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  1. ESBL Detection: Comparison of a Commercially Available Chromogenic Test for Third Generation Cephalosporine Resistance and Automated Susceptibility Testing in Enterobactericeae.

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    Mohamed Ramadan El-Jade

    Full Text Available Rapid detection and reporting of third generation cephalosporine resistance (3GC-R and of extended spectrum betalactamases in Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E is a diagnostic and therapeutic priority to avoid inefficacy of the initial antibiotic regimen. In this study we evaluated a commercially available chromogenic screen for 3GC-R as a predictive and/or confirmatory test for ESBL and AmpC activity in clinical and veterinary Enterobacteriaceae isolates. The test was highly reliable in the prediction of cefotaxime and cefpodoxime resistance, but there was no correlation with ceftazidime and piperacillin/tazobactam minimal inhibitory concentrations. All human and porcine ESBL-E tested were detected with exception of one genetically positive but phenotypically negative isolate. By contrast, AmpC detection rates lay below 30%. Notably, exclusion of piperacillin/tazobactam resistant, 3GC susceptible K1+ Klebsiella isolates increased the sensitivity and specificity of the test for ESBL detection. Our data further imply that in regions with low prevalence of AmpC and K1 positive E. coli strains chromogenic testing for 3GC-R can substitute for more time consuming ESBL confirmative testing in E. coli isolates tested positive by Phoenix or VITEK2 ESBL screen. We, therefore, suggest a diagnostic algorithm that distinguishes 3GC-R screening from primary culture and species-dependent confirmatory ESBL testing by βLACTATM and discuss the implications of MIC distribution results on the choice of antibiotic regimen.

  2. Performance of Vitek 2 for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae with Vitek 2 (2009 FDA) and 2014 CLSI breakpoints.

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    Bobenchik, April M; Deak, Eszter; Hindler, Janet A; Charlton, Carmen L; Humphries, Romney M

    2015-03-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility test system. We compared the MIC results obtained using the Vitek 2 AST-GN69 and AST-XN06 cards to those obtained by CLSI broth microdilution (BMD) for 255 isolates of Enterobacteriaceae, including 25 isolates of carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. In total, 25 antimicrobial agents were examined. For 10 agents, the MIC data were evaluated using two sets of breakpoints: (i) the Vitek 2 breakpoints, which utilized the 2009 FDA breakpoints at the time of the study and are equivalent to the 2009 CLSI M100-S19 breakpoints, and (ii) the 2014 CLSI M100-S24 breakpoints. There was an overall 98.7% essential agreement (EA). The categorical agreement was 95.5% (CA) using the Vitek 2 breakpoints and 95.7% using the CLSI breakpoints. There was 1 very major error (VME) (0.05%) observed using the Vitek 2 breakpoints (cefazolin) and 8 VMEs (0.5%) using the CLSI breakpoints (2 each for aztreonam, cefepime, and ceftriaxone, and 1 for cefazolin and ceftazidime). Fifteen major errors (MEs) (0.4%) were noted using the Vitek 2 breakpoints and 8 (0.5%) using the CLSI breakpoints. Overall, the Vitek 2 performance was comparable to that of BMD for testing a limited number of Enterobacteriaceae commonly isolated by clinical laboratories. Ongoing studies are warranted to assess performance in isolates with emerging resistance. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. EVALUATION OF VITEK 2 SYSTEM FOR CLINICAL IDENTIFICATION OF CANDIDA SPECIES AND THEIR ANTIFUNGAL SUSCEPTIBILITY TEST

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan; Ram Murugan

    2016-01-01

    BJECTIVES 1. To evaluate the Vitek 2 system for clinical identification of Candida species and their antifungal susceptibility test; 2. To study the incidence of various types of Candida species in this part of Tamilnadu. METHODS Samples collected from different wards were subjected for culture, isolation and identification of Candida Species and Antifungal Susceptibility testing by Vitek System. Vitek 2 test was carried out in Apollo Specialty Hospital Lab Services, Madurai....

  4. Performance of Vitek 2 for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Staphylococcus spp. and Enterococcus spp.

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    Bobenchik, April M; Hindler, Janet A; Giltner, Carmen L; Saeki, Sandra; Humphries, Romney M

    2014-02-01

    Vitek 2 (bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) is a widely used commercial antimicrobial susceptibility testing system. We compared MIC results obtained by Vitek 2 to those obtained by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) broth microdilution (BMD) reference method for 134 staphylococcal and 84 enterococcal clinical isolates. Nineteen agents were evaluated, including all those available on Vitek 2 for testing staphylococci and enterococci. The resistance phenotypes tested included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (n = 58), S. aureus with inducible clindamycin resistance (ICR) (n = 30), trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole-resistant MRSA (n = 10), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 37), high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus (n = 15), linezolid-resistant Enterococcus (n = 5), and daptomycin-nonsusceptible Enterococcus faecalis (n = 6). For the staphylococci, there was 98.9% categorical agreement (CA). There was one very major error (VME) for gentamicin in a Staphylococcus hominis isolate, six VMEs for inducible clindamycin in S. aureus isolates, and two major errors (ME) for daptomycin in an S. aureus and a Staphylococcus epidermidis isolate. For enterococci, there was 97.3% CA. Two VMEs were observed for daptomycin in isolates of E. faecalis and 2 ME, 1 for high-level gentamicin resistance and 1 for nitrofurantoin, in E. faecium isolates. Overall, there was 98.3% CA and 99% essential agreement for the testing of staphylococci and enterococci by the Vitek 2. With the exception of detecting ICR in S. aureus, Vitek 2 performed reliably for antimicrobial susceptibility testing of staphylococci and enterococci.

  5. Inducible resistance to clindamycin in Staphylococcus aureus: validation of Vitek-2 against CLSI D-test.

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    Gardiner, B J; Grayson, M L; Wood, G M

    2013-02-01

    Inducible resistance to clindamycin in Staphylococcus aureus is common but not easily identified by routine testing, and can result in treatment failure if not detected. The gold standard method is the D-test described by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI). The Vitek-2 AST-P612 card contains an 'inducible clindamycin resistance' (ICR) test. We aimed to determine the accuracy of the Vitek-2 ICR test compared to the D-test. Isolates of erythromycin non-susceptible, clindamycin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus were identified. Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed using the Vitek-2 AST-P612 card, including the ICR test, and compared against the D-test. 217 isolates were obtained. All of the 191 isolates that were ICR positive were D-test positive. Of the 27 ICR negative isolates, 10 (37%) were D-test positive [9 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA), 1 methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA)]. This correlates with a specificity of 100%, sensitivity of 95%, positive predictive value of 100%, and negative predictive value of 72%. The ICR test is reliable in the presence of a positive result; however there is a false negative rate of approximately one in four. This will lead to susceptibility reporting errors, with potentially serious clinical implications. A negative ICR should be confirmed by CLSI D-test before reporting clindamycin as susceptible where the organism is not susceptible to erythromycin.

  6. Modified CLSI extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) confirmatory test for phenotypic detection of ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae producing various β-lactamases.

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    Poulou, Aggeliki; Grivakou, Evgenia; Vrioni, Georgia; Koumaki, Vassiliki; Pittaras, Theodoros; Pournaras, Spyros; Tsakris, Athanassios

    2014-05-01

    The worldwide dissemination of Enterobacteriaceae producing AmpC β-lactamases and carbapenemases makes difficult the phenotypic detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), as they may be masked by these additional enzymes. A modification of the CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was developed and evaluated in a comparative study for its ability to successfully detect ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae producing various carbapenemases (Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase [KPC], VIM, NDM, and OXA-48) and plasmidic or derepressed AmpCs. The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was performed with cefotaxime and ceftazidime disks with and without clavulanate, on which both boronic acid (BA) and EDTA were dispensed. A total of 162 genotypically confirmed ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae isolates (83 carbapenemase/ESBL producers, 25 AmpC/ESBL producers, and 54 ESBL-only producers) were examined. For comparison, 139 genotypically confirmed ESBL-negative Enterobacteriaceae isolates (94 of them possessed carbapenemases and 20 possessed AmpCs) were also tested. The standard CLSI ESBL confirmatory test was positive for 106 of the 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 65.4%) and showed false-positive results for 4 of the 139 non-ESBL producers (specificity, 97.1%). The modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test detected 158 of 162 ESBL producers (sensitivity, 97.5%) and showed no false-positive results for non-ESBL producers (specificity, 100%). The findings of the study demonstrate that the modified CLSI ESBL confirmatory test using antibiotic disks containing both BA and EDTA accurately detects ESBLs in Enterobacteriaceae regardless of the coexistence of additional β-lactam resistance mechanisms.

  7. suitability of vitek 2 system in identification and susceptibility testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... identify bacteria and determine their susceptibility to antimicrobial agents (3). The VITEK® 2 system (bioMérieux) is an automated bacteria identification and antimicrobial sensitivity testing platform that conventionally uses bacteria colonies obtained from cultures of clinical specimens. For blood this means ...

  8. suitability of vitek 2 system in identification and susceptibility testing

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2014-04-01

    Apr 1, 2014 ... Infection of the bloodstream remains a life-threatening occurrence. Blood cultures and their microbiological analysis are essential for the diagnosis of this infection. (1,2). Rapid detection, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria from blood are crucial in patient management.

  9. Multicenter evaluation of the new Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility test using new CLSI clinical breakpoints for fluconazole.

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    Pfaller, M A; Diekema, D J; Procop, G W; Wiederhold, N P

    2014-06-01

    A fully automated antifungal susceptibility test system recently updated to reflect the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs) of fluconazole for Candida (Vitek 2 AF03 yeast susceptibility test; bioMérieux, Inc., Durham, NC) was compared in three different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference broth microdilution (BMD) method by testing 2 quality control strains, 10 reproducibility strains (4 Candida species and 6 Cryptococcus neoformans strains), and 746 isolates of Candida species (702 isolates, 13 species) and 44 isolates of C. neoformans against fluconazole. Excellent essential agreement (EA) (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and Vitek 2 MICs was observed for fluconazole and Candida species (94.0%). The EA was lower for fluconazole and C. neoformans at 86.4%. The mean times to a result with the Vitek 2 test were 9.1 h for Candida species and 12.1 h for C. neoformans. Categorical agreement (CA) between the two methods was assessed by using the new species-specific CBPs. For less common species without fluconazole CBPs, the epidemiological cutoff values (ECVs) were used to differentiate wild-type (WT; MIC, ≤ ECV) from non-WT (MIC, >ECV) strains. The CAs between the two methods were 92.0% for Candida species (0.3% very major errors [VME] and 2.6% major errors [ME]) and 84.1% for C. neoformans (4.5% VME and 11.4% ME). The updated Vitek 2 AF03 IUO yeast susceptibility system is comparable to the CLSI BMD reference method for testing the susceptibility of clinically important yeasts to fluconazole when using the new (lower) CBPs and ECVs. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Comparison of disk diffusion, Etest and VITEK2 for detection of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae with the EUCAST and CLSI breakpoint systems.

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    Vading, M; Samuelsen, Ø; Haldorsen, B; Sundsfjord, A S; Giske, C G

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this study was to compare CLSI and EUCAST MIC and disk diffusion carbapenem breakpoints for the detection of carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. K. pneumoniae strains with known KPC (n = 31) or VIM (n = 20) carbapenemases were characterized by disk diffusion (Oxoid) and Etest (bioMérieux) vs. imipenem, meropenem and ertapenem, and with VITEK2 (bioMérieux, five different cards). Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) testing was performed with VITEK2 (bioMérieux), ESBL combination disks (Becton Dickinson) and the ESBL Etest (bioMérieux). With CLSI and EUCAST MIC breakpoints, respectively, 11 and seven of the strains were susceptible to imipenem, 12 and eight to meropenem, and seven and none to ertapenem. The EUCAST epidemiological cut-off (ECOFF) values for meropenem and ertapenem identified all carbapenemase producers, whereas the imipenem ECOFF failed in five strains. All carbapenemase producers were detected with EUCAST disk diffusion breakpoints for ertapenem and meropenem, and four strains were susceptible to imipenem. CLSI disk diffusion breakpoints characterized 18 (imipenem), 14 (meropenem) and three (ertapenem) isolates as susceptible. When cards with a single carbapenem were used, detection failures with VITEK2 were four for imipenem, none for meropenem and one for ertapenem. Cards containing all three carbapenems had one to two failures. With ESBL combination disks, 21/31 KPC producers and 2/20 VIM producers were positive. With VITEK2, no VIM producers and between none and seven KPC producers were ESBL-positive. All carbapenemase producers were detected with the meropenem MIC ECOFF, or the clinical EUCAST breakpoint for ertapenem. EUCAST disk diffusion breakpoints for meropenem and ertapenem detected all carbapenemase producers. VITEK2 had between none and four failures in detecting carbapenemase producers, depending on the antibiotic card. © 2010 The Authors. Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2010 European Society

  11. Same day identification and full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles made possible by a combined lysis-filtration method with MALDI-TOF VITEK mass spectrometry and the VITEK2 system.

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    Alexandra Machen

    Full Text Available Rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing of microorganisms causing bloodstream infections or sepsis have the potential to improve patient care. This proof-of-principle study evaluates the Lysis-Filtration Method for identification as well as antimicrobial susceptibility testing of bacteria directly from positive blood culture bottles in a clinical setting. A total of 100 non-duplicated positive blood cultures were tested and 1012 microorganism-antimicrobial combinations were assessed. An aliquot of non-charcoal blood culture broth was incubated with lysis buffer briefly before being filtered and washed. Microorganisms recovered from the filter membrane were first identified by using Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight VITEK® Mass Spectrometry (VITEK MS. After quick identification from VITEK MS, filtered microorganisms were inoculated to VITEK®2 system for full panel antimicrobial susceptibility testing analysis. Of 100 bottles tested, the VITEK MS resulted in 94.0% correct organism identification to the species level. Compared to the conventional antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods, direct antimicrobial susceptibility testing from VITEK®2 resulted in 93.5% (946/1012 category agreement of antimicrobials tested, with 3.6% (36/1012 minor error, 1.7% (7/1012 major error, and 1.3% (13/1012 very major error of antimicrobials. The average time to identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was 11.4 hours by using the Lysis-Filtration method for both VITEK MS and VITEK®2 compared to 56.3 hours by using conventional methods (p<0.00001. Thus, the same-day results of microorganism identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing directly from positive blood culture can be achieved and can be used for appropriate antibiotic therapy and antibiotic stewardship.

  12. Characterization of Klebsiella isolates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and determination of antimicrobial resistance with VITEK 2 advanced expert system (AES).

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    Karagöz, Alper; Acar, Sümeyra; Körkoca, Hanifi

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the performance of the VITEK mass spectrometry (MS) (bioMérieux, France) system for the identification of Klebsiella spp. isolated from different sources. Moreover, while assessing the ability of the VITEK 2 automated expert system (AES) to recognize antimicrobial resistance patterns, the researchers have extended the study to compare VITEK 2 with the routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing method. This study tested 51 Klebsiella spp. isolates that were isolated from environmental examples and clinical examples. Results of conventional methods and the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) MS were compared. Then, any differing results were compared against a reference 16S rRNA gene sequence, and when indicated, a recA sequencing analysis was done. VITEK MS correctly identified 100% of the Klebsiella spp. isolates. There were two K. oxytoca isolates incorrectly identified to the species level with conventional methods according to the 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. In addition, a VITEK 2 AST-N261 card was used for the detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL). Using the VITEK 2 AES, ESBL positivity was found at the rate of 16.3% whereas this rate was 4.08% using the disk diffusion method. MALDI-TOF MS is a rapid and accurate method for the identification of Klebsiella spp. Moreover, the bioMérieux AES provides a useful laboratory tool for the interpretation of susceptibility results.

  13. Same-Day Identification and Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Bacteria in Positive Blood Culture Broths Using Short-Term Incubation on Solid Medium with the MicroFlex LT, Vitek-MS, and Vitek2 Systems.

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    Ha, Jihye; Hong, Sung Kuk; Han, Geum Hee; Kim, Myungsook; Yong, Dongeun; Lee, Kyungwon

    2018-05-01

    Early and appropriate antibiotic treatment improves the clinical outcome of patients with septicemia; therefore, reducing the turn-around time for identification (ID) and antimicrobial susceptibility test (AST) results is essential. We established a method for rapid ID and AST using short-term incubation of positive blood culture broth samples on solid media, and evaluated its performance relative to that of the conventional method using two rapid ID systems and a rapid AST method. A total of 254 mono-microbial samples were included. Positive blood culture samples were incubated on blood agar plates for six hours and identified by the MicroFlex LT (Bruker Daltonics) and Vitek-MS (bioMeriéux) systems, followed by AST using the Vitek2 System (bioMeriéux). The correct species-level ID rates were 82.3% (209/254) and 78.3% (199/254) for the MicroFlex LT and Vitek-MS platforms, respectively. For the 1,174 microorganism/antimicrobial agent combinations tested, the rapid AST method showed total concordance of 97.8% (1,148/1,174) with the conventional method, with a very major error rate of 0.5%, major error rate of 0.7%, and minor error rate of 1.0%. Routine implementation of this short-term incubation method could provide ID results on the day of blood culture-positivity detection and one day earlier than the conventional AST method. This simple method will be very useful for rapid ID and AST of bacteria from positive blood culture bottles in routine clinical practice.

  14. Modified Double Disc Synergy Test to Detect ESBL Production in Urinary Isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

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    Kaur, Jaspal; Chopra, Shashi; Sheevani; Mahajan, Gomty

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Various phenotypic methods are recommended in the routine practice to detect the ESBL production in gram negative bacilli. Among them, the Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST) which uses the third generation cephalosporins (3GC), is a simple and a reliable method. But the coexistence of AmpC may give false negative results. In such cases, the ESBL detection can be improved by using cefepime along with the third generation cephalosporins in DDST. Methods: A total of 350 urinary isolates (224 Escherichia coli and 126 Klebsiella pneumoniae) were studied for ESBL production by the modified double disc test (MDDST) i.e. by using cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, cefpopdoxime (third generation cephalosporins) and cefepime ( fourth generation cephalosporin) along with a amoxicillin-clavulanate disc. Results and Interpretation: ESBL production was seen in 63.4% (142/224) Escherichia coli and in 60.3% (76/126) Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates by MDDST. Among these, in twelve E.coli and five K.pneumoniae strains, only cefepime but none of the third generation cephalosporins showed synergism with amoxicillin-clavulanate. All these seventeen strains showed a clear extension of the edge of inhibition which was produced by cefepime towards the amoxicillin-clavulanate disc. These strains were further tested for AmpC co-production by the AmpC disc test and all these strains were found to be AmpC positive, thus revealing the superior activity of cefepime in detecting ESBLs in the bacteria which co-produced AmpC. A high degree of coresistance was found in the ESBL producers. Conclusion: The ESBL detection can be improved by MDDST by using cefepime along with the third generation cephalosporins. PMID:23543257

  15. Performance of Vitek 2 for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing of Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia with Vitek 2 (2009 FDA) and CLSI M100S 26th Edition Breakpoints.

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    Bobenchik, April M; Deak, Eszter; Hindler, Janet A; Charlton, Carmen L; Humphries, Romney M

    2017-02-01

    The performances of Vitek 2 AST-GN69 and AST-XN06 cards were compared to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference broth microdilution (BMD) for 99 isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, 26 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates, and 11 Stenotrophomonas maltophilia isolates. In total, 15 antimicrobials were evaluated, with 11 for P. aeruginosa, 14 for A. baumannii, and 2 for S. maltophilia Categorical agreement (CA) was assessed using both Vitek 2 breakpoints and 2016 CLSI M100S 26th edition breakpoints. The essential agreement values for P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, and S. maltophilia were 99.5%, 99.2%, and 100%, respectively. The CA values for P. aeruginosa, A. baumannii, and S. maltophilia were 94.1%, 92.7%, and 95.5%, respectively, by the Vitek 2 breakpoints, and 93.4%, 92.3%, and 95.5%, respectively, by the CLSI breakpoints. Overall, the Vitek 2 performance was comparable to that of BMD using both Vitek 2 breakpoints and 2016 CLSI M100S 26th edition breakpoints. Improved performance was noted for the reformulated piperacillin-tazobactam and imipenem found on the AST-GN69 card, with no very major or major errors noted when using the CLSI breakpoints. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  16. [Evaluation of the VITEK 2 system (AST-YSO1 cards) for antifungal susceptibility testing against different Candida species].

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    Ochiuzzi, María E; Arechavala, Alicia; Guelfand, Liliana; Maldonado, Ivana; Soloaga, Rolando

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the results of antifungal susceptibility for various Candida species using the Vitek 2 semi-automated system (AST-YSO1 cards, bioMérieux), and to compare them with those obtained by the CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) broth microdilution reference method (Document M27-A3,2008). The essential agreement (EA) was > 90%, except for Candida glabrata against voriconazole (VCZ); and for Candida krusei against fluconazole (FCZ). The overall categorical agreement (CA) was > 90% when FCZ was evaluated and 89.5% at 24h and 80.7% at 48 h for VCZ. The average time for obtaining results was 15.5h. Minor errors were 7.8% at 24h and 6.1% at 48 h for FCZ, and 10.5% at 24h and 19.3% at 48 h for VCZ. There was only one very major error for FCZ against Candida parapsilosis and no major errors were observed. For amphotericin B, only three isolates showed MICs ≥ 2 μg/ml. The Vitek 2 system detected the MIC value for various Candida species and showed excellent agreement with the reference method proposed by the CLSI. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Colombiana de Psiquiatría. Publicado por Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  17. Comparing in vitro activity of tigecycline by using the disk diffusion test, the manual microdilution method, and the VITEK 2 automated system Comparación de la actividad in vitro de la tigeciclina mediante la prueba de difusión con disco, el método de microdilución manual y el sistema automatizado Vitek 2

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    A. L. Leal Castro

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Tigecycline is a broad spectrum antibiotic having activity against multiresistant isolates. In vitro susceptibility testing is difficult to perform with the use of traditional microbiological techniques. The aim of this study was to evaluate the disk diffusion test with three different Mueller-Hinton agar brands, and the Vitek 2 automated system in comparison with the standard broth microdilution method against 200 gram-negative isolates (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and Acinetobacter baumannii. Among Enterobacteriaceae, the Becton Dickinson agar had the lowest rate of minor (32.5% and major errors (3.8%. No very major errors were found. For A. baumanni, the rate of minor and major errors was lower. A high rate of agreement (94% was found between the broth microdilution method and the Vitek 2 system. Our results show that there are important differences between agars used for the disk diffusion test, and that Vitek 2 is a valid tool for susceptibility testing in clinical laboratories.La tigeciclina es un antibiótico de amplio espectro con actividad frente a bacterias multirresistentes. Existen dificultades en la determinación de la actividad in vitro a través de las técnicas microbiológicas convencionales. El objetivo del estudio fue evaluar tres marcas diferentes de medio agar Mueller-Hinton para utilizar en el método de difusión con disco y el método automatizado Vitek 2, y compararlos con la prueba tradicional de microdilución manual (Paneles Trek frente a 200 aislamientos de microorganismos gram negativos (Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens y Acinetobacter baumannii. Para el grupo de las enterobacterias, el medio con mejor desempeño fue el producido por Becton Dickinson, que tuvo 32,5% de errores menores y 3,8% de errores mayores. No se presentaron errores mayores con ningún medio. Se encontró una alta concordancia (94% entre el

  18. Isolation and identification of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli from brolier in Erbil, Iraq

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    M.N. Al-Sharook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli isolated from slaughtered broilers in retail market that sell live chickens in Erbil city, Iraq. Forty-one cloacal fecal samples from broiler caecum were investigated from January to April 2016. ESBLs strains were isolated using MacConkey agar supplemented with cefotaxime 1 mg/l and the isolates were identified phynotypically by biochemical tests, TBX agar and VITEK-2 compact system. A total of 34 Escherichia coli and 4 Proteus mirabilis were analysed for determination of ESBL/AmpC by disc diffusion test using antimicrobial 68DC MAST® ESβL discs group including cefpodoxime, cefpodoxime + ESBL inhibitor, cefpodoxime + AmpC inhibitor and cefpodoxime + ESBL inhibitor + AmpC inhibitor and 67DC MAST® ESβL discs group including cefpodoxime, cefpodoxime + clavulanate, ceftazidime, ceftazidime + clavulanate, cefotaxime and cefotaxime + clavulanate. The phenotypic results showed that in group 68DC discs 23.7% E. coli were resistant to cefpodoxime and in group 67DC discs 73.7% of E. coli and 7.9% of P. mirabilis were resistance to one or more of the cefpodoxime, ceftazidime and ceftazidime. Final results revealed that 78.0% of samples were ESBLs/ AmpC positive. This study is the first examination to determine phenorypically E. coli producing ESBLs/AmpC in broiler chickens in Iraq. Conclusion, the healthy broiler can be a major source of ESBLs/AmpC and the possibility that transmitted to humans through the food chain, direct contact and the surrounding environment raises the concerns about public health and safety of poultry meat and the negative consequences of drug therapy that causes the spread of antibiotic resistance.

  19. Prevalence of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolated from blood cultures in Mali.

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    Sangare, Samba Adama; Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Guindo, Ibrehima; Maiga, Aminata; Camara, Namory; Dicko, Oumar Agaly; Diallo, Souleymane; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence; Andremont, Antoine; Maiga, Ibrahim Izetiegouma

    2016-10-31

    The increasing frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae is becoming a serious public health concern. This study sought to determine ESBL frequency in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from patients' blood cultures in two university teaching hospitals of Bamako, Mali. During a three-month period, the presence of Enterobacteriaceae from blood cultures of patients admitted to the university teaching hospitals of Bamako was evaluated. The microbial identifications were initially performed with an API 20E gallery and VITEK2 locally in Mali, and then confirmation in France was performed with a mass spectrometry MALDI-TOF in the bacteriology laboratory of the university teaching hospital of Bichat. Antibiotic susceptibility profiles were determined by the diffusion method as recommended by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). The isolated species were K. pneumoniae (14/40; 35.0%), E. coli (11/40; 27.5%), and E. cloacae (9/40; 22.5%). Of the strains isolated, 21/34 (61.8%) had an ESBL phenotype, including 10/14 (71.4%) K. pneumoniae, 8/11 (72.7%) E. coli, and 3/9 (33.3%) E. cloacae. Resistances associated with ESBL strains of K. pneumoniae, E. coli, and E. cloacae were as follows: gentamicin (10/10, 100%; 6/8, 75%; 2/3, 67%, respectively), amikacin (2/10, 20%; 0/8, 0%; 0/3, 0%, respectively), ofloxacin (8/10, 80%; 7/8, 87%; 3/3, 100%, respectively), and cotrimoxazole (10/10, 100%; 6/8, 75%; 3/3, 100%, respectively). Almost two-thirds (61.8%) of Enterobacteriaceae isolated from our blood cultures were ESBL producers. Only susceptibilities to carbapenems and to amikacin were fully conserved within the strains.

  20. ESBL Evaluation framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondt, N.; Asseldonk, van M.A.P.M.; Bergevoet, R.H.M.

    2016-01-01

    Extended-spectrum bèta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing bacteria have become increasingly common in animals and humans. The goal of the presented ESBL evaluation framework is to help policy makers to evaluate the effectiveness of possible interventions aimed to reduce ESBL levels in livestock. An

  1. Accuracy of the VITEK 2 system to detect glycopeptide resistance in enterococci.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N.P.W.C.J. van den Braak (Nicole); W.H.F. Goessens (Wil); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri); H.P. Endtz (Hubert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe evaluated the accuracy of the VITEK 2 fully automated system to detect and identify glycopeptide-resistant enterococci (GRE) compared to a reference agar dilution method. The sensitivity of vancomycin susceptibility testing with VITEK 2 for the detection

  2. Liofilchem(®) Chromatic VRE and vancomycin MIC Test Strip detected glycopeptide resistance in a vanB neonatal Enterococcus faecium isolate showing alternate vancomycin susceptibility and resistance with bioMérieux Vitek2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savini, Vincenzo; Marrollo, Roberta; Coclite, Eleonora; Fusilli, Paola; D'Incecco, Carmine; Fazii, Paolo; Gherardi, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A 1-month old neonate urine sample yielded vanB Enterococcus faecium; nevertheless, the isolate alternatively showed susceptibility and resistance to vancomycin with bioMérieux Vitek2 (cards AST592, AST632, AST586), while glycopeptide resistance was detected by Liofilchem(®) vancomycin MIC Test Strip and disc along with the Chromatic VRE chromogenic medium. This communication emphasizes that, as vanB gene may be heterogeneously expressed within a given Enterococcus population, glycopeptide resistance may be missed when using automated systems for antibiotic susceptibility testing. We suggest therefore that vancomycin in vitro activity be studied on all clinical isolates through agar methods, including use of chromogenic media.

  3. High proportion of intestinal colonization with successful epidemic clones of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in a neonatal intensive care unit in Ecuador.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viveka Nordberg

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Neonatal infections caused by Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing bacteria are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. No data are available on neonatal colonization with ESBL-producing bacteria in Ecuador. The aim of this study was to determine the proportion of intestinal colonization with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, their resistance pattern and risk factors of colonization in a neonatal intensive care unit in Ecuador. METHODS: During a three month period, stool specimens were collected every two weeks from hospitalized neonates. Species identification and susceptibility testing were performed with Vitek2, epidemiologic typing with automated repetitive PCR. Associations between groups were analyzed using the Pearson X (2 test and Fisher exact test. A forward step logistic regression model identified significant predictors for colonization. RESULTS: Fifty-six percent of the neonates were colonized with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Length of stay longer than 20 days and enteral feeding with a combination of breastfeeding and formula feeding were significantly associated with ESBL-colonization. The strains found were E. coli (EC, 89% and K. pneumoniae (KP, 11% and epidemiological typing divided these isolates in two major clusters. All EC and KP had bla CTX-M group 1 except for a unique EC isolate that had bla CTX-M group 9. Multi-locus sequence typing performed on the K. pneumoniae strains showed that the strains belonged to ST855 and ST897. The two detected STs belong to two different epidemic clonal complexes (CC, CC11 and CC14, which previously have been associated with dissemination of carbapenemases. None of the E. coli strains belonged to the epidemic ST 131 clone. CONCLUSIONS: More than half of the neonates were colonized with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae where the main risk factor for colonization was length of hospital stay. Two of the isolated clones were epidemic and known

  4. Suitability of Vitek 2 System in Identification and Susceptibility ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To verify the accuracy of direct Vitek testing for blood cultures with Gramnegative bacilli. Design: Validation study. Setting: Aga Khan University Hospital Nairobi. Subjects: Twenty two positive blood cultures. Main outcome measures: Correct bacteria identification and errors for susceptibility testing. Results: Of the ...

  5. Evaluación del antibiograma directo desde el frasco de hemocultivo con el sistema Vitek 2C: su utilidad en la clínica Evaluation of direct susceptibility testing from blood culture bottles: Clinical usefulness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolando N. Soloaga

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio prospectivo observacional que incluyó 191 episodios de bacteriemia monomicrobiana por bacilos gram negativos en los que se combinó el uso del sistema Bact-Alert de hemocultivos con el sistema de identificación y sensibilidad Vitek 2C. Se compararon los resultados con los correspondientes a los de colonia aislada en medios sólidos. La correlación obtenida en la identificación fue del 99 %. Con respecto a la sensibilidad a los antibióticos, la correlación total en categoría fue del 99 % (0,22 % de errores muy mayores, 0,17 % de errores mayores y 0,61 % de errores menores. De los 191 episodios de infecciones del torrente sanguíneo, 108 (56,5 % recibieron los antibióticos adecuados en forma empírica. Una vez comunicado el resultado del antibiograma directo del frasco, se cambió el tratamiento antibiótico en 116 episodios (60,7 %.A prospective observational study was conducted in two hospitals of Buenos Aires city (Argentina; 191 clinically significant monomicrobial gram-negative bloodstream infections were included in the study, which combined the Bact-Alert System Blood culture machine and the Vitek 2C System. Organism identification and susceptibility results directly from blood culture bottles were compared with those obtained from cards inoculated with a standardized bacterial suspension obtained following subculture on agar. By comparing the results obtained from pure cultures with those by the Vitek 2C System as reference method, the agreement between the reference method and the direct identification from positive blood cultures was 99 %. By antimicrobial susceptibility testing, the overall categorical accuracy was 99 % (0.22 %, very major errors, 0.17 %, major errors and 0.61 %, minor errors. One hundred and eight (56,8 % bloodstream infections were treated empirically with adequate antibiotics. After the results obtained directly from the bottles were reported, antimicrobial therapy was changed in 116

  6. Comparison of the Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system with CLSI microdilution for antifungal susceptibility testing of fluconazole and voriconazole against Candida spp., using new clinical breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaller, Michael A; Diekema, Daniel J; Procop, Gary W; Rinaldi, Michael G

    2013-09-01

    A commercially available, fully automated yeast susceptibility test system (Vitek 2; bioMérieux, Marcy d'Etoile, France) was compared in 3 different laboratories with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) reference microdilution (BMD) method by testing 2 quality control strains, 10 reproducibility strains, and 425 isolates of Candida spp. against fluconazole and voriconazole. Reference CLSI BMD MIC endpoints and Vitek 2 MIC endpoints were read after 24 hours and 9.1-27.1 hours incubation, respectively. Excellent essential agreement (within 2 dilutions) between the reference and Vitek 2 MICs was observed for fluconazole (97.9%) and voriconazole (96.7%). Categorical agreement (CA) between the 2 methods was assessed using the new species-specific clinical breakpoints (CBPs): susceptible (S) ≤2 μg/mL, susceptible dose-dependent (SDD) 4 μg/mL, and resistant (R) ≥8 μg/mL for fluconazole and Candida albicans, Candida tropicalis, and Candida parapsilosis and ≤32 μg/mL (SDD), ≥64 μg/mL (R) for Candida glabrata; S ≤0.12 μg/mL, SDD 0.25-0.5 μg/mL, R ≥1 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis, and ≤0.5 μg/mL (S), 1 μg/mL (SDD), ≥2 μg/mL (R) for Candida krusei. The epidemiological cutoff value (ECV) of 0.5 μg/mL for voriconazole and C. glabrata was used to differentiate wild-type (WT; MIC ≤ ECV) from non-WT (MIC > ECV) strains of this species. Due to the lack of CBPs for the less common species, the ECVs for fluconazole and voriconazole, respectively, were used for Candida lusitaniae (2 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida dubliniensis (0.5 μg/mL and 0.03 μg/mL), Candida guilliermondii (8 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL), and Candida pelliculosa (4 μg/mL and 0.25 μg/mL) to categorize isolates of these species as WT and non-WT. CA between the 2 methods was 96.8% for fluconazole and 96.5% for voriconazole with less than 1% very major errors and 1.3-3.0% major errors. The Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system

  7. Comparison of the VITEK 2 antifungal susceptibility system with Etest using clinical isolates of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfouzan, Wadha; Al-Enezi, Tahani; AlRoomi, Ebteehal; Sandhya, Vayalil; Chandy, Rachel; Khan, Zia Uddin

    Candida species are part of the normal human microbiota. However, in recent years, nosocomial bloodstream Candida infections have emerged as a significant problem ranking the fourth common cause of fungemia in intensive care units. Although microdilution methods are the ones recommended for susceptibility testing, they are difficult to undertake in the clinical practice. Thus, an automated commercially available test is ideal. To compare minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) obtained with the recently introduced Vitek 2 yeast susceptibility system card (AST-YS01) with Etest. 263 clinical Candida isolates representing six species were included in the study. Categorical agreements (CA) were assessed as described elsewhere. Irrespective of the Candida species tested, the overall CA between Vitek 2 and Etest ranged between 66.7% and 100%. In general, Etest yielded lower MICs than Vitek 2. For Candida albicans, the CA between Vitek 2 and Etest was >95% for amphotericin B, voriconazole and flucytosine, but only 89% for fluconazole. With respect to Candida glabrata, the CA was between 97% and 100%. The major errors were with Candida krusei and flucytosine and Candida kefyr and amphotericin B. Candida tropicalis susceptibility for fluconazole by Vitek 2 reported more SDD and resistant strains than Etest. Candida parapsilosis showed 100% CA against all the four antifungals tested. No very major errors were detected between the two methods. Vitek 2 provided comparable results to Etest with quick turnaround for the testing of Candida species susceptibilities. Copyright © 2017 Asociación Española de Micología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of the ability of four ESBL-screening media to detect ESBL-producing Salmonella and Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturød, Kjersti; Dahle, Ulf R; Berg, Einar Sverre; Steinbakk, Martin; Wester, Astrid L

    2014-09-04

    The aim of this study was to compare the ability of four commercially available media for screening extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) to detect and identify ESBL-producing Salmonella and Shigella in fecal samples. A total of 71 Salmonella- and 21 Shigella-isolates producing ESBL(A) and/or AmpC, were received at Norwegian Institute of Public Health between 2005 and 2012. The 92 isolates were mixed with fecal specimens and tested on four ESBL screening media; ChromID ESBL (BioMèrieux), Brilliance ESBL (Oxoid), BLSE agar (AES Chemunex) and CHROMagar ESBL (CHROMagar). The BLSE agar is a biplate consisting of two different agars. Brilliance and CHROMagar are supposed to suppress growth of AmpC-producing bacteria while ChromID and BLSE agar are intended to detect both ESBL(A) and AmpC. The total sensitivity (ESBL(A)+AmpC) with 95% confidence intervals after 24 hours of incubation were as follows: ChromID: 95% (90.4-99.6), Brilliance: 93% (87.6-98.4), BLSE agar (Drigalski): 99% (96.9-100), BLSE agar (MacConkey): 99% (96.9-100) and CHROMagar: 85% (77.5-92.5). The BLSE agar identified Salmonella and Shigella isolates as lactose-negative. The other agars based on chromogenic technology displayed Salmonella and Shigella flexneri isolates with colorless colonies (as expected). Shigella sonnei produced pink colonies, similar to the morphology described for E. coli. All four agar media were reliable in screening fecal samples for ESBL(A)-producing Salmonella and Shigella. However, only ChromID and BLSE agar gave reliable detection of AmpC-producing isolates. Identification of different bacterial species based on colony colour alone was not accurate for any of the four agars.

  9. Bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of ESBLs producers from pus in patients with abdominal trauma associated intra-abdominal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, S; Wang, J; Li, Y; Li, J

    2017-02-01

    Intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) caused by ESBLs producing bacteria have become a serious clinical concern worldwide as the prevalence of bacterial resistance to antibiotics continues to increase. The objective of this study was to analyze the bacteriology and antimicrobial susceptibility of ESBLs producers using pus samples from IAIs patients caused by abdominal trauma. A total of 113 pus samples aspirated from IAIs patients were collected. The BACTEC 9120 and Vitek 2 system were used for detecting positive pathogens and confirming ESBLs production. The results of susceptibility were determined following the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Among the pathogens causing IAIs, Escherichia coli (E. coli) (29.1 %) was the most commonly isolated, followed by Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) (22.5 %). The incidence rates of ESBLs production among E. coli, K. pneumoniae, and Klebsiella oxytoca were 69.6, 45.1, and 25.0 %, respectively. All pathogens had high resistance rates against studied antibiotics, with imipenem (88.7 %) and ertapenem (90.7 %) remaining the only practical options. Trend analysis documented an increase in ESBLs producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae, and a decrease in susceptibility for carbapenems among ESBLs producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae. Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae were the major pathogens causing abdominal trauma associated IAIs. The most active agents against ESBLs producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae were ertapenem and imipenem. However, the ESBLs rates were alarmingly high and increasing among IAIs associated gram-negative bacilli infections in China, and most agents exhibited decreased susceptibility against ESBLs producing pathogens.

  10. Characterisation of drug resistance of nosocomial ESBL-producing E. coli isolates obtained from a Turkish university hospital between 2009 and 2012 by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic resistance tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karagöz, Alper; Sunnetcioglu, Mahmut; Ceylan, Mehmet Resat; Bayram, Yasemin; Yalcin, Gozde; Kocak, Nadir; Suvak, Burak; Andac, Cenk A

    2016-01-01

    In this study, drug resistance of 28 ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates obtained from 144 patients hospitalized at the Yüzüncüyil University Hospital at Van (YUH), Turkey, between 2009 and 2012 were characterized by pulsed field gel electrophoresis and antibiotic susceptibility tests. Antibiotic resistance profile was determined by Phoenix automated system (BD, USA). The ratio of ESBL-producing E. coli strains was determined to be 19.4% (28 out of 144 E. coli isolates). It was determined that the anaesthesiology, paediatrics and thoracic medicine intensive care units in YUH were cross-contaminated between 2009 and 2012 by ESBL-producing E. coli strains, which is a sign of nosocomial infection in YUH. Analysis of PFGE results gave rise to two main PFGE profiles, profile-A with four subprofiles and profile-B with three subprofiles, where profile-A predominates over profile-B (14%). Comparison of the antibiotic resistance profile with the PFGE profile yielded similarities while some differences also exist due to either identical restriction enzyme cutting sites with slightly different genetic sequences in between the cutting sites or newly formed restriction enzyme cutting sites that do not affect antibiotic resistance genes. Enterobacteriaceae, particularly E. coli, have developed resistance in YUH by producing ESBLs against oxyimino and non-oxyimino cephalosporins, and penicillin-type antibiotics. Therefore, more effective antibiotics such as cefoxitin or cefoperazone-sulbactam should be used for the treatment of future nosocomial infections in YUH while hospital staff should take care with hygiene, such as hand washing.

  11. Investigations of multiresistance to antibiotics and chemotherapeutics and extended spectrum beta: Lactamase effect (ESBL test in strains E.coli and salmonella originating from domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić Dušan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of multiresistance to the effects of antibiotics and chemotherapeutics and extended spectrum beta-lactamase were examined in 45 strains of E. coli and 35 strains of Salmonella. The strains of E. coli originated from several species of domestic animals: dogs, cats, poultry, and cattle, and 30 strains of Salmonella originated from poultry, 4 strains from cattle, and 1 strain from swine. The presence of the following serovarieties was established using serological examinations: Salmonella Enteritidis 17 strains, Salmonella Gallinarum 1 strain, Salmonella Hartford 5 strains, Salmonella Anatum 1 strain, Salmonella Typhimurium 4 strains, Salmonella Agona 1 strain, Salmonella Infantis 1 strain, Salmonella Thompson var. Berlin 1 strain, Salmonella Tennessee 1 strain, Salmonella Senftenberg 1 strain, Salmonella Glostrup 1 strain, and Salmonella Hadar 1 strain. In the examinations of the listed strains we used antibiogram discs of ampicillin, amoxicillin with clavulanic acid, cephalexin, cephtriaxon, cephotaxim, cephtazidime, aztreonam, gentamycin, chloramphenicol, tetracycline, cyprofloxacine, and a combination of sulphamethoxasole and trimethoprim. The lowest prevalence of multiresistance in E. Coli strains to 3 or more antibiotics was established in dogs 20%, and the highest in 60% strains originating from swine. In 62.88% strains of Salmonella we established sensitivity to all applied antibiotics. Resistance was also established in a small number of the examined strains to ampicillin (11 strains, to tetracycline (5 strains, to amoxicillin with clavulanic acid (5 strains, to sulphamethoxasole with trimethoprim (5 strains, to gentamycin (3 strains, and to cloramphenicol (1 strain. Of all the examined strains of Salmonella, 6 strains originating from poultry exhibited multiresistence. The presence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase effects examined using the ESBL test, was not established in strains of E. coli and Salmonella strains.

  12. Identification of clinical yeasts by Vitek MS system compared with API ID 32 C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durán-Valle, M Teresa; Sanz-Rodríguez, Nuria; Muñoz-Paraíso, Carmen; Almagro-Moltó, María; Gómez-Garcés, José Luis

    2014-05-01

    We performed a clinical evaluation of the Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) system with the commercial database version 2.0 for rapid identification of medically important yeasts as compared with the conventional phenotypic method API ID 32 C. We tested 161 clinical isolates, nine isolates from culture collections and five reference strains. In case of discrepant results or no identification with one or both methods, molecular identification techniques were employed. Concordance between both methods was observed with 160/175 isolates (91.42%) and misidentifications by both systems occurred only when taxa were not included in the respective databases, i.e., one isolate of Candida etchellsii was identified as C. globosa by Vitek MS and two isolates of C. orthopsilosis were identified as C. parapsilosis by API ID 32 C. Vitek MS could not identify nine strains (5.14%) and API ID 32 C did not identify 13 (7.42%). Vitek MS was more reliable than API ID 32 C and reduced the time required for the identification of clinical isolates to only a few minutes.

  13. Rapid Detection ofStaphylococcus aureusand Related Species Isolated from Food, Environment, Cosmetics, a Medical Device, and Clinical Samples Using the VITEK MS Microbial Identification System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Banerjee, Pratik; Hsieh, Ying-Hsin; Miranda, Nancy; Simpson, Steven; Kerdahi, Khalil

    2017-09-15

    Staphylococcus spp. is considered as one of the most common human-pathogenic bacteria, causing illnesses ranging from nonthreatening skin infections to lethal diseases, including sepsis, pneumonia, bloodstream infections, and food poisoning. The emergence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strains has increased morbidity and mortality and resulted in a major healthcare burden worldwide. Single and multilocus sequence typing have been extensively used in the identification of Staphylococcus species. Nevertheless, these assays are relatively time-consuming and require high-quality DNA. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time-of-flight has been used recently for the rapid identification of several bacterial species. In this study, we have examined 47 Staphylococcus isolates recovered from food, environment, clinical samples, cosmetic products, and a medical device and 3 American Type Culture Collection Staphylococcus reference isolates using bioMérieux VITEK MS and VITEK 2 systems to determine isolate identity. Sequencing of the 16S ribosomal RNA gene was performed to confirm and compare the species identification data generated by VITEK 2 and VITEK MS systems. Although the VITEK 2 system could not identify one of the isolates, VITEK MS identified all 50 Staphylococcus spp. isolates tested. Results of this study clearly suggest that VITEK MS can be used in the rapid identification of Staphylococcus isolates of public health importance.

  14. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg

    2014-01-01

    faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion...... method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME.......0001) or Merck Mueller-Hinton (MH) agar (P=0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI...

  15. In vivo susceptibility of ESBL producing Escherichia coli to ceftriaxone in children with acute pyelonephritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peco-Antić Amira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The choice of empiric therapy of acute pyelonephritis (APN in children should be based on the knowledge of Escherichia coli (E. coli as the most common uropathogen and its antibiotic sensitivities considering that nowadays ESBL-producing [ESBL (+] E. coli is on the rise worldwide. Objective. To examine in vivo susceptibility of ESBL (+ E. coli to ceftriaxone (CTX, and to evaluate the options for empiric therapy for APN in children. Methods. Retrospective study of CTX empiric therapy of APN in children treated at the University Children΄s Hospital in Belgrade from January 2005 to December 2009. ESBL phenotypic confirmatory test with ceftazidime, CTX and cefotaxime was performed for all urine isolates by disc diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar plates. In vivo sensitivity of CTX documented by clinical response to empiric CTX therapy was compared between two groups of children: group I with ESBL (+ E. coli and group II with ESBL (- E. coli APN. Results. Group I with ESBL (+ APN consisted of 94 patients and group II of 120 patients with ESBL (- APN, respectively. All patients received CTX as empiric therapy at a mean dose of 66.9 mg during 7.2±2.6 days of therapy. Clinical effect of CTX was similar in patients with ESBL (+ compared to those with ESBL (- APN. Conclusions. In vitro resistance of ESBL E. coli to CTX determined by standard methods is not sufficiently predictive for its in vivo sensitivity. Therefore CTX may be used as empiric therapy for acute pyelonephritis in children.

  16. Performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method, the CLSI agar screen method, and the Vitek 2 automated antimicrobial susceptibility testing system for detection of clinical isolates of Enterococci with low- and medium-level VanB-type vancomycin resistance: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegstad, Kristin; Giske, Christian G; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M; Kahlmeter, Gunnar; Sundsfjord, Arnfinn

    2014-05-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n=28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n=12) and Enterococcus faecium (n=18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n=5), Norwegian (n=13), and Swedish (n=10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n=28) and the CLSI agar screen (n=18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n=5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P=0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (PCLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P=0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges.

  17. Performance of the EUCAST Disk Diffusion Method, the CLSI Agar Screen Method, and the Vitek 2 Automated Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing System for Detection of Clinical Isolates of Enterococci with Low- and Medium-Level VanB-Type Vancomycin Resistance: a Multicenter Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giske, Christian G.; Haldorsen, Bjørg; Matuschek, Erika; Schønning, Kristian; Leegaard, Truls M.; Kahlmeter, Gunnar

    2014-01-01

    Different antimicrobial susceptibility testing methods to detect low-level vancomycin resistance in enterococci were evaluated in a Scandinavian multicenter study (n = 28). A phenotypically and genotypically well-characterized diverse collection of Enterococcus faecalis (n = 12) and Enterococcus faecium (n = 18) strains with and without nonsusceptibility to vancomycin was examined blindly in Danish (n = 5), Norwegian (n = 13), and Swedish (n = 10) laboratories using the EUCAST disk diffusion method (n = 28) and the CLSI agar screen (n = 18) or the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux) (n = 5). The EUCAST disk diffusion method (very major error [VME] rate, 7.0%; sensitivity, 0.93; major error [ME] rate, 2.4%; specificity, 0.98) and CLSI agar screen (VME rate, 6.6%; sensitivity, 0.93; ME rate, 5.6%; specificity, 0.94) performed significantly better (P = 0.02) than the Vitek 2 system (VME rate, 13%; sensitivity, 0.87; ME rate, 0%; specificity, 1). The performance of the EUCAST disk diffusion method was challenged by differences in vancomycin inhibition zone sizes as well as the experience of the personnel in interpreting fuzzy zone edges as an indication of vancomycin resistance. Laboratories using Oxoid agar (P agar (P = 0.027) for the disk diffusion assay performed significantly better than did laboratories using BBL MH II medium. Laboratories using Difco brain heart infusion (BHI) agar for the CLSI agar screen performed significantly better (P = 0.017) than did those using Oxoid BHI agar. In conclusion, both the EUCAST disk diffusion and CLSI agar screening methods performed acceptably (sensitivity, 0.93; specificity, 0.94 to 0.98) in the detection of VanB-type vancomycin-resistant enterococci with low-level resistance. Importantly, use of the CLSI agar screen requires careful monitoring of the vancomycin concentration in the plates. Moreover, disk diffusion methodology requires that personnel be trained in interpreting zone edges. PMID:24599985

  18. ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one the most common bacterial infections and is regularly treated in primary health care. The most common cause of UTI is extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) already present in the intestinal microflora, often as the dominating strain. Resistance...... in E.coli is increasing and especially isolates producing Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases (ESBL) have been reported worldwide. Treatment of UTI is usually initiated by the general practitioners and a significant proportion of clinical isolates are now resistant to first line antibiotics. The global...... dissemination of resistant E.coli has in particular been driven by the spread of a few specific E.coli-lineages and it seems that there is a difference between the sequence types found among resistant E.coli, ESBL-producing E.coli and antibiotic susceptible E.coli. The overall objectives of this thesis were...

  19. Analysis of Transmission of MRSA and ESBL-E among Pigs and Farm Personnel.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda Maria Schmithausen

    Full Text Available Livestock-associated bacteria with resistance to two or more antibiotic drug classes have heightened our awareness for the consequences of antibiotic consumption and spread of resistant bacterial strains in the veterinary field. In this study we assessed the prevalence of concomitant colonization with livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (LA-MRSA and enterobacteriaceae expressing extended-spectrum betalactamases (ESBL-E in farms at the German-Dutch border region. Nasal colonization of pigs with MRSA (113/547 (20.7% was less frequent than rectal colonization with ESBL-E (163/540 (30.2%. On the individual farm level MRSA correlated with ESBL-E recovery. The data further provide information on prevalence at different stages of pig production, including abattoirs, as well as in air samples and humans living and working on the farms. Notably, MRSA was detected in stable air samples of 34 out of 35 pig farms, highlighting air as an important MRSA transmission reservoir. The majority of MRSA isolates, including those from humans, displayed tetracycline resistance and spa types t011 and t034 characteristic for LA-MRSA, demonstrating transmission from pigs to humans. ESBL-E positive air samples were detected on 6 out of 35 farms but no pig-to-human transmission was found. Detection of ESBL-E, e.g. mostly Escherichia coli with CTX-M-type ESBL, was limited to these six farms. Molecular typing revealed transmission of ESBL-E within the pig compartments; however, related strains were also found on unrelated farms. Although our data suggest that acquisition of MRSA and ESBL-E might occur among pigs in the abattoirs, MRSA and ESBL-E were not detected on the carcasses. Altogether, our data define stable air (MRSA, pig compartments (ESBL-E and abattoir waiting areas (MRSA and ESBL-E as major hot spots for transmission of MRSA and/or ESBL-E along the pig production chain.

  20. Comparison of Vitek Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Versus Conventional Methods in Candida Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keçeli, Sema Aşkın; Dündar, Devrim; Tamer, Gülden Sönmez

    2016-02-01

    Candida species are generally identified by conventional methods such as germ tube or morphological appearance on corn meal agar, biochemical methods using API kits and molecular biological methods. Alternative to these methods, rapid and accurate identification methods of microorganisms called matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDİ-TOF MS) has recently been described. In this study, Candida identification results by API Candida kit, API 20C AUX kit and identifications on corn meal agar (CMA) are compared with the results obtained on Vitek-MS. All results were confirmed by sequencing internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of rDNA. Totally, 97 Candida strains were identified by germ tube test, CMA, API and Vitek-MS. Vitek-MS results were compatible with 74.2 % of API 20C AUX and 81.4 % of CMA results. The difference between the results of API Candida and API 20C AUX was detected. The ratio of discrepancy between Vitek-MS and API 20C AUX was 25.8 %. Candida species mostly identified as C. famata or C. tropicalis by and not compatible with API kits were identified as C. albicans by Vitek-MS. Sixteen Candida species having discrepant results with Vitek-MS, API or CMA were randomly chosen, and ITS sequence analysis was performed. The results of sequencing were compatible 56.2 % with API 20C AUX, 50 % with CMA and 93.7 % with Vitek-MS. When compared with conventional identification methods, MS results are more reliable and rapid for Candida identification. MS system may be used as routine identification method in clinical microbiology laboratories.

  1. Isolation of Extended Spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) Producing Bacteria from Urban Surface Waters in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissera, Shehani; Lee, Sui Mae

    2013-05-01

    This was a preliminary study to test for the presence of multiple antibiotic-resistant extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria in Malaysian urban surface waters. Although the literature review revealed several published papers on clinical ESBL isolates in Malaysia, none were found on ESBL isolates obtained from local surface waters. Isolated bacterial species were tested for resistance to cefotaxime, amoxicillin/clavulanate and aztreonam, and susceptibility to imipenem and meropenem using antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) by disc diffusion. This served as a screening step to detect bacteria that could be potential ESBL species. 16S ribose ribonucleic acid (rRNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing with two clusters of bla (β-lactamase) gene primers was used to test for the bla genes CTX-M (Groups 1, 2, 9), OXA-1, SHV and TEM. A total of 19 isolates were found, possessing at least one of the bla genes tested for. There was a relatively high occurrence of CTX-M genes (84.2%) among these, followed by TEM genes (47.4%). The isolates were identified as Enterobacteriaceae (89.5%), predominantly Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. There appears to be a high occurrence of ESBL-bacteria in local surface waters, among these being opportunistic pathogens. The persistence and spread of these species in the environment poses a threat to exposed human populations.

  2. Prospective evaluation of the VITEK MS for the routine identification of bacteria and yeast in the clinical microbiology laboratory: assessment of accuracy of identification and turnaround time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnot-Katsikas, Angella; Tesic, Vera; Boonlayangoor, Sue; Bethel, Cindy; Frank, Karen M

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed the accuracy of bacterial and yeast identification using the VITEK MS, and the time to reporting of isolates before and after its implementation in routine clinical practice. Three hundred and sixty-two isolates of bacteria and yeast, consisting of a variety of clinical isolates and American Type Culture Collection strains, were tested. Results were compared with reference identifications from the VITEK 2 system and with 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The VITEK MS provided an acceptable identification to species level for 283 (78 %) isolates. Considering organisms for which genus-level identification is acceptable for routine clinical care, 315 isolates (87 %) had an acceptable identification. Six isolates (2 %) were identified incorrectly, five of which were Shigella species. Finally, the time for reporting the identifications was decreased significantly after implementation of the VITEK MS for a total mean reduction in time of 10.52 h (Pmicrobiology laboratory and future expansion of the database should provide improved accuracy for the identification of micro-organisms.

  3. Quantifying within-household transmission of ESBL-producing bacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkate, Manon R; Platteel, Tamara N; Fluit, A C; Cohen Stuart, James W; Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A; Thijsen, Steven F T; Scharringa, J.; Kloosterman, Fieke R C; Bonten, Marc J M; Bootsma, Martin C J

    OBJECTIVES: Patients can acquire extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae during hospitalisation and colonised patients may transmit these bacteria after discharge, most likely to household contacts. In this study, ESBL transmission was quantified in households. METHODS:

  4. Multidrug resistant and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESBL) producing Gram-negative bacteria pose great threat to antibiotic treatment of life threatening infections worldwide. Objectives: This study investigated the occurrence and distribution of MDR and ESBL producing Proteus mirabilis among ...

  5. Prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamases (esbls) among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Confirmed variants of enterobacteriaceae isolated from 143 patients that attended Murtala Mohammed Specialist Hospital Kano, were screened for extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) production using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) breakpoint. Suspected ESBLs producers were subjected to ...

  6. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing bacteria are not detected in supragingival plaque samples from human fecal carriers of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Søraas

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The prevalence of infections caused by Cefotaximase-Munich (CTX-M-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E has rapidly increased during the past 15 years. Enterobacteriaceae are commonly found in the gastrointestinal tract and long-term intestinal carriage is considered important for the spread of ESBL and as a source of clinical infections. Oral biofilm such as supragingival plaque is known to contain numerous antibiotic resistance determinants and may also represent a poorly investigated site for ESBL carriage and further spread. Objective: To investigate possible carriage of ESBL-producing bacteria in supragingival plaque of known fecal carriers of these bacteria. Design: We screened for the presence of aerobic and anaerobic ESBL-producing bacteria and blaCTX-M in supragingival plaque samples from healthy human adults with culture-verified fecal carriage of CTX-M-producing Escherichia coli. The presence or absence of Enterobacteriaceae and ESBL-producing bacteria in plaque samples was evaluated using culture-based methods and consensus CTX-M PCR. Results: Oral samples were obtained from 17 participants with known previous carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli. No ESBL-producing bacteria or ESBL genes were detected using culture-based and molecular methods. One colony of Rahnella aquatilis harboring the class A ESBL gene bla RAHN-1/2 was identified in an oral sample from one of the participants. Conclusion: This pilot study supports the notion that the presence of CTX-M-producing bacteria is uncommon in oral plaque of healthy human adult fecal carriers. Due to the limited number of persons tested, a low prevalence of oral ESBL-carriage in healthy adults or carriage in selected groups of patients cannot be excluded. To our knowledge, this is the first description of an R. aquatilis with the RAHN-1/2 gene in the oral cavity.

  7. High carriage rate of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae at presentation and follow-up among travellers with gastrointestinal complaints returning from India and Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto Miranda, Isabel; Ignatius, Ralf; Pfüller, Roland; Friedrich-Jänicke, Barbara; Steiner, Florian; Paland, Matthias; Dieckmann, Sebastian; Schaufler, Katharina; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian; Mockenhaupt, Frank P

    2016-02-01

    International travel contributes to the spread of multidrug-resistant microorganisms including extended spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE). We assessed the proportion of faecal carriers of ESBL-PE among 211 patients with gastrointestinal symptoms who returned to Berlin, Germany, after international travel. ESBL-PE were screened for on chromogenic agar, antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed, and ESBL-genes were genotyped. Travel-related data were assessed by questionnaire. Diarrhoea, abdominal pain and nausea were the main symptoms. Half of the travellers carried ESBL-PE (97% Escherichia coli); the proportion was highest for returnees from India (72%) and mainland Southeast Asia (59%), and comparatively lower for Africa (33%) and Central America (20%). Co-resistance to fluoroquinolones (particularly in isolates from India), gentamicin and cotrimoxazole was frequent but all isolates were carbapenem-susceptible. ESBL-PE carriage decreased with increasing timespan from return to presentation, and with age. At revisit of initially ESBL-PE positive patients half a year later, 28% (17/61) of the individuals were still carriers, CTX-M groups being congruent with the initial isolates. CTX-M groups 9 and 1/9, vegetarian diet and cat ownership tended to be associated with ESBL-PE carriage upon revisit. Travellers, particularly those returning from India and Southeast Asia, constitute a relevant source of potential spread of ESBL-PE. Carriage declines over time but ESBL-PE persist for at least 6 months in a substantial proportion of individuals. Both genetic characteristics of the bacteria and lifestyle factors seem to contribute to persistent carriage of ESBL-PE. A recent, extra-European travel history argues for ESBL-PE screening and contact precautions for patients admitted to hospital. © International Society of Travel Medicine, 2016. All rights reserved. Published by Oxford University Press. For permissions, please e

  8. High Prevalence of Multiple Drug Resistance among ESBLs-Producing Klebsiella pneumoniae Isolated from Hospitalized Patients in Isfahan, Iran

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    Zahra Tahanasab

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background:   This study was to evaluate the prevalence of CTX-Mand TEM type ESBLs-producing K. pneumoniae and determination of MDR, XDR, and PDR phenotypes of these isolates as well as find out the genetic relationship and molecular typing of these isolates using phenotypic and genotypic methods.Methods:   Non-repetitive 96 K. pneumonia isolates were isolated from hospitalized patients in Al-Zahra hospital of Isfahan, Iran. The antibiotic susceptibility test was assessed for 20 antibiotics using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. The frequency of ESBL-producing isolates was determined by phenotypic confirmatory test. All ESBLs-producing isolates were assessed for blaTEM and blaCTX-M genes using PCR method. Molecular typing was performed by enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus sequence-based PCR (ERIC-PCR.Results:  Among 96 isolates, 58 isolates (60.4% were ESBL-producers. In this study, 85.7% and 30.3% of ESBL-producing isolates showed MDR and XDR phenotypes, respectively. No PDR isolate was found. PCR amplification on ESBL-producing isolates showed that 47 (81% isolates were carried blaTEM gene, while blaCTX-M was detected in all isolates (100%. ERIC-PCR typing was characterized the high genetic similarity among ESBL-producing K. pneumonia isolates and revealed 32 band pattern for the isolates. Conclusion:  This study showed high prevalence of important ESBL genes (blaCTX-M and blaTEM genes among the K. pneumoniae isolated from in-patients. Constant following of ESBLs, also identification of their types, in bacteria isolated from hospitalized patients has an important clinical impact. It can provide valuable information for the choice of appropriate antibacterial therapy and decrease of antibiotic resistance.

  9. Detection and PFGE analysis of ESBL-producing isolates of Proteus species isolated from patients at Tehran hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malekjamshidi, Mohammad Reza; Shahcheraghi, Fereshteh; Feizabadi, Mohammad Mehdi

    2010-10-01

    The production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), in particular TEM and CTX-M type, by the strains of Proteus spp. is a contributing factor to the emergence of bacterial drug resistance. The aim of this study was to screen and determine of ESBLs genes among strains of Proteus spp. at Tehran hospitals. A total of 100 clinical isolates of Proteus species and 1 isolate of Morganella morganii were collected from hospitals in Tehran. Susceptibility of these isolates to various antibiotics was tested by disk diffusion method. Microbroth dilution assay was then used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ceftazidime. The phenotypic confirmatory test (PCT) was used for detection of ESBLs. Isolates showing MIC ≥4 µg/ml for ceftazidime were screened for detection of ESBLs genes by PCR. The genomic DNA from ESBL-producing isolates was extracted and analyzed by PFGE. During the study, 11.8% of the isolates were positive for ESBLs genes. The MICs of ceftazidime-resistant isolates were in the range of 4 to 8 µg/ml. The Frequencies of different genes encoding the ESBLs were as follows: blaCTX-M (n=13), blaTEM (n=10), blaVEB (n=7), blaSHV (n=1), and blaPER (n=0). Analysis of 12 ESBL-producing isolates by PFGE produced 5 distinct clusters designated as I-V. The Detection of ESBL-producing isolates of Proteus spp. with similar PFGE pattern is alarming and suggests the clonal outbreaks with these strains at Tehran hospitals is likely, necessitating control over prescription of new generation cephalosporins.

  10. Transcriptional Response of Multiple ESBL Genes Within Escherichia coli Under Oxyimino-Cephalosporin Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Anand Prakash; Chanda, Debadatta Dhar; Bora, Debajyoti; Das Talukdar, Anupam; Chakravarty, Atanu; Bhattacharjee, Amitabha

    2017-03-01

    The expression of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases directly interferes with the treatment options in a clinical setting. It is not clearly defined why bacteria acquire multiple beta-lactamases and how they are being expressed in antibiotic stress. With this key question, the study was designed to understand the transcriptional response in Escherichia coli harboring multiple bla ESBLs against different oxyimino-cephalosporin stress. A total of 169 consecutive, nonduplicate oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant isolates of E. coli were screened and were ESBL positive. Among them six isolates were found to harbor multiple beta-lactamase genes and we, as per our objective, selected them for this study. Molecular characterization was done by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Minimum inhibitory concentration, transcriptional expression, transferability, and plasmid incompatibility typing of multiple bla ESBLs were carried out. Plasmid stability and antibiotic susceptibility of donor and transconjugants were performed. A total of six isolates were found to be harboring multiple ESBL genes and MIC above the breakpoint level against all the tested antibiotics. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that in basal level without antibiotic stress, SHV-148 expressed more, but with ceftriaxone stressed, expression of CTX-M-15 and SHV-148 was high. In case of PER-1, expression was high with ceftazidime stress. bla ESBLs were horizontally transferable and originated through multiple inc types. Plasmids were stable till 115 serial passages. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis results showed that multiple ESBL genes were spread through six pulsotypes. Our study concludes that acquisition of multiple ESBL genes in E. coli was a specific adaptation for survival against multiple oxyimino-cephalosporin stress in this clinical setting.

  11. Characterization of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in Asi (Orontes) River in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kürekci, Cemil; Aydin, Muhsin; Yipel, Mustafa; Katouli, Mohammad; Gündoğdu, Aycan

    2017-10-01

    In this study, the presence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in aquatic environments (the Orontes River and an urban wastewater) was investigated. Fifty-four E. coli strains resistant to cefotaxime were isolated from the river waters and nearby waste water treatment plant and screened for ESBL gene variants, different classes of integrons and sulfonamide resistance genes. The ESBL-producing E. coli strains were further characterized by PhP-typing system, phylogenetic grouping and antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Of the 54 ESBL-producing strains, 14 (25.9%) belonged to four common PhP types and the remaining were of single types. CTX-M type ESBL genes were identified in 68% of the isolates. The most predominant specific CTX-M subtype identified was blaCTX-M-15 (n = 36), followed by blaCTX-M-1 (n = 1). None of the isolates were SHV and OXA positive. Most of the ESBL positive isolates (n = 37; 68.5%) were harboring sul gene. This study indicates a widespread distribution of CTX-M-15 producing E. coli strains in the surface waters in part of Turkey, suggesting an aquatic reservoir for ESBL genes.

  12. Rapid Identification of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) by the Vitek MS Saramis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Weiguang; Li, Jiaping; Fang, Ying; Wang, Xuan; Gu, Danxia; Zhang, Rong

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, sensitive, and accurate Vitek MS assay was developed to distinguish clinical isolates of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from clinical isolates of methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) by developing an in-house knowledgebase of SuperSpectra. Three unique peaks, including peaks at 2305.6 and 3007.3 Da specific to MRSA, and 6816.7 Da specific to MSSA, were selected for differentiating MRSA and MSSA. This assay accurately identified 84 and 91% of clinical MRSA and MSSA strains out of the total 142 clinically acquired S. aureus strains that were tested. This method will greatly improve the efficiency of single clinical sample identification of MRSA, thereby facilitating a reduction in the transmission of MRSA in clinical settings.

  13. (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Emerging antibiotic resistance due to extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production limited the use of β-lactam antibiotics against Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae. This observational study was conducted at the Microbiology department of the Children's Hospital, Lahore Pakistan, from June, 2009 to ...

  14. Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)–Producing Gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, Enterobacter species, Wound, Urine, Gram negative bacteria. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research is .... Table 1: Prevalence of ESBL production in relation to specimen. Organism. Wound. Urine. Total (%). No. tested. No. positive. (%). No. tested. No. positive. (%).

  15. Characterization of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from urine of nonhospitalized patients in the Zagreb region

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    Branka Bedenić,

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim To determine the prevalence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae strains isolated from urine of nonhospitalized patients during a three-year period, to determine their antibiotic susceptibility, investigate the transfer of ESBL genes with cotransfer of resistance and to characterize isolated beta-lactamases. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility was determined by disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods. The double-disk test was used for ESBL detection. Transfer of resistance was performed by broth mating method and characterization of isolated beta-lactamases by polymerase chain reaction. Results The prevalence of ESBL-producing E. coli was 1.5% and of K. pneumoniae 4.1% with its different distribution according to patients`age and gender. ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae showed high resistance rates to aminoglycosides, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin and quinolones while ESBL-producing E. coli isolates, with exception of high aminoglycoside resistance, showed low resistance rates to other antibiotics. Successful conjugation of ESBL genes was obtained with 25% E. coli and 76.2% K. pneumoniae strains. Comparing to E. coli, K. pneumoniae strains showed higher rates of aminoglycosideand cotrimoxazole resistance cotransfer. Beta-lactamases of investigated strains belonged to TEM, SHV and CTX-M families.Conclusion The existence of multiple-resistant ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae strains was confirmed in observed outpatient population. ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae isolates, in contrast toESBL-producing E. coli, showed higher resistance rates to non-beta-lactam antibiotics, probably caused by cotransfer of resistance genes located on the same plasmid as ESBL genes. It is important to monitor the prevalence of such strains and their possible spreading in the outpatient population of the Zagreb region

  16. Evaluation of Bruker Biotyper and Vitek MS for the identification of Candida tropicalis on different solid culture media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He; Li, Ying; Fan, Xin; Chiueh, Tzong-Shi; Xu, Ying-Chun; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2017-11-11

    The aim of this study was to investigate the performance of the Bruker Biotyper matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek MS systems for identification of genetically-confirmed blood isolates of Candida tropicalis that had been grown on several types of culture media commonly used for primary fungal isolation. Isolates included 105 from the National China Hospital Invasive Fungal Surveillance Net program (CHIF-NET) and 120 from National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH). Culture media tested for CHIF-NET isolates included trypticase soy agar supplemented with 5% sheep blood (BAP), Sabouraud dextrose agar (SDA-C), CHROMagar, China blue agar (CBA), chocolate agar supplemented with vancomycin (CAP-VA), and MacConkey agar (MAC). Culture media used for NTUH isolates included BAP, SDA, CHROMagar, eosin methylene blue (EMB), inhibitory mold agar (IMA), Mycosel agar, and cornmeal agar (CMA). The Bruker Biotyper correctly identified all CHIF-NET isolates to the species level on all six agar media tested and correctly identified the majority of NTUH isolates with the exception of isolates grown on SDA (85.8%) and CMA (52.5%). The Vitek MS system correctly identified all CHIF-NET isolates to the species level with the exception of isolates grown on CHROMagar (84.8%), and correctly identified the majority of NTUH isolates with the exception of isolates grown on SDA (51.7%), Mycosel agar (57.5%), and CMA (9.2%) for NTUH isolates. Clinical microbiologists should be aware that different culture media can affect the performance of the Bruker Biotyper MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek MS systems in identifying C. tropicalis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Occurrence of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli in Livestock and Farm Workers in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Germany.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Dahms

    Full Text Available In recent years, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL producing bacteria have been found in livestock, mainly as asymptomatic colonizers. The zoonotic risk for people working in close contact to animal husbandry has still not been completely assessed. Therefore, we investigated the prevalence of ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. in livestock animals and workers to determine the potential risk for an animal-human cross-transmission.In Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, northeast Germany, inguinal swabs of 73 individuals with livestock contact from 23 different farms were tested for ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. Two pooled fecal samples per farm of animal origin from 34 different farms (17 pig farms, 11 cattle farms, 6 poultry farms as well as cloacal swabs of 10 randomly selected broilers or turkeys were taken at each poultry farm. For identification, selective chromogenic agar was used after an enrichment step. Phenotypically ESBL-producing isolates (n = 99 were tested for CTX-M, OXA, SHV and TEM using PCR, and isolates were further characterized using multilocus sequence typing (MLST. In total, 61 diverse isolates from different sources and/or different MLST/PCR results were acquired. Five farm workers (three from cattle farms and two from pig farms harbored ESBL-producing E. coli. All human isolates harbored the CTX-M β-lactamase; TEM and OXA β-lactamases were additionally detected in two, resp. one, isolates. ESBL-producing Escherichia spp. were found in fecal samples at pig (15/17, cattle (6/11 and poultry farms (3/6. In total, 70.6% (24/36 of the tested farms were ESBL positive. Furthermore, 9 out of 60 cloacal swabs turned out to be ESBL positive. All isolated ESBL-producing bacteria from animal sources were E. coli, except for one E. hermanii isolate. CTX-M was the most prevalent β-lactamase at cattle and pig farms, while SHV predominated in poultry. One human isolate shared an identical MLST sequence type (ST 3891 and CTX-M allele to the

  18. Antimicrobial Resistance status and prevalence rates of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL producers isolated from a mixed human population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A. Afunwa

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the increasing epidemiological and therapeutic challenges associated with infections due to ESBL producers, ESBL prevalence rate among some bacteria isolates from healthy and non-healthy human population in a metropolitan Nigerian setting was evaluated.A total of one hundred and forty-five (145 bacteria strains were isolated from a total of four hundred and sixty (460 samples collected from urine, wound, throat and anal swabs of 220 healthy volunteers in the community and from 240 patients in 2 secondary and 2 tertiary hospitals (altogether, 4 in Enugu metropolis. The presumptive confirmatory test used for ESBL detection was the Double Disc Synergy Test (DDST method. Conjugation and plasmid curing studies were also done for resistance factor determination.Of the 145 isolates, 20 were ESBL producers with 35% of these ESBL producers being of community origin and 65% from hospitals. This translates to 4.8% and 9% incidences (comparably higher than established prevalence of 4.4% and 7.5 respectively for community and hospital infections respectively. The ESBL isolates showed high resistance to tetracycline, gentamicin, pefloxacin, ceftriaxone, cefuroxime, ciprofloxacin and Augmentin® (Amoxicilin and clavulanic acid combination. Conjugation studies for Resistance plasmid transfer showed non-transference of resistance determinants between the ESBL transconjugants and recipient strains. Correspondingly, the plasmid curing studies revealed that the acridine orange could not effect a cure on the isolates as they still retained high resistance to the antibiotics after the treatment.This study confirms the growing incidences/pool of ESBL strains in Nigeria and call for widespread and continuous monitoring towards an effective management of the potential therapeutic hurdle posed by this trend.

  19. A Side by Side Comparison of Bruker Biotyper and VITEK MS: Utility of MALDI-TOF MS Technology for Microorganism Identification in a Public Health Reference Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Simon; Dufresne, Philippe J; Soualhine, Hafid; Domingo, Marc-Christian; Bekal, Sadjia; Lefebvre, Brigitte; Tremblay, Cécile

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid, highly accurate, and cost-effective method for routine identification of a wide range of microorganisms. We carried out a side by side comparative evaluation of the performance of Bruker Biotyper versus VITEK MS for identification of a large and diverse collection of microorganisms. Most difficult and/or unusual microorganisms, as well as commonly encountered microorganisms were selected, including Gram-positive and negative bacteria, mycobacteria, actinomycetes, yeasts and filamentous fungi. Six hundred forty two strains representing 159 genera and 441 species from clinical specimens previously identified at the Laboratoire de santé publique du Québec (LSPQ) by reference methods were retrospectively chosen for the study. They included 254 Gram-positive bacteria, 167 Gram-negative bacteria, 109 mycobacteria and aerobic actinomycetes and 112 yeasts and moulds. MALDI-TOF MS analyses were performed on both systems according to the manufacturer's instructions. Of the 642 strains tested, the name of the genus and / or species of 572 strains were referenced in the Bruker database while 406 were present in the VITEK MS IVD database. The Biotyper correctly identified 494 (86.4%) of the strains, while the VITEK MS correctly identified 362 (92.3%) of the strains (excluding 14 mycobacteria that were not tested). Of the 70 strains not present in the Bruker database at the species level, the Biotyper correctly identified 10 (14.3%) to the genus level and 2 (2.9%) to the complex/group level. For 52 (74.2%) strains, we obtained no identification, and an incorrect identification was given for 6 (8.6%) strains. Of the 178 strains not present in the VITEK MS IVD database at the species level (excluding 71 untested mycobacteria and actinomycetes), the VITEK MS correctly identified 12 (6.8%) of the strains each to the genus and to the complex/group level. For 97 (54

  20. ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in households with children of preschool age: prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bunt, G; Liakopoulos, A; Mevius, D J; Geurts, Y; Fluit, A C; Bonten, M J M; Mughini-Gras, L; van Pelt, W

    2017-02-01

    ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging public health concern. As households with preschool children may substantially contribute to the community burden of antimicrobial resistance, we determined the prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria in preschool children and their parents. From April 2013 to January 2015, each month 2000 preschool children were randomly selected from Dutch population registries. The parents were invited to complete an epidemiological questionnaire and to obtain and send a faecal sample from the selected child and from one parent. Samples were tested for ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria. Logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for ESBL/AmpC carriage in children and parents, and findings were internally validated by bootstrapping. In total, 1016 families were included and ESBL/AmpC prevalence was 4.0% (95% CI 3.2%-5.0%); 3.5% (95% CI 2.5%-4.8%) in children and 4.5% (95% CI 3.4%-6.0%) in parents. Attending a daycare centre (DCC) was the only significant risk factor for children (OR 2.1, 95% CI 1.0-4.3). For parents, the only significant risk factor was having one or more children attending DCCs (OR 2.2, 95% CI 1.2-4.8). For parents of ESBL/AmpC-positive children the OR for ESBL/AmpC carriage was 19.7 (95% CI 9.2-42.4). Co-carriage of specific ESBL/AmpC genotypes in child and parent occurred more often than expected by chance (14.6% versus 1.1%, P producing bacteria. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  1. Occurrence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) in Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stobberingh, EE; Arends, J; Hoogkamp-Korstanje, JAA; Goessens, WHF; Visser, MR; Buiting, AGM; Debets-Ossenkopp, YJ; van Ketel, RJ; van Ogtrop, ML; Sabbe, LJM; Voorn, GP; Winter, HLJ; van Zeijl, JH

    1999-01-01

    The prevalence of ESBL was determined among isolates of Escherichia coli (n = 571) and Klebsiella spp. (n = 196) collected during a 1-week study period in 8 university and 3 large regional laboratories all over the Netherlands. 18 isolates were positive for at least one of the screening tests used,

  2. Comparison of the Vitek MS and Bruker Microflex LT MALDI-TOF MS platforms for routine identification of commonly isolated bacteria and yeast in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deak, Eszter; Charlton, Carmen L; Bobenchik, April M; Miller, Shelley A; Pollett, Simon; McHardy, Ian H; Wu, Max T; Garner, Omai B

    2015-01-01

    This study compared the diagnostic performance of Bruker's Microflex LT and bioMérieux's Vitek MS matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry systems. A total of 477 isolates were tested on both instruments. Discrepant results were resolved by sequencing. Overall, there was no statistically significant difference between the proportion of isolates correctly identified, miscalled or not called by each instrument. Although both systems were good at identifying yeast (66/69 to species level), the confidence level was high only to genus level for 30% of the isolates on the Bruker. Both systems performed with high accuracy when evaluated solely on Food and Drug Administration-approved organisms for each database. A user-based assessment of the 2 instruments revealed an overall preference for the Vitek MS instrument. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Accurate characterization of ofloxacin susceptibility with Enterobacteriaceae using a modified GNS F6 card and the bioMerieux Vitek System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doern, G V; Torres, B B; Jankins, M; Jones, R N

    1996-07-01

    Routine antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae using the Vitek System (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, MO) and the GNS-F6 card revealed discrepancies between the activity of ofloxacin and ciprofloxacin, primarily with isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Specifically, during a one-year period, 12% of 618 ciprofloxacin-susceptible isolates were determined to be ofloxacin resistant with the GNS-F6 card. A similar problem, but one of lower magnitude, was observed with Serratia marsescens. That these represented false ofloxacin resistance results was confirmed by comparison of broth microdilution determinations of ofloxacin MICs with F6 results on a collection of 203 fresh clinical isolates of K. pneumoniae and 39 isolates of S. marsescens. The GNS-F6 card was then modified by the manufacturer to include a new formulation of ofloxacin and assessed using a collection of 224 recent clinical isolates of Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and 78 stock cultures of enteric Gram-negative bacilli selected specifically because of disproportionately high rates of fluoroquinolone resistance. No ofloxacin false resistant results were observed with this collection when the modified GNS-F6 card was evaluated in comparison to a standardized broth microdilution MIC test. The current clinical version of the Vitek System appears to accurately assess ofloxacin susceptibility.

  4. Evaluation of the MicroScan ESBL plus confirmation panel for detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in clinical isolates of oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürenburg, Enno; Lang, Melanie; Horstkotte, Matthias A; Laufs, Rainer; Mack, Dietrich

    2004-11-01

    We aimed to assess the performance of the MicroScan ESBL plus confirmation panel using a series of 87 oxyimino-cephalosporin-resistant Gram-negative bacilli of various species. Organisms tested included 57 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) strains comprising Enterobacter aerogenes (3), Enterobacter cloacae (10), Escherichia coli (11), Klebsiella pneumoniae (26), Klebsiella oxytoca (3) and Proteus mirabilis (4). Also included were 30 strains resistant to oxyimino cephalosporins but lacking ESBLs, which were characterized with other resistance mechanisms, such as inherent clavulanate susceptibility in Acinetobacter spp. (4), hyperproduction of AmpC enzyme in Citrobacter freundii (2), E. aerogenes (3), E. cloacae (3), E. coli (4), Hafnia alvei (1) and Morganella morganii (1), production of plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase in K. pneumoniae (3) and E. coli (3) or hyperproduction of K1 enzyme in K. oxytoca (6). The MicroScan MIC-based clavulanate synergy correctly classified 50 of 57 ESBL strains as ESBL-positive and 23 of 30 non-ESBL strains as ESBL-negative (yielding a sensitivity of 88% and a specificity of 76.7%, respectively). False negatives among ESBL producers were highest with Enterobacter spp. due to masking interactions between ESBL and AmpC beta-lactamases. False-positive classifications occurred in two Acinetobacter spp., one E. coli producing plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase and two K. oxytoca hyperproducing their chromosomal K1 beta-lactamase. The MicroScan clavulanate synergy test proved to be a valuable tool for ESBL confirmation. However, this test has limitations in detecting ESBLs in Enterobacter spp. and in discriminating ESBL-related resistance from the K1 enzyme and from inherent clavulanate susceptibility in Acinetobacter spp.

  5. (ESBL) Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Asa River

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADOWIE PERE

    blaTEM, or both), 5(31.3%) isolates do not have any of the three ESBL genes, and blaSHV was not detected in any of the isolates. The results of this study indicate the widespread prevalence of ESBLs in E. coli. Therefore, beta-lactam antibiotics and beta-lactamase inhibitors should be prescribed based on an antibacterial ...

  6. [Impact of enterobacteriaceae-producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLE) incidence increasing on barrier precautions implementation in a university hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourigault, C; Corvec, S; Bemer, P; Juvin, M-E; Guillouzouic, A; Crémet, L; Reynaud, A; Leprince, C; Lepelletier, D

    2013-10-01

    The French national surveillance program of multidrug-resistant bacteria (MDR) shows an increase of enterobacteriaceae-producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLE) incidence. The objectives of this study were to assess: the incidence of EBLSE in a large French university hospital between 2005 and 2010, and the difference of barrier precautions implementation between ESBL and other MDR. The ESBLE incidence measure used data from the laboratory of bacteriology. The application of isolation and barrier precautions was analyzed from the MRB national surveillance data over a 3-year period from 2006 to 2008. Data were entered and analyzed using Epi Info software. The Chi(2) test was used for the comparison of proportions. The overall incidence of ESBLE was significantly higher in 2010 than in 2005 (0.20/1000 patients-days vs 0.03/1000 patients-days, respectively) (P<0.001). The same was observed for Escherichia coli incidence with rates ranging from 0.02/1000 patients-days in 2005 to 0.15/1000 patients-days in 2010. Isolation precautions for patients with EBLSE were applied in relation for most patients with MRB (ESBLE vs others), without significant difference. The surveillance programme of MRB showed a significant increase of ESBLE, especially for E. coli. Isolation and barrier precautions were used for most patients with MRB, including ESBLE. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Incidence of multidrug-resistant pseudomonas spp. in ICU patients with special reference to ESBL, AMPC, MBL and biofilm production

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    Richa Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Multidrug-resistant (MDR Pseudomonas spp. have been reported to be the important cause of ICU infections. The appearance of ESBL, AmpC and MBL genes and their spread among bacterial pathogens is a matter of great concern. Biofilm production also attributes to antimicrobial resistance due to close cell to cell contact that permits bacteria to more effectively transfer plasmids to one another. This study aimed at determining the incidence of ESBL, AmpC, MBL and biofilm producing Pseudomonas spp. in ICU patients. Material and Methods: The clinical specimens were collected aseptically from 150 ICU patients from February 2012 to October 2013. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. ESBLs and AmpC were detected phenotypically and genotypically. MBL was detected by modified Hodge and imipenem-EDTA double-disk synergy test. Results: Pseudomonas spp. 35(28% were the most prevalent pathogen in ICU infections. Multidrug resistance and biofilm production was observed in 80.1% and 60.4% isolates, respectively. Prevalence of ESBL, AmpC and MBL was 22.9%, 42.8% and 14.4%, respectively. The average hospital stay was 25 days and was associated with 20% mortality. Conclusions: A regular surveillance is required to detect ESBL, AmpC and MBL producers especially in ICU patients. Carbapenems should be judiciously used to prevent their spread. The effective antibiotics, such as fluoroquinolones and piperacillin-tazobactum should be used after sensitivity testing.

  8. Discrepant susceptibility to gentamicin despite amikacin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae by VITEK 2 represents false susceptibility associated with the armA 16S rRNA methylase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Jae-Hoon; Baek, Jin Yang; Peck, Kyong Ran; Cho, Sun Young; Ha, Young Eun; Kim, So Hyun; Huh, Hee Jae; Lee, Nam Yong; Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2017-10-01

    Because we experienced gentamicin failure in Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteraemia that was susceptible to gentamicin despite amikacin resistance, as determined by VITEK 2, we evaluated the true susceptibility and mechanism of resistance. We screened 2818 K. pneumoniae isolates during a 1-year period at a university hospital and reviewed anti-microbial susceptibility reports using the VITEK 2 system. The minimum inhibitory concentration was substantiated by broth microdilution (BMD), and the presence of 16S rRNA methylase genes and aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes was also investigated. A total of 131 amikacin-resistant isolates from 19 patients were gentamicin non-resistant according to the VITEK 2 system. Among these, we were able to collect isolates from 12 patients (63.2 %), and a single isolate from each patient was tested. Eleven of the gentamicin non-resistant isolates (91.7 %) showed high-level resistance to both amikacin and gentamicin by BMD in association with the armA gene. Gentamicin is not an adequate treatment option for amikacin-resistant K. pneumoniae, even if VITEK 2 reports susceptibility.

  9. Phylogenetic Distribution of Virulence Genes Among ESBL-producing Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Isolated from Long-term Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruike; Shi, Jinfang; Shen, Yimin; Li, Yanmeng; Han, Qingzhen; Zhang, Xianfeng; Gu, Guohao; Xu, Jie

    2015-07-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the antibiotic resistance, virulence potential and phylogenetic grouping of ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (EP-UPEC) isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. EP-UPEC isolates from September 2013 to June 2014 at a tertiary care hospital of China were screened for ESBL-production by the double disk diffusion test. Isolates with ESBL-phenotype were further characterized by antibiotic resistance testing, PCR of different ESBL and virulence genes, and phylogenetic grouping. One hundred and twenty EP-UPEC were isolated from long-term hospitalized patients. All EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Ampicillin, Cefazolin, Cefuroxime, Cefotaxime, Cefoperazone and Ceftriaxone, and the majority of EP-UPEC isolates were resistant to Piperacillin (82.5%), Ciprofloxacin (81.2%), Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole (72.5%). The isolates showed the highest sensitivity against Imipenem (98.4%), Piperacillin/tazobactam (96.7%), Cefoperazone/sulbactam (91.7%), Amikacin (90.8%) and Cefepime (75.8%). Nine different ESBL genotype patterns were observed and CTX-M type was the most prevalent ESBL genotype (42.5%, 51/120). Majority of EP-UPEC isolates possess more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC isolates belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2(36.7%) and D(35.0%). The prevalence of traT, ompT, iss, PAI, afa, fimH and papC were 75.8%, 63.3%, 63.3%, 60.8%, 40.8%, 19.2% and 6.7%, respectively. The number of virulence genes (VGs) detected was significantly higher in group B2 than in group A (ANOVA, pUPEC strains showed multidrug resistance and co-resistance to other non β-lactam antibiotics. CTX-M was the most prevalent ESBL genotype and majority of EP-UPEC strains more than one ESBL genes. EP-UPEC strains belonged mainly to phylogenetic group B2 and D, and most of the virulence genes were more prevalent in group B2.

  10. A case of wound dual infection with Pasteurella dagmatis and Pasteurella Canis resulting from a dog bite - limitations of Vitek-2 system in exact identification of Pasteurella species

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    Akahane T

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pasteurella species, widely known as indigenous orgganisms in the oral and gastrointestinal floras of many wild and domestic animals, are important pathogens in both animals and humans. Human infections due to Pasteurella species are in most cases associated with infected injuries following animal bites. We encountered a rare case of dual infections caused by different two Pasteurella species occurred in a previously healthy 25-year-old female sustaining injury by a dog-bite. Methodology Exudates from the open wound of her dog-bite site, together with the saliva of the dog were submitted for bacteriological examination. Predominantly appearing grayish-white smooth colonies with almost the same colonial properties but slightly different glistening grown on chocolate and sheep blood agar plates were characterized morphologically by Gram's stain, biochemically by automated instrument using Vitek 2 system using GN cards together with commercially available kit system, ID-Test HN-20 rapid panels, and genetically by sequencing the 16S rRNA genes of the organism using a Taq DyeDeoxy Terminator Cycle Sequencing and a model 3100 DNA sequencer instrument. Results The causative isolates from the dog-bite site were finally identified as P. canis and P. dagmatis from the findings of the morphological, cultural, and biochemical properties together with the comparative sequences of the 16S rRNA genes. Both the isolates were highly susceptible to many antibiotics and the patient was successfully treated with the administration of so-called the first generation cephalosporin, cefazolin followed by so-called the third generation cephalosporin, cefcapene pivoxil. The isolate from the dog was subsequently identified as P. canis, the same species as the isolate from the patient. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this was the second report of a dual infection with Pasteurella species consisting of P. dagmatis and P. canis resulting from a

  11. Bacteriological profile and clinical predictors of ESBL neonatal sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Kumar, Chetan; Pandita, Aakash; Pratap, Oleti Tejo; Dasi, Teena; Murki, Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriologic profile and risk factors for ESBL sepsis in newborns admitted to a Level III NICU. This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled newborns admitted to NICU with perinatal risk factors or clinical signs of sepsis and positive blood culture from January 2013 to August 2014. Blood cultures were done by BACTEC and ESBL production was evaluated from double-disc synergy method. Maternal, perinatal and neonatal risk factors were recorded from the case records and computerized information base. Mothers received cephalosporins for PPROM but its use was restricted in newborns for both probable and culture-positive sepsis. Among the infants with sepsis 24% had early-onset sepsis. The incidence of ESBL of early-onset Gram-negative sepsis (EOGNS) was 44.7% (n = 17 of 38) and it was 65% in late-onset Gram-negative sepsis (n = 84 of 129). The predominant ESBL-producing microbe responsible for neonatal sepsis was Klebsiella sp. Among newborns with EOGNS, the risk factors for the production of ESBL were preterm PROM (p = 0.004) and maternal exposure to antibiotics (p = 0.05). ESBL Gram-negative sepsis is a substantial problem in neonatal infections. Maternal exposure to cephalosporins and maternal PPROM are important risk factors for ESBL Gram-negative EOS.

  12. Comparison of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL CTX-M Genotypes in Franklin Gulls from Canada and Chile.

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    Jonas Bonnedahl

    Full Text Available Migratory birds have been suggested to contribute to long-distance dispersal of antimicrobial resistant bacteria, but tests of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study we determined resistance profiles and genotypes of ESBL-producing bacteria in randomly selected Escherichia coli from Franklin´s gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan at breeding sites in Canada and compared with similar data from the gulls' wintering grounds in Chile. Resistant E. coli phenotypes were common, most notably to ampicillin (30.1% and cefadroxil (15.1%. Furthermore, 17.0% of the gulls in Canada carried ESBL producing bacteria, which is higher than reported from human datasets from the same country. However, compared to gulls sampled in Chile (30.1% the prevalence of ESBL was much lower. The dominant ESBL variants in Canada were blaCTX-M-14 and blaCTX-M-15 and differed in proportions to the data from Chile. We hypothesize that the observed differences in ESBL variants are more likely linked to recent exposure to bacteria from anthropogenic sources, suggesting high local dissemination of resistant bacteria both at breeding and non-breeding times rather than a significant trans-hemispheric exchange through migrating birds.

  13. Risk factors for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli on pig farms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Wietske; Dorado-García, Alejandro; Bonten, Marc J.M.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Mevius, Dik; Heederik, Dick J.J.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli) in food animals is a public health concern. This study aimed to determine prevalence of ESBL-E. coli on pig farms and to assess the effect of reducing veterinary antimicrobial use (AMU) and farm management

  14. Emergence of Multi-drug Resistant ESBL Producing Strains among Enterobacteriaceae Members Isolated from Patients Blood Samples in South of Iran.

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    Jalal Mardaneh

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs have emerged as important mechanism of resistance among enterobacteriaceae family. These ESBL positive strains are major problem in hospitalized patients. The goal of this study was the survey emergence of multi-drug resistant ESBL producing strains among enterobacteriaceae members isolated from patients blood samples using BACTEC 9240 automatic system in south of Iran. Materials & Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 4825 blood samples were collected from hospitalized patients, and positive samples were detected by BACTEC automatic system. Positive blood cultures removed from BACTEC and subculture was performed on microbiological media including blood agar, chocolate agar and MacConkey agar. The isolates were identified based on biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system. Susceptibility testing (disc diffusion was performed according clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI, 2013 guidelines. Phenotypic detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing isolates was performed by double disk synergy test (DDST. Results: Total 1145 (24% blood cultures were positive that among them 248 (21.5% belonged to the enterobacteriaceae family. The most common isolates in this family were Escherichia coli (46.5%, Klebsiella spp. (28%, Enterobacter spp. (13.5%. Among enterobacteriaceae family, ampicillin was most effective drug against Salmonella isolates. Escherichia coli was the most common ESBL-producing isolate (58% of isolates were ESBL positive. Respectively, polymyxin B, colistin, imipenem were the most effective drugs against ESBL-positive Klebsiella strains. The ESBL-positive Enterobacter strains showed lowest resistance to imipenem (7.7%. All ESBL positive Serratia isolates were sensitive to chloramphenicol, co-trimoxazole and imipenem. Conclusion: Results showed unfortunately betalactam antibiotics are not effective against more than 40% of bacteremia caused by Escherichia

  15. ESBL determination and antibacterial drug resistance pattern of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ESBL determination and antibacterial drug resistance pattern of Klebsiella Pneumoniae amongst patients at PIMS Islamabad. Jafar Khan, Noor Naz, Naser M AbdEl-Salam, Nayab Nayab, Anum Tabassum, H Hussain, Riaz Ullah ...

  16. Evaluation of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry-based VITEK MS system for the identification of Acinetobacter species from blood cultures: comparison with VITEK 2 and MicroScan systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Yeob; Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter species are the leading cause of bloodstream infection (BSI), but their correct identification is challenging. We evaluated the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS)-based VITEK MS (bioMérieux, France), and two automated systems, VITEK 2 (bioMérieux) and MicroScan (Siemens, USA) for identification of Acinetobacter BSI isolates. A total of 187 BSI isolates recovered at a university hospital in Korea between 2010 and 2012 were analyzed. The identification results obtained using VITEK MS and two automated systems were compared with those of rpoB sequencing. Of 187 isolates analyzed, 176 were identified to the species level by rpoB sequencing: the Acinetobacter baumannii group (ABG; 101 A. baumannii, 43 A. nosocomialis, 10 A. pittii isolates) was most commonly identified (82.4%), followed by Acinetobacter genomic species 13BJ/14TU (5.3%), A. ursingii (2.1%), A. soli (2.1%), A. bereziniae (1.1%), and A. junii (1.1%). Correct identification rates to the species group (ABG) level or the species level was comparable among the three systems (VITEK MS, 90.3%; VITEK 2, 89.2%; MicroScan, 86.9%). However, VITEK MS generated fewer misidentifications (0.6%) than VITEK 2 (10.8%) and MicroScan (13.1%) (PAcinetobacter BSI isolates, with fewer misidentifications and better discrimination between the ABG and non-ABG isolates.

  17. Evaluation of VITEK 2 for discriminating Trichosporon species: misidentification of Trichosporon non-T. asahii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Figueiredo, Dulce Sachiko Yamamoto; de Almeida, João Nobrega; Motta, Adriana Lopes; Castro e Silva, Dulcilena Mattos; Szeszs, Maria Walderez; Del Negro, Gilda Maria Barbaro

    2014-09-01

    The VITEK 2 system was evaluated for the identification of 74 Trichosporon invasive and non-invasive clinical isolates, comparing its results with the IGS1 sequencing. The system correctly identified Trichosporon asahii but not non-T. asahii isolates, which represented nearly 50% of the invasive infections in our nosocomial setting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Salmonella in retail raw chicken carcasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jing; Zhang, Qiang; Alali, Walid Q; Wang, Jiawei; Meng, Lingyuan; Xiao, Yingping; Yang, Hua; Chen, Sheng; Cui, Shenghui; Yang, Baowei

    2017-05-02

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs)-producing Salmonella is considered a serious concern to public health worldwide. However, limited information is available on ESBLs-producing Salmonella in retail chicken products in China. The objective of this study was to characterize ESBLs-producing Salmonella isolates from retail chickens in China. A total of 890 Salmonella isolates from retail chicken carcasses collected from 4 provinces were firstly screened for ESBLs-production phenotype via the double-disk synergy test method. A total of 96 (10.8%, n=890) ESBLs-producing Salmonella were identified and subjected to PFGE analysis, characterization for the presence of ESBLs encoding genes, transposons, carbapenemase and virulence genes. A total of 59 PFGE profiles were detected in these 96 isolates, among which 57.3% were found to harbor bla TEM-1 , whereas 30.2%, 24.0%, 18.8% and 7.3% were carrying bla OXA-1 , bla CTX-M-15 , bla CTX-M-3 and bla PSE-1 genes, respectively. Moreover, 42 (43.8%) isolates co-carried 2 ESBLs-producing genes, and two (2.1%) isolates co-carried 3 genes. Furthermore, 24 (25.0%) ESBLs-producing isolates carried VIM and 10 (10.4%) carried KPC encoding genes that closely associated with carbapenems resistance. Eighty-eight isolates harbored transposons ranging from 4.2% for Tn903 to 76.0% for Tn21. Out of the 88 Salmonella that harbored transposons, 25%, 22.7%, 23.9%, 10.2% and 1.1% of isolates were found to carry 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 transposons, respectively. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values for cephalosporins (ceftriaxone, cefoperazone and cefoxitin) to ESBLs-producing isolates were from 4 to 1024μg/mL, for nalidixic acid were from 64 to 512μg/mL, for fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin and gatifloxacin) were from 4 to 256μg/mL. Twenty-nine virulence genes were detected in the 96 ESBLs-producing isolates with 2.1% harbored spvR (lowest) and 90.6% harbored marT and steB (highest). All isolates carried at least one

  19. Epidemiological factors associated with ESBL- and non ESBL-producing E. coli causing urinary tract infection in general practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Schønning, Kristian; Rasmussen, Steen Christian; Littauer, Pia; Knudsen, Jenny Dahl; Løbner-Olesen, Anders; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how use of antibiotics precedes the presence of ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice. The authors performed a triple-case-control study where three case groups were individually compared to a single control group of uninfected individuals. Urine samples were prospectively collected and retrospective statistical analyses were done. This study included 98 cases with urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by ESBL-producing E. coli, 174 with antibiotic-resistant (non-ESBL) E. coli, 177 with susceptible E. coli and 200 with culture negative urine samples. Case groups had significantly higher use of antibiotics than the control group within 30 days before infection (p E. coli. Exposure to antibiotics was a risk factor for UTI with E. coli, while prior antibiotic usage was not an indisputable predictor for infection with ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice.

  20. Molecular characterization of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Shigella spp. in Shanghai.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J; Li, B; Ni, Y; Sun, J

    2015-03-01

    Shigellosis is a public health concern in China. We tested 216 Shigella isolates collected in Shanghai in 2007 for the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). ESBL-producing isolates were characterized using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping, conjugation, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), and DNA sequence analysis of regions adjacent to bla genes. Plasmids containing genes encoding ESBLs were analyzed using plasmid replicon typing. ESBLs were produced by 18.1 % (39/216) of Shigella isolates, and all 39 ESBL-producing strains harbored bla CTX-M genes. CTX-M-14 was the most frequent variant (69.2 %, 27/39), followed by CTX-M-15 (15.4 %, 6/39). All bla CTX-M genes were transferable by conjugation, and the insertion sequence ISEcp1 was detected upstream of all bla CTX-M genes. The CTX-M-producing Shigella isolates showed high clonal diversity. IncI1, IncFII, IncN, and IncB/O replicons were respectively detected in 23 (58.9 %), 9 (23.1 %), 1 (2.6 %), and 1 (2.6 %) of the 39 transconjugants carrying bla CTX-M. The bla CTX-M-14 genes were most frequently carried by IncI1 (n = 13, 48.1 %) or IncFII (n = 9, 33.3 %) plasmids, and the bla CTX-M-15 genes were closely associated with IncI1 (n = 5, 83.3 %). Our findings demonstrate the high prevalence of ESBL-producing Shigella in Shanghai, the importance of plasmids and ISEcp1 as carriers of bla CTX-M genes, and the close association between certain bla CTX-M genes with a specific plasmid.

  1. Prevalence of ESBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Warsaw, Poland, detected by various phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudy, Agnieszka E; Róg, Patrycja; Smolińska-Król, Katarzyna; Ćmiel, Milena; Słoczyńska, Alicja; Patzer, Jan; Dzierżanowska, Danuta; Wolinowska, Renata; Starościak, Bohdan; Tyski, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge of the prevalence of ESBL enzymes among P. aeruginosa strains compared to the Enterobacteraiceae family is limited. The phenotypic tests recommended by EUCAST for the detection of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae are not always suited for P. aeruginosa strains. This is mainly due to the presence of other families of ESBLs in P. aeruginosa isolates more often than in Enterobacteriaceae, production of natural AmpC cephalosporinase and its overexpression, and co-production of metallo-β-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of ESBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from patients from hospitals in Warsaw, to evaluate the ESBL production of these isolates using currently available phenotypic tests, their modifications, multiplex PCR and molecular typing of ESBL-positive isolates by PFGE. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected in 2000-2014 from four Warsaw hospitals. Based on the data obtained in this study, we suggest using three DDST methods with inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, sulbactam and imipenem, to detect ESBL-producing P. aeruginosa strains. Depending on the appearance of the plates, we suggest a reduction in the distance between discs with antibiotics to 15 mm and the addition of boronic acid at 0.4 mg per disc. The analysed isolates carried genes encoding ESBL from the families VEB (69 isolates with VEB-9), GES (6 with GES-1, 1 GES-5, 5 GES-13 and 2 with GES-15), OXA-2 (12 with OXA-15, 1 OXA-141, 1 OXA-210, 1 OXA-543 and 1 with OXA-544) and OXA-10 (5 isolates with OXA-74 and one with OXA-142). The most important result of this study was the discovery of three new genes, blaGES-15, blaOXA-141 and blaOXA-142; their nucleotide sequences have been submitted to the NCBI GenBank. It is also very important to note that this is the first report on the epidemiological problem of VEB-9-producing bacterial strains, not only in Poland but also worldwide.

  2. Prevalence of ESBL-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in Warsaw, Poland, detected by various phenotypic and genotypic methods.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka E Laudy

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the prevalence of ESBL enzymes among P. aeruginosa strains compared to the Enterobacteraiceae family is limited. The phenotypic tests recommended by EUCAST for the detection of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae are not always suited for P. aeruginosa strains. This is mainly due to the presence of other families of ESBLs in P. aeruginosa isolates more often than in Enterobacteriaceae, production of natural AmpC cephalosporinase and its overexpression, and co-production of metallo-β-lactamases. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of ESBLs in P. aeruginosa isolated from patients from hospitals in Warsaw, to evaluate the ESBL production of these isolates using currently available phenotypic tests, their modifications, multiplex PCR and molecular typing of ESBL-positive isolates by PFGE. Clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa were collected in 2000-2014 from four Warsaw hospitals. Based on the data obtained in this study, we suggest using three DDST methods with inhibitors, such as clavulanic acid, sulbactam and imipenem, to detect ESBL-producing P. aeruginosa strains. Depending on the appearance of the plates, we suggest a reduction in the distance between discs with antibiotics to 15 mm and the addition of boronic acid at 0.4 mg per disc. The analysed isolates carried genes encoding ESBL from the families VEB (69 isolates with VEB-9, GES (6 with GES-1, 1 GES-5, 5 GES-13 and 2 with GES-15, OXA-2 (12 with OXA-15, 1 OXA-141, 1 OXA-210, 1 OXA-543 and 1 with OXA-544 and OXA-10 (5 isolates with OXA-74 and one with OXA-142. The most important result of this study was the discovery of three new genes, blaGES-15, blaOXA-141 and blaOXA-142; their nucleotide sequences have been submitted to the NCBI GenBank. It is also very important to note that this is the first report on the epidemiological problem of VEB-9-producing bacterial strains, not only in Poland but also worldwide.

  3. First description of Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15- extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL in out-patients from south eastern Nigeria

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    Iroha Ifeanyichukwu R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We studied the presence of extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs in 44 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli collected from out-patients in two university teaching hospitals in South-Eastern Nigeria. Species identification was performed by standard microbiology methods and re-confirmed by MALDI-TOF technology. Phenotypic characterization of ESBL enzymes was done by double disc synergy test and presence of ESBL genes was determined by specific PCR followed by sequencing. Transfer of plasmid DNA was carried out by transformation using E. coli DH5 as recipient strain. Phenotypic characterization identified all isolates to be ESBL positive. 77% of strains were from urine, 13.6% from vaginal swabs and 9.0% from wound swabs. 63.6% were from female patients, 68% were from outpatients and 95.5% from patients younger than 30 years. All ESBL producers were positive in a PCR for blaCTX-M-1 cluster, in exemplary strains blaCTX-M-15 was found by sequencing. In all strains ISEcp1 was found upstream and ORF477 downstream of blaCTX-M. PCR for blaTEM and blaOXA-1 was positive in 93.1% of strains, whereas blaSHV was not detected, aac(6′-Ib-cr was found in 97.7% of strains. RAPD analysis revealed seven different clonal groups named A through G with the majority of the strains (65.9% belonging to clone A. Transfer of an ESBL plasmid with co-resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, tobramycin, doxycycline and trimethropim-sulfamethoxazole was successful in 19 (43.2% strains. This study showed a high rate of CTX-M-1 cluster - ESBLs in South-Eastern Nigeria and further confirms the worldwide spread of CTX-M ESBL in clinical isolates.

  4. First description of Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15- extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) in out-patients from south eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iroha, Ifeanyichukwu R; Esimone, Charles O; Neumann, Sandra; Marlinghaus, Lennart; Korte, Miriam; Szabados, Florian; Gatermann, Sören; Kaase, Martin

    2012-07-23

    We studied the presence of extended spectrum beta lactamases (ESBLs) in 44 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli collected from out-patients in two university teaching hospitals in South-Eastern Nigeria. Species identification was performed by standard microbiology methods and re-confirmed by MALDI-TOF technology. Phenotypic characterization of ESBL enzymes was done by double disc synergy test and presence of ESBL genes was determined by specific PCR followed by sequencing. Transfer of plasmid DNA was carried out by transformation using E. coli DH5 as recipient strain. Phenotypic characterization identified all isolates to be ESBL positive. 77% of strains were from urine, 13.6% from vaginal swabs and 9.0% from wound swabs. 63.6% were from female patients, 68% were from outpatients and 95.5% from patients younger than 30 years. All ESBL producers were positive in a PCR for bla(CTX-M-1) cluster, in exemplary strains bla(CTX-M-15) was found by sequencing. In all strains ISEcp1 was found upstream and ORF477 downstream of bla(CTX-M). PCR for bla(TEM) and bla(OXA-1) was positive in 93.1% of strains, whereas bla(SHV) was not detected, aac(6')-Ib-cr was found in 97.7% of strains. RAPD analysis revealed seven different clonal groups named A through G with the majority of the strains (65.9%) belonging to clone A. Transfer of an ESBL plasmid with co-resistance to gentamicin, kanamycin, tobramycin, doxycycline and trimethropim-sulfamethoxazole was successful in 19 (43.2%) strains. This study showed a high rate of CTX-M-1 cluster - ESBLs in South-Eastern Nigeria and further confirms the worldwide spread of CTX-M ESBL in clinical isolates.

  5. Comparative analysis of ESBL-positive Escherichia coli isolates from animals and humans from the UK, The Netherlands and Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, G.; Day, M.J.; Mafura, T.; Nunez-Garcia, J.; Fenner, J.J.; Sharma, M.; Essen-Zandbergen, van A.; Rodriguez, I.; Dierikx, C.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    The putative virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene contents of extended spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)-positive E. coli (n=629) isolated between 2005 and 2009 from humans, animals and animal food products in Germany, The Netherlands and the UK were compared using a microarray approach to test the

  6. Consequences of revised CLSI and EUCAST guidelines for antibiotic susceptibility patterns of ESBL- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hombach, Michael; Mouttet, Brice; Bloemberg, Guido V

    2013-09-01

    This study aimed to: (i) analyse the antibiotic susceptibility testing (AST) profiles of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates applying EUCAST 2013 AST guidelines; and (ii) evaluate discrepancies in AST profiles according to EUCAST 2010 guidelines, EUCAST 2013 guidelines, CLSI 2009 guidelines and CLSI 2013 guidelines. The 195 ESBL- and/or AmpC β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates used in this study were systematically characterized by disc diffusion AST interpreted according to the 2013 guidelines of EUCAST and CLSI, the EUCAST 2010 guidelines and the CLSI 2009 guidelines. Individual cephalosporin AST patterns according to EUCAST 2013 guidelines were described for individual ESBL and AmpC β-lactamase genotypes. Significant differences in the susceptibility rates of important cephalosporins such as cefepime, ceftazidime and cefotaxime applying EUCAST 2013 and CLSI 2013 AST guidelines were demonstrated for ESBL- and AmpC β-lactamase-producing isolates. The confirmation of ESBL and/or AmpC β-lactamase production can support the selection of an adequate antibiotic drug therapy. Despite a harmonized CLSI and EUCAST 'report as found' strategy for cephalosporins and ESBL-producing isolates, AST interpretation according to the CLSI 2013 and EUCAST 2013 guidelines shows significant differences in susceptibility rates for mainstay cephalosporins such as cefepime, ceftazidime and cefotaxime. Thus, further harmonization of clinical breakpoints is warranted.

  7. High rates of multidrug resistance among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in children and analyses of ESBL producers from Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli causing urinary tract infections (UTI among pediatric patients is an increasing problem worldwide. However, very little is known about pediatric urinary tract infections and antimicrobial resistance trend from Nepal. This study was conducted to assess the current antibiotic resistance rate and ESBL production among uropathogenic Escherichia coli in pediatric patients of a tertiary care teaching hospital of Nepal. Methods A total of 5,484 urinary tract specimens from children suspected with UTI attending a teaching hospital of Nepal over a period of one year were processed for the isolation of bacterial pathogens and their antimicrobial susceptibility testing. Escherichia coli (n = 739, the predominant isolate in pediatric UTI, was further selected for the detection of ESBL-production by phenotypic combination disk diffusion test. Results Incidence of urinary tract infection among pediatric patients was found to be 19.68% and E coli (68.4% was leading pathogen involved. Out of 739 E coli isolates, 64.9% were multidrug resistant (MDR and 5% were extensively drug resistant (XDR. Extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL was detected in 288 (38.9% of the E coli isolates. Conclusion Alarming rate of drug resistance among pediatric uropathogens and high rate of ESBL-producing E. coli was observed. It is extremely necessary to routinely investigate the drug resistance among all isolates and formulate strict antibiotics prescription policy in our country.

  8. in vitro effectiveness of commercial bacteriophage cocktails on diverse extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Escherichia coli strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aycan Gundogdu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to determine the in vitro susceptibility of Georgian bacteriophage cocktails on multi-drug resistant extended-spectrum β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-EC isolated from patients' blood and urine cultures. 615 E. coli isolates were included in this study. PhP-typing and phylogenetic grouping were used for the typing. Antimicrobial resistance profiles and ESBL production of all isolates were confirmed according to CLSI criteria. The activities of four bacteriophage cocktails (Enko-phage, SES-bacteriophage, Pyo-bacteriophage and Intesti-bacteriophage were determined against 142 ESBL- EC using in vitro spot tests. According to this, Enko-phage were active against 87.3% of the tested strains while that ratio was 81.7% for intesti-bacteriophage, 81.7% for Pyo-bacteriophage and 59.2% for SES-bacteriophage cocktails. Based on the contingency tests, the phage cocktails were observed to be statistically significantly (p<0.001 more effective on ESBL-EC strains belonging to phylogenetic groups D and B2. The employed phage cocktails were found to be affective against all tested resistant types. These results are promising especially for the infections that are caused by multi-drug resistant pathogens that are difficult to treat. As this is a preliminary step to the potential clinical trials to be designed for the country, in vitro confirmation of their success on a multi-drug-resistant ESBL-EC collection should be accepted as an initial action, which is encouraging to consider clinical trials of phage therapy especially in countries which are not introduce phage therapy.

  9. Detection of amphotericin B resistance in Candida haemulonii and closely related species by use of the Etest, Vitek-2 yeast susceptibility system, and CLSI and EUCAST broth microdilution methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jong Hee; Kim, Mi-Na; Jang, Sook Jin; Ju, Min Young; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal; Ryang, Dong Wook

    2012-06-01

    The emerging fungal pathogens Candida haemulonii and Candida pseudohaemulonii often show high-level resistance to amphotericin B (AMB). We compared the utilities of five antifungal susceptibility testing methods, i.e., the Etest using Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with glucose and methylene blue (Etest-MH), the Etest using RPMI agar supplemented with glucose (Etest-RPG), the Vitek-2 yeast susceptibility system, and the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) broth microdilution methods, for the detection of AMB-resistant isolates of C. haemulonii and closely related species. Thirty-eight clinical isolates (8 C. haemulonii, 10 C. pseudohaemulonii, and 20 Candida auris isolates) were analyzed. Of the 18 C. haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii isolates, 18, 15, 18, 10, and 9 exhibited AMB MICs of >1 μg/ml by the Etest-MH, Etest-RPG, Vitek-2, CLSI, and EUCAST methods, respectively. All 20 C. auris isolates showed AMB MICs of ≤1 μg/ml by all five methods. Of the methods, the Etest-MH generated the broadest distribution of AMB MICs for all 38 isolates and showed the best discrimination between the C. haemulonii and C. pseudohaemulonii isolates (4 to 32 μg/ml) and those of C. auris (0.125 to 0.5 μg/ml). Taking the Etest-MH as the reference method, the essential agreements (within two dilutions) for the Etest-RPG, Vitek-2, CLSI, and EUCAST methods were 84, 92, 55, and 55%, respectively; the categorical agreements were 92, 92, 79, and 76%, respectively. This study provides the first data on the efficacy of the Etest-MH and its excellent agreement with Vitek-2 for discriminating AMB-resistant from AMB-susceptible isolates of these Candida species.

  10. Prevalence and risk factors for carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Amsterdam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reuland, E A|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/325855633; Al Naiemi, N; Kaiser, A M; Heck, M; Kluytmans, J A J W|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/323262139; Savelkoul, P H M; Elders, P J M; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C M J E

    OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of carriage of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) in a representative sample of the general adult Dutch community, to identify risk factors and to gain understanding of the epidemiology of these resistant strains.

  11. Dutch patients, retail chicken meat and poultry share the same ESBL genes, plasmids and strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Dierikx, C.M.; Cohen Stuart, J.; Voets, G.M.; Munckhof, Van den M.P.; Essen-Zandbergen, Van A.; Platteel, T.; Fluit, A.C.; Sande-Bruinsma, Van de N.; Scharinga, J.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Mevius, D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans. Therefore, distribution of ESBL genes, plasmids and strain

  12. Dutch patients, retail chicken meat and poultry share the same ESBL genes, plasmids and strains.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Dierikx, C.M.; Cohen Stuart, J.; Voets, G.M.; Munckhof, M.P. van den; Essen-Zandbergen, A. van; Platteel, T.; Fluit, A.C.; Sande-Bruinsma, N. van de; Scharinga, J.; Bonten, M.J.; Mevius, D.J.; Sturm, P.D.

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans. Therefore, distribution of ESBL genes, plasmids and strain

  13. Dutch patients, retail chicken meat and poultry share the same ESBL genes, plasmids and strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leverstein-van Hall, M. A.; Dierikx, C. M.; Stuart, J. Cohen; Voets, G. M.; van den Munckhof, M. P.; van Essen-Zandbergen, A.; Platteel, T.; Fluit, A. C.; van de Sande-Bruinsma, N.; Scharinga, J.; Bonten, M. J. M.; Mevius, D. J.

    Intestinal carriage of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) -producing bacteria in food-producing animals and contamination of retail meat may contribute to increased incidences of infections with ESBL-producing bacteria in humans. Therefore, distribution of ESBL genes, plasmids and strain

  14. ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from children with acute diarrhea - antimicrobial susceptibility, adherence patterns and phylogenetic background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franiczek, Roman; Sobieszczańska, Beata; Turniak, Michał; Kasprzykowska, Urszula; Krzyzanowska, Barbara; Jermakow, Katarzyna; Mokracka-Latajka, Grazyna

    2012-01-01

    Escherichia coli remains the principal bacterial pathogen in childhood diarrhea and constitutes an important public health problem, especially in developing countries. Diarrheagenic E. coli strains often display resistance to beta-lactams due to the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). A total of thirty ESBL-producing E. coli strains colonizing the gastrointestinal tracts of children with acute diarrhea were studied in order to determine their antimicrobial susceptibility, adherence patterns to the HEp-2 cell line and phylogenetic background. ESBL production was detected by the double disk synergy test (DDST). The minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibacterial drugs were determined by an agar dilution technique on Mueller-Hinton agar. The presence of bla(TEM), bla(SHV) and bla(CTX-M) determinants in the strains studied was ascertained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The strains displayed the resistance pattern typical of ESBL producers. The majority of them (23 out of 30) were found to produce CTX-M-type ESBLs conferring a high level of resistance to oxyimino-beta-lactams, especially to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone. In many cases, the strains exhibited resistance to non-beta-lactam antimicrobials, such as gentamicin, amikacin, co-trimoxazole and tetracycline. On the other hand, these strains were uniformly susceptible to carbapenems, to oxyimino-beta-lactams combined with clavulanic acid and to tigecycline. The E. coli strains were distributed among the four main phylogenetic groups: A, B1, B2 and D. The in vitro adhesion assay revealed that all but two of the strains adhered to the HEp-2 epithelial cell line. Aggregative and diffuse adherence patterns were found to be the most prevalent. CTX-M-type enzymes were the most prevalent ESBLs among the strains studied. As many as 40% of the diarrheagenic E. coli isolates were found to belong to phylogenetic group D, which usually comprises E. coli strains associated with extra intestinal

  15. Profiles of phenotype resistance to antibiotic other than β-lactams in Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBLs-producers, carrying blaSHV genes

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    Pawel Sacha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Extended spectrum β-lactamases production is one of the most common mechanism of resistance to extendedspectrum β-lactam antibiotics is increasing worldwide. Twenty five strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolated from clinicalspecimens were tested. Based on the phenotypic confirmatory test all these strains were defined as ESBL producers namedESBL(+. The plasmid DNA from each strains was used to investigate the presence of blaSHV genes responsible for extendedspectrum β-lactamases production. Moreover, susceptibility of these strains to antibiotic other than β-lactams in was tested.

  16. Occurrence and molecular characteristics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in faecal samples from horses in an equine clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakos, Ilias; Franz, Eelco; van Hoek, Angela H A M; Florijn, Alice; Veenman, Christiaan; Sloet-van Oldruitenborgh-Oosterbaan, Marianne M; Dierikx, Cindy; van Duijkeren, Engeline

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the occurrence and characteristics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in faecal samples from horses at one equine clinic in the Netherlands. A total of 91 horses, including residents and patients, were sampled. ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli were identified by a combination disc diffusion test. Phylogenetic groups and MLST were determined. ESBL/AmpC genes were analysed using PCR and sequencing. Plasmids were characterized by transformation and PCR-based replicon typing. Subtyping of plasmids was done by plasmid MLST. At least one E. coli isolate with a confirmed ESBL/AmpC gene was found in samples from 76 horses (84%). Although phylogenetic group B1 E. coli bla CTX-M-1 predominated, a diverse E. coli population was found, indicating that clonal nosocomial spread was not the only reason for the high occurrence found. MLST analysis revealed the presence of 47 E. coli STs, organized in four clusters of genetically related strains. ST10, ST641, ST1079 and ST1250 were most commonly found. With regard to the genes, bla CTX-M-1 was most prevalent ( n  =   91), followed by bla CTX-M-2 ( n  =   26). The most frequently found plasmid type was IncHI1, but plasmids belonging to the IncF, IncI1 and IncN groups were also identified. A high occurrence of ESBL-producing E. coli in faecal samples was found among horses in an equine clinic and the variety of STs, ESBL genes and plasmid types suggests nosocomial transmission. ESBL E. coli can cause difficult-to-treat infections in horses and prudent use of antimicrobials is warranted. A further assessment of the risks of transmission to persons in close contact with horses, such as caretakers or veterinarians, is crucial.

  17. The first occurrence of a CTX-M ESBL-producing Escherichia coli outbreak mediated by mother to neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ciara; Philip, Roy K; Kelleher, John; Powell, James; O'Gorman, Alan; Slevin, Barbara; Woodford, Neil; Turton, Jane F; McGrath, Elaine; Finnegan, Cathriona; Power, Lorraine; O'Connell, Nuala H; Dunne, Colum P

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) comprise part of the normal vaginal microflora. Transfer from mother to neonate can occur during delivery resulting, sometimes, in neonatal bacterial disease. Here, we aim to report the first outbreak of CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli with evidence of mother-to-neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) followed by patient-to-patient transmission. Investigation including molecular typing was conducted. Infection was defined by clinical and laboratory criteria and requirement for antimicrobial therapy with or without positive blood cultures. Colonisation was determined by isolation without relevant symptoms or indicators of infection. Index case was an 8-day-old baby born at 34 weeks gestation who developed ESBL-producing E. coli infections at multiple body sites. Screening confirmed their mother as colonised with ESBL-producing E. coli. Five other neonates, in the NICU simultaneously with the index case, also tested positive. Of these, four were colonised while one neonate developed sepsis, requiring antimicrobial therapy. The second infected neonate's mother was also colonised by ESBL-producing E. coli. Isolates from all eight positive patients (6 neonates, 2 mothers) were compared using pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Two distinct ESBL-producing strains were implicated, with evidence of transmission between mothers and neonates for both strains. All isolates were confirmed as CTX-M ESBL-producers. There were no deaths associated with the outbreak. Resources were directed towards control interventions focused on hand hygiene and antimicrobial stewardship, which ultimately proved successful. Since this incident, all neonates admitted to the NICU have been screened for ESBL-producers and expectant mothers are screened at their first antenatal appointment. To date, there have been no further outbreaks.

  18. Alternatives to carbapenems in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, D; Chirouze, C; Leroy, J; Cholley, P; Talon, D; Plésiat, P; Bertrand, X

    2013-02-01

    The authors had for objective to assess the activity of a wide panel of antibiotics on extended-spectrum-β-lactamase producing Escherichia coli isolates (ESBL-Ec), because of the sharp increase of their frequency, leading to an increased use of carbapenems. We selected 100 ESBL-Ec in which ESBLs were identified by PCR and sequencing, between 2009 and 2010. We determined the MICs of amoxicillin-clavulanate, piperacillin-tazobactam, temocillin, mecillinam, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, aztreonam, tigecycline, nitrofurantoin, and fosfomycin using reference methods. The susceptibility profiles were defined according to EUCAST 2012 recommendations. Fosfomycin, nitrofurantoin, and pivmecillinam were active against more than 90% of isolates and remain excellent choices for the oral treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Temocillin and piperacillin-tazobactam are also good candidates for the treatment of pyelonephritis or bloodstream infections. Only 27, 23, and 8% of isolates were susceptible to ceftazidime, cefepime, and cefotaxime, respectively. Our study results prove that in many cases, there are non-carbapenem alternatives for the treatment of ESBL-Ec infections. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  19. (MAR) calculation of extended spectrum β- lactamase (ESBL)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to check for the antibiotic susceptibility pattern and multiple antibiotic resistances (MAR) of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella species. All methods used in this study were according to the standard criteria of NCCLs. It was shown that there was high ...

  20. Evaluation of chromogenic agar, [corrected] VITEK2 YST and VITEK® MS for identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariguzel, Fatma Mutlu; Berk, Elife; Koc, Ayse Nedret; Sav, Hafize; Aydemir, Gonca

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to compare conventional methods, chromogenic agar, [corrected] VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS system for the identification of Candida strains isolated from blood cultures. Fifty-four strains were identified according to conventional methods, chromogenic agar, [corrected] VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS. Sequencing was used as the reference method. The 54 strains included 32 Candida parapsilosis, 19 Candida albicans, 1 Candida glabrata and 2 Candida tropicalis according to the reference method. One C. albicans and one C. glabrata isolate were misidentified as C. parapsilosis by chromogenic agar. [corrected]. Two C. parapsilosis and three C. albicans isolates were misidentified by VITEK2 YST card. Chromogenic agar, [corrected] VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS identified correctly 96.2%, 90.7% and 100% of all strains, respectively. We found that the chromogenic agar, [corrected] VITEK2 YST card and VITEK®MS system are easy, rapid and accurate alternative methods for the identification of yeast species in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

  1. Epidemiology and risk factors for mortality in bloodstream infection by CP-Kp, ESBL-E, Candida and CDI: A single center retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcione, Silvia; Angilletta, Roberto; Raviolo, Stefania; Filippini, Claudia; Fossati, Lucina; Di Perri, Giovanni; Cavallo, Rossana; De Rosa, Francesco Giuseppe

    2017-10-30

    The incidence of C. difficile infection (CDI) and of bloodstream infection (BSI) caused by Candida spp., ESBL-E-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and carbapenemase-producing K. pneumoniae (CP-Kp) is associated with high mortality. We conducted a single centre retrospective study on patients admitted to Molinette Hospital, Turin, Italy, from January 2013 to April 2015 with CDI or BSI caused by Candida, ESBL-E or CP-Kp. For each patient demographic, clinical and microbiological data were collected. Aims of this study were to describe epidemiology and to evaluate risk factors for in-hospital mortality in this group of patients. Seven hundred-eighty six cases were analyzed: 398 CDI, 137 candidemia, 125 ESBL-E BSI and 126 CP-Kp BSI. CDI, candidemia and ESBL-E BSI were more frequently reported in internal medicine wards (IMW), whilst CP-Kp were more described in intensive care unit (ICU). Sixty-six percent of patients had a previous hospitalization and the majority of patients had several medical comorbidities. In-hospital death occurred in 23.4%. Independent risk factors for mortality were antibiotic therapy before hospital admission, cardiovascular diseases, neutropenia, urinary catheter, total parenteral nutrition, SIRS and higher creatinine levels at diagnosis. Previous abdominal surgery, inflammatory bowel disease, higher serum albumin levels at the admission and fever at diagnosis were significantly associated with survival. Our data showed that CDI, ESBL-E BSI and candidemia are more frequent in frail patients, admitted to IMW, with chronic comorbidities and broad exposure to antibiotic therapies, with the exception for CP-Kp BSI, still more common in the ICU. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous occurrence of MRSA and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae on pig farms and in nasal and stool samples from farmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Julia; Hille, Katja; Ruddat, Inga; Mellmann, Alexander; Köck, Robin; Kreienbrock, Lothar

    2017-02-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producing enterobacteria (ESBL-E) have emerged in livestock. This study prospectively investigates the prevalence of MRSA and ESBL-E on pig farms and in nasal and stool samples from farmers and compares molecular characteristics of these ESBL-E isolates. In 2014, samples were derived at 51 pig farms in Germany. Per farm, five dust and five fecal samples were collected; one nasal and one stool sample were retrieved from farmers. ESBL-E isolates from humans and environmental isolates from the respective farms were characterized using whole genome sequencing for classical multilocus sequence typing (MLST), determination of ESBL-encoding genes and an ad hoc core genome MLST (cgMLST) analysis. MRSA and ESBL-E were detected on 49 (96%) and 31 (61%) of the farms, respectively; in most cases (59%) simultaneously. Nasal MRSA carriage was detected in 72 of 85 (84.7%) farmers and five of 84 (6.0%) farmers carried ESBL-E. ESBL-Escherichia coli isolates from farmers belonged to MLST STs/ESBL-genes ST10/CTX-M-1, ST196/TEM-52, ST278/TEM-52, ST410/CTX-M-15 and ST453/CTX-M-1. In one case, the human ESBL-E isolate was clonally identical to isolates from the farm environment; in the other four cases typing results indicated potential exchange of resistance determinants between human and environmental isolates, but, comparing the isolates within a minimum spanning tree indicated differences in cgMLST-patterns between the farms (p=0.076). This study demonstrated rectal ESBL-E carriage rates among farmers, which were similar to those in the general population. Molecular typing suggested that cross-transmission between the farmers and the farm environment is possible. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of ESBL mediated cephalosporin resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae: emergence of high resistance against cefepime, the fourth generation cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, S S; Sharma, Meenakshi; Chattopadhya, D; Kapoor, Hema; Pasha, S T; Singh, Gajendra

    2006-10-01

    Cephalosporins belonging to second and third generation are commonly used in India for the treatment of Klebsiella pneumoniae. Report on resistance among K. pneumoniae strains to second and third generation cephalosporins are on rise in this country, which has been attributed to emergence of strains expressing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro susceptibility of K. pneumoniae to broad-spectrum cephalosporins particularly to cefepime, a recently introduced fourth generation cephalosporin in relation to ESBL production. This study has been carried out in two phases among K. pneumoniae strains isolated between October 2001 and September 2002 (phase I, before marketing of cefepime in India) and between August 2003 and July 2004 (phase II, after marketing of cefepime in India). Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) was determined by a commercial strip containing gradient of antimicrobials (Strip E-test). Detection for ESBL production was carried out by DDST, E-test ESBL and PCR. Antimicrobial resistance profile of K. pneumoniae strains to five cephalosporins as analyzed by WHONET 5 identified 15 different resistance profiles among the 108 phase I isolates, ranging from resistance to none (19.44%) to all the five cephalosporin (8.33%) and eight different resistance profiles among the 99 phase II isolates, ranging from resistance to none (9.1%) to all the five cephalosporins (36.4%). Among the 108 phase I isolates a total of 71 (65.72%) and out of 99 phase II isolates, a total of 87 (88.0%) could be identified as ESBL producers. Among the isolates, regardless of the phase of the isolation, those characterized by production of ESBL showed overall higher frequency of resistance to cephalosporins (range 19.7-85.9% and 51.7-100% in phase I and phase II, respectively) compared to those for ESBL non-producers (range 0-13.5% and 0-25% in phase I and phase II, respectively). Ten randomly selected isolates from the most

  4. Antifungal susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. isolated primarily during invasive Candidiasis and comparison of the Vitek 2 system with the CLSI broth microdilution and Etest methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, N; Dehandschoewercker, L; Bertout, S; Bousquet, P-J; Rispail, P; Lachaud, L

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity.

  5. Antifungal Susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. Isolated Primarily during Invasive Candidiasis and Comparison of the Vitek 2 System with the CLSI Broth Microdilution and Etest Methods▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, N.; Dehandschoewercker, L.; Bertout, S.; Bousquet, P.-J.; Rispail, P.; Lachaud, L.

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of ≤1 mg/liter for 201 (VK2), 190 (CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity. PMID:19889902

  6. Prevalence and characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae in fresh pork meat at processing level in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Franziska; Abdulmawjood, Amir; Klein, Günter; Reich, Felix

    2017-09-18

    ESBL or AmpC β-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae is an increasing concern in human medicine. A distribution via the food chain is discussed, but less is known about these bacteria on fresh pork meat. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of ESBL/AmpC Enterobacteriaceae bacteria in fresh pork meat at processing level in Germany. The analysis comprised microbiological hygiene parameters and further pheno- and genotypical characterization of ESBL/AmpC isolates. The examination included three pools of meat and one corresponding meat juice sample from each of the tested pork meat batches (n=63). ESBL/AmpC producers were found in 42.9% (36.5% confirmed by genotype, gt) of the investigated batches, either in meat or meat juice. Meat juice was more often (28.6%) contaminated with ESBL/AmpC bacteria than meat (20.6%). Hygiene parameters were satisfactory in all samples and were thus not a suitable tool for predicting the presence of ESBL/AmpC producers. Most of the 37 confirmed ESBL/AmpC bacteria were identified as Escherichia coli (n=18) or Serratia fonticola (n=13). Susceptibility testing identified 32 of the 37 isolates to be multidrug-resistant. The most common resistance genes TEM, SHV, and CTX-M were found in 19 of the ESBL/AmpC isolates, mostly E. coli. A single detected AmpC β-lactamase producing E. coli carried a CMY-2 gene. Multilocus sequence typing (MLST) investigations of the ESBL/AmpC E. coli revealed 11 different sequence types. In conclusion, fresh pork meat can harbor highly diverse multidrug-resistant ESBL Enterobacteriaceae, even though at low rates. The study suggests that fresh pork meat might be a source for multidrug-resistant ESBL/AmpC Enterobacteriaceae of various origins. Therefore these data contribute to the epidemiological understanding of the distribution of resistant bacteria and the impact of the food chain on public health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of ESBLs and PMQR genes in fecal Escherichia coli isolated from the non-human primates in six zoos in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; He, Tao; Han, Jing; Wang, Juan; Foley, Steven L; Yang, Guangyou; Wan, Shuangxiu; Shen, Jianzhong; Wu, Congming

    2012-09-14

    The aim of this study is to characterize the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) and plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) genes in Escherichia coli from captive non-human primates. A total of 206 E. coli isolates were collected from primates in six zoos in China in 2009 and their susceptibility to 10 antimicrobials were tested by broth microdilution. The susceptibility patterns of E. coli strains varied greatly among different zoos reflecting different backgrounds of antimicrobial usage. Both the ESBL-encoding genes and the PMQR genes were detected by PCR. Of the 206 strains, 65 (32%) were confirmed as phenotypic ESBL producers with bla(CTX-M) (27%, bla(CTX-M-15), n=31, bla(CTX-M-3), n=23 and bla(CTX-M-14), n=2) mainly mediating the ESBL phenotype. qnrS1 (18%, n=36) and oqxAB (15%, n=31) were the predominant PMQR genes and the prevalence of PMQR genes was much higher among phenotypic ESBL producers than that among phenotypic non-ESBL producers from any zoo. Notably, the PMQR genes qnrS1 and oqxAB and β-lactamase genes bla(TEM-1) and bla(CTX-M-3) were found together in 23 E. coli isolates in two zoos in Shanghai. PFGE analysis of these 23 isolates demonstrated nearly identical PFGE profiles (similarity matrix >97%) indicating this specific E. coli genotype was prevalent in these two zoos. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of these four genes coexisting in an E. coli genotype and the first report of antimicrobial resistance profiles in E. coli isolated from primates in China. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Frequency of Extended-Spectrum Beta-lactamases (ESBLs) in strains of Klebsiella and E. coli isolated from patients hospitalized in Yazd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandi, Hengameh; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mostafa; Ehsani, Fatemeh; Zarch, Mojtaba Babaei; Doosthosseini, Samira

    2017-02-01

    Frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and its variants may vary in different geographical areas, as reports indicate their spread in some certain communities. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of ESBLs in strains of Klebsiella and E. coli, isolated from patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals of Yazd. This cross-sectional study was carried out on samples including E. coli and Klebsiella strains collected from laboratories of Shahid Sadoughi and Shahid Rahnemoun hospitals in Yazd, Iran in the period of 2011-2012. The colonies which were positive in lactose Eosin methylene-blue (EMB) medium were identified by biochemical methods, and 270 strains of Klebsiella and E. coli were isolated. Collected data and information were analyzed using Fisher's exact test and descriptive statistics such as mean in SPSS software, version 15, at a significant level of 0.05. In this study, 270 samples were examined, including 152 samples of E. coli (56.3%) and 118 samples of Klebsiella pneumonia (43.7%). Among the 152 samples of E. coli, 45 strains (30%) were producers of ESBLs. In addition, among the 118 samples of Klebsiella pneumonia, 44 strains (37.3%) were producers of ESBLs. E. coli strains showed the most resistance to Cefotaxime (100%), Ceftazidime (97.7%), and Cefepime (75.5%) respectively and Klebsiella strains showed the most resistance to Cefotaxime (100%), Ceftazidime (100%) and Cefepime (79.5%), respectively. Frequency of ESBLs in Klebsiella strains was higher than E. coli strains. No significant relationship was found between frequency of ESBLs and age or gender. In addition, E. coli strains showed the highest sensitivity to Imipenem, Amoxicillin/clavulanate, and Ciprofloxacin, while the highest antibiotic sensitivity of Klebsiella strains was shown to be to Piperacillin, Imipenem, and Amoxicillin/clavulanate.

  9. Fecal Carriage of ESbL types TEM, SHV, CTX Producing Genera Proteus, Morganella, Providencia in Patients of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Taghi Akhi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Diseases like urinary tract infection, wound infections, bacteremia and other infections are mainly caused by the members of the genus Proteus, Morganella and Providencia which are mainly either found freely in the environment or in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. We studied Fecal carriage of ESbL producing species in carrier patients.Stool samples obtained from outpatients and inpatients not suffering from diarrhea and were cultured in CTX-MC-Conkey agar. Lactose negative and cefotaxime resistant bacteria were identified by biochemical tests and ESbL-producing isolates were detected using Combined Test. TEM, SHV and CTX genes were investigated by PCR.Total 15 (7.35% isolates of 204 stool samples were identified as ESBL producing Proteus spp. (n=4, 1.96%, Morganella spp. (n=5, 2.45% and Providencia spp. (n=6, 2.94%. Further, amongst or of the 15 ESbL producing strains, blaTEM was the commonest genotype (86.66%, followed by blaSHV (26.66% and blaCTX-M (20%. All isolates were resistant to ampicillin, and cefotaxime whereas all Providencia and Morganella spp. were found to resist ceftazidime. Although the number of ESbL-producing Proteus, Morganella and Providencia isolates from fecal carriers were low, but still, they can be considered as a reservoir of TEM, SHV and CTX genes and capable to transfer these resistant bacteria to hospitals.

  10. Presence of antimicrobial resistance in coliform bacteria from hatching broiler eggs with emphasis on ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mezhoud, H; Chantziaras, I; Iguer-Ouada, M; Moula, N; Garmyn, A; Martel, A; Touati, A; Smet, A; Haesebrouck, F; Boyen, F

    2016-08-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most important global health challenges. Broilers are an important reservoir of antimicrobial resistant bacteria in general and, more particularly, extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Since contamination of 1-day-old chicks is a potential risk factor for the introduction of antimicrobial resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the broiler production chain, the presence of antimicrobial resistant coliform bacteria in broiler hatching eggs was explored in the present study. Samples from 186 hatching eggs, collected from 11 broiler breeder farms, were inoculated on MacConkey agar with or without ceftiofur and investigated for the presence of antimicrobial resistant lactose-positive Enterobacteriaceae, particularly, ESBL/AmpC-producers. Escherichia coli and Enterobacter cloacae were obtained from the eggshells in 10 out of 11 (10/11) sampled farms. The majority of the isolates were recovered from crushed eggshells after external decontamination suggesting that these bacteria are concealed from the disinfectants in the egg shell pores. Antimicrobial resistance testing revealed that approximately 30% of the isolates showed resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulphonamides, while the majority of isolates were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, nitrofurantoin, aminoglycosides, florfenicol, neomycin and apramycin. Resistance to extended-spectrum cephalosporins was detected in eight Enterobacteriaceae isolates from five different broiler breeder farms. The ESBL phenotype was confirmed by the double disk synergy test and blaSHV-12, blaTEM-52 and blaACT-39 resistance genes were detected by PCR. This report is the first to present broiler hatching eggs as carriers and a potential source of ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae for broiler chicks.

  11. Evaluation of meat, fruit and vegetables from retail stores in five United Kingdom regions as sources of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, L P; Lodge, M P; Elviss, N C; Lemma, F L; Hopkins, K L; Teale, C J; Woodford, N

    2017-01-16

    We determined the prevalence and types of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and carbapenem-resistant Escherichia coli in raw retail beef, chicken, pork, fruit and vegetables in five UK regions in 2013-14. Raw meat (n=397), and fruit and vegetable samples (n=400) were purchased from retail stores in London, East Anglia, North West England, Scotland and Wales. Samples were tested for the presence of ESBL-producing E. coli by plating enriched samples on CHROMagar CTX and CHROMagar ESBL, for AmpC-type E. coli by plating on "CHROMagar FOX" (CHROMagar ECC+16mg/L cefoxitin), and for carbapenem-resistant E. coli by plating on CHROMagar KPC. Additionally, pre-enrichment counts were performed on the above agars, and on CHROMagar ECC. Isolates of interest were characterised by MALDI-ToF to confirm identification, by PCR for bla CIT, bla CTX-M, bla OXA , bla SHV and bla TEM genes; ESBL or bla CIT genes were sequenced. Only 1.9% and 2.5% of beef and pork samples, respectively were positive for ESBL-producing E. coli after enrichment compared with 65.4% of chicken samples. 85.6% positive samples from chicken meat carried bla CTX-M-1 ; bla CTX-M-15 was not detected. None of the fruits or vegetables yielded ESBL-producing E. coli and none of the meat, fruit or vegetable samples yielded carbapenem-resistant E. coli. Retail chicken was more frequently a source of ESBL-producing E. coli than were beef, pork, fruit or vegetables. None of the foodstuffs yielded E. coli with CTX-M-15 ESBL, which dominates in human clinical isolates in the UK, and none yielded carbapenem-resistant E. coli. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. ESBL carriage in pig slaughterhouse workers is associated with occupational exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dohmen, W; VAN Gompel, L; Schmitt, H; Liakopoulos, A; Heres, L; Urlings, B A; Mevius, D; Bonten, M J M; Heederik, D J J

    2017-07-01

    We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) carriage in slaughterhouse workers and the association with occupational exposure to slaughter animals and products. Stool samples from 334 employees in a Dutch pig slaughterhouse were obtained. Presence of ESBL was determined by selective plating, microarray analysis, and gene sequencing. Questionnaires were used to collect personal and occupational information. The overall prevalence of ESBL carriage was 4·8% (16/334). All ESBL-producing isolates were Escherichia coli. The ESBL genes detected were bla CTX-M-1 (n = 8), bla CTX-M-15 (n = 3), bla CTX-M-27 (n = 2), bla CTX-M-24 (n = 1), bla CTX-M-55 (n = 1), and bla SHV-12 (n = 1). A higher prevalence of ESBL was seen in workers in jobs with as tasks 'removal of lungs, heart, liver, tongue' (33%), and 'removal of head and spinal cord' (25%). For further analysis, participants were divided in two groups based on potential exposure to ESBL as related to their job title. One group with an assumed higher exposure to ESBL (e.g. stable work, stabbing, dehairing, removal of organs) and another group with an assumed lower exposure to ESBL (e.g. refrigeration, packaging and expedition). In the 'higher exposure' group, ten out of 95 (10·5%) were carrying ESBL vs. six out of 233 (2·6%) in the 'lower exposure' group. Human ESBL carriage was significantly associated with job exposure in the slaughterhouse (OR 4·5, CI 1·6-12·6). Results suggest that ESBL carriage in slaughterhouse workers overall is comparable with the Dutch population. Within the slaughterhouse population a difference in carriage exists depending on their position along the slaughter line and tasks involved.

  13. High prevalence of NDM metallo-β-lactamase among ESBL-producing Escherichia coli İsolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çetinkol, Yeliz; Sandalli, Cemal; Çalgin, Mustafa Kerem; Yildirim, Arzu Altunçekiç; Akyildiz, Esma; Karaman, Esin; Çiçek, Ayşegül Çopur

    2017-06-01

    Resistance to β-lactams in Enterobacteriaceae has been increasing worldwide. This study aimed to determine the frequency of β-lactamase genes and antibiotic resistance rates of 140 extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates obtained from urinary tract infection in Ordu Province, Turkey. Isolates were identified by classic methods and by automated system. ESBL production was confirmed by double disk synergy test and antimicrobial susceptibility was investigated by disk diffusion method. All isolates were screened for β-lactamase coding genes from three groups (A, B, and D) by polymerase chain reaction. The highest rate of susceptible isolates was observed for imipenem (IPM, 99.3%) and ertapenem (ETP, 97.9%), and the highest rate of resistant isolates was observed for cefuroxime (97.9%), ceftriaxone (97.2%), and cefazolin (90.7%). In our study, blaCTX-M1-like group was the most prevalent β-lactamase (n = 109), followed by blaTEM (n = 68), blaCTX-M2 (n = 22), and blaSHV (n = 2). By contrast to low resistance rate to IPM and ETP, we determined blaNDM in 31 isolates (22.1%). In co-prevalence of blaNDM-1 and ESBL-coding genes, a low carbapenem resistance was determined. We can confirm that blaCTX-M1-types are still the most frequent β-lactamase coding gene in Turkey. Our study showed the highest prevalence of blaNDM-1 metallo-β-lactamase coding gene in ESBL-producing E. coli.

  14. A multi-centre prospective evaluation of the Check-Direct ESBL Screen for BD MAX as a rapid molecular screening method for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae rectal carriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, T; Slotboom, B J; van Maarseveen, N; van Zwet, A A; Nabuurs-Franssen, M H; Hagen, F

    2017-11-01

    A multiplex extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), performed directly on rectal swabs, was compared with a culture-based protocol to study the discrepancies between the two methods, and identify existing challenges to apply this assay in routine clinical practice. The secondary objective was to assess the performance of the qPCR. In two Dutch teaching hospitals, 573 rectal swabs were collected prospectively. Culture with additional testing with the Check-MDR CT103XL (Check-Points) was compared with the Check-Direct ESBL Screen for BD MAX (Check-Points), which detects the presence of the ESBL gene families CTX-M1, CTX-M2, CTX-M9 and SHV2/5-ESBL. The culture-based protocol (with Brilliance agar) was considered as the gold standard to assess the performance of the qPCR. Of the 573 rectal swabs, 74 (12.9%) were culture-positive. Eighty-four (14.7%) were qPCR-positive. There were eight culture-positive/qPCR-negative discrepancies and 18 culture-negative/qPCR-positive discrepancies. Sensitivity and specificity of qPCR vs culture were 87.7% [95% confidence interval (CI) 79.7-95.7] and 96.3% (95% CI 94.6-98.0), respectively. The Check-Direct ESBL Screen for the BD MAX is an easy-to-perform, quick molecular diagnostic test with the potential to significantly speed up screening for rectal ESBL-E carriage. Discrepancies were observed between the culture-based protocol and the qPCR in 4.5% of tested samples. Existing challenges for implementing qPCR are its limited sensitivity, the need for thorough knowledge of the local ESBL-E genes, and interpretation of culture-negative but qPCR-positive samples. It is believed that the limited sensitivity of qPCR could be optimized by including blaTEM as a molecular target, and improving the limit of detection. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Clinically Relevant Filamentous Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Allison R.; Wallace, Meghan A.; Pincus, David H.; Wilkey, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections have a high rate of morbidity and mortality, and accurate identification is necessary to guide appropriate antifungal therapy. With the increasing incidence of invasive disease attributed to filamentous fungi, rapid and accurate species-level identification of these pathogens is necessary. Traditional methods for identification of filamentous fungi can be slow and may lack resolution. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid and accurate method for identification of bacteria and yeasts, but a paucity of data exists on the performance characteristics of this method for identification of filamentous fungi. The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Vitek MS for mold identification. A total of 319 mold isolates representing 43 genera recovered from clinical specimens were evaluated. Of these isolates, 213 (66.8%) were correctly identified using the Vitek MS Knowledge Base, version 3.0 database. When a modified SARAMIS (Spectral Archive and Microbial Identification System) database was used to augment the version 3.0 Knowledge Base, 245 (76.8%) isolates were correctly identified. Unidentified isolates were subcultured for repeat testing; 71/319 (22.3%) remained unidentified. Of the unidentified isolates, 69 were not in the database. Only 3 (0.9%) isolates were misidentified by MALDI-TOF MS (including Aspergillus amoenus [n = 2] and Aspergillus calidoustus [n = 1]) although 10 (3.1%) of the original phenotypic identifications were not correct. In addition, this methodology was able to accurately identify 133/144 (93.6%) Aspergillus sp. isolates to the species level. MALDI-TOF MS has the potential to expedite mold identification, and misidentifications are rare. PMID:27225405

  16. Evaluation of the Vitek MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry System for Identification of Clinically Relevant Filamentous Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMullen, Allison R; Wallace, Meghan A; Pincus, David H; Wilkey, Kathy; Burnham, C A

    2016-08-01

    Invasive fungal infections have a high rate of morbidity and mortality, and accurate identification is necessary to guide appropriate antifungal therapy. With the increasing incidence of invasive disease attributed to filamentous fungi, rapid and accurate species-level identification of these pathogens is necessary. Traditional methods for identification of filamentous fungi can be slow and may lack resolution. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a rapid and accurate method for identification of bacteria and yeasts, but a paucity of data exists on the performance characteristics of this method for identification of filamentous fungi. The objective of our study was to evaluate the accuracy of the Vitek MS for mold identification. A total of 319 mold isolates representing 43 genera recovered from clinical specimens were evaluated. Of these isolates, 213 (66.8%) were correctly identified using the Vitek MS Knowledge Base, version 3.0 database. When a modified SARAMIS (Spectral Archive and Microbial Identification System) database was used to augment the version 3.0 Knowledge Base, 245 (76.8%) isolates were correctly identified. Unidentified isolates were subcultured for repeat testing; 71/319 (22.3%) remained unidentified. Of the unidentified isolates, 69 were not in the database. Only 3 (0.9%) isolates were misidentified by MALDI-TOF MS (including Aspergillus amoenus [n = 2] and Aspergillus calidoustus [n = 1]) although 10 (3.1%) of the original phenotypic identifications were not correct. In addition, this methodology was able to accurately identify 133/144 (93.6%) Aspergillus sp. isolates to the species level. MALDI-TOF MS has the potential to expedite mold identification, and misidentifications are rare. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing Escherichia coli isolated from urinary tract infections in Zabol, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeide Saeidi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the role of a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay in comparison with traditional empiric therapy in detection of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producer Escherichia coli (E. coli. Methods: Ninety isolates of E. coli from urinary tract infection were collected and screening of ESBL resistance using disc diffusion method, minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for ceftazidime and detection of TEM resistant gene by PCR were done. Results: The results of disc diffusion method showed that forty out of ninety E. coli isolates were ESBLs producing organisms. Antibiotic susceptibility of E. coli isolates to 9 antibacterial agents were evaluated. However, all isolated E. coli were resistant to all 9 antibacterial agents by these percentage: ceftriaxon (100%, ceftazidime (100%, amoxicillin (100%, erythromycin (100%, azithromycin (95%, cefixime (87.5%, tetracyclin (87.5%, nalidixic acid (85% and difloxcain (75%. The abundance of antibiotic-resistant TEM gene according to PCR was 30%. Totally 82.5% of strains tested by MIC were observed as ceftazidime-resistant. Conclusions: We conclude that the TEM gene PCR assay is a rapid, sensitive and clinically useful test, particularly for the early detection of ESBLs-producing E. coli.

  18. Fastidious Gram-Negatives: Identification by the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Card and by Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff Sönksen, Ute; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Nielsen, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    characterization using 100 fastidious Gram negative bacteria. Seventy-five strains represented 21 of the 26 taxa included in the Vitek 2 NH database and 25 strains represented related species not included in the database. Of the 100 strains, 31 were the type strains of the species. Vitek 2 NH identification......Taxonomy and identification of fastidious Gram negatives are evolving and challenging. We compared identifications achieved with the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus (NH) card and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (526 bp stretch) analysis with identifications obtained with extensive phenotypic...

  19. Fastidious Gram-Negatives: Identification by the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Card and by Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff Sönksen, Ute; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Nielsen, Lisbeth

    2010-01-01

    Taxonomy and identification of fastidious Gram negatives are evolving and challenging. We compared identifications achieved with the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus (NH) card and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (526 bp stretch) analysis with identifications obtained with extensive phenotypic...... characterization using 100 fastidious Gram negative bacteria. Seventy-five strains represented 21 of the 26 taxa included in the Vitek 2 NH database and 25 strains represented related species not included in the database. Of the 100 strains, 31 were the type strains of the species. Vitek 2 NH identification...

  20. Prevalence and clonal relationship of ESBL-producing Salmonella strains from humans and poultry in northeastern Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djeffal, Samia; Bakour, Sofiane; Mamache, Bakir; Elgroud, Rachid; Agabou, Amir; Chabou, Selma; Hireche, Sana; Bouaziz, Omar; Rahal, Kheira; Rolain, Jean-Marc

    2017-05-15

    The aims of this study were to investigate Salmonella contamination in broiler chicken farms and slaughterhouses, to assess the antibiotic resistance profile in avian and human Salmonella isolates, and to evaluate the relationship between avian and human Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates. Salmonella was screened in different sample matrices collected at thirty-two chicken farms and five slaughterhouses. The human isolates were recovered from clinical specimens at the University Teaching Hospital of Constantine (UTH). All suspected colonies were confirmed by MALDI-TOF (Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Time OF light) and serotyped. Susceptibility testing against 13 antibiotics including, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid, ticarcillin, cefoxitin, cefotaxime, aztreonam, imipenem, ertapenem, gentamicin, amikacin, ciprofloxacin, colistin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole and fosfomycin, was performed using the disk diffusion method on Mueller-Hinton agar. ESBL-production was screened by the double-disk synergy test and confirmed by molecular characterization using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) amplification and sequencing of ESBL encoding genes. Clonality of the avian and human strains was performed using the Multi Locus Sequencing Typing method (MLST). Forty-five isolated avian Salmonella strains and 37 human collected ones were studied. Five S. enterica serotypes were found in avian isolates (mainly Kentucky) and 9 from human ones (essentially Infantis). 51.11% and 26.6% of the avian isolates were resistant to ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime, respectively, whereas human isolates were less resistant to these antibiotics (13.5% to ciprofloxacin and 16.2% to cefotaxime). Eighteen (12 avian and 6 human) strains were found to produce ESBLs, which were identified as bla CTX-M-1 (n = 12), bla CTX-M-15 (n = 5) and bla TEM group (n = 8). Interestingly, seven of the ESBL-producing strains (5 avian and 2 human) were of the same ST (ST15) and

  1. Laboratory tests in the detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase production: National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS screening test, the E-test, the double disk confirmatory test, and cefoxitin susceptibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. d'Azevedo

    Full Text Available Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL production by Klebsiella sp. and E. coli is an emerging problem. In this study, 107 clinical isolates (53 E. coli, 47 K. pneumoniae and 7 K. oxytoca screened as ESBL producers by the NCCLS disk diffusion procedure were submitted to a double disk confirmatory test (DDT and to the E-test double strip for confirmation of ESBL production by demonstration of clavulanic acid inhibition effect (CAIE. Only 72/107 (67% of the isolates were confirmed as ESBL producers by DDT, with diverse results among species. By the E-test, 58/107 (54% isolates were confirmed as ESBL producers, and 18/107 (17% were not determinable. Susceptibility to cefoxitin was found in 57/68 (83% of strains that did not show CAIE. ESBL detection remains a controversial issue and clinical laboratories are in need of a simple and effective way to recognize strains with this kind of resistance.

  2. ESBL carriage in pig slaughterhouse workers is associated with occupational exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, W.; Gompel, Van L.; Schmitt, H.; Liakopoulos, A.; Heres, L.; Urlings, B.A.; Mevius, D.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) carriage in slaughterhouse workers and the association with occupational exposure to slaughter animals and products. Stool samples from 334 employees in a Dutch pig slaughterhouse were obtained. Presence of ESBL was determined by

  3. Detection of bla SHV and bla CTX-M genes in ESBL producing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ola Ibrahim Ahmed

    2013-06-10

    Jun 10, 2013 ... Abstract The correct identification of the genes involved in ESBL mediated resistance is necessary for the surveillance and epidemiological studies of their transmission in hospitals. The aim of the present study was to find the prevalence of ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae among K. pneu-.

  4. MRSA og ESBL er fortsat stigende i samfundet og ved hospitalsassocierede udbrud

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Robert; Hansen, Dennis Schrøder

    2011-01-01

    pigs is an increasing problem. For ESBL producing Escherichia coli a considerable multi clonal increase has been seen both in the community and in hospitals. There are indications on food being a significant reservoir. For ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae an increasing number of hospital outbreaks...

  5. Detection of bla SHV and bla CTX-M genes in ESBL producing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The correct identification of the genes involved in ESBL mediated resistance is necessary for the surveillance and epidemiological studies of their transmission in hospitals. The aim of the present study was to find the prevalence of ESBL producing Klebsiella pneumoniae among K. pneumoniae isolates separated from ...

  6. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolates collected from diseased food-producing animals in the GERM-Vet monitoring program 2008-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Geovana Brenner; Kaspar, Heike; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; de Freitas Costa, Eduardo; Corbellini, Luís Gustavo; Kadlec, Kristina; Schwarz, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to identify extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli collected from diseased food-producing animals in Germany. A total of 6849 E. coli isolates, collected from diseased cattle, pigs and poultry in the German national monitoring program GERM-Vet (2008-2014), were characterized by antimicrobial susceptibility testing and screened for the ESBL phenotype. ESBL genes were identified by PCR and sequencing. The isolates were further characterized by PCR-based phylotyping. The 419/6849 (6.1%) ESBL-producers identified included 324/2896 (11.2%) isolates from cattle, 75/1562 (4.8%) from pigs and 20/2391 (0.8%) from poultry. The ESBL genes detected were: bla CTX-M-1 (69.9%), bla CTX-M-15 (13.6%), bla CTX-M-14 (11.7%), bla TEM-52 (1.9%), bla SHV-12 (1.4%), bla CTX-M-3 (1.0%), and bla CTX-M-2 (0.5%). The phylogroup A was the dominant phylogroup (57.0%) followed by phylogroups D (23.4%), B1 (17.9%), and B2 (1.7%). Bovine isolates belonged predominantly to the phylogroups A and D, whereas the porcine and avian isolates mainly belonged to A and B1. The majority of the ESBL-producing isolates found in each phylogroup were from animals suffering from gastrointestinal infections. In 399/419 isolates (95.2%), additional resistance to non-β-lactam antibiotics was seen. Multidrug-resistance [resistance to aminoglycosides, fluoro(quinolones), sulphonamides, tetracyclines, and trimethoprim] was seen in 369/419 (88.1%) isolates, which may facilitate the co-selection of ESBL genes, when located on the same mobile genetic element as the others resistance genes, and may compromise the therapeutic options. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Accuracy of different methods for susceptibility testing of gentamicin with KPC carbapenemase-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Fabio; Giani, Tommaso; Vaggelli, Guendalina; Terenzi, Giovanni; Pecile, Patrizia; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2015-02-01

    Performance of Vitek2, Etest, and TREK broth microdilution (BMD) panels was evaluated versus reference CLSI BMD for gentamicin susceptibility testing with 57 bloodstream isolates of KPC-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae. Compared with reference BMD, the Essential Agreement and Categorical Agreement for TREK panels, Vitek2, and Etest were 91.2%, 31.6%, and 61.4%, respectively, and 86%, 21%, and 52.6%, respectively. Four very major discrepancies occurred with Vitek2. In these 4 strains, gentamicin resistance was associated with the presence of an armA aminoglycoside resistance determinant. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Detection of ctx-M gene in ESBL-producing E. coli strains isolated from urinary tract infection in Semnan, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabar, Mahbobeh Mohammad; Mirkalantari, Shiva; Amoli, Rabeeh Izadi

    2016-07-01

    The incidence of urinary tract infections caused by Extended-Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains due to long term and overuse of broad-spectrum cephalosporine is on the rise. CTX beta-lactamase type, a broad-spectrum beta-lactamase, has been expanding in many countries. The ctx gene is harbored on a plasmid that is spread between Enterobacteriaceae family, especially in E. coli. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of antimicrobial resistance and investigate the prevalent ESBL phenotype and the ctx-M gene in E. coli isolated from patients with urinary tract infections (UTI) in Semnan. A cross sectional study was performed on 109 strains of E. coli isolated from the urine culture of patient suffering from a UTI referred to Shafa hospital (Semnan, Iran) during March-July 2015. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was applied and the prevalence of the ESBL phenotype was confirmed using combination disk. PCR methods were completed for amplification of the bla ctx gene. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18 software. One hundred ninety samples (4.16%) were identified as E. coli. Twenty one (26.6%) of E. coli were ESBL positive and 73.4% were ESBL negative. There was 100% susceptibility to imipeneme. Twenty (68.97%) out of 29 isolates were positive for the ctx-M gene, as detected by PCR. In urinary tract infections, antibiotic treatment was experimental and detailed information regarding the sensitivity of bacteria in the area can be useful to achieve the best treatment.

  9. Characteristics of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Methicillinresistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolated from Swiss and imported raw poultry meat collected at retail level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zogg, A L; Zurfluh, K; Nüesch-Inderbinen, M; Stephan, R

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the occurrence and genetic characteristics of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in 80 samples of Swiss (n=36) and imported (n=44) raw chicken meat collected at retail level. In addition, ESBL-producers were screened for the presence of the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1. Countries of import included Argentina (n=2), Austria (n=1), Brazil (n=3), Denmark (n=5), France (n=1), Germany (n=13), Hungary (n=5), Italy (n=8), and Slovenia (n=6). Forty ESBL-producing E. coli strains were isolated from 33 (41.3%) of the 80 samples, comprising seven (19.4%) of the Swiss and 26 (59%) of the imported samples. The most common blaESBL among the isolates were blaCTX-M-1 (n=14) and blaSHV-12 (n=16). Other genes comprised blaTEM-52 (n=4), blaCTX-M-2 (n=3), blaCTX-M-8 (n=1), blaCTX-M-14 (n=1) and a novel blaCTX-M-14-like variant (n=1). Two ESBL-producers isolated from samples from Germany (n=1) and Italy (n=1) tested additionally positive for the plasmid-mediated colistin resistance gene mcr-1. Six (7.5%) samples, all imported from Germany, were found to contain MRSA. Three isolates belonged to the livestock-associated CC398-MRSA-V-t034, and 3 to CC9-MRSA-IV-t13177, described here for the first time in chicken meat.

  10. Evaluación de los sistemas comerciales automatizados VITEK 2 y API 20NE para la identificación de organismos del complejo Burkholderia cepacia aislados de muestras clínicas Evaluation of commercial systems VITEK 2 and API 20NE for identification of Burkholderia cepacia complex bacteria from clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Oderiz

    2011-09-01

    chain reaction (PCR technique based on the amplification of the recA gene (PCR-recA was applied for an accurate identification of bacteria belonging to the BCC. Sensitivity (S and specificity (E of two biochemically-based commercial automated systems, API 20NE and VITEK 2 (bioMérieux®, and of the most representative biochemical manual tests for the identification of the Burkholderia cepacia complex were herein evaluated. The commercial systems VITEK 2 and API 20NE showed the following sensitivity and specificity vaues for identification to the species level, S: 71.1 %, E: 100 %, S: 69.7 %, E: 90.2 %, respectively. More complex results were observed for phenotypic manual tests, since BCC bacteria can undergo selective pressure to survive in chronic patients causing the loss of their typical phenotypic characteristics. The PCR-recA technique was easy to implement even in medium-complexity clinical diagnostic laboratories.

  11. E. coli bacteremia in comparison to K. pneumoniae bacteremia: influence of pathogen species and ESBL production on 7-day mortality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Leistner

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In a previous study, we demonstrated prolonged length of hospital stay in cases of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-positive K. pneumoniae bacteremia compared to bacteremia cases due to E. coli (ESBL-positive and –negative and ESBL-negative K. pneumoniae. The overall mortality was significantly higher in bacteremia cases resulting from ESBL-positive pathogens but also in K. pneumoniae cases disregarding ESBL-production. In order to examine whether pathogen species rather than multidrug resistance might affect mortality risk, we reanalyzed our dataset that includes 1.851 cases of bacteremia.

  12. Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris Misidentified as Candida haemulonii: Characterization by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and DNA Sequencing and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile Variability by Vitek 2, CLSI Broth Microdilution, and Etest Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Shallu; Singh, Pradeep K.; Sharma, Cheshta; Prakash, Anupam; Masih, Aradhana; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes a wide spectrum of infections, especially in intensive care settings. We investigated C. auris prevalence among 102 clinical isolates previously identified as Candida haemulonii or Candida famata by the Vitek 2 system. Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing confirmed 88.2% of the isolates as C. auris, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) easily separated all related species, viz., C. auris (n = 90), C. haemulonii (n = 6), C. haemulonii var. vulnera (n = 1), and Candida duobushaemulonii (n = 5). The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined using CLSI broth microdilution (CLSI-BMD), the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility test, and the Etest method. C. auris isolates revealed uniformly elevated fluconazole MICs (MIC50, 64 μg/ml), and an alarming percentage of isolates (37%) exhibited elevated caspofungin MICs by CLSI-BMD. Notably, 34% of C. auris isolates had coexisting elevated MICs (≥2 μg/ml) for both fluconazole and voriconazole, and 10% of the isolates had elevated coexisting MICs (≥2 μg/ml) to two additional azoles, i.e., posaconazole and isavuconazole. In contrast to reduced amphotericin B MICs by CLSI-BMD (MIC50, 1 μg/ml) for C. auris, elevated MICs were noted by Vitek 2 (MIC50, 8 μg/ml), which were statistically significant. Candida auris remains an unnoticed pathogen in routine microbiology laboratories, as 90% of the isolates characterized by commercial identification systems are misidentified as C. haemulonii. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a more robust diagnostic technique for rapid identification of C. auris. Considering that misleading elevated MICs of amphotericin B by the Vitek AST-YS07 card may lead to the selection of inappropriate therapy, a cautionary approach is recommended for laboratories relying on commercial systems for identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of rare yeasts. PMID:25809970

  13. Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from the River Danube: Antibiotic Resistances, with a Focus on the Presence of ESBL and Carbapenemases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Kittinger

    Full Text Available In a clinical setting it seems to be normal these days that a relevant proportion or even the majority of different bacterial species has already one or more acquired antibiotic resistances. Unfortunately, the overuse of antibiotics for livestock breeding and medicine has also altered the wild-type resistance profiles of many bacterial species in different environmental settings. As a matter of fact, getting in contact with resistant bacteria is no longer restricted to hospitals. Beside food and food production, the aquatic environment might also play an important role as reservoir and carrier. The aim of this study was the assessment of the resistance patterns of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp. out of surface water without prior enrichment and under non-selective culture conditions (for antibiotic resistance. In addition, the presence of clinically important extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL and carbapenmase harboring Enterobacteriaceae should be investigated. During Joint Danube Survey 3 (2013, water samples were taken over the total course of the River Danube. Resistance testing was performed for 21 different antibiotics. Samples were additionally screened for ESBL or carbapenmase harboring Enterobacteriaceae. 39% of all isolated Escherichia coli and 15% of all Klebsiella spp. from the river Danube had at least one acquired resistance. Resistance was found against all tested antibiotics except tigecycline. Taking a look on the whole stretch of the River Danube the proportion of multiresistances did not differ significantly. In total, 35 ESBL harboring Enterobacteriaceae, 17 Escherichia coli, 13 Klebsiella pneumoniae and five Enterobacter spp. were isolated. One Klebsiella pneumoniae harboring NMD-1 carbapenmases and two Enterobacteriaceae with KPC-2 could be identified. Human generated antibiotic resistance is very common in E. coli and Klebsiella spp. in the River Danube. Even isolates with resistance patterns normally associated

  14. Risk factors for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli on pig farms : A longitudinal study in the context of reduced use of antimicrobials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dohmen, Wietske; Dorado-García, Alejandro; Bonten, Marc J M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/123144337; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Mevius, Dik; Heederik, Dick J J

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-E. coli) in food animals is a public health concern. This study aimed to determine prevalence of ESBL-E. coli on pig farms and to assess the effect of reducing veterinary antimicrobial use (AMU) and farm management

  15. Methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL)- and plasmid-mediated AmpC ß-lactamase -producing Gram-negative bacteria associated with skin and soft tissue infections in hospital and community settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunović, Selma; Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Ibrahimagić, Amir; Kamberović, Farah; Fiolić, Zlatko; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2015-08-01

    To investigate the characteristics of meticillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL), and plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria causing skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) in hospital and outpatient settings of Zenica-Doboj Canton, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Antibiotic susceptibility was determined by disc-diffusion and broth microdillution methods according to CLSI guidelines. MecA gene was detected by PCR, and genetic characterization of MRSA was performed using spa-typing and the algorithm based upon repeat patterns (BURP). Double-disk-synergy test was used to screen for ESBLs. PCR was used to detect blaESBL alleles. Genetic relatedness of the strains was tested by PFGE. Seventeen in-patients with MRSA, 13 with ESBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria and three patients co-infected with both, were detected. Five MRSA and 16 ESBL-producing Gram-negative bacteria were found in outpatient samples. Klebsiella spp. was isolated in 11 in- and seven outpatients. MLST CC152 was the most prevalent MRSA. Seven (38.9%) Klebsiella spp. yielded amplicons with primers specific for SHV, TEM-1 and CTX-M group 1 β-lactamases. Eight K. pneumonia (44.4%) and 16 (64%) MRSA (including the in- and outpatient) strains were clonally related. The presence of MRSA and ESBL-producing organisms causing SSTIs in the community poses a substantial concern, due to the high morbidity and mortality associated with possible consequent hospital infections. Copyright© by the Medical Assotiation of Zenica-Doboj Canton.

  16. Comparison of ESBL contamination in organic and conventional retail chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, James; van den Munckhof, Thijs; Voets, Guido; Scharringa, Jelle; Fluit, Ad; Hall, Maurine Leverstein-Van

    2012-03-15

    Contamination of retail chicken meat by Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria likely contributes to the increasing incidence of infections with these bacteria in humans. This study aimed to compare the prevalence and load of ESBL positive isolates between organic and conventional retail chicken meat samples, and to compare the distribution of ESBL genes, strain genotypes and co-resistance. In 2010, 98 raw chicken breasts (n=60 conventional; n=38 organic) were collected from 12 local stores in the Netherlands. Prevalence of ESBL producing micro-organisms was 100% on conventional and 84% on organic samples (porganisms were 80 (range conventional, and organic samples (p=0.001). The distribution of ESBL genes in conventional samples and organic samples was 42% versus 56%, respectively (N.S.), for CTX-M-1, 20% versus 42% (N.S.) for TEM-52, and 23% versus 3% (pconventional samples. Co-resistance rates of ESBL positive isolates were not different between conventional and organic samples (co-trimoxazole 56%, ciprofloxacin 14%, and tobramycin 2%), except for tetracycline, 73% and 46%, respectively, pconventional meat samples harbored 4 MLST types also reported in humans and 5 of 10 organic samples harbored 3 MLST types also reported in humans (2 ST10, 2 ST23, ST354). In conclusion, the majority of organic chicken meat samples were also contaminated with ESBL producing E. coli, and the ESBL genes and strain types were largely the same as in conventional meat samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Septicemia, meningitis, and skull osteomyelitis complicating infected cephalhematoma caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakwan, Narongsak; Nakwan, Narongwit; Wannaro, Jeerawan; Dissaneevate, Pathikan; Kritsaneepaiboon, Supika; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya

    2011-01-01

    An infected cephalhematoma is a rare condition in neonates. We report a case of an 18-day-old neonate who was diagnosed with an infected cephalhematoma caused by an extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli complicated with septicemia, meningitis, and skull osteomyelitis. He was successfully treated with meropenem and surgical incision and drainage. ESBL-producing E. coli may cause infection of a cephalhematoma in neonates.

  18. Epidemiological factors associated with ESBL- and non ESBL-producing E. coli causing urinary tract infection in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Frederik Boetius; Schønning, Kristian; Rasmussen, Steen Christian

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate how use of antibiotics precedes the presence of ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice. The authors performed a triple-case-control study where three case groups were individually compared to a single control group of uninfected individuals. Urine samples......-producing E. coli. Exposure to antibiotics was a risk factor for UTI with E. coli, while prior antibiotic usage was not an indisputable predictor for infection with ESBL-producing E.coli in general practice....

  19. Dissemination of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli of chicken origin to the nearby river water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Lili; Hu, Jiaqing; Zhang, Xiaodan; Ma, Ruihua; Gao, Jing; Li, Song; Zhao, Miaoqing; Miao, Zengmin; Chai, Tongjie

    2014-01-01

    The dissemination of drug-resistant bacteria from animal farms to aquatic environments can pose a potential threat to public health. In this study, antimicrobial resistance, resistance genes, and genetic similarity of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli of different origins (chicken feces and upstream and downstream river waters) were analyzed to track the spread of drug-resistant bacteria of animals. The results showed that a total of 29 ESBL-producing E. coli were obtained from 258 samples, and isolation rates of the ESBL-producing E. coli from chicken feces and upstream and downstream waters were 10.7% (16/150), 3.7% (1/27), and 14.8% (12/81), respectively. The ESBL-producing E. coli from upstream water was resistant to 7 antibiotics, but isolates from feces and downstream water had a higher resistance rate. In 29 ESBL-producing E. coli, the most common gene was CTX-M and the SHV gene was not detected. Five ESBL-producing isolates from downstream water showed >90% similarity with the fecal isolates, while the only one isolate from upstream water had <70% similarity with fecal isolates. The results suggest that animal farms' effluent, especially the untreated wastewater, could contribute to the spread of resistance genes. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Molecular characterisation of blaESBL-harbouring conjugative plasmids identified in multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli isolated from food-producing animals and healthy humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan eWang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Extended-spectrum β-lactamse (ESBL-encoding genes are frequently mapped to plasmids, yet few of these structures have been characterized at the molecular level, to date.Methods: Eighty-seven ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from fecal samples of food-producing animals and healthy humans in Switzerland from 2009 to 2011. Plasmid DNA of all isolates was purified. Broth mating assays were carried out individually for 32 isolates to determine if the ESBL marker could be transferred by conjugation. The plasmid sizes were determined by S1 nuclease pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE and the plasmids were typed by PCR-based replicon typing. Susceptibility tests by disk diffusion followed with a re-analysis S1-nuclease PFGE and PCR reactions were performed to confirm plasmid transfer. Microarray was performed to detect additional antibiotic resistance markers and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST was also performed in selected donor strains. The phylotypes were identified by triplex PCR.Results: About half (n=46 of the 87 isolates carried small (< 20-kb plasmids. All selected 32 isolates contained large plasmids (ranging in sizes from 20- to 600-kb. Eleven plasmid replicon types were detected. Of these, IncFIA (n=5, IncFIB (n=9 and IncK/B (n=4 were common. Nine isolates demonstrated the ability to transfer their cefotaxime resistance marker at high transfer rates. Plasmid profile re-analysis of these transconjugants identified 16 plasmids. IncFIB and IncI1 were the most prevalent replicon types. Phylogenetic grouping showed that five of the nine donor strains belonged to phylogroup B1. Nine different STs were identified in nine tested donor strains.Conclusions: Characterization of these ESBL-encoding conjugative plasmids extends our understanding on these resistance markers in multi-drug resistant E. coli cultured from healthy human and animal sources.

  1. Profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahla Abbas Poor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hospital-acquired infections are a major challenge to patient. A range of gram-negative organisms are responsible for hospital-acquired infections, the Enterobacteriaceae family being the most commonly identified group overall. Infections by ESBL producers are associated with severe adverse clinical outcomes that have led to increased mortality, prolonged hospitalization, and rising medical costs. The aim of this study was to survey profile of antimicrobial susceptibility isolated microorganisms from hospitalized patients in PICU ward and detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and ESBL-producing bacteria by phenotypic methods. Material and Methods: In this study participants were patients hospitalized in PICU part of Bahrami Hospital, Tehran, with attention to involved organ. For isolation of bacteria from patient’s samples, culture performed on different selective and differential media. After confirmation of bacteria by biochemical tests, susceptibility testing was performed by disc diffusion method. Phenotypic detection of MRSA strains was performed using cefoxcitin disc. ESBL producing strains were detected by ceftazidime (CAZ and ceftazidime/clavulanic acid (CAZ/CLA discs. Results: Among all isolated organisms from clinical samples, the most common isolated organisms were Escherichia coli (24 cases, Pseudomonas areoginosa (9 cases and Staphylococcus aureus (8 cases, respectively. Among eight MRSA isolated strains from different clinical samples, six strains (75% were MRSA. Among 52 isolated gram negative organisms, 5 strains (9/6% were ESBL. Conclusion: Standard interventions to prevent the transmission of antimicrobial resistance in health care facilities include hand hygiene, using barrier precautions in the care of colonized and infected patients, using dedicated instruments and equipment for these patients. The colonized or infected patients should be isolated in single rooms, multibed rooms or areas

  2. Molecular characterization of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolates from hospital- and community-acquired infections in NW Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda-Romero, Ana Laura; Silva-Sanchez, Jesus; Garza-Ramos, Ulises; Barrios, Humberto; Sánchez-Pérez, Alejandro; Reyna-Flores, Fernando

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the molecular characteristics of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-PEc) isolates from two hospitals and community settings in Ciudad Obregon, Sonora, Mexico. Between 2011 and 2014, thirty-seven ESBL-PEc isolates were collected. The major encoded ESBL was the blaCTX-M-15 gene (97%); followed by 13.5% of the blaSHV-12 gene, and 5.5% encoded the blaTLA-1 gene. The PMQR gene aac(6´)-Ib-cr was detected in 97% of the isolates and the qnrB gene, in one isolate. The ESBL-PEc isolates corresponded to phylogenetic group B2, ST131. Our results highlight the dissemination of ESBL-PEc isolates in northwest Mexico (Ciudad Obregon, Sonora). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Detection of antimicrobial sensitiveness of isolates of Listeria monocytogenes from food chain using Vitek 2 Compact Biomerieux

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jankuloski Dean

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivity of 26 Listeria monocytogenes isolates toward 18 antimicrobial substances used in veterinary and human medicine was examined using the automated VITEK 2 Compact system bioMerieux. The obtained results indicate that L. monocytogenes strains isolated from food and food processing environment had resistance to several or more antimicrobial substances that are commonly used in the treatment in animals and humans. Results showed resistance of all 26 (100% isolates toward Benzylpenicilin, Ampicilin/Sublactam, Oxacillin, Imipenem and Fosfomycine. Also 7 of the isolates (26.9% were resistant to Clindamiycin, 3 (11.5% to Quinupristion/Dalfopristin and 1 strain to Teicoplanin, Vancomycin, Tetracycline and Fusic acid, respectively.

  4. Genetic characterization of TEM-type ESBL-associated antibacterial resistance in Enterobacteriaceae in a tertiary hospital in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oduro-Mensah, Daniel; Obeng-Nkrumah, Noah; Bonney, Evelyn Yayra; Oduro-Mensah, Ebenezer; Twum-Danso, Kingsley; Osei, Yaa Difie; Sackey, Sammy Tawiah

    2016-05-04

    Antibiotic resistance due to the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) among Enterobacteriaceae is a worldwide problem. Data from Ghana regarding this resistance mechanism is limited. This study was designed to investigate the presence of TEM-type ESBL genes, their locations and their conjugabilities in clinical isolates of enterobacteria collected from the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital in Ghana. Study isolates were characterized with respect to ESBL phenotype, TEM-type ESBL gene detection, location of the ESBL gene(s) and conjugability of the ESBL phenotype using nalidixic acid-resistant Escherichia coli K-12 as recipient. Phenotyping was by Kirby Bauer disk diffusion using cefpodoxime, ceftazidime, cefotaxime and their combinations with clavulanate. Gene detections were by PCR using blaTEM primers. Overall, 37.96 % of 137 clinical isolates showed ESBL phenotype. The ESBLs occurred mostly in Klebsiella spp. (42.3 %) and then Escherichia coli (34.6 %). The TEM gene was detected in 48.1 % of ESBL-positive isolates and was determined to be plasmid-borne in 24 of 25 blaTEM detections. Overall, 62.7 % of TEM-producing isolates transferred the ESBL phenotype by conjugation. The results highlight the presence of TEM-type ESBLs in the Korle-Bu Teaching Hospital and show considerable risk of environmental contamination through the urine of infected persons. An inhibition zone chart was generated which indicates the possible presence of complex beta-lactamase types. The data points to the fact that the ESBL-producing bacteria may disseminate this resistance mechanism via conjugation.

  5. Improved detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in input and output samples of German biogas plants by a selective pre-enrichment procedure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thorsten Schauss

    Full Text Available The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing Escherichia coli was investigated in input (manure from livestock husbandry and output samples of six German biogas plants in 2012 (one sampling per biogas plant and two German biogas plants investigated in an annual cycle four times in 2013/2014. ESBL-producing Escherichia coli were cultured by direct plating on CHROMagar ESBL from input samples in the range of 100 to 104 colony forming units (CFU per g dry weight but not from output sample. This initially indicated a complete elimination of ESBL-producing E. coli by the biogas plant process. Detected non target bacteria were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Bordetella, Achromobacter, Castellaniella, and Ochrobactrum. A selective pre-enrichment procedure increased the detection efficiency of ESBL-producing E. coli in input samples and enabled the detection in five of eight analyzed output samples. In total 119 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from input and 46 from output samples. Most of the E. coli isolates carried CTX-M-type and/or TEM-type beta lactamases (94%, few SHV-type beta lactamase (6%. Sixty-four blaCTX-M genes were characterized more detailed and assigned mainly to CTX-M-groups 1 (85% and 9 (13%, and one to group 2. Phylogenetic grouping of 80 E. coli isolates showed that most were assigned to group A (71% and B1 (27%, only one to group D (2%. Genomic fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST showed a high clonal diversity with 41 BOX-types and 19 ST-types. The two most common ST-types were ST410 and ST1210. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 46 selected ESBL-producing E. coli revealed that several isolates were additionally resistant to other veterinary relevant antibiotics and some grew on CHROMagar STEC but shiga-like toxine (SLT genes were not detected. Resistance to carbapenems was not detected. In summary the study showed for the first time the presence of ESBL-producing E

  6. Improved Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing Escherichia coli in Input and Output Samples of German Biogas Plants by a Selective Pre-Enrichment Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schauss, Thorsten; Glaeser, Stefanie P.; Gütschow, Alexandra; Dott, Wolfgang; Kämpfer, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli was investigated in input (manure from livestock husbandry) and output samples of six German biogas plants in 2012 (one sampling per biogas plant) and two German biogas plants investigated in an annual cycle four times in 2013/2014. ESBL-producing Escherichia coli were cultured by direct plating on CHROMagar ESBL from input samples in the range of 100 to 104 colony forming units (CFU) per g dry weight but not from output sample. This initially indicated a complete elimination of ESBL-producing E. coli by the biogas plant process. Detected non target bacteria were assigned to the genera Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Bordetella, Achromobacter, Castellaniella, and Ochrobactrum. A selective pre-enrichment procedure increased the detection efficiency of ESBL-producing E. coli in input samples and enabled the detection in five of eight analyzed output samples. In total 119 ESBL-producing E. coli were isolated from input and 46 from output samples. Most of the E. coli isolates carried CTX-M-type and/or TEM-type beta lactamases (94%), few SHV-type beta lactamase (6%). Sixty-four blaCTX-M genes were characterized more detailed and assigned mainly to CTX-M-groups 1 (85%) and 9 (13%), and one to group 2. Phylogenetic grouping of 80 E. coli isolates showed that most were assigned to group A (71%) and B1 (27%), only one to group D (2%). Genomic fingerprinting and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed a high clonal diversity with 41 BOX-types and 19 ST-types. The two most common ST-types were ST410 and ST1210. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of 46 selected ESBL-producing E. coli revealed that several isolates were additionally resistant to other veterinary relevant antibiotics and some grew on CHROMagar STEC but shiga-like toxine (SLT) genes were not detected. Resistance to carbapenems was not detected. In summary the study showed for the first time the presence of ESBL-producing E. coli in

  7. High Heterogeneity of Escherichia coli Sequence Types Harbouring ESBL/AmpC Genes on IncI1 Plasmids in the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellanos, Luis Ricardo; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; León, Maribel; Clavijo, Viviana; Arevalo, Alejandra; Bernal, Johan F; Timmerman, Arjen J; Mevius, Dik J; Wagenaar, Jaap A; Hordijk, Joost

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread. To investigate the diversity of genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars). A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L) were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. Plasmids were purified and transformed into E. coli DH10B cells or transferred by conjugation to E. coli W3110. When applicable, PCR Based Replicon Typing (PBRT), plasmid Multi Locus Sequence Typing (pMLST), plasmid Double Locus Sequence Typing (pDLST) and/or plasmid Replicon Sequence Typing (pRST) was performed on resulting transformants and conjugants. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) was used for strain characterization. In total, 132 of 541 isolates were resistant to cefotaxime and 122 were found to carry ESBL/AmpC genes. Ninety-two harboured blaCMY-2 (75%), fourteen blaSHV-12 (11%), three blaSHV-5 (2%), five blaCTX-M-2 (4%), one blaCTX-M-15 (1%), one blaCTX-M-8 (1%), four a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-12 (4%) and two a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-5 (2%). A selection of 39 ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates was characterized at the plasmid and strain level. ESBL/AmpC genes from 36 isolates were transferable by transformation or conjugation of which 22 were located on IncI1 plasmids. These IncI1

  8. High Heterogeneity of Escherichia coli Sequence Types Harbouring ESBL/AmpC Genes on IncI1 Plasmids in the Colombian Poultry Chain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Ricardo Castellanos

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global spread.To investigate the diversity of genes, plasmids and strains in ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli from the Colombian poultry chain isolated within the Colombian Integrated Program for Antimicrobial Resistance Surveillance (Coipars.A total of 541 non-clinical E. coli strains from epidemiologically independent samples and randomly isolated between 2008 and 2013 within the Coipars program were tested for antimicrobial susceptibility. Poultry isolates resistant to cefotaxime (MIC ≥ 4 mg/L were screened for ESBL/AmpC genes including blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM, blaCMY and blaOXA. Plasmid and strain characterization was performed for a selection of the ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. Plasmids were purified and transformed into E. coli DH10B cells or transferred by conjugation to E. coli W3110. When applicable, PCR Based Replicon Typing (PBRT, plasmid Multi Locus Sequence Typing (pMLST, plasmid Double Locus Sequence Typing (pDLST and/or plasmid Replicon Sequence Typing (pRST was performed on resulting transformants and conjugants. Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST was used for strain characterization.In total, 132 of 541 isolates were resistant to cefotaxime and 122 were found to carry ESBL/AmpC genes. Ninety-two harboured blaCMY-2 (75%, fourteen blaSHV-12 (11%, three blaSHV-5 (2%, five blaCTX-M-2 (4%, one blaCTX-M-15 (1%, one blaCTX-M-8 (1%, four a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-12 (4% and two a combination of blaCMY-2 and blaSHV-5 (2%. A selection of 39 ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates was characterized at the plasmid and strain level. ESBL/AmpC genes from 36 isolates were transferable by transformation or conjugation of which 22 were located on IncI1 plasmids. These IncI1

  9. Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant, Extended Spectrum-β-Lactamase (ESBL-Producing Enterobacteria in Fresh Seafood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asem Sanjit Singh

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Members of the family Enterobacteriaceae include several human pathogens that can be acquired through contaminated food and water. In this study, the incidence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing enterobacteria was investigated in fresh seafood sold in retail markets. The ESBL-positive phenotype was detected in 169 (78.60% isolates, with Escherichia coli being the predominant species (53, followed by Klebsiella oxytoca (27, and K. pneumoniae (23. More than 90% of the isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefpodoxime. Sixty-five percent of the isolates were resistant to the monobactam drug aztreonam, 40.82% to ertapenem, and 31.36% to meropenem. Resistance to at least five antibiotics was observed in 38.46% of the isolates. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR analysis of ESBL-encoding genes detected blaCTX, blaSHV, and blaTEM genes in 76.92%, 63.3%, and 44.37% of the isolates, respectively. Multiple ESBL genes were detected in majority of the isolates. The recently discovered New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene (blaNDM-1 was detected in two ESBL+ isolates. Our study shows that secondary contamination of fresh seafood with enteric bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics may implicate seafood as a potential carrier of antibiotic resistant bacteria and emphasizes an urgent need to prevent environmental contamination and dissemination of such bacteria.

  10. ESBL Escherichia coli Ventriculitis after Aneurysm Clipping: A Rare and Difficult Therapeutic Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. A. Zeiler

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL produced Escherichia coli (E. coli ventriculitis is a rare infection of the central nervous system, with increasing rarity in the adult population. The therapeutic strategy to achieve cure may need to involve a combination of intraventricular and intravenous (IV therapy. Objective. To describe a case of ESBL E. coli meningitis/ventriculitis in an adult and outline the antimicrobial therapy that leads to cure. Methods. We retrospectively reviewed the records of a patient admitted to the neurosurgical department for aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, who developed ESBL E. coli ventriculitis. Results. A 55-year-old female, admitted for a Fisher grade 3, World Federation of Neurological Surgeons grade 1, subarachnoid hemorrhage, developed ESBL E. coli ventriculitis requiring a combination of intraventricular gentamicin and high dose intravenous meropenem for clearance. Cerebrospinal fluid clearance occurred at 7 days after initiation of combined therapy. The patient remained shunt dependent. Conclusions. Meningitis and ventriculitis caused by ESBL E. coli species are rare and pose significant challenges to the treating physician. Early consideration for combined intraventricular and IV therapy should be made.

  11. Multiple Antibiotic-Resistant, Extended Spectrum-β-Lactamase (ESBL)-Producing Enterobacteria in Fresh Seafood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanjit Singh, Asem; Lekshmi, Manjusha; Prakasan, Sreepriya; Nayak, Binaya Bhusan; Kumar, Sanath

    2017-01-01

    Members of the family Enterobacteriaceae include several human pathogens that can be acquired through contaminated food and water. In this study, the incidence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteria was investigated in fresh seafood sold in retail markets. The ESBL-positive phenotype was detected in 169 (78.60%) isolates, with Escherichia coli being the predominant species (53), followed by Klebsiella oxytoca (27), and K. pneumoniae (23). More than 90% of the isolates were resistant to third generation cephalosporins, cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefpodoxime. Sixty-five percent of the isolates were resistant to the monobactam drug aztreonam, 40.82% to ertapenem, and 31.36% to meropenem. Resistance to at least five antibiotics was observed in 38.46% of the isolates. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis of ESBL-encoding genes detected blaCTX, blaSHV, and blaTEM genes in 76.92%, 63.3%, and 44.37% of the isolates, respectively. Multiple ESBL genes were detected in majority of the isolates. The recently discovered New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase gene (blaNDM-1) was detected in two ESBL+ isolates. Our study shows that secondary contamination of fresh seafood with enteric bacteria resistant to multiple antibiotics may implicate seafood as a potential carrier of antibiotic resistant bacteria and emphasizes an urgent need to prevent environmental contamination and dissemination of such bacteria. PMID:28867789

  12. [Evaluation of antibiotic treatments for urinary tract infections in the elderly, especially regarding the effect on extended spectrum β-lactamase producing (ESBL-) Escherichia coli: A comparison between meropenem and alternatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Akira; Yamasaki, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    An increasing incidence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-) producing Escherihia Coli poses a difficult problem for clinicians to establish an optimal strategy for the effective antibiotic treatment of urinary tract infections (UTI). (1) Fosfomycin/minocycline (FOM/MINO) or rifampicin/sulfamethoxazole-trimethoprim (RFP/ST) combinations and (2) levofloxacin (LVFX) alone were used as an internal medication, and (3) cefoperazone/sulbactam (CPZ/SBT) and (4) meropenem (MEPM) were administered through intravenous injection. The selection of antibiotics was done empirically, according to the history and severity of illness and urinary findings, and the presence of comobidities. The efficacy of the treatment was determined by the absence of any pathogenic bacteria from a urinary culture after treatment. ESBL-producing and LVFX resistant non-ESBL producing E. coli were detected by an initial urinary culture in 33 and 10%, respectively, of the specimens before treatment. All the ESBL-producing E. Coli colonies were resistant against LVFX. The efficacy of the treatment was 9/11 (82%) in the FOM/MINO-RFP/ST group, 9/14 (64%) in the LVFX group, 9/16 (56%) in the CPZ/SBT group, and 19/27 (70%) in the MEPM group. In the FOM/MINO・RFP/ST group, ESBL-producing E. Coli were detected in the urine before treatment in 5 out of 16 patients and those E. coli disappeared after treatment in all 5 patients. In the LVFX group, the drug was changed to MEPM in 6 out of 15 patients soon after the presence of ESBL-producing/LVFX resistant E. Coli was identified by a urinary culture. In the CPZ/SBT group, ESBL-producing and/or LVFX-resistant E. coli disappeared in 4 out of 6 cases, while they were newly found in post-treatment urine cultures in 2 patients. In the MEPM group, 15 out of 28 patients initially had ESBL-producing/LVFX resistant E. Coli and those drug-resistant E. Coli disappeared from their urine after treatment in all patients. The drug susceptibility test of the urinary

  13. Fortuitous Detection of cmy-2 and dha-1 from ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, S; Robin, F; Ba-Diallo, A; Diallo, O F; Dia, M L; Beyrouthy, R; Gaye-Diallo, A; Sow, A I; Bonnet, R

    2017-10-01

    Cephalosporinases, which are naturally present in some enterobacterial species, can be mobilized by transposons, migrate to plasmids, and spread into other species such as Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to characterize genes responsible for the production of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) in E. coli isolates from urinary origin isolated in two hospitals in Senegal. Thus, a fortuitous discovery of plasmidic cephalosporinase in two isolates was noted. One of the isolates produced dha-1 associated with ESBL CTX-M-14, the other produced cmy-2, ESBL CTXM-15, tem-1 penicillinase, and oxa-1. This confirms the circulation of multidrug-resistant bacteria producing plasmidic cephalosporinase in Senegal. However, a large study is needed to better understand the prevalence and the nature of the genes involved.

  14. STUDY ON SURGICAL SITE INFECTIONS CAUSED BY ESBL PRODUCING GRAM NEGATIVE BACTERIA

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    Rambabu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Surgical site infections have been a major problem, because of the emergence of drug resistant bacteria, in particular B - lactamase producing bacteria. Extended spectrum beta lactamase producing gram negative organisms pose a great challenge in treatment o f SSI present study is aimed at determining multiple drug resistance in gram negative bacteria & to find out ESBL producers, in correlation with treatment outcome. A total of 120 wound infected cases were studied. Staphylococcus aureus was predominant bact erium - 20.Among gram negative bacteria, Pseudomonas species is predominant (14 followed by Escherichia coli (13 , Klebsiella species (12 , Proteus (9 Citrobacter (4 Providencia (2 & Acinetobacter species (2 . Out of 56 gramnegative bacteria isolated, 20 were i dentified as ESBL producers, which was statistically significant. Delay in wound healing correlated with infection by ESBL producers, which alarms the need of abstinence from antibiotic abuse

  15. Nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum identified by MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 from a blood culture of a septic patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnke, Philipp; Köller, Thomas; Stoll, Paul; Podbielski, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    We report the case of a nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum isolated from a blood culture of a 75-year-old septic male patient. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek 2 succeeded in identification of the isolate.

  16. Nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum identified by MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 from a blood culture of a septic patient

    OpenAIRE

    Warnke, Philipp; K?ller, Thomas; Stoll, Paul; Podbielski, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    We report the case of a nosocomial infection due to Enterococcus cecorum isolated from a blood culture of a 75-year-old septic male patient. Matrix-assisted laser desorption?ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and Vitek 2 succeeded in identification of the isolate.

  17. Fastidious Gram-Negatives: Identification by the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus Card and by Partial 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sönksen, Ute Wolff; Christensen, Jens Jørgen; Nielsen, Lisbeth; Hesselbjerg, Annemarie; Hansen, Dennis Schrøder; Bruun, Brita

    2010-12-31

    Taxonomy and identification of fastidious Gram negatives are evolving and challenging. We compared identifications achieved with the Vitek 2 Neisseria-Haemophilus (NH) card and partial 16S rRNA gene sequence (526 bp stretch) analysis with identifications obtained with extensive phenotypic characterization using 100 fastidious Gram negative bacteria. Seventy-five strains represented 21 of the 26 taxa included in the Vitek 2 NH database and 25 strains represented related species not included in the database. Of the 100 strains, 31 were the type strains of the species. Vitek 2 NH identification results: 48 of 75 database strains were correctly identified, 11 strains gave `low discrimination´, seven strains were unidentified, and nine strains were misidentified. Identification of 25 non-database strains resulted in 14 strains incorrectly identified as belonging to species in the database. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis results: For 76 strains phenotypic and sequencing identifications were identical, for 23 strains the sequencing identifications were either probable or possible, and for one strain only the genus was confirmed. Thus, the Vitek 2 NH system identifies most of the commonly occurring species included in the database. Some strains of rarely occurring species and strains of non-database species closely related to database species cause problems. Partial 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis performs well, but does not always suffice, additional phenotypical characterization being useful for final identification.

  18. ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in households with children of preschool age : prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Bunt, G; Liakopoulos, A; Mevius, D J; Geurts, Y; Fluit, A C; Bonten, M J M; Mughini-Gras, L; van Pelt, W

    OBJECTIVES: ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging public health concern. As households with preschool children may substantially contribute to the community burden of antimicrobial resistance, we determined the prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria

  19. ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae in households with children of preschool age: prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunt, van den G.; Liakopoulos, A.; Mevius, D.J.; Geurts, Y.; Fluit, A.C.; Bonten, M.J.M.; Mughini-Gras, Lapo; Pelt, van W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae are an emerging public health concern. As households with preschool children may substantially contribute to the community burden of antimicrobial resistance, we determined the prevalence, risk factors and co-carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria

  20. Prevalence and characteristics of ESBL-producing E. coli in Dutch recreational waters influenced by wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaak, Hetty; de Kruijf, Patrick; Hamidjaja, Raditijo A; van Hoek, Angela H A M; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Schets, Franciska M

    2014-07-16

    Outside health care settings, people may acquire ESBL-producing bacteria through different exposure routes, including contact with human or animal carriers or consumption of contaminated food. However, contact with faecally contaminated surface water may also represent a possible exposure route. The current study investigated the prevalence and characteristics of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in four Dutch recreational waters and the possible role of nearby waste water treatment plants (WWTP) as contamination source. Isolates from recreational waters were compared with isolates from WWTP effluents, from surface water upstream of the WWTPs, at WWTP discharge points, and in connecting water bodies not influenced by the studied WWTPs. ESBL-producing E. coli were detected in all four recreational waters, with an average concentration of 1.3 colony forming units/100ml, and in 62% of all samples. In surface waters not influenced by the studied WWTPs, ESBL-producing E. coli were detected in similar concentrations, indicating the existence of additional ESBL-E. coli contamination sources. Isolates with identical ESBL-genes, phylogenetic background, antibiotic resistance profiles, and sequence type, were obtained from effluent and different surface water sites in the same watershed, on the same day; occasionally this included isolates from recreational waters. Recreational waters were identified as a potential exposure source of ESBL-producing E. coli. WWTPs were shown to contribute to the presence of these bacteria in surface waters, but other (yet unidentified) sources likely co-contribute. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) in Danish clinical isolates of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Dennis Schrøder; Schumacher, Helga; Hansen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Most Gram-negative community-acquired and nosocomial infections are caused by Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae, among which increasing resistance due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) is a major problem. We present data from the first Danish nationwide prevalence study on ESBL...

  2. Transmission of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from broiler chicken farms to surrounding areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, H; Friese, A; von Salviati, C; Guerra, B; Rösler, U

    2014-08-27

    Although previous studies have demonstrated high carriage of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in livestock, especially in broiler chickens, data on emission sources of these bacteria into the environment are still rare. Therefore, this study was designed to systematically investigate the occurrence of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in slurry, air (inside animal houses), ambient air (outside animal houses) and on soil surfaces in the areas surrounding of seven ESBL/AmpC-positive broiler chicken fattening farms, including investigation of the possible spread of these bacteria via the faecal route and/or exhaust air into the environment. Seven German broiler fattening farms were each investigated at three points in time (3-36 h after restocking, 14-18 and 26-35 days after housing) during one fattening period. The occurrence of ESBL/AmpC genes in the investigated samples was confirmed by PCR, detecting blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaTEM and blaCMY-genes, and, if necessary, by sequencing and/or the disc diffusion method. The results showed a wide spread of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in broiler farms, as well as emissions into the surroundings. 12 out of 14 (86%) slurry samples were positive for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli. Additionally, 28.8% (n=23/80) of boot swabs taken from various surfaces in the areas surrounding of the farms as well as 7.5% (n=3/40) of the exhaust air samples turned out to be positive for these microorganisms. Moreover, a small proportion of air samples from inside the barns were ESBL/AmpC-positive. By comparing selected isolates using pulsed field gel electrophoresis, we proved that faecal and airborne transfer of ESBL/AmpC-producing microorganisms from broiler fattening farms to the surrounding areas is possible. Two isolates from farm G2 (slurry and boot swab 50 m downwind), two isolates from farm G3 (slurry and individual animal swab) as well as two isolates from farm G6 (air sample in the barn and air sample 50 m downwind) showed 100% similarity in

  3. Detection of Extended Spectrum β-Lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL E.coli) from chicken meat in Niigata Prefecture, Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Bandara, Holipitige Pubuduni Sugandhika; Sato, Marcello Otake; Sato, Megumi; Yatawara, Lalani; Watanabe, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    The extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are the enzymes which degrade oxyimino-cephalosporins such as cefotaxime and ceftazidime, and make the antibiotics ineffective. In the past decade, drug resistance derived from Extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL E. coli) has been increasing dramatically worldwide. The ESBLs genes are located on plasmids that can be easily transferred between and within bacterial species. It is indicated the linkage of ESBL E. coli from the...

  4. Iodometric and Molecular Detection of ESBL Production Among Clinical Isolates of E. coli Fingerprinted by ERIC-PCR: The First Egyptian Report Declares the Emergence of E. coli O25b-ST131clone Harboring blaGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Mohamed F; Tawakol, Wael M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Mansy, Moselhy S; Shohayeb, Mohamed M; Ashour, Mohammed S

    2017-09-01

    The extensive use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to emergence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of 7 different ESBL genes (bla TEM , bla SHV , bla CTX-M , bla VEB , bla PER , bla GES , and bla OXA-10 ) and O25b-ST131 high-risk clone among 61 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli. Also, one broad-spectrum β-lactamase (bla OXA-1 ) was investigated. This study was also constructed to evaluate iodometric overlay method in detection of ESBL production. Phenotypic identification of E. coli isolates using API 20E revealed 18 distinct biotypes. DNA fingerprinting using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) differentiated all isolates into 2 main phylogenetic groups with 60 distinct genetic profiles. Elevated values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 and MIC 90 for third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins were observed. Phenotypic tests revealed that 85.24% of isolates were ESBL producers. The incidence rates of bla TEM , bla SHV , bla CTX-M , bla GES , bla OXA-1 , and bla OXA-10 among E. coli ESBL producer phenotype were 69.23%, 25%, 96.15%, 3.85%, 11.54%, and 48%, respectively. On the other hand, bla VEB and bla PER were not detected. Sequencing of bla TEM and bla SHV revealed that bla TEM-214 and bla SHV-11 were the most prevalent variants. Group characterization of bla CTX-M revealed that bla CTX-M-1 was the most prevalent group of bla CTX-M family. It was found that 30.77% of E. coli ESBL producers belonged to O25b-ST131 clone harboring bla CTX-M-15 . This study concluded that iodometric overlay method was 100% sensitive in detection of ESBL production. To our knowledge, this is the first Egyptian study that declares the emergence of E. coli O25b-ST131 harboring bla GES .

  5. Saponin promotes rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria in blood cultures with the Vitek 2 system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupetti, A; Barnini, S; Morici, P; Ghelardi, E; Nibbering, P H; Campa, M

    2013-04-01

    The rapid identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) of bacteria in clinical blood cultures is crucial to optimise antimicrobial therapy. A previous study involving small sample numbers revealed that the addition of saponin to blood cultures, further referred to as the new method, shortened considerably the turn-around time for the identification and AST of Gram-positive cocci as compared to the current method involving an overnight subculture. Here, we extend previous results and compare the identification and AST of blood cultures containing Gram-negative bacilli by the new and current methods. The identification and AST of 121 Gram-positive and 109 Gram-negative bacteria in clinical monomicrobial blood cultures by the new and current methods and, in the case of Gram-negative bacilli, by direct (no additions) inoculation into an automated system (rapid method) was assessed using the Vitek 2 system. Discrepancies between the results obtained with the different methods were solved by manual methods. The new method correctly identified 88 % of Gram-positive and 98 % of Gram-negative bacteria, and the rapid method correctly identified 94 % of Gram-negative bacteria. The AST for all antimicrobials by the new method were concordant with the current method for 55 % and correct for an additional 9 % of Gram-positive bacteria, and concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 21 % of Gram-negative bacilli. The AST by the rapid method was concordant with the current method for 62 % and correct for an additional 12 % of Gram-negative bacilli. Together, saponin-treated monomicrobial blood cultures allow rapid and reliable identification and AST of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. High Emergence of ESBL-Producing E. coli Cystitis: Time to Get Smarter in Cyprus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantas, Leon; Suer, Kaya; Guler, Emrah; Imir, Turgut

    2015-01-01

    Widespread prevalence of extended-spectrum βeta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli (ESBL-producing E. coli) limits the infection therapeutic options and is a growing global health problem. In this study our aim was to investigate the antimicrobial resistance profile of the E. coli in hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. During the period 2010-2014, 389 strains of E. coli were isolated from urine samples of hospitalized and out-patients in Cyprus. ESBL-producing E. coli, was observed in 53% of hospitalized and 44% in out-patients, latest one being in 2014. All ESBL-producing E. coli remained susceptible to amikacin, carbapenems except ertapenem (in-patients = 6%, out-patients = 11%). High emerging ESBL-producing E. coli from urine samples in hospitalized and out-patients is an extremely worrisome sign of development of untreatable infections in the near future on the island. We therefore emphasize the immediate need for establishment of optimal therapy guidelines based on the country specific surveillance programs. The need for new treatment strategies, urgent prescription habit changes and ban of over-the-counter sale of antimicrobials at each segment of healthcare services is also discussed in this research.

  7. Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)–Producing Gram ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: A high prevalence (44.3%) of ESBL producing Gram–negative bacteria was observed among the patients, with Enterobacter species being the most prevalent. Prudent use of antibacterial agents is advocated to stem the tide. Keywords: Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase, Enterobacter species, Wound, Urine, ...

  8. Influence of subinhibitory-concentration (sub-MIC Cefetoxime on biofilm formation. SEM study of ESBL-producing Salmonella typhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Narasanna, Manjunath Chavadi, Ajaykumar Oli

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In the present study, we have analyzed ESBL-producing S. typhi’s capability in forming a significant amount of biofilm on plastic and glass surface, and the influence of cefetoxime on biofilm development at subinhibitory (Sub-MIC concentration. Methods: Nine strains of cefetoxime-mediated ESBL-producing S. typhi were used in the study. S. typhi formed biofilm on plastic and glass materials; it was demonstrated using micro titre plate (MTP and standard test tube methods. Comparative study of the influence of cefetoxime on biofilm formation in its MIC (128 µg/ml and at sub-MIC (64 µg/ml was demonstrated by microtitre plate method. The biofilm production was observed in SEM images, statistical analysis (ANOVA showed significant increase in cell surface and volume due to the influence of Cefetoxime. Results: Of the nine selected isolates, two S. typhi strains, namely BST 51 and BST 130, produced relatively strong biofilm in the presence of cefetoxime at sub-MIC level (64 µg/ml, comparatively weak biofilm formation at MIC level (128 µg/ml. Typical morphological changes were observed in cefetoxime-resistant strains, S. typhi BST 51 and BST 130, in comparison to cefetoxime-sensitive strain S. typhi BST 63 used as a control. We found an increase in surface and volume of a cell in response to cefetoxime and statistical data (ANOVA proved that resistant strains were significantly different from control strains. Conclusion: The above study clearly shows that cefetoxime at sub-MIC level efficiently induces biofilm formation and promotes changes in morphology of the cell. J Microbiol Infect Dis 2017; 7(2: 67-75

  9. Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris Misidentified as Candida haemulonii: Characterization by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and DNA Sequencing and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile Variability by Vitek 2, CLSI Broth Microdilution, and Etest Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kathuria, Shallu; Singh, Pradeep K; Sharma, Cheshta; Prakash, Anupam; Masih, Aradhana; Kumar, Anil; Meis, Jacques F; Chowdhary, Anuradha

    2015-06-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes a wide spectrum of infections, especially in intensive care settings. We investigated C. auris prevalence among 102 clinical isolates previously identified as Candida haemulonii or Candida famata by the Vitek 2 system. Internal transcribed spacer region (ITS) sequencing confirmed 88.2% of the isolates as C. auris, and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) easily separated all related species, viz., C. auris (n = 90), C. haemulonii (n = 6), C. haemulonii var. vulnera (n = 1), and Candida duobushaemulonii (n = 5). The in vitro antifungal susceptibility was determined using CLSI broth microdilution (CLSI-BMD), the Vitek 2 antifungal susceptibility test, and the Etest method. C. auris isolates revealed uniformly elevated fluconazole MICs (MIC50, 64 μg/ml), and an alarming percentage of isolates (37%) exhibited elevated caspofungin MICs by CLSI-BMD. Notably, 34% of C. auris isolates had coexisting elevated MICs (≥2 μg/ml) for both fluconazole and voriconazole, and 10% of the isolates had elevated coexisting MICs (≥2 μg/ml) to two additional azoles, i.e., posaconazole and isavuconazole. In contrast to reduced amphotericin B MICs by CLSI-BMD (MIC50, 1 μg/ml) for C. auris, elevated MICs were noted by Vitek 2 (MIC50, 8 μg/ml), which were statistically significant. Candida auris remains an unnoticed pathogen in routine microbiology laboratories, as 90% of the isolates characterized by commercial identification systems are misidentified as C. haemulonii. MALDI-TOF MS proved to be a more robust diagnostic technique for rapid identification of C. auris. Considering that misleading elevated MICs of amphotericin B by the Vitek AST-YS07 card may lead to the selection of inappropriate therapy, a cautionary approach is recommended for laboratories relying on commercial systems for identification and antifungal susceptibility testing of rare yeasts. Copyright

  10. The risk to import ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus through chicken meat trade in Gabon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Alabi, Abraham S; Frielinghaus, Lisa; Grobusch, Martin P; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G; Peters, Georg; Mellmann, Alexander

    2014-11-19

    A main export market for chicken meat from industrialized countries is sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that antibiotic resistant bacteria could be exported to developing countries through chicken meat trade. The objective was to investigate the occurrence and molecular types of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus in chicken meat in Gabon and to assess their dissemination among humans. Frozen chicken meat samples imported from industrialized countries to Gabon (n = 151) were screened for ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and S. aureus. Genotypes and resistance genes (SHV, TEM, CTX-M, CMY-2) of isolates from meat were compared with isolates derived from humans. The contamination rate per chicken part (i. e. leg, wing) with ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (ESBL E. coli, no other ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were found) and S. aureus was 23% and 3%, respectively. The beta-lactamase CTX-M 1 was predominant in ESBL E. coli from meat samples but was not found in isolates from cases of human colonization or infection. S. aureus belonging to spa type t002 (multilocus sequence type ST5) were found both in chicken meat and humans. There is a risk to import ESBL E. coli to Gabon but molecular differences between isolates from humans and chicken meat argue against a further dissemination. No MRSA isolate was detected in imported chicken meat.

  11. Characterization of multi-drug resistant ESBL producing nonfermenter bacteria isolated from patients blood samples using phenotypic methods in Shiraz (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maneli Amin Shahidi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: The emergence of  nonfermenter bacteria that are resistant to multidrug resistant ESBL  are  nowadays a principal problem  for hospitalized patients. The present study aimed at surveying the emergence of nonfermenter bacteria resistant to multi-drug ESBL producing isolated from patients blood samples using BACTEC 9240 automatic system in Shiraz. Materials and Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 4825 blood specimens were collected from hospitalized patients in Shiraz (Iran, and positive samples were detected by means of  BACTEC 9240 automatic system. The isolates  containing nonfermenter bacteria were identified based on biochemical tests embedded in the API-20E system. Antibiotic sensitivity  test was performed  and identification of  ESBL producing strains were done  using phenotypic detection of extended spectrum beta-lactamase producing isolates(DDST according to CLSI(2013 guidelines.   Results: Out of 4825 blood samples, 1145 (24% specimen were gram-positive using BACTEC system. Among all isolated microorganisms, 206 isolates were non-fermenting gram- negative bacteria. The most common non-fermenter isolates were Pseudomonas spp. (48%, Acinetobacter spp. (41.7% ,and Stenotrophomonas spp. (8.2%. Seventy of them (81.4% were  Acinetobacter spp. which were ESBL positive. Among &beta-lactam antibiotics, Pseudomonas spp. showed  the best sensitivity to piperacillin-tazobactam (46.5%.  Conclusion: It was found that  &beta-lactam antibiotics are not effective against more than 40% of Pseudomonas spp. infections and 78% Acinetobacter infections. Emergence of multi-drug resistant strains that are resistant to most antibiotic classes is a major public health problem in Iran. To resolve this problem using of practical guidelines is critical.

  12. A multicentre cohort study on colonization and infection with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in high-risk patients with haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vehreschild, Maria J G T; Hamprecht, Axel; Peterson, Lisa; Schubert, Sören; Häntschel, Maik; Peter, Silke; Schafhausen, Philippe; Rohde, Holger; Lilienfeld-Toal, Marie V; Bekeredjian-Ding, Isabelle; Libam, Johannes; Hellmich, Martin; Vehreschild, Jörg J; Cornely, Oliver A; Seifert, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by enterobacteria remain a leading cause of mortality in patients with chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. The rate and type of colonization and infection with ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and their mode of transmission in German cancer centres is largely unknown. We performed a prospective, observational study at five German university-based haematology departments. Participating sites screened for intestinal ESBL-E colonization within 72 h of admission, every 10 ± 2 days thereafter and before discharge. Three of the five centres performed contact isolation for patients colonized or infected with ESBL-E. Molecular characterization of resistance mechanisms and epidemiological typing of isolates by repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR) and PFGE was performed to assess strain transmission between patients. Between October 2011 and December 2012, 719 hospitalizations of 497 haematological high-risk patients comprising 20,143 patient-days were analysed. Mean duration of in-hospital stay was 36.6 days (range: 2-159 days). ESBL-E were identified from screening samples (82.8% Escherichia coli and 14.6% Klebsiella pneumoniae) in 55/497 patients (11.1%; range by centre: 5.8%-23.1%). PFGE and rep-PCR revealed only a single case of potential cross-transmission among two patients colonized with K. pneumoniae. Six episodes of BSI with ESBL-E were observed. Multivariate analysis revealed previous colonization with ESBL-E as the most important risk factor for BSI with ESBL-E (OR 52.00; 95% CI 5.71-473.89). Even though BSI with ESBL-E is still rare in this high-risk population, colonization rates are substantial and vary considerably between centres. In-hospital transmission of ESBL-E as assessed by molecular typing was the exception. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. Fecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Korean community and hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Y J; Moon, H-W; Hur, M; Park, C-M; Cho, S E; Yun, Y-M

    2013-02-01

    The assessment and early recognition of risk factors for infections due to extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are important for infection control and proper treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of fecal carriage of ESBL-E in healthy individuals and hospitalized high-risk patients in Korea and to compare the characteristics of ESBL-E in these two groups. A total of 384 samples from 290 healthy individuals and 94 high-risk patients were collected. The screening of ESBL-E was performed using a commercial chromogenic medium. Bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility testing were performed using the Vitek 2 system. The prevalence of ESBL-E carriage was 20.3 % in healthy individuals and 42.5 % in high-risk patients. Escherichia coli comprised a large majority (96.6 %) of the isolates from healthy individuals, but Klebsiella pneumoniae was more commonly detected (45.0 %) in high-risk patients than in healthy individuals. K. pneumoniae isolates exhibited significantly higher resistance to ceftazidime, ampicillin, and carbapenem, and E. coli exhibited higher resistance to cefotaxime. E. coli from high-risk patients exhibited significantly higher resistance to levofloxacin and cefepime than that from healthy individuals. We demonstrated the high prevalence of ESBL-E carriage in Korea and clarified the characteristics of ESBL-E carriage in healthy individuals and high-risk patients. The distribution and antibiotic susceptibility of colonizing ESBL-E were different between the group of healthy individuals and the high-risk patients. Active surveillance of ESBL-E carriage is suggested for infection control, and the use of chromogenic agar appears to be an efficient method.

  14. Direct Identification of Urinary Tract Pathogens From Urine Samples Using the Vitek MS System Based on Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeongsic; Park, Kang Gyun; Lee, Kyungwon; Park, Yeon-Joon

    2015-07-01

    We evaluated the coincidence rate between Vitek MS system (bioMérieux, France) and Vitek 2 in identifying uropathogens directly from urine specimens. Urine specimens submitted to our microbiology laboratory between July and September 2013 for Gram staining and bacterial culture were analyzed. Bacterial identification was performed by using the conventional method. Urine specimens showing a single morphotype by Gram staining were processed by culturing and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Of 2,370 urine specimens, 251 showed a single morphotype on Gram staining, and among them, 202 were available for MALDI-TOF MS. In these 202 specimens, colony growth was observed in 189 specimens, and 145 specimens had significant growth of single-colony morphotype in culture. One hundred and ten (75.9%) of them had colony counts of ≥10(5) colony-forming units (CFU)/mL and included 71 enteric gram-negative bacteria (GNB), 5 glucose-non-fermenting GNB, 9 gram-positive cocci (GPC), and 25 yeasts. Furthermore, 70 (98.6%), 3 (60.0%), 4 (44.4%), and 5 (20.0%), respectively, of these were correctly identified by Vitek MS. Thirty-one specimens (21.4%; 11 GNB, 7 GPC, 12 yeasts, and 1 gram-positive bacillus) had colony counts of 10(4)-10(5) CFU/mL. Four specimens (2.8%) yielded colony counts of 10(3)-10(4) CFU/mL. Vitek MS showed high rate of accuracy for the identification of GNB in urine specimens (≥10(5) CFU/mL). This could become a rapid and accurate diagnostic method for urinary tract infection caused by GNB. However, for the identification of GPC and yeasts, further studies on appropriate pre-treatment are warranted.

  15. The risk to import ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus through chicken meat trade in Gabon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Alabi, Abraham S; Frielinghaus, Lisa; Grobusch, Martin P; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G; Peters, Georg; Mellmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    .... The objective was to investigate the occurrence and molecular types of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus in chicken meat in Gabon and to assess their dissemination among humans...

  16. Presence of ESBL/AmpC -Producing Escherichia coli in the Broiler Production Pyramid: A Descriptive Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierikx, Cindy M.; van der Goot, Jeanet A.; Smith, Hilde E.; Kant, Arie; Mevius, Dik J.

    2013-01-01

    Broilers and broiler meat products are highly contaminated with extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Escherichia coli and are considered to be a source for human infections. Both horizontal and vertical transmission might play a role in the presence of these strains in broilers. As not much is known about the presence of these strains in the whole production pyramid, the epidemiology of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli in the Dutch broiler production pyramid was examined. Cloacal swabs of Grandparent stock (GPS) birds (one−/two-days (breed A and B), 18 and 31 weeks old (breed A)), one-day old Parent stock birds (breed A and B) and broiler chickens of increasing age (breed A) were selectively cultured to detect ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates. ESBL/AmpC-producing isolates were found at all levels in the broiler production pyramid in both broiler breeds examined. Prevalence was already relatively high at the top of the broiler production pyramid. At broiler farms ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli were still present in the environment of the poultry house after cleaning and disinfection. Feed samples taken in the poultry house also became contaminated with ESBL/AmpC producing E. coli after one or more production weeks. The prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-positive birds at broiler farms increased within the first week from 0–24% to 96–100% independent of the use of antibiotics and stayed 100% until slaughter. In GPS breed A, prevalence at 2 days, 18 weeks and 31 weeks stayed below 50% except when beta-lactam antibiotics were administered. In that case prevalence increased to 100%. Interventions minimizing ESBL/AmpC contamination in broilers should focus on preventing horizontal and vertical spread, especially in relation to broiler production farms. PMID:24244401

  17. Comparative prevalence and characterization of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in dominant versus subdominant enteric flora in veal calves at slaughterhouse, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenni, Marisa; Châtre, Pierre; Métayer, Véronique; Bour, Maxime; Signol, Elodie; Madec, Jean-Yves; Gay, Emilie

    2014-07-16

    Food-producing animals have become a growing reservoir of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria. In cattle, veal calves are exposed to high amounts of antibiotics but ESBL prevalence data are still limited compared to other food sectors such as poultry production. Based on the investigation of 491 veal calves from different slaughtering batches at 12 abattoirs, this study shows a prevalence of 29.4% of ESBL producers in the faecal flora of veal calves in France in 2012. A variety of blaCTX-M genes was found, reflecting possible diverse pathways of dissemination in cattle. Another major conclusion is the comparison of the ESBL prevalence in the dominant versus sub-dominant Escherichia coli population of the same calves (1% and 29.4%, respectively). Also, the ESBL E. coli clones in the sub-dominant flora mostly differed from the non-ESBL dominant E. coli clones of the same calves. Of note, the distribution of blaCTX-M genes and E. coli phylogroups were similar to the ones previously found in ESBL E. coli clones from diseased calves. The hypothesis that ESBL genes may distribute more abundantly in certain backgrounds of E. coli was also discussed. In all, as recently reported in the Netherlands, these results strongly suggest a recent increase in the prevalence of ESBL carriage in French veal calves, which should be considered one of the major ESBL reservoirs in food animals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of infections caused by multiresistant gram-negatives: ESBLs, MBLs, panresistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossolini, Gian Maria; Mantengoli, Elisabetta; Docquier, Jean-Denis; Musmanno, Rosa Anna; Coratza, Grazietta

    2007-07-01

    Microbial drug resistance is a growing problem of global magnitude. In gram-negative pathogens, the most important resistance problems are encountered in Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter, with increasing trends observed for all major anti-gram-negative agents (beta-lactams, fluoroquinolones and aminoglycosides). A matter of major concern is the emergence of new beta-lactamases capable of degrading the expanded-spectrum cephalosporins and/or carbapenems, such as the extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and the carbapenemases. These beta-lactamase genes are often associated with resistance determinants to non-beta-lactam agents (e.g. aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones), and strains producing ESBLs or carbapenemases often exhibit complex multidrug resistant phenotypes and sometimes are panresistant. The problem is worsened by the dearth of new agents active on multidrug-resistant Gram-negatives in the pipeline. The importance to develop better strategies to control resistance is underscored.

  19. High prevalence of ESBL-Producing E. coli in private and shared latrines in an informal urban settlement in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Erb

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Data about the burden of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing microorganisms in Africa are limited. Our study aimed to estimate the prevalence of human faecal ESBL carriage in the community of an informal urban settlement in Dar es Salaam (Tanzania, East Africa by using environmental contamination of household latrines with ESBL as a surrogate marker. Methods Within the context of a large survey in February 2014 assessing 636 randomly selected household latrines for faecal contamination by the detection of growth of E. coli and total faecal coliform bacteria, a randomly selected subset of the samples were screened for ESBL. Results Seventy latrines were screened for ESBL. An average of 11.4 persons (SD ±6.5 were sharing one latrine. Only three (4.3% latrines had hand-washing facilities and 50 showed faeces on the floor. ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae were confirmed in 17 (24.3% of the 70 latrine samples: 16 E. coli and 1 Klebsiella pneumoniae. Five ESBL E. coli strains were detected on door handles. The most prevalent ESBL type was CTX-M-1 group (76.5%. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis typing of a subset of ESBL-producing E. coli isolates revealed both diverse singular types and a cluster of 3 identical isolates. There was no significant difference of the latrine and household characteristics between the group with ESBL (n = 17 and the group with non-ESBL E. coli (n = 53 (p > 0.05. Conclusions Almost a quarter of private and shared latrines in an informal urban settlement in Tanzania are contaminated with ESBL-producing microorganisms, suggesting a high prevalence of human ESBL faecal carriage in the community. Shared latrines may serve as a reservoir for transmission in urban community settings in Tanzania.

  20. Faecal occurrence and emissions of livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (laMRSA) and ESbl/AmpC-producing E. coli from animal farms in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friese, Anika; Schulz, Jochen; Laube, Henriette; von Salviati, Christina; Hartung, Joerg; Roesler, Uwe

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of laMRSA (livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) and extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and/or plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase-producing (AmpC) Enterobacteriaceae in healthy livestock herds is known for some time.The spread of these bacteria in the environment is discussed critically.The object of this study was to determine the presence of these microorganisms in faeces of livestock as well as the discussion about a potential faecal emission. Therefore, faeces samples from 37 different MRSA positive livestock holdings were tested for MRSA. Furthermore, faeces samples from 50 farms with an unknown status regarding ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli were screened for those resistant bacteria. LaMRSA was detected in samples of turkey (2/5, 40%) and broiler fattening farms (1/4, 25%) as well as in pig farms with higher detection frequencies in fattening farms (11/15, 73.3%) than in breeding farms (4/12, 33.3%). ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli was found in all investigated eight broiler farms (100%), in nine out of 16 (56.3%) breeding pig as well as in six out of 10 (60%) dairy cattle herds and in seven of 16 (43.8%) fattening pig holdings. This presents the first detection of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli originating from healthy pigs, turkeys and broilers in Germany. In addition, samples of fertilized field surfaces were studied exemplarily for the presence of MRSA (n = 4) as well as ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli (n = 2). Furthermore, slurry samples from four broiler and five pig farms were analysed for the latter. Both MRSA and ESBL/ AmpC-producing E. coli could be detected on the field surfaces, the last also in slurry samples. Faecal emissions from animal husbandry seem to be one possible route for the spread of these resistant microorganisms in the environment.

  1. Comparative Exposure Assessment of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli through Meat Consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Evers, Eric G.; Pielaat, Annemarie; Joost H Smid; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Vennemann, Francy B. C.; Wijnands, Lucas M.; Chardon, Jurgen E.

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum ?-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmidic AmpC (pAmpC) producing Escherichia coli (EEC) in food animals, especially broilers, has become a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to quantify the EEC exposure of humans in The Netherlands through the consumption of meat from different food animals. Calculations were done with a simplified Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model. The model took the effect of pre-retail processing, ...

  2. Occurrence and Genomic Characterization of ESBL-Producing, MCR-1-Harboring Escherichia coli in Farming Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beiwen Zheng

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The emergence and spread of the mobile colistin resistance gene (mcr-1 has become a major global public health concern. So far, this gene has been widely detected in food animals, pets, food, and humans. However, there is little information on the contamination of mcr-1-containing bacteria in farming soils. In August 2016, a survey of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from farming soils was conducted in Shandong Province, China. We observed colistin resistance in 12 of 53 (22.6% ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates from farming soil. Six mcr-1-positive E. coli strains originating from a livestock-intensive area were found. The isolates belonged to four different STs (ST2060, ST3014, ST6756, and ST1560 and harbored extensive additional resistance genes. An E. coli with blaNDM-1 was also detected in a soil sample from the same area. Comparative whole genome sequencing and S1-PFGE analysis indicated that mcr-1 was chromosomally encoded in four isolates and located on IncHI2 plasmids in two isolates. To our knowledge, we report the first isolation of mcr-1 in ESBL-producing E. coli from farming soils. This work highlights the importance of active surveillance of colistin-resistant organisms in soil. Moreover, investigations addressing the influence of animal manure application on the transmission of mcr-1-producing bacteria are also warranted.

  3. Characterization of Multidrug Resistant ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli Isolates from Hospitals in Malaysia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King-Ting Lim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of Escherichia coli that produce extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs and are multidrug resistant (MDR poses antibiotic management problems. Forty-seven E. coli isolates from various public hospitals in Malaysia were studied. All isolates were sensitive to imipenem whereas 36 were MDR (resistant to 2 or more classes of antibiotics. PCR detection using gene-specific primers showed that 87.5% of the ESBL-producing E. coli harbored the blaTEM gene. Other ESBL-encoding genes detected were blaOXA, blaSHV, and blaCTX-M. Integron-encoded integrases were detected in 55.3% of isolates, with class 1 integron-encoded intI1 integrase being the majority. Amplification and sequence analysis of the 5′CS region of the integrons showed known antibiotic resistance-encoding gene cassettes of various sizes that were inserted within the respective integrons. Conjugation and transformation experiments indicated that some of the antibiotic resistance genes were likely plasmid-encoded and transmissible. All 47 isolates were subtyped by PFGE and PCR-based fingerprinting using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD, repetitive extragenic palindromes (REPs, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC. These isolates were very diverse and heterogeneous. PFGE, ERIC, and REP-PCR methods were more discriminative than RAPD in subtyping the E. coli isolates.

  4. Evaluation of a commercial microarray as a confirmation test for the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in isolates from the routine clinical setting.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, T.N.; Stuart, J.W.; Voets, G.M.; Scharringa, J.; Sande, N. van de; Fluit, A.C.; Leverstein-van Hall, M.A.; Sturm, P.D.J.

    2011-01-01

    Since the diagnostic characteristics of the Check-KPC ESBL microarray as a confirmation test on isolates obtained in a routine clinical setting have not been determined, we evaluated the microarray in a random selection of 346 clinical isolates with a positive ESBL screen test (MIC >1 mg/L for

  5. Discrepancy in Vancomycin AUC/MIC Ratio Targeted Attainment Based upon the Susceptibility Testing in Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seenae Eum

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study demonstrated a statistically significant difference in vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC for Staphylococcus aureus between a common automated system (Vitek 2 and the E-test method in patients with S. aureus bloodstream infections. At an area under the serum concentration time curve (AUC threshold of 400 mg∙h/L, we would have reached the current Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA/American Society of Health System Pharmacists (ASHP/Society of Infectious Diseases Pharmacists (SIDP guideline suggested AUC/MIC target in almost 100% of patients while using the Vitek 2 MIC data; however, we could only generate 40% target attainment while using E-test MIC data (p < 0.0001. An AUC of 450 mg∙h/L or greater was required to achieve 100% target attainment using either Vitek 2 or E-test MIC results.

  6. Enterobactérias produtoras de ESBL em Passo Fundo, estado do Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil ESBL-producing enterobacteria in Passo Fundo, state of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldalise Lago

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUÇÃO: O principal mecanismo de resistência emergente entre Enterobacteriaceae é a produção de β-lactamases de espectro estendido, enzimas capazes de hidrolisar cefalosporinas-de-amplo-espectro, que são bastante utilizadas na terapia antimicrobiana de infecções por enterobactérias. Embora a resistência a esses agentes apresente grande variabilidade geográfica, os índices de resistência são elevados em diversos países MÉTODOS: Um estudo observacional, transversal, descritivo e retrospectivo foi desenvolvido para avaliar a frequência de ESBL entre cepas de Enterobacteriaceae obtidas no Hospital São Vicente de Paulo, Brasil RESULTADOS: A produção de ESBL foi observada em 24,8% (nº=208/838 dos isolados avaliados. Isolados de Escherichia coli representaram 46,2% (nº=96/208 do percentual de produtores de ESBL, seguido de espécies de Enterobacter 30,3% (nº=63/208. A sensibilidade desses isolados ao meropenem foi de 91,4% e a piperacilina/tazobactam de 67,4% CONCLUSÕES: Os índices de ESBL encontrados confirmam a preocupação mundial com este mecanismo de resistência.INTRODUCTION: The main emerging resistance mechanism relating to Enterobacteriaceae is represented by production of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs. These enzymes have the capacity to hydrolyze broad-spectrum cephalosporins and are greatly used for antimicrobial chemotherapy on enterobacterial infections. Although resistance to these agents presents remarkable geographical variability, the resistance rates are high in many countries METHODS: A retrospective observational cross-sectional descriptive study was developed to evaluate the frequency of ESBLs among Enterobacteriaceae strains obtained from Hospital São Vicente de Paulo, Brazil RESULTS: ESBL production was noted in 24.8% (n = 208/838 of the isolates evaluated. Isolates of Escherichia coli represented 46.2% (n = 96/208 of the ESBL producers, followed by Enterobacter species (30.3%; n = 63

  7. Comparative Analysis of ESBL-Positive Escherichia coli Isolates from Animals and Humans from the UK, The Netherlands and Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guanghui; Day, Michaela J.; Mafura, Muriel T.; Nunez-Garcia, Javier; Fenner, Jackie J.; Sharma, Meenaxi; van Essen-Zandbergen, Alieda; Rodríguez, Irene; Dierikx, Cindy; Kadlec, Kristina; Schink, Anne-Kathrin; Wain, John; Helmuth, Reiner; Guerra, Beatriz; Schwarz, Stefan; Threlfall, John; Woodward, Martin J.; Woodford, Neil; Coldham, Nick; Mevius, Dik

    2013-01-01

    The putative virulence and antimicrobial resistance gene contents of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive E. coli (n=629) isolated between 2005 and 2009 from humans, animals and animal food products in Germany, The Netherlands and the UK were compared using a microarray approach to test the suitability of this approach with regard to determining their similarities. A selection of isolates (n=313) were also analysed by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Isolates harbouring blaCTX-M-group-1 dominated (66%, n=418) and originated from both animals and cases of human infections in all three countries; 23% (n=144) of all isolates contained both blaCTX-M-group-1 and blaOXA-1-like genes, predominantly from humans (n=127) and UK cattle (n=15). The antimicrobial resistance and virulence gene profiles of this collection of isolates were highly diverse. A substantial number of human isolates (32%, n=87) did not share more than 40% similarity (based on the Jaccard coefficient) with animal isolates. A further 43% of human isolates from the three countries (n=117) were at least 40% similar to each other and to five isolates from UK cattle and one each from Dutch chicken meat and a German dog; the members of this group usually harboured genes such as mph(A), mrx, aac(6’)-Ib, catB3, blaOXA-1-like and blaCTX-M-group-1. forty-four per cent of the MLST-typed isolates in this group belonged to ST131 (n=18) and 22% to ST405 (n=9), all from humans. Among animal isolates subjected to MLST (n=258), only 1.2% (n=3) were more than 70% similar to human isolates in gene profiles and shared the same MLST clonal complex with the corresponding human isolates. The results suggest that minimising human-to-human transmission is essential to control the spread of ESBL-positive E. coli in humans. PMID:24086522

  8. Multiresistant CTX-M-15 ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in southern Sweden: Description of an outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsterlund, Rolf; Carlsson, Barbro; Gezelius, Lena; Haeggman, Sara; Olsson-Liljequist, Barbro

    2009-01-01

    An outbreak caused by a multiresistant Escherichia coli producing CTX-M-15 ESBL occurred during autumn 2005 and spring 2006 in Kristianstad, a town in southern Sweden. The outbreak comprised 27 cases and was related to an infectious diseases ward and a neighbouring long-term care facility. Our primary objective was to investigate the epidemiology in order to control the outbreak. In addition, we studied the time of carriage of multiresistant ESBL-producing Escherichia coli by follow-up samples and measured the frequency of carriage of ESBL-producing bacteria in the patient population admitted to the infectious diseases ward during autumn 2006. The outbreak described is one of the first caused by ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Sweden. The source of the outbreak was not found. Infection control measures were reinforced in the outbreak situation, and epidemiological and microbiological methods, including PFGE typing, were used for analysis. The carriage time of multiresistant Escherichia coli was longer in several of the affected patients than has previously been reported. The longest carriage time to date is 33 months. This demonstrates the risk for new outbreaks unless strict infection control measures are implemented. Among the patients admitted to the ward during autumn 2006, 2.5% carried ESBL-producing enterobacteria.

  9. Prevalence and risk factors of MRSA, ESBL and MDR bacterial colonization upon admission to an Egyptian medical ICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouda, Ragai; Soliman, May Sherif; ElAnany, Mervat Gaber; Abadeer, Maggie; Soliman, Ghada

    2016-04-28

    Bacterial colonization of the skin and mucous membranes of intensive care unit (ICU) patients with virulent organisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producers, and multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR-GNB) frequently results in life-threatening infections. Universal screening of ICU patients upon admission has been suggested. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the prevalence and pattern of MRSA, ESBL, and MDR-GNB colonization in patients upon admission to an Egyptian medical ICU, along with the related demographic and clinical risk factors. Throat, axillary, and groin swabs were obtained from all study participants in addition to rectal swabs from consenting patients. These swabs were screened for MRSA, ESBL, and MDR-GNB. Of the patients included in the study, 33%, 13%, and 63% were colonized with ESBL, MDR-GNB, and MRSA organisms, respectively. Those suffering from a more severe disease with a simplified acute physiology score II (SAPS II) > 29 demonstrated higher levels of MDR-GNB colonization upon admission, while MDR-GNB or ESBL colonization upon admission was associated with higher ICU mortality. Colonization of ICU patients with superbugs upon admission has an impact on outcome and mortality. In this Egyptian example, colonization rates were higher than in other literature reports, demonstrating the need for routine screening and decolonization, if applicable.

  10. The prevalence of ESBL-producing E-coli and Klebsiella strains in the Copenhagen area of Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjerulf, A.; Hansen, D.S.; Sandvang, D.

    2008-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli and Klebsiella strains in the Greater Copenhagen area. Four collections of strains were investigated: A) 380 consecutive E. coli and Klebsiella isolates primarily from urine, B) 200 gentamicin-resistant E. coli...... and Klebsiella isolates primarily from urine, C) 210 consecutive E. coli isolates from blood cultures, and D) 68 cefuroxime-resistant E. coli and Klebsiella isolates primarily from urine. Only one strain per patient was included. Strains with a zone diameter for cefpodoxime ...). In conclusion, the frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli and Klebsiella isolates was low in the Copenhagen area of Denmark (0.8 %). The most common ESBL genes found in our study were ctx-m and shv genes Udgivelsesdato: 2008/2...

  11. Comparison of the Bruker Biotyper and VITEK MS Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Systems Using a Formic Acid Extraction Method to Identify Common and Uncommon Yeast Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyun Seung; Shin, Jong Hee; Choi, Min Ji; Won, Eun Jeong; Kee, Seung Jung; Kim, Soo Hyun; Shin, Myung Geun; Suh, Soon Pal

    2017-05-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) allows rapid and accurate identification of clinical yeast isolates. In-tube formic acid/acetonitrile (FA/ACN) extraction is recommended prior to the analysis with MALDI Biotyper, but the direct on-plate FA extraction is simpler. We compared the Biotyper with the VITEK MS for the identification of various clinically relevant yeast species, focusing on the use of the FA extraction method. We analyzed 309 clinical isolates of 42 yeast species (four common Candida species, Cryptococcus neoformans, and 37 uncommon yeast species) using the Biotyper and VITEK MS systems. FA extraction was used initially for all isolates. If 'no identification' result was obtained following the initial FA extraction, these samples were then retested by using FA (both systems, additive FA) or FA/ACN (Biotyper only, additive FA/ACN) extraction. These results were compared with those obtained by sequence-based identification. Both systems correctly identified all 158 isolates of the four common Candida species after the initial FA extraction. The Biotyper correctly identified 8.7%, 30.4%, and 100% of 23 C. neoformans isolates after performing initial FA, additive FA, and FA/ACN extractions, respectively, while VITEK MS identified all C. neoformans isolates after the initial FA extraction. Both systems had comparable identification rates of 37 uncommon yeast species (128 isolates), following the initial FA (Biotyper, 74.2%; VITEK MS, 73.4%) or additive FA (Biotyper, 82.0%; VITEK MS, 73.4%). The identification rate of most common and uncommon yeast isolates is comparable between simple FA extraction/Biotyper method and VITEK MS methods, but FA/ACN extraction is necessary for C. neoformans identification by Biotyper.

  12. Characterization of Escherichia coli-Producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL) Isolated from Chicken Slaughterhouses in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jong-Soo; Choi, Da-Som; Kim, Young-Jo; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Hong-Seok; Park, Hyun-Jung; Moon, Jin-San; Wee, Sung-Hwan; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2015-09-01

    In South Korea, few reports have indicated the occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in food-producing animals, particularly in poultry slaughterhouses. In this study, we investigated the occurrence and antibiotic resistance of ESBL-producing E. coli from whole chicken carcasses (n=156) and fecal samples (n=39) of chickens obtained from 2 slaughterhouses. Each sample enriched in buffered peptone water was cultured on MacConkey agar with 2 mg/L cefotaxime and ESBL agar. ESBL production and antibiotic susceptibility were determined using the Trek Diagnostics system. The ESBL genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the bla(SHV), bla(TEM), and bla(CTX-M) gene sequences. Subtyping using a repetitive sequence-based PCR system (DiversiLab™) and multilocus sequence typing (MLST) were used to assess the interspecific biodiversity of isolates. Sixty-two ESBL-producing E. coli isolates were obtained from 156 samples (39.7%). No bla(SHV) genes were detected in any of the isolates, whereas all contained the bla(TEM) gene. Twenty-five strains (40.3%) harbored the CTX-M group 1 gene. The most prevalent MLST sequence type (ST) was ST 93 (14.5%), followed by ST 117 (9.7%) and ST 2303 (8.1%). This study reveals a high occurrence and β-lactams resistance rate of E. coli in fecal samples and whole chickens collected from slaughterhouses in South Korea.

  13. Faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteria in liver disease patients from two hospitals in Egypt and France: a comparative epidemiological study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fam, N S; Defasque, S; Bert, F; Leflon-Guibout, V; El-Ray, A; El-Ghannam, M; Attia, M E; Omar, M; Desouki, D G; Valla, D; Nicolas-Chanoine, M-H

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to assess and compare the epidemiology of faecal carriage of extended spectrum β-lactamase-producing enterobacteria (ESBL-E) in Hepatology departments of two hospitals specializing in liver diseases, Theodor Bilharz Research Institute (TBRI) in Cairo (Egypt) and Beaujon Hospital (Bj) in Clichy (France). CTX-M groups were identified by PCR, and TEM and SHV derivatives with the check-point system. Phylogenetic groups of E. coli were determined by multiplex PCR, and clone ST131 by PCR of gene pabB. Prevalence of ESBL-E was 77·6% (45/58) in TBRI and 6·5% (13/199) in Bj (P < 10-7). Previous hospitalization was more common (P = 0·003) in Bj patients (93%) than in TBRI patients (45%) suggesting high prevalence of ESBL-E in the Egyptian community. The presence of E. coli B2 ST131 among ESBL-E faecal E. coli in Egypt confirms its pervasiveness in the community and raises concern regarding this highly virulent and resistant clone.

  14. Preliminary Remarks Regarding the Prevalence of ESBL-Producing Strains of E. coli and K. Pneumoniae, Isolated from Cows with Clinical Endometritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ioana CRIVEI

    2017-05-01

    In this preliminary study, by phenotypic methods was confirmed a prevalence of 35.3% for the ESBL strains of E. coli and K. pneumoniae, which requires further research to confirm by molecular biology the identification of ESBL resistance genes, but also for the plasmids encoding these gene transmission.

  15. Incidência de Klebsiella pneumoniae e Escherichia coli produtoras de betalactamase de espectro estendido (ESBL em um hospital universitário

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Braoios

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Estended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL are bacterial enzymes that hydrolyses beta-lactam antibiotics with broad spectrum of action. Currently, ESBL-producing strains are important agents of nosocomial infection which may limit the available options available, necessitating the deployment of appropriate techniques for its detection. The ESBL is codified in plasmids that can be transferred to other microorganisms by conjugation. The indiscriminate use of broad-spectrum cephalosporins contributes to the selection of ESBL-producing strains and makes the problem of universal interest. This work carried out two techniques for detection of ESBL, the technique of Double Disks Diffusion and the technique of Clavulanate Disk Addition. Strains of Klebsiella sp (n=38 and Escherichia coli (n=114 routinely isolated from patients admitted in the university hospital from January 2004 to December 2005 were included in the study. Of those, 19 (50% of samples of Klebsiella sp and 55 (48.3% samples of E. coli were ESBL-producing. The technique the clavulanate disk addition showed greater sensitivity (100% showing higher skill in the detection of ESBL, whereas the technique of Double Disk Diffusion had a sensitivity of 24.3%. Cefotaxima was the substrate that showed greater sensitivity in detecting ESBL. Both techniques showed high specificity (100%.

  16. The Prevalence of Esbl-Producing Strains of E.coli, Isolated from Calves with Colibacilosis - Preliminary Remarks

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    Andreea Paula COZMA

    2017-05-01

    The studies that were previously conducted on the dairy farms have pointed out that the young calves rapidly acquire bacterial strains resistant to antibiotics that are often ESBL strains (Hordijk et al., 2013. The prevalence obtained by us, as well as an insufficient quantity of information concerning the antimicrobial resistance on this segment of species of animals used for the human consumption, support conducting a more thorough study, as well as the identification of ESBL resistance genes, but also of the plasmids that encode the transmission of these genes.

  17. Performances and Reliability of Bruker Microflex LT and VITEK MS MALDI-TOF Mass Spectrometry Systems for the Identification of Clinical Microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilecen, Kivanc; Yaman, Gorkem; Ciftci, Ugur; Laleli, Yahya Rauf

    2015-01-01

    In clinical microbiology laboratories, routine microbial identification is mostly performed using culture based methodologies requiring 24 to 72 hours from culturing to identification. Matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) technology has been established as a cost effective, reliable, and faster alternative identification platform. In this study, we evaluated the reliability of the two available MALDI-TOF MS systems for their routine clinical level identification accuracy and efficiency in a clinical microbiology laboratory setting. A total of 1,341 routine phenotypically identified clinical bacterial and fungal isolates were selected and simultaneously analyzed using VITEK MS (bioMérieux, France) and Microflex LT (Bruker Diagnostics, Germany) MALDI-TOF MS systems. For any isolate that could not be identified with either of the systems and for any discordant result, 16S rDNA gene or ITS1/ITS2 sequencing was used. VITEK MS and Microflex LT correctly identified 1,303 (97.17%) and 1,298 (96.79%) isolates to the species level, respectively. In 114 (8.50%) isolates initial phenotypic identification was inaccurate. Both systems showed a similar identification efficiency and workflow robustness, and they were twice as more accurate compared to routine phenotypic identification in our sample pool. MALDITOF systems with their accuracy and robustness offer a good identification platform for routine clinical microbiology laboratories.

  18. Correlation between the VITEK2 system and cefoxitin disk diffusion for the daily detection of oxacillin resistance in a large number of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemer, P; Juvin, M E; Le Gargasson, G; Drugeon, H; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the new VITEK2 AST-P551 card with the cefoxitin disk diffusion method for the daily detection of methicillin resistance with a high number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. Detection of the PBP2a protein or mecA gene was performed for each discordant case. Seventy (3.3%) isolates out of 2,107 clinical strains showed discordant results, two very major errors, four major errors and 64 minor errors. Fifty-nine (84%) discordant results were resolved, with a final overall agreement of 99.5%. Eleven (0.5%) strains remained discordant (minor error [mE]). Four of 370 MRSA strains were misclassified as susceptible in daily practice by the cefoxitin disk diffusion method. All of these strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones. The VITEK2 system is highly reliable for methicillin resistance detection at the routine level. Oxacillin-susceptible classified clinical strains with associated resistance patterns required attention.

  19. Risk factors and clinical outcomes of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli septicemia at Srinagarind University Hospital, Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anunnatsiri, Siriluck; Towiwat, Patapong; Chaimanee, Prajuab

    2012-09-01

    Escherichia coli producing extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) has emerged as a worldwide, public health problem. The aims of this study were to determine the incidence of ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia and evaluate the factors associated with the infection and the clinical outcomes. We reviewed 145 cases of E. coli septicemia among adult patients admitted to Srinagarind University Hospital in northeastern Thailand between 2005 and 2006. The incidence of ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia was 9.9 cases per 10,000 hospital admissions. The factors significantly associated with ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia were: 1) hospital acquisition [odds ratio (OR) 6.46; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.01-20.79], 2) previous use of a fluoroquinolone, (OR 19.14; 95% CI 5.82-62.96), and 3) use of a central venous catheter (OR, 8.59; 95% CI, 1.11-66.27). Seventy-two hours after receiving empiric treatment, a significantly greater proportion of patients with ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia had a worse clinical outcome than those with non-ESBL producing E. coli septicemia (p = 0.01). The overall mortality rate was significantly higher among the ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia group than the non-ESBL producing E. coli septicemia group (29% vs 11.5%, respectively, p = 0.02). A high APACHE II score, ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia, primary septicemia, and having a non-urinary tract infecting as a source of septicemia were significantly independent factors related to mortality among patients with E. coli septicemia. ESBL-producing E. coli septicemia is an important cause of nosocomial infection and is related to higher mortality risk, especially among those with primary septicemia and secondary septicemia due to a non-urinary tract infection.

  20. The risk to import ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus through chicken meat trade in Gabon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaumburg, Frieder; Alabi, Abraham S.; Frielinghaus, Lisa; Grobusch, Martin P.; Köck, Robin; Becker, Karsten; Issifou, Saadou; Kremsner, Peter G.; Peters, Georg; Mellmann, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    A main export market for chicken meat from industrialized countries is sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that antibiotic resistant bacteria could be exported to developing countries through chicken meat trade. The objective was to investigate the occurrence and molecular types of ESBL-producing

  1. Within-farm dynamics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves: a longitudinal approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Mevius, D.J.; Kant, A.; Bos, M.E.H.; Graveland, H.; Bosman, A.B.; Hartskeerl, C.M.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the within-farm dynamics of extended-spectrum b-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves. Methods: Three veal-calf fattening farms were screened. Faecal samples from all calves within a compartment (109–150 per farm)were taken upon arrival on the farm

  2. Within-farm dynamics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves: a longitudinal approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hordijk, J.; Mevius, D.J.; Kant, A.; Bos, M.E.H.; Graveland, H.; Bosman, A.B.; Hartskeerl, M.; Heederik, D.J.J.; Wagenaar, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the within-farm dynamics of extended-spectrum ß-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves. METHODS: Three veal-calf fattening farms were screened. Faecal samples from all calves within a compartment (109-150 per farm) were taken upon arrival on the farm

  3. Antimicrobial susceptibility patterns of ESBL Escherichia coli isolated from community and hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najwa Al Mously

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: This study highlights the source and current antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of ESBL E. coli. Since bacterial multidrug resistance is an increasingly existing problem, periodical monitoring of antimicrobial susceptibility, rotating the use of effective antimicrobial drugs, and research for finding novel drugs and their rational use should be considered.

  4. Clinical and bacteriological effects of pivmecillinam for ESBL-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae in urinary tract infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansåker, Filip; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Sjögren, Ingegerd

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae is increasing and the therapeutic options are limited, especially in primary care. Recent indications have suggested pivmecillinam to be a suitable option. Here, we evalua...

  5. High prevalence of ESBLs in retail chicken meat despite reduced use of antimicrobials in chicken production, France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Tiago; Nogueira, Mara Correa Lelles; Saras, Estelle; Haenni, Marisa; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2017-09-18

    Extended-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs) are critically important antibiotics for humans and their use in animals poses a potential threat for public health. Chicken represents an increasing part of the human diet and has also been regarded as a source of ESC-resistant Enterobacteriaceae because of the worldwide off-label use of ceftiofur, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin. Thus, numerous studies pointed out chicken as a reservoir of ESBL/pAmpC genes, plasmids and/or clones at risk for humans. In France, late 2011, strong political pressure led to a drastic reduction of ceftiofur use and all other antibiotics in chicken production. Here, we ascertained the potential impact of those efforts on the prevalence of ESC-resistant E. coli in retail chicken. From October 2015 to January 2016, of 48 unrelated pieces of meat (chicken legs) belonging to four different brands, 44 (91.7%) were positive for ESC-resistant E. coli. The blaCTX-M-1 gene was highly prevalent (68/74, 91.9%), mostly located on IncI1/ST3 plasmids (65/68, 95.6%). Other ESBL/pAmpC genes (blaTEM-52, blaSHV-12, blaCMY-2) were carried by IncX1, IncI1/ST36, IncI1/ST95, IncA/C or IncK plasmids. The positive isolates were non-clonal, suggesting a horizontal spread of the ESBL/pAmpC genes. Obviously, the strong decrease of antimicrobial use in chicken farms had no impact yet on the ESBL/pAmpC prevalence in retail chicken meat in France. A human source of these ESBL/pAmpC genes is unlikely as blaCTX-M-1 IncI1/ST3 plasmids are dominant in animals and rare in humans. Our data question the real impact of the decrease of antimicrobial use in chicken production on ESBL contamination of chicken meat and point out the risk of ESBL/AmpCs human transfer through the food chain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of MLVA for epidemiological typing and outbreak detection of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helldal, Lisa; Karami, Nahid; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Moore, Edward R B; Åhren, Christina

    2017-01-06

    To identify the spread of nosocomial infections and halt outbreak development caused by Escherichia coli that carry multiple antibiotic resistance factors, such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs) and carbapenemases, is becoming demanding challenges due to the rapid global increase and constant and increasing influx of these bacteria from the community to the hospital setting. Our aim was to assess a reliable and rapid typing protocol for ESBL-E. coli, with the primary focus to screen for possible clonal relatedness between isolates. All clinical ESBL-E. coli isolates, collected from hospitals (n = 63) and the community (n = 41), within a single geographical region over a 6 months period, were included, as well as clinical isolates from a polyclonal outbreak (ST131, n = 9, and ST1444, n = 3). The sporadic cases represented 36 STs, of which eight STs dominated i.e. ST131 (n = 33 isolates), ST648 (n = 10), ST38 (n = 9), ST12 and 69 (each n = 4), ST 167, 405 and 372 (each n = 3). The efficacy of multiple-locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) was evaluated using three, seven or ten loci, in comparison with that of pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multi locus sequence typing (MLST). MLVA detected 39, 55 and 60 distinct types, respectively, using three (GECM-3), seven (GECM-7) or ten (GECM-10) loci. For GECM-7 and -10, 26 STs included one type and eleven STs each included several types, the corresponding numbers for GECM-3 were 29 and 8. The highest numbers were seen for ST131 (7,7 and 8 types, respectively), ST38 (5,5,8) and ST648 (4,5,5). Good concordance was observed with PFGE and GECM-7 and -10, despite fewer types being identified with MLVA; 78 as compared to 55 and 60 types. The lower discriminatory power of MLVA was primarily seen within the O25b-ST131 lineage (n = 34) and its H30-Rx subclone (n = 21). Epidemiologically unrelated O25b-ST131 isolates were clustered with O25b-ST131

  7. Within-farm dynamics of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves: a longitudinal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hordijk, Joost; Mevius, Dik J; Kant, Arie; Bos, Marian E H; Graveland, Haitske; Bosman, Angela B; Hartskeerl, Cedric M; Heederik, Dick J J; Wagenaar, Jaap A

    2013-11-01

    To assess the within-farm dynamics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli in veal calves. Three veal-calf fattening farms were screened. Faecal samples from all calves within a compartment (109-150 per farm) were taken upon arrival on the farm (T0) and after 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks (T3-T10). ESBL/AmpC genes were characterized by PCR and sequencing. Plasmids were characterized by transformation, PCR-based replicon typing and plasmid multilocus sequence typing (MLST). E. coli genotypes were analysed by MLST. At T0 the prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli ranged from 18% to 26%. These were predominantly isolates carrying blaCTX-M-1 and blaCTX-M-15 genes, located on various plasmids and E. coli sequence types (STs). Farm 1 was negative for ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli after T0. Farm 2 showed an increase up to 37% at T3, which subsequently decreased gradually to 0% at T10. The presence from T3 to T10 on farm 2 was mainly caused by the clonal spread of a multiresistant E. coli ST57 harbouring blaCTX-M-14 on an IncF F2:A-:B- plasmid. Farm 3 showed a gradual decrease in prevalence to 1.4% at T10, with a relative increase of the identical clonal variant as shown for farm 2. A second clonal variant found in farm 3 was a multiresistant E. coli ST10 harbouring blaCTX-M-14 on an IncK plasmid. The prevalence of ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli decreased over time. A clonal spread was observed on farm 2 and farm 3, illustrative of the complex dynamics probably associated with the use of antimicrobials.

  8. Mutation in ESBL Plasmid from Escherichia coli O104:H4 Leads Autoagglutination and Enhanced Plasmid Dissemination

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    Mickaël Poidevin

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Conjugative plasmids are one of the main driving force of wide-spreading of multidrug resistance (MDR bacteria. They are self-transmittable via conjugation as carrying the required set of genes and cis-acting DNA locus for direct cell-to-cell transfer. IncI incompatibility plasmids are nowadays often associated with extended-spectrum beta-lactamases producing Enterobacteria in clinic and environment. pESBL-EA11 was isolated from Escherichia coli O104:H4 outbreak strain in Germany in 2011. During the previous study identifying transfer genes of pESBL-EA11, it was shown that transposon insertion at certain DNA region of the plasmid, referred to as Hft, resulted in great enhancement of transfer ability. This suggested that genetic modifications can enhance dissemination of MDR plasmids. Such ‘superspreader’ mutations have attracted little attention so far despite their high potential to worsen MDR spreading. Present study aimed to gain our understanding on regulatory elements that involved pESBL transfer. While previous studies of IncI plasmids indicated that immediate downstream gene of Hft, traA, is not essential for conjugative transfer, here we showed that overexpression of TraA in host cell elevated transfer rate of pESBL-EA11. Transposon insertion or certain nucleotide substitutions in Hft led strong TraA overexpression which resulted in activation of essential regulator TraB and likely overexpression of conjugative pili. Atmospheric Scanning Electron Microscopy observation suggested that IncI pili are distinct from other types of conjugative pili (such as long filamentous F-type pili and rather expressed throughout the cell surface. High transfer efficiency in the mutant pESBL-EA11 was involved with hyperpiliation which facilitates cell-to-cell adhesion, including autoagglutination. The capability of plasmids to evolve to highly transmissible mutant is alarming, particularly it might also have adverse effect on host pathogenicity.

  9. Different Escherichia coli B2-ST131 clades (B and C) producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) colonizing residents of Portuguese nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, C; Machado, E; Fernandes, S; Peixe, L; Novais, Â

    2017-11-01

    ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and particularly Escherichia coli ST131 isolates producing CTX-M enzymes are commonly found colonizing the intestine of nursing home (NH) residents, but ST131 subclonal structure has been scarcely explored in this vulnerable population. Our goal was to perform a pilot study to assess the faecal carriage rate and epidemiological features of ESBL- and/or carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E and CPE, respectively) among NH residents. For this purpose, faecal samples from residents at 4 different NHs in the North of Portugal (representing 9·5% of the residents' population, July 2014) were screened for ESBL-E and/or CPE by phenotypic and genotypic methods. Clonal structure and plasmid typing of ESBL-producing E. coli (ESBL-Ec) was performed by PCR and sequencing. Four ESBL-Ec isolates (2 CTX-M-15/2 CTX-M-14) were found in 20% of the samples, all belonging to the pandemic clonal lineage B2-ST131-O25b:H4. Two different clades were identified, the C2/H30-Rx-virotype C producing CTX-M-15 and an atypical B/H22-like-virotype D5 (producing CTX-M-14 and fluoroquinolone-resistant), firstly described in Portugal. This pilot study highlights the role of NH residents as a source of different ST131 clades, besides emphasizing the importance of E. coli B2-ST131 subtyping in different clinical settings, and understanding the transmission dynamics of the different variants.

  10. Emergency (clonal spread) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended spectrum (ESBL)--and AmpC beta-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria infections at Pediatric Department, Bosnia and Herzegovina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzunović, Selma; Bedenić, Branka; Budimir, Ana; Kamberović, Farah; Ibrahimagić, Amir; Delić-Bikić, Sabina; Sivec, Sara; Meštrović, Tomislav; Varda Brkić, Dijana; Rijnders, Michelle I A; Stobberingh, Ellen E

    2014-12-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), extended-spectrum (ESBL) and plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria in children. Antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA and beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria was determined by disc diffusion and broth microdilution methods according to CLSI guidelines. Methicillin resistance was confirmed by the presence of mecA gene by PCR. The genetic characterization of S. aures was performed using spa-typing and the algorithm based upon repeat pattern (BURP). Double-disk synergy test was used to screen for ESBL production. PCR was used to detect bla ESBL alleles. Genetic relatedness of the strains was tested by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). Among 23 MRSA, 12 (52.2 %) were obtained from newborns. MLST CC152 (spa-CC 355-595) (Balkan clone) was the most prevalent, 20 (87 %) cases. Among 24 beta-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria, 10 (41.7 %) were obtained from each newborns and one-year-old children; 14 (58.3 %) were from urine. Among 11 Klebsiella strains isolated from urine eight (73 %) produced CTX-M-15, and one CTX-M-3 beta-lactamase. Twenty (83 %) of CTX-M producers were coproduced by other types of beta-lactamases. Fifteen (65.2 %) MRSA isolates were clonally related. Five clones among 13 K. pneumoniae isolates were detected by PFGE suggesting clonal spread of β-lactamase producing Gram-negative bacteria. Pediatric infections caused by clonal spread of MRSA and beta-lactamase-producing Gram-negative bacteria are of major concern. Proper infection control measures should be implemented in order to avoid the transmission and major outbreaks.

  11. No nosocomial transmission under standard hygiene precautions in short term contact patients in case of an unexpected ESBL or Q&A E. coli positive patient: a one-year prospective cohort study within three regional hospitals

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    Dennis Souverein

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many Highly Resistant Gram Negative Rod (HR-GNR positive patients are found unexpectedly in clinical cultures, besides patients who are screened and isolated based on risk factors. As unexpected HR-GNR positive patients are isolated after detection, transmission to contact patients possibly occurred. The added value of routine contact tracing in such situations within hospitals with standard hygiene precautions is unknown. Methods In 2014, this study was performed as a prospective cohort study. Index patients were defined as those tested unexpectedly HR-GNR positive in clinical cultures to diagnose a possible infection and were nursed under standard hygiene precautions before tested positive. After detection they were nursed in contact isolation. Contact patients were still hospitalized and shared the same room with the index patient for at least 12 h. HR-GNR screening was performed by culturing a rectal and throat swab. Clonal relatedness of HR-GNR isolates was determined using whole genome sequencing (WGS. Results Out of 152 unexpected HR-GNR positive patients, 35 patients (23.0% met our inclusion criteria for index patient. ESBL E. coli was found most frequently (n = 20, 57.1%, followed by Q&A E. coli (n = 10, 28.6%, ESBL K. pneumoniae (n = 3, 8.5%, ESBL R. ornithinolytica (n = 1, 2.9% and multi resistant P. aeruginosa (n = 1, 2.9%. After contact tracing, 69 patients were identified as contact patient of an index patient, with a median time between start of contact and sampling of 3 days. None were found HR-GNR positive by nosocomial transmission. Conclusions In a local setting within hospitals with standard hygiene precautions, routine contact tracing among unexpected HR-GNR positive patients may be replaced by appropriate surveillance as we found no nosocomial transmission in short term contacts.

  12. No nosocomial transmission under standard hygiene precautions in short term contact patients in case of an unexpected ESBL or Q&A E. coli positive patient: a one-year prospective cohort study within three regional hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souverein, Dennis; Euser, Sjoerd M; Herpers, Bjorn L; Hattink, Corry; Houtman, Patricia; Popma, Amerens; Kluytmans, Jan; Rossen, John W A; Den Boer, Jeroen W

    2017-01-01

    Many Highly Resistant Gram Negative Rod (HR-GNR) positive patients are found unexpectedly in clinical cultures, besides patients who are screened and isolated based on risk factors. As unexpected HR-GNR positive patients are isolated after detection, transmission to contact patients possibly occurred. The added value of routine contact tracing in such situations within hospitals with standard hygiene precautions is unknown. In 2014, this study was performed as a prospective cohort study. Index patients were defined as those tested unexpectedly HR-GNR positive in clinical cultures to diagnose a possible infection and were nursed under standard hygiene precautions before tested positive. After detection they were nursed in contact isolation. Contact patients were still hospitalized and shared the same room with the index patient for at least 12 h. HR-GNR screening was performed by culturing a rectal and throat swab. Clonal relatedness of HR-GNR isolates was determined using whole genome sequencing (WGS). Out of 152 unexpected HR-GNR positive patients, 35 patients (23.0%) met our inclusion criteria for index patient. ESBL E. coli was found most frequently (n = 20, 57.1%), followed by Q&A E. coli (n = 10, 28.6%), ESBL K. pneumoniae (n = 3, 8.5%), ESBL R. ornithinolytica (n = 1, 2.9%) and multi resistant P. aeruginosa (n = 1, 2.9%). After contact tracing, 69 patients were identified as contact patient of an index patient, with a median time between start of contact and sampling of 3 days. None were found HR-GNR positive by nosocomial transmission. In a local setting within hospitals with standard hygiene precautions, routine contact tracing among unexpected HR-GNR positive patients may be replaced by appropriate surveillance as we found no nosocomial transmission in short term contacts.

  13. Differentiation of Yersinia enterocolitica biotype 1A from pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica biotypes by detection of β-glucosidase activity: comparison of two chromogenic culture media and Vitek2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karhukorpi, Jari; Päivänurmi, Marjut

    2014-01-01

    Aesculin hydrolysis (ESC) is one of the key reactions in differentiating pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica biotypes 1B, 2, 3, 4 and 5 from the less-pathogenic biotype 1A. Because the ESC reaction is caused by β-glucosidase (βGLU) activity of the bacteria, we studied whether two commonly used methods (BBL CHROMagar Orientation and Vitek2 Gram-negative identification card) could be used in assessing βGLU activity of 74 Yersinia strains. Both methods were sensitive (100 % and 97 %) and specific (100 % and 100 %) in differentiating βGLU-positive YE BT1A from βGLU-negative Y. enterocolitica biotypes. For a subset of strains (n = 69), a new selective CHROMagar Yersinia showed excellent agreement with the strains' βGLU activity. Thus all the methods evaluated in this study may be used to differentiate between YE BT1A and other Y. enterocolitica biotypes.

  14. Synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the Streptomyces coelicolor klmp33 pigment: An antimicrobial agent against extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manikprabhu, Deene; Lingappa, K., E-mail: lingappak123@gmail.com

    2014-12-01

    The increasing emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) occurred mainly due to continuous persistent exposure to antibiotics causing high morbidity and mortality so studies in controlling this infection are required. In the present investigation, we developed a synthesis for silver nanoparticles employing a pigment produced by Streptomyces coelicolor klmp33, and assessed the antimicrobial activity of these nanoparticles against ESBL producing E. coli. The ESBL producing E. coli were isolated from urine samples collected from the Gulbarga region in India. As can been seen from our studies, the silver nanoparticles having irregular shapes and size of 28–50 nm showed remarkable antimicrobial activity and moreover the synthesis time is just 20 min and thus the same can be used for formulating pharmaceutical remedies. - Highlights: • Silver nanoparticle synthesis by photo-irradiation method in just 20 min • Isolation of ESBL producing E. coli from urine samples from the Gulbarga region. • Antimicrobial activity of silver nanoparticles against ESBL producing E. coli • The minimum inhibitory concentration of silver nanoparticles against ESBL producing E. coli was 40 μL.

  15. [Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (esbl)-producing enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples at the National Institute of Child Health, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquechagua Aliaga, Fabiola; Sevilla Andrade, Carlos; Gonzales Escalante, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    To describe the frequency of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing enterobacteriaceae in fecal samples at the National Institute of Child Health, Lima, Peru. Stool samples received between July 2012 and March 2013 with colonies suspected to be ESBL-producing enterobacteriaceae that developed in Karmali agar were analyzed. Conventional methods were performed for biochemical identification and the confirmation of the ESBL phenotype. Genotypic analysis to detect the beta-lactamase gene CTX-M family was performed by PCR. Of the 235 fecal samples analyzed, 64.2% of ESBL-producing enterobacteria was isolated being 86.1% Escherichia coli, 7.9% Klebsiella pneumoniae, 2.6% Salmonella sp, 2.0% Enterobacter cloacae, and 1.3% Proteus mirabilis. 89.1% of the ESBL-producing enterobacteria presented the CTX-M gene. We found high resistance to nalidixic acid 84.8%, 74.2% ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole 81.5%.The resistance to amikacin was 1.3% and all isolates were susceptible to imipenem and meropenem. A high frequency of ESBL-producing enterobacteria was found in fecal samples of outpatients seen in the outpatient and emergency departments of the National Institute of Child Health of Peru.

  16. Prevalence and characterization of ESBL- and AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae on retail vegetables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Angela H A M; Veenman, Christiaan; van Overbeek, Wendy M; Lynch, Gretta; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria; Blaak, Hetty

    2015-07-02

    In total 1216 vegetables obtained from Dutch stores during 2012 and 2013 were analysed to determine the prevalence of 3rd-generation cephalosporin (3GC) resistant bacteria on soil-grown fresh produce possibly consumed raw. Vegetables grown conventionally and organically, from Dutch as well as foreign origin were compared. Included were the following vegetable types; blanched celery (n=192), bunched carrots (n=190), butterhead lettuce (n=137), chicory (n=96), endive (n=188), iceberg lettuce (n=193) and radish (n=120). Overall, 3GC-resistant Enterobacteriaceae were detected on 5.2% of vegetables. Based on primary habitat and mechanism of 3GC-resistance, these bacteria could be divided into four groups: ESBL-producing faecal species (Escherichia coli, Enterobacter spp.), AmpC-producing faecal species (Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter spp.), ESBL-producing environmental species (Pantoea spp., Rahnella aquatilis, Serratia fonticola), and AmpC-producing environmental species (Cedecca spp., Hafnia alvei, Pantoea spp., Serratia plymuthica), which were detected on 0.8%, 1.2%, 2.6% and 0.4% of the vegetables analysed, respectively. Contamination with faecal 3GC-resistant bacteria was most frequently observed in root and bulb vegetables (average prevalence 4.4%), and less frequently in stem vegetables (prevalence 1.6%) and leafy greens (average prevalence 0.6%). In Dutch stores, only four of the included vegetable types (blanched celery, bunched carrots, endive, iceberg lettuce) were available in all four possible variants: Dutch/conventional, Dutch/organic, foreign/conventional, foreign/organic. With respect to these vegetable types, no statistically significant difference was observed in prevalence of 3GC-resistant Enterobacteriaceae between country of origin or cultivation type (5.2%, 5.7%, 5.7% and 3.3%, respectively). Vegetables consumed raw may be a source of dissemination of 3GC-resistant Enterobacteriaceae and their resistance genes to humans. The magnitude of the

  17. Presence of antimicrobial resistance in coliform bacteria from hatching broiler eggs with emphasis on ESBL/AmpC-producing bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Mezhoud, Halima; Chantziaras, Ilias; Iguer-Ouada, M; N. Moula; Garmyn, An; Martel, An; Touati, A.; Smet, Annemieke; Haesebrouck, Freddy; Boyen, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is recognized as one of the most important global health challenges. Broilers are an important reservoir of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria in general and, more particularly, extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Since contamination of 1-day-old chicks is a potential risk factor for the introduction of antimicrobial-resistant Enterobacteriaceae in the broiler production chain, the presence of antimicrobial-resistant coliform bact...

  18. The risk to import ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus through chicken meat trade in Gabon

    OpenAIRE

    Schaumburg, F.; A.S. Alabi; Frielinghaus, L. (Lisa); Grobusch, M.; Köck, R.; Becker, K.; Issifou, S.; P.G. Kremsner; Peters, G; Mellmann, A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: A main export market for chicken meat from industrialized countries is sub-Saharan Africa. We hypothesized that antibiotic resistant bacteria could be exported to developing countries through chicken meat trade. The objective was to investigate the occurrence and molecular types of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Staphylococcus aureus in chicken meat in Gabon and to assess their dissemination among humans. Results: Frozen chicken meat samples imported from industrialized cou...

  19. Antibacterial effect of silver nanoparticles and capsaicin against MDR-ESBL producing Escherichia coli: An in vitro study

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    Debasish Kar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the antibacterial property of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs and capsaicin against multidrug resistant (MDR and extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Escherichia coli of bovine and poultry origin. Methods: Antibacterial efficacy of AgNPs and capsaicin was measured using broth dilution method. Five MDR-ESBL producing E. coli isolates of poultry (PEC4, PEC6, PEC15 and PEC16 and cattle mastitis origin (MEC2 were taken to evaluate the antibacterial effect of AgNPs and capsaicin. Results: At 50 mmol/L AgNPs, the viability of MDR of bacterial pathogens was reduced to almost 80%–90% and at 1000 mmol/L, the viability went down to 0%–3%. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50 of AgNPs against these MDR-ESBL producing isolates was found to vary between 172–218 mmol/L whereas the MIC80 varied between 450–640 mmol/L. Capsaicin showed more prominent bactericidal effect and only at 2.5 mmol/L concentration, the viability was shown to be reduced by 20%–35% whereas at 7.5 mmol/L concentration, there was approximately 60% reduction in viability. Further at 25 mmol/L concentration, the viability was reduced to 0%–8%. The MIC50 and MIC80 of capsaicin against these MDRESBL producing isolates were found to vary between 4.6–7.5 mmol/L and 10.9–16.9 mmol/L, respectively. Conclusions: The results point out that capsaicin and AgNPs could be of use in treating ESBL infection.

  20. Whole genome sequencing of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli isolated from patients, farm waste and canals in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runcharoen, Chakkaphan; Raven, Kathy E; Reuter, Sandra; Kallonen, Teemu; Paksanont, Suporn; Thammachote, Jeeranan; Anun, Suthatip; Blane, Beth; Parkhill, Julian; Peacock, Sharon J; Chantratita, Narisara

    2017-09-06

    Tackling multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli requires evidence from One Health studies that capture numerous potential reservoirs in circumscribed geographic areas. We conducted a survey of extended β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli isolated from patients, canals and livestock wastewater in eastern Thailand between 2014 and 2015, and analyzed isolates using whole genome sequencing. The bacterial collection of 149 isolates consisted of 84 isolates from a single hospital and 65 from the hospital sewer, canals and farm wastewater within a 20 km radius. E. coli ST131 predominated the clinical collection (28.6%), but was uncommon in the environment. Genome-based comparison of E. coli from infected patients and their immediate environment indicated low genetic similarity overall between the two, although three clinical-environmental isolate pairs differed by ≤ 5 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Thai E. coli isolates were dispersed throughout a phylogenetic tree containing a global E. coli collection. All Thai ESBL-positive E. coli isolates were multidrug resistant, including high rates of resistance to tobramycin (77.2%), gentamicin (77.2%), ciprofloxacin (67.8%) and trimethoprim (68.5%). ESBL was encoded by six different CTX-M elements and SHV-12. Three isolates from clinical samples (n = 2) or a hospital sewer (n = 1) were resistant to the carbapenem drugs (encoded by NDM-1, NDM-5 or GES-5), and three isolates (clinical (n = 1) and canal water (n = 2)) were resistant to colistin (encoded by mcr-1); no isolates were resistant to both carbapenems and colistin. Tackling ESBL-producing E. coli in this setting will be challenging based on widespread distribution, but the low prevalence of resistance to carbapenems and colistin suggests that efforts are now required to prevent these from becoming ubiquitous.

  1. Antibiotic combinatorial approach utilized against extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL bacteria isolates from Enugu, South Eastern Nigeria

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    Ruth A. Afunwa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic options in the treatment of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing bacteria are very limited. The purpose of this study was to analyze several commonly applied antibiotics in quite various novel combinations for use against ESBL-producing bacteria isolates.Methods: Total of 460 samples of urine, throat and anal swab were collected from volunteers and patients from nursery, primary and secondary schools and from other individuals in the community. Hospital and community isolates comprised of 65% and 35% respectively. The identification and characterization of the isolates were done by standard culturing and in vitro antibiotic sensitivity procedures.Results: The antibiotic combination studies showed that the combination of gentamicin with the other antibiotics had predominantly synergistic effects. The percentage synergistic effect for the combinations of gentamicin/pefloxacin was 69%, gentamicin/[Amoxicillin and clavulanic acid] 72%, gentamicin/ceftriaxone 68%, gentamicin/cefuroxime 81.9%, and gentamicin/ciprofloxacin 80.6%, against the community and hospital derived ESBL producing organisms of both Enterobacteriaceae and Pseudomonas species.Conclusion: Good antimicrobial monitoring exercise and corresponding antimicrobial screening activities should work towards a dynamic approach to generate effective treatment options using combination therapy.

  2. Selection of ESBL-Producing E. coli in a Mouse Intestinal Colonization Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertz, Frederik Boëtius; Nielsen, Karen Leth; Frimodt-Møller, Niels

    2018-01-01

    Asymptomatic human carriage of antimicrobially drug-resistant pathogens prior to infection is increasing worldwide. Further investigation into the role of this fecal reservoir is important for combatting the increasing antimicrobial resistance problems. Additionally, the damage on the intestinal microflora due to antimicrobial treatment is still not fully understood. Animal models are powerful tools to investigate bacterial colonization subsequent to antibiotic treatment. In this chapter we present a mouse-intestinal colonization model designed to investigate how antibiotics select for an ESBL-producing E. coli isolate. The model can be used to study how antibiotics with varying effect on the intestinal flora promote the establishment of the multidrug-resistant E. coli. Colonization is successfully investigated by sampling and culturing stool during the days following administration of antibiotics. Following culturing, a precise identification of the bacterial strain found in mice feces is applied to ensure that the isolate found is in fact identical to the strain used for inoculation. For this purpose random amplified of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR specifically developed for E. coli is applied. This method allows us to distinguish E. coli with more than 99.95% genome similarity using a duplex PCR method.

  3. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A.C.; Barbosa, A.V.; Arais, L.R.; Ribeiro, P.F.; Carneiro, V.C.; Cerqueira, A.M.F.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n = 134), their owners (n = 134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n = 44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. PMID:26887238

  4. Detection of antibiotic residues and association of cefquinome residues with the occurrence of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase (ESBL)-producing bacteria in waste milk samples from dairy farms in England and Wales in 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Luke; Heinrich, Katharina; Horton, Robert; Brunton, Lucy; Sharman, Matthew; Bailey-Horne, Victoria; Sharma, Meenaxi; McLaren, Ian; Coldham, Nick; Teale, Chris; Jones, Jeff

    2014-02-01

    Waste milk samples from 103 farms in England and Wales were examined for the presence of β-lactam antibiotics and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae. Approximately 10 months after the initial sampling, further waste milk, environmental and faecal samples from farms shown to be positive for CTX-M Escherichia coli were investigated further. Isolates with an ESBL phenotype were tested by PCR for the presence of blaCTX-M, blaOXA, blaSHV and blaTEM genes. Isolates positive for blaCTX-M were sequenced to determine CTX-M type. Representative isolates were further examined by PFGE, plasmid replicon typing and serotyping. Of particular interest, 21.4% of waste milk samples contained residues of the cephalosporin cefquinome, which was significantly associated with CTX-M bacteria. Such bacteria occurred in 5.8% of the waste milk samples (including 3.9% CTX-M E. coli). CTX-M types identified were 1, 14, 14b and 15, but none of the E. coli were serotype O25, the serotype of the human pandemic strain. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluación de las tarjetas AST-YSO1 del sistema Vitek 2 para determinar la sensibilidad a antifúngicos de levaduras del género Candida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María E Ochiuzzi

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo fue evaluar los resultados de sensibilidad a los antifúngicos de diversas especies de Candida utilizando el sistema semiautomatizado Vitek 2 (tarjetas AST-YSO1; bioMérieux, y compararlos con los obtenidos por el método de referencia del Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI, la microdilución en caldo (Documento M27-A3, 2008. La concordancia esencial fue > 90 %, excepto en el caso de Candida glabrata frente al voriconazol (VCZ y de Candida krusei frente al fluconazol (FCZ. La concordancia global por categoría (variación no mayor que 2 diluciones, sin discriminar por especie fue > 90 % cuando se evaluó el FCZ, y 89,5 % a las 24 h y 80,7 % a las 48 h con el VCZ. El tiempo promedio para obtener los resultados fue de 15,5 h. Los errores menores (sensible o resistente por un método y dosis dependiente por el otro para FCZ fueron de 7,8 % a las 24 h y 6,1 % a las 48 h; para VCZ, 10,5 % a las 24 h y 19,3 % a las 48 h. Solo se detectó 1 error muy mayor (resistente por el método de referencia y sensible por Vitek 2 con Candida parapsilosis frente a FCZ a las 48 h. No se observaron errores mayores (sensibles por el método de referencia y resistentes por Vitek 2. Con respecto a la anfotericina B, solo 3 cepas presentaron una CIM = 2 ?g/ml. El sistema Vitek 2 detectó correctamente el valor de CIM para diversas especies de Candida y presentó una excelente concordancia con el método de referencia propuesto por el CLSI.

  6. Species-Level Identification of Actinomyces Isolates Causing Invasive Infections: Multiyear Comparison of Vitek MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization–Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry) to Partial Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregson, D.; Church, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    Actinomyces species are uncommon but important causes of invasive infections. The ability of our regional clinical microbiology laboratory to report species-level identification of Actinomyces relied on molecular identification by partial sequencing of the 16S ribosomal gene prior to the implementation of the Vitek MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization–time of flight mass spectrometry [MALDI-TOF MS]) system. We compared the use of the Vitek MS to that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for reliable species-level identification of invasive infections caused by Actinomyces spp. because limited data had been published for this important genera. A total of 115 cases of Actinomyces spp., either alone or as part of a polymicrobial infection, were diagnosed between 2011 and 2014. Actinomyces spp. were considered the principal pathogen in bloodstream infections (n = 17, 15%), in skin and soft tissue abscesses (n = 25, 22%), and in pulmonary (n = 26, 23%), bone (n = 27, 23%), intraabdominal (n = 16, 14%), and central nervous system (n = 4, 3%) infections. Compared to sequencing and identification from the SmartGene Integrated Database Network System (IDNS), Vitek MS identified 47/115 (41%) isolates to the correct species and 10 (9%) isolates to the correct genus. However, the Vitek MS was unable to provide identification for 43 (37%) isolates while 15 (13%) had discordant results. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences demonstrate high diversity in recovered Actinomyces spp. and provide additional information to compare/confirm discordant identifications between MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA gene sequences. This study highlights the diversity of clinically relevant Actinomyces spp. and provides an important typing comparison. Based on our analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing should be used to rapidly identify Actinomyces spp. until MALDI-TOF databases are optimized. PMID:26739153

  7. Species-Level Identification of Actinomyces Isolates Causing Invasive Infections: Multiyear Comparison of Vitek MS (Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry) to Partial Sequencing of the 16S rRNA Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, T; Gregson, D; Church, D L

    2016-03-01

    Actinomyces species are uncommon but important causes of invasive infections. The ability of our regional clinical microbiology laboratory to report species-level identification of Actinomyces relied on molecular identification by partial sequencing of the 16S ribosomal gene prior to the implementation of the Vitek MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry [MALDI-TOF MS]) system. We compared the use of the Vitek MS to that of 16S rRNA gene sequencing for reliable species-level identification of invasive infections caused by Actinomyces spp. because limited data had been published for this important genera. A total of 115 cases of Actinomyces spp., either alone or as part of a polymicrobial infection, were diagnosed between 2011 and 2014. Actinomyces spp. were considered the principal pathogen in bloodstream infections (n = 17, 15%), in skin and soft tissue abscesses (n = 25, 22%), and in pulmonary (n = 26, 23%), bone (n = 27, 23%), intraabdominal (n = 16, 14%), and central nervous system (n = 4, 3%) infections. Compared to sequencing and identification from the SmartGene Integrated Database Network System (IDNS), Vitek MS identified 47/115 (41%) isolates to the correct species and 10 (9%) isolates to the correct genus. However, the Vitek MS was unable to provide identification for 43 (37%) isolates while 15 (13%) had discordant results. Phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rRNA sequences demonstrate high diversity in recovered Actinomyces spp. and provide additional information to compare/confirm discordant identifications between MALDI-TOF and 16S rRNA gene sequences. This study highlights the diversity of clinically relevant Actinomyces spp. and provides an important typing comparison. Based on our analysis, 16S rRNA gene sequencing should be used to rapidly identify Actinomyces spp. until MALDI-TOF databases are optimized. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of ESBL and AmpC producing organisms associated with bacteraemia in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam

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    Nguyen Phu Huong Lan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are commonly used as empirical therapy for infections of presumed bacterial origin. Increasing resistance to these antimicrobial agents has prompted the need for alternative therapies and more effective surveillance. Better surveillance leads to more informed and improved delivery of therapeutic interventions, potentially leading to better treatment outcomes. Methods We screened 1017 Gram negative bacteria (excluding Pseudomonas spp. and Acinetobacter spp. isolated between 2011 and 2013 from positive blood cultures for susceptibility against third generation cephalosporins, ESBL and/or AmpC production, and associated ESBL/AmpC genes, at the Hospital for Tropical Diseases in Ho Chi Minh City. Results Phenotypic screening found that 304/1017 (30% organisms were resistance to third generation cephalosporins; 172/1017 (16.9% of isolates exhibited ESBL activity, 6.2% (63/1017 had AmpC activity, and 0.5% (5/1017 had both ESBL and AmpC activity. E. coli and Aeromonas spp. were the most common organisms associated with ESBL and AmpC phenotypes, respectively. Nearly half of the AmpC producers harboured an ESBL gene. There was no significant difference (p > 0.05 between the antimicrobial resistance phenotypes of the organisms associated with community and hospital-acquired infections. Conclusion AmpC and ESBL producing organisms were commonly associated with bloodstream infections in this setting, with antimicrobial resistant organisms being equally distributed between infections originating from the community and healthcare settings. Aeromonas spp., which was associated with bloodstream infections in cirrhotic/hepatitis patients, were the most abundant AmpC producing organism. We conclude that empirical monotherapy with third generation cephalosporins may not be optimum in this setting.

  9. Comparison of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI screening parameters for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase production in clinical Enterobacteriaceae isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polsfuss, Silke; Bloemberg, Guido V; Giger, Jacqueline; Meyer, Vera; Hombach, Michael

    2012-01-01

    To compare the performance of European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) and CLSI breakpoints following their revision in 2010, for the detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) production in Enterobacteriaceae. 236 well-characterized clinical isolates (including 118 ESBL producers) were investigated by antibiotic disc testing with cefpodoxime, ceftriaxone, cefepime, cefotaxime EUCAST (5 μg/disc), ceftazidime EUCAST (10 μg/disc), cefotaxime CLSI (30 μg/disc) and ceftazidime CLSI (30 μg/disc) with the Kirby-Bauer method. Additionally, synergy phenomena were recorded between amoxicillin/clavulanic acid discs (20/10 μg/disc) and cefepime (30 μg/disc), EUCAST cefotaxime (5 μg/disc), EUCAST ceftazidime (10 μg/disc), CLSI cefotaxime (30 μg/disc) and CLSI ceftazidime [30 μg/disc; disc approximation method (DAM)]. Overall sensitivity of the cefotaxime EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoint equalled sensitivity of the cefotaxime CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint (99.2%). With the ceftazidime EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoint, 27/118 ESBL-producing isolates were not detected, whereas the ceftazidime CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint missed 41/118 ESBL-producing isolates. For cefpodoxime the resistant EUCAST breakpoint showed higher sensitivity for ESBL detection compared with the CLSI ESBL screening breakpoint/disc content (100% versus 98.3%, respectively). Sensitivities of ceftazidime and cefotaxime DAM with CLSI or EUCAST disc contents were comparable (sensitivities ranging from 84.7% to 89.8%). DAM with cefepime displayed the highest overall sensitivity (96.6%). In AmpC-producing isolates, synergy of amoxicillin/clavulanic acid with cefepime showed sensitivity and specificity for ESBL detection of 100% and 97.4%, respectively. EUCAST non-susceptible breakpoints for ceftazidime and cefpodoxime detect more ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae isolates compared with corresponding CLSI ESBL screening breakpoints. Implementation of the cefepime

  10. Comparative Exposure Assessment of ESBL-Producing Escherichia coli through Meat Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, Eric G; Pielaat, Annemarie; Smid, Joost H; van Duijkeren, Engeline; Vennemann, Francy B C; Wijnands, Lucas M; Chardon, Jurgen E

    2017-01-01

    The presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) and plasmidic AmpC (pAmpC) producing Escherichia coli (EEC) in food animals, especially broilers, has become a major public health concern. The aim of the present study was to quantify the EEC exposure of humans in The Netherlands through the consumption of meat from different food animals. Calculations were done with a simplified Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) model. The model took the effect of pre-retail processing, storage at the consumers home and preparation in the kitchen (cross-contamination and heating) on EEC numbers on/in the raw meat products into account. The contribution of beef products (78%) to the total EEC exposure of the Dutch population through the consumption of meat was much higher than for chicken (18%), pork (4.5%), veal (0.1%) and lamb (0%). After slaughter, chicken meat accounted for 97% of total EEC load on meat, but chicken meat experienced a relatively large effect of heating during food preparation. Exposure via consumption of filet americain (a minced beef product consumed raw) was predicted to be highest (61% of total EEC exposure), followed by chicken fillet (13%). It was estimated that only 18% of EEC exposure occurred via cross-contamination during preparation in the kitchen, which was the only route by which EEC survived for surface-contaminated products. Sensitivity analysis showed that model output is not sensitive for most parameters. However, EEC concentration on meat other than chicken meat was an important data gap. In conclusion, the model assessed that consumption of beef products led to a higher exposure to EEC than chicken products, although the prevalence of EEC on raw chicken meat was much higher than on beef. The (relative) risk of this exposure for public health is yet unknown given the lack of a modelling framework and of exposure studies for other potential transmission routes.

  11. Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, A C; Barbosa, A V; Arais, L R; Ribeiro, P F; Carneiro, V C; Cerqueira, A M F

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n=134), their owners (n=134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n=44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Genetic & virulence profiling of ESBL-positive E. coli from nosocomial & veterinary sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrrell, J M; Wootton, M; Toleman, M A; Howe, R A; Woodward, M; Walsh, T R

    2016-04-15

    CTX-M genes are the most prevalent ESBL globally, infiltrating nosocomial, community and environmental settings. Wild and domesticated animals may act as effective vectors for the dissemination of CTX-producing Enterobacteriaceae. This study aimed to contextualise blaCTX-M-14-positive, cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacteriaceae human infections and compared resistance and pathogenicity markers with veterinary isolates. Epidemiologically related human (n=18) and veterinary (n=4) blaCTX-M-14-positive E. coli were fully characterised. All were typed by XbaI pulsed field gel electrophoresis and ST. Chromosomal/plasmidic locations of blaCTX-M-14 were deduced by S1-nuclease digestion, and association with ISEcp1 was investigated by sequencing. Conjugation experiments assessed transmissibility of plasmids carrying blaCTX-M-14. Presence of virulence determinants was screened by PCR assay and pathogenicity potential was determined by in vitro Galleria mellonella infection models. 84% of clinical E. coli originated from community patients. blaCTX-M-14 was found ubiquitously downstream of ISEcp1 upon conjugative plasmids (25-150 kb). blaCTX-M-14 was also found upon the chromosome of eight E. coli isolates. CTX-M-14-producing E. coli were found at multiple hospital sites. Clonal commonality between patient, hospitals and livestock microbial populations was found. In vivo model survival rates from clinical isolates (30%) and veterinary isolates (0%) were significantly different (pE. coli involving community patients and farm livestock. blaCTX-M-14 positive human clinical isolates carry a lower intrinsic pathogenic potential than veterinary E. coli highlighting the need for greater veterinary practices in preventing dissemination of MDR E. coli among livestock. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Occurrence and characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae in food producing animals, minced meat and raw milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geser Nadine

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The impact of food animals as a possible reservoir for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Enterobacteriaceae, and the dissemination of such strains into the food production chain need to be assessed. In this study 334 fecal samples from pigs, cattle, chicken and sheep were investigated at slaughter. Additionally, 100 raw milk samples, representing bulk tank milk of 100 different dairy farms, 104 minced meat (pork and beef samples and 67 E. coli isolates from cattle E. coli mastitis were analyzed. Results As many as 15.3% of the porcine, 13.7% of the bovine, 8.6% of the sheep and 63.4% of the chicken fecal samples yielded ESBL producers after an enrichment step. In contrast, none of the minced meat, none of the bulk tank milk samples and only one of the mastitis milk samples contained ESBL producing strains. Of the total of 91 isolates, 89 were E. coli, one was Citrobacter youngae and one was Enterobacter cloacae. PCR analysis revealed that 78 isolates (85.7% produced CTX-M group 1 ESBLs while six isolates (6.6% produced CTX-M group 9 enzymes. Five detected ESBLs (5.5% belonged to the SHV group and 2 isolates (2.2% contained a TEM-type enzyme. A total of 27 CTX-M producers were additionally PCR-positive for TEM-beta-lactamase. The ESBL-encoding genes of 53 isolates were sequenced of which 34 produced CTX-M-1, 6 produced CTX-M-14, 5 produced CTX-M-15 and also 5 produced SHV-12. Two isolates produced TEM-52 and one isolate expressed a novel CTX-M group 1 ESBL, CTX-M-117. One isolate--aside from a CTX-M ESBL-- contained an additional novel TEM-type broad-spectrum beta-lactamase, TEM-186. Conclusions The relatively high rates of ESBL producers in food animals and the high genetic diversity among these isolates are worrisome and indicate an established reservoir in farm animals.

  14. Putative connection between zoonotic multiresistant extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli in dog feces from a veterinary campus and clinical isolates from dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaufler, Katharina; Bethe, Astrid; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Ewers, Christa; Kohn, Barbara; Wieler, Lothar H; Guenther, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to the understanding of multiresistant bacteria, a 'One Health' approach in estimating the rate of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli and getting insights into the transmission from clinical settings to the surrounding environment was employed by collecting fecal samples of dogs in a public area. Isolates were compared to those from samples of diseased dogs from a nearby small-animal clinic. One hundred fecal samples of dogs were collected on a single day in the public area of a veterinary faculty with a small-animal clinic and adjacent residential neighborhoods. All identified ESBL-producing strains were isolated by selective plating, genotypically analyzed by DNA microarray, polymerase chain reaction, sequence analysis, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and compared to 11 clinical ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli isolated from diseased dogs treated in the small-animal clinic 2 months before and 2 months following the environmental sampling collection. Fourteen percent (14/100) of the extra-clinical samples harbored phenotypic ESBL/putative AmpC-producing E. coli with additional resistances against other antimicrobials. One ESBL-strain displayed an identical macrorestriction pattern to one clinical, another one to three clinical clonal ESBL-producing strains. The genotypic ESBL-determinants (blaCTX-M-1 and blaCTX-M-15) and detection rates (10%) in dog feces collected outside of the small-animal clinic are comparable to the rates and ESBL-types in the healthy human population in Germany and to clinical and non-clinical samples of humans and companion animals in Europe. The occurrence of identical strains detected both outside and inside the clinical setting suggests a connection between the small-animal clinic and the surrounding environment. In conclusion, dog feces collected in proximity to veterinary facilities should be considered as a non-point infection source of zoonotic ESBL-producing E. coli for both animals and

  15. Transcriptional Alterations of Virulence-Associated Genes in Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL-Producing Uropathogenic Escherichia coli during Morphologic Transitions Induced by Ineffective Antibiotics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isak Demirel

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available It is known that an ineffective antibiotic treatment can induce morphological shifts in uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC but the virulence properties during these shifts remain to be studied. The present study examines changes in global gene expression patterns and in virulence factor-associated genes in an extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL-producing UPEC (ESBL019 during the morphologic transitions induced by an ineffective antibiotic and in the presence of human primary bladder epithelial cells. Microarray results showed that the different morphological states of ESBL019 had significant transcriptional alterations of a large number of genes (Transition; 7%, Filamentation; 32%, and Reverted 19% of the entities on the array. All three morphological states of ESBL019 were associated with a decreased energy metabolism, altered iron acquisition systems and altered adhesion expression. In addition, genes associated with LPS synthesis and bacterial motility was also altered in all the morphological states. Furthermore, the transition state induced a significantly higher release of TNF-α from bladder epithelial cells compared to all other morphologies, while the reverted state was unable to induce TNF-α release. Our findings show that the morphological shifts induced by ineffective antibiotics are associated with significant transcriptional virulence alterations in ESBL-producing UPEC, which may affect survival and persistence in the urinary tract.

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic evaluation of beta-lactamases (ESBL and KPC) among enterobacteria isolated from community-acquired monomicrobial urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Vanessa Cordeiro; da Silva, Vânia Lúcia; Barros, Renata; Bastos, André Netto; de Andrade Bastos, Lucas Quinnet; de Andrade Bastos, Victor Quinnet; Diniz, Cláudio Galuppo

    2014-12-01

    Beta-lactamases enzymes such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and carbapenemase type beta-lactamases (KPC) confer resistance to beta-lactam drugs among Gram-negative rods, mainly Enterobacteriaceae, as those frequently related to urinary tract infections (UTI). The aim of this study was to evaluate ESBL and KPC among enterobacteria isolated from monomicrobial UTI and to establish correlations between the presence of genetic markers and the phenotypic resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. Out of 12 304 urine samples collected during 2009, 93 enterobacteria showing an ESBL phenotype were recovered. Imipenem was used for KPC screening and modified disk approximation assay was used for detection of ESBL phenotype. Polymerase chain reaction was used for screening of bla(SHV), bla(TEM), bla(CTX-M), and bla(KPC). Considering the isolated bacteria showing ESBL phenotype 56% of the isolates were positive for two genes. The bla(TEM) was the most frequent (87·1%). Neither KPC phenotype nor bla(KPC)-harboring bacteria were observed. Monitoring the antimicrobial resistance is extremely important to sustain empirical therapy of community-acquired urinary tract infections (Co-UTI).

  17. Avaliação da acurácia de testes laboratoriais para detecção de amostras de Klebsiella pneumoniae produtora de betalactamase de espectro estendido Comparison of different methods for detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae isolates producers of extended spectrum beta-lactamase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea dos Santos Pereira

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Bactérias produtoras de betalactamase de espectro estendido (ESBL representam um dos mais importantes problemas de resistência bacteriana nos hospitais brasileiros. A necessidade da implementação de testes que apresentem alta acurácia e baixo custo é de suma importância devido à dificuldade na detecção de ESBL. O objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar a acurácia dos testes de adição de ácido clavulânico comercializados pela Oxoid® (Basingstoke, Inglaterra e do Etest ESBL Screen® (AB Biodisk, Solna, Suécia para detecção de K. pneumoniae produtoras de ESBL. Objetivamos também avaliar comparativamente a sensibilidade e a especificidade dos substratos betalactâmicos utilizados nestas metodologias. Foram avaliadas 134 amostras de K. pneumoniae isoladas em hemocultura de pacientes internados no Hospital São Paulo no período de julho de 1996 a julho de 2001. As amostras foram avaliadas quanto à produção de ESBL pelo teste de triagem preconizado pelo National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS, adição de ácido clavulânico (Oxoid® e Etest ESBL Screen®. Foram consideradas produtoras de ESBL (padrão-ouro amostras que apresentaram teste de triagem positivo e pelo menos um dos dois testes avaliados também positivo. O teste de adição de ácido clavulânico (Oxoid® apresentou 100% de sensibilidade e 100% de especificidade, e os substratos que apresentaram melhor desempenho neste teste foram cefotaxima e cefpodoxima, ambos com 100% de sensibilidade e especificidade. O Etest ESBL Screen® apresentou 96% de sensibilidade e 100% de especificidade, sendo que a cefotaxima mostrou novamente melhor desempenho, com 92,5% de sensibilidade e 100% de especificidade. O teste de adição de ácido clavulânico (Oxoid® apresentou excelente desempenho e pode ser facilmente implementado na rotina laboratorial por ser de alta acurácia e de fáceis realização e interpretação.Bacterial strains producing extended

  18. Urban riverine environment is a source of multidrug-resistant and ESBL-producing clinically important Acinetobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravić, Ana; Skočibušić, Mirjana; Fredotović, Željana; Šamanić, Ivica; Cvjetan, Svjetlana; Knezović, Mia; Puizina, Jasna

    2016-02-01

    Some Acinetobacter species have emerged as very important opportunistic pathogens in humans. We investigated Acinetobacter spp. from the polluted urban riverine environment in Croatia in regard to species affiliation, antibiotic resistance pattern, and resistance mechanisms. Considerable number of isolates produced acquired extended-spectrum β-lactamase(s) (ESBLs), CTX-M-15 solely or with TEM-116. By Southern blot hybridization, bla TEM-116 was identified on plasmids ca. 10, 3, and 1.2 kb in Acinetobacter junii, A. gandensis, and A. johnsonii. The bla TEM-116-carrying plasmid in A. gandensis was successfully transferred by conjugation to azide-resistant Escherichia coli J53. A. radioresistens isolate also carried an intrinsic carbapenemase gene bla OXA-133 with ISAba1 insertion sequence present upstream to promote its expression. Majority of ESBL-producing isolates harbored integrases intI1 and/or intI2 and the sulfamethoxazole resistance gene sul1. Almost all isolates had overexpressed resistance-nodulation-cell division (RND) efflux system, indicating that this mechanism may have contributed to multidrug resistance phenotypes. This is the first report of environmental CTX-M-15-producing Acinetobacter spp. and the first identification of CTX-M-15 in A. johnsonii, A. junii, A. calcoaceticus, A. gandensis, A. haemolyticus, and A. radioresistens worldwide. We identified, also for the first time, the environmental Acinetobacter-producing TEM ESBLs, highlighting the potential risk for human health, and the role of these bacteria in maintenance and dissemination of clinically important antibiotic resistance genes in community through riverine environments.

  19. Ceftibuten-induced filamentation of extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL)-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli alters host cell responses during an in vitro infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirel, Isak; Kruse, Robert; Önnberg, Anna; Persson, Katarina

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate and delayed antibiotic treatment of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing isolates have been associated with increased mortality of affected patients. The purpose of this study was to compare the host response of human renal epithelial cells and polymorphonuclear leucocyte (PMN) cells when infected by ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) isolates in the presence or absence of ineffective antibiotics. The renal epithelial cell line A498 and PMN cells were stimulated with ESBL-producing UPEC isolates in the presence or absence of three different antibiotics (trimetoprim, ceftibuten and ciprofloxacin). Host cell responses were evaluated as release of cytokines (IL-6, IL-8), reactive oxygen species (ROS), ATP and endotoxins. Bacterial morphology and PMN phagocytosis were evaluated by microscopy. In the presence of ceftibuten, 2 out of 3 examined ESBL-isolates changed their morphology into a filamentous form. The presence of ceftibuten enhanced IL-6, IL-8 and ROS-production from host cells, but only from cells stimulated by the filamentous isolates. The bacterial supernatant and not the filamentous bacteria per se was responsible for the increased release of IL-6, IL-8 and ROS. Increased endotoxin and ATP levels were found in the bacterial supernatants from filamentous isolates. Apyrase decreased IL-6 secretion from A498 cells and polymyxin B abolished the increased ROS-production from PMN cells. PMN were able to inhibit the bacterial growth of some ESBL-isolates in the presence of ceftibuten. In conclusion, antibiotic-induced filamentation of ESBL-producing UPEC isolates and the associated release of ATP and endotoxins can alter the host cell response in the urinary tract. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A multi-centre prospective evaluation of the Check-Direct ESBL Screen for BD MAX as a rapid molecular screening method for extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae rectal carriage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engel, T.G.; Slotboom, B.J.; Maarseveen, N. van; Zwet, A.A. van; Nabuurs-Franssen, M.H.; Hagen, F.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: A multiplex extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), performed directly on rectal swabs, was compared with a culture-based protocol to study the discrepancies between the two methods, and identify existing

  1. Characterization of Extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli obtained from Danish pigs, pig farmers and their families from farms with high or no consumption of 3rd or 4th generation cephalosporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammerum, Anette M.; Larsen, Jesper; Dalhoff Andersen, Vibe

    2014-01-01

    to incompatibility group IncI1, IncF, or IncN. Conclusions: The present study shows an increased frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli on farms with high consumption of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins and indicates transfer of either ESBL-producing E. coli or plasmids between pigs and farmers....

  2. Evaluation of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute phenotypic confirmatory test to detect the presence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases from 4005 Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrissey, Ian; Bouchillon, Samuel K; Hackel, Meredith; Biedenbach, Douglas J; Hawser, Stephen; Hoban, Daryl; Badal, Robert E

    2014-04-01

    A subset of Escherichia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Proteus mirabilis isolates collected for the Study for Monitoring Antimicrobial Resistance Trends that were positive for the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) phenotypic confirmatory test (n = 3245) or had an ertapenem MIC of ≥0.5 µg ml(-1) (n = 293), or both (n = 467), were analysed for ESBL genes. Most ESBL phenotype E. coli or K. pneumoniae possessed an ESBL gene (95.8 and 88.4 %, respectively), and this was 93.1 % if carbapenem-non-susceptible K. pneumoniae were removed. This rate was lower for P. mirabilis (73.4 %) and K. oxytoca (62.5 %). Virtually all ESBL-positive isolates (99.5 %) were cefotaxime non-susceptible [CLSI or European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) breakpoints)]. Fewer isolates (82 %) were ceftazidime non-susceptible (CLSI breakpoints). In addition, 21.1 % of E. coli, 25 % of K. oxytoca and 78.7 % of P. mirabilis isolates were ceftazidime susceptible but ESBL positive. This suggests that CLSI breakpoints for ceftazidime are too high to detect ESBLs. The lower EUCAST breakpoints detected ESBLs in E. coli and K. oxytoca better, but 59.6 % of ESBL-positive isolates of P. mirabilis were ceftazidime susceptible. For isolates with ertapenem MICs ≥0.5 µg ml(-1), more accurate ESBL phenotype analysis was observed for E. coli and K. pneumoniae (sensitivity >95 % for both, specificity 94.4 and 54.1 %, respectively). If carbapenemase-positive K. pneumoniae were excluded, the specificity increased to 78 %. The positive predictive values for the ESBL phenotypic test with E. coli and K. pneumoniae were 97.6 and 81.8 %, respectively, and negative predictive values were 75.9 and 95.2 %, respectively. We therefore suggest that it would be prudent to confirm phenotypic ESBL-positive P. mirabilis, K. pneumoniae and K. oxytoca with molecular analysis.

  3. A multidisciplinary intervention to reduce infections of ESBL- and AmpC-producing, gram-negative bacteria at a University Hospital

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Inge Jenny Dahl; Andersen, Stig Ejdrup

    2014-01-01

    /AmpC-producing and other resistant bacteria, in addition to their use in severe sepsis/septic shock. Piperacillin-tazobactam ± gentamicin was recommended for empiric treatments of most febrile conditions. The intervention also included education and guidance on infection control, as well as various other surveillances...... led to a sustained change in antimicrobial consumption, and the incidence of patients infected with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae decreased significantly (presistant Pseudomonas...... intervention led to a statistically significant decrease in the incidence of ESBL/AmpC-resistant K. pneumoniae infections, as well as in the incidences of other typical hospital-associated bacterial infections....

  4. Prevalence and characterization of plasmid-mediated blaESBL with their genetic environment in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in patients with pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-rong; Chen, Ji-chao; Kang, Yu; Jiang, Ning; An, Shu-chang; Gao, Zhan-cheng

    2012-03-01

    The extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Klebsiella pneumoniae (K. pneumoniae) are the major pathogens causing pneumonia and have a significant impact on the clinical course. Limited data exist on molecular characterization of ESBL-producing E. coli and K. pneumoniae that cause pneumonia. The aim of this study was to investigate the comprehensive multilevel characteristics of E. coli and K. pneumoniae causing pneumonia in China for the first time. E. coli (17) and K. pneumoniae (21) isolates responsible for pneumonia were isolated from 1270 specimens collected in a prospective multi-center study in eight teaching hospitals in China from June to December in 2007. The susceptibilities, ESBL confirmation, sequence typing, blaCTX-M and blaSHV genes, their genetic environment and plasmid Inc/rep types were determined. Sixteen E. coli (94.1%) and eleven K. pneumoniae (52.4%) isolates were ESBL producers. About 77.8% and 66.7% of them were resistance to ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin, and 100% were susceptible to imipenem. The most prevalent ESBL gene was CTX-M-14, followed by SHV-2, CTX-M-15, CTX-M-3, CTX-M-65, SHV-12, SHV-26 and SHV-28. SHV-1 and SHV-11 were also detected and coexisted with blaCTX-Ms in five strains, and three strains contained only SHV-1. All CTX-M-14 were detected ISEcp1 upstream and nine were found IS903 downstream and the majority of them (64.3%) were carried by IncF plasmids. All blaSHV were flanked by recF and deoR, located on IncF, IncN, IncX and IncH plasmids. Two SHV-2, one SHV-1 and the only SHV-28 were further preceded by IS26. Genes lacY and lacZ were detected at further upstream of two blaSHV-1. The K. pneumoniae carrying SHV-28 was susceptible to β-lactams, and no mutations or deletions in gene or promoter sequences were identified to account for susceptibility. Multilocus sequence typing experiments showed the ESBL-producing strains were genetically diverse. The rate of occurrence of blaESBL in E

  5. Comparative evaluation of two matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems, Vitek MS and Microflex LT, for the identification of Gram-positive cocci routinely isolated in clinical microbiology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miae; Chung, Hae-Sun; Moon, Hee-Won; Lee, Sun Hwa; Lee, Kyungwon

    2015-06-01

    We evaluated the performance of two MALDI-TOF MS systems for the identification of clinically important Gram-positive cocci. Vitek MS and Microflex LT correctly identified 97.2% and 94.7%, respectively. Both systems offer reliable and rapid identification of clinically important Gram-positive cocci isolated in clinical laboratories, including staphylococci, streptococci, and enterococci. Expanding the databases, especially of coagulase-negative staphylococci and viridans streptococci, would enhance performance. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. High heterogeneity of Escherichia coli sequence types harbouring ESBL/AmpC genes on IncI1 plasmids in the Colombian poultry chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castellanos, Luis Ricardo; Donado-Godoy, Pilar; León, Maribel; Clavijo, Viviana; Arevalo, Alejandra; Bernal, Johan F.; Timmerman, Arjen J.; Mevius, Dik J.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; Hordijk, Joost

    2017-01-01

    Background: Escherichia coli producing ESBL/AmpC enzymes are unwanted in animal production chains as they may pose a risk to human and animal health. Molecular characterization of plasmids and strains carrying genes that encode these enzymes is essential to understand their local and global

  7. Regional distribution of nosocomial infections due to ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in Germany: data from the German National Reference Center for the Surveillance of Nosocomial Infections (KISS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistner, R; Schröder, C; Geffers, C; Breier, A-C; Gastmeier, P; Behnke, M

    2015-03-01

    Surveillance systems for hospital infections are reporting increasing rates of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-positive Enterobacteriaceae in Europe. We aimed to perform a national survey on this trend and on the regional distribution of nosocomial infections due to ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in German hospitals. Data from 2007 to 2012 from two components of the German national nosocomial infection surveillance system were used for this analysis. The data derive from intensive care units and surgical departments. Independent factors determining the proportion of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae among nosocomial infections due to Enterobacteriaceae and changes in its regional distribution (broken down into German federal states) were calculated by regression analysis. From 2007 to 2012, the data showed a significantly increasing proportion of ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae in surgical site infections (from 11.46 to 15.38, 134%, p 0.003), urinary tract infections (9.36 to 16.56, 177%, p infections (11.91 to 14.70, 123%, p nosocomial infections has significantly increased in Germany over the last 6 years. Hospitals in Central Germany and surgical departments in all of Germany are especially affected by this development. Copyright © 2014 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multilocus sequence typing and CTX-M characterization of ESBL-producing E. coli: a prospective single-centre study in Lower Saxony, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhold, G; Schulze, M H; Gross, U; Bohne, W

    2016-11-01

    The increasing prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Gram-negative bacteria is a serious threat for current healthcare settings. In this study we investigated the molecular epidemiology of ESBL-producing E. coli at the University Medical Center Göttingen in Lower Saxony, Germany. All E. coli isolates with an ESBL phenotype were collected during a 6-month period in 2014. Multilocus sequence typing and CTX-M characterization were performed on 160 isolates. Of the ESBL-producing isolates 95·6% were CTX-M positive. Compared to recent Germany-wide studies, we found CTX-M-1 to occur in higher frequency than CTX-M-15 (44·4% vs. 34·4%). CTX-M-14 and CTX-M-27 were detected at 9·4% and 5·0%, respectively. The globally dominant sequence type (ST) 131, which is often associated with CTX-M-15, occurred at a relatively low rate of 24%. Major non-ST131 sequence types were ST101 (5%), ST58 (5%), ST10 (4·4%), ST38 (4·4%), ST410 (3·8%) and ST453 (3·1%). Several of these major sequence types were previously shown to be associated with livestock farming. Together, our study indicates that E. coli lineage distribution in individual healthcare settings can significantly differ from average numbers obtained in nationwide studies.

  9. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franco, Alessia; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Feltrin, Fabiola

    2015-01-01

    . This megaplasmid carried the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and additional genes [tet(A), sul1, dfrA1 and dfrA14] mediating cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim resistance. It also contained genes conferring enhanced colonization capability, virulence (fimbriae, yersiniabactin), resistance and fitness...

  10. Conjugative IncFI plasmids carrying CTX-M-15 among Escherichia coli ESBL producing isolates at a University hospital in Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hain Torsten

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multi-drug-resistant, extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, constitute an emerging public-health concern. Little data on the molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing Escherichia coli is available in Germany. Here we describe the prevalence and molecular epidemiology of ESBL producing-Escherichia coli isolates at a German University hospital. Methods We analysed 63 non-duplicate clinical ESBL isolates obtained over an 8-month period using PCR and sequence-based ESBL allele typing, plasmid replicon typing, phylogenetic group typing. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE based genotyping and plasmid profiling was performed, as well as confirmatory DNA-based hybridization assays. Results Examination of the 63 Escherichia coli isolates revealed an almost equal distribution among the E. coli phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2 and D. High prevalence (36/63 of the CTX-M-15 gene was observed and an analysis of PFGE-based patterns revealed the presence of this CTX-M allele in multiple clones. Resistance to cefotaxime was a transferable trait and a commonly occurring 145.5 kb conjugative IncFI plasmid was detected in 65% of E. coli carrying the CTX-M-15 allele. The rate of transferable antibiotic resistances for GM, SXT, TET, GM-SXT-TET, SXT-TET and GM-TET was 33%, 61%, 61%, 27%, 44% and 11%, respectively. The remaining strains did not have a common IncFI plasmid but harboured transferable IncFI plasmids with sizes that ranged from 97 to 242.5 kb. Conclusion Our data demonstrate the presence of IncFI plasmids within the prevailing E. coli population in a hospital setting and suggest that the dissemination of CTX-M-15 allele is associated to lateral transfer of these well-adapted, conjugative IncFI plasmids among various E. coli genotypes.

  11. The potential role of microbiota for controlling the spread of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE in neonatal population [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thibaud Delerue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The spread of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-PE in the hospital and also the community is worrisome. Neonates particularly are exposed to the risk of ESBL-PE acquisition and, owing to the immaturity of their immune system, to a higher secondary risk of ESBL-PE-related infection. Reducing the risk of acquisition in the hospital is usually based on a bundle of measures, including screening policies at admission, improving hand hygiene compliance, and decreasing antibiotic consumption. However, recent scientific data suggest new prevention opportunities based on microbiota modifications.

  12. Distribution of extended-spectrum β-lactamase types in a Brazilian tertiary hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keite da Silva Nogueira

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Epidemiological data on the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs are scarce in Brazil despite the fact that these data are essential for empirical treatment and control measures. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of different ESBLs by type and distribution in a tertiary hospital in southern Brazil. METHODS: We evaluated 1,827 enterobacterial isolates between August 2003 and March 2008 isolated from patients at a tertiary hospital. Samples were identified using a Vitek automated system and were confirmed by biochemical testing. The identified ESBL strains were characterized by phenotypic methods, polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and sequencing. Genetic similarities were evaluated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. RESULTS: It was 390 (21.3% ESBL-producing strains, which expressed the ESBLs CTX-M (292, SHV (84, CTX and SHV (10, TEM (2, and PER (2. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of ESBL-expressing strains was high, especially in Klebsiella pneumoniae and Enterobacter spp. CTX-M was the predominant type of ESBL observed, and its genetic variability indicates a polyclonal distribution.

  13. Comparison of detection methods for extended-spectrum beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli strains

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    Ewelina Kałużna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Detection of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBLs could be a major challenge for microbiologists – the difficulties arise mainly from the phenotypic differences among strains.Materials and Methods: Evaluation of ESBLs was performed on 42 strains of E. coli by: 1 DDST on MHA, 2 DDST on MHA with cloxacillin, 3 CT on MHA, according to CLSI, 4 CT on MHA with cloxacillin, 5 Etest ESBL (AB Biodisk, 6 CHROMagarTM ESBL (GRASO, 7 ChromID® ESBL (bioMérieux, and 8 automatic system VITEK2 ESBL test (bioMérieux.Result: Positive results were obtained for 20 strains using method 1, for 18 strains using method 2, 17 by method 3, 14 by method 4, 11 by method 5, 39 by method 6, 40 by method 7, and 15 by method 8. Using Etest ESBL 6.0 non-determinable results were obtained. The most consistent results were obtained when comparing the results of method 3 with results of method 2 (97.6%, and comparing the results obtained using methods 3 and 8 (95.2%.Conclusions: Based on our study we conclude that the chromogenic media can only be used as a screening method for the detection of ESBLs in E. coli rods. Etest is less useful compared to other phenotype methods, due to the impossibility of obtaining results for all the tested strains. Adding cloxacillin to MHA does not increase the frequency of detection of ESBLs in E. coli strains. DDST seems to be the most reliable among phenotypic methods for the detection of ESBLs in E. coli rods.

  14. Spread of ESBL/AmpC-producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in the community through ready-to-eat sandwiches in Algeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaici, Lydia; Haenni, Marisa; Métayer, Véronique; Saras, Estelle; Mesbah Zekar, Ferielle; Ayad, Meriem; Touati, Abdelaziz; Madec, Jean-Yves

    2017-03-20

    The spread of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases (ESBLs) or AmpC β-Lactamases (AmpC) encoding genes in healthy human populations is of major concern. The role of the food chain has been questioned since numerous studies reported surface contamination of retail meat or crude vegetables with ESBL/AmpC-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL/AmpC-E). Nonetheless, these food products are intended to be cooked or washed before consumption so that the risk of human transfer might be low. Here, the presence of ESBL/AmpC-E was investigated in ready-to-eat (RTE) sandwiches purchased in the street in the city of Bejaia, Algeria. Thirty ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli (n=18), K. pneumoniae (n=11) and K. oxytoca (n=1) were recovered from 21 sandwiches purchased in 14 of the 100 shops that were visited (14%). Twenty-four isolates (13 E. coli, 10 K. pneumoniae, 1 K. oxytoca) produced one or two ESBLs, while 5 E. coli and 1 K. pneumoniae isolates produced an AmpC. Among those, 12 E. coli harbored blaCTX-M-1 (n=7), blaCTX-M-15 (n=3), blaCTX-M-14 (n=1) or blaCTX-M-2 (n=1) and one E. coli co-harbored the blaCTX-M-15 and blaSHV-2 genes. The 10 K. pneumoniae displayed blaCTX-M-15 (n=7), blaSHV-2 (n=3), blaSHV-12 (n=1) or blaCTX-M-1 (n=1), including two isolates presenting a blaCTX-M-15/blaSHV-2 or blaCTX-M-1/blaSHV-2 combination. The K. oxytoca harbored the blaSHV-2 gene, and one K. pneumoniae and four E. coli displayed blaDHA and blaCMY-2, respectively. Most isolates (26/30, n=87%) also possessed the aac(6')-Ib-cr gene. Identical ESBL/AmpC-producing E. coli or K. pneumoniae clones were detected at different places across the city. This may reflect cross-contamination through poor handling practices, contaminated equipment, common ingredients or environmental factors. Of note, the emergent ST405 K. pneumoniae human clone was identified as a CTX-M-15 producer. This study highlights the presence of ESBL/AmpC-E in RTE sandwiches, which are a source of direct transfer to the human gut. These data

  15. A multidisciplinary intervention to reduce infections of ESBL- and AmpC-producing, gram-negative bacteria at a University Hospital.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Dahl Knudsen

    Full Text Available In response to a considerable increase in the infections caused by ESBL/AmpC-producing Klebsiella pneumonia in 2008, a multidisciplinary intervention, with a main focus on antimicrobial stewardship, was carried out at one university hospital. Four other hospitals were used as controls. Stringent guidelines for antimicrobial treatment and prophylaxis were disseminated throughout the intervention hospital; cephalosporins were restricted for prophylaxis use only, fluoroquinolones for empiric use in septic shock only, and carbapenems were selected for penicillin-allergic patients, infections due to ESBL/AmpC-producing and other resistant bacteria, in addition to their use in severe sepsis/septic shock. Piperacillin-tazobactam ± gentamicin was recommended for empiric treatments of most febrile conditions. The intervention also included education and guidance on infection control, as well as various other surveillances. Two year follow-up data on the incidence rates of patients with selected bacterial infections, outcomes, and antibiotic consumption were assessed, employing before-and-after analysis and segmented regression analysis of interrupted time series, using the other hospitals as controls. The intervention led to a sustained change in antimicrobial consumption, and the incidence of patients infected with ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae decreased significantly (p<0.001. The incidences of other hospital-associated infections also declined (p's<0.02, but piperacillin-tazobactam-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterococcus faecium infections increased (p's<0.033. In wards with high antimicrobial consumption, the patient gut carrier rate of ESBL-producing bacteria significantly decreased (p = 0.023. The unadjusted, all-cause 30-day mortality rates of K. pneumoniae and E. coli were unchanged over the four-year period, with similar results in all five hospitals. Although not statistically significant, the 30-day mortality rate of patients

  16. Characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter obtained in environmental samples of a Tunisian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziri, Raoudha; Klibi, Naouel; Alonso, Carla Andrea; Said, Leila Ben; Bellaaj, Ridha; Slama, Karim Ben; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Torres, Carmen

    2016-10-01

    The assessment of the hospital environment as a reservoir of ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae in Tunisian hospitals is scarcely analyzed, except for Escherichia coli. The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of ESBL-producing non-E. coli Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-EbNoEc) in 300 samples of abiotic surfaces and the hands of patients and staff of a Tunisian Hospital, and to characterize the ESBL genes of the recovered isolates. ESBL-EbNoEc were recovered in 28 of 300 (9.3%) analyzed samples and were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae (n= 11), Enterobacter cloacae (n=11), Citrobacter freundii (n=4) and Klebsiella oxytoca (n=2). The bla genes identified by PCR and sequencing among the strains were as follows: 11 K.pneumoniae strains [blaCTX-M-15+ blaTEM-1+ blaSHV-11 (n=6); blaCTX-M-15+ blaTEM-1+ blaSHV-28 (n=3); blaCTX-M-15+ blaTEM-1+ blaSHV-1 (n=2)], 11 E. cloacae strains [blaCTX-M-15 (n=6); blaCTX-M-15+ blaTEM-1b (n=2); blaCTX-M-15+ blaTEM-1b+ blaOXA-1 (n=1);blaCTX-M-15+ blaOXA-1 (n=1);blaSHV-12 (n=1)], 4 C. freundii strains [blaCTX-M-15] and 2 K. oxytoca strains [blaCTX-M-15 (n=1); blaSHV-12 (n=1)]. The ISEcp1 and orf477 sequences were identified upstream and downstream of the blaCTX-M-15 gene, respectively, in 3 K. pneumoniae and 3 E. cloacae isolates. The PFGE analysis demonstrated three unrelated pulsotypes in K. pneumoniae strains and five pulsotypes in E. cloacae. The uncontrolled dissemination of ESBL-producing bacteria, even in the hospital environment, has become a real problem and new strategies and hygienic rules are needed to stop this bacterial dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Multidrug-Resistant Candida auris Misidentified as Candida haemulonii: Characterization by Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization-Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry and DNA Sequencing and Its Antifungal Susceptibility Profile Variability by Vitek 2, CLSI Broth Microdilution, and Etest Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kathuria, S.; Singh, P.K.; Sharma, C.; Prakash, A.; Masih, A.; Kumar, A.; Meis, J.F.G.M.; Chowdhary, A.

    2015-01-01

    Candida auris is a multidrug-resistant yeast that causes a wide spectrum of infections, especially in intensive care settings. We investigated C. auris prevalence among 102 clinical isolates previously identified as Candida haemulonii or Candida famata by the Vitek 2 system. Internal transcribed

  18. Occurrence and Phenotypic Characteristics of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases among Members of the Family Enterobacteriaceae at the Tel-Aviv Medical Center (Israel) and Evaluation of Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navon-Venezia, Shiri; Hammer-Munz, Orly; Schwartz, David; Turner, Dan; Kuzmenko, Boris; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2003-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence and phenotypic characteristics of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) producers among cefuroxime-resistant (CXM-R) (MIC ≥ 32 μg/ml) members of the family Enterobacteriaceae in our institution. The 438 CXM-R clinical isolates obtained from nonurine sources among inpatients were screened. ESBL production was confirmed by disk diffusion assay using cefpodoxime (CPD), cefotaxime (CTX), and ceftazidime (CTZ) with and without clavulanate (CLAV). A difference of ≥5 mm in the size of the zone of inhibition in the presence of CLAV for at least one of the agents was considered representative of the ESBL phenotype: 186 isolates (42.5%) were confirmed as ESBL producers. The isolates tested and the rates of ESBL producers were as follows: Klebsiella spp. (n = 81), 79%; Proteus spp. (n = 58), 62%; Escherichia coli (n = 64), 53%; Enterobacter spp. (n = 69), 42%; Serratia spp. (n = 70), 14%; Citrobacter spp. (n = 25), 24%; Providencia spp. (n = 21), 24%; Morganella spp. (n = 41), 5%; and Kluyvera (n = 3), 0%. The overall sensitivity of isolated ESBL confirmatory tests was 79% for CPD-CLAV, 66% for CTZ-CLAV, and 91% for CTX-CLAV. Sensitivities of CTZ-CLAV confirmatory tests for Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., E. coli, and Enterobacter spp. were 84, 22, 76, and 62%, respectively, and those for CTX-CLAV were 95, 97, 94, and 83%, respectively. They were 90% for CPD-CLAV and CTZ-CLAV, 95% for CPD-CLAV and CTX-CLAV, and 100% for CTZ-CLAV and CTX-CLAV. ESBL production was highly prevalent among Enterobacteriaceae. Using resistance to CXM as an ESBL screening criterion is a suitable option in high-incidence areas where Klebsiella spp. are not the dominant ESBL producers. This screening criterion may simplify the screening test and improve its sensitivity, although at the price of testing more isolates. The CTX-CLAV combination confirmed ESBL producers better than the CTZ-CLAV combination, with sensitivity varying between species. Combined CTZ-CLAV and CTX

  19. The first occurrence of a CTX-M ESBL-producing Escherichia coli outbreak mediated by mother to neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, Ciara

    2017-01-05

    Escherichia coli (E. coli) comprise part of the normal vaginal microflora. Transfer from mother to neonate can occur during delivery resulting, sometimes, in neonatal bacterial disease. Here, we aim to report the first outbreak of CTX-M ESBL-producing E. coli with evidence of mother-to-neonate transmission in an Irish neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) followed by patient-to-patient transmission.

  20. Environmental adaptation and vertical dissemination of ESBL-/pAmpC-producing Escherichia coli in an integrated broiler production chain in the absence of an antibiotic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Projahn, Michaela; Daehre, Katrin; Semmler, Torsten; Guenther, Sebastian; Roesler, Uwe; Friese, Anika

    2018-01-17

    High prevalence numbers of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- (ESBL-)/plasmid-mediated AmpC beta-lactamase- (pAmpC-) producing Escherichia coli in broiler chicken and their distribution along the broiler production chain is an ongoing problem in food production. We, therefore, investigated resistant isolates along the broiler production chain to determine whether there is a constantly occurring direct vertical transmission of the ESBL-/pAmpC-producing E. coli from the parent flocks to their offspring or not. We, furthermore, analysed the isolates concerning the occurrence of virulence factors and their ability to form biofilms to estimate their potential to effectively colonize broiler chickens and/or persist and survive in the environment of the broiler production facilities. Using whole genome sequencing, we could show that ESBL-/pAmpC-producing E. coli were likely transferred in a step-wise process along the broiler production chain but not directly from the parent flock to the fattening flock with every single batch of offspring chickens. Additionally, resistant E. coli strains showing an extraintestinal pathogenic genotype as well as high numbers of virulence-associated genes including the production of curli fibres and cellulose have high capabilities to persist and spread in the broiler production chain. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  1. Silver nanoparticle production by Rhizopus stolonifer and its antibacterial activity against extended spectrum {beta}-lactamase producing (ESBL) strains of Enterobacteriaceae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banu, Afreen [Department of Microbiology, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106, Karnataka (India); Rathod, Vandana, E-mail: drvandanarathod@rediffmail.com [Department of Microbiology, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106, Karnataka (India); Ranganath, E. [Department of Microbiology, Gulbarga University, Gulbarga 585106, Karnataka (India)

    2011-09-15

    Highlights: {yields} Silver nanoparticle production by using Rhizopus stolonifer. {yields} Antibacterial activity of silver nanoparticles against extended spectrum {beta}-lactamase producing (ESBL) strains of Enterobacteriaceae. {yields} Synergistic effect of antibiotics with silver nanoparticles towards ESBL-strains. {yields} Characterization of silver nanoparticles made by UV-vis spectra, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM). -- Abstract: This report focuses on the synthesis of silver nanoparticles using the fungus, Rhizopus stolonifer and its antimicrobial activity. Research in nanotechnology highlights the possibility of green chemistry pathways to produce technologically important nanomaterials. Characterization of newly synthesized silver nanoparticles was made by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and atomic force microscope (AFM). TEM micrograph revealed the formation of spherical nanoparticles with size ranging between 3 and 20 nm. The biosynthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) showed excellent antibacterial activity against ESBL-strains which includes E. coli, Proteus. sp. and Klebsiella sp.

  2. Direct RNA-based detection and differentiation of CTX-M-type extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    Full Text Available The current global spread of multi-resistant Gram-negatives, particularly extended spectrum β-lactamases expressing bacteria, increases the likelihood of inappropriate empiric treatment of critically ill patients with subsequently increased mortality. From a clinical perspective, fast detection of resistant pathogens would allow a pre-emptive correction of an initially inappropriate treatment. Here we present diagnostic amplification-sequencing approach as proof of principal based on the fast molecular detection and correct discrimination of CTX-M-β-lactamases, the most frequent ESBL family. The workflow consists of the isolation of total mRNA and CTX-M-specific reverse transcription (RT, amplification and pyrosequencing. Due to the high variability of the CTX-M-β-lactamase-genes, degenerated primers for RT, qRT as well as for pyrosequencing, were used and the suitability and discriminatory performance of two conserved positions within the CTX-M genes were analyzed, using one protocol for all isolates and positions, respectively. Using this approach, no information regarding the expected CTX-M variant is needed since all sequences are covered by these degenerated primers. The presented workflow can be conducted within eight hours and has the potential to be expanded to other β-lactamase families.

  3. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in camel in Egypt: potential human hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elhariri, Mahmoud; Hamza, Dalia; Elhelw, Rehab; Dorgham, Sohad M

    2017-03-31

    The rapid increase of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria are a potential health hazard. Development of antimicrobial resistance in animal pathogens has serious implications for human health, especially when such strains could be transmitted to human. In this study, the antimicrobial resistance due to ESBL producing Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the camel meat was investigated. In this study meat samples from 200 healthy camels at two major abattoirs in Egypt (Cairo and Giza) were collected. Following culture on cetrimide agar, suspected P. aeruginosa colonies were confirmed with a Vitek 2 system (bioMe´rieux). P. aeruginosa isolates were phenotypically identified as ESBL by double disk synergy test. Additionally antimicrobial susceptibility testing of ESBL producing P. aeruginosa isolates were done against 11 antimicrobial drugs and carried out by disk diffusion method. The ESBL genotypes were determined by polymerase chain reaction according to the presence of the bla PER-1, bla CTX-M, bla SHV, and bla TEM. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was isolated from 45 camel meat sample (22.5%). The total percentage of ESBL producing P. aeruginosa was 45% (21/45) from camel meat isolates. Antibiogram results revealed the highest resistance was for c, ceftriaxone and rifampicin followed by cefepime and aztreonam. The prevalence rates of β-lactamase genes were recorded (bla PER-1 28.5%, bla CTX-M 38%, bla SHV 33.3% and bla TEM 23.8%). This study illustrates the presence of high rates of ESBL-P. aeruginosa in camels that represents an increasing alarming for the risk of transmission to human and opens the door for current and future antibiotics therapy failure. Livestock associated ESBL-P. aeruginosa is a growing disaster, therefore, attention has to be fully given to livestock associated ESBL-bacteria which try to find its way to human beings.

  4. Intestinal decolonization of Enterobacteriaceae producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL): a retrospective observational study in patients at risk for infection and a brief review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieg, Siegbert; Küpper, M Fabian; de With, Katja; Serr, Annerose; Bohnert, Jürgen A; Kern, Winfried V

    2015-10-28

    Multidrug-resistant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacteria producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBL) have emerged as an important cause of invasive infection. Targeting the primary (intestinal) niche by decolonization may be a valuable approach to decrease the risk of relapsing infections and to reduce transmission of ESBL-producing enteric pathogens. In a retrospective observational study we evaluated the efficacy of intestinal decolonization treatment using orally administered colistin or other non-absorbable agents given for 2 to 4 weeks in adult patients with previous relapsing infection and persistent intestinal colonization with ESBL-positive Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E). Eradication success was defined as negative rectal swab or stool culture at the end of treatment and at follow up-2 weeks after treatment discontinuation. First-line decolonization treatment led to eradication of ESBL-E in 19/45 patients (42%, 7/18 low-dose [4 × 1 million units] colistin, 3/12 high-dose [4 × 2 million units] colistin, 9/15 rifaximin [2 × 400 mg]), and secondary/salvage treatment was successful in 8/13 patients (62 %, 20 treatment episodes). Late follow-up showed that 7/13 patients (54%) with successful initial or salvage decolonization became recolonized within 3 months after post-treatment assessment while all eight of the patients failing initial or salvage decolonization treatment with late follow-up remained colonized. A narrative review of the literature confirms the limited efficacy of non-absorbable antibiotics including conventional selective digestive tract decolonization (SDD)-like combination regimens for eradicating multidrug-resistant enteric bacteria from the intestinal tract. At present, there is no clear evidence of a significant decolonization efficacy using single-drug treatment with oral non-absorbable antibiotics. More effective regimens are needed and a better definition of at risk patients is required for planning meaningful randomized

  5. Community carriage of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli is associated with strains of low pathogenicity: a Swedish nationwide study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ny, Sofia; Löfmark, Sonja; Börjesson, Stefan; Englund, Stina; Ringman, Maj; Bergström, Jakob; Nauclér, Pontus; Giske, Christian G; Byfors, Sara

    2017-02-01

    Community carriage of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli (EPE) is common worldwide and there is a need to understand the connection between carriage and infection. We compared the molecular characteristics of EPE among Swedish community carriers with those of EPE causing invasive infections. We collected 2134 faecal samples from randomly selected Swedish inhabitants and examined them for the presence of EPE. All participating volunteers answered a questionnaire about putative risk factors for EPE carriage. Suspected EPE isolates (n = 418) from patients with bloodstream infection (BSI) were collected from Swedish laboratories. Isolates were genotypically and phenotypically characterized. Our results show that the EPE population found in carriers generally had lower pathogenicity compared with the isolates from BSIs, since carriers had a lower proportion of E. coli belonging to phylogroup B2, ST131 and ST131 subclone H30-Rx. Isolates from carriers also had lower levels of multiresistance. The Swedish carriage rate of EPE was 4.7% (101/2134) among healthy volunteers. Risk factors associated with carriage were travel to countries in Asia (OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.4-9.2) and Africa (OR = 3.6, 95% CI = 1.7-7.7) and a diet without pork (OR = 0.5, 95% CI = 0.3-0.8 for pork eaters). E. coli host factors previously associated with higher pathogenicity were all more common in BSIs compared with carriers. This indicates that the risk of invasive infection with EPE may be relatively modest in many community carriers and that EPE carriage of high-risk strains should be the focus of attention for prevention. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy.

  6. Characterization of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli obtained from Danish pigs, pig farmers and their families from farms with high or no consumption of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerum, Anette M; Larsen, Jesper; Andersen, Vibe D; Lester, Camilla H; Skovgaard Skytte, Timmy S; Hansen, Frank; Olsen, Stefan S; Mordhorst, Hanne; Skov, Robert L; Aarestrup, Frank M; Agersø, Yvonne

    2014-10-01

    To compare and characterize extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli from pigsties, pig farmers and their families on farms with previous high or no use of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins. Twenty farms with no third- or fourth-generation cephalosporin use and 19 herds with previous frequent use were included. The ESBL-producing isolates detected in humans and pigs were characterized by ESBL genotype, PFGE, susceptibility to non-β-lactam antibiotics and phylotype, and selected isolates were characterized by multilocus sequence typing (MLST). Furthermore, transferability of bla(CTX-M-)1 from both human and pig isolates was studied and plasmid incompatibility groups were defined. The volunteers answered a questionnaire including epidemiological risk factors for carriage of ESBL-producing E. coli. ESBL-producing E. coli was detected in pigs on 79% of the farms with high consumption of cephalosporins compared with 20% of the pigs on farms with no consumption. ESBL-producing E. coli was detected in 19 of the 195 human participants and all but one had contact with pigs. The genes found in both humans and pigs at the same farms were blaCTX-M-1 (eight farms), bla(CTX-M-14) (one farm) and bla(SHV-12) (one farm). At four farms ESBL-producing E. coli isolates with the same CTX-M enzyme, phylotype, PFGE type and MLST type were detected in both pigs and farmers. The majority of the plasmids with bla(CTX-M-1) were transferable by conjugation and belonged to incompatibility group IncI1, IncF, or IncN. The present study shows an increased frequency of ESBL-producing E. coli on farms with high consumption of third- or fourth-generation cephalosporins and indicates transfer of either ESBL-producing E. coli or plasmids between pigs and farmers. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. CLINICAL ISOLATES OF MECA, METHICILLIN, VANCOMYCIN RESISTANCE S. AUREUS; ESBLs PRODUCING K.PNEUMONIA, E.COLI, P. AUREGENOSA FROM VARIOUS CLINICAL SOURCE AND ITS ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Mahmud Ali, Amirthalingam R

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: Antimicrobial resistance has turned into a key medical and public health crisis globally since the injudicious use of magic bullets (drugs. Aim of this study is focused on the clinical isolate and their percentages of resistant to antibiotics in gram positive bacteria such as MRSA, VRSA, and MSSA are common causes of nosocomical, skin structure infections, bacteremia and infection of other systems; ESBLs producing Enterobacteriaceae (E. coli, Klebsiella spp. is common agent of urinary tract, bloodstream, pulmonary and intra-abdominal infections and carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa with its complete antimicrobial patterns which are currently practiced in this population. Methods: There are one hundred and fourteen (114 various clinical isolates, isolated from various clinical samples like throat swab, urine, pus, sputum, and blood culture, identified as specific isolate with resistance patterns were analyzed by BD phoenix-100 the auto analyzer. Results: Off 114 clinical isolate, 6 mecA-mediated resistance (cefoxitin>8mgc/ml, 11 methicillin resistance, 18 β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor, 12 methicillin sensitive and 3 vancomycin (>16µg/ml resistance S. aureus have been isolated from overall 50 isolate of S.aureus. In addition, there are 27 P.aeruginosa, 15 ESBLs from overall of 25 K. pneumoniae and 7 ESBLs out of 12 Escherichia coli species have been isolated. The resistance and susceptibility pattern percentages have been graphically represented for each isolates. Conclusion: Current study revealed that the drug classes of β lactam/βlactamase inhibitor having high resistance rate with S.aureus, P.aureginosa, K. pneumoniae and E. coli isolate. Also, some of other drug classes such as cepham and tetracycline having higher resistance rate with P.aureginosa and K.pneumoniae. In addition, the vancomycin resistances S. aureus have been isolated and reported as first time in this population.

  8. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Alessia Franco; Pimlapas Leekitcharoenphon; Fabiola Feltrin; Patricia Alba; Gessica Cordaro; Manuela Iurescia; Rita Tolli; Mario D'Incau; Monica Staffolani; Elisabetta Di Giannatale; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Antonio Battisti

    2015-01-01

    We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR), ESBL-producing (bla CTX-M-1) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013?2014.A set (n = 49) of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant (R) isolates of S. Infantis (2011?2014) from humans, food-producing animals and meat thereof, were studied along with a selected s...

  9. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Franco, Alessia; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Cordaro, Gessica; Iurescia, Manuela; Tolli, Rita; D'Incau, Mario; Staffolani, Monica; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Hendriksen, Rene S.; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR), ESBL-producing (blaCTX-M-1) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013-2014.A set (n = 49) of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant (R) isolates of S. Infantis (2011-2014) from humans, food-producing animals and meat thereof, were studied along with a selected se...

  10. Bacteraemia due to non-ESBL-producing Escherichia coli O25b:H4 sequence type 131: insights into risk factors, clinical features and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Barroso, Isabel; López-Cerero, Lorena; Molina, José; Bellido, Mar; Navarro, María Dolores; Serrano, Lara; González-Galán, Verónica; Praena, Julia; Pascual, Alvaro; Rodríguez-Baño, Jesús

    2017-04-01

    The epidemiology and outcomes of bloodstream infections (BSIs) caused by Escherichia coli ST131 isolates not producing extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) are not well defined despite being more prevalent than ESBL-producers. In this study, risk factors and the impact on outcome of BSIs caused by non-ESBL-producing ST131 E. coli versus non-ST131 E. coli were investigated. A case-control study was performed in two tertiary centres to identify risk factors for ST131. Molecular methods were used to investigate all E. coli isolates from blood cultures for those belonging to O25b:H4-ST131 clonal group. fimH alleles were characterised in ST131 isolates. Multivariate analysis was performed by logistic regression or Cox regression as appropriate. A total of 33 ST131 E. coli cases and 56 controls were studied. ST131 isolates showed higher rates of resistance to ampicillin and ciprofloxacin; fimH alleles were H30 in 14 isolates (42.4%) and H22 in 12 isolates (36.4%). Only recent surgery (OR = 7.03, 95% CI 1.71-28.84; P = 0.007) and unknown source of bacteraemia (OR = 5.37, 95% CI 0.93-30.81; P = 0.05) were associated with ST131. ST131 isolates showed no association with 30-day mortality, therapeutic failure, presentation with severe sepsis/shock or length of stay. Bacteraemia due to non-ESBL-producing O25b:H4-ST131 E. coli showed few differences in terms of risk factors as well as similar outcome to non-ST131 E. coli. These data support the notion that ST131 strains are not less clinically virulent despite showing increased antimicrobial resistance, but also that they are not more virulent than other clonal groups causing BSI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing urinary isolates of Escherichia coli in outpatients

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    Marković Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In Gram-negative bacteria, the production of beta-lactamases is the most important mechanism of resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics. In the Banja Luka region, there were no extensive researches on the prevalence and antimicrobial resistance of the extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL producing Escherichia coli (E. coli isolates. Objective. The aim of the present study was to determine the presence of ESBL producing E. coli isolates as the cause of the urinary tract infections in outpatients, the distribution of these ESBL isolates according to age and gender of patients and their susceptibility to antimicrobials. Methods. Urine specimens obtained from outpatients were cultured on chromogenic CPS-ID3 media. All plates showing significant (>105 cfu/ml growth of E. coli in pure culture were further processed. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed on VITEK TWO Compact using AST-GN27 cards for testing Gram negative bacteria and detection of ESBL producers. Results. Out of 2,195 isolates, 177 (8.1% were ESBL producers. Ninety-two isolates were obtained from female patients (5% of E. coli isolated from women and 85 isolates from male patients (23% of E. coli isolated from men. High percentage of ESBL isolates was detected in the infant age group under one year (36.7% and in the age group over 60 years (28.8%. All ESBL isolates were susceptible to imipenem and resistant to ampicillin, piperacillin, cefazolin, cefotaxime, ceftazidime and cefepime. There was a significant resistance to amikacin (79.1%, gentamicin (76.8%, amoxicillin/clavulanate (54.8% and trimethoprim/sulphamethoxazole (45.8%. Resistance to nutrofurantoin was 13.6%. Conclusion. This study has demonstrated the presence of ESBL producing E. coli urinary isolates in outpatients, and their extensive susceptibility to imipenem and nitrofurantoin.

  12. [Rapid test for detection of susceptibility to cefotaxime in Enterobacteriaceae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Guerra, Gemma; Hoyos-Mallecot, Yannik; Rodríguez-Granger, Javier; Navarro-Marí, José María; Gutiérrez-Fernández, José

    In this work an "in house" rapid test based on the change in pH that is due to hydrolysis for detecting Enterobacteriaceae susceptible to cefotaxime is evaluated. The strains of Enterobacteriaceae from 1947 urine cultures were assessed using MicroScan panels and the "in house" test. This rapid test includes red phenol solution and cefotaxime. Using MicroScan panels, 499 Enterobacteriaceae isolates were evaluated, which included 27 isolates of Escherichia coli producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL), 16 isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae ESBL and 1 isolate of Klebsiella oxytoca ESBL. The "in house" test offers the following values: sensitivity 98% and specificity 97%, with negative predictive value 100% and positive predictive value 78%. The "in house" test based on the change of pH is useful in our area for detecting presumptively cefotaxime-resistant Enterobacteriaceae strains. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Shigellosis Caused by CTX-M Type ESBL Producing Shigella flexneri in Two Siblings of Rural Nepal: First Case Report from the Country

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    Narayan Prasad Parajuli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shigellosis is an acute infectious disease characterized as severe bloody diarrhea (dysentery and is accountable for a significant burden of morbidity and mortality especially in children under the age of 5 years. Antimicrobial therapy is required in the cases of severe dysentery associated with Shigella. However, emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains of Shigella spp. over the last two decades has restricted the use of common therapeutic antimicrobials. In MDR strains, the third-generation cephalosporins have been used for the treatment, but, unfortunately, emerging reports of enzyme mediated β-lactam resistance among Shigella isolates from various parts of the world have greatly compromised the therapy of pediatric dysentery. In Nepal, drug resistant strains of Shigella spp. have been reported, but MDR and extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL producing strains were previously unknown. Here, we report two Shigella flexneri isolates harboring ESBL genotype-CTX-M associated with acute dysentery in two siblings which were presented and treated in a tertiary care teaching hospital of Kathmandu, Nepal.

  14. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  15. Variability of β-lactam susceptibility testing for Streptococcus pneumoniae using 4 commercial test methods and broth microdilution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Marthe K; Berenger, Byron M; Turnbull, LeeAnn; Rennie, Robert; Fuller, Jeff

    2016-03-01

    Limited data are available that verify the performance of commercial susceptibility methods for Streptococcus pneumoniae following the 2008 Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute revision of the β-lactam breakpoints. We compared the performance of Etest, M.I.C. Evaluator (M.I.C.E), Vitek, and Sensititre systems to broth microdilution for S. pneumoniae susceptibility testing of penicillin, ceftriaxone, meropenem, and amoxicillin. Essential agreement was ≥90% for the majority of the β-lactams and methods tested, particularly for penicillin and ceftriaxone. Categorical agreements (CAs) for penicillin using meningeal and nonmeningeal breakpoints were ≥90%; CAs using penicillin oral breakpoints were 84-89%. Ceftriaxone CAs using nonmeningeal and meningeal breakpoints were 68-88% for Etest, M.I.C.E., and Vitek2 with 6-12% very major errors (VMEs) using meningeal breakpoints. Sensititre CAs for ceftriaxone, amoxicillin, and meropenem were ≥90% with no VMEs. In the context of the current guidelines, there exists considerable method-dependent variability in the susceptibility of S. pneumoniae to β-lactams. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization and comparison of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) resistance genotypes and population structure of Escherichia coli isolated from Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) and humans in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Jorge; Johansson, Anders; Stedt, Johan; Bengtsson, Stina; Porczak, Aleksandra; Granholm, Susanne; González-Acuña, Daniel; Olsen, Björn; Bonnedahl, Jonas; Drobni, Mirva

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the general level of antibiotic resistance with further analysis of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) prevalence, as well as the population structure of E. coli in fecal flora of humans and Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan) in central parts of Chile. We found a surprisingly high carriage rate of ESBL-producing E. coli among the gulls 112/372 (30.1%) as compared to the human population 6/49 (12.2%.) Several of the E. coli sequence types (STs) identified in birds have previously been reported as Multi Drug Resistant (MDR) human pathogens including the ability to produce ESBLs. This means that not only commensal flora is shared between birds and humans but also STs with pathogenic potential. Given the migratory behavior of Franklin's gulls, they and other migratory species, may be a part of ESBL dissemination in the environment and over great geographic distances. Apart from keeping the antibiotic use low, breaking the transmission chains between the environment and humans must be a priority to hinder the dissemination of resistance.

  17. Characterization and comparison of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL resistance genotypes and population structure of Escherichia coli isolated from Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan and humans in Chile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Hernandez

    Full Text Available We investigated the general level of antibiotic resistance with further analysis of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL prevalence, as well as the population structure of E. coli in fecal flora of humans and Franklin's gulls (Leucophaeus pipixcan in central parts of Chile. We found a surprisingly high carriage rate of ESBL-producing E. coli among the gulls 112/372 (30.1% as compared to the human population 6/49 (12.2%. Several of the E. coli sequence types (STs identified in birds have previously been reported as Multi Drug Resistant (MDR human pathogens including the ability to produce ESBLs. This means that not only commensal flora is shared between birds and humans but also STs with pathogenic potential. Given the migratory behavior of Franklin's gulls, they and other migratory species, may be a part of ESBL dissemination in the environment and over great geographic distances. Apart from keeping the antibiotic use low, breaking the transmission chains between the environment and humans must be a priority to hinder the dissemination of resistance.

  18. Comparison of susceptibility patterns using commercially available susceptibility testing methods performed on prevalent Candida spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cretella, David; Barber, Katie E; King, S Travis; Stover, Kayla R

    2016-12-01

    The rising rates of invasive fungal infections caused by non-albicans Candida and the increasing emergence of antifungal resistance complicate the management of invasive candidiasis. Accurate and timely antifungal susceptibility testing is critical to targeting antifungal therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare commercially available susceptibility testing methods using prospectively collected Candida isolates. Susceptibility testing was performed on 74 Candida isolates collected from July 2014 to March 2015 using broth microdilution according to the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute method, Etest, Vitek 2 (YS-05) and Sensititre. Essential agreement and categorical agreement (CA) were assessed using the reference method. Of the 34 total blood isolates collected, Candida albicans comprised only 38 % (13) of the Candida spp. with Candidaglabrata being nearly as prevalent (29 %, 10). CA using Etest was 86 % for fluconazole, 72 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 97 % for anidulafungin. Vitek 2 CA was 90 % for fluconazole and 98 % for caspofungin. Sensititre CA was 93 % for fluconazole, 98 % for caspofungin, 98 % for micafungin and 100 % for anidulafungin. Although our study tested a small population of Candida isolates, our results were variable by method. When implementing antifungal susceptibility testing, clinicians should be aware of the strengths and limitations of each testing method.

  19. Isolation of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with altered susceptibility to carbapenems not carbapenemase mediated

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    Franca Cian

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The spread of enterobacteria producing extended-spectrum ß-lactamases (ESBLs is sharply increasing in Italy, while the detection of isolates resistant to carbapenems is still sporadic. Isolates of Klebsiella pneumoniae resistant to all cephalosporins, aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones have been isolated in Trieste since 2008. Because of the altered profile of resistance to carbapenems, these strains were reported as ESBL-negative and possible carbapenemases producer by the expert system, leaving tigecycline as the only therapeutic choice.The purpose of this study is the characterization of the mechanisms involved in resistance to carbapenems in these strains and the evaluation of a reliable and simple test for phenotypic confirmation of ESBL and/or carbapenemase production. 25 isolates of MDR K. pneumoniae were collected between October 2008 and May 2009, mainly from urinary samples of elderly patients hospitalized in medicine wards. Identification and susceptibility testing were performed using the Vitek 2 system.The double-disc (DD test was used to check the production of ESBLs, while imipenem and imipenem-EDTA synergy test was used to detect the production of metallo-ßlactamase (MBL. Carbapenemase activity was tested by an hydrolysis assay and the production of MBLs was also investigated by PCR. The DD synergy test highlighted the possible production of ESBLs in 18 out of 22 strains, considered as negative by Vitek. All ESBLs producers tested positive for the blaCTX-M-15 allele. Only one isolate was resistant to carbapenems and resulted positive for production of MBL by the phenotypic test.The crude extract showed carbapenemase activity inhibited by EDTA; PCR test gave positive result for a blaVIM-type allele. PCR analysis performed on representative isolates, followed by sequencing, showed that coding sequence of ompk35 was not functional. Results of this study confirmed the emergence of ESBL-positive strains of K. pneumoniae that

  20. A Cross-Sectional Study of Colonization Rates with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA and Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae in Four Swiss Refugee Centres.

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    Rein Jan Piso

    Full Text Available The recent crisis of refugees seeking asylum in European countries challenges public health on many levels. Most refugees currently arrive from Syria, Afghanistan, or Eritrea. Data about multidrug resistant bacteria (MDR prevalence are not present for these countries. However, when entering the European heath care systems, data about colonisation rates regarding highly resistant bacterial pathogens are important.We performed a cross-sectional screening in four Swiss refugee centres to determine the colonization rates for MRSA and ESBL- and carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae. We used pharyngeal, nasal, and inguinal swabs for MRSA and rectal swabs and urine for ESBL and carbapenemase screening using standard microbiological procedures. Whole genome sequencing (WGS was used to determine the relatedness of MRSA isolates with high resolution due to a suspected outbreak.41/261(15.7% refugees were colonized with MRSA. No differences regarding the country of origin were observed. However, in a single centre significantly more were colonized, which was confirmed to be a recent local outbreak. 57/241 (23.7% refugees were colonized with ESBL with significantly higher colonisation in persons originating from the Middle East (35.1%, p<0.001. No carbapenemase producers were detected.The colonisation rate of the refugees was about 10 times higher for MRSA and 2-5 times higher for ESBL compared to the Swiss population. Contact precaution is warranted for these persons if they enter medical care. In cases of infections, MRSA and ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae should be considered regarding antibiotic treatment choices.

  1. Adaptive responses to cefotaxime treatment in ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and the possible use of significantly regulated pathways as novel secondary targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea S. B.; Rau, Martin Holm; Bonde, Charlotte S

    2016-01-01

    -fold). Inhibition and/or mutations in other genes that were significantly regulated, belonging to energy synthesis, purine synthesis, proline uptake or potassium uptake, also rendered the resistant bacteria more susceptible to cefotaxime. The results show that ESBL-producing E. coli adapt to treatment...... that can be used to combat the resistant bacteria. Strains of E. coli MG1655 encoding blaCTX-M-1 from an IncI1 plasmid and from the chromosome were challenged with cefotaxime corresponding to inhibitory concentrations, and transcriptional patterns were compared with growth without or with very low...... concentrations of cefotaxime by RNA sequencing. Significantly regulated pathways were inhibited with suitable inhibitors, or genes encoding the enzymes of the regulated pathways were knocked out. The ability of the bacteria to grow in the presence of cefotaxime was determined. Chequerboard assays were utilized...

  2. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Alessia; Leekitcharoenphon, Pimlapas; Feltrin, Fabiola; Alba, Patricia; Cordaro, Gessica; Iurescia, Manuela; Tolli, Rita; D'Incau, Mario; Staffolani, Monica; Di Giannatale, Elisabetta; Hendriksen, Rene S; Battisti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR), ESBL-producing (blaCTX-M-1) Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013-2014.A set (n = 49) of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC)-resistant (R) isolates of S. Infantis (2011-2014) from humans, food-producing animals and meat thereof, were studied along with a selected set of earlier and more recent ESC-susceptible (ESC-S) isolates (n = 42, 2001-2014). They were characterized by macrorestriction-PFGE analysis and genetic environment of ESC-resistance. Isolates representative of PFGE-patterns and origin were submitted to Whole Genome Sequencing. The emerging ESC-R clone, detected mainly from broiler chickens, broiler meat and humans, showed a minimum pattern of clinical resistance to cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim, beside ciprofloxacin microbiological resistance (MIC 0.25 mg/L). All isolates of this clone harbored a conjugative megaplasmid (~ 280-320 Kb), similar to that described in ESC-susceptible S. Infantis in Israel (pESI-like) in 2014. This megaplasmid carried the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and additional genes [tet(A), sul1, dfrA1 and dfrA14] mediating cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim resistance. It also contained genes conferring enhanced colonization capability, virulence (fimbriae, yersiniabactin), resistance and fitness (qacE1, mer) in the intensive-farming environment. This emerging clone of S. Infantis has been causing infections in humans, most likely through the broiler industry. Since S. Infantis is among major serovars causing human infections in Europe and is an emerging non-typhoidal Salmonella globally, further spread of this lineage in primary productions deserves quick and thorough risk-management strategies.

  3. Emergence of a Clonal Lineage of Multidrug-Resistant ESBL-Producing Salmonella Infantis Transmitted from Broilers and Broiler Meat to Humans in Italy between 2011 and 2014.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessia Franco

    Full Text Available We report the spread of a clone of multidrug-resistant (MDR, ESBL-producing (blaCTX-M-1 Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Infantis, in the Italian broiler chicken industry and along the food-chain. This was first detected in Italy in 2011 and led to human infection in Italy in 2013-2014.A set (n = 49 of extended-spectrum cephalosporin (ESC-resistant (R isolates of S. Infantis (2011-2014 from humans, food-producing animals and meat thereof, were studied along with a selected set of earlier and more recent ESC-susceptible (ESC-S isolates (n = 42, 2001-2014. They were characterized by macrorestriction-PFGE analysis and genetic environment of ESC-resistance. Isolates representative of PFGE-patterns and origin were submitted to Whole Genome Sequencing. The emerging ESC-R clone, detected mainly from broiler chickens, broiler meat and humans, showed a minimum pattern of clinical resistance to cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamides, and trimethoprim, beside ciprofloxacin microbiological resistance (MIC 0.25 mg/L. All isolates of this clone harbored a conjugative megaplasmid (~ 280-320 Kb, similar to that described in ESC-susceptible S. Infantis in Israel (pESI-like in 2014. This megaplasmid carried the ESBL gene blaCTX-M-1, and additional genes [tet(A, sul1, dfrA1 and dfrA14] mediating cefotaxime, tetracycline, sulfonamide, and trimethoprim resistance. It also contained genes conferring enhanced colonization capability, virulence (fimbriae, yersiniabactin, resistance and fitness (qacE1, mer in the intensive-farming environment. This emerging clone of S. Infantis has been causing infections in humans, most likely through the broiler industry. Since S. Infantis is among major serovars causing human infections in Europe and is an emerging non-typhoidal Salmonella globally, further spread of this lineage in primary productions deserves quick and thorough risk-management strategies.

  4. New plasmid-mediated aminoglycoside 6'-N-acetyltransferase, AAC(6')-Ian, and ESBL, TLA-3, from a Serratia marcescens clinical isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Wanchun; Wachino, Jun-Ichi; Kimura, Kouji; Yamada, Keiko; Arakawa, Yoshichika

    2015-05-01

    Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates showing amikacin resistance (MIC 64 to >256 mg/L) in the absence of 16S rRNA methyltransferase (MTase) genes were found. The aim of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying amikacin resistance in Enterobacteriaceae clinical isolates that do not produce 16S rRNA MTases. PCR was performed to detect already-known amikacin resistance determinants. Cloning experiments and sequence analyses were performed to characterize unknown amikacin resistance determinants. Transfer of amikacin resistance determinants was performed by conjugation and transformation. The complete nucleotide sequence of the plasmids was determined by next-generation sequencing technology. Amikacin resistance enzymes were purified with a column chromatography system. The enzymatic function of the purified protein was investigated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC) and HPLC. Among the 14 isolates, 9 were found to carry already-known amikacin resistance determinants such as aac(6')-Ia and aac(6')-Ib. Genetic analyses revealed the presence of a new amikacin acetyltransferase gene, named aac(6')-Ian, located on a 169 829 bp transferable plasmid (p11663) of the Serratia marcescens strain NUBL-11663, one of the five strains negative for known aac(6') genes by PCR. Plasmid p11663 also carried a novel ESBL gene, named blaTLA-3. HPLC and TLC analyses demonstrated that AAC(6')-Ian catalysed the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl coenzyme A onto an amine at the 6'-position of various aminoglycosides. We identified aac(6')-Ian as a novel amikacin resistance determinant together with a new ESBL gene, blaTLA-3, on a transferable plasmid of a S. marcescens clinical isolate. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Laboratory detection of intestinal carriage of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae - A comparison of algorithms using the Carba NP test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, James; Gregory, Claire; Prendergast, Louise; Perera, Chandrika; Robson, Jennifer; Waring, Lynette

    2017-01-01

    Stool specimens spiked with a panel of 46 carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) and 59 non-carbapenemase producers were used to compare the diagnostic accuracy of 4 testing algorithms for the detection of intestinal carriage of CPE: (1) culture on Brilliance ESBL agar followed by the Carba NP test; (2) Brilliance ESBL followed by the Carba NP test, plus chromID OXA-48 agar with no Carba NP test; (3) chromID CARBA agar followed by the Carba NP test; (4) chromID CARBA followed by the Carba NP test, plus chromID OXA-48 with no Carba NP test. All algorithms were 100% specific. When comparing algorithms (1) and (3), Brilliance ESBL agar followed by the Carba NP test was significantly more sensitive than the equivalent chromID CARBA algorithm at the lower of 2 inoculum strengths tested (84.8% versus 63.0%, respectively [P<0.02]). With the addition of chromID OXA-48 agar, the sensitivity of these algorithms was marginally increased. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prevalence of urinary colonization by extended spectrum-beta-lactamase Enterobacteriaceae among catheterised inpatients in Italian long term care facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldo, Luca; Migliavacca, Roberta; Regattin, Laura; Raglio, Annibale; Pagani, Laura; Nucleo, Elisabetta; Spalla, Melissa; Vailati, Francesca; Agodi, Antonella; Mosca, Adriana; Zotti, Carla; Tardivo, Stefano; Bianco, Ines; Rulli, Adele; Gualdi, Paola; Panetta, Pietro; Pasini, Carlo; Pedroni, Mino; Brusaferro, Silvio

    2013-03-06

    Long Term Care Facilities (LTCFs) play a key role in guaranteeing care to patients in developed countries. Many patients, mostly elderly, access LTCFs at some time in their lives, and their healthcare pathways often require them to move back and forth between hospital and outpatient settings. These patterns bring about new challenges regarding infection control, especially healthcare associated infections. A point prevalence study was conducted in 23 Italian LTCFs, to identify colonization in patients with urinary catheter (>24 hours). Species identification, susceptibility tests and extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESBL) production screenings were performed using Vitek 2 System. Enterobacteria identified by Vitek 2 System as ESBL-producers or suspected AmpC hyperproducers on the basis of cephamycin resistance, were sent to a research laboratory where they underwent a double-disk synergy test. Finally, ESBL-producers were screened for bla resistance genes by PCR assay. 211 patients with catheter were screened, 185 out of 211 patients showed positive samples for the presence of Enterobacteriaceae, 114 of these 185 patients were colonized by extended spectrum cephalosporins resistant microorganisms. We identified a total of 257 Gram negative pathogens, of which 51.8% (133/257) were extended spectrum cephalosporins resistant. 7 out of 133 cephamycin not susceptible strains proved to be AmpC-type beta-lactamases and 125/133 ESBL-producers; 1 was not further characterized. 43 out of 257 (16.7%) E. coli, 37/257 (14.4%) P. mirabilis, 20/257 (7.8%), P. stuartii, 14/257 (5.4%) M. morganii, 7/257 (2.7%), K. pneumoniae, 4/257 (1.6%) C. koseri proved to be overall ESBL-producers by double-disk synergy test. Third and fourth generation cephalosporin resistant P. mirabilis, P. stuartii and M. morganii strains mainly harboured a blaTEM gene (95.9%), while 89.1% of E. coli were positive for the blaCTX-M determinant by PCR and sequencing. Patients with decubitus had a higher risk

  7. Einsatz von Antibiotika in 60 Milchrinderbetrieben in Norddeutschland und Charakterisierung von Methicillin-resistenten Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) und Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase produzierenden Escherichia coli (ESBL produzierende E. coli)

    OpenAIRE

    Kreausukon, Khwanchai

    2011-01-01

    Das Ziel der Studie war, Informationen über den Einsatz von Antibiotika in deutschen Milchkuhherden zu sammeln. Zudem sollte auf das Vorkommen von MRSA und ESBL-produzierenden E. coli in Tankmilchproben untersucht werden. Fragebögen wurden unter den Herdenmanagern von 60 norddeutschen Betrieben (Herdengröße von 25 bis 3000 Tiere) verteilt, die auf freiwilliger Basis an den Untersuchungen teilnahmen. Tankmilchproben wurden in den Betrieben einmalig entnommen und auf das Vorkommen von MRSA u...

  8. In vitro antibacterial activity of ZnO and Nd doped ZnO nanoparticles against ESBL producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Abdulrahman Syedahamed Haja; Karthikeyan, Chandrasekaran; Ahamed, Abdulazees Parveez; Thajuddin, Nooruddin; Alharbi, Naiyf S.; Alharbi, Sulaiman Ali; Ravi, Ganasan

    2016-04-01

    Pure ZnO and Neodymium (Nd) doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The synthesized nanoparticles retained the wurtzite hexagonal structure. From FESEM studies, ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs showed nanorod and nanoflower like morphology respectively. The FT-IR spectra confirmed the Zn-O stretching bands at 422 and 451 cm-1 for ZnO and Nd doped ZnO NPs respectively. From the UV-VIS spectroscopic measurement, the excitonic peaks were found around 373 nm and 380 nm for the respective samples. The photoluminescence measurements revealed that the broad emission was composed of ten different bands due to zinc vacancies, oxygen vacancies and surface defects. The antibacterial studies performed against extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) producing strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae showed that the Nd doped ZnO NPs possessed a greater antibacterial effect than the pure ZnO NPs. From confocal laser scanning microscopic (CLSM) analysis, the apoptotic nature of the cells was confirmed by the cell shrinkage, disorganization of cell wall and cell membrane and dead cell of the bacteria. SEM analysis revealed the existence of bacterial loss of viability due to an impairment of cell membrane integrity, which was highly consistent with the damage of cell walls.

  9. Assessment of the Activity of Tigecycline against Gram-Positive and Gram-Negative Organisms Collected from Italy between 2012 and 2014, as Part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Stefani

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Tigecycline Evaluation and Surveillance Trial (T.E.S.T we report the in vitro activity of tigecycline and its comparators against Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms collected from Italian centers between 2012 and 2014. Minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined according to the broth microdilution methodology of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute, and antimicrobial resistance was determined using the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing interpretive criteria. Among the Enterobacteriaceae, 31% of Escherichia coli isolates, 22% of Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 1% of Klebsiella oxytoca were extended-spectrum β-lactamase producers (ESBLs. Resistance rates among ESBL-K. pneumoniae and ESBL-E. coli to meropenem were 24% and <1%, respectively. Thirty-seven percent of K. pneumoniae were multidrug resistant (MDR strains. Resistance rates among isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii to amikacin, levofloxacin and meropenem were between 84% and 94%. Eighty percent of A. baumannii isolates were MDR strains. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA accounted for 38% of S. aureus isolates. No isolates of MRSA were resistant to linezolid, tigecycline or vancomycin. Antimicrobial resistance remains a problem in Italy with increasing numbers of MDR organisms. Despite high levels, MRSA rates appear to be stabilising. Tigecycline retains its in vitro activity against the majority of organisms, including those with multidrug resistance.

  10. Evaluation of Caspofungin Susceptibility Testing by the New Vitek 2 AST-YS06 Yeast Card Using a Unique Collection of FKS Wild-Type and Hot Spot Mutant Isolates, Including the Five Most Common Candida Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astvad, Karen M; Perlin, David S; Johansen, Helle K

    2013-01-01

    susceptibility card to correctly identify the fks mutants from wt isolates and compared the performance to those of the CLSI and EUCAST reference methods. A collection of 98 Candida isolates, including 31 fks hot spot mutants, were included. Performance was evaluated using the FKS genotype as the "gold standard...

  11. Direct blood culturing on solid medium outperforms an automated continuously monitored broth-based blood culture system in terms of time to identification and susceptibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.A. Idelevich

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Pathogen identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST should be available as soon as possible for patients with bloodstream infections. We investigated whether a lysis-centrifugation (LC blood culture (BC method, combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS identification and Vitek 2 AST, provides a time advantage in comparison with the currently used automated broth-based BC system. Seven bacterial reference strains were added each to 10 mL human blood in final concentrations of 100, 10 and 1 CFU/mL. Inoculated blood was added to the Isolator 10 tube and centrifuged at 3000 g for 30 min, then 1.5 mL sediment was distributed onto five 150-mm agar plates. Growth was observed hourly and microcolonies were subjected to MALDI-TOF MS and Vitek 2 as soon as possible. For comparison, seeded blood was introduced into an aerobic BC bottle and incubated in the BACTEC 9240 automated BC system. For all species/concentration combinations except one, successful identification and Vitek 2 inoculation were achieved even before growth detection by BACTEC. The fastest identification and inoculation for AST were achieved with Escherichia coli in concentrations of 100 CFU/mL and 10 CFU/mL (after 7 h each, while BACTEC flagged respective samples positive after 9.5 h and 10 h. Use of the LC-BC method allows skipping of incubation in automated BC systems and, used in combination with rapid diagnostics from microcolonies, provides a considerable advantage in time to result. This suggests that the usefulness of direct BC on solid medium should be re-evaluated in the era of rapid microbiology.

  12. Quinolone co-resistance in ESBL- or AmpC-producing Escherichia coli from an Indian urban aquatic environment and their public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Kanaujia, Pawan Kumar; Singh, Nambram Somendro; Sharma, Shalu; Kumar, Shakti; Virdi, Jugsharan Singh

    2016-01-01

    Quinolone and β-lactam antibiotics constitute major mainstay of treatment against infections caused by pathogenic Escherichia coli. Presence of E. coli strains expressing co-resistance to both these antibiotic classes in urban aquatic environments which are consistently being used for various anthropogenic activities represents a serious public health concern. From a heterogeneous collection of 61 E. coli strains isolated from the river Yamuna traversing through the National Capital Territory of Delhi (India), those harboring blaCTX-M-15 (n = 10) or blaCMY-42 (n = 2) were investigated for co-resistance to quinolones and the molecular mechanisms thereof. Resistance was primarily attributed to amino acid substitutions in the quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of GyrA (S83L ± D87N) and ParC (S80I ± E84K). One of the E. coli strains, viz., IPE, also carried substitutions in GyrB and ParE at positions Ser492→Asn and Ser458→Ala, respectively. The phenotypically susceptible strains nevertheless carried plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) gene, viz., qnrS, which showed co-transfer to the recipient quinolone-sensitive E. coli J53 along with the genes encoding β-lactamases and led to increase in minimal inhibitory concentrations of quinolone antibiotics. To the best of our knowledge, this represents first report of molecular characterization of quinolone co-resistance in E. coli harboring genes for ESBLs or AmpC β-lactamases from a natural aquatic environment of India. The study warrants true appreciation of the potential of urban aquatic environments in the emergence and spread of multi-drug resistance and underscores the need to characterize resistance genetic elements vis-à-vis their public health implications, irrespective of apparent phenotypic resistance.

  13. Multidrug resistance and extended-spectrum β-lactamases genes among Escherichia coli from patients with urinary tract infections in Northwestern Libya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abujnah, Abubaker A; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Sabri, Mohamed A M; El-Mohammady, Hanan; Khalek, Rania A; Ghenghesh, Khalifa S

    2015-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) and emergence of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs) that mediate resistance to β-lactam drugs among Escherichia coli and other uropathogens have been reported worldwide. However, there is little information on the detection of ESBLs genes in E. coli from patients with urinary tract infections (UTIs) in the Arab countries using polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and in Libya such information is lacking. All patients attending Zawiya Teaching Hospital in Zawiya city between November 2012 and June 2013 suspected of having UTIs and from whom midstream urine samples were taken as part of the clinical workup were included in this prospective study. Samples were examined for uropathogens by standard bacteriological procedures. VITEK-2 automated microbiology system was used to identify the isolated uropathogens and determine the susceptibility of E. coli and Klebsiella spp. isolates to antimicrobials. In addition, phenotypically ESBLs-positive E. coli isolates were tested for ESBLs genes by PCR. The present study enrolled 1,790 patients with UTIs. Uropathogens were found in 371 (20.7%) urine specimens examined. Mixed pathogens were detected in two specimens with 373 total pathogens isolated. E. coli and Klebsiella spp. were the predominant uropathogens at 55.8% (208/373) and 18.5% (69/373), respectively. Other pathogens were detected in 25.7% (96/373) of urine samples. Of the E. coli and Klebsiella spp. tested, 69.2 and 100% were resistant to ampicillin, 6.7 and 33.3% to ceftriaxone, and 23.1 and 17.4% to ciprofloxacin, respectively. MDR (resistance to ≥3 antimicrobial groups) was found in 69 (33.2%) of E. coli and in 29 (42%) of Klebsiella spp. isolates. ESBLs were detected phenotypically in 14 (6.7%) of E. coli and in 15 (21.7%) of Klebsiella spp. isolates. Thirteen out of the 14 phenotypically ESBL-positive E. coli were positive for ESBL genes by PCR. bla TEM gene was detected in seven isolates, bla OXA gene in 10 isolates and bla CTX

  14. Development of an Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Method Suitable for Performing During Space Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, James H.; Skweres, Joyce A.; Mishra S. K.; McElmeel, M. Letticia; Maher, Louise A.; Mulder, Ross; Lancaster, Michael V.; Pierson, Duane L.

    1997-01-01

    Very little is known regarding the affects of the microgravity environment of space flight upon the action of antimicrobial agents on bacterial pathogens. This study was undertaken to develop a simple method for conducting antibacterial susceptibility tests during a Space Shuttle mission. Specially prepared susceptibility test research cards (bioMerieux Vitek, Hazelwood, MO) were designed to include 6-11 serial two-fold dilutions of 14 antimicrobial agents, including penicillins, cephalosporins, a Beta-lactamase inhibitor, vancomycin, erythromycin, tetracycline, gentamicin, ciprofloxacin, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICS) of the drugs were determined by visual reading of color endpoints in the Vitek research cards made possible by incorporation of a colorimetric growth indicator (alamarBlue(Trademark), Accumed International, Westlake, OH). This study has demonstrated reproducible susceptibility results when testing isolates of Staphylococcus aurezis, Group A Streptococcus, Enterococcusfaecalis, Escherichia coli (beta-lactamase positive and negative strains), Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae, and Pseudomoiias aeruginosa. In some instances, the MICs were comparable to those determined using a standard broth microdilution method, while in some cases the unique test media and format yielded slightly different values, that were themselves reproducible. The proposed in-flight experiment will include inoculation of the Vitek cards on the ground prior to launch of the Space Shuttle, storage of inoculated cards at refrigeration temperature aboard the Space Shuttle until experiment initiation, then incubation of the cards for 18-48 h prior to visual interpretation of MICs by the mission's astronauts. Ground-based studies have shown reproducible MICs following storage of inoculated cards for 7 days at 4-8 C to accommodate the mission's time schedule and the astronauts' activities. For comparison, ground-based control

  15. A reliable phenotypic assay for detection of ESBLs and AmpCs in MBL-producing gram-negative bacteria with the use of aminophenylboronic acid, dipicolinic acid and cloxacillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Saswati; Chatterjee, Somdatta; Mitra, Shravani; Basu, Sulagna

    2015-08-01

    ESBLs and AmpCs may escape detection when they coexist with metallo-β-lactamases such as New Delhi Metallo-β-lactamases-1. In this study a combination disk assay was established using cefotaxime, cefotaxime/clavulanic acid, cefotaxime/clavulanic acid/cloxacillin, cefoxitin and cefoxitin/phenylboronic acid/cloxacillin on Mueller Hinton agar supplemented with dipicolinic acid for determination of β-lactamases in the presence of NDM-1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Multi drug resistance and Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases in clinical isolates of Shigella: A study from New Delhi, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Prabhav; Uppal, Beena; Ghosh, Roumi; Krishna Prakash, S; Chakravarti, Anita; Jha, Arun Kumar; Rajeshwari, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Shigella is an important cause of gastroenteritis in local Indian population, as well as of traveler's diarrhea in the international visitors to India. These patients often require appropriate antimicrobial therapy; however, rapid development of antimicrobial resistance poses a major hurdle in achieving this goal. A prospective study was conducted during 2009-12 in New Delhi, India, including 6339 stool samples from gastroenteritis patients. 121 Shigella strains were identified on the basis of colony morphology, biochemical reactions, serotyping and ipaH gene based PCR. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing by disc diffusion, MIC determination by Vitek(®) 2 and phenotypic tests for ESBL/AmpC production were done. Nineteen percent strains (23/121) were found to be resistant to third generation cephalosporins and all were phenotypically confirmed to be ESBL producers; one strain was positive for AmpC. ESBL producing strains were also found to be significantly more resistant (p Shigella is a matter of concern for the local population as well as international travelers. Therefore, better national level antimicrobial management programs are the priority needs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and other beta-lactamases (ampC and carbapenemase) producing Enterobacteriaceae: association with health-care and cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gómez, Miriam; Guío, Laura; Hernández, José Luis; Vilar, Begoña; Pijoán, José Ignacio; Montejo, José Miguel

    2015-10-01

    Bloodstream infections due to multire-sistant Enterobacteriaceae are a major matter of concern nowadays. The present study evaluated the impact of these infections in our area. Prospective observational study of a cohort of patients with bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and other beta-lactamases producing organisms among hospitalized patients in Cruces Hospital for 2 years. We conducted a descriptive analysis, a subgroup analysis (cancer vs. non-cancer patients) and a mortality analysis. During the study period, 3409 episodes of bacteraemia were diagnosed, of which 124 (3.6%) were ESBL and other beta-lactamases producing Enterobacteriaceae. 40.3% of the cases were nosocomial, 15.3% community acquired and 44.4% were health-care associated. 44.4% of the cohort had cancer as underlying disease. The most commonly isolated organism was E. coli (83% of cases), regardless of the source of infection. 58.1% of patients received inadequate empirical therapy. 7 day-mortality was 10.5% and 30 day-mortality was 21.8%. None of the analyzed variables showed association with 7 and 14 day-mortality, but the presence of solid cancer (p= 0.032) and advanced HIV infection (p = 0.027), were significantly associated with higher 30 day-mortality. More than half of bacteraemia episodes affected outpatients and most of them were health-care associated episodes. Even though more than half of the patients received inadequate empirical treatment, this was not related to higher mortality. We only found an association between 30 day-mortality and the presence of underlying solid malignancy or advanced HIV infection.

  18. Global gene expression profiling and antibiotic susceptibility after repeated exposure to the carbon monoxide-releasing molecule-2 (CORM-2 in multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Sahlberg Bang

    Full Text Available Treatment of urinary tract infections is today a challenge due to the increasing prevalence of multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. There is an urgent need for new treatment strategies for multidrug-resistant UPEC and preferably with targets that have low potential for development of resistance. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs are novel and potent antibacterial agents. The present study examines the transcriptomic targets of CORM-2 in a multidrug-resistant ESBL-producing UPEC isolate in response to a single exposure to CORM-2 and after repeated exposure to CORM-2. The bacterial viability and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC were also examined after repeated exposure to CORM-2. Microarray analysis revealed that a wide range of processes were affected by CORM-2, including a general trend of down-regulation in energy metabolism and biosynthesis pathways and up-regulation of the SOS response and DNA repair. Several genes involved in virulence (ibpB, antibiotic resistance (marAB, mdtABC and biofilm formation (bhsA, yfgF were up-regulated, while some genes involved in virulence (kpsC, fepCEG, entABE, antibiotic resistance (evgA and biofilm formation (artIP were down-regulated. Repeated exposure to CORM-2 did not alter the gene expression patterns, the growth inhibitory response to CORM-2 or the MIC values for CORM-2, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin and trimethoprim. This study identifies several enriched gene ontologies, modified pathways and single genes that are targeted by CORM-2 in a multidrug-resistant UPEC isolate. Repeated exposure to CORM-2 did not change the gene expression patterns or fold changes and the susceptibility to CORM-2 remained after repeated exposure.

  19. Utility of the ceftazidime-imipenem antagonism test (CIAT to detect and confirm the presence of inducible AmpC beta-lactamases among enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlademir Vicente Cantarelli

    Full Text Available Detection of AmpC beta-lactamase production by enterobacteria has been problematic. Contrary to ESBLs, no specific guidelines are available for detection and confirmation of AmpC production by clinical relevant microorganisms. Moreover, some bacterial species may produce inducible AmpC beta-lactamases that can be easily overlooked by routine susceptibility tests. We reported here a new test based on the strong inducible effect of imipenem on AmpC genes and the consequent antagonism with ceftazidime. This test is very simple and proved to be helpful in detecting AmpC-inducible enzymes among several species of clinical isolates.

  20. Identification of Plasmid-Mediated AmpC β-Lactamases in Escherichia coli, Klebsiella spp., and Proteus Species Can Potentially Improve Reporting of Cephalosporin Susceptibility Testing Results ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenover, Fred C.; Emery, Shannon L.; Spiegel, Carol A.; Bradford, Patricia A.; Eells, Samantha; Endimiani, Andrea; Bonomo, Robert A.; McGowan, John E.

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if the interpretations of extended-spectrum and advanced-spectrum cephalosporins (ESCs and ASCs, respectively) for isolates of Enterobacteriaceae would be impacted by the results of aminophenylboronic acid (APBA) testing. Fifty-three isolates of Escherichia coli, 21 Klebsiella species, and 6 Proteus species that were resistant to at least one ESC were tested by disk diffusion with ceftazidime and cefotetan disks with and without APBA. Ceftazidime disks with and without clavulanic acid (CLAV) were also tested to confirm extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) carriage. Twenty-nine (36.3%) isolates were only APBA test positive, 27 were only CLAV test positive, 2 were positive with both substrates, and 22 were negative with both substrates. Thirteen (41.9%) of the 31 APBA-test-positive isolates (all E. coli) tested susceptible to cefotaxime, ceftriaxone, or ceftazidime. Since clinical data suggest that AmpC-producing isolates should be reported as resistant to all ESCs, APBA testing can be helpful in identifying such organisms. Screening for AmpC-producing organisms using nonsusceptibility to cefoxitin and amoxicillin-clavulanate was less specific than APBA testing; it identified ESBL as well as AmpC-producing organisms. Only 18 of 31 APBA-positive isolates were positive by PCR for an AmpC β-lactamase gene. Thus, testing with APBA could improve the accuracy of reporting ESCs, especially for E. coli. However, results of APBA and CLAV testing did not correlate well for isolates containing both AmpC β-lactamases and ESBLs. Thus, additional data are needed before formal recommendations can be made on changing the reporting of ASC test results. PMID:19036936

  1. Microbiology System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Technology originating in a NASA-sponsored study of the measurement of microbial growth in zero gravity led to the development of Biomerieux Vitek, Inc.'s VITEK system. VITEK provides a physician with accurate diagnostic information and identifies the most effective medication. Test cards are employed to identify organisms and determine susceptibility to antibiotics. A photo-optical scanner scans the card and monitors changes in the growth of cells contained within the card. There are two configurations - VITEK and VITEK JR as well as VIDAS, a companion system that detects bacteria, viruses, etc. from patient specimens. The company was originally created by McDonnell Douglas, the NASA contractor.

  2. Susceptibility to disinfectants in antimicrobial-resistant and -susceptible isolates of Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium from poultry-ESBL/AmpC-phenotype of E. coli is not associated with resistance to a quaternary ammonium compound, DDAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, N; Boss, J; Lettmann, S; Fritz, B; Schwaiger, K; Bauer, J; Hölzel, C S

    2017-06-01

    The spread of bacteria that are simultaneously resistant to disinfectants and antimicrobials would constitute an unsettling scenario. In order to explore an association between antimicrobial resistance and reduced susceptibility to biocides/microbicides (disinfectants) in agriculture, we investigated Escherichia coli (n = 438) and enterococci (n = 120) isolated from six different flocks of the same poultry farm with known history of antimicrobial treatment. Susceptibility to disinfectants (formic acid and a quaternary ammonium compound (QAC), didecyldimethylammoniumchloride-DDAC) was assessed by macrodilution according to guidelines of the German Veterinary Society. Escherichia coli, Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus faecium were screened (i) for reduced biocide susceptibility and (ii) for an association of biocide susceptibility and antimicrobial resistance including the production of extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL) and the hyperproduction of AmpC-type beta-lactamases. DDAC inhibited ESBL/AmpC(hyper)-producing E. coli (n = 53) from poultry at similar or slightly lower inhibitory concentrations, compared with non-ESBL/AmpC strains (median MIC = 0·36 vs 1·44 mg l -1 ). In contrast, DDAC-MICs were positively correlated with several other antibiotic MICs (e.g. piperacillin and sulphamethoxazole + trimethoprim in E. coli, chloramphenicol in E. faecalis) and increased DDAC-MICs were statistically linked to high-level aminoglycoside resistance in enterococci (streptomycin high level). DDAC-MICs did not correlate with the presence of the integron marker qacEDelta1. This study provides indication that residual disinfectant might be able to select antimicrobial-resistant enterococci, but not ESBL-/AmpC (hyper)producing E. coli from poultry. While ESBL-/AmpC-E. coli were inhibited at disinfectant concentrations comparable to or lower than wildtype values, low concentrations of QACs might be able to select other antimicrobial-resistant E

  3. Evaluation of mini-VIDAS rapid test for detection of Listeria monocytogenes from production lines of fresh to cold-smoked fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaz-Velho, M; Duarte, G; Gibbs, P

    2000-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the efficacy of the mini-VIDAS Listeria monocytogenes (LMO) system (BioMérieux Vitek, Inc., Missouri, USA) for detection of L. monocytogenes in environmental and fish samples from three Portuguese cold-smoking plants and from their fresh fish suppliers. Mini-VIDAS-LMO is a fully automated system that uses fluorescent ELFA (Enzyme Linked Fluorescent Assay) technology for detection of Listeria monocytogenes antigens in food. It can be a rapid screening method alternative to time consuming classical isolation and identification. Two hundred and ninety five samples were tested in mini-VIDAS-LMO and in parallel by the ISO 11290-1 traditional protocol. The mini-VIDAS-LMO detected 8 of the 11 confirmed positive samples and presented 11 false positive results. The specificity of the mini-VIDAS-LMO found in this experiment was 0.96 and the sensitivity 0.73.

  4. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active againstStaphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at 90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  5. Ceftaroline activity tested against contemporary Latin American bacterial pathogens (2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert K. Flamm

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 2484 target bacterial pathogens were collected (one per patient episode from patients in 16 Latin American medical centers located in seven nations during 2011. Isolate identity was confirmed at a coordinating laboratory and susceptibility testing was performed for ceftaroline and comparator agents according to reference broth microdilution methods. A total of 30.0% of isolates were from respiratory tract, 29.4% from skin and skin structure, 21.4% from blood stream, 7.9% from urinary tract and 11.3% from other sites. Ceftaroline was active against Staphylococcus aureus (42.8% MRSA with 83.6% of the isolates at ≤1 mg/L and all isolates at ≤2 mg/L (MIC5090, 0.25/2 mg/L. National MRSA rates ranged from a low of 28.8% in Colombia to a high of 68.1% in Chile. All Streptococcus pyogenes and Streptococcus agalactiae were susceptible to ceftaroline (MIC50/90 values were at ≤0.015/≤0.015 mg/L for both. All Streptococcus pneumoniae were susceptible to ceftaroline, linezolid, tigecycline and vancomycin. Susceptibility to ceftriaxone was at 88.4% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 73.9% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for all S. pneumoniae. Ceftriaxone susceptibility was only at 33.3% (CLSI non-meningitis interpretive criteria and 0.0% (CLSI meningitis interpretive criteria for penicillin-intermediate (penicillin MIC, 4 mg/L strains. All Haemophilus influenzae (29.4% β-lactamase-positive isolates were susceptible to ceftaroline, amoxicillin–clavulanate, ceftriaxone, and levofloxacin. For the Latin American region, the ESBL-phenotype rate was 37.6% for Escherichia coli and 53.3% for Klebsiella pneumoniae. Ceftaroline was not active against ESBL-phenotype strains but was active against >90.0% of the non-ESBL-phenotype. The spectrum of activity of ceftaroline against pathogens from Latin America indicates that it merits further study for its potential use in the Latin American region.

  6. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase- and Carbapenemase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Egyptian Patients with Suspected Blood Stream Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H M Abdallah

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of extended-spectrum β-lactamase and carbapenemase production among Enterobacteriaceae isolated from Egyptian patients with suspected blood stream infection.Ninety-four Enterobacteriaceae blood culture isolates from Egyptian patients with suspected blood stream infection were collected, one isolate per patient. Identification of bacterial isolates was performed with MALDI-TOF (MS-based Vitek MS system, bioMerieux. Screening for ESBLs and carbapenemases production was done with the Vitek 2 system (bioMérieux. ESBL production was confirmed using the combined disk diffusion method for cefotaxime, ceftazidime, and cefepime, all with and without clavulanic acid (Rosco. Real-time PCR and sequencing were used to characterize the resistance genes. The phylogenetic groups of E. coli were identified by a PCR-based method.Of the 94 Enterobacteriaceae isolates 46 (48.93% showed an ESBL phenotype. One Enterobacter spp isolate was ESBL-producer and meropenem-resistant. The genetic analysis showed that CTX-M was present in 89.13% (41/46 of the ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae, whereas TEM and SHV were detected in 56.52% (26/46 and 21.74% (10/46 respectively (47.83% of the ESBL-producing isolates were multidrug resistant (MDR. Eleven out of 30 ESBL-producing E-coli isolates were assigned to phylogroup B2, followed by groups B1 (8 isolates, A (6 isolates and D (5 isolates.The high ESBL-E rates (48.93% found in this study together with the identification of one carbapenem-resistant Enterobacter spp isolate is worrisome. Our results indicate that systems for monitoring and detection of ESBL-producing bacteria in Egyptian hospitals have to be established. Also strict hospital infection control policies with the restriction of the consumption of extended-spectrum cephalosporins are necessary.

  7. Performance of EUCAST and CLSI approaches for co-amoxiclav susceptibility testing conditions for clinical categorization of a collection of Escherichia coli isolates with characterized resistance phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díez-Aguilar, María; Morosini, María-Isabel; López-Cerero, Lorena; Pascual, Álvaro; Calvo, Jorge; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Marco, Francesc; Vila, Jordi; Ortega, Adriana; Oteo, Jesús; Cantón, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    There are different methodological recommendations for in vitro testing of the co-amoxiclav combination. Performance of co-amoxiclav MIC testing for Escherichia coli by the standard ISO microdilution method (ISO 20776-1) was compared using EUCAST (fixed 2 mg/L clavulanate concentration) and CLSI (2 : 1 ratio) interpretive criteria. MICs were determined by broth microdilution using a 2 : 1 ratio and fixed clavulanate concentrations (2 and 4 mg/L) for 160 clinical E. coli isolates with characterized resistance mechanisms. Essential agreements, categorical agreements and relative errors were determined. For all isolates, essential agreement between microdilution using 2 mg/L clavulanate and a 2 : 1 ratio was 25.6%. For ESBL-producing isolates, considering EUCAST breakpoints, 55% of isolates tested with 2 mg/L clavulanate were classified as resistant; conversely, 95% of isolates tested with 4 mg/L clavulanate were susceptible. When using CLSI breakpoints and a 2 : 1 ratio, 90% of isolates were susceptible and 10% were intermediate. Variation in the clavulanate concentration gave different susceptibility testing results, particularly among ESBL-producing E. coli isolates. The in vitro concentration of clavulanate that better correlates with clinical outcome is still under debate and should be established. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Phenotypic Tests for the Detection of β-Lactamase-Producing Enterobacteriaceae Isolated from Different Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Daniele V; Van Der Sand, Sueli T

    2016-07-01

    Some bacteria from the Enterobacteriaceae family are showing a significant capability to disseminate β-lactams resistance mechanisms among them, and these same mechanisms can be carried out from the hospital environment to superficial water. The aim of this study was to evaluate different phenotypic methods for the detection β-lactamases production by enterobacteria isolated from the anthropogenic environment: hospital wastewater and from a stream that cross the city of Porto Alegre. The applied tests were the modified Hodge test (MHT) and phenotypic tests with the following inhibitors: carbapenemase-phenylboronic acid (APB), metallo-β-lactamase-EDTA, AmpC β-lactamase-cloxacillin, and the confirmatory test for extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-clavulanic acid. For this evaluation, 131 isolates were initially subjected to antibiogram using the following antimicrobials: cefotaxime (30 µg), cefpodoxime (10 μg), ceftazidime (30 µg), ertapenem (10 μg), meropenem (10 μg), and aztreonam (30 μg). After this first screening, 62 isolates showed a profile resistance for at least one antimicrobial. These isolates were subjected to all phenotypic tests. Of those, 40 isolates were positive for at least one phenotypic test. In MHT test, one isolate was positive and five were with inconclusive results. The results achieved with the inhibitors are as follows: APB 25/40 positive strains; EDTA 8/40 positive strains; and with CLOXA 2/40 positive strains. ESBL production was observed for 34/40 strains. This assessment shows a high level of bacteria which can produce enzymes that inactivate β-lactams present in the different environment like the stream waters and from the hospital settings.

  9. [Antimicrobial resistance monitoring in Lower Saxony (ARMIN): first trends for MRSA, ESBL-producing Escherichia coli and VRE from 2006 to 2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharlach, M; Wagner, D; Dreesman, J; Pulz, M

    2011-11-01

    Antimicrobial resistance is one of the most important health topics of the past few years. To identify regional trends of antimicrobial resistance in inpatient and outpatient care, the Governmental Institute of Public Health of Lower Saxony (Germany) launched the sentinel system ARMIN (Antimicrobial Resistance Monitoring in Lower Saxony). Currently 9 laboratories participate as sentinel sites and contribute single case data of their microbiological results. Data are presented by an interactive data query in the internet. From 2006 to 2010 laboratories reported about 800 000 diagnostic test results. The proportion of MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus) among all Staphylococcus aureus increased from 19.5% in 2006 to 23.4% in 2010 for inpatient care in Lower Saxony. During the same period Escherichia coli resistance to cefotaxime for inpatient care increased from 3.0% to 8.8%. Enterococcus faecium resistance to vancomycin decreased from 13.6% to 5.6%. Currently the emphasis of ARMIN is on the description of trends and on the information of prescribing physicians. A quality circle was established to improve standardisation. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. A two-hour antibiotic susceptibility test by ATP-bioluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; García-Loygorri Jordán de Urries, María Cristina; Gutiérrez Rodríguez, María Purificación; Simarro Grande, María; Orduña Domingo, Antonio; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The antibiotic susceptibility test (AST) in Clinical Microbiology laboratories is still time-consuming, and most procedures take 24h to yield results. In this study, a rapid antimicrobial susceptibility test using ATP-bioluminescence has been developed. The design of method was performed using five ATCC collection strains of known susceptibility. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on 10 strains of enterococci, 10 staphylococci, 10 non-fermenting gram negative bacilli, and 13 Enterobacteriaceae from patients. The agreement obtained in the sensitivity between the ATP-bioluminescence method and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and VITEK2) was 100%. In summary, the preliminary results obtained in this work show that the ATP-bioluminescence method could provide a fast and reliable AST in two hours. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular and epidemiological analysis of nosocomial carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella spp. using repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treviño, Mercedes; Navarro, Daniel; Barbeito, Gema; García-Riestra, Carlos; Crespo, Carlos; Regueiro, Benito J

    2011-09-01

    Infections with carbapenem-resistant enterobacteria are an emerging threat. This study reports the microbiologic, clinical, and epidemiologic features and the therapeutic outcomes of the infections caused by carbapenem- and pandrug-resistant Klebsiella emerged in our hospital. Fingerprinting analyses by automated repetitive extragenic palindromic-polymerase chain reaction (rep-PCR) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry are also compared. Carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella spp. affecting 13 patients were investigated using automated rep-PCR (DiversiLab System) and MALDI-TOF. Species identification was performed by Vitek 2 System and MALDI-TOF. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was made using Vitek 2 System and Etest. Screening for extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) and carbapenemase production was made by double disk synergy and Hodge tests, respectively. Synergy studies were performed using Etest. DNA array was used for detection of KPC and ESBLs. bla(VIM-1) gene was amplified by PCR and sequencing. Use of carbapenems in the hospital was studied. A total of 13 patients were found to be colonized/infected with carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella. All patients were previously submitted to surgery and/or presented with severe underlying disease. After carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella isolation, the majority of the patients were treated with amikacin plus carbapenem, tigecycline, or fosfomycin. All Klebsiella isolates (n = 14), except two, had the bla(VIM-1) gene and all Klebsiella pneumoniae also had bla(SHV) gene associated with ESBL production. DiversiLab system showed higher discriminatory power than MALDI-TOF for strain typing. The risk of a rapid dissemination and the persistence of these multidrug-resistant strains through the time determine the need to implement routine procedures for metallo-beta-lactamase detection and measures for prevention of the spread of these microorganisms. The combined use of

  12. Prevalence of Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamases (ESBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Resistance to broad spectrum β lactams, mediated by extended spectrum beta lactamase (ESβL) is an increasing problem worldwide. Production of these enzymes in clinical infections can result in treatment failure if one of the second or third generation cephalosporins is used. This study investigates the incidence of ESBL ...

  13. SHV-type extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL are encoded in related plasmids from enterobacteria clinical isolates from Mexico beta-Lactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE tipo SHV están codificadas en plásmidos relacionados en aislamientos clínicos de enterobacterias en México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulises Garza-Ramos

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In this work we report the molecular characterization of beta-lactam antibiotics resistance conferred by genes contained in plasmids from enterobacteria producing extended-spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Fourteen enterobacterial clinical isolates selected from a group of strains obtained from seven different hospitals in Mexico during 1990-1992 and 1996-1998 were analyzed at the Bacterial Resistance Laboratory (National Institute Public Health, Cuernavaca. Molecular characterization included PFGE, IEF of beta-lactamases, bacterial conjugation, PCR amplification and DNA sequencing, plasmid extraction and restriction. RESULTS: Isolates were genetically unrelated. ESBL identified were SHV-2 (5/14 and SHV-5 (9/14 type. Cephalosporin-resistance was transferable in 9 of 14 (64% clinical isolates with only one conjugative plasmid, DNA finger printing showed a similar band pattern in plasmids. CONCLUSIONS: The dissemination of cephalosporin resistance was due to related plasmids carrying the ESBL genes.OBJETIVO: En este trabajo se reporta la caracterización molecular de la resistencia a antibiótico beta-lactámicos conferida por genes contenidos en plásmidos de enterobacterias productoras de beta-lactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEEs. MATERIAL Y MÉTODOS: Catorce aislamientos clínicos de enterobacterias fueron seleccionados por conveniencia de un banco de cepas obtenidas de siete diferentes hospitales de México durante los periodos 1990-1992 y 1996-1998 y fueron procesados en el Laboratorio de Resistencia Bacteriana (Instituto Nacional de Salud Pública, Cuernavaca. En la caracterización se empleó PFGE, IEF para beta-lactamasas, conjugación bacteriana, amplificación por PCR y secuenciación de DNA, extracción y restricción de plásmidos. RESULTADOS: Las 14 cepas fueron no relacionadas genéticamente. Se identificaron BLEEs tipo SHV-2 (5/14 y SHV-5 (9/14. La resistencia a cefalosporinas fue transferida por

  14. Comparison of three phenotypic techniques for detection of methicillin resistance in Staphylococcus spp. reveals a species-dependent performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Michael A; Burden, Julia; Stuart, J Ian; Reyes, Romina C; Lannigan, Robert; Milburn, Sue; Diagre, Deb; Wilson, Bev; Hussain, Zafar

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of the cefoxitin screen in Vitek 2 Gram-positive panels for recognizing methicillin-resistant strains of staphylococci. Seven hundred and ninety-nine non-duplicate isolates of Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative strains were included in the study. Methicillin resistance was measured using PCR for the mecA gene, the CLSI cefoxitin disc diffusion method, the Vitek 2 cefoxitin screen and the Vitek 2 oxacillin susceptibility test. Compared with the molecular detection of methicillin resistance the overall sensitivities and specificities of the phenotypic tests for cefoxitin disc diffusion were 94.9% and 97.0%, for Vitek 2 cefoxitin screen were 94.6% and 93.5% and for Vitek 2 oxacillin susceptibility test were 93.8% and 77.9%. The cephamycin tests (cefoxitin disc diffusion and Vitek 2 screen) were not able to identify mecA-positive strains of Staphylococcus simulans. In addition, the performance of the Vitek 2 system was poor against Staphylococcus cohnii subspecies, Staphylococcus hominis hominis and Staphylococcus saprophyticus. Overall, the performance of the Vitek 2 system for differentiating mecA-positive staphylococci was comparable to PCR and the CLSI disc diffusion method; however, performance was species-dependent. Thus, before accepting the results produced by Vitek 2, species identification may be required.

  15. Test Architecture, Test Retrofit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred

    2009-01-01

    Just like buildings, tests are designed and built for specific purposes, people, and uses. However, both buildings and tests grow and change over time as the needs of their users change. Sometimes, they are also both used for purposes other than those intended in the original designs. This paper explores architecture as a metaphor for language…

  16. [Susceptibilities of multidrug-resistant pathogens responsible for complicated skin and soft tissue infections to standard bacteriophage cocktails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündoğdu, Aycan; Kılıç, Hüseyin; Ulu Kılıç, Ayşegül; Kutateladze, Mzia

    2016-04-01

    Skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) may represent a wide clinical spectrum from cellulitis to high-mortality associated necrotizing fasciitis. Limitations in therapy due to the multiple drug resistance, leads to increase in the morbidity and mortality rates, especially in complicated SSTIs such as diabetic foot, decubitus, and surgical wound infections. Therefore, alternative treatment strategies other than antibiotics are needed in appropriate clinical conditions. "Bacteriophage therapy", which is an old method and has been used as part of standard treatment in some countries such as Georgia and Russia, has again become popular worldwide. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro susceptibilities of multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens isolated from patients with complicated SSTIs, against standard bacteriophage (phage) cocktails. Six different ready-made phage preparations [Pyophage, Intestiphage, ENKO, SES, Fersisi and Staphylococcal Bacteriophage (Sb)] used in this study have been provided by G. Eliava Institute, Georgia. Because of the absence of ready-made phage preparations for Acinetobacter baumannii and Klebsiella pneumoniae, Φ1-Φ7 and ΦKL1- ΦKL3 phages were used provided from the same institute's phage library, respectively. Isolation and identification of the pathogens from abscess and wound samples of patients with SSTIs were performed by conventional methods and automatized VITEK(®)-2 (bioMerieux, ABD) system. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was conducted complying CLSI standards' and the bacteria that were resistant to at least two different antibiotic groups were considered as MDR. Accordingly, a total of 33 isolates, nine of them were E.coli (8 ESBL and 1 ESBL + carbapenemase positive); nine were MDR P.aeruginosa; nine were MDR A.baumannii; three were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and three were K.pneumoniae (1 ESBL, 1 carbapenemase and 1 ESBL + carbapenemase positive) were included in the study. The

  17. Prevalence and antimicrobial susceptibility of Extended Spectrum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lactamase (ESBL) producing gram-negative uropathogens in Sokoto, Nigeria. ... Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was determined using the modified Kirby Bauer method. Confirmation of ESBL phenotype was performed by Double-Disc Synergy Test ...

  18. Testing "Compatibility Testing."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robins, Elliot; Huston, Ted L.

    Most models of marital choice are attempts to explain choices within the field of available eligibles. The essence of compatibility testing is that people select their mates by evaluating the match between psychological characteristics after sorting the available field on the basis of social characteristics. A compatibility model seems to require…

  19. Test plan :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, Stephen F.

    2013-05-01

    This test plan is a document that provides a systematic approach to the planned testing of rooftop structures to determine their actual load carrying capacity. This document identifies typical tests to be performed, the responsible parties for testing, the general feature of the tests, the testing approach, test deliverables, testing schedule, monitoring requirements, and environmental and safety compliance.

  20. Pinworm test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxyuriasis test; Enterobiasis test; Tape test ... diagnose this infection is to do a tape test. The best time to do this is in ... lay their eggs at night. Steps for the test are: Firmly press the sticky side of a ...

  1. Predictive Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Predictive testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... you make the decision. What Is Predictive Genetic Testing Predictive genetic testing searches for genetic changes, or ...

  2. Pharmacogenomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Pharmacogenomic testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to fit your genetic makeup What Is Pharmacogenomic Testing? Pharmacogenomic testing is done before your healthcare provider ...

  3. Mono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Heterophile Test Heterophile Antibody Test Monospot Formal Name Infectious Mononucleosis Rapid Test This article was last reviewed on ... Why Get Tested? To detect and help diagnose infectious mononucleosis (mono) When To Get Tested? When a person, ...

  4. [Bacterial strains isolated from systemic infections and reported for evaluation and antibiotic resistance surveillance by the "Dr. Victor Babeş" Clinical Hospital for Infectious and Tropical Diseases, Bucharest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Maria; Biolan, Tatiana; Dascălu, Amalia; Mozes, Elena; Toderan, Andreea; Calistru, Petre; Ceauşu, Emanoil

    2010-01-01

    Testing antibiotic resistance of bacterial strains (compulsor, reported for EARSS surveillance) isolated from patients hospitalised for systemic infection in the "Dr. V. Babe" Hospital for Infectious and Tropical Diseases during 01.01.2005-11.11.2009, for a dynamic evaluation and for the surveillance of resistance emergence for certain classes of antibiotics. Bacterial isolation: BacT/ALERT system; strain identification in classic and automated system (ATB Expression. VITEK 2C): antibioresistance: disk-difussion method (NCCLS 2005--CLSI 2009), MIC (E-Test, ATB/ Expression, VITEK 2C). Screening of ESBL-producing strains performed with double disk-difussion method (DDD). Reference strains used: S. aureus ATCC 25923, S. pneumoniae ATCC 49619, E. coli A TCC 25922, Enterococcus fiecalis ATCC 29212. During the studied period, 245 bacterial strains have been isolated, identified and tested (Staphylococcus aureus / 70, Streptococcus pneumoniae / 61, Enterococcus faecalis / 18, Enterococcus faecium / 5, Neisseria meningitidis / 18, E. coli / 73). out of 166 hemocultures and 79 cerebrospinal fluids / CSF. The average incidence of MRSA strains in systemic infections was 34.28%. 44.28% of the S. aureus strains were resistant to erythromycin, 17.14% to cyprofloxacyne, 15.71% to rifampicine, 14.49% to gentamycine. No strain resistant to vancomycine and linezolide. Streptococcus pneumoniae presented an average high resistance to penicillin G of 11.47%. and a 1.63% resistance to third generation cephalosporines. 0% resistance to vancomycine and rifampicine. 7/ 18 Enterococcus faecalis strains and 4/5 Enterococcus faecium strains presented high level resistance to gentamycine (CN 120 microg/disk) and no strain was resistant to vancomycine, teicoplanin or linezolid. The 18 Neisseria meningitidis strains were all sensitive to beta-lactams, macrolides, fluoroquinolones and cloramphenicol. For the 73 Escherichia coli strains, the average incidence of ESBL-producing isolates was 10

  5. Consequences of switching from a fixed 2 : 1 ratio of amoxicillin/clavulanate (CLSI) to a fixed concentration of clavulanate (EUCAST) for susceptibility testing of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leverstein-van Hall, Maurine A; Waar, Karola; Muilwijk, Jan; Cohen Stuart, James

    2013-11-01

    The CLSI recommends a fixed 2 : 1 ratio of co-amoxiclav for broth microdilution susceptibility testing of Enterobacteriaceae, while EUCAST recommends a fixed 2 mg/L clavulanate concentration. The aims of this study were: (i) to determine the influence of a switch from CLSI to EUCAST methodology on Escherichia coli susceptibility rates; (ii) to compare susceptibility results obtained using EUCAST-compliant microdilution with those from disc diffusion and the Etest; and (iii) to evaluate the clinical outcome of patients with E. coli sepsis treated with co-amoxiclav in relation to the susceptibility results obtained using either method. Resistance rates were determined in three laboratories that switched from CLSI to EUCAST cards with the Phoenix system (Becton Dickinson) as well as in 17 laboratories that continued to use CLSI cards with the VITEK 2 system (bioMérieux). In one laboratory, isolates were simultaneously tested by both the Phoenix system and either disc diffusion (n = 471) or the Etest (n = 113). Medical and laboratory records were reviewed for E. coli sepsis patients treated with co-amoxiclav monotherapy. Only laboratories that switched methodology showed an increase in resistance rates - from 19% in 2010 to 31% in 2011 (P CLSI methodology, but correlated better with clinical outcome. EUCAST-compliant microdilution and disc diffusion provided discrepant results.

  6. The Phantom Menace for Patients with Hepatobiliary Diseases: Shewanella haliotis, Often Misidentified as Shewanella algae in Biochemical Tests and MALDI-TOF Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Jung-Hyun; Park, Hyunwoong; Kim, Sunjoo

    2017-03-24

    Although Shewanella algae has been known to have weak pathogenicity, case reports on infections with this species have been steadily increasing. S. algae and S. haliotis are difficult to distinguish from each other with conventional phenotypic methods. We reviewed the microbiological and clinical features of S. algae and S. haliotis infections at our institute. Bacterial culture and identification reports from patient samples from 2010 to 2014 were reviewed to screen the cases of Shewanella infections. In addition to conventional biochemical tests, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry were performed for 19 stored bacterial isolates. Medical records were reviewed for clinical characteristics and laboratory findings. All isolates were identified as S. algae by using VITEK 2. MALDI-TOF also identified all isolates as S. algae with a 99.9 confidence value. In contrast, 16S rRNA analysis identified 10 isolates as S. algae and 9 isolates as S. haliotis. Both S. algae (60%) and S. haliotis (77%) infections were strongly associated with diseases of the hepatobiliary tract and pancreas. To distinguish between S. algae and S. haliotis, 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis seems more accurate than biochemical tests or MALDI-TOF. Patients with underlying diseases in the hepatobiliary tract and pancreas seem to be susceptible to these marine pathogens.

  7. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PMQR) genes and the prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) types in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Methods: Sixty-one ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates were studied. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed ...

  8. Ham test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acid hemolysin test; Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria - Ham test; PNH - Ham test ... BJ. In: Chernecky CC, Berger BJ, eds. Laboratory Tests and Diagnostic Procedures . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  9. Coombs test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Direct antiglobulin test; Indirect antiglobulin test; Anemia - hemolytic ... No special preparation is necessary for this test. ... There are 2 types of the Coombs test: Direct Indirect The direct ... that are stuck to the surface of red blood cells. Many diseases ...

  10. Trichomonas Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose Tests Gonorrhea Testing Gram Stain Growth Hormone Haptoglobin hCG Pregnancy ... With some NAATs, samples collected for testing of gonorrhea and chlamydial infections can also be used to ...

  11. Urodynamic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Urodynamic Testing What is the urinary tract? The urinary tract ... view of the urinary tract What is urodynamic testing? Urodynamic testing is any procedure that looks at ...

  12. Mono Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Mononucleosis (Mono) Test Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic ... Questions Related Content View Sources Also Known As Mononucleosis Spot Test Mononuclear Heterophile Test Heterophile Antibody Test ...

  13. Antifungal susceptibility testing of Candida in the Clinical Laboratory: how to do it, when to do it, and how to interpret it

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Manso

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Significant changes in the management of fungaemia have occurred in the last decade with increased use of fluconazole prophylaxis, of empirical treatment and of echinocandins as first-line agents for documented disease. The emergence of drug resistance in fungal pathogens has a profound impact on human health given limited number of antifungal drugs. Antifungal resistance in Candida may be either intrinsic or acquired and may be encountered in the antifungal drug exposed but also the antifungal drug naïve patient The variation in resistance rates between centers emphasizes that it is essential to have knowledge of the local Candida species distribution and antifungal resistance rates to guide initial therapy for Candida BSI. Moreover, all Candida isolates from blood and normally sterile sites should be identified to the species level. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute and European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing have developed breakpoints and epidemiological cutoff values that are now established for Candida spp. Clinical microbiology laboratories will be employed commercial susceptibility assays, rather than reference broth microdilution methods and comparative studies are particularly important. Vitek 2®, Etest® and Sensititre YeastOne® provided a high degree of essential agreement and comparable sensitivity and specificity to BMD-RPMI for identifying resistance to azole and echinocandins in Candida spp.

  14. [Epidemiological profile of uropathogenic enterobacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sbiti, Mohammed; Lahmadi, Khalid; Louzi, Lhoussaine

    2017-01-01

    Urinary tract infections due to enterobacteria producing extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL-E) constitute a infectious risk, a major therapeutic challenge and can even lead, in some cases, to a deadlock beacuse of their multi-resistance to antibiotics. This study aimed to determine the epidemiological profile of uropathogenic ESBL-E and to describe their current level of resistance to antibiotics for a better patient management according to local data. We conducted a retrospective study of all ESBL-E strains isolated from all cytobacteriogical testing of urine (CBEU) treated in the Microbiology Laboratory at the Military Hospital of Moulay Ismail, Meknes over a period of three years (from 1 January 2013 to 31 December 2015). Culture was performed according to conventional techniques and antibiogram was performed using Mueller-Hinten agar disk diffusion susceptibility test according to the recommendations from the Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility of the French Society for Microbiology (CA-SFM), year 2013/2014. This study allowed to report a significant overall prevalence of isolation of ESBL-E (12.2%), particularly among hospitalized patients (54.8%). The greater prevalence (72%) was registered in the Department of Urology. Among these, ESBL-E Escherichia coli constitutes the majority (61%) of the isolates, however Klebsiella pneumoniae is the major ESBL producer (25.8%) within the same species. The analysis of ESBL-E antibioresistance conducted during these three years revealed some co-resistances to ciprofloxacin (92.5%), sulfametoxazole-trimethoprim (88.4%), gentamycin (67.2%). Globally, our results are compliant with the data from the other Mediterranean countries, except for amikacin whose resistance was very low (6.1%) in our study. This study shows that the prevalence of ESBL-E in hospital is high and that its diffusion in community setting is a matter of concern. These ESBL-E are generally resistant to antibiotics, including molecules useful in

  15. Phenotypic detection of beta-lactamases production in enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković Ivana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Beta-lactam antibiotics are the most commonly used antibacterial drugs. However, many bacteria have developed resistance to these antibiotics, and the most common form of resistance is the production of beta-lactamase enzymes. Many members of the Enterobacteriaceae family produce different types of these enzymes. Objective. The aim of this study was to perform phenotypic detection of production and identification of beta-lactamase type in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from different clinical specimens from patients hospitalized in the Clinical Center of Serbia. Methods. The strains of Enterobacteriaceae were collected between November 2011 and January 2012 in the laboratory of the Clinical Center of Serbia. The isolates were identified according to the standard microbiology procedures and confirmed by the Vitek2 automated system. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by the disk diffusion method, and the phenotypic detection of production and identification of betalactamases was performed according to previously described methodologies. Results. In this study, a total of 172 Enterobacteriaceae strains were isolated. Further testing was performed on 54/145 (37.2% strains showing decreased susceptibility to beta-lactam antibiotics: 13/85 (15.3% Escherichia coli, 31/46 (67.4% Klebsiella pneumoniae and 10/14 (71.4% Proteus mirabilis. Among them, 40/145 (27.6% strains produced extended spectrum betalactamases (ESBLs, 9/145 (6.2% - AmpC, 1/145 (0.7% - K1 beta-lactamase and 4/145 (2.8% - carbapenemases. Carbapenemases were predominantly detected in K. pneumoniae (75%. Conclusion. Enterobacteriaceae produce different types of betalactamases, and the most common type in our study was ESBLs. Production of carbapenemases detected in Enterobacteriaceae is also an associated problem. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. ON 175039

  16. Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae among Travelers from the Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, Jessica A.; Kraakman, Margriet E.M.; Mesman, Romy; Bruijning, Marguerite L.; Bernards, Alexandra T.; Visser, Leo G.; Veldkamp, Karin Ellen

    2013-01-01

    A prospective cohort study was performed among travelers from the Netherlands to investigate the acquisition of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CP-E) and extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) and associated risk factors. Questionnaires were administered and rectal swab samples were collected and tested before and after traveler return. Of 370 travelers, 32 (8.6%) were colonized with ESBL-E before trave,; 113 (30.5%) acquired an ESBL-E during travel, and 26 were still colonized 6 months after return. No CP-E were found. Independent risk factors for ESBL-E acquisition were travel to South and East Asia. Multilocus sequence typing showed extensive genetic diversity among Escherichia coli. Predominant ESBLs were CTX-M enzymes. The acquisition rate, 30.5%, of ESBL-E in travelers from the Netherlands to all destinations studied was high. Active surveillance for ESBL-E and CP-E and contact isolation precautions may be recommended at admission to medical facilities for patients who traveled to Asia during the previous 6 months. PMID:23885972

  17. Fungal Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prep Fungal Smear, Culture, Antigen and Antibody Tests Mycology Tests Fungal Molecular Tests Potassium Hydroxide Preparation Calcofluor ... February 7, Modified). Calcofluor White with 10% KOH. Mycology Online [On-line information]. Available online at http:// ...

  18. Laboratory Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... age and race What you eat and drink Medicines you take How well you followed pre-test instructions Your doctor may also compare your results to results from previous tests. Laboratory tests are often part of a routine checkup ...

  19. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LDL-P) Lead Legionella Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus ... Site Tests: Albumin , CBC , CMP , Electrolytes , Iron Tests , Lipid Profile , Urinalysis , Prealbumin , Vitamin D , Vitamin B12 and Folate , ...

  20. Genetic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is responding to gluten. Unlike antibody testing, the HLA gene testing for celiac disease measures the presence or ... found on the surface of some cells. The HLA gene test for celiac disease can be performed at ...

  1. Genomic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Counseling Genomic Testing Pathogen Genomics Epidemiology Resources Genomic Testing Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Fact Sheet: ... Page The Need for Reliable Information on Genetic Testing In 2008, the former Secretary’s Advisory Committee on ...

  2. Randomization tests

    CERN Document Server

    Edgington, Eugene

    2007-01-01

    Statistical Tests That Do Not Require Random Sampling Randomization Tests Numerical Examples Randomization Tests and Nonrandom Samples The Prevalence of Nonrandom Samples in Experiments The Irrelevance of Random Samples for the Typical Experiment Generalizing from Nonrandom Samples Intelligibility Respect for the Validity of Randomization Tests Versatility Practicality Precursors of Randomization Tests Other Applications of Permutation Tests Questions and Exercises Notes References Randomized Experiments Unique Benefits of Experiments Experimentation without Mani

  3. Tissue tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sonneveld, C.; Voogt, W.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue tests are widely used in horticulture practice and have in comparison with soil or substrate testing advantages as well disadvantages in comparison with soil testing. One of the main advantages of tissue tests is the certainty that analysed nutrients in plant tissues are really present in the

  4. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    2009-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  5. Test chamber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leferink, Frank Bernardus Johannes

    1999-01-01

    A test chamber for measuring electromagnetic radiation emitted by an apparatus to be tested or for exposing an apparatus to be tested to an electromagnetic radiation field. The test chamber includes a reverberation chamber made of a conductive tent fabric. To create a statistically uniform field in

  6. Characterization of bacterial etiologic agents of biofilm formation in medical devices in critical care setup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revdiwala, Sangita; Rajdev, Bhaumesh M; Mulla, Summaiya

    2012-01-01

    Background. Biofilms contaminate catheters, ventilators, and medical implants; they act as a source of disease for humans, animals, and plants. Aim. Critical care units of any healthcare institute follow various interventional strategies with use of medical devices for the management of critical cases. Bacteria contaminate medical devices and form biofilms. Material and Methods. The study was carried out on 100 positive bacteriological cultures of medical devices which were inserted in hospitalized patients. The bacterial isolates were processed as per microtitre plate. All the isolates were subjected to antibiotic susceptibility testing by VITEK 2 compact automated systems. Results. Out of the total 100 bacterial isolates tested, 88 of them were biofilm formers. A 16-20-hour incubation period was found to be optimum for biofilm development. 85% isolates were multidrug resistants and different mechanisms of bacterial drug resistance like ESBL, carbapenemase, and MRSA were found among isolates. Conclusion. Availability of nutrition in the form of glucose enhances the biofilm formation by bacteria. Time and availability of glucose are important factors for assessment of biofilm progress. It is an alarm for those who are associated with invasive procedures and indwelling medical devices especially in patients with low immunity.

  7. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  8. The role of point-of-care tests in antibiotic stewardship for urinary tract infections in a resource-limited setting on the Thailand-Myanmar border.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmers, Lauren; Cross, Jessica; Chu, Cindy S; Phyo, Aung Pyae; Trip, Margreet; Ling, Clare; Carrara, Verena; Watthanaworawit, Wanitda; Keereecharoen, Lily; Hanboonkunupakarn, Borimas; Nosten, François; McGready, Rose

    2015-10-01

    Published literature from resource-limited settings is infrequent, although urinary tract infections (UTI) are a common cause of outpatient presentation and antibiotic use. Point-of-care test (POCT) interpretation relates to antibiotic use and antibiotic resistance. We aimed to assess the diagnostic accuracy of POCT and their role in UTI antibiotic stewardship. One-year retrospective analysis in three clinics on the Thailand-Myanmar border of non-pregnant adults presenting with urinary symptoms. POCT (urine dipstick and microscopy) were compared to culture with significant growth classified as pure growth of a single organism >10(5)  CFU/ml. In 247 patients, 82.6% female, the most common symptoms were dysuria (81.2%), suprapubic pain (67.8%) and urinary frequency (53.7%). After excluding contaminated samples, UTI was diagnosed in 52.4% (97/185); 71.1% (69/97) had a significant growth on culture, and >80% of these were Escherichia coli (20.9% produced extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)). Positive urine dipstick (leucocyte esterase ≥1 and/or nitrate positive) compared against positive microscopy (white blood cell >10/HPF, bacteria ≥1/HPF, epithelial cells antimicrobial to which the organism was not fully sensitive. One rapid, cost-effective POCT was too inaccurate to be used alone by healthcare workers, impeding antibiotic stewardship in a high ESBL setting. Appropriate prescribing is improved with concurrent use and concordant results of urine dipstick and microscopy. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. In vivo study on selection of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in the intestinal tract of pigs treated with extended-spectrum cephalosporins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Concalves Cavaco, Lina Maria; Aarestrup, Frank; Abatih Nji, Emmanuel

    2007-01-01

    treatment at day 4, 8, 15, 22 and 25. Total coliforms and cefotaxime-resistant coliforms were counted on MacConckey agar plates without and with 2mg/L cefotaxime, respectively. Selected cefotaxime-resistant colonies were identified as E. coli by biochemical testing and the presence of the gene was confirmed...... by PCR. Surprisingly, all but one of the pigs carried cephalosporin resistant coliforms carrying blaCTX-M genes in the faeces prior to inoculation. Following treatment both relative and total numbers of cefotaxime-resistant E. coli were significantly higher in the two groups treated with cephalosporins...

  10. Nationale test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test.......Professor Sven Erik Nordenbo og centerleder Niels Egelund, begge DPU, i samtale om nationale test....

  11. Magnesium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests G6PD Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Gastrin Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose ... as spinach, as well as whole grains and nuts. Foods that have dietary fiber are usually also ...

  12. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tests G6PD Gamma-Glutamyl Transferase (GGT) Gastrin Gastrointestinal Pathogens Panel Genetic Tests for Targeted Cancer Therapy Glucose ... hepatic). Copper is found in many foods including nuts, chocolate, mushrooms, shellfish, whole grains, dried fruits, and ...

  13. Osmolality Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Serum Screening, Second Trimester Measles and Mumps Tests Mercury Metanephrines Methotrexate Methylmalonic Acid Mononucleosis (Mono) Test MRSA ... Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis Kidney Disease Lactose Intolerance Lead Poisoning Leukemia Liver Disease Lung Cancer Lung Diseases Lupus ...

  14. Bilirubin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bilirubin test in conjunction with other laboratory tests ( alkaline phosphatase , aspartate aminotransferase , alanine aminotransferase ) when someone shows signs of abnormal liver function. A bilirubin level may be ordered when ...

  15. Gonorrhea Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... can get tested. You can input your zip code and find a local testing site. How can ...

  16. Syphilis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... can get tested. You can input your zip code and find a local testing site. Should I ...

  17. Trichomonas Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Known As T. vaginalis Wet Prep Formal Name Trichomonas vaginalis testing This article was last reviewed on March ... Tested? To diagnose an infection with the parasite Trichomonas vaginalis , which causes the sexually transmitted disease trichomoniasis When ...

  18. Chymotrypsin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... at http://www.upcmd.com/dot/examples/00218/description.html. Sainato, D., (2002, March). Genetic Testing for ...

  19. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content View Sources Ask Us Also Known As ACT Activated Coagulation Time Formal Name Activated Clotting Time ... What is being tested? The activated clotting time (ACT) is a test that is used primarily to ...

  20. Rubella Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... AACC products and services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities Rubella Test Share this page: Was this page helpful? ... Three-day Measles; 3-day Measles Formal name: Rubella Antibodies, IgM and IgG Related tests: TORCH ; Measles ...

  1. Gonorrhea Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Gonorrhea Testing Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At ... Sources Ask Us Also Known As GC Test Gonorrhea NAAT or NAT Neisseria gonorrhoeae Nucleic Acid Amplification ...

  2. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... absorbs too much iron, even on a normal diet. How is the sample collected for testing? A ...

  3. AMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... 50% of the cases of PBC will be discovered before a person has noticeable symptoms. What causes ...

  4. Lactate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests ...

  5. Allergy Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment. These include: allergy screening tests done in supermarkets or drug stores, home testing, applied kinesiology (allergy ... this topic visit the AAAAI Store . Utility navigation Donate Annual meeting Browse your conditions Check pollen counts ...

  6. Progesterone Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urine Culture Urine Metanephrines Urine Protein and Urine Protein to Creatinine Ratio Valproic Acid Vancomycin Vanillylmandelic Acid (VMA) VAP Vitamin A Vitamin B12 and Folate Vitamin D Tests Vitamin K VLDL Cholesterol von Willebrand Factor Warfarin Sensitivity Testing ...

  7. Rubella Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the blood testing required to obtain a marriage license. What does the test result mean? Adult ... their joints , especially their hands and wrists. Side effects are rarely seen in young children who get ...

  8. Fungal Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... at http://www.thoracic.org/education/breathing-in-america/resources/chapter-9-fungal-lung-disease.pdf. Accessed ...

  9. VMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... spasms and rapid eye movements referred to as "dancing eyes, dancing feet." The VMA test may also be ordered ... ratio is associated with a poorer prognosis . A variety of medications can interfere with VMA testing, but ...

  10. DHEAS Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Acidosis and Alkalosis Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison Disease Alcoholism Allergies Alzheimer Disease Anemia Angina Ankylosing Spondylitis Anthrax ... for Teens (Ages 13-18) Screening Tests for Young Adults (Ages 19-29) Screening Tests for Adults ( ...

  11. Pregnancy test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003432.htm Pregnancy test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A pregnancy test measures a hormone in the body called human ...

  12. Nationale Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv......Hvad er egentlig formålet med de nationale test? Bliver eleverne klogere af at blive testet? Og er der en sammenhæng mellem bandekrig og nationale test? Fysisk medie: dpu.dk/tv...

  13. HIV Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abroad Treatment Basic Statistics Get Tested Find an HIV testing site near you. Enter ZIP code or city Follow HIV/AIDS CDC HIV CDC HIV/AIDS See RSS | ... All Collapse All Should I get tested for HIV? CDC recommends that everyone between the ages of ...

  14. Testing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbøll, Joachim T.; Henriksen, Mogens; Nilson, Jesper K.

    1999-01-01

    , destroy the insulation and eventually cause breakdown. It is difficult to make a model of the real-life components that can be used to examine all of these phenomena. Some decisions have to be made on how to approach this problem, how to design a test cell and how the tests should be carried out....... In this paper, four suggestions on test cells are considered....

  15. Trypsinogen test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... like immunoreactivity; Serum trypsinogen; Immunoreactive trypsin Images Blood test References Forsmark CE. Chronic pancreatitis. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, eds. Sleisenger and Fordtran's Gastrointestinal ...

  16. Evaluation of automated systems for aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones susceptibility testing for Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichang Zhao

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Automated systems (MicroScan WalkAway 96 Plus, Phoenix 100, and Vitek 2 Compact are widely used in clinical laboratories nowadays. The aim of this study is to evaluate the performance of these three systems for susceptibility testing of aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones against Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE. Methods A total of 75 CRE isolates were used in this study. Quinolone resistance determinants (QRDs (qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS, aac(6′-Ib-cr, oqxAB and qepA and aminoglycoside resistance determinants (ARDs (aac(6′-Ib, armA, npmA, rmtA, rmtB, rmtC, rmtD and rmtE of these CRE were screened by PCR. The MICs of aminoglycosides (gentamicin and amikacin and fluoroquinolones (ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin to CRE obtained with the automated systems were compared with the reference method (agar dilution method. Results Totally, 97.3% (73/75 of CRE harbored QRDs. The qnr gene was the most common QRD determinant identified in 68 (96.7%, followed by aac (6′-Ib-cr in 56 (74.7%, oqxAB in 23 (30.7%, and qepA in 2 (2.7%, respectively. 22.7% (17/75 of CRE harbored ARD determinants. rmtA, rmtB and npmA were identified among these isolates in 6 (8.0%, 6 (8.0% and 5 (6.7%, respectively. A total of 900 results were obtained in this study. Overall, the total error rate was 9.89%. Twenty-eight very major errors (3.11%, 22 major errors (2.44% and 39 minor errors (4.33% were identified against agar dilution method. The very major errors were almost evenly distributed between results for fluoroquinolones (2.89% and aminoglycosides (3.33%, while the major errors and minor errors were more commonly found in the results of fluoroquinolones (3.11% and 6.44%, respectively than aminoglycosides (1.78% and 2.22%, respectively. Conclusions Our study shows that testing difficulties in susceptibility testing do exist in automated systems. We suggest clinical laboratories using automated systems should consider using a second

  17. Nationale test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundsgaard, Jeppe; Puck, Morten Rasmus

    Nationale test skubber undervisning i en forkert retning. Det er lærerne og skolelederne enige om. Men særligt skolelederne ser også muligheder for at bruge testen til at få viden om elevernes faglige kompetencer og om undervisningen. Det kommer til udtryk i rapporten Nationale test: Danske lærere...

  18. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and bicarbonate , to help regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base balance . This test measures the level of chloride in ... and bicarbonate , to help regulate the amount of fluid in the body and maintain the acid-base (pH) balance . Chloride and electrolyte tests may also be ordered ...

  19. Runflat Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-09

    the valve cores using a valve core removal tool to simulate a puncture flat. This should be done at the test site, after the tires are warmed up...F), and ideally be as close to the SAE standard temperature of 25 °C (77 °F) as possible. Test conditions should also be dry (no precipitation or

  20. Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on the bad things that could happen also fuels test anxiety. For example, someone worrying about doing poorly ... are shaking." Just like other types of anxiety, test anxiety can create a bad cycle: The more a person focuses on the negative ...

  1. Evaluation of LAMP Assay Using Phenotypic Tests and Conventional PCR for Detection of nuc and mecA genes Among Clinical Isolates of Staphylococcus spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Vanjari, Lavanya; Mamidi, Neeraja; Ede, Nagapriyanka; Vemu, Lakshmi

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a nuc and mecA gene specific Loop-mediated isothermal Amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid identification and detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus among clinical isolates. A total of 100 (70 from pus and 30 from blood), clinical isolates of Staphylococcus spp were screened for the nuc gene to differentiate between S.aureus and Coagulase negative Staphylococci (CONS) by a nuc gene specific LAMP assay. The isolates were also screened for the presence of the mec Agene by the mecA specific LAMP assay. The results were compared with the phenotypic identification and methicillin resistance by Vitek-2 system (bioMérieux, Marcy l'Etoile, France) and conventional PCR. Among 100 Staphylococcus isolates, there were 82 (82%) Staphylococcus aureus isolates and 18 (18%) coagulase negative Staphylococcus as detected by the Vitek 2, conventional PCR and the LAMP assay using the nuc gene. The mecA gene was detected by the LAMP assay in 56(56%) isolates (44 Methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 12 Methicillin resistant coagulase negative Staphylococcus (MRCONS), which were also identified by the Vitek 2 and conventional PCR as methicillin resistant. The results of the LAMP assay were available within 90min as compared to the Vitek 2 results (18- 24hours) and conventional PCR (3-4 hours). The present study proved that LAMP assay can be used for the simultaneous differentiation of Staphylococcal spp and detection of methicillin resistance.

  2. CHARACTERIZATION OF EXTENDED-SPECTRUM Β-LACTAMASE-PRODUCING ESCHERICHIA COLI STRAINS ISOLATED FROM DAIRY PRODUCTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahem Khoshbakht

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs are enzymes that hydrolyze the β-lactam ring, and ESBL-producing E. coli has rapidly spread worldwide with pose a serious hazard for humans. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of ESBL producing E. coli and molecular evaluation of four ESBL-associated genes among E. coli strains isolated from milk and cheese in southern Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility test was carried out for a total of 150 isolates of E. coli, previously collected from dairy products. ESBL production was screened using a double-disc synergy test (DDST and presence of four ESBL genes (PER, VEB, TEM and CTX-M was tested using PCR. Among 150 E. coli strains 57 (38% isolates were identified as ESBL-producing strains. All ESBL positive isolates could be typed for one or more genes and the most prevalent ESBL-associated gene was CTX-M (80.7%. The PER gene was not present among isolates. Isolates showed high susceptibility to imipe¬nem and cefoxitin. The results showed the high prevalence of ESBL producing E. coli strains among dairy products and high occurrence of CTX-M-associated ESBL activity among isolates indicating the hazards of increasing the strains with antibiotic resistance which can transfer to human trough the dairy food products.

  3. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be a sign of anemia or thalassemia. Blood Chemistry Tests/Basic Metabolic Panel The basic metabolic panel ( ... parents, and children talk about their experiences with clinical research. More Information Related Health Topics Anemia Coronary Heart ...

  4. Pertussis Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... whooping cough); when you have symptoms of a cold and have been exposed to someone with pertussis ...

  5. TORCH Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... The two most common infections with HSV are "cold sores" affecting the lips and genital herpes. Both ...

  6. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eye or brain infection that a health practitioner suspects are due to toxoplasmosis Sample Required? A blood ... to an infection or detects the genetic material ( DNA ) of the parasite in the blood. Testing is ...

  7. RPR test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... later stages of the infection. Some conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: IV drug use Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Pregnancy Systemic lupus erythematosus and some other autoimmune ...

  8. VDRL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the earlier and later stages. Some conditions may cause a false-positive test, including: HIV Lyme disease Certain types of pneumonia Malaria Systemic lupus erythematosus The body does not always ...

  9. Test Ship

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U. S. Navy dedicated the decommissioned Spruance Class destroyer ex-PAUL F. FOSTER (EDD 964), Test Ship, primarily for at sea demonstration of short range weapon...

  10. HPV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... detects the presence of HPV, the virus that causes cervical cancer, in your system. Certain types of HPV — including ... have any of the types of HPV that cause cervical cancer. Depending on your test results, your doctor may ...

  11. Blood Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & ... special preparations. For some, you may need to fast (not eat any food) for 8 to 12 hours before the test. ...

  12. Lactate Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) Lactoferrin Lactose Tolerance Tests LDL Cholesterol LDL ... metabolism) in which pyruvate is not converted to lactate. One example is pyruvate dehydrogenase deficiency. In these cases, pyruvate will accumulate, the ...

  13. Serotonin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... acute myocardial infarction ( heart attack ), cystic fibrosis , and dumping syndrome . The serotonin test is not usually ordered ... Thank you. Contact a Scientist Find Us On Social Media: Facebook Twitter Google Plus Footer Menu Home ...

  14. IQ testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person's talents or future potential. Results of any intelligence test may be culturally biased. The more widely used ... Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence Stanford-Binet Intelligence ... mathematical, analytical, spatial (for example, reading ...

  15. Electrolytes Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High-sensitivity C-reactive Protein (hs-CRP) Histamine Histone Antibody HIV Antibody and HIV Antigen (p24) HIV ... www.mayomedicallaboratories.com/test-catalog/print.php?unit_code=87972. Accessed September 2011. See More See Less ...

  16. VMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Total Protein and Albumin/Globulin (A/G) Ratio Toxoplasmosis Testing Trace Minerals Transferrin and Iron-binding Capacity ( ... Blood in Urine (Hematuria) Bone Marrow Disorders Breast Cancer Cancer Cardiovascular Disease Celiac Disease Cervical Cancer Chronic ...

  17. VLDL test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease . This test may be included in a coronary risk profile. ... cholesterol level may be associated with a higher risk for heart disease and stroke. However, VLDL cholesterol level is rarely targeted when treatment for high ...

  18. Test report :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, David Martin; Schenkman, Benjamin L.; Borneo, Daniel R.

    2013-08-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Electricity (DOE/OE), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the Base Camp Integration Lab (BCIL) partnered together to incorporate an energy storage system into a microgrid configured Forward Operating Base to reduce the fossil fuel consumption and to ultimately save lives. Energy storage vendors have supplied their systems to SNL Energy Storage Test Pad (ESTP) for functional testing and a subset of these systems were selected for performance evaluation at the BCIL. The technologies tested were electro-chemical energy storage systems comprised of lead acid, lithium-ion or zinc-bromide. MILSPRAY Military Technologies has developed an energy storage system that utilizes lead acid batteries to save fuel on a military microgrid. This report contains the testing results and some limited assessment of the Milspray Scorpion Energy Storage Device.

  19. Iron Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... not enough iron is taken in from the diet, blood levels will drop; thus, over time, the ...

  20. Magnesium Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... bones. It comes into the body through the diet and is absorbed by the small intestine and ...

  1. Phosphorus Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... balance . Phosphorus comes into the body through the diet. It is found in many foods and is ...

  2. Toxoplasmosis Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... humid locations and is influenced by the regional diet. It is higher in areas that routinely eat ...

  3. PTT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... but can occur due to an extremely poor diet, malabsorption disorders , or prolonged use of certain antibiotics, ...

  4. Copper Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... or trying to get more copper in my diet? In most cases, a regular diet satisfies the ...

  5. Chloride Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... 20Files/Nutrition/DRIs/DRI_Electrolytes_Water.pdf?la=en. Accessed Oct 2015. Sources Used in Previous Reviews ...

  6. RSV Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... int/immunization/research/meetings_workshops/rsv_vaccine_development/en/. Accessed November 2016. Sources Used in Previous Reviews ...

  7. Malnutrition Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sex Hormone Binding Globulin (SHBG) Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli Sickle Cell Tests Sirolimus Smooth Muscle Antibody (SMA) ... www.who.int/vaccine_research/diseases/soa_parasitic/en/index2.html through http://www.who.int . Accessed ...

  8. Knowledge Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ole Henning

    1998-01-01

    The knowledge test is about competing temporal and spatial expressions of the politics of technological development and national prosperity in contemporary society. The discussion is based on literature of national systems of innovation and industrial networks of various sorts. Similarities...

  9. Electrolytes Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pregnancy hCG Tumor Marker HDL Cholesterol Heavy Metals Helicobacter pylori Testing Hematocrit Hemoglobin Hemoglobin A1c Hemoglobinopathy Evaluation ... sometimes reported as total CO 2 ). A person's diet provides sodium, potassium, and chloride. The kidneys help ...

  10. Osmolality Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... affecting osmolality; to help determine the cause of chronic diarrhea When To Get Tested? When someone has a ... increased or decreased amounts of urine, or has chronic diarrhea Sample Required? A blood sample drawn from a ...

  11. Lead Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Links Patient Resources For Health Professionals Subscribe Search Lead Send Us Your Feedback Choose Topic At a ... Related Content View Sources Also Known As Blood Lead Test Blood Lead Level BLL Formal Name Lead, ...

  12. Porphyrin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... safe and unsafe drugs, different sites use different classifications and the lists are not the same. Why ... Kathleen D. & Pagana, Timothy J. (2001). M osby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., ...

  13. Tests computarizados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Fernando Prialé Z.

    1983-12-01

    Full Text Available En primer lugar, se considera el impacto de las microcomputadoras en la actualidad, viéndolo como un hecho social destinado a traer profundos cambios: nos orientamos hacia una cultura informática cuyo signo es la posibilidad de tratar grandes cantidades de información. En segundo lugar; se analiza brevemente la importancia de los tests en el desarrollo de la psicología. Finalmente, se discute la posibilidad de aplicar la informática a la psicometría con el ejemplo del test de BARSIT.   The impact of microcomputers is discussed as a cultural fact that will bring profound changes in the near future: a society with an ubiquous capacity for treating big amounts of information. The importance of tests for the development of psychology is then analysed. Finaly, the possibility of applying microcomputers to psychometry is discussed trough a concrete example: The BARSIT test.

  14. Stool Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development Infections Diseases & Conditions Pregnancy & Baby Nutrition & Fitness Emotions & Behavior School & Family Life First Aid & Safety Doctors & ... stool. Collecting a Stool Specimen Unlike most other lab tests, stool is sometimes collected by the child's ...

  15. Porphyrin Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... LA Kaplan, AJ Pesce, SC Kazmierczak, Eds), CV Mosby, St. Louis, 2003, pp. 657-674. Pagana, Kathleen ... osby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc., Saint Louis, MO. Pp325, 670-672. (2003 ...

  16. Fibrinogen Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... an investigation of a possible bleeding disorder or inappropriate blood clot formation ( thrombotic episode ) As a follow- ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: PT and INR , PTT , ...

  17. ACT Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heparin is used to help prevent and treat inappropriate blood clot formation ( thrombosis or thromboembolism ) and is ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) , ...

  18. PTH Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... diseases that disrupt this feedback loop can cause inappropriate elevations or decreases in calcium and PTH levels ... More Common Questions See Less Common Questions Related Content On This Site Tests: Calcium ; Phosphorus ; Magnesium ; Vitamin ...

  19. Ferritin Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the past few decades, some lab-to-lab variability can occur due to differences in testing equipment, ... Pp 443-444. Clarke, W., Editor (© 2011). Contemporary Practice in Clinical Chemistry 2nd Edition: AACC Press, Washington, ...

  20. AMA Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Site Tests: ANCA/MPO/PR3 Antibodies , Liver/Kidney Microsomal Antibody , ALP , ALT , Liver Panel , Smooth Muscle Antibody , ANA Conditions: Autoimmune Diseases , Liver Disease , Hepatitis , Cirrhosis Elsewhere On The Web ...

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles and prevalence of ESBLS among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Majority of MDR strains were obtained from young individuals working in middle class hotels. Genetic relatedness of the MDR isolates was apparently influenced by the resistance profiles, hotel type and clinical characteristics. Conclusion: This study revealed that apparently healthy people working in the hospitality industry ...

  2. (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli isolated from cl

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Lab Med 2014; 34(2): 139-144. 24. Fuentes Arriaga R, Talavera Rojas M, Vázquez. Navarrete J, Soriano Vargas E, Gutiérrez Castillo A. Presencia de integrones clase I en Escherichia coli aislada de productos cárnicos en plantas Tipo. Inspección Federal (TIF) en el Estado de México. Vet. Mexico 2013; 44(1): 23-30.

  3. Prevalence and antibiotic susceptibility pattern of ESBL producing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    26.8%) Klebsiella pneumoniae and 13(26.5%) Klebsiella oxytoca. EPK were mostly from wound specimens (24.0%) although Klebsiellae were mostly occurring in sputum (26.2%). The EPK were resistant to ceftazidime (100%), cefotaxime ...

  4. Distribution Profile of Extended Spectrum Beta Lactamase (ESBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Escherichia coli are known pathogenic organism that has caused diseases which has led to severe morbidity and increased death rate. The occurrence of extended spectrum beta Lactamase (bla) producing Escherichia coli has been on the rise. Water samples were investigated as a potential reservoir for the Extended ...

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility pattern and ESBL prevalence in nosocomial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary tract infections (UTI) are the most prevalent infections worldwide, mostly caused byEscherichia coli. These bacteria also produce enzymes called extended spectrum Escherichia coli. These bacteria also produce enzymes called extended spectrum Escherichia coli. These bacteria also produce enzymes called ...

  6. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) for rapid identification of micro-organisms in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattal, C; Oberoi, J K; Goel, N; Raveendran, R; Khanna, S

    2017-05-01

    The study evaluates the utility of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) Vitek MS for identification of microorganisms in the routine clinical microbiology laboratory. From May 2013 to April 2014, microbial isolates recovered from various clinical samples were identified by Vitek MS. In case of failure to identify by Vitek MS, the isolate was identified using the Vitek 2 system (bioMerieux, France) and serotyping wherever applicable or otherwise by nucleic acid-mediated methods. All the moulds were identified by Lactophenol blue mounts, and mycobacterial isolates were identified by molecular identification systems including AccuProbe (bioMerieux, France) or GenoType Mycobacterium CM (Hain Lifescience, Germany). Out of the 12,003 isolates, the Vitek MS gave a good overall ID at the genus and or species level up to 97.7% for bacterial isolates, 92.8% for yeasts and 80% for filamentous fungi. Of the 26 mycobacteria tested, only 42.3% could be identified using the Saramis RUO (Research Use Only) database. VITEK MS could not identify 34 of the 35 yeast isolates identified as C. haemulonii by Vitek 2. Subsequently, 17 of these isolates were identified as Candida auris (not present in the Vitek MS database) by 18S rRNA sequencing. Using these strains, an in-house superspectrum of C. auris was created in the VITEK MS database. Use of MALDI-TOF MS allows a rapid identification of aerobic bacteria and yeasts in clinical practice. However, improved sample extraction protocols and database upgrades with inclusion of locally representative strains is required, especially for moulds.

  7. Adaptive test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lars Peter; Eriksen, Mette Rose

    2010-01-01

    Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale.......Artikelen er en evaluering af de adaptive tests, som blev indført i folkeskolen. Artiklen sætter særligt fokus på evaluering i folkeskolen, herunder bidrager den med vejledning til evaluering, evalueringsværktøjer og fagspecifkt evalueringsmateriale....

  8. Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/publications/AssessingAlcohol/index.htm .) This issue of Alcohol Research & Health highlights some of the most popular screening ... tolerance to more than two drinks (the T question) = 2 points. The Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) can detect alcohol ...

  9. Comparison of two rapid biochemical tests and four chromogenic selective media for detection of carbapenemase-producing Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinić, Vladimira; Amrein, Ivo; Stammler, Sabrina; Heckendorn, Judith; Meinel, Dominik; Frei, Reno; Egli, Adrian

    2017-04-01

    We evaluated RAPIDEC® CARBA NP, Neo-Rapid CARB, chromID® CARBA SMART (CARB/OXA), Brilliance™ CRE/ESBL, ChromArt CRE and BBL™ CHROMagar™ CPE for the detection of carbapenemase-producing bacteria. The analytical sensitivity of RAPIDEC® CARBA NP was better than that of Neo-Rapid CARB. A combination of carbapenemase and ESBL screening plates could be advantageous. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Perfil de resistência aos antimicrobianos e prevalência da produção de beta-lactamases de espectro estendido em cepas de Escherichia coli em um hospital terciário do Ceará, Brasil (2010 – 2013doi: 10.20513/2447-6595.2016v56n1p8-13

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathiane Lustosa Augusto

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVOS: A resistência bacteriana aos antimicrobianos comumente utilizados na prática médica para tratamento das infecções do trato urinário (ITU vem crescendo nos últimos anos, acarretando maiores gastos com a saúde da mulher. Os objetivos deste estudo são traçar o perfil epidemiológico dos uropatógenos e o perfil de susceptibilidade antimicrobiana desses microorganismos nas urinoculturas positivas de mulheres, acima de 18 anos, atendidas ambulatorialmente em um hospital terciário de Fortaleza entre os anos de 2010 a 2013, além de prover um perfil da produção da enzima beta-lactamase de espectro estendido (ESBL nas cepas de E. coli isoladas nos anos de 2010 a 2012. METODOLOGIA: Realizado estudo retrospectivo transversal no Hospital Geral de Fortaleza (HGF, coletando-se um total de 2.852 urinoculturas e obtendo-se dados acerca da prevalência de uropatógenos e o perfil de susceptibilidade antimicrobiana destes microorganismos. A identificação das espécies bacterianas e testes de antibiograma foram realizados utilizando-se a metodologia automatizada Vitek 2 ( bioMérieux. A produção de betalactamases de espectro estendido também foi detectada pelo Vitek 2, seguindo os critérios do CLSI (Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute.  RESULTADOS: Do total 2.852 urinoculturas positivas, 1.193 (41,8% eram de mulheres com idade superior a 18 anos de demanda ambulatorial. Dessas amostras, Escherichia coli foi o agente mais prevalente (59,8%. Observa-se incidência crescente isolamento de E. coli durante o período estudado (p<0.001.  As cepas de E. coli encontradas  apresentaram  taxas elevadas de resistência para ampicilina (de 52 a 67% , sulfametoxazol-trimetropim ( 43 a50% , ciprofloxacino ( 26 a 35% e cefalotina ( 22 a 30% no período estudado. Do total de 713 cepas de E. coli isoladas, 71 (9,9% foram produtoras ESBL. Observou-se importante  tendência  de crescimento  no período avaliado, variando de 10,7% em 2010 a

  11. Comparison of ViTEK 2, MALDI-TOF and Partial Sequencing of 16S ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All the strains were susceptible to Vancomycin, Linezolid and Rifampicin while they were all resistant to Penicillin, Fusidic acid, and Trimethoprim. Brevibacterium epidermidis were generally resistant to Erythromycin and Clindamycin while B. iodinum and B. oceani were susceptible. Conclusion - 16S rRNA identification is ...

  12. About testing $\

    CERN Document Server

    Loverre, P F; Spada, F R

    1999-01-01

    We study the feasibility of a long-baseline neutrino experiment from CERN to Gran Sasso LNGS Laboratories using the CERN PS accelerator. Baseline and neutrino energy spectrum are suitable to explore a region of the Dm2 and sin2(thetat) parameters space which is not reached by K2K, the first experiment that will test at accelerator the atmospheric neutrino anomaly put in evidence by Super Kamiokande

  13. Oedometer Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Grete

    1996-01-01

    . The results, however, tell nothing about the kind of actions, which has caused the overconsolidation. The determined OCR-values might be due to previous ice caps but a big difference in the two values from Solsø indicates a considerable influence from other actions. The sediments from Hollerup and Solsø...... a model set up by Moust Jacobsen in 1992. The test results do not show any significant difference in the determined values of the overconsolidation ratio (OCR) for the samples from Hollerup and Solsø, east and west of the main stationary line for the last ice sheet in Weichselian, respectively...

  14. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samba Adama Sangare

    Full Text Available The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE, is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali, which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI, were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3% were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21] and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]. Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae. The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6% among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  15. Very high prevalence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in bacteriemic patients hospitalized in teaching hospitals in Bamako, Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangare, Samba Adama; Rondinaud, Emilie; Maataoui, Naouale; Maiga, Almoustapha Issiaka; Guindo, Ibrehima; Maiga, Aminata; Camara, Namory; Dicko, Oumar Agaly; Dao, Sounkalo; Diallo, Souleymane; Bougoudogo, Flabou; Andremont, Antoine; Maiga, Ibrahim Izetiegouma; Armand-Lefevre, Laurence

    2017-01-01

    The worldwide dissemination of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing Enterobacteriaceae, (ESBL-E) and their subset producing carbapenemases (CPE), is alarming. Limited data on the prevalence of such strains in infections from patients from Sub-Saharan Africa are currently available. We determined, here, the prevalence of ESBL-E/CPE in bacteriemic patients in two teaching hospitals from Bamako (Mali), which are at the top of the health care pyramid in the country. During one year, all Enterobacteriaceae isolated from bloodstream infections (E-BSI), were collected from patients hospitalized at the Point G University Teaching Hospital and the pediatric units of Gabriel Touré University Teaching Hospital. Antibiotic susceptibility testing, enzyme characterization and strain relatedness were determined. A total of 77 patients had an E-BSI and as many as 48 (62.3%) were infected with an ESBL-E. ESBL-E BSI were associated with a previous hospitalization (OR 3.97 95% IC [1.32; 13.21]) and were more frequent in hospital-acquired episodes (OR 3.66 95% IC [1.07; 13.38]). Among the 82 isolated Enterobacteriaceae, 58.5% were ESBL-E (20/31 Escherichia coli, 20/26 Klebsiella pneumoniae and 8/15 Enterobacter cloacae). The remaining (5 Salmonella Enteritidis, 3 Morganella morganii 1 Proteus mirabilis and 1 Leclercia adecarboxylata) were ESBL negative. CTX-M-1 group enzymes were highly prevalent (89.6%) among ESBLs; the remaining ones being SHV. One E. coli produced an OXA-181 carbapenemase, which is the first CPE described in Mali. The analysis of ESBL-E relatedness suggested a high rate of cross transmission between patients. In conclusion, even if CPE are still rare for the moment, the high rate of ESBL-BSI and frequent cross transmission probably impose a high medical and economic burden to Malian hospitals.

  16. Phenotypic and genotypic characterization of Klebsiella pneumoniae strains with reduced susceptibiliy to carbapenems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Ambretti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Reduced susceptibility to carbapenems in Gram-negative pathogens is an emerging feature of the antibiotic-resistance phenomenom Reports about strains resistant to this class of antibiotics among Enterobacteriaceae, particularly in Klebsiella pneumoniae, are increasing.The aims of this study were to assess the incidence of Klebsiella pneumoniae with reduced susceptibility to carbapenems in Bologna area and to carry out the characterization of these strains.The study included isolates of K. pneumoniae that showed reduced susceptibility to carbapenems, as detected by an automated system (Vitek2, bioMérieux. Between January and May 2009, 26 strains were collected (mainly isolated from urinary samples.These isolates were tested for susceptibility to carbapenems by E-test, to define MIC values for meropenem and ertapenem. Moreover, to detect the production of metallo-beta lactamases (MBL and carbapenemases (KPC were respectively performed the Etest with imipenem and imipenem/EDTA (IPM-IPM/EDTA and the modified Hodge test. Susceptibility assays performed by E-test showed that 25/26 strains were susceptible to meropenem, while for ertapenem 20/26 strains resulted resistant.The modified Hodge test was positive for 1 strain, while all the isolates were negative to the IPM-IPM/EDTA E-test.These results show that, as recently reported, the majority of strains of K. pneumoniae exhibiting reduced susceptibility to carbapenems, especially to ertapenem, are characterized by the production of ESBLs, which likely is associated with the loss of porins. On the other side, one strain was found to produce KPC and this finding confirms that the diffusion of carbapenemases producing K. pneumoniae has also to be considered in this geographic area.

  17. Encoded Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Produced by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Escherichia coli and Klebsiella spp were obtained over a period of nineteen months (June. 2007 to December 2008). Both were tested by the double disk synergy test, combined disk test and. Epsiometer-test (E-test) to evaluate their ability to detect ESBLs. The genotypes of ESBLs were analyzed by monoplex ...

  18. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  19. Cholesterol testing and results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cholesterol test results; LDL test results; VLDL test results; HDL test results; Coronary risk profile results; Hyperlipidemia-results; Lipid disorder test results; Heart disease - cholesterol results

  20. Nuclear stress test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Persantine stress test; Thallium stress test; Stress test - nuclear; Adenosine stress test; Regadenoson stress test; CAD - nuclear stress; Coronary artery disease - nuclear stress; Angina - nuclear ...

  1. Heliostat tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-12-01

    An enormous glint of sunlight darted over gently sloping summits and the hairpin curves of the mountain road. Mirrors concentrated this glint into a single beam, which then shot through a thick sheet of aluminum. Such was the result of the first test run on heliostats of the unique Solntse scientific-production complex being erected in Tashkent Oblast. There will be 62 such heliostats, each with an area of 50 square meters. Hot beams will be transmitted to the concave mirror of a concentrator (2,000 square meters). And the glint that shoots from it effortlessly melts not only aluminum but also almost all known materials. A special melting furnace toward which the concentractor directs hundreds of kilowatts of energy, burns brighter than a thousand suns. The complex presently under construction is intended for acquisition of ultrahigh-heat and concurrently ultrapure materials needed by many industrial sectors. This is extremely difficult to do by traditional chemical methods and even by the most modern methods--ultrahigh frequency and cathode ray methods.

  2. Faecal carriage of extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in asymptomatic nursery children in Lower Saxony (Germany), 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, M; Dreesman, J; Rettenbacher-Riefler, S; Mertens, E

    2016-09-09

    Children may be at higher risk for carriage of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria because of higher usage of antimicrobials. They also have higher rates of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) infections than other population groups. Some infections, particularly in children, are asymptomatic, but still lead to the excretion of large numbers of bacteria and viruses that may cause clinical disease in other individuals. That is one reason why, in Lower Saxony as in other German federal states - asymptomatic carriers of STEC are excluded from nurseries and schools until three consecutive stool samples test negative in order to prevent secondary cases. The prevalence of children who are asymptomatic STEC carriers is unknown. But if it is high, this measure would have substantial socioeconomic effects on families. Infections with extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (ESBL-E) are an increasing problem for public health, especially for hospitals. However, there are no reliable estimates of the prevalence of asymptomatic ESBL-E carriers in Lower Saxony, as there is no mandatory requirement to report these carriers. In order to discuss the exclusion policies for children attending nurseries and ascertain a baseline of ESBL-E carriers, we conducted a cross-sectional study. The aim was to determine the prevalence of ESBL-E and STEC and identify risk factors for carriage in nursery children without diarrhoea (asymptomatic) aged 0-6 years in four selected districts in Northern Germany. During April-September 2014, we collected stool specimens with the support of voluntarily participating nurseries. We tested for STEC by PCR and for ESBL-E on chromogenic agar. Questionnaires answered by parents contained data on eating and drinking habits, outdoor activities, prior antibiotic treatment and animal contact for each participating child. We compared the epidemiological characteristics of ESBL-E carriers vs. non-carriers by using univariable analysis (P

  3. Indagine epidemiologica locale dell’eziologia delle infezioni delle vie urinarie (IVU nosocomiali e comunitarie e dell’antibiotico-sensibilità degli uropatogeni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostina Ronca

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Urinary tract infections (UTIs are common infectious diseases that can be associated with substantial morbidity. During the last decade, resistance to ampicillin and co-trimoxazole has increased in Escherichia coli, the most common uropathogen, and recent reports have shown increasing resistance even to fluoroquinolones. The aim of this local surveillance study was to determine the distribution of bacterial strains isolated from outpatients and inpatients with UTIs and antibiotic susceptibility patterns to antimicrobial agents currently used in the treatment of pathogens causing these infections. Materials and methods: Between January and March 2006 a total of 1596 urine specimens, 968 from outpatients and 628 from inpatients, respectively, were recovered. Urinary pathogens isolated were 235, identification and antimicrobial susceptibility testing were performed by Vitek II.The following antimicrobial agents were tested: ampicillin, amoxicillin-clavulanic acid, ceftazidime, imipenem, co-trimoxazole, ciprofloxacin, gentamicin and nitrofurantoin. E test® method were used to study the production of extended spectrum beta-lactamases (ESBL. Results:The most frequent pathogen found was Escherichia coli (68.5%, followed by Klebsiella spp. (8.5%, Proteus mirabilis (7.6%, and Enterococcus spp. (6%. E. coli resistance rates less than 10% was observed for ceftazidime, imipenem and nitrofurantoin. In strains isolated from outpatients resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole was 37% and 19%, respectively, and resistance to fluoroquinolones was about 20%. Resistance rates of E. coli was significantly higher in complicated nosocomial-acquired infection: ampicillin 53.6%, cotrimossazole 35.7% and ciprofloxacin 33.9%. ESBL producer strains were 7 E.coli (4.3% and 6 Proteus spp. (33%. Conclusions: This study confirmed that E. coli and other Enterobacteriaceae are the predominant bacterial pathogens envolved in UTIs. Currently, the

  4. Mononucleosis spot test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monospot test; Heterophile antibody test; Heterophile agglutination test; Paul-Bunnell test; Forssman antibody test ... The mononucleosis spot test is done when symptoms of mononucleosis are ... Fatigue Fever Large spleen (possibly) Sore throat Tender ...

  5. Coccidioides precipitin test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccidioidomycosis antibody test; Coccidioides blood test; Valley fever blood test ... There is no special preparation for the test. ... The precipitin test is one of several tests that can be done to determine if you are infected with coccidioides, which ...

  6. Carbapenem MICs in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella Species Producing Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamases in Critical Care Patients from 2001 to 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J Kristie; Robinson, Gwen L; Pineles, Lisa L; Ajao, Adebola O; Zhao, LiCheng; Albrecht, Jennifer S; Harris, Anthony D; Thom, Kerri A; Furuno, Jon P

    2017-04-01

    Extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Enterobacteriaceae strains are increasing in prevalence worldwide. Carbapenem antibiotics are used as a first line of therapy against ESBL-producing Enterobacteriaceae We examined a cohort of critical care patients for gastrointestinal colonization with carbapenem-resistant ESBL-producing strains (CR-ESBL strains). We cultured samples from this cohort of patients for ESBL-producing Klebsiella spp. and Escherichia coli and then tested the first isolate from each patient for susceptibility to imipenem, doripenem, meropenem, and ertapenem. Multilocus sequence typing was performed on isolates that produced an ESBL and that were carbapenem resistant. Among all patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), 4% were positive for an ESBL-producing isolate and 0.64% were positive for a CR-ESBL strain on surveillance culture. Among the first ESBL-producing E. coli and Klebsiella isolates from the patients' surveillance cultures, 11.2% were carbapenem resistant. Sequence type 14 (ST14), ST15, ST42, and ST258 were the dominant sequence types detected in this cohort of patients, with ST15 and ST258 steadily increasing in prevalence from 2006 to 2009. Patients colonized by a CR-ESBL strain were significantly more likely to receive antipseudomonal and anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (anti-MRSA) therapy prior to ICU admission than patients colonized by carbapenem-susceptible ESBL-producing strains. They were also significantly more likely to have received a cephalosporin or a carbapenem antibiotic than patients colonized by carbapenem-susceptible ESBL-producing strains. In conclusion, in a cohort of patients residing in intensive care units within the United States, we found that 10% of the isolates were resistant to at least one carbapenem antibiotic. The continued emergence of carbapenem-resistant ESBL-producing strains is of significant concern, as infections due to these organisms are notoriously difficult to

  7. Myoglobin urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urine myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin urine test; Myositis - myoglobin urine test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin urine test ... The test involves only normal urination, which should cause no discomfort.

  8. Rapid identification of carbapenemase genes in gram-negative bacteria with an oligonucleotide microarray-based assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sascha D Braun

    Full Text Available Rapid molecular identification of carbapenemase genes in Gram-negative bacteria is crucial for infection control and prevention, surveillance and for epidemiological purposes. Furthermore, it may have a significant impact upon determining the appropriate initial treatment and greatly benefit for critically ill patients. A novel oligonucleotide microarray-based assay was developed to simultaneously detect genes encoding clinically important carbapenemases as well as selected extended (ESBL and narrow spectrum (NSBL beta-lactamases directly from clonal culture material within few hours. Additionally, a panel of species specific markers was included to identify Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Citrobacter freundii/braakii, Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii. The assay was tested using a panel of 117 isolates collected from urinary, blood and stool samples. For these isolates, phenotypic identifications and susceptibility tests were available. An independent detection of carbapenemase, ESBL and NSBL genes was carried out by various external reference laboratories using PCR methods. In direct comparison, the microarray correctly identified 98.2% of the covered carbapenemase genes. This included blaVIM (13 out of 13, blaGIM (2/2, blaKPC (27/27, blaNDM (5/5, blaIMP-2/4/7/8/13/14/15/16/31 (10/10, blaOXA-23 (12/13, blaOXA-40-group (7/7, blaOXA-48-group (32/33, blaOXA-51 (1/1 and blaOXA-58 (1/1. Furthermore, the test correctly identified additional beta-lactamases [blaOXA-1 (16/16, blaOXA-2 (4/4, blaOXA-9 (33/33, OXA-10 (3/3, blaOXA-51 (25/25, blaOXA-58 (2/2, CTX-M1/M15 (17/17 and blaVIM (1/1]. In direct comparison to phenotypical identification obtained by VITEK or MALDI-TOF systems, 114 of 117 (97.4% isolates, including Acinetobacter baumannii (28/28, Enterobacter spec. (5/5, Escherichia coli (4/4, Klebsiella pneumoniae (62/63, Klebsiella oxytoca (0/2, Pseudomonas aeruginosa (12/12, Citrobacter freundii (1/1 and Citrobacter

  9. [Performance of two matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) models for identification of bacteria isolated from blood culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Eisuke; Watari, Tomohisa; Azuma, Yuka; Watanabe, Naoki; Tomoda, Yutaka; Akasaka, Kazumi; Kino, Shuichi

    2013-05-01

    We compared the results of two bacterial identification methods: 1) a traditional method based on phenotypic identification of the causative organism using gram-staining, culture and biochemical markers and 2) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). A total of 111 isolates, including 107 strains of common bacteria species and 4 strains of 3 yeast species, were tested by the traditional method and MALDI-TOF MS method(VITEK MS and Micro flex LT). Data obtained using MALDI-TOF MS were classified as Level 1 and Level 2 according to the confidence level of identification results from the VITEK MS ver. 1.0 database (VITEK MS) and MALDI Biotyper ver. 2.0 database (Microflex LT). The proportions of measured samples identified as Level 1 were 98.2% with the VITEK MS database and 87.4% with the MALDI Biotyper database. The concordance rates of the traditional method were 93.7% with the VITEK MS database and 82.0% with the MALDI Biotyper database. Identification results of five strains were mismatched between the traditional method and MALDI-TOF MS. Their ribosomal RNA sequences were identical to the results obtained from MALDI-TOF MS. We concluded that the performance of VITEK MS is superior to that of the traditional method and Microflex LT.

  10. Outbreak caused by Proteus mirabilis isolates producing weakly expressed TEM-derived extended-spectrum β-lactamase in spinal cord injury patients with recurrent bacteriuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremet, Lise; Bemer, Pascale; Rome, Joanna; Juvin, Marie-Emmanuelle; Navas, Dominique; Bourigault, Celine; Guillouzouic, Aurelie; Caroff, Nathalie; Lepelletier, Didier; Asseray, Nathalie; Perrouin-Verbe, Brigitte; Corvec, Stephane

    2011-12-01

    We performed a retrospective extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) molecular characterization of Proteus mirabilis isolates recovered from urine of spinal cord injury patients. A incorrectly detected TEM-24-producing clone and a new weakly expressed TEM-derived ESBL were discovered. In such patients, ESBL detection in daily practice should be improved by systematic use of a synergy test in strains of P. mirabilis resistant to penicillins.

  11. Test Review: TestDaF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, John; Drackert, Anastasia

    2018-01-01

    The Test of German as a Foreign Language (TestDaF) plays a critical role as a standardized test of German language proficiency. Developed and administered by the Society for Academic Study Preparation and Test Development (g.a.s.t.), TestDaF was launched in 2001 and has experienced persistent annual growth, with more than 44,000 test takers in…

  12. Helicobacter pylori Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Content Related Images View Sources Also Known As H. pylori antibody test, stool antigen, breath tests Urea breath test CLO test Rapid urease test (RUT) for H. pylori Formal Name Helicobacter pylori This article was last ...

  13. What Is Diagnostic Testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Diagnostic testing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... help you make the decision. What Is Diagnostic Testing? Diagnostic genetic testing can usually work out if ...

  14. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... what you want to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... Genes: A Guide to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  15. HCG blood test - quantitative

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood test - quantitative; Beta-HCG blood test - quantitative; Pregnancy test - blood - quantitative ... of a screening test for Down syndrome. This test is also done to diagnose abnormal conditions not related to pregnancy that can raise HCG level.

  16. Design Driven Testing Test Smarter, Not Harder

    CERN Document Server

    Stephens, M

    2010-01-01

    The groundbreaking book Design Driven Testing brings sanity back to the software development process by flipping around the concept of Test Driven Development (TDD) - restoring the concept of using testing to verify a design instead of pretending that unit tests are a replacement for design. Anyone who feels that TDD is "Too Damn Difficult" will appreciate this book. Design Driven Testing shows that, by combining a forward-thinking development process with cutting-edge automation, testing can be a finely targeted, business-driven, rewarding effort. In other words, you'll learn how to test

  17. Learning software testing with Test Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Madi, Rawane

    2013-01-01

    Learning Software Testing with Test Studio is a practical, hands-on guide that will help you get started with Test Studio to design your automated solution and tests. All through the book, there are best practices and tips and tricks inside Test Studio which can be employed to improve your solution just like an experienced QA.If you are a beginner or a professional QA who is seeking a fast, clear, and direct to the point start in automated software testing inside Test Studio, this book is for you. You should be familiar with the .NET framework, mainly Visual Studio, C#, and SQL, as the book's

  18. Compositional Testing with ioco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrenko, A.; van der Bijl, H.M.; Rensink, Arend; Ulrich, A.; Tretmans, G.J.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract. Compositional testing concerns the testing of systems that consist of communicating components which can also be tested in isolation. Examples are component based testing and interoperability testing. We show that, with certain restrictions, the ioco-test theory for conformance testing is

  19. Detection of extended-spectrum & Plasmid-mediated AmpC Beta-Lactasmases in nosocomial Klebsiella isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Mansour, Shymaa Abd El-Azim; El-Sharkawy, Azza Abdel-Rahman; El-Kady, Laila Mostafa; Esmaeel, Noura El-Sayed

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The coexistence of ESBLs and pAmpCs enzymes in the same Klebsiella strain may result in false-negativetests for the detection of ESBLs as pAmpCs resist inhibition by clavulanic acid so masking ESBL presence. This study wasto highlight the detection rates of ESBLs and pAmpCs by using phenotypic method; MAST 4-disc test and multiplexpolymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. In addition, it aimed to evaluate the sensitivity of the phenotypic method indetection of these enzymes.Methods: ...

  20. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  1. Detection of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamases Among Gram Negative Bacilli Recovered from Cattle Feces In Benin City, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Oroboghae OGEFERE

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL among Gram negative bacteria isolated from cattle feces in Benin City, Nigeria. A total of 250 Gram negative bacteria isolates were recovered from cattle feces and were processed microbiologically using standard techniques. Emergent colonies were identified and antibacterial susceptibility tests were determined using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method. All bacterial isolates were screened for the presence of ESBL using the double-disc synergy method. A total of 37 (14.8% isolates were positive for ESBL, with 33 (13.2% indicated by ceftazidime, while only 4 (1.6% were indicated by both ceftazidime and cefotaxime (P < 0.0001. Of the Gram negative bacterial isolates recovered, Salmonella species was the most prevalent ESBL-producer with 55.0% prevalence (P = 0.0092, while no isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa produced ESBL. ESBL-positive isolates showed poor susceptibility to the tested antibacterial agents in comparison with non-ESBL-producers and imipenem was the most active antibiotic. The prevalence of ESBL among Gram negative bacilli recovered from cattle feces was 14.8%. The study advises prudent use of antibiotics in the treatment of cattle and harps on improved hygiene in managing cattle, as they are potential reservoirs of ESBL-producing organisms.

  2. High Stringency Evaluation of the Automated BD Phoenix™ CPO Detect and RAPIDEC® CARBA NP Tests for Detection and Classification of Carbapenemases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Gina; Turner, David; Brasso, William; Kircher, Susan; Guillet, Thierry; Thomson, Kenneth

    2017-10-04

    There is an urgent need for rapid, accurate detection and classification of carbapenemases. The current study evaluated the automated BD Phoenix™ CPO Detect and the manual bioMérieux RAPIDEC® CARBA NP for meeting these needs. Both tests were challenged with 294 Enterobacteriaceae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii chosen to provide extreme diagnostic difficulty. Carbapenemases such as KPC, NMC-A, IMI, SME, NDM, SPM, IMP, VIM, OXA-23, 40, 48, 58, 72, 181, and 232 were produced by 243 isolates and 51 carbapenemase-negative isolates included porin mutants and producers of ESBLs, AmpCs, K1, and broad spectrum β-lactamases. Both tests exhibited high sensitivity of carbapenemase detection (> 97%). Due to the highly challenging carbapenemase-negative isolates, specificities were lower than typical of evaluations involving mostly routine clinical isolates. BD Phoenix™ CPO Detect was 68.6% specific and RAPIDEC® CARBA NP was 60.8% to 78.4% specific depending on how borderline results were interpreted. Only BD Phoenix™ CPO Detect classified carbapenemases. It correctly classified 85.0% of class A, 72.4% of class B, and 88.6% of class D carbapenemases. Importantly with respect to empirical therapy with new β-lactamase inhibitor combinations such as ceftazidime/avibactam, no class B carbapenemases were misclassified as class A carbapenemases. Both tests offer advantages. Used alone, without initial susceptibility tests, RAPIDEC® CARBA NP can provide positive results for some isolates after only 10 to 30 minutes incubation. BD Phoenix™ CPO Detect provides novel advantages such as automated carbapenemase detection, inclusion in susceptibility panels to eliminate delays and subjectivity in initiating carbapenemase tests, and classification of most carbapenemases. Copyright © 2017 Thomson et al.

  3. Antibiogram and plasmid profiling of carbapenemase and extended ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Antibiogram and plasmid profiling of carbapenemase and extended spectrum Beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae in ... acidometric method, while ESBL and carbapenemase activity was determined using the double-disk diffusion test as well as the Modified Hodge test (MHT).

  4. Antimicrobial susceptibility of microorganisms that cause urinary tract infections in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Lozano, Jesús; de Malet, Ana; Cano, María Eliecer; de la Rubia, Luis; Wallmann, Reinhard; Martínez-Martínez, Luis; Calvo, Jorge

    2017-10-06

    Cumulative susceptibility reports are a valuable tool for the empirical treatment of urinary tract infections, especially in the current context of increasing resistance rates. Our objective was to analyze the antimicrobial susceptibility of bacterial isolates in urine cultures of pediatric patients during a five-year period. Retrospective study of urine cultures from 2011 to 2015. Identification and antimicrobial susceptibility tests were performed using the Vitek-2 system (BioMérieux®) and categorized according to EUCAST criteria. Antimicrobial susceptibility data were analyzed by gender and age groups (neonates, 1 month to 5 years, 5-15 years) before being compared with data obtained from patients over the age of 15 years. During the study period, 17164 urine cultures were processed from 7924 patients under 16 years of age. Antimicrobial susceptibility rates in these patients were: ampicillin 36.3%, amoxicillin/clavulanic acid 75.3%, cefuroxime 83.2%, co-trimoxazole 68.9%, ciprofloxacin 85.3%, fosfomycin 85.5%, nitrofurantoin 84.4% and 3rd generation cephalosporins 89-91%. Aminoglycosides (>92%) and carbapenems (95%) maintained the highest susceptibility rates. The prevalence of ESBL-producing isolates was significantly lower in children under the age of 16 years (1.5% vs. 4.1%). In patients under the age of 16 years, Escherichia coli isolates in girls were significantly more sensitive (p<0.0001) to ampicillin (41% vs. 30%) and amoxicillin/clavulanic acid (82% vs. 72%) than in boys. The compilation of cumulative susceptibility reports disaggregated by age or gender reveals significant differences. In our setting, cefuroxime may be considered the first-line empirical treatment in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  5. Myoglobin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serum myoglobin; Heart attack - myoglobin blood test; Myositis - myoglobin blood test; Rhabdomyolysis - myoglobin blood test ... too high, it can damage the kidneys. This test is ordered when your health care provider suspects ...

  6. Ketones urine test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ketone bodies - urine; Urine ketones; Ketoacidosis - urine ketones test; Diabetic ketoacidosis - urine ketones test ... Urine ketones are usually measured as a "spot test." This is available in a test kit that ...

  7. Blood Test: Glucose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Videos for Educators Search English Español Blood Test: Glucose KidsHealth / For Parents / Blood Test: Glucose What's in ... liver or kidneys) is working. What Is a Glucose Test? A glucose test measures how much glucose ...

  8. PT and INR Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Normalized Ratio Related tests: Activated Clotting Time ; Partial Thromboplastin Time ; Prothrombin Consumption Time; Fibrinogen ; Coagulation Factors ; Platelet Count ; Platelet Function Tests ; Thrombin Time ; Warfarin Sensitivity Testing All content on Lab Tests Online has ...

  9. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  10. Genetic Testing (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Genetic Testing KidsHealth / For Parents / Genetic Testing What's in ... blood, skin, bone, or other tissue is needed. Genetic Testing During Pregnancy For genetic testing before birth, ...

  11. Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Screening Tests FAQ165, July 2017 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Screening Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...

  12. To test or not to test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rochon, Justine; Gondan, Matthias; Kieser, Meinhard

    2012-01-01

    Background: Student's two-sample t test is generally used for comparing the means of two independent samples, for example, two treatment arms. Under the null hypothesis, the t test assumes that the two samples arise from the same normally distributed population with unknown variance. Adequate...... control of the Type I error requires that the normality assumption holds, which is often examined by means of a preliminary Shapiro-Wilk test. The following two-stage procedure is widely accepted: If the preliminary test for normality is not significant, the t test is used; if the preliminary test rejects...... the null hypothesis of normality, a nonparametric test is applied in the main analysis. Methods: Equally sized samples were drawn from exponential, uniform, and normal distributions. The two-sample t test was conducted if either both samples (Strategy I) or the collapsed set of residuals from both samples...

  13. Survey of Testing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malarkey, Cynthia J.; Aiken, Lewis R.

    The Survey of Testing Practices was administered to 470 undergraduate students at Pepperdine University and the Univesity of California Los Angeles. The items concerned testing practices in three or four classes taken the previous term: type of test, test administration, class size, procedures for returning tests, test difficulty, and observed…

  14. Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) Modal Test Correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakos, Gregory J.; Corliss, James M.; Mark, Stephen D.

    2017-01-01

    Modal testing of the Boilerplate Test Article (BTA) was performed to obtain data to determine the accuracy of the BTA LS- DYNA model in determining the structural response. The BTA is a full-scale steel and aluminum test article that is representative of the Orion Crew Module (CM), with similar outer-mold-line geometry, mass properties, and some similar structural features, including an internal pressure vessel connected to a backshell and heatshield via longerons, Retention and Release (R&R) brackets, and an aft ring. The structural design of the Orion CM is being developed based on LS-DYNA water landing simulations. To obtain data to evaluate the accuracy of LS-DYNA water impact landing simulations, a series of BTA water impacts was conducted at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). Discrepancies between test and simulation data are attributed to three causes:(1) Test data variability and uncertainty, (2) LS-DYNA water model and fluid-structure coupling approximations; and (3) LS-DYNA structural modeling approximations. Two activities have been undertaken to assess the accuracy of the BTA LS-DYNA structural model separately from the fluid-structure coupling portion of the water landing simulations: 1) modal testing, and 2) static load testing. The results from the static load tests are documented in a separate report. For the modal test series, the following tests were performed: (1) BTA Fully-Assembled Model Test, (2) BTA Backshell Removed Modal Test, (3) Standalone Heatshield Modal Test, (4) Standalone Windward Backshell Panel Modal Test; and (5) Standalone Leeward Backshell Panel Modal Test. This report documents findings from correlation of modal test data with LS-DYNA modal analysis results. The following figures illustrate the correlation of the modal frequencies. Where multiple closely spaced modes have been identified, the points representing the upper and lower frequencies are shown connected by a dotted line.

  15. From Test Takers to Test Makers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kari

    2009-01-01

    As a classroom teacher, Kari Smith realized that traditional objective tests don't always assess what students actually know. But tests are so deeply embedded in the education system that it would be difficult to do away with them entirely. Smith decided to make tests into learning tools. In this article, Smith describes three strategies for…

  16. Test Bias and Ability Level Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Bernard

    1979-01-01

    The average grade equivalent reading comprehension scores of students in Black schools are compared to those of students in White schools under two forms of test administration. Concludes that use of grade level testing with the Iowa Tests of Basic Skills is biased in favor of low scoring subgroups. (Author)

  17. Testing and Tests: Pedagogical Versus Public Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Scarvia B.; Dobbin, John E.

    Public uses of tests and testing include all those materials and practices in observation of human behavior that are intended to help administrators, school boards, legislatures, taxpayers, and others to evaluate their educational systems. Pedagogical uses of tests, on the other hand, cover all those materials and practices in observation of human…

  18. AUTOMATED API TESTING APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    SUNIL L. BANGARE; SEEMA BORSE; PALLAVI S. BANGARE; SHITAL NANDEDKAR

    2012-01-01

    Software testing is an investigation conducted to provide stakeholders with information about the quality of the product or service under test. With the help of software testing we can verify or validate the software product. Normally testing will be done after development of software but we can perform the software testing at the time of development process also. This paper will give you a brief introduction about Automated API Testing Tool. This tool of testing will reduce lots of headache ...

  19. Web Security Testing Cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Hope, Paco

    2008-01-01

    Among the tests you perform on web applications, security testing is perhaps the most important, yet it's often the most neglected. The recipes in the Web Security Testing Cookbook demonstrate how developers and testers can check for the most common web security issues, while conducting unit tests, regression tests, or exploratory tests. Unlike ad hoc security assessments, these recipes are repeatable, concise, and systematic-perfect for integrating into your regular test suite.

  20. Growth hormone stimulation test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arginine test; Arginine-GHRH test ... of re-inserting the needle each time. The test takes between 2 to 5 hours. The procedure ... eat for 10 to 12 hours before the test. Eating food can change the test results. Some ...

  1. Blood Test: Lipid Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Advertisement Featured ContentPap Smear (Pap Test)Read Article >>Pap Smear (Pap Test)Preconception Carrier ScreeningsRead Article >>Preconception Carrier ... Article >>Tests and ProceduresPap Smear (Pap Test)A Pap smear (Pap test) is a medical exam used to ...

  2. Vendor System Vulnerability Testing Test Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Davidson

    2005-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) prepared this generic test plan to provide clients (vendors, end users, program sponsors, etc.) with a sense of the scope and depth of vulnerability testing performed at the INL’s Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed and to serve as an example of such a plan. Although this test plan specifically addresses vulnerability testing of systems applied to the energy sector (electric/power transmission and distribution and oil and gas systems), it is generic enough to be applied to control systems used in other critical infrastructures such as the transportation sector, water/waste water sector, or hazardous chemical production facilities. The SCADA Test Bed is established at the INL as a testing environment to evaluate the security vulnerabilities of SCADA systems, energy management systems (EMS), and distributed control systems. It now supports multiple programs sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, other government agencies, and private sector clients. This particular test plan applies to testing conducted on a SCADA/EMS provided by a vendor. Before performing detailed vulnerability testing of a SCADA/EMS, an as delivered baseline examination of the system is conducted, to establish a starting point for all-subsequent testing. The series of baseline tests document factory delivered defaults, system configuration, and potential configuration changes to aid in the development of a security plan for in depth vulnerability testing. The baseline test document is provided to the System Provider,a who evaluates the baseline report and provides recommendations to the system configuration to enhance the security profile of the baseline system. Vulnerability testing is then conducted at the SCADA Test Bed, which provides an in-depth security analysis of the Vendor’s system.b a. The term System Provider replaces the name of the company/organization providing the system

  3. Tractor accelerated test on test rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mattetti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The experimental tests performed to validate a tractor prototype before its production, need a substantial financial and time commitment. The tests could be reduced using accelerated tests able to reproduce on the structural part of the tractor, the same damage produced on the tractor during real life in a reduced time. These tests were usually performed reproducing a particular harsh condition a defined number of times, as for example using a bumpy road on track to carry out the test in any weather condition. Using these procedures the loads applied on the tractor structure are different with respect to those obtained during the real use, with the risk to apply loads hard to find in reality. Recently it has been demonstrated how, using the methodologies designed for cars, it is possible to also expedite the structural tests for tractors. In particular, automotive proving grounds were recently successfully used with tractors to perform accelerated structural tests able to reproduce the real use of the machine with an acceleration factor higher than that obtained with the traditional methods. However, the acceleration factor obtained with a tractor on proving grounds is in any case reduced due to the reduced speed of the tractors with respect to cars. In this context, the goal of the paper is to show the development of a methodology to perform an accelerated structural test on a medium power tractor using a 4 post test rig. In particular, several proving ground testing conditions have been performed to measure the loads on the tractor. The loads obtained were then edited to remove the not damaging portion of signals, and finally the loads obtained were reproduced in a 4 post test rig. The methodology proposed could be a valid alternative to the use of a proving ground to reproduce accelerated structural tests on tractors.

  4. Dexamethasone suppression test

    Science.gov (United States)

    DST; ACTH suppression test; Cortisol suppression test ... During this test, you will receive dexamethasone. This is a strong man-made (synthetic) glucocorticoid medicine. Afterward, your blood is drawn ...

  5. Bone mineral density test

    Science.gov (United States)

    BMD test; Bone density test; Bone densitometry; DEXA scan; DXA; Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry; p-DEXA; Osteoporosis - BMD ... need to undress. This scan is the best test to predict your risk of fractures, especially of ...

  6. Ketones blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acetone bodies; Ketones - serum; Nitroprusside test; Ketone bodies - serum; Ketones - blood; Ketoacidosis - ketones blood test ... fat cells break down in the blood. This test is used to diagnose ketoacidosis . This is a ...

  7. Campylobacter serology test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003530.htm Campylobacter serology test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Campylobacter serology test is a blood test to look ...

  8. Mark 1 Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Mark I Test Facility is a state-of-the-art space environment simulation test chamber for full-scale space systems testing. A $1.5M dollar upgrade in fiscal year...

  9. Testing for normality

    CERN Document Server

    Thode, Henry C

    2002-01-01

    Describes the selection, design, theory, and application of tests for normality. Covers robust estimation, test power, and univariate and multivariate normality. Contains tests ofr multivariate normality and coordinate-dependent and invariant approaches.

  10. Large Rotor Test Apparatus

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This test apparatus, when combined with the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex, produces a thorough, full-scale test capability. The Large Rotor Test Apparatus...

  11. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  12. Kidney function tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidney function tests are common lab tests used to evaluate how well the kidneys are working. Such tests include: ... Oh MS, Briefel G. Evaluation of renal function, water, electrolytes ... and Management by Laboratory Methods . 23rd ed. Philadelphia, ...

  13. ALP isoenzyme test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkaline phosphatase isoenzyme test ... anything for 10 to 12 hours before the test, unless your health care provider tells you to do so. Many medicines can interfere with blood test results. Your health care provider will tell you ...

  14. Methylene blue test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methemoglobinemia - methylene blue test ... No special preparation is required for this test. ... which are genetic (problem with your genes). This test is used to tell the difference between methemoglobinemia ...

  15. Blood Test: Estradiol

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... levels of estradiol, which are produced by the testes and adrenal glands. In young girls, estradiol levels ... to check for damage or disease of the testes, ovaries, or adrenal glands. Testing estradiol levels also ...

  16. Aviation Flight Test

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Test Center provides an expert workforce and technologically advanced test equipment to conduct the rigorous testing necessary for U.S. Army acquisition and...

  17. Blood sugar test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fasting blood sugar; Glucose test; Diabetic screening - blood sugar test; Diabetes - blood sugar test ... to screen a person for diabetes. High blood sugar and diabetes may not cause symptoms in the early stages. ...

  18. Strep Throat Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Testing Leptin Levetiracetam Lipase Lipid Profile Lipoprotein (a) Lithium Liver Panel Lp-PLA2 Lupus Anticoagulant Testing Luteinizing ... 2012 guidelines from the Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA), confirmatory testing on adults is not usually ...

  19. Solving Leak Testing Challenges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John Sprovieri

    2007-01-01

    .... InterTech provided two Model 1075 pressure-decay leak detectors to perform the three tests-a leak test at 220 inches of water column, a leak test at 5 inches of water column, and a forward direction...

  20. Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Home For Patients Search FAQs Prenatal ... Pamphlets - Spanish FAQ164, September 2016 PDF Format Prenatal Genetic Diagnostic Tests Pregnancy What is prenatal genetic testing? ...