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Sample records for vivo 31p-nuclear magnetic

  1. Gated in vivo examination of cardiac metabolites with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kantor, H.L.; Briggs, R.W.; Metz, K.R.; Balaban, R.S.

    1986-01-01

    Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the temporal aspects of metabolism of canine heart in vivo. An NMR catheter coil was passed through the jugular vein of a dog into the apex of the right ventricle and spectra were recorded at four points in the cardiac cycle by triggering from the blood pressure trace of the animal. The 31 P spin-lattice relaxation times of phosphocreatine (PC) and the γ - ,α - , and β-phosphates of ATP at 1.89 Tesla are 4.4, 1.8, 1.7, and 1.6 s, respectively. The ratio of PC to ATP is 2.0. No changes in PC/ATP were noted in any of the four portions of the cardiac cycle examined, and difference spectra exhibited no observable signals, in contrast to previously reported results for glucose-perfused rat hearts. On the assumption that intracellular pH and the total creatine pool were constant, the expression for the creatine kinase reaction was used to deduce that free ADP concentrations were invariant throughout the cardiac cycle. This is in apparent disagreement with the proposed regulatory role for ADP in heart oxidative phosphorylation

  2. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of erythrocyte extracts in myotonic muscular dystrophy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadoth, N.; Grinblat, J.; Tel Aviv Univ.; Shvo, H.; Navon, G.

    1984-01-01

    Extracts freshly prepared from erythrocytes of patients with myotonic muscular dystrophy, their unaffected siblings, and normal control subjects were examined with both 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A moderate variability was found in the relative amounts of various nonphosphorylated compounds among patients and control subjects; however, no significant differences were found between the groups. As for the phosphorylated compounds, the sum of ADP+ATP was found significantly elevated in the myotonic muscular dystrophy patients

  3. /sup 31/P nuclear-magnetic-resonance studies an the developing embryos of Xenopus laevis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadian, D G [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Biochemistry; Colman, A [Oxford Univ. (UK). Dept. of Zoology

    1976-01-01

    The concentrations of nucleoside triphosphate, inorganic phosphate and yolk proteins, phosvitin and lipovitellin, have been monitored in living embryos of Xenopus laevis by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The nucleoside triphosphate levels remain relatively constant at about 3.5 - 4.5 nmol/embryo at least until the 'spontaneous movement' stage of development. By the swimming tadpole stage an inorganic phosphate resonance representing about 30 nmol/embryo becomes evident in the NMR spectrum. Computer manipulation also shows such a resonance, although smaller, to be present at a somewhat earlier developmental stage; these findings are confirmed biochemically. The major contribution to the NMR spectrum of oocytes, unfertilized eggs and early embryos is the yolk phosphoprotein resonance. On isolation of the yolk from the embryos it is possible to quantify the contribution to the NMR spectrum from the lipid-phosphate and protein-phosphate moieties of the yolk proteins. During development, as the yolk is used up, it is found that the protein-phosphate resonance disappears at a greater rate than the lipid-phosphate peak. The total phosphorus content of the embryo (ca. 200 nmol/embryo) is shown biochemically to remain constant during development; however, the total amount of phosphorus observed by NMR decreases by about 40% during development. From the resonance positions of their ..cap alpha.., ..beta.. and ..gamma.. phosphate groups is is deduced that the nucleoside triphosphate molecules are liganded in vivo to a divalent cation which is not manganese, but could be either magnesium or calcium. From the position of the inorganic phosphate resonance it is deduced that the internal pH of embryos where this resonance is evident is 6.8 +- 0.2.

  4. 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis of extracts of vascular smooth muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barron, J.T.; Messer, J.V.; Glonek, Thomas

    1986-01-01

    31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to assess phosphate metabolites in perchloric acid extracts of rabbit aorta. In addition to the high energy phosphates, several other phosphorus compounds were detected and quantified. Most notable was the presence of a prominent phosphomonoester compound appearing at a chemical shift of 3.86 delta. This compound constituted 26% of the total extractable tissue phosphorus and is tentatively identified as ribose-5-phosphate, a pentose phosphate pathway intermediate. While ATP and phosphocreatine did not change during glucose and oxygen deprivation or during prolonged muscle contraction, the 3.86delta phosphate decreased significantly. Furthermore, theophylline, an agent that increases intracellular cAMP, also decreased the level of the 3.86 delta phosphate. These results are consistent with the concept that intermediate metabolism sustains high energy phosphate pools in vascular smooth muscle in the steady state under various conditions. The pentose phosphate pathway may play an important role in vascular smooth muscle metabolism. (author)

  5. The structure of phosphate glass biomaterials from neutron diffraction and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickup, D M; Ahmed, I; Guerry, P; Knowles, J C; Smith, M E; Newport, R J

    2007-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to probe the structure of phosphate glass biomaterials of general composition (CaO) 0.5-x (Na 2 O) x (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 (x = 0, 0.1 and 0.5). The results suggest that all three glasses have structures based on chains of Q 2 phosphate groups. Clear structural differences are observed between the glasses containing Na 2 O and CaO. The P-O bonds to bridging and non-bridging oxygens are less well resolved in the neutron data from the samples containing CaO, suggesting a change in the nature of the bonding as the field strength of the cation increases Na + → Ca 2+ . In the (CaO) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass most of the Ca 2+ ions are present in isolated CaO x polyhedra whereas in the (Na 2 O) 0.5 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 glass the NaO x polyhedra share edges leading to a Na-Na correlation. The results of the structural study are related to the properties of the (CaO) 0.4 (Na 2 O) 0.1 (P 2 O 5 ) 0.5 biomaterial

  6. Effects of 2-Deoxy-D-Glucose on Metabolic Status, Proliferative Capacity and Growth Rate of FSall Tumor: Observations made by In Vivo 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and Flow Cytometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Hye Sook; Choi, Eun Kyung; Cho, Jeong Gill; Lim, Tae Hwan; Lee, Tae Keun; Yi, Yun; Cho, Young Joo; Kim, Gon Sup

    1991-01-01

    The effect of 2-deoxy-d-glucose (2-DDG) on C 3 H mouse fibrosarcoma (FSall) was studied. Metabolic status, especially for energy metabolism, was studied using in vivo 31 P-MRS, proliferative capacity was observed on flow cytometry (FC) and growth rate was measured after transplantation of 106 viable tumor cells in the dorsum of foot of C 3 Hf/Sed mice. One gram of 2-DDG per kg of body weight was injected intraperitoneally on 12th day of implantation. Average tumor size on 12th day of implantation was 250mm 3 . Growth rate of FSall tumor was measured by tumor doubling time between tumor age 5-12 days was 0.84 days with slope 0.828 and tumor doubling time between tumor age 13-28 days was 3.2 days with slope 0.218 in control group. After 2-DDG injection, tumor doubling time was elongated to 5.1 days with slope 0.136. The effect of 2-DDG studied in vivo 31 P-MRS suggested that the increase of phosphomonoester (PME) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) by increasing size of tumor, slowed down after 2-DDG injection. Flow cytometry showed significantly increased S-phase and G 2 +M phase fraction suggesting increased proliferative capacity of tumor cells in the presence of 2-DDG. Authors observed an interesting effect 2-DDG on FSall tumor and attempt to utilize as an adjunct for radiotherapy

  7. Radioimmunotherapy of human lymphoma in athymic, nude mice as monitored by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adams, D.A.; DeNardo, G.L.; DeNardo, S.J.; Matson, G.B.; Epstein, A.L.; Bradbury, E.M.

    1985-01-01

    Human B cell lymphoma (Raji) growing in athymic, nude mice has been successfully treated with a single pulse dose of 131 I-labeled monoclonal antibody (Lym-1) specific for this tumor. Sequential in vivo measurements of phosphate metabolites in the tumors by 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance showed a significant initial decrease of phosphocreatine following radioimmunotherapy. Diminution of relative ATP to Pi peak area ratio suggesting tissue damage occurred within 3-4 days. The sequence of alterations of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra from tumors of treated mice were strikingly different from sequential nuclear magnetic resonance spectra obtained from tumors of control mice. These observations lead us to conclude that 31 P surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance is a promising non-invasive method for assessing and predicting the efficacy of radioimmunotherapy. Further spatial discrimination of the region of tissue observed by the surface coil nuclear magnetic resonance experiment is under exploration in an effort to increase the utility of these methods

  8. Interleaved localized 1H/31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of skeletal muscle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyerspeer, M.

    2005-09-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used as a spectroscopic method in physics and chemistry before it was developed to become a diagnostic imaging tool in medicine. When NMR spectroscopy is applied to human tissue, metabolism can be studied in normal physiological and pathological states in vivo. Metabolite concentrations and rates can be monitored dynamically and with localization of a defined region of interest. The 'window' which is opened for observation, i.e. which quantities are measured, depends on the nucleus used for RF excitation. Mechanisms of adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) resynthesis, as a direct source of energy for muscle contraction, are phosphocreatine (PCr) splitting, glycolysis, beta-oxidation and, finally, oxidative phosphorylation. Whilst the dependency of these processes' fractional contribution to muscular energy supply on exercise type and duration is well known, quantitative models of the regulating mechanisms involved are still subject of current research. A large fraction of the established knowledge about metabolism is based on biochemical analysis of tissue acquired invasively (e.g. microdialysis and open-flow microperfusion) or representing averaged metabolic concentrations for the whole body (via serum metabolites or gas exchange analysis). Localized NMR spectroscopy, however, is capable of non-invasively acquiring time-resolved data from a defined volume of interest, in vivo. In contrast to the vast majority of MRS studies investigating metabolism, where spectra of a single nucleus (commonly 1 H, 31 P or 13 C) were acquired or several MR spectra with different nuclei were measured in separate experiments, this work opens an additional 'window' on muscle metabolism by interleaved localized acquisition of 1 H and 31 P NMR spectra from human calf muscle in vivo, during rest, exercise and recovery, in a single experiment. Using this technique, the time courses of the concentrations of phosphocreatine, inorganic phosphate (Pi), ATP

  9. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31 P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which leads to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  10. Erythrocytes in muscular dystrophy. Investigation with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarpel, G.; Lubansky, H.J.; Danon, M.J.; Omachi, A.

    1981-01-01

    Phosphorus 31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) signals were recorded from intact human erythrocytes for 16 hours. Total phosphate concentration, which was estimated as the sum of the individual 31P signals, was 25% lower in erythrocytes from men with myotonic dystrophy than in control erythrocytes. The inorganic-phosphate fraction contained the highest average phosphate concentration over the 16-hour period, and made the major contribution to the difference in total phosphate between the two groups. This result was not observed in erythrocytes from either women with myotonic dystrophy or patients with Duchenne's dystrophy and may be due to a change in cell membrane permeability to inorganic phosphate, which lead to lower steady-state concentrations of the intracellular phosphates

  11. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance surface coil study of ischemic preconditioned isolated perfused rat heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Yongbin; Luo Xuechun; Zhang Riqing; Wang Xiaoyin; Zuo Lin; Liu Wei

    2000-01-01

    ischemic preconditioning (IPC) will protect the heart from the damage caused by a subsequent long ischemia period. 31 P spectra of isolated perfused rat heart measured by the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) surface coil technique can be used to continually, dynamically and noninvasively obtain metabolism information. This paper explores the IPC mechanisms by NMR. This study shows that IPC has no effect on enhancing the ATP and PCr levels during reperfusion but makes significantly slows and smooths the changes of intracellular pH and ATP during ischemia periods. The ATP and PCr recovery rate of the IPC group after ischemia is significantly higher than that of the control group. In conclusion, the above results support that IPC can protect the rat heart by reducing damage during the ischemia period

  12. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de

    2004-01-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na + -channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  13. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Weiying; Zhu, Yuanrong; Wu, Fengchang; Meng, Wei; Giesy, John P; He, Zhongqi; Song, Lirong; Fan, Mingle

    2016-04-01

    Debris from aquatic macrophytes and algae are important recycling sources of phosphorus (P), which can result in continuing blooms of algae by recycling bioavailable P in the eutrophic lakes. However, knowledge of forms of P in aquatic macrophytes and algae and their contribution to internal loads of P in lakes is limited. Without such knowledge, it is difficult to develop appropriate strategies to remediate and or restore aquatic ecosystems that have become eutrophic. Therefore, in this work, P was extracted from six types of aquatic macrophytes and algae collected from Tai Lake of China and characterized by use of solution (31)P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. When extracted by 0.5 M NaOH-25 mM EDTA, extraction recovery of total P(TP) and organic P(Po) exceeded 90 %. Concentrations of Po in algae and aquatic macrophytes were 5552 mg kg(-1) and 1005 mg kg(-1) and accounted for 56.0 and 47.2 % of TP, respectively. When Po, including condensed P, was characterized by solution (31)P-NMR Po in algae included orthophosphate monoesters (79.8 %), pyrophosphate (18.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (2.0 %), and Po in aquatic macrophytes included orthophosphate monoesters (90.3 %), pyrophosphate (4.2 %), and orthophosphate diester (5.5 %). Additionally, orthophosphate monoesters in algal debris mainly included β-glycerophosphate (44.1 %), α-glycerophosphate (13.5 %), and glucose 6-phosphate (13.5 %). Orthophosphate monoesters in aquatic macrophytes mainly included β-glycerophosphate (27.9 %), α-glycerophosphate (24.6 %), and adenosine 5' monophosphate (8.2 %). Results derived from this study will be useful in better understanding nutrient cycling, relevant eutrophication processes, and pollution control for freshwater lakes.

  14. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of tumor energy metabolism and its relationship to intracapillary oxyhemoglobin saturation status and tumor hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rofstad, E K; DeMuth, P; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1988-10-01

    Relationships between tumor bioenergetic status on the one hand and intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells on the other were studied using two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI). Tumor energy metabolism was studied in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and the resonance area ratio (PCr + NTP beta)/Pi was used as parameter for bioenergetic status. Intracapillary HbO2 saturation status reflects the oxygen supply conditions in tumors and was measured in vitro using a cryospectrophotometric method. The KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines showed decreasing bioenergetic status, i.e., decreasing PCr and NTP beta resonances and an increasing Pi resonance, with increasing tumor volume, whereas the OWI line showed no changes in these resonances during tumor growth. The volume-dependence of the HbO2 saturation status differed similarly among the tumor lines; HbO2 saturation status decreased with increasing tumor volume for the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines and was independent of tumor volume for the OWI line. Moreover, linear correlations were found between bioenergetic status and HbO2 saturation status for individual tumors of the KHT, RIF-1, and MLS lines. These observations together indicated a direct relationship between 31P-NMR spectral parameters and tumor oxygen supply conditions. However, this relationship was not identical for the different tumor lines, suggesting that it was influenced by intrinsic properties of the tumor cells such as rate of respiration and ability to survive under hypoxia. Similarly, there was no correlation between bioenergetic status and fraction of radiobiologically hypoxic cells across the four tumor lines. This indicates that 31P-NMR spectroscopy data have to be supplemented with other data, e.g., rate of oxygen consumption, cell survival time under hypoxic stress, and/or fraction of metabolically active

  15. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy allows noninvasive studies of cerebral energy-rich phosphorous compounds in humans. In an attempt to characterize the relationship between peripheral blood glucose concentrations and whole-brain phosphate metabolism during insulin......-induced hypoglycemia, 31P NMR spectra were obtained before and after intravenous injection of insulin (0.15 IU/kg body wt) in six men. Compared with prehypoglycemic measurements, no significant changes were found in brain content of Pi, sugar phosphates, phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, and ATP, and brain pH remained...... constant during the experiment. These results show that the integrated brain profile of energy-rich phosphorous compounds is unaffected by experimental insulin-induced hypoglycemia in humans....

  16. "3"1P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Charge-Density-Wave Transition in a Single Crystal of RuP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Guo-Zhi; Luo Jian-Lin; Chen Rong-Yan; Wang Nan-Lin

    2015-01-01

    We perform "3"1P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements on a single crystal of RuP. The anomalies in resistivity at about T_A = 270 K and T_B = 330 K indicate that two phase transitions occur. The line shape of "3"1P NMR spectra in different temperature ranges is attributed to the charge density distribution. The Knight shift and spin-lattice relaxation rate 1/T_1T are measured from 10 K to 300 K. At about T_A = 270 K, they both decrease abruptly with the temperature reduction, which reveals the gap-opening behavior. Well below T_A, they act like the case of normal metal. Charge-density-wave phase transition is proposed to interpret the transition occurring at about T_A. (paper)

  17. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interaction between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and human normal adult hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russu, I.M.; Wu, S.S.; Bupp, K.A.; Ho, N.T.; Ho, C.

    1990-01-01

    High-resolution 1 H and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human normal adult hemoglobin and the molecular interactions involved in the allosteric effect of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate molecule on hemoglobin. Individual hydrogen ion NMR titration curves have been obtained for 22-26 histidyl residues of hemoglobin and for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate with hemoglobin in both the deoxy and carbonmonoxy forms. The results indicate that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binds to deoxyhemoglobin at the central cavity between the two β chains and the binding involves the β2-histidyl residues. Moreover, the results suggest that the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to carbonmonoxyhemoglobin contains the same (or at least some of the same) amino acid residues responsible for binding in the deoxy form. As a result of the specific interactions with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the β2-histidyl residues make a significant contribution to the alkaline Bohr effect under these experimental conditions. These results give the first experimental demonstration that long-range electrostatic and/or conformation effects of the binding could play an important role in the allosteric effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on hemoglobin. The 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance titration data for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate have been used to calculate the pK values of the phosphate groups in 2,3-diphosphoglycerate bound to deoxy- and carbon-monoxyhemoglobin and the proton uptake by 2,3-diphosphoglycerate upon ligand binding to hemoglobin

  18. Dietary fat modulation of mammary tumor growth and metabolism demonstrated by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erickson, K.L.; Buckman, D.K.; Hubbard, N.E.; Ross, B.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship of dietary fat concentration and saturation on the growth and metabolic activity of line 168 was studied using syngeneic mice fed 6 experimental diets before and during tumor growth. Tumor latency was significantly greater for mice fed a diet containing the minimum of essential fatty acids (EFA, 0.5% corn oil) or 8% coconut oil (SF) than for mice fed 8 or 20% safflower oil (PUF) or 20% SF. Changes in dietary fat resulted in alterations of tumor cell and serum fatty acid composition but not the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the tumor. 31 P-surface coil NMR was used to measure possible changes in tumor metabolism in vivo. Although pH decreased from 7.2 to 6.6 as the tumor volume increased, there was no difference in pH among dietary groups. There was an inverse relationship between both sugar phosphate (SP)/Pi and ATP/Pi ratios and tumor volume; those ratios for mice fed an EFA deficient or minimal EFA diet decreased at a different rate than ratios for mice fed diets with additional fat. Tumors of mice fed diets containing no or a low level (0.3%) of 18:2 had higher SP/ATP ratios than mice fed diets containing a moderate level (∼ 4%) of 18:2. Thus, high levels of dietary fat had a significant effect on promotion of mammary tumors during early stages of tumor growth. Differences in tumor volume associated with dietary fat may be related to changes in the levels of high energy phosphate metabolites

  19. Physiological effects of the form of nitrogen on corn root tips: a 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, F.H.; Anderson, I.C.

    1986-01-01

    Physiological effects of different N forms (NO − 3 , NH + 4 , or a combination of both) on corn (Zea mays L.) root tips and leaves were studied by following 31 P signals with a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer. With root tips, both cytoplasmic and vacuolar pH could be measured, whereas with leaves, only vacuolar pH could be determined. The N treatments did not affect the cytoplasmic pH of corn root tips in contrast to proposals of previous workers. Leaf vacuolar pH was higher and root tip vacuolar pH lower with NO − 3 than with NH + 4 . Under anaerobic conditions, cytoplasmic pH was reduced because of lactic acid fermentation. Nitrate, an electron acceptor, delayed the acidification of the cytoplasm compartment because it represents an alternative way to reoxidize NADH. In conclusion, for the conditions of these experiments, the pH of the cytoplasm of corn root tips was not modified by the form of N absorbed; however, the pH of this compartment was affected by the form of N presented during development anaerobiosi. (author)

  20. Cooperation and competition between adenylate kinase, nucleoside diphosphokinase, electron transport, and ATP synthase in plant mitochondria studied by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roberts, J.K.M.; Aubert, S.; Gout, E.; Bligny, R.; Douce, R.

    1997-01-01

    Nucleotide metabolism in potato (Solanum tuberosum) mitochondria was studied using 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the O2 electrode. Immediately following the addition of ADP, ATP synthesis exceeded the rate of oxidative phosphorylation, fueled by succinate oxidation, due to mitochondrial adenylate kinase (AK) activity two to four times the maximum activity of ATP synthase. Only when the AK reaction approached equilibrium was oxidative phosphorylation the primary mechanism for net ATP synthesis. A pool of sequestered ATP in mitochondria enabled AK and ATP synthase to convert AMP to ATP in the presence of exogenous inorganic phosphate. During this conversion, AK activity can indirectly influence rates of oxidation of both succinate and NADH via changes in mitochondrial ATP. Mitochondrial nucleoside diphosphokinase, in cooperation with ATP synthase, was found to facilitate phosphorylation of nucleoside diphosphates other than ADP at rates similar to the maximum rate of oxidative phosphorylation. These results demonstrate that plant mitochondria contain all of the machinery necessary to rapidly regenerate nucleoside triphosphates from AMP and nucleoside diphosphates made during cellular biosynthesis and that AK activity can affect both the amount of ADP available to ATP synthase and the level of ATP regulating electron transport

  1. Therapeutic effect of 15-deoxyspergualin on acute graft rejection detected by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectrography, and its effect on rat heart transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, S.; Kanashiro, M.; Watanabe, H.; Amemiya, H.

    1988-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 15-deoxyspergualin (DSG) on graft rejection, starting administration at the onset of rejection and on the induction of immunologic unresponsiveness. Hearts from WKAH rats were transplanted into the neck of ACI rats. The energy metabolism of the grafted hearts was followed by 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The day that energy metabolism started to fall was defined as the onset of rejection, and intraperitoneal administration of DSG was initiated at 5 mg/kg/day for 15 days from this day. The grafted heart arrested in 2 of 10 rats 9 and 11 days after transplantation, respectively, but the remaining 8 recovered from rejection and 5 of them showed evidence of immunologic unresponsiveness. Of 10 rats treated with DSG from the day of transplantation, only 1 rat showed evidence of unresponsiveness. The initiation of DSG treatment from the onset of rejection resulted in a higher percentage of induction of unresponsiveness. Therefore, DSG was considered to specifically inhibit lymphocyte clone expansion at the onset of rejection. Spleen cells obtained from recipients 7-10 days after the end of DSG treatment were administered to syngeneic ACI rats grafted with WKAH hearts. Graft survival was significantly prolonged, but long-term unresponsiveness could not be transferred. However, immunologic unresponsiveness could be adoptively transferred in 3 of 5 rats receiving spleen cells from syngeneic rats that had recovered from rejection after DSG treatment and had acquired long-term unresponsiveness. These results suggest that suppressor cells are resistant to DSG and are spared and participate in the maintenance of immunologic unresponsiveness

  2. 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance investigation of the interaction between 2,3-diphosphoglycerate and human normal adult hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russu, I M; Wu, S S; Bupp, K A; Ho, N T; Ho, C

    1990-04-17

    High-resolution 1H and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to investigate the binding of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to human normal adult hemoglobin and the molecular interactions involved in the allosteric effect of the 2,3-diphosphoglycerate molecule on hemoglobin. Individual hydrogen ion NMR titration curves have been obtained for 22-26 histidyl residues of hemoglobin and for each phosphate group of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate with hemoglobin in both the deoxy and carbonmonoxy forms. The results indicate that 2,3-diphosphoglycerate binds to deoxyhemoglobin at the central cavity between the two beta chains and the binding involves the beta 2-histidyl residues. Moreover, the results suggest that the binding site of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate to carbonmonoxyhemoglobin contains the same (or at least some of the same) amino acid residues responsible for binding in the deoxy form. As a result of the specific interactions with 2,3-diphosphoglycerate, the beta 2-histidyl residues make a significant contribution to the alkaline Bohr effect under these experimental conditions (up to 0.5 proton/Hb tetramer). 2,3-Diphosphoglycerate also affects the individual hydrogen ion equilibria of several histidyl residues located away from the binding site on the surface of the hemoglobin molecule, and, possibly, in the heme pockets. These results give the first experimental demonstration that long-range electrostatic and/or conformational effects of the binding could play an important role in the allosteric effect of 2,3-diphosphoglycerate on hemoglobin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Comparison of effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition with those of angiotensin II receptor antagonism on functional and metabolic recovery in postischemic working rat heart as studied by [31P] nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werrmann, J G; Cohen, S M

    1994-10-01

    To assess the role of angiotensin II (AII) in development of myocardial injury during ischemia and reperfusion, the effects of short-term treatment with the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor lisinopril were compared with the effects of short-term treatment with L-158,338, an AII antagonist, in isolated working rat heart. Myocardial function was assessed and correlated with simultaneous measurement of high-energy phosphate metabolism and intracellular pH by [31P] nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) before, during, and after global ischemia. Hearts from rats treated with 1 mg/kg lisinopril in vivo recovered substantially more function than those of controls (p effect on functional recovery. A dose-dependent increase in functional recovery was observed in rat heart treated with 0.3, 1, or 3 mg/kg L-158,338 in vivo (p energy phosphate metabolism was essentially unchanged by any treatment regimen. AII antagonism alone resulted in a degree of improvement in functional recovery comparable to that observed with oral ACE inhibitor treatment.

  4. An overview of the metabolic differences between Bradyrhizobium japonicum 110 bacteria and differentiated bacteroids from soybean (Glycine max) root nodules: an in vitro 13C- and 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vauclare, Pierre; Bligny, Richard; Gout, Elisabeth; Widmer, Francois

    2013-01-01

    Bradyrhizobium japonicum is a symbiotic nitrogen-fixing soil bacteria that induce root nodules formation in legume soybean (Glycine max.). Using 13 C- and 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, we have analysed the metabolite profiles of cultivated B. japonicum cells and bacteroids isolated from soybean nodules. Our results revealed some quantitative and qualitative differences between the metabolite profiles of bacteroids and their vegetative state. This includes in bacteroids a huge accumulation of soluble carbohydrates such as trehalose, glutamate, myo-inositol and homo-spermidine as well as Pi, nucleotide pools and intermediates of the primary carbon metabolism. Using this novel approach, these data show that most of the compounds detected in bacteroids reflect the metabolic adaptation of rhizobia to the surrounding microenvironment with its host plant cells. (authors)

  5. Mechanism of the negative force-frequency relationship in physiologically intact rat ventricular myocardium. Studies by intracellular Ca2+ monitor with iodo-1 and by 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morii, Isao; Kihara, Yasuki; Sasayama, Shigetake; Konishi, Takashi; Inubushi, Toshiro.

    1996-01-01

    We studied the subcellular mechanisms of the negative force-frequency relationship in rat myocardium by measuring intracellular Ca 2+ transients by indo-1 fluorometry and intracellular pH (pH i ) and phosphate compounds with 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The data were compared with those from guinea pig hearts, which show a positive force-frequency relationship. By increasing the pacing rate from 3 Hz to 5 Hz, the peak positive first derivative of left ventricular pressure (LVdP/dt) in rat heart decreased by 10±1% (n=6). In contrast to this negative inotropic response, simultaneously measured peak Ca 2+ transients increased by 6±1%. Guinea pig heart (n=6) showed an increase in peak positive LVdP/dt (33±1%) which was associated with an increase in peak Ca 2+ transients (8±1%). Under equivalent experimental conditions in an NMR spectrometer, this increase in the pacing rate did not affect intracellular levels of phosphate compounds in either rat (n=6) or guinea pig heart (n=6). In contrast, pH i showed a decrease of 0.031±0.006 pH units in rat heart, while no changes were observed in guinea pig heart. These results suggest that in physiological rat myocardium, pH i is susceptible to changes in the stimulus frequency and may affect the Ca 2+ -responsiveness of contractile proteins, which results in the negative force-frequency relationship. (author)

  6. In vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance saturation transfer measurements of phosphate exchange reactions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.L.; Jones, K.A.; Schulman, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    31 P saturation transfer techniques have been used to measure phosphate kinetics in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The phosphate comsumption rate observed in acetate grown mid-log cells was combined with measurements of O 2 consumption to yield P/O ratios of 2.2 and 2.9, for cells respiring on glucose and ethanol, respectively. However, no phosphate consumption activity was observed in saturation transfer experiments on anaerobic glucose fed cells. The phosphate consumption rates measured by saturation transfer in cells respiring on glucose and ethanol was attributed to the unidirectional rates of mitochondrial ATP synthesis. (Auth.)

  7. Local anesthetics: interaction with human erythrocyte membranes as studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance; Anestesicos locais: interacao com membranas de eritrocitos de sangue humano, estudada por ressonancia magnetica nuclear de {sup 1}H e {sup 31}P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fraceto, Leonardo Fernandes; Paula, Eneida de [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Bioquimica]. E-mail: depaula@unicamp.br

    2004-02-01

    The literature carries many theories about the mechanism of action of local anesthetics (LA). We can highlight those focusing the direct effect of LA on the sodium channel protein and the ones that consider the interaction of anesthetic molecules with the lipid membrane phase. The interaction between local anesthetics and human erythrocyte membranes has been studied by {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It was found that lidocaine (LDC) and benzocaine (BZC) bind to the membranes, increase the mobility of the protons of the phospholipids acyl chains, and decrease the mobility and/or change the structure of the polar head groups. The results indicate that lidocaine molecules are inserted across the polar and liquid interface of the membrane, establishing both electrostatic (charged form) and hydrophobic (neutral form) interactions. Benzocaine locates itself a little deeper in the bilayer, between the interfacial glycerol region and the hydrophobic core. These changes in mobility or conformation of membrane lipids could affect the Na{sup +}-channel protein insertion in the bilayer, stabilizing it in the inactivated state, thus causing anesthesia. (author)

  8. Relationship between 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectra and pulmonary vasomotor tone in hypoxic pig lobes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buescher, P.; Pillain, R.; Pearse, D.; Eichhorn, G.; Sylvester, J.

    1986-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone, the authors measured 31 P NMR spectra during repeated exposures to hypoxia in 5 isolated degassed left lower lobes perfused with blood at a constant flow (500ml/min) and left atrial pressure ( 2 tension (PpO 2 ) was changed by varying the gas mixtures (40, 7, 0% O 2 ) flowing through a bubble oxygenator in the perfusion circuit. 31 P spectra obtained after stabilization of pulmonary artery pressure (Ppa) at each PpO 2 revealed peaks for ATP, inorganic phosphate (Pi) phosphomono and diesters (PME and PDE). During 7% O 2 , Ppa and ATP increased but Pi did not change suggesting that lung tissue energy state improved during hypoxic vasoconstriction. During 0% O 2 , there was a reversible deterioration of energy state (high Pi, low ATP). Thus, it appears that lung tissue energy state and vasomotor tone were related, but the precise nature of the relationship remains to be determined

  9. Simultaneous electromyography and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy--with application to muscle fatigue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, P; Thomsen, C; Sinkjaer, T

    1992-01-01

    changes in human muscle. The aim of this study was to develop a method by which EMG and NMR spectroscopy measurements could be performed simultaneously. All measurements were performed in a whole body 1.5 Tesla NMR scanner. A calf muscle ergometer, designed for use in a whole body NMR scanner, was used....... The subject had the left foot strapped to the ergometer. The anterior tibial EMG was recorded by bipolar surface electrodes. A surface coil was strapped to the anterior tibial muscle next to the EMG electrodes. Simultaneous measurements of surface EMG and surface coil 31P NMR spectroscopy were performed...

  10. Transport and compartmentation of phosphite in higher plant cells - kinetic and 31P nuclear magnetic resonance studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Danova-Alt, R.; Dijkema, C.; Waard, de P.; Köck, M.

    2008-01-01

    Phosphite (Phi, H(2)PO(3)(-)), being the active part of several fungicides, has been shown to influence not only the fungal metabolism but also the development of phosphate-deficient plants. However, the mechanism of phosphite effects on plants is still widely unknown. In this paper we analysed

  11. pH homeostasis in Escherichia coli: measurement by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance of methylphosphonate and phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slonczewski, J.L.; Rosen, B.P.; Alger, J.R.; Macnab, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    The intracellular pH of Escherichia coli cells, respiring on endogenous energy sources, was monitored continuously by 31 P NMR over an extracellular pH range between 5.5 and 9. pH homeostasis was found to be good over the entire range, with the data conforming to the simple relationship intracellular pH = 7.6 + 0.1(external pH - 7.6) so that the extreme values observed for intracellular pH were 7.4 and 7.8 external pH 5.5 and 9, respectively. As well as inorganic phosphate, we employed the pH-sensitive NMR probe methylphosphonate, which was taken up by glycerol-grown cells and was nontoxic; its pK/sub a/ of 7.65 made it an ideal probe for measurement of cytoplasmic pH and alkaline external pH

  12. Characterization of phosphorus forms in lake macrophytes and algae by solution 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquatic macrophytes and algae are important sources of phosphorus (P) in the lake environment that cause blooms of algae under certain biogeochemical conditions. However, the knowledge of forms of P in these plants and algae and their contribution to internal loads of lake P is very limited. Witho...

  13. 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance of Charge-Density-Wave Transition in a Single Crystal of RuP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Guo-Zhi; Chen, Rong-Yan; Wang, Nan-Lin; Luo, Jian-Lin

    2015-07-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No 11025422, the National Basic Research Program of China under Grant Nos 2011CB921700 and 2015CB921300, and the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences under Grant No XDB07020200.

  14. Centerband-only-detection-of-exchange (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance and phospholipid lateral diffusion: theory, simulation and experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Angel; Saleem, Qasim; Macdonald, Peter M

    2015-10-14

    Centerband-only-detection-of-exchange (CODEX) (31)P NMR lateral diffusion measurements were performed on dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) assembled into large unilamellar spherical vesicles. Optimization of sample and NMR acquisition conditions provided significant sensitivity enhancements relative to an earlier first report (Q. Saleem, A. Lai, H. Morales, and P. M. Macdonald, Chem. Phys. Lipids, 2012, 165, 721). An analytical description was developed that permitted the extraction of lateral diffusion coefficients from CODEX data, based on a Gaussian-diffusion-on-a-sphere model (A. Ghosh, J. Samuel, and S. Sinha, Europhys. Lett., 2012, 98, 30003-p1) as relevant to CODEX (31)P NMR measurements on a population of spherical unilamellar phospholipid bilayer vesicles displaying a distribution of vesicle radii.

  15. Measurement of adenosine triphosphate and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate in stored blood with 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruso, D R; Hawkins, B; Johnson, D L; Fritzberg, A R; Klingensmith, W C; McCabe, E R

    1986-06-01

    Conditions for blood storage are chosen to assure adequate levels of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG). Because of the invasive nature of the techniques, biochemical assays are not routinely used to measure levels of these compounds in stored blood. However, 31P NMR spectroscopy measures phosphorylated intermediates in intact cells and could be used without disruption of the storage pack. We compared levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by 31P spectroscopy and standard enzyme-linked biochemical assays in whole blood (WB) and packed red blood cells (PRBCs) at weekly intervals during a 35-day storage period. NMR demonstrated a marked decrease in 2,3-DPG and an increase in inorganic phosphate after the first week of storage. No significant differences in ATP concentrations were seen in WB during the storage period, but a significant decrease in ATP in PRBCs was documented. There was good agreement in levels of ATP and 2,3-DPG measured by NMR and biochemical techniques. 31P NMR spectroscopy is a noninvasive technique for measuring ATP and 2,3-DPG which has a potential use in quality assurance of stored blood.

  16. Effects of intra-arterial epinephrine on energy metabolism in exercising rabbit gastrocnemius muscle, studied by in vivo phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argov, Z; Nioka, S; Eleff, S; Chance, B

    1991-10-01

    Epinephrine has an inotropic effect on skeletal muscle, especially on glycolytic type 2 fibers. The mechanism of this effect is not completely clear and its association with a change in oxidative metabolism or glycolytic activation was not fully investigated. Epinephrine's effects on muscle bioenergetics were studied by in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance to find if mitochondrial metabolism is changed during the inotropic action and if the known glycolytic activation by epinephrine is operative during muscle twitch. The study was also used as a model for the application of in vivo 31P nuclear magnetic resonance in the evaluation of short-term acting drugs. When injected intra-arterially, epinephrine (1 micrograms/kg) augmented the twitch tension of indirectly stimulated, continuously working rabbit gastrocnemius muscle by 15.4 + 6.5%. This increase in work was associated with reduction of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate ratio (PCr/Pi) from 3.4 to 2.1 without change in ATP levels. Intracellular pH was reduced from 6.9 to 6.75, but no accumulation of glycolytic intermediates could be observed. The increase in work was not associated with a rise in ADP. All these changes occurred for a few minutes only. The findings suggest that epinephrine's inotropic action is not mediated by a change in mitochondrial metabolism. Glycolytic activation by epinephrine occurs even during twitch and contributes partly to the energy demands of the augmented force. Epinephrine's inotropic effect is, however, not primarily due to changes in bioenergetic kinetics, but to effects on force generating mechanisms, with secondary reduction in energy state.

  17. 31P-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Determination of Phosphate Compartmentation in Leaves of Reproductive Soybeans (Glycine max L.) as Affected by Phosphate Nutrition 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Michael J.; Blevins, Dale G.; Sierzputowska-Gracz, Hanna

    1989-01-01

    Most leaf phosphorus is remobilized to the seed during reproductive development in soybean. We determined, using 31P-NMR, the effect phosphorus remobilization has on vacuolar inorganic phosphate pool size in soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) leaves with respect to phosphorus nutrition and plant development. Phosphate compartmentation between cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools was observed and followed in intact tissue grown hydroponically, at the R2, R4, and R6 growth stages. As phosphorus in the nutrient solution decreased from 0.45 to 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak became less prominent relative to cytoplasmic phosphate and hexose monophosphate peaks. At a nutrient phosphate concentration of 0.05 millimolar, the vacuolar phosphate peak was not detectable. At higher levels of nutrient phosphate, as plants progressed from the R2 to the R6 growth stage, the vacuolar phosphate peak was the first to disappear, suggesting that storage phosphate was remobilized to a greater extent than metabolic phosphate. Under suboptimal phosphate nutrition (≤ 0.20 millimolar), the hexose monophosphate and cytoplasmic phosphate peaks declined earlier in reproductive development than when phosphate was present in optimal amounts. Under low phosphate concentrations (0.05 millimolar) cytoplasmic phosphate was greatly reduced. Carbon metabolism was coincidently disrupted under low phosphate nutrition as shown by the appearance of large, prominent starch grains in the leaves. Cytoplasmic phosphate, and leaf carbon metabolism dependent on it, are buffered by vacuolar phosphate until late stages of reproductive growth. Images Figure 4 PMID:16666705

  18. Pleiotropic functions of magnetic nanoparticles for ex vivo gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kami, Daisuke; Kitani, Tomoya; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Toyoda, Masashi; Tomitaka, Asahi; Ota, Satoshi; Ishii, Ryuga; Takemura, Yasushi; Watanabe, Masatoshi; Umezawa, Akihiro; Gojo, Satoshi

    2014-08-01

    Gene transfer technique has various applications, ranging from cellular biology to medical treatments for diseases. Although nonviral vectors, such as episomal vectors, have been developed, it is necessary to improve their gene transfer efficacy. Therefore, we attempted to develop a highly efficient gene delivery system combining an episomal vector with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). In comparison with the conventional method using transfection reagents, polyethylenimine-coated MNPs introduced episomal vectors more efficiently under a magnetic field and could express the gene in mammalian cells with higher efficiency and for longer periods. This novel in vitro separation method of gene-introduced cells utilizing the magnetic property of MNPs significantly facilitated the separation of cells of interest. Transplanted cells in vivo were detected using magnetic resonance. These results suggest that MNPs play multifunctional roles in ex vivo gene transfer, such as improvement of gene transfer efficacy, separation of cells, and detection of transplanted cells. This study convincingly demonstrates enhanced efficiency of gene transfer via magnetic nanoparticles. The method also enables magnetic sorting of cells positive for the transferred gene, and in vivo monitoring of the process with MRI. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Rotating magnetic field induced oscillation of magnetic particles for in vivo mechanical destruction of malignant glioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Muroski, Megan E; Petit, Dorothée C M C; Mansell, Rhodri; Vemulkar, Tarun; Morshed, Ramin A; Han, Yu; Balyasnikova, Irina V; Horbinski, Craig M; Huang, Xinlei; Zhang, Lingjiao; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-02-10

    Magnetic particles that can be precisely controlled under a magnetic field and transduce energy from the applied field open the way for innovative cancer treatment. Although these particles represent an area of active development for drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia, the in vivo anti-tumor effect under a low-frequency magnetic field using magnetic particles has not yet been demonstrated. To-date, induced cancer cell death via the oscillation of nanoparticles under a low-frequency magnetic field has only been observed in vitro. In this report, we demonstrate the successful use of spin-vortex, disk-shaped permalloy magnetic particles in a low-frequency, rotating magnetic field for the in vitro and in vivo destruction of glioma cells. The internalized nanomagnets align themselves to the plane of the rotating magnetic field, creating a strong mechanical force which damages the cancer cell structure inducing programmed cell death. In vivo, the magnetic field treatment successfully reduces brain tumor size and increases the survival rate of mice bearing intracranial glioma xenografts, without adverse side effects. This study demonstrates a novel approach of controlling magnetic particles for treating malignant glioma that should be applicable to treat a wide range of cancers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Ex vivo investigation of magnetically targeted drug delivery system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Y.; Fukui, S.; Fujimoto, S.; Mishima, F.; Takeda, S.; Izumi, Y.; Ohtani, S.; Fujitani, Y.; Nishijima, S.

    2007-01-01

    In conventional systemic drug delivery the drug is administered by intravenous injection; it then travels to the heart from where it is pumped to all regions of the body. When the drug is aimed at a small target region, this method is extremely inefficient and leads to require much larger doses than those being necessary. In order to overcome this problem a number of targeted drug delivery methods are developed. One of these, magnetically targeted drug delivery system (MT-DDS) will be a promising way, which involves binding a drug to small biocompatible magnetic particles, injecting these into the blood stream and using a high gradient magnetic field to pull them out of suspension in the target region. In the present paper, we describe an ex vivo experimental work. It is also reported that navigation and accumulation test of the magnetic particles in the Y-shaped glass tube was performed in order to examine the threshold of the magnetic force for accumulation. It is found that accumulation of the magnetic particles was succeeded in the blood vessel when a permanent magnet was placed at the vicinity of the blood vessel. This result indicates the feasibility of the magnetically drug targeting in the blood vessel

  1. Modifying bone scaffold architecture in vivo with permanent magnets to facilitate fixation of magnetic scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panseri, S; Russo, A; Sartori, M; Giavaresi, G; Sandri, M; Fini, M; Maltarello, M C; Shelyakova, T; Ortolani, A; Visani, A; Dediu, V; Tampieri, A; Marcacci, M

    2013-10-01

    The fundamental elements of tissue regeneration are cells, biochemical signals and the three-dimensional microenvironment. In the described approach, biomineralized-collagen biomaterial functions as a scaffold and provides biochemical stimuli for tissue regeneration. In addition superparamagnetic nanoparticles were used to magnetize the biomaterials with direct nucleation on collagen fibres or impregnation techniques. Minimally invasive surgery was performed on 12 rabbits to implant cylindrical NdFeB magnets in close proximity to magnetic scaffolds within the lateral condyles of the distal femoral epiphyses. Under this static magnetic field we demonstrated, for the first time in vivo, that the ability to modify the scaffold architecture could influence tissue regeneration obtaining a well-ordered tissue. Moreover, the association between NdFeB magnet and magnetic scaffolds represents a potential technique to ensure scaffold fixation avoiding micromotion at the tissue/biomaterial interface. © 2013.

  2. Automated Segmentation of in Vivo and Ex Vivo Mouse Brain Magnetic Resonance Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alize E.H. Scheenstra

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI data is required for many applications, such as the comparison of different structures or time points, and for annotation purposes. Currently, the gold standard for automated image segmentation is nonlinear atlas-based segmentation. However, these methods are either not sufficient or highly time consuming for mouse brains, owing to the low signal to noise ratio and low contrast between structures compared with other applications. We present a novel generic approach to reduce processing time for segmentation of various structures of mouse brains, in vivo and ex vivo. The segmentation consists of a rough affine registration to a template followed by a clustering approach to refine the rough segmentation near the edges. Compared with manual segmentations, the presented segmentation method has an average kappa index of 0.7 for 7 of 12 structures in in vivo MRI and 11 of 12 structures in ex vivo MRI. Furthermore, we found that these results were equal to the performance of a nonlinear segmentation method, but with the advantage of being 8 times faster. The presented automatic segmentation method is quick and intuitive and can be used for image registration, volume quantification of structures, and annotation.

  3. Simultaneous in vivo positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catana, Ciprian; Procissi, Daniel; Wu, Yibao; Judenhofer, Martin S; Qi, Jinyi; Pichler, Bernd J; Jacobs, Russell E; Cherry, Simon R

    2008-03-11

    Positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are widely used in vivo imaging technologies with both clinical and biomedical research applications. The strengths of MRI include high-resolution, high-contrast morphologic imaging of soft tissues; the ability to image physiologic parameters such as diffusion and changes in oxygenation level resulting from neuronal stimulation; and the measurement of metabolites using chemical shift imaging. PET images the distribution of biologically targeted radiotracers with high sensitivity, but images generally lack anatomic context and are of lower spatial resolution. Integration of these technologies permits the acquisition of temporally correlated data showing the distribution of PET radiotracers and MRI contrast agents or MR-detectable metabolites, with registration to the underlying anatomy. An MRI-compatible PET scanner has been built for biomedical research applications that allows data from both modalities to be acquired simultaneously. Experiments demonstrate no effect of the MRI system on the spatial resolution of the PET system and <10% reduction in the fraction of radioactive decay events detected by the PET scanner inside the MRI. The signal-to-noise ratio and uniformity of the MR images, with the exception of one particular pulse sequence, were little affected by the presence of the PET scanner. In vivo simultaneous PET and MRI studies were performed in mice. Proof-of-principle in vivo MR spectroscopy and functional MRI experiments were also demonstrated with the combined scanner.

  4. In vivo quantification of magnetically labelled cells by MRI relaxometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Ulysse; Lajous, Hélène; El Atifi, Michèle; Bidart, Marie; Auboiroux, Vincent; Fries, Pascal Henry; Berger, François; Lahrech, Hana

    2016-11-01

    Cellular MRI, which visualizes magnetically labelled cells (cells*), is an active research field for in vivo cell therapy and tracking. The simultaneous relaxation rate measurements (R 2 *, R 2 , R 1 ) are the basis of a quantitative cellular MRI method proposed here. U937 cells were labelled with Molday ION Rhodamine B, a bi-functional superparamagnetic and fluorescent nanoparticle (U937*). U937* viability and proliferation were not affected in vitro. In vitro relaxometry was performed in a cell concentration range of [2.5 × 10 4 -10 8 ] cells/mL. These measurements show the existence of complementary cell concentration intervals where these rates vary linearly. The juxtaposition of these intervals delineates a wide cell concentration range over which one of the relaxation rates in a voxel of an in vivo image can be converted into an absolute cell concentration. The linear regime was found at high concentrations for R 1 in the range of [10 6 - 2 × 10 8 ] cells/mL, at intermediate concentrations for R 2 in [2.5 × 10 5 - 5 × 10 7 ] cells/mL and at low concentrations for R 2 * in [8 × 10 4 - 5 × 10 6 ] cells/mL. In vivo relaxometry was performed in a longitudinal study, with labelled U937 cells injected into a U87 glioma mouse model. Using in vitro data, maps of in vivo U937* concentrations were obtained by converting one of the in vivo relaxation rates to cell concentration maps. MRI results were compared with the corresponding optical images of the same brains, showing the usefulness of our method to accurately follow therapeutic cell biodistribution in a longitudinal study. Results also demonstrate that the method quantifies a large range of magnetically labelled cells*. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. In vivo NMR spectroscopy of ripening avocado

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennett, A.B.; Smith, G.M.; Nichols, B.

    1987-01-01

    Ripening of avocado fruit is associated with a dramatic increase in respiration. Previous studies have indicated that the increase in respiration is brought about by activation of the glycolytic reaction catalyzing the conversion of fructose-6-phosphate to fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The authors reinvestigated the proposed role of glycolytic regulation in the respiratory increase using in vivo 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy using an external surface coil and analysis of phosphofructokinase (PFK), phosphofructophosphotransferase (PFP), and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (fru 2,6-P 2 ) levels in ripening avocado fruit. In vivo 31 P NMR spectroscopy revealed large increases in ATP levels accompanying the increase in respiration. Both glycolytic enzymes, PFK and PFP, were present in avocado fruit, with the latter activity being highly stimulated by fru 2,6-P 2 . Fructose 2,6-bisphosphate levels increased approximately 90% at the onset of ripening, indicating that the respiratory increase in ripening avocado may be regulated by the activation of PFP brought about by an increase in fru 2,6-P 2

  6. In vitro and in vivo investigations of targeted chemotherapy with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiou, Christoph; Jurgons, Roland; Schmid, Roswitha; Hilpert, Andrea; Bergemann, Christian; Parak, Fritz; Iro, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a local drug delivery system. Electromicroscopic pictures document the ferrofluid enrichment in the intracellular space in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed in VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits using magnetic nanoparticles bound to mitoxantrone. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses after magnetic drug targeting showed an increasing concentration of the chemotherapeutic agent in the tumor region compared to regular systemic chemotherapy

  7. In vivo measurement of intracellular pH in human brain during different tensions of carbon dioxide in arterial blood. A 31P-NMR study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O

    1988-01-01

    The effect of changes in carbon dioxide tension in arterial blood upon intracellular pH in brain tissue was studied in seven healthy volunteers, aged 22-45 years. The pH changes were monitored by use of 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, performed on a whole-body 1.5 Tesla Siemens imaging...

  8. Nanohybrids with Magnetic and Persistent Luminescence Properties for Cell Labeling, Tracking, In Vivo Real-Time Imaging, and Magnetic Vectorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teston, Eliott; Maldiney, Thomas; Marangon, Iris; Volatron, Jeanne; Lalatonne, Yoann; Motte, Laurence; Boisson-Vidal, Catherine; Autret, Gwennhael; Clément, Olivier; Scherman, Daniel; Gazeau, Florence; Richard, Cyrille

    2018-04-01

    Once injected into a living organism, cells diffuse or migrate around the initial injection point and become impossible to be visualized and tracked in vivo. The present work concerns the development of a new technique for therapeutic cell labeling and subsequent in vivo visualization and magnetic retention. It is hypothesized and subsequently demonstrated that nanohybrids made of persistent luminescence nanoparticles and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles incorporated into a silica matrix can be used as an effective nanoplatform to label therapeutic cells in a nontoxic way in order to dynamically track them in real-time in vitro and in living mice. As a proof-of-concept, it is shown that once injected, these labeled cells can be visualized and attracted in vivo using a magnet. This first step suggests that these nanohybrids represent efficient multifunctional nanoprobes for further imaging guided cell therapies development. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. In Vivo Imaging of Local Gene Expression Induced by Magnetic Hyperthermia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivier Sandre

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims to demonstrate that colloidal dispersions of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with dextran macromolecules placed in an alternating magnetic field can not only produce heat, but also that these particles could be used in vivo for local and noninvasive deposition of a thermal dose sufficient to trigger thermo-induced gene expression. Iron oxide nanoparticles were first characterized in vitro on a bio-inspired setup, and then they were assayed in vivo using a transgenic mouse strain expressing the luciferase reporter gene under transcriptional control of a thermosensitive promoter. Iron oxide nanoparticles dispersions were applied topically on the mouse skin or injected subcutaneously with Matrigel™ to generate so-called pseudotumors. Temperature was monitored continuously with a feedback loop to control the power of the magnetic field generator and to avoid overheating. Thermo-induced luciferase expression was followed by bioluminescence imaging 6 h after heating. We showed that dextran-coated magnetic iron oxide nanoparticle dispersions were able to induce in vivo mild hyperthermia compatible with thermo-induced gene expression in surrounding tissues and without impairing cell viability. These data open new therapeutic perspectives for using mild magnetic hyperthermia as noninvasive modulation of tumor microenvironment by local thermo-induced gene expression or drug release.

  10. Development of a Novel Lipophilic, Magnetic Nanoparticle for in Vivo Drug Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torben Moos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to evaluate the transfection potential of chitosan-coated, green-fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs (chi-MNPs after encapsulation inside polyethylglycol (PEGylated liposomes that produced lipid-encapsulated chitosan-coated MNPs (lip-MNPs, and also to evaluate how these particles would distribute in vivo after systemic injection. The transfection potential of both chi-MNPs and lip-MNPs was evaluated in vitro in rat brain endothelial 4 (RBE4 cells with and without applying a magnetic field. Subsequently, the MNPs were evaluated in vivo in young rats. The in vitro investigations revealed that the application of a magnetic field resulted in an increased cellular uptake of the particles. The lip-MNPs were able to transfect the RBE4 cells with an incidence of approximately 20% of a commercial transfection agent. The in vivo distribution studies revealed that lip-MNPs had superior pharmacokinetic properties due to evasion of the RES, including hepatic Kuppfer cells and macrophages in the spleen. In conclusion, we were able to design a novel lipid-encapsulated MNP with the ability to carry genetic material, with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, and under the influence of a magnetic field with the capability to mediate transfection in vitro.

  11. Development of a Novel Lipophilic, Magnetic Nanoparticle for in Vivo Drug Delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linemann, Thomas; Thomsen, Louiza B.; Du Jardin, Kristian G.; Laursen, Jens C.; Jensen, Jesper B.; Lichota, Jacek; Moos, Torben

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the transfection potential of chitosan-coated, green-fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) (chi-MNPs) after encapsulation inside polyethylglycol (PEG)ylated liposomes that produced lipid-encapsulated chitosan-coated MNPs (lip-MNPs), and also to evaluate how these particles would distribute in vivo after systemic injection. The transfection potential of both chi-MNPs and lip-MNPs was evaluated in vitro in rat brain endothelial 4 (RBE4) cells with and without applying a magnetic field. Subsequently, the MNPs were evaluated in vivo in young rats. The in vitro investigations revealed that the application of a magnetic field resulted in an increased cellular uptake of the particles. The lip-MNPs were able to transfect the RBE4 cells with an incidence of approximately 20% of a commercial transfection agent. The in vivo distribution studies revealed that lip-MNPs had superior pharmacokinetic properties due to evasion of the RES, including hepatic Kuppfer cells and macrophages in the spleen. In conclusion, we were able to design a novel lipid-encapsulated MNP with the ability to carry genetic material, with favorable pharmacokinetic properties, and under the influence of a magnetic field with the capability to mediate transfection in vitro. PMID:24300449

  12. Intracellular pH and inorganic phosphate content of heart in vivo: A 31P-NMR study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katz, L.A.; Swain, J.A.; Portman, M.A.; Balaban, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the contribution of red blood cells to the 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of the canine heart in vivo and the feasibility of measuring myocardial intracellular phosphate and pH. This was accomplished by replacing whole blood with a perfluorochemical perfusion emulsion blood substitute, Oxypherol, and noting the difference in the 31 P-NMR spectrum of the heart. NMR data were collected with a NMR transmitter-receiver coil on the surface of the distal portion of the left ventricle. These studies demonstrated that a small contribution from 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) and phosphodiesters in the blood could be detected. The magnitude and shift of these blood-borne signals permitted the relative quantification of intracellular inorganic phosphate (P i ) content as well as intracellular pH. Under resting conditions, the intracellular ATP/P i was 7.0 ± 0.08. This corresponds to a free intracellular P 1 content of ∼ 0.8 μmol./g wet wt. The intracellular pH was 7.10 ± 0.01. Acute respiratory alkalosis and acidosis, with the arterial pH ranging from ∼7.0 to 7.7, resulted in only small changes in the intracellular pH. These latter results demonstrate an effective myocardial intracellular proton-buffering mechanism in vivo

  13. In Vivo Assessment of Neurotransmitters and Modulators with Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Application to Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijtenburg, S. Andrea; Yang, Shaolin; Fischer, Bernard A.; Rowland, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo measurement of neurotransmitters and modulators is now feasible with advanced proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) techniques. This review provides a basic tutorial of MRS, describes the methods available to measure brain glutamate, glutamine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutathione, N-acetylaspartylglutamate, glycine, and serine at magnetic field strengths of 3Tesla or higher, and summarizes the neurochemical findings in schizophrenia. Overall, 1H-MRS holds great promise for producing biomarkers that can serve as treatment targets, prediction of disease onset, or illness exacerbation in schizophrenia and other brain diseases. PMID:25614132

  14. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Hachemian, Nilouparak [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria); Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed [Department of Radiology, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna 1090 (Austria)

    2013-07-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality.

  15. Magnetic Field Interactions of Copper-Containing Intrauterine Devices in 3.0-Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In Vivo Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger-Kulemann, Vanessa; Einspieler, Henrik; Hachemian, Nilouparak; Prayer, Daniela; Trattnig, Siegfried; Weber, Michael; Ba-Ssalamah, Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    An ex vivo study found a copper-containing intrauterine device (IUD) to be safe for women undergoing an MRI examination at a 3.0-T field. No significant artifacts caused by the metallic implant were detected. However, there are still no in vivo data about these concerns. The aim of this study was to evaluate 3.0-T magnetic field interactions of copper-containing IUDs in vivo. Magnetic field interactions and potential adverse events were evaluated in 33 women using a questionnaire-based telephone survey. Two experienced radiologists performed artifact evaluation on MR images of the pelvis. Eighteen patients were eligible for the survey. One patient reported a dislocation of the IUD after the MR examination. All other patients had no signs of field interactions. No IUD-related artifacts were found. MRI at 3.0-T is possible for women with copper-containing IUDs. However, consulting a gynecologist to check the correct position of the IUD and exclude complications after an MR examination is highly recommended. High-quality clinical imaging of the female pelvis can be performed without a loss in image quality

  16. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids and Polychlorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-05

    Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic Phosphorus L...Carboxylic Acids and 4Polychiorotrifluoroethylene: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance G-AFOSR-90-0148 Investigation in Vivo ,IIC 6. AUTHOR(S a Nicholas V. Reo...Maxim um 200 words) This report outlines our research progress regarding toxicological investigations of perifluoro- n-octanoic acid (PFOA) and

  17. Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-17

    Reo, C. M. Goecke, L. Narayanan, and B. M. Jarnot. "Effects of Perfluoro-n- octanoic Acid , Perfluoro-n-decanoic Acid , and Clofibrate on Hepatic...SUBTITLE 7C 5. FUNDING NUMBERS" Hepatic Metabolism of Perfluorinated Carboxylic Acids : A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Investigation in Vivo G-AFOSR-90-0148 6...octanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluoro-n-decanoic acid (PFDA). These Air Force chemicals belong to a class of CU’. compounds known as peroxisome

  18. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  19. NMR studies of renal phosphate metabolites in vivo: Effects of hydration and dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.D.; Eng, C.; Balaban, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present study characterizes the 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of rabbit kidneys in vivo and evaluates the effect of hydration on phosphorous metabolites including the organic solute glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC). Cortical phosphorylethanolamine is the predominant component of the phosphomonoester region of the 31 P spectrum. The contribution of blood to the spectrum is mainly from 2,3 diphosphoglycerate, which comprises ∼30% of the inorganic phosphate region. Acute infusion of 0.9% saline decreases the sodium content of the inner medulla by >50% in 15 min as shown by 23 Na imaging. Despite this medullary Na dilution, no change in renal GPC content was observed for >1 h even with the addition of furosemide or furosemide and antidiuretic hormone. However, 20 h of chronic dehydration with 0.45% saline did result in a 30% decrease in renal GPC content when compared with dehydrated animals. These findings are consistent with GPC not playing a role in the short-term regulation of the medullary intracellular milieu in response to acute reductions in medullary Na content

  20. Magnetic resonance imaging of trabecular and cortical bone in mice: comparison of high resolution in vivo and ex vivo MR images with corresponding histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Michael H.; Sharp, Jonathan C.; Latta, Peter; Sramek, Milos; Hassard, H. Thomas; Orr, F. William

    2005-01-01

    Measurements of bone morphometry and remodeling have been shown to reflect bone strength and can be used to diagnose degenerative bone disease. In this study, in vivo and ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to assess trabecular and cortical bone properties have been compared to each other and to histology as a novel means for the quantification of bone. Femurs of C57Bl/6 mice were examined both in vivo and ex vivo on an 11.7 T MRI scanner, followed by histologic processing and morphometry. A thresholding analysis technique was applied to the MRI images to generate contour lines and to delineate the boundaries between bone and marrow. Using MRI, an optimal correlation with histology was obtained with an in vivo longitudinal sectioned short echo time gradient-echo versus an in vivo long echo time spin-echo sequence or an ex vivo pulse sequence. Gradient-echo images were acquired with a maximum in-plane resolution of 35 μm. Our results demonstrated that in both the in vivo and ex vivo data sets, the percent area of marrow increases and percent area of trabecular bone and cortical bone thickness decreases moving from the epiphyseal growth plate to the diaphysis. These changes, observed with MRI, correlate with the histological data. Investigations using in vivo MRI gradient-echo sequences consistently gave the best correlation with histology. Our quantitative evaluation using both ex vivo and in vivo MRI was found to be an effective means to visualize non-invasively the normal variation in trabecular and cortical bone as compared to a histological 'gold standard' The experiments validated in vivo MRI as a potential high resolution technique for investigating both soft tissue, such as marrow, and bone without radiation exposure

  1. Comparative in vivo mucoadhesion studies of thiomer formulations using magnetic resonance imaging and fluorescence detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, K; Greindl, M; Kremser, C; Wolf, C; Debbage, P; Bernkop-Schnürch, A

    2006-09-28

    The aim of this study was to compare different oral delivery systems based on the thiolated polymer polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-Cys) and to provide evidence for the validity of the hypothesis that unhydrated polymers provide better mucoadhesion in vivo. To achieve dry polymer application, a new, experimental dosage form named Eutex (made of Eudragit L100-55 and latex) capsule has been developed. Magnetic resonance imaging was used to localize the point of release of the thiolated polymer from the application forms via the positive magnetic resonance signal from a gadolinium complex (Gd-DTPA). In vivo mucoadhesion was determined by ascertaining the residence time of the fluorescence-tagged thiomer on intestinal mucosa after 3 h. Results showed that in comparison to conventional application forms the Eutex capsules led to 1.9-fold higher mucoadhesive properties of PCP-Cys when compared to application with a conventional enteric-coated capsule, and to 1.4-fold higher mucoadhesion when compared to administration with an enteric-coated tablet of the thiomer. The findings of this study should contribute to the understanding of mucoadhesion and mucoadhesion influencing parameters in vivo and should therefore be of considerable interest for the development of future mucoadhesive oral drug delivery dosage forms.

  2. Recommendations for In Vitro and In Vivo Testing of Magnetic Nanoparticle Hyperthermia Combined with Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spiridon V. Spirou

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic nanoparticle (MNP-mediated hyperthermia (MH coupled with radiation therapy (RT is a novel approach that has the potential to overcome various practical difficulties encountered in cancer treatment. In this work, we present recommendations for the in vitro and in vivo testing and application of the two treatment techniques. These recommendations were developed by the members of Working Group 3 of COST Action TD 1402: Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Magnetic Hyperthermia and Indirect Radiation Therapy (“Radiomag”. The purpose of the recommendations is not to provide definitive answers and directions but, rather, to outline those tests and considerations that a researcher must address in order to perform in vitro and in vivo studies. The recommendations are divided into 5 parts: (a in vitro evaluation of MNPs; (b in vitro evaluation of MNP-cell interactions; (c in vivo evaluation of the MNPs; (d MH combined with RT; and (e pharmacokinetic studies of MNPs. Synthesis and characterization of the MNPs, as well as RT protocols, are beyond the scope of this work.

  3. In Vivo Imaging of Nitric Oxide by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO biosensors are novel tools for real-time bioimaging of tissue oxygen changes and physiological monitoring of tissue vasculature. Nitric oxide behavior further enhances its role in mapping signal transduction at the molecular level. Spectrometric electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR and fluorometric imaging are well known techniques with the potential for in vivo bioimaging of NO. In tissues, NO is a specific target of nitrosyl compounds for chemical reaction, which provides a unique opportunity for application of newly identified NO biosensors. However, the accuracy and sensitivity of NO biosensors still need to be improved. Another potential magnetic resonance technique based on short term NO effects on proton relaxation enhancement is magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, and some NO biosensors may be used as potent imaging contrast agents for measurement of tumor size by MRI combined with fluorescent imaging. The present review provides supporting information regarding the possible use of nitrosyl compounds as NO biosensors in MRI and fluorescent bioimaging showing their measurement limitations and quantitative accuracy. These new approaches open a perspective regarding bioimaging of NO and the in vivo elucidation of NO effects by magnetic resonance techniques.

  4. Magnet Tracking: a new tool for in vivo studies of the rat gastrointestinal motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guignet, R; Bergonzelli, G; Schlageter, V; Turini, M; Kucera, P

    2006-06-01

    Digestive motility was studied in the rat using a miniaturized version of the Magnet Tracking system which monitored the progression of a small magnetic pill through the entire digestive tract. The dynamics of movement was followed and three-dimensional (3-D) images of digestive tract were generated. After a retention period in the stomach and rapid passage through duodenum, the magnet progressed along the small intestine with gradually decreasing speed and longer stationary periods. It remained in the caecum for variable intervals. In the colon, periods of progress alternated with long quiescent periods. Gastric activity oscillated at 5-6 min(-1). In the small intestine, two frequency domains coexisted, showing independent modulations and proximo-distal gradients (40 to >32 and 28 to >20 min(-1)). Caecal oscillations were of 1.5 min(-1). The data allowed the magnet location and calculation of gastric and small intestinal transit times (58 +/- 36 and 83 +/- 14 min respectively), both significantly prolonged by oleate administration (243 +/- 130 and 170 +/- 45 min respectively). Magnet Tracking is a non-invasive tool to study the in vivo spatial and temporal organization of gastrointestinal motility in the rat.

  5. The Response of RIF-1 Fibrosarcomas to the Vascular-Disrupting Agent ZD6126 Assessed by In Vivo and Ex Vivo1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basetti Madhu

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The response of radiation-induced fibrosarcoma1 (RIF-1 tumors treated with the vascular-disrupting agent (VDA ZD6126 was assessed by in vivo and ex vivo1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS methods. Tumors treated with 200 mg/kg ZD6126 showed a significant reduction in total choline (tCho in vivo 24 hours after treatment, whereas control tumors showed a significant increase in tCho. This response was investigated further within both ex vivo unprocessed tumor tissues and tumor tissue metabolite extracts. Ex vivo high-resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS and 1H MRS of metabolite extracts revealed a significant reduction in phosphocholine and glycerophosphocholine in biopsies of ZD6126-treated tumors, confirming in vivo tCho response. ZD6126-induced reduction in choline compounds is consistent with a reduction in cell membrane turnover associated with necrosis and cell death following disruption of the tumor vasculature. In vivo tumor tissue water diffusion and lactate measurements showed no significant changes in response to ZD6126. Spin-spin relaxation times (T2 of water and metabolites also remained unchanged. Noninvasive 1H MRS measurement of tCho in vivo provides a potential biomarker of tumor response to VDAs in RIF-1 tumors.

  6. In vivo assessment of cold adaptation in insect larvae by magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Mietchen

    Full Text Available Temperatures below the freezing point of water and the ensuing ice crystal formation pose serious challenges to cell structure and function. Consequently, species living in seasonally cold environments have evolved a multitude of strategies to reorganize their cellular architecture and metabolism, and the underlying mechanisms are crucial to our understanding of life. In multicellular organisms, and poikilotherm animals in particular, our knowledge about these processes is almost exclusively due to invasive studies, thereby limiting the range of conclusions that can be drawn about intact living systems.Given that non-destructive techniques like (1H Magnetic Resonance (MR imaging and spectroscopy have proven useful for in vivo investigations of a wide range of biological systems, we aimed at evaluating their potential to observe cold adaptations in living insect larvae. Specifically, we chose two cold-hardy insect species that frequently serve as cryobiological model systems--the freeze-avoiding gall moth Epiblema scudderiana and the freeze-tolerant gall fly Eurosta solidaginis.In vivo MR images were acquired from autumn-collected larvae at temperatures between 0 degrees C and about -70 degrees C and at spatial resolutions down to 27 microm. These images revealed three-dimensional (3D larval anatomy at a level of detail currently not in reach of other in vivo techniques. Furthermore, they allowed visualization of the 3D distribution of the remaining liquid water and of the endogenous cryoprotectants at subzero temperatures, and temperature-weighted images of these distributions could be derived. Finally, individual fat body cells and their nuclei could be identified in intact frozen Eurosta larvae.These findings suggest that high resolution MR techniques provide for interesting methodological options in comparative cryobiological investigations, especially in vivo.

  7. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems using magnetic resonance imaging and Monte Carlo computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallett, M.W.

    1991-01-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. This method uses magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to determine the anatomical makeup of an individual. A new MRI technique is also employed that is capable of resolving the fat and water content of the human tissue. This anatomical and biochemical information is used to model a mathematical phantom. Monte Carlo methods are then used to simulate the transport of radiation throughout the phantom. By modeling the detection equipment of the in vivo measurement system into the code, calibration factors are generated that are specific to the individual. Furthermore, this method eliminates the need for surrogate human structures in the calibration process. A demonstration of the proposed method is being performed using a fat/water matrix

  8. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; Ståhlberg, F; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    , corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory...... arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105 +/- 31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate......Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve...

  9. Magnetic particle imaging for in vivo blood flow velocity measurements in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Michael G.; Salamon, Johannes; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald; Adam, Gerhard; Weller, Horst; Jung, Caroline

    2018-03-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new imaging technology. It is a potential candidate to be used for angiographic purposes, to study perfusion and cell migration. The aim of this work was to measure velocities of the flowing blood in the inferior vena cava of mice, using MPI, and to evaluate it in comparison with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A phantom mimicking the flow within the inferior vena cava with velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 was used for the evaluation of the applied analysis techniques. Time–density and distance–density analyses for bolus tracking were performed to calculate flow velocities. These findings were compared with the calibrated velocities set by a flow pump, and it can be concluded that velocities of up to 21 cm s‑1 can be measured by MPI. A time–density analysis using an arrival time estimation algorithm showed the best agreement with the preset velocities. In vivo measurements were performed in healthy FVB mice (n  =  10). MRI experiments were performed using phase contrast (PC) for velocity mapping. For MPI measurements, a standardized injection of a superparamagnetic iron oxide tracer was applied. In vivo MPI data were evaluated by a time–density analysis and compared to PC MRI. A Bland–Altman analysis revealed good agreement between the in vivo velocities acquired by MRI of 4.0  ±  1.5 cm s‑1 and those measured by MPI of 4.8  ±  1.1 cm s‑1. Magnetic particle imaging is a new tool with which to measure and quantify flow velocities. It is fast, radiation-free, and produces 3D images. It therefore offers the potential for vascular imaging.

  10. In vivo biodistribution and biological impact of injected carbon nanotubes using magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Achraf Al Faraj

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Achraf Al Faraj1,2, Florence Fauvelle3, Nathalie Luciani4, Ghislaine Lacroix5, Michael Levy4, Yannick Crémillieux1, Emmanuelle Canet-Soulas1Université Lyon1, Créatis-LRMN, Lyon, France; 2King Saud University, College of Applied Medical Sciences, Radiological Sciences Department, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 3CRSSA, Biophysique Cellulaire et Moléculaire, Laboratoire de RMN, La Tronche, France; 4Université Paris7-Paris Diderot, Matières et Systèmes Complexes, Paris, France; 5Institut National de l’Environnement et des Risques Industriels, Verneuil-en-Halatte, FranceBackground: Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT hold promise for applications as contrast agents and target delivery carriers in the field of nanomedicine. When administered in vivo, their biodistribution and pharmacological profile needs to be fully characterized. The tissue distribution of carbon nanotubes and their potential impact on metabolism depend on their shape, coating, and metallic impurities. Because standard radiolabeled or fluorescently-labeled pharmaceuticals are not well suited for long-term in vivo follow-up of carbon nanotubes, alternative methods are required.Methods: In this study, noninvasive in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI investigations combined with high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS, Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological analysis ex vivo were proposed and applied to assess the biodistribution and biological impact of intravenously injected pristine (raw and purified and functionalized SWCNT in a 2-week longitudinal study. Iron impurities allowed raw detection of SWCNT in vivo by susceptibility-weighted MRI.Results: A transitional accumulation in the spleen and liver was observed by MRI. Raman spectroscopy, iron assays, and histological findings confirmed the MRI readouts. Moreover, no acute toxicological effect on the liver metabolic profile was observed using the HR-MAS technique, as confirmed by quantitative real

  11. In vivo determination of body composition of rats using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, H; Vasselli, J; Wu, E; Gallagher, D

    2000-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has potential as an instrument to measure body composition because it can discriminate various soft tissues in vivo. These soft tissues include adipose tissue, muscle, organs, and brain. We report on preliminary studies using a 4.2-tesla MRI for measuring body composition in the mouse and rat. We employed image segmentation methods that include an image correction method, a necessary requirement when the images are taken in the presence of nonuniform radio-frequency (RF) coil response. The software for 3-D data segmentation, quantification, correction, image manipulation, and visualization has been developed as a research tool. This method currently is being validated.

  12. An optimized framework for quantitative magnetization transfer imaging of the cervical spinal cord in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battiston, Marco; Grussu, Francesco; Ianus, Andrada; Schneider, Torben; Prados, Ferran; Fairney, James; Ourselin, Sebastien; Alexander, Daniel C; Cercignani, Mara; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Samson, Rebecca S

    2018-05-01

    To develop a framework to fully characterize quantitative magnetization transfer indices in the human cervical cord in vivo within a clinically feasible time. A dedicated spinal cord imaging protocol for quantitative magnetization transfer was developed using a reduced field-of-view approach with echo planar imaging (EPI) readout. Sequence parameters were optimized based in the Cramer-Rao-lower bound. Quantitative model parameters (i.e., bound pool fraction, free and bound pool transverse relaxation times [ T2F, T2B], and forward exchange rate [k FB ]) were estimated implementing a numerical model capable of dealing with the novelties of the sequence adopted. The framework was tested on five healthy subjects. Cramer-Rao-lower bound minimization produces optimal sampling schemes without requiring the establishment of a steady-state MT effect. The proposed framework allows quantitative voxel-wise estimation of model parameters at the resolution typically used for spinal cord imaging (i.e. 0.75 × 0.75 × 5 mm 3 ), with a protocol duration of ∼35 min. Quantitative magnetization transfer parametric maps agree with literature values. Whole-cord mean values are: bound pool fraction = 0.11(±0.01), T2F = 46.5(±1.6) ms, T2B = 11.0(±0.2) µs, and k FB  = 1.95(±0.06) Hz. Protocol optimization has a beneficial effect on reproducibility, especially for T2B and k FB . The framework developed enables robust characterization of spinal cord microstructure in vivo using qMT. Magn Reson Med 79:2576-2588, 2018. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. © 2017 The Authors Magnetic Resonance in Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc

  13. Assessment of tumor energy and oxygenation status by bioluminescence, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and cryospectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Klieser, W; Schaefer, C; Walenta, S; Rofstad, E K; Fenton, B M; Sutherland, R M

    1990-03-15

    The energy and oxygenation status of tumors from two murine sarcoma lines (KHT, RIF-1) and two human ovarian carcinoma xenograft lines (MLS, OWI) were assessed using three independent techniques. Tumor energy metabolism was investigated in vivo by 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After nuclear magnetic resonance measurements, tumors were frozen in liquid nitrogen to determine the tissue ATP concentration by imaging bioluminescence and to register the intracapillary oxyhemoglobin (HbO2) saturation using the cryospectrophotometric method. There was a positive correlation between the nucleoside triphosphate beta/total resonance ratio or a negative correlation between the Pi/total resonance ratio and the model ATP concentration obtained by bioluminescence, respectively. This was true for small tumors with no extended necrosis irrespective of tumor type. Moreover, a positive correlation was obtained between the HbO2 saturations and the ATP concentration measured with bioluminescence. The results demonstrate the potential of combined studies using noninvasive, integrating methods and high-resolution imaging techniques for characterizing the metabolic milieu in tumors.

  14. Visualizing Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in vivo using Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Mayank Anant

    Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) is a low-cost, non-invasive neuromodulation technique that has been shown to treat clinical symptoms as well as improve cognition. However, no techniques exist at the time of research to visualize tDCS currents in vivo. This dissertation presents the theoretical framework and experimental implementations of a novel MRI technique that enables non-invasive visualization of the tDCS electric current using magnetic field mapping. The first chapter establishes the feasibility of measuring magnetic fields induced by tDCS currents. The following chapter discusses the state of the art implementation that can measure magnetic field changes in individual subjects undergoing concurrent tDCS/MRI. The final chapter discusses how the developed technique was integrated with BOLD fMRI-an established MRI technique for measuring brain function. By enabling a concurrent measurement of the tDCS current induced magnetic field as well as the brain's hemodynamic response to tDCS, our technique opens a new avenue to investigate tDCS mechanisms and improve targeting.

  15. Quantification of in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy signals with baseline and lineshape estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osorio-Garcia, M I; Sima, D M; Van Huffel, S; Nielsen, F U; Dresselaers, T; Himmelreich, U; Van Leuven, F

    2011-01-01

    The in vivo quantification of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) signals is a method to estimate metabolite concentrations of living tissue. Obtaining reliable concentrations is still a challenge due to the experimental conditions affecting spectral quality. Additionally, lipids and macromolecules overlap with the metabolites of interest, affecting their reliable estimation. In this study, we propose to combine the self-deconvolution lineshape estimation method, which accounts for spectral shape distortions, with two different approaches for taking into account the macromolecular baseline contribution: (a) based on macromolecules and lipids measured in vivo using an inversion recovery technique, and (b) based on the simulation of macromolecular resonances using prior knowledge from a database of inversion recovery signals. The ultimate goal is to measure macromolecular and lipid data only once as described in (a) to create macromolecular and lipid profiles. These profiles then can be used as described in (b) for data measured under the same conditions. The method is evaluated on in vivo 1 H MRS signals at 9.4 T from mouse hippocampus. Results show that better metabolite fits are obtained when lineshape and baseline estimations are simultaneously performed and that baseline estimation based on prior knowledge from macromolecular measured signals can be reliably used to replace time-consuming individual macromolecular and lipid acquisitions

  16. In vivo evaluation of femoral blood flow measured with magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henriksen, O.; Staahlberg, F.; Thomsen, C.; Moegelvang, J.; Persson, B.; Lund Univ.

    1989-01-01

    Quantitative measurements of blood flow based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using conventional multiple spin echo sequences were evaluated in vivo in healthy young volunteers. Blood flow was measured using MRI in the femoral vein. The initial slope of the multiple spin echo decay curve, corrected for the T2 decay of non-flowing blood was used to calculate the blood flow. As a reference, the blood flow in the femoral artery was measured simultaneously with an invasive indicator dilution technique. T2 of non-flowing blood was measured in vivo in popliteal veins during regional circulatory arrest. The mean T2 of non-flowing blood was found to be 105±31 ms. The femoral blood flow ranged between 0 and 643 ml/min measured with MRI and between 280 and 531 ml/min measured by the indicator dilution technique. There was thus poor agreement between the two methods. The results indicate that in vivo blood flow measurements made with MRI based on wash-out effects, commonly used in multiple spin echo imaging, do not give reliable absolute values for blood flow in the femoral artery or vein. (orig.)

  17. In vivo biotinylation of recombinant beta-glucosidase enables simultaneous purification and immobilization on streptavidin coated magnetic particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alftrén, Johan; Ottow, Kim Ekelund; Hobley, Timothy John

    2013-01-01

    Beta-glucosidase from Bacillus licheniformis was in vivo biotinylated in Escherichia coli and subsequently immobilized directly from cell lysate on streptavidin coated magnetic particles. In vivo biotinylation was mediated by fusing the Biotin Acceptor Peptide to the C-terminal of beta......-glucosidase and co-expressing the BirA biotin ligase. The approach enabled simultaneous purification and immobilization of the enzyme from crude cell lysate on magnetic particles because of the high affinity and strong interaction between biotin and streptavidin. After immobilization of the biotinylated beta...

  18. In vivo measurement of water self diffusion in the human brain by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Henriksen, O; Ring, P

    1987-01-01

    A new pulse sequence for in vivo diffusion measurements by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is introduced. The pulse sequence was tested on phantoms to evaluate the accuracy, reproducibility and inplane variations. The sensitivity of the sequence was tested by measuring the self diffusion...... coefficient of water with different temperatures. This phantom study showed that the water self diffusion could be measured accurately and that the inplane deviation was less than +/- 10 per cent. Seven healthy volunteers were studied with a 10 mm thick slice through the lateral ventricles, clear differences...... between grey and white matter as well as regional differences within the white matter were seen. In two patients with infarction, alternations in water self diffusion were seen in the region of the infarct. Likewise, pronounced changes in brain water self diffusion were observed in a patient with benign...

  19. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sole, Angelo Del; Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea; Lecchi, Michela; Lucignani, Giovanni

    2002-01-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  20. In vivo neurochemistry with emission tomography and magnetic resonance spectroscopy: clinical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sole, Angelo Del [Azienda Ospedaliera San Paolo e Universita di Milano, 20142 Milan (Italy); Gambini, Anna; Falini, Andrea [IRCCS H San Raffaele e Universita Vita e Salute, 20132 Milan (Italy); Lecchi, Michela [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Lucignani, Giovanni [Azienda Ospedaliera L. Sacco e Universita di Milano, 20157 Milan (Italy); Universita di Milano, Istituto di Scienze Radiologiche, Cattedra di Medicina Nucleare c/o Ospedale L. Sacco, Via G.B. Grassi, 74, 20157 Milan (Italy)

    2002-10-01

    The assessment of neurochemical processes in vivo has received much attention in the past decade as techniques such as positron or single photon emission tomography (PET and SPET), and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) have become more available. With PET and SPET, basic processes, such as blood flow and oxygen or glucose metabolism, can be regionally assessed, along with more specific functions such as the production, release, and reuptake of neurotransmitters and their occupancy of specific receptors. At the same time, MRS can reveal changes in concentration of several hydrogenate compounds in the brain. All these methods have been extensively applied for research in neurology, and some applications have reached the clinical level, namely for the study of degenerative diseases, motor-neuron diseases, movement disorders, cerebrovascular diseases, and epilepsy. This article focuses on the most relevant information that can be obtained with these complementary techniques to help clinicians in the assessment of neurological diseases. (orig.)

  1. Novel magnetic multicore nanoparticles designed for MPI and other biomedical applications: From synthesis to first in vivo studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald Kratz

    Full Text Available Synthesis of novel magnetic multicore particles (MCP in the nano range, involves alkaline precipitation of iron(II chloride in the presence of atmospheric oxygen. This step yields green rust, which is oxidized to obtain magnetic nanoparticles, which probably consist of a magnetite/maghemite mixed-phase. Final growth and annealing at 90°C in the presence of a large excess of carboxymethyl dextran gives MCP very promising magnetic properties for magnetic particle imaging (MPI, an emerging medical imaging modality, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. The magnetic nanoparticles are biocompatible and thus potential candidates for future biomedical applications such as cardiovascular imaging, sentinel lymph node mapping in cancer patients, and stem cell tracking. The new MCP that we introduce here have three times higher magnetic particle spectroscopy performance at lower and middle harmonics and five times higher MPS signal strength at higher harmonics compared with Resovist®. In addition, the new MCP have also an improved in vivo MPI performance compared to Resovist®, and we here report the first in vivo MPI investigation of this new generation of magnetic nanoparticles.

  2. Intra- and extracellular pH of the brain in vivo studied by 31P-NMR during hyper- and hypocapnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Portman, M A; Lassen, N A; Cooper, T G

    1991-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine the pH relationships among the extracellular, intracellular, and arterial blood compartments in the brain in vivo. Resolution of the extracellular monophosphate resonance peak from the intracellular peak in 31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectra of sheep...... brain with the calvarium intact enabled pH measurement in these respective compartments. Sheep were then subjected to both hyper- and hypoventilation, which resulted in a wide range of arterial PCO2 and pH values. Linear regression analysis of pH in these compartments yielded slopes of 0.56 +/- 0.......05 for extracellular pH (pHe) vs. arterial pH, 0.43 +/- 0.078 for intracellular pH (pHi) vs. pHe, and 0.23 +/- 0.056 for pHi vs. arterial pH. These data indicate that CO2 buffering capacity is different and decreases from the intracellular to extracellular to arterial blood compartments. Separation...

  3. Precise determination of the heat delivery during in vivo magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia with infrared thermography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Harley F.; Capistrano, Gustavo; Mello, Francyelli M.; Zufelato, Nicholas; Silveira-Lacerda, Elisângela; Bakuzis, Andris F.

    2017-05-01

    Non-invasive and real-time monitoring of the heat delivery during magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (MNH) is of fundamental importance to predict clinical outcomes for cancer treatment. Infrared thermography (IRT) can determine the surface temperature due to three-dimensional heat delivery inside a subcutaneous tumor, an argument that is supported by numerical simulations. However, for precise temperature determination, it is of crucial relevance to use a correct experimental configuration. This work reports an MNH study using a sarcoma 180 murine tumor containing 3.9 mg of intratumorally injected manganese-ferrite nanoparticles. MNH was performed at low field amplitude and non-uniform field configuration. Five 30 min in vivo magnetic hyperthermia experiments were performed, monitoring the surface temperature with a fiber optical sensor and thermal camera at distinct angles with respect to the animal’s surface. The results indicate that temperature errors as large as 7~\\circ C can occur if the experiment is not properly designed. A new IRT error model is found to explain the data. More importantly, we show how to precisely monitor temperature with IRT during hyperthermia, which could positively impact heat dosimetry and clinical planning.

  4. In vivo characterization of a new abdominal aortic aneurysm mouse model with conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klink, Ahmed; Heynens, Joeri; Herranz, Beatriz; Lobatto, Mark E.; Arias, Teresa; Sanders, Honorius M. H. F.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Merkx, Maarten; Nicolay, Klaas; Fuster, Valentin; Tedgui, Alain; Mallat, Ziad; Mulder, Willem J. M.; Fayad, Zahi A.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to use noninvasive conventional and molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect and characterize abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) in vivo. Collagen is an essential constituent of aneurysms. Noninvasive MRI of collagen may represent an opportunity to help detect

  5. Formulation of novel lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles as the probe for in vivo imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mou Chung-Yuan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Application of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIOs as the contrast agent has improved the quality of magnetic resonance (MR imaging. Low efficiency of loading the commercially available iron oxide nanoparticles into cells and the cytotoxicity of previously formulated complexes limit their usage as the image probe. Here, we formulated new cationic lipid nanoparticles containing SPIOs feasible for in vivo imaging. Methods Hydrophobic SPIOs were incorporated into cationic lipid 1,2-dioleoyl-3-(trimethylammonium propane (DOTAP and polyethylene-glycol-2000-1,2-distearyl-3-sn-phosphatidylethanolamine (PEG-DSPE based micelles by self-assembly procedure to form lipid-coated SPIOs (L-SPIOs. Trace amount of Rhodamine-dioleoyl-phosphatidylethanolamine (Rhodamine-DOPE was added as a fluorescent indicator. Particle size and zeta potential of L-SPIOs were determined by Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS and Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV, respectively. HeLa, PC-3 and Neuro-2a cells were tested for loading efficiency and cytotoxicity of L-SPIOs using fluorescent microscopy, Prussian blue staining and flow cytometry. L-SPIO-loaded CT-26 cells were tested for in vivo MR imaging. Results The novel formulation generates L-SPIOs particle with the average size of 46 nm. We showed efficient cellular uptake of these L-SPIOs with cationic surface charge into HeLa, PC-3 and Neuro-2a cells. The L-SPIO-loaded cells exhibited similar growth potential as compared to unloaded cells, and could be sorted by a magnet stand over ten-day duration. Furthermore, when SPIO-loaded CT-26 tumor cells were injected into Balb/c mice, the growth status of these tumor cells could be monitored using optical and MR images. Conclusion We have developed a novel cationic lipid-based nanoparticle of SPIOs with high loading efficiency, low cytotoxicity and long-term imaging signals. The results suggested these newly formulated non-toxic lipid-coated magnetic

  6. Synthesis and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of biocompatible branched copolymer nanocontrast agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackson AW

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Alexander W Jackson,1,* Prashant Chandrasekharan,2,* Jian Shi,3 Steven P Rannard,4 Quan Liu,5 Chang-Tong Yang,6 Tao He1,7 1Institute of Chemical and Engineering Sciences (ICES, 2Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Agency for Science Technology and Research (A* STAR, 3Department of Biological Science, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Department of Chemistry, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, United Kingdom; 5School of Chemical and Biomedical Engineering, 6Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 7School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, HeFei University of Technology, Anhui, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Branched copolymer nanoparticles (Dh =20–35 nm possessing 1,4,7, 10-tetraazacyclododecane-N,N',N",N'"-tetraacetic acid macrocycles within their cores have been synthesized and applied as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI nanosized contrast agents in vivo. These nanoparticles have been generated from novel functional monomers via reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. The process is very robust and synthetically straightforward. Chelation with gadolinium and preliminary in vivo experiments have demonstrated promising characteristics as MRI contrast agents with prolonged blood retention time, good biocompatibility, and an intravascular distribution. The ability of these nanoparticles to perfuse and passively target tumor cells through the enhanced permeability and retention effect is also demonstrated. These novel highly functional nanoparticle platforms have succinimidyl ester-activated benzoate functionalities within their corona, which make them suitable for future peptide conjugation and subsequent active cell-targeted MRI or the conjugation of fluorophores for bimodal imaging. We have also demonstrated that these branched copolymer nanoparticles are able to noncovalently

  7. In vivo organ mass of Korean adults obtained from whole-body magnetic resonance data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, S.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, J. I.; Lee, Y. J.; Lim, Y. K.; Kim, C. S.; Lee, C.

    2006-01-01

    In vivo organ mass of the Korean adult, male and female were presented for the purpose of radiation protection. A total of 121 healthy volunteers (66 males and 55 females), whose body dimensions were close to that of average Korean adults, were recruited for this study. Whole-body magnetic resonance (MR) images were obtained, and contours of 15 organs (brain, eye, gall bladder, heart, kidney, liver, lung, pancreas, stomach, spleen, testes, thymus, thyroid, urinary bladder and uterus) and 9 bones (femur, tibia + fibula, humerus, radius + ulna, pelvis, cervical spine, thoracic and lumber spine, skull and clavicle) were segmented for organ volume rendering by anatomists using commercial software. Organ and bone masses were calculated by multiplying the Asian reference densities of the corresponding organs and bones by the measured volumes. The resulting organ and bone masses were compared with those of the International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP) and the Asian reference data. Significantly large standard deviation was shown in the moving organs of the respiratory and circulatory systems and in the alimentary and urogenital organs that are variable in volume in a single person. Gall bladder and pancreas showed unique Korean organ masses compared with those of ICRP and the Asian reference adults. Different from anatomical data based on autopsy, the in vivo volume and mass in this study can more exactly describe the organ volume of a living human subject for radiation protection. A larger sample size would be required for obtaining statistically more reliable results. It is also needed to establish the reference organ mass of younger age groups for which it is difficult to recruit volunteers and to immobilise the subjects for long-time MR scanning. At present, the data from this study will contribute to the establishment of a Korean reference database. (authors)

  8. How Energy Metabolism Supports Cerebral Function: Insights from 13C Magnetic Resonance Studies In vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Sonnay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral function is associated with exceptionally high metabolic activity, and requires continuous supply of oxygen and nutrients from the blood stream. Since the mid-twentieth century the idea that brain energy metabolism is coupled to neuronal activity has emerged, and a number of studies supported this hypothesis. Moreover, brain energy metabolism was demonstrated to be compartmentalized in neurons and astrocytes, and astrocytic glycolysis was proposed to serve the energetic demands of glutamatergic activity. Shedding light on the role of astrocytes in brain metabolism, the earlier picture of astrocytes being restricted to a scaffold-associated function in the brain is now out of date. With the development and optimization of non-invasive techniques, such as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS, several groups have worked on assessing cerebral metabolism in vivo. In this context, 1H MRS has allowed the measurements of energy metabolism-related compounds, whose concentrations can vary under different brain activation states. 1H-[13C] MRS, i.e., indirect detection of signals from 13C-coupled 1H, together with infusion of 13C-enriched glucose has provided insights into the coupling between neurotransmission and glucose oxidation. Although these techniques tackle the coupling between neuronal activity and metabolism, they lack chemical specificity and fail in providing information on neuronal and glial metabolic pathways underlying those processes. Currently, the improvement of detection modalities (i.e., direct detection of 13C isotopomers, the progress in building adequate mathematical models along with the increase in magnetic field strength now available render possible detailed compartmentalized metabolic flux characterization. In particular, direct 13C MRS offers more detailed dataset acquisitions and provides information on metabolic interactions between neurons and astrocytes, and their role in supporting neurotransmission. Here

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of articular cartilage: ex vivo study on normal cartilage correlated with magnetic resonance microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cova, M.; Frezza, F.; Pozzi-Mucelli, R.S.; Dalla-Palma, L.; Toffanin, R.; Pozzi-Mucelli, M.; Mlynarik, V.; Vittur, F.

    1998-01-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to compare the MR appearance of normal articular cartilage in ex vivo MR imaging (MRI) and MR microscopy (MRM) images of disarticulated human femoral heads, (b) to evaluate by MRM the topographic variations in articular cartilage of disarticulated human femoral heads, and subsequently, (c) to compare MRM images with histology. Ten disarticulated femoral heads were examined. Magnetic resonance images were obtained using spin-echo (SE) and gradient-echo (GE) sequences. Microimages were acquired on cartilage-bone cylindrical plugs excised from four regions (superior, inferior, anterior, posterior) of one femoral head, using a modified SE sequence. Both MRI and MRM images were obtained before and after a 90 rotation of the specimen, around the axis perpendicular to the examined cartilage surface. Finally, MRM images were correlated with histology. A trilaminar appearance of articular cartilage was observed with MRI and with a greater detail with MRM. A good correlation between MRI and MRM features was demonstrated. Both MRI and MRM showed a loss of the trilaminar cartilage appearance after specimen rotation, with greater evidence on MRM images. Cartilage excised from the four regions of the femoral head showed a different thickness, being thickest in the samples excised from the superior site. The MRM technique confirms the trilaminar MRI appearance of human articular cartilage, showing good correlation with histology. The loss of the trilaminar appearance of articular cartilage induced by specimen rotation suggests that this feature is partially related to the collagen-fiber orientation within the different layers. The MRM technique also shows topographic variations in thickness of human articular cartilage. (orig.)

  10. A randomized comparison of laparoscopic, flexible endoscopic, and wired and wireless magnetic cameras on ex vivo and in vivo NOTES surgical performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Victoria C; Tang, Shou-Jiang; Swain, C Paul; Bergs, Richard; Paramo, Juan; Hogg, Deborah C; Fernandez, Raul; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A; Scott, Daniel J

    2013-08-01

    The influence of endoscopic video camera (VC) image quality on surgical performance has not been studied. Flexible endoscopes are used as substitutes for laparoscopes in natural orifice translumenal endoscopic surgery (NOTES), but their optics are originally designed for intralumenal use. Manipulable wired or wireless independent VCs might offer advantages for NOTES but are still under development. To measure the optical characteristics of 4 VC systems and to compare their impact on the performance of surgical suturing tasks. VC systems included a laparoscope (Storz 10 mm), a flexible endoscope (Olympus GIF 160), and 2 prototype deployable cameras (magnetic anchoring and guidance system [MAGS] Camera and PillCam). In a randomized fashion, the 4 systems were evaluated regarding standardized optical characteristics and surgical manipulations of previously validated ex vivo (fundamentals of laparoscopic surgery model) and in vivo (live porcine Nissen model) tasks; objective metrics (time and errors/precision) and combined surgeon (n = 2) performance were recorded. Subtle differences were detected for color tests, and field of view was variable (65°-115°). Suitable resolution was detected up to 10 cm for the laparoscope and MAGS camera but only at closer distances for the endoscope and PillCam. Compared with the laparoscope, surgical suturing performances were modestly lower for the MAGS camera and significantly lower for the endoscope (ex vivo) and PillCam (ex vivo and in vivo). This study documented distinct differences in VC systems that may be used for NOTES in terms of both optical characteristics and surgical performance. Additional work is warranted to optimize cameras for NOTES. Deployable systems may be especially well suited for this purpose.

  11. In vivo determination of hepatic stiffness using steady-state free precession magnetic resonance elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klatt, Dieter; Asbach, Patrick; Rump, Jens; Papazoglou, Sebastian; Somasundaram, Rajan; Modrow, Jens; Braun, Jürgen; Sack, Ingolf

    2006-12-01

    The objective of this study was to introduce an magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) protocol based on fractional motion encoding and planar wave acquisition for rapid measurements of in vivo human liver stiffness. Vibrations of a remote actuator membrane were fed by a rigid rod to the patient's surface beneath the right costal arch resulting in axial shear deflections of the liver. Data acquisition was performed using a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP) sequence incorporating oscillating gradients for motion sensitization. Tissue vibrations of frequency fv = 51 Hz were tuned by twice the sequence repetition time (1/fv = 2TR). Twenty axial images acquired by time-resolved through-plane wave encoding were used for planar elasticity reconstruction. The MRE data acquisition was achieved within 4 breathholds of 17 seconds each. The method was applied to 12 healthy volunteers and 2 patients with diffuse liver disease (fibrosis grade 3). MRE data acquisition was successful in all volunteers and patients. The elastic moduli were measured with values between 1.99 +/- 0.16 and 5.77 +/- 0.88 kPa. Follow-up studies demonstrated the reproducibility of the method and revealed a difference of 0.74 +/- 0.47 kPa (P analysis of the strain wave field captured by axial wave images. The measured data indicate individual variations of hepatic stiffness in healthy volunteers.

  12. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the 13C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:24676563

  13. Fabrication and Packaging of Flexible Polymeric Microantennae for in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Dufour-Gergam

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we detail how microantennae dedicated to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI can benefit from the advantages offered by polymer substrates, especially flexibility and dielectric properties. We present a monolithic and wireless design based on the transmission lines between conductor windings on both sides of a dielectric substrate and its fabrication process. This last one requires specific plasma treatments to improve polymer/metal adhesion. We have led a comparative study on the effects of the ageing time on the wettability and the metal adhesion to Kapton and Teflon surfaces. Correlation between wettability (water contact angle and adhesion (tensile strength has been established. Then, the use of PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS as biocompatible packaging material and the optimization of its thickness allows us to conserve suitable f0 and Q values in a conducting environment such as the biological tissues. These studies allow us to perform 7 Tesla in vivo MRI of the rat brain with a high spatial resolution of 100 x 100 x 200 µm3 and a Signal to Noise Ratio of 80.

  14. High Field In Vivo 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Brain by Random Radiofrequency Heteronuclear Decoupling and Data Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ningzhi; Li, Shizhe; Shen, Jun

    2017-06-01

    In vivo 13C magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a unique and effective tool for studying dynamic human brain metabolism and the cycling of neurotransmitters. One of the major technical challenges for in vivo 13C-MRS is the high radio frequency (RF) power necessary for heteronuclear decoupling. In the common practice of in vivo 13C-MRS, alkanyl carbons are detected in the spectra range of 10-65ppm. The amplitude of decoupling pulses has to be significantly greater than the large one-bond 1H-13C scalar coupling (1JCH=125-145 Hz). Two main proton decoupling methods have been developed: broadband stochastic decoupling and coherent composite or adiabatic pulse decoupling (e.g., WALTZ); the latter is widely used because of its efficiency and superb performance under inhomogeneous B1 field. Because the RF power required for proton decoupling increases quadratically with field strength, in vivo 13C-MRS using coherent decoupling is often limited to low magnetic fields (protons via weak long-range 1H-13C scalar couplings, which can be decoupled using low RF power broadband stochastic decoupling. Recently, the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS technique using low power random RF heteronuclear decoupling was safely applied to human brain studies at 7T. Here, we review the two major decoupling methods and the carboxylic/amide 13C-MRS with low power decoupling strategy. Further decreases in RF power deposition by frequency-domain windowing and time-domain random under-sampling are also discussed. Low RF power decoupling opens the possibility of performing in vivo 13C experiments of human brain at very high magnetic fields (such as 11.7T), where signal-to-noise ratio as well as spatial and temporal spectral resolution are more favorable than lower fields.

  15. Translational Approaches for Studying Neurodevelopmental Disorders Utilizing in Vivo Proton (+H) Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronca, April E.

    2014-01-01

    Intrauterine complications have been implicated in the etiology of neuripsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia, autism and ADHD. This presentation will describe new translational studies derived from in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of developing and adult brain following perinatal asphyxia (PA). Our findings reveal significant effects of PA on neurometabolic profiles at one week of age, and significant relationships between early metabolites and later life phenotypes including behavior and brain morphometry

  16. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Østergaard Christian

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment strategies. Methods Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29 or saline (n = 13 were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI was used to evaluate blood-brain-barrier (BBB permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. Results MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability (P Changes in brain water distribution, assessed by ADC, and categorization of brain 'perfusion' by cortex ΔSI(bolus were subject to increased inter-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05. Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05. Conclusion The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments

  17. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Christian T; Simonsen, Helle; Liptrot, Matthew; Søgaard, Lise V; Lundgren, Jens D; Østergaard, Christian; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Rowland, Ian J

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment strategies. Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability (P < 0.002) and ventricle size (P < 0.0001) among infected rats. Clinical disease severity was closely related to ventricle expansion (P = 0.024). Changes in brain water distribution, assessed by ADC, and categorization of brain 'perfusion' by cortex ΔSI (bolus) were subject to increased inter-rat variation as the disease progressed, but without overall differences compared to uninfected rats (P > 0.05). Areas of well-'perfused' muscle decreased with the progression of infection indicative of septicaemia (P = 0.05). The evolution of bacterial meningitis was successfully followed in-vivo with MRI. Increasing BBB-breakdown and ventricle size was observed in rats with meningitis whereas changes in brain water distribution were heterogeneous. MRI will be a valuable technique for future studies aiming at evaluating or optimizing adjunctive treatments

  18. In vivo MR imaging of nanometer magnetically labeled bone marrow stromal cells transplanted via portal vein in rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Ping; Wang Jianhua; Yan Zhiping; Hu Meiyu; Xu Pengju; Zhou Meiling; Ya Fuhua; Fan Sheung-tat; Luk John-m

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo magnetic resonance imaging with a conventional 1.5-T system for tracking of intra-portal vein transplantation nanometer magnetically labeled BMSCs in rat liver. Methods: BMSCs were isolated from 5 SD rats bone marrow with the density gradient centrifugation method. Then BMSCs were labeled with nanometer superpara-magnetic iron oxide and transfection agent. Cell labeling efficiency was assessed with determination of the percentage of Peris Prussian blue stain. Then BMSCs transplanted into normal rats' livers via portal vein. The receipts were divided into 5 groups ,including sham control,2 h ,3 d,7 d and 2 w after transplantation. Follow-up serial T 1 WI,T 2 WI and T 2 * -weighted gradient- echo MR imaging were performed at 1.5 T MRI system. MR imaging findings were compared with histology. Results: Cell labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Perls Prussian blue stain. After transplantation of labeled BMSCs via portal vein, liver's had diffuse granular signal intensity appearance in T 2 * WI MRI. Cells were detected for up to 2 w in receipts' liver's. At histologic analysis, signal intensity loss correlated with iron-loaded cells. Conclusion: MR imaging could aid in monitoring of magnetically labeled BMSCs administered via portal vein in vivo. (authors)

  19. The Preparation of Glucan-Fe3O4 Magnetic Nanoparticles and Its In Vivo Distribution in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengdan Jin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The glucan-Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles were prepared by hydrothermal method. The mixture of FeCl2 and glucan was stirred vigorously for half an hour under low temperature (15°C. KOH of 1 mol/L was dropwise added, slowly, into the solution until the pH to 12. Immediately, KNO3 was added and the temperature was raised to 75°C for an hour. All the processes of Fe3O4 crystal particles generation were under nitrogen. An atomic absorption spectrometry quantitative analysis method was built to determine the in vivo distribution of the glucan-Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles in mice. The diameter of glucan-Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles was about 25 nm and they were up taken by the liver primarily after intravenous administration via the tail.

  20. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after cell transplantation, a small number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl's Prussian blue staining detected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visually tracking transplanted cells in vivo. PMID:25206659

  1. Quantification of drug-loaded magnetic nanoparticles in rabbit liver and tumor after in vivo administration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tietze, Rainer; Jurgons, Roland; Lyer, Stefan; Schreiber, Eveline [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany); Wiekhorst, Frank; Eberbeck, Dietmar; Richter, Heike; Steinhoff, Uwe; Trahms, Lutz [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany); Alexiou, Christoph [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuernberg, Waldstr. 1, 91054 Erlangen (Germany)], E-mail: C.Alexiou@web.de

    2009-05-15

    Magnetic nanoparticles have been investigated for biomedical applications for more than 30 years. The development of biocompatible nanosized drug delivery systems for specific targeting of therapeutics is imminent in medical research, especially for treating cancer and vascular diseases. We used drug-labeled magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, which were attracted to an experimental tumor in rabbits with an external magnetic field (magnetic drug targeting, MDT). Aim of this study was to detect and quantify the biodistribution of the magnetic nanoparticles by magnetorelaxometry. The study shows higher amount of nanoparticles in the tumor after intraarterial application and MDT compared to intravenous administration.

  2. 31 P magnetic resonance fingerprinting for rapid quantification of creatine kinase reaction rate in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Charlie Y; Liu, Yuchi; Huang, Shuying; Griswold, Mark A; Seiberlich, Nicole; Yu, Xin

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop a 31 P spectroscopic magnetic resonance fingerprinting (MRF) method for fast quantification of the chemical exchange rate between phosphocreatine (PCr) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) via creatine kinase (CK). A 31 P MRF sequence (CK-MRF) was developed to quantify the forward rate constant of ATP synthesis via CK ( kfCK), the T 1 relaxation time of PCr ( T1PCr), and the PCr-to-ATP concentration ratio ( MRPCr). The CK-MRF sequence used a balanced steady-state free precession (bSSFP)-type excitation with ramped flip angles and a unique saturation scheme sensitive to the exchange between PCr and γATP. Parameter estimation was accomplished by matching the acquired signals to a dictionary generated using the Bloch-McConnell equation. Simulation studies were performed to examine the susceptibility of the CK-MRF method to several potential error sources. The accuracy of nonlocalized CK-MRF measurements before and after an ischemia-reperfusion (IR) protocol was compared with the magnetization transfer (MT-MRS) method in rat hindlimb at 9.4 T (n = 14). The reproducibility of CK-MRF was also assessed by comparing CK-MRF measurements with both MT-MRS (n = 17) and four angle saturation transfer (FAST) (n = 7). Simulation results showed that CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was robust, with less than 5% error in the presence of model inaccuracies including dictionary resolution, metabolite T 2 values, inorganic phosphate metabolism, and B 1 miscalibration. Estimation of kfCK by CK-MRF (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 at baseline and 0.42 ± 0.03 s -1 post-IR) showed strong agreement with MT-MRS (0.39 ± 0.03 s -1 at baseline and 0.44 ± 0.04 s -1 post-IR). kfCK estimation was also similar between CK-MRF and FAST (0.38 ± 0.02 s -1 for CK-MRF and 0.38 ± 0.11 s -1 for FAST). The coefficient of variation from 20 s CK-MRF quantification of kfCK was 42% of that by 150 s MT-MRS acquisition and was 12% of that by 20 s FAST

  3. Magnetic resonance imaging in patients with cardiac pacemakers: In vitro-and vivo-evaluation at 0.5 Tesla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, T.; Block, W.; Schild, H.; Schimpf, R.; Smekal, A. v.; Wolke, S.; Gieseke, J.; Schneider, C.; Funke, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: MRI is currently regarded as absolutely contraindicated in patients with implanted cardiac pacemakers. In this prospective study safety and feasibility of MRI in patients with new generation pacemakers (PM) was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results: In the static magnetic field all PM switched to the asynchronous mode due to activation of the Reed switch, resulting in continuous pacing at a fixed rate. In three PM models in vitro, however, after activation of the Reed switch, there was a software-induced switch back to the demand mode. In these PM inhibition and triggering were observed after starting the MRI scan due to influence of the pulsed magnetic fields. PM program changes, damage of PM components, dislocation/torque of the PM and rapid pacing of the PM were observed neither in vitro nor in vivo. Atrial and ventricular stimulation thresholds remained unchanged. Conclusion: MRI at 0.5 Tesla should not be regarded as absolutely contraindicated in patients with implanted new generation PM. However, knowledge of the behaviour of the specific PM model in static and pulsed magnetic fields is required, if necessary also changes of the PM program prior of the MRI exam, continuous ECG monitoring and cardiological stand-by. (orig.) [de

  4. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  5. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Bačić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS, are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes.

  6. In vivo (1)H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung at 1.5 T: technical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Vahidi, Kiarash; Caughey, Aaron B; Coakley, Fergus V; Vigneron, Daniel B; Kurhanewicz, John; Mow, Ben; Joe, Bonnie N

    2008-10-01

    To identify the major technical challenges associated with in utero single-voxel proton spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung and to evaluate the feasibility of performing in utero fetal spectroscopy for fetal lung maturity testing. Fetal magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy of amniotic fluid and fetal lung were performed at 1.5 T in 8 near-term pregnant women. Presence/absence of lactate and choline peaks was tabulated. Ex vivo spectra were obtained from amniotic fluid samples to investigate and refine sequence parameters. Spectroscopy failed in 3 of 8 cases due to maternal discomfort (n = 1) or fetal gastroschisis (n = 2). Both fetal motion and low signal-to-noise ratio were limiting factors for the remaining 5 clinical in vivo studies at 1.5 T. Ex vivo and in vivo studies suggested feasibility for detecting lactate from amniotic fluid within a reasonable clinical scan time (4-5 minutes). Lactate was detected in 3 of 5 patients. Choline detection was limited and was detected in 1 patient. Minor motion effects can be overcome but continuous fetal motion is problematic. Lactate detection seems clinically feasible, but choline detection requires additional technical development and, potentially, further imaging at a higher field strength because of the low signal-to-noise ratio at 1.5 T. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. CLINICAL APPLICABILITY OF HUMAN IN-VIVO LOCALIZED P-31 MAGNETIC-RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPY OF BONE AND SOFT-TISSUE TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    HOEKSTRA, HJ; BOEVE, WJ; KAMMAN, RL; MOOYAART, EL

    1994-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of restricted value for the in vivo characterization of tumor types. The applicability of phosphorus-31 (P-31) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) in the diagnosis of bone and soft tissue tumors is unknown. Methods: A total of 191 consecutive

  8. In Vivo Deep Tissue Fluorescence and Magnetic Imaging Employing Hybrid Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortgies, Dirk H; de la Cueva, Leonor; Del Rosal, Blanca; Sanz-Rodríguez, Francisco; Fernández, Nuria; Iglesias-de la Cruz, M Carmen; Salas, Gorka; Cabrera, David; Teran, Francisco J; Jaque, Daniel; Martín Rodríguez, Emma

    2016-01-20

    Breakthroughs in nanotechnology have made it possible to integrate different nanoparticles in one single hybrid nanostructure (HNS), constituting multifunctional nanosized sensors, carriers, and probes with great potential in the life sciences. In addition, such nanostructures could also offer therapeutic capabilities to achieve a wider variety of multifunctionalities. In this work, the encapsulation of both magnetic and infrared emitting nanoparticles into a polymeric matrix leads to a magnetic-fluorescent HNS with multimodal magnetic-fluorescent imaging abilities. The magnetic-fluorescent HNS are capable of simultaneous magnetic resonance imaging and deep tissue infrared fluorescence imaging, overcoming the tissue penetration limits of classical visible-light based optical imaging as reported here in living mice. Additionally, their applicability for magnetic heating in potential hyperthermia treatments is assessed.

  9. Preliminary observations on the correlation of proliferative phenomena with in vivo /sup 31/P NMR spectroscopy after tumor chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiffer, L.M.; Braunschweiger, P.G.; Glickson, J.D.; Evanochko, W.T.; Ng, T.C.

    1985-01-01

    In order to translate the concepts that have been developed in animal systems to human treatment programs, there is an urgent need for noninvasive techniques to study tumor cell biology. The characteristics of the ideal technique for the noninvasive monitoring of cell proliferation are truly imposing. The method should not require repeated biopsies; it should be amenable to repeated studies at frequent intervals without patient discomfort; it should monitor the proliferative response to the treatment modality; and it should not, in itself, perturb the tumor. Ideally, one would also like to be able to evaluate normal cell proliferation as well. It appears now that a new technique, /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (/sup 31/PNMR), may fulfill these rather rigid requirements. However, many studies in animal systems are necessary before it can be applied to the study of human tumors. The theory and mechanics of /sup 31/P NMR have been well described. Recently, its use as a noninvasive technique to study in vivo metabolic processes has become important. The authors presented a series of reports on the use of /sup 31/P NMR for the evaluation of tumor metabolism in animal systems under a variety of conditions. Studies of subcutaneously transplanted mouse tumors and human xenografts detected significant changes in nucleotide triphosphate (NTP), phosphocreatine, and inorganic phosphorus (Pi) as a result of tumor growth and perturbation with chemotherapeutic drugs, radiation, and hyperthermia. Their collabortive studies were designed to evaluate the changing effects of a noncurative single dose of cyclophosphamide on the /sup 31/P NMR resonances from the RIF-1 tumor, and to compare them with the proliferative changes that occur with time after drug administration. They were carried out in the hope of finding a noninvasive correlate with tumor cell proliferation

  10. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian [Department of Surgery, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren [State Key Lab of Silicon Materials and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Jiang Biao, E-mail: wuyulian@medmail.com.c, E-mail: yulianwu2003@yahoo.c [Department of Radiology, 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2009-09-09

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet {beta}-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into {beta}-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  11. Labeling transplanted mice islet with polyvinylpyrrolidone coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for in vivo detection by magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Hai; Xie Qiuping; Kang Muxing; Zhang Bo; Wu Yulian; Zhang Hui; Chen Jin; Zhai Chuanxin; Yang Deren; Jiang Biao

    2009-01-01

    Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) are emerging as a novel probe for noninvasive cell tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and have potential wide usage in medical research. In this study, we have developed a method using high-temperature hydrolysis of chelate metal alkoxide complexes to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone coated iron oxide nanoparticles (PVP-SPIO), as a biocompatible magnetic agent that can efficiently label mice islet β-cells. The size, crystal structure and magnetic properties of the as-synthesized nanoparticles have been characterized. The newly synthesized PVP-SPIO with high stability, crystallinity and saturation magnetization can be efficiently internalized into β-cells, without affecting viability and function. The imaging of 100 PVP-SPIO-labeled mice islets in the syngeneic renal subcapsular model of transplantation under a clinical 3.0 T MR imager showed high spatial resolution in vivo. These results indicated the great potential application of the PVP-SPIO as an MRI contrast agent for monitoring transplanted islet grafts in the clinical management of diabetes in the near future.

  12. Fluorine cardiovascular magnetic resonance angiography in vivo at 1.5 T with perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contrast agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Anne M; Caruthers, Shelton D; Hockett, Franklin D; Cyrus, Tillman; Robertson, J David; Allen, J Stacy; Williams, Todd D; Fuhrhop, Ralph W; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2007-01-01

    While the current gold standard for coronary imaging is X-ray angiography, evidence is accumulating that it may not be the most sensitive technique for detecting unstable plaque. Other imaging modalities, such as cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), can be used for plaque characterization, but suffer from long scan and reconstruction times for determining regions of stenosis. We have developed an intravascular fluorinated contrast agent that can be used for angiography with cardiovascular magnetic resosnace at clinical field strengths (1.5 T). This liquid perfluorocarbon nanoparticle contains a high concentration of fluorine atoms that can be used to generate contrast on 19F MR images without any competing background signal from surrounding tissues. By using a perfluorocarbon with 20 equivalent fluorine molecules, custom-built RF coils, a modified clinical scanner, and an efficient steady-state free procession sequence, we demonstrate the use of this agent for angiography of small vessels in vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo. The surprisingly high signal generated with very short scan times and low doses of perfluorocarbon indicates that this technique may be useful in clinical settings when coupled with advanced imaging strategies.

  13. Laser-polarized xenon-129 magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. The development of a method for in vivo perfusion measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Matthew Scot

    2001-07-01

    This thesis presents in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies with laser-polarized 129Xe delivered to living rats by inhalation and transported to tissue via blood flow. The results presented herein include the observation, assignment, and dynamic measurement of 129Xe resonances in the brain and body, the first one- and two-dimensional chemical-shift-resolved images of 129Xe in blood, tissue, and gas in the thorax, and the first images of 129Xe in brain tissue. These results establish that laser-polarized 129Xe can be used as a magnetic resonance tracer in vivo. NMR resonances at 0, 191, 198, and 209 ppm relative to the 129 Xe gas resonance are observed in the rat thorax and assigned to 129Xe in gas, fat, tissue, and blood respectively. Resonances at 189, 192, 195, 198, and 209 ppm are observed in the brain, and the 195 and 209 ppm resonances are assigned to 129Xe in grey matter, and blood, respectively. The design and construction of a laser-polarized 129Xe production and delivery system is described. This system produces liter-volumes of laser- polarized 129Xe by spin-exchange optical- pumping. It represented an order of magnitude increase over previously reported production volumes of polarized 129Xe. At approximately 3-7% polarization, 157 cc-atm of xenon is produced and stored as ice every 5 minutes. This reliable, effective, and simple production method for large volumes of 129Xe can be applied to other areas of research involving the use of laser-polarized noble gases. A model of the in vivo transport of laser polarized 129Xe to tissue under realistic experimental NMR conditions is described. Appropriate control of the NMR parameters is shown to allow tissue perfasion and 129Xe tissue T1 to be extracted from measurement of the steady-state 129Xe tissue signal. In vivo rodent 129Xe NMR results are used to estimate the signal-to-noise ratio of this technique, and an inhaled 30% xenon/70% O2 mixture polarized to 5

  14. Magnetic nanoparticle-based approaches to locally target therapy and enhance tissue regeneration in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sensenig, Richard; Sapir, Yulia; MacDonald, Cristin; Cohen, Smadar; Polyak, Boris

    2012-09-01

    Magnetic-based systems utilizing superparamagnetic nanoparticles and a magnetic field gradient to exert a force on these particles have been used in a wide range of biomedical applications. This review is focused on drug targeting applications that require penetration of a cellular barrier as well as strategies to improve the efficacy of targeting in these biomedical applications. Another focus of this review is regenerative applications utilizing tissue engineered scaffolds prepared with the aid of magnetic particles, the use of remote actuation for release of bioactive molecules and magneto-mechanical cell stimulation, cell seeding and cell patterning.

  15. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Junhui; Teng Gaojun; Ju Shenghong; Ma Zhanlong; Mai Xiaoli; Zhang Yu; Ma Ming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe 2 O 3 -PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T 2 * -weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe 2 O 3 -PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  16. Predicting in vivo glioma growth with the reaction diffusion equation constrained by quantitative magnetic resonance imaging data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hormuth II, David A; Weis, Jared A; Barnes, Stephanie L; Miga, Michael I; Yankeelov, Thomas E; Rericha, Erin C; Quaranta, Vito

    2015-01-01

    Reaction–diffusion models have been widely used to model glioma growth. However, it has not been shown how accurately this model can predict future tumor status using model parameters (i.e., tumor cell diffusion and proliferation) estimated from quantitative in vivo imaging data. To this end, we used in silico studies to develop the methods needed to accurately estimate tumor specific reaction–diffusion model parameters, and then tested the accuracy with which these parameters can predict future growth. The analogous study was then performed in a murine model of glioma growth. The parameter estimation approach was tested using an in silico tumor ‘grown’ for ten days as dictated by the reaction–diffusion equation. Parameters were estimated from early time points and used to predict subsequent growth. Prediction accuracy was assessed at global (total volume and Dice value) and local (concordance correlation coefficient, CCC) levels. Guided by the in silico study, rats (n = 9) with C6 gliomas, imaged with diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging, were used to evaluate the model’s accuracy for predicting in vivo tumor growth. The in silico study resulted in low global (tumor volume error 0.92) and local (CCC values >0.80) level errors for predictions up to six days into the future. The in vivo study showed higher global (tumor volume error >11.7%, Dice <0.81) and higher local (CCC <0.33) level errors over the same time period. The in silico study shows that model parameters can be accurately estimated and used to accurately predict future tumor growth at both the global and local scale. However, the poor predictive accuracy in the experimental study suggests the reaction–diffusion equation is an incomplete description of in vivo C6 glioma biology and may require further modeling of intra-tumor interactions including segmentation of (for example) proliferative and necrotic regions. (paper)

  17. Folic acid-conjugated Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and MRI in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Q.L.; Zheng, S.W.; Hong, R.Y.; Deng, S.M.; Guo, L.; Hu, R.L.; Gao, B.; Huang, M.; Cheng, L.F.; Liu, G.H.; Wang, Y.Q.

    2014-01-01

    The folic acid (FA)-conjugated Fe 3 O 4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe 3+ and Fe 2+ solution followed by surface modification with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) to form carboxymethyl group terminated MNPs, then FA was conjugated with the carboxyl group functionalized MNPs. The morphology and properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV–visible spectra (UV–vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The FA-conjugated MNPs exhibited relatively high saturation magnetization and fast magneto-temperature response which could be applied to hyperthermia therapy. To determine the accurate targeting effect of FA, we chose FA-conjugated MNPs as MRI contrast enhancement agent for detection of KB cells with folate receptor over-expression in vitro and in vivo. The results show that these magnetic nanoparticles appear to be the promising materials for local hyperthermia and MRI.

  18. In vivo field-cycling relaxometry using an insert coil for magnetic field offset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, Kerrin J; Goldie, Fred; Lurie, David J

    2014-11-01

    The T(1) of tissue has a strong dependence on the measurement magnetic field strength. T(1) -dispersion could be a useful contrast parameter, but is unavailable to clinical MR systems which operate at fixed magnetic field strength. The purpose of this work was to implement a removable insert magnet coil for field-cycling T(1) -dispersion measurements on a vertical-field MRI scanner, by offsetting the static field over a volume of interest. An insert magnet coil was constructed for use with a whole-body sized 59 milli-Tesla (mT) vertical-field, permanent-magnet based imager. The coil has diameter 38 cm and thickness 6.1 cm and a homogeneous region (± 5%) of 5 cm DSV, offset by 5 cm from the coil surface. Surface radiofrequency (RF) coils were also constructed. The insert coil was used in conjunction with a surface RF coil and a volume-localized inversion-recovery pulse sequence to plot T(1) -dispersion in a human volunteer's forearm over a range of field strengths from 1 mT to 70 mT. T(1) -dispersion measurements were demonstrated on a fixed-field MRI scanner, using an insert coil. This demonstrates the feasibility of relaxation dispersion measurements on an otherwise conventional MR imager, facilitating the exploitation of T(1) -dispersion contrast for enhanced diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Considerations of the potential for observation of tissue function using in-vivo magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1989-01-01

    This paper concentrates on three topics - the observation of perfused flow, tissue susceptibility variations, and aspects of localized spectroscopy - to illustrate the potential offered by in vivo NMR for the study of tissue function. It concludes that while useful data can be learned now from observation of flow, the reality of the situation is that the process is going to require much more work before real biochemical observation is possible. (author)

  20. In vitro and in vivo assessment of magnetically actuated biomaterials and prospects in tendon healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Lívia; Silva, Marta; Gonçalves, Ana I; Pesqueira, Tamagno; Rodrigues, Márcia T; Gomes, Manuela E

    2016-05-01

    To expand our understanding on the effect of magnetically actuated biomaterials in stem cells, inflammation and fibrous tissue growth. Magnetic biomaterials were obtained by doping iron oxide particles into starch poly-ϵ-caprolactone (SPCL) to create two formulations, magSPCL-1.8 and 3.6. Stem cell behavior was assessed in vitro and the inflammatory response, subcutaneously in Wistar rats. Metabolic activity and proliferation increased significantly overtime in SPCL and magSPCL-1.8. Electromagnetic fields attenuated the presence of mast cells and macrophages in tissues surrounding SPCL and magSPCL-1.8, between weeks 1 and 9. Macrophage reduction was more pronounced for magSPCL-1.8, which could explain why this material prevented growth of fibrous tissue overtime. Magnetically actuated biomaterials have potential to modulate inflammation and the growth of fibrous tissue.

  1. In Vivo Kinetics of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transplanted into the Knee Joint in a Rat Model Using a Novel Magnetic Method of Localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikuta, Yasunari; Kamei, Naosuke; Ishikawa, Masakazu; Adachi, Nobuo; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a magnetic system for targeting cells in minimally invasive cell transplantation. Magnetically labeled MSCs (m-MSCs) with nanoscale iron particles can be guided into the desired region by magnetic force from an extracorporeal device. We reported that magnetic targeting of m-MSCs enhances cartilage repair in a mini-pig model. However, the detailed kinetics of these magnetically targeted m-MSCs remain unknown. For clinical use, this aspect should be clarified from a safety standpoint. We therefore investigated the spatial and temporal distribution of the fluorescently-labeled m-MSCs transplanted into the knee joint using in vivo fluorescence combined with three-dimensional computed tomographic imaging in a rat model. Although the intraarticularly injected m-MSCs were spread throughout the joint cavity in the absence of magnetic force, the magnetic force caused the injected m-MSCs to accumulate around the chondral lesion. Further examinations including ex vivo imaging, histological assessments and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that transplanted MSCs were not present in any major organs after intraarticular administration, regardless of magnetic targeting. Our data suggest that m-MSCs can be accumulated efficiently into a chondral lesion using our magnetic targeting system, while none of the intraarticularly transplanted MSCs migrate to other major organs. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Assessment of Isocitrate Dehydrogenase mutational status in cerebral gliomas by in vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tietze, Anna; Oettingen, Gorm von; Sangill, Ryan

    concentrations in normal tissue or in gliomas with wildtype IDH. It has recently been shown that 2-HG is detectable non-invasively by clinical Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) [2]. The aim of our study is to establish 2-HG MRS in patients suspected for cerebral gliomas on a clinical Magnetic Resonance (MR......) system. Material and Methods: We performed pre-surgical MRS in four grade 3 glioma patients. A standard MR protocol was combined with an optimized MRS sequence (single-voxel point-resolved spectroscopy)[3]. Metabolite quantification was performed using an unsuppressed water signal as reference...

  3. Hitchhiker'S Guide to Voxel Segmentation for Partial Volume Correction of in Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Quadrelli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial volume effects have the potential to cause inaccuracies when quantifying metabolites using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS. In order to correct for cerebrospinal fluid content, a spectroscopic voxel needs to be segmented according to different tissue contents. This article aims to detail how automated partial volume segmentation can be undertaken and provides a software framework for researchers to develop their own tools. While many studies have detailed the impact of partial volume correction on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification, there is a paucity of literature explaining how voxel segmentation can be achieved using freely available neuroimaging packages.

  4. Reproducibility of in-vivo diffusion tensor cardiovascular magnetic resonance in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGill Laura-Ann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myocardial disarray is an important histological feature of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM which has been studied post-mortem, but its in-vivo prevalence and extent is unknown. Cardiac Diffusion Tensor Imaging (cDTI provides information on mean intravoxel myocyte orientation and potentially myocardial disarray. Recent technical advances have improved in-vivo cDTI, and the aim of this study was to assess the interstudy reproducibility of quantitative in-vivo cDTI in patients with HCM. Methods and results A stimulated-echo single-shot-EPI sequence with zonal excitation and parallel imaging was implemented. Ten patients with HCM were each scanned on 2 different days. For each scan 3 short axis mid-ventricular slices were acquired with cDTI at end systole. Fractional anisotropy (FA, mean diffusivity (MD, and helix angle (HA maps were created using a cDTI post-processing platform developed in-house. The mean ± SD global FA was 0.613 ± 0.044, MD was 0.750 ± 0.154 × 10-3 mm2/s and HA was epicardium −34.3 ± 7.6°, mesocardium 3.5 ± 6.9° and endocardium 38.9 ± 8.1°. Comparison of initial and repeat studies showed global interstudy reproducibility for FA (SD = ± 0.045, Coefficient of Variation (CoV = 7.2%, MD (SD = ± 0.135 × 10-3 mm2/s, CoV = 18.6% and HA (epicardium SD = ± 4.8°; mesocardium SD = ± 3.4°; endocardium SD = ± 2.9°. Reproducibility of FA was superior to MD (p = 0.003. Global MD was significantly higher in the septum than the reference lateral wall (0.784 ± 0.188 vs 0.750 ± 0.154 x10-3 mm2/s, p  Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the interstudy reproducibility of DTI in the human HCM heart in-vivo and the largest cDTI study in HCM to date. Our results show good reproducibility of FA, MD and HA which indicates that current technology yields robust in-vivo measurements that have potential clinical value. The

  5. An in vivo three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging-based averaged brain collection of the neonatal piglet (Sus scrofa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Conrad

    Full Text Available Due to the fact that morphology and perinatal growth of the piglet brain is similar to humans, use of the piglet as a translational animal model for neurodevelopmental studies is increasing. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI can be a powerful tool to study neurodevelopment in piglets, but many of the MRI resources have been produced for adult humans. Here, we present an average in vivo MRI-based atlas specific for the 4-week-old piglet. In addition, we have developed probabilistic tissue classification maps. These tools can be used with brain mapping software packages (e.g. SPM and FSL to aid in voxel-based morphometry and image analysis techniques. The atlas enables efficient study of neurodevelopment in a highly tractable translational animal with brain growth and development similar to humans.

  6. Windows on the Human Body – in Vivo High-Field Magnetic Resonance Research and Applications in Medicine and Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Ewald; Meyerspeer, Martin; Fischmeister, Florian Ph. S.; Grabner, Günther; Bauer, Herbert; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2010-01-01

    Analogous to the evolution of biological sensor-systems, the progress in “medical sensor-systems”, i.e., diagnostic procedures, is paradigmatically described. Outstanding highlights of this progress are magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), which enable non-invasive, in vivo acquisition of morphological, functional, and metabolic information from the human body with unsurpassed quality. Recent achievements in high and ultra-high field MR (at 3 and 7 Tesla) are described, and representative research applications in Medicine and Psychology in Austria are discussed. Finally, an overview of current and prospective research in multi-modal imaging, potential clinical applications, as well as current limitations and challenges is given. PMID:22219684

  7. Prolonged bone marrow T1-relaxation in acute leukaemia. In vivo tissue characterization by magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Sørensen, P G; Karle, H

    1987-01-01

    In vivo tissue characterization by measurement of T1- and T2-relaxation processes is one of the greatest potentials of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This may be especially useful in the evaluation of bone marrow disorders as the MRI-signal from bone marrow is not influenced by the overlying...... osseous tissue. Nine patients with acute leukaemia, one patient with myelodysplastic syndrome, and ten normal volunteers were included in the study. The T1- and T2-relaxation processes were measured in the lumbar spine bone marrow using a wholebody superconductive MR-scanner operating at 1.5 Tesla.......38-0.60 sec.). No significant difference was seen in the T2-relaxation process. In relation to chemotherapy T1 decreased towards the normal range in the patients who obtained complete remission, whereas T1 remained prolonged in the patients who did not respond successfully to the treatment. The results...

  8. Imaging in Vivo Extracellular pH with a Single Paramagnetic Chemical Exchange Saturation Transfer Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guanshu Liu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of extracellular pH (pHe has potential utility for cancer diagnoses and for assessing the therapeutic effects of pH-dependent therapies. A single magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent that is detected through paramagnetic chemical exchange saturation transfer (PARACEST was designed to measure tumor pHe throughout the range of physiologic pH and with magnetic resonance saturation powers that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer. The chemical characterization and modeling of the contrast agent Yb3+-1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7-triacetic acid, 10-o-aminoanilide (Yb-DO3A-oAA suggested that the aryl amine of the agent forms an intramolecular hydrogen bond with a proximal carboxylate ligand, which was essential for generating a practical chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST effect from an amine. A ratio of CEST effects from the aryl amine and amide was linearly correlated with pH throughout the physiologic pH range. The pH calibration was used to produce a parametric pH map of a subcutaneous flank tumor on a mouse model of MCF-7 mammary carcinoma. Although refinements in the in vivo CEST MRI methodology may improve the accuracy of pHe measurements, this study demonstrated that the PARACEST contrast agent can be used to generate parametric pH maps of in vivo tumors with saturation power levels that are not harmful to a mouse model of cancer.

  9. In Vivo1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of Lactate in Patients With Stage IV Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, Quynh-Thu; Koong, Albert; Lieskovsky, Yee Yie; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian; Graves, Edward; Pinto, Harlan; Brown, J. Martin; Spielman, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate in vivo 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy imaging of lactate for assessing tumor hypoxia in head and neck cancers and to determine its utility in predicting the response and outcomes. Methods and Materials: Volume-localized lactate-edited 1 H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 1.5 T was performed in vivo on involved neck nodes and control subcutaneous tissues in 36 patients with Stage IV head and neck cancer. The signal intensities (SIs) of lactate, choline, and creatine and the choline/creatine ratio were measured. The tumor partial pressure of oxygen (pO 2 ) was obtained in the same lymph node before MRS. Patients were treated with either two cycles of induction chemotherapy (tirapazamine, cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil) followed by simultaneous chemoradiotherapy or the same regimen without tirapazamine. The lactate SI and the choline/creatine ratio correlated with the tumor pO 2 , nodal response, and locoregional control. Results: The lactate SI was greater for the involved nodes (median, 0.25) than for the subcutaneous tissue (median, 0.04; p = 0.07). No significant correlation was found between the lactate SI and tumor pO 2 (mean, 0.46 ± 0.10 for hypoxic nodes [pO 2 ≤10 mm Hg, n = 15] vs. 0.36 ± 0.07 for nonhypoxic nodes [pO 2 >10 mm Hg, n = 21], p = 0.44). A significant correlation was found between the choline/creatine ratios and tumor pO 2 (mean, 2.74 ± 0.34 for hypoxic nodes vs. 1.78 ± 0.31 for nonhypoxic nodes, p = 0.02). No correlation was found between the lactate SI and the complete nodal response (p = 0.52) or locoregional control rates. Conclusions: The lactate SI did not correlate with tumor pO 2 , treatment response, or locoregional control. Additional research is needed to refine this technique

  10. Mitochondrial NAD(PH in vivo: identifying natural indicators of oxidative phosphorylation in the 31P magnetic resonance spectrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin eConley

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural indicators provide intrinsic probes of metabolism, biogenesis and oxidative protection. Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide metabolites (NAD(P are one class of indicators that have roles as co-factors in oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis and anti-oxidant protection, as well as signaling in the mitochondrial biogenesis pathway. These many roles are made possible by the distinct redox states (NAD(P+ and NAD(PH, which are compartmentalized between cell and mitochondria. Here we provide evidence for detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in separate mitochondrial and cell pools in vivo in human tissue by phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P MRS. These NAD(P pools are identified by chemical standards (NAD+, NADP+ and NADH and by physiological tests. A unique resonance reflecting mitochondrial NAD(PH is revealed by the changes elicited by elevation of mitochondrial oxidation. The decline of NAD(PH with oxidation is matched by a stoichiometric rise in the NAD(P+ peak. This unique resonance also provides a measure of the improvement in mitochondrial oxidation that parallels the greater phosphorylation found after exercise training in these elderly subjects. The implication is that the dynamics of the mitochondrial NAD(PH peak provides an intrinsic probe of the reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction in elderly muscle. Thus non-invasive detection of NAD(P+ and NAD(PH in cell vs. mitochondria yield natural indicators of redox compartmentalization and sensitive intrinsic probes of the improvement of mitochondrial function with an intervention in human tissues in vivo. These natural indicators hold the promise of providing mechanistic insight into metabolism and mitochondrial function in vivo in a range of tissues in health, disease and with treatment.

  11. In vivo detection of activated platelets allows characterizing rupture of atherosclerotic plaques with molecular magnetic resonance imaging in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik von Elverfeldt

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Early and non-invasive detection of platelets on micro atherothrombosis provides a means to identify unstable plaque and thereby allowing prophylactic treatment towards prevention of stroke or myocardial infarction. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging (mMRI of activated platelets as early markers of plaque rupture using targeted contrast agents is a promising strategy. In this study, we aim to specifically image activated platelets in murine atherothrombosis by in vivo mMRI, using a dedicated animal model of plaque rupture. METHODS: An antibody targeting ligand-induced binding sites (LIBS on the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa-receptor of activated platelets was conjugated to microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO to form the LIBS-MPIO contrast agent causing a signal-extinction in T2*-weighted MRI. ApoE(-/- mice (60 weeks-old were fed a high fat diet for 5 weeks. Using a small needle, the surface of their carotid plaques was scratched under blood flow to induce atherothrombosis. In vivo 9.4 Tesla MRI was performed before and repetitively after intravenous injection of either LIBS-MPIO versus non-targeted-MPIO. RESULTS: LIBS-MPIO injected animals showed a significant signal extinction (p<0.05 in MRI, corresponding to the site of plaque rupture and atherothrombosis in histology. The signal attenuation was effective for atherothrombosis occupying ≥ 2% of the vascular lumen. Histology further confirmed significant binding of LIBS-MPIO compared to control-MPIO on the thrombus developing on the surface of ruptured plaques (p<0.01. CONCLUSION: in vivo mMRI detected activated platelets on mechanically ruptured atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE(-/- mice with a high sensititvity. This imaging technology represents a unique opportunity for noninvasive detection of atherothrombosis and the identification of unstable atherosclerotic plaques with the ultimate promise to prevent strokes and myocardial infarctions.

  12. In vivo detection of c-MET expression in a rat hepatocarcinogenesis model using molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Rheal A; Smith, Nataliya; Tesiram, Yasvir A; Abbott, Andrew; Saunders, Debbie; Blindauer, Rebecca; Herlea, Oana; Silasi-Mansat, Robert; Lupu, Florea

    2007-01-01

    The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA)-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent. SPIO-anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T(2) values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3) cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO-anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  13. In Vivo Detection of c-MET Expression in a Rat Hepatocarcinogenesis Model Using Molecularly Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rheal A. Towner

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The multifunctional growth factor scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor and its tyrosine kinase receptor, c-MET, have been implicated in the genesis and malignant progression of numerous human malignancies, including hepatocellular carcinomas. The incidence of hepatocellular carcinomas in the United States has increased noticeably over the past two decades and is listed as the fifth major cancer in men worldwide. In this study, we used a choline-deficient l-amino acid (CDAA-defined rat hepatocarcinogenesis model to visualize increased in vivo expression of the c-MET antigen in neoplastic lesion formation with the use of a super paramagnetic iron oxide (SPIO–anti-c-MET molecularly targeted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI contrast agent. SPIO–anti-c-MET was used for the first time to detect overexpression of c-MET in neoplastic nodules and tumors within the livers of CDAA-treated rats, as determined by a decrease in MRI signal intensity and a decrease in regional T2 values. Specificity for the binding of the molecularly targeted anti-c-MET contrast agent was determined using rat hepatoma (H4-II-E-C3 cell cultures and immunofluorescence microscopic imaging of the targeting agents within neoplastic liver tissue 1 to 2 hours following intravenous administration of SPIO–anti-c-MET and MRI investigation. This method has the ability to visualize in vivo the overexpression of c-MET at early developmental stages of tumor formation.

  14. In Vivo Performance of a Novel Fluorinated Magnetic Resonance Imaging Agent for Functional Analysis of Bile Acid Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A novel trifluorinated cholic acid derivative, CA-lys-TFA, was designed and synthesized for use as a tool to measure bile acid transport noninvasively using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the present study, the in vivo performance of CA-lys-TFA for measuring bile acid transport by MRI was investigated in mice. Gallbladder CA-lys-TFA content was quantified using MRI and liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry. Results in wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J mice were compared to those in mice lacking expression of Asbt, the ileal bile acid transporter. 19F signals emanating from the gallbladders of WT mice 7 h after oral gavage with 150 mg/kg CA-lys-TFA were reproducibly detected by MRI. Asbt-deficient mice administered the same dose had undetectable 19F signals by MRI, and gallbladder bile CA-lys-TFA levels were 30-fold lower compared to WT animals. To our knowledge, this represents the first report of in vivo imaging of an orally absorbed drug using 19F MRI. Fluorinated bile acid analogues have potential as tools to measure and detect abnormal bile acid transport by MRI. PMID:24708306

  15. In vivo magnetic resonance diffusion measurement in the brain of patients with multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsson, H B; Thomsen, C; Frederiksen, J

    1992-01-01

    Measurement of water self-diffusion in the brain in 25 patients with multiple sclerosis was performed by magnetic resonance imaging. Quantitative diffusion measurements were obtained using single spin-echo pulse sequences with pulsed magnetic field gradients of different magnitude. Twenty......-two of these patients also underwent measurement of the transverse relaxation time (T2). Only one plaque was evaluated in each patient. Based on prior knowledge, 12 plaques were classified as being 3 mo or less in age, and 7 plaques were classified as being more than 3 mo old. In all 25 plaques, water self......-diffusion was found to be higher than in apparently normal white matter. Furthermore, water self-diffusion was found to be higher in acute plaques compared with chronic plaques. Finally, a slight tendency toward a relationship between the diffusion capability and T2 was found. We believe that an increased diffusion...

  16. Human in-vivo brain magnetic resonance current density imaging (MRCDI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göksu, Cihan; Hanson, Lars G.; Siebner, Hartwig R

    2017-01-01

    is modulated by these shifts, allowing to determine ΔBz,c for the reconstruction of the current flow and ohmic conductivity. Here, we demonstrate reliable ΔBz,c measurements in-vivo in the human brain based on multi-echo spin echo (MESE) and steady-state free precession free induction decay (SSFP......-FID) sequences. In a series of experiments, we optimize their robustness for in-vivo measurements while maintaining a good sensitivity to the current-induced fields. We validate both methods by assessing the linearity of the measured ΔBz,c with respect to the current strength. For the more efficient SSFP...... of ΔBz,c fields as weak as 1 nT, caused by currents of 1 mA strength. Comparison of the ΔBz,c measurements with simulated ΔBz,c images based on FEM calculations and individualized head models reveals significant linear correlations in all subjects, but only for the stray field-corrected data. As final...

  17. In vivo measurement of phosphorus energy metabolites by topical magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watari, Hiroshi [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki Aichi (Japan); Koizuka, Izumi; Takada, Muneharu; Naruse, Shoji

    1982-12-01

    An apparatus of TMR (topical magnetic resonance) was briefly described, and the technique to use it was shown. The effect of digital filter was demonstrated and measurement of a pulse width was shown using a phantom. Pulse width and /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum measured in a rat head were shown. The /sup 31/P-NMR spectrum well revealed the phosphorus energy metabolites such as creatine phosphoric acid, ATP, and ADP.

  18. In vitro and in vivo lung deposition of coated magnetic aerosol particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yuanyuan; Longest, P Worth; Xu, Yun Hao; Wang, Jian Ping; Wiedmann, Timothy Scott

    2010-11-01

    The magnetic induced deposition of polydispersed aerosols composed of agglomerated superparamagnetic particles was measured with an in vitro model system and in the mouse trachea and deep lung for the purpose of investigating the potential of site specific respiratory drug delivery. Oleic acid coated superparamagnetic particles were prepared and characterized by TEM, induced magnetic moment, and iron content. The particles were dispersed in cyclohexane, aerosolized with an ultrasonic atomizer and dried by sequential reflux and charcoal columns. The fraction of iron deposited on glass tubes increased with particle size and decreasing flow rate. High deposition occurred with a small diameter tube, but the deposition fraction was largely independent of tube size at larger diameters. Results from computational fluid dynamics qualitatively agreed with the experimental results. Enhanced deposition was observed in the mouse lung but not in the trachea consistent with the analysis of the aerodynamic time allowed for deposition and required magnetic deposition time. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  19. Mapping Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropies of White Matter in vivo in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu; Vikram, Deepti S; Lim, Issel Anne L; Jones, Craig K; Farrell, Jonathan A.D.; van Zijl, Peter C. M.

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic resonance phase- or frequency- shift images acquired at high field show contrast related to magnetic susceptibility differences between tissues. Such contrast varies with the orientation of the organ in the field, but the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) has made it possible to reproducibly image the intrinsic tissue susceptibility contrast. However, recent studies indicate that magnetic susceptibility is anisotropic in brain white matter and, as such, needs to be described by a symmetric second-rank tensor (χ¯¯). To fully determine the elements of this tensor, it would be necessary to acquire frequency data at six or more orientations. Assuming cylindrical symmetry of the susceptibility tensor in myelinated white matter fibers, we propose a simplified method to reconstruct the susceptibility tensor in terms of a mean magnetic susceptibility, MMS = (χ∥ + 2χ⊥)/3 and a magnetic susceptibility anisotropy, MSA = χ∥ − χ⊥, where χ∥ and χ⊥ are susceptibility parallel and perpendicular to the white matter fiber direction, respectively. Computer simulations show that with a practical head rotation angle of around 20°–30°, four head orientations suffice to reproducibly reconstruct the tensor with good accuracy. We tested this approach on whole brain 1×1×1 mm3 frequency data acquired from five healthy subjects at 7 T. The frequency information from phase images collected at four head orientations was combined with the fiber direction information extracted from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to map the white matter susceptibility tensor. The MMS and MSA were quantified for regions in several large white matter fiber structures, including the corona radiata, posterior thalamic radiation and corpus callosum. MMS ranged from −0.037 to −0.053 ppm (referenced to CSF being about zero). MSA values could be quantified without the need for a reference and ranged between 0.004 and 0.029 ppm, in line with

  20. Effect of vasopressin on rabbit hepatic energy metabolism evaluated using in vivo P-31 magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Shigeki; Moriyasu, Fuminori; Tamada, Takashi

    1989-01-01

    Changes in metabolic state of rabbit livers after administration of vasopressin (10 mU/kg/min d.i.v.) were evaluated using in vivo P-31 magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy. Targets were nine normal control rabbits and eight with chronically carbontetrachloride-damaged livers. A 2.0 Tesla whole-body MR imager was used for measurement. After administration of vasopressin, liver spectroscopy showed a mild ischemic pattern. The inorganic phosphate peak increased statistically significantly (p<0.05) both in the normal control group and in the damaged-liver group (20% and 16% above base line value respectively). In the normal control group, there was a statistically significant decrease (p<0.05) in the ATP peak to 18% below the base line value while the PME (phosphomonoester) peak increased slightly (about 10%); there was little change in the damaged-liver group. It was thought that the difference between the two groups was due to differences in blood flow mechanism and liver metabolism. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy was considered to be useful in studying the detailed changes in metabolic state of rabbit liver after administration of vasopressin. (author)

  1. Magnetic particle imaging: advancements and perspectives for real-time in vivo monitoring and image-guided therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pablico-Lansigan, Michele H.; Situ, Shu F.; Samia, Anna Cristina S.

    2013-05-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging biomedical imaging technology that allows the direct quantitative mapping of the spatial distribution of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. MPI's increased sensitivity and short image acquisition times foster the creation of tomographic images with high temporal and spatial resolution. The contrast and sensitivity of MPI is envisioned to transcend those of other medical imaging modalities presently used, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray scans, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this review, we present an overview of the recent advances in the rapidly developing field of MPI. We begin with a basic introduction of the fundamentals of MPI, followed by some highlights over the past decade of the evolution of strategies and approaches used to improve this new imaging technique. We also examine the optimization of iron oxide nanoparticle tracers used for imaging, underscoring the importance of size homogeneity and surface engineering. Finally, we present some future research directions for MPI, emphasizing the novel and exciting opportunities that it offers as an important tool for real-time in vivo monitoring. All these opportunities and capabilities that MPI presents are now seen as potential breakthrough innovations in timely disease diagnosis, implant monitoring, and image-guided therapeutics.

  2. Different energy metabolism in two human small cell lung cancer subpopulations examined by 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biochemical analysis in vivo and in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Spang-Thomsen, M; Quistorff, B

    1991-01-01

    Two human small cell lung cancer tumor lines, maintained as solid tumor xenografts on nude mice and as in vitro cell cultures, were studied by in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by biochemical analysis of extracts of solid tumors and cell cultures. The tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and CPH...

  3. Different early effect of irradiation in brain and small cell lung cancer examined by in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Pedersen, A G; Quistorff, B

    1992-01-01

    Early effects of irradiation were evaluated by non-invasive in vivo 31P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (31P-MRS) of two small cell lung cancer (SCLC) tumor lines CPH SCCL 54A and 54B, in nude mice. The tumors were originally derived from the same patient and have similar morphology and growth...

  4. An in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy study of the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, S.; Ciapaite, J.; Wolters, J.C.; van Riel, N.A.; Nicolay, K.; Prompers, J.J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  5. An In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study of the Effects of Caloric and Non-Caloric Sweeteners on Liver Lipid Metabolism in Rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssens, Sharon; Ciapaite, Jolita; Wolters, Justina C.; van Riel, Natal A.; Nicolay, Klaas; Prompers, Jeanine J.

    2017-01-01

    We aimed to elucidate the effects of caloric and non-caloric sweeteners on liver lipid metabolism in rats using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and to determine their roles in the development of liver steatosis. Wistar rats received normal chow and either normal drinking water, or

  6. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K E; Nielsen, H; Thomsen, C

    1989-01-01

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow-...... not differ from patients with polycythemia vera....

  7. High-resolution, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging of Drosophila at 18.8 Tesla.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Null

    Full Text Available High resolution MRI of live Drosophila was performed at 18.8 Tesla, with a field of view less than 5 mm, and administration of manganese or gadolinium-based contrast agents. This study demonstrates the feasibility of MR methods for imaging the fruit fly Drosophila with an NMR spectrometer, at a resolution relevant for undertaking future studies of the Drosophila brain and other organs. The fruit fly has long been a principal model organism for elucidating biology and disease, but without capabilities like those of MRI. This feasibility marks progress toward the development of new in vivo research approaches in Drosophila without the requirement for light transparency or destructive assays.

  8. Quantitative perfusion modeling in cardiac in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carme, Sabin Charles

    2004-01-01

    A parametrical analysis of contrast agent distribution is proposed to interpret first pass MR images and to quantify the myocardial perfusion. We are concerned with the correction of spatial intensity variations in images. Furthermore, we are interested in the application of a robust NMR signal processing technique and deconvolution techniques adapted to low signal-to-noise ratio. Data sets were provided, close to clinical conditions, using in-vivo experiments applying several pharmacological stresses on ischemic pigs presenting a stenosis of the left circumflex coronary artery. The agreement and accuracy measurements between observers are respectively 57.1% and 53.1% for visual analysis, and 81.2% and 81.1% for parametric map analysis. A linear relationship between perfusion parameters and radioactive microspheres is established for low blood flows [fr

  9. Robust high-resolution quantification of time signals encoded by in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkić, Dževad; Belkić, Karen

    2018-01-01

    This paper on molecular imaging emphasizes improving specificity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) for early cancer diagnostics by high-resolution data analysis. Sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is excellent, but specificity is insufficient. Specificity is improved with MRS by going beyond morphology to assess the biochemical content of tissue. This is contingent upon accurate data quantification of diagnostically relevant biomolecules. Quantification is spectral analysis which reconstructs chemical shifts, amplitudes and relaxation times of metabolites. Chemical shifts inform on electronic shielding of resonating nuclei bound to different molecular compounds. Oscillation amplitudes in time signals retrieve the abundance of MR sensitive nuclei whose number is proportional to metabolite concentrations. Transverse relaxation times, the reciprocal of decay probabilities of resonances, arise from spin-spin coupling and reflect local field inhomogeneities. In MRS single voxels are used. For volumetric coverage, multi-voxels are employed within a hybrid of MRS and MRI called magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI). Common to MRS and MRSI is encoding of time signals and subsequent spectral analysis. Encoded data do not provide direct clinical information. Spectral analysis of time signals can yield the quantitative information, of which metabolite concentrations are the most clinically important. This information is equivocal with standard data analysis through the non-parametric, low-resolution fast Fourier transform and post-processing via fitting. By applying the fast Padé transform (FPT) with high-resolution, noise suppression and exact quantification via quantum mechanical signal processing, advances are made, presented herein, focusing on four areas of critical public health importance: brain, prostate, breast and ovarian cancers.

  10. Absolute Quantification of Human Liver Phosphorus-Containing Metabolites In Vivo Using an Inhomogeneous Spoiling Magnetic Field Gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashir, Adil; Gropler, Robert; Ackerman, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Absolute concentrations of high-energy phosphorus (31P) metabolites in liver provide more important insight into physiologic status of liver disease compared to resonance integral ratios. A simple method for measuring absolute concentrations of 31P metabolites in human liver is described. The approach uses surface spoiling inhomogeneous magnetic field gradient to select signal from liver tissue. The technique avoids issues caused by respiratory motion, chemical shift dispersion associated with linear magnetic field gradients, and increased tissue heat deposition due to radiofrequency absorption, especially at high field strength. Methods A method to localize signal from liver was demonstrated using superficial and highly non-uniform magnetic field gradients, which eliminate signal(s) from surface tissue(s) located between the liver and RF coil. A double standard method was implemented to determine absolute 31P metabolite concentrations in vivo. 8 healthy individuals were examined in a 3 T MR scanner. Results Concentrations of metabolites measured in eight healthy individuals are: γ-adenosine triphosphate (ATP) = 2.44 ± 0.21 (mean ± sd) mmol/l of wet tissue volume, α-ATP = 3.2 ± 0.63 mmol/l, β-ATP = 2.98 ± 0.45 mmol/l, inorganic phosphates (Pi) = 1.87 ± 0.25 mmol/l, phosphodiesters (PDE) = 10.62 ± 2.20 mmol/l and phosphomonoesters (PME) = 2.12 ± 0.51 mmol/l. All are in good agreement with literature values. Conclusions The technique offers robust and fast means to localize signal from liver tissue, allows absolute metabolite concentration determination, and avoids problems associated with constant field gradient (linear field variation) localization methods. PMID:26633549

  11. In vivo study of experimental pneumococcal meningitis using magnetic resonance imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, C.T.; Simonsen, H.; Liptrot, Matthew George

    2008-01-01

    Background: Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods were evaluated as a tool for the study of experimental meningitis. The identification and characterisation of pathophysiological parameters that vary during the course of the disease could be used as markers for future studies of new treatment...... strategies. Methods: Rats infected intracisternally with S. pneumoniae (n = 29) or saline (n = 13) were randomized for imaging at 6, 12, 24, 30, 36, 42 or 48 hours after infection. T1W, T2W, quantitative diffusion, and post contrast T1W images were acquired at 4.7 T. Dynamic MRI (dMRI) was used to evaluate...... blood-brain-barrier (BBB) permeability and to obtain a measure of cerebral and muscle perfusion. Clinical- and motor scores, bacterial counts in CSF and blood, and WBC counts in CSF were measured. Results: MR images and dMRI revealed the development of a highly significant increase in BBB permeability...

  12. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G.; Rivera, F.; Babinski, E.; Berlanga, E.; Madrazo, M.; Franco-Bourland, R.; Grijalva, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Contreras, B.; Madrazo, I.

    1994-01-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance imaging of the normal and chronically injured adult rat spinal cord in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guizar-Sahagun, G [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo XXI, Inst. Mexicano del Seguro Social, Mexico City (Mexico); Rivera, F [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Babinski, E [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico); Berlanga, E [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Madrazo, M [Dept. of Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Hospital Angeles del Pedregal, Mexico City (Mexico); Franco-Bourland, R [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Biochemistry, Inst. Nacional de la Nutricion, Mexico City (Mexico); Grijalva, I [Centro de Investigacion del Proyecto Camina, Mexico City (Mexico) Dept. of Clinical Research in Neurology and Neurosurgery, Hospital de Especialidades, Centro Medico Nacional Siglo

    1994-08-01

    We assessed the capacity of MRI to show and characterise the spinal cord (SC) in vivo in normal and chronically injured adult rats. In the chronically injured animals the SC was studied by MRI and histological examination. MRI was performed at 1.5 T, using gradient-echo and spin-echo (SE) sequences, the latter with and without gadolinium-DTPA (Gd-DTPA). Several positions were tried for good alignment and to diminish interference by respiratory movements. Images of the SC were obtained in sagittal, coronal, and axial planes. Normal SC was observed as a continuous intensity in both sequences, although contrast resolution was better using SE; it was not possible to differentiate the grey and white matter. Low signal was seen in the damaged area in chronically injured rats, which corresponded to cysts, trabeculae, mononuclear infiltrate, and fibroglial wall on histological examination. Gd-DTPA failed to enhance the SC in normal or chronically injured rats. It did, however, cause enhancement of the lesion after acute SC injury. (orig.)

  14. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of lipid-rich necrotic core in carotid atheroma in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, Victoria Eleanor; Patterson, Andrew J.; Sadat, Umar; Bowden, David J.; Tang, Tjun Y.; Gillard, Jonathan H.; Graves, Martin J.; Priest, Andrew N.; Skepper, Jeremy N.; Kirkpatrick, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that knowing the morphology of carotid atheroma improves current risk stratification for predicting subsequent thrombo-embolic events. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) ex vivo studies have shown that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can detect lipid-rich necrotic core (LR/NC) and fibrous cap. This study aims to establish if this is achievable in vivo. Twenty-six patients (mean age 73 years, range 54-87 years) with moderate to severe carotid stenosis confirmed on ultrasound were imaged. An echo-planar DWI sequence was performed along with standard high-resolution MR imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were evaluated. Two independent readers reported the mean ADC values from regions of interest defining LR/NCs and fibrous caps. For subjects undergoing carotid endarterectomy (n = 19), carotid specimens were obtained and stained using Nile red. The mean ADC values were 1.0 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (±SD 0.3 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) and 0.7 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s (±SD 0.2 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s) for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively; the difference was significant (p < 0.0001). The intra-class correlation coefficients summarising the agreement between the two independent readers were 0.84 and 0.60 for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively. Comparison of quantitative ADC values and histology (by subjective grading of lipid content) showed a significant correlation: heavier lipid staining matched lower ADC values (r = -0.435, p = 0.005). This study indicates that DWI can be used to distinguish LR/NC and the fibrous cap. The study also suggests that the mean ADC value may be linearly related to subjective graded LR/NC content determined by histology. (orig.)

  15. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for the detection of lipid-rich necrotic core in carotid atheroma in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Young, Victoria Eleanor; Patterson, Andrew J.; Sadat, Umar; Bowden, David J.; Tang, Tjun Y.; Gillard, Jonathan H. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Graves, Martin J.; Priest, Andrew N. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, University Department of Radiology, Box 218, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Medical Physics, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Skepper, Jeremy N. [University of Cambridge, Multi-imaging Centre, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Kirkpatrick, Peter J. [Addenbrooke' s Hospital, Department of Neurosurgery, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2010-10-15

    Research has shown that knowing the morphology of carotid atheroma improves current risk stratification for predicting subsequent thrombo-embolic events. Previous magnetic resonance (MR) ex vivo studies have shown that diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) can detect lipid-rich necrotic core (LR/NC) and fibrous cap. This study aims to establish if this is achievable in vivo. Twenty-six patients (mean age 73 years, range 54-87 years) with moderate to severe carotid stenosis confirmed on ultrasound were imaged. An echo-planar DWI sequence was performed along with standard high-resolution MR imaging. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps were evaluated. Two independent readers reported the mean ADC values from regions of interest defining LR/NCs and fibrous caps. For subjects undergoing carotid endarterectomy (n = 19), carotid specimens were obtained and stained using Nile red. The mean ADC values were 1.0 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ({+-}SD 0.3 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) and 0.7 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s ({+-}SD 0.2 x 10{sup -3} mm{sup 2}/s) for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively; the difference was significant (p < 0.0001). The intra-class correlation coefficients summarising the agreement between the two independent readers were 0.84 and 0.60 for fibrous cap and LR/NC, respectively. Comparison of quantitative ADC values and histology (by subjective grading of lipid content) showed a significant correlation: heavier lipid staining matched lower ADC values (r = -0.435, p = 0.005). This study indicates that DWI can be used to distinguish LR/NC and the fibrous cap. The study also suggests that the mean ADC value may be linearly related to subjective graded LR/NC content determined by histology. (orig.)

  16. Development and Validation of Noninvasive Magnetic Resonance Relaxometry for the In Vivo Assessment of Tissue-Engineered Graft Oxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einstein, Samuel A; Weegman, Bradley P; Firpo, Meri T; Papas, Klearchos K; Garwood, Michael

    2016-11-01

    Techniques to monitor the oxygen partial pressure (pO 2 ) within implanted tissue-engineered grafts (TEGs) are critically necessary for TEG development, but current methods are invasive and inaccurate. In this study, we developed an accurate and noninvasive technique to monitor TEG pO 2 utilizing proton ( 1 H) or fluorine ( 19 F) magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) relaxometry. The value of the spin-lattice relaxation rate constant (R 1 ) of some biocompatible compounds is sensitive to dissolved oxygen (and temperature), while insensitive to other external factors. Through this physical mechanism, MRS can measure the pO 2 of implanted TEGs. We evaluated six potential MRS pO 2 probes and measured their oxygen and temperature sensitivities and their intrinsic R 1 values at 16.4 T. Acellular TEGs were constructed by emulsifying porcine plasma with perfluoro-15-crown-5-ether, injecting the emulsion into a macroencapsulation device, and cross-linking the plasma with a thrombin solution. A multiparametric calibration equation containing R 1 , pO 2 , and temperature was empirically generated from MRS data and validated with fiber optic (FO) probes in vitro. TEGs were then implanted in a dorsal subcutaneous pocket in a murine model and evaluated with MRS up to 29 days postimplantation. R 1 measurements from the TEGs were converted to pO 2 values using the established calibration equation and these in vivo pO 2 measurements were simultaneously validated with FO probes. Additionally, MRS was used to detect increased pO 2 within implanted TEGs that received supplemental oxygen delivery. Finally, based on a comparison of our MRS data with previously reported data, ultra-high-field (16.4 T) is shown to have an advantage for measuring hypoxia with 19 F MRS. Results from this study show MRS relaxometry to be a precise, accurate, and noninvasive technique to monitor TEG pO 2 in vitro and in vivo.

  17. Molecular imaging of in vivo redox dynamics using magnetic resonance system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsumi, Hideo; Yasukawa, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    Homeostatic failure through redox systems in vivo results in abnormality in mitochondrial function, protein expression and metabolism leading to many diseases like lifestyle related ones and cancer. It is therefore important to see redox dynamics for early prevention of the diseases. This paper describes development of machines for electron spin resonance (ESR) imaging of the redox state, for Overhauser Effect MRI (OMRI), application of nitroxyl-probes and state of redox project by authors. They have developed the ESR equipments hitherto, including the latest 300 MHz one, with which images of a mouse given carbamoyl-PROXYL probe are obtained and fused with MRI images for anatomical positioning: resonator for both ESR and MRI coils has been developed for animal images. Philips OMRI machine has been able to give separate images of reduction and oxidation in animals given appropriate probe compounds, which lead to molecular imaging of redox using such probes as 14 N- and 15 N-nitroxyl radicals with different membrane permeability. Application of nitroxyl-radicals like hydroxyl-TEMPO has made it possible for the animal diseases caused by oxidative stress to be analyzed by ESR/spin probe method, and derivatization of the probe results in detection of its distribution in various cell and body areas even in nanometer-space. Authors' project concerns the development of the processing system of redox dynamics/OMRI-integrated images, of better probe complexes and application of these to actual model animals. The techniques are thought to be important in the fields of medicare and new drug development in future. (R.T.)

  18. In vivo USPIO magnetic resonance imaging shows that minocycline mitigates macrophage recruitment to a peripheral nerve injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanouni Pejman

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Minocycline has proven anti-nociceptive effects, but the mechanism by which minocycline delays the development of allodynia and hyperalgesia after peripheral nerve injury remains unclear. Inflammatory cells, in particular macrophages, are critical components of the response to nerve injury. Using ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide-magnetic resonance imaging (USPIO-MRI to monitor macrophage trafficking, the purpose of this project is to determine whether minocycline modulates macrophage trafficking to the site of nerve injury in vivo and, in turn, results in altered pain thresholds. Results Animal experiments were approved by Stanford IACUC. A model of neuropathic pain was created using the Spared Nerve Injury (SNI model that involves ligation of the left sciatic nerve in the left thigh of adult Sprague–Dawley rats. Animals with SNI and uninjured animals were then injected with/without USPIOs (300 μmol/kg IV and with/without minocycline (50 mg/kg IP. Bilateral sciatic nerves were scanned with a volume coil in a 7 T magnet 7 days after USPIO administration. Fluid-sensitive MR images were obtained, and ROIs were placed on bilateral sciatic nerves to quantify signal intensity. Pain behavior modulation by minocycline was measured using the Von Frey filament test. Sciatic nerves were ultimately harvested at day 7, fixed in 10% buffered formalin and stained for the presence of iron oxide-laden macrophages. Behavioral measurements confirmed the presence of allodynia in the neuropathic pain model while the uninjured and minocycline-treated injured group had significantly higher paw withdrawal thresholds (p  Conclusion Animals with neuropathic pain in the left hindpaw show increased trafficking of USPIO-laden macrophages to the site of sciatic nerve injury. Minocycline to retards the migration of macrophages to the nerve injury site, which may partly explain its anti-nociceptive effects. USPIO-MRI is an effective in

  19. In-vivo Imaging of Magnetic Fields Induced by Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) in Human Brain using MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jog, Mayank V.; Smith, Robert X.; Jann, Kay; Dunn, Walter; Lafon, Belen; Truong, Dennis; Wu, Allan; Parra, Lucas; Bikson, Marom; Wang, Danny J. J.

    2016-10-01

    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is an emerging non-invasive neuromodulation technique that applies mA currents at the scalp to modulate cortical excitability. Here, we present a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique, which detects magnetic fields induced by tDCS currents. This technique is based on Ampere’s law and exploits the linear relationship between direct current and induced magnetic fields. Following validation on a phantom with a known path of electric current and induced magnetic field, the proposed MRI technique was applied to a human limb (to demonstrate in-vivo feasibility using simple biological tissue) and human heads (to demonstrate feasibility in standard tDCS applications). The results show that the proposed technique detects tDCS induced magnetic fields as small as a nanotesla at millimeter spatial resolution. Through measurements of magnetic fields linearly proportional to the applied tDCS current, our approach opens a new avenue for direct in-vivo visualization of tDCS target engagement.

  20. Comparing the magnetic resonant coupling radiofrequency stimulation to the traditional approaches: Ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Sai Ho; Pradhan, Raunaq; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin

    2015-09-01

    Recently, the design concept of magnetic resonant coupling has been adapted to electromagnetic therapy applications such as non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) stimulation. This technique can significantly increase the electric field radiated from the magnetic coil at the stimulation target, and hence enhancing the current flowing through the nerve, thus enabling stimulation. In this paper, the developed magnetic resonant coupling (MRC) stimulation, magnetic stimulation (MS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are compared. The differences between the MRC RF stimulation and other techniques are presented in terms of the operating mechanism, ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis. The ev-vivo tissue voltage measurement experiment is performed on the compared devices based on measuring the voltage induced by electromagnetic induction at the tissue. The focusing effect, E field and voltage induced across the tissue, and the attenuation due to the increase of separation between the coil and the target are analyzed. The electromagnetic stimulation will also be performed to obtain the electric field and magnetic field distribution around the biological medium. The electric field intensity is proportional to the induced current and the magnetic field is corresponding to the electromagnetic induction across the biological medium. The comparison between the MRC RF stimulator and the MS and TENS devices revealed that the MRC RF stimulator has several advantages over the others for the applications of inducing current in the biological medium for stimulation purposes.

  1. Comparing the magnetic resonant coupling radiofrequency stimulation to the traditional approaches: Ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sai Ho Yeung

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, the design concept of magnetic resonant coupling has been adapted to electromagnetic therapy applications such as non-invasive radiofrequency (RF stimulation. This technique can significantly increase the electric field radiated from the magnetic coil at the stimulation target, and hence enhancing the current flowing through the nerve, thus enabling stimulation. In this paper, the developed magnetic resonant coupling (MRC stimulation, magnetic stimulation (MS and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS are compared. The differences between the MRC RF stimulation and other techniques are presented in terms of the operating mechanism, ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis. The ev-vivo tissue voltage measurement experiment is performed on the compared devices based on measuring the voltage induced by electromagnetic induction at the tissue. The focusing effect, E field and voltage induced across the tissue, and the attenuation due to the increase of separation between the coil and the target are analyzed. The electromagnetic stimulation will also be performed to obtain the electric field and magnetic field distribution around the biological medium. The electric field intensity is proportional to the induced current and the magnetic field is corresponding to the electromagnetic induction across the biological medium. The comparison between the MRC RF stimulator and the MS and TENS devices revealed that the MRC RF stimulator has several advantages over the others for the applications of inducing current in the biological medium for stimulation purposes.

  2. Comparing the magnetic resonant coupling radiofrequency stimulation to the traditional approaches: Ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeung, Sai Ho; Pradhan, Raunaq; Feng, Xiaohua; Zheng, Yuanjin [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)

    2015-09-15

    Recently, the design concept of magnetic resonant coupling has been adapted to electromagnetic therapy applications such as non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) stimulation. This technique can significantly increase the electric field radiated from the magnetic coil at the stimulation target, and hence enhancing the current flowing through the nerve, thus enabling stimulation. In this paper, the developed magnetic resonant coupling (MRC) stimulation, magnetic stimulation (MS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are compared. The differences between the MRC RF stimulation and other techniques are presented in terms of the operating mechanism, ex-vivo tissue voltage measurement and electromagnetic simulation analysis. The ev-vivo tissue voltage measurement experiment is performed on the compared devices based on measuring the voltage induced by electromagnetic induction at the tissue. The focusing effect, E field and voltage induced across the tissue, and the attenuation due to the increase of separation between the coil and the target are analyzed. The electromagnetic stimulation will also be performed to obtain the electric field and magnetic field distribution around the biological medium. The electric field intensity is proportional to the induced current and the magnetic field is corresponding to the electromagnetic induction across the biological medium. The comparison between the MRC RF stimulator and the MS and TENS devices revealed that the MRC RF stimulator has several advantages over the others for the applications of inducing current in the biological medium for stimulation purposes.

  3. Resolution Improvements in in Vivo1H NMR Spectra with Increased Magnetic Field Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruetter, Rolf; Weisdorf, Sally A.; Rajanayagan, Vasantham; Terpstra, Melissa; Merkle, Hellmut; Truwit, Charles L.; Garwood, Michael; Nyberg, Scott L.; Ugurbil, Kâmil

    1998-11-01

    The measurement of cerebral metabolites using highly homologous localization techniques and similar shimming methods was performed in the human brain at 1.5 and 4 T as well as in the dog and rat brain at 9.4 T. In rat brain, improved resolution was achieved by shimming all first- and second-order shim coils using a fully adiabatic FASTMAP sequence. The spectra showed a clear improvement in spectral resolution for all metabolite resonances with increased field strength. Changes in cerebral glutamine content were clearly observed at 4 T compared to 1.5 T in patients with hepatic encephalopathy. At 9.4 T, glutamine H4 at 2.46 ppm was fully resolved from glutamate H4 at 2.37 ppm, as was the potential resonance from γ-amino-butyric acid at 2.30 ppm and N-acetyl-aspartyl-glutamate at 2.05 ppm. Singlet linewidths were found to be as low as 6 Hz (0.015 ppm) at 9.4 T, indicating a substantial decrease in ppm linewidth with field strength. Furthermore, the methylene peak of creatine was partially resolved from phosphocreatine, indicating a close to 1:1 relationship in gray matter. We conclude that increasing the magnetic field strength increases spectral resolution also for1H NMR, which can lead to more than linear sensitivity gains.

  4. In vivo 3-dimensional Magnetic Resonance Wall Shear Stress Estimation in Ascending Aortic Dilatation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieging, Erik T.; Frydrychowicz, Alex; Wentland, Andrew; Landgraf, Benjamin R.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Wieben, Oliver; François, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To estimate surface-based wall shear stress (WSS) and evaluate flow patterns in ascending aortic dilatation (AscAD) using a high-resolution, time-resolved, three-dimensional (3D), three-directional velocity encoded, radially undersampled phase contrast magnetic resonance sequence (4D PC-MRI). Materials and Methods 4D PC-MRI was performed in 11 patients with AscAD (46.3±22.0 years) and 10 healthy volunteers (32.9±13.4 years) after written informed consent and IRB-approval. Following manual vessel wall segmentation of the ascending aorta (MATLAB, The Mathworks, Natick, MA), a 3D surface was created using spline interpolation. Spatial WSS variation based on surface division in 12 segments and temporal variation were evaluated in AscAD and normal aortas. Visual analysis of flow patterns was performed based on streamlines and particle traces using EnSight (v9.0, CEI, Apex, NC). Results AscAD was associated with significantly increased diastolic WSS, decreased systolic to diastolic WSS ratio, and delayed onset of peak WSS (all P wall of the ascending aorta. Vortical flow with highest velocities along the anterior wall and increased helical flow during diastole were observed in AscAD compared to controls. Conclusion Changes in WSS in the ascending aorta of AscAD correspond to observed alterations in flow patterns compared to controls. PMID:21563242

  5. Studying Dynamic Myofiber Aggregate Reorientation in Dilated Cardiomyopathy Using In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Deuster, Constantin; Sammut, Eva; Asner, Liya; Nordsletten, David; Lamata, Pablo; Stoeck, Christian T; Kozerke, Sebastian; Razavi, Reza

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the dynamic alterations of myocardial microstructure and strain between diastole and systole in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to healthy controls using the magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging, myocardial tagging, and biomechanical modeling. Dual heart-phase diffusion tensor imaging was successfully performed in 9 patients and 9 controls. Tagging data were acquired for the diffusion tensor strain correction and cardiac motion analysis. Mean diffusivity, fractional anisotropy, and myocyte aggregate orientations were compared between both cohorts. Cardiac function was assessed by left ventricular ejection fraction, torsion, and strain. Computational modeling was used to study the impact of cardiac shape on fiber reorientation and how fiber orientations affect strain. In patients with dilated cardiomyopathy, a more longitudinal orientation of diastolic myofiber aggregates was measured compared with controls. Although a significant steepening of helix angles (HAs) during contraction was found in the controls, consistent change in HAs during contraction was absent in patients. Left ventricular ejection fraction, cardiac torsion, and strain were significantly lower in the patients compared with controls. Computational modeling revealed that the dilated heart results in reduced HA changes compared with a normal heart. Reduced torsion was found to be exacerbated by steeper HAs. Diffusion tensor imaging revealed reduced reorientation of myofiber aggregates during cardiac contraction in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy relative to controls. Left ventricular remodeling seems to be an important factor in the changes to myocyte orientation. Steeper HAs are coupled with a worsening in strain and torsion. Overall, the findings provide new insights into the structural alterations in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy. © 2016 The Authors.

  6. EMMPRIN-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for In Vivo Visualization and Regression of Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Irene; Piedras, Maria Jose Garcia Miguel; Herruzo, Irene; Turpin, Maria Del Carmen; Castejón, Borja; Reventun, Paula; Martin, Ana; Saura, Marta; Zamorano, Jose Luis; Zaragoza, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation may represent a mechanism for cardiac protection against ischemia. Extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN) is highly expressed in response to acute myocardial infarction (AMI), and induces activation of several matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), including gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9. We targeted EMMPRIN with paramagnetic/fluorescent micellar nanoparticles conjugated with the EMMPRIN binding peptide AP-9 (NAP9), or an AP-9 scrambled peptide as a negative control (NAPSC). We found that NAP9 binds to endogenous EMMPRIN in cultured HL1 myocytes and in mouse hearts subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (IR). Injection of NAP9 at the time of or one day after IR, was enough to reduce progression of myocardial cell death when compared to CONTROL and NAPSC injected mice (infarct size in NAP9 injected mice: 32%±6.59 vs 46%±9.04 or NAPSC injected mice: 48%±7.64). In the same way, cardiac parameters were recovered to almost healthy levels (LVEF NAP9 63% ± 7.24 vs CONTROL 42% ± 4.74 or NAPSC 39% ± 6.44), whereas ECM degradation was also reduced as shown by inhibition of MMP-2 and MMP-9 activation. Cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) scans have shown a signal enhancement in the left ventricle of NAP9 injected mice with respect to non-injected, and to mice injected with NAPSC. A positive correlation between CMR enhancement and Evans-Blue/TTC staining of infarct size was calculated (R:0.65). Taken together, these results point to EMMPRIN targeted nanoparticles as a new approach to the mitigation of ischemic/reperfusion injury.

  7. In vivo skin moisturizing measurement by high-resolution 3 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesrar, J; Ognard, J; Garetier, M; Chechin, D; Misery, L; Ben Salem, D

    2017-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is rarely used for the exploration of skin, even if studies have validated both feasibility of skin MRI and its interest for anatomical, physiological, and biochemical study of the skin. The purpose of this study is to explore moisturizing of the different skin layers using 3-T scan. An MRI of the heel's skin was performed using a 23 mm coil diameter on a 3T scan with a FFE (Fast Field Echo) 3D T1-weighted sequence and a TSE (Turbo Spin Echo) calculation T2-weighted sequence (pixels size of respectively 60 and 70 μm). This study was conducted on 35 healthy volunteers, who were scanned before applying moisturizer topic and 1 h after applying it. Region of interest in the stratum corneum, the epidermis and the dermis were generated on the T2 mapping. The thickness of each layer was measured. The T1 sequence allowed accurate cross-examination repositioning to ensure the comparability of the measurements. Among the 35 cases, two were excluded from the analysis because of movement artifacts. Measurements before and after moisturizer topic application displayed a T2 increase of 48.94% (P < 0.0001) in the stratum corneum and of 5.45% (P < 0.0001) in the epidermis yet without significant difference in the dermis. There was no significant link between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the T2 increase. However, there was a strong correlation between the thickness of the stratum corneum and the thickness of the epidermis (P < 0.001; rhô=0.72). High-resolution MRI allows fine exploration of anatomical and physiological properties of the skin and can further be used to extend the studies of skin hydration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. In Vivo Imaging of Tau Pathology Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Textural Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niall Colgan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-invasive characterization of the pathological features of Alzheimer's disease (AD could enhance patient management and the development of therapeutic strategies. Magnetic resonance imaging texture analysis (MRTA has been used previously to extract texture descriptors from structural clinical scans in AD to determine cerebral tissue heterogeneity. In this study, we examined the potential of MRTA to specifically identify tau pathology in an AD mouse model and compared the MRTA metrics to histological measures of tau burden.Methods: MRTA was applied to T2 weighted high-resolution MR images of nine 8.5-month-old rTg4510 tau pathology (TG mice and 16 litter matched wild-type (WT mice. MRTA comprised of the filtration-histogram technique, where the filtration step extracted and enhanced features of different sizes (fine, medium, and coarse texture scales, followed by quantification of texture using histogram analysis (mean gray level intensity, mean intensity, entropy, uniformity, skewness, standard-deviation, and kurtosis. MRTA was applied to manually segmented regions of interest (ROI drawn within the cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus regions and the level of tau burden was assessed in equivalent regions using histology.Results: Texture parameters were markedly different between WT and TG in the cortex (E, p < 0.01, K, p < 0.01, the hippocampus (K, p < 0.05 and in the thalamus (K, p < 0.01. In addition, we observed significant correlations between histological measurements of tau burden and kurtosis in the cortex, hippocampus and thalamus.Conclusions: MRTA successfully differentiated WT and TG in brain regions with varying degrees of tau pathology (cortex, hippocampus, and thalamus based on T2 weighted MR images. Furthermore, the kurtosis measurement correlated with histological measures of tau burden. This initial study indicates that MRTA may have a role in the early diagnosis of AD and the assessment of tau pathology using

  9. Hippocampal Neurometabolite Changes in Hypothyroidism: An In Vivo (1) H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Study Before and After Thyroxine Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, S; Rana, P; Kumar, P; Shankar, L R; Khushu, S

    2016-09-01

    The hippocampus is a thyroid hormone receptor-rich region of the brain. A change in thyroid hormone levels may be responsible for an alteration in hippocampal-associated function, such as learning, memory and attention. Neuroimaging studies have shown functional and structural changes in the hippocampus as a result of hypothyroidism. However, the underlying process responsible for this dysfunction remains unclear. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the metabolic changes in the brain of adult hypothyroid patients during pre- and post-thyroxine treatment using in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1) H MRS). (1) H MRS was performed in both healthy control subjects (n = 15) and hypothyroid patients (n = 15) (before and after thyroxine treatment). The relative ratios of the neurometabolites were calculated using the linear combination model (LCModel). Our results revealed a significant decrease of glutamate (Glu) (P = 0.045) and myo-inositol (mI) (P = 0.002) levels in the hippocampus of hypothyroid patients compared to controls. No significant changes in metabolite ratios were observed in the hypothyroid patients after thyroxine treatment. The findings of the present study reveal decreased Glu/tCr and mI/tCr ratios in the hippocampus of hypothyroid patients and these metabolite alterations persisted even after the patients became clinically euthyroid subsequent to thyroxine treatment. © 2016 British Society for Neuroendocrinology.

  10. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy reveals region specific metabolic responses to SIV infection in the macaque brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joo Chan-Gyu

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS studies of HIV-infected humans have demonstrated significant metabolic abnormalities that vary by brain region, but the causes are poorly understood. Metabolic changes in the frontal cortex, basal ganglia and white matter in 18 SIV-infected macaques were investigated using MRS during the first month of infection. Results Changes in the N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho, myo-inositol (MI, creatine (Cr and glutamine/glutamate (Glx resonances were quantified both in absolute terms and relative to the creatine resonance. Most abnormalities were observed at the time of peak viremia, 2 weeks post infection (wpi. At that time point, significant decreases in NAA and NAA/Cr, reflecting neuronal injury, were observed only in the frontal cortex. Cr was significantly elevated only in the white matter. Changes in Cho and Cho/Cr were similar across the brain regions, increasing at 2 wpi, and falling below baseline levels at 4 wpi. MI and MI/Cr levels were increased across all brain regions. Conclusion These data best support the hypothesis that different brain regions have variable intrinsic vulnerabilities to neuronal injury caused by the AIDS virus.

  11. Evaluation of Cancer Metabolomics Using ex vivo High Resolution Magic Angle Spinning (HRMAS Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor L. Fuss

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization (WHO estimates, cancer is responsible for more deaths than all coronary heart disease or stroke worldwide, serving as a major public health threat around the world. High resolution magic angle spinning (HRMAS magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS has demonstrated its usefulness in the identification of cancer metabolic markers with the potential to improve diagnosis and prognosis for the oncology clinic, due partially to its ability to preserve tissue architecture for subsequent histological and molecular pathology analysis. Capable of the quantification of individual metabolites, ratios of metabolites, and entire metabolomic profiles, HRMAS MRS is one of the major techniques now used in cancer metabolomic research. This article reviews and discusses literature reports of HRMAS MRS studies of cancer metabolomics published between 2010 and 2015 according to anatomical origins, including brain, breast, prostate, lung, gastrointestinal, and neuroendocrine cancers. These studies focused on improving diagnosis and understanding patient prognostication, monitoring treatment effects, as well as correlating with the use of in vivo MRS in cancer clinics.

  12. WE-G-303-03: Advances in in Vivo Magnetic NanoparticleSensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weaver, J. [Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  13. WE-G-303-03: Advances in in Vivo Magnetic NanoparticleSensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weaver, J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Understand the physical bases of gold nanoparticle applications for radiosensitization and x-ray fluorescence imaging Understand the parameters that define gold nanoparticle-mediated radiosensitization in biological systems Understand the potential of magnetic nanoparticle characterization of the microenvironment Understand the various strategies for radiolabeling of nanoparticles and their applications S.C. and S.K. acknowledge support from MD Anderson Cancer Center, NIH (R01CA155446 and P30CA16672) and DoD (W81XWH-12-1-0198); J.W. acknowledges support from NIH (U54CA151662-01); W.C. acknowledges support from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, NIH (R01CA169365, P30CA014520, and T32CA009206), DoD (W81XWH-11-1-0644 and W81XWH-11-1-0648), and ACS (125246-RSG-13-099-01-CCE)

  14. Biocompatibility of Fe3O4@Au composite magnetic nanoparticles in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Y

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Yuntao Li1,2, Jing Liu1, Yuejiao Zhong3, Jia Zhang1, Ziyu Wang1, Li Wang1, Yanli An1, Mei Lin1, Zhiqiang Gao2, Dongsheng Zhang11School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China; 2Second Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of China; 3Jiangsu Cancer Hospital and Jiangsu Institute of Cancer Research, Nanjing, Jiangsu Province, People's Republic of ChinaPurpose: This research was conducted to assess the biocompatibility of the core-shell Fe3O4@Au composite magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs, which have potential application in tumor hyperthermia. Methods: Fe3O4@Au composite MNPs with core-shell structure were synthesized by reduction of Au3+ in the presence of Fe3O4-MNPs prepared by improved co-precipitation. Cytotoxicity assay, hemolysis test, micronucleus (MN assay, and detection of acute toxicity in mice and beagle dogs were then carried out.Results: The result of cytotoxicity assay showed that the toxicity grade of this material on mouse fibroblast cell line (L-929 was classified as grade 1, which belongs to no cytotoxicity. Hemolysis rates showed 0.278%, 0.232%, and 0.197%, far less than 5%, after treatment with different concentrations of Fe3O4@Au composite MNPs. In the MN assay, there was no significant difference in MN formation rates between the experimental groups and negative control (P > 0.05, but there was a significant difference between the experimental groups and the positive control (P < 0.05. The median lethal dose of the Fe3O4@Au composite MNPs after intraperitoneal administration in mice was 8.39 g/kg, and the 95% confidence interval was 6.58-10.72 g/kg, suggesting that these nanoparticles have a wide safety margin. Acute toxicity testing in beagle dogs also showed no significant difference in body weight between the treatment groups at 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after liver injection and no behavioral changes. Furthermore, blood

  15. The clinical utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: recent in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstock, A. William; Kwock, Lester; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Schiro, Sharon; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has resulted in improved outcomes in patients treated with gastrointestinal malignancies and squamous cancers of the head and neck. In our first aim, we proposed that the enhanced cell kill and tumor regression observed with the combination of 5-FU and radiation is related to radiation potentiating the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU. Using fluorine-19 ( 19 F) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) we non-invasively determined the tumor clearance rates of 5-FU +/- radiation in an animal model and used this research tool to predict tumor response in patients receiving concurrent radiation and 5-FU therapy. Our second aim was to evaluate the use of proton ( 1 H) nmr spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the spectral characteristics of malignant tumors in the head and neck and liver and correlate these clinical observations with in vitro and in vivo data. Materials and Methods: 1 H and 19 F spectroscopic analysis were performed with a 2.0T Otsuka magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. 1 H nmr patient studies were done on a clinical 1.5T Philips MR system. In vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies were performed on a 11 T Bruker nmr system. Animal experiments for the 19 F nmr studies were performed on 3-6 week old female (Nu/Nu) athymic nude mice. Animals were injected s.c. with 10 6 human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. At a tumor size of 1.0 cm, animals in the first group received i.v. 5-FU (100 mg/kg) immediately prior to spectroscopic analysis. Animals in the second group were treated with a single radiation dose of either 2 Gy or 10 Gy just prior to the 5-FU injection and subsequent spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analyses were performed at 20-30 minute intervals for 4-6 hr's. Results: 19 F nmr: A decrease in tumor clearance was observed in tumors pre-treated with a single dose of irradiation (2.0 Gy and 10 Gy). The clearance rate of the 5-FU for non-irradiated animals was 0.0178 min

  16. Microstructural parcellation of the human cerebral cortex – from Brodmann's post-mortem map to in vivo mapping with high-field magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Geyer

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The year 2009 marked the 100th anniversary of the publication of the famous brain map of Korbinian Brodmann. Although a "classic" guide to microanatomical parcellation of the cerebral cortex, it is – from today's state-of-the-art neuroimaging perspective – problematic to use Brodmann's map as a structural guide to functional units in the cortex. In this article we discuss some of the reasons, especially the problematic compatibility of the "post-mortem world" of microstructural brain maps with the "in vivo world" of neuroimaging. We conclude with some prospects for the future of in vivo structural brain mapping: a new approach which has the enormous potential to make direct correlations between microstructure and function in living human brains: "in vivo Brodmann mapping" with high-field magnetic resonance imaging.

  17. Exploring symbiotic nitrogen fixation and assimilation in pea root nodules by in vivo 15N nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scharff, A.M.; Egsgaard, H.; Hansen, P.E.

    2003-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) fixation and assimilation in pea (Pisum sativum) root nodules were studied by in vivo N-15 nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) by exposing detached nodules to N-15, via a perfusion medium, while recording a time course of spectra. In vivo P-31 NMR spectroscopy was used to monitor...... the physiological state of the metabolically active nodules. The nodules were extracted after the NMR studies and analyzed for total soluble amino acid pools and N-15 labeling of individual amino acids by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. A substantial pool of free ammonium was observed by N-15 NMR...... labeling of Asn was observed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, which is consistent with the generally accepted role of Asn as the end product of primary N assimilation in pea nodules. However, the Asn N-15 amino signal was absent in in vivo N-15 NMR spectra, which could be because...

  18. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media. PMID:22453050

  19. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlert, Philipp; Parohl, Nina; Albert, Juliane; Schäfer, Lena; Reinhardt, Renate; Kaiser, Gernot M; McDougall, Ian; Decker, Brad; Plicht, Björn; Erbel, Raimund; Eggebrecht, Holger; Ladd, Mark E; Quick, Harald H

    2012-03-27

    Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR) is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI) using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2) and transsubclavian (n = 6) TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  20. Towards real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance guided transarterial CoreValve implantation: in vivo evaluation in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kahlert Philipp

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Real-time cardiovascular magnetic resonance (rtCMR is considered attractive for guiding TAVI. Owing to an unlimited scan plane orientation and an unsurpassed soft-tissue contrast with simultaneous device visualization, rtCMR is presumed to allow safe device navigation and to offer optimal orientation for precise axial positioning. We sought to evaluate the preclinical feasibility of rtCMR-guided transarterial aortic valve implatation (TAVI using the nitinol-based Medtronic CoreValve bioprosthesis. Methods rtCMR-guided transfemoral (n = 2 and transsubclavian (n = 6 TAVI was performed in 8 swine using the original CoreValve prosthesis and a modified, CMR-compatible delivery catheter without ferromagnetic components. Results rtCMR using TrueFISP sequences provided reliable imaging guidance during TAVI, which was successful in 6 swine. One transfemoral attempt failed due to unsuccessful aortic arch passage and one pericardial tamponade with subsequent death occurred as a result of ventricular perforation by the device tip due to an operating error, this complication being detected without delay by rtCMR. rtCMR allowed for a detailed, simultaneous visualization of the delivery system with the mounted stent-valve and the surrounding anatomy, resulting in improved visualization during navigation through the vasculature, passage of the aortic valve, and during placement and deployment of the stent-valve. Post-interventional success could be confirmed using ECG-triggered time-resolved cine-TrueFISP and flow-sensitive phase-contrast sequences. Intended valve position was confirmed by ex-vivo histology. Conclusions Our study shows that rtCMR-guided TAVI using the commercial CoreValve prosthesis in conjunction with a modified delivery system is feasible in swine, allowing improved procedural guidance including immediate detection of complications and direct functional assessment with reduction of radiation and omission of contrast media.

  1. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by {sup 1}H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-10-15

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. {sup 1}H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo{sup 1}H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 {+-} 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 {+-} 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. {sup 1}H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation.

  2. Early myocardial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: a study using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandrasekaran Suresh

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is associated with a cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the present study we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and echocardiographic techniques to examine and characterize early changes in myocardial function in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Methods Diabetes was induced in 8-week old C57BL/6 mice with two intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin. The blood glucose levels were maintained at 19–25 mmol/l using intermittent low dosages of long acting insulin glargine. MRI and echocardiography were performed at 4 weeks of diabetes (age of 12 weeks in diabetic mice and age-matched controls. Results After 4 weeks of hyperglycemia one marker of mitochondrial function, NADH oxidase activity, was decreased to 50% of control animals. MRI studies of diabetic mice at 4 weeks demonstrated significant deficits in myocardial morphology and functionality including: a decreased left ventricular (LV wall thickness, an increased LV end-systolic diameter and volume, a diminished LV ejection fraction and cardiac output, a decreased LV circumferential shortening, and decreased LV peak ejection and filling rates. M-mode echocardiographic and Doppler flow studies of diabetic mice at 4 weeks showed a decreased wall thickening and increased E/A ratio, supporting both systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that MRI interrogation can identify the onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice with its impaired functional capacity and altered morphology. The MRI technique will lend itself to repetitive study of early changes in cardiac function in small animal models of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  3. Early myocardial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice: a study using in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xichun; Tesiram, Yasvir A; Towner, Rheal A; Abbott, Andrew; Patterson, Eugene; Huang, Shijun; Garrett, Marion W; Chandrasekaran, Suresh; Matsuzaki, Satoshi; Szweda, Luke I; Gordon, Brian E; Kem, David C

    2007-01-01

    Background Diabetes is associated with a cardiomyopathy that is independent of coronary artery disease or hypertension. In the present study we used in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiographic techniques to examine and characterize early changes in myocardial function in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Methods Diabetes was induced in 8-week old C57BL/6 mice with two intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin. The blood glucose levels were maintained at 19–25 mmol/l using intermittent low dosages of long acting insulin glargine. MRI and echocardiography were performed at 4 weeks of diabetes (age of 12 weeks) in diabetic mice and age-matched controls. Results After 4 weeks of hyperglycemia one marker of mitochondrial function, NADH oxidase activity, was decreased to 50% of control animals. MRI studies of diabetic mice at 4 weeks demonstrated significant deficits in myocardial morphology and functionality including: a decreased left ventricular (LV) wall thickness, an increased LV end-systolic diameter and volume, a diminished LV ejection fraction and cardiac output, a decreased LV circumferential shortening, and decreased LV peak ejection and filling rates. M-mode echocardiographic and Doppler flow studies of diabetic mice at 4 weeks showed a decreased wall thickening and increased E/A ratio, supporting both systolic and diastolic dysfunction. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that MRI interrogation can identify the onset of diabetic cardiomyopathy in mice with its impaired functional capacity and altered morphology. The MRI technique will lend itself to repetitive study of early changes in cardiac function in small animal models of diabetic cardiomyopathy. PMID:17309798

  4. Radiation-induced changes in human brain metabolites as studied by 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Usenius, Taina; Usenius, Jussi-Pekka; Tenhunen, Mikko; Vainio, Pauli; Johansson, Risto; Soimakallio, Seppo; Kauppinen, Risto

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: External radiation therapy for brain tumors exposes healthy areas of brain to considerable doses of radiation. This may cause cognitive and psychological impairment, which indicate neuronal dysfunction. 1 H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) was used to study brain metabolites in the adjacent regions 0.5-13 years after exposure to therapeutic irradiation. Methods and Materials: Eight patients with irradiated brain tumors were examined by means of in vivo 1 H-MRS using a point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence with echo times of 60 or 270 ms. The metabolites were quantified by using brain water concentration as internal reference. The volume of interest (VOI) was positioned in irradiated brain areas excluding, however, scar and recurrent tumor. The respective radiation doses were measured based on radiation therapy plans, simulator films, and localization MR images. Results: The concentration of the neuron-specific metabolite N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) was 13.2 ± 1.4 mmol/l in controls, whereas it was reduced in the brains of treated patients to 8.6 ± 0.9 mmol/l (total radiation dose 59-62 Gy). Concentrations of creatine and choline-containing compounds were unchanged. The T2 of water was longer in irradiated than in unexposed brain areas. Conclusion: Therapeutic brain irradiation causes neuronal damage, which is reflected by reduction of N-acetyl-l-aspartate (NAA) concentrations. 1 H-MRS could serve clinically as a means of evaluating adverse effects in the central nervous system, enabling intervention and rehabilitation

  5. Optimized labeling of bone marrow mesenchymal cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and in vivo visualization by magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising addition to traditional treatments for a number of diseases. However, harnessing the therapeutic potential of stem cells requires an understanding of their fate in vivo. Non-invasive cell tracking can provide knowledge about mechanisms responsible for functional improvement of host tissue. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) have been used to label and visualize various cell types with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study we performed experiments designed to investigate the biological properties, including proliferation, viability and differentiation capacity of mesenchymal cells (MSCs) labeled with clinically approved SPIONs. Results Rat and mouse MSCs were isolated, cultured, and incubated with dextran-covered SPIONs (ferumoxide) alone or with poly-L-lysine (PLL) or protamine chlorhydrate for 4 or 24 hrs. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by dextran immunocytochemistry and MRI. Cell proliferation and viability were evaluated in vitro with Ki67 immunocytochemistry and live/dead assays. Ferumoxide-labeled MSCs could be induced to differentiate to adipocytes, osteocytes and chondrocytes. We analyzed ferumoxide retention in MSCs with or without mitomycin C pretreatment. Approximately 95% MSCs were labeled when incubated with ferumoxide for 4 or 24 hrs in the presence of PLL or protamine, whereas labeling of MSCs incubated with ferumoxide alone was poor. Proliferative capacity was maintained in MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and PLL for 4 hrs, however, after 24 hrs it was reduced. MSCs incubated with ferumoxide and protamine were efficiently visualized by MRI; they maintained proliferation and viability for up to 7 days and remained competent to differentiate. After 21 days MSCs pretreated with mitomycin C still showed a large number of ferumoxide-labeled cells. Conclusions The efficient and long lasting uptake and retention of SPIONs by MSCs using a protocol employing ferumoxide and

  6. Dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent based on ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide nanoparticles: synthesis, characterization, and in vivo application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tegafaw, Tirusew; Xu, Wenlong; Ahmad, Md Wasi; Lee, Gang Ho; Baeck, Jong Su; Chang, Yongmin; Bae, Ji Eun; Chae, Kwon Seok; Kim, Tae Jeong

    2015-01-01

    A new type of dual-mode T_1 and T_2 magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent based on mixed lanthanide oxide nanoparticles was synthesized. Gd"3"+ ("8S_7_/_2) plays an important role in T_1 MRI contrast agents because of its large electron spin magnetic moment resulting from its seven unpaired 4f-electrons, and Dy"3"+ ("6H_1_5_/_2) has the potential to be used in T_2 MRI contrast agents because of its very large total electron magnetic moment: among lanthanide oxide nanoparticles, Dy_2O_3 nanoparticles have the largest magnetic moments at room temperature. Using these properties of Gd"3"+ and Dy"3"+ and their oxide nanoparticles, ultrasmall mixed gadolinium-dysprosium oxide (GDO) nanoparticles were synthesized and their potential to act as a dual-mode T_1 and T_2 MRI contrast agent was investigated in vitro and in vivo. The D-glucuronic acid coated GDO nanoparticles (d_a_v_g = 1.0 nm) showed large r_1 and r_2 values (r_2/r_1 ≈ 6.6) and as a result clear dose-dependent contrast enhancements in R_1 and R_2 map images. Finally, the dual-mode imaging capability of the nanoparticles was confirmed by obtaining in vivo T_1 and T_2 MR images. (paper)

  7. In vivo intervertebral disc characterization using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and T1ρ imaging: association with discography and Oswestry Disability Index and Short Form-36 Health Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jin; Joseph, Gabby B; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M; Hu, Serena S; Berven, Sigurd H; Kurhanewitz, John; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2012-02-01

    An in vivo study of intervertebral disc degeneration by using quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). To quantify water and proteoglycan (PG) content in the intervertebral disc by using in vivo MRS and to evaluate the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content, T1ρ, Pfirrmann score, clinical self-assessment, and discography. Previous in vitro studies have investigated the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content and degenerative grade by using cadaveric intervertebral discs. T1ρ has been shown to relate to Pfirrmann grade and clinical self-assessment. However, the associations between MRS-quantified water/PG content, MRI-based T1ρ, self-assessment of health status, and clinical response to discography have not been studied in vivo. MRS and MRI were performed in 26 patients (70 discs) with symptomatic intervertebral degenerative disc (IVDD) and 23 controls (41 discs). Patients underwent evaluation of intervertebral discs with provocative discography. All subjects completed the Short Form-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires. The water/PG peak area ratio was significantly elevated in (a) patients (compared with controls) and in (b) discs with positive discography (compared with negative discography). Magnetic resonance (MR) T1ρ exhibited similar trends. A significant association was found between T1ρ and normalized PG content (R = 0.61, P 0.05). The water/PG peak area ratio, normalized water, normalized PG, and Pfirrmann grade were significantly associated with patient self-assessment of disability and physical composite score, while disc height was not. This study demonstrated a relationship between in vivo MRS spectroscopy (water content and PG content), imaging parameters (T1ρ and Pfirrmann grade), discography results, and clinical self-assessment, suggesting that MRS-quantified water, PG, and MR T1ρ relaxation time may potentially serve as biomarkers of

  8. Optically transmitted and inductively coupled electric reference to access in vivo concentrations for quantitative proton-decoupled ¹³C magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xing; Pavan, Matteo; Heinzer-Schweizer, Susanne; Boesiger, Peter; Henning, Anke

    2012-01-01

    This report describes our efforts on quantification of tissue metabolite concentrations in mM by nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy and the Electric Reference To access In vivo Concentrations (ERETIC) method. Previous work showed that a calibrated synthetic magnetic resonance spectroscopy-like signal transmitted through an optical fiber and inductively coupled into a transmit/receive coil represents a reliable reference standard for in vivo (1) H magnetic resonance spectroscopy quantification on a clinical platform. In this work, we introduce a related implementation that enables simultaneous proton decoupling and ERETIC-based metabolite quantification and hence extends the applicability of the ERETIC method to nuclear Overhauser enhanced and proton decoupled in vivo (13) C magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In addition, ERETIC signal stability under the influence of simultaneous proton decoupling is investigated. The proposed quantification method was cross-validated against internal and external reference standards on human skeletal muscle. The ERETIC signal intensity stability was 100.65 ± 4.18% over 3 months including measurements with and without proton decoupling. Glycogen and unsaturated fatty acid concentrations measured with the ERETIC method were in excellent agreement with internal creatine and external phantom reference methods, showing a difference of 1.85 ± 1.21% for glycogen and 1.84 ± 1.00% for unsaturated fatty acid between ERETIC and creatine-based quantification, whereas the deviations between external reference and creatine-based quantification are 6.95 ± 9.52% and 3.19 ± 2.60%, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Monitoring of implanted stem cell migration in vivo: A highly resolved in vivo magnetic resonance imaging investigation of experimental stroke in rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, Mathias; Küstermann, Ekkehard; Blunk, James; Wiedermann, Dirk; Trapp, Thorsten; Wecker, Stefan; Föcking, Melanie; Arnold, Heinz; Hescheler, Jürgen; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Schwindt, Wolfram; Bührle, Christian

    2002-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of stem cells after grafting is essential for a better understanding of their migrational dynamics and differentiation processes and of their regeneration potential. Migration of endogenous or grafted stem cells and neurons has been described in vertebrate brain, both under normal conditions from the subventricular zone along the rostral migratory stream and under pathophysiological conditions, such as degeneration or focal cerebral ischemia. Those studies, however, relied on invasive analysis of brain sections in combination with appropriate staining techniques. Here, we demonstrate the observation of cell migration under in vivo conditions, allowing the monitoring of the cell dynamics within individual animals, and for a prolonged time. Embryonic stem (ES) cells, constitutively expressing the GFP, were labeled by a lipofection procedure with a MRI contrast agent and implanted into rat brains. Focal cerebral ischemia had been induced 2 weeks before implantation of ES cells into the healthy, contralateral hemisphere. MRI at 78-μm isotropic spatial resolution permitted the observation of the implanted cells with high contrast against the host tissue, and was confirmed by GFP registration. During 3 weeks, cells migrated along the corpus callosum to the ventricular walls, and massively populated the borderzone of the damaged brain tissue on the hemisphere opposite to the implantation sites. Our results indicate that ES cells have high migrational dynamics, targeted to the cerebral lesion area. The imaging approach is ideally suited for the noninvasive observation of cell migration, engraftment, and morphological differentiation at high spatial and temporal resolution. PMID:12444255

  10. Estimation of in vivo inter-vertebral loading during motion using fluoroscopic and magnetic resonance image informed finite element models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanjani-Pour, Sahand; Meakin, Judith R; Breen, Alex; Breen, Alan

    2018-03-21

    Finite element (FE) models driven by medical image data can be used to estimate subject-specific spinal biomechanics. This study aimed to combine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and quantitative fluoroscopy (QF) in subject-specific FE models of upright standing, flexion and extension. Supine MR images of the lumbar spine were acquired from healthy participants using a 0.5 T MR scanner. Nine 3D quasi-static linear FE models of L3 to L5 were created with an elastic nucleus and orthotropic annulus. QF data was acquired from the same participants who performed trunk flexion to 60° and trunk extension to 20°. The displacements and rotations of the vertebrae were calculated and applied to the FE model. Stresses were averaged across the nucleus region and transformed to the disc co-ordinate system (S1 = mediolateral, S2 = anteroposterior, S3 = axial). In upright standing S3 was predicted to be -0.7 ± 0.6 MPa (L3L4) and -0.6 ± 0.5 MPa (L4L5). S3 increased to -2.0 ± 1.3 MPa (L3L4) and -1.2 ± 0.6 MPa (L4L5) in full flexion and to -1.1 ± 0.8 MPa (L3L4) and -0.7 ± 0.5 MPa (L4L5) in full extension. S1 and S2 followed similar patterns; shear was small apart from S23. Disc stresses correlated to disc orientation and wedging. The results demonstrate that MR and QF data can be combined in a participant-specific FE model to investigate spinal biomechanics in vivo and that predicted stresses are within ranges reported in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Angiogenesis In Vivo using Polyvalent Cyclic RGD-Iron Oxide Microparticle Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melemenidis, Stavros; Jefferson, Andrew; Ruparelia, Neil; Akhtar, Asim M; Xie, Jin; Allen, Danny; Hamilton, Alastair; Larkin, James R; Perez-Balderas, Francisco; Smart, Sean C; Muschel, Ruth J; Chen, Xiaoyuan; Sibson, Nicola R; Choudhury, Robin P

    2015-01-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential component of tumour growth and, consequently, an important target both therapeutically and diagnostically. The cell adhesion molecule αvβ3 integrin is a specific marker of angiogenic vessels and the most prevalent vascular integrin that binds the amino acid sequence arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD). Previous studies using RGD-targeted nanoparticles (20-50 nm diameter) of iron oxide (NPIO) for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of tumour angiogenesis, have identified a number of limitations, including non-specific extravasation, long blood half-life (reducing specific contrast) and low targeting valency. The aim of this study, therefore, was to determine whether conjugation of a cyclic RGD variant [c(RGDyK)], with enhanced affinity for αvβ3, to microparticles of iron oxide (MPIO) would provide a more sensitive contrast agent for imaging of angiogenic tumour vessels. Cyclic RGD [c(RGDyK)] and RAD [c(RADyK)] based peptides were coupled to 2.8 μm MPIO, and binding efficacy tested both in vitro and in vivo. Significantly greater specific binding of c(RGDyK)-MPIO to S-nitroso-n-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP)-stimulated human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro than PBS-treated cells was demonstrated under both static (14-fold increase; P agent in both tumour models (melanoma P < 0.001; colorectal P < 0.0001). Correspondingly, MPIO density per tumour volume assessed immunohistochemically was significantly greater for c(RGDyK)-MPIO than c(RADyK)-MPIO injected animals, in both melanoma (P < 0.05) and colorectal (P < 0.0005) tumours. In both cases, binding of c(RGDyK)-MPIO co-localised with αvβ3 expression. Comparison of RGD-targeted and dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI assessment of tumour perfusion indicated sensitivity to different vascular features. This study demonstrates specific binding of c(RGDyK)-MPIO to αvβ3 expressing neo-vessels, with marked and quantifiable contrast and rapid clearance of unbound particles from the

  12. Magnetic control system targeted for capsule endoscopic operations in the stomach--design, fabrication, and in vitro and ex vivo evaluations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Gi-Shih; Liu, Chih-Wen; Jiang, Joe-Air; Chuang, Cheng-Long; Teng, Ming-Tsung

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a novel solution of a hand-held external controller to a miniaturized capsule endoscope in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Traditional capsule endoscopes move passively by peristaltic wave generated in the GI tract and the gravity, which makes it impossible for endoscopists to manipulate the capsule endoscope to the diagnostic disease areas. In this study, the main objective is to present an endoscopic capsule and a magnetic field navigator (MFN) that allows endoscopists to remotely control the locomotion and viewing angle of an endoscopic capsule. The attractive merits of this study are that the maneuvering of the endoscopic capsule can be achieved by the external MFN with effectiveness, low cost, and operation safety, both from a theoretical and an experimental point of view. In order to study the magnetic interactions between the endoscopic capsule and the external MFN, a magnetic-analysis model is established for computer-based finite-element simulations. In addition, experiments are conducted to show the control effectiveness of the MFN to the endoscopic capsule. Finally, several prototype endoscopic capsules and a prototype MFN are fabricated, and their actual capabilities are experimentally assessed via in vitro and ex vivo tests using a stomach model and a resected porcine stomach, respectively. Both in vitro and ex vivo test results demonstrate great potential and practicability of achieving high-precision rotation and controllable movement of the capsule using the developed MFN.

  13. Non-invasive in vivo evaluation of in situ forming PLGA implants by benchtop magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempe, Sabine; Metz, Hendrik; Pereira, Priscila G C; Mäder, Karsten

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, we used benchtop magnetic resonance imaging (BT-MRI) for non-invasive and continuous in vivo studies of in situ forming poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) implants without the use of contrast agents. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) 400 was used as an alternative solvent to the clinically used NMP. In addition to BT-MRI, we applied electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to characterize implant formation and drug delivery processes in vitro and in vivo. We were able to follow key processes of implant formation by EPR and MRI. Because EPR spectra are sensitive to polarity and mobility, we were able to follow the kinetics of the solvent/non-solvent exchange and the PLGA precipitation. Due to the high water affinity of PEG 400, we observed a transient accumulation of water in the implant neighbourhood. Furthermore, we detected the encapsulation by BT-MRI of the implant as a response of the biological system to the polymer, followed by degradation over a period of two months. We could show that MRI in general has the potential to get new insights in the in vivo fate of in situ forming implants. The study also clearly shows that BT-MRI is a new viable and much less expensive alternative for superconducting MRI machines to monitor drug delivery processes in vivo in small mammals. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo measurements of the T1 relaxation processes in the bone marrow in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome. A magnetic resonance imaging study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, K.E.; Nielsen, H.; Thomsen, C.; Soerensen, P.G.; Karle, H.; Christoffersen, P.; Henriksen, O. (Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Magnetic Resonance; Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Hematology; Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen (Denmark). Dept. of Pathology)

    Nine patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) were examined with magnetic resonance imaging and in vivo T1 relaxation time measurements of the vertebral bone marrow in a 1.5 tesla whole body scanner. Two patients underwent transformation to acute myeloid leukemia and were evaluated at follow-up examinations. At the time of diagnosis the T1 relaxation times of the vertebral bone marrow were significantly prolonged compared with normal values. The T1 relaxation times of the vertebral bone marrow in patients with MDS showed significantly lower values compared with patients with acute leukemia and did not differ from patients with polycythemia vera. (orig.).

  15. Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Young, I.R.

    1984-01-01

    A magnet pole piece for an NMR imaging magnet is made of a plurality of magnetic wires with one end of each wire held in a non-magnetic spacer, the other ends of the wires being brought to a pinch, and connected to a magnetic core. The wires may be embedded in a synthetic resin and the magnetisation and uniformity thereof can be varied by adjusting the density of the wires at the spacer which forms the pole piece. (author)

  16. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis : effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duckers, H.J.; Muller, H J; Verhaagen, J; Nicolay, K; Gispen, Willem Hendrik

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short tau inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a

  17. Safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation in patients with implanted cortical electrodes. An ex-vivo study and report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phielipp, Nicolás M; Saha, Utpal; Sankar, Tejas; Yugeta, Akihiro; Chen, Robert

    2017-06-01

    To evaluate the safety of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) in patients with implanted subdural cortical electrodes. We performed ex-vivo experiments to test the temperature, displacement and current induced in the electrodes with single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) from 10 to 100% of stimulator output and tested a typical rTMS protocol used in a clinical setting. We then used rTMS to the motor cortex to treat a patient with refractory post-herpetic neuralgia who had previously been implanted with a subdural motor cortical electrode for pain management. The rTMS protocol consisted of ten sessions of 2000 stimuli at 20Hz and 90% of resting motor threshold. The ex-vivo study showed an increase in the coil temperature of 2°C, a maximum induced charge density of 30.4μC/cm 2 /phase, and no electrode displacement with TMS. There was no serious adverse effect associated with rTMS treatment of the patient. Cortical tremor was observed in the intervals between trains of stimuli during one treatment session. TMS was safe in a patient with implanted Medtronic Resume II electrode (model 3587A) subdural cortical electrode. TMS may be used as a therapeutic, diagnostic or research tool in patients this type of with implanted cortical electrodes. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Tumor-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of short hairpin RNA suppresses IGF-1R overexpression of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chunmao; Ding, Chao; Kong, Minjian [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Dong, Aiqiang, E-mail: dr_dongaiqiang@sina.com [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China); Qian, Jianfang; Jiang, Daming; Shen, Zhonghua [Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310009 (China)

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} We compared lipofection with magnetofection about difference of transfection efficiency on delivery a therapeutic gene in vitro and in vivo. {yields} We investigated the difference of shRNA induced by magnetofection and lipofection into A549 cell and subcutaneous tumor to knockdown IGF-1R overexpressed in A549 cell and A549 tumor. {yields} We investigated in vivo shRNA silenced IGF-1R overexpression 24, 48, and 72 h after shRNA intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice by way of magnetofection and lipofection. {yields} Our results showed that magnetofection could achieve therapeutic gene targeted delivery into special site, which contributed to targeted gene therapy of lung cancers. -- Abstract: Liposomal magnetofection potentiates gene transfection by applying a magnetic field to concentrate magnetic lipoplexes onto target cells. Magnetic lipoplexes are self-assembling ternary complexes of cationic lipids with plasmid DNA associated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Type1insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), an important oncogene, is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer and mediates cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency (percentage of transfected cells) and therapeutic potential (potency of IGF-1R knockdown) of liposomal magnetofection of plasmids expressing GFP and shRNAs targeting IGF-1R (pGFPshIGF-1Rs) in A549 cells and in tumor-bearing mice as compared to lipofection using Lipofectamine 2000. Liposomal magnetofection provided a threefold improvement in transgene expression over lipofection and transfected up to 64.1% of A549 cells in vitro. In vitro, IGF-1R specific-shRNA transfected by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 56.1 {+-} 6% and by liposomal magnetofection by 85.1 {+-} 3%. In vivo delivery efficiency of the pGFPshIGF-1R plasmid into the tumor was significantly higher in the liposomal magnetofection group than in the

  19. Tumor-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of short hairpin RNA suppresses IGF-1R overexpression of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Chunmao; Ding, Chao; Kong, Minjian; Dong, Aiqiang; Qian, Jianfang; Jiang, Daming; Shen, Zhonghua

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → We compared lipofection with magnetofection about difference of transfection efficiency on delivery a therapeutic gene in vitro and in vivo. → We investigated the difference of shRNA induced by magnetofection and lipofection into A549 cell and subcutaneous tumor to knockdown IGF-1R overexpressed in A549 cell and A549 tumor. → We investigated in vivo shRNA silenced IGF-1R overexpression 24, 48, and 72 h after shRNA intravenous injection into tumor-bearing mice by way of magnetofection and lipofection. → Our results showed that magnetofection could achieve therapeutic gene targeted delivery into special site, which contributed to targeted gene therapy of lung cancers. -- Abstract: Liposomal magnetofection potentiates gene transfection by applying a magnetic field to concentrate magnetic lipoplexes onto target cells. Magnetic lipoplexes are self-assembling ternary complexes of cationic lipids with plasmid DNA associated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Type1insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), an important oncogene, is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer and mediates cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency (percentage of transfected cells) and therapeutic potential (potency of IGF-1R knockdown) of liposomal magnetofection of plasmids expressing GFP and shRNAs targeting IGF-1R (pGFPshIGF-1Rs) in A549 cells and in tumor-bearing mice as compared to lipofection using Lipofectamine 2000. Liposomal magnetofection provided a threefold improvement in transgene expression over lipofection and transfected up to 64.1% of A549 cells in vitro. In vitro, IGF-1R specific-shRNA transfected by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 56.1 ± 6% and by liposomal magnetofection by 85.1 ± 3%. In vivo delivery efficiency of the pGFPshIGF-1R plasmid into the tumor was significantly higher in the liposomal magnetofection group than in the lipofection group. In vivo IGF-1R

  20. Association Between Brain Gene Expression, DNA Methylation, and Alteration of Ex Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging Transverse Relaxation in Late-Life Cognitive Decline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Lei; Dawe, Robert J; Boyle, Patricia A; Gaiteri, Chris; Yang, Jingyun; Buchman, Aron S; Schneider, Julie A; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; De Jager, Philip L; Bennett, David A

    2017-12-01

    Alteration of ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation is associated with late-life cognitive decline even after controlling for common neuropathologic conditions. However, the underlying neurobiology of this association is unknown. To investigate the association between brain gene expression, DNA methylation, and alteration of magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation in late-life cognitive decline. Data came from 2 community-based longitudinal cohort studies of aging and dementia, the Religious Orders Study, which began in 1993, and the Rush Memory and Aging Project, which began in 1997. All participants agreed to undergo annual clinical evaluations and to donate their brains after death. By October 24, 2016, a total of 1358 individuals had died and had brain autopsies that were approved by board-certified neuropathologists. Of those, 552 had undergone ex vivo imaging. The gene expression analysis was limited to 174 individuals with both imaging and brain RNA sequencing data. The DNA methylation analysis was limited to 225 individuals with both imaging and brain methylation data. Maps of ex vivo magnetic resonance imaging transverse relaxation were generated using fast spin echo imaging. The target was a composite measure of the transverse relaxation rate (R2) that was associated with cognitive decline after controlling for common neuropathologic conditions. Next-generation RNA sequencing and DNA methylation data were generated using frozen tissue from the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Genome-wide association analysis was used to investigate gene expression and, separately, DNA methylation for signals associated with the R2 measure. Of the 552 individuals with ex vivo imaging data, 394 were women and 158 were men, and the mean (SD) age at death was 90.4 (6.0) years. Four co-expressed genes (PADI2 [Ensembl ENSG00000117115], ZNF385A [Ensembl ENSG00000161642], PSD2 [Ensembl ENSG00000146005], and A2ML1 [Ensembl ENSG00000166535]) were

  1. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic lesions with a newly developed Evans blue-DTPA-gadolinium contrast medium in apolipoprotein-E-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Satoshi; Ikuta, Kenjiro; Uwatoku, Toyokazu; Oi, Keiji; Abe, Kohtaro; Hyodo, Fuminori; Yoshimitsu, Kengo; Sugimura, Kohtaro; Utsumi, Hideo; Katayama, Yoshiki; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2008-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents that specifically detect atherosclerotic plaque may be useful for the noninvasive detection of the plaque. We have recently developed a new contrast agent, Evans blue-DTPA-gadolinium (EB-DTPA-Gd), which selectively accumulates vascular lesions with endothelial removal. In this study, we examined whether EB-DTPA-Gd is also useful for in vivo imaging of atherosclerotic plaques. We used male apolipoprotein-E-deficient (ApoE-/-) mice of different ages (3, 6 and 12 months old) and age-matched male wild-type mice. After a single intravenous administration of EB-DTPA-Gd (160 microM/kg body weight), MRI T(1) signal was obtained in vivo. Increased signal intensity in the aortic wall was noted within 10-20 min after intravenous injection of EB-DTPA-Gd and was maintained for 30 min. The MRI enhancement in the aorta of ApoE-/- mice was increased in accordance with age, whereas no such enhancement was noted in wild-type mice. Histological examination demonstrated that there was a topological correlation between the site of MRI enhancement and that of atherosclerotic plaque. These results indicate that EB-DTPA-Gd is a useful MRI contrast medium for the in vivo detection of atherosclerotic plaques. Copyright (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Investigation of the biochemical state of paramagnetic ions in vivo using the magnetic field dependence of 1/T1 of tissue protons (NMRD profile): applications to contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, S.H.; Brown, R.D. III; Spiller, M.; Wolf, G.L.

    1988-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) profiles of protons are obtained in homogenous aqueous solutions of the paramagnetic ions, Mn 2+ and Gd 3+ and their chelate and macromolecular complexes in vitro, giving information regarding the biochemical state of these ions. Similarly NMRD profiles of protons of excised rabbit tissues containing Mn 2+ and Gd 3+ complexes are obtained. These NMRD profiles are shown to be very useful for determining the fate of potentially useful paramagnetic NMR imaging contrast agents in vivo. (U.K.)

  3. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Haeyun; Lee, Chaedong; Nam, Gi-Eun; Quan, Bo; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Yoo, Jung Sun; Piao, Yuanzhe

    2016-01-01

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex ® with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  4. In vivo magnetic resonance and fluorescence dual imaging of tumor sites by using dye-doped silica-coated iron oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Haeyun; Lee, Chaedong [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Gi-Eun [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Quan, Bo [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Hyuck Jae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Asan Medical Center (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Jung Sun [Seoul National University, Department of Transdisciplinary Studies, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Smart Humanity Convergence Center (Korea, Republic of); Piao, Yuanzhe, E-mail: parkat9@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Program in Nano Science and Technology, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    The difficulty in delineating tumor is a major obstacle for better outcomes in cancer treatment of patients. The use of single-imaging modality is often limited by inadequate sensitivity and resolution. Here, we present the synthesis and the use of monodisperse iron oxide nanoparticles coated with fluorescent silica nano-shells for fluorescence and magnetic resonance dual imaging of tumor. The as-synthesized core–shell nanoparticles were designed to improve the accuracy of diagnosis via simultaneous tumor imaging with dual imaging modalities by a single injection of contrast agent. The iron oxide nanocrystals (∼11 nm) were coated with Rhodamine B isothiocyanate-doped silica shells via reverse microemulsion method. Then, the core–shell nanoparticles (∼54 nm) were analyzed to confirm their size distribution by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic laser scattering. Photoluminescence spectroscopy was used to characterize the fluorescent property of the dye-doped silica shell-coated nanoparticles. The cellular compatibility of the as-prepared nanoparticles was confirmed by a trypan blue dye exclusion assay and the potential as a dual-imaging contrast agent was verified by in vivo fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging. The experimental results show that the uniform-sized core–shell nanoparticles are highly water dispersible and the cellular toxicity of the nanoparticles is negligible. In vivo fluorescence imaging demonstrates the capability of the developed nanoparticles to selectively target tumors by the enhanced permeability and retention effects and ex vivo tissue analysis was corroborated this. Through in vitro phantom test, the core/shell nanoparticles showed a T2 relaxation time comparable to Feridex{sup ®} with smaller size, indicating that the as-made nanoparticles are suitable for imaging tumor. This new dual-modality-nanoparticle approach has promised for enabling more accurate tumor imaging.

  5. Cerebral metabolism in experimental hydrocephalus: an in vivo 1H and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braun, K. P.; van Eijsden, P.; Vandertop, W. P.; de Graaf, R. A.; Gooskens, R. H.; Tulleken, K. A.; Nicolay, K.

    1999-01-01

    Brain damage in patients with hydrocephalus is caused by mechanical forces and cerebral ischemia. The severity and localization of impaired cerebral blood flow and metabolism are still largely unknown. Magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy offers the opportunity to investigate cerebral energy

  6. Computed Tomography Perfusion, Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Histopathological Findings After Laparoscopic Renal Cryoablation: An In Vivo Pig Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Tommy Kjærgaard; Østraat, Øyvind; Graumann, Ole

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigates how computed tomography perfusion scans and magnetic resonance imaging correlates with the histopathological alterations in renal tissue after cryoablation. A total of 15 pigs were subjected to laparoscopic-assisted cryoablation on both kidneys. After intervention...... of follow-up, but on microscopic examination, the urothelium was found to be intact in all cases. In conclusion, cryoablation effectively destroyed renal parenchyma, leaving the urothelium intact. Both computed tomography perfusion and magnetic resonance imaging reflect the microscopic findings...

  7. Thermo-induced modifications and selective accumulation of glucose-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles in vivo in rats - increasing the effectiveness of magnetic-assisted therapy - pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traikov, L; Antonov, I; Gerou, A; Vesselinova, L; Hadjiolova, R; Raynov, J

    2015-09-01

    Ferro-Magnetic nanoparticles (Fe-MNP) have gained a lot of attention in biomedical and industrial applications due to their biocompatibility, ease of surface modification and paramagnetic properties. The basic idea of our study is whether it is possible to use glucose-conjugate Fe-MNP (Glc-Fe-MNP) for targeting and more accurate focusing in order to increase the effect of high-frequency electromagnetic fields induced hyperthermia in solid tumors. Tumors demonstrate high metabolic activity for glucose in comparison with other somatic cells.Increasing of accumulation of glucose conjugated (Glc)-Fe-MNP on tumor site and precision of radio frequency electro-magnetic field (RF-EMF) energy absorption in solid tumors, precede RF-EMF induced hyperthermia. Rat model for monitoring the early development of breast cancer. Twenty female Wistar rats (MU-line-6171) were divided into two groups of 10 rats that were either treated with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea to induce breast cancer and 10 with carrageenan to induce inflammation (control). Glc-Fe-MNP can offer a solution to increase hyperthermia effect to the desired areas in the body by accumulation and increasing local concentration due to high tissue metabolic assimilation. In this condition, it is considered that the magnetization of the nanoparticles is a single-giant magnetic moment, the sum of all the individual magnetic moments and is proportional to the concentration of Glc-Fe-MNP.

  8. Tumor-targeting magnetic lipoplex delivery of short hairpin RNA suppresses IGF-1R overexpression of lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunmao; Ding, Chao; Kong, Minjian; Dong, Aiqiang; Qian, Jianfang; Jiang, Daming; Shen, Zhonghua

    2011-07-08

    Liposomal magnetofection potentiates gene transfection by applying a magnetic field to concentrate magnetic lipoplexes onto target cells. Magnetic lipoplexes are self-assembling ternary complexes of cationic lipids with plasmid DNA associated with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs). Type1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R), an important oncogene, is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer and mediates cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth. In this study, we evaluated the transfection efficiency (percentage of transfected cells) and therapeutic potential (potency of IGF-1R knockdown) of liposomal magnetofection of plasmids expressing GFP and shRNAs targeting IGF-1R (pGFPshIGF-1Rs) in A549 cells and in tumor-bearing mice as compared to lipofection using Lipofectamine 2000. Liposomal magnetofection provided a threefold improvement in transgene expression over lipofection and transfected up to 64.1% of A549 cells in vitro. In vitro, IGF-1R specific-shRNA transfected by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 56.1±6% and by liposomal magnetofection by 85.1±3%. In vivo delivery efficiency of the pGFPshIGF-1R plasmid into the tumor was significantly higher in the liposomal magnetofection group than in the lipofection group. In vivo IGF-1R specific-shRNA by lipofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by an average of 43.8±5.3%; that by liposomal magnetofection inhibited IGF-1R protein by 43.4±5.7%, 56.3±9.6%, and 72.2±6.8%, at 24, 48, and 72 h, respectively, after pGFPshIGF-1R injection. Our findings indicate that liposomal magnetofection may be a promising method that allows the targeting of gene therapy to lung cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. In-vivo Intervertebral Disc Characterization using Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and T1ρ Imaging: Association with Discography and Oswestry Disability Index and SF-36

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Jin; Joseph, Gabby B.; Li, Xiaojuan; Link, Thomas M.; Hu, Serena S.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Kurhanewitz, John; Majumdar, Sharmila

    2011-01-01

    Study Design An in vivo study of intervertebral disc degeneration using quantitative MRI and MRS. Objective To quantify water and proteoglycan (PG) content in the intervertebral disc using in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), and to evaluate the relationship between MRS- quantified water/PG content, T1ρ, Pfirrmann score, clinical self-assessment, and discography. Summary of Background Data Previous in vitro studies have investigated the relationship between MRS-quantified water/PG content, and degenerative grade using cadaveric intervertebral discs. T1ρ has been shown to relate to Pfirmann grade and clinical self-assessment. However, the associations between MRS-quantified water/PG content, MR imaging-based T1ρ, self-assessment of health status and clinical response to discography have not been studied in vivo. Methods MRS and MR imaging were performed in 26 patients (70 discs) with symptomatic intervertebral degenerative disc (IVDD) and 23 controls (41 discs). Patients underwent evaluation of intervertebral discs with provocative discography. All subjects completed the SF-36 Health Survey and Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires. Results The water/PG peak area ratio was significantly elevated in a) patients (compared to controls) and in b) discs with positive discography (compared to negative discography). MR T1ρ exhibited similar trends. A significant association was found between T1ρ and normalized PG content (R2 = 0.61, p 0.05). The water/PG peak area ratio, normalized water, normalized PG, and Pfirrmann grade were significantly associated with patient self-assessment of disability and physical composite score, while disc height was not. Conclusion This study demonstrated a relationship between in vivo MRS spectroscopy (water content, PG content), imaging parameters (T1ρ, Pfirrmann Grade), discography results, and clinical self-assessment, suggesting that MRS-quantified water, PG and MR T1ρ relaxation time may potentially serve as

  10. Preferential magnetic nanoparticle uptake by bone marrow derived macrophages sub-populations: effect of surface coating on polarization, toxicity, and in vivo MRI detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Faraj, Achraf, E-mail: aalfaraj@ksu.edu.sa [College of Applied Medical Sciences, King Saud University, Molecular and Cellular Imaging Lab, Department of Radiological Sciences (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-07-15

    Noninvasive imaging of macrophages activity has raised increasing interest for diagnosis of different diseases, which make them attractive vehicles to deliver contrast agents or drugs for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol functionalization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their further surface modification with carboxylic groups on bone marrow-derived M1 and M2 macrophages phenotype, labeling efficiency, uptake mechanism, biocompatibility, and their in vivo MR detection was assessed. An enhanced labeling efficiency was observed for carboxylic surface-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) compared to PEGylated SPIO and to a higher extent to plain SPIO along with a higher uptake by M2 subsets. Magnetic nanoparticles were found located in the periphery of the vesicles dispersed in the cytoplasm in TEM. Investigation of the labeling mechanism by inhibiting different uptake pathways revealed that endocytosis via scavenger receptor A, a process known to be clathrin mediated, plays a central role in the cellular uptake kinetics of both macrophages subpopulations. Biocompatibility evaluation showed no variation in cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential with a low release of ROS. Flow cytometry and measurement of iNOS and Arginase 1 activity as marker of M1 and M2 macrophages polarization confirmed that magnetic labeling of macrophages subsets did not affect their polarization. In addition, no variation was observed in the biodistribution of magnetic iron oxide-labeled M1 and M2 macrophages subsets when monitored using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging with a better detection for the enhanced SPIO-PEG-COOH-labeled cells.

  11. Preferential magnetic nanoparticle uptake by bone marrow derived macrophages sub-populations: effect of surface coating on polarization, toxicity, and in vivo MRI detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Faraj, Achraf

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive imaging of macrophages activity has raised increasing interest for diagnosis of different diseases, which make them attractive vehicles to deliver contrast agents or drugs for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. In this study, the effect of polyethylene glycol functionalization of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and their further surface modification with carboxylic groups on bone marrow-derived M1 and M2 macrophages phenotype, labeling efficiency, uptake mechanism, biocompatibility, and their in vivo MR detection was assessed. An enhanced labeling efficiency was observed for carboxylic surface-modified superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) compared to PEGylated SPIO and to a higher extent to plain SPIO along with a higher uptake by M2 subsets. Magnetic nanoparticles were found located in the periphery of the vesicles dispersed in the cytoplasm in TEM. Investigation of the labeling mechanism by inhibiting different uptake pathways revealed that endocytosis via scavenger receptor A, a process known to be clathrin mediated, plays a central role in the cellular uptake kinetics of both macrophages subpopulations. Biocompatibility evaluation showed no variation in cell viability and mitochondrial membrane potential with a low release of ROS. Flow cytometry and measurement of iNOS and Arginase 1 activity as marker of M1 and M2 macrophages polarization confirmed that magnetic labeling of macrophages subsets did not affect their polarization. In addition, no variation was observed in the biodistribution of magnetic iron oxide-labeled M1 and M2 macrophages subsets when monitored using noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging with a better detection for the enhanced SPIO–PEG–COOH-labeled cells

  12. Folic acid-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles for hyperthermia and MRI in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Q.L.; Zheng, S.W. [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Hong, R.Y., E-mail: rhong@suda.edu.cn [College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Key Laboratory of Organic Synthesis of Jiangsu Province, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou 350002 (China); Deng, S.M.; Guo, L. [The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215011 (China); Hu, R.L. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Hangzhou First People' s Hospital, Hangzhou 310006 (China); Gao, B.; Huang, M.; Cheng, L.F. [College of Medicine, Soochow University, SIP, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liu, G.H. [Respiration Department, Suzhou Municipal Hospital (East-Section), Suzhou 215001 (China); Wang, Y.Q. [Key Laboratory of Environmental Materials and Engineering of Jiangsu Province, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225002 (China)

    2014-07-01

    The folic acid (FA)-conjugated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) were synthesized by co-precipitation of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} solution followed by surface modification with carboxymethyl dextran (CMD) to form carboxymethyl group terminated MNPs, then FA was conjugated with the carboxyl group functionalized MNPs. The morphology and properties of obtained nanoparticles were characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), UV–visible spectra (UV–vis), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering (DLS), vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). The FA-conjugated MNPs exhibited relatively high saturation magnetization and fast magneto-temperature response which could be applied to hyperthermia therapy. To determine the accurate targeting effect of FA, we chose FA-conjugated MNPs as MRI contrast enhancement agent for detection of KB cells with folate receptor over-expression in vitro and in vivo. The results show that these magnetic nanoparticles appear to be the promising materials for local hyperthermia and MRI.

  13. In Vivo MR Imaging of Magnetically Labeled Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Rat Model of Renal Ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sung Il [Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Hyup [Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyo Cheol; Chung, Se Young; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Hoe Suk [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Jong Sun [Dongguk University International Hospital, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Min Hoan [Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Kyu Ri; Sung, Chang Kyu [Seoul National University Boramae Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    This study was designed to evaluate in vivo MR imaging for the depiction of intraarterially injected superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO)-labeled mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia. Left renal ischemia was induced in 12 male Sprague- Dawley rats by use of the catheter lodging method. In vivo MR signal intensity variations depicted on T2*-weighted sequences were evaluated in both the left and right kidneys prior to injection (n = 2), two hours (n = 4), 15 hours (n = 2), 30 hours (n = 2) and 72 hours (n = 2) after injection of SPIO-labeled MSCs in both kidneys. Signal intensity variations were correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells as visualized in histological specimens. In an in vivo study, it was determined that there was a significant difference in signal intensity variation for both the left and right cortex (40.8 {+-} 4.12 and 26.4 {+-} 7.92, respectively) and for both the left and right medulla (23.2 {+-} 3.32 and 15.2 {+-} 3.31, respectively) until two hours after injection (p < 0.05). In addition, signal intensity variation in the left renal cortex was well correlated with the number of Prussian blue stain-positive cells per high power field (r = 0.98, p < 0.05). Intraarterial injected SPIO-labeled MSCs in an experimental rat model of renal ischemia can be detected with the use of in vivo MR imaging immediately after injection.

  14. Intracranial metastatic mucinous adrenocarcinoma with characteristic features on diffusion-weighted imaging and in vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guruprasad, Ashwathnarayan S.; Chandrashekar, Hoskote S.; Jayakumar, Peruvumba N.; Srikanth, Subbamma G.; Shankar, Susarla K.

    2004-01-01

    Intracranial abscesses and metastases are common lesions that might not be differentiated on routine MR I alone. In vivo proton spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted imaging have been used as complementary investigations for improved tissue characterization. In the present report we illustrate the role of mucin and its contribution to signal characteristics on diffusion-weighted imaging in a metastatic mucinous adenocarcinoma Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  15. The formulation, characterization and in vivo evaluation of a magnetic carrier for brain delivery of NIR dye

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raut, S L; Kirthivasan, B; Bommana, M M; Squillante, E; Sadoqi, M, E-mail: squillae@stjohns.edu, E-mail: sadoqim@stjohns.edu [College of Pharmacy and Allied Health Professions, St John' s University, Queens, NY 11439 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    This work reports the targeting of the near infrared (NIR) dye indocyanine green (ICG) to the brain using composite nanoparticles. Thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl was used to synthesize monodisperse oleic acid coated magnetic nanoparticles (OAMNP). Synthesized OAMNP and ICG were encapsulated in a poly (lactide-co-glycolide) matrix using an emulsion evaporation method. Different batches containing OAMNP:PLGA ratios (1:4, 1:2 and 3:4) were prepared with ICG (group B-1, 2, 3) and without ICG (group A-1, 2, 3) loading. All the formulations were characterized in terms of morphology, particle size, zeta potential, magnetic content, ICG encapsulation efficiency and the spectral properties of ICG. The optimized formulation showed an encapsulation efficiency of 56 {+-} 4.6% for ICG and 57 {+-} 1.37% for OAMNP. The biodistribution and brain targeting study involved three groups of six animals, each with 0.4 mg kg{sup -1} equivalent of ICG, given as neat ICG solution, composite nanoparticles without the aid of a magnetic field, and composite nanoparticles under the influence of a magnetic field (8000 G) to groups 1, 2 and 3 respectively. The tissue analysis and microscopy images revealed a significantly higher brain concentration of ICG (p < 0.05) for group 3 than the two control groups. These results are encouraging for the brain delivery of hydrophilic dyes/drugs using this method for biomedical applications.

  16. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging and 31P spectroscopy of large human brain tumours at 1.5 tesla

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, C; Jensen, K E; Achten, E

    1988-01-01

    31P MR spectroscopy of human brain tumours is one feature of magnetic resonance imaging. Eight patients with large superficial brain tumours and eight healthy volunteers were examined with 31P spectroscopy using an 8 cm surface coil for volume selection. Seven frequencies were resolved in our spe...

  17. Elevated prefrontal cortex γ-aminobutyric acid and glutamate-glutamine levels in schizophrenia measured in vivo with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegeles, Lawrence S; Mao, Xiangling; Stanford, Arielle D; Girgis, Ragy; Ojeil, Najate; Xu, Xiaoyan; Gil, Roberto; Slifstein, Mark; Abi-Dargham, Anissa; Lisanby, Sarah H; Shungu, Dikoma C

    2012-05-01

    Postmortem studies have found evidence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) deficits in fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies in unmedicated patients have reported glutamine or glutamate-glutamine (Glx) elevations in this region. Abnormalities in these transmitters are thought to play a role in cognitive impairments in the illness. To measure GABA and Glx levels in vivo in 2 prefrontal brain regions in unmedicated and medicated patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. Case-control study. Inpatient psychiatric research unit and associated outpatient clinic. Sixteen unmedicated patients with schizophrenia, 16 medicated patients, and 22 healthy controls matched for age, sex, ethnicity, parental socioeconomic status, and cigarette smoking. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy with a 3-T system and the J-edited spin-echo difference method. The GABA and Glx levels were measured in the dorsolateral and medial prefrontal cortex and normalized to the simultaneously acquired water signal. Working memory performance was assessed in all subjects. The GABA and Glx concentrations determined by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In the medial prefrontal cortex region, 30% elevations were found in GABA (P = .02) and Glx (P = .03) levels in unmedicated patients compared with controls. There were no alterations in the medicated patients or in either group in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Both regions showed correlations between GABA and Glx levels in patients and controls. No correlations with working memory performance were found. To our knowledge, this study presents the first GABA concentration measurements in unmedicated patients with schizophrenia, who showed elevations in both GABA and Glx levels in the medial prefrontal cortex but not the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex. Medicated patients did not show these elevations, suggesting possible normalization of levels with

  18. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gispen, W.H. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Nicolay, K. [Department of in vivo NMR, Bijvoet Center, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Verhaagen, J. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Muller, H.J. [Department of in vivo NMR, Bijvoet Center, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands); Duckers, H.J. [Rudolf Magnus Institute for Neurosciences, Department of Medical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty, Utrecht University Utrecht (Netherlands)

    1997-02-14

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short {tau} inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a neurotrophic adrenocorticotrophic hormone{sub 4-9} analogue [H-Met(O{sub 2})-Glu-His-Phe-d-Lys-Phe-OH] on the volume of lesions in the brains of rats suffering from chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis. Lesion volume was monitored during a five-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated that treatment with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone{sub 4-9} analogue significantly reduced the lesion volume by 84 and 85% 10 and 20 weeks after lesion induction, respectively. Furthermore, peptide treatment significantly reduced chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-related neurological symptoms during the chronic phase of the disease (week 3 until week 20 after lesion induction). Both functional and morphological recovery were considerably advanced by peptide treatment. Twenty weeks after lesion induction rats with chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis were killed for histological analysis, to correlate magnetic resonance imaging findings with morphological changes. The regions of abnormally high signal intensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images coincided with areas of demyelination and concomitant widespread inflammatory infiltration, oedema formation and enlarged ventricles.The improved neurological status and the 84% reduction in the lesion volume in the cerebrum of rats chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis point to the potential value of trophic peptides in the development of strategies for limiting the damage caused by central demyelinating lesions in syndromes such as multiple sclerosis. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  19. Longitudinal in vivo magnetic resonance imaging studies in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis: effect of a neurotrophic treatment on cortical lesion development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gispen, W.H.; Nicolay, K.; Verhaagen, J.; Muller, H.J.; Duckers, H.J.

    1997-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance imaging enables non-invasive monitoring of lesion formation in multiple sclerosis and has an important role in assessing the potential effects of therapy. T2-weighted and short τ inversion recovery magnetic resonance imaging were used to assess the effect of a neurotrophic adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9 analogue [H-Met(O 2 )-Glu-His-Phe-d-Lys-Phe-OH] on the volume of lesions in the brains of rats suffering from chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, an animal equivalent of multiple sclerosis. Lesion volume was monitored during a five-month period. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated that treatment with the adrenocorticotrophic hormone 4-9 analogue significantly reduced the lesion volume by 84 and 85% 10 and 20 weeks after lesion induction, respectively. Furthermore, peptide treatment significantly reduced chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis-related neurological symptoms during the chronic phase of the disease (week 3 until week 20 after lesion induction). Both functional and morphological recovery were considerably advanced by peptide treatment. Twenty weeks after lesion induction rats with chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis were killed for histological analysis, to correlate magnetic resonance imaging findings with morphological changes. The regions of abnormally high signal intensities on T2-weighted magnetic resonance images coincided with areas of demyelination and concomitant widespread inflammatory infiltration, oedema formation and enlarged ventricles.The improved neurological status and the 84% reduction in the lesion volume in the cerebrum of rats chronic experimental allergic encephalomyelitis point to the potential value of trophic peptides in the development of strategies for limiting the damage caused by central demyelinating lesions in syndromes such as multiple sclerosis. (Copyright (c) 1997 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  20. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    by B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet operation was very satisfactory till the technical stop at the end of the year 2010. The field was ramped down on 5th December 2010, following the successful regeneration test of the turbine filters at full field on 3rd December 2010. This will limit in the future the quantity of magnet cycles, as it is no longer necessary to ramp down the magnet for this type of intervention. This is made possible by the use of the spare liquid Helium volume to cool the magnet while turbines 1 and 2 are stopped, leaving only the third turbine in operation. This obviously requires full availability of the operators to supervise the operation, as it is not automated. The cryogenics was stopped on 6th December 2010 and the magnet was left without cooling until 18th January 2011, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The maintenance of the vacuum pumping was done immediately after the magnet stop, when the magnet was still at very low temperature. Only the vacuum pumping of the ma...

  1. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Hyeonjin; Kim, Sungjin; Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas

  2. In-Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of 2-Hydroxyglutarate in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Mutated Gliomas: A Technical Review for Neuroradiologists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyeonjin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University Medical Research Center, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sungjin [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyeong Hun; Heo, Hwon [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 03087 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic potential of an onco-metabolite, 2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG) as a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) detectable biomarker of the isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH)-mutated (IDH-MT) gliomas has drawn attention of neuroradiologists recently. However, due to severe spectral overlap with background signals, quantification of 2HG can be very challenging. In this technical review for neuroradiologists, first, the biochemistry of 2HG and its significance in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas are summarized. Secondly, various 1H-MRS methods used in the previous studies are outlined. Finally, wereview previous in vivo studies, and discuss the current status of 1H-MRS in the diagnosis of IDH-MT gliomas.

  3. Three-dimensional in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and contact area of anterior cruciate ligament-deficient and -reconstructed subjects using magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Choongsoo S; Carpenter, R Dana; Majumdar, Sharmila; Ma, C Benjamin

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to test whether (1) the 3-dimensional in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and patellofemoral contact area of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL)-deficient knees are different from those of normal, contralateral knees and (2) ACL reconstruction restores in vivo patellofemoral kinematics and contact area. Ten ACL-deficient knees and twelve ACL-reconstructed knees, as well as the contralateral uninjured knees, were tested. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed at full extension and 40 degrees of flexion under simulated partial weight-bearing conditions. Six-degrees of freedom patellofemoral kinematics, patellofemoral contact area, and contact location were analyzed by use of magnetic resonance image-based 3-dimensional patellofemoral knee models. The patella in the ACL-deficient knees underwent significantly more lateral tilt during flexion (P contact areas of ACL-deficient knees at both the extended and flexed positions (37 +/- 22 mm(2) and 357 +/- 53 mm(2), respectively) were significantly smaller than those of contralateral knees (78 +/- 45 mm(2) and 437 +/- 119 mm(2), respectively) (P contact area of ACL-reconstructed knees in the extended position (86 +/- 41 mm(2)) was significantly larger (P contact centroid translation, and contact area showed coefficients of variation of less than 6.8%. ACL injuries alter patellofemoral kinematics including patellar tilt and patellar lateral translation, but ACL reconstruction with hamstring or allograft restores altered patellar tilt. ACL injuries reduce the patellofemoral contact area at both the extended and flexed positions, but ACL reconstruction enlarges the patellofemoral contact area at extension and restores the normal contact area at low angles of flexion. Level III, case-control study.

  4. In vivo hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms obtained by magnetic resonance fluid dynamics (MRFD) based on time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isoda, Haruo; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Namba, Hiroki; Alley, Marcus T.; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2010-01-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to perform in vivo hemodynamic analysis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms of magnetic resonance fluid dynamics using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and to analyze relationships between hemodynamics and wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). This study included nine subjects with 14 unruptured aneurysms. 4D-Flow was performed by a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner with a head coil. We calculated in vivo streamlines, WSS, and OSI of intracranial aneurysms based on 4D-Flow with our software. We evaluated the number of spiral flows in the aneurysms and compared the differences in WSS or OSI between the vessel and aneurysm and between whole aneurysm and the apex of the spiral flow. 3D streamlines, WSS, and OSI distribution maps in arbitrary direction during the cardiac phase were obtained for all intracranial aneurysms. Twelve aneurysms had one spiral flow each, and two aneurysms had two spiral flows each. The WSS was lower and the OSI was higher in the aneurysm compared to the vessel. The apex of the spiral flow had a lower WSS and higher OSI relative to the whole aneurysm. Each intracranial aneurysm in this study had at least one spiral flow. The WSS was lower and OSI was higher at the apex of the spiral flow than the whole aneurysmal wall. (orig.)

  5. In vivo hemodynamic analysis of intracranial aneurysms obtained by magnetic resonance fluid dynamics (MRFD) based on time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoda, Haruo; Ohkura, Yasuhide; Kosugi, Takashi; Hirano, Masaya; Takeda, Hiroyasu; Hiramatsu, Hisaya; Yamashita, Shuhei; Takehara, Yasuo; Alley, Marcus T; Bammer, Roland; Pelc, Norbert J; Namba, Hiroki; Sakahara, Harumi

    2010-10-01

    Hemodynamics is thought to play a very important role in the initiation, growth, and rupture of intracranial aneurysms. The purpose of our study was to perform in vivo hemodynamic analysis of unruptured intracranial aneurysms of magnetic resonance fluid dynamics using time-resolved three-dimensional phase-contrast MRI (4D-Flow) at 1.5 T and to analyze relationships between hemodynamics and wall shear stress (WSS) and oscillatory shear index (OSI). This study included nine subjects with 14 unruptured aneurysms. 4D-Flow was performed by a 1.5-T magnetic resonance scanner with a head coil. We calculated in vivo streamlines, WSS, and OSI of intracranial aneurysms based on 4D-Flow with our software. We evaluated the number of spiral flows in the aneurysms and compared the differences in WSS or OSI between the vessel and aneurysm and between whole aneurysm and the apex of the spiral flow. 3D streamlines, WSS, and OSI distribution maps in arbitrary direction during the cardiac phase were obtained for all intracranial aneurysms. Twelve aneurysms had one spiral flow each, and two aneurysms had two spiral flows each. The WSS was lower and the OSI was higher in the aneurysm compared to the vessel. The apex of the spiral flow had a lower WSS and higher OSI relative to the whole aneurysm. Each intracranial aneurysm in this study had at least one spiral flow. The WSS was lower and OSI was higher at the apex of the spiral flow than the whole aneurysmal wall.

  6. In Vivo Quantification of Inflammation in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Rats Using Fluorine-19 Magnetic Resonance Imaging Reveals Immune Cell Recruitment outside the Nervous System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhong

    Full Text Available Progress in identifying new therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS can be accelerated by using imaging biomarkers of disease progression or abatement in model systems. In this study, we evaluate the ability to noninvasively image and quantitate disease pathology using emerging "hot-spot" 19F MRI methods in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE rat, a model of MS. Rats with clinical symptoms of EAE were compared to control rats without EAE, as well as to EAE rats that received daily prophylactic treatments with cyclophosphamide. Perfluorocarbon (PFC nanoemulsion was injected intravenously, which labels predominately monocytes and macrophages in situ. Analysis of the spin-density weighted 19F MRI data enabled quantification of the apparent macrophage burden in the central nervous system and other tissues. The in vivo MRI results were confirmed by extremely high-resolution 19F/1H magnetic resonance microscopy in excised tissue samples and histopathologic analyses. Additionally, 19F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of intact tissue samples was used to assay the PFC biodistribution in EAE and control rats. In vivo hot-spot 19F signals were detected predominantly in the EAE spinal cord, consistent with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates. Surprising, prominent 19F hot-spots were observed in bone-marrow cavities adjacent to spinal cord lesions; these were not observed in control animals. Quantitative evaluation of cohorts receiving cyclophosphamide treatment displayed significant reduction in 19F signal within the spinal cord and bone marrow of EAE rats. Overall, 19F MRI can be used to quantitatively monitored EAE disease burden, discover unexpected sites of inflammatory activity, and may serve as a sensitive biomarker for the discovery and preclinical assessment of novel MS therapeutic interventions.

  7. In vivo anticancer evaluation of the hyperthermic efficacy of anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted PEG-based nanocarrier containing magnetic nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldi G

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Giovanni Baldi,1 Costanza Ravagli,1 Filippo Mazzantini,1 George Loudos,2 Jaume Adan,3 Marc Masa,3 Dimitrios Psimadas,2 Eirini A Fragogeorgi,2 Erica Locatelli,4 Claudia Innocenti,5,6 Claudio Sangregorio,5,7 Mauro Comes Franchini4 1CERICOL, Sovigliana-Vinci, Italy; 2Technological Educational Institute of Athens, Athens, Greece; 3Leitat Technological Center, Barcelona, Spain; 4Department of Industrial Chemistry Toso Montanari, University of Bologna, Bologna, 5Consorzio Interuniversitario Nazionale per la Scienza e Tecnologia dei Materiali (INSTM, 6Dipartimento di Chimica U Schiff, Università di Firenze, Firenze, 7Centro Nazionale delle Ricerche (ICCOM – CNR, Firenze, Italy Abstract: Polymeric nanoparticles with targeting moieties containing magnetic nanoparticles as theranostic agents have considerable potential for the treatment of cancer. Here we report the chemical synthesis and characterization of a poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide-b-poly(ethylene glycol-based nanocarrier containing iron oxide nanoparticles and human epithelial growth factor receptor on the outer shell. The nanocarrier was also radiolabeled with 99mTc and tested as a theranostic nanomedicine, ie, it was investigated for both its diagnostic ability in vivo and its therapeutic hyperthermic effects in a standard A431 human tumor cell line. Following radiolabeling with 99mTc, the biodistribution and therapeutic hyperthermic effects of the nanosystem were studied noninvasively in vivo in tumor-bearing mice. A substantial decrease in tumor size correlated with an increase in both nanoparticle concentration and local temperature was achieved, confirming the possibility of using this multifunctional nanosystem as a therapeutic tool for epidermoid carcinoma. Keywords: magnetic nanoparticles, polymeric nanocarriers, skin cancer, hyperthermia, single-photon emission computed tomography, imaging

  8. Visualizing the Acute Effects of Vascular-Targeted Therapy In Vivo Using Intravital Microscopy and Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Correlation with Endothelial Apoptosis, Cytokine Induction, and Treatment Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukund Seshadri

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The acute effects of the vascular-disrupting agent 5,6-dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA were investigated in vivo using intravital microscopy (IVM and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Changes in vascular permeability and blood flow of syngeneic CT-26 murine colon adenocarcinomas were assessed at 4 and 24 hours after DMXAA treatment (30 mg/kg, i.p. and correlated with induction of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, endothelial damage [CD31/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT], and treatment outcome. Intravital imaging revealed a marked increase in vascular permeability 4 hours after treatment, consistent with increases in intratumoral mRNA and protein levels of TNF-α. Parallel contrast-enhanced MRI studies showed a ~ 4-fold increase in longitudinal relaxation rates (ΔR1, indicative of increased contrast agent accumulation within the tumor. Dualimmunostained tumor sections (CD31/TdT revealed evidence of endothelial apoptosis at this time point. Twenty-four hours after treatment, extensive hemorrhage and complete disruption of vascular architecture were observed with IVM, along with a significant reduction in ΔR1 and virtual absence of CD31 immunostaining. DMXAA-induced tumor vascular damage resulted in significant long-term (60-day cures compared to untreated controls. Multimodality imaging approaches are useful in visualizing the effects of antivascular therapy in vivo. Such approaches allow cross validation and correlation of findings with underlying molecular changes contributing to treatment outcome.

  9. In-vivo monitoring of acute DSS-Colitis using Colonoscopy, high resolution Ultrasound and bench-top Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walldorf, J.; Hermann, M.; Pohl, S.; Zipprich, A.; Porzner, M.; Seufferlein, T.; Metz, H.; Maeder, K.; Christ, B.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate (colour Doppler-) high-resolution-ultrasound (hrUS) and bench-top magnetic resonance imaging (btMRI) as new methods to monitor experimental colitis. hrUS, btMRI and endoscopy were performed in mice without colitis (n = 15), in mice with acute colitis (n = 14) and in mice with acute colitis and simultaneous treatment with infliximab (n = 19). Determination of colon wall thickness using hrUS (32 MHz) and measurement of the cross-sectional colonic areas by btMRI allowed discrimination between the treatment groups (mean a vs. b vs. c - btMRI: 922 vs. 2051 vs. 1472 pixel, hrUS: 0.26 vs. 0.45 vs. 0.31 mm). btMRI, endoscopy, hrUS and colour Doppler-hrUS correlated to histological scoring (p < 0.05), while endoscopy and btMRI correlated to post-mortem colon length (p < 0.05). The innovative in vivo techniques btMRI and hrUS are safe and technically feasible. They differentiate between distinct grades of colitis in an experimental setting, and correlate with established post-mortem parameters. In addition to endoscopic procedures, these techniques provide information regarding colon wall thickness and perfusion. Depending on the availability of these techniques, their application increases the value of in vivo monitoring in experimental acute colitis in small rodents. (orig.)

  10. In vitro and in vivo antitumor effects of doxorubicin loaded with bacterial magnetosomes (DBMs) on H22 cells: the magnetic bio-nanoparticles as drug carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Bo; Duan, Jin-Hong; Dai, Shun-Ling; Ren, Jun; Zhang, Yan-Dong; Tian, Jie-Sheng; Li, Ying

    2007-12-08

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most common form of cancer although effective therapeutic strategy especially targeted therapy is lacking. We recently employed bacterial magnetosomes (BMs) as the magnetic-targeted drug carrier and found an antitumor effect of doxorubicin (DOX)-loaded BMs (DBMs) in EMT-6 and HL60 cell lines. The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro and in vivo anti-neoplastic effects of DBMs on hepatic cancer. DBMs, DOX and BMs displayed tumor suppression rates of 86.8%, 78.6% and 4.3%, respectively, in H22 cell-bearing mice. The mortality rates following administration of DBMs, DOX and BMs were 20%, 80% and 0%, respectively. Pathological examination of hearts and tumors revealed that both DBMs and DOX effectively inhibited tumor growth although DBMs displayed a much lower cardiac toxicity compared with DOX. The DBMs were cytotoxic to H22 cells manifested as inhibition of cell proliferation and c-myc expression, consistent with DOX. The IC(50) of DOX, DBMs and BMs in target cells were 5.309 +/- 0.010, 4.652 +/- 0.256 and 22.106 +/- 3.330 microg/ml, respectively. Our data revealed both in vitro and in vivo antitumor property of DBMs similar to that of DOX. More importantly, the adverse cardiac toxicity was significantly reduced in DBMs compared with DOX. Collectively, our study suggests the therapeutic potential of DBMs in target-therapy against liver cancer.

  11. Effect of MDMA-Induced Axotomy on the Dorsal Raphe Forebrain Tract in Rats: An In Vivo Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuang-Hsin Chiu

    Full Text Available 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, also known as "Ecstasy", is a common recreational drug of abuse. Several previous studies have attributed the central serotonergic neurotoxicity of MDMA to distal axotomy, since only fine serotonergic axons ascending from the raphe nucleus are lost without apparent damage to their cell bodies. However, this axotomy has never been visualized directly in vivo. The present study examined the axonal integrity of the efferent projections from the midbrain raphe nucleus after MDMA exposure using in vivo manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI. Rats were injected subcutaneously six times with MDMA (5 mg/kg or saline once daily. Eight days after the last injection, manganese ions (Mn2+ were injected stereotactically into the raphe nucleus, and a series of MEMRI images was acquired over a period of 38 h to monitor the evolution of Mn2+-induced signal enhancement across the ventral tegmental area, the medial forebrain bundle (MFB, and the striatum. The MDMA-induced loss of serotonin transporters was clearly evidenced by immunohistological staining consistent with the Mn2+-induced signal enhancement observed across the MFB and striatum. MEMRI successfully revealed the disruption of the serotonergic raphe-striatal projections and the variable effect of MDMA on the kinetics of Mn2+ accumulation in the MFB and striatum.

  12. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Medical Center, Laboratory for Molecular and Functional Imaging, Department of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Seoul (Korea); Lee, Kyoung Geun [Korea University College of Life Sciences and Biotechnology, Division of Biotechnology, Seoul (Korea); Kang, Hee Jung [Hallym University College of Medicine, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Anyang (Korea)

    2008-10-15

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  13. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and metabolism. Applications of proton and sup 13 C NMR to the study of glutamate metabolism in cultured glial cells and human brain in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portais, J.C.; Pianet, I.; Merle, M.; Raffard, G.; Biran, M.; Labouesse, J.; Canioni, P. (Bordeaux-2 Univ., 33 (FR)); Allard, M.; Kien, P.; Caille, J.M. (Centre Hospitalier Universitaire, 33 Bordeaux (FR))

    1991-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy was used to study the metabolism of cells from the central nervous system both in vitro on perchloric acid extracts obtained either from cultured tumoral cells (C6 rat glioma) or rat astrocytes in primary culture, and in vivo within the human brain. Analysis of carbon 13 NMR spectra of perchloric acid extracts prepared from cultured cells in the presence of NMR (1-{sup 13}C) glucose as substrate allowed determination of the glutamate and glutamine enrichments in both normal and tumoral cells. Preliminary results indicated large changes in the metabolism of these amino acids (and also of aspartate and alanine) in the C6 cell as compared to its normal counterpart. Localized proton NMR spectra of the human brain in vivo were obtained at 1.5 T, in order to evaluate the content of various metabolites, including glutamate, in peritumoral edema from a selected volume of 2 x 2 x 2 cm{sup 3}. N-acetyl aspartate, glutamate, phosphocreatine, creatine, choline and inositol derivative resonances were observed in 15 min spectra. N-acetyl-aspartate was found to be at a lower level in contrast to glutamate which was detected at a higher level in the injured area as compared to the controlateral unaffected side.

  14. Pace of macrophage recruitment during different stages of soft tissue infection: Semi-quantitative evaluation by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jin Seong; Sohn, Jin Young; Jung, Hyun-Don; Kim, Sang-Tae; Lee, Kyoung Geun; Kang, Hee Jung

    2008-01-01

    We describe the pace of recruitment of iron-oxide-labeled macrophages to the site of different stages of infection by in vivo magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Peritoneal macrophages were labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide ex vivo and administered through the tail vein 6 (acute) or 48 (subacute) h after bacterial inoculation. The legs of the mice were imaged sequentially on a 4.7-T MR unit before and 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 48 and 72 h after macrophage administration. The band-shaped lower signal intensity zone around the abscess on T2*-weighted GRE images became more obvious due to recruited macrophages up until 24 h after injection in the subacute and 48 h after injection in the acute group, indicating that the relative SI of the abscess wall decreased more rapidly and the pace of recruitment of macrophages was faster in the subacute than in the acute group. Chemokine antibody arrays of mouse sera detected increased concentration of granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 beginning at 12 h and increased interleukin-13 at 18 h. Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor began to increase at 96 h after infection. This difference in pace of recruitment may result from the release of chemokines. (orig.)

  15. In-vivo monitoring of acute DSS-Colitis using Colonoscopy, high resolution Ultrasound and bench-top Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walldorf, J.; Hermann, M.; Pohl, S.; Zipprich, A. [Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg, Department of Internal Medicine I, Halle (Germany); Porzner, M.; Seufferlein, T. [University of Ulm, Department of Internal Medicine I, Ulm (Germany); Metz, H.; Maeder, K. [Martin Luther University, Institut of Pharmacy, Halle-Wittenberg (Germany); Christ, B. [University of Leipzig, Department of Surgery II, Leipzig (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this study was to establish and evaluate (colour Doppler-) high-resolution-ultrasound (hrUS) and bench-top magnetic resonance imaging (btMRI) as new methods to monitor experimental colitis. hrUS, btMRI and endoscopy were performed in mice without colitis (n = 15), in mice with acute colitis (n = 14) and in mice with acute colitis and simultaneous treatment with infliximab (n = 19). Determination of colon wall thickness using hrUS (32 MHz) and measurement of the cross-sectional colonic areas by btMRI allowed discrimination between the treatment groups (mean a vs. b vs. c - btMRI: 922 vs. 2051 vs. 1472 pixel, hrUS: 0.26 vs. 0.45 vs. 0.31 mm). btMRI, endoscopy, hrUS and colour Doppler-hrUS correlated to histological scoring (p < 0.05), while endoscopy and btMRI correlated to post-mortem colon length (p < 0.05). The innovative in vivo techniques btMRI and hrUS are safe and technically feasible. They differentiate between distinct grades of colitis in an experimental setting, and correlate with established post-mortem parameters. In addition to endoscopic procedures, these techniques provide information regarding colon wall thickness and perfusion. Depending on the availability of these techniques, their application increases the value of in vivo monitoring in experimental acute colitis in small rodents. (orig.)

  16. Quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after hypoxia ischemia using the lipid peak at 1.3 ppm of proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in neonatal rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, So Yoon; Yoo, Hye Soo; Lee, Jang Hoon; Sung, Dong Kyung; Jung, Yu Jin; Sung, Se In; Lim, Keun Ho; Chang, Yun Sil; Lee, Jung Hee; Kim, Ki Soo; Park, Won Soon

    2013-07-01

    This study was performed to determine the accuracy of proton magnetic spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) lipid peak as a noninvasive tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death. Seven day-old Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to 8% oxygen following a unilateral carotid artery ligation. For treatment, cycloheximide was given immediately after hypoxic ischemia (HI). Lipid peak was measured using (1)H-MRS at 24 hr after HI, and then brains were harvested for fluorocytometric analyses with annexin V/propidium iodide (PI) and fluorescent probe JC-1, and for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) and lactate. Increased lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured with (1)H-MRS, apoptotic and necrotic cells, and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨ) at 24 hr after HI were significantly improved with cycloheximide treatment. Significantly reduced brain ATP and increased lactate levels observed at 24 hr after HI showed a tendency to improve without statistical significance with cycloheximide treatment. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm showed significant positive correlation with both apoptotic and necrotic cells and loss of ΔΨ, and negative correlation with normal live cells. Lipid peak at 1.3 ppm measured by (1)H-MRS might be a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for quantitative in vivo detection of brain cell death after HI.

  17. In Vivo Dual-Modality Fluorescence and Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Lymph Node Mapping with Good Biocompatibility Manganese Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghua Zhan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Multifunctional manganese oxide nanoparticles (NPs with impressive enhanced T1 contrast ability show great promise in biomedical diagnosis. Herein, we developed a dual-modality imaging agent system based on polyethylene glycol (PEG-coated manganese oxide NPs conjugated with organic dye (Cy7.5, which functions as a fluorescence imaging (FI agent as well as a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI imaging agent. The formed Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs with the size of ~10 nm exhibit good colloidal stability in different physiological media. Serial FI and MRI studies that non-invasively assessed the bio-distribution pattern and the feasibility for in vivo dual-modality imaging-guided lymph node mapping have been investigated. In addition, histological and biochemical analyses exhibited low toxicity even at a dose of 20 mg/kg in vivo. Since Mn3O4@PEG-Cy7.5 NPs exhibited desirable properties as imaging agents and good biocompatibility, this work offers a robust, safe, and accurate diagnostic platform based on manganese oxide NPs for tumor metastasis diagnosis.

  18. Fast glomerular quantification of whole ex vivo mouse kidneys using Magnetic Resonance Imaging at 9.4 Tesla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chacon-Caldera, Jorge; Kraemer, Philipp; Schad, Lothar R. [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Computer Assisted Clinical Medicine; Geraci, Stefania; Gretz, Norbert [Heidelberg Univ., Mannheim (Germany). Medical Research Centre; Cullen-McEwen, Luise; Bertram, John F. [Monash Univ., Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Development and Stem Cells Program and Dept. of Anatomy and Developmental Biology

    2016-05-01

    A method to measure total glomerular number (N{sub glom}) in whole mouse kidneys using MRI is presented. The method relies on efficient acquisition times. A 9.4 T preclinical MRI system with a surface cryogenic coil and a 3D gradient echo sequence were used to image nine whole ex vivo BALB/c mouse kidneys labelled with cationized-ferritin (CF). A novel method to segment the glomeruli was developed. The quantification of glomeruli was achieved by identifying and fitting the probability distribution of glomeruli thus reducing variations due to noise. For validation, N{sub glom} of the same kidneys were also obtained using the gold standard: design-based stereology. Excellent agreement was found between the MRI and stereological measurements of N{sub glom}, with values differing by less than 4%: (mean ± SD) MRI = 15 606 ± 1 178; stereology = 16 273 ± 1 523. Using a robust segmentation method and a reliable quantification method, it was possible to acquire N{sub glom} with a scanning time of 33 minutes and 20 seconds. This was more than 8 times faster than previously presented MRI-based methods. Thus, an efficient approach to measure N{sub glom} ex vivo in health and disease is provided.

  19. Thermoablation of Malignant Kidney Tumors Using Magnetic Nanoparticles: An In Vivo Feasibility Study in a Rabbit Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruners, Philipp; Braunschweig, Till; Hodenius, Michael; Pietsch, Hubertus; Penzkofer, Tobias; Baumann, Martin; Guenther, Rolf W.; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the technical feasibility of CT-guided magnetic thermoablation for the treatment of malignant kidney tumors in a VX2 tumor rabbit model. VX2 tumors were implanted into the kidneys of five rabbits and allowed to grow for 2 weeks. After preinterventional CT perfusion imaging, CT-guided injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (300 μl) was performed, followed by exposure of the animals to an alternating electromagnetic field for 15 min (∼0.32 kA/m). Then animals underwent CT perfusion imaging again. Afterward, animals were sacrificed and kidneys were dissected for macroscopic and histological evaluation. Changes in perfusion before and after exposure to the alternating magnetic field were analyzed. In one animal no tumor growth could be detected so the animal was used for optimization of the ablation procedure including injection technique and peri-interventional cross-sectional imaging (CT, MRI). After image-guided intratumoral injection of ferrofluids, the depiction of nanoparticle distribution by CT correlated well with macroscopic evaluation of the dissected kidneys. MRI was limited due to severe susceptibility artefacts. Postinterventional CT perfusion imaging revealed a perfusion deficiency around the ferrofluid deposits. Histological workup showed different zones of thermal damage adjacent to the ferrofluid deposits. In conclusion, CT-guided magnetic thermoablation of malignant kidney tumors is technically feasible in an animal model and results in a perfusion deficiency indicating tumor necrosis as depicted by CT perfusion imaging and shown in histological evaluation.

  20. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, LF

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson’s disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model. PMID:24531365

  1. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibov, Tatiana T; Pavon, Lorena F; Miyaki, Liza A; Mamani, Javier B; Nucci, Leopoldo P; Alvarim, Larissa T; Silveira, Paulo H; Marti, Luciana C; Gamarra, Lf

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh), their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC) with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 10(5) cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.

  2. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    Operation of the magnet has gone quite smoothly during the first half of this year. The magnet has been at 4.5K for the full period since January. There was an unplanned short stop due to the CERN-wide power outage on May 28th, which caused a slow dump of the magnet. Since this occurred just before a planned technical stop of the LHC, during which access in the experimental cavern was authorized, it was decided to leave the magnet OFF until 2nd June, when magnet was ramped up again to 3.8T. The magnet system experienced a fault also resulting in a slow dump on April 14th. This was triggered by a thermostat on a filter choke in the 20kA DC power converter. The threshold of this thermostat is 65°C. However, no variation in the water-cooling flow rate or temperature was observed. Vibration may have been the root cause of the fault. All the thermostats have been checked, together with the cables, connectors and the read out card. The tightening of the inductance fixations has also been checked. More tem...

  3. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet was energised at the beginning of March 2012 at a low current to check all the MSS safety chains. Then the magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T on 6 March 2012. Unfortunately two days later an unintentional switch OFF of the power converter caused a slow dump. This was due to a misunderstanding of the CCC (CERN Control Centre) concerning the procedure to apply for the CMS converter control according to the beam-mode status at that time. Following this event, the third one since 2009, a discussion was initiated to define possible improvement, not only on software and procedures in the CCC, but also to evaluate the possibility to upgrade the CMS hardware to prevent such discharge from occurring because of incorrect procedure implementations. The magnet operation itself was smooth, and no power cuts took place. As a result, the number of magnetic cycles was reduced to the minimum, with only two full magnetic cycles from 0 T to 3.8 T. Nevertheless the magnet suffered four stops of the cryogeni...

  4. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      Following the unexpected magnet stops last August due to sequences of unfortunate events on the services and cryogenics [see CMS internal report], a few more events and initiatives again disrupted the magnet operation. All the magnet parameters stayed at their nominal values during this period without any fault or alarm on the magnet control and safety systems. The magnet was stopped for the September technical stop to allow interventions in the experimental cavern on the detector services. On 1 October, to prepare the transfer of the liquid nitrogen tank on its new location, several control cables had to be removed. One cable was cut mistakenly, causing a digital input card to switch off, resulting in a cold-box (CB) stop. This tank is used for the pre-cooling of the magnet from room temperature down to 80 K, and for this reason it is controlled through the cryogenics control system. Since the connection of the CB was only allowed for a field below 2 T to avoid the risk of triggering a fast d...

  5. Development of a disposable magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump (MedTech Dispo) intended for bridge-to-bridge applications--two-week in vivo evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaoka, Eiki; Someya, Takeshi; Kitao, Takashi; Kimura, Taro; Ushiyama, Tomohiro; Hijikata, Wataru; Shinshi, Tadahiko; Arai, Hirokuni; Takatani, Setsuo

    2010-09-01

    Last year, we reported in vitro pump performance, low hemolytic characteristics, and initial in vivo evaluation of a disposable, magnetically levitated centrifugal blood pump, MedTech Dispo. As the first phase of the two-stage in vivo studies, in this study we have carried out a 2-week in vivo evaluation in calves. Male Holstein calves with body weight of 62.4–92.2 kg were used. Under general anesthesia, a left heart bypass with a MedTech Dispo pump was instituted between the left atrium and the descending aorta via left thoracotomy. Blood-contacting surface of the pump was coated with a 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine polymer. Post-operatively, with activated clotting time controlled at 180–220 s using heparin and bypass flow rate maintained at 50 mL/kg/min, plasma-free hemoglobin (Hb), coagulation, and major organ functions were analyzed for evaluation of biocompatibility. The animals were electively sacrificed at the completion of the 2-week study to evaluate presence of thrombus inside the pump,together with an examination of major organs. To date, we have done 13 MedTech Dispo implantations, of which three went successfully for a 2-week duration. In these three cases, the pump produced a fairly constant flow of 50 mL/Kg/min. Neurological disorders and any symptoms of thromboembolism were not seen. Levels of plasma-free Hb were maintained very low. Major organ functions remained within normal ranges. Autopsy results revealed no thrombus formation inside the pump. In the last six cases, calves suffered from severe pneumonia and they were excluded from the analysis. The MedTech Dispo pump demonstrated sufficient pump performance and biocompatibility to meet requirements for 1-week circulatory support. The second phase (2-month in vivo study) is under way to prove the safety and efficacy of MedTech Dispo for 1-month applications. © 2010, Copyright the Authors. Artificial Organs © 2010, International Center for Artificial Organs and Transplantation

  6. Gadolinium-enhanced 7.0 T magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the aqueous inflow in rat eyes in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lu; Yuan, Yuxiang; Chen, Liwen; Li, Mu; Ji, Pingting; Gong, Jieling; Zhao, Yin; Zhang, Hong

    2017-09-01

    The goal of this study was to calculate the anterior chamber volume and assess aqueous inflow in rat eyes in vivo, under anesthetic condition. Gadolinium-contrast agent (Gd-DTPA, 234.5 mg/ml) was administered to Sprague-Dawley rat eyes via anterior chamber injection or instillation of 234.5 or 117.25 mg/ml Gd-DTPA in 0.2% azone as eye drops, and changes of Gd signal visualized by 7.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The safety of local application of Gd-DTPA and azone were performed after MRI scanning. The anterior chamber injection of Gd-DTPA (234.5 mg/ml) group was used for anterior chamber volume and aqueous inflow calculating. Serial changes in Gd-DTPA relative concentration in the anterior chamber was determined based on the initial Gd signal gray values and the initial relative concentration of Gd-DTPA after anterior chamber Gd-DTPA injection. The mean aqueous inflow in rat eyes in vivo was assessed based on changes in Gd-DTPA relative concentration and the anterior chamber volume. Eye drops of Gd-DTPA (234.5 mg/ml) in 0.2% azone readily allowed safe assessment of the aqueous inflow by 7.0 T MRI. Under anesthetic condition in vivo, the mean anterior chamber volume (ACV) in rats was 8493.6 ± 657.4 μm 3 , no differences were observed in the aqueous inflow measured by topical instillation of 234.5 mg/ml Gd-DTPA in 0.2% azone (0.182 ± 0.011 μl/min) between that measured by anterior chamber injection (0.165 ± 0.041 μl/min, P > 0.05), Timolol reduced aqueous inflow to 0.124 ± 0.020 μl/min (P DTPA can be assessed by the variability of relative concentration of Gd-DTPA in anterior chamber and ACV in vivo, under anesthetic condition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells labeled with multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles with fluorescent and magnetic properties: application for in vivo cell tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibov TT

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tatiana T Sibov,1,2 Lorena F Pavon,1 Liza A Miyaki,1 Javier B Mamani,1 Leopoldo P Nucci,1,2 Larissa T Alvarim,1,3 Paulo H Silveira,1 Luciana C Marti,1 LF Gamarra1–31Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Departamento de Neurologia e Neurociências, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 3Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilAbstract: Here we describe multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles conjugated to Rhodamine-B (MION-Rh, their stability in culture medium, and subsequent validation of an in vitro protocol to label mesenchymal stem cells from umbilical cord blood (UC-MSC with MION-Rh. These cells showed robust labeling in vitro without impairment of their functional properties, the viability of which were evaluated by proliferation kinetic and ultrastructural analyzes. Thus, labeled cells were infused into striatum of adult male rats of animal model that mimic late onset of Parkinson's disease and, after 15 days, it was observed that cells migrated along the medial forebrain bundle to the substantia nigra as hypointense spots in T2 magnetic resonance imaging. These data were supported by short-term magnetic resonance imaging. Studies were performed in vivo, which showed that about 5 × 105 cells could be efficiently detected in the short term following infusion. Our results indicate that these labeled cells can be efficiently tracked in a neurodegenerative disease model.Keywords: mesenchymal stem cells, multimodal iron oxide nanoparticles, Rhodamine, magnetic resonance imaging, Parkinson's disease

  8. Assessing Exposures to Magnetic Resonance Imaging’s Complex Mixture of Magnetic Fields for In Vivo, In Vitro, and Epidemiologic Studies of Health Effects for Staff and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Frankel

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available A complex mixture of electromagnetic fields is used in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI: static, low-frequency, and radio frequency magnetic fields. Commonly, the static magnetic field ranges from one to three Tesla. The low-frequency field can reach several millitesla and with a time derivative of the order of some Tesla per second. The radiofrequency (RF field has a magnitude in the microtesla range giving rise to specific absorption rate values of a few Watts per kilogram. Very little attention has been paid to the case where there is a combined exposure to several different fields at the same time. Some studies have shown genotoxic effects in cells after exposure to an MRI scan while others have not demonstrated any effects. A typical MRI exam includes muliple imaging sequences of varying length and intensity, to produce different types of images. Each sequence is designed with a particular purpose in mind, so one sequence can, for example, be optimized for clearly showing fat water contrast, while another is optimized for high-resolution detail. It is of the utmost importance that future experimental studies give a thorough description of the exposure they are using, and not just a statement such as “An ordinary MRI sequence was used.” Even if the sequence is specified, it can differ substantially between manufacturers on, e.g., RF pulse height, width, and duty cycle. In the latest SCENIHR opinion, it is stated that there is very little information regarding the health effects of occupational exposure to MRI fields, and long-term prospective or retrospective cohort studies on workers are recommended as a high priority. They also state that MRI is increasingly used in pediatric diagnostic imaging, and a cohort study into the effects of MRI exposure on children is recommended as a high priority. For the exposure assessment in epidemiological studies, there is a clear difference between patients and staff and further work is needed on this

  9. In-vivo quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms from 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmonik, C. [The Methodist Hospital Research Inst., Houston (United States); Diaz, O.; Klucznik, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States); Grossman, R. [The Methodist Hospital, Houston (United States). Neurosurgery

    2010-02-15

    Purpose: The quantification of wall motion in cerebral aneurysms is of interest for the assessment of aneurysmal rupture risk, for providing boundary conditions for computational simulations and as a validation tool for theoretical models. Materials and Methods: 2D cine phase contrast magnetic resonance imaging (2D pcMRI) in combination with quantitative magnetic resonance angiography (QMRA) was evaluated for measuring wall motion in 7 intracranial aneurysms. In each aneurysm, 2 (in one case 3) cross sections, oriented approximately perpendicular to each other, were measured. Results: The maximum aneurysmal wall distention ranged from 0.16 mm to 1.6 mm (mean 0.67 mm), the maximum aneurysmal wall contraction was -1.91 mm to -0.34 mm (mean 0.94 mm), and the average wall displacement ranged from 0.04 mm to 0.31 mm (mean 0.15 mm). Statistically significant correlations between average wall displacement and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 7 of 15 cross sections; statistically significant correlations between the displacement of the luminal boundary center point and the shape of inflow curves (p-value < 0.05) were found in 6 of 15 cross sections. Conclusion: 2D pcMRI in combination with QMRA is capable of visualizing and quantifying wall motion in cerebral aneurysms. However, application of this technique is currently restricted by its limited spatial resolution. (orig.)

  10. Phosphorus-31 NMR magnetization transfer measurements of metabolic reaction rates in the rat heart and kidney in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koretsky, A.P.

    1984-01-01

    31 P NMR is a unique tool to study bioenergetics in living cells. The application of magnetization transfer techniques to the measurement of steady-state enzyme reaction rates provides a new approach to understanding the regulation of high energy phosphate metabolism. This dissertation is concerned with the measurement of the rates of ATP synthesis in the rat kidney and of the creatine kinase catalyzed reaction in the rat heart in situ. The theoretical considerations of applying magnetization transfer techniques to intact organs are discussed with emphasis on the problems associated with multiple exchange reactions and compartmentation of reactants. Experimental measurements of the ATP synthesis rate were compared to whole kidney oxygen consumption and Na + reabsorption rates to derive ATP/O values. The problems associated with ATP synthesis rate measurements in kidney, e.g. the heterogeneity of the inorganic phosphate resonance, are discussed and experiments to overcome these problems proposed. In heart, the forward rate through creatine kinase was measured to be larger than the reverse rate. To account for the difference in forward and reverse rates a model is proposed based on the compartmentation of a small pool of ATP

  11. Biocompatible KMnF3 nanoparticular contrast agent with proper plasma retention time for in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhi-jun; Song, Xiao-xia; Xu, Xian-zhu; Tang, Qun

    2014-04-18

    Nanoparticular MRI contrast agents are rapidly becoming suitable for use in clinical diagnosis. An ideal nanoparticular contrast agent should be endowed with high relaxivity, biocompatibility, proper plasma retention time, and tissue-specific or tumor-targeting imaging. Herein we introduce PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles as a new type of T1 contrast agent. Studies showed that the nanoparticular contrast agent revealed high bio-stability with bovine serum albumin in PBS buffer solution, and presented excellent biocompatibility (low cytotoxicity, undetectable hemolysis and hemagglutination). Meanwhile the new contrast agent possessed proper plasma retention time (circulation half-life t1/2 is approximately 2 h) in the body of the administrated mice. It can be delivered into brain vessels and maintained there for hours, and is mostly cleared from the body within 48 h, as demonstrated by time-resolved MRI and Mn-biodistribution analysis. Those distinguishing features make it suitable to obtain contrast-enhanced brain magnetic resonance angiography. Moreover, through the process of passive targeting delivery, the T1 contrast agent clearly illuminates a brain tumor (glioma) with high contrast image and defined shape. This study demonstrates that PEGylated KMnF3 nanoparticles represent a promising biocompatible vascular contrast agent for magnetic resonance angiography and can potentially be further developed into an active targeted tumor MRI contrast agent.

  12. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2012-01-01

      The magnet and its sub-systems were stopped at the beginning of the winter shutdown on 8th December 2011. The magnet was left without cooling during the cryogenics maintenance until 17th January 2012, when the cryoplant operation resumed. The magnet temperature reached 93 K. The vacuum pumping was maintained during this period. During this shutdown, the yearly maintenance was performed on the cryogenics, the vacuum pumps, the magnet control and safety systems, and the power converter and discharge lines. Several preventive actions led to the replacement of the electrovalve command coils, and the 20A DC power supplies of the magnet control system. The filters were cleaned on the demineralised water circuits. The oil of the diffusion pumps was changed. On the cryogenics, warm nitrogen at 343 K was circulated in the cold box to regenerate the filters and the heat exchangers. The coalescing filters have been replaced at the inlet of both the turbines and the lubricant trapping unit. The active cha...

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

      The magnet was operated without any problem until the end of the LHC run in February 2013, apart from a CERN-wide power glitch on 10 January 2013 that affected the CMS refrigerator, causing a ramp down to 2 T in order to reconnect the coldbox. Another CERN-wide power glitch on 15 January 2013 didn’t affect the magnet subsystems, the cryoplant or the power converter. At the end of the magnet run, the reconnection of the coldbox at 2.5 T was tested. The process will be updated, in particular the parameters of some PID valve controllers. The helium flow of the current leads was reduced but only for a few seconds. The exercise will be repeated with the revised parameters to validate the automatic reconnection process of the coldbox. During LS1, the water-cooling services will be reduced and many interventions are planned on the electrical services. Therefore, the magnet cryogenics and subsystems will be stopped for several months, and the magnet cannot be kept cold. In order to avoid unc...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet was successfully operated at the end of the year 2009 despite some technical problems on the cryogenics. The magnet was ramped up to 3.8 T at the end of November until December 16th when the shutdown started. The magnet operation met a few unexpected stops. The field was reduced to 3.5 T for about 5 hours on December 3rd due to a faulty pressure sensor on the helium compressor. The following day the CERN CCC stopped unintentionally the power converters of the LHC and the experiments, triggering a ramp down that was stopped at 2.7 T. The magnet was back at 3.8 T about 6 hours after CCC sent the CERN-wide command. Three days later, a slow dump was triggered due to a stop of the pump feeding the power converter water-cooling circuit, during an intervention on the water-cooling plant done after several disturbances on the electrical distribution network. The magnet was back at 3.8 T in the evening the same day. On December 10th a break occurred in one turbine of the cold box producing the liquid ...

  15. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The CMS magnet has been running steadily and smoothly since the summer, with no detected flaw. The magnet instrumentation is entirely operational and all the parameters are at their nominal values. Three power cuts on the electrical network affected the magnet run in the past five months, with no impact on the data-taking as the accelerator was also affected at the same time. On 22nd June, a thunderstorm caused a power glitch on the service electrical network. The primary water cooling at Point 5 was stopped. Despite a quick restart of the water cooling, the inlet temperature of the demineralised water on the busbar cooling circuit increased by 5 °C, up to 23.3 °C. It was kept below the threshold of 27 °C by switching off other cooling circuits to avoid the trigger of a slow dump of the magnet. The cold box of the cryogenics also stopped. Part of the spare liquid helium volume was used to maintain the cooling of the magnet at 4.5 K. The operators of the cryogenics quickly restarted ...

  16. Fibrin-Targeted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Allows In Vivo Quantification of Thrombus Fibrin Content and Identifies Thrombi Amenable for Thrombolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Julia; Modarai, Bijan; Wiethoff, Andrea J.; Phinikaridou, Alkystis; Grover, Steven P.; Patel, Ashish S.; Schaeffter, Tobias; Smith, Alberto; Botnar, Rene M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Deep venous thrombosis is a major health problem. Thrombolytic therapies are effective in recanalizing the veins and preventing post-thrombotic complications, but there is no consensus on selection criteria. The aim of this study was to investigate a fibrin-specific MRI contrast agent (EP-2104R) for the accurate quantification of thrombus’ fibrin content in vivo and for the identification of thrombus suitable for thrombolysis. Approach and Results Venous thrombosis was induced in the inferior vena cava of 8- to 10-week-old male BALB/C mice and MRI performed 2, 4, 7, 10, 14, and 21 days later. Eighteen mice were scanned at each time point pre and 2 hours post injection of EP-2104R (8.0 μmol/kg) with 12 mice at each time point used to correlate fibrin contrast uptake with thrombus’ histological stage and fibrin content. Six mice at each time point were immediately subjected to intravascular thrombolytic therapy (10 mg/kg of tissue-type plasminogen activator). Mice were imaged to assess response to lytic therapy 24 hours after thrombolytic treatment. Two mice at each time point were scanned post injection of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA (gadolinium with diethylenetriaminepentacetate, Magnevist, Schering AG, Berlin, Germany) for control purpose. Contrast uptake was correlated positively with the fibrin content of the thrombus measured by Western blotting (R2=0.889; PThrombus relaxation rate (R1) post contrast and the change in visualized thrombus size on late gadolinium enhancement inversion recovery MRI pre–EP-2104R and post–EP-2104R injection were the best predictors for successful thrombolysis (area under the curve, 0.989 [95% confidence interval, 0.97–1.00] and 0.994 [95% confidence interval, 0.98–1.00] respectively). Conclusions MRI with a fibrin-specific contrast agent accurately estimates thrombus fibrin content in vivo and identifies thrombi that are amenable for thrombolysis. PMID:24723557

  17. Application of a Compact Magnetic Resonance Imaging System with 1.5 T Permanent Magnets to Visualize Release from and the Disintegration of Capsule Formulations in Vitro and in Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshita, Keizo; Okazaki, Shoko; Shinada, Kyosuke; Shibamoto, Yuma

    2017-01-01

    Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has potential in assessments of formulations, few studies have been conducted because of the size and expense of the instrument. In the present study, the processes of in vitro and in vivo release in a gelatin capsule formulation model were visualized using a compact MRI system with 1.5 T permanent magnets, which is more convenient than the superconducting MRI systems typically used for clinical and experimental purposes. A Gd-chelate of diethylenetriamine-N,N,N',N″,N″-pentaacetic acid, a contrast agent that markedly enhances proton signals via close contact with water, was incorporated into capsule formulations as a marker compound. In vitro experiments could clearly demonstrate the preparation-dependent differences in the release/disintegration of the formulations. In some preparations, the penetration of water into the formulation and generation of bubbles in the capsule were also observed prior to the disintegration of the formulation. When capsule formulations were orally administered to rats, the release of the marker into the stomach and its transit to the duodenum were visualized. These results strongly indicate that the compact MRI system is a powerful tool for pharmaceutical studies.

  18. In vivo mitochondrial function in HIV-infected persons treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy: a magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan A I Payne

    Full Text Available Modern anti-retroviral therapy is highly effective at suppressing viral replication and restoring immune function in HIV-infected persons. However, such individuals show reduced physiological performance and increased frailty compared with age-matched uninfected persons. Contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is thought to be largely free from neuromuscular complications, whereas several anti-retroviral drugs previously in common usage have been associated with mitochondrial toxicity. It has recently been established that patients with prior exposure to such drugs exhibit irreversible cellular and molecular mitochondrial defects. However the functional significance of such damage remains unknown. Here we use phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31P-MRS to measure in vivo muscle mitochondrial oxidative function, in patients treated with contemporary anti-retroviral therapy, and compare with biopsy findings (cytochrome c oxidase (COX histochemistry. We show that dynamic oxidative function (post-exertional ATP (adenosine triphosphate resynthesis was largely maintained in the face of mild to moderate COX defects (affecting up to ∼10% of fibers: τ½ ADP (half-life of adenosine diphosphate clearance, HIV-infected 22.1±9.9 s, HIV-uninfected 18.8±4.4 s, p = 0.09. In contrast, HIV-infected patients had a significant derangement of resting state ATP metabolism compared with controls: ADP/ATP ratio, HIV-infected 1.24±0.08×10(-3, HIV-uninfected 1.16±0.05×10(-3, p = 0.001. These observations are broadly reassuring in that they suggest that in vivo mitochondrial function in patients on contemporary anti-retroviral therapy is largely maintained at the whole organ level, despite histochemical (COX defects within individual cells. Basal energy requirements may nevertheless be increased.

  19. Changes in water content and distribution in Quercus ilex leaves during progressive drought assessed by in vivo 1H magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardans, Jordi; Peñuelas, Josep; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia

    2010-08-24

    Drought is a common stressor in many regions of the world and current climatic global circulation models predict further increases in warming and drought in the coming decades in several of these regions, such as the Mediterranean basin. The changes in leaf water content, distribution and dynamics in plant tissues under different soil water availabilities are not well known. In order to fill this gap, in the present report we describe our study withholding the irrigation of the seedlings of Quercus ilex, the dominant tree species in the evergreen forests of many areas of the Mediterranean Basin. We have monitored the gradual changes in water content in the different leaf areas, in vivo and non-invasively, by 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using proton density weighted (rhow) images and spin-spin relaxation time (T2) maps. Rhow images showed that the distal leaf area lost water faster than the basal area and that after four weeks of similar losses, the water reduction was greater in leaf veins than in leaf parenchyma areas and also in distal than in basal leaf area. There was a similar tendency in all different areas and tissues, of increasing T2 values during the drought period. This indicates an increase in the dynamics of free water, suggesting a decrease of cell membranes permeability. The results indicate a non homogeneous leaf response to stress with a differentiated capacity to mobilize water between its different parts and tissues. This study shows that the MRI technique can be a useful tool to follow non-intrusively the in vivo water content changes in the different parts of the leaves during drought stress. It opens up new possibilities to better characterize the associated physiological changes and provides important information about the different responses of the different leaf areas what should be taken into account when conducting physiological and metabolic drought stress studies in different parts of the leaves during drought stress.

  20. Comparison of magnetic resonance imaging and Laser Doppler Anemometry velocity measurements downstream of replacement heart valves: implications for in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontaine, A A; Heinrich, R S; Walker, P G; Pedersen, E M; Scheidegger, M B; Boesiger, P; Walton, S P; Yoganathan, A P

    1996-01-01

    The non-invasive, in-vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function is compromised by the lack of accurate measurements of the transvalvular flow fields or hemodynamics by current techniques. Short echo time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may provide a method for the non-invasive, in vivo assessment of prosthetic valve function by accurately measuring changes in the transvalvular flow fields associated with normal and dysfunctional prosthetic valves. The objectives of these in vitro experiments were to investigate the potential for using MRI as a tool to measure the complex flow fields distal to replacement heart valves, and to assess the accuracy of MRI velocity measurements by comparison with Laser Doppler Anemometry (LDA), a gold standard. The velocity fields downstream of tilting disc, bileaflet, ball and cage, and pericardial tissue valves were measured using both three-component LDA and MRI phase velocity encoding under a steady flow rate of 22.8 l/min, simulating peak systolic flow. The valves were tested under normal and stenotic conditions to assess the MRI capabilities under a wide range of local flow conditions, velocities and turbulence levels. A new short echo time MRI technique (FAcE), which allowed velocity measurements in stenotic jets with high turbulence, was tested. Good overall agreement was obtained between the MRI velocity measurements and the LDA data. The MRI velocity measurements adequately reproduced the spatial structure of the flow fields. In most cases peak velocities were accurately measured to within 15%. The results indicate that the FAcE MRI method has the potential to be used as a diagnostic tool to assess prosthetic valve function.

  1. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2011-01-01

    The magnet ran smoothly in the last few months until a fast dump occurred on 9th May 2011. Fortunately, this occurred in the afternoon of the first day of the technical stop. The fast dump was due to a valve position controller that caused the sudden closure of a valve. This valve is used to regulate the helium flow on one of the two current leads, which electrically connects the coil at 4.5 K to the busbars at room temperature. With no helium flow on the lead, the voltage drop and the temperatures across the leads increase up to the defined thresholds, triggering a fast dump through the Magnet Safety System (MSS). The automatic reaction triggered by the MSS worked properly. The helium release was limited as the pressure rise was just at the limit of the safety valve opening pressure. The average temperature of the magnet reached 72 K. It took four days to recover the temperature and refill the helium volumes. The faulty valve controller was replaced by a spare one before the magnet ramp-up resumed....

  2. Monitoring of the insecticide trichlorfon by phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance (31P NMR) spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Talebpour, Zahra; Ghassempour, Alireza; Zendehzaban, Mehdi; Bijanzadeh, Hamid Reza; Mirjalili, Mohammad Hossein

    2006-01-01

    Trichlorfon is an organophosphorus insecticide, which is extensively being used for protection of fruit crops. Trichlorfon is a thermal labile compound, which cannot be easily determined by gas chromatography (GC) and has no suitable group for sensitive detection by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). In this study, a 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance ( 31 P NMR) has been described for monitoring of trichlorfon without any separation step. The quantitative works of 31 P NMR spectroscopy has been performed in the presence of an internal standard (hexamethylphosphoramide). Limit of detection (LOD) for this method has been found to be 55 mg L -1 , without any sample preparation, and the linear working range was 150-5500 mg L -1 . Relative standard deviation (R.S.D.%) of the method for three replicates within and between days was obtained ≤9%. The average recovery efficiency was approximately 99-112%. This method was applied for monitoring trichlorfon in a commercial insecticide sample and tomato sample

  3. Nature versus nurture: functional assessment of restoration effects on wetland services using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundareshwar, P.V.; Richardson, C.J.; Gleason, R.A.; Pellechia, P.J.; Honomichl, S.

    2009-01-01

    Land-use change has altered the ability of wetlands to provide vital services such as nutrient retention. While compensatory practices attempt to restore degraded wetlands and their functions, it is difficult to evaluate the recovery of soil biogeochemical functions that are critical for restoration of ecosystem services. Using solution 31P Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, we examined the chemical forms of phosphorus (P) in soils from wetlands located across a land-use gradient. We report that soil P diversity, a functional attribute, was lowest in farmland, and greatest in native wetlands. Soil P diversity increased with age of restoration, indicating restoration of biogeochemical function. The trend in soil P diversity was similar to documented trends in soil bacterial taxonomic composition but opposite that of soil bacterial diversity at our study sites. These findings provide insights into links between ecosystem structure and function and provide a tool for evaluating the success of ecosystem restoration efforts. Copyright 2009 by the American Geophysical Union.

  4. Folate conjugated Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles for targeted magnetic resonance imaging in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Xinyi [The Education Ministry Key Lab of Resource Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Zhou, Zhiguo, E-mail: zgzhou@shnu.edu.cn [The Education Ministry Key Lab of Resource Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Wang, Li; Tang, Caizhi; Yang, Hong [The Education Ministry Key Lab of Resource Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Yang, Shiping, E-mail: shipingy@shnu.edu.cn [The Education Ministry Key Lab of Resource Chemistry and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Functional Materials, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); The Education Ministry Key Lab of Pesticide and Chemical Biology, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510641 (China)

    2014-09-15

    Graphical abstract: The Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(PEG)–FA has been used as a T{sub 1}-MRI probe for in vivo. - Highlights: • The PEG and FA modified Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–FA) were prepared. • Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–FA exhibited the good colloidal stability in the simulated biological medium. • Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–FA showed the targeting ability to HeLa cells overexpressed the FA receptor. • The T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging demonstrated the targeting ability of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}–FA in vivo tumor. - Abstract: The monodisperse silica-coated manganese oxide nanoparticles (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2} NPs) were synthesized via the high temperature pyrolysis approach and were aminated through silanization. The amine-functionalized Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs enabled the covalent conjugation of hydrophilic methoxypoly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and the targeting ligand of folate (FA) onto their surface. The formed PEG and FA modified Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(PEG)–FA) exhibited the good colloidal stability in the simulated biological medium and the targeting ability to HeLa cells overexpressed the FA receptor. The T{sub 1}-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) analysis of Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}@SiO{sub 2}(PEG)–FA NPs further demonstrated their targeting ability in tumor.

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for the exploitation of bubble-enhanced heating by high-intensity focused ultrasound: a feasibility study in ex vivo liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbes, Delphine; Denost, Quentin; Robert, Benjamin; Köhler, Max O; Tanter, Mickaël; Bruno, Quesson

    2014-05-01

    Bubble-enhanced heating (BEH) may be exploited to improve the heating efficiency of high-intensity focused ultrasound in liver and to protect tissues located beyond the focal point. The objectives of this study, performed in ex vivo pig liver, were (i) to develop a method to determine the acoustic power threshold for induction of BEH from displacement images measured by magnetic resonance acoustic radiation force imaging (MR-ARFI), and (ii) to compare temperature distribution with MR thermometry for HIFU protocols with and without BEH. The acoustic threshold for generation of BEH was determined in ex vivo pig liver from MR-ARFI calibration curves of local tissue displacement resulting from sonication at different powers. Temperature distributions (MR thermometry) resulting from "conventional" sonications (20 W, 30 s) were compared with those from "composite" sonications performed at identical parameters, but after a HIFU burst pulse (0.5 s, acoustic power over the threshold for induction of BEH). Displacement images (MR-ARFI) were acquired between sonications to measure potential modifications of local tissue displacement associated with modifications of tissue acoustic characteristics induced by the burst HIFU pulse. The acoustic threshold for induction of BEH corresponded to a displacement amplitude of approximately 50 μm in ex vivo liver. The displacement and temperature images of the composite group exhibited a nearly spherical pattern, shifted approximately 4 mm toward the transducer, in contrast to elliptical shapes centered on the natural focal position for the conventional group. The gains in maximum temperature and displacement values were 1.5 and 2, and the full widths at half-maximum of the displacement data were 1.7 and 2.2 times larger than in the conventional group in directions perpendicular to ultrasound propagation axes. Combination of MR-ARFI and MR thermometry for calibration and exploitation of BEH appears to increase the efficiency and safety

  6. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avcıbaşı, Uğur; Avcıbaşı, Nesibe; Akalın, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroğlu, Hasan; Gümüşer, Fikriye Gül; Özçalışkan, Emir; Türkcan, Ceren; Uygun, Deniz Aktaş; Akgöl, Sinan

    2013-10-01

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe3O4 particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, 131I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that 131I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 ± 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with 131I [131I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with 131I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain results can only be obtained whether this

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2010-01-01

    The magnet worked very well at 3.8 T as expected, despite a technical issue that manifested twice in the cryogenics since June. All the other magnet sub-systems worked without flaw. The issue in the cryogenics was with the cold box: it could be observed that the cold box was getting progressively blocked, due to some residual humidity and air accumulating in the first thermal exchanger and in the adsorber at 65 K. This was later confirmed by the analysis during the regeneration phases. An increase in the temperature difference between the helium inlet and outlet across the heat exchanger and a pressure drop increase on the filter of the adsorber were observed. The consequence was a reduction of the helium flow, first compensated by the automatic opening of the regulation valves. But once they were fully opened, the flow and refrigeration power reduced as a consequence. In such a situation, the liquid helium level in the helium Dewar decreased, eventually causing a ramp down of the magnet current and a field...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    MAGNET During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bough...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé.

    The magnet operation restarted end of June this year. Quick routine checks of the magnet sub-systems were performed at low current before starting the ramps up to higher field. It appeared clearly that the end of the field ramp down to zero was too long to be compatible with the detector commissioning and operations plans. It was decided to perform an upgrade to keep the ramp down from 3.8T to zero within 4 hours. On July 10th, when a field of 1.5T was reached, small movements were observed in the forward region support table and it was decided to fix this problem before going to higher field. At the end of July the ramps could be resumed. On July 28th, the field was at 3.8T and the summer CRAFT exercise could start. This run in August went smoothly until a general CERN wide power cut took place on August 3rd, due to an insulation fault on the high voltage network outside point 5. It affected the magnet powering electrical circuit, as it caused the opening of the main circuit breakers, resulting in a fast du...

  10. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    2013-01-01

    The magnet is fully stopped and at room temperature. The maintenance works and consolidation activities on the magnet sub-systems are progressing. To consolidate the cryogenic installation, two redundant helium compressors will be installed as ‘hot spares’, to avoid the risk of a magnet downtime in case of a major failure of a compressor unit during operation. The screw compressors, their motors, the mechanical couplings and the concrete blocks are already available and stored at P5. The metallic structure used to access the existing compressors in SH5 will be modified to allow the installation of the two redundant ones. The plan is to finish the installation and commissioning of the hot spare compressors before the summer 2014. In the meantime, a bypass on the high-pressure helium piping will be installed for the connection of a helium drier unit later during the Long Shutdown 1, keeping this installation out of the schedule critical path. A proposal is now being prepared for the con...

  11. Characterization of healing following atherosclerotic carotid plaque rupture in acutely symptomatic patients: an exploratory study using in vivo cardiovascular magnetic resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Victoria E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Carotid plaque rupture, characterized by ruptured fibrous cap (FC, is associated with subsequent cerebrovascular events. However, ruptured FC may heal following stroke and convey decreased risk of future events. This study aims to characterize the healing process of ruptured FC by assessing the lumen conditions, quantified by the lumen curvature and roughness, using in vivo carotid cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR. Methods Patients suffering from transient ischemic attack underwent high resolution carotid MR imaging within 72 hours of the acute cerebrovascular ischemic event. CMR imaging was repeated at 3 and 12 months in 26 patients, in whom FC rupture/erosion was observed on baseline images and subsequent cerebrovascular events were recorded during the follow-up period. Lumen curvature and roughness were quantified from carotid CMR images and changes in these values were monitored on follow-up imaging. Results Healing of ruptured plaque was observed in patients (23 out of 26 without any ischemic symptom recurrence as shown by the lumen surface becoming smoother during the follow-up period, characterized by decreasing maximum lumen curvature (p Conclusions Carotid plaque healing can be assessed by quantification of the lumen curvature and roughness and the incidence of recurrent cerebrovascular events may be high in plaques that do not heal with time. The assessment of plaque healing may facilitate risk stratification of recent stroke patients on the basis of CMR results.

  12. Non-invasive tracking of human haemopoietic CD34{sup +} stem cells in vivo in immunodeficient mice by using magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemeyer, Markus; Jacobs, Volker R.; Timmer, Sebastian; Kiechle, Marion [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Gynaecology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J.; Hippauf, Sandra; Bekker-Ruz, Viktoria [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kremer, Markus [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Pathology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Baurecht, Hansjoerg [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Statistics, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Institute for Medical Statistics and Epidemiology, Munich (Germany); Ludwig, Georg; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Piontek, Guido [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Beer, Ambros J. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany)

    2010-09-15

    To assess migration of CD34{sup +} human stem cells to the bone marrow of athymic mice by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Resovist, a contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. All animal and human procedures were approved by our institution's ethics committee, and women had given consent to donate umbilical cord blood (UCB). Balb/c-AnN Foxn1{sup nu}/Crl mice received intravenous injection of 1 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3), 5 x 10{sup 6} (n = 3) or 1 x 10{sup 7} (n = 3) human Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells; control mice received Resovist (n = 3). MR imaging was performed before, 2 and 24 h after transplantation. Signal intensities of liver, muscle and bone marrow were measured and analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Student's t tests. MR imaging data were verified by histological and immunological detection of both human cell surface markers and carboxydextran-coating of the contrast agent. CD34{sup +} cells were efficiently labelled by Resovist without impairment of functionality. Twenty-four hours after administration of labelled cells, MR imaging revealed a significant signal decline in the bone marrow, and histological and immunological analyses confirmed the presence of transplanted human CD34{sup +} cells. Intravenously administered Resovist-labelled CD34{sup +} cells home to bone marrow of mice. Homing can be tracked in vivo by using clinical 1.5-T MR imaging technology. (orig.)

  13. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The magnet subsystems resumed operation early this spring. The vacuum pumping was restarted mid March, and the cryogenic power plant was restarted on March 30th. Three and a half weeks later, the magnet was at 4.5 K. The vacuum pumping system is performing well. One of the newly installed vacuum gauges had to be replaced at the end of the cool-down phase, as the values indicated were not coherent with the other pressure measurements. The correction had to be implemented quickly to be sure no helium leak could be at the origin of this anomaly. The pressure measurements have been stable and coherent since the change. The cryogenics worked well, and the cool-down went quite smoothly, without any particular difficulty. The automated start of the turbines had to be fine-tuned to get a smooth transition, as it was observed that the cooling power delivered by the turbines was slightly higher than needed, causing the cold box to stop automatically. This had no consequence as the cold box safety system acts to keep ...

  14. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    B. Curé

    During the winter shutdown, the magnet subsystems went through a full maintenance. The magnet was successfully warmed up to room temperature beginning of December 2008. The vacuum was broken later on by injecting nitrogen at a pressure just above one atmosphere inside the vacuum tank. This was necessary both to prevent any accidental humidity ingress, and to allow for a modification of the vacuum gauges on the vacuum tank and maintenance of the diffusion pumps. The vacuum gauges had to be changed, because of erratic variations on the measurements, causing spurious alarms. The new type of vacuum gauges has been used in similar conditions on the other LHC experiments and without problems. They are shielded against the stray field. The lubricants of the primary and diffusion pumps have been changed. Several minor modifications were also carried out on the equipment in the service cavern, with the aim to ease the maintenance and to allow possible intervention during operation. Spare sensors have been bought. Th...

  15. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E.; Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen; Piert, Morand; Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P 6 NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 10 6 parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently labeled with clinically applicable iron-oxide contrast

  16. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [UCSF Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Technical University Munich, Institute of Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Piert, Morand [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried [University of Frankfurt, Georg Speyer House, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P<0.05). After intravenous injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 10{sup 6} parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently

  17. Changes in water content and distribution in Quercus ilex leaves during progressive drought assessed by in vivo 1H magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sardans Jordi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is a common stressor in many regions of the world and current climatic global circulation models predict further increases in warming and drought in the coming decades in several of these regions, such as the Mediterranean basin. The changes in leaf water content, distribution and dynamics in plant tissues under different soil water availabilities are not well known. In order to fill this gap, in the present report we describe our study withholding the irrigation of the seedlings of Quercus ilex, the dominant tree species in the evergreen forests of many areas of the Mediterranean Basin. We have monitored the gradual changes in water content in the different leaf areas, in vivo and non-invasively, by 1H magnetic resonance imaging (MRI using proton density weighted (ρw images and spin-spin relaxation time (T2 maps. Results ρw images showed that the distal leaf area lost water faster than the basal area and that after four weeks of similar losses, the water reduction was greater in leaf veins than in leaf parenchyma areas and also in distal than in basal leaf area. There was a similar tendency in all different areas and tissues, of increasing T2 values during the drought period. This indicates an increase in the dynamics of free water, suggesting a decrease of cell membranes permeability. Conclusions The results indicate a non homogeneous leaf response to stress with a differentiated capacity to mobilize water between its different parts and tissues. This study shows that the MRI technique can be a useful tool to follow non-intrusively the in vivo water content changes in the different parts of the leaves during drought stress. It opens up new possibilities to better characterize the associated physiological changes and provides important information about the different responses of the different leaf areas what should be taken into account when conducting physiological and metabolic drought stress studies in

  18. Metabolic profiling of heat or anoxic stress in mouse C2C12 myotubes using multinuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Straadt, Ida K; Young, Jette F; Petersen, Bent O

    2010-01-01

    to anaerobic metabolism due to inhibition of the aerobic pathway in the mitochondria. Conversely, lower levels of unlabeled ((12)C) lactate were apparent at increasing severity of stress, which indicate that lactate is released from the myotubes to the medium. In conclusion, the metabolites identified......In the present study, the metabolic effects of heat and anoxic stress in myotubes from the mouse cell line C2C12 were investigated by using a combination of (13)C, (1)H, and (31)P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and enrichment with [(13)C]-glucose. Both the (13)C and the (1)H NMR...... spectra showed reduced levels of the amino acids alanine, glutamate, and aspartate after heat or anoxic stress. The decreases were smallest at 42 degrees C, larger at 45 degrees C, and most pronounced after anoxic conditions. In addition, in both the (1)H and the (31)P NMR spectra, decreases in the high...

  19. Synthesis and biodistribution of novel magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH) nanopolymer radiolabeled with iodine-131 and investigation its fate in vivo for cancer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Ugur, E-mail: uguravcibasi@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Avc Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I bas Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , Nesibe [Ege University, Ege Higher Vocational School (Turkey); Akal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I n, Hilmi Arkut; Ediz, Melis; Demiroglu, Hasan [Celal Bayar University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Guemueser, Fikriye Guel [Celal Bayar University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Faculty of Medicine (Turkey); Oezcal Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I skan, Emir; Tuerkcan, Ceren [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey); Uygun, Deniz Aktas [Adnan Menderes University, Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Arts and Science (Turkey); Akgoel, Sinan [Ege University, Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science (Turkey)

    2013-10-15

    Herein, we investigated the biological uptake, distribution, and radiopharmaceutical potential of a novel molecule based on 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and anilinephtalein (APH) in the metabolism of Albino Wistar rats. In order to achieve this, we synthesized APH using organic synthesis methods and copolymerized APH with HEMA using a common polymerization method, surfactant-free emulsion polymerization. In the presence of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} particles, we obtained a new generation magnetic-nano-scale polymer, magnetic-poly(HEMA-APH). This new molecule was chemically identified and approved by several characterization methods using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron spin resonance, atomic force microscope, and Zeta particle-size analysis. To evaluate the biological activity in live metabolism and anti-cancer potential of mag-poly(HEMA-APH), molecule was radioiodinated by a widely used labeling technique, iodogen method, with a gamma diffuser radionuclide, {sup 131}I. Thin-layer radiochromatography experiments demonstrated that {sup 131}I binded to nanopolymer with the labeling yield of 90 %. Lipophilicity and stability experiments were conducted to determine the condition of cold and labeled mag-poly(HEMA-APH) in rat blood and lipid medium. Results demonstrated that radioiodinated molecule stayed as an intact complex in rat metabolism for 24 h and experimental lipophilicity was determined as 0.12 {+-} 0.02. In vivo results obtained by imaging and biological distribution experiments indicated that mag-poly(HEMA-APH) labeled with {sup 131}I [{sup 131}I-mag-poly(HEMA-APH)] highly incorporated into tissues of the uterus, the ovarian, the prostate, and the lungs in rat metabolism. Based on these results, it may be evaluated that novel mag-poly(HEMA-APH) molecule labeled with {sup 131}I is a compound which has a significant potential for being used as an anti-cancer agent. Certain

  20. Early detection of ventilation-induced brain injury using magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion tensor imaging: an in vivo study in preterm lambs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Béatrice Skiöld

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: High tidal volume (VT ventilation during resuscitation of preterm lambs results in brain injury evident histologically within hours after birth. We aimed to investigate whether magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS and/or diffusion tensor imaging (DTI can be used for early in vivo detection of ventilation-induced brain injury in preterm lambs. METHODS: Newborn lambs (0.85 gestation were stabilized with a "protective ventilation" strategy (PROT, n = 7: prophylactic Curosurf, sustained inflation, VT 7 mL/kg, positive end expiratory pressure (PEEP 5 cmH2O or an initial 15 minutes of "injurious ventilation" (INJ, n = 10: VT 12 mL/kg, no PEEP, late Curosurf followed by PROT ventilation for the remainder of the experiment. At 1 hour, lambs underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging (Siemens, 3 Tesla. For measures of mean/axial/radial diffusivity (MD, AD, RD and fractional anisotropy (FA, 30 direction DTI was performed. Regions of interests encompassed the thalamus, internal capsule, periventricular white matter and the cerebellar vermis. MRS was performed using a localized single-voxel (15×15×20 mm3, echo time 270 ms encompassing suptratentorial deep nuclear grey matter and central white matter. Peak-area ratios for lactate (Lac relative to N-acetylaspartate (NAA, choline (Cho and creatine (Cr were calculated. Groups were compared using 2-way RM-ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U-test and Spearman's correlations. RESULTS: No cerebral injury was seen on structural MR images. Lambs in the INJ group had higher mean FA and lower mean RD in the thalamus compared to PROT lambs, but not in the other regions of interest. Peak-area lactate ratios >1.0 was only seen in INJ lambs. A trend of higher mean peak-area ratios for Lac/Cr and Lac/Cho was seen, which correlated with lower pH in both groups. CONCLUSION: Acute changes in brain diffusion measures and metabolite peak-area ratios were observed after injurious ventilation. Early MRS/DTI is

  1. Effects of fluoxetine on the amygdala and the hippocampus after administration of a single prolonged stress to male Wistar rates: In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Fang; Xiao, Bing; Wen, Lili; Shi, Yuxiu

    2015-05-30

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety- and memory-based disorder. The hippocampus and amygdala are key areas in mood regulation. Fluoxetine was found to improve the anxiety-related symptoms of PTSD patients. However, little work has directly examined the effects of fluoxetine on the hippocampus and the amygdala. In the present study, male Wistar rats received fluoxetine or vehicle after exposure to a single prolonged stress (SPS), an animal model of PTSD. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) was performed -1, 1, 4, 7 and 14 days after SPS to examine the effects of fluoxetine on neurometabolite changes in amygdala, hippocampus and thalamus. SPS increased the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine (Cr) and choline moieties (Cho)/Cr ratios in the bilateral amygdala on day 4, decreased the NAA/Cr ratio in the left hippocampus on day 1, and increased both ratios in the right hippocampus on day 14. But no significant change was found in the thalamus. Fluoxetine treatment corrected the SPS increases in the NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr levels in the amygdala on day 4 and in the hippocampus on day 14, but it failed to normalise SPS-associated decreases in NAA/Cr levels in the left hippocampus on day 1. These results suggested that metabolic abnormalities in the amygdala and the hippocampus were involved in SPS, and different effects of fluoxetine in correcting SPS-induced neurometabolite changes among the three areas. These findings have implications for fluoxetine treatment in PTSD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Evidence from in vivo 31-phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy phosphodiesters that exhaled ethane is a biomarker of cerebral n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamilton Gavin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study tested the hypothesis that exhaled ethane is a biomarker of cerebral n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid peroxidation in humans. Ethane is released specifically following peroxidation of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. We reasoned that the cerebral source of ethane would be the docosahexaenoic acid component of membrane phospholipids. Breakdown of the latter also releases phosphorylated polar head groups, giving rise to glycerophosphorylcholine and glycerophosphorylethanolamine, which can be measured from the 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy phosphodiester peak. Schizophrenia patients were chosen because of evidence of increased free radical-mediated damage and cerebral lipid peroxidation in this disorder. Methods Samples of alveolar air were obtained from eight patients and ethane was analyzed and quantified by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (m/z = 30. Cerebral 31-phosphorus spectra were obtained from the same patients at a magnetic field strength of 1.5 T using an image-selected in vivo spectroscopy sequence (TR = 10 s; 64 signal averages localized on a 70 × 70 × 70 mm3 voxel. The quantification of the 31-phosphorus signals using prior knowledge was carried out in the temporal domain after truncating the first 1.92 ms of the signal to remove the broad component present in the 31-phosphorus spectra. Results The ethane and phosphodiester levels, expressed as a percentage of the total 31-phosphorus signal, were positively and significantly correlated (rs = 0.714, p Conclusion Our results support the hypothesis that the measurement of exhaled ethane levels indexes cerebral n-3 lipid peroxidation. From a practical viewpoint, if human cerebral n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid catabolism can be measured by ethane in expired breath, this would be more convenient than determining the area of the 31-phosphorus neurospectroscopy phosphodiester peak.

  3. In vivo cleavage rate of a dextran-bound magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent: preparation and intravascular pharmacokinetic characteristics in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hals, Petter Arnt; Sontum, Per Christian; Holtz, Eckart; Klaveness, Jo; Rongved, Pål

    2013-02-01

    Earlier described dextran-based contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) comprising the gadolinium chelate diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (GdDTPA, 1) have shown significantly shorter in vivo contrast duration in rat than what would be expected from the initial average molecular weight (Mw) of the dextran fraction (71.4 kD). To investigate this further, four dextran fractions with given initial average molecular weight (Mw) of 10.4, 41.0, 71.4 and 580 kD were used as starting material to prepare products 2-5 where one of the carboxylic acid functionalities in GdDTPA was used as a direct covalent ester linker to hydroxyl groups in dextrans. A fifth derivative (6) was an amide-ester bound β-alanine-DTPAGd conjugate with dextran having Mw 71.4 kD. The reference compound GdDTPA (1) and gadoliniumlabelled dextran derivatives 2-6 were injected intravenously in rabbits. Pharmacokinetic parameters showed that when GdDTPA is ester-bound directly to dextran hydroxyls, the cleavage rates of 2-5 were only moderately dependent on the molecular weights of the dextrans, having blood pool half-lives comparable to the low-molecular reference compound (t 1/2,β 0.3 - 0.5 hrs.). Presence of a β-alanine spacer in 6 prolonged the plasma half-life t 1/2,β to 6.9 hours, rendering a blood residence time suitable for blood pool slow release of GdDTPA. Biological cleavage regenerates the clinically acceptable carrier dextran and the β-alanine derivative of GdDTPA, pointing at a clinically acceptable product class for blood-pool contrast in MRI.

  4. In vivo intracellular oxygen dynamics in murine brain glioma and immunotherapeutic response of cytotoxic T cells observed by fluorine-19 magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia Zhong

    Full Text Available Noninvasive biomarkers of anti-tumoral efficacy are of great importance to the development of therapeutic agents. Tumor oxygenation has been shown to be an important indicator of therapeutic response. We report the use of intracellular labeling of tumor cells with perfluorocarbon (PFC molecules, combined with quantitative ¹⁹F spin-lattice relaxation rate (R₁ measurements, to assay tumor cell oxygen dynamics in situ. In a murine central nervous system (CNS GL261 glioma model, we visualized the impact of Pmel-1 cytotoxic T cell immunotherapy, delivered intravenously, on intracellular tumor oxygen levels. GL261 glioma cells were labeled ex vivo with PFC and inoculated into the mouse striatum. The R₁ of ¹⁹F labeled cells was measured using localized single-voxel magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and the absolute intracellular partial pressure of oxygen (pO₂ was ascertained. Three days after tumor implantation, mice were treated with 2×10⁷ cytotoxic T cells intravenously. At day five, a transient spike in pO₂ was observed indicating an influx of T cells into the CNS and putative tumor cell apoptosis. Immunohistochemistry and quantitative flow cytometry analysis confirmed that the pO₂ was causally related to the T cells infiltration. Surprisingly, the pO₂ spike was detected even though few (∼4×10⁴ T cells actually ingress into the CNS and with minimal tumor shrinkage. These results indicate the high sensitivity of this approach and its utility as a non-invasive surrogate biomarker of anti-cancer immunotherapeutic response in preclinical models.

  5. In vivo gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate levels in people with first-episode schizophrenia: A proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, P W; Lui, Simon S Y; Hung, Karen S Y; Chan, Raymond C K; Chan, Queenie; Sham, P C; Cheung, Eric F C; Mak, Henry K F

    2018-03-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) dysfunction and its consequent imbalance are implicated in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Reduced GABA production would lead to a disinhibition of glutamatergic neurons and subsequently cause a disruption of the modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. In this study, levels of GABA, Glx (summation of glutamate and glutamine), and other metabolites in the anterior cingulate cortex were measured and compared between first-episode schizophrenia subjects and healthy controls (HC). Diagnostic potential of GABA and Glx as upstream biomarkers for schizophrenia was explored. Nineteen first-episode schizophrenia subjects and fourteen HC participated in this study. Severity of clinical symptoms of patients was measured with Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Metabolites were measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and quantified using internal water as reference. First-episode schizophrenia subjects revealed reduced GABA and myo-inositol (mI), and increased Glx and choline (Cho), compared to HC. No significant correlation was found between metabolite levels and PANSS scores. Receiver operator characteristics analyses showed Glx had higher sensitivity and specificity (84.2%, 92.9%) compared to GABA (73.7%, 64.3%) for differentiating schizophrenia patients from HC. Combined model of both GABA and Glx revealed the best sensitivity and specificity (89.5%, 100%). This study simultaneously showed reduction in GABA and elevation in Glx in first-episode schizophrenia subjects, and this might provide insights on explaining the disruption of modulation between GABAergic interneurons and glutamatergic neurons. Elevated Cho might indicate increased membrane turnover; whereas reduced mI might reflect dysfunction of the signal transduction pathway. In vivo Glx and GABA revealed their diagnostic potential for schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Magnetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboud, Essam; El-Masry, Nabil; Qaddah, Atef; Alqahtani, Faisal; Moufti, Mohammed R. H.

    2015-06-01

    The Rahat volcanic field represents one of the widely distributed Cenozoic volcanic fields across the western regions of the Arabian Peninsula. Its human significance stems from the fact that its northern fringes, where the historical eruption of 1256 A.D. took place, are very close to the holy city of Al-Madinah Al-Monawarah. In the present work, we analyzed aeromagnetic data from the northern part of Rahat volcanic field as well as carried out a ground gravity survey. A joint interpretation and inversion of gravity and magnetic data were used to estimate the thickness of the lava flows, delineate the subsurface structures of the study area, and estimate the depth to basement using various geophysical methods, such as Tilt Derivative, Euler Deconvolution and 2D modeling inversion. Results indicated that the thickness of the lava flows in the study area ranges between 100 m (above Sea Level) at the eastern and western boundaries of Rahat Volcanic field and getting deeper at the middle as 300-500 m. It also showed that, major structural trend is in the NW direction (Red Sea trend) with some minor trends in EW direction.

  7. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    The cooling down to the nominal temperature of 4.5 K was achieved at the beginning of August, in conjunction with the completion of the installation work of the connection between the power lines and the coil current leads. The temperature gradient on the first exchanger of the cold box is now kept within the nominal range. A leak of lubricant on a gasket of the helium compressor station installed at the surface was observed and several corrective actions were necessary to bring the situation back to normal. The compressor had to be refilled with lubricant and a regeneration of the filters and adsorbers was necessary. The coil cool down was resumed successfully, and the cryogenics is running since then with all parameters being nominal. Preliminary tests of the 20kA coil power supply were done earlier at full current through the discharge lines into the dump resistors, and with the powering busbars from USC5 to UXC5 without the magnet connected. On Monday evening August 25th, at 8pm, the final commissionin...

  8. MAGNET

    CERN Document Server

    B. Curé

    The first phase of the commissioning ended in August by a triggered fast dump at 3T. All parameters were nominal, and the temperature recovery down to 4.5K was carried out in two days by the cryogenics. In September, series of ramps were achieved up to 3 and finally 3.8T, while checking thoroughly the detectors in the forward region, measuring any movement of and around the HF. After the incident of the LHC accelerator on September 19th, corrective actions could be undertaken in the forward region. When all these displacements were fully characterized and repetitive, with no sign of increments in displacement at each field ramp, it was possible to start the CRAFT, Cosmic Run at Four Tesla (which was in fact at 3.8T). The magnet was ramped up to 18.16kA and the 3 week run went smoothly, with only 4 interruptions: due to the VIP visits on 21st October during the LHC inauguration day; a water leak on the cooling demineralized water circuit, about 1 l/min, that triggered a stop of the cooling pumps, and resulte...

  9. MAGNET

    CERN Multimedia

    Benoit Curé

    2013-01-01

    Maintenance work and consolidation activities on the magnet cryogenics and its power distribution are progressing according to the schedules. The manufacturing of the two new helium compressor frame units has started. The frame units support the valves, all the sensors and the compressors with their motors. This activity is subcontracted. The final installation and the commissioning at CERN are scheduled for March–April 2014. The overhauls of existing cryogenics equipment (compressors, motors) are in progress. The reassembly of the components shall start in early 2014. The helium drier, to be installed on the high-pressure helium piping, has been ordered and will be delivered in the first trimester of 2014. The power distribution for the helium compressors in SH5 on the 3.3kV network is progressing. The 3.3kV switches, between each compressor and its hot spare compressor, are being installed, together with the power cables for the new compressors. The 3.3kV electrical switchboards in SE5 will ...

  10. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enables In Vivo Confirmation of Peri-Infarct Restoration Following Stem Cell Therapy in a Porcine Ischemia-Reperfusion Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dash, Rajesh; Kim, Paul J; Matsuura, Yuka; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Metzler, Scott; Huang, Ngan F; Lyons, Jennifer K; Nguyen, Patricia K; Ge, Xiaohu; Foo, Cheryl Wong Po; McConnell, Michael V; Wu, Joseph C; Yeung, Alan C; Harnish, Phillip; Yang, Phillip C

    2015-07-27

    The exact mechanism of stem cell therapy in augmenting the function of ischemic cardiomyopathy is unclear. In this study, we hypothesized that increased viability of the peri-infarct region (PIR) produces restorative benefits after stem cell engraftment. A novel multimodality imaging approach simultaneously assessed myocardial viability (manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging [MEMRI]), myocardial scar (delayed gadolinium enhancement MRI), and transplanted stem cell engraftment (positron emission tomography reporter gene) in the injured porcine hearts. Twelve adult swine underwent ischemia-reperfusion injury. Digital subtraction of MEMRI-negative myocardium (intrainfarct region) from delayed gadolinium enhancement MRI-positive myocardium (PIR and intrainfarct region) clearly delineated the PIR in which the MEMRI-positive signal reflected PIR viability. Human amniotic mesenchymal stem cells (hAMSCs) represent a unique population of immunomodulatory mesodermal stem cells that restored the murine PIR. Immediately following hAMSC delivery, MEMRI demonstrated an increased PIR viability signal compared with control. Direct PIR viability remained higher in hAMSC-treated hearts for >6 weeks. Increased PIR viability correlated with improved regional contractility, left ventricular ejection fraction, infarct size, and hAMSC engraftment, as confirmed by immunocytochemistry. Increased MEMRI and positron emission tomography reporter gene signal in the intrainfarct region and the PIR correlated with sustained functional augmentation (global and regional) within the hAMSC group (mean change, left ventricular ejection fraction: hAMSC 85±60%, control 8±10%; P<0.05) and reduced chamber dilatation (left ventricular end-diastole volume increase: hAMSC 24±8%, control 110±30%; P<0.05). The positron emission tomography reporter gene signal of hAMSC engraftment correlates with the improved MEMRI signal in the PIR. The increased MEMRI signal represents PIR viability and the

  11. Epithelial and stromal metabolite changes in the transition from cervical intraepithelial neoplasia to cervical cancer: an in vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging study with ex vivo correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Sonali S. de; Payne, Geoffrey S.; Morgan, Veronica A.; Ind, Thomas E.J.; Shepherd, John H.; Barton, Desmond P.J.; Souza, Nandita M. de

    2009-01-01

    To investigate epithelial and stromal metabolite changes in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer in vivo and correlate findings with MR spectroscopy of tissue samples. Forty-seven women (19 with CIN, 28 with cervical cancer) underwent endovaginal MR at 1.5 T with T2-W and localised 2D MR spectroscopic imaging (PRESS, TR=1,500 ms, TE=135 ms). tCho, 2 ppm and -CH 2 lipid peaks were measured in epithelial (>50% epithelium, no tumour), stromal (>50% stroma, no tumour) and tumour (>30% tumour) voxels. Unsuppressed water signal from the same voxel provided a concentration reference. 1 H HR-MAS MR spectra were acquired from tissue in 37 patients (11.74 T, pulse-acquire and cpmg sequences, with water pre-saturation). Analysable data from 17 CIN and 25 cancer patients showed significant increases in tCho (p=0.03) and 2 ppm (p=0.007) in tumour compared with epithelial voxels from CIN patients, but not with epithelial voxels from cancer patients. No significant differences were seen in stroma from cancer compared with CIN patients. Differences in -CH 2 lipids were not significant between groups. There was no significant correlation between in vivo and ex vivo tCho or -CH 2 lipids. Estimated in vivo concentrations of tCho and 2 ppm resonances increase in tumour and adjacent epithelium in progression from CIN to cervical cancer. (orig.)

  12. Development of an in vivo visual robot system with a magnetic anchoring mechanism and a lens cleaning mechanism for laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Haibo; Dong, Dinghui; Ma, Tengfei; Zhuang, Jinlei; Fu, Yili; Lv, Yi; Li, Liyi

    2017-12-01

    Surgical robot systems which can significantly improve surgical procedures have been widely used in laparoendoscopic single-site surgery (LESS). For a relative complex surgical procedure, the development of an in vivo visual robot system for LESS can effectively improve the visualization for surgical robot systems. In this work, an in vivo visual robot system with a new mechanism for LESS was investigated. A finite element method (FEM) analysis was carried out to ensure the safety of the in vivo visual robot during the movement, which was the most important concern for surgical purposes. A master-slave control strategy was adopted, in which the control model was established by off-line experiments. The in vivo visual robot system was verified by using a phantom box. The experiment results show that the robot system can successfully realize the expected functionalities and meet the demands of LESS. The experiment results indicate that the in vivo visual robot with high manipulability has great potential in clinical application. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. In vitro and in vivo ocular safety and eye surface permanence determination by direct and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of ion-sensitive hydrogels based on gellan gum and kappa-carrageenan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Ferreiro, Anxo; González Barcia, Miguel; Gil-Martínez, María; Vieites-Prado, Alba; Lema, Isabel; Argibay, Barbara; Blanco Méndez, José; Lamas, Maria Jesus; Otero-Espinar, Francisco Javier

    2015-08-01

    Gellan gum, kappa-carrageenan and alginates are natural polysaccharides able to interact with different cations that can be used to elaborate ion-activated in situ gelling systems for different uses. The interaction between fluid solutions of these polysaccharides and cations presents into the tear made these biopolymers very interesting to elaborate ophthalmic drug delivery systems. The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the ability of mixtures of these polymers to obtain ion-activated ophthalmic in situ gelling systems with optimal properties for ocular use. To achieve this purpose different proportion of the biopolymers were analyzed using a mixture experimental design evaluating their transparency, mechanical properties and bioadhesion in the absence and presence of simulated tear fluid. Tear induces a rapid sol-to-gel phase transition in the mixtures forming a consistent hydrogel. The solution composed by 80% of gellan gum and 20% kappa-carrageenan showed the best mechanical and mucoadhesive properties. This mixture was evaluated for rheological behavior, microstructure, cytotoxicity, acute corneal irritancy, ex-vivo and in vivo ocular toxicity and in vivo corneal contact time using Magnetic Resonance Images (MRI) techniques. Result indicates that the system is safe at ophthalmic level and produces an extensive ocular permanence higher than 6h. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vivo Targeting of Cutaneous Melanoma Using an Melanoma Stimulating Hormone-Engineered Human Protein Cage with Fluorophore and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Tracers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vannucci, Luca; Falvo, E.; Failla, C. M.; Carbo, M.; Fornara, M.; Canese, R.; Cecchetti, S.; Rajsiglová, Lenka; Stakheev, Dmitry; Křižan, Jiří; Boffi, A.; Carpinelli, G.; Morea, V.; Ceci, P.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 1 (2015), s. 81-92 ISSN 1550-7033 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Protein-Based Nanoparticles * Ferritin * In Vivo Melanoma-Targeting Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.929, year: 2015

  15. New quantitative and multi-modal approach for in-vivo studies of small animals: coupling of the β-microprobe with magnetic techniques and development of voxelized rat and mouse phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbree, A.

    2005-09-01

    For the last 15 years, animal models that mimic human disorders have become ubiquitous participants to understand biological mechanisms and human disorders and to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. The necessity to study these models in the course of time has stimulated the development of instruments dedicated to in vivo small animal studies. To further understand physiopathological processes, the current challenge is to couple simultaneously several of these methods. Given this context, the combination of the magnetic and radioactive techniques remains an exciting challenge since it is still limited by strict technical constraints. Therefore we propose to couple the magnetic techniques with the radiosensitive Beta-Microprobe, developed in the IPB group and which shown to be an elegant alternative to PET measurements. In this context, the thesis was dedicated to the study of the coupling feasibility from a physical point of view, by simulation and experimental characterizations. Then, the determination of a biological protocol was carried out on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies. The experiments have shown the possibility to use the probe for radioactive measurements under intense magnetic field simultaneously to anatomical images acquisitions. Simultaneously, we have sought to improve the quantification of the radioactive signal using a voxelized phantom of a rat brain. Finally, the emergence of transgenic models led us to reproduce pharmacokinetic studies for the mouse and to develop voxelized mouse phantoms. (author)

  16. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance imaging in solid bone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Limin.

    1990-01-01

    Phosphorus ( 31 P) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) double-pulse transient experiments of solid bone have shown that the spins dephased by the dipolar spin-spin interactions can be refocused with a 90 degree-β pulse sequence so that an echo is observable at some time following the second pulse. The decay time constant of the maximum echo amplitude is larger than that of the free induction decay (FID) signal from a single 90 degree pulse. Depending on the nutation angle of the second pulse, the former decay time constant is about three-five times as long as the latter one. The dipolar-echo properties of the bone may be relevant with the interpair dipolar interactions. The experiments have also show that, in general, the time for the transient signal from the double pulses to reach the maximum amplitude is not equal to the pulse separation. This can be attributed to the effect of the heteronuclear dipolar interactions. In addition, it is found experimentally that refocused gradients applied only in a time interval of the formation of an echo have the capability of phase-encoding spatial information. Based on this, a new imaging method was proposed. With the method, several 31 P images of the solid bone samples have been obtained. The picture element size is 1-1.5 mm with very good signal-to-noise ratios. The imaging ability of the refocused gradients may be relevant with the inhomogeneous local field produced by the interpair dipolar interactions

  17. In vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurement of gray-matter and white-matter gamma-aminobutyric acid concentration in sensorimotor cortex using a motion-controlled MEGA point-resolved spectroscopy sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Pallab K; Phillips, Micheal D; Stone, Lael A; Lowe, Mark J

    2011-04-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain. Understanding the GABA concentration, in vivo, is important to understand normal brain function. Using MEGA point-resolved spectroscopy sequence with interleaved water scans to detect subject motion, GABA level of sensorimotor cortex was measured using a voxel identified from a functional magnetic resonance imaging scan. The GABA level in a 20×20×20-mm(3) voxel consisting of 37%±7% gray matter, 52%±12% white matter and 11%±8% cerebrospinal fluid in the sensorimotor region was measured to be 1.43±0.48 mM. In addition, using linear regression analysis, GABA concentrations within gray and white matter were calculated to be 2.87±0.61 and 0.33±0.11 mM, respectively. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Simultaneous in vivo visualization and localization of solid oral dosage forms in the rat gastrointestinal tract by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christmann, V; Rosenberg, J; Seega, J; Lehr, C M

    1997-08-01

    Bioavailability of orally administered drugs is much influenced by the behavior, performance and fate of the dosage form within the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. Therefore, MRI in vivo methods that allow for the simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and anatomical structures of the GI tract have been investigated. Oral contrast agents containing Gd-DTPA were used to depict the lumen of the digestive organs. Solid oral dosage forms were visualized in a rat model by a 1H-MRI double contrast technique (magnetite-labelled microtablets) and a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI (fluorine-labelled minicapsules). Simultaneous visualization of solid oral dosage forms and the GI environment in the rat was possible using MRI. Microtablets could reproducibly be monitored in the rat stomach and in the intestines using a 1H-MRI double contrast technique. Fluorine-labelled minicapsules were detectable in the rat stomach by a combination of 1H- and 19F-MRI in vivo. The in vivo 1H-MRI double contrast technique described allows solid oral dosage forms in the rat GI tract to be depicted. Solid dosage forms can easily be labelled by incorporating trace amounts of non-toxic iron oxide (magnetite) particles. 1H-MRI is a promising tool for observing such pharmaceutical dosage forms in humans. Combined 1H- and 19F-MRI offer a means of unambiguously localizing solid oral dosage forms in more distal parts of the GI tract. Studies correlating MRI examinations with drug plasma levels could provide valuable information for the development of pharmaceutical dosage forms.

  19. Intratumoral pharmacokinetic analysis by 19F-magnetic resonance spectroscopy and cytostatic in vivo activity of gemcitabine (dFdC) in two small cell lung cancer xenografts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristjansen, P E; Quistorff, B; Spang-Thomsen, M

    1993-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gemcitabine, 2'2'difluoro-deoxycytidine (dFdC), has shown activity in several preclinical models, and presently the compound is being clinically evaluated in patients with lung cancer and other solid tumors. DESIGN: The cytostatic in vivo activity of dFdC was tested in the two human.......p. every third day, four times were applied. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Significant activity of gemcitabine was demonstrated in both SCLC tumor lines. The tumor line 54A is the most sensitive to radiotherapy, doxorubicin, and nitrosoureas; but in this case the 54B tumors were more sensitive to gemcitabine...

  20. SU-F-I-67: Neurometabolic Effect Induced by Repeated Exposure to Dizocilpine On Prefrontal Cortex of Schizophrenic Animal Model Using In Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, C-H; Lim, S-I [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Song, K-H; Choe, B-Y [Department of Biomedical Engineering, and Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Woo, D-C [Asan Institute for Life Sciences, Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Repeated exposure of dizocilpine (MK-801) can provide a pathophysiological model for progressive development of schizophrenia. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) was widely used for non-invasive measurement of neurometabolites, and assessment of disease-induced neurometabolic alterations. The purpose of this study was to investigate neurometabolic alteration in prefrontal cortex (PFC) with respect to progression (from first-episode to chronic stage) of schizophrenia by using in vivo {sup 1}H MRS. Methods: We used high-field {sup 1}H MRS to investigate the neurometabolic alteration in the PFC region of the rats (N = 13) by comparing before and after 6 day of MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg) treatment. A point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence was used to obtain spectra in a 22.5 µL of volume of interest carefully located in PFC region with parameters like follow; repetition time, 5000ms; echo time (TE), 13.4 ms; averages = 256. Another experiment group (N = 11) were conducted behavior test by recording the behavior for 20 min. Results: All the rats showed hyperlocomotion, stereotyped behaviors before initiation of MRS. Significantly increased level (N = 7, p < 0.05) of N-acetylasrparate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), taurine and decreased level (N = 6, p < 0.05) of NAA, Glu and phosphocreatine were observed between baseline and day 6. Both metabolic alterations are consistent with results of first-episode and chronic schizophrenia respectively. Conclusion: From our findings, the repeated MK-801 model could be a pathophysiological model which can provide an insight into the transition from first-episode to chronic stage. This is first time to investigate effects of repeated MK-801 using high-field in vivo 1H MRS. We expect our findings can contribute to combining previous diverging results into one pathophysiological interpretation, which can postulate the origin of diverging results to the progression of schizophrenia.

  1. SU-F-I-67: Neurometabolic Effect Induced by Repeated Exposure to Dizocilpine On Prefrontal Cortex of Schizophrenic Animal Model Using In Vivo Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, C-H; Lim, S-I; Song, K-H; Choe, B-Y; Woo, D-C

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Repeated exposure of dizocilpine (MK-801) can provide a pathophysiological model for progressive development of schizophrenia. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ("1H MRS) was widely used for non-invasive measurement of neurometabolites, and assessment of disease-induced neurometabolic alterations. The purpose of this study was to investigate neurometabolic alteration in prefrontal cortex (PFC) with respect to progression (from first-episode to chronic stage) of schizophrenia by using in vivo "1H MRS. Methods: We used high-field "1H MRS to investigate the neurometabolic alteration in the PFC region of the rats (N = 13) by comparing before and after 6 day of MK-801 (0.5 mg/kg) treatment. A point-resolved spectroscopy (PRESS) sequence was used to obtain spectra in a 22.5 µL of volume of interest carefully located in PFC region with parameters like follow; repetition time, 5000ms; echo time (TE), 13.4 ms; averages = 256. Another experiment group (N = 11) were conducted behavior test by recording the behavior for 20 min. Results: All the rats showed hyperlocomotion, stereotyped behaviors before initiation of MRS. Significantly increased level (N = 7, p < 0.05) of N-acetylasrparate (NAA), glutamate (Glu), taurine and decreased level (N = 6, p < 0.05) of NAA, Glu and phosphocreatine were observed between baseline and day 6. Both metabolic alterations are consistent with results of first-episode and chronic schizophrenia respectively. Conclusion: From our findings, the repeated MK-801 model could be a pathophysiological model which can provide an insight into the transition from first-episode to chronic stage. This is first time to investigate effects of repeated MK-801 using high-field in vivo 1H MRS. We expect our findings can contribute to combining previous diverging results into one pathophysiological interpretation, which can postulate the origin of diverging results to the progression of schizophrenia.

  2. Quantification of plaque lipids in the aortic root of ApoE-deficient mice by 3D DIXON magnetic resonance imaging in an ex vivo model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietel, Barbara; Kuehn, Constanze; Achenbach, Stephan; Budinsky, Lubos; Uder, Michael; Hess, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    To establish a dedicated protocol for the three-dimensional (3D) quantification of plaque lipids in apolipoprotein E-deficient (apoE -/- ) mice using ex vivo MRI. ApoE -/- mice were fed a high-fat diet (n = 10) or normal food (n = 10) for 3 months. Subsequently, a 3D FLASH MRI sequence was used to view the anatomy of the aortic root in the isolated hearts, where a 3D double-echo two-excitation pulse sequence (DIXON sequence) was used to selectively image plaque lipids. The vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid volumes were quantified by MRI and histology for correlation analysis. DIXON MRI allowed visualisation and accurate quantification of plaque lipids. When comparing the vessel wall, lumen and plaque lipid sizes in the aortic root, Bland-Altman and linear regression analysis revealed a close correlation between MRI results and the histological data both on a slice-by-slice basis and of the volumetric measurements (vessel wall: r 2 = 0.775, p 2 = 0.875; p = 0.002; plaque lipid: r 2 = 0.819, p = 0.003). The combination of 3D FLASH and DIXON-sequence MRI permits an accurate ex vivo assessment of the investigated plaque parameters in the aortic root of mice, particularly the lipid content. (orig.)

  3. Correlation of iron deposition and change of gliocyte metabolism in the basal ganglia region evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging techniques: an in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Haodi; Wang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We assessed the correlation between iron deposition and the change of gliocyte metabolism in healthy subjects? basal ganglia region, by using 3D-enhanced susceptibility weighted angiography (ESWAN) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Material and methods Seventy-seven healthy volunteers (39 female and 38 male subjects; age range: 24?82 years old) were enrolled in the experiment including ESWAN and proton MRS sequences, consent for which was provided by themselves...

  4. Direct monitoring by carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of the metabolism and metabolic rate of 13C-labeled compounds in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, K; Hidoh, O; Fukami, J; Kajiwara, M

    1991-01-01

    Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy has been used to observe the transformations of [1-13C]-D-glucose to [1,1'-13C2]-D-trehalose, and [3-13C]-L-alanine to [2-13C]-L-glutamic acid in the living body of Gryllodes sigillatus. [3-13C]-D-Alanine was not metabolized. The metabolic rate of [1-13C]-D-glucose was found to be altered by prior injection of boric acid.

  5. Oval window transport of Gd-dOTA from rat middle ear to vestibulum and scala vestibuli visualized by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Jing; Poe, Dennis; Ramadan, Usama Abo; Pyykkö, Ilmari

    2012-02-01

    We tested our hypothesis that the oval window (OW) potentially functions as a route to carry substances from the middle ear to the vestibulum and then the scala vestibuli through the annular ligament across the stapediovestibular joint. Gd-DOTA was either injected into the lateral attic compartment of rats with a high-performance polyimide tube in a selective OW delivery group, or administered to the middle ear cavity of two groups of rats in which the OW was either sealed or not sealed. The dynamic uptake of Gd-DOTA in the inner ear was visualized with a 4.7-T magnetic resonance imaging machine. In the selective OW delivery group, Gd-DOTA appeared in the vestibulum and in the basal turn of the scala vestibuli but not in the scala tympani on T1-weighted images acquired at 10 minutes after Gd-DOTA administration (the earliest available time point of magnetic resonance imaging). In the sealed-OW group, immediate uptake of Gd-DOTA was absent in the vestibulum and scala vestibuli. Measurement of the signal ratio of the vestibulum to that of the scala tympani showed that selective OW delivery induced the greatest signal ratio and that sealing of the OW induced the lowest signal ratio. The OW is a genuine and efficient pathway to transport Gd-DOTA from the middle ear to the vestibulum.

  6. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N. [University College London, Dementia Research Group, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, Division of Neuroscience and Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, London (United Kingdom); MacManus, D.G. [University College London, NMR Research Unit, Department of Clinical Neurology, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom); Collinge, J. [University College London, MRC Prion Unit, Department of Neurodegenerative Disease, Institute of Neurology, London (United Kingdom)

    2006-06-15

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  7. Regional brain metabolite abnormalities in inherited prion disease and asymptomatic gene carriers demonstrated in vivo by quantitative proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, A.D.; Cordery, R.J.; Godbolt, A.; Rossor, M.N.; MacManus, D.G.; Collinge, J.

    2006-01-01

    Inherited prion diseases are caused by mutations in the gene which codes for prion protein (PrP), leading to proliferation of abnormal PrP isomers in the brain and neurodegeneration; they include Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker disease (GSS), fatal familial insomnia (FFI) and familial Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (fCJD). We studied two patients with symptomatic inherited prion disease (P102L) and two pre-symptomatic P102L gene carriers using quantitative magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Short echo time spectra were acquired from the thalamus, caudate region and frontal white matter, metabolite levels and ratios were measured and z-scores calculated for individual patients relative to age-matched normal controls. MRS data were compared with structural magnetic resonance imaging. One fCJD case had generalised atrophy and showed increased levels of myo-inositol (MI) in the thalamus (z=3.7). The other had decreased levels of N-acetylaspartate (z=4) and diffuse signal abnormality in the frontal white matter. Both asymptomatic gene carriers had normal imaging, but increased frontal white matter MI (z=4.3, 4.1), and one also had increased MI in the caudate (z=5.3). Isolated MI abnormalities in asymptomatic gene carriers are a novel finding and may reflect early glial proliferation, prior to significant neuronal damage. MRS provides potential non-invasive surrogate markers of early disease and progression in inherited prion disease. (orig.)

  8. Structural and metabolic changes in the traumatically injured rat brain. High-resolution in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng; Yang, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Zhao-Yang; Wang, Zhan-Jing; Lei, Jian-Feng; Li, Xiao-Guang

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of microstructural and metabolic changes in the post-traumatic brain injury is the key to brain damage suppression and repair in clinics. Ten female Wistar rats were traumatically injured in the brain CA1 region and above the cortex. Next, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) were used to analyze the microstructural and metabolic changes in the brain within the following 2 weeks. Anisotropy fraction (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) of the corpus callosum (CC) began to decrease significantly at day 1, whereas radial diffusivity (RD) significantly increased immediately after injury, reflecting the loss of white matter integrity. Compared with day 3, RD decreased significantly at day 7, implicating the angioedema reduction. In the hippocampus, FA significantly increased at day 7; the choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (MI) remarkably increased at day 7 compared with those at day 3, indicating the proliferation of astrocytes and radial glial cells after day 7. No significant differences between DTI and 1 H MRS parameters were observed between day 1 and day 3. Day 1-3 after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may serve as a relatively appropriate time window for treatment planning and the following nerve repair. (orig.)

  9. In vivo quantification of response to treatment in patients with multiple myeloma by 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy of bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oriol, Albert; Valverde, Daniel; Capellades, Jaume; Cabañas, Miquel E; Ribera, Josep-Maria; Arús, Carles

    2007-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard non-invasive technique to detect malignant disease in the bone marrow. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) can be performed as a quick adjunct to routine spinal MRI. We performed proton MRS to patients with multiple myeloma (MM) at diagnosis and after treatment to investigate the possible correlation of MRS data with response to therapy. Twenty-one patients with newly diagnosed MM underwent combined MRI/MRS explorations of a transverse center section in the fifth lumbar vertebral body. MRS was acquired with STEAM and 40 ms TE. Areas of unsuppressed water and lipid resonances were used to calculate the lipid-to-water ratio (LWR). No association was detected between initial LWRs and the clinical characteristics of patients. Post treatment MRS was available in 16 patients of whom 11 (69%) presented an LWR increase, this included all complete responders (8/8, 100%, P = 0.012). A post-treatment LWR value equal to or larger than one is proposed as a non-invasive marker of complete response to treatment. Only patients responding to treatment presented a significant increase in bone marrow LWR after therapy. MRS may provide an adequate quantification of response to chemotherapy in patients with MM.

  10. Structural and metabolic changes in the traumatically injured rat brain. High-resolution in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 7 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jing; Zhao, Can; Rao, Jia-Sheng [Beihang University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Neural Regeneration, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beijing (China); Yang, Fei-Xiang; Yang, Zhao-Yang [Capital Medical University, Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing (China); Wang, Zhan-Jing; Lei, Jian-Feng [Capital Medical University, Medical Experiment and Test Center, Beijing (China); Li, Xiao-Guang [Beihang University, Beijing Key Laboratory for Biomaterials and Neural Regeneration, School of Biological Science and Medical Engineering, Beijing (China); Capital Medical University, Department of Neurobiology, School of Basic Medical Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-12-15

    The understanding of microstructural and metabolic changes in the post-traumatic brain injury is the key to brain damage suppression and repair in clinics. Ten female Wistar rats were traumatically injured in the brain CA1 region and above the cortex. Next, diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTI) and proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H MRS) were used to analyze the microstructural and metabolic changes in the brain within the following 2 weeks. Anisotropy fraction (FA) and axial diffusivity (AD) of the corpus callosum (CC) began to decrease significantly at day 1, whereas radial diffusivity (RD) significantly increased immediately after injury, reflecting the loss of white matter integrity. Compared with day 3, RD decreased significantly at day 7, implicating the angioedema reduction. In the hippocampus, FA significantly increased at day 7; the choline-containing compounds (Cho) and myo-inositol (MI) remarkably increased at day 7 compared with those at day 3, indicating the proliferation of astrocytes and radial glial cells after day 7. No significant differences between DTI and {sup 1}H MRS parameters were observed between day 1 and day 3. Day 1-3 after traumatic brain injury (TBI) may serve as a relatively appropriate time window for treatment planning and the following nerve repair. (orig.)

  11. Quantitative measurement of portal blood flow by magnetic resonance phase contrast. Comparative study of flow phantom and Doppler ultrasound in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Masatoshi; Kimoto, Shin; Hamazaki, Keisuke; Takeda, Yoshihiro; Hiraki, Yoshio.

    1994-01-01

    A non-invasive method for measuring portal blood flow by magnetic resonance (MR) phase contrast was evaluated in a flow phantom and 20 healthy volunteers. In a flow phantom study, the flow volumes and mean flow velocities measured by MR phase contrast showed close correlations with those measured by electromagnetic flow-metry. In 20 healthy volunteers, the cross-sectional areas, flow volumes and mean flow velocities measured by MR phase contrast correlated well with those measured by the Doppler ultrasound method. Portal blood flow averaged during the imaging time could be measured under natural breathing conditions by using a large number of acquisitions without the limitations imposed on the Doppler ultrasound method. MR phase contrast is considered to be useful for the non-invasive measurement of portal blood flow. (author)

  12. Experimental ex-vivo validation of PMMA-based bone cements loaded with magnetic nanoparticles enabling hyperthermia of metastatic bone tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariem Harabech

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Percutaneous vertebroplasty comprises the injection of Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA bone cement into vertebrae and can be used for the treatment of compression fractures of vertebrae. Metastatic bone tumors can cause such compression fractures but are not treated when injecting PMMA-based bone cement. Hyperthermia of tumors can on the other hand be attained by placing magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs in an alternating magnetic field (AMF. Loading the PMMA-based bone cement with MNPs could both serve vertebra stabilization and metastatic bone tumor hyperthermia when subjecting this PMMA-MNP to an AMF. A dedicated pancake coil is designed with a self-inductance of 10 μH in series with a capacitance of 0.1 μF that acts as resonant inductor-capacitor circuit to generate the AMF. The thermal rise is appraised in beef vertebra placed at 10 cm from the AMF generating circuit using optical temperatures sensors, i.e. in the center of the PMMA-MNP bone cement, which is located in the vicinity of metastatic bone tumors in clinical applications; and in the spine, which needs to be safeguarded to high temperature exposures. Results show a temperature rise of about 7 °C in PMMA-MNP whereas the temperature rise in the spine remains limited to 1 °C. Moreover, multicycles heating of PMMA-MNP is experimentally verified, validating the technical feasibility of having PMMA-MNP as basic component for percutaneous vertebroplasty combined with hyperthermia treatment of metastatic bone tumors.

  13. Bi-exponential T2 analysis of healthy and diseased Achilles tendons: an in vivo preliminary magnetic resonance study and correlation with clinical score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juras, Vladimir; Apprich, Sebastian; Szomolanyi, Pavol; Bieri, Oliver; Deligianni, Xeni; Trattnig, Siegfried

    2013-10-01

    To compare mono- and bi-exponential T2 analysis in healthy and degenerated Achilles tendons using a recently introduced magnetic resonance variable-echo-time sequence (vTE) for T2 mapping. Ten volunteers and ten patients were included in the study. A variable-echo-time sequence was used with 20 echo times. Images were post-processed with both techniques, mono- and bi-exponential [T2 m, short T2 component (T2 s) and long T2 component (T2 l)]. The number of mono- and bi-exponentially decaying pixels in each region of interest was expressed as a ratio (B/M). Patients were clinically assessed with the Achilles Tendon Rupture Score (ATRS), and these values were correlated with the T2 values. The means for both T2 m and T2 s were statistically significantly different between patients and volunteers; however, for T2 s, the P value was lower. In patients, the Pearson correlation coefficient between ATRS and T2 s was -0.816 (P = 0.007). The proposed variable-echo-time sequence can be successfully used as an alternative method to UTE sequences with some added benefits, such as a short imaging time along with relatively high resolution and minimised blurring artefacts, and minimised susceptibility artefacts and chemical shift artefacts. Bi-exponential T2 calculation is superior to mono-exponential in terms of statistical significance for the diagnosis of Achilles tendinopathy. • Magnetic resonance imaging offers new insight into healthy and diseased Achilles tendons • Bi-exponential T2 calculation in Achilles tendons is more beneficial than mono-exponential • A short T2 component correlates strongly with clinical score • Variable echo time sequences successfully used instead of ultrashort echo time sequences.

  14. Investigation of the neuroprotective effects of bee-venom acupuncture in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease by using immunohistochemistry and In-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy at 9.4 T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Moon-Hyun; Lee, Do-Wan; Kim, Hyun-Jin; Chung, Jin-Yeung; Doo, Ah-Reum; Park, Hi-Joon; Kim, Seung-Nam; Choe, Bo-Young

    2013-01-01

    Neuroprotective therapeutics slows down the degeneration process in animal models of Parkinson's disease (PD). The neuronal survival in PD animal models is often measured by using immunohistochemistry. However, dynamic changes in the pathology of the brain cannot be explored with this technique. Application of in-vivo 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H MRS) can cover this shortcoming, as these techniques are non-invasive and can be repeated over time in the same animal. Thus, the sensitivity of both techniques to measure changes in the PD pathology was explored in an experiment studying the neuroprotective effects of the vigilance enhancer bee-venom (BV) in a mouse model of PD. The mice were pre-treated with 0.02-ml BV administered to the acupuncture point GB34 (Yangneungcheon) once every 3 days for 2 weeks. Three groups were classified as control, MPTP-intoxicated PD model and BV-treated mice. Outer volume suppression combined with the ultra-short echo-time STEAM (TE = 2.2 ms, TM = 20 ms, TR = 5000 ms) was used for localized in-vivo 1H MRS. Based on the 1H MRS spectral analysis, substantial changes of the neurochemical profiles were evaluated in the three investigated groups. In particular, the glutamate complex (Glx)/creatine (Cr) ratio (7.72 ± 1.25) in the PD group was significantly increased compared to that in the control group (3.93 ± 2.21, P = 0.001). Compared to the baseline values, the Glx/Cr ratio of the BV-treated group was significantly decreased 2 weeks after MPTP intoxication (one-way ANOVA, p < 0.05). In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that neurochemical alterations occurred in the three groups and that the neuroprotective effects of the BV acupuncture in a mouse model of PD could be quantified by using immunohistochemistry and 1H MRS.

  15. Complementarity of magnetic resonance spectroscopy, positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography for the in vivo investigation of human cardiac metabolism and neurotransmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.; Jehenson, P.

    1991-01-01

    PET is quantitative and very sensitive, and therefore only tracer amounts of molecules need to be injected. It allows neurotransmitters and receptors to be studied and a global view of metabolism to oxygen consumption, glucose and fatty acid utilization to be obtained. SPET also has good sensitivity, but uses gamma-emitting isotopes of heteroatoms. Their longer half-lives allow follow-up for hours or days. MRS is based on stable elements with high or low natural abundance. It has very low sensitivity and only millimolar concentrations of substrates can be detected, but various parts of metabolism can be studied. The in vivo measurement of myocardial concentration of substances has many problems that are common to all three techniques. The complementarity of the techniques is illustrated by their applications to the study of cardiac metabolism. For instance, the energy metabolism can be studied by 31 P-MRS, which detects the high-energy compounds ATP and phosphocreatine, and 13 C-MRS yields information on the tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. PET and SPET allow the utilization of fatty acids, the normal fuels of the heart, to be studied. During ischaemia, PET with 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose can determine the glucose consumption and 1 H-MRS shows the increase in lactic acid, reflecting anaerobic glycolysis. Comparison of the use of acetate labelled with 11 C for PET or 13 C for MRS shows the potentials and limitations of each technique. Myocardial perfusion can be evaluated directly with various PET tracers or indirectly with thallium 201 or various technetium-99m-labelled tracers by SPET. No MRS marker of perfusion is so far clinically available. Mainly SPET and PET are used clinically for the investigation of ischaemic heart disease as well as cardiomyophathies, but some initial results using 31 P-MRS are being obtained. (orig./MG)

  16. An Objective Short Sleep Insomnia Disorder Subtype Is Associated With Reduced Brain Metabolite Concentrations In Vivo: A Preliminary Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher B; Rae, Caroline D; Green, Michael A; Yee, Brendon J; Gordon, Christopher J; D'Rozario, Angela L; Kyle, Simon D; Espie, Colin A; Grunstein, Ronald R; Bartlett, Delwyn J

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate brain metabolites in objective insomnia subtypes defined from polysomnography (PSG): insomnia with short sleep duration (I-SSD) and insomnia with normal sleep duration (I-NSD), relative to good sleeping controls (GSCs). PSG empirically grouped insomnia patients into I-SSD (n = 12: mean [SD] total sleep time [TST] = 294.7 minutes [30.5]) or I-NSD (n = 19: TST = 394.4 minutes [34.9]). 1H magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) acquired in the left occipital cortex (LOCC), left prefrontal cortex, and anterior cingulate cortex was used to determine levels of creatine, aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine (referenced to water). Glutathione, glycerophosphocholine, lactate, myoinositol, and N-acetylaspartate measurements were also obtained. Sixteen GSCs were included for comparison. Multivariate analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences in creatine, aspartate, glutamate, and glutamine. Aspartate and glutamine concentrations were reduced in the LOCC in I-SSD compared with I-NSD (both p sleep onset (r = -.40, p sleep study: Australia New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?ACTRN=12612000050853. 12612000050853. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hajek, M.; Grosmanova, A.; Horska, A.; Urban, P.

    1993-01-01

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using 31 P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using 31 P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  18. Comparison of the clinical state and its changes in patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy with results of in vivo {sup 31}P magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajek, M [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Grosmanova, A [Dept. of Neuropediatrics, Thomayer` s Hospital, Prague (Czech Republic); Horska, A [MR Unit, Inst. for Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Prague (Czech Republic); Urban, P [Dept. of Analytical Chemistry, Prague Inst. of Chemical Technology (Czech Republic)

    1993-12-01

    A total of 14 boys with the Duchenne and Becker forms of muscular dystrophy (DMD, BMD) were examined using {sup 31}P magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy; 12 boys were examined repeatedly. The results were correlated with clinical findings (including those of genetic tests) and with data obtained from examinations of an age-matched control group. Evaluation of results using principal component analysis revealed maximum variability in the following ratios: phosphocreatine/inorganic phosphate (PCr/Pi), phosphocreatine/phosphodiesters (PCr/PDe) and phosphocreatine/phosphomonoesters (PCr/PMe). A decrease in PCr/Pi correlates with weakness of the hip girdle and of the lower part of the shoulder girdle in DMD/BMD patients. The values of all ratios in the group of patients with the DMD phenotype differ significantly from results obtained in the group with the BMD phenotype. Continuous follow-up of patients using {sup 31}P MR spectroscopy revealed a marked decrease in PCr/Pi in DMD/BMD patients at an age that could be expected in subjects with a typical clinical course of DMD/BMD. An attempt to manage a concomitant disease with prednisone and carnitene was followed by an increase in PCr/Pi in 3 cases. A rise in the PCr/Pi ratio signalled clinical improvement in the patients. A decrease in PCr/Pi was found after controlled physical training, a finding consistent with data obtained from clinical observations describing an adverse effect of physical stress on the dystrophic process. (orig.)

  19. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiation Application Research School; Rahighi, Reza [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Physics; Tayyebi, Ahmad [Sharif Univ. of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Dept. of Engineering

    2017-03-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by [{sup 68}Ga]GaCl{sub 3} as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite ([{sup 68}Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  20. Multicontrast-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic plaques at 3.0 and 1.5 Tesla: ex-vivo comparison with histopathologic correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koops, Andreas; Ittrich, Harald; Priest, Andrew; Stork, Alexander; Adam, Gerhard; Weber, Christoph; Petri, Susan; Lockemann, Ute

    2007-01-01

    The purpose was to analyze magnetic resonance (MR) plaque imaging at 3.0 Tesla and 1.5 Tesla in correlation with histopathology. MR imaging (MRI) of the abdominal aorta and femoral artery was performed on seven corpses using T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and PD-weighted sequences at 3.0 and 1.5 Tesla. Cross-sectional images at the branching of the inferior mesenteric artery and the profunda femoris were rated with respect to image quality. Corresponding cross sections of the imaged vessels were obtained at autopsy. The atherosclerotic plaques in the histological slides and MR images were classified according to the American Heart Association (AHA) and analyzed for differences. MRI at 3.0 Tesla offered superior depiction of arterial wall composition in all contrast weightings, rated best for T2-weighted images. Comparing for field strength, the highest differences were observed in T1-weighted and T2-weighted techniques (both P≤0.001), with still significant differences in PD-weighted sequence (P≤0.005). The majority of plaques were histologically classified as calcified plaques. In up to 21% of the cases, MRI at both field strengths detected signal loss characteristic of calcification although calcified plaque was absent in histology. MRI at 3.0 Tesla offers superior plaque imaging quality compared with 1.5 Tesla, but further work is necessary to determine whether this translates in superior diagnostic accuracy. (orig.)

  1. Multifunctional BaYbF5: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun; Liu, Hongrong

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er (50:2mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T 1 -weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF 5 : Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of a well dispersed suspension of gallium-68-labeled magnetic nanosheets of graphene oxide for in vivo coincidence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Feizi, Shahzad; Rahighi, Reza; Tayyebi, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets were hybridized with Fe_3O_4 nanoparticles (NPs) to form magnetic GO (MGO) and were further labeled by ["6"8Ga]GaCl_3 as a potential drug delivery system. Paper chromatography, Fourier transform infra red (FTIR) spectroscopy, low-angle X-ray diffraction (XRD), CHN and atomic force microscopy (AFM) were utilized to characterize the trinary composite (["6"8Ga] rate at MGO). Biological evaluations of the prepared nanocomposite were performed in normal Sprague Dawley rats and it was found to be a possible host for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. The results showed that the grafting of Fe_3O_4 NPs on nanocomposite reduced the unwanted liver and spleen uptakes and increased the ratio of kidney/liver uptake from 0.037 to 1.07, leading to the fast removal of radioactive agent and less imposed radiation to patients. The high level of hydrogen bonding caused by the presence of functional groups is responsible for this effect. Considering the accumulation of the tracer in vital organs of rat (especially brain), efficient iron oxide grafting, fast wash-out, the short half-life gallium-68 and less imposed radiation doses to patients, this nanocomposite could be a suitable candidate for positron emission tomography (PET) studies and imaging applications.

  3. In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) evaluation of the metabolite concentration of optic radiation in primary open angle glaucoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidek, Sabrilhakim [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Universiti Teknologi MARA, Medical Imaging Unit, Faculty of Medicine, Sg Buloh, Selangor (Malaysia); Ramli, Norlisah; Rahmat, Kartini; Kuo, Tan Li [University of Malaya, Department of Biomedical Imaging, University Malaya Research Imaging Centre (UMRIC), Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Ramli, Norlina Mohd; Abdulrahman, Fadzlina [University of Malaya, Department of Ophthalmology, Faculty of Medicine, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2016-12-15

    To compare the metabolite concentration of optic radiation in glaucoma patients with that of healthy subjects using Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (1H-MRS). 1H-MRS utilising the Single-Voxel Spectroscopy (SVS) technique was performed using a 3.0Tesla MRI on 45 optic radiations (15 from healthy subjects, 15 from mild glaucoma patients, and 15 from severe glaucoma patients). A standardised Volume of Interest (VOI) of 20 x 20 x 20 mm was placed in the region of optic radiation. Mild and severe glaucoma patients were categorised based on the Hodapp-Parrish-Anderson (HPA) classification. Mean and multiple group comparisons for metabolite concentration and metabolite concentration ratio between glaucoma grades and healthy subjects were obtained using one-way ANOVA. The metabolite concentration and metabolite concentration ratio between the optic radiations of glaucoma patients and healthy subjects did not demonstrate any significant difference (p > 0.05). Our findings show no significant alteration of metabolite concentration associated with neurodegeneration that could be measured by single-voxel 1H-MRS in optic radiation among glaucoma patients. (orig.)

  4. The relationship between cognitive impairment and in vivo metabolite ratios in patients with clinical Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia: a proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waldman, A.D.; Rai, G.S.

    2003-01-01

    Previous magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies have shown increased myo-inositol (MI) and decreased N-acetyl aspartate (NAA) levels in the parieto-occipital lobes of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) compared to those with other dementias and normal subjects. This study aimed to establish the quantitative relationship between metabolite ratios and degree of cognitive impairment in patients with mild to moderate AD and sub-cortical ischaemic vascular dementia (SIVD). Forty-four older people with clinical dementia were recruited from a memory clinic and followed up for 2.0-3.5 years; 20 cases were finally classified as probable AD, 18 as SIVD and 6 as mixed type. Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and short echo time single voxel automated MRS from the mesial parieto-occipital lobes were performed at the time of initial referral. Spearman rank correlation coefficients were calculated for MMSE scores and measured metabolite ratios MI/Cr, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr and NAA/MI. The AD group showed a significant correlation between MMSE and NAA/MI (r=0.54, P=0.014) and NAA/Cr (r=0.48, P=0.033), and a negative, non-significant association with MI/Cr (r=-0.41, P=0.072). MI/Cr was negatively correlated with NAA/Cr (r=-0.51, P=0.021). Neither Cho/Cr ratios nor age correlated with cognitive function. The SIVD group showed no correlation between any of the measured metabolite ratios and MMSE score. This study reinforces the specific association between reduced NAA and increased MI levels in the parieto-occipital region and cognitive impairment in AD. MRS may have a role in evaluating disease progression and therapeutic monitoring in AD, as new treatments become available. (orig.)

  5. Laparoendoscopic single site (LESS) in vivo suturing using a magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) camera in a porcine model: impact on ergonomics and workload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Gang; Han, Woong Kyu; Faddegon, Stephen; Tan, Yung Khan; Liu, Zhuo-Wei; Olweny, Ephrem O; Scott, Daniel J; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A

    2013-01-01

    To compare the ergonomics and workload of the surgeon during single-site suturing while using the magnetic anchoring and guidance system (MAGS) camera vs a conventional laparoscope. Seven urologic surgeons were enrolled and divided into an expert group (n=2) and a novice group (n=5) according to their laparoendoscopic single-site (LESS) experience. Each surgeon performed 2 conventional LESS and 2 MAGS camera-assisted LESS vesicostomy closures in a porcine model. A Likert scale (scoring 1-5) questionnaire assessing workload, ergonomics, technical difficulty, visualization, and needle handling, as well as a validated National Aeronautics and Space Administration Task Load Index (NASA-TLX) questionnaire were used to evaluate the tasks and workloads. MAGS LESS suturing was universally favored by expert and novice surgeons compared with conventional LESS in workload (3.4 vs 4.2), ergonomics (3.4 vs 4.4), technical challenge (3.3 vs 4.3), visualization (2.4 vs 3.3), and needle handling (3.1 vs 3.9 respectively; PNASA-TLX assessments found MAGS LESS suturing significantly decreased the workload in physical demand (P=.004), temporal demand (P=.017), and effort (P=.006). External instrument clashing was significantly reduced in MAGS LESS suturing (P<.001). The total operative time of MAGS LESS suturing was comparable to that of conventional LESS (P=.89). MAGS camera technology significantly decreased surgeon workload and improved ergonomics. Nevertheless, LESS suturing and knot tying remains a challenging task that requires training, regardless of which camera is used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomechanical and magnetic resonance imaging evaluation of a single- and double-row rotator cuff repair in an in vivo sheep model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baums, Mike H; Spahn, Gunter; Buchhorn, Gottfried H; Schultz, Wolfgang; Hofmann, Lars; Klinger, Hans-Michael

    2012-06-01

    To investigate the biomechanical and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-derived morphologic changes between single- and double-row rotator cuff repair at different time points after fixation. Eighteen mature female sheep were randomly assigned to either a single-row treatment group using arthroscopic Mason-Allen stitches or a double-row treatment group using a combination of arthroscopic Mason-Allen and mattress stitches. Each group was analyzed at 1 of 3 survival points (6 weeks, 12 weeks, and 26 weeks). We evaluated the integrity of the cuff repair using MRI and biomechanical properties using a mechanical testing machine. The mean load to failure was significantly higher in the double-row group compared with the single-row group at 6 and 12 weeks (P = .018 and P = .002, respectively). At 26 weeks, the differences were not statistically significant (P = .080). However, the double-row group achieved a mean load to failure similar to that of a healthy infraspinatus tendon, whereas the single-row group reached only 70% of the load of a healthy infraspinatus tendon. No significant morphologic differences were observed based on the MRI results. This study confirms that in an acute repair model, double-row repair may enhance the speed of mechanical recovery of the tendon-bone complex when compared with single-row repair in the early postoperative period. Double-row rotator cuff repair enables higher mechanical strength that is especially sustained during the early recovery period and may therefore improve clinical outcome. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement of creatine kinase reaction rate in human brain using magnetization transfer image-selected in vivo spectroscopy (MT-ISIS) and a volume ³¹P/¹H radiofrequency coil in a clinical 3-T MRI system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Eun-Kee; Sung, Young-Hoon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Zuo, Chun; Shi, Xianfeng; Mellon, Eric A; Renshaw, Perry F

    2011-08-01

    High-energy phosphate metabolism, which allows the synthesis and regeneration of adenosine triphosphate (ATP), is a vital process for neuronal survival and activity. In particular, creatine kinase (CK) serves as an energy reservoir for the rapid buffering of ATP levels. Altered CK enzyme activity, reflecting compromised high-energy phosphate metabolism or mitochondrial dysfunction in the brain, can be assessed using magnetization transfer (MT) MRS. MT (31)P MRS has been used to measure the forward CK reaction rate in animal and human brain, employing a surface radiofrequency coil. However, long acquisition times and excessive radiofrequency irradiation prevent these methods from being used routinely for clinical evaluations. In this article, a new MT (31)P MRS method is presented, which can be practically used to measure the CK forward reaction rate constant in a clinical MRI system employing a volume head (31)P coil for spatial localization, without contamination from the scalp muscle, and an acquisition time of 30 min. Other advantages associated with the method include radiofrequency homogeneity within the regions of interest of the brain using a volume coil with image-selected in vivo spectroscopy localization, and reduction of the specific absorption rate using nonadiabatic radiofrequency pulses for MT saturation. The mean value of k(f) was measured as 0.320 ± 0.075 s(-1) from 10 healthy volunteers with an age range of 18-40 years. These values are consistent with those obtained using earlier methods, and the technique may be used routinely to evaluate energetic processes in the brain on a clinical MRI system. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles for in vivo tri-modal upconversion optical, X-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiaolong; Yi, Zhigao; Xue, Zhenluan; Zeng, Songjun, E-mail: songjunz@hunnu.edu.cn; Liu, Hongrong, E-mail: hrliu@hunnu.edu.cn

    2017-06-01

    Development of high-quality upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with combination of the merits of multiple molecular imaging techniques, such as, upconversion luminescence (UCL) imaging, X-ray computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, could significantly improve the accuracy of biological diagnosis. In this work, multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er (50:2 mol%) UCNPs were synthesized via a solvothermal method using oleic acid (OA) as surface ligands (denoted as OA-UCNPs). The OA-UCNPs were further treated by diluted HCl to form ligand-free UCNPs (LF-UCNPs) for later bioimaging applications. The cytotoxicity assay in HeLa cells shows low cell toxicity of these LF-UCNPs. Owing to the efficient UCL of BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er, the LF-UCNPs were successfully used as luminescent bioprobe in UCL bioimaging. And, X-ray CT imaging reveals that BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er UCNPs can act as potential contrast agents for detection of the liver and spleen in the live mice owing to the high-Z elements (e.g., Ba, Yb, and Gd) in host matrix. Moreover, with the addition of Gd, the as-designed UCNPs exhibit additional positive contrast enhancement in T{sub 1}-weighted MR imaging. These findings demonstrate that BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er UCNPs are potential candidates for tri-modal imaging. - Graphical abstract: Multifunctional BaYbF{sub 5}: Gd/Er upconversion nanoparticles with efficient upconversion emission, high absorption coefficient, predominant paramagnetic behavior, and low biological toxicity were demonstrated for tri-modality in vivo UCL, CT and MR imaging. Display Omitted - Highlights: • The multifunctional UCNPs with high monodispersity were synthesized. • The UCNPs present large r{sub 1} value and binary CT contrast agents. • These UCNPs were demonstrated as optimal probes for tri-modal bioimaging.

  9. Absolute calibration in vivo measurement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruchten, D.A.; Hickman, D.P.

    1991-02-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently investigating a new method for obtaining absolute calibration factors for radiation measurement systems used to measure internally deposited radionuclides in vivo. Absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems will eliminate the need to generate a series of human surrogate structures (i.e., phantoms) for calibrating in vivo measurement systems. The absolute calibration of in vivo measurement systems utilizes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to define physiological structure, size, and composition. The MRI image provides a digitized representation of the physiological structure, which allows for any mathematical distribution of radionuclides within the body. Using Monte Carlo transport codes, the emission spectrum from the body is predicted. The in vivo measurement equipment is calibrated using the Monte Carlo code and adjusting for the intrinsic properties of the detection system. The calibration factors are verified using measurements of existing phantoms and previously obtained measurements of human volunteers. 8 refs

  10. New quantitative and multi-modal approach for in-vivo studies of small animals: coupling of the {beta}-microprobe with magnetic techniques and development of voxelized rat and mouse phantoms; Nouvelle approche multimodale et quantitative pour les etudes in vivo chez le petit animal: couplage de la {beta}-MicroProbe aux techniques magnetiques et developpement de fantomes de rat et de souris voxelises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbree, A

    2005-09-15

    For the last 15 years, animal models that mimic human disorders have become ubiquitous participants to understand biological mechanisms and human disorders and to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. The necessity to study these models in the course of time has stimulated the development of instruments dedicated to in vivo small animal studies. To further understand physiopathological processes, the current challenge is to couple simultaneously several of these methods. Given this context, the combination of the magnetic and radioactive techniques remains an exciting challenge since it is still limited by strict technical constraints. Therefore we propose to couple the magnetic techniques with the radiosensitive Beta-Microprobe, developed in the IPB group and which shown to be an elegant alternative to PET measurements. In this context, the thesis was dedicated to the study of the coupling feasibility from a physical point of view, by simulation and experimental characterizations. Then, the determination of a biological protocol was carried out on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies. The experiments have shown the possibility to use the probe for radioactive measurements under intense magnetic field simultaneously to anatomical images acquisitions. Simultaneously, we have sought to improve the quantification of the radioactive signal using a voxelized phantom of a rat brain. Finally, the emergence of transgenic models led us to reproduce pharmacokinetic studies for the mouse and to develop voxelized mouse phantoms. (author)

  11. Tracking of autologous adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells with in vivo magnetic resonance imaging and histology after intralesional treatment of artificial equine tendon lesions--a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geburek, Florian; Mundle, Kathrin; Conrad, Sabine; Hellige, Maren; Walliser, Ulrich; van Schie, Hans T M; van Weeren, René; Skutella, Thomas; Stadler, Peter M

    2016-02-01

    Adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (AT-MSCs) are frequently used to treat equine tendinopathies. Up to now, knowledge about the fate of autologous AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into equine superficial digital flexor tendons (SDFTs) is very limited. The purpose of this study was to monitor the presence of intralesionally injected autologous AT-MSCs labelled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles and green fluorescent protein (GFP) over a staggered period of 3 to 9 weeks with standing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and histology. Four adult warmblood horses received a unilateral injection of 10 × 10(6) autologous AT-MSCs into surgically created front-limb SDFT lesions. Administered AT-MSCs expressed lentivirally transduced reporter genes for GFP and were co-labelled with SPIO particles in three horses. The presence of AT-MSCs in SDFTs was evaluated by repeated examinations with standing low-field MRI in two horses and post-mortem in all horses with Prussian blue staining, fluorescence microscopy and with immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry using anti-GFP antibodies at 3, 5, 7 and 9 weeks after treatment. AT-MSCs labelled with SPIO particles were detectable in treated SDFTs during each MRI in T2*- and T1-weighted sequences until the end of the observation period. Post-mortem examinations revealed that all treated tendons contained high numbers of SPIO- and GFP-labelled cells. Standing low-field MRI has the potential to track SPIO-labelled AT-MSCs successfully. Histology, fluorescence microscopy, immunofluorescence and immunohistochemistry are efficient tools to detect labelled AT-MSCs after intralesional injection into surgically created equine SDFT lesions. Intralesional injection of 10 × 10(6) AT-MSCs leads to the presence of high numbers of AT-MSCs in and around surgically created tendon lesions for up to 9 weeks. Integration of injected AT-MSCs into healing tendon tissue is an essential pathway after intralesional

  12. Fusing in vivo and ex vivo NMR sources of information for brain tumor classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Croitor-Sava, A R; Laudadio, T; Sima, D M; Van Huffel, S; Martinez-Bisbal, M C; Celda, B; Piquer, J; Heerschap, A

    2011-01-01

    In this study we classify short echo-time brain magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) data by applying a model-based canonical correlation analyses algorithm and by using, as prior knowledge, multimodal sources of information coming from high-resolution magic angle spinning (HR-MAS), MRSI and magnetic resonance imaging. The potential and limitations of fusing in vivo and ex vivo nuclear magnetic resonance sources to detect brain tumors is investigated. We present various modalities for multimodal data fusion, study the effect and the impact of using multimodal information for classifying MRSI brain glial tumors data and analyze which parameters influence the classification results by means of extensive simulation and in vivo studies. Special attention is drawn to the possibility of considering HR-MAS data as a complementary dataset when dealing with a lack of MRSI data needed to build a classifier. Results show that HR-MAS information can have added value in the process of classifying MRSI data

  13. In vivo and ex vivo proton MR spectroscopy of primary and secondary melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourne, Roger M.; Stanwell, Peter; Stretch, Jonathan R.; Scolyer, Richard A.; Thompson, John F.; Mountford, Carolyn E.; Lean, Cynthia L

    2005-03-01

    In vivo magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy at 1.5T was performed on a large polypoid cutaneous melanoma, and two enlarged lymph nodes containing metastatic melanoma, from three patients. Spectra were acquired in vivo from voxels wholly within the primary tumour or secondary lymph node and were thus uncontaminated by signals from adjacent tissue. Tissue biopsies taken after resection of primary tumours and secondary lymph nodes were examined by 8.5T magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and the results compared with the in vivo spectra, and with spectra from normal skin and a benign skin lesion. There was good agreement between the dominant features of 1.5T spectra acquired in vivo and 8.5T spectra acquired from resected tissue. However, less intense resonances observed at 8.5T in malignant biopsy tissue were not consistently observed at 1.5T in vivo. In vivo spectra from primary and metastatic melanoma showed high levels of choline metabolites. An intense lactate resonance was also present in the in vivo spectrum of primary melanoma. All 8.5T spectra of biopsies from primary and secondary melanoma showed high levels of choline metabolites and lactate, and additional resonances consistent with elevated levels of taurine, alanine, lysine, and glutamate/glutamine relative to normal and benign tissue. Elevated levels of choline, lactate, taurine, and amino acids appear to be clinically useful markers for identifying the pathology of primary and metastatic melanoma.

  14. Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery; Pelphrey, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), with its excellent spatial resolution and ability to visualize networks of neuroanatomical structures involved in complex information processing, has become the dominant technique for the study of brain function and its development. The accessibility of in-vivo pediatric brain-imaging techniques…

  15. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rueterjans, H.

    1987-01-01

    Contributions by various authors who are working in the field of NMR imaging present the current status and the perspectives of in-vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, explaining not only the scientific and medical aspects, but also technical and physical principles as well as questions concerning practical organisation and training, and points of main interest for further research activities. (orig./TRV) [de

  16. Pancreas Oxygen Persufflation Increases ATP Levels as Shown by Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, W.E.; Weegman, B.P.; Ferrer-Fabrega, J.; Stein, S.A.; Anazawa, T.; Kirchner, V.A.; Rizzari, M.D.; Stone, J.; Matsumoto, S.; Hammer, B.E.; Balamurugan, A.N.; Kidder, L.S.; Suszynski, T.M.; Avgoustiniatos, E.S.; Stone, S.G.; Tempelman, L.A.; Sutherland, D.E.R.; Hering, B.J.; Papas, K.K.

    2010-01-01

    Background Islet transplantation is a promising treatment for type 1 diabetes. Due to a shortage of suitable human pancreata, high cost, and the large dose of islets presently required for long-term diabetes reversal; it is important to maximize viable islet yield. Traditional methods of pancreas preservation have been identified as suboptimal due to insufficient oxygenation. Enhanced oxygen delivery is a key area of improvement. In this paper, we explored improved oxygen delivery by persufflation (PSF), ie, vascular gas perfusion. Methods Human pancreata were obtained from brain-dead donors. Porcine pancreata were procured by en bloc viscerectomy from heparinized donation after cardiac death donors and were either preserved by either two-layer method (TLM) or PSF. Following procurement, organs were transported to a 1.5-T magnetic resonance (MR) system for 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to investigate their bioenergetic status by measuring the ratio of adenosine triphosphate to inorganic phosphate (ATP:Pi) and for assessing PSF homogeneity by MRI. Results Human and porcine pancreata can be effectively preserved by PSF. MRI showed that pancreatic tissue was homogeneously filled with gas. TLM can effectively raise ATP:Pi levels in rat pancreata but not in larger porcine pancreata. ATP:Pi levels were almost undetectable in porcine organs preserved with TLM. When human or porcine organs were preserved by PSF, ATP:Pi was elevated to levels similar to those observed in rat pancreata. Conclusion The methods developed for human and porcine pancreas PSF homogeneously deliver oxygen throughout the organ. This elevates ATP levels during preservation and may improve islet isolation outcomes while enabling the use of marginal donors, thus expanding the usable donor pool. PMID:20692395

  17. Nanodiamonds for In Vivo Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, KiranJ; Hasani, Masoumeh; Zheng, Tingting; Schirhagl, Romana

    2018-05-01

    Due to their unique optical properties, diamonds are the most valued gemstones. However, beyond the sparkle, diamonds have a number of unique properties. Their extreme hardness gives them outstanding performance as abrasives and cutting tools. Similar to many materials, their nanometer-sized form has yet other unique properties. Nanodiamonds are very inert but still can be functionalized on the surface. Additionally, they can be made in very small sizes and a narrow size distribution. Nanodiamonds can also host very stable fluorescent defects. Since they are protected in the crystal lattice, they never bleach. These defects can also be utilized for nanoscale sensing since they change their optical properties, for example, based on temperature or magnetic fields in their surroundings. In this Review, in vivo applications are focused upon. To this end, how different diamond materials are made and how this affects their properties are discussed first. Next, in vivo biocompatibility studies are reviewed. Finally, the reader is introduced to in vivo applications of diamonds. These include drug delivery, aiding radiology, labeling, and use in cosmetics. The field is critically reviewed and a perspective on future developments is provided. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the energetic state and of the intracellular pH of the isolated rat heart in the course of ischemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, A [Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France); Martin, J; de Leiris, J [CEA Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. de Chimie Organique Physique

    1981-01-01

    Continuous measurements of high energy phosphate compounds and intracellular pH in perfused, beating rat hearts, were performed by /sup 31/P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Hearts were placed in a 15 mm NMR tube and perfused at 28/sup 0/C by conventional methods with a phosphate-free solution. Phosphorus NMR spectra were recorded at 101,3 MHz in a Brucker WP 250 spectrometer. Global mild ischemia was achieved by reducing the coronary flow to 1/10 of its initial value. Changes in creatine phosphate (CP) and inorganic phosphate (Pi) levels and intracellular pH (pHi) were monitored in the course of a 50 min ischemia and during the post-ischemic phase. When the breakdown of CP was less than 30%, the decrease in pHi was about 0.1 to 0.2 pH unit; for a greater CP decrease, the fall in pHi was about 1 pH unit.

  19. Mechanical properties of porcine brain tissue in vivo and ex vivo estimated by MR elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guertler, Charlotte A; Okamoto, Ruth J; Schmidt, John L; Badachhape, Andrew A; Johnson, Curtis L; Bayly, Philip V

    2018-03-01

    The mechanical properties of brain tissue in vivo determine the response of the brain to rapid skull acceleration. These properties are thus of great interest to the developers of mathematical models of traumatic brain injury (TBI) or neurosurgical simulations. Animal models provide valuable insight that can improve TBI modeling. In this study we compare estimates of mechanical properties of the Yucatan mini-pig brain in vivo and ex vivo using magnetic resonance elastography (MRE) at multiple frequencies. MRE allows estimations of properties in soft tissue, either in vivo or ex vivo, by imaging harmonic shear wave propagation. Most direct measurements of brain mechanical properties have been performed using samples of brain tissue ex vivo. It has been observed that direct estimates of brain mechanical properties depend on the frequency and amplitude of loading, as well as the time post-mortem and condition of the sample. Using MRE in the same animals at overlapping frequencies, we observe that porcine brain tissue in vivo appears stiffer than porcine brain tissue samples ex vivo at frequencies of 100 Hz and 125 Hz, but measurements show closer agreement at lower frequencies. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Bilayers of phosphatidyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholesterol give 31P-NMR spectra characteristic for hexagonal and isotropic phases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noggle, J.H.; Marecek, J.F.; Mandal, S.B.; Venetie, R. van; Rogers, J.; Jain, M.K.; Ramirez, F.

    1982-01-01

    Aqueous dispersions of phosphatidyldiacylglycerol and phosphatidylcholesterol are shown to form bilayers by differential scanning calorimetry, diphenylhexatriene fluorescence polarization, and electron microscopy; however, 31P-nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of these dispersions are

  1. Magnets and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuris, Ch.; Rifflet, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world's largest highest-energy particle collider that the CERN plans to commission in 2008, gets a double boost from superconducting magnet technology. Superconducting magnets are first used to guide the particles scheduled for collision through the accelerator, and then to observe the events triggered by the collision inside giant detectors in a known magnetic field. Despite the installation's massive dimensions, all this is done with minimal expenditure of energy. (author)

  2. In vivo imaging of human biochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, L.D.

    1983-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is an extremely powerful method for studying aspects of the biochemistry of defined regions of the human body, literally 'in-vivo' biochemistry. To place this technique in the broader perspective of medical diagnostic methods an introduction is given to some of the more important imaging methods which are already widely used clinically. A brief summary of the most recently developed imaging method, which is based on Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Spectroscopy, is also included

  3. Magnetism and magnetic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    It describes the actual status of physics in Brazil concerning the study of magnetism and magnetic materials. It gives an overview of different research groups in Brazil, their needs, as well as the investments needed to improve the area. (A.C.A.S.)

  4. Nanomaterials for In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Bryan Ronain; Gambhir, Sanjiv Sam

    2017-02-08

    In vivo imaging, which enables us to peer deeply within living subjects, is producing tremendous opportunities both for clinical diagnostics and as a research tool. Contrast material is often required to clearly visualize the functional architecture of physiological structures. Recent advances in nanomaterials are becoming pivotal to generate the high-resolution, high-contrast images needed for accurate, precision diagnostics. Nanomaterials are playing major roles in imaging by delivering large imaging payloads, yielding improved sensitivity, multiplexing capacity, and modularity of design. Indeed, for several imaging modalities, nanomaterials are now not simply ancillary contrast entities, but are instead the original and sole source of image signal that make possible the modality's existence. We address the physicochemical makeup/design of nanomaterials through the lens of the physical properties that produce contrast signal for the cognate imaging modality-we stratify nanomaterials on the basis of their (i) magnetic, (ii) optical, (iii) acoustic, and/or (iv) nuclear properties. We evaluate them for their ability to provide relevant information under preclinical and clinical circumstances, their in vivo safety profiles (which are being incorporated into their chemical design), their modularity in being fused to create multimodal nanomaterials (spanning multiple different physical imaging modalities and therapeutic/theranostic capabilities), their key properties, and critically their likelihood to be clinically translated.

  5. Recommendations concerning magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    In medicine the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is applied in the form of in vivo nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). In vivo MRS can be carried out non-invasively. The committee of the Dutch Health Council briefly discusses the qualities and potentialities of the nuclei that will probably be used in future clinical spectroscopy: 31 P, 13 C, 1 H (and possibly 19 F and 23 Na). The committee discusses several possibilities of combining imaging and spectroscopy. The imaging of nuclei other than protons is also possible with MRS. Potential applications are considered in oncology, cardiology, neurology and hepatology. (Auth.)

  6. EDITORIAL: Nanotechnology in vivo Nanotechnology in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-04-01

    Since the development of x-rays the ability to image inside our bodies has provided medicine with a potent diagnostic tool, as well as fascinating us with the eerie evidence of our mechanistic mortality. In December 2008 Osamu Shimomura, Martin Chalfie and Roger Y Tsien received a Nobel Prize for the discovery and development of the green fluorescent protein. The award recognised a new discovery that further facilitated our abilities to follow cellular activities and delve deeper into the workings of living organisms. Since the first observation of green fluorescent protein in jelly fish over thirty years ago, quantum dots have emerged as a potential alternative tool for imaging [1]. The advantages of quantum dots over organic dyes and fluorescent proteins include intense luminescence, high molar extinction coefficient, resistance to photobleaching, and broad excitation with narrow emission bands. However, one drawback for biological applications has been the layer of hydrophobic organic ligands often present at the surface as a result of the synthesis procedures. One solution to improve the solubility of quantum dots has been to conjugate them with a hydrophilic substance, as reported by Nie et al [2]. Chitosan is a hydrophilic, non-toxic, biocompatible and biodegradable substance and has been conjugated with quantum dots such as CdSe-ZnS [2] for bioassays and intracellular labelling. As well as luminescence, different nanoparticles present a variety of exceptional properties that render them useful in a range of bio applications, including MRI, drug delivery and cancer hyperthermia therapy. The ability to harness these various attributes in one system was reported by researchers in China, who incorporated magnetic nanoparticles, fluorescent quantum dots and pharmaceutical drugs into chitosan nanoparticles for multifunctional smart drug delivery systems [3]. More recently silicon quantum dots have emerged as a less cytotoxic alternative to CdSe for bio

  7. The in vivo biofilm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Alhede, Maria; Alhede, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria can grow and proliferate either as single, independent cells or organized in aggregates commonly referred to as biofilms. When bacteria succeed in forming a biofilm within the human host, the infection often becomes very resistant to treatment and can develop into a chronic state. Biofilms...... have been studied for decades using various in vitro models, but it remains debatable whether such in vitro biofilms actually resemble in vivo biofilms in chronic infections. In vivo biofilms share several structural characteristics that differ from most in vitro biofilms. Additionally, the in vivo...... experimental time span and presence of host defenses differ from chronic infections and the chemical microenvironment of both in vivo and in vitro biofilms is seldom taken into account. In this review, we discuss why the current in vitro models of biofilms might be limited for describing infectious biofilms...

  8. Specialty magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-07-01

    A number of basic conceptual designs are explained for magnet systems that use permanent magnet materials. Included are iron free multipoles and hybrid magnets. Also appended is a discussion of the manufacturing process and magnetic properties of some permanent magnet materials

  9. A magnet without a magnetic circuit, of high homogeneity, specially for nuclear magnetic resonance images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barjhoux, Yves.

    1981-01-01

    This invention concerns a high homogeneity, double access magnet without a magnetic circuit. It is specially adapted for nuclear magnetic resonance (N.M.R.) imagery. Another advantage worth stressing resides in the possibilities of NMR in biochemical analysis which will enable, for instance, cancerous tumours to be detected in vivo. In order to increase the NMR signal ratio over background noise, it is necessary to increase the homogeneity of the B 0 orientating magnetic field. This magnetic field must orientate the nuclear magnetic moments of the elementary particles which compose the body being examined and in particular the protons. It must therefore be relatively constant in intensity and direction in the entire domain of the examination [fr

  10. Detection of magnetic nanoparticles with magnetoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Wenyan [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Xu, Guizhi [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin, 300130 (China); Sclabassi, Robert J. [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Zhu Jiangang [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Carnegie Melon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bagic, Anto [Department of Neurology, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Sun Mingui [Department of Neurosurgery, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States)], E-mail: mrsun@neuronet.pitt.edu

    2008-04-15

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been widely utilized in biomedical applications due to their extremely high sensitivity to magnetic signals. The present study explores the feasibility of a new type of nanotechnology-based imaging method using standard clinical magnetoencephalographic (MEG) systems equipped with SQUID sensors. Previous studies have shown that biological targets labeled with non-toxic, magnetized nanoparticles can be imaged by measuring the magnetic field generated by these particles. In this work, we demonstrate that (1) the magnetic signals from certain nanoparticles can be detected without magnetization using standard clinical MEG, (2) for some types of nanoparticles, only bound particles produce detectable signals, and (3) the magnetic field of particles several hours after magnetization is significantly stronger than that of un-magnetized particles. These findings hold promise in facilitating the potential application of magnetic nanoparticles to in vivo tumor imaging. The minimum amount of nanoparticles that produce detectable signals is predicted by theoretical modeling and computer simulation.

  11. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skalpe, I.O.

    1984-01-01

    A brief survey of the working principle of the NMR technique in diagnostical medicine is given. Its clinical usefulness for locating tumors, diagnosing various other diseases, such as some mental illnesses and multiple sclerosis, and its possibilities for studying biochemical processes in vivo are mentioned. The price of NMR image scanners and the problems of the strong magnetic field around the machines are mentioned

  12. Desmosomes In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Garrod

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The structure, function, and regulation of desmosomal adhesion in vivo are discussed. Most desmosomes in tissues exhibit calcium-independent adhesion, which is strongly adhesive or “hyperadhesive”. This is fundamental to tissue strength. Almost all studies in culture are done on weakly adhesive, calcium-dependent desmosomes, although hyperadhesion can be readily obtained in confluent cell culture. Calcium dependence is a default condition in vivo, found in wounds and embryonic development. Hyperadhesion appears to be associated with an ordered arrangement of the extracellular domains of the desmosomal cadherins, which gives rise to the intercellular midline identified in ultrastructural studies. This in turn probably depends on molecular order in the desmosomal plaque. Protein kinase C downregulates hyperadhesion and there is preliminary evidence that it may also be regulated by tyrosine kinases. Downregulation of desmosomes in vivo may occur by internalisation of whole desmosomes rather than disassembly. Hyperadhesion has implications for diseases such as pemphigus.

  13. Optical spectroscopy combined with high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging for digestive wall assessment: endoluminal bimodal probe conception and characterization in vitro, on organic sample and in vivo on a rabbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramgolam, Anoop; Sablong, Raphaël; Lafarge, Lionel; Saint-Jalmes, Hervé; Beuf, Olivier

    2011-11-01

    Colorectal cancer is a major health issue worldwide. Conventional white light endoscopy (WLE) coupled to histology is considered as the gold standard today and is the most widespread technique used for colorectal cancer diagnosis. However, during the early stages, colorectal cancer is very often characterized by flat adenomas which develop just underneath the mucosal surface. The use of WLE, which is heavily based on the detection of morphological changes, becomes quite delicate due to subtle or quasi-invisible morphological changes of the colonic lining. Several techniques are currently being investigated in the scope of providing new tools that would allow such a diagnostic or assist actual techniques in so doing. We hereby present a novel technique where high spatial resolution MRI is combined with autofluorescence and reflectance spectroscopy in a bimodal endoluminal probe to extract morphological data and biochemical information, respectively. The design and conception of the endoluminal probe are detailed and the promising preliminary results obtained in vitro (home-built phantom containing eosin and rhodamine B), on an organic sample (the kiwi fruit) and in vivo on a rabbit are presented and discussed.

  14. Towards a versatile platform based on magnetic nanoparticles for in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted wide attention because of their usefulness as contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or colloidal mediators for cancer magnetic hyperthermia. This paper examines these in vivo applications through an understanding of the problems involved and the current and future ...

  15. Advanced tools for in vivo skin analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cal, Krzysztof; Zakowiecki, Daniel; Stefanowska, Justyna

    2010-05-01

    A thorough examination of the skin is essential for accurate disease diagnostics, evaluation of the effectiveness of topically applied drugs and the assessment of the results of dermatologic surgeries such as skin grafts. Knowledge of skin parameters is also important in the cosmetics industry, where the effects of skin care products are evaluated. Due to significant progress in the electronics and computer industries, sophisticated analytic devices are increasingly available for day-to-day diagnostics. The aim of this article is to review several advanced methods for in vivo skin analysis in humans: magnetic resonance imaging, electron paramagnetic resonance, laser Doppler flowmetry and time domain reflectometry. The molecular bases of these techniques are presented, and several interesting applications in the field are discussed. Methods for in vivo assessment of the biomechanical properties of human skin are also reviewed.

  16. Magnetism of the spin-trimer compound CaNi 3(P 2O 7)2: Microscopic insight from combined 31P NMR and first-principles studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, M.; Kanungo, S.; Ghoshray, A.; Ghosh, M.; Ghoshray, K.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetization, 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study, and first-principles electronic structure calculations have been performed in the spin-1 trimer chain compound CaNi3(P2O7 )2. Two separate spectra arising from magnetically and crystallographically inequivalent P sites are observed. In the ordered state, the resonance lines for both the P sites (P1 and P2) are found to be split into two, which is clear microscopic evidence of the development of two-sublattice AFM order below TM. A nonnegligible contribution of ferromagnetic hyperfine field and dipolar field have also been seen in the ordered state. The first-principles calculations show that the intratrimer (J1) and intertrimer interactions (J2) are of weak ferromagnetic type with the values 2.85 and 1.49 meV, respectively, whereas the interchain interaction (J3) is of strong antiferromagnetic type with a value of 5.63 meV. The anisotropy of the imaginary part of dynamical spin susceptibility around TM along with the exponential decrement of 1 /T1 below TM indicate the probable participation of the Ni -3 d electron's orbital degrees of freedom in the ferrimagnetic transition. The dominance of orbital fluctuations over the spin fluctuations seems to be responsible for showing low value of the binding energy u of the local spin configuration (estimated from local spin models) and an unusually weak exponent in the power-law behavior of 1 /T1 below 50 K, in the paramagnetic state. Electronic structure calculations also reveal the importance of orbital degrees of freedom of Ni -3 d moments, which is consistent with our NMR data analysis.

  17. On EPR detection of nitric oxide in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Faassen, E.E.H.

    2008-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO ) is a peculiar radical: Ground state is not paramagnetic (g = 0 since orbital and spin magnetic moments cancel); low reactivity with other molecules except superoxide (O2 ); thermodynamically unstable; dimerizes to N2O2; difficult to detect in-vivo.

  18. Magnetic Spinner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, P. J.

    2006-01-01

    A science toy sometimes called the "magnetic spinner" is an interesting class demonstration to illustrate the principles of magnetic levitation. It can also be used to demonstrate Faraday's law and a horizontally suspended physical pendulum. The levitated part contains two circular magnets encased in a plastic housing. Each magnet stays…

  19. In vivo studies. In vivo nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syrota, A.; CEA, 91 - Orsay

    1997-01-01

    A historical review of the use of radioelements for biological applications and nuclear medicine is presented: planar gamma-scintigraphy, invented in 1957, which gives planar projections of the radioactivity distribution in an organ; tomography, which gives sections of an organ and reconstructed three-dimensional images; positron emission tomography, invented in the 70's, gives brain section images with carbon 11, nitrogen 13 and oxygen 15. Coupled utilization of these techniques with other functional image systems such as nuclear magnetic resonance, enables simultaneous anatomic and functional information such as cognitive functions and cerebral localizations

  20. Magnetic skyrmions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-06-01

    Welcome to the special issue of Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials on magnetic skyrmions. We are proud to present, with great pleasure, a timely collection of 9 original research articles on the recent hot topic "magnetic skyrmions" which studies the static and dynamic properties of skyrmions and the methods to control them in a variety of ways, including magnetic field, electric current and applied strain.

  1. Cardioprotective effect of magnetic hydrogel nanocomposite loaded N,α-L-rhamnopyranosyl vincosamide isolated from Moringa oleifera leaves against doxorubicin-induced cardiac toxicity in rats: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheraghi, Mostafa; Namdari, Mehrdad; Daraee, Hadis; Negahdari, Babak

    2017-06-01

    Cardioprotective effect of N, α-L-rhamnopyranosyl vincosamide (VR), isolated from the leaves of Moringa oleifera plant in doxorubicin (Dox)-induced cardiac toxicity rats was evaluated. Twelve (12) rats were randomly selected into three groups; two rats received distilled water in the control group, five rats in group I received varying concentration of VR treatment, and group II containing five rats received varying concentration of VR-loaded magnetic hydrogel nanocomposite. Malondialdehyde (MDA), glutathione peroxidase (GSH) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes activities level were analysed after two weeks. In addition, the expression of three heart failure markers; beta major histocompatibility complex (β-MHC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) were also evaluated. It was observed that the level of these markers expression decreases with an increase in VR concentration (p < 0.05). The reduced GSH and SOD level were increased after VR administration, this extract also reduced the initially increased MDA level in cardiac tissue. Pharmacokinetic parameters evaluation showed that nanogel treated rats possesses a significantly increased VR plasma concentration, C max , K el , t ½(a), t ½(el), K a and AUC. The result of this study indicated that VR may help to lower the dosage level, and reduces the treatment course in cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Our conclusion proposes the cardio-protective ability of the isolated VR and its beneficial effect via free radical scavenging properties.

  2. In-vivo monitoring of development of cholangiocarcinoma induced with C. sinensis and N-nitrosodimethylamine in Syrian golen hamsters using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Hyunsik; Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Jung Hoon; Hong, Sung-Tae; Uddin, M.H.; Jang, Ja-June

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate high-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring of cholangiocarcinoma in the hamsters with C. sinensis infection and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Twenty-four male Syrian golden hamsters of were divided into four groups composed of five hamsters as control, five hamsters receiving 30 metacercariae of C. sinensis per each hamster, five hamsters receiving NDMA in drinking water, and nine hamsters receiving both metacercariae and NDMA. Ultrasound was performed every other week from baseline to the 12th week of infection. MRI and histopathologic examination was done from the 4th week to 12th week. Cholangiocarcinomas appeared as early as the 6th week of infection. There were 12 cholangiocarcinomas, nine and ten of which were demonstrated by ultrasound and MRI, respectively. Ultrasound and MRI findings of cholangiocarcinomas in the hamsters were similar to those of the mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas in humans. Ultrasound and MRI also showed other findings of disease progression such as periductal increased echogenicity or signal intensity, ductal dilatation, complicated cysts, and sludges in the gallbladder. High-resolution ultrasound and MRI can monitor and detect the occurrence of cholangiocarcinoma in the hamsters non-invasively. (orig.)

  3. In-vivo monitoring of development of cholangiocarcinoma induced with C. sinensis and N-nitrosodimethylamine in Syrian golen hamsters using ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging: a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Hyunsik [SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Joon Koo; Kim, Jung Hoon [Seoul National University Hospital, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sung-Tae [Seoul National University, Department of Parasitology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Uddin, M.H. [Seoul National University, Adult Stem Cell Research Center, Laboratory of Stem Cell and Tumor Biology, Department of Veterinary Public Health, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Ja-June [Seoul National University, Department of Pathology, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate high-resolution ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in monitoring of cholangiocarcinoma in the hamsters with C. sinensis infection and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA). Twenty-four male Syrian golden hamsters of were divided into four groups composed of five hamsters as control, five hamsters receiving 30 metacercariae of C. sinensis per each hamster, five hamsters receiving NDMA in drinking water, and nine hamsters receiving both metacercariae and NDMA. Ultrasound was performed every other week from baseline to the 12th week of infection. MRI and histopathologic examination was done from the 4th week to 12th week. Cholangiocarcinomas appeared as early as the 6th week of infection. There were 12 cholangiocarcinomas, nine and ten of which were demonstrated by ultrasound and MRI, respectively. Ultrasound and MRI findings of cholangiocarcinomas in the hamsters were similar to those of the mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinomas in humans. Ultrasound and MRI also showed other findings of disease progression such as periductal increased echogenicity or signal intensity, ductal dilatation, complicated cysts, and sludges in the gallbladder. High-resolution ultrasound and MRI can monitor and detect the occurrence of cholangiocarcinoma in the hamsters non-invasively. (orig.)

  4. An induction heating device using planar coil with high amplitude alternating magnetic fields for magnetic hyperthermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zuhe; Zhuo, Zihang; Cai, Dongyang; Wu, Jian'an; Wang, Jie; Tang, Jintian

    2015-01-01

    Induction heating devices using the induction coil and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are the way that the magnetic hyperthermia is heading. To facilitate the induction heating of in vivo magnetic nanoparticles in hyperthermia experiments on large animals. An induction heating device using a planar coil was designed with a magnetic field frequency of 328 kHz. The coil's magnetic field distribution and the device's induction heating performance on different concentrations of magnetic nanoparticles were measured. The alternating magnetic field produced in the axis position 165 mm away from the coil center is 40 Gs in amplitude; magnetic nanoparticles with a concentration higher than 80 mg. mL-1 can be heated up rapidly. Our results demonstrate that the device can be applied not only to in vitro and in small animal experiments of magnetic hyperthermia using MNPs, but also in large animal experiments.

  5. Microstructural imaging of human neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Luke J; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2018-03-24

    The neocortex of the human brain is the seat of higher brain function. Modern imaging techniques, chief among them magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allow non-invasive imaging of this important structure. Knowledge of the microstructure of the neocortex has classically come from post-mortem histological studies of human tissue, and extrapolations from invasive animal studies. From these studies, we know that the scale of important neocortical structure spans six orders of magnitude, ranging from the size of axonal diameters (microns), to the size of cortical areas responsible for integrating sensory information (centimetres). MRI presents an opportunity to move beyond classical methods, because MRI is non-invasive and MRI contrast is sensitive to neocortical microstructure over all these length scales. MRI thus allows inferences to be made about neocortical microstructure in vivo, i.e. MRI-based in vivo histology. We review recent literature that has applied and developed MRI-based in vivo histology to probe the microstructure of the human neocortex, focusing specifically on myelin, iron, and neuronal fibre mapping. We find that applications such as cortical parcellation (using R 1 maps as proxies for myelin content) and investigation of cortical iron deposition with age (using R 2 * maps) are already contributing to the frontiers of knowledge in neuroscience. Neuronal fibre mapping in the cortex remains challenging in vivo, but recent improvements in diffusion MRI hold promise for exciting applications in the near future. The literature also suggests that utilising multiple complementary quantitative MRI maps could increase the specificity of inferences about neocortical microstructure relative to contemporary techniques, but that further investment in modelling is required to appropriately combine the maps. In vivo histology of human neocortical microstructure is undergoing rapid development. Future developments will improve its specificity, sensitivity, and

  6. Magnetic nanoparticles for biomedical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krustev, P.; Ruskov, T.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we describe different biomedical application using magnetic nanoparticles. Over the past decade, a number of biomedical applications have begun to emerge for magnetic nanoparticles of differing sizes, shapes, and compositions. Areas under investigation include targeted drug delivery, ultra-sensitive disease detection, gene therapy, high throughput genetic screening, biochemical sensing, and rapid toxicity cleansing. Magnetic nanoparticles exhibit ferromagnetic or superparamagnetic behavior, magnetizing strongly under an applied field. In the second case (superparamagnetic nanoparticles) there is no permanent magnetism once the field is removed. The superparamagnetic nanoparticles are highly attractive as in vivo probes or in vitro tools to extract information on biochemical systems. The optical properties of magnetic metal nanoparticles are spectacular and, therefore, have promoted a great deal of excitement during the last few decades. Many applications as MRI imaging and hyperthermia rely on the use of iron oxide particles. Moreover magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with antibodies are also applied to hyperthermia and have enabled tumor specific contrast enhancement in MRI. Other promising biomedical applications are connected with tumor cells treated with magnetic nanoparticles with X-ray ionizing radiation, which employs magnetic nanoparticles as a complementary radiate source inside the tumor. (authors)

  7. Comparison of the T2-star Values of Placentas Obtained from Pre-eclamptic Patients with Those of a Control Group: an Ex-vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurttutan, Nursel; Bakacak, Murat; Kızıldağ, Betül

    2017-09-29

    Endotel dysfunction, vasoconstriction, and oxidative stress are described in the pathophysiology of pre-eclampsia, but its aetiology has not been revealed clearly. To examine whether there is a difference between the placentas of pre-eclamptic pregnant women and those of a control group in terms of their T2 star values. Case-control study. Twenty patients diagnosed with pre-eclampsia and 22 healthy controls were included in this study. The placentas obtained after births performed via Caesarean section were taken into the magnetic resonance imaging area in plastic bags within the first postnatal hour, and imaging was performed via modified DIXON-Quant sequence. Average values were obtained by performing T2 star measurements from four localisations on the placentas. T2 star values measured in the placentas of the control group were found to be significantly lower than those in the pre-eclampsia group (pstar value in the pre-eclamptic group was found to be 37.48 ms (standard deviation ± 11.3), this value was 28.74 (standard deviation ± 8.08) in the control group. The cut-off value for the T2 star value, maximising the accuracy of diagnosis, was 28.59 ms (area under curve: 0.741; 95% confidence interval: 0.592-0.890); sensitivity and specificity were 70% and 63.6%, respectively. This study, the T2 star value, which is an indicator of iron amount, was found to be significantly lower in the control group than in the pre-eclampsia group. This may be related to the reduction in blood flow to the placenta due to endothelial dysfunction and vasoconstriction, which are important in pre-eclampsia pathophysiology.

  8. 1H nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the conformation of an ATP analogue at the active site of Na,K-ATPase from kidney medulla

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stewart, J.M.M.; Grisham, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    1 H nuclear magnetic relaxation measurements have been used to determine the three-dimensional conformation of an ATP analogue, Co(NH 3 ) 4 ATP, at the active site of sheep kidney Na,K-ATPase. Previous studies have shown that Co(NH 4 ) 4 ATP is a competitive inhibitor with respect to MnATP for the Na,K-ATPase and that Mn 2+ bound to a single, high-affinity site on the ATPase can be an effective paramagnetic probe for nuclear relaxation studies of the Na-K-ATPase. From the paramagnetic effect of Mn 2+ bound to the APTase on the longitudinal relaxation rates of the protons of Co(NH 3 ) 4 ATP at the substrate site (at 300 and 361 MHz), Mn-H distances to seven protons on the bound nucleotide were determined. Taken together with previous 31 P nuclear relaxation data, these measurements are consistent with a single nucleotide conformation at the active site. The nucleotide adopts a bent configuration, in which the triphosphate chain lies nearly parallel to the adenine moiety. The glycosidic torsion angle is 35 0 , and the conformation of the ribose ring is slightly N-type. The bound Mn 2+ lies above and in the plane of the adenine ring. The distances from Mn 2+ to N 6 and N 7 are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The NMR data also indicate that the structure of the bound ATP analogue is independent of the conformational state of the enzyme

  9. Acid dissociation constants of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds determined by {sup 31}phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and internal pH referencing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jancan, Igor [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States); Macnaughtan, Megan A., E-mail: macnau@lsu.edu [Louisiana State University, Department of Chemistry, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2012-10-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The first reported phosphate and imide pK{sub a} values of UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New role for the monosaccharide in the imide pK{sub a} of uridine-5 Prime -phosphate compounds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UDP-S-GlcNAc and UDP-GlcNAc have the same phosphate pK{sub a}, unlike thioyl analogs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The {sup 31}P chemical shift of inorganic phosphate is a viable internal pH reference. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stability of the external {sup 31}P chemical shift reference is essential. - Abstract: The acid dissociation constant (pK{sub a}) of small, biological molecules is an important physical property used for investigating enzyme mechanisms and inhibitor design. For phosphorus-containing molecules, the {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) chemical shift is sensitive to the local chemical environment, particularly to changes in the electronic state of the molecule. Taking advantage of this property, we present a {sup 31}P NMR approach that uses inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference to determine the pK{sub a} values of the imide and second diphosphate of uridine-5 Prime -diphosphate compounds, including the first reported values for UDP-GlcNAc and UDP-S-GlcNAc. New methods for using inorganic phosphate buffer as an internal pH reference, involving mathematical correction factors and careful control of the chemical shift reference sample, are illustrated. A comparison of the newly determined imide and diphosphate pK{sub a} values of UDP, UDP-GlcNAc, and UDP-S-GlcNAc with other nucleotide phosphate and thio-analogs reveals the significance of the monosaccharide and sulfur position on the pK{sub a} values.

  10. /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic resonance studies of the conformation of an ATP analogue at the active site of Na,K-ATPase from kidney medulla

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacD. Stewart, J.M.; Grisham, C.M.

    1988-06-28

    /sup 1/H nuclear magnetic relaxation measurements have been used to determine the three-dimensional conformation of an ATP analogue, Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/ATP, at the active site of sheep kidney Na,K-ATPase. Previous studies have shown that Co(NH/sub 4/)/sub 4/ATP is a competitive inhibitor with respect to MnATP for the Na,K-ATPase and that Mn/sup 2 +/ bound to a single, high-affinity site on the ATPase can be an effective paramagnetic probe for nuclear relaxation studies of the Na-K-ATPase. From the paramagnetic effect of Mn/sup 2 +/ bound to the APTase on the longitudinal relaxation rates of the protons of Co(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/ATP at the substrate site (at 300 and 361 MHz), Mn-H distances to seven protons on the bound nucleotide were determined. Taken together with previous /sup 31/P nuclear relaxation data, these measurements are consistent with a single nucleotide conformation at the active site. The nucleotide adopts a bent configuration, in which the triphosphate chain lies nearly parallel to the adenine moiety. The glycosidic torsion angle is 35/sup 0/, and the conformation of the ribose ring is slightly N-type. The bound Mn/sup 2 +/ lies above and in the plane of the adenine ring. The distances from Mn/sup 2 +/ to N/sub 6/ and N/sub 7/ are too large for first coordination sphere complexes but are appropriate for second-sphere complexes involving, for example, intervening hydrogen-bonded water molecules. The NMR data also indicate that the structure of the bound ATP analogue is independent of the conformational state of the enzyme.

  11. Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2008-01-01

    Starting from the beam requirements for accelerator magnets, we will outline the main issues and the physical limitations for producing strong and pure magnetic fields with superconductors. The seminar will mainly focus on the magnets for the accelerator, and give some hints on the magnets for the experiments. Prerequisite knowledge: Basic knowledge of Maxwell equations, and linear optics for particle accelerators (FODO cell, beta functions).

  12. Magnetic strings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaves, Max

    2006-01-01

    The conception of the magnetic string is presented as an infinitely thin bundle of magnetic flux lines. The magnetic strings are surrounded by a film of current that rotates around them, and are a solution of Maxwell's equations. The magnetic potential contains a line singularity, and its stability can be established topologically. A few comments are added on the possibility that they may exist at a cosmological scale as relics of the Big Bang. (author) [es

  13. Magnetic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaldin, Nicola A.

    2003-04-01

    Magnetic materials are the foundation of multi-billion dollar industries and the focus of intensive research across many disciplines. This book covers the fundamentals, basic theories and applications of magnetism and conventional magnetic materials. Based on a lecture course given by Nicola Spaldin in the Materials Department at University of California, Santa Barbara, the book is ideal for a one- semester course in magnetic materials. It contains numerous homework problems and solutions.

  14. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-08-01

    This report discusses the following topics on superconducting magnets: D19B and -C: The next steps for a record-setting magnet; D20: The push beyond 10 T: Beyond D20: Speculations on the 16-T regime; other advanced magnets for accelerators; spinoff applications; APC materials development; cable and cabling-machine development; and high-T c superconductor at low temperature

  15. Superconducting magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willen, E.

    1996-01-01

    Superconducting dipole magnets for high energy colliders are discussed. As an example, the magnets recently built for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven are reviewed. Their technical performance and the cost for the industry-built production dipoles are given. The cost data is generalized in order to extrapolate the cost of magnets for a new machine

  16. In vivo rapid field map measurement and shimming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanayama, Shoichi; Kassai, Yoshimori; Kondo, Masafumi; Kuhara, Shigehide; Satoh, Kozo; Seo, Yasutsugu.

    1992-01-01

    MR imaging and MR spectroscopy need a homogeneous static magnetic field. The static field characteristics are determined by the magnet's homogeneity, the set-up conditions, and the magnetic suspectibility of the subject itself. The field inhomogeneity is usually minimized only once when the apparatus is installed. However, field distortions arising from the magnetic susceptibility differ with each subject and region. To overcome this problem, in vivo shimming can be carried out to improve the homogeneity. The procedures are too lengthy when applying the conventional shimming techniques in vivo. We have developed a new field map measurement technique using a double gradient-recalled echo phase mapping. The values of the currents for the 13-channel shim coils are derived by least squares fitting to the field map and automatically applied to the shim coils. The proposed technique can rapidly and accurately measure the field map in vivo and correct the field inhomogeneity. The results show that this technique improves the homogeneity, especially in regions having a simple field distribution. However, local sharp field distortions which can not be practically corrected by shimming occur near the eyes, ears, heart, etc. due to abrupt susceptibility changes. (author)

  17. Magnetic nanoparticles for theragnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubayev, Veronica I.; Pisanic, Thomas R.; Jin, Sungho

    2009-01-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a cutting-edge tool in medicine because they can be simultaneously functionalized and guided by a magnetic field. Use of MNPs has advanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), guided drug and gene delivery, magnetic hyperthermia cancer therapy, tissue engineering, cell tracking and bioseparation. Integrative therapeutic and diagnostic (i.e., theragnostic) applications have emerged with MNP use, such as MRI-guided cell replacement therapy or MRI-based imaging of cancer-specific gene delivery. However, mounting evidence suggests that certain properties of nanoparticles (e.g., enhanced reactive area, ability to cross cell and tissue barriers, resistance to biodegradation) amplify their cytotoxic potential relative to molecular or bulk counterparts. Oxidative stress, a 3-tier paradigm of nanotoxicity, manifests in activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) (tier I), followed by a pro-inflammatory response (tier II) and DNA damage leading to cellular apoptosis and mutagenesis (tier III). In vivo administered MNPs are quickly challenged by macrophages of the reticuloendothelial system (RES), resulting in not only neutralization of potential MNP toxicity but also reduced circulation time necessary for MNP efficacy. We discuss the role of MNP size, composition and surface chemistry in their intracellular uptake, biodistribution, macrophage recognition and cytotoxicity, and review current studies on MNP toxicity, caveats of nanotoxicity assessments and engineering strategies to optimize MNPs for biomedical use. PMID:19389434

  18. Tracking of multimodal therapeutic nanocomplexes targeting breast cancer in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardhan, Rizia; Chen, Wenxue; Bartels, Marc; Perez-Torres, Carlos; Botero, Maria F; McAninch, Robin Ward; Contreras, Alejandro; Schiff, Rachel; Pautler, Robia G; Halas, Naomi J; Joshi, Amit

    2010-12-08

    Nanoparticle-based therapeutics with local delivery and external electromagnetic field modulation holds extraordinary promise for soft-tissue cancers such as breast cancer; however, knowledge of the distribution and fate of nanoparticles in vivo is crucial for clinical translation. Here we demonstrate that multiple diagnostic capabilities can be introduced in photothermal therapeutic nanocomplexes by simultaneously enhancing both near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We track nanocomplexes in vivo, examining the influence of HER2 antibody targeting on nanocomplex distribution over 72 h. This approach provides valuable, detailed information regarding the distribution and fate of complex nanoparticles designed for specific diagnostic and therapeutic functions.

  19. Cadmium analysis in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergman, R.

    1980-12-01

    The report describes the development of a method for in vivo Cd-analysis. The method is based on the analysis of the prompt gamma radiation which is emitted by neutron capture of the isotope Cd113. Different parts of the body can be analysed selectively by neutrons in the interval of 1 to 100 KeV. The results show that the level of Cd in Kidneys can be measured without exceeding the dose of 40 mrad and that only 20% uncertainty is introduced when analysing Cd. The development has been made at the R2 reactor in Studsvik using 25 KeV neutrons. (G.B.)

  20. Circulating Tumor Cell Detection and Capture by Photoacoustic Flow Cytometry in Vivo and ex Vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I. [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Zharov, Vladimir P., E-mail: zharovvladimirp@uams.edu [Phillips Classic Laser and Nanomedicine Laboratories, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States); Arkansas Nanomedicine Center, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, 4301 West Markham Street, Little Rock, AR 72205 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    Despite progress in detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs), existing assays still have low sensitivity (1–10 CTC/mL) due to the small volume of blood samples (5–10 mL). Consequently, they can miss up to 10{sup 3}–10{sup 4} CTCs, resulting in the development of barely treatable metastasis. Here we analyze a new concept of in vivo CTC detection with enhanced sensitivity (up to 10{sup 2}–10{sup 3} times) by the examination of the entire blood volume in vivo (5 L in adults). We focus on in vivo photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry (PAFC) of CTCs using label-free or targeted detection, photoswitchable nanoparticles with ultrasharp PA resonances, magnetic trapping with fiber-magnetic-PA probes, optical clearance, real-time spectral identification, nonlinear signal amplification, and the integration with PAFC in vitro. We demonstrate PAFC’s capability to detect rare leukemia, squamous carcinoma, melanoma, and bulk and stem breast CTCs and its clusters in preclinical animal models in blood, lymph, bone, and cerebrospinal fluid, as well as the release of CTCs from primary tumors triggered by palpation, biopsy or surgery, increasing the risk of metastasis. CTC lifetime as a balance between intravasation and extravasation rates was in the range of 0.5–4 h depending on a CTC metastatic potential. We introduced theranostics of CTCs as an integration of nanobubble-enhanced PA diagnosis, photothermal therapy, and feedback through CTC counting. In vivo data were verified with in vitro PAFC demonstrating a higher sensitivity (1 CTC/40 mL) and throughput (up to 10 mL/min) than conventional assays. Further developments include detection of circulating cancer-associated microparticles, and super-resolution PAFC beyond the diffraction and spectral limits.

  1. Synchronous ultrasonic Doppler imaging of magnetic microparticles in biological tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pyshnyi, Michael Ph. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Kuznetsov, Oleg A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: kuznetsov_oa@yahoo.com; Pyshnaya, Svetlana V.; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A. [Institute of Biochemical Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kosygin St. 4, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-15

    We considered applicability of acoustic imaging technology for the detection of magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles inside soft biological tissues. Such particles are widely used for magnetically targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. We developed a new method of ultrasonic synchronous tissue Doppler imaging with magnetic modulation for in vitro and in vivo detection and visualization of magnetic ultradisperse objects in soft tissues. Prototype hardware with appropriate software was produced and the method was successfully tested on magnetic microparticles injected into an excised pig liver.

  2. Synchronous ultrasonic Doppler imaging of magnetic microparticles in biological tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyshnyi, Michael Ph.; Kuznetsov, Oleg A.; Pyshnaya, Svetlana V.; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Kuznetsov, Anatoly A.

    2009-01-01

    We considered applicability of acoustic imaging technology for the detection of magnetic microparticles and nanoparticles inside soft biological tissues. Such particles are widely used for magnetically targeted drug delivery and magnetic hyperthermia. We developed a new method of ultrasonic synchronous tissue Doppler imaging with magnetic modulation for in vitro and in vivo detection and visualization of magnetic ultradisperse objects in soft tissues. Prototype hardware with appropriate software was produced and the method was successfully tested on magnetic microparticles injected into an excised pig liver.

  3. Magnetic Hysteresis

    CERN Document Server

    Della Torre, Edward

    2000-01-01

    Understanding magnetic hysteresis is vitally important to the development of the science of magnetism as a whole and to the advancement of practical magnetic device applications. Magnetic Hysteresis, by acclaimed expert Edward Della Torre, presents a clear explanation of the connection between physical principles and phenomenological hysteresis. This comprehensive book offers a lucid analysis that enables the reader to save valuable time by reducing trial-and-error design. Dr. Della Torre uses physical principles to modify Preisach modeling and to describe the complex behavior of magnetic media. While Pretsach modeling is a useful mathematical tool, its congruency and deletion properties present limitations to accurate descriptions of magnetic materials. Step-by-step, this book describes the modifications that can overcome these limitations. Special attention is given to the use of feedback around a Preisach transducer to remove the congruency restriction, and to the use of accommodation and aftereffect model...

  4. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  5. Magnetic levitation

    OpenAIRE

    Štěpánek,B.; Paleček,M.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with magnetism and its influence on superconducting materials. We describe the discovery and development of superconductivity, superconducting levitation and its use in future technology - called. MAGLEV speed trains. We show the interaction of the magnetic field of a strong neodymium magnet and high-temperature superconductor, cooled with liquid nitrogen at about -200 ° C. Of superconductors at this temperature becomes perfect diamagnetic material. That is ejected from the ma...

  6. Magnet Systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Over the decades, Fermilab has been responsible for the design, construction, test and analysis of hundreds of conventional and superconducting accelerator magnets...

  7. Planetary Magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.T.

    1980-01-01

    Planetary spacecraft have now probed the magnetic fields of all the terrestrial planets, the moon, Jupiter, and Saturn. These measurements reveal that dynamos are active in at least four of the planets, Mercury, the earth, Jupiter, and Saturn but that Venus and Mars appear to have at most only very weak planetary magnetic fields. The moon may have once possessed an internal dynamo, for the surface rocks are magnetized. The large satellites of the outer solar system are candidates for dynamo action in addition to the large planets themselves. Of these satellites the one most likely to generate its own internal magnetic field is Io

  8. Magnetics Processing

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Processing Lab equipped to perform testing of magnetometers, integrate them into aircraft systems, and perform data analysis, including noise reduction...

  9. High resolution anatomical and quantitative MRI of the entire human occipital lobe ex vivo at 9.4 T

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sengupta, S.; Lagos Fritz, F.J.; Harms, R.L.; Hildebrand, S.; Tse, D.H.Y.; Poser, B.A.; Goebel, R.; Roebroeck, A.

    Several magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrasts are sensitive to myelin content in gray matter in vivo which has ignited ambitions of MRI-based in vivo cortical histology. Ultra-high field (UHF) MRI, at fields of 7 T and beyond, is crucial to provide the resolution and contrast needed to sample

  10. Magnetic starspots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahn, K.; Stepien, K.

    1984-01-01

    Models of large magnetic starspots with an axisymmetric untwisted magnetic field on late type stars are discussed. It is assumed that the magnetic field reduces the efficiency of convection inside the spot. A unique relation between the stellar mass and the difference of effective temperatures of the spot and the surrounding photosphere is adopted from observations. It is equivalent to the reduction of a s (the mixing length theory parameter) inside the spot to the value 0.15 independently of the stellar mass. The surface magnetic field of large spots covering a considerable part of the stellar surface is a decreasing function of the magnetic flux. Hence a coverage of a star by magnetic regions rapidly increases as a function of the magnetic flux in a narrow range of fluxes. This behaviour can explain the Vaughan-Preston gap. Recent observations of magnetic fields on G and K type stars are in a good agreement with our predictions. 35 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs. (author)

  11. Magnetic superlattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwo, J.; Hong, M.; McWhan, D.B.; Yafet, Y.; Fleming, R.M.; DiSalvo, F.J.; Waszczak, J.V.; Majkrzak, C.F.; Gibbs, D.; Goldmann, A.I.; Boni, P.; Bohr, J.; Grimm, H.; Bohr, J.; Chien, C.L.; Grimm, H.; Cable, J.W.

    1988-01-01

    Single crystal magnetic rare earth superlattices were synthesized by molecular beam epitaxy. The studies include four rare earth systems: Gd-Y, Dy-Y, Ho-Y, and Gd-Dy. The magnetic properties and the long-range spin order are reviewed in terms of the interfacial behavior, and the interlayer exchange coupling across Y medium

  12. Magnetic Field

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils

    2015-01-01

    he Earth has a large and complicated magnetic field, the major part of which is produced by a self-sustaining dynamo operating in the fluid outer core. Magnetic field observations provide one of the few tools for remote sensing the Earth’s deep interior, especially regarding the dynamics...... of the fluid flow at the top of the core. However, what is measured at or near the surface of the Earth is the superposition of the core field and fields caused by magnetized rocks in the Earth’s crust, by electric currents flowing in the ionosphere, magnetosphere, and oceans, and by currents induced...... in the Earth by time-varying external fields. These sources have their specific characteristics in terms of spatial and temporal variations, and their proper separation, based on magnetic measurements, is a major challenge. Such a separation is a prerequisite for remote sensing by means of magnetic field...

  13. Manganese ferrite-based nanoparticles induce ex vivo, but not in vivo, cardiovascular effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nunes ADC

    2014-07-01

    rate or arterial blood pressure in conscious rats. In summary, although the MNPs were able to induce effects ex vivo, no significant changes were observed in vivo. Thus, given the proper dosages, these MNPs should be considered for possible therapeutic applications. Keywords: cardiac function, isolated heart, magnetic fluids, magnetic nanoparticles, nanomedicine

  14. Shaping magnetic fields to direct therapy to ears and eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, B; Kulkarni, S; Nacev, A; Sarwar, A; Preciado, D; Depireux, D A

    2014-07-11

    Magnetic fields have the potential to noninvasively direct and focus therapy to disease targets. External magnets can apply forces on drug-coated magnetic nanoparticles, or on living cells that contain particles, and can be used to manipulate them in vivo. Significant progress has been made in developing and testing safe and therapeutic magnetic constructs that can be manipulated by magnetic fields. However, we do not yet have the magnet systems that can then direct those constructs to the right places, in vivo, over human patient distances. We do not yet know where to put the external magnets, how to shape them, or when to turn them on and off to direct particles or magnetized cells-in blood, through tissue, and across barriers-to disease locations. In this article, we consider ear and eye disease targets. Ear and eye targets are too deep and complex to be targeted by a single external magnet, but they are shallow enough that a combination of magnets may be able to direct therapy to them. We focus on how magnetic fields should be shaped (in space and time) to direct magnetic constructs to ear and eye targets.

  15. Lunar magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, L. L.; Sonett, C. P.; Srnka, L. J.

    1984-01-01

    Aspects of lunar paleomagnetic and electromagnetic sounding results which appear inconsistent with the hypothesis that an ancient core dynamo was the dominant source of the observed crustal magnetism are discussed. Evidence is summarized involving a correlation between observed magnetic anomalies and ejecta blankets from impact events which indicates the possible importance of local mechanisms involving meteoroid impact processes in generating strong magnetic fields at the lunar surface. A reply is given to the latter argument which also presents recent evidence of a lunar iron core.

  16. Rare earth permanent magnet with easy magnetization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, A.S.; Camp, F.E.

    1998-01-01

    Rare earth permanent magnets have high energy products and coercivities, and thus the volume miniaturization of magnetic devices has been possible with improved magnetic performance. Although the high energy products of these rare earth permanent magnets provide substantial advantages for magnetic design and application, the strong magnetic force of the magnetized magnets makes assembly difficult. Therefore, a special device is needed to assemble the magnetized magnets. On the other hand, unmagnetized magnets are assembled and then they are magnetized. The assembled magnets are generally more difficult to magnetize than unassembled magnets because a much less effective magnetic field may be applied to them. This is particularly true for the rare earth permanent magnets because they usually need a much higher magnetic field to be fully magnetized than alnico or ferrite magnets. To obtain optimum magnetic properties, the required minimum magnetizing fields for SmCo 5 , Sm 2 TM 17 and Nd 2 Fe 14 B magnets were reported as 25-30 kOe, 45-60 kOe and 25-30 kOe, respectively. If the required magnetizing field for full saturation could be lowered, the effective utilization of magnetic properties would be maximized and the magnetic design option could be expanded with reduced restrictions. To meet this demand, we have sought to lower the field required for full magnetic saturation, and found that an increase in Dy content in R-(Fe,Co,Cu)-B type magnets lowers the field required for full saturation as well as improves the temperature stability. By increasing the H ci with Dy addition from 14 kOe to 24 and 34 kOe, the field required for full magnetic saturation decreases from about 20 to 15 and 10 kOe, respectively. This dual benefit will open up new application areas with more freedom for magnet design options. The mechanism for the lower magnetizing fields will be discussed. (orig.)

  17. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fryberger, D.

    1984-12-01

    In this talk on magnetic monopoles, first the author briefly reviews some historical background; then, the author describes what several different types of monopoles might look like; and finally the author discusses the experimental situation. 81 references

  18. Quantum magnetism

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Johannes; Farnell, Damian; Bishop, Raymod

    2004-01-01

    The investigation of magnetic systems where quantum effects play a dominant role has become a very active branch of solid-state-physics research in its own right. The first three chapters of the "Quantum Magnetism" survey conceptual problems and provide insights into the classes of systems considered, namely one-dimensional, two-dimensional and molecular magnets. The following chapters introduce the methods used in the field of quantum magnetism, including spin wave analysis, exact diagonalization, quantum field theory, coupled cluster methods and the Bethe ansatz. The book closes with a chapter on quantum phase transitions and a contribution that puts the wealth of phenomena into the context of experimental solid-state physics. Closing a gap in the literature, this volume is intended both as an introductory text at postgraduate level and as a modern, comprehensive reference for researchers in the field.

  19. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preskill, J

    1984-01-01

    This article offers a review of the physics of the magnetic monopole, which, although as yet unseen, offers sound theoretical reasons to believe that it must exist. Several theories are presented and equations are given. The idea that magnetic monopoles, stable particles carrying magnetic charges, ought to exist has, according to the authors, proved to be very durable. One theory presented demonstrates the consistency of magnetic monopoles with quantum electrodynamics. Another theory demonstrates the necessity of monopoles in grand unified gauge theories. The authors believe it is reasonable to expect the monopole to be an extremely heavy stable elementary particle. The stability of the classical monopole solution given is ensured by a topological principle explained

  20. Magnetic Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jane Bray; Nelson, Jim

    1992-01-01

    Describes the history of Richard Blakemore's discovery of magnetotaxic organisms. Discusses possible reasons why the magnetic response in bacteria developed. Proposes research experiments integrating biology and physics in which students investigate problems using cultures of magnetotaxic organisms. (MDH)

  1. LHC magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1992-01-01

    Preparations for the LHC proton collider to be built in CERN's LEP tunnel continue to make good progress. In particular development work for the high field superconducting magnets to guide the almost 8 TeVproton beams through the 'tight' curve of the 27-kilometre ring are proceeding well, while the magnet designs and lattice configuration are evolving in the light of ongoing experience. At the Evian LHC Experiments meeting, this progress was covered by Giorgio Brianti

  2. Superconducting magnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Extensive computer based engineering design effort resulted in optimization of a superconducting magnet design with an average bulk current density of approximately 12KA/cm(2). Twisted, stranded 0.0045 inch diameter NbTi superconductor in a copper matrix was selected. Winding the coil from this bundle facilitated uniform winding of the small diameter wire. Test coils were wound using a first lot of the wire. The actual packing density was measured from these. Interwinding voltage break down tests on the test coils indicated the need for adjustment of the wire insulation on the lot of wire subsequently ordered for construction of the delivered superconducting magnet. Using the actual packing densities from the test coils, a final magnet design, with the required enhancement and field profile, was generated. All mechanical and thermal design parameters were then also fixed. The superconducting magnet was then fabricated and tested. The first test was made with the magnet immersed in liquid helium at 4.2K. The second test was conducted at 2K in vacuum. In the latter test, the magnet was conduction cooled from the mounting flange end.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and in vivo evaluation of biocompatible ferrogels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Lopez, M.T., E-mail: modesto@ugr.es [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Rodriguez, I.A. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Rodriguez-Arco, L. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Carriel, V. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Bonhome-Espinosa, A.B. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Campos, F. [Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain); Department of Histology (Tissue Engineering Group), University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Zubarev, A. [Department of Mathematical Physics, Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Duran, J.D.G. [Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, Granada (Spain); Instituto de Investigación Biosanitaria ibs.GRANADA, Granada (Spain)

    2017-06-01

    A hydrogel is a 3-D network of polymer chains in which water is the dispersion medium. Hydrogels have found extensive applications in the biomedical field due to their resemblance to living tissues. Furthermore, hydrogels can be endowed with exceptional properties by addition of synthetic materials. For example, magnetic field-sensitive gels, called ferrogels, are obtained by embedding magnetic particles in the polymer network. Novel living tissues with unique magnetic field-sensitive properties were recently prepared by 3-D cell culture in biocompatible ferrogels. This paper critically reviews the most recent progress and perspectives in their synthesis, characterization and biocompatibility evaluation. Optimization of ferrogels for this novel application requires low-density, strongly magnetic, multi-domain particles. Interestingly, the rheological properties of the resulting ferrogels in the absence of field were largely enhanced with respect to nonmagnetic hydrogels, which can only be explained by the additional cross-linking imparted by the embedded magnetic particles. Remarkably, rheological measurements under an applied magnetic field demonstrated that ferrogels presented reversibly tunable mechanical properties, which constitutes a unique advantage with respect to nonmagnetic hydrogels. In vivo evaluation of ferrogels showed good biocompatibility, with only some local inflammatory response, and no particle migration or damage to distant organs.

  4. Free Radical Imaging Using In Vivo Dynamic Nuclear Polarization-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Hideo; Hyodo, Fuminori

    2015-01-01

    Redox reactions that generate free radical intermediates are essential to metabolic processes, and their intermediates can produce reactive oxygen species, which may promote diseases related to oxidative stress. The development of an in vivo electron spin resonance (ESR) spectrometer and its imaging enables us noninvasive and direct measurement of in vivo free radical reactions in living organisms. The dynamic nuclear polarization magnetic resonance imaging (DNP-MRI), also called PEDRI or OMRI, is also a new imaging method for observing free radical species in vivo. The spatiotemporal resolution of free radical imaging with DNP-MRI is comparable with that in MRI, and each of the radical species can be distinguished in the spectroscopic images by changing the frequency or magnetic field of ESR irradiation. Several kinds of stable nitroxyl radicals were used as spin probes to detect in vivo redox reactions. The signal decay of nitroxyl probes, which is determined with in vivo DNP-MRI, reflects the redox status under oxidative stress, and the signal decay is suppressed by prior administration of antioxidants. In addition, DNP-MRI can also visualize various intermediate free radicals from the intrinsic redox molecules. This noninvasive method, in vivo DNP-MRI, could become a useful tool for investigating the mechanism of oxidative injuries in animal disease models and the in vivo effects of antioxidant drugs. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular speciation of phosphorus in organic amendments and amended soils using nuclear magnetic resonance and X-ray absorption spectroscopies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajibove, B.

    2007-01-01

    Characterization of phosphorus (P) in organic amendments is essential for environmentally sustainable fertilization of agricultural soils. The sequential chemical extraction (SCE) technique commonly used for P characterization does not provide any direct molecular information about P species. Studies were conducted to characterize P species in organic amendments and amended soils at a molecular level. The SCE was used to fractionate P in organic amendments including biosolids, hog, dairy and beef cattle manures, and poultry litter. The extracts were analyzed for total P and P species using inductively coupled plasma - optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) and solution 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, respectively. The relative proportions of P species in intact organic amendments and residues after each extraction, and calcareous soils amended with organic amendments and monoammonium phosphate (MAP) were estimated using the synchrotron-based P 1s X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy. The solution 31 P NMR provided a detailed characterization of organic P in the non-labile NaOH and HCl fractions of organic amendments, but was limited in characterizing the labile fractions of most of these organic amendments due to their proneness to alkaline hydrolysis. The XANES analysis, however, identified the actual chemical species constituting the labile P that was only characterized as inorganic P or orthophosphates by sequential extraction and solution 31 P NMR. In the amended Vertisolic and Chernozemic soils, XANES analysis estimated 'soluble and adsorbed P' as the dominant P species. For the Vertisolic soil, both the unamended and soil amended with biosolids and MAP contained hydroxyapatite (HAP). In addition, soil amended with biosolids, hog and dairy manures contained β-tricalcium phosphate (TRICAL), a more soluble CaP than HAP. TRICAL was found in all amended soils except in that amended with hog manure, while HAP was present

  6. Organic phosphorus fractionation in wetland soil profiles by chemical extraction and phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Min; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Guangqian; Yang, Haijun; Whelan, Michael J.; White, Sue M.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Chemical sequential extraction and 31 P NMR spectroscopy were used for organic P analysis. ► Organic P includes orthophosphate, monoester and diester phosphate and pyrophosphate. ► Highly resistant organic P and monoester phosphate were the dominant organic P. ► HCl pretreatment can remove most inorganic P and increase organic P recovery rate. ► A comprehensive organic P chemical sequential fractionation approach was proposed. - Abstract: Organic P (OP) plays an important role in soil P cycling and is a potential P source for wetland plants. In this study, a modified chemical sequential fractionation method and 31 P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 31 P NMR) of NaOH–EDTA extracts were used to examine the distribution of organic P fractions and compounds in soil profiles of the Beijing Yeyahu Wetland, China. The influence of acid treatment prior to NaOH–EDTA extraction on 31 P NMR spectra was also investigated. Results show that highly resistant OP was the major class of organic P. The rank order of organic P fractions was highly resistant OP (on average accounting for 68.5% of total OP) > moderately resistant OP (15.8%m of total OP) > moderately labile OP (11.4% of total OP) > labile OP (4.3% of total OP). Most of the organic P fractions decreased with soil depth due to the accumulation of plant residues in surface soils and the deposition and diagenesis of soils. Moderately (r = 0.586, p < 0.01) and highly (r = 0.741, p < 0.01) resistant OP fractions were positively correlated with soil organic matter. Phosphorus compounds including orthophosphate (23–74.6% of total P in spectra), monoester phosphate (18.6–76%), diester phosphate (nil-7.8%) and pyrophosphate (nil-6.7%) were characterized using 31 P NMR. Monoester-P was the dominant soil organic P compound identified. The proportion of monoester-P increased significantly in NaOH–EDTA extracts with HCl pretreatment and it was confirmed by chemical analysis. Therefore, it

  7. Magnetizing of permanent magnet using HTS bulk magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Tetsuo; Muraya, Tomoki; Kawasaki, Nobutaka; Fukui, Satoshi; Ogawa, Jun; Sato, Takao; Terasawa, Toshihisa

    2011-01-01

    A demagnetized Nd-Fe-B permanent magnet was scanned just above the magnetic pole containing the HTS bulk magnet, generating a magnetic field of 3.27 T. The magnet sample was subsequently found to be fully magnetized in the open space of the static magnetic fields. We examined the magnetic field distributions when the magnetic poles were scanned twice to activate the magnetic plates inversely with various overlap distances between the tracks of the HTS bulk magnet. The magnetic field of the 'rewritten' magnet reached the values of the magnetically saturated region of the material, showing steep gradients at the border of each magnetic pole. As a replacement for conventional pulse field magnetizing methods, this technique is proposed to expand the degree of freedom in the design of electromagnetic devices, and is proposed as a novel practical method for magnetizing rare-earth magnets, which have excellent magnetic performance and require intense fields of more than 3 T to be activated. (author)

  8. Magnetic spring based on two permanent magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsivilitsin, V.Yu.; Mil'man, Yu.V.; Goncharuk, V.A.; Bondar, I.B.

    2011-01-01

    A new type of the magnetic spring construction 'two permanent magnets' has been considered. A mathematical expression for the estimation of a pulling-in force has been offered. This expression is verified experimentally on the produced operating magnetic spring. The theoretical and experimental data are in good accordance. A number of advantages of the magnetic spring over the construction 'permanent magnet - magnetic circuit' such as an insignificant friction force between two magnets and a higher pulling force are discussed.

  9. Magnetic-plasmonic multilayered nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumthan, Orathai

    -infrared region can be used in in-vivo biomedical applications such as photo thermal therapy because tissue has an absorption maximum in the infrared range. The magnetic nanorods were explored for the following two applications: 1) as active component orientation-tunable ferrogel for cell culture matrix, 2) as MRI contrast agent. The results show that Au/NiFe magnetic nanorods can be aligned along applied magnetic field. Using MTT assay for 3T3 fibroblast cells, the biocompatibility of Au/Co nanorods was investigated. It shows that cell proliferation after 72 hours of incubation with nanorods decreases as the concentration of nanorods increases. However, cell viability quantified by counting dead cell/live cell reveals that only few cells died after three days of incubation. Au/Co multilayered nanorods were tested as T2 MRI-contrast agent, and a very large relaxivity was observed. In summary, we have successfully fabricated multilayered nanorods with tunability in both magnetic and SPR properties. These nanorods can potentially be used in biological and biomedical fields.

  10. Magnetic reheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saga, Shohei; Tashiro, Hiroyuki; Yokoyama, Shuichiro

    2018-02-01

    We provide a new bound on the amplitude of primordial magnetic fields (PMFs) by using a novel mechanism, magnetic reheating. The damping of the magnetohydrodynamics fluid motions in a primordial plasma brings the dissipation of the PMFs. In the early Universe with z ≳ 2 × 106, cosmic microwave background (CMB) photons are quickly thermalized with the dissipated energy and shift to a different Planck distribution with a new temperature. In other words, the PMF dissipation changes the baryon-to-photon number ratio, and we name such a process magnetic reheating. From the current baryon-to-photon number ratio obtained from the big bang nucleosynthesis and CMB observations, we put the strongest constraint on the PMFs on small scales which CMB observations cannot access, B0 ≲ 1.0 μG at the scales 104 generation mechanisms of PMFs in the early Universe.

  11. Magnetic monopoles and dipoles

    CERN Multimedia

    Dominguez, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Conventional bar magnets are also called ‘magnetic dipoles’ because they have two magnetic poles (a “North” and a “South” magnetic pole, like the Earth). In theory, “magnetic monopoles” could exist that act like an isolated “magnetic charge”, i.e. either a “North” or a “South” magnetic pole.

  12. Magnetic images of the disintegration process of tablets in the human stomach by ac biosusceptometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cora, L A; Andreis, U; Romeiro, F G; Americo, M F; Oliveira, R B; Baffa, O; Miranda, J R A

    2005-01-01

    Oral administration of solid dosage forms is usually preferred in drug therapy. Conventional imaging methods are essential tools to investigate the in vivo performance of these formulations. The non-invasive technique of ac biosusceptometry has been introduced as an alternative in studies focusing on gastrointestinal motility and, more recently, to evaluate the behaviour of magnetic tablets in vivo. The aim of this work was to employ a multisensor ac biosusceptometer system to obtain magnetic images of disintegration of tablets in vitro and in the human stomach. The results showed that the transition between the magnetic marker and the magnetic tracer characterized the onset of disintegration (t 50 ) and occurred in a short time interval (1.1 ± 0.4 min). The multisensor ac biosusceptometer was reliable to monitor and analyse the in vivo performance of magnetic tablets showing accuracy to quantify disintegration through the magnetic images and to characterize the profile of this process

  13. A Real-Time Localization System for an Endoscopic Capsule Using Magnetic Sensors †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Duc Minh; Aziz, Syed Mahfuzul

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic sensing technology offers an attractive alternative for in vivo tracking with much better performance than RF and ultrasound technologies. In this paper, an efficient in vivo magnetic tracking system is presented. The proposed system is intended to localize an endoscopic capsule which delivers biomarkers around specific locations of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. For efficiently localizing a magnetic marker inside the capsule, a mathematical model has been developed for the magnetic field around a cylindrical magnet and used with a localization algorithm that provides minimum error and fast computation. The proposed tracking system has much reduced complexity compared to the ones reported in the literature to date. Laboratory tests and in vivo animal trials have demonstrated the suitability of the proposed system for tracking a magnetic marker with expected accuracy. PMID:25379813

  14. Magnetic images of the disintegration process of tablets in the human stomach by ac biosusceptometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cora, L A [Departamento de Fisica e BioFisica, IBB, UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Andreis, U [Departamento de Fisica e BioFisica, IBB, UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Romeiro, F G [Departamento de ClInica Medica, FMB, UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil); Americo, M F [Departamento de ClInica Medica, FMRP, USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Oliveira, R B [Departamento de ClInica Medica, FMRP, USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Baffa, O [Departamento de Fisica e Matematica, FFCLRP, USP, Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil); Miranda, J R A [Departamento de Fisica e BioFisica, IBB, UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2005-12-07

    Oral administration of solid dosage forms is usually preferred in drug therapy. Conventional imaging methods are essential tools to investigate the in vivo performance of these formulations. The non-invasive technique of ac biosusceptometry has been introduced as an alternative in studies focusing on gastrointestinal motility and, more recently, to evaluate the behaviour of magnetic tablets in vivo. The aim of this work was to employ a multisensor ac biosusceptometer system to obtain magnetic images of disintegration of tablets in vitro and in the human stomach. The results showed that the transition between the magnetic marker and the magnetic tracer characterized the onset of disintegration (t{sub 50}) and occurred in a short time interval (1.1 {+-} 0.4 min). The multisensor ac biosusceptometer was reliable to monitor and analyse the in vivo performance of magnetic tablets showing accuracy to quantify disintegration through the magnetic images and to characterize the profile of this process.

  15. Magnetic images of the disintegration process of tablets in the human stomach by ac biosusceptometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corá, L. A.; Andreis, U.; Romeiro, F. G.; Américo, M. F.; Oliveira, R. B.; Baffa, O.; Miranda, J. R. A.

    2005-12-01

    Oral administration of solid dosage forms is usually preferred in drug therapy. Conventional imaging methods are essential tools to investigate the in vivo performance of these formulations. The non-invasive technique of ac biosusceptometry has been introduced as an alternative in studies focusing on gastrointestinal motility and, more recently, to evaluate the behaviour of magnetic tablets in vivo. The aim of this work was to employ a multisensor ac biosusceptometer system to obtain magnetic images of disintegration of tablets in vitro and in the human stomach. The results showed that the transition between the magnetic marker and the magnetic tracer characterized the onset of disintegration (t50) and occurred in a short time interval (1.1 ± 0.4 min). The multisensor ac biosusceptometer was reliable to monitor and analyse the in vivo performance of magnetic tablets showing accuracy to quantify disintegration through the magnetic images and to characterize the profile of this process.

  16. Designing a magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerk, R

    2010-03-15

    This thesis investigates the design and optimization of a permanent magnet assembly for use in a magnetic refrigeration device. The heart of magnetic refrigeration is the adiabatic temperature change in the magnetocaloric material which is caused by the magnetic field. In order to design an ideal magnet assembly the magnetocaloric materials and the refrigeration process itself and their properties and performance as a function of magnetic field are investigated. For the magnetocaloric materials it is the magnetization, specific heat capacity and adiabatic temperature that are investigated as functions of the magnetic field. Following this the process utilized by a magnetic refrigerator to provide cooling is investigated using a publicly available one dimensional numerical model. This process is called active magnetic regeneration (AMR). The aim is to determine the performance of the AMR as a function of the magnetic field in order to learn the properties of the optimal magnet assembly. The performance of the AMR as a function of the synchronization and width of the magnetic field with respect to the AMR cycle, the ramp rate and maximum value of the magnetic field are investigated. Other published magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration devices are also evaluated, using a figure of merit based on the properties of the investigated magnetocaloric materials, to learn the properties of the best magnet designs to date. Following this investigation the Halbach cylinder, which is a hollow permanent magnet cylinder with a rotating remanent flux density, is investigated in detail as it forms the basis of many magnet designs used in magnetic refrigeration. Here the optimal dimensions of a Halbach cylinder, as well as analytical calculations of the magnetic field for a Halbach cylinder of infinite length, are presented. Once it has been determined which properties are desirable for a magnet used in magnetic refrigeration the design of a new magnet is described. This is

  17. Magnetic collectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frew, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    A collector for use in a magnetic separator is formed by isostatically pressing a metal which is resistant to attack by acid about ferromagnetic bodies whereby to encase the bodies in the metal. In one arrangement, as shown, the bodies are encapsulated between inner and outer cylinders. In other arrangements the encapsulating metal is in the form of a tube or planar sheets. The bodies are of Fe or an oxide thereof and the acid-resistant metal parts may be of stainless steel, Au, Pt, Pa or an alloy. The magnetic separator is intended for use in removing particles from liquids during the reprocessing of nuclear fuel materials. (author)

  18. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1980-03-01

    The 'ingredients' which control a phase transition in well defined system as well as in random ones (e.g. random magnetic systems) are listed and discussed within a somehow unifying perspective. Among these 'ingredients' we find the couplings and elements responsible for the cooperative phenomenon, the topological connectivity as well as possible topological incompatibilities, the influence of new degrees of freedom, the order parameter dimensionality, the ground state degeneracy and finally the 'quanticity' of the system. The general trends, though illustrated in magnetic systems, essentially hold for all phase transitions, and give a basis for connection of this area with Field theory, Theory of dynamical systems, etc. (Author) [pt

  19. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsallis, C.

    1981-01-01

    The 'ingredients' which control a phase transition in well defined systems as well as in random ones (e.q. random magnetic systems) are listed and discussed within a somehow unifying perspective. Among these 'ingredients' the couplings and elements responsible for the cooperative phenomenon, the topological connectivity as well as possible topological incompatibilities, the influence of new degrees of freedom, the order parameter dimensionality, the ground state degeneracy and finally the 'quanticity' of the system are found. The general trends, though illustrated in magnetic systems, essentially hold for all phase transitions, and give a basis for connection of this area with Field theory, Theory of dynamical systems, etc. (Author) [pt

  20. Magnetic particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  1. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  2. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in schizophrenia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertolino, Alessandro; Weinberger, Daniel R.

    1999-01-01

    Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) has become an important tool to study in vivo certain biochemical aspects of brain disorders. In the last decade this technique has been applied to the in vivo investigation of pathophysiological aspects of psychiatric disorders, extending knowledge of the related brain alterations. This review will focus on providing some background to clarify technical and biochemical issues and it will describe the studies that have been performed in schizophrenia. The results will be framed in a more general context to highlight what we have learned and what remains to be understood from the application of this technique to schizophrenia

  3. Random magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir-Kheli, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    A few simple problems relating to random magnetic systems are presented. Translational symmetry, only on the macroscopic scale, is assumed for these systems. A random set of parameters, on the microscopic scale, for the various regions of these systems is also assumed. A probability distribution for randomness is obeyed. Knowledge of the form of these probability distributions, is assumed in all cases [pt

  4. In vivo field dependence of proton relaxation times in human brain, liver and skeletal muscle: a multicenter study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, O; de Certaines, J D; Spisni, A

    1993-01-01

    and MRS, the in vivo field dispersion of T1 and T2 has been measured in order to evaluate whether ex vivo data are representative for the in vivo situation. Brain, skeletal muscle, and liver of healthy human volunteers were studied. Fifteen MR units with a field strength ranging from 0.08 T to 1.5 T took......T1 and T2 relaxation times are fundamental parameters for signal contrast behaviour in MRI. A number of ex vivo relaxometry studies have dealt with the magnetic field dispersion of T1. By means of multicenter study within the frame of the COMAC BME Concerted Action on Tissue Characterization by MRI......, whereas no significant variations were seen for T2. Our in vivo data were generally in reasonable agreement with proposed models based on ex vivo measurements....

  5. Magnetic Design of Superconducting Magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todesco, E [European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)

    2014-07-01

    In this paper we discuss the main principles of magnetic design for superconducting magnets (dipoles and quadrupoles) for particle accelerators. We give approximated equations that govern the relation between the field/gradient, the current density, the type of superconductor (Nb−Ti or Nb3Sn), the thickness of the coil, and the fraction of stabilizer. We also state the main principle controlling the field quality optimization, and discuss the role of iron. A few examples are given to show the application of the equations and their validity limits.

  6. Neutron Scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaboussant, G.

    2009-01-01

    This work deals with inelastic neutron scattering studies of magnetic molecular magnets and focuses on their magnetic properties at low temperature and low energies. Several molecular magnets (Mn 12 , V 15 , Ni 12 , Mn 4 , etc.) are reviewed. Inelastic neutron scattering is shown to be a perfectly suited spectroscopy tool to -a) probe magnetic energy levels in such systems and -b) provide key information to understand the quantum tunnel effect of the magnetization in molecular spin clusters. (author)

  7. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase....

  8. Magnetic iron oxide for contrast-enhanced MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fahlvik, A.K.

    1991-05-01

    The main objective of this experimental work has been to study the biological fate and the contrast enhancing potential of a model preparation of magnetic iron oxide (MSM) after intravenous injection to rodents. This was achieved by: Studying in vitro contrast efficacy of various magnetic iron oxide preparations by relaxation analysis. Studying in vivo contrast efficacy of MSM by relaxation analysis and NMR imaging. Studying the biodistribution and bioelimination of MSM in independent experiments using relaxation analysis, radioactivity studies and histological techniques. Studying interactions of MSM with target cells and target organelles using ex vivo techniques. Based on the presented experimental study, the MSM model preparation of magnetic iron oxide seems to fulfill basic requirements of NMR contrast agents: efficient proton relaxation, specific in vivo distribution, and biological tolerance. 177 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs

  9. 'In vivo' and high resolution spectroscopy in solids by NMR: an instrument for transgenic plants study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colnago, L.A.; Herrmann, P.S.P.; Bernardes Filho, R.

    1995-01-01

    This work has developed a study on transgenic plants using two different techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance, in vivo NMR and high resolution NMR. In order to understand the gene mutations and characterize the plants constituents, NMR spectral data were analysed and discussed, then the results were presented

  10. In vivo postprandial lipid partitioning in liver and muscle of diabetic rats is disturbed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prompers, J.J.; Jonkers, R.A.M.; Loon, van L.J.C.; Nicolay, K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To study in vivo lipid partitioning in insulin-resistant liver and muscle of diabetic rats using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Methods: Four groups of n=6 male Zucker diabetic fatty rats were used for this study: obese, pre-diabetic fa/fa rats and lean, non-diabetic fa/+

  11. MRI and in vivo proton MR spectroscopy in a racemose cysticercal cyst of the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, P.N.; Chandrashekar, H.S.; Srikanth, S.G.; Guruprasad, A.S.; Devi, B.Indira; Shankar, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    Racemose cysticercal cyst is the subarachnoid manifestation of the larvae of Taenia solium. On MRI the cysts may resemble other cystic masses. We report the magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) features of a case on in vivo proton spectroscopy and discuss its role in the diagnosis of intracranial cysts of parasitic aetiology. (orig.)

  12. Dental implants coated with laser deposited hydroxyapatite films - physical properties and in-vivo study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jelínek, Miroslav; Dostálová, T.; Himmlová, L.; Grivas, Ch.; Fotakis, C.

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 374, - (2002), s. 599-604 ISSN 1058-725X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : laser deposition * thin films * implants * hydroxyapatite * in-vivo tests Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.457, year: 2002

  13. In Vivo EPR Resolution Enhancement Using Techniques Known from Quantum Computing Spin Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Robabeh; Halpern, Howard J; Takui, Takeji

    2017-01-01

    A crucial issue with in vivo biological/medical EPR is its low signal-to-noise ratio, giving rise to the low spectroscopic resolution. We propose quantum hyperpolarization techniques based on 'Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling', allowing possible approaches for improving the resolution in magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging.

  14. In vivo reconstruction of lumbar erector spinae architecture using diffusion tensor MRI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sieben, Judith M.; Van Otten, Ilse; Lataster, Arno; Froeling, Martijn; Nederveen, Aart J.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Drost, Maarten R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design: Diffusion tensor magnetic resonance imaging (DTMRI) reconstruction of lumbar erector spinae (ES) compared with cadaver dissection. Objective: The aim of this study was to reconstruct the human lumbar ES from in vivo DT-MRI measurements and to compare the results with literature and

  15. A Novel Paramagnetic Substrate for Detecting Myeloperoxidase Activity in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed S. Shazeeb

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Bis-phenylamides and bis-hydroxyindolamides of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA(Gd are paramagnetic reducing substrates of peroxidases that enable molecular imaging of peroxidase activity in vivo. Specifically, gadolinium chelates of bis-5-hydroxytryptamide-DTPA (bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd have been used to image localized inflammation in animal models by detecting neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO activity at the inflammation site. However, in other preclinical disease models, bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd presents technical challenges due to its limited solubility in vivo. Here we report a novel MPO-sensing probe obtained by replacing the reducing substrate serotonin (5-HT with 5-hydroxytryptophan (HTrp. Characterization of the resulting probe (bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd in vitro using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enzyme kinetic analysis showed that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd (1 improves solubility in water; (2 acts as a substrate for both horseradish peroxidase and MPO enzymes; (3 induces cross-linking of proteins in the presence of MPO; (4 produces oxidation products, which bind to plasma proteins; and (5 unlike bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd, does not follow first-order reaction kinetics. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MR! in mice demonstrated that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd was retained for up to 5 days in MPO-containing sites and cleared faster than bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd from MPO-negative sites. Bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd should offer improvements for MR! of MPO-mediated inflammation in vivo, especially in high-field MR!, which requires a higher dose of contrast agent.

  16. A novel paramagnetic substrate for detecting myeloperoxidase activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shazeeb, Mohammed S; Xie, Yang; Gupta, Suresh; Bogdanov, Alexei A

    2012-01-01

    Bis-phenylamides and bis-hydroxyindolamides of diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-gadolinium (DTPA(Gd)) are paramagnetic reducing substrates of peroxidases that enable molecular imaging of peroxidase activity in vivo. Specifically, gadolinium chelates of bis-5-hydroxytryptamide-DTPA (bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd)) have been used to image localized inflammation in animal models by detecting neutrophil-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity at the inflammation site. However, in other preclinical disease models, bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd) presents technical challenges due to its limited solubility in vivo. Here we report a novel MPO-sensing probe obtained by replacing the reducing substrate serotonin (5-HT) with 5-hydroxytryptophan (HTrp). Characterization of the resulting probe (bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd)) in vitro using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and enzyme kinetic analysis showed that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) (1) improves solubility in water; (2) acts as a substrate for both horseradish peroxidase and MPO enzymes; (3) induces cross-linking of proteins in the presence of MPO; (4) produces oxidation products, which bind to plasma proteins; and (5) unlike bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd), does not follow first-order reaction kinetics. In vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in mice demonstrated that bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) was retained for up to 5 days in MPO-containing sites and cleared faster than bis-5HT-DTPA(Gd) from MPO-negative sites. Bis-HTrp-DTPA(Gd) should offer improvements for MRI of MPO-mediated inflammation in vivo, especially in high-field MRI, which requires a higher dose of contrast agent.

  17. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo imaging of the microvasculature with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Joe; Koletar, Margaret; Stefanovic, Bojana; Sled, John G.

    2016-03-01

    This study evaluates 2-Photon fluorescence microscopy of in vivo and ex vivo cleared samples for visualizing cortical vasculature. Four mice brains were imaged with in vivo 2PFM. Mice were then perfused with a FITC gel and cleared in fructose. The same regions imaged in vivo were imaged ex vivo. Vessels were segmented automatically in both images using an in-house developed algorithm that accounts for the anisotropic and spatially varying PSF ex vivo. Through non-linear warping, the ex vivo image and tracing were aligned to the in vivo image. The corresponding vessels were identified through a local search algorithm. This enabled comparison of identical vessels in vivo/ex vivo. A similar process was conducted on the in vivo tracing to determine the percentage of vessels perfused. Of all the vessels identified over the four brains in vivo, 98% were present ex vivo. There was a trend towards reduced vessel diameter ex vivo by 12.7%, and the shrinkage varied between specimens (0% to 26%). Large diameter surface vessels, through a process termed 'shadowing', attenuated in vivo signal from deeper cortical vessels by 40% at 300 μm below the cortical surface, which does not occur ex vivo. In summary, though there is a mean diameter shrinkage ex vivo, ex vivo imaging has a reduced shadowing artifact. Additionally, since imaging depths are only limited by the working distance of the microscope objective, ex vivo imaging is more suitable for imaging large portions of the brain.

  18. Magnetic resonance annual 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kressel, H.Y.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains papers written on magnetic resonance during 1986. Topics include: musculosketetal magnetic resonance imaging; imaging of the spine; magnetic resonance chemical shift imaging; magnetic resonance imaging in the central nervous system; comparison to computed tomography; high resolution magnetic resonance imaging using surface coils; magnetic resonance imaging of the chest; magnetic resonance imaging of the breast; magnetic resonance imaging of the liver; magnetic resonance spectroscopy of neoplasms; blood flow effects in magnetic resonance imaging; and current and potential applications of clinical sodium magnetic resonance imaging

  19. Designing a magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus

    This thesis investigates the design and optimization of a permanent magnet assembly for use in a magnetic refrigeration device. The heart of magnetic refrigeration is the adiabatic temperature change in the magnetocaloric material which is caused by the magnetic field. In order to design an ideal...... magnet assembly the magnetocaloric materials and the refrigeration process itself and their properties and performance as a function of magnetic field are investigated. For the magnetocaloric materials it is the magnetization, specific heat capacity and adiabatic temperature that are investigated...... as a function of the magnetic field in order to learn the properties of the optimal magnet assembly. The performance of the AMR as a function of the synchronization and width of the magnetic field with respect to the AMR cycle, the ramp rate and maximum value of the magnetic field are investigated. Other...

  20. Magnetic monopoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shnir, Ya.M.

    2005-01-01

    This monograph addresses the field theoretical aspects of magnetic monopoles. Written for graduate students as well as researchers, the author demonstrates the interplay between mathematics and physics. He delves into details as necessary and develops many techniques that find applications in modern theoretical physics. This introduction to the basic ideas used for the description and construction of monopoles is also the first coherent presentation of the concept of magnetic monopoles. It arises in many different contexts in modern theoretical physics, from classical mechanics and electrodynamics to multidimensional branes. The book summarizes the present status of the theory and gives an extensive but carefully selected bibliography on the subject. The first part deals with the Dirac monopole, followed in part two by the monopole in non-abelian gauge theories. The third part is devoted to monopoles in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theories. (orig.)

  1. magnetic horn

    CERN Document Server

    Neutrinos and antineutrinos are ideal for probing the weak force because it is effectively the only force they feel. How were they made? Protons fired into a metal target produce a tangle of secondary particles. A magnetic horn like this one, invented by Simon Van der Meer, selected pions and focused them into a sharp beam. Pions decay into muons and neutrinos or antineutrinos. The muons were stopped in a wall of 3000 tons of iron and 1000 tons of concrete, leaving the neutrinos or antineutrinos to reach the Gargamelle bubble chamber. A simple change of magnetic field direction on the horn flipped between focusing positively- or negatively-charged pion beams, and so between neutrinos and antineutrinos.

  2. Magnetic Reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

    2009-09-17

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

  3. Planetary magnetism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolginov, Sh.Sh.

    1977-01-01

    Experimental data on magnetic fields of planets are surveyed. The magnetic fields of the Earth, Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Venus, and the Moon are considered in detail. A similarity of the physical models of both the planets of the Earth group and the giant planets was revealed. The fields of the planets and of the Earth are compared in the scheme of the precession dynamo and in the kinematic scheme. Proceeding from the assumption that the Poincare forces and their ratio to other forces are model-similar in the cores of all the planets, the values of Hsub(i)/Hsub(E) are calculated, where Hsub(i) and Hsub(E) are the field strengths of the i-th planet and that of the Earth. The experimental data on the dynamic compression of the Mercury confirm the calculations made. It is concluded that the problem of the origin and moving forces of the terrestrial magnetic field may be resolved only within the framework of comparative planetology

  4. MAGNET / INFRASTRUCTURE

    CERN Multimedia

    D. Campi

    The final fast discharge of the Magnet took place on 3rd of November. The Coil reached a temperature of 70K by internal energy dissipation. By injecting a current of 200 A room temperature was reached on the 23rd November. During the heating of the coil un-connecting of the first magnet connectors on YBO was started to give the earliest possible access to the assembly groups and to continue the installation of the muon chambers. The removal of the pumping lines and the disconnection of the vacuum system was instead done as soon as the room temperature was reached: more precisely from the 4 to the 18 December. The disconnection of the transfer line from the cold box and the completion of the removal of the control cables of the vacuum system and cryogenics was done at last. In January 2007 the disconnection of MCS-MSS, CDS, vacuum racks and their cable trays was also achieved. After coil disconnection the effort of the magnet team has been mainly devoted in optimizing the lowering and reassembly of the a...

  5. Magnetic semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihler, Christoph

    2009-04-15

    In this thesis we investigated in detail the properties of Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As, Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}P, and Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}N dilute magnetic semiconductor thin films with a focus on the magnetic anisotropy and the changes of their properties upon hydrogenation. We applied two complementary spectroscopic techniques to address the position of H in magnetic semiconductors: (i) Electron paramagnetic resonance, which provides direct information on the symmetry of the crystal field of the Mn{sup 2+} atoms and (ii) x-ray absorption fine structure analysis which allows to probe the local crystallographic neighborhood of the absorbing Mn atom via analysing the fine structure at the Mn K absorption edge. Finally, we discussed the obstacles that have to be overcome to achieve Curie temperatures above the current maximum in Ga{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}As of 185 K. Here, we outlined in detail the generic problem of the formation of precipitates at the example of Ge:MN. (orig.)

  6. Magnetic Reconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Kulsrud, Russell; Ji, Hantao

    2009-01-01

    We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two-fluid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also briefly discussed.

  7. Magnetic elements for switching magnetization magnetic force microscopy tips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cambel, V.; Elias, P.; Gregusova, D.; Martaus, J.; Fedor, J.; Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.

    2010-01-01

    Using combination of micromagnetic calculations and magnetic force microscopy (MFM) imaging we find optimal parameters for novel magnetic tips suitable for switching magnetization MFM. Switching magnetization MFM is based on two-pass scanning atomic force microscopy with reversed tip magnetization between the scans. Within the technique the sum of the scanned data with reversed tip magnetization depicts local atomic forces, while their difference maps the local magnetic forces. Here we propose the design and calculate the magnetic properties of tips suitable for this scanning probe technique. We find that for best performance the spin-polarized tips must exhibit low magnetic moment, low switching fields, and single-domain state at remanence. The switching field of such tips is calculated and optimum shape of the Permalloy elements for the tips is found. We show excellent correspondence between calculated and experimental results for Py elements.

  8. Synthesis and in-vivo detection of boronated compounds for use in BNCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabalka, G.W.

    1990-04-01

    The primary objective of the DOE Program at the University of Tennessee Biomedical Imaging Center is the development of new technology to detect boron compounds in-vivo. The research focuses on the development of multinuclear magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for verifying and measuring BNCT agents in-vivo. A small but significant portion of the effort is directed toward the design of boron-containing neutron-capture-therapy agents. The UT -- DOE program is unique in that it has access to two state-of-the-art multinuclear magnetic resonance imaging units housed in the Biomedical Imaging Center at the University of Tennessee Medical Center at Knoxville. Included in this report are two sections describing research accomplishments in multinuclear magnetic resonance imaging and synthesis of potential BNCT agents

  9. Magnetic Measurement and Magnet Tutorial, Part 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanabe, Jack

    2003-07-15

    Magnetic measurements, like magnet design, is a broad subject. It is the intention of this lecture to cover only a small part of the field, regarding the characterization of the line integral field quality of multipole magnets (dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles) using compensated rotating coils. Other areas which are not covered are magnet mapping, AC measurements and sweeping wire measurements.

  10. Surface magnetic field measurement with magnetic shielding

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Perevertov, Oleksiy

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 61, č. 7 (2010), 66-68 ISSN 1335-3632 Grant - others:AVČR(CZ) M100100906 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : magnetic hysteresis * magnetic field measurement * magnetic shielding * extrapolation Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.270, year: 2010

  11. An optimized magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden; Smith, Anders

    2010-01-01

    A magnet designed for use in a magnetic refrigeration device is presented. The magnet is designed by applying two general schemes for improving a magnet design to a concentric Halbach cylinder magnet design and dimensioning and segmenting this design in an optimum way followed by the construction...... of the actual magnet. The final design generates a peak value of 1.24 T, an average flux density of 0.9 T in a volume of 2 L using only 7.3 L of magnet, and has an average low flux density of 0.08 T also in a 2 L volume. The working point of all the permanent magnet blocks in the design is very close...... to the maximum energy density. The final design is characterized in terms of a performance parameter, and it is shown that it is one of the best performing magnet designs published for magnetic refrigeration....

  12. An optimized magnet for magnetic refrigeration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjork, R.; Bahl, C.R.H.; Smith, A.; Christensen, D.V.; Pryds, N.

    2010-01-01

    A magnet designed for use in a magnetic refrigeration device is presented. The magnet is designed by applying two general schemes for improving a magnet design to a concentric Halbach cylinder magnet design and dimensioning and segmenting this design in an optimum way followed by the construction of the actual magnet. The final design generates a peak value of 1.24 T, an average flux density of 0.9 T in a volume of 2 L using only 7.3 L of magnet, and has an average low flux density of 0.08 T also in a 2 L volume. The working point of all the permanent magnet blocks in the design is very close to the maximum energy density. The final design is characterized in terms of a performance parameter, and it is shown that it is one of the best performing magnet designs published for magnetic refrigeration.

  13. Magnetic nanosensor particles in luminescence upconversion capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Stefan; Hirsch, Thomas; Scheucher, Elisabeth; Mayr, Torsten; Wolfbeis, Otto S

    2011-09-05

    Nanoparticles (NPs) exhibit interesting size-dependent electrical, optical, magnetic, and chemical properties that cannot be observed in their bulk counterparts. The synthesis of NPs (i.e., crystalline particles ranging in size from 1 to 100 nm) has been intensely studied in the past decades. Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) form a particularly attractive class of NPs and have found numerous applications such as in magnetic resonance imaging to visualize cancer, cardiovascular, neurological and other diseases. Other uses include drug targeting, tissue imaging, magnetic immobilization, hyperthermia, and magnetic resonance imaging. MNPs, due to their magnetic properties, can be easily separated from (often complex) matrices and manipulated by applying external magnetic field. Near-infrared to visible upconversion luminescent nanoparticles (UCLNPs) form another type of unusual nanoparticles. They are capable of emitting visible light upon NIR light excitation. Lanthanide-doped (Yb, Er) hexagonal NaYF₄ UCLNPs are the most efficient upconversion phosphors known up to now. The use of UCLNPs for in vitro imaging of cancer cells and in vivo imaging in tissues has been demonstrated. UCLNPs show great potential as a new class of luminophores for biological, biomedical, and sensor applications. We are reporting here on our first results on the combination of MNP and UCLNP technology within an ongoing project supported by the DFG and the FWF (Austria).

  14. Handheld magnetic probe with permanent magnet and Hall sensor for identifying sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekino, Masaki; Kuwahata, Akihiro; Ookubo, Tetsu; Shiozawa, Mikio; Ohashi, Kaichi; Kaneko, Miki; Saito, Itsuro; Inoue, Yusuke; Ohsaki, Hiroyuki; Takei, Hiroyuki; Kusakabe, Moriaki

    2018-01-19

    The newly developed radioisotope-free technique based on magnetic nanoparticle detection using a magnetic probe is a promising method for sentinel lymph node biopsy. In this study, a novel handheld magnetic probe with a permanent magnet and magnetic sensor is developed to detect the sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer patients. An outstanding feature of the probe is the precise positioning of the sensor at the magnetic null point of the magnet, leading to highly sensitive measurements unaffected by the strong ambient magnetic fields of the magnet. Numerical and experimental results show that the longitudinal detection length is approximately 10 mm, for 140 μg of iron. Clinical tests were performed, for the first time, using magnetic and blue dye tracers-without radioisotopes-in breast cancer patients to demonstrate the performance of the probe. The nodes were identified through transcutaneous and ex-vivo measurements, and the iron accumulation in the nodes was quantitatively revealed. These results show that the handheld magnetic probe is useful in sentinel lymph node biopsy and that magnetic techniques are widely being accepted as future standard methods in medical institutions lacking nuclear medicine facilities.

  15. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging in cerebral ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rijen, P.C. van.

    1991-01-01

    In-vivo proton and phosphorus magnetic resonance spectroscopy was used to detect changes in cerebral metabolism during ischemia and other types of metabolic stress. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed in an animal model to observe morphological alterations during focal cerebral ischemia. Spectroscopy was performed in animal models with global ischemia, in volunteers during hyperventilation and pharmaco-logically altered cerebral perfusion, and in patients with acute and prolonged focal cerebral ischemia. (author). 396 refs.; 44 figs.; 14 tabs

  16. Clinically viable magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) particles for MRI-based cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granot, Dorit; Nkansah, Michael K.; Bennewitz, Margaret F.; Tang, Kevin S.; Markakis, Eleni A.; Shapiro, Erik M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To design, fabricate, characterize and in vivo assay clinically viable magnetic particles for MRI-based cell tracking. Methods PLGA encapsulated magnetic nano- and microparticles were fabricated. Multiple biologically relevant experiments were performed to assess cell viability, cellular performance and stem cell differentiation. In vivo MRI experiments were performed to separately test cell transplantation and cell migration paradigms, as well as in vivo biodegradation. Results Highly magnetic nano- (~100 nm) and microparticles (~1–2 μm) were fabricated. Magnetic cell labeling in culture occurred rapidly achieving 3–50 pg Fe/cell at 3 hrs for different particles types, and >100 pg Fe/cell after 10 hours, without the requirement of a transfection agent, and with no effect on cell viability. The capability of magnetically labeled mesenchymal or neural stem cells to differentiate down multiple lineages, or for magnetically labeled immune cells to release cytokines following stimulation, was uncompromised. An in vivo biodegradation study revealed that NPs degraded ~80% over the course of 12 weeks. MRI detected as few as 10 magnetically labeled cells, transplanted into the brains of rats. Also, these particles enabled the in vivo monitoring of endogenous neural progenitor cell migration in rat brains over 2 weeks. Conclusion The robust MRI properties and benign safety profile of these particles make them promising candidates for clinical translation for MRI-based cell tracking. PMID:23568825

  17. Magnetic nanoparticle-based cancer nanodiagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousaf Muhammad Zubair; Yu Jing; Hou Yang-Long; Gao Song

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis facilitates the discovery of an impending disease. A complete and accurate treatment of cancer depends heavily on its early medical diagnosis. Cancer, one of the most fatal diseases world-wide, consistently affects a larger number of patients each year. Magnetism, a physical property arising from the motion of electrical charges, which causes attraction and repulsion between objects and does not involve radiation, has been under intense investigation for several years. Magnetic materials show great promise in the application of image contrast enhancement to accurately image and diagnose cancer. Chelating gadolinium (Gd III) and magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) have the prospect to pave the way for diagnosis, operative management, and adjuvant therapy of different kinds of cancers. The potential of MNP-based magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agents (CAs) now makes it possible to image portions of a tumor in parts of the body that would be unclear with the conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Multiple functionalities like variety of targeting ligands and image contrast enhancement have recently been added to the MNPs. Keeping aside the additional complexities in synthetic steps, costs, more convoluted behavior, and effects in-vivo, multifunctional MNPs still face great regulatory hurdles before clinical availability for cancer patients. The trade-off between additional functionality and complexity is a subject of ongoing debate. The recent progress regarding the types, design, synthesis, morphology, characterization, modification, and the in-vivo and in-vitro uses of different MRI contrast agents, including MNPs, to diagnose cancer will be the focus of this review. As our knowledge of MNPs' characteristics and applications expands, their role in the future management of cancer patients will become very important. Current hurdles are also discussed, along with future prospects of MNPs as the savior of cancer victims. (topical review - magnetism

  18. Enhancing the magnetic properties of magnetic nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlburg, Jakob; Saura-Múzquiz, Matilde; Stingaciu, Marian

    with a similar magnetic performance. There are several different ways of enhancing magnetic properties of 3d magnetic compounds. This includes, size control, core-shell particles or mixing hard and soft magnetic materials together to achieve an exchange coupling between the compounds and enhancing the magnetic...... energy product. In order to control the particle size, a hydrothermal synthesis is preferred. This followed by reduction or the oxides into either core shell particles, or a mixture of magnetic oxides and a metallic phase.......Strong magnets with a high energy product are vital when optimizing the efficiency in the electric industry. But since the rare earth metals, normally used for making strong permanent magnets, are both expensive and difficult to mine, a great demand has come to cheaper types of magnets...

  19. Magnetization reversal in ultrashort magnetic field pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauer, M.; Lopusnik, R.; Fassbender, J.; Hillebrands, B.

    2000-01-01

    We report the switching properties of a thin magnetic film subject to an ultrashort, laterally localized magnetic field pulse, obtained by numerical investigations. The magnetization distribution in the film is calculated on a grid assuming Stoner-like coherent rotation within the grid square size. Perpendicularly and in-plane magnetized films exhibit a magnetization reversal due to a 4 ps magnetic field pulse. Outside the central region the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period. In this area the evolution of the magnetization during the field pulse does not depend strongly on magnetic damping and/or pulse shape. However, the final magnetization distribution is affected by the magnetic damping. Although the pulse duration is short compared to the precession period, the time needed for the relaxation of the magnetization to the equilibrium state is rather large. The influence of the different magnetic anisotropy contributions and the magnetic damping parameter enters into the magnetization reversal process. Comparing the case of perpendicular anisotropy with different kinds of in-plane anisotropies, a principal difference is found due to the symmetry of the shape anisotropy with respect to the anisotropy in question

  20. MAGNETIC WOVEN FABRICS - PHYSICAL AND MAGNETIC PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GROSU Marian C

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A coated material is a composite structure that consists of at least two components: base material and coating layer. The purpose of coating is to provide special properties to base material, with potential to be applied in EMI shielding and diverse smart technical fields. This paper reports the results of a study about some physical and magnetic properties of coated woven fabrics made from cotton yarns with fineness of 17 metric count. For this aim, a plain woven fabric was coated with a solution hard magnetic polymer based. As hard magnetic powder, barium hexaferrite (BaFe12O19 was selected. The plain woven fabric used as base has been coated with five solutions having different amounts of hard magnetic powder (15% - 45% in order to obtain five different magnetic woven fabrics. A comparison of physical properties regarding weight (g/m2, thickness (mm, degree of charging (% and magnetic properties of magnetic woven samples were presented. Saturation magnetizing (emu/g, residual magnetizing (emu/g and coercive force (kA/m of pure hard magnetic powder and woven fabrics have been studied as hysteresis characteristics. The magnetic properties of the woven fabrics depend on the mass percentage of magnetic powder from coating solution. Also, the residual magnetism and coercive field of woven fabrics represents only a part of bulk barium hexafferite residual magnetism and coercive field.

  1. Magnetic Retraction of Bowel by Intraluminal Injectable Cyanoacrylate-Based Magnetic Glue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic retraction offers advantages over physical retraction by graspers because of reduced tissue trauma. The objectives of this study are to investigate a novel method of magnetisation of bowel segments by intraluminal injection of magnetic glue and to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetic retraction of bowel with sufficient force during minimal access surgery. Following an initial materials characterisation study, selected microparticles of stainless steel (SS410-μPs were mixed with chosen cyanoacrylate glue (Loctite 4014. During intraluminal injection of the magnetic glue using ex vivo porcine colonic segments, a magnetic probe placed at the injected site ensured that the SS410-μPs aggregated during glue polymerisation to form an intraluminal mucosally adherent coagulum. The magnetised colonic segments were retracted by magnetic probes (5 and 10 mm placed external to the bowel wall. A tensiometer was used to record the retraction force. With an injected volume of 2 mL in a particle concentration of 1 g/mL, this technique produced maximal magnetic retraction forces of 2.24 ± 0.23 N and 5.11 ± 0.34 N (, with use of 5 and 10 mm probes, respectively. The results indicate that the formation of an intraluminal coagulum based on SS410-μPs and Loctite 4014 produces sufficient magnetic retraction for bowel retraction.

  2. Magnet innovations for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-01-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results of past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs are presented

  3. Magnet innovations for linacs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halbach, K.

    1986-06-01

    It is possible to produce large magnetic fields at the aperture of permanent magnet quadrupoles, even when the magnetic aperture is very small. That, combined with their compactness, makes permanent magnet quadrupoles very powerful components of small aperture linacs. Results will be presented about past and present work on both fixed and variable strength permanent magnets suitable for use in and around linacs

  4. Magnetic guns with cylindrical permanent magnets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, Marco; Heller, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    The motion of a cylindrical permanent magnet (projectile) inside a tubular permanent magnet, with both magnets magnetized axially, illustrates nicely the physical principles behind the operation of magnetic guns. The force acting upon the projectile is expressed semi-analytically as derivative...... of the magnetostatic interaction energy. For comparison, the forces involved are also calculated numerically using finite elements methods. Based on the conservation of the magnetostatic and kinetic energies, the exit and asymptotic velocities are determined. The derived formulas can be used to optimize the generated...... forces and motion of the inner cylindrical magnet....

  5. Metabolite quantitation in breast cancer by in vivo MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jagananthan, Naranamangalam R.

    2014-01-01

    A large number of biochemical and imaging investigations are available for the diagnosis of cancer but detection is still a challenging task. Various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods are used for the detection of tumors that gives morphological and functional details. On the other hand, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides metabolites or biochemicals at the molecular level. With technological advancement in MR, it is possible to detect in vivo metabolites from normal and pathological tissues that are present in millimolar concentrations and there are several localization methods available for the same. The commonest cancer in women is the breast cancer and is a leading cause of death among the female population worldwide. The in vivo localized proton MR spectroscopy of normal breast tissues is dominated by a huge lipid with little contribution from water while malignant breast tissues contain high water content. By suppressing the water and fat contribution, it is possible to detect choline containing compounds (tCho) in malignant breast tissues. The parameters obtained from in vivo proton MRS of breast tissues are water-to-fat (W-F) ratio and detection of tCho. tCho has been documented by many workers as a potential marker of breast malignancy. Recently, quantitative assessment of tCho concentration has been reported. There are two methods that are used for quantification of tCho: (a) semi-quantitative method that calculates the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the choline signal; and (b) determination of the absolute concentration of tCho using water as an internal and external reference. Both W-F ratio and tCho concentration have been evaluated as markers for assessment of tumor response to therapy. This talk would cover various MRS methods used for the diagnosis of breast cancer together with the details of the determination of the absolute and relative concentrations of metabolites. (author)

  6. The Behaviors of Ferro-Magnetic Nano-Particles In and Around Blood Vessels under Applied Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacev, A.; Beni, C.; Bruno, O.; Shapiro, B.

    2010-01-01

    In magnetic drug delivery, therapeutic magnetizable particles are typically injected into the blood stream and magnets are then used to concentrate them to disease locations. The behavior of such particles in-vivo is complex and is governed by blood convection, diffusion (in blood and in tissue), extravasation, and the applied magnetic fields. Using physical first-principles and a sophisticated vessel-membrane-tissue (VMT) numerical solver, we comprehensively analyze in detail the behavior of magnetic particles in blood vessels and surrounding tissue. For any blood vessel (of any size, depth, and blood velocity) and tissue properties, particle size and applied magnetic fields, we consider a Krogh tissue cylinder geometry and solve for the resulting spatial distribution of particles. We find that there are three prototypical behaviors (blood velocity dominated, magnetic force dominated, and boundary-layer formation) and that the type of behavior observed is uniquely determined by three non-dimensional numbers (the magnetic-Richardson number, mass Péclet number, and Renkin reduced diffusion coefficient). Plots and equations are provided to easily read out which behavior is found under which circumstances (Figures 5, 6, 7, and 8). We compare our results to previously published in-vitro and in-vivo magnetic drug delivery experiments. Not only do we find excellent agreement between our predictions and prior experimental observations, but we are also able to qualitatively and quantitatively explain behavior that was previously not understood. PMID:21278859

  7. MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Procedures Medical Imaging MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a medical imaging procedure for ...

  8. Magnetic nanocomposite sensor

    KAUST Repository

    Alfadhel, Ahmed; Li, Bodong; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2016-01-01

    A magnetic nanocomposite device is described herein for a wide range of sensing applications. The device utilizes the permanent magnetic behavior of the nanowires to allow operation without the application of an additional magnetic field

  9. Magnetism of Carbonados

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kletetschka, G.; Taylor, P. T.; Wasilewski, P. J.

    2000-01-01

    Origin of Carbonado is not clear. Magnetism of Carbonado comes from the surface, indicating contemporary formation of both the surface and magnetic carriers. The interior of carbonado is relatively free of magnetic phases.

  10. In vivo counting of uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palmer, H.E.

    1985-03-01

    A state-of-the-art radiation detector system consisting of six individually mounted intrinsic germanium planar detectors, each 20 cm 2 by 13 mm thick, mounted together such that the angle of the whole system can be changed to match the slope of the chest of the person being counted, is described. The sensitivity of the system for counting uranium and plutonium in vivo and the precedures used in calibrating the system are also described. Some results of counts done on uranium mill workers are presented. 15 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Enhanced Radiofrequency Ablation With Magnetically Directed Metallic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Duy T; Tzou, Wendy S; Zheng, Lijun; Barham, Waseem; Schuller, Joseph L; Shillinglaw, Benjamin; Quaife, Robert A; Sauer, William H

    2016-05-01

    Remote heating of metal located near a radiofrequency ablation source has been previously demonstrated. Therefore, ablation of cardiac tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles may improve local radiofrequency heating and lead to larger ablation lesions. We sought to evaluate the effect of magnetic nanoparticles on tissue sensitivity to radiofrequency energy. Ablation was performed using an ablation catheter positioned with 10 g of force over prepared ex vivo specimens. Tissue temperatures were measured and lesion volumes were acquired. An in vivo porcine thigh model was used to study systemically delivered magnetically guided iron oxide (FeO) nanoparticles during radiofrequency application. Magnetic resonance imaging and histological staining of ablated tissue were subsequently performed as a part of ablation lesion analysis. Ablation of ex vivo myocardial tissue treated with metallic nanoparticles resulted in significantly larger lesions with greater impedance changes and evidence of increased thermal conductivity within the tissue. Magnet-guided localization of FeO nanoparticles within porcine thigh preps was demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging and iron staining. Irrigated ablation in the regions with greater FeO, after FeO infusion and magnetic guidance, created larger lesions without a greater incidence of steam pops. Metal nanoparticle infiltration resulted in significantly larger ablation lesions with altered electric and thermal conductivity. In vivo magnetic guidance of FeO nanoparticles allowed for facilitated radiofrequency ablation without direct infiltration into the targeted tissue. Further research is needed to assess the clinical applicability of this ablation strategy using metallic nanoparticles for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  12. Magnetic propulsion for magnetically levitated trains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melville, P H

    1973-12-01

    One of the main problems associated with magnetically levitated trains is the means of propulsion. A system is described whereby the repulsion from the superconducting magnets, in addition to levitating the train, can also be used to propel it.

  13. Nuclear magnetic resonance and earth magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance concerns nuclei whose spin is different from 0. These nuclei exposed to a magnetic field is comparable to a peg top spinning around its axis while being moved by a precession movement called Larmor precession. This article presents an experiment whose aim is to reveal nuclear magnetism of nuclei by observing Larmor precession phenomena due to the earth magnetic field. The earth magnetic field being too weak, it is necessary to increase the magnetization of the sample during a polarization phase. First the sample is submitted to a magnetic field B perpendicular to the earth magnetic field B 0 , then B is cut off and the nuclei move back to their equilibrium position by executing a precession movement due to B 0 field. (A.C.)

  14. Magnetic guns with cylindrical permanent magnets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vokoun, David; Beleggia, M.; Heller, Luděk

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 324, č. 9 (2012), s. 1715-1719 ISSN 0304-8853 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP107/11/0391; GA AV ČR IAA100100920 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : permanent magnet * cylindrical magnet * Earnshaw's theorem * magnetic gun * magnetostatic interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.826, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304885311008997

  15. Magnetic Field Calculator

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Magnetic Field Calculator will calculate the total magnetic field, including components (declination, inclination, horizontal intensity, northerly intensity,...

  16. Magnetic Resonance Imaging to Visualize Disintegration of Oral Formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curley, Louise; Hinton, Jordan; Marjoribanks, Cameron; Mirjalili, Ali; Kennedy, Julia; Svirskis, Darren

    2017-03-01

    This article demonstrates that magnetic resonance imaging can visualize the disintegration of a variety of paracetamol containing oral formulations in an in vitro setting and in vivo in the human stomach. The different formulations had unique disintegration profiles which could be imaged both in vitro and in vivo. No special formulation approaches or other contrast agents were required. These data demonstrate the potential for further use of magnetic resonance imaging to investigate and understand the disintegration behavior of different formulation types in vivo, and could potentially be used as a teaching tool in pharmaceutical and medical curricula. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing bulk exchange spring magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccall, Scott K.; Kuntz, Joshua D.

    2017-06-27

    A method of making a bulk exchange spring magnet by providing a magnetically soft material, providing a hard magnetic material, and producing a composite of said magnetically soft material and said hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet. The step of producing a composite of magnetically soft material and hard magnetic material is accomplished by electrophoretic deposition of the magnetically soft material and the hard magnetic material to make the bulk exchange spring magnet.

  18. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R. (Florence Univ. (Italy))

    1994-06-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs.

  19. Magnetic resonance of low dimensional magnetic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gatteschi, D.; Ferraro, F.; Sessoli, R.

    1994-01-01

    The utility of EPR and NMR in the study of low-dimensional magnetic solids is shown. A short summary of the basis of magnetic resonance in these systems is reported, and the importance of spin-diffusion and magnetic anisotropy evidenced. Some results from experiments on metal-radical chains and clusters are presented. (authors). 37 refs., 7 figs

  20. Magnetic Barkhausen noise at different magnetization conditions

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stupakov, Alexandr; Perevertov, Oleksiy; Neslušan, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 7 (2015), s. 10-13 ISSN 1335-3632 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-18993S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Barkhausen noise * surface magnetic field * magnetization control * magnetic hysteresis * digital feedback loop Subject RIV: JB - Sensors, Measurment, Regulation Impact factor: 0.407, year: 2015

  1. In-vivo quantitative measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Takashi

    1992-01-01

    So far by positron CT, the quantitative analyses of oxygen consumption rate, blood flow distribution, glucose metabolic rate and so on have been carried out. The largest merit of using the positron CT is the observation and verification of mankind have become easy. Recently, accompanying the rapid development of the mapping tracers for central nervous receptors, the observation of many central nervous receptors by the positron CT has become feasible, and must expectation has been placed on the elucidation of brain functions. The conditions required for in vitro processes cannot be realized in strict sense in vivo. The quantitative measurement of in vivo tracer method is carried out by measuring the accumulation and movement of a tracer after its administration. The movement model of the mapping tracer for central nervous receptors is discussed. The quantitative analysis using a steady movement model, the measurement of dopamine receptors by reference method, the measurement of D 2 receptors using 11C-Racloprode by direct method, and the possibility of measuring dynamics bio-reaction are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Magnetic drug delivery with FePd nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pondman, Kirsten M.; Bunt, Nathan D. [Neuro Imaging, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Maijenburg, A. Wouter [Inorganic Material Science, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Wezel, Richard J.A. van [Biomedical Signals and Systems, MIRA, Twente University, Enschede (Netherlands); Kishore, Uday [Centre for Infection, Immunity and Disease Mechanisms, Biosciences, Brunel University, London (United Kingdom); Abelmann, Leon [Transducer Science and Technology group, MESA+ Institute for nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Elshof, Johan E. ten [Inorganic Material Science, MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands); Haken, Bennie ten, E-mail: b.tenhaken@utwente.nl [Neuro Imaging, MIRA Institute, University of Twente, Enschede (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic drug delivery is a promising method to target a drug to a diseased area while reducing negative side effects caused by systemic administration of drugs. In magnetic drug delivery a therapeutic agent is coupled to a magnetic nanoparticle. The particles are injected and at the target location withdrawn from blood flow by a magnetic field. In this study a FePd nanowire is developed with optimised properties for magnetic targeting. The nanowires have a high magnetic moment to reduce the field gradient needed to capture them with a magnet. The dimensions and the materials of the nanowire and coating are such that they are dispersable in aqueous media, non-cytotoxic, easily phagocytosed and not complement activating. This is established in several in-vitro tests with macrophage and endothelial cell lines. Along with the nanowires a magnet is designed, optimised for capture of the nanowires from the blood flow in the hind leg of a rat. The system is used in a pilot scale in-vivo experiment. No negative side effects from injection of the nanowires were found within the limited time span of the experiment. In this first pilot experiment no nanowires were found to be targeted by the magnet, or in the liver, kidneys or spleen, most likely the particles were removed during the fixation procedure. - Highlights: • Description of the magnetic properties of nanowires. • Design and characterisation of a biocompatible FePd nanowire. • In-vitro cytotoxicity analysis and immune system responses. • In-vivo magnetic drug delivery using the developed nanowires.

  3. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer Imaging in Human Brain at 3 T via Selective Inversion Recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Dortch, Richard D.; Li, Ke; Gochberg, Daniel F.; Welch, E. Brian; Dula, Adrienne N.; Tamhane, Ashish A.; Gore, John C.; Smith, Seth A.

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative magnetization transfer imaging yields indices describing the interactions between free water protons and immobile, macromolecular protons—including the macromolecular to free pool size ratio (PSR) and the rate of magnetization transfer between pools kmf. This study describes the first implementation of the selective inversion recovery quantitative magnetization transfer method on a clinical 3.0-T scanner in human brain in vivo. Selective inversion recovery data were acquired at 1...

  4. Combined preclinical magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. Initial results in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaul, M.G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Raabe, N.; Ittrich, H.; Adam, G.; Heinen, U.; Reitmeier, A.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new radiologic imaging modality. For the first time, a commercial preclinical scanner is installed. The goal of this study was to establish a workflow between MPI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners for a complete in vivo examination of a mouse and to generate the first co-registered in vivo MR-MP images. The in vivo examination of five mice were performed on a preclinical MPI scanner and a 7 Tesla preclinical MRI system. MRI measurements were used for anatomical referencing and validation of the injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles during a dynamic MPI scan. We extracted MPI data of the injection phase and co-registered it with MRI data. A workflow process for a combined in vivo MRI and MPI examination was established. A successful injection of ferucarbotran was proven in MPI and MRI. MR-MPI co-registration allocated the SPIOs in the inferior vena cava and the heart during and shortly after the injection. The acquisition of preclinical MPI and MRI data is feasible and allows the combined analysis of MR-MPI information.

  5. Combined preclinical magnetic particle imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. Initial results in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaul, M.G.; Mummert, T.; Jung, C.; Raabe, N.; Ittrich, H.; Adam, G. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Weber, O. [Philips Medical Systems DMC GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Heinen, U. [Bruker BioSpin MRI GmbH, Ettlingen (Germany); Reitmeier, A. [Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Animal Facility; Knopp, T. [University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Hamburg (Germany). Dept. of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology; Hamburg University of Technology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-05-15

    Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is a new radiologic imaging modality. For the first time, a commercial preclinical scanner is installed. The goal of this study was to establish a workflow between MPI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners for a complete in vivo examination of a mouse and to generate the first co-registered in vivo MR-MP images. The in vivo examination of five mice were performed on a preclinical MPI scanner and a 7 Tesla preclinical MRI system. MRI measurements were used for anatomical referencing and validation of the injection of superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles during a dynamic MPI scan. We extracted MPI data of the injection phase and co-registered it with MRI data. A workflow process for a combined in vivo MRI and MPI examination was established. A successful injection of ferucarbotran was proven in MPI and MRI. MR-MPI co-registration allocated the SPIOs in the inferior vena cava and the heart during and shortly after the injection. The acquisition of preclinical MPI and MRI data is feasible and allows the combined analysis of MR-MPI information.

  6. Integrated magnetic transformer assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to an integrated magnetics transformer assembly comprising a first magnetically permeable core forming a first substantially closed magnetic flux path and a second magnetically permeable core forming a second substantially closed magnetic flux path. A first input...... inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the first magnetically permeable core and a second input inductor winding is wound around a first predetermined segment of the second magnetically permeable core. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly further comprises a first output......-winding of the first output inductor winding and the first half-winding of the second output inductor winding are configured to produce aligned, i.e. in the same direction, magnetic fluxes through the first substantially closed magnetic flux path. The integrated magnetics transformer assembly is well- suited for use...

  7. In vitro and in vivo study of commercial calcium phosphate cement HydroSet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Niall W; Blunn, Gordon; Karpukhina, Natalia; Davis, Graham; de Godoy, Roberta Ferro; Wilson, Rory M; Coathup, Melanie; Onwordi, Lyris; Quak, Wen Yu; Hill, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The commercial calcium phosphate cement, HydroSet™, was investigated in vitro, studying phase formation, compressive strength and setting time, followed by an ovine in vivo study to measure osseointegration, bone apposition and bone-to-graft contact. The X-ray diffraction and 31 P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) results showed the initial formation of octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite at one hour. Over 7 days the octacalcium phosphate transformed to apatite, which was the only crystalline phase of the cement at 28 days. This apatite phase is thought to be a calcium deficient apatite. In the scanning electron microscopy, histological images of 12-week ovine in vivo results showed a high degree of osseointegration, 92.5%. Compressive strength comparisons between in vitro and in vivo measurements showed a dramatic difference between the in vitro measurements (highest 25.4 MPa) and in vivo (95 MPa), attributed to bone ingrowth into the cement in vivo. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time phase evolution of HydroSet™ and the properties studied in vitro complement the in vivo evaluation of the cement in a publication. The significance of the new finding of initial formation of octacalcium phosphate in this cement is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 21-30, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. MAGNETIC DENSITOMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCann, J.A.; Jones, R.H.

    1961-08-15

    A magnetic densitometer for locating defects and metallic inclusions in materials is described. The apparatus consists of two primary coils connected in series opposition and adapted te be placed in inductive relation to the material under test, a source of constant frequency alternating current coupled across the primary coil combination, a pick-up coil disposed in symmetrical inductive relationship with said primary coils, a phase-shifter coupled to the output of the energizing source. The output of the phase-shifter is coupled in series with the pick-up coil. An amplifier is provided selective to the third harmonic of the energizing source frequency. The series combination of the pick-up coil and the phase-shifter output are connected across the input of the amplifier, and an amplitude comparitor is coupled to the output of the amplifier and the energizing source for comparing the instantaneous amplitude of the amplifier output and the instantaneous output of the energizing source and producing an output proportional to the difference in amplitude. A recorder is coupled to the output of the amplitude comparison means to give an indication