. H9 viruses infected the upper and lower respiratory tract and the majority of H9 viruses had a decreased ability to release virus from the bronchus rather than the lung. This may be attributed to a weak neuraminidase (NA) cleavage of carbon-6-linked sialic acid (Sia) rather than carbon-3-linked Sia. The modified cleavage of N-acetlylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) and N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc) by NA in H9 virus replication was observed by reverse genetics, and recombinant H9N2 viruses with amino acids (38KQ) deleted in the NA stalk, and changing the amino acid at position 431 from Proline-to-Lysine. Using recombinant H9 viruses previously evaluated in the ferret, we found that viruses which replicated well in the ferret did not replicate to the same extent in the human ex vivo cultures. The existing risk assessment models for H9N2 viruses in ferrets may not always have a strong correlation with the replication in the human upper respiratory tract. The inclusion of the human ex vivo cultures would further strengthen the future risk-assessment strategies.

  11. Synaptic release and extracellular actions of Zn2+ limit propagation of spreading depression and related events in vitro and in vivo

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    Aiba, Isamu; Carlson, Andrew P.; Sheline, Christian T.

    2012-01-01

    Cortical spreading depression (CSD) is a consequence of a slowly propagating wave of neuronal and glial depolarization (spreading depolarization; SD). Massive release of glutamate contributes to SD propagation, and it was recently shown that Zn2+ is also released from synaptic vesicles during SD. The present study examined consequences of extracellular Zn2+ accumulation on the propagation of SD. SD mechanisms were studied first in murine brain slices, using focal KCl applications as stimuli and making electrical and optical recordings in hippocampal area CA1. Elevating extracellular Zn2+ concentrations with exogenous ZnCl2 reduced SD propagation rates. Selective chelation of endogenous Zn2+ (using TPEN or CaEDTA) increased SD propagation rates, and these effects appeared due to chelation of Zn2+ derived from synaptic vesicles. Thus, in tissues where synaptic Zn2+ release was absent [knockout (KO) of vesicular Zn2+ transporter ZnT-3], SD propagation rates were increased, and no additional increase was observed following chelation of endogenous Zn2+ in these tissues. The role of synaptic Zn2+ was then examined on CSD in vivo. ZnT-3 KO animals had higher susceptibility to CSD than wild-type controls as evidenced by significantly higher propagation rates and frequencies. Studies of candidate mechanisms excluded changes in neuronal excitability, presynaptic release, and GABA receptors but left open a possible contribution of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor inhibition. These results suggest the extracellular accumulation of synaptically released Zn2+ can serve as an intrinsic inhibitor to limit SD events. The inhibitory action of extracellular Zn2+ on SD may counteract to some extent the neurotoxic effects of intracellular Zn2+ accumulation in acute brain injury models. PMID:22131381

  12. Preparation and characterization of pH-sensitive methyl methacrylate-g-starch/hydroxypropylated starch hydrogels: in vitro and in vivo study on release of esomeprazole magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Ganure, Ashok Laxmanrao; Subudhi, Bharat Bhushan; Shukla, Shubhanjali

    2015-06-01

    In the present study, novel hydrogels were prepared through graft copolymerization of methyl methacrylate onto starch and hydroxypropylated starch for intestinal drug delivery. The successful grafting has been confirmed by FTIR, NMR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Morphological examination of copolymeric hydrogels by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirms the macroporous nature of the copolymers. The high decomposition temperature was observed in thermograms indicating the thermal stability of the hydrogels. To attain a hydrogel with maximum percent graft yield, the impact of reaction variables like concentration of ceric ammonium nitrate as initiator and methyl methacrylate as monomer were consistently optimized. X-ray powder diffraction and differential scanning calorimetric analysis supported the successful entrapment of the drug moiety (esomeprazole magnesium; proton pump inhibitor) within the hydrogel network. Drug encapsulation efficiency of optimized hydrogels was found to be >78%. Furthermore, swelling capacity of copolymeric hydrogels exhibited a pH-responsive behavior which makes the synthesized hydrogels potential candidates for controlled delivery of medicinal agents. In vitro drug release was found to be sustained up to 14 h with 80-90% drug release in pH 6.8 solution; however, the cumulative release was 40-45% in pH 1.2. The gastrointestinal transit behavior of optimized hydrogel was determined by gamma scintigraphy, using (99m)Tc as marker. The amount of radioactive tracer released from the labeled hydrogel was minimal when the hydrogel was in the stomach, whereas it increased as hydrogel reached in intestine. Well-correlated results of in vitro and in vivo analysis proved their controlled release behavior with preferential delivery into alkaline pH environment.

  13. Growth factor release from a chemically modified elastomeric poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) thin film promotes angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun K; Bury, Matthew I; Fuller, Natalie J; Rozkiewicz, Dorota I; Hota, Partha V; Kollhoff, David M; Webber, Matthew J; Tapaskar, Natalie; Meisner, Jay W; Lariviere, Patrick J; Destefano, Samantha; Wang, Deli; Ameer, Guillermo A; Cheng, Earl Y

    2012-03-01

    The ultimate success of in vivo organ formation utilizing ex vivo expanded "starter" tissues relies heavily upon the level of vascularization provided by either endogenous or artificial induction of angiogenic or vasculogenic events. To facilitate proangiogenic outcomes and promote tissue growth, an elastomeric scaffold previously shown to be instrumental in the urinary bladder regenerative process was modified to release proangiogenic growth factors. Carboxylic acid groups on poly(1,8-octanediol-co-citrate) films (POCfs) were modified with heparan sulfate creating a heparan binding POCf (HBPOCf). Release of proangiogenic growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) from HBPOCfs demonstrated an approximate threefold increase over controls during a 30-day time course in vitro. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated significant topological differences between films. Subcutaneous implantation of POCf alone, HBPOCf, POCf-VEGF, and HBPOCf-VEGF within the dorsa of nude rats yielded increased vascular growth in HBPOCf-VEGF constructs. Vessel quantification studies revealed that POCfs alone contained 41.1 ± 4.1 vessels/mm², while HBPOCf, POCf-VEGF, and HBPOCF-VEGF contained 41.7 ± 2.6, 76.3 ± 9.4, and 167.72 ± 15.3 vessels/mm², respectively. Presence of increased vessel growth was demonstrated by CD31 and vWF immunostaining in HBPOCf-VEGF implanted areas. Data demonstrate that elastomeric POCfs can be chemically modified and possess the ability to promote angiogenesis in vivo. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Ethanol extract of Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai suppresses in vitro LPS-induced cytokine production in RAW 264.7 macrophages and in vivo acute inflammatory symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunyao; Wang, Myeong-Hyeon

    2014-02-01

    Synurus deltoides (Aiton) Nakai, belonging to the Compositae family, is an edible plant widely distributed in Northeast Asia. In this study, we examined the mechanisms underlying the immunomodulative effects of the ethanol extract of S. deltoides (SDE). The SDE extract strongly down-regulated the mRNA expression of the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, thereby inhibiting the production of nitric oxide (NO), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and TNF-α in the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated RAW 264.7 cells. Furthermore, SDE also suppressed the nuclear translocation of the activation protein (AP)-1 and the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and simultaneously decreased the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinases (ERK), p38, and Akt. In agreement with the in vitro observations, the orally administered SDE ameliorated the acute inflammatory symptoms in the arachidonic acid-induced ear edema and the EtOH/HCl-induced gastritis in mice. Therefore, S. deltoides have a potential anti-inflammatory capacity in vitro and in vivo, suggesting the potential therapeutic use in the inflammation-associated disorders.

  15. Octadecylamine-Mediated Versatile Coating of CoFe2O4 NPs for the Sustained Release of Anti-Inflammatory Drug Naproxen and in Vivo Target Selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadou, Violetta; Makris, George; Papagiannopoulou, Dionysia; Vourlias, Georgios; Dendrinou-Samara, Catherine

    2016-04-13

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) can play a distinct role in magnetic drug delivery via their distribution to the targeted area. The preparation of such MNPs is a challenging multiplex task that requires the optimization of size, magnetic, and surface properties for the achievement of desirable target selectivity, along with the sustained drug release as a prerequisite. In that context, CoFe2O4 MNPs with a small size of ∼7 nm and moderate saturation magnetization of ∼60 emu g(-1) were solvothermally synthesized in the presence of octadecylamine (ODA) with a view to investigate the functionalization route effect on the drug release. Synthetic regulations allowed us to prepare MNPs with aminated (AmMNPs) and amine-free (FAmMNPs) surface. The addition of the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug with a carboxylate donor, Naproxen (NAP), was achieved by direct coupling with the NH2 groups, rendered by ODA, through the formation of an amide bond in the case of AmMNPs. In the case of FAmMNPs, indirect coupling of NAP was performed through an intermediate linker (polyethylenimine) and on PEG-ylated MNPs. FT-IR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, and UV-vis data confirmed the addition of NAP, whereas diverse drug-release behavior was observed for the different functionalization approaches. The biological behavior of the MNPs@NAP was evaluated in vitro in rat serum and in vivo in mice, after radiolabeling with a γ-emitting radionuclide, (99m)Tc. The in vivo fate of MNPs@NAP carriers was in straightforward relation with the direct or indirect coupling of NAP. Furthermore, an inflammation was induced intramuscularly, where the directly coupled (99m)Tc-MNPs@NAP carriers showed increased accumulation at the inflammation site.

  16. Cytokine response to vitamin E supplementation is dependent on pre-supplementation cytokine levels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisle, Sarah E.; Leka, Lynette S.; Dallal, Gerard E.; Jacques, Paul F.; Delgado-Lista, Javier; Ordovas, Jose M.; Meydani, Simin Nikbin

    2009-01-01

    Vitamin E supplementation has been suggested to improve immune response in the aged in part by altering cytokine production. However, there is not a consensus regarding the effect of supplemental vitamin E on cytokine production in humans. There is evidence that baseline immune health can affect immune response to supplemental vitamin E in the elderly. Thus, the effect of vitamin E on cytokines may depend on their pre-supplementation cytokine response. Using data from a vitamin E intervention in elderly nursing home residents, we examined if the effect of vitamin E on ex vivo cytokine production of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ depended on baseline cytokine production. . We observed that the effect of vitamin E supplementation on cytokine production depended on pre-supplementation production of the respective cytokines. The interactions between vitamin E and baseline cytokine production were not explained covariates known to impact cytokine production. Our results offer evidence that baseline cytokine production should be considered in studies that examine the effect of supplemental vitamin E on immune and inflammatory responses. Our results could have implications in designing clinical trials to determine the impact of vitamin E on conditions in which cytokines are implicated such as infections and atherosclerotic disease. PMID:19478423

  17. Soluble cytokine receptors in biological therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Botran, Rafael; Crespo, Fabian A; Sun, Xichun

    2002-08-01

    Due to their fundamental involvement in the pathogenesis of many diseases, cytokines constitute key targets for biotherapeutic approaches. The discovery that soluble forms of cytokine receptors are involved in the endogenous regulation of cytokine activity has prompted substantial interest in their potential application as immunotherapeutic agents. As such, soluble cytokine receptors have many advantages, including specificity, low immunogenicity and high affinity. Potential disadvantages, such as low avidity and short in vivo half-lifes, have been addressed by the use of genetically-designed receptors, hybrid proteins or chemical modifications. The ability of many soluble cytokine receptors to inhibit the binding and biological activity of their ligands makes them very specific cytokine antagonists. Several pharmaceutical companies have generated a number of therapeutic agents based on soluble cytokine receptors and many of them are undergoing clinical trials. The most advanced in terms of clinical development is etanercept (Enbrel, Immunex), a fusion protein between soluble TNF receptor Type II and the Fc region of human IgG1. This TNF-alpha; antagonist was the first soluble cytokine receptor to receive approval for use in humans. In general, most agents based on soluble cytokine receptors have been safe, well-tolerated and have shown only minor side effects in the majority of patients. Soluble cytokine receptors constitute a new generation of therapeutic agents with tremendous potential for applications in a wide variety of human diseases. Two current areas of research are the identification of their most promising applications and characterisation of their long-term effects.

  18. Hybrid Iron Oxide-Graphene Oxide-Polysaccharides Microcapsule: A Micro-Matryoshka for On-demand Drug Release and Antitumor Therapy In Vivo

    KAUST Repository

    Deng, Lin

    2016-02-25

    Premature drug release is a common drawback in stimuli responsive drug delivery systems (DDS) especially if it depends on internal triggers, that are hard to control, or a single external stimulus, that can only have one function. Thus, many DDS systems were reported combining different triggers, however limited success has been established in fine-tuning the release process mainly due to the poor bioavailability and complexity of the reported designs. This paper reports the design of a hybrid microcapsule (h-MC) by a simple layer-by-layer technique comprising polysaccharides (Alg, Chi, HA), iron oxide, and graphene oxide. Electrostatic assembly of the oppositely charged polysaccharides and graphene sheets provided a robust structure to load drugs through pH control. The polysaccharides component ensured high biocompatibility, bioavailability, and tumor cells targeting. Magnetic field and near infrared laser triggerable Fe3O4@GO component provided dual high energy and high penetration hyperthermia therapy. On-demand drug release from h-MC can be achieved by synchronizing these external triggers, making it highly controllable. The synergistic effect of hyperthermia and chemotherapy was successfully confirmed in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Feasibility of poly (ϵ-caprolactone-co-DL-lactide) as a biodegradable material for in situ forming implants: evaluation of drug release and in vivo degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Wei; Meng, Shu; Liu, Danhua; Wang, Ping; Guo, Jing; Li, Jianxin; Guan, Yanmin; Yang, Dan

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of poly (ϵ-caprolactone-co-DL-lactide), P (CL/DL-LA), for injectable in situ forming implants (ISFI). The ISFI was prepared by dissolving P (CL/DL-LA) in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP), and Testosterone undecanoate (TU) was used as model drug. The effect of various polymer concentrations, molecular weights (Mws) and drug loads on the drug release from the TU-loaded ISFI systems was investigated in vitro. The release of TU-loaded ISFI was also evaluated in rats. In addition, a subcutaneous rabbit model was used to evaluate the degradation and foreign-body reaction of P (CL/DL-LA) ISFI. The use of higher concentration of P (CL/DL-LA) with higher molecule weight and larger CL:DL-LA monomer ratio for the TU-loaded ISFI gave a slower drug release. The ISFI of 80/20 P (CL/DL-LA) (Mw 61 753):NMP 20:80 with 16% TU formulation increased serum testosterone levels in rats over a period of three months. The in vivo degradation and biocompatibility study of ISFI shows that P (CL/DL-LA) degrades by a process of bulk degradation and that the foreign-body reaction of this biomaterial is relatively mild. In summary, our investigations demonstrate that in situ parenteral drug delivery systems can be obtained from P (CL/DL-LA) solutions.

  20. In vivo release by vagal stimulation of L-/sup 3/Hglutamic acid in the nucleus tractus solitarius preloaded with L-/sup 3/Hglutamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granata, A.R.; Sved, A.F.; Reis, D.J.

    1984-01-01

    In anesthetized and paralyzed rats, using a push-pull perfusion technique, we examined the effect of bilateral vagal stimulation on the release of L-/sup 3/Hglutamic acid (L-/sup 3/HGlu) from the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), after preloading the tissue either with L-/sup 3/HGlu or L-/sup 3/Hglutamine (L-/sup 3/HGln). Vagal stimulation sufficient to produce a maximum fall of arterial pressure (AP) evoked release of L-/sup 3/HGlu from the NTS when the tissue was preloaded with either /sup 3/H-Glu or /sup 3/H-Gln, and of D-/sup 3/Haspartic acid (D-/sup 3/HAsp) when this stable Glu analogue was used to preloaded with either /sup 3/H-Glu or /sup 3/H-Gln, and of D-/sup 3/H precursor L-Gln is a good marker of the releasable pool of L-Glu in vivo and are consistent with the hypothesis that L-/sup 3/HGlu is a neurotransmitter in the NTS, mediating the vasodepressor response from cardiopulmonary mechanoreceptors.

  1. Focal release of neurotrophic factors by biodegradable microspheres enhance motor and sensory axonal regeneration in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) promote nerve regeneration and neuronal survival after peripheral nerve injury. However, drawbacks related with administration and bioactivity during long periods limit their therapeutic application. In this study, PLGA microspheres (MPs) were used to locally release different NTFs and evaluate whether they accelerate axonal regeneration in comparison with free NTFs or controls. ELISA, SEM, UV/visible light microscopy, organotypic cultures of DRG explants and spina...

  2. Cdc14 Localization as a Marker for Mitotic Exit: In Vivo Quantitative Analysis of Cdc14 Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurohr, Gabriel; Mendoza, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    To complete cell division and to exit from mitosis into the next G1 phase, eukaryotic cells need to inactivate the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) and reverse Cdk-phosphorylation events. In budding yeast mitotic exit depends on the phosphatase Cdc14. During the majority of the cell cycle Cdc14 is sequestered and kept inactive in the nucleolus. Activation of Cdc14 at anaphase onset coincides with its release from the nucleolus into the nucleus and subsequently into the cytoplasm. Here we describe a microscopy method, originally developed in the laboratory of Frederick Cross (Lu and Cross, Cell 141:268-279, 2010), that allows quantifying Cdc14 release in live cells using the open source software FIJI. We adapted this method and show that it is able to distinguish between Cdc14 activation defects caused by mutations in the "cdcFourteen Early Anaphase Release"-(FEAR) and the mitotic exit network (MEN) using slk19∆ and cdc15-1 mutant strains.

  3. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bin; Dun, Sai-Hong; Gu, Jian-Qiu; Guo, Yang; Ikuyama, Shoichiro

    2015-01-01

    Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton) with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived) microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO), TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1) and perilipin 2 (PLIN2). Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia.

  4. Pycnogenol Attenuates the Release of Proinflammatory Cytokines and Expression of Perilipin 2 in Lipopolysaccharide-Stimulated Microglia in Part via Inhibition of NF-κB and AP-1 Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Fan

    Full Text Available Over activation of microglia results in the production of proinflammatory agents that have been implicated in various brain diseases. Pycnogenol is a patented extract from French maritime pine bark (Pinus pinaster Aiton with strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory potency. The present study investigated whether pycnogenol may be associated with the production of proinflammatory mediators in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated BV2 (mouse-derived microglia. It was found that pycnogenol treatment was dose-dependently associated with significantly less release of nitricoxide (NO, TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-1β, and lower levels of intercellular adhesion molecule1 (ICAM-1 and perilipin 2 (PLIN2. Furthermore, this effect was replicated in primary brain microglia. Levels of inducible NO synthase mRNA and protein were attenuated, whereas there was no change in the production of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further evidence indicated that pycnogenol treatment led to the suppression of NF-κB activation through inhibition of p65 translocation into the nucleus and inhibited DNA binding of AP-1, suggesting that these proinflammatory factors are associated with NF-κB and AP-1. We conclude that pycnogenol exerts anti-inflammatory effects through inhibition of the NF-κB and AP-1pathway, and may be useful as a therapeutic agent in the prevention of diseases caused by over activation of microglia.

  5. Specific deletion of LDL receptor-related protein on macrophages has skewed in vivo effects on cytokine production by invariant natural killer T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Covarrubias

    Full Text Available Expression of molecules involved in lipid homeostasis such as the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr on antigen presenting cells (APCs has been shown to enhance invariant natural killer T (iNKT cell function. However, the contribution to iNKT cell activation by other lipoprotein receptors with shared structural and ligand binding properties to the LDLr has not been described. In this study, we investigated whether a structurally related receptor to the LDLr, known as LDL receptor-related protein (LRP, plays a role in iNKT cell activation. We found that, unlike the LDLr which is highly expressed on all immune cells, the LRP was preferentially expressed at high levels on F4/80+ macrophages (MΦ. We also show that CD169+ MΦs, known to present antigen to iNKT cells, exhibited increased expression of LRP compared to CD169- MΦs. To test the contribution of MΦ LRP to iNKT cell activation we used a mouse model of MΦ LRP conditional knockout (LRP-cKO. LRP-cKO MΦs pulsed with glycolipid alpha-galactosylceramide (αGC elicited normal IL-2 secretion by iNKT hybridoma and in vivo challenge of LRP-cKO mice led to normal IFN-γ, but blunted IL-4 response in both serum and intracellular expression by iNKT cells. Flow cytometric analyses show similar levels of MHC class-I like molecule CD1d on LRP-cKO MΦs and normal glycolipid uptake. Survey of the iNKT cell compartment in LRP-cKO mice revealed intact numbers and percentages and no homeostatic disruption as evidenced by the absence of programmed death-1 and Ly-49 surface receptors. Mixed bone marrow chimeras showed that the inability iNKT cells to make IL-4 is cell extrinsic and can be rescued in the presence of wild type APCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that, although MΦ LRP may not be necessary for IFN-γ responses, it can contribute to iNKT cell activation by enhancing early IL-4 secretion.

  6. Exploring polyvinylpyrrolidone in the engineering of large porous PLGA microparticles via single emulsion method with tunable sustained release in the lung: In vitro and in vivo characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rui; Muenster, Uwe; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Lan; Becker-Pelster, Eva-Maria; Rosenbruch, Martin; Mao, Shirui

    2017-03-10

    Sustained pulmonary drug delivery is regarded as an effective strategy for local treatment of chronic lung diseases. Despite of the progress made so far, there remains a need for respirable drug loaded porous microparticles, where porosity of the microparticles can be readily engineered during the preparation process, with tunable sustained drug release upon lung deposition. In this work, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) was used as a novel porogen to engineer PLGA-based large porous particles (LPPs) using single emulsion method, with fine tuning of the porosity, sustained drug release both in vitro and in vivo. Using cinaciguat as the model drug, influence of PVP content and PLGA type on the properties of the LPPs was characterized, including geometric particle size, drug encapsulation efficiency, tap density, theoretical and experimental aerodynamic particle size, specific surface area, morphology, and in vitro drug release. Solid state of cinaciguat in the LPPs was studied based on DSC and X-ray analysis. LPPs retention in the rat lung was carried out using bronchoalveolar lavage fluid method. Raw 264.7 macrophage cells were used for LPPs uptake study. Pharmacodynamic study was performed in mini-pigs in a well-established model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (thromboxane challenge). It was demonstrated that porosity of the LPPs is tunable via porogen content variation. Cinaciguat can be released from the LPP in a controlled manner for over 168h. Significant reduction of macrophage phagocytosis was presented for LPPs. Furthermore, LPPs was found to have extended retention time (~36h) in the rat lung and accordingly, sustained pharmacodynamics effect was achieved in mini-pig model. Taken together, our results demonstrated that this simple PLGA based LPPs engineering using single emulsion method with PVP as porogen may find extensive application for the pulmonary delivery of hydrophobic drugs to realize tunable sustained effect with good safety profile. Copyright

  7. The slow-releasing hydrogen sulfide donor, GYY4137, exhibits novel anti-cancer effects in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Wei Lee

    Full Text Available The slow-releasing hydrogen sulfide (H₂S donor, GYY4137, caused concentration-dependent killing of seven different human cancer cell lines (HeLa, HCT-116, Hep G2, HL-60, MCF-7, MV4-11 and U2OS but did not affect survival of normal human lung fibroblasts (IMR90, WI-38 as determined by trypan blue exclusion. Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS was less potent and not active in all cell lines. A structural analogue of GYY4137 (ZYJ1122 lacking sulfur and thence not able to release H₂S was inactive. Similar results were obtained using a clonogenic assay. Incubation of GYY4137 (400 µM in culture medium led to the generation of low (<20 µM concentrations of H₂S sustained over 7 days. In contrast, incubation of NaHS (400 µM in the same way led to much higher (up to 400 µM concentrations of H₂S which persisted for only 1 hour. Mechanistic studies revealed that GYY4137 (400 µM incubated for 5 days with MCF-7 but not IMR90 cells caused the generation of cleaved PARP and cleaved caspase 9, indicative of a pro-apoptotic effect. GYY4137 (but not ZYJ1122 also caused partial G₂/M arrest of these cells. Mice xenograft studies using HL-60 and MV4-11 cells showed that GYY4137 (100-300 mg/kg/day for 14 days significantly reduced tumor growth. We conclude that GYY4137 exhibits anti-cancer activity by releasing H₂S over a period of days. We also propose that a combination of apoptosis and cell cycle arrest contributes to this effect and that H₂S donors should be investigated further as potential anti-cancer agents.

  8. Pituitary binding and internalization of radioiodinated gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist and antagonist ligands in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wynn, P.C.; Suarez-Quian, C.A.; Childs, G.V.; Catt, K.J.

    1986-10-01

    In rat pituitary gonadotrophs, the rates of binding and endocytosis of two GnRH superagonist analogs, (D-Ala6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH and (D-Lys6,Pro9-NEt)GnRH, were compared with those of the potent antagonist analog (N-acetyl-D-pCl-Phe1,2,D-Trp3,D-Lys6,D-Ala10)GnRH by quantitative electron microscopic autoradiography. In dispersed pituitary cells, the two agonist analogs showed similar binding kinetics and comparable degrees of sequestration, as measured by their resistance to dissociation by low pH buffer. However, quantification of silver grain localization suggested that cellular internalization of the (D-Ala6)GnRH agonist increased more rapidly than that of the (D-Lys6)GnRH analog. These discrepancies, and the finding that a larger amount of the specifically bound /sup 125/I-(D-Ala6)GnRH agonist was removed during glutaraldehyde fixation, indicated that the proportional internalization of this analog was over estimated by quantitative autoradiography owing to loss of cell surface-bound radioligand. We, therefore, employed radioiodinated D-Lys6-substituted analogs to analyze the receptor binding and cellular uptake of GnRH agonist and antagonist derivatives in vivo. After iv injection, a high proportion of the /sup 125/I-(D-Lys6)GnRH agonist was translocated into pituitary gonadotrophs within 60 min, whereas the D-Lys6 antagonist was predominantly associated with the plasma membrane during that time. Four hours after injection of the antagonist, an appreciable proportion of silver grains was associated with intracellular organelles, and this trend increased progressively at later time points. The relatively prolonged cellular processing of the GnRH antagonist is consistent with in vivo binding kinetics, and its slower internalization may reflect the basal rate of GnRH receptor turnover in the cell membrane.

  9. The melanocortin-4 receptor is expressed in enteroendocrine L cells and regulates the release of peptide YY and glucagon-like peptide 1 in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panaro, Brandon L; Tough, Iain R; Engelstoft, Maja S

    2014-01-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is expressed in the brainstem and vagal afferent nerves and regulates a number of aspects of gastrointestinal function. Here we show that the receptor is also diffusely expressed in cells of the gastrointestinal system, from stomach to descending colon....... Furthermore, MC4R is the second most highly enriched GPCR in peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) expressing enteroendocrine L cells. When vectorial ion transport is measured across mouse or human intestinal mucosa, administration of α-MSH induces a MC4R-specific PYY-dependent antisecretory...... response consistent with a role for the MC4R in paracrine inhibition of electrolyte secretion. Finally, MC4R-dependent acute PYY and GLP-1 release from L cells can be stimulated in vivo by intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of melanocortin peptides to mice. This suggests physiological significance...

  10. In Vitro and In Vivo Suppression of Cellular Activity by Guanidinoethyl Disulfide Released from Hydrogel Microspheres Composed of Partially Oxidized Hyaluronan and Gelatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Lihui; Ivanova, Natalia D.; Zakhaleva, Julia; Chen, Weiliam

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the preparation of oxidized hyaluronan crosslinked gelatin microspheres for drug delivery. Microspheres were prepared by a modified water-in-oil-emulsion crosslinking method, where 3-dimensional crosslinked hydrogel microspheres formed in the absence of any extraneous crosslinker. SEM analyses of the microspheres showed rough surfaces in their dried state with an average diameter of 90 µm. Lyophilization of fully-swollen microspheres revealed a highly porous structure. Guanidinoethyl disulfide (GED) was used as a model drug for incorporation into the microspheres; encapsulation of GED was confirmed by HPLC. There was an inverse correlation between the diameters of the microspheres with their GED loading. Macrophage was used as a model cell to evaluate the in vitro efficacy of GED release from the microspheres. The in vivo efficacy of the microspheres was further validated in a mouse full-thickness transcutaneous dermal wound model through suppression of cell infiltration. PMID:18678403

  11. RNA-seq reveals activation of both common and cytokine-specific pathways following neutrophil priming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen L Wright

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are central to the pathology of inflammatory diseases, where they can damage host tissue through release of reactive oxygen metabolites and proteases, and drive inflammation via secretion of cytokines and chemokines. Many cytokines, such as those generated during inflammation, can induce a similar "primed" phenotype in neutrophils, but it is unknown if different cytokines utilise common or cytokine-specific pathways to induce these functional changes. Here, we describe the transcriptomic changes induced in control human neutrophils during priming in vitro with pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α and GM-CSF using RNA-seq. Priming led to the rapid expression of a common set of transcripts for cytokines, chemokines and cell surface receptors (CXCL1, CXCL2, IL1A, IL1B, IL1RA, ICAM1. However, 580 genes were differentially regulated by TNF-α and GM-CSF treatment, and of these 58 were directly implicated in the control of apoptosis. While these two cytokines both delayed apoptosis, they induced changes in expression of different pro- and anti-apoptotic genes. Bioinformatics analysis predicted that these genes were regulated via differential activation of transcription factors by TNF-α and GM-CSF and these predictions were confirmed using functional assays: inhibition of NF-κB signalling abrogated the protective effect of TNF-α (but not that of GM-CSF on neutrophil apoptosis, whereas inhibition of JAK/STAT signalling abrogated the anti-apoptotic effect of GM-CSF, but not that of TNF-α (p<0.05. These data provide the first characterisation of the human neutrophil transcriptome following GM-CSF and TNF-α priming, and demonstrate the utility of this approach to define functional changes in neutrophils following cytokine exposure. This may provide an important, new approach to define the molecular properties of neutrophils after in vivo activation during inflammation.

  12. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP) material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uemura, Toshimasa; Kojima, Hiroko, E-mail: t.uemura@aist.go.jp [Nanosystem Research Institute (NRI), National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba Central-4, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8562 (Japan)

    2011-06-15

    Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation) is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1) were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of {beta}-tricalcium phosphate ({beta}-TCP), a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed {beta}-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous {beta}-TCP as a carrier.

  13. Bone formation in vivo induced by Cbfa1-carrying adenoviral vectors released from a biodegradable porous β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimasa Uemura and Hiroko Kojima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Overexpression of Cbfa1 (a transcription factor indispensable for osteoblastic differentiation is expected to induce the formation of bone directly and indirectly in vivo by accelerating osteoblastic differentiation. Adenoviral vectors carrying the cDNA of Cbfa1/til-1(Adv-Cbf1 were allowed to be adsorbed onto porous blocks of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP, a biodegradable ceramic, which were then implanted subcutaneously and orthotopically into bone defects. The adenoviral vectors were released sustainingly by biodegradation, providing long-term expression of the genes. Results of the subcutaneous implantation of Adv-Cbfa1-adsorbed β-TCP/osteoprogenitor cells suggest that a larger amount of bone formed in the pores of the implant than in the control material. Regarding orthotopic implantation into bone defects, the released Adv-Cbfa1 accelerated regeneration in the cortical bone, whereas it induced bone resorption in the marrow cavity. A safer gene transfer using a smaller amount of the vector was achieved using biodegradable porous β-TCP as a carrier.

  14. Formulation, in vitro drug release and in vivo human X-ray investigation of polysaccharide based drug delivery systems for targeting 5-fluorouracil to the colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidramappa Mallikarjun Chickpetty

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research study was to develop 5-fluorouracil compression coated tablets by using biodegradable polysaccharide polymer locust bean gum (LBG and hydroxyl propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC as coating materials. The fast disintegrating core tablets containing 50 mg of 5-fluorouracil were compression coated with LBG and HPMC in different ratios (8:1, 7:2 and 6:3 with a coat weight of 300, 400 and 500 mg. In vitro dissolution data indicated that the formulation (CLH63 with a coat weight of 500 mg containing LBG and HPMC in the ratio 6:3 gave the best release profile (0% in first 5 hour and 96.18% in 24 hours. DSC and FTIR results indicated no possibility of interaction between drug and polymers or other excipients. In vivo human X-ray studies revealed that formulation CLH63 was able to resist breakdown in the stomach and small intestine. The disintegration of the tablet occurred in the colon between 8 to 16 hours of post dose. By the present study, it can be concluded that the LBG and HPMC based compression coated tablets of 5-fluorouracil will be useful strategy for colonic delivery of 5-fluorouracil without being released in upper gastrointestinal region for the safe and effective management of colon cancer.

  15. Environmental mold and mycotoxin exposures elicit specific cytokine and chemokine responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenblum Lichtenstein, Jamie H; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Gavin, Igor M; Donaghey, Thomas C; Molina, Ramon M; Thompson, Khristy J; Chi, Chih-Lin; Gillis, Bruce S; Brain, Joseph D

    2015-01-01

    Molds can cause respiratory symptoms and asthma. We sought to use isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to understand changes in cytokine and chemokine levels in response to mold and mycotoxin exposures and to link these levels with respiratory symptoms in humans. We did this by utilizing an ex vivo assay approach to differentiate mold-exposed patients and unexposed controls. While circulating plasma chemokine and cytokine levels from these two groups might be similar, we hypothesized that by challenging their isolated white blood cells with mold or mold extracts, we would see a differential chemokine and cytokine release. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were isolated from blood from 33 patients with a history of mold exposures and from 17 controls. Cultured PBMCs were incubated with the most prominent Stachybotrys chartarum mycotoxin, satratoxin G, or with aqueous mold extract, ionomycin, or media, each with or without PMA. Additional PBMCs were exposed to spores of Aspergillus niger, Cladosporium herbarum and Penicillium chrysogenum. After 18 hours, cytokines and chemokines released into the culture medium were measured by multiplex assay. Clinical histories, physical examinations and pulmonary function tests were also conducted. After ex vivo PBMC exposures to molds or mycotoxins, the chemokine and cytokine profiles from patients with a history of mold exposure were significantly different from those of unexposed controls. In contrast, biomarker profiles from cells exposed to media alone showed no difference between the patients and controls. These findings demonstrate that chronic mold exposures induced changes in inflammatory and immune system responses to specific mold and mycotoxin challenges. These responses can differentiate mold-exposed patients from unexposed controls. This strategy may be a powerful approach to document immune system responsiveness to molds and other inflammation-inducing environmental agents.

  16. Trehalose maintains bioactivity and promotes sustained release of BMP-2 from lyophilized CDHA scaffolds for enhanced osteogenesis in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhao

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate (Ca-P scaffolds have been widely employed as a supportive matrix and delivery system for bone tissue engineering. Previous studies using osteoinductive growth factors loaded Ca-P scaffolds via passive adsorption often experience issues associated with easy inactivation and uncontrolled release. In present study, a new delivery system was fabricated using bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2 loaded calcium-deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA scaffold by lyophilization with addition of trehalose. The in vitro osteogenesis effects of this formulation were compared with lyophilized BMP-2/CDHA construct without trehalose and absorbed BMP-2/CDHA constructs with or without trehalose. The release characteristics and alkaline phosphatase (ALP activity analyses showed that addition of trehalose could sufficiently protect BMP-2 bioactivity during lyophilization and achieve sustained BMP-2 release from lyophilized CDHA construct in vitro and in vivo. However, absorbed BMP-2/CDHA constructs with or without trehalose showed similar BMP-2 bioactivity and presented a burst release. Quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA demonstrated that lyophilized BMP-2/CDHA construct with trehalose (lyo-tre-BMP-2 promoted osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells (bMSCs significantly and this formulation could preserve over 70% protein bioactivity after 5 weeks storage at 25°C. Micro-computed tomography, histological and fluorescent labeling analyses further demonstrated that lyo-tre-BMP-2 formulation combined with bMSCs led to the most percentage of new bone volume (38.79% ± 5.32% and area (40.71% ± 7.14% as well as the most percentage of fluorochrome stained bone area (alizarin red S: 2.64% ± 0.44%, calcein: 6.08% ± 1.37% and mineral apposition rate (4.13 ± 0.62 µm/day in critical-sized rat cranial defects healing. Biomechanical tests also indicated the maximum stiffness (118.17 ± 15.02 Mpa and

  17. Good Manufacturing Practice-Compliant Production and Lot-Release of Ex Vivo Expanded Regulatory T Cells As Basis for Treatment of Patients with Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Wiesinger

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the exploration of regulatory T cell (Treg-based cellular therapy has become an attractive strategy to ameliorate inflammation and autoimmunity in various clinical settings. The main obstacle to the clinical application of Treg in human is their low number circulating in peripheral blood. Therefore, ex vivo expansion is inevitable. Moreover, isolation of Treg bears the risk of concurrent isolation of unwanted effector cells, which may trigger or deteriorate inflammation upon adoptive Treg transfer. Here, we present a protocol for the GMP-compliant production, lot-release and validation of ex vivo expanded Tregs for treatment of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. In the presented production protocol, large numbers of Treg, previously enriched from a leukapheresis product by using the CliniMACS® system, are ex vivo expanded in the presence of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander beads, exogenous IL-2 and rapamycin during 21 days. The expanded Treg drug product passed predefined lot-release criteria. These criteria include (i sterility testing, (ii assessment of Treg phenotype, (iii assessment of non-Treg cellular impurities, (iv confirmation of successful anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander bead removal after expansion, and (v confirmation of the biological function of the Treg product. Furthermore, the Treg drug product was shown to retain its stability and suppressive function for at least 1 year after freezing and thawing. Also, dilution of the Treg drug product in 0.9% physiological saline did not affect Treg phenotype and Treg function for up to 90 min. These data indicate that these cells are ready to use in a clinical setting in which a cell infusion time of up to 90 min can be expected. The presented production process has recently undergone on site GMP-conform evaluation and received GMP certification from the Bavarian authorities in Germany. This protocol can now be used for Treg-based therapy of various

  18. Good Manufacturing Practice-Compliant Production and Lot-Release of Ex Vivo Expanded Regulatory T Cells As Basis for Treatment of Patients with Autoimmune and Inflammatory Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiesinger, Manuel; Stoica, Diane; Roessner, Susanne; Lorenz, Carmen; Fischer, Anika; Atreya, Raja; Neufert, Clemens F; Atreya, Imke; Scheffold, Alexander; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice; Neurath, Markus F; Schuler, Gerold; Voskens, Caroline J

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the exploration of regulatory T cell (Treg)-based cellular therapy has become an attractive strategy to ameliorate inflammation and autoimmunity in various clinical settings. The main obstacle to the clinical application of Treg in human is their low number circulating in peripheral blood. Therefore, ex vivo expansion is inevitable. Moreover, isolation of Treg bears the risk of concurrent isolation of unwanted effector cells, which may trigger or deteriorate inflammation upon adoptive Treg transfer. Here, we present a protocol for the GMP-compliant production, lot-release and validation of ex vivo expanded Tregs for treatment of patients with autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. In the presented production protocol, large numbers of Treg, previously enriched from a leukapheresis product by using the CliniMACS® system, are ex vivo expanded in the presence of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander beads, exogenous IL-2 and rapamycin during 21 days. The expanded Treg drug product passed predefined lot-release criteria. These criteria include (i) sterility testing, (ii) assessment of Treg phenotype, (iii) assessment of non-Treg cellular impurities, (iv) confirmation of successful anti-CD3/anti-CD28 expander bead removal after expansion, and (v) confirmation of the biological function of the Treg product. Furthermore, the Treg drug product was shown to retain its stability and suppressive function for at least 1 year after freezing and thawing. Also, dilution of the Treg drug product in 0.9% physiological saline did not affect Treg phenotype and Treg function for up to 90 min. These data indicate that these cells are ready to use in a clinical setting in which a cell infusion time of up to 90 min can be expected. The presented production process has recently undergone on site GMP-conform evaluation and received GMP certification from the Bavarian authorities in Germany. This protocol can now be used for Treg-based therapy of various inflammatory and

  19. Kappa opioid receptor activation potentiates the cocaine-induced increase in evoked dopamine release recorded in vivo in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrich, Jonathan M; Phillips, Paul E M; Chavkin, Charles

    2014-12-01

    Behavioral stressors increase addiction risk in humans and increase the rewarding valence of drugs of abuse including cocaine, nicotine and ethanol in animal models. Prior studies have established that this potentiation of drug reward was mediated by stress-induced release of the endogenous dynorphin opioids and subsequent kappa opioid receptor (KOR) activation. In this study, we used in vivo fast scan cyclic voltammetry to test the hypothesis that KOR activation before cocaine administration might potentiate the evoked release of dopamine from ventral tegmental (VTA) synaptic inputs to the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and thereby increase the rewarding valence of cocaine. The KOR agonist U50488 inhibited dopamine release evoked by either medial forebrain bundle (MFB) or pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPTg) activation of VTA inputs to the shell or core of the mouse NAc. Cocaine administration increased the dopamine response recorded in either the shell or core evoked by either MFB or PPTg stimulation. Administration of U50488 15 min before cocaine blocked the conditioned place preference (CPP) to cocaine, but only significantly reduced the effect of cocaine on the dopamine response evoked by PPTg stimulation to NAc core. In contrast, administration of U50488 60 min before cocaine significantly potentiated cocaine CPP and significantly increased the effects of cocaine on the dopamine response evoked by either MFB or PPTg stimulation, recorded in either NAc shell or core. Results of this study support the concept that stress-induced activation of KOR by endogenous dynorphin opioids may enhance the rewarding valence of drugs of abuse by potentiating the evoked dopamine response.

  20. Development and Optimization of Gastro-Retentive Controlled-Release Tablet of Calcium-Disodium Edentate and its In Vivo Gamma Scintigraphic Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Soni, Sandeep; Singh, Thakuri; Kumar, Amit; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-12-01

    Medical management of heavy metal toxicity, including radioactive ones, is a cause for concern because of their increased use in energy production, healthcare, and mining. Though chelating agents like EDTA and DTPA in parenteral form are available, no suitable oral formulation is there that can trap ingested heavy metal toxicants in the stomach itself, preventing their systemic absorption. The objective of the present study was to develop and optimize gastro-retentive controlled-release tablets of calcium-disodium edentate (Ca-Na2EDTA). Gastro-retentive tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was prepared by direct compression method. Thirteen tablet formulations were designed using HPMC-K4M, sodium chloride, and carbopol-934 along with effervescing agents sodium bicarbonate and citric acid. Tablet swelling ability, in vitro buoyancy, and drug dissolution studies were conducted in 0.1 N HCl at 37 ± 0.5°C. Ca-Na2EDTA was radiolabeled with technetium-99m for scintigraphy-based in vivo evaluation. Formula F8 (Ca-Na2EDTA 200 mg, carbopol 100 mg, avicel 55 mg, citric acid 30 mg, NaHCO3 70 mg, NaCl 100 mg, and HPMC 95 mg) was found to be optimum in terms of excellent floating properties and sustained drug release. F8 fitted best for Korsmeyer-Peppas equation with an R (2) value of 0.993. Gamma scintigraphy in humans showed mean gastric retention period of 6 h. Stability studies carried out in accordance with ICH guidelines and analyzed at time intervals of 0, 1, 2, 4, and 6 months have indicated insignificant difference in tablet hardness, drug content, total floating duration, or matrix integrity of the optimized formulation. Gastro-retentive, controlled-release tablet of Ca-Na2EDTA was successfully developed using effervescent technique as a potential oral antidote for neutralizing ingested heavy metal toxicity.

  1. Eosinophil cytokines: Emerging roles in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paige eLacy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils derive from the bone marrow and circulate at low levels in the blood in healthy individuals. These granulated cells preferentially leave the circulation and marginate to tissues, where they are implicated in the regulation of innate and adaptive immunity. In diseases such as allergic inflammation, eosinophil numbers escalate markedly in the blood and tissues where inflammatory foci are located. Eosinophils possess a range of immunomodulatory factors that are released upon cell activation, including over 35 cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines. Unlike T and B cells, eosinophils can rapidly release cytokines within minutes in response to stimulation. While some cytokines are stored as preformed mediators in crystalloid granules and secretory vesicles, eosinophils are also capable of undergoing de novo synthesis and secretion of these immunological factors. Some of the molecular mechanisms that coordinate the final steps of cytokine secretion are hypothesized to involve binding of membrane fusion complexes comprised of soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs. These intracellular receptors regulate the release of granules and vesicles containing a range of secreted proteins, among which are cytokines and chemokines. Emerging evidence from both human and animal model-based research has suggested an active participation of eosinophils in several physiological/pathological processes such as immunomodulation and tissue remodeling. The observed eosinophil effector functions in health and disease implicate eosinophil cytokine secretion as a fundamental immunoregulatory process. The focus of this review is to describe the cytokines, growth factors, and chemokines that are elaborated by eosinophils, and to illustrate some of the intracellular events leading to the release of eosinophil-derived cytokines.

  2. Cytokines as cellular communicators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Debets

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines and their receptors are involved in the pathophysiology of many diseases. Here we present a detailed review on cytokines, receptors and signalling routes, and show that one important lesson from cytokine biology is the complex and diverse regulation of cytokine activity. The activity of cytokines is controlled at the level of transcription, translation, storage, processing, posttranslational modification, trapping, binding by soluble proteins, and receptor number and/or function. Translation of this diverse regulation in strategies aimed at the control of cytokine activity will result in the development of more specific and selective drugs to treat diseases.

  3. Macrophage cytokines: Involvement in immunity and infectious diseases

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    Guillermo eArango Duque

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The evolution of macrophages has made them primordial for both development and immunity. Their functions range from the shaping of body plans to the ingestion and elimination of apoptotic cells and pathogens. Cytokines are small soluble proteins that confer instructions and mediate communication among immune and non-immune cells. A portfolio of cytokines is central to the role of macrophages as sentries of the innate immune system that mediate the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. In concert with other mediators, cytokines bias the fate of macrophages into a spectrum of inflammation-promoting ‘classically activated’, to anti-inflammatory or ‘alternatively activated’ macrophages. Deregulated cytokine secretion is implicated in several disease states ranging from chronic inflammation to allergy. Macrophages release cytokines via a series of beautifully orchestrated pathways that are spatiotemporally regulated. At the molecular level, these exocytic cytokine secretion pathways are coordinated by multi-protein complexes that guide cytokines from their point of synthesis to their ports of exit into the extracellular milieu. These trafficking proteins, many of which were discovered in yeast and commemorated in the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, coordinate the organelle fusion steps that are responsible for cytokine release. This review discusses the functions of cytokines secreted by macrophages, and summarizes what is known about their release mechanisms. This information will be used to delve into how selected pathogens subvert cytokine release for their own survival.

  4. Macrophage cytokines: involvement in immunity and infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arango Duque, Guillermo; Descoteaux, Albert

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of macrophages has made them primordial for both development and immunity. Their functions range from the shaping of body plans to the ingestion and elimination of apoptotic cells and pathogens. Cytokines are small soluble proteins that confer instructions and mediate communication among immune and non-immune cells. A portfolio of cytokines is central to the role of macrophages as sentries of the innate immune system that mediate the transition from innate to adaptive immunity. In concert with other mediators, cytokines bias the fate of macrophages into a spectrum of inflammation-promoting "classically activated," to anti-inflammatory or "alternatively activated" macrophages. Deregulated cytokine secretion is implicated in several disease states ranging from chronic inflammation to allergy. Macrophages release cytokines via a series of beautifully orchestrated pathways that are spatiotemporally regulated. At the molecular level, these exocytic cytokine secretion pathways are coordinated by multi-protein complexes that guide cytokines from their point of synthesis to their ports of exit into the extracellular milieu. These trafficking proteins, many of which were discovered in yeast and commemorated in the 2013 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, coordinate the organelle fusion steps that are responsible for cytokine release. This review discusses the functions of cytokines secreted by macrophages, and summarizes what is known about their release mechanisms. This information will be used to delve into how selected pathogens subvert cytokine release for their own survival.

  5. Increased circulating cytokine receptors and ex vivo interleukin-1 receptor antagonist and interleukin-1β production but decreased tumour necrosis factor-α production after a 5-km run

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drenth, J.P.H.; Krebbers, R.J.M.; Bijzet, J.; Van Der Meer, J.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 5-km run on blood leucocytes, acute-phase proteins and cytokines. In addition, cytokines were measured in the supernatants from whole-blood cell cultures incubated with lipolysaccharide (LPS). Methods Ten healthy, recreational

  6. Low pH Environmental Stress Inhibits LPS and LTA-Stimulated Proinflammatory Cytokine Production in Rat Alveolar Macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley F. Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gastric aspiration increases the risks for developing secondary bacterial pneumonia. Cytokine elaboration through pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs is an important mechanism in initiating innate immune host response. Effects of low pH stress, a critical component of aspiration pathogenesis, on the PRR pathways were examined, specifically toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2 and TLR4, using isolated rat alveolar macrophages (aMØs. We assessed the ability of aMØs after brief exposure to acidified saline to elaborate proinflammatory cytokines in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS and lipoteichoic acid (LTA stimulation, known ligands of TLR4 and TLR2, respectively. Low pH stress reduced LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine release (CINC-1, MIP-2, TNF-, MCP-1, and IFN-. LPS and LTA increased intracellular Ca2+ concentrations while Ca2+ chelation by BAPTA decreased LPS- and LTA-mediated cytokine responses. BAPTA blocked the effects of low pH stress on most of LPS-stimulated cytokines but not of LTA-stimulated responses. In vivo mouse model demonstrates suppressed E. coli and S. pneumoniae clearance following acid aspiration. In conclusion, low pH stress inhibits antibacterial cytokine response of aMØs due to impaired TLR2 (MyD88 pathway and TLR4 signaling (MyD88 and TRIF pathways. The role of Ca2+ in low pH stress-induced signaling is complex but appears to be distinct between LPS- and LTA-mediated responses.

  7. Cytokines in Drosophila immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanha-Aho, Leena-Maija; Valanne, Susanna; Rämet, Mika

    2016-02-01

    Cytokines are a large and diverse group of small proteins that can affect many biological processes, but most commonly cytokines are known as mediators of the immune response. In the event of an infection, cytokines are produced in response to an immune stimulus, and they function as key regulators of the immune response. Cytokines come in many shapes and sizes, and although they vary greatly in structure, their functions have been well conserved in evolution. The immune signaling pathways that respond to cytokines are remarkably conserved from fly to man. Therefore, Drosophila melanogaster, provides an excellent platform for studying the biology and function of cytokines. In this review, we will describe the cytokines and cytokine-like molecules found in the fly and discuss their roles in host immunity. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Targeted concurrent chemoradiotherapy, by using improved microcapsules that release carboplatin in response to radiation, improves detectability by computed tomography as well as antitumor activity while reducing adverse effect in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Satoshi; Ehara, Shigeru; Ishii, Keizo; Sato, Takahiro; Koka, Masashi; Kamiya, Tomihiro; Sera, Koichiro; Goto, Shyoko

    2015-03-01

    The effect of alginate-hyaluronate microcapsules that release carboplatin in response to radiation was improved by adding ascorbic acid (AA). Four measures of the effectiveness of the microcapsules were evaluated: 1) release of carboplatin in response to radiation in vitro and in vivo; 2) detectability of their accumulation by computed tomography (CT) in vivo; 3) enhancement of antitumor effects in vivo; and 4) reduction of adverse effects in vivo. There were significant increases in the rupture of microcapsules by adding AA in vitro. Subcutaneously injected microcapsules around the tumor could be detected by using CT and the alteration of CT-values correlated with the accumulation of the microcapsules. Those microcapsules released carboplatin and resulted in synergistic antitumor effect with concomitant radiation. With the encapsulation of carboplatin, chemotherapeutic effects were still observed two weeks after treatment. However, addition of AA did not result in increased antitumor effect in vivo. A reduction in adverse effects was observed with the encapsulation of carboplatin, through localization of carboplatin around the tumor. Addition of AA to the materials of microcapsules did not result in increasing antitumor effect. However encapsulation of carboplatin will be useful as a clinical cancer-therapy option. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Stimulus-Responsive, Biodegradable, Biocompatible, Covalently Cross-Linked Hydrogel Based on Dextrin and Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) for in Vitro/in Vivo Controlled Drug Release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dipankar; Ghosh, Paulomi; Ghosh, Animesh; Haldar, Chanchal; Dhara, Santanu; Panda, Asit Baran; Pal, Sagar

    2015-07-08

    A novel stimulus-sensitive covalently cross-linked hydrogel derived from dextrin, N-isopropylacrylamide, and N,N'-methylene bis(acrylamide) (c-Dxt/pNIPAm), has been synthesized via Michael type addition reaction for controlled drug release application. The chemical structure of c-Dxt/pNIPAm has been confirmed through Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and (1)H and (13)C NMR spectral analyses. The surface morphology of the hydrogel has been studied by field emission scanning electron microscopic (FE-SEM) and environmental scanning electron microscopic (E-SEM) analyses. The stimulus responsiveness of the hydrogel was studied through equilibrium swelling in various pH media at 25 and 37 °C. Rheological study was performed to measure the gel strength and gelation time. Noncytotoxicity of c-Dxt/pNIPAm hydrogel has been studied using human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). The biodegradability of c-Dxt/pNIPAm was confirmed using hen egg lysozyme. The in vitro and in vivo release studies of ornidazole and ciprofloxacin imply that c-Dxt/pNIPAm delivers both drugs in a controlled way and would be an excellent alternative for a dual drug carrier. The FTIR, powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), and UV-vis-near infrared (NIR) spectra along with the computational study predict that the drugs remain in the matrix through physical interaction. A stability study signifies that the drugs (ornidazole ∼97% and ciprofloxacin ∼98%) are stable in the tablet formulations for up to 3 months.

  10. In-vitro/in-vivo studies of the biodegradable poly-(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) microspheres of a novel luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist for prostate cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Lina; Mei, Xingguo; Wang, Chenyun; Li, Xin; Zhang, Fucheng; Jin, Yiguang

    2011-03-01

    The introduction of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) analogs and their antagonists is revolutionizing the treatment of prostate cancer. In this study, poly(D,L-lactideco-glycolide) (PLGA) microspheres containing a highly potent LHRH antagonist (LXT-101) of interest in the indication of prostate cancer were evaluated on release mechanisms in vitro and biological performance in vivo. LXT-101 microspheres were prepared by the water/oil/water double emulsion method and the solid/oil/oil method. The results showed that the mechanism of LXT-101 releasing from PLGA 14,000 microspheres was the cooperation of drug diffusion and polymer degradation. This clarified the relationship between the microsphere characterization and hormone level in vivo. The larger microspheres (33 μm) could inhibit the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (35 days) than the smaller microspheres (15 μm, 14 days). The formulation containing the hydrophilic additive (polyethylene glycol 6000) could suppress the testosterone level to castration for a longer time (> 35 days) than the formulation without polyethylene glycol (14 days). The appearance of testis, vesicular seminalis, and prostates changed after treatment. The weights of sexual organs decreased significantly. The in-vivo release of the LXT-101 PLGA 14,000 microspheres curve showed that in-vivo release started immediately after day 1 (22.7%) and was rapid during the first 5 days (40.2% release). The LXT-101 microspheres could be a promising drug delivery system candidate to treat sex hormone-dependent tumors and other related disorders.

  11. In vivo microdialysis studies on the effects of decortication and excitotoxic lesions on kainic acid-induced calcium fluxes, and endogenous amino acid release, in the rat striatum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butcher, S.P.; Lazarewicz, J.W.; Hamberger, A.

    1987-11-01

    The in vivo effects of kainate (1 mM) on fluxes of /sup 45/Ca2+, and endogenous amino acids, were examined in the rat striatum using the brain microdialysis technique. Kainate evoked a rapid decrease in dialysate /sup 45/Ca2+, and an increase in the concentration of amino acids in dialysates in Ca2+-free dialysates. Taurine was elevated six- to 10-fold, glutamate two- to threefold, and aspartate 1.5- to twofold. There was also a delayed increase in phosphoethanolamine, whereas nonneuroactive amino acids were increased only slightly. The kainic acid-evoked reduction in dialysate /sup 45/Ca2+ activity was attenuated in striata lesioned previously with kainate, suggesting the involvement of intrinsic striatal neurons in this response. The increase in taurine concentration induced by kainate was slightly smaller under these conditions. Decortication did not affect the kainate-evoked alterations in either dialysate /sup 45/Ca2+ or amino acids. These data suggest that kainate does not release acidic amino acids from their transmitter pools located in corticostriatal terminals.

  12. Evaluation of metal ion release from Ti6Al4V and Co-Cr-Mo casting alloys: in vivo and in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sawy, Amal A; Shaarawy, Mohammed A

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amount of ions released from Ti6Al4V and Co-Cr-Mo alloys both in vivo and in vitro. Twenty-one discs of each alloy were constructed and divided into seven groups. Three specimens from each group were immersed in a buffered saline solution over a period of 1, 3, 5, 7, 14, 21, and 28 days. Twenty-eight participants were also included in the study, where the study group consisted of 14 mandibular partially edentulous patients, and the control group consisted of 14 volunteers. The study group was further divided into two equal groups: the first group received removable partial dentures (RPDs) constructed from Co-Cr-Mo alloy, while the second group received RPDs constructed from Ti6Al4V alloy. Saliva samples were collected from each participant over the same study period. The conditioning media and saliva samples were analyzed using a spectrophotometer. One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests were used for statistical analysis (p Ti6Al4V alloys were higher in the buffered saline solutions than in the studied saliva samples and control groups; however, these amounts were still within the physiological limit of trace elements in the human body. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  13. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  14. Blends of hydrophobic and swelling agents in the swelling layer in the preparation of delayed-release pellets of a hydrophilic drug with low MW: Physicochemical characterizations and in-vivo evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang You

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a hydrophobic material, ethylcellulose, which was used as its aqueous suspension Surelease®, was combined with a swelling agent as the swelling layer to prepare delayed-release pellets for Danshensu, which is a hydrophilic drug with low MW. A rupturable, delayed-release pellet consists of a drug core, a swelling layer containing a swelling agent (cross-linked sodium carboxymethyl cellulose with a hydrophobic agent (Surelease®, and a controlled layer composed by an insoluble, water-permeable polymeric coating (aqueous ethylcellulose dispersions was developed in a fluidised bed. Results showed that blending Surelease® into the swelling layer could effectively extend the release of Danshensu from the pellets, which may be attributed to the slowed swelling rate by reduction of water penetration and improvement of mechanical integrity of the swelling layer. Drug in the delayed pellets showed sustained release in beagle dogs after oral administration with comparable in-vivo exposure to the uncoated drug pellets. In conclusion, blends of hydrophobic and swelling agents in the swelling layer in double-membrane pellets could achieve a delayed drug-release profile in vitro, as well as delayed and sustained absorption in vivo for highly soluble, low-MW drug. The present study highlighted the potential use of a delayed-release system for other hydrophilic, low-MW drugs to meet the formulation requirements for chronopharmacological diseases.

  15. Cytokine Release Patterns in Mixed Lymphocyte Culture (MLC) of T-Cells with Dendritic Cells (DC) Generated from AML Blasts Contribute to Predict anti-Leukaemic T-Cell Reactions and Patients' Response to Immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbacher, Dorothea; Merle, Marion; Liepert, Anja; Grabrucker, Christine; Kroell, Tanja; Kremser, Andreas; Dreyßig, Julia; Freudenreich, Markus; Schuster, Friedhelm; Borkhardt, Arndt; Kraemer, Doris; Koehne, Claus-Henning; Kolb, Hans-Jochem; Schmid, Christoph; Schmetzer, Helga Maria

    To enlighten interactions between autologous, allogeneic or T-cells from patients after stem cell transplantation with leukaemia-derived-dendritic-cells containing dendritic cells or blast containing mononuclear cells (n = 21, respectively), we determined cytokine-concentrations (interleukin 2, 4, 6, 10, tumor-necrosis-factor-α, interferon-γ) in supernatants of mixed-lymphocyte-culture and in serum (n = 16) of 20 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia and three patients with myelodysplastic syndromes by cytometric-bead-assay. We correlated our data with lytic capabilities of stimulated T-cells in a fluorolysis-assay and clinical data: Dendritic-cell-/mononuclear-cell-stimulation of T-cells resulted in increased cytokine-levels in culture-medium compared to serum. There were no significant differences between cytokine-patterns of cases with/without lytic T-cell-activity, response to immunotherapy (stem cell transplantation/donor-lymphocyte-infusion) or graft-versus-host-disease. However, some predictive cytokine-cut-off-values for antileukaemic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease could be defined. Cytokine-profiles alone, without functional assays, are no useful tool to predict antileukaemic T-cell-function, although they can indicate lytic T-cell-activity, patients' response to immunotherapy and graft-versus-host-disease.

  16. Lactobacillus GG has in vitro effects on enhanced interleukin-10 and interferon-gamma release of mononuclear cells but no in vivo effects in supplemented mothers and their neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, M V; Goldstein, M; Dietschek, A; Sofke, J; Heinzmann, A; Urbanek, R

    2008-04-01

    The value of probiotics for primary prevention is controversial. Moreover, only little is known about the underlying immunological mechanisms of action. Therefore, we assessed the proliferative response and cytokine release in cultures of isolated mononuclear cells from pregnant women and their neonates supplemented with Lactobacillus GG (LGG) or placebo. In a double-blind, placebo-controlled prospective trial, pregnant women with at least one first-degree relative or a partner with an atopic disease were randomly assigned to receive either the probiotic LGG (ATCC 53103; 5 x 10(9) colony-forming units LGG twice daily) or placebo 4-6 weeks before expected delivery, followed by a post-natal period of 6 months. Cord blood mononuclear cells (CBMC) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of the corresponding mother were isolated from cord blood and peripheral blood (n=68). The proliferative response of CBMC and PBMC was expressed as the stimulation index (SI), which was calculated according to the ratio between the mean counts per minute (c.p.m.) values measured in the wells with stimulated cells and the mean c.p.m. values measured in the wells with unstimulated cells. Additionally, the cytokines IFN-gamma, IL-10 and IL-13 in the cell culture supernatants were measured using the ELISA technique. No difference was observed between the LGG-supplemented group and the placebo group in terms of the proliferative capacity of maternal or neonatal cord blood cells in response to IL-2, beta-lactoglobulin or LGG. In vitro stimulation with LGG resulted in significantly enhanced release of IL-10 and IFN-gamma, compared with cytokine release in unstimulated controls. However, this phenomenon was observed in supernatants of maternal and neonatal MC in both groups, independent of prior supplementation with LGG. LGG has in vitro effects on enhanced IL-10 and IFN-gamma release of mononuclear cells. However, supplementation with LGG during pregnancy did not alter the proliferative

  17. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin Suppresses NF-κB Signaling in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika Nath

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Estrogen receptor negative (ER(− breast cancer is aggressive, responds poorly to current treatments and has a poor prognosis. The NF-κB signaling pathway is implicated in ER(− tumorigenesis. Aspirin (ASA is chemopreventive against ER(+ but not for ER(− breast cancers. Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-ASA is a safer ASA where ASA is linked to an NO-releasing moiety through a spacer. In vitro, we investigated anti-proliferation effects of NO-ASA (para- and meta-isomers against ER(− breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-23, effects on NF-κB signaling, and reactive oxygen species by standard techniques. In vivo, effects of NO-ASA were evaluated in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 cells. p-NO-ASA inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells at 24 h, the respective IC50s were 13 ± 2 and 17 ± 2 μM; ASA had an IC50 of >3000 μM in both cell lines. The IC50s for m-NO-ASA in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 were 173 ± 15 and 185 ± 12 μM, respectively, therefore, implying p-NO-ASA as a stronger inhibitor of growth p-NO-ASA reduced cell growth by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis and causing G0/G1 cell cycle block. Activation of NF-κB was inhibited by both isomers as demonstrated by decreases in NF-κB-DNA binding and luciferase activity at 24 h, However, m-NO-ASA produced transient effects at 3 h such as increased NF-κB-DNA-binding, increased levels of nuclear p50, even though both isomers inhibited IκB degradation. Increase in nuclear p50 by m-NO-ASA was associated with translocation of p50 in to the nucleus as observed by immunoflouresence at 3 h. NO-ASA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS as evidenced by overall increases in both H2DCFDA (2′,7′-dichlorodihydrofluorescein and DHE (dihydroethidium-derived fluorescence. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-cysteine reversed the m-NO-ASA-mediated translocation of p50 in to the nucleus. In xenografts, p-NO-ASA inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting proliferation (PCNA and

  18. Nitric Oxide-Releasing Aspirin Suppresses NF-κB Signaling in Estrogen Receptor Negative Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Niharika; Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Rodes, Deborah B; Nazarenko, Anna; Kodela, Ravinder; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2015-07-09

    Estrogen receptor negative (ER(-)) breast cancer is aggressive, responds poorly to current treatments and has a poor prognosis. The NF-κB signaling pathway is implicated in ER(-) tumorigenesis. Aspirin (ASA) is chemopreventive against ER(+) but not for ER(-) breast cancers. Nitric oxide-releasing aspirin (NO-ASA) is a safer ASA where ASA is linked to an NO-releasing moiety through a spacer. In vitro, we investigated anti-proliferation effects of NO-ASA (para- and meta-isomers) against ER(-) breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-23, effects on NF-κB signaling, and reactive oxygen species by standard techniques. In vivo, effects of NO-ASA were evaluated in a mouse xenograft model using MDA-MB-231 cells. p-NO-ASA inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 cells at 24 h, the respective IC50s were 13 ± 2 and 17 ± 2 μM; ASA had an IC50 of >3000 μM in both cell lines. The IC50s for m-NO-ASA in MDA-MB-231 and SK-BR-3 were 173 ± 15 and 185 ± 12 μM, respectively, therefore, implying p-NO-ASA as a stronger inhibitor of growth p-NO-ASA reduced cell growth by inhibiting proliferation, inducing apoptosis and causing G0/G1 cell cycle block. Activation of NF-κB was inhibited by both isomers as demonstrated by decreases in NF-κB-DNA binding and luciferase activity at 24 h, However, m-NO-ASA produced transient effects at 3 h such as increased NF-κB-DNA-binding, increased levels of nuclear p50, even though both isomers inhibited IκB degradation. Increase in nuclear p50 by m-NO-ASA was associated with translocation of p50 in to the nucleus as observed by immunoflouresence at 3 h. NO-ASA induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) as evidenced by overall increases in both H2DCFDA (2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein) and DHE (dihydroethidium)-derived fluorescence. Inhibition of ROS by N-acetyl-cysteine reversed the m-NO-ASA-mediated translocation of p50 in to the nucleus. In xenografts, p-NO-ASA inhibited tumor growth by inhibiting proliferation (PCNA and tumor volume

  19. Eosinophil secretion of granule-derived cytokines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A Spencer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophils are tissue-dwelling leukocytes, present in the thymus, and gastrointestinal and genitourinary tracts of healthy individuals at baseline, and recruited, often in large numbers, to allergic inflammatory foci and sites of active tissue repair. The biological significance of eosinophils is vast and varied. In health, eosinophils support uterine and mammary gland development, and maintain bone marrow plasma cells and adipose tissue alternatively activated macrophages, while in response to tissue insult eosinophils function as inflammatory effector cells, and, in the wake of an inflammatory response, promote tissue regeneration and wound healing. One common mechanism driving many of the diverse eosinophil functions is the regulated and differential secretion of a vast array of eosinophil-derived cytokines. Eosinophils are distinguished from most other leukocytes in that many, if not all, of the over three dozen eosinophil-derived cytokines are pre-synthesized and stored within intracellular granules, poised for very rapid, stimulus-induced secretion. Eosinophils engaged in cytokine secretion in situ utilize distinct pathways of cytokine release that include: classical exocytosis, whereby granules themselves fuse with the plasma membrane and release their entire contents extracellularly; piecemeal degranulation, whereby granule-derived cytokines are selectively mobilized into vesicles that emerge from granules, traverse the cytoplasm and fuse with the plasma membrane to release discrete packets of cytokines; and eosinophil cytolysis, whereby intact granules are extruded from eosinophils, and deposited within tissues. In this latter scenario, extracellular granules can themselves function as stimulus-responsive secretory-competent organelles within the tissue. Here we review the distinctive processes of differential secretion of eosinophil granule-derived cytokines.

  20. T-cell adhesion induced by proteoglycan-immobilized cytokine MIP-1 beta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Y; Adams, D H; Hubscher, S; Hirano, H; Siebenlist, U; Shaw, S

    1993-01-07

    Lymphocyte migration from blood into tissue depends on integrin-mediated adhesion to endothelium. Adhesion requires not only integrin ligands on the endothelium, but also activation signals because T-cell integrins cannot bind well until they are activated. The physiological 'triggers' for T-cell adhesion are unknown, but cytokines may be good candidates as they are released during inflammation and trigger adhesion in neutrophils and monocytes. We have identified a cytokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-1 beta (MIP-1 beta), that induces both chemotaxis and adhesion of T cells; MIP-1 beta is most effective at augmenting adhesion of CD8+ T cells to the vascular cell adhesion molecule VCAM-1. We reasoned that, as cytokines in vivo will be rapidly washed away, MIP-1 beta might be bound to endothelial surfaces and so induce adhesion in its immobilized form. Here we show that: (1) MIP-1 beta is present on lymph node endothelium; (2) immobilized MIP-1 beta induces binding of T cells to VCAM-1 in vitro. MIP-1 beta was immobilized by binding to proteoglycan: a conjugate of heparin with bovine serum albumin and cellular proteoglycan CD44 were both effective. We propose that MIP-1 beta and other cytokines with glycosaminoglycan-binding sites will bind to and be presented by endothelial proteoglycans to trigger adhesion selectively not only of lymphocyte subsets, but also of other cell types.

  1. Effects of VMAT2 inhibitors lobeline and GZ-793A on methamphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release, metabolism and synthesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Andrew C; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A; Dwoskin, Linda P; Bardo, Michael T

    2013-10-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) inhibitors reduce methamphetamine (METH) reward in rats. The current study determined the effects of VMAT2 inhibitors lobeline (LOB; 1 or 3 mg/kg) and N-(1,2R-dihydroxylpropyl)-2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidine hydrochloride (GZ-793A; 15 or 30 mg/kg) on METH-induced (0.5 mg/kg, SC) changes in extracellular dopamine (DA) and its metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the reward-relevant nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell using in vivo microdialysis. The effect of GZ-793A (15 mg/kg) on DA synthesis in tissue also was investigated in NAc, striatum, medial prefrontal cortex and orbitofrontal cortex. In NAc shell, METH produced a time-dependent increase in extracellular DA and decrease in DOPAC. Neither LOB nor GZ-793A alone altered extracellular DA; however, both drugs increased extracellular DOPAC. In combination with METH, LOB did not alter the effects of METH on DA; however, GZ-793A, which has greater selectivity than LOB for inhibiting VMAT2, reduced the duration of the METH-induced increase in extracellular DA. Both LOB and GZ-793A enhanced the duration of the METH-induced decrease in extracellular DOPAC. METH also increased tissue DA synthesis in NAc and striatum, whereas GZ-793A decreased synthesis; no effect of METH or GZ-793A on DA synthesis was found in medial prefrontal cortex or orbitofrontal cortex. These results suggest that selective inhibition of VMAT2 produces a time-dependent decrease in DA release in NAc shell as a result of alterations in tyrosine hydroxylase activity, which may play a role in the ability of GZ-793A to decrease METH reward. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  2. In Vivo Stabilization of a Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor Antagonist Enhances PET Imaging and Radionuclide Therapy of Prostate Cancer in Preclinical Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatalic, Kristell L S; Konijnenberg, Mark; Nonnekens, Julie; de Blois, Erik; Hoeben, Sander; de Ridder, Corrina; Brunel, Luc; Fehrentz, Jean-Alain; Martinez, Jean; van Gent, Dik C; Nock, Berthold A; Maina, Theodosia; van Weerden, Wytske M; de Jong, Marion

    2016-01-01

    A single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing GRPR. However, the successful application of small peptides in a theranostic approach is often hampered by their fast in vivo degradation by proteolytic enzymes, such as neutral endopeptidase (NEP). Here we show for the first time that co-injection of a NEP inhibitor (phosphoramidon (PA)) can lead to an impressive enhancement of diagnostic sensitivity and therapeutic efficacy of the theranostic (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168 GRPR-antagonist. Co-injection of PA (300 µg) led to stabilization of (177)Lu-JMV4168 in murine peripheral blood. In PC-3 tumor-bearing mice, PA co-injection led to a two-fold increase in tumor uptake of (68)Ga-/(177)Lu-JMV4168, 1 h after injection. In positron emission tomography (PET) imaging with (68)Ga-JMV4168, PA co-injection substantially enhanced PC-3 tumor signal intensity. Radionuclide therapy with (177)Lu-JMV4168 resulted in significant regression of PC-3 tumor size. Radionuclide therapy efficacy was confirmed by production of DNA double strand breaks, decreased cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Increased survival rates were observed in mice treated with (177)Lu-JMV4168 plus PA as compared to those without PA. This data shows that co-injection of the enzyme inhibitor PA greatly enhances the theranostic potential of GRPR-radioantagonists for future application in PCa patients.

  3. An in vivo study of the chlorhexidine release profile of the PerioChip in the gingival crevicular fluid, plasma and urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soskolne, W A; Chajek, T; Flashner, M; Landau, I; Stabholtz, A; Kolatch, B; Lerner, E I

    1998-12-01

    The release profile of chlorhexidine from the PerioChip (Chip), a biodegradable local delivery system that contains 2.5 mg of chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX) in a cross-linked hydrolyzed gelatin matrix, into the gingival crevice, was evaluated in an in vivo, open label, single-center, 10-day pharmacokinetic study conducted on 19 volunteers with chronic adult periodontitis. Each volunteer had a single chip inserted into each of 4 selected pockets, with probing pocket depths of between 5-8 mm, at time 0. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were collected using filter paper strips prior to Chip placement and at 2 h, 4 h, 24 h and 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 days post-Chip placement. The GCF volume was measured using a calibrated Periotron 6000. Blood samples were collected at times 0, 1, 4, 8, 12 h and 5 days post-dosing. Urine was collected as a total 24-h specimen immediately post-dosing and 2 single samples at time 0, prior to dosing, and 5 days. The CHX was eluted from the paper strips and the CHX levels in GCF, blood and urine quantified using HPLC. The results indicate an initial peak concentration of CHX in the GCF at 2 h post-Chip insertion (2007 microg/ml) with slightly lower concentrations of between 1300-1900 microg/ml being maintained over the next 96 h. The CHX concentration then progressively decreased until study conclusion with significant CHX concentrations (mean=57 microg/ml) still being detectable at study termination. CHX was not detectable in any of the plasma or urine samples at any time point during the study. These results indicate that the PerioChip can maintain clinically effective levels of CHX in the GCF of periodontal pockets for over 1 week with no detectable systemic absorption.

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of 64Cu-Labeled SarAr-Bombesin Analogs in Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor–Expressing Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lears, Kimberly A.; Ferdani, Riccardo; Liang, Kexian; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Andrews, Rebecca; Sherman, Christopher D.; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.; Rogers, Buck E.

    2011-01-01

    Bombesin is a 14–amino-acid amphibian peptide that binds with high affinity to the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), which is overexpressed on a variety of solid tumors. It has been demonstrated that bombesin analogs can be radiolabeled with a variety of radiometals for potential diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-positive tumors. In this regard, several studies have used different chelators conjugated to the 8 C-terminal amino acids of bombesin(7–14) for radiolabeling with 64Cu. These analogs have demonstrated GRPR-specific small-animal PET of tumors but have various advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to conjugate the previously described (1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]-eicosane-1,8-diamine) (SarAr) chelator to bombesin (7–14), radiolabel the conjugate with 64Cu, and evaluate in vitro and in vivo. Methods SarAr was synthesized as previously published and conjugated to bombesin(7–14) by solid-phase peptide synthesis using standard Fmoc chemistry. Succinic acid (SA), 8-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc), and Gly-Ser-Gly (GSG) were used as linkers between SarAr and bombesin(7–14) to yield the resulting SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) peptides. The unlabeled peptides were evaluated in a competitive binding assay using PC-3 prostate cancer cells and 125I-Tyr4-bombesin to determine the inhibitory concentration of 50%. The peptides were radiolabeled with 64Cu and evaluated for internalization into PC-3 cells in vitro and for in vivo tumor uptake in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts using biodistribution and small-animal PET/CT studies. Results The competitive binding assay demonstrated that both SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7–14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7–14) bound with high affinity to GRPR with an inhibitory concentration of 50% of 3.5 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Both peptides were radiolabeled with 64Cu at room temperature without further purification and demonstrated similar

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of 64Cu-labeled SarAr-bombesin analogs in gastrin-releasing peptide receptor-expressing prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lears, Kimberly A; Ferdani, Riccardo; Liang, Kexian; Zheleznyak, Alexander; Andrews, Rebecca; Sherman, Christopher D; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J; Rogers, Buck E

    2011-03-01

    Bombesin is a 14-amino-acid amphibian peptide that binds with high affinity to the gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR), which is overexpressed on a variety of solid tumors. It has been demonstrated that bombesin analogs can be radiolabeled with a variety of radiometals for potential diagnosis and treatment of GRPR-positive tumors. In this regard, several studies have used different chelators conjugated to the 8 C-terminal amino acids of bombesin(7-14) for radiolabeling with (64)Cu. These analogs have demonstrated GRPR-specific small-animal PET of tumors but have various advantages and disadvantages. The objective of this study was to conjugate the previously described (1-N-(4-aminobenzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaazabicyclo[6.6.6]-eicosane-1,8-diamine) (SarAr) chelator to bombesin(7-14), radiolabel the conjugate with (64)Cu, and evaluate in vitro and in vivo. SarAr was synthesized as previously published and conjugated to bombesin(7-14) by solid-phase peptide synthesis using standard Fmoc chemistry. Succinic acid (SA), 8-aminooctanoic acid (Aoc), and Gly-Ser-Gly (GSG) were used as linkers between SarAr and bombesin(7-14) to yield the resulting SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14) peptides. The unlabeled peptides were evaluated in a competitive binding assay using PC-3 prostate cancer cells and (125)I-Tyr(4)-bombesin to determine the inhibitory concentration of 50%. The peptides were radiolabeled with (64)Cu and evaluated for internalization into PC-3 cells in vitro and for in vivo tumor uptake in mice bearing PC-3 xenografts using biodistribution and small-animal PET/CT studies. The competitive binding assay demonstrated that both SarAr-SA-Aoc-bombesin(7-14) and SarAr-SA-Aoc-GSG-bombesin(7-14) bound with high affinity to GRPR with an inhibitory concentration of 50% of 3.5 and 4.5 nM, respectively. Both peptides were radiolabeled with (64)Cu at room temperature without further purification and demonstrated similar internalization into PC

  6. Cytokines and intestinal inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamias, Giorgos; Cominelli, Fabio

    2016-11-01

    Cytokines of the intestinal microenvironment largely dictate immunological responses after mucosal insults and the dominance of homeostatic or proinflammatory pathways. This review presents important recent studies on the role of specific cytokines in the pathogenesis of intestinal inflammation. The particular mucosal effects of cytokines depend on their inherent properties but also the cellular origin, type of stimulatory antigens, intermolecular interactions, and the particular immunological milieu. Novel cytokines of the interleukin-1 (IL-1) family, including IL-33 and IL-36, have dominant roles in mucosal immunity, whereas more established ones such as IL-18 are constantly enriched with unique properties. Th17 cells are important mucosal constituents, although their profound plasticity, makes the specific set of cytokines they secrete more important than their mere numbers. Finally, various cytokines, such as tumor necrosis factor-α, IL-6, tumor necrosis factor-like cytokine 1A, and death receptor, 3 demonstrate dichotomous roles with mucosa-protective function in acute injury but proinflammatory effects during chronic inflammation. The role of cytokines in mucosal health and disease is increasingly revealed. Such information not only will advance our understanding of the pathogenesis of gut inflammation, but also set the background for development of reliable diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers and cytokine-specific therapies.

  7. Cutting edge: extracellular high mobility group box-1 protein is a proangiogenic cytokine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitola, Stefania; Belleri, Mirella; Urbinati, Chiara; Coltrini, Daniela; Sparatore, Bianca; Pedrazzi, Marco; Melloni, Edon; Presta, Marco

    2006-01-01

    The chromosomal high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) protein acts as a proinflammatory cytokine when released in the extracellular environment by necrotic and inflammatory cells. In the present study, we show that HMGB1 exerts proangiogenic effects by inducing MAPK ERK1/2 activation, cell proliferation, and chemotaxis in endothelial cells of different origin. Accordingly, HMGB1 stimulates membrane ruffling and repair of a mechanically wounded endothelial cell monolayer and causes endothelial cell sprouting in a three-dimensional fibrin gel. In keeping with its in vitro properties, HMGB1 stimulates neovascularization when applied in vivo on the top of the chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane whose blood vessels express the HMGB1 receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Accordingly, RAGE blockade by neutralizing Abs inhibits HMGB1-induced neovascularization in vivo and endothelial cell proliferation and membrane ruffling in vitro. Taken together, the data identify HMGB1/RAGE interaction as a potent proangiogenic stimulus.

  8. Cytokines and intraocular inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekzema, R.; Murray, P. I.; Kijlstra, A.

    1990-01-01

    Although new endogenous mediators of inflammatory and immune responses are reported almost on a monthly basis, the cytokines IL-1, TNF, and IL-6 have emerged as the primary regulators of local inflammation in man. In this paper, uveitogenic and other properties of these particular cytokines are

  9. Optimization (Central Composite Design and Validation of HPLC Method for Investigation of Emtricitabine Loaded Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid Nanoparticles: In Vitro Drug Release and In Vivo Pharmacokinetic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurinder Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the current study is to develop nanoparticles (NPs drug delivery system of emtricitabine solely using poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA and evaluate its in vitro and in vivo release performance by systematically optimized HPLC method using Formulation by Design (FbD. NPs were evaluated for in vitro release and in vivo absorption study. The desired chromatographic separation was achieved on a Phenomenex C18 (250 mm × 4.6 mm I.D., 5 μm column, under isocratic conditions using UV detection at 280 nm. The optimized mobile phase consisted of a mixture of 40 mM phosphate dihydrogen phosphate buffer (pH 6.8, methanol, and 2% acetonitrile in a ratio of (83 : 15 : 2, v/v/v at a flow rate of 1 mL/min. The linear regression analysis for the calibration curves showed a good linear correlation over the concentration range 0.040–2.0 μg/mL, with retention time of 4.39 min. An average encapsulation efficiency of 74.34% was obtained for NPs. In vitro studies showed zero-order release and about 95% drug being released within 15 days in PBS (pH 7.4. In conclusion, the proposed optimized method was successfully applied for the determination of in vitro and in vivo release studies of emtricitabine NPs.

  10. Cytokines in bipolar disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munkholm, Klaus; Vinberg, Maj; Vedel Kessing, Lars

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Current research and hypothesis regarding the pathophysiology of bipolar disorder suggests the involvement of immune system dysfunction that is possibly related to disease activity. Our objective was to systematically review evidence of cytokine alterations in bipolar disorder according...... to affective state. METHODS: We conducted a systemtic review of studies measuring endogenous cytokine concentrations in patients with bipolar disorder and a meta-analysis, reporting results according to the PRISMA statement. RESULTS: Thirteen studies were included, comprising 556 bipolar disorder patients...... and 767 healthy controls, evaluating 15 different cytokines-, cytokine receptors- or cytokine antagonists. The levels of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), the soluble tumor necrosis factor receptor type 1 (sTNF-R1) and the soluble inlerleukin-2 receptor (sIL-2R) were elevated in manic patients compared...

  11. Study of stem cell homing & self-renewal marker gene profile of ex vivo expanded human CD34+ cells manipulated with a mixture of cytokines & stromal cell-derived factor 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kode

    2017-01-01

    Interpretation & conclusions: Cocktail of cytokines and SDF1 showed good potential to successfully expand HSPC which exhibited enhanced ability to generate multilineage cells in short-term and long-term repopulation assay. This cocktail-mediated stem cell expansion has potential to obviate the need for longer and large volume apheresis procedure making it convenient for donors.

  12. Cytokines and major depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiepers, Olga J G; Wichers, Marieke C; Maes, Michael

    2005-02-01

    In the research field of psychoneuroimmunology, accumulating evidence has indicated the existence of reciprocal communication pathways between nervous, endocrine and immune systems. In this respect, there has been increasing interest in the putative involvement of the immune system in psychiatric disorders. In the present review, the role of proinflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin (IL)-1, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interferon (IFN)-gamma, in the aetiology and pathophysiology of major depression, is discussed. The 'cytokine hypothesis of depression' implies that proinflammatory cytokines, acting as neuromodulators, represent the key factor in the (central) mediation of the behavioural, neuroendocrine and neurochemical features of depressive disorders. This view is supported by various findings. Several medical illnesses, which are characterised by chronic inflammatory responses, e.g. rheumatoid arthritis, have been reported to be accompanied by depression. In addition, administration of proinflammatory cytokines, e.g. in cancer or hepatitis C therapies, has been found to induce depressive symptomatology. Administration of proinflammatory cytokines in animals induces 'sickness behaviour', which is a pattern of behavioural alterations that is very similar to the behavioural symptoms of depression in humans. The central action of cytokines may also account for the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity that is frequently observed in depressive disorders, as proinflammatory cytokines may cause HPA axis hyperactivity by disturbing the negative feedback inhibition of circulating corticosteroids (CSs) on the HPA axis. Concerning the deficiency in serotonergic (5-HT) neurotransmission that is concomitant with major depression, cytokines may reduce 5-HT levels by lowering the availability of its precursor tryptophan (TRP) through activation of the TRP-metabolising enzyme indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO). Although the central effects of

  13. SU-F-T-330: Characterization of the Clinically Released ScandiDos Discover Diode Array for In-Vivo Dose Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saenz, D; Gutierrez, A [University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The ScandiDos Discover has obtained FDA clearance and is now clinically released. We studied the essential attenuation and beam hardening components as well as tested the diode array’s ability to detect changes in absolute dose and MLC leaf positions. Methods: The ScandiDos Discover was mounted on the heads of an Elekta VersaHD and a Varian 23EX. Beam attenuation measurements were made at 10 cm depth for 6 MV and 18 MV beam energies. The PDD(10) was measured as a metric for the effect on beam quality. Next, a plan consisting of two orthogonal 10 × 10 cm2 fields was used to adjust the dose per fraction by scaling monitor units to test the absolute dose detection sensitivity of the Discover. A second plan (conformal arc) was then delivered several times independently on the Elekta VersaHD. Artificially introduced MLC position errors in the four central leaves were then added. The errors were incrementally increased from 1 mm to 4 mm and back across seven control points. Results: The absolute dose measured at 10 cm depth decreased by 1.2% and 0.7% for 6 MV and 18 MV beam with the Discover, respectively. Attenuation depended slightly on the field size but only changed the attenuation by 0.1% across 5 × 5 cm{sup 2} and 20 − 20 cm{sup 2} fields. The change in PDD(10) for a 10 − 10 cm{sup 2} field was +0.1% and +0.6% for 6 MV and 18 MV, respectively. Changes in monitor units from −5.0% to 5.0% were faithfully detected. Detected leaf errors were within 1.0 mm of intended errors. Conclusion: A novel in-vivo dosimeter monitoring the radiation beam during treatment was examined through its attenuation and beam hardening characteristics. The device tracked with changes in absolute dose as well as introduced leaf position deviations.

  14. Cytokines in Radiobiological Responses: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaue, Dörthe; Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; McBride, William H.

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines function in many roles that are highly relevant to radiation research. This review focuses on how cytokines are structurally organized, how they are induced by radiation, and how they orchestrate mesenchymal, epithelial and immune cell interactions in irradiated tissues. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are the major components of immediate early gene programs and as such can be rapidly activated after tissue irradiation. They converge with the effects of ionizing radiation in that both generate free radicals including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS). “Self” molecules secreted or released from cells after irradiation feed the same paradigm by signaling for ROS and cytokine production. As a result, multilayered feedback control circuits can be generated that perpetuate the radiation tissue damage response. The pro-inflammatory phase persists until such times as perceived challenges to host integrity are eliminated. Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory cytokines then act to restore homeostasis. The balance between pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory forces may shift to and fro for a long time after radiation exposure, creating waves as the host tries to deal with persisting pathogenesis. Individual cytokines function within socially interconnected groups to direct these integrated cellular responses. They hunt in packs and form complex cytokine networks that are nested within each other so as to form mutually reinforcing or antagonistic forces. This yin-yang balance appears to have redox as a fulcrum. Because of their social organization, cytokines appear to have a considerable degree of redundancy and it follows that an elevated level of a specific cytokine in a disease situation or after irradiation does not necessarily implicate it causally in pathogenesis. In spite of this, “driver” cytokines are emerging in pathogenic situations that can clearly be targeted for therapeutic benefit, including in radiation settings. Cytokines can greatly

  15. [Cytokine storm in avian influenza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Us, Dürdal

    2008-04-01

    The most dramatic example of defining the pathogenicity of influenza virus A/H5N1 strains is the higher fatality rate of avian influenza epidemic (>50%) occured in Southeast Asia in 1997 comparing to the pandemic caused by influenza virus A/H1N1 in 1918 (5-10%) which was recorded as the most destructive pandemic in the world. When considering the fatal/total case numbers (208/340) reported by World Health Organization in respect of December 14th, 2007, the mortality rate has now reached to 61 percent. Recent studies have shown that the high fatality rate of avian influenza virus infections is a consequence of an overactive inflammatory response and the severity of infection is closely related with virus-induced cytokine dysregulation. The most important feature of A/H5N1 immunopathogenesis is the appearence of hypercytokinemia ("cytokine storm") which is characterized by the extreme (exaggerated) production and secretion of large numbers and excessive levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines. This phenomenon is blamed on the emergence of lethal clinical symptoms such as extensive pulmonary oedema, acute bronchopneumoniae, alveolar haemorrhage, reactive haemophagocytosis, and acute respiratory distress syndrome, associated with necrosis and tissue destruction. Numerous in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies have pointed out that A/H5N1 viruses are very strong inducers of various cytokines and chemokines [Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)-alpha, Interferon (IFN)-gamma, IFN-alpha/beta, Interleukin (IL)-6, IL-1, MIP-1 (Macrophage Inflammatory Protein), MIG (Monokine Induced by IFN-gamma), IP-10 (Interferon-gamma-Inducible Protein), MCP-1 (Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein), RANTES (Regulated on Activation Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted), IL-8], in both humans and animals. The privileged cells of cytokine storm are macrophages and CD8+ T-lymphocytes, while the primary contributor cytokines are TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IFN-gamma. It has been detected that, mutations of some viral

  16. Cytokines and Liver Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herbert Tilg

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytokines are pleiotropic peptides produced by virtually every nucleated cell in the body. In most tissues, including the liver, constitutive production of cytokines is absent or minimal. There is increasing evidence that several cytokines mediate hepatic inflammation, apoptosis and necrosis of liver cells, cholestasis and fibrosis. Interestingly, the same mediators also mediate the regeneration of liver tissue after injury. Among the various cytokines, the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-a has emerged as a key factor in various aspects of liver disease, such as cachexia and/or cholestasis. Thus, antagonism of TNF-a and other injury-related cytokines in liver diseases merits evaluation as a treatment of these diseases. However, because the same cytokines are also necessary for the regeneration of the tissue after the liver has been injured, inhibition of these mediators might impair hepatic recovery. The near future will bring the exiting clinical challenge of testing new anticytokine strategies in various liver diseases.

  17. [Cytokines and osteogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Makoto; Ozono, Keiichi

    2014-06-01

    Many cytokines associate with proliferation, differentiation and activation of osteoblasts which have an important role in osteogenesis. TGF-β, BMP, IGF, FGF, Hedgehog, Notch, IL and WNT signaling pathways and their inhibitors have been revealed to correlate to osteogenesis, and those gene mutations have been shown to cause various bone disorders. It has been suggested that there are common pathways or crosstalk in these cytokine signaling each other, but mechanism of their complicated regulation on osteogenesis has been unclear. It was expected that the knowledge about these cytokines will apply to clinical therapies of bone diseases.

  18. Ex Vivo Normothermic Perfusion Induces Donor-Derived Leukocyte Mobilization and Removal Prior to Renal Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Stone

    2016-11-01

    Discussion: We demonstrate that ex vivo normothermic perfusion initiates an inflammatory cytokine storm and release of mitochondrial and genomic DNA. This is likely to be responsible for immune cell activation and mobilization into the circuit prior to transplantation. Interestingly this did not have an impact on renal function. These data therefore suggest that normothermic perfusion can be used to immunodeplete and to saturate the pro-inflammatory capacity of donor kidneys prior to transplantation.

  19. Cytokines regulating hematopoietic stem cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng C; Lodish, Harvey F

    2008-07-01

    Regulation of the multiple fates of hematopoietic stem cells - including quiescence, self-renewal, differentiation, apoptosis, and mobilization from the niche - requires the cooperative actions of several cytokines and other hormones that bind to receptors on these cells. In this review we discuss recent advances in the identification of novel hematopoietic stem cell supportive cytokines and the mechanisms by which they control hematopoietic stem cell fate decisions. Several extrinsic factors that stimulate ex-vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem cells were recently identified by a number of experimental approaches, including forward genetic screening and transcriptional profiling of supportive stromal cells. Recent experiments in which multiple cytokine signaling pathways are activated or suppressed in hematopoietic stem cells reveal the complexity of signal transduction and cell-fate choice in hematopoietic stem cells in vivo and in vitro. The study of genetically modified mice and improvements in the in-vitro hematopoietic stem cell culture system will be powerful tools to elucidate the functions of cytokines that regulate hematopoietic stem cell function. These will further reveal the complex nature of the mechanisms by which extrinsic factors regulate signal transduction and cell-fate decisions of hematopoietic stem cells.

  20. Sustained release donepezil loaded PLGA microspheres for injection: Preparation, in vitro and in vivo study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Wenjia; Quan, Peng; Fang, Liang

    2015-01-01

    was in amorphous state or molecularly dispersed in microspheres. The Tg of PLGA was increased with the addition of DP. The release profile in vitro was characterized with slow but continuous release that lasted for about one week and fitted well with first-order model, which suggested the diffusion governing...

  1. Sustained-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gande, S; Rao, Ym

    2011-01-01

    Baclofen, a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant, is indicated in the long-term treatment of spasticity. It is difficult to formulate baclofen sustained release dosage forms because its absorption on arrival to colon (or even before) is low or nonexistent. In the present investigation efforts were made to improve the bioavailability of baclofen by increasing the residence time of the drug through sustained-release matrix tablet formulation via gastroretentive mechanism. Tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique. The influence of gas generating and gel forming agents, amount of baclofen and total weight of tablet on physical properties, in vitro buoyancy, floating lag time, drug release, DSC, X-ray studies were investigated. The release mechanisms were explored and explained by applying zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer equations. The selected formulations were subjected to stability study for the period of three months. For all formulations, kinetics of drug release from tablet followed Higuchi's square root of time kinetic treatment heralding diffusion as predominant mechanism of drug release. Formulations containing 20 mg and 40 mg (F-1 and F-7) showed similar release profiles. There was no significant change in the selected formulations, when subjected to accelerated stability conditions over a period of three months. X-ray imaging in six healthy human volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50±0.7 hrs for the selected formulation. Stable, sustained release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen could be prepared by wet granulation technique.

  2. Censored correlated cytokine concentrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Andreas; Benn, Christine Stabell; Jørgensen, Mathias J

    2013-01-01

    Interest in cytokines as markers for the function of the immune system is increasing. Methods quantifying cytokine concentrations are often subject to detection limits, which lead to non-detectable observations and censored distributions. When distributions are skewed, geometric mean ratios (GMRs......) can be used to describe the relative concentration between two cytokines, and the GMR ratio (GMRR) can be used to compare two groups. The problem is how to estimate GMRRs from censored distributions.We evaluated methods, including simple deletion and substitution, in simulated and real data. One...... method applies Tobit directly to the censored difference between the two cytokine log-concentrations (Diff). However, censoring is correlated to the outcome and is therefore not independent. The correlation increases as the correlation between the two log-concentrations decreases. We propose a Tobit...

  3. Amniotic fluid inflammatory cytokines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Morsi; Larsen, Nanna; Grove, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy.......The aim of the study was to analyze cytokine profiles in amniotic fluid (AF) samples of children developing autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and controls, adjusting for maternal autoimmune disorders and maternal infections during pregnancy....

  4. Electrospun Zein/PCL Fibrous Matrices Release Tetracycline in a Controlled Manner, Killing Staphylococcus aureus Both in Biofilms and Ex Vivo on Pig Skin, and are Compatible with Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhusein, Nour; Blagbrough, Ian S; Beeton, Michael L; Bolhuis, Albert; De Bank, Paul A

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the destruction of clinically-relevant bacteria within biofilms via the sustained release of the antibiotic tetracycline from zein-based electrospun polymeric fibrous matrices and to demonstrate the compatibility of such wound dressing matrices with human skin cells. Zein/PCL triple layered fibrous dressings with entrapped tetracycline were electrospun. The successful entrapment of tetracycline in these dressings was validated. The successful release of bioactive tetracycline, the destruction of preformed biofilms, and the viability of fibroblast (FEK4) cells were investigated. The sustained release of tetracycline from these matrices led to the efficient destruction of preformed biofilms from Staphylococcus aureus MRSA252 in vitro, and of MRSA252 and ATCC 25923 bacteria in an ex vivo pig skin model using 1 × 1 cm square matrices containing tetracycline (30 μg). Human FEK4 cells grew normally in the presence of these matrices. The ability of the zein-based matrices to destroy bacteria within increasingly complex in vitro biofilm models was clearly established. An ex vivo pig skin assay showed that these matrices, with entrapped tetracycline, efficiently kill bacteria and this, combined with their compatibility with a human skin cell line suggest these matrices are well suited for applications in wound healing and infection control.

  5. Extracellular RNA promotes leukocyte recruitment in the vascular system by mobilising proinflammatory cytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Silvia; Grantzow, Tobias; Pagel, Judith I; Tschernatsch, Marlene; Sperandio, Markus; Preissner, Klaus T; Deindl, Elisabeth

    2012-10-01

    Extracellular RNA (eRNA), released from cells under conditions of injury or vascular disease, acts as potent prothrombotic factor and promotes vascular hyperpermeability related to oedema formation in vivo. In this study, we aimed to investigate the mechanism by which eRNA triggers inflammatory processes, particularly associated with different steps of leukocyte recruitment. Using intravital microscopy of murine cremaster muscle venules, eRNA (but not DNA) significantly induced leukocyte adhesion and transmigration in vivo, which was comparable in its effects to the function of tumour-necrosis-factor-α (TNF-α). In vitro, eRNA promoted adhesion and transmigration of monocytic cells on and across endothelial cell monolayers. eRNA-induced monocyte adhesion in vitro was mediated by activation of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)/VEGF-receptor-2 system and was abolished by neutralising antibodies against intercellular adhesion molecule-1 or the β2-integrin Mac-1. Additionally, eRNA induced the release of TNF-α from monocytic cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, which involved activation of TNF-α-converting enzyme (TACE) as well as the nuclear factor κB signalling machinery. In vivo, inhibiton of TACE significantly reduced eRNA-induced leukocyte adhesion. Our findings present evidence that eRNA in connection with tissue/vascular damage provokes a potent inflammatory response by inducing leukocyte recruitment and by mobilising proinflammatory cytokines from monocytes.

  6. Relative contribution of matrix metalloprotease and cysteine protease activities to cytokine-stimulated articular cartilage degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondergaard, B C; Henriksen, K; Wulf, H; Oestergaard, S; Schurigt, U; Bräuer, R; Danielsen, I; Christiansen, C; Qvist, P; Karsdal, M A

    2006-08-01

    Both matrix metalloprotease (MMP) activity and cathepsin K (CK) activity have been implicated in cartilage turnover. We investigated the relative contribution of MMP activity and CK activity in cartilage degradation using ex vivo and in vivo models. Bovine articular cartilage explants were stimulated with oncostatin M (OSM) 10 ng/ml and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) 20 ng/ml in the presence or absence of the broad-spectrum MMP inhibitor GM6001 and the cysteine protease inhibitor, E64. Cartilage degradation was evaluated in the conditioned medium by glycosaminoglycans (GAG), hydroxyproline, and cross-linked C-telopeptide fragments of type II collagen (CTX-II), which were compared to immunohistochemical evaluations of proteoglycans and CTX-II. We assessed MMP expression by gelatine zymography and CK expression by immunohistochemistry. In vivo, CTX-II release was measured from CK-deficient mice. OSM and TNF-alpha combined induced significant (Pdegradation products measured by hydroxyproline and CTX-II compared to vehicle control. The cytokines potently induced MMP expression, assessed by zymography, and CK expression investigated by immunohistochemistry. Inhibition of MMP activity completely abrogated hydroxyproline and CTX-II release (Pdegradation. In contrast, inhibition of cysteine proteases resulted in an increase rather than a decrease in MMP derived fragments of collagen type II degradation, CTX-II, suggesting altered collagen metabolism.

  7. Kappa opioid receptor activation potentiates the cocaine-induced increase in evoked dopamine release recorded in vivo in the mouse nucleus accumbens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ehrich, Jonathan M; Phillips, Paul E M; Chavkin, Charles

    2014-01-01

    .... Prior studies have established that this potentiation of drug reward was mediated by stress-induced release of the endogenous dynorphin opioids and subsequent kappa opioid receptor (KOR) activation...

  8. Influence of phthalates on cytokine production in monocytes and macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Juliana Frohnert; Bendtzen, Klaus; Boas, Malene

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Phthalates are a group of endocrine disrupting chemicals suspected to influence the immune system. The aim of this systematic review is to summarise the present knowledge on the influence of phthalates on monocyte and macrophage production and secretion of cytokines, an influence which......://www.crd.york.ac.uk/NIHR_PROSPERO, registration number CRD42013004236). In vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies investigating the influence of phthalates on cytokine mRNA expression and cytokine secretion in animals and humans were included. A total of 11 reports, containing 12 studies, were found eligible for inclusion. In these, a total of four...... different phthalate diesters, six primary metabolites (phthalate monoesters) and seven different cytokines were investigated. Though all studies varied greatly in study design and species sources, four out of five studies that investigated di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate found an increased tumour necrosis factor...

  9. Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm-released cells induce a prompt and more marked in vivo inflammatory-type response than planktonic or biofilm cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ângela França; Ângela França; Begoña Pérez-Cabezas; Alexandra Correia; Gerald B. Pier; Nuno Cerca; Manuel Vilanova; Manuel Vilanova

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm formation on indwelling medical devices is frequently associated with the development of chronic infections. Nevertheless, it has been suggested that cells released from these biofilms may induce severe acute infections with bacteraemia as one of its major associated clinical manifestations. However, how biofilm-released cells interact with the host remains unclear. Here, using a murine model of hematogenously disseminated infection, we characterized the int...

  10. Sustained-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YM Rao

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available "n  Background and the purpose of the study: Baclofen, a centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant, is indicated in the long-term treatment of spasticity. It is difficult to formulate baclofen sustained release dosage forms because its absorption on arrival to colon (or even before is low or nonexistent. In the present investigation efforts were made to improve the bioavailability of baclofen by increasing the residence time of the drug through sustained-release matrix tablet formulation via gastroretentive mechanism. "n  Methods: Tablets were prepared by wet granulation technique. The influence of gas generating and gel forming agents, amount of baclofen and total weight of tablet on physical properties, in vitro buoyancy, floating lag time, drug release, DSC, X-ray studies were investigated. The release mechanisms were explored and explained by applying zero order, first order, Higuchi and Korsmeyer equations. The selected formulations were subjected to stability study for the period of three months. "n  Results: For all formulations, kinetics of drug release from tablet followed Higuchi's square root of time kinetic treatment heralding diffusion as predominant mechanism of drug release. Formulations containing 20 mg and 40 mg (F-1 and F-7 showed similar release profiles. There was no significant change in the selected formulations, when subjected to accelerated stability conditions over a period of three months. X-ray imaging in six healthy human volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50±0.7 hrs for the selected formulation. "n  Conclusion:Stable, sustained release effervescent floating matrix tablets of baclofen could be prepared by wet granulation technique.

  11. Nerve growth factor: neurotrophin or cytokine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, S; Rasi, G; Bracci-Laudiero, M L; Procoli, A; Aloe, L

    2003-06-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) is a neutrophin exerting an important role in the development and functions of the central and peripheral nervous system. However, it has recently been documented that several immune cells - such as mast cells, lymphocytes and eosinophils - produce, store and release NGF. Moreover, NGF high and low affinity receptors are widely expressed in the immune system, thus indicating the potential of responding to this neurotrophin through an autocrine mechanism. In fact, NGF influences development differentiation, chemotaxis and mediator release of inflammatory cells as well as fibroblast activation through a complex network influenced by other pro-inflammatory cytokines. Finally, NGF is increased in biological fluids of several allergic, immune and inflammatory diseases. Data reviewed suggest, therefore, that NGF might also be viewed as a (Th2?) cytokine with a modulatory role in allergic inflammation and tissue remodeling. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  12. What is the best treatment to decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine release in acute skeletal muscle injury induced by trauma in rats: low-level laser therapy, diclofenac, or cryotherapy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Patrícia; Tomazoni, Shaiane Silva; Frigo, Lucio; de Carvalho, Paulo de Tarso Camillo; Vanin, Adriane Aver; Santos, Larissa Aline; Albuquerque-Pontes, Gianna Móes; De Marchi, Thiago; Tairova, Olga; Marcos, Rodrigo Labat; Lopes-Martins, Rodrigo Álvaro Brandão; Leal-Junior, Ernesto Cesar Pinto

    2014-03-01

    Currently, treatment of muscle injuries represents a challenge in clinical practice. In acute phase, the most employed therapies are cryotherapy and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. In the last years, low-level laser therapy (LLLT) has becoming a promising therapeutic agent; however, its effects are not fully known. The aim of this study was to analyze the effects of sodium diclofenac (topical application), cryotherapy, and LLLT on pro-inflammatory cytokine levels after a controlled model of muscle injury. For such, we performed a single trauma in tibialis anterior muscle of rats. After 1 h, animals were treated with sodium diclofenac (11.6 mg/g of solution), cryotherapy (20 min), or LLLT (904 nm; superpulsed; 700 Hz; 60 mW mean output power; 1.67 W/cm(2); 1, 3, 6 or 9 J; 17, 50, 100 or 150 s). Assessment of interleukin-1β and interleukin-6 (IL-1β and IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) levels was performed at 6 h after trauma employing enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. LLLT with 1 J dose significantly decreased (p cryotherapy groups. On the other hand, treatment with diclofenac and cryotherapy does not decrease pro-inflammatory cytokine levels compared to the non-treated injured group. Therefore, we can conclude that 904 nm LLLT with 1 J dose has better effects than topical application of diclofenac or cryotherapy in acute inflammatory phase after muscle trauma.

  13. Class I Cytokine Receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steinocher, Helena

    The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce their intr......The members of the class I cytokine receptor family are involved in a wide range of cellular processes and of high pharmaceutical importance, however, even though the transmembrane receptors have been studied for decades, it has not been fully elucidated yet, how these receptors induce...... their intracellular response. The overall goal of this thesis was to improve the understanding of class I cytokine receptor activation and regulation at an atomic level. Two members of the class I cytokine receptor family, the human growth hormone receptor (hGHR), and the human erythropoietin receptor (hEPOR) have...... the traptamers on the hEPOR TMD dimeric complex in detergent micelles. To gain a better understanding of hGHR regulation a point mutation in the hGHR intracellular domain (ICD), which has recently been linked to lung cancer, was characterized. The mutation was found to decrease binding of suppressor of cytokine...

  14. Cytokines in the modulation of eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faccioli Lúcia H

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review we discuss our recently results showing interleukin 5 (IL-5 involvement in eosinophil migration and in the maintenance of eosinophilia in blood, bone marrow, lung and peritoneal cavity, in a visceral larva migrans syndrome model using guinea-pigs infected with Toxocara canis. We also describe the sequential release of TNF-alpha and IL-8 during the course of infection, and the interaction between these cytokines and IL-5 during infection. Finally we propose a new biological role for IL-5, at least in our model, as a modulator of IL-8 release and secretion.

  15. Influence of the type of vegetable oil on the drug release profile from lipid-core nanocapsules and in vivo genotoxicity study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigo, Lucas Almeida; Frescura, Viviane; Fiel, Luana; Coradini, Karine; Ourique, Aline Ferreira; Emanuelli, Tatiana; Quatrin, Andréia; Tedesco, Solange; Silva, Cristiane B da; Guterres, Silvia Staniçuaski; Pohlmann, Adriana Raffin; Beck, Ruy Carlos Ruver

    2014-11-01

    The use of rice bran (RB), soybean (SB) or sunflower seed (SF) oils to prepare lipid-core nanocapsules (LNCs) as controlled drug delivery systems was investigated. LNCs were prepared by interfacial deposition using the preformed polymer method. All formulations showed negative zeta potential and adequate nanotechnological characteristics (particle size 220-230  nm, polydispersity index oils did not present genotoxic potential. Clobetasol propionate (CP) was selected as a model drug to evaluate the influence of the type of vegetable oil on the control of the drug release from LNCs. Biphasic drug release profiles were observed for all formulations. After 168  h, the concentration of drug released from the formulation containing SF oil was lower (0.36  mg/mL) than from formulations containing SB (0.40  mg/mL) or RB oil (0.45  mg/mL). Good correlations between the consistency indices for the LNC cores and the burst and sustained drug release rate constants were obtained. Therefore, the type of the vegetal oil was shown as an important factor governing the control of drug release from LNCs.

  16. Sustained Release of Lidocaine from Solvent-Free Biodegradable Poly[(d,l-Lactide-co-Glycolide] (PLGA: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chuan Kau

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Local anesthetics are commonly used for pain relief by regional nerve blocking. In this study, we fabricated solvent-free biodegradable pellets to extend the duration of lidocaine release without any significant local or systemic toxicity levels. To manufacture the pellets, poly[(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide] (PLGA was first pre-mixed with lidocaine powder into different ratios. The powder mixture was then compressed with a mold (diameter of 1, 5, 8 or 10 mm and sintered at 65 °C to form pellets. The in vitro release study showed that the lidocaine/PLGA pellets exhibited a tri-phase release behavior (a burst, a diffusion-controlled release and a degradation-dominated release and reached completion around day 28. Scanning electron microscope (SEM photos show that small channels could be found on the surfaces of the pellets on day 2. Furthermore, the polymer matrix swelled and fell apart on day 7, while the pellets became viscous after 10 days of in vitro elution. Perineural administration of the lidocaine/PLGA pellets produced anti-hypersensitivity effects lasting for at least 24 h in rats, significant when compared to the control group (a pure PLGA was pellet administered. In addition, no inflammation was detected within the nerve and in the neighboring muscle by histopathology.

  17. [18F]FDG labeling of neural stem cells for in vivo cell tracking with positron emission tomography : inhibition of tracer release by phloretin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stojanov, Katica; de Vries, Erik F. J.; Hoekstra, Dick; van Waarde, Aren; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; Zuhorn, Inge S.

    The introduction of neural stem cells into the brain has promising therapeutic potential for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. To monitor the cellular replacement therapy, that is, to determine stem cell migration, survival, and differentiation, in vivo tracking methods are needed.

  18. ANALYSIS OF IMMEDIATE EX VIVO RELEASE OF NITRIC OXIDE FROM HUMAN COLONIC MUCOSA IN GASTROINTESTINALLY MEDIATED ALLERGY, INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE AND CONTROLS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raithel, M.; Hagel, A. F.; Zopf, Y.; Bijlsma, P. B.; de Rossi, T. M.; Gabriel, S.; Weidenhiller, M.; Kressel, J.; Hahn, E. G.; Konturek, P. C.

    2012-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a local mediator in inflammation and allergy. The aim of this study was to investigate whether live incubated colorectal mucosal tissue shows a direct NO response ex vivo to nonspecific and specific immunological stimuli and whether there are disease-specific differences between

  19. Cytokine genes as potential biomarkers for muscle weakness in OPMD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Raz, Yotam; van der Slujis, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Molecular biomarkers emerge as an accurate diagnostic tool, but are scarce for myopathies. Lack of outcome measures sensitive to disease onset and symptom severity hamper evaluation of therapeutic developments. Cytokines are circulating immunogenic molecules, and their potential as biomarkers has...... been exploited in the last decade. Cytokines are released from many tissues, including skeletal muscles, but their application to monitor muscle pathology is sparse. We report that the cytokine functional group is altered in the transcriptome of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). OPMD...... is a dominant, late-onset myopathy, caused by an alanine-expansion mutation in the gene encoding for poly(A) binding protein nuclear 1 (expPABPN1). Here, we investigated the hypothesis that cytokines could mark OPMD disease state. We determined cytokines levels the vastus lateralis muscle from genetically...

  20. Cytokines in human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Roberto

    2010-02-01

    Epidemiologic studies conducted in the past 30 years to investigate the protective functions of human milk strongly support the notion that breastfeeding prevents infantile infections, particularly those affecting the gastrointestinal and respiratory tracts. However, more recent clinical and experimental observations also suggest that human milk not only provides passive protection, but also can directly modulate the immunological development of the recipient infant. The study of this remarkable defense system in human milk has been difficult because of its biochemical complexity, the small concentration of certain bioactive components, the compartmentalization of some of these agents, the dynamic quantitative and qualitative changes of milk during lactation, and the lack of specific reagents to quantify these agents. However, a host of bioactive substances, including hormones, growth factors, and immunological factors such as cytokines, have been identified in human milk. Cytokines are pluripotent polypeptides that act in autocrine/paracrine fashions by binding to specific cellular receptors. They operate in networks and orchestrate the development and functions of immune system. Several different cytokines and chemokines have been discovered in human milk in the past years, and the list is growing very rapidly. This article will review the current knowledge about the increasingly complex network of chemoattractants, activators, and anti-inflammatory cytokines present in human milk and their potential role in compensating for the developmental delay of the neonate immune system. Copyright 2010. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  1. Plantago ovata F. Mucilage-Alginate Mucoadhesive Beads for Controlled Release of Glibenclamide: Development, Optimization, and In Vitro-In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Nayak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study deals with the development and optimization of ispaghula (Plantago ovata F. husk mucilage- (IHM- alginate mucoadhesive beads containing glibenclamide by ionotropic gelation technique. The effects of sodium alginate (SA to IHM and cross-linker (CaCl2 concentration on the drug encapsulation efficiency (DEE, %, as well as cumulative drug release after 10 hours (R10 h, %, were optimized using 32 factorial design based on response surface methodology. The observed responses were coincided well with the predicted values by the experimental design. The optimized mucoadhesive beads exhibited 94.43±4.80% w/w of DEE and good mucoadhesivity with the biological membrane in wash-off test and sustained drug release profile over 10 hours. The beads were also characterized by SEM and FTIR analyses. The in vitro drug release from these beads was followed by controlled release (zero-order pattern with super case-II transport mechanism. The optimized glibenclamide-loaded IHM-alginate mucoadhesive beads showed significant antidiabetic effect in alloxan-induced diabetic rats over prolonged period after oral administration.

  2. In vivo stabilization of a gastrin-releasing peptide receptor antagonist enhances pet imaging and radionuclide therapy of prostate cancer in preclinical studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.L.S. Chatalic (Kristell); M. Konijnenberg (Mark); J. Nonnekens (Julie); E. de Blois (Erik); S. Hoeben (Sander); C.M.A. Ridder (Corrina); L. Brunel (Luc); J.-A. Fehrentz (Jean-Alain); J. Martinez (Jean); D.C. van Gent (Dik); B.A. Nock (Berthold); T. Maina (Theodosia); W.M. van Weerden (Wytske); M. Jong (Marion de)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractA single tool for early detection, accurate staging, and personalized treatment of prostate cancer (PCa) would be a major breakthrough in the field of PCa. Gastrin-releasing peptide receptor (GRPR) targeting peptides are promising probes for a theranostic approach for PCa overexpressing

  3. VEGF(165) and bFGF protein-based therapy in a slow release system to improve angiogenesis in a bioartificial dermal substitute in vitro and in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilcke, I.; Lohmeyer, J. A.; Liu, S.; Condurache, A.; Krueger, S.; Mailaender, P.; Machens, H. G.

    Background Angiogenesis can be enhanced by several growth factors, like vascular endothelial growth factor-165 (VEGF(165)) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). Delayed release of such growth factors could be provided by incorporation of growth factors in fibrin matrices. In this study, we

  4. Controlled-release effervescent floating matrix tablets of ciprofloxacin hydrochloride: development, optimization and in vitro-in vivo evaluation in healthy human volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadros, Mina Ibrahim

    2010-02-01

    Ciprofloxacin hydrochloride has a short elimination half-life, a narrow absorption window and is mainly absorbed in proximal areas of GIT. The purpose of this study was to develop a gastroretentive controlled-release drug delivery system with swelling, floating, and adhesive properties. Ten tablet formulations were designed using hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (HPMC K15M) and/or sodium alginate (Na alginate) as release-retarding polymer(s) and sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO(3)) or calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) as a gas former. Swelling ability, floating behaviour, adhesion period and drug release studies were conducted in 0.1 N HCl (pH 1.2) at 37+/-0.5 degrees C. The tablets showed acceptable physicochemical properties. Drug release profiles of all formulae followed non-Fickian diffusion. Statistical analyses of data revealed that tablets containing HPMC K15M (21.42%, w/w), Na alginate (7.14%, w/w) and NaHCO(3) (20%, w/w) (formula F7) or CaCO(3) (20%, w/w) (formula F10) were promising systems exhibiting excellent floating properties, extended adhesion periods and sustained drug release characteristics. Both formulae were stored at 40 degrees C/75% RH for 3months according to ICH guidelines. Formula F10 showed better physical stability. Abdominal X-ray imaging of formula F10, loaded with barium sulfate, in six healthy volunteers revealed a mean gastric retention period of 5.50+/-0.77h. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Critical quality attributes, in vitro release and correlated in vitro skin permeation-in vivo tape stripping collective data for demonstrating therapeutic (non)equivalence of topical semisolids: A case study of "ready-to-use" vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilić, Tanja; Pantelić, Ivana; Lunter, Dominique; Đorđević, Sanela; Marković, Bojan; Ranković, Dragana; Daniels, Rolf; Savić, Snežana

    2017-08-07

    This work aimed to prove the ability of "ready-to-use" topical vehicles based on alkyl polyglucoside-mixed emulsifier (with/without co-solvent modifications) to replace the conventionally used pharmacopoeial bases (e.g., non-ionic hydrophilic cream) in compounding practice. For this purpose, considering the regulatory efforts to establish alternative, scientifically valid methods for evaluating therapeutic equivalence of topical semisolids, we performed a comparative assessment of microstructure, selected critical quality attributes (CQAs) and in vitro/in vivo product performances, by utilizing aceclofenac as a model drug. The differences in composition between investigated samples have imposed remarkable variances in monitored CQAs (particularly in the amount of aceclofenac dissolved, rheological properties and water distribution mode), reflecting the distinct differences in microstructure formed, as partially observed by polarization microscopy and confocal Raman spectral imaging. Although not fully indicative of the in vivo performances, in vitro release data (vertical diffusion vs. immersion cells) proved the microstructure peculiarities, asserting the rheological properties as decisive factor for obtained liberation profiles. Contrary, in vitro permeation results obtained using pig ear epidermis correlated well with in vivo dermatopharmacokinetic data and distinguished unequivocally between tested formulations, emphasizing the importance of skin/vehicle interactions. In summary, suggested multi-faceted approach can provide adequate proof on topical semisolids therapeutic equivalence or lack thereof. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. In situ prebiotics: enzymatic release of galacto-rhamnogalacturonan from potato pulp in vivo in the gastrointestinal tract of the weaning piglet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Jensen, Tim Kåre; Meyer, Anne S.

    2015-01-01

    Prebiotics may be efficient for prevention of intestinal infections in humans and animals by increasing the levels of beneficial bacteria and thereby improving gut health. Using purified prebiotics may however not be cost-effective in the livestock production industry. Instead, prebiotic fibres may...... be released directly in the gastro-intestinal tract by feeding enzymes with a suitable substrate and allowing the prebiotics to be produced in situ. Using low doses, 0.03 % enzyme-to-substrate ratio, of the enzymes pectin lyase and polygalacturonase in combination with potato pulp, a low-value industrial by......-product, we show that high molecular weight galacto-rhamnogalacturonan can be solubilized in the stomach of weaning piglets. The release of this fiber is in the order of 22–38 % of the theoretical amount, achieved within 20 min. The catalysis takes place mainly in the stomach of the animal...

  7. TLR2 and TLR4 signaling pathways are required for recombinant Brucella abortus BCSP31-induced cytokine production, functional upregulation of mouse macrophages, and the Th1 immune response in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jia-Yun; Liu, Yuan; Gao, Xiao-Xue; Gao, Xiang; Cai, Hong

    2014-09-01

    Brucella abortus is a zoonotic Gram-negative pathogen that causes brucelosis in ruminants and humans. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) recognize Brucella abortus and initiate antigen-presenting cell activities that affect both innate and adaptive immunity. In this study, we focused on recombinant Brucella cell-surface protein 31 (rBCSP31) to determine its effects on mouse macrophages. Our results demonstrated that rBCSP31 induced TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-12p40 production, which depended on the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) by stimulating the rapid phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and the activation of transcription factor NF-κB in macrophages. In addition, continuous exposure (>24 h) of RAW264.7 cells to rBCSP31 significantly enhanced IFN-γ-induced expression of MHC-II and the ability to present rBCSP31 peptide to CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, we found that rBCSP31 could interact with both TLR2 and TLR4. The rBCSP31-induced cytokine production by macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice was lower than that from C57BL/6 macrophages, and the activation of NF-κB and MAPKs was attenuated in macrophages from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. In addition, CD4(+) T cells from C57BL/6 mice immunized with rBCSP31 produced higher levels of IFN-γ and IL-2 compared with CD4(+) T cells from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Macrophages from immunized C57BL/6 mice produced higher levels of IL-12p40 than those from TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice. Furthermore, immunization with rBCSP31 provided better protection in C57BL/6 mice than in TLR2(-/-) and TLR4(-/-) mice after B. abortus 2308 challenge. These results indicate that rBCSP31 is a TLR2 and TLR4 agonist that induces cytokine production, upregulates macrophage function and induces the Th1 immune response.

  8. Phytantriol and glyceryl monooleate cubic liquid crystalline phases as sustained-release oral drug delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs II. In-vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tri-Hung; Hanley, Tracey; Porter, Christopher J H; Larson, Ian; Boyd, Ben J

    2010-07-01

    Lipid-based liquid crystals formed from phytantriol (PHY) and glyceryl monooleate (GMO) retain their cubic-phase structure on dilution in physiologically relevant simulated gastrointestinal media, suggesting their potential application as sustained-release drug-delivery systems for poorly water-soluble drugs. In this study the potential of PHY and GMO to serve as sustained-release lipid vehicles for a model poorly-water-soluble drug, cinnarizine, was assessed and compared to that of an aqueous suspension formulation. Small-angle X-ray scattering was used to confirm the nanostructure of the liquid-crystalline matrix in the presence of the selected model drug, cinnarizine. Oral bioavailability studies were conducted in rats, and disposition of lipid and drug in segments of the gastrointestinal tract was determined over time. Differences in the digestibility and stability of formulations under digestion conditions were investigated using an in-vitro lipolysis model. The oral bioavailability of cinnarizine using the PHY formulation was 41%, compared to 19% for the GMO formulation and 6% for an aqueous suspension. The PHY formulation provided a T(max) for cinnarizine of 33 h, with absorption apparent up to 55 h after administration. In contrast, the T(max) for the GMO formulation was only 5 h. The PHY formulation was retained in the stomach for extended periods of time, with 56% of lipid remaining in the stomach after 24 h, in contrast to less than 1% of the GMO formulation after 8 h, suggesting that gastric retention was a key aspect of the prolonged period of absorption, which correlated with the formulations' relative susceptibility to in-vitro lipolysis and degradation. PHY provides a dramatic sustained-release effect for cinnarizine on oral administration, which is linked to gastric retention of the formulation and its ability to resist digestive processing. Poorly digested liquid crystal lipid formulations therefore offer a novel class of sustained-release

  9. Development and Optimization of Gastro-Retentive Controlled-Release Tablet of Calcium-Disodium Edentate and its In Vivo Gamma Scintigraphic Evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar, Neeraj; Soni, Sandeep; Singh, Thakuri; Kumar, Amit; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Bhatnagar, Aseem; Mittal, Gaurav

    2015-01-01

    Medical management of heavy metal toxicity, including radioactive ones, is a cause for concern because of their increased use in energy production, healthcare, and mining. Though chelating agents like EDTA and DTPA in parenteral form are available, no suitable oral formulation is there that can trap ingested heavy metal toxicants in the stomach itself, preventing their systemic absorption. The objective of the present study was to develop and optimize gastro-retentive controlled-release table...

  10. Tablets compressed with gastric floating pellets coated with acrylic resin for gastro retention and sustained release of famotidine: in-vitro and in-vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaole; Jiang, Yingchun; Zhang, Huiting; Wu, Zhenghong

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to prepare a disintegrating gastric floating tablet composed of floating pellets coated with acrylic resin to prolong the gastric residence time and increase the oral bioavailability of famotidine. The gastric floating pellets containing famotidine, stearyl alcohol and microcrystalline cellulose (1 : 10 : 1) were prepared by extrusion-spheronization process and coated with acrylic resin, then compressed into tablets with Avicel PH 301 pellets and cross-linked polyvinylpyrrolidone. The coating weight, volume ratio of Eudragit RL30 D and RS30 D and solid content of coating fluid were optimized by Box-Behnken design. In 0.1 M HCl, tablets can immediately disintegrate into pellets which can remain floating and sustained drug releasing over 12 h. The AUC0-∞ of famotidine gastric floating pellets (7776.52 ± 1065.93 h ng/ml) administered into rats was significantly higher than that of marketed rapid release tablets Xingfading® (Xingyi, Shanghai, China) (4166.23 ± 312.43 h ng/ml), while the relative bioavailability was 187.01 ± 22.81%. The experimental results indicated that the optimized formulation did offer a new gastro retention and sustained release approach to enhance the oral absorption of famotidine. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  11. An in vitro-in vivo correlation study for nifedipine immediate release capsules administered with water, alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages: Impact of in vitro dissolution media and hydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercuri, A; Fares, R; Bresciani, M; Fotaki, N

    2016-02-29

    The impact of hydrodynamics and media composition on nifedipine dissolution profile from IR (immediate release) soft capsules was investigated using dissolution apparatus USP1, USP2, USP3 and USP4 (United State Pharmacopoeia). Media composition was varied in terms of pH and content, to mimic the dosage form intake with water or non-alcoholic beverages (orange juice) and alcoholic beverages (orange juice/ethanol mixture (47% v/v)). Through construction of in vitro-in vivo correlations (IVIVC) with corresponding in vivo data from the literature, it was possible to evaluate the in vitro conditions that are likely to simulate the in vivo formulation behaviour. Both linear and nonlinear correlations were obtained depending on experimental set-ups. Testing of 20mg nifedipine capsules in FaSSGFst (Fasted State Simulated Gastric Fluid pH 1.6; water administration) produced IVIVC with the USP3 (after time scaling) and USP4 apparatus. IVIVC were obtained for USP2, USP3 and USP4 in FaSSGFoj (Fasted State Simulated Gastric Fluid pH 3.4; orange juice administration). Linear and nonlinear correlations were obtained with the USP1, USP2 and USP3 apparatus when testing the capsules in FaSSGFoj/EtOH (orange juice/ethanol administration). This study highlighted that selection of physiologically relevant dissolution set-ups is critical for predicting the in vivo impact of formulations co-administration with water, non-alcoholic and alcoholic beverages. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of VMAT2 inhibitors lobeline and GZ-793A on methamphetamine-induced changes in dopamine release, metabolism and synthesis in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Andrew C.; Neugebauer, Nichole M; Zheng, Guangrong; Crooks, Peter A.; Dwoskin, Linda P.; Bardo, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2) inhibitors reduce methamphetamine (METH) reward in rats. The current study determined the effects of VMAT2 inhibitors lobeline (LOB; 1 or 3 mg/kg) and N-(1,2R-dihydroxylpropyl)-2,6-cis-di(4-methoxyphenethyl)piperidine hydrochloride (GZ-793A; 15 or 30 mg/kg) on METH-induced (0.5 mg/kg, SC) changes in extracellular dopamine (DA) and its metabolite dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the reward-relevant nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell using in vivo micro...

  13. Effects of unilateral 6-OHDA lesions on [3H]-N-propylnorapomorphine binding in striatum ex vivo and vulnerability to amphetamine-evoked dopamine release in rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Palner, Mikael; Kjaerby, Celia; Knudsen, Gitte M

    2011-01-01

    in a preferential increase in agonist binding, and a lesser competition from residual dopamine to the agonist binding. To test this hypothesis we used autoradiography to measure [(3)H]NPA and [(3)H]raclopride binding sites in hemi-parkinsonian rats with unilateral 6-OHDA lesions, with and without amphetamine...... challenge. Unilateral lesions were associated with a more distinct increase in [(3)H]NPA binding ex vivo than was seen for [(3)H]raclopride binding in vitro. Furthermore, this preferential asymmetry in [(3)H]NPA binding was more pronounced in amphetamine treated rats. We consequently predict that agonist...

  14. Activation of monocytes and cytokine production in patients with peripheral atherosclerosis obliterans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lastória Sidney

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arterial peripheral disease is a condition caused by the blocked blood flow resulting from arterial cholesterol deposits within the arms, legs and aorta. Studies have shown that macrophages in atherosclerotic plaque are highly activated, which makes these cells important antigen-presenting cells that develop a specific immune response, in which LDLox is the inducing antigen. As functional changes of cells which participate in the atherogenesis process may occur in the peripheral blood, the objectives of the present study were to evaluate plasma levels of anti-inflammatory and inflammatory cytokines including TNF-α, IFN-γ, interleukin-6 (IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β in patients with peripheral arteriosclerosis obliterans, to assess the monocyte activation level in peripheral blood through the ability of these cells to release hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and to develop fungicidal activity against Candida albicans (C. albicans in vitro. Methods TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-6, IL-10 and TGF-β from plasma of patients were detected by ELISA. Monocyte cultures activated in vitro with TNF-alpha and IFN-gamma were evaluated by fungicidal activity against C. albicans by culture plating and Colony Forming Unit (CFU recovery, and by H2O2 production. Results Plasma levels of all cytokines were significantly higher in patients compared to those detected in control subjects. Control group monocytes did not release substantial levels of H2O2 in vitro, but these levels were significantly increased after activation with IFN-γ and TNF-α. Monocytes of patients, before and after activation, responded less than those of control subjects. Similar results were found when fungicidal activity was evaluated. The results seen in patients were always significantly smaller than among control subjects. Conclusions: The results revealed an unresponsiveness of patient monocytes in vitro probably due to the high activation process occurring in vivo as corroborated by high

  15. Cytokines: abnormalities in major depression and implications for pharmacological treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Brien, Sinead M

    2012-02-03

    The role of cytokines in depression was first considered when the cytokine interferon resulted in "sickness behaviour", the symptoms of which are similar to those of major depression. The latter is associated with an increase in pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 (IL-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha). These cytokines are potent modulators of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) which produces heightened hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity characterized by increases in ACTH and cortisol, both of which are reported elevated in major depression. Antidepressant treatment has immunomodulatory effects with increases in the production of IL-10, which is an anti-inflammatory cytokine. This review based on a Medline search from 1980-2003, focuses on the evidence available of cytokine changes in acute stress, chronic stress and major depression. It examines the effects of antidepressant treatment on immune parameters in both animal models and clinical trials. We suggest that future antidepressants may target the immune system by either blocking the actions of pro-inflammatory cytokines or increasing the production of anti-inflammatory cytokines.

  16. Coordinate cytokine regulatory sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazer, Kelly A.; Rubin, Edward M.; Loots, Gabriela G.

    2005-05-10

    The present invention provides CNS sequences that regulate the cytokine gene expression, expression cassettes and vectors comprising or lacking the CNS sequences, host cells and non-human transgenic animals comprising the CNS sequences or lacking the CNS sequences. The present invention also provides methods for identifying compounds that modulate the functions of CNS sequences as well as methods for diagnosing defects in the CNS sequences of patients.

  17. Cytokines in human leptospirosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Anna; Kotrotsiou, Tzimoula

    2015-12-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonotic disease with increased public health concern. Cytokines produced in response to the infection with pathogenic leptospires have been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of the disease. The aim of the study was to measure and evaluate the levels of 27 cytokines in patients with acute leptospirosis. The levels of 27 cytokines were measured from 42 acute leptospirosis cases; 47 samples were obtained from severe cases. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS. IL-6, IL-8, GM-CSF, IP-10, MCP-1, and VEGF levels differed significantly between the severe cases and the control group, while GM-CSF levels differed significantly between the mild cases and the control group (pleptospirosis could be the basis for immunotherapeutic targets, especially for the severe cases in which antibiotic treatment is not enough. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. A systemic evaluation of drug in acrylic pressure sensitive adhesive patch in vitro and in vivo: The roles of intermolecular interaction and adhesive mobility variation in drug controlled release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chao; Quan, Peng; Li, Shanshan; Zhao, Yongshan; Fang, Liang

    2017-04-28

    Though acrylic pressure sensitive adhesives (PSAs) are widely used in transdermal drug delivery system, molecular details of drug-PSA interactions, PSA molecular mobility variations and their influences on drug skin permeation are unclear. In this study, three classes of acrylic PSAs containing hydroxyl (AAOH), carboxyl (AACOOH) and non-functional group (AAnone) were synthesized. Their abilities of controlling drug release were evaluated using propranolol (PRO) and zaltoprofen (ZAL) in vitro and in vivo. Interaction details were identified by FT-IR, solid-state NMR and molecular modeling. Thermodynamic activity of drug and strength of drug-PSA interaction were characterized using miscibility study. PSA mobility was characterized using thermal analysis and rheology study. Thus, ionic interaction reduced the thermodynamic activity of PRO and mobility of AACOOH, which made PRO-AACOOH obtain a significant lower bioavailability (11.8±0.7%) than these of PRO-AAnone (40.7±2.5%) and PRO-AAOH (42.3±2.9%). Though thermodynamic activity of ZAL in AACOOH was lower than that in AAOH due to the hydrogen bonding, bioavailability of ZAL-AAOH (19.0±4.1%) exhibited no significant difference with ZAL-AACOOH (15.4±2.8%), mainly because AAOH mobility was decreased by ZAL. In conclusion, the strength, types and involved functional groups of drug-PSA interactions were identified. On this basis, it was found that different control patterns of drug release were not only caused by the thermodynamic or kinetic hindrance effects of drug-PSA interactions, but also influenced by the interactions introduced PSA mobility variations, which was an innovative mechanism of controlled release in transdermal patch. The conclusions extended our understanding about the mechanism of controlled drug release of drug-in-adhesive patch. In addition, they contributed to the design of TDDS and custom acrylic PSAs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Sustained release of bactericidal concentrations of penicillin in the pleural space via an antibiotic-eluting pigtail catheter coated with electrospun nanofibers: results from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Yin-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Liu, Kuo-Sheng; Wang, Yi-Chuan; Wang, Chih-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate intrapleural drug concentrations caused by poor penetration of systemic antibiotics into the pleural cavity is a major cause of treatment failure in empyema. Herein, we describe a novel antibiotic-eluting pigtail catheter coated with electrospun nanofibers used for the sustained release of bactericidal concentrations of penicillin in the pleural space. Electrospun nanofibers prepared using polylactide-polyglycolide copolymer and penicillin G sodium dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol were used to coat the surface of an Fr6 pigtail catheter. The in vitro patterns of drug release were tested by placing the catheter in phosphate-buffered saline. In vivo studies were performed using rabbits treated with penicillin either intrapleurally (Group 1, 20 mg delivered through the catheter) or systemically (Group 2, intramuscular injection, 10 mg/kg). Penicillin concentrations in the serum and pleural fluid were then measured and compared. In vitro studies revealed a burst release of penicillin (10% of the total dose) occurring in the first 24 hours, followed by a sustained release in the subsequent 30 days. Intrapleural drug levels were significantly higher in Group 1 than in Group 2 (Ppenicillin concentrations remained above the minimum inhibitory concentration breakpoint throughout the entire study period. In contrast, serum penicillin levels were significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (P<0.001). Notably, all Group 2 rabbits showed signs of systemic toxicity (paralytic ileus and weight loss). We conclude that our antibiotic-eluting catheter may serve as a novel therapeutic option to treat empyema.

  20. LPS from bovine serum albumin drives TNF-α release during ex-vivo placenta perfusion experiments, contaminates the perfusion system but can be effectively removed by oxidative cleaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasanthan, T; Rochow, N; Mian, F; Codini, T; DeFrance, B; Fusch, G; Samiee-Zafarghandy, S; Fusch, C

    2014-12-01

    The dual ex-vivo perfusion of human placental tissue is useful to study inflammatory pathways. We found significant TNF-α release in negative controls similar in concentration to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated placentas. The aim of the current study was to (i) identify sources driving TNF-α release and (ii) develop an approach to control for it. (i) To determine sources leading to TNF-α release, solutions frequently circulated through the perfusion system and perfusion media with different bovine serum albumin (BSA) quality were exposed to mouse macrophage cell lines (RAW264.7) and subsequently measured for TNF-α expression. (ii) To assess memory effects and validate cleaning procedures, sham perfusion experiments were conducted either in the presence or absence of exogenous LPS, in new tubing that was contaminated, cleaned and analyzed for the effectiveness of LPS removal. Oxidative and acid-base cleaning were tested for their effectiveness to reduce LPS contamination. TNF-α release, observed in negative control experiments, was attributed to the use of LPS-contaminated BSA as well as inadequate cleaning of the perfusion system. Once introduced in the perfusion system, LPS accumulated and created a memory effect. Oxidative but not acid-base depyrogenation effectively reduced LPS levels to concentrations that were in accordance with FDA guidelines (contamination of the placenta perfusion model could have confounding effects on experimental outcomes leading to misinterpretation of data. To circumvent LPS contamination LPS-free BSA and oxidative depyrogenation cleaning techniques should be implemented in future placental perfusion studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone d,l polylactide nanoparticles (TRH-NPs) protect against glutamate toxicity in vitro and kindling development in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Michael C; Aldouby, Yanir; Domb, Abraham J; Kubek, Michael J

    2009-12-15

    Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) is reported to have anticonvulsant effects in animal seizure models and certain intractable epileptic patients. However, its duration of action is limited by rapid tissue metabolism and the blood brain barrier. Direct nose-brain delivery of neuropeptides in sustained-release biodegradable nanoparticles (NPs) is a promising mode of therapy for enhancing CNS bioavailability. Bioactivity/neuroprotection of d,l polylactide nanoparticles containing TRH was assessed against glutamate toxicity in cultured rat fetal hippocampal neurons. Subsequently, we utilized the kindling model of temporal lobe epilepsy to determine if intranasal administration of nanoparticles containing TRH (TRH-NPs) could inhibit kindling development. Animals received daily treatments of either blank (control) or TRH-NPs for 7 days before initiation of kindling. On day 8 and each day thereafter until either fully kindled or until day 20, the animals received daily treatments before receiving a kindling stimulus 3 h later. Afterdischarge duration (ADD) was assessed via electroencephalographs recorded from electrodes in the basolateral amygdalae and behavioral seizure stereotypy was simultaneously recorded digitally. Intranasal application of TRH-NPs resulted in a significant reduction in seizure ADD as kindling progressed, while the number of stimulations required to reach stage V seizures and to become permanently kindled was significantly greater in TRH-NP-treated subjects. Additionally, delay to clonus was significantly prolonged while clonus duration was reduced indicating a less severe seizure in TRH-NP-treated subjects. Our results provide proof of principle that intranasal delivery of sustained-release TRH-NPs may be neuroprotective and can be utilized to suppress seizures and perhaps epileptogenesis.

  2. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Coch

    Full Text Available Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR or RIG-I like helicases (RLH are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4 was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  3. A human in vitro whole blood assay to predict the systemic cytokine response to therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coch, Christoph; Lück, Christian; Schwickart, Anna; Putschli, Bastian; Renn, Marcel; Höller, Tobias; Barchet, Winfried; Hartmann, Gunther; Schlee, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Therapeutic oligonucleotides including siRNA and immunostimulatory ligands of Toll-like receptors (TLR) or RIG-I like helicases (RLH) are a promising novel class of drugs. They are in clinical development for a broad spectrum of applications, e.g. as adjuvants in vaccines and for the immunotherapy of cancer. Species-specific immune activation leading to cytokine release is characteristic for therapeutic oligonucleotides either as an unwanted side effect or intended pharmacology. Reliable in vitro tests designed for therapeutic oligonucleotides are therefore urgently needed in order to predict clinical efficacy and to prevent unexpected harmful effects in clinical development. To serve this purpose, we here established a human whole blood assay (WBA) that is fast and easy to perform. Its response to synthetic TLR ligands (R848: TLR7/8, LPS: TLR4) was on a comparable threshold to the more time consuming peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) based assay. By contrast, the type I IFN profile provoked by intravenous CpG-DNA (TLR9 ligand) in humans in vivo was more precisely replicated in the WBA than in stimulated PBMC. Since Heparin and EDTA, but not Hirudin, displaced oligonucleotides from their delivery agent, only Hirudin qualified as the anticoagulant to be used in the WBA. The Hirudin WBA exhibited a similar capacity as the PBMC assay to distinguish between TLR7-activating and modified non-stimulatory siRNA sequences. RNA-based immunoactivating TLR7/8- and RIG-I-ligands induced substantial amounts of IFN-α in the Hirudin-WBA dependent on delivery agent used. In conclusion, we present a human Hirudin WBA to determine therapeutic oligonucleotide-induced cytokine release during preclinical development that can readily be performed and offers a close reflection of human cytokine response in vivo.

  4. Pharmacokinetics of Abamectin/Levamisole Combination in a Medium Chain Mono and Diglyceride-Based Vehicle and an In Vitro Release and In Vitro In Vivo Correlation Study for Levamisole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Peyami; Sun, Jianguo; Razzak, Majid; Tucker, Ian G

    2017-05-01

    A combination of lipophilic and hydrophilic drugs in a single solution is a challenge due to their different physicochemical properties. In vitro and in vivo release studies are useful to optimize this solution. The in vitro (Franz diffusion cell) release rate of levamisole phosphate from an isotropic vehicle of medium chain mono and diglycerides (MCMDG) was significantly slower than the release from water. The injectable solution of the isotropic MCMDG-based system was prepared with 13.65% of levamisole phosphate and 0.5% of abamectin. Two milliliters/50 kg (0.04 ml/kg) was injected subcutaneously into five healthy adult sheep. None of the animals showed the signs of inflammation at injection site. Both drugs were assayed using validated HPLC methods. The absorption rates for levamisole (0.71 ± 0.32 h -1 ) and abamectin (0.24 ± 0.08 day -1 ) from the MCMDG-based formulation were considerably slower than those of other studies conducted on the commercial products. The t max was delayed for levamisole (2.20 ± 0.45 h) and abamectin (4.20 ± 1.64 days) compared with those in published studies. Longer MRT values for levamisole (6.14 ± 1.14 h) and abamectin (8.80 ± 1.39 days) were found in this study compared to those reported. A correlation was observed between in vivo fraction absorbed and in vitro fraction released for levamisole phosphate in the MCMDG-based formulation. The injection vehicle of isotropic MCMDG-based system delayed the subcutaneous absorption of levamisole phosphate and abamectin compared to the commercial subcutaneous injection products for levamisole and abamectin. Notably, this isotropic MCMDG-based vehicle system is prepared with a combination of two drugs with different physicochemical properties.

  5. In vivo evaluation of the potential neurotoxicity of aerosols released from mechanical stress of nano-TiO2 additived paints in mice chronically exposed by inhalation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manixay, S.; Delaby, S.; Gaie-Levrel, F.; Wiart, M.; Motzkus, C.; Bencsik, A.

    2017-06-01

    Engineered Nanomaterials (ENM) provide technical and specific benefits due to their physical-chemical properties at the nanometer scale. For instance, many ENM are used to improve products in the building industry. Nanoscaled titanium dioxide (TiO2) is one of the most used ENM in this industry. Incorporated in different matrix, cement, glass, paints… TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs) provide the final product with anti-UV, air purification and self-cleaning properties, thanks to their photocatalytic activity. However, ageing processes of such products, as photocatalytic paints, during a mechanical stress have been shown to release TiO2 NPs from this matrix associated with sanding dust. Thus, workers who sand painted walls could be exposed to TiO2 NPs through inhalation. As inhalation may lead to a translocation of particulate matter to the brain via olfactory or trigeminal nerves, there is an urgent need for evaluating a potential neurotoxicity. In order to provide new knowledge on this topic, we developed a dedicated experimental set-up using a rodent model exposed via inhalation. The aerosol released from a mechanical stress of photocatalytic paints containing TiO2 NPs was characterized and coupled to an exposition chamber containing group of mice free to move and chronically exposed (2 hours per day for 5 days a week during 8 weeks).

  6. Polymeric mechanical amplifiers of immune cytokine-mediated apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J.; Webster, Jamie; Chung, Amanda; Guimarães, Pedro P. G.; Khan, Omar F.; Langer, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Physical forces affect tumour growth, progression and metastasis. Here, we develop polymeric mechanical amplifiers that exploit in vitro and in vivo physical forces to increase immune cytokine-mediated tumour cell apoptosis. Mechanical amplifiers, consisting of biodegradable polymeric particles tethered to the tumour cell surface via polyethylene glycol linkers, increase the apoptotic effect of an immune cytokine on tumour cells under fluid shear exposure by as much as 50% compared with treatment under static conditions. We show that targeted polymeric particles delivered to tumour cells in vivo amplify the apoptotic effect of a subsequent treatment of immune cytokine, reduce circulating tumour cells in blood and overall tumour cell burden by over 90% and reduce solid tumour growth in combination with the antioxidant resveratrol. The work introduces a potentially new application for a broad range of micro- and nanoparticles to maximize receptor-mediated signalling and function in the presence of physical forces.

  7. Topical piroxicam in vitro release and in vivo anti-inflammatory and analgesic effects from palm oil esters-based nanocream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulkarim, Muthanna F; Abdullah, Ghassan Z; Chitneni, Mallikarjun; Salman, Ibrahim M; Ameer, Omar Z; Yam, Mun F; Mahdi, Elrashid S; Sattar, Munavvar A; Basri, Mahiran; Noor, Azmin M

    2010-11-04

    During recent years, there has been growing interest in use of topical vehicle systems to assist in drug permeation through the skin. Drugs of interest are usually those that are problematic when given orally, such as piroxicam, a highly effective anti-inflammatory, anti-pyretic, and analgesic, but with the adverse effect of causing gastrointestinal ulcers. The present study investigated the in vitro and in vivo pharmacodynamic activity of a newly synthesized palm oil esters (POEs)-based nanocream containing piroxicam for topical delivery. A ratio of 25:37:38 of POEs: external phase: surfactants (Tween 80:Span 20, in a ratio 80:20), respectively was selected as the basic composition for the production of a nanocream with ideal properties. Various nanocreams were prepared using phosphate-buffered saline as the external phase at three different pH values. The abilities of these formulae to deliver piroxicam were assessed in vitro using a Franz diffusion cell fitted with a cellulose acetate membrane and full thickness rat skin. These formulae were also evaluated in vivo by comparing their anti-inflammatory and analgesic activities with those of the currently marketed gel. After eight hours, nearly 100% of drug was transferred through the artificial membrane from the prepared formula F3 (phosphate-buffered saline at pH 7.4 as the external phase) and the marketed gel. The steady-state flux through rat skin of all formulae tested was higher than that of the marketed gel. Pharmacodynamically, nanocream formula F3 exhibited the highest anti- inflammatory and analgesic effects as compared with the other formulae. The nanocream containing the newly synthesized POEs was successful for trans-dermal delivery of piroxicam.

  8. Inflammatory Cytokines as Preclinical Markers of Adverse Responses to Chemical Stressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: The in vivo cytokine response to chemical stressors is a promising mainstream tool used to assess potential systemic inflammation and immune function changes. Notably, new instrumentation and statistical analysis provide the selectivity and sensitivity to rapidly diff...

  9. Importance of IL-10 and IL-17 cytokines in human asthma as studied ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: ELISPOT assays are an integral part of many clinical trials or basic immune monitoring research projects and detection of cytokines can be used in conjunction with other functional assays to gain a better overall picture of an immune response. Aim: Detection of cytokines secreted by ex vivo stimulated ...

  10. Endotoxin-Induced Inflammation Suppresses the Effect of Melatonin on the Release of LH from the Ovine Pars Tuberalis Explants—Ex Vivo Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolina Wojtulewicz

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The secretion of the hormone melatonin reliably reflects environmental light conditions. Among numerous actions, in seasonal breeders, melatonin may regulate the secretion of the gonadotropins acting via its corresponding receptors occurring in the Pars Tuberalis (PT. However, it was previously found that the secretory activity of the pituitary may be dependent on the immune status of the animal. Therefore, this study was designed to determine the role of melatonin in the modulation of luteinizing hormone (LH secretion from the PT explants collected from saline- and endotoxin-treated ewes in the follicular phase of the oestrous cycle. Twelve Blackhead ewes were sacrificed 3 h after injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 400 ng/kg or saline, and the PTs were collected. Each PT was cut into 4 explants, which were then divided into 4 groups: I, incubated with ‘pure’ medium 199; II, treated with gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH (100 pg/mL; III, treated with melatonin (10 nmol/mL; and IV, incubated with GnRH and melatonin. Melatonin reduced (p < 0.05 GnRH-induced secretion of LH only in the PT from saline-treated ewes. Explants collected from LPS-treated ewes were characterized by lower (p < 0.05 GnRH-dependent response in LH release. It was also found that inflammation reduced the gene expression of the GnRH receptor and the MT1 melatonin receptors in the PT. Therefore, it was shown that inflammation affects the melatonin action on LH secretion from the PT, which may be one of the mechanisms via which immune/inflammatory challenges disturb reproduction processes in animals.

  11. 805-nm diode-laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye for quantification of chorioretinal thermal damage: in-vivo study on a rabbit eye model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordon, Serge R.; Desmettre, Thomas; Devoisselle, Jean-Marie; Begu, Sylvie; Mitchell, Valerie A.

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of retinal thermal damage assessment in a rabbit eye model by using laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye. After anethesia, thermosensitive liposomes (DSPC) loaded with 5,6- Carboxyfluorescein were injected intravenously to pigmented rabbits. Retinal photocoagulation were performed with a 810 nm diode laser (P equals 100 to 400 mW, (Phi) equals 500 micrometer, ls). Fluorescence measurements in the area of the laser exposures were then realized with a digitized angiograph. Histology was performed on retinal tissue and adjacent ares. Fluorescent spots were observed for fluences ranging from 50 plus or minus 10 J/cm2 to 210 plus or minus 10 J/cm2. The fluorescence intensity increased linearly with the fluence and reached a plateau at 150 plus or minus 10 J/cm2. The fluorescence intensity was correlated to the maximum temperature at the center of the laser spot with a linear increase from 42 plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius to 65 plus or minus 3 degrees Celsius. The chorioretinal thermal damage quantified by histology was correlated to temperature. These results are in agreement with our two previous studies with DSPC liposomes for temperature measurements in a tissue model and then in a vascular model. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the possibility of a laser-induced release of liposome-encapsulated dye for a quantification of diode laser induced thermal damage in ophthalmology. Such a method could be useful for a real-time monitoring of laser photocoagulation for condition such as choroidal neovessels when a precise thermal damage is required near the foveolar area.

  12. Release of iC3b from apoptotic tumor cells induces tolerance by binding to immature dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Jan; Klempp, Christoph; Büchler, Markus W; Märten, Angela

    2006-01-01

    Chemo- as well as immunotherapeutical approaches induce apoptosis in tumor cells. Apoptotic cells are known to activate homologous complement and to be opsonized with iC3b. Since maturation of dendritic cells (DC) can be inhibited by binding of iC3b to the complement receptor 3 (CR3, CD11b/CD18) and because immature DC induce tolerance, we investigated the induction of tolerance after pulsing DC with apoptotic cells in the presence or absence of native serum. Apoptosis in pancreatic carcinoma cells was induced either by heat-stress, chemotherapy or anti-Her2 antibody. Monocyte-derived DC were pulsed with apoptotic cells with or without native serum. DC were analyzed for the maturation state by flow cytometry and the cytotoxic activity was determined. Tolerance was prevented by addition of substances such as anti CD11b or N-acetyl-D-Glucosamine (NADG) which block iC3b binding to CR3. Furthermore, binding of iC3b from apoptotic cells to DC was blocked in a syngeneic pancreatic carcinoma mouse model. All of the former strategies for apoptosis induction resulted in iC3b release. Pulsing DC with apoptotic cells in the presence of serum prevents maturation of DC and induces finally tolerance. This tolerance could be prevented almost completely by blocking the interaction of iC3b with the CR3 receptor. This could be shown as well in an immunocompetent mouse model. Chemo- as well as immunotherapeutical approaches induce apoptosis in tumor cells. Release of iC3b from apoptotic tumor cells prevents fully maturation of DC and immature DC induce antigen-specific silencing or tolerance. Blocking of iC3b-binding could mostly prevent this effect.

  13. Physiological studies in heterozygous calcium sensing receptor (CaSR gene-ablated mice confirm that the CaSR regulates calcitonin release in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Christopher S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR regulates serum calcium by suppressing secretion of parathyroid hormone; it also regulates renal tubular calcium excretion. Inactivating mutations of CaSR raise serum calcium and reduce urine calcium excretion. Thyroid C-cells (which make calcitonin express CaSR and may, therefore, be regulated by it. Since calcium stimulates release of calcitonin, the higher blood calcium caused by inactivation of CaSR should increase serum calcitonin, unless CaSR mutations alter the responsiveness of calcitonin to calcium. To demonstrate regulatory effects of CaSR on calcitonin release, we studied calcitonin responsiveness to calcium in normal and CaSR heterozygous-ablated (Casr+/- mice. Casr+/- mice have hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria, and live normal life spans. Each mouse received either 500 μl of normal saline or one of two doses of elemental calcium (500 μmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg by intraperitoneal injection. Ionized calcium was measured at baseline and 10 minutes, and serum calcitonin was measured on the 10 minute sample. Results At baseline, Casr+/- mice had a higher blood calcium, and in response to the two doses of elemental calcium, had greater increments and peak levels of ionized calcium than their wild type littermates. Despite significantly higher ionized calcium levels, the calcitonin levels of Casr+/- mice were consistently lower than wild type at any ionized calcium level, indicating that the dose-response curve of calcitonin to increases in ionized calcium had been significantly blunted or shifted to the right in Casr+/- mice. Conclusions These results confirm that the CaSR is a physiological regulator of calcitonin; therefore, in response to increases in ionized calcium, the CaSR inhibits parathyroid hormone secretion and stimulates calcitonin secretion.

  14. Enhancement of wound closure by modifying dual release patterns of stromal-derived cell factor-1 and a macrophage recruitment agent from gelatin hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yang-Hee; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2017-11-01

    The objective of the present study is to evaluate the effects of the release patterns of stromal derived factor (SDF)-1 and sphingosine-1 phosphate agonist (SEW2871), used as MSC and macrophage recruitment agents, on the wound closure of diabetic mouse skin defects. To achieve different release patterns, hydrogels were prepared using two types of gelatin with isoelectric points (IEP) of 5 and 9, into which SDF-1 and SEW2871 were then incorporated in various combinations. When the hydrogels incorporating SDF-1 and SEW2871 were applied into wound defects of diabetic mice, the number of MSCs and macrophages recruited to the defects and the levels of pro- and anti- inflammatory cytokines were found to be dependent on the release profiles of SDF-1 and SEW2871. Of particular interest was the case of a rapid release of SDF-1 combined with a controlled release of SEW2871. This resulted in a higher number of M2 macrophages and gene expression levels of anti-inflammatory cytokines 3 days after implantation and faster wound closure than when pairing the controlled release of SDF-1 with a rapid release of SEW2871. Therefore, the present study demonstrates that different release patterns of SDF-1 and SEW2871 can enhance the in vivo recruitment of MSCs and macrophages, and can promote skin wound closure through the modulation of inflammation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Early release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from neurons in experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Qing; Wu, Wei; Hu, Yang-Chun; Li, Hua; Zhang, Dingding; Li, Song; Li, Wei; Li, Wei-De; Ma, Biao; Zhu, Jian-Hong; Zhou, Meng-Liang; Hang, Chun-Hua

    2014-06-12

    Translocation of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) from nucleus could trigger inflammation. Extracellular HMGB1 up-regulates inflammatory response in sepsis as a late mediator. However, little was known about its role in subarachnoid hemorrhage-inducible inflammation, especially in the early stage. This study aims to identify whether HMGB1 translocation occurred early after SAH and also to clarify the potential role of HMGB1 in brain injury following SAH. Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were randomly divided into sham group and SAH groups at 2 h, 12 h and on day 1, day 2. SAH groups suffered experimental subarachnoid hemorrhage by injection of 0.3 ml autoblood into the pre-chiasmatic cistern. Rats injected by recombinant HMGB1(rHMGB1) solution were divided into four groups according to different time points. Cultured neurons were assigned into control group and four hemoglobin (Hb) incubated groups. Mixed glial cells were cultured and stimulated in medium from neurons incubated by Hb. HMGB1 expression is measured by western blot analysis, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. Downstream nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) subunit P65 and inflammatory factor Interleukin 1β (IL-1β) were measured by western blot and real-time PCR, respectively. Brain injury was evaluated by cleaved caspase-3 staining. Our results demonstrated HMGB1 translocation occurred as early as 2 h after experimental SAH with mRNA and protein level increased. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence results indicated cytosolic HMGB1 was mainly located in neurons while translocated HMGB1 could also be found in some microglia. After subarachnoid injection of rHMGB1, NF-κB, downstream inflammatory response and cleaved caspase-3 were up-regulated in the cortex compared to the saline control group. In-vitro, after Hb incubation, HMGB1 was also rapidly released from neurons to medium. Incubation with medium from neurons up-regulated IL-1β in mixed glial

  16. Cytokine expression profile over time in severely burned pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Przkora, Rene; Pereira, Clifford T; Oliveira, Hermes M; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Andreia M C; Jeschke, Marc G

    2006-07-01

    A severe burn leads to hypermetabolism and catabolism resulting in compromised function and structure of essential organs. The massive release of cytokines is implicated in this hypermetabolic response. The aim of the present study was to compare cytokine expression profiles from severely burned children without signs of infections or inhalation injury (n = 19) to the cytokine profiles from normal, noninfected, nonburned children (n = 14). The Bio-Plex suspension array system was used to measure the concentration of 17 cytokines. The expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was maximal during the first week after thermal injury. Significant increases were measured for 15 mediators during the first week after thermal injury: interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p70, IL-13, IL-17, interferon gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (P sepsis. The cytokine concentrations decrease during 5 weeks after burn but remain elevated over nonburned values. Furthermore, the elevation in most serum cytokine levels during the first week after burn may indicate a potential window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention.

  17. Pulp response to high fluoride releasing glass ionomer, silver diamine fluoride, and calcium hydroxide used for indirect pulp treatment: An in-vivo comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atish Korwar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The study aims at determining pulp response of two high fluoride releasing materials silver diamine fluoride (SDF and Type VII glass ionomer cement (GIC when used as indirect pulp treatment (IPT materials. Materials and Methods: Deep Class V cavities were made on four first premolars indicated for extraction for orthodontic reasons. SDF, Type VII GIC, and calcium hydroxide base are given in three premolars, and one is kept control. Premolars were extracted 6 weeks after the procedure and subjected to histopathological examination to determine the pulp response. The results were analyzed using Chi-square test. Results: No inflammatory changes were observed in any of the groups. Significantly more number of specimens in SDF and Type VII GIC groups showed tertiary dentin deposition (TDD when compared to control group. No significant difference was seen in TDD when intergroup comparison was made. Odontoblasts were seen as short cuboidal cells with dense basophilic nucleus in SDF and Type VII GIC group. Conclusion: The study demonstrated TDD inducing ability of SDF and Type VII GIC and also established the biocompatibility when used as IPT materials.

  18. Effect of Sulindac Binary System on In Vitro and In Vivo Release Profiles: An Assessment of Polymer Type and Its Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal A. Shazly

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The bioavailability of sulindac (SDC, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is low due to poor aqueous solubility and poor dissolution rate. For this reason it is necessary to enhance the solubility and enhance dissolution of the drug by dispersing SDC in polyethylene glycols 6000 (PEG 6000 and polyvinyl pyrrolidone 40000 (PVP 40000 matrices using the coevaporation technique. Studying the influence of SDC to polymer ratio on drug content, percent yield, particle size, and in vitro release was performed. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize any change in crystal habit of SDC in the prepared formulae. The anti-inflammatory effect of SDC was studied using the hind paw edema model. It was found that incorporation of SDC in PEG 6000 and PVP 40000 matrices resulted in improving the dissolution rate, which was found to depend on the polymer and its weight ratio of the drug. It is clearly obvious that the dissolution rate was remarkably improved in drug PVP 40000 molecular dispersions when compared to drug PEG 6000 systems. Solid dispersion of SDC in PEG and PVP improved the anti-inflammatory effect of SDC and it was found that formula SDV5 exhibited a more pronounced inhibition of swelling than other formulae.

  19. Effect of Sulindac Binary System on In Vitro and In Vivo Release Profiles: An Assessment of Polymer Type and Its Ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazly, Gamal A

    2016-01-01

    The bioavailability of sulindac (SDC), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is low due to poor aqueous solubility and poor dissolution rate. For this reason it is necessary to enhance the solubility and enhance dissolution of the drug by dispersing SDC in polyethylene glycols 6000 (PEG 6000) and polyvinyl pyrrolidone 40000 (PVP 40000) matrices using the coevaporation technique. Studying the influence of SDC to polymer ratio on drug content, percent yield, particle size, and in vitro release was performed. Differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy were used to characterize any change in crystal habit of SDC in the prepared formulae. The anti-inflammatory effect of SDC was studied using the hind paw edema model. It was found that incorporation of SDC in PEG 6000 and PVP 40000 matrices resulted in improving the dissolution rate, which was found to depend on the polymer and its weight ratio of the drug. It is clearly obvious that the dissolution rate was remarkably improved in drug PVP 40000 molecular dispersions when compared to drug PEG 6000 systems. Solid dispersion of SDC in PEG and PVP improved the anti-inflammatory effect of SDC and it was found that formula SDV5 exhibited a more pronounced inhibition of swelling than other formulae.

  20. * Demineralized Bone Matrix as a Carrier for Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2: Burst Release Combined with Long-Term Binding and Osteoinductive Activity Evaluated In Vitro and In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Elisabeth; Pobloth, Anne-Marie; Bormann, Nicole; Kolarczik, Nicolai; Schmidt-Bleek, Katharina; Schell, Hanna; Schwabe, Philipp; Duda, Georg N; Wildemann, Britt

    2017-12-01

    To allow bone defect regeneration, autologous bone grafting still represents the gold standard. However, autograft harvesting has limitations, including an additional surgery, donor site morbidity, and limited availability. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) would represent an alternative, yet lacks sufficient osteoinductive properties. Combining DBM with a potent agent, such as bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) might be a feasible alternative approach, optimizing an established grafting material with strong osteoinductive properties. A unique mixing device has been developed that enables perioperative handling to reach a homogeneous and standardized paste for bone defect filling. DBM proved in vitro to be a suitable carrier for BMP-2, with a documented release over 56 days at concentrations sufficient to stimulate osteogenic differentiation. At the end of the elution experiment, 56 days, bioactive BMP was still captured within the DBM. Using a sheep drill hole defect model, DBM perioperatively mixed with BMP-2 showed strong osteoinductive properties comparable to those of autologous bone and outnumbering the one of DBM alone or empty defects. Bone defect healing was enabled at diaphyseal and metaphyseal defects and thus BMP-2-doped DBM represented an easy perioperative enriching method and an efficient carrier for BMP-2. With the comparability to the clinical gold standard autologous bone, DBM mixed with BMP-2 might serve as possible alternative grafting material enabling a controlled osteogenic stimulation.

  1. Inflammatory cytokine-associated depression

    OpenAIRE

    Lotrich, Francis E

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory cytokines can sometimes trigger depression in humans, are often associated with depression, and can elicit some behaviors in animals that are homologous to major depression. Moreover, these cytokines can affect monoaminergic and glutamatergic systems, supporting an overlapping pathoetiology with major depression. This suggests that there could be a specific major depression subtype, inflammatory cytokine-associated depression (ICAD), which may require different therapeutic approa...

  2. The effect of pseudomonas exotoxin A on cytokine production in whole blood exposed to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schultz, M. J.; Speelman, P.; Zaat, S. A.; Hack, C. E.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2000-01-01

    To determine the effect of Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (P-ExA) on cytokine production, we studied cytokine release induced by heat-killed P. aeruginosa (HKPA) in human whole blood in the presence or absence of P-ExA. P-ExA (0.01-1 microgram ml(-1)) caused a dose-dependent decrease in

  3. Circulating levels of platelet α-granule cytokines in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Windeløv, Nis Agerlin; Ostrowski, Sisse Rye; Johansson, Per Ingemar

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE AND DESIGN: To elucidate whether platelets differentiate cytokine release following trauma, we prospectively measured three major platelet-derived cytokines in 213 trauma patients on hospital arrival. METHODS: We measured plasma levels of the anti-inflammatory β-thromboglobulins (β...

  4. The cytokines cardiotrophin-like cytokine/cytokine-like factor-1 (CLC/CLF) and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) differ in their receptor specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tormo, Aurélie Jeanne; Letellier, Marie-Claude; Lissilaa, Rami; Batraville, Laurie-Anne; Sharma, Mukut; Ferlin, Walter; Elson, Greg; Crabé, Sandrine; Gauchat, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    Ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF) and cardiotrophin-like cytokine (CLC) are two cytokines with neurotrophic and immunomodulatory activities. CNTF is a cytoplasmic factor believed to be released upon cellular damage, while CLC requires interaction with a soluble cytokine receptor, cytokine-like factor 1 (CLF), to be efficiently secreted. Both cytokines activate a receptor complex comprising the cytokine binding CNTF receptor α (CNTFRα) and two signaling chains namely, leukemia inhibitory factor receptor β (LIFRβ) and gp130. Human CNTF can recruit and activate an alternative receptor in which CNTFRα is substituted by IL-6Rα. As both CNTF and CLC have immune-regulatory activities in mice, we compared their ability to recruit mouse receptors comprising both gp130 and LIFRβ signaling chains and either IL-6Rα or IL-11Rα which, unlike CNTFRα, are expressed by immune cells. Our results indicate that 1) mouse CNTF, like its human homologue, can activate cells expressing gp130/LIFRβ with either CNTFRα or IL-6Rα and, 2) CLC/CLF is more restricted in its specificity in that it activates only the tripartite CNTFR. Several gp130 signaling cytokines influence T helper cell differentiation. We therefore investigated the effect of CNTF on CD4 T cell cytokine production. We observed that CNTF increased the number of IFN-γ producing CD4 T cells. As IFN-γ is considered a mediator of the therapeutic effect of IFN