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Sample records for virus-free hsv-1 vectors

  1. Helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged both in the presence of VSV G protein and in the absence of HSV-1 glycoprotein B support gene transfer into neurons in the rat striatum.

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    Tang, J; Yang, T; Ghosh, H P; Geller, A I

    2001-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) vectors have potential for gene transfer into quiescent cells, but the gene transfer process could be more efficient. In other vector systems, both the titers and the efficiency of gene transfer have been enhanced by pseudotyping the vector particles with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) G protein. In this report, we pseudotyped helper virus-free HSV-1 plasmid vectors with VSV G protein. Packaging was performed in the presence of both VSV G protein and a deletion in an essential HSV-1 glycoprotein, gB. The resulting vector stocks supported gene transfer into both fibroblast and neuronal cell lines. VSV G protein was required for gene transfer because preincubation of these vector stocks with antibodies directed against either VSV G protein or VSV reduced the titer to undetectable levels. Although the titers were lower than those obtained using the unmodified vector system, the titers were not increased by use of chimeric proteins that contain the extracellular domain of VSV G protein and the transmembrane and/or cytoplasmic domains of specific HSV-1 glycoproteins. Also, the titers were not increased by performing the packaging in the presence of deletions in multiple HSV-1 glycoproteins. Nonetheless, pHSVlac pseudotyped with VSV G protein supported gene transfer into striatal neurons in the rat brain. Thus, HSV-1 vectors pseudotyped with VSV G protein may be useful for specific gene transfer studies.

  2. Improved long-term expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged using combinations of mutated HSV-1 proteins that include the UL13 protein kinase and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex

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    Geller Alfred I

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 gene expression is thought to shut off recombinant gene expression from HSV-1 vectors; however, in a helper virus-free HSV-1 vector system, a number of promoters support only short-term expression. These results raise the paradox that recombinant gene expression remains short-term even in the absence of almost all (~99% of the HSV-1 genome, HSV-1 genes, and HSV-1 gene expression. To resolve this paradox, we hypothesized that specific proteins in the HSV-1 virus particle shut off recombinant gene expression. In two earlier studies, we examined the effects on recombinant gene expression of packaging vectors using specific mutated HSV-1 proteins. We found that vectors packaged using mutated UL13 (a protein kinase, or VP16, or UL46 and/or UL47 (components of the VP16 transcriptional complex supported improved long-term expression, and vectors packaged using mutated UL46 and/or UL47 also supported improved gene transfer (numbers of cells at 4 days. These results suggested the hypothesis that specific proteins in the HSV-1 particle act by multiple pathways to reduce recombinant gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined combinations of mutated proteins that included both UL13 and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex. Results A HSV-1 vector containing a neuronal-specific promoter was packaged using specific combinations of mutated proteins, and the resulting vector stocks were tested in the rat striatum. For supporting long-term expression, the preferred combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins was mutated UL13, UL46, and UL47. Vectors packaged using this combination of mutated proteins supported a higher efficiency of gene transfer and high levels expression for 3 months, the longest time examined. Conclusion Vector particles containing this combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins improve recombinant gene expression. Implications of these results for strategies to further improve

  3. Improved long-term expression from helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors packaged using combinations of mutated HSV-1 proteins that include the UL13 protein kinase and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex.

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    Liu, Meng; Wang, Xiaodan; Geller, Alfred I

    2009-06-16

    Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) gene expression is thought to shut off recombinant gene expression from HSV-1 vectors; however, in a helper virus-free HSV-1 vector system, a number of promoters support only short-term expression. These results raise the paradox that recombinant gene expression remains short-term even in the absence of almost all (approximately 99%) of the HSV-1 genome, HSV-1 genes, and HSV-1 gene expression. To resolve this paradox, we hypothesized that specific proteins in the HSV-1 virus particle shut off recombinant gene expression. In two earlier studies, we examined the effects on recombinant gene expression of packaging vectors using specific mutated HSV-1 proteins. We found that vectors packaged using mutated UL13 (a protein kinase), or VP16, or UL46 and/or UL47 (components of the VP16 transcriptional complex) supported improved long-term expression, and vectors packaged using mutated UL46 and/or UL47 also supported improved gene transfer (numbers of cells at 4 days). These results suggested the hypothesis that specific proteins in the HSV-1 particle act by multiple pathways to reduce recombinant gene expression. To test this hypothesis, we examined combinations of mutated proteins that included both UL13 and specific components of the VP16 transcriptional complex. A HSV-1 vector containing a neuronal-specific promoter was packaged using specific combinations of mutated proteins, and the resulting vector stocks were tested in the rat striatum. For supporting long-term expression, the preferred combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins was mutated UL13, UL46, and UL47. Vectors packaged using this combination of mutated proteins supported a higher efficiency of gene transfer and high levels expression for 3 months, the longest time examined. Vector particles containing this combination of mutated HSV-1 proteins improve recombinant gene expression. Implications of these results for strategies to further improve long-term expression are discussed

  4. Enhanced nigrostriatal neuron-specific, long-term expression by using neural-specific promoters in combination with targeted gene transfer by modified helper virus-free HSV-1 vector particles

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    Kong Lingxin

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Direct gene transfer into neurons has potential for developing gene therapy treatments for specific neurological conditions, and for elucidating neuronal physiology. Due to the complex cellular composition of specific brain areas, neuronal type-specific recombinant gene expression is required for many potential applications of neuronal gene transfer. One approach is to target gene transfer to a specific type of neuron. We developed modified Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 particles that contain chimeric glycoprotein C (gC – glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF or brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF proteins. HSV-1 vector particles containing either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF target gene transfer to nigrostriatal neurons, which contain specific receptors for GDNF or BDNF. A second approach to achieve neuronal type-specific expression is to use a cell type-specific promoter, and we have used the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH promoter to restrict expression to catecholaminergic neurons or a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter to restrict expression to neurons, and both of these promoters support long-term expression from HSV-1 vectors. To both improve nigrostriatal-neuron specific expression, and to establish that targeted gene transfer can be followed by long-term expression, we performed targeted gene transfer with vectors that support long-term, neuronal-specific expression. Results Helper virus-free HSV-1 vector packaging was performed using either gC – GDNF or gC – BDNF and vectors that contain either the TH promoter or the modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter. Vector stocks were injected into the midbrain proximal to the substantia nigra, and the rats were sacrificed at either 4 days or 1 month after gene transfer. Immunofluorescent costaining was performed to detect both recombinant gene products and nigrostriatal neurons. The combination of targeted gene transfer with neuronal

  5. Engineering HSV-1 vectors for gene therapy.

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    Goins, William F; Huang, Shaohua; Cohen, Justus B; Glorioso, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    Virus vectors have been employed as gene transfer vehicles for various preclinical and clinical gene therapy applications, and with the approval of Glybera (alipogene tiparvovec) as the first gene therapy product as a standard medical treatment (Yla-Herttuala, Mol Ther 20: 1831-1832, 2013), gene therapy has reached the status of being a part of standard patient care. Replication-competent herpes simplex virus (HSV) vectors that replicate specifically in actively dividing tumor cells have been used in Phase I-III human trials in patients with glioblastoma multiforme, a fatal form of brain cancer, and in malignant melanoma. In fact, T-VEC (talimogene laherparepvec, formerly known as OncoVex GM-CSF) displayed efficacy in a recent Phase III trial when compared to standard GM-CSF treatment alone (Andtbacka et al. J Clin Oncol 31: sLBA9008, 2013) and may soon become the second FDA-approved gene therapy product used in standard patient care. In addition to the replication-competent oncolytic HSV vectors like T-VEC, replication-defective HSV vectors have been employed in Phase I-II human trials and have been explored as delivery vehicles for disorders such as pain, neuropathy, and other neurodegenerative conditions. Research during the last decade on the development of HSV vectors has resulted in the engineering of recombinant vectors that are totally replication defective, nontoxic, and capable of long-term transgene expression in neurons. This chapter describes methods for the construction of recombinant genomic HSV vectors based on the HSV-1 replication-defective vector backbones, steps in their purification, and their small-scale production for use in cell culture experiments as well as preclinical animal studies.

  6. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part II. Vector Systems and Applications

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    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Many properties of HSV-1 are especially suitable for using this virus as a vector to treat diseases affecting the central nervous system (CNS, such as Parkinson's disease or malignant gliomas. These advantageous properties include natural neurotropism, high transduction efficiency, large transgene capacity, and the ability of entering a latent state in neurons. Selective oncolysis in combination with modulation of the immune response mediated by replication-conditional HSV-1 vectors appears to be a highly promising approach in the battle against malignant glioma. Helper virus-free HSV/AAV hybrid amplicon vectors have great promise in mediating long-term gene expression in the PNS and CNS for the treatment of various neurodegenerative disorders or chronic pain. Current research focuses on the design of HSV-1-derived vectors which are targeted to certain cell types and support transcriptionally regulatable transgene expression. Here, we review the recent developments on HSV-1-based vector systems and their applications in experimental and clinical gene therapy protocols.

  7. HSV-1-Based Vectors for Gene Therapy of Neurological Diseases and Brain Tumors: Part I. HSV-1 Structure, Replication and Pathogenesis

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    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The design of effective gene therapy strategies for brain tumors and other neurological disorders relies on the understanding of genetic and pathophysiological alterations associated with the disease, on the biological characteristics of the target tissue, and on the development of safe vectors and expression systems to achieve efficient, targeted and regulated, therapeutic gene expression. The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 virion is one of the most efficient of all current gene transfer vehicles with regard to nuclear gene delivery in central nervous system-derived cells including brain tumors. HSV-1-related research over the past decades has provided excellent insight into the structure and function of this virus, which, in turn, facilitated the design of innovative vector systems. Here, we review aspects of HSV-1 structure, replication and pathogenesis, which are relevant for the engineering of HSV-1-based vectors.

  8. Integrating retroviral cassette extends gene delivery of HSV-1 expression vectors to dividing cells.

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    de Felipe, P; Izquierdo, M; Wandosell, F; Lim, F

    2001-08-01

    Retroviral vectors have long been used in a wide variety of gene transfer applications but have certain drawbacks, such as small cargo size, limited tropism, and low titers. HSV expression vectors overcome these disadvantages, but, because they persist in target cells as nonreplicative episomes, they are not retained in all the progeny of dividing cells. Chimeric HSV/AAV products that can mediate transgene integration in human mitotic cells have been constructed, but, to date, genetic modification of dividing cells in animal models using HSV products has not been possible. Here, we report the construction of hybrid HSV/retroviral vectors that exhibit up to 50-fold higher transgene integration efficiency compared to vectors containing only HSV-1 components. Efficient integration of a retroviral transgene cassette encoding pac in human cells required expression of the Moloney murine leukemia virus gag-pol genes, but in murine cells, could also be mediated by endogenous activities, albeit at a lower level. Gene delivery was equally efficient in BHK21, a cell line resistant to retroviral infection, and transgene retention and expression were observed to be stable for least one month in Hs683 human glioma cells. These vectors have wide applications for the genetic modification of many cell types.

  9. Expresión en cultivo celular de la proteína VP6 de rotavirus mediante el uso de vectores virales basados en HSV-1

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    Carlos A. Palacios; Claus, Juan; Mattion, Nora

    2016-01-01

    HSV-1 vectors were developed for the expression of several rotavirus genes. Genes from other pathogens were also expressed, thus generating a set of tools to be tested as new vaccine candidates against In this section, we show two different HSV-1 vectors that express the VP6 protein from different rotavirus strains. Figure 1 shows a defective recombinant virus expressing simultaneously EGFP and VP6 from murine rotavirus strain EC, In Figure 2, an amplicon vector overexpressing VP6 from a Wa s...

  10. Joint capsule treatment with enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 recombinant vector reduces inflammatory damage and behavioural sequelae in rat CFA monoarthritis.

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    Lu, Ying; McNearney, Terry A; Wilson, Steven P; Yeomans, David C; Westlund, Karin N

    2008-03-01

    This study assessed enkephalin expression induced by intra-articular application of recombinant, enkephalin-encoding herpes virus (HSV-1) and the impact of expression on nociceptive behaviours and synovial lining inflammation in arthritic rats. Replication-conditional HSV-1 recombinant vectors with cDNA encoding preproenkephalin (HSV-ENK), or control transgene beta-galactosidase cDNA (HSV-beta-gal; control) were injected into knee joints with complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Joint temperatures, circumferences and nociceptive behaviours were monitored on days 0, 7, 14 and 21 post CFA and vector treatments. Lumbar (L4-6) dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and spinal cords were immunostained for met-enkephalin (met-ENK), beta-gal, HSV-1 proteins and Fos. Joint tissues were immunostained for met-ENK, HSV-1 proteins, and inflammatory mediators Regulated on Activation, Normal T-cell Expressed and Secreted (RANTES) and cyclo-oxygenase-2, or stained with haematoxylin and eosin for histopathology. Compared to exuberant synovial hypertrophy and inflammatory cell infiltration seen in arthritic rats treated with CFA only or CFA and HSV-beta-gal, the CFA- and HSV-ENK-treated arthritic rats had: (i) striking preservation of synovial membrane cytoarchitecture with minimal inflammatory cell infiltrates; (ii) significantly improved nociceptive behavioural responses to mechanical and thermal stimuli; (iii) normalized Fos staining in lumbar dorsal horn; and (iv) significantly increased met-ENK staining in ipsilateral synovial tissue, lumbar DRG and spinal cord. The HSV-1 and transgene product expression were confined to ipsilateral lumbar DRG (HSV-1, met-ENK, beta-gal). Only transgene product (met-ENK and beta-gal) was seen in lumbar spinal cord sections. Targeted delivery of enkephalin-encoding HSV-1 vector generated safe, sustained opioid-induced analgesia with protective anti-inflammatory blunting in rat inflammatory arthritis.

  11. Sustained FXN expression in dorsal root ganglia from a nonreplicative genomic HSV-1 vector.

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    Ventosa, Maria; Wu, Zetang; Lim, Filip

    2017-11-01

    Friedreich's ataxia (FA) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease caused by mutations in the frataxin gene (FXN), which lead to reduced levels of the essential mitochondrial protein frataxin. Currently, there is no effective cure. With the aim of developing a gene therapy for FA neuropathology, we describe the construction and preliminary characterization of a high-capacity nonreplicative genomic herpes simplex virus type 1 vector (H24B-FXNlac vector) carrying a reduced version of the human FXN genomic locus, comprising the 5-kb promoter and the FXN cDNA with the inclusion of intron 1. We show that the transgene cassette contains the elements necessary to preserve physiological neuronal regulation of human FXN expression. Transduction of cultured fetal rat dorsal root ganglia neurons with the H24B-FXNlac vector results in sustained expression of human FXN transcripts and frataxin protein. Rat footpad inoculation with the H24B-FXNlac vector results in human FXN transgene delivery to the dorsal root ganglia, with expression persisting for at least 1 month. The results of the present study support the feasibility of using this vector for sustained neuronal expression of human frataxin for FA gene therapy. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. HSV-1 amplicon vectors launch the production of heterologous rotavirus-like particles and induce rotavirus-specific immune responses in mice.

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    Laimbacher, Andrea S; Esteban, Laura E; Castello, Alejandro A; Abdusetir Cerfoglio, Juan C; Argüelles, Marcelo H; Glikmann, Graciela; D'Antuono, Alejandra; Mattion, Nora; Berois, Mabel; Arbiza, Juan; Hilbe, Monika; Schraner, Elisabeth M; Seyffert, Michael; Dresch, Christiane; Epstein, Alberto L; Ackermann, Mathias; Fraefel, Cornel

    2012-09-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are promising vaccine candidates because they represent viral antigens in the authentic conformation of the virion and are therefore readily recognized by the immune system. As VLPs do not contain genetic material they are safer than attenuated virus vaccines. In this study, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon vectors were constructed to coexpress the rotavirus (RV) structural genes VP2, VP6, and VP7 and were used as platforms to launch the production of RV-like particles (RVLPs) in vector-infected mammalian cells. Despite the observed splicing of VP6 RNA, full-length VP6 protein and RVLPs were efficiently produced. Intramuscular injection of mice with the amplicon vectors as a two-dose regimen without adjuvants resulted in RV-specific humoral immune responses and, most importantly, immunized mice were partially protected at the mucosal level from challenge with live wild-type (wt) RV. This work provides proof of principle for the application of HSV-1 amplicon vectors that mediate the efficient production of heterologous VLPs as genetic vaccines.

  13. Comparative study of cellular kinetics of reporter probe [{sup 131}I]FIAU in neonatal cardiac myocytes after transfer of HSV1-tk reporter gene with two vectors

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    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: lxl730724@hotmail.com; Yin Xiaohua; Wang Ruihua; Liu Ying [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China) and Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2009-02-15

    Aim: Reporter gene imaging is a promising approach for noninvasive monitoring of cardiac gene therapy. In this study, HSV1-tk (herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase) and FIAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) were used as the reporter gene and probe, respectively. Cellular uptakes of radiolabeled FIAU of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes transferred with HSV1-tk were compared between two vectors, adenovirus and liposome. The aims of this study were to choose the better vector and to provide a theoretical basis for good nuclide images. Methods: Neonatal cardiac myocytes were obtained from rat heart by single collagenase digestion. HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (recombinant adenovirus type 5, Ad5-tk) and plasmid (pDC316-tk) coated with Lipofectamine 2000 (pDC316-tk/lipoplex) were developed; thus, HSV1-tk could be transferred into neonatal cardiac myocytes. FAU (2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyluracil) was labeled with {sup 131}I, and the product was assessed after purification with reversed-phase Sep-Pak C-18 column. The uptake rates of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in the transferred cardiac myocytes at different times (0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 h) were detected. Furthermore, mRNA expression and protein expression of HSV1-tk were detected by semiquantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry. Results: FAU could be labeled with {sup 131}I, and the labeling efficiency and radiochemical purity rates were 53.82{+-}2.05% and 94.85{+-}1.76%, respectively. Time-dependent increase of the accumulation of [{sup 131}I]FIAU was observed in both the Ad5-tk group and the pDC316/lipoplex group, and the highest uptake rate occurred at 5 h, with peak values of 12.55{+-}0.37% and 2.09{+-}0.34%, respectively. Greater uptakes of [{sup 131}I]FIAU in Ad5-tk-infected cells compared with pDC316/lipoplex-transfected ones occurred at all the time points (t=12.978-38.253, P<.01). The exogenous gene

  14. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model.

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    Salabert, Anne-Sophie; Vaysse, Laurence; Beaurain, Marie; Alonso, Mathieu; Arribarat, Germain; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tafani, Mathieu; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression. A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo. Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft. The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection.

  15. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model.

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    Anne-Sophie Salabert

    Full Text Available Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression.A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo.Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft.The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection.

  16. Imaging grafted cells with [18F]FHBG using an optimized HSV1-TK mammalian expression vector in a brain injury rodent model

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    Beaurain, Marie; Alonso, Mathieu; Arribarat, Germain; Lotterie, Jean-Albert; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Tafani, Mathieu; Payoux, Pierre

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Cell transplantation is an innovative therapeutic approach after brain injury to compensate for tissue damage. To have real-time longitudinal monitoring of intracerebrally grafted cells, we explored the feasibility of a molecular imaging approach using thymidine kinase HSV1-TK gene encoding and [18F]FHBG as a reporter probe to image enzyme expression. Methods A stable neuronal cell line expressing HSV1-TK was developed with an optimised mammalian expression vector to ensure long-term transgene expression. After [18F]FHBG incubation under defined parameters, calibration ranges from 1 X 104 to 3 X 106 Neuro2A-TK cells were analysed by gamma counter or by PET-camera. In parallel, grafting with different quantities of [18F]FHBG prelabelled Neuro2A-TK cells was carried out in a rat brain injury model induced by stereotaxic injection of malonate toxin. Image acquisition of the rats was then performed with PET/CT camera to study the [18F]FHBG signal of transplanted cells in vivo. Results Under the optimised incubation conditions, [18F]FHBG cell uptake rate was around 2.52%. In-vitro calibration range analysis shows a clear linear correlation between the number of cells and the signal intensity. The PET signal emitted into rat brain correlated well with the number of cells injected and the number of surviving grafted cells was recorded via the in-vitro calibration range. PET/CT acquisitions also allowed validation of the stereotaxic injection procedure. Technique sensitivity was evaluated under 5 X 104 grafted cells in vivo. No [18F]FHBG or [18F]metabolite release was observed showing a stable cell uptake even 2 h post-graft. Conclusion The development of this kind of approach will allow grafting to be controlled and ensure longitudinal follow-up of cell viability and biodistribution after intracerebral injection. PMID:28926581

  17. Correction of a rat model of Parkinson's disease by coexpression of tyrosine hydroxylase and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase from a helper virus-free herpes simplex virus type 1 vector.

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    Sun, Mei; Zhang, Guo-Rong; Kong, Lingxin; Holmes, Courtney; Wang, Xiaodan; Zhang, Wei; Goldstein, David S; Geller, Alfred I

    2003-03-20

    We previously reported long-term biochemical and behavioral correction of the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson's disease (PD) by expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the partially denervated striatum, using a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vector. This study had a number of limitations, including the use of a helper virus packaging system, limited long-term expression, and expression of only TH. To address these issues, we developed a helper virus-free packaging system, a modified neurofilament gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons, and a vector that coexpresses TH and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Coexpression of TH and AADC supported high-level (80%), behavioral correction of the 6-OHDA rat model of PD for 5 weeks. Biochemical correction included increases in extracellular dopamine and DOPAC concentrations between 2 and 4 months after gene transfer. Histologic analyses demonstrated neuronal-specific coexpression of TH and AADC at 4 days to 7 months after gene transfer, and cell counts revealed 1000 to 10,000 TH positive cells per rat at 2 months after gene transfer. This improved system efficiently corrects the rat model of PD.

  18. An attenuated herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 encoding the HIV-1 Tat protein protects mice from a deadly mucosal HSV1 challenge.

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    Mariaconcetta Sicurella

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV1 and HSV2 are common infectious agents in both industrialized and developing countries. They cause recurrent asymptomatic and/or symptomatic infections, and life-threatening diseases and death in newborns and immunocompromised patients. Current treatment for HSV relies on antiviral medications, which can halt the symptomatic diseases but cannot prevent the shedding that occurs in asymptomatic patients or, consequently, the spread of the viruses. Therefore, prevention rather than treatment of HSV infections has long been an area of intense research, but thus far effective anti-HSV vaccines still remain elusive. One of the key hurdles to overcome in anti-HSV vaccine development is the identification and effective use of strategies that promote the emergence of Th1-type immune responses against a wide range of epitopes involved in the control of viral replication. Since the HIV1 Tat protein has several immunomodulatory activities and increases CTL recognition of dominant and subdominant epitopes of heterologous antigens, we generated and assayed a recombinant attenuated replication-competent HSV1 vector containing the tat gene (HSV1-Tat. In this proof-of-concept study we show that immunization with this vector conferred protection in 100% of mice challenged intravaginally with a lethal dose of wild-type HSV1. We demonstrate that the presence of Tat within the recombinant virus increased and broadened Th1-like and CTL responses against HSV-derived T-cell epitopes and elicited in most immunized mice detectable IgG responses. In sharp contrast, a similarly attenuated HSV1 recombinant vector without Tat (HSV1-LacZ, induced low and different T cell responses, no measurable antibody responses and did not protect mice against the wild-type HSV1 challenge. These findings strongly suggest that recombinant HSV1 vectors expressing Tat merit further investigation for their potential to prevent and/or contain HSV1

  19. High level of transgene expression in primary chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells using helper-virus-free recombinant Epstein-Barr virus vectors.

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    Wendtner, Clemens-Martin; Kurzeder, Christian; Theiss, Hans D; Kofler, David M; Baumert, Jens; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Janz, Annette; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Hallek, Michael

    2003-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-based vectors have favorable features for gene transfer, including a high transduction efficiency especially for B cells, large packaging capacity up to 150 kb pairs, and ability to infect postmitotic cells. Recombinant EBV was explored for transduction of primary human B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. EBV vectors deleted for all oncogenic sequences and encoding terminal repeats (TR) essential for encapsidation, the lytic origin of replication (oriLyt) for DNA amplification, and the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) were packaged using an optimized, helper-virus-free method. Infectious EBV virions encoding EGFP (EBV/EGFP) with an infectious titer up to 2 x 10(6) per milliliter were generated. Primary leukemic cells from 14 patients with CLL were successfully transduced with EBV/EGFP at a very low multiplicity of infection (gp350/220. Furthermore, transduction of CLL cells with packaged EBV vectors coding for EGFP but deleted for TR sequences (TR-) did not result in EGFP expression compared to TR+ vector constructs (p = 0.009). Helper-virus-free EBV-based gene transfer vectors hold promise for development of genetic therapies for CLL patients.

  20. Coexpression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase, GTP Cyclohydrolase I, Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase, and Vesicular Monoamine Transporter 2 from a Helper Virus-Free Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Vector Supports High-Level, Long-Term Biochemical and Behavioral Correction of a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease

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    SUN, MEI; KONG, LINGXIN; WANG, XIAODAN; HOLMES, COURTNEY; GAO, QINGSHENG; ZHANG, GUO-RONG; PFEILSCHIFTER, JOSEF; GOLDSTEIN, DAVID S.; GELLER, ALFRED I.

    2006-01-01

    normal rats, and only the 4-gene-vector supported significant K+-dependent release of dopamine. OVERVIEW SUMMARY Gene therapy treatments may benefit the management of Parkinson’s disease (PD). In the present study, we used a helper virus-free herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vector system and a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons. We coexpressed tyrosine hydroxylase, GTP cyclohydrolase I, aromatic amino acid decarboxylase, and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 in striatal cells in the 6-hydroxydopamine rat model of PD. Recombinant gene expression was maintained for 14 months in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic striatal neurons. Long-term behavioral (6 months) and biochemical (3 months) correction was observed with high K+-dependent release of significant levels of dopamine. These results suggest that HSV-1 vectors that coexpress multiple dopamine biosynthetic and transporter genes have promise for developing gene therapy treatments for PD. PMID:15684695

  1. Combination of MPPa-PDT and HSV1-TK/GCV gene therapy on prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Liming; Bi, Wenxiang; Chen, Weiwen; Lin, Yani; Tian, Yuanyuan

    2018-02-01

    We combined pyropheophorbide-a methyl ester, photodynamic therapy (MPPa-PDT), 670 ± 10 nm, 4 mW/cm 2 , with herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase/ganciclovir (HSV1-TK/GCV) to improve the therapeutic effect. We built HSV1-TK expression vector GV230-TK and we observed a bright green fluorescence under fluorescence microscope. It indicated the recombinant plasmid was transfected into PC-3M prostate cancer cells successfully. As the abundant glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78) promoter in PC-3M cells can cause active expression of HSV1-TK, cell protein was collected for western blot to determine the expression of HSV1-TK. In CCK-8 assay (n = 6), the cell survival rate of combined treatment group was about 10%, less than that of pure MPPa-PDT group (23%) and pure HSV1-TK/GCV group (35%) (t test, P PDT group (about 22%) and pure HSV1-TK/GCV group (about 19%). The results showed that the combination of the two treatments can effectively improve the cytocidal effect in PC-3M cells.

  2. Correction of a Rat Model of Parkinson’s Disease by Coexpression of Tyrosine Hydroxylase and Aromatic Amino Acid Decarboxylase from a Helper Virus-Free Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 Vctor

    Science.gov (United States)

    SUN, MEI; ZHANG, GUO-RONG; KONG, LINGXIN; HOLMES, COURTNEY; WANG, XIAODAN; ZHANG, WEI; GOLDSTEIN, DAVID S.; GELLER, ALFRED I.

    2006-01-01

    We previously reported long-term biochemical and behavioral correction of the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD) by expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the partially denervated striatum, using a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vector. This study had a number of limitations, including the use of a helper virus packaging system, limited long-term expression, and expression of only TH. To address these issues, we developed a helper virus-free packaging system, a modified neurofilament gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons, and a vector that coexpresses TH and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC). Coexpression of TH and AADC supported high-level (80%), behavioral correction of the 6-OHDA rat model of PD for 5 weeks. Biochemical correction included increases in extracellular dopamine and DOPAC concentrations between 2 to 4 months after gene transfer. Histologic analyses demonstrated neuronal-specific coexpression of TH and AADC at 4 days to 7 months after gene transfer, and cell counts revealed 1000 to 10,000 TH positive cells per rat at 2 months after gene transfer. This improved system efficiently corrects the rat model of PD. OVERVIEW SUMMARY Gene therapy has potential for treating Parkinson’s disease (PD). In this study, we used a helper virus-free herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) vector system and a modified neurofilament gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons. We coexpressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in striatal cells in the 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) rat model of Parkinson’s disease (PD). Biochemical (2–4 months) and behavioral (5 weeks) correction was observed. TH and AADC were expressed for at least 7 months. These results indicate the promise of helper virus-free HSV-1 vectors for developing gene therapy of PD. PMID:12691607

  3. Natural infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces humoral and T cell responses to the HSV-1 glycoprotein H : L complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, DF; Verjans, GMGM; Osterhaus, ADME; van Kooij, A; Welling, GW; Scheffer, AJ; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S

    The glycoproteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are important targets for the immune system in the control of HSV-1 infections. The humoral and T cell responses to the glycoprotein (g)H-t(His):gL complex of HSV-1 were studied in seven HSV-1-seropositive and three HSV-1-seronegative healthy

  4. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Sand, Lars

    2015-11-01

    It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). We investigated the prevalence of HSV-1 in biopsies obtained from 26 fresh, normal oral mucosa from healthy volunteers as well as 53 oral leukoplakia and 27 OSCC paraffin-embedded samples. DNA was extracted from the specimens and investigated for the presence of HSV-1 by nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) and DNA sequencing. HSV-1 was detected in 14 (54%) of the healthy samples, in 19 (36%) of the oral leukoplakia samples, and in 14 (52%) of the OSCC samples. The differences were not statistically significant. We observed a high incidence of HSV-1 in healthy oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and OSCC tissues. Thus, no connection between OSCC development and presence of HSV-1 was detected.

  5. IFI16 restricts HSV-1 replication by accumulating on the hsv-1 genome, repressing HSV-1 gene expression, and directly or indirectly modulating histone modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Johnson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ inducible factor 16 (IFI16 is a multifunctional nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, induction of interferon-β (IFN-β, and activation of the inflammasome response. It interacts with the sugar-phosphate backbone of dsDNA and modulates viral and cellular transcription through largely undetermined mechanisms. IFI16 is a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1, though the mechanisms of HSV-1 restriction are not yet understood. Here, we show that IFI16 has a profound effect on HSV-1 replication in human foreskin fibroblasts, osteosarcoma cells, and breast epithelial cancer cells. IFI16 knockdown increased HSV-1 yield 6-fold and IFI16 overexpression reduced viral yield by over 5-fold. Importantly, HSV-1 gene expression, including the immediate early proteins, ICP0 and ICP4, the early proteins, ICP8 and TK, and the late proteins gB and Us11, was reduced in the presence of IFI16. Depletion of the inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, or the IFN-inducing transcription factor, IRF-3, did not affect viral yield. ChIP studies demonstrated the presence of IFI16 bound to HSV-1 promoters in osteosarcoma (U2OS cells and fibroblasts. Using CRISPR gene editing technology, we generated U2OS cells with permanent deletion of IFI16 protein expression. ChIP analysis of these cells and wild-type (wt U2OS demonstrated increased association of RNA polymerase II, TATA binding protein (TBP and Oct1 transcription factors with viral promoters in the absence of IFI16 at different times post infection. Although IFI16 did not alter the total histone occupancy at viral or cellular promoters, its absence promoted markers of active chromatin and decreased those of repressive chromatin with viral and cellular gene promoters. Collectively, these studies for the first time demonstrate that IFI16 prevents association of important transcriptional activators with wt HSV-1 promoters and suggest potential

  6. Nested PCR for detection of HSV-1 in oral mucosa

    OpenAIRE

    Jalouli, Miranda-Masoumeh; Jalouli, Jamshid; Hasséus, Bengt; Öhman, Jenny; Hirsch, Jan-Michaél; Sand, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Background: It has been estimated that 15%-20% of human tumours are driven by infection and inflammation, and viral infections play an important role in malignant transformation. The evidence that herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) could be involved in the aetiology of oral cancer varies from weak to persuasive. This study aimed to investigate by nested PCR (NPCR) the prevalence of HSV-1 in samples from normal oral mucosa, oral leukoplakia, and oral squamous ...

  7. In Vitro Synergism of Trifluorothymidine and Ganciclovir against HSV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobden, Jeffery A.; Kumar, Manish; Kaufman, Herbert E.; Clement, Christian; Varnell, Emily D.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. To determine whether trifluorothymidine (TFT) and ganciclovir (GCV) are synergistic against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Methods. TFT and GCV activity against 12 strains of HSV-1 (including an acyclovir-resistant strain) was measured by plaque-forming unit (PFU) inhibition. Cellular toxicity was assessed with an MTT dye reduction assay. Synergism was determined by calculating fractional inhibitory concentration (FIC indices) based on PFU reduction. Results. Concentrations of TFT resulting in 50% inhibition of PFUs (IC50) of acyclovir-susceptible HSV-1 strains ranged from 3.07 ± 0.36 to 12.52 ± 0.61 μM. GCV IC50 values ranged from 0.40 ± 0.02 to 1.59 ± 0.14 μM. IC50 values of TFT and GCV against the acyclovir-resistant strain were 15.40 ± 3.17 and 93.00 ± 9.64 μM, respectively. Concentrations of TFT or GCV resulting in 50% cell cytotoxicity (CC50) were 0.99 ± 0.01 and 92.91 ± 8.92 μM, respectively. TFT and GCV combined (10:1) were 10 times more potent against all acyclovir-susceptible HSV-1 strains. For 8 of 12 HSV-1 strains, the IC50 of TFT and GCV combined was lower than the CC50 of either drug. For acyclovir-susceptible HSV-1 strains, TFT and GCV combined generated a FIC index of <0.5, suggesting strong synergism between the two drugs. The FIC value for TFT and GCV combined against the acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 strain was 0.84, indicating nonantagonism. Conclusions. TFT and GCV are synergistic against acyclovir-susceptible HSV-1 at concentrations significantly less toxic than if each antiviral were used as a sole agent. PMID:20861476

  8. Widespread disruption of host transcription termination in HSV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutkowski, Andrzej J.; Erhard, Florian; L'Hernault, Anne; Bonfert, Thomas; Schilhabel, Markus; Crump, Colin; Rosenstiel, Philip; Efstathiou, Stacey; Zimmer, Ralf; Friedel, Caroline C.; Dölken, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an important human pathogen and a paradigm for virus-induced host shut-off. Here we show that global changes in transcription and RNA processing and their impact on translation can be analysed in a single experimental setting by applying 4sU-tagging of newly transcribed RNA and ribosome profiling to lytic HSV-1 infection. Unexpectedly, we find that HSV-1 triggers the disruption of transcription termination of cellular, but not viral, genes. This results in extensive transcription for tens of thousands of nucleotides beyond poly(A) sites and into downstream genes, leading to novel intergenic splicing between exons of neighbouring cellular genes. As a consequence, hundreds of cellular genes seem to be transcriptionally induced but are not translated. In contrast to previous reports, we show that HSV-1 does not inhibit co-transcriptional splicing. Our approach thus substantially advances our understanding of HSV-1 biology and establishes HSV-1 as a model system for studying transcription termination. PMID:25989971

  9. Imaging expression of adenoviral HSV1-tk suicide gene transfer using the nucleoside analogue FIRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Dharmin [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Jong, Marion de; Bakker, Willem; Bijster, Magda; Cox, Peter [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Vogels, Ronald; Havenga, Menzo [Crucell Holland BV, Leiden (Netherlands); Driesse, Maarten; Avezaat, Cees [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands); Morin, Kevin; Naimi, Ebrahim; Knaus, Edward; Wiebe, Leonard [Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Smitt, Peter Sillevis [Department of Neurology, Daniel den Hoed Cancer Centre, University Hospital Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    Substrates for monitoring HSV1-tk gene expression include uracil and acycloguanosine derivatives.The most commonly used uracil derivative to monitor HSV1-tk gene transfer is 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (fialuridine; I*-FIAU), where the asterisk denotes any of the radioactive iodine isotopes that can be used. We have previously studied other nucleosides with imaging properties as good as or better than FIAU, including 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-[*I]iodouracil (FIRU). The first aim of this study was to extend the biodistribution data of {sup 123}I-labelled FIRU. Secondly, we assessed the feasibility of detecting differences in HSV1-tk gene expression levels following adenoviral gene transfer in vivo with {sup 123}I-FIRU. 9L rat gliosarcoma cells were stably transfected with the HSV1-tk gene (9L-tk+). {sup 123}I-FIRU was prepared by radioiodination of 1-(2-fluoro-2-deoxy-{beta}-D-ribofuranosyl)-5-tributylstannyl uracil (FTMRSU; precursor compound) and purified using an activated Sep-Pak column. Incubation of 9L-tk+ cells and the parental 9L cells with {sup 123}I-FIRU resulted in a 100-fold higher accumulation of radioactivity in the 9L-tk+ cells after an optimum incubation time of 4 h. NIH-bg-nu-xid mice were then inoculated subcutaneously with HSV1-tk (-) 9L cells or HSV1-tk (+) 9L-tk+ cells into both flanks. Biodistribution studies and gamma camera imaging were performed at 15 min and 1, 2, 4 and 24 h p.i. At 15 min, the tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios were 5.2, 1.0 and 30.3 respectively. Rapid renal clearance of the tracer from the body resulted in increasing tumour/muscle, tumour/blood and tumour/brain ratios, reaching values of 32.2, 12.5 and 171.6 at 4 h p.i. A maximum specific activity of 22%ID/g tissue was reached in the 9L-tk+ tumours 4 h after {sup 123}I-FIRU injection. Two Ad5-based adenoviral vectors containing the HSV1-tk gene were constructed: a replication-incompetent vector with

  10. Cell Cycle-Dependent Expression of Adeno-Associated Virus 2 (AAV2) Rep in Coinfections with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Gives Rise to a Mosaic of Cells Replicating either AAV2 or HSV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoso, Francesca D.; Seyffert, Michael; Vogel, Rebecca; Yakimovich, Artur; de Andrade Pereira, Bruna; Meier, Anita F.; Sutter, Sereina O.; Tobler, Kurt; Vogt, Bernd; Greber, Urs F.; Büning, Hildegard; Ackermann, Mathias

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) depends on the simultaneous presence of a helper virus such as herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for productive replication. At the same time, AAV2 efficiently blocks the replication of HSV-1, which would eventually limit its own replication by diminishing the helper virus reservoir. This discrepancy begs the question of how AAV2 and HSV-1 can coexist in a cell population. Here we show that in coinfected cultures, AAV2 DNA replication takes place almost exclusively in S/G2-phase cells, while HSV-1 DNA replication is restricted to G1 phase. Live microscopy revealed that not only wild-type AAV2 (wtAAV2) replication but also reporter gene expression from both single-stranded and double-stranded (self-complementary) recombinant AAV2 vectors preferentially occurs in S/G2-phase cells, suggesting that the preference for S/G2 phase is independent of the nature of the viral genome. Interestingly, however, a substantial proportion of S/G2-phase cells transduced by the double-stranded but not the single-stranded recombinant AAV2 vectors progressed through mitosis in the absence of the helper virus. We conclude that cell cycle-dependent AAV2 rep expression facilitates cell cycle-dependent AAV2 DNA replication and inhibits HSV-1 DNA replication. This may limit competition for cellular and viral helper factors and, hence, creates a biological niche for either virus to replicate. IMPORTANCE Adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) differs from most other viruses, as it requires not only a host cell for replication but also a helper virus such as an adenovirus or a herpesvirus. This situation inevitably leads to competition for cellular resources. AAV2 has been shown to efficiently inhibit the replication of helper viruses. Here we present a new facet of the interaction between AAV2 and one of its helper viruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). We observed that AAV2 rep gene expression is cell cycle dependent and gives rise to distinct time

  11. Identification of replication-competent HSV-1 Cgal+ strain targets in a mouse model of human hepatocarcinoma xenograft.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaría, Enrique; Mora, María I; Carro-Roldán, Elvira; Molina, Manuela; Fernández-Irigoyen, Joaquín; Marconi, Peggy; Manservigi, Roberto; Greco, Anna; Epstein, Alberto L; Prieto, Jesús; Hernández-Alcoceba, Rubén; Corrales, Fernando J

    2009-11-02

    Recent studies based on animal models have shown the advantages and potential of oncolytic viral therapy using HSV-1 -based replication-competent vectors in the treatment of liver tumors, but little is known about the cellular targets that are modulated during viral infection. In the present work, we have studied the effects of intratumoral injections of HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain in a murine model of human hepatoma xenografts. Viral replication was assessed for more than 1month, leading to a significant reduction of tumor growth rate mediated, in part, by a cyclin B dependent cell proliferation arrest. Early events resulting in this effect were analyzed using a proteomic approach. Protein extracts from xenografted human hepatomas treated with saline or HSV-1 Cgal(+) strain during 24h were compared by 2-D DIGE and differential spots were identified by nanoLC-ESI-MS/MS. Alterations on glutathione S transferase 1 Omega, and ERp29 suggest novel HSV-1 Cgal(+) targets in solid liver tumors. Additionally, ERp29 showed a complex differential isoform pattern upon HSV-1 Cgal(+) infection, suggesting regulatory mechanisms based on post-translational modification events.

  12. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhi Tang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP. However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6 and Hegu (LI4 in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP.

  13. Effects of Electroacupuncture on Facial Nerve Function and HSV-1 DNA Quantity in HSV-1 Induced Facial Nerve Palsy Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hongzhi; Feng, Shuwei; Chen, Jiao; Yang, Mingxiao; Zhong, Zhendong; Li, Ying; Liang, Fanrong

    2014-01-01

    Acupuncture is a common and effective therapeutic method to treat facial nerve palsy (FNP). However, its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study was aimed to investigate the effects of electroacupuncture on symptoms and content of HSV-1 DNA in FNP mice. Mice were randomized into four groups, an electroacupuncture treatment group, saline group, model animal group, and blank control group. Electroacupuncture was applied at Jiache (ST6) and Hegu (LI4) in electroacupuncture group once daily for 14 days, while electroacupuncture was not applied in model animal group. In electroacupuncture group, mice recovered more rapidly and HSV-1 DNA content also decreased more rapidly, compared with model animal group. We conclude that electroacupuncture is effective to alleviate symptoms and promote the reduction of HSV-1 in FNP. PMID:24991226

  14. PET imaging of oncolytic VSV expressing the mutant HSV-1 thymidine kinase transgene in a preclinical HCC rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Álvarez, Kim A; Altomonte, Jennifer; Laitinen, Iina; Ziegler, Sibylle; Steiger, Katja; Esposito, Irene; Schmid, Roland M; Ebert, Oliver

    2015-04-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the most predominant form of liver cancer and the third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Due to the relative ineffectiveness of conventional HCC therapies, oncolytic viruses have emerged as novel alternative treatment agents. Our previous studies have demonstrated significant prolongation of survival in advanced HCC in rats after oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) treatment. In this study, we aimed to establish a reporter system to reliably and sensitively image VSV in a clinically relevant model of HCC for clinical translation. To this end, an orthotopic, unifocal HCC model in immune-competent Buffalo rats was employed to test a recombinant VSV vector encoding for an enhanced version of the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) thymidine kinase (sr39tk) reporter, which would allow the indirect detection of VSV via positron emission tomography (PET). The resulting data revealed specific tracer uptake in VSV-HSV1-sr39tk-treated tumors. Further characterization of the VSV-HSV1-sr39tk vector demonstrated its optimal detection time-point after application and its detection limit via PET. In conclusion, oncolytic VSV expressing the HSV1-sr39tk reporter gene allows for highly sensitive in vivo imaging via PET. Therefore, this imaging system may be directly translatable and beneficial in further clinical applications.

  15. First HSV-1 non primary genital herpes in two patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouéré, Sébastien; Chaine, Bénédicte; Maylin, Sarah; Minier, Marine; Vallée, Pascale; Scieux, Catherine; Lassau, François; Legoff, Jérôme; Janier, Michel

    2016-05-01

    First HSV-1 genital episodes in HSV-2 infected patients however, had never been demonstrated until the 2 cases we observed. This scarcity could reflect the lower impact of HSV-2 on western populations but questions the existence of cross-protection between viral types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Short hairpin RNA-mediated inhibition of HSV-1 gene expression and function during HSV-1 infection in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan-yuan; Deng, Hai-ying; Yang, Guang; Jiang, Wen-lin; Grossin, Laurent; Yang, Zhan-qiu

    2008-08-01

    To evaluate the efficiency of 3 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) interfering with the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) gene coding glycoprotein D (gD) for inhibiting the gD expression and virus replication in vitro. Vero cells were selected for an in vitro model of infection. Three shRNA sequences (shRNAgD1, -gD2, and -gD3) targeting specifically the gD gene of HSV-1 were selected for evaluating the antiviral effects. The antiviral effects of shRNA in the cells infected with HSV-1 were evaluated by cytopathic effect (CPE) observations and plaque assays. The transcription level of viral RNA and the gD expression were studied by RT-PCR, Western blotting, and flow cytometry. With the 3 shRNA at a final concentration of 120 nmol/L, a significant inhibition of CPE in the HSV-1-infected cells was observed. The ED50 of shRNA-gD1, gD2, and gD3 were 48.74+/-2.57, 57.13+/-3.24, and 114.64+/-5.12 nmol/L, respectively. The gD gene decreased significantly after viral infection in the Vero cells pretreated with shRNA compared to the virus group. The expressions of the gD protein, determined by Western blotting and flow cytometry, were also drastically decreased in shRNA-transfected cells. Exogenous shRNA molecules can suppress the HSV-1 gD expression. They are inhibitors of HSV replication during infection in Vero cells.

  17. Short hairpin-loop-structured oligodeoxynucleotides reduce HSV-1 replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinrich Jochen

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Herpes simplex virus (HSV is known as an infectious agent and widespread in the human population. The symptoms of HSV infections can range from mild to life threatening, especially in immune-compromised individuals. HSV infections are commonly treated with the guanosine analogue Aciclovir, but reports of resistance are increasing. Efforts are made to establish single-stranded antisense oligodeoxynucleotides (as and small interfering ribonucleic acids (siRNAs for antiviral treatment. Recently, another class of short interfering nucleic acids, partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured 54 mer oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs, was shown to allow hydrolysis of HIV RNA by binding to the viral RNA. This leads to a substrate for the viral RNase H. To assess the potential of such ODNs for inhibition of HSV-1 replication, five partially double-stranded ODNs were designed based on the sequences of known siRNAs against HSV-1 with antiviral activity. Three of them are directed against early and two against leaky late genes. Primary human lung fibroblasts, MRC-5, and African green monkey kidney cells, Vero, were transfected with ODNs and subsequently infected. The effect on HSV-1 replication was determined by analyzing the virus titer in cell culture supernatants by quantitative PCR and plaque assays. An inhibitory effect was observed with all five selected ODNs, with two cases showing statistical significance in both cell types. The observed effect was sequence-specific and dose dependent. In one case the ODN was more efficient than a previously described siRNA directed against the same target site in the mRNA of UL5, a component of the helicase/primase complex. HSV-1 virions and ODNs can be applied simultaneously without transfection reagent, but at a 50-fold higher concentration to Vero cells with similar efficiencies. The results underline the potential of partially double-stranded hairpin loop-structured ODNs as antiviral agents.

  18. Analysis of the SUMO2 Proteome during HSV-1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Sloan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Covalent linkage to members of the small ubiquitin-like (SUMO family of proteins is an important mechanism by which the functions of many cellular proteins are regulated. Sumoylation has roles in the control of protein stability, activity and localization, and is involved in the regulation of transcription, gene expression, chromatin structure, nuclear transport and RNA metabolism. Sumoylation is also linked, both positively and negatively, with the replication of many different viruses both in terms of modification of viral proteins and modulation of sumoylated cellular proteins that influence the efficiency of infection. One prominent example of the latter is the widespread reduction in the levels of cellular sumoylated species induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ubiquitin ligase ICP0. This activity correlates with relief from intrinsic immunity antiviral defence mechanisms. Previous work has shown that ICP0 is selective in substrate choice, with some sumoylated proteins such the promyelocytic leukemia protein PML being extremely sensitive, while RanGAP is completely resistant. Here we present a comprehensive proteomic analysis of changes in the cellular SUMO2 proteome during HSV-1 infection. Amongst the 877 potentially sumoylated species detected, we identified 124 whose abundance was decreased by a factor of 3 or more by the virus, several of which were validated by western blot and expression analysis. We found many previously undescribed substrates of ICP0 whose degradation occurs by a range of mechanisms, influenced or not by sumoylation and/or the SUMO2 interaction motif within ICP0. Many of these proteins are known or are predicted to be involved in the regulation of transcription, chromatin assembly or modification. These results present novel insights into mechanisms and host cell proteins that might influence the efficiency of HSV-1 infection.

  19. Developing de novo human artificial chromosomes in embryonic stem cells using HSV-1 amplicon technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moralli, Daniela; Monaco, Zoia L

    2015-02-01

    De novo artificial chromosomes expressing genes have been generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) and are maintained following differentiation into other cell types. Human artificial chromosomes (HAC) are small, functional, extrachromosomal elements, which behave as normal chromosomes in human cells. De novo HAC are generated following delivery of alpha satellite DNA into target cells. HAC are characterized by high levels of mitotic stability and are used as models to study centromere formation and chromosome organisation. They are successful and effective as gene expression vectors since they remain autonomous and can accommodate larger genes and regulatory regions for long-term expression studies in cells unlike other viral gene delivery vectors currently used. Transferring the essential DNA sequences for HAC formation intact across the cell membrane has been challenging for a number of years. A highly efficient delivery system based on HSV-1 amplicons has been used to target DNA directly to the ES cell nucleus and HAC stably generated in human embryonic stem cells (hESc) at high frequency. HAC were detected using an improved protocol for hESc chromosome harvesting, which consistently produced high-quality metaphase spreads that could routinely detect HAC in hESc. In tumour cells, the input DNA often integrated in the host chromosomes, but in the host ES genome, it remained intact. The hESc containing the HAC formed embryoid bodies, generated teratoma in mice, and differentiated into neuronal cells where the HAC were maintained. The HAC structure and chromatin composition was similar to the endogenous hESc chromosomes. This review will discuss the technological advances in HAC vector delivery using HSV-1 amplicons and the improvements in the identification of de novo HAC in hESc.

  20. Application of shRNA-containing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-based gene therapy for HSV-2-induced genital herpes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhihong; Xiang, Yang; Wei, Zhun; Yu, Bo; Shao, Yong; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Hong; Li, Manmei; Guan, Ming; Wan, Jun; Zhang, Wei

    2013-11-01

    HSV-1-based vectors have been widely used to achieve targeted delivery of genes into the nervous system. In the current study, we aim to use shRNA-containing HSV-1-based gene delivery system for the therapy of HSV-2 infection. Guinea pigs were infected intravaginally with HSV-2 and scored daily for 100 days for the severity of vaginal disease. HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 was applied intravaginally daily between 8 and 14 days after HSV-2 challenge. Delivery of HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 had no effect on the onset of disease and acute virus shedding in animals, but resulted in a significant reduction in both the cumulative recurrent lesion days and the number of days with recurrent disease. Around half of the animals in the HSV-2 shRNA group did not develop recurrent disease 100 days post HSV-2 infection. In conclusion, HSV-2 shRNA-containing HSV-1 particles are effective in reducing the recurrence of genital herpes caused by HSV-2. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  2. Ocular HSV-1: Is the Cornea a Reservoir for Viral Latency or a Fast Pit Stop?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, David P.; Clement, Christian; Arceneaux, Richard L.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Huq, Tashfin S.; Hill, James M.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To present a review supporting and refuting evidence from mouse, rabbit, non-human primate, and human studies of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) concerning corneal latency. Methods More than 50 research papers on HSV-1 published in peer-reviewed journals were examined. Results Infectious HSV-1 has been found in mouse denervated tissues and in tissues with negative cultures from the corresponding ganglion. However, the different mouse strains have shown varied responses to different strains of HSV, making it difficult to relate such findings to humans. Rabbit studies provide excellent evidence for HSV-1 corneal latency including data on HSV-1 migration from the cornea into the corneoscleral rim and on the distribution of HSV-1 DNA in the cornea. However, the available methods for the detection of infectious HSV-1 may not be sensitive enough to detect low-level infection. Infectious HSV-1 has been successfully isolated from the tears of non-human primates in the absence of detectable corneal lesions. The recurrence of corneal ulcers in non-human primates before the appearance of infectious HSV-1 in tears suggests that the origin of the HSV-1 is the cornea, rather than the TG. Human studies presented evidence of both ganglion and corneal latency. Conclusion Understanding HSV-1 disease progression and the possibility of corneal latency could lead to more effective treatments for herpetic keratitis. However, it is unlikely that operational latency in the cornea will be definitively proven unless a new method with higher sensitivity for the detection of infectious virus is developed. PMID:21304287

  3. Seroprevalence of serum IgG of HSV-1 coinfected with HIV infected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV patients who attended Offa General Hospital, Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Clinic (HAART). Methods: A cross sectional study used to study the seroprevalence of IgG of HSV-1 coinfected HIV infected patients that attended Offa Highly Active ...

  4. Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1 Encephalitis Mimicking Glioblastoma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burke A. Cunha

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM often presents as a brain mass with encephalitis. In a patient with GBM, subsequent presentation with new onset encephalitis may be due to another GBM or Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 encephalitis. We present a case of HSV-1 encephalitis mimicking GBM in a patient with previous GBM.

  5. Autoradiography study and SPECT imaging of reporter gene HSV1-tk expression in heart

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan Xiaoli [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: LXL730724@hotmail.com; Liu Ying; He Yong; Wu Tao; Zhang Binqing; Gao Zairong; An Rui [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China); Zhang Yongxue [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hubei Province Key Laboratory of Molecular Imaging, Wuhan, Hubei Province, 430022 (China)], E-mail: zhyx1229@163.com

    2010-04-15

    Aim: To demonstrate the feasibility and optimal conditions of imaging herpes simplex virus 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene transferred into hearts with {sup 131}I-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil ({sup 131}I-FIAU) using autoradiography (ARG) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in animal models. Methods: HSV1-tk inserted into adenovirus vector (Ad5-tk) and adenovirus (Ad5-null) was prepared. Rats or rabbits were divided into a study group receiving intramyocardial injection of Ad5-tk, and a control group receiving Ad-null injection. In the study group of rats, two sets of experiments, time-course study and dose-dependence study, were performed. In time-course experiments, rats were injected with {sup 131}I-FIAU on Days 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7, after transfection of 1x10{sup 8} pfu Ad5-tk, to study the feasibility and suitable time course for reporter gene imaging. In dose-dependence study, various titers of Ad5-tk (5x10{sup 8}, 1x10{sup 8}, 5x10{sup 7} and 1x10{sup 7} pfu) were used to determine the threshold and optimal viral titer needed for detection of gene expression. The gamma counts of hearts were measured. The rat myocardium was analyzed by ARG and reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). SPECT whole-body planar imaging and cardiac tomographic imaging were performed in the rabbit models. Results: From the ARG images, rats injected with Ad5-tk showed significant {sup 131}I-FIAU activity in the anterolateral wall compared with background signals seen in the control Ad5-null rats. In time-course study, the highest radioactivity in the focal myocardium could be seen on Day 1, and then progressively declined with time. In dose-dependence study, the level of {sup 131}I-FIAU accumulation in the transfected myocardium declined with the decrease of Ad viral titers. From the ARG analysis and gamma counting, the threshold viral titer was 5x10{sup 7} pfu, and the optimal Ad titer was 1x10{sup 8} pfu

  6. Autologous antibody is protective against HSV-1 infection of the immunocompromised mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, T S; Rosenthal, K S

    1990-09-01

    The protective capability of autologous anti-herpes simplex virus type 1 (anti-HSV-1) antibody was analyzed in immunosuppressed mice. Immunologically naive, immunosuppressed mice infected with a low-passage clinical HSV-1 isolate developed local site lesions, monoplegia, paraplegia, and died within 8 days. Mice that had recovered from a previous HSV-1 infection and were immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide and then rechallenged with live virus showed no symptoms and survived. Untreated mice that had recovered from infection (primed mice) had high titers of anti-HSV-1 antibody and a delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to virus challenge. Cyclophosphamide treatment, but not lethal irradiation, could ablate the DTH response, resulting in a lack of antivirus cell-mediated immunity. Antibody was the only demonstrable protective immune function in the cyclophosphamide-treated animals. This indicates that cell-mediated immunity is not required for protection against HSV-1 challenge in individuals with virus-specific antibody.

  7. Rabbit and Mouse Models of HSV-1 Latency, Reactivation, and Recurrent Eye Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webre, Jody M.; Hill, James M.; Nolan, Nicole M.; Clement, Christian; McFerrin, Harris E.; Bhattacharjee, Partha S.; Hsia, Victor; Neumann, Donna M.; Foster, Timothy P.; Lukiw, Walter J.; Thompson, Hilary W.

    2012-01-01

    The exact mechanisms of HSV-1 establishment, maintenance, latency, reactivation, and also the courses of recurrent ocular infections remain a mystery. Comprehensive understanding of the HSV-1 disease process could lead to prevention of HSV-1 acute infection, reactivation, and more effective treatments of recurrent ocular disease. Animal models have been used for over sixty years to investigate our concepts and hypotheses of HSV-1 diseases. In this paper we present descriptions and examples of rabbit and mouse eye models of HSV-1 latency, reactivation, and recurrent diseases. We summarize studies in animal models of spontaneous and induced HSV-1 reactivation and recurrent disease. Numerous stimuli that induce reactivation in mice and rabbits are described, as well as factors that inhibit viral reactivation from latency. The key features, advantages, and disadvantages of the mouse and rabbit models in relation to the study of ocular HSV-1 are discussed. This paper is pertinent but not intended to be all inclusive. We will give examples of key papers that have reported novel discoveries related to the review topics. PMID:23091352

  8. The effect of cellular differentiation on HSV-1 infection of oligodendrocytic cells.

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    Raquel Bello-Morales

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex type 1 (HSV-1 is a neurotropic virus that infects many types of cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oligodendrocytic cells are highly susceptible to HSV-1 infection. Here we analysed HSV-1 infection of a human oligodendrocytic cell line, HOG, and oligodendrocyte precursor cells (OPCs cultured under growth or differentiation conditions. In addition to cell susceptibility, the role of the major cell receptors for viral entry was assessed. Our results revealed that OPCs and HOG cells cultured under differentiation conditions became more susceptible to HSV-1. On the other hand, viral infection induced morphological changes corresponding to differentiated cells, suggesting that HSV-1 might be inducing cell differentiation. We also observed colocalization of HVEM and nectin-1 with viral particles, suggesting that these two major HSV-1 receptors are functional in HOG cells. Finally, electron microscopy assays indicated that HSV-1 may be also entering OLs by macropinocytosis depending on their differentiation stage. In addition, vesicles containing intracellular enveloped virions observed in differentiated cells point to an endocytic mechanism of virus entry. All these data are indicative of diverse entry pathways dependent on the maturation stage of OLs.

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of HSV-1 replication by tumor necrosis factor and interferon gamma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Carrasco, L

    1991-02-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) synergizes with interferon (IFN gamma) in the blockade of HSV-1 replication. Antibodies against IFN beta block this synergism, implying a role of IFN beta in the antiviral activity of TNF plus IFN gamma. IFN beta 1 added exogenously to Hep-2 cells shows antiviral activity against HSV-1 only at high concentrations, whereas IFN beta 2 (also known as IL-6) alone has no effect on the replication of VSV or HSV-1 even when 1,000 U/ml are present. Our results are in accordance with the idea that TNF induces IFN beta 1 and that both cytokines must be present in the culture medium to synergize with IFN gamma in order to inhibit HSV-1 replication.

  10. Inhibitory effect of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea and Nerium oleander on HSV-1 multiplication

    OpenAIRE

    Maliheh Farahani

    2014-01-01

    Background: Treatment of HSV-1 infections with the available chemical drugs may have some problems such as drug resistance and virus latency. Therefore, there is a requirement for new antiherpes drugs in today's world. The present study was carried out to analyze the inhibitory effect of Echinacea purpurea and Nerium oleander plants with ethnomedical background on HSV-1 replication. Methods: Plants were extracted by decoction method to obtain aqueous extract. These extracts were screened f...

  11. Almond Skin Extracts Abrogate HSV-1 Replication by Blocking Virus Binding to the Cell

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    Carlo Bisignano

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present research was to determine the effect of almond skin extracts on herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 replication. Drug-resistant strains of HSV frequently develop following therapeutic treatment. Therefore, the discovery of novel anti-HSV drugs deserves great effort. Here, we tested both natural (NS and blanched (BS polyphenols-rich almond skin extracts against HSV-1. HPLC analysis showed that the prevalent compounds in NS and BS extracts contributing to their antioxidant activity were quercetin, epicatechin and catechin. Results of cell viability indicated that NS and BS extracts were not toxic to cultured Vero cells. Furthermore, NS extracts were more potent inhibitors of HSV-1 than BS extracts, and this trend was in agreement with different concentrations of flavonoids. The plaque forming assay, Western blot and real-time PCR were used to demonstrate that NS extracts were able to block the production of infectious HSV-1 particles. In addition, the viral binding assay demonstrated that NS extracts inhibited HSV-1 adsorption to Vero cells. Our conclusion is that natural products from almond skin extracts are an extraordinary source of antiviral agents and provide a novel treatment against HSV-1 infections.

  12. Gene Therapy with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV Exhibits a Stronger Therapeutic Efficacy Than HSV1-TK/GCV in Rat C6 Glioma Cells

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    Lei-qing Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the combination of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 thymidine kinase (TK with ganciclovir (GCV has been shown as a promising suicide gene treatment strategy for glioma, the almost immunodepressive dose of GCV required for its adequate in vivo efficacy has hampered its further clinical application. Therefore, In order to reduce the GCV dose required, we aim to compare the therapeutic efficacy of HSV1-sr39TK, an HSV1-TK mutant with increased GCV prodrug catalytic activity, with wildtype TK in C6 glioma cells. Accordingly, rat C6 glioma cells were first transfected with pCDNA-TK and pCDNA-sr39TK, respectively, and the gene transfection efficacy was verified by immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis. Then the in vivo sensitivity of these transfected C6-TK and C6-sr39TK cells to GCV was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo-(-z-y1-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT colorimetric assay and Hoechst-propidium iodide (PI staining. Finally, a subcutaneously C6 xenograft tumor model was established in the nude mice to test the in vitro efficacy of TK/GCV gene therapy. Our results showed that, as compared with wildtype TK, HSV1-sr39TK/GCV demonstrated a stronger therapeutic efficacy against C6 glioma both in vitro and in vivo, which, by reducing the required GCV dose, might warrant its future use in the treatment of glioma under clinical setting.

  13. Assessment of Anti HSV-1 Activity of Aloe Vera Gel Extract: an In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezazadeh, Fahimeh; Moshaverinia, Maryam; Motamedifar, Mohammad; Alyaseri, Montazer

    2016-03-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection is one of the most common and debilitating oral diseases; yet, there is no standard topical treatment to control it. The extract of Aloe vera leaves has been previously reported to have anti-inflammatory, antibacterial, and also antiviral effects. There is no data on anti-Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) activity of Aloe vera gel. This study aimed to evaluate the anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in Vero cell line. In this study, gel extraction and cytotoxicity of various increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel (0.2, 0.5, 1, 2, and 5%) was evaluated in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle Medium (DMEM) containing 2% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Having been washed with phosphate buffered saline, 50 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1 was added to each well. After 1 hour of incubation at 37°C, cell monolayers in 24 well plates were exposed to different increasing concentrations of Aloe vera gel. The anti-HSV-1 activity of Aloe vera gel in different concentrations was assessed by plaque reduction assays. Data were analyzed by using One-way ANOVA. The cytotoxicity assay showed that Aloe vera in prearranged concentrations was cell-compatible. The inhibitory effect of various concentrations of Aloe vera was observed one hour after the Vero cell was infected with HSV-1. However, there was no significant difference between two serial concentrations (p> 0.05). One-way ANOVA also revealed no significant difference between the groups. The findings indicated a dose-dependent antiviral effect of Aloe vera. The findings showed significant inhibitory effect of 0.2-5% Aloe vera gel on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line. Therefore, this gel could be a useful topical treatment for oral HSV-1 infections without any significant toxicity.

  14. DNA vaccine-encoded glycoprotein B of HSV-1 fails to protect chronic morphine-treated mice against HSV-1 challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamali, Abbas; Roostaee, Mohammad H; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Ghaderi Pakdel, Firouz; Bamdad, Taravat

    2007-03-01

    The use of morphine has been demonstrated to increase susceptibility to infections. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a highly successful pathogen among immunocompromised individuals. In the present study, due to the importance of HSV vaccination in morphine abusers, the effects of chronic morphine exposure on the host response to a HSV-1 gB DNA-based vaccine have been investigated. The study is addressing an important aspect of vaccine development among the susceptible (immunocompromised) hosts. BALB/c mice were exposed to morphine over 11 days. They were then vaccinated with DNA vaccine or KOS strain as a live vaccine. The findings showed that the morphine-treated animals failed to respond to DNA vaccination evaluated by the anti-HSV gB antibody titer, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and lethal HSV-1 challenge. Under the same conditions, the KOS vaccine showed a reduced Ab titer and DTH response in morphine-treated mice, but could protect mice against the lethal challenge and was safe for vaccination of morphine-treated animals.

  15. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

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    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  16. HSV-1-induced chemokine expression via IFI16-dependent and IFI16-independent pathways in human monocyte-derived macrophages

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søby, Stine; Laursen, Rune R; Østergaard, Lars Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    and monocytes were differentiated to macrophages. Macrophages infected with HSV-1 were analyzed using siRNA-mediated knock-down of IFI16 by real-time PCR, ELISA, and Western blotting. RESULTS: We determined that both CXCL10 and CCL3 are induced independent of HSV-1 replication. IFI16 mediates CCL3 m......RNA accumulation during early HSV-1 infection. In contrast, CXCL10 was induced independently of IFI16. CONCLUSIONS: Our data provide the first evidence of HSV-1-induced innate immune responses via IFI16 in human primary macrophages. In addition, the data suggest that at least one additional unidentified receptor...

  17. The antiviral effect of three plant species of Iran on HSV-1

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    malihe Farahani

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background : plants have had special position in human life and their medicinal application have been observed in manuscripts of many world scientists. Nowadays the treatment of HSV-1 infections with the available  chemical drugs often leads to the problems due to viral resistance and virus latency duration, therefore there is a requirement for new anti-herpes drugs.In this research the antiviral effects of  Camellia sinesis, Echium amoenumL and Nerium oleander, with ethnomedical background on HSV-1 were studied. Materials and Methods:The plants were extracted with decoction method to obtain aqueous extracts and after evaluating their cytotoxicity on Hep-2 cell lines by evaluating CPE, antiherpes effect of the plants extracts were determined by cytopathic effect inhibition assay. Results: Nerium oleander extract had the  most toxicity (> 50 μg/ml on cell line and Camellia sinesis showed the most inhibitory property on HSV-1 multiplication. Echium amoenumL had the lowest antiherpes effect. Camellia sinesis was inhibitor of virus multiplication completely at 50-1000 μg/ml and Echium amoenumL at concentrations >300 μg/ml. Conclusion: Camellia sinesis and Echium amoenumL could inhibit well HSV-1 multiplication completely at concentrations nontoxic. Further researches are needed to find the effect mechanism of these drugs which may be used in the manufacture of new antiherpes drugs.

  18. Inhibitory effect of aqueous extract of Echinacea purpurea and Nerium oleander on HSV-1 multiplication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliheh Farahani

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Treatment of HSV-1 infections with the available chemical drugs may have some problems such as drug resistance and virus latency. Therefore, there is a requirement for new antiherpes drugs in today's world. The present study was carried out to analyze the inhibitory effect of Echinacea purpurea and Nerium oleander plants with ethnomedical background on HSV-1 replication. Methods: Plants were extracted by decoction method to obtain aqueous extract. These extracts were screened for their cytotoxicity against Hep-2 cell line by CPE (cytopathic effect assay. Antiviral effect of the plant extracts were determined by the virus cytopathic effect inhibition assay. Results: Nerium oleander extract had the highest toxicity (>0.1 μg/ml on Hep-2 cells and Echinacea purpurea extract exhibited significant antiherpes effect at nontoxic concentrations used on the cell lines. Findings indicated that Echinacea purpurea extract inhibited HSV-1 multiplication at concentrations >400 μg/ml. Conclusion: Echinacea purpurea plant had no any effect on cells at nontoxic concentrations and inhibited HSV-1 multiplication at concentrations >400 μg/ml. Further research is needed to find out the anti herpetic mechanism of this plant.

  19. PD-L1-Expressing Dendritic Cells Contribute to Viral Resistance during Acute HSV-1 Infection

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    Katie M. Bryant-Hudson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The inhibitory receptor, Programmed Death 1 (PD-1, and its ligands (PD-L1/PD-L2 are thought to play a role in immune surveillance during chronic viral infection. The contribution of the receptor/ligand pair during an acute infection is less understood. To determine the role of PD-L1 and PD-L2 during acute ocular herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection, HSV-1-infected mice administered neutralizing antibody to PD-L1 or PD-L2 were assessed for viral burden and host cellular immune responses. Virus titers were elevated in cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG of anti-PD-L1-treated mice which corresponded with a reduced number of CD80-expressing dendritic cells, PD-L1+ dendritic cells, and HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells within the draining (mandibular lymph node (MLN. In contrast, anti-PD-L2 treatment had no effect on viral replication or changes in the MLN population. Notably, analysis of CD11c-enriched MLN cells from anti-PD-L1-treated mice revealed impaired functional capabilities. These studies indicate PD-L1-expressing dendritic cells are important for antiviral defense during acute HSV-1 infection.

  20. Hsc70 focus formation at the periphery of HSV-1 transcription sites requires ICP27.

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    Ling Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cellular chaperone protein Hsc70, along with components of the 26S proteasome and ubiquitin-conjugated proteins have been shown to be sequestered in discrete foci in the nuclei of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infected cells. We recently reported that cellular RNA polymerase II (RNAP II undergoes proteasomal degradation during robust HSV-1 transcription, and that the immediate early protein ICP27 interacts with the C-terminal domain and is involved in the recruitment of RNAP II to viral transcription/replication compartments. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: Here we show that ICP27 also interacts with Hsc70, and is required for the formation of Hsc70 nuclear foci. During infection with ICP27 mutants that are unable to recruit RNAP II to viral replication sites, viral transcript levels were greatly reduced, viral replication compartments were poorly formed and Hsc70 focus formation was curtailed. Further, a dominant negative Hsc70 mutant that cannot hydrolyze ATP, interfered with RNAP II degradation during HSV-1 infection, and an increase in ubiquitinated forms of RNAP II was observed. There was also a decrease in virus yields, indicating that proteasomal degradation of stalled RNAP II complexes during robust HSV-1 transcription and replication benefits viral gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We propose that one function of the Hsc70 nuclear foci may be to serve to facilitate the process of clearing stalled RNAP II complexes from viral genomes during times of highly active transcription.

  1. Isolation, identification and function of a novel anti-HSV-1 protein from Grifola frondosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Chang-Qing; Li, Jun-Wen; Chao, Fuhuan; Jin, Min; Wang, Xin-Wei; Shen, Zhi-Qiang

    2007-09-01

    A novel antiviral protein was purified from an extract of Grifola frondosa fruiting bodies using a procedure that included 40% ammonium sulfate precipitation and DEAE-cellulose ion exchange chromatography, and designated GFAHP. This protein inhibited herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) replication in vitro with an IC(50) value of 4.1 microg/ml and a therapeutic index >29.3. Higher concentrations of GFAHP (125 and 500 microg/ml) also significantly reduced the severity of HSV-1 induced blepharitis, neovascularization, and stromal keratitis in a murine model. Topical administration of GFAHP to the mouse cornea resulted in a significant decrease in virus production (mean virus yields: 3.4log10PFU in the treated group and 4.19log10PFU in the control group). We proved that GFAHP directly inactivates HSV-1 while simultaneously inhibiting HSV-1 penetration into Vero cells. Gel electrophoresis showed that GFAHP had a molecular weight of 29.5 kDa. GFAHP was tryptic digested and analyzed from the PMF of matrix assisted desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) and nanoelectrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry. The N-terminal sequence of GFAHP consisted of an 11 amino acid peptide, NH(2)-REQDNAPCGLN-COOH that did not match any known amino acid sequences, indicating that GFAHP is likely to be a novel antivirus protein. To our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes an anti-HSV protein from G. frondosa.

  2. HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress mediated by UL31 in association with UL34 is impeded by cellular transmembrane protein 140

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guan, Ying [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Yunnan Academy of Tobacco Science, Kunming, Yunnan 650106 (China); Guo, Lei; Yang, Erxia; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Che, Yanchun; Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Wang, Jingjing [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China); Li, Qihan, E-mail: imbcams.lq@gmail.com [Department of Viral Immunology, Institute of Medical Biology, Chinese Academy of Medicine Science, Peking Union Medical College, Kunming 650118 (China)

    2014-09-15

    During HSV-1 infection, the viral UL31 protein forms a complex with the UL34 protein at the cellular nuclear membrane, where both proteins play important roles in the envelopment of viral nucleocapsids and their egress into the cytoplasm. To characterize the mechanism of HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress, we screened host proteins to identify proteins that interacted with UL31 via yeast two-hybrid analysis. Transmembrane protein 140 (TMEM140), was identified and confirmed to bind to and co-localize with UL31 during viral infection. Further studies indicated that TMEM140 inhibits HSV-1 proliferation through selectively blocking viral nucleocapsid egress during the viral assembly process. The blockage function of TMEM140 is mediated by impeding the formation of the UL31–UL34 complex due to competitive binding to UL31. Collectively, these data suggest the essentiality of the UL31–UL34 interaction in the viral nucleocapsid egress process and provide a new anti-HSV-1 strategy in viral assembly process of nucleocapsid egress. - Highlights: • Cellular TMEM140 protein interacts with HSV-1 UL31 protein during viral infection. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 leads to inhibition of HSV-1 proliferation. • Increasing expression of TMEM140 blocks HSV-1 nucleocapsid egress process. • Binding to UL31 of TMEM140 impedes formation of HSV-1 UL31–UL34 complex.

  3. PET imaging of HSV1-tk mutants with acquired specificity toward pyrimidine- and acycloguanosine-based radiotracers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Likar, Yury; Dobrenkov, Konstantin; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Shenker, Larissa; Hricak, Hedvig; Ponomarev, Vladimir [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Molecular Imaging Laboratory, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Cai, Shangde [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, Radiochemistry/Cyclotron Core Facility, New York, NY (United States)

    2009-08-15

    The aim of this study was to create an alternative mutant of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene with reduced phosphorylation capacity for acycloguanosine derivatives, but not pyrimidine-based compounds that will allow for successful PET imaging. A new mutant of HSV1-tk reporter gene, suitable for PET imaging using pyrimidine-based radiotracers, was developed. The HSV1-tk mutant contains an arginine-to-glutamine substitution at position 176 (HSV1-R176Qtk) of the nucleoside binding region of the enzyme. The mutant-gene product showed favorable enzymatic characteristics toward pyrimidine-based nucleosides, while exhibiting reduced activity with acycloguanosine derivatives. In order to enhance HSV1-R176Qtk reporter activity with pyrimidine-based radiotracers, we introduced the R176Q substitution into the more active HSV1-sr39tk mutant. U87 human glioma cells transduced with the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk double mutant reporter gene showed high {sup 3}H-FEAU pyrimidine nucleoside and low {sup 3}H-penciclovir acycloguanosine analog uptake in vitro. PET imaging also demonstrated high {sup 18}F-FEAU and low {sup 18}F-FHBG accumulation in HSV1-R176Qsr39tk+ xenografts. The feasibility of imaging two independent nucleoside-specific HSV1-tk mutants in the same animal with PET was demonstrated. Two opposite xenografts expressing the HSV1-R176Qsr39tk reporter gene and the previously described acycloguanosine-specific mutant of HSV1-tk, HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, were imaged using a short-lived pyrimidine-based {sup 18}F-FEAU and an acycloguanosine-based {sup 18}F-FHBG radiotracer, respectively, administered on 2 consecutive days. We conclude that in combination with acycloguanosine-specific HSV1-A167Ysr39tk reporter gene, a HSV1-tk mutant containing the R176Q substitution could be used for PET imaging of two different cell populations or concurrent molecular biological processes in the same living subject. (orig.)

  4. FasL and FADD delivery by a glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon virus enhanced apoptosis in primary human brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam Paula Y

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme is the most malignant cancer of the brain and is notoriously difficult to treat due to the highly proliferative and infiltrative nature of the cells. Herein, we explored the combination treatment of pre-established human glioma xenograft using multiple therapeutic genes whereby the gene expression is regulated by both cell-type and cell cycle-dependent transcriptional regulatory mechanism conferred by recombinant HSV-1 amplicon vectors. Results We demonstrated for the first time that Ki67-positive proliferating primary human glioma cells cultured from biopsy samples were effectively induced into cell death by the dual-specific function of the pG8-FasL amplicon vectors. These vectors were relatively stable and exhibited minimal cytotoxicity in vivo. Intracranial implantation of pre-transduced glioma cells resulted in better survival outcome when compared with viral vectors inoculated one week post-implantation of tumor cells, indicating that therapeutic efficacy is dependent on the viral spread and mode of viral vectors administration. We further showed that pG8-FasL amplicon vectors are functional in the presence of commonly used treatment regimens for human brain cancer. In fact, the combined therapies of pG8-FasL and pG8-FADD in the presence of temozolomide significantly improved the survival of mice bearing intracranial high-grade gliomas. Conclusion Taken together, our results showed that the glioma-specific and cell cycle-dependent HSV-1 amplicon vector is potentially useful as an adjuvant therapy to complement the current gene therapy strategy for gliomas.

  5. The antiviral effect of three plant species of Iran on HSV-1

    OpenAIRE

    malihe Farahani

    2016-01-01

    Background : plants have had special position in human life and their medicinal application have been observed in manuscripts of many world scientists. Nowadays the treatment of HSV-1 infections with the available  chemical drugs often leads to the problems due to viral resistance and virus latency duration, therefore there is a requirement for new anti-herpes drugs.In this research the antiviral effects of  Camellia sinesis, Echium amoenumL and Nerium oleander, with ethnomedica...

  6. Platelet Activating Factor (PAF) Receptor Deletion or Antagonism Attenuates Severe HSV-1 Meningoencephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilela, Márcia Carvalho; Lima, Graciela Kunrath; Rodrigues, David Henrique; Lacerda-Queiroz, Norinne; Pedroso, Vinicius Sousa Pietra; de Miranda, Aline Silva; Rachid, Milene Alvarenga; Kroon, Erna Geessien; Campos, Marco Antônio; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Teixeira, Antonio Lucio

    2016-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a human pathogen that may cause severe encephalitis. The exacerbated immune response against the virus contributes to the disease severity and death. Platelet activating factor (PAF) is a mediator capable of inducing increase in vascular permeability, production of cytokines on endothelial cells and leukocytes. We aimed to investigate the activation of PAF receptor (PAFR) and its contribution to the severity of the inflammatory response in the brain following HSV-1 infection. C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) and PAFR deficient (PAFR-/-) mice were inoculated intracranially with 104 plaque-forming units (PFU) of HSV-1. Visualization of leukocyte recruitment was performed using intravital microscopy. Cells infiltration in the brain tissue were analyzed by flow cytometry. Brain was removed for chemokine assessment by ELISA and for histopathological analysis. The pharmacological inhibition by the PAFR antagonist UK-74,505 was also analyzed. In PAFR-/- mice, there was delayed lethality but no difference in viral load. Histopathological analysis of infected PAFR-/- mice showed that brain lesions were less severe when compared to their WT counterparts. Moreover, PAFR-/- mice showed less TCD4+, TCD8+ and macrophages in brain tissue. This reduction of the presence of leukocytes in parenchyma may be mechanistically explained by a decrease in leukocytes rolling and adhesion. PAFR-/- mice also presented a reduction of the chemokine CXCL9 in the brain. In addition, by antagonizing PAFR, survival of C57BL/6 infected mice increased. Altogether, our data suggest that PAFR plays a role in the pathogenesis of experimental HSV-1 meningoencephalitis, and its blockade prevents severe disease manifestation.

  7. Methimazole-Induced Hypothyroidism Enhances HSV-1 Infectivity without Altering Circulating Leukocytes in the Rat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Feizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgrounds & objectives: In addition to their genomic actions, thyroid hormones (THs can modulate the immune responses through cell surface receptors. One of these is the antiviral effect of THs. Methimazole, as an anti-thyroid compound, is widely used to treat hyperthyroid patients. It also reduces blood leukocytes, granulocytes in particular, and thereby may affect the immune response. Recently, we reported that methimazole-induced hypothyroidism intensifies herpes simplex virus-1(HSV-1 infectivity. To determine whether the effect is mediated through alterations in circulating leukocytes, we assessed the HSV-1 infectivity and circulating leukocytes in methimazole-induced hypothyroid rat.   Methods: Male Sprague Dawley rats received methimazole (200 μg/ml in their drinking water for 2 weeks. Rats were then inoculated with a non-lethal single dose of HSV-1, and sacrificed 3 days later to harvest their spleen. Spleen extract was prepared, and virus yield was determined by evaluation of cytopathic effects (CPE induced by the extract in a Vero cell culture system. For quantitative analysis, standard method of Reed-Muench was employed. The routine Wright’s staining protocol was used for blood leukocytes differential count.   Results: The CPE development was significantly increased in the cell cultures exposed to the spleen extract of methimazole-treated animals (P < 0.05, indicating a higher virus yield and intensified virus infectivity. However, the effect of methimazole on blood leukocytes was minimal.   Conclusion: Our data suggest that methimazole increases the susceptibility to HSV-1 infection, at least in part, by blocking THs synthesis but not alterations in circulating leukocytes.

  8. Characterization of Wild-type and Temperature Sensitive Mutants of HSV-1 DNA Polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-15

    two genomic isomeric arrangements [Ben-Porat , 1979; Plummer, 1973] o Virus: Pseudorabies Virus (Suid herpesvirus 1) Equine Herpesvirus (Equid...Huang, 1975], equine herpesvirus [Cohen et al., 1975; Kemp et al., 1975) and HSV [Keir & Gold, 1963]. Since then, several herpesvirus DNA polymerases... hypersensitive to the inhibitor PAA, based on an in vivo plaque reduction assay, when compared to the levels of PAA needed to inhibit HSV-1 KOS plaque

  9. PEDF plus DHA modulate inflammation and stimulate nerve regeneration after HSV-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jiucheng; Neumann, Donna; Kakazu, Azucena; Pham, Thang Luong; Musarrat, Farhana; Cortina, M Soledad; Bazan, Haydee E P

    2017-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection leads to impaired corneal sensation and, in severe cases, to corneal ulceration, melting and perforation. Here, we explore the potential therapeutic action of pigment epithelial-derived factor (PEDF) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) on corneal inflammation and nerve regeneration following HSV-1 infection. Rabbits inoculated with 100,000 PFU/eye of HSV-1 strain 17Syn+ were treated with PEDF + DHA or vehicle. PEDF + DHA treatment resulted in a biphasic immune response with stronger infiltration of CD4+T cells, neutrophils and macrophages at 7-days post-treatment (p.t.) that was significantly decreased by 14 days, compared to the vehicle-treated group. Screening of 14 immune-related genes by q-PCR showed that treatment induced higher expression of IFN-γ and CCL20 and inhibition of IL-18 by 7 days in the cornea. PEDF + DHA-treated animals developed less dendritic corneal lesions, opacity and neovascularization. Corneal nerve density increased at 12-weeks p.t. with functional recovery of corneal sensation. Treatment with PEDF + DHA that was postponed by 3 weeks also showed increased nerve density when compared to vehicle. Our data demonstrate that PEDF + DHA promotes resolution of the inflammatory response to the virus and, most importantly, induces regeneration of damaged corneal nerves vital for maintaining ocular surface homeostasis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Newly Characterized Murine Undifferentiated Sarcoma Models Sensitive to Virotherapy with Oncolytic HSV-1 M002

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric K. Ring

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in conventional chemotherapy, surgical techniques, and radiation, outcomes for patients with relapsed, refractory, or metastatic soft tissue sarcomas are dismal. Survivors often suffer from lasting morbidity from current treatments. New targeted therapies with less toxicity, such as those that harness the immune system, and immunocompetent murine sarcoma models to test these therapies are greatly needed. We characterized two new serendipitous murine models of undifferentiated sarcoma (SARC-28 and SARC-45 and tested their sensitivity to virotherapy with oncolytic herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1. Both models expressed high levels of the primary HSV entry molecule nectin-1 (CD111 and were susceptible to killing by interleukin-12 (IL-12 producing HSV-1 M002 in vitro and in vivo. M002 resulted in a significant intratumoral increase in effector CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and activated monocytes, and a decrease in myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs in immunocompetent mice. Compared to parent virus R3659 (no IL-12 production, M002 resulted in higher CD8:MDSC and CD8:T regulatory cell (Treg ratios, suggesting that M002 creates a more favorable immune tumor microenvironment. These data provide support for clinical trials targeting sarcomas with oncolytic HSV-1. These models provide an exciting opportunity to explore combination therapies for soft tissue sarcomas that rely on an intact immune system to reach full therapeutic potential.

  11. Synthesis and anti-HSV-1 activity of quinolonic acyclovir analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, Bianca d'A; Gomes, Claudia Regina B; Frugulhetti, Izabel Christina de P P; Faro, Letícia V; Alvarenga, Lise; de Souza, Maria Cecília B V; de Souza, Thiago M L; Ferreira, Vitor F

    2006-02-15

    Several 1-[(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)methyl]-3-carbethoxy-4(1H)quinolones (2a-l) and l-[(2-hydroxy-ethoxy)methyl]-4(1H)quinolone-3-carboxylic acids (3a-j and 3l) were synthesized and 2a-j, 2l and 3a-j, 3l were evaluated against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), employing a one-pot reaction: silylation of the desired quinolone (BSTFA 1% TMCS) followed by equimolar amount addition of 1,3-dioxolane, chlorotrimethylsilane and KI, at room temperature. The acyclonucleosides 2a-l were obtained in 40-77% yields. The esters 2a-j and 2l were subsequently converted into the corresponding hydroxyacids 3 in 40-70% yields. Attempts of hydrolysis of 2k produced only a mixture of degradation products. Antiviral activity of 2 and 3 on HSV-1 virus infection was assessed by the virus yield assay. Except for compounds 2i and 3e, the acyclonucleosides were found to reduce the virus yield by 70-99% at the concentration of 50 microM, being the acids, in general, more effective inhibitors than their corresponding esters. Compounds 3j and 2d exhibited antiviral activity against HSV-1 virus with EC50 of 0.7+/-0.04 and 0.8+/-0.09 microM, respectively. Both compounds were not toxic towards the Vero cell line.

  12. HSV-1 Glycoproteins Are Delivered to Virus Assembly Sites Through Dynamin-Dependent Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albecka, Anna; Laine, Romain F; Janssen, Anne F J; Kaminski, Clemens F; Crump, Colin M

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) is a large enveloped DNA virus that belongs to the family of Herpesviridae. It has been recently shown that the cytoplasmic membranes that wrap the newly assembled capsids are endocytic compartments derived from the plasma membrane. Here, we show that dynamin-dependent endocytosis plays a major role in this process. Dominant-negative dynamin and clathrin adaptor AP180 significantly decrease virus production. Moreover, inhibitors targeting dynamin and clathrin lead to a decreased transport of glycoproteins to cytoplasmic capsids, confirming that glycoproteins are delivered to assembly sites via endocytosis. We also show that certain combinations of glycoproteins colocalize with each other and with the components of clathrin-dependent and -independent endocytosis pathways. Importantly, we demonstrate that the uptake of neutralizing antibodies that bind to glycoproteins when they become exposed on the cell surface during virus particle assembly leads to the production of non-infectious HSV-1. Our results demonstrate that transport of viral glycoproteins to the plasma membrane prior to endocytosis is the major route by which these proteins are localized to the cytoplasmic virus assembly compartments. This highlights the importance of endocytosis as a major protein-sorting event during HSV-1 envelopment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. The Synthesis of the Stable IVDU Derivative for Imaging HSV-1 TK Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jung; Choi, Tae Hyun; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Kim, Byoung Soo; Park, Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; An, Gwang Il [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Science, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Rhee, Hak June [Hanyang University, Ansan (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-10-15

    5-iododeoxyuridine analogues have been exclusively developed for the potential antiviral and antitumor therapeutic agents. In this study, we synthesized carbocyclic radioiododeoxyuridineanalogue (ddIVDU) and carbocyclic intermediate as efficient carbocyclic radiopharmaceuticals. The synthesis is LAH reduction, hetero Diels-Alder reaction as key reactions including Pd(0)-catalyzed coupling reaction together with organotin. MCA-RH7777 (MCA) and MCA-tk (HSV1-tk positive) cells were treated with various concentration of carbocyclic ddIVDU, and GCV. Cytotoxicity was measured by the MTS methods. For in vitro uptake study, MCA and MCA-tk cells were incubated with 1uCi of [{sup 125}I]carbocyclic ddIVDU. Accumulated radioactivity was measured after various incubation times. The synthesis of ddIVDU and precursor for radioiodination were achieved from cyclopentadiene in good overall yield, respectively. The radioiododemetallation for radiolabeling gave more than 80% yield with > 95% radiochemical purity. GCV was more toxic than carbocyclic ddIVDU in MCA-tk cells. Accumulation of [{sup 125}I]carbocyclic ddIVDU was higher in MCA-tk cells than MCA cells. Biological data reveal that ddIVDU is stable in vitro, less toxic than ganciclovir (GCV), and selective in HSV1-tk expressed cells. Thus, this new carbocyclic nucleoside, referred to in this paper as carbocyclic 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxy-5- iodovinyluridine (carbocyclic ddIVDU), is a potential imaging probe for HSV1-tk.

  14. Inhibition of HSV-1 replication by laser diode-irradiation: possible mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnarumma, G; De Gregorio, V; Fusco, A; Farina, E; Baroni, A; Esposito, V; Contaldo, M; Petruzzi, M; Pannone, G; Serpico, R

    2010-01-01

    Herpes labialis are the most frequent clinical manifestations of HSV-1 infection. Epithelial cells are able to respond to HSV-1 presence inducing the expression of IL-6, IL-1, TNF-α and IL-8. These proinflammatory cytokines have a function in the acute-phase response mediation, chemotaxis, inflammatory cell activation and antigen-presenting cells. In the human epithelial cell models, it has been demonstrated that, after an early induction of proinflammatory host response, HSV-1 down-modulates the proinflammatory cytokine production through the accumulation of two viral proteins, ICP4 and ICP27, whose transcription is induced by tegument protein VP16. These viral proteins, through the decreasing of stabilizing the mRNAs of proinflammatory genes, delay cytokine production to an extent that allows the virus to replicate. Moreover, viral transactivating proteins, ICP-0 and VP-16 induce IL-10 expression. The conventional treatment of herpes labialis involves the topical and systemic use of antiviral drugs but it is necessary to find new therapies that can act in a selective and non-cytotoxic manner in viral infection. Laser diode therapy has been considered as a non-invasive alternative treatment to the conventional treatment of herpes labialis in pain therapy, in modulation of inflammation and in wound healing. This study aims to report a possible mechanism of action of laser diode irradiation in prevention and reduction of severity of labial manifestations of herpes labialis virus. We investigated, in an in vitro model of epithelial cells HaCat, the laser-effect on HSV-1 replication and we evaluated the modulation of expression of certain proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6), antimicrobial peptide HBD2, chemokine IL-8 and the immunosuppressive cytokine, IL-10. Our results lead us to hypothesize that LD-irradiation acts in the final stage of HSV-1 replication by limiting viral spread from cell to cell and that laser therapy acts also on the host immune

  15. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sufiawati, Irna; Tugizov, Sharof M

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD). Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  16. Synthesis and Cellular Uptake of Radioiodine labeled 2{sup '}-deoxyuridine derivatives with HSV1-TK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Ah; Lee, Kyo Chul; Hong, Su Hee; Kim, Eun Jung; Lee, Jong Chan; An, Gwang Il; Choi, Tae Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Chun, Kwon Soo [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01

    Several different radiolabeled probes have been developed to image Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 thyrimidine kinase gene (HSV1-TK) expression. The nucleoside prodrugs under investigation for HSV1-TK imaging generally fall into two main chemical and radioisotope categories: the pyrimidine nucleosides, primarily radioiodinated, and the purin nucleosides, primarily radiofluorinated, and their respective analogues. In non-invasive imaging of the HSV1-TK system, many nucleoside derivatives have been recommended as HSV1-TK substrates. Most of these nucleoside derivatives have been developed as prodrugs for tumor proliferation imaging or as anti-viral drugs. For example, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and IUdR have been used as tumor agents and acyclovir (ACV), ganciclovir (GCV) and (E)-5-(2-bromovinyl)-2{sup '}- deoxyuridine (BVDU) as an anti-viral agents for virus infection several 5-substituted uracil nucleoside derivatives have been identified to have high sensitivity and selective accumulation in HSV1-TK expressing cells. Of those, IVDU was shown to be rapidly accumulated in HSV1- TK expressing cells in vitro. Imaging of the HSV1-TK reporter gene along with various reporter probes is of current interest. In contrast to the mammalian kinase, which phosphorylates thymidine preferentially, HSV1-TK is less discriminative and phosphorylates a wide range of nucleoside analogues such as acycloguanosines and 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyuridine derivatives that are not phosphorylated efficiently by the native enzyme. More specifically, 5-substituted 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyarabinofuranosyluracil nucleosides are efficiently phosphorylated by HSV- TK. This property, together with the presence of fluorine in the 2{sup '}-arabino-position, endows the 2{sup '}-fluoro-2{sup '}-deoxyuridines with antiviral activity against HSV.

  17. HIV-associated disruption of tight and adherens junctions of oral epithelial cells facilitates HSV-1 infection and spread.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irna Sufiawati

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV types 1 and 2 are the most common opportunistic infections in HIV/AIDS. In these immunocompromised individuals, HSV-1 reactivates and replicates in oral epithelium, leading to oral disorders such as ulcers, gingivitis, and necrotic lesions. Although the increased risk of HSV infection may be mediated in part by HIV-induced immune dysfunction, direct or indirect interactions of HIV and HSV at the molecular level may also play a role. In this report we show that prolonged interaction of the HIV proteins tat and gp120 and cell-free HIV virions with polarized oral epithelial cells leads to disruption of tight and adherens junctions of epithelial cells through the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway. HIV-induced disruption of oral epithelial junctions facilitates HSV-1 paracellular spread between the epithelial cells. Furthermore, HIV-associated disruption of adherens junctions exposes sequestered nectin-1, an adhesion protein and critical receptor for HSV envelope glycoprotein D (gD. Exposure of nectin-1 facilitates binding of HSV-1 gD, which substantially increases HSV-1 infection of epithelial cells with disrupted junctions over that of cells with intact junctions. Exposed nectin-1 from disrupted adherens junctions also increases the cell-to-cell spread of HSV-1 from infected to uninfected oral epithelial cells. Antibodies to nectin-1 and HSV-1 gD substantially reduce HSV-1 infection and cell-to-cell spread, indicating that HIV-promoted HSV infection and spread are mediated by the interaction of HSV gD with HIV-exposed nectin-1. Our data suggest that HIV-associated disruption of oral epithelial junctions may potentiate HSV-1 infection and its paracellular and cell-to-cell spread within the oral mucosal epithelium. This could be one of the possible mechanisms of rapid development of HSV-associated oral lesions in HIV-infected individuals.

  18. Analysis of Select Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Proteins for Restriction of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1): HSV-1 gM Protein Potently Restricts HIV-1 by Preventing Intracellular Transport and Processing of Env gp160.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polpitiya Arachchige, Sachith; Henke, Wyatt; Pramanik, Ankita; Kalamvoki, Maria; Stephens, Edward B

    2018-01-15

    Virus-encoded proteins that impair or shut down specific host cell functions during replication can be used as probes to identify potential proteins/pathways used in the replication of viruses from other families. We screened nine proteins from herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) for the ability to enhance or restrict human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. We show that several HSV-1 proteins (glycoprotein M [gM], US3, and UL24) potently restricted the replication of HIV-1. Unlike UL24 and US3, which reduced viral protein synthesis, we observed that gM restriction of HIV-1 occurred through interference with the processing and transport of gp160, resulting in a significantly reduced level of mature gp120/gp41 released from cells. Finally, we show that an HSV-1 gM mutant lacking the majority of the C-terminal domain (HA-gM[Δ345-473]) restricted neither gp160 processing nor the release of infectious virus. These studies identify proteins from heterologous viruses that can restrict viruses through novel pathways.IMPORTANCE HIV-1 infection of humans results in AIDS, characterized by the loss of CD4+ T cells and increased susceptibility to opportunistic infections. Both HIV-1 and HSV-1 can infect astrocytes and microglia of the central nervous system (CNS). Thus, the identification of HSV-1 proteins that directly restrict HIV-1 or interfere with pathways required for HIV-1 replication could lead to novel antiretroviral strategies. The results of this study show that select viral proteins from HSV-1 can potently restrict HIV-1. Further, our results indicate that the gM protein of HSV-1 restricts HIV-1 through a novel pathway by interfering with the processing of gp160 and its incorporation into virus maturing from the cell. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Nonsulfated, cinnamic acid-based lignins are potent antagonists of HSV-1 entry into cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Jay N; Tiwari, Vaibhav; Desai, Umesh R

    2010-05-10

    In an effort to discover macromolecular mimetics of heparan sulfate (HS), we previously designed sulfated lignins (Raghuraman et al. Biomacromolecules 2007, 8, 1759-1763). To probe the relevance of sulfate groups of HS in viral entry, lignins completely devoid of sulfate moieties, and yet possessing an electrostatic surface equivalent to that of HS, were designed. Two carboxylated lignins based on a 4-hydroxy cinnamic acid scaffold were synthesized using enzymatic oxidative coupling in high yields, fractionated according to their sizes, and tested in cellular assays of herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) infection. The two carboxylated lignins were found to not only inhibit HSV-1 entry into mammalian cells (IC(50) = 8-56 nM), but were more potent than sulfated lignins. In addition, shorter carboxylated lignins were found to be as active as the longer chains, suggesting that structural features, in addition to carboxylate groups, may be important. It can be expected that carboxylated lignins also antagonize the entry of other enveloped viruses, for example, HIV-1, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus, and hepatitis C virus, that utilize HS to gain entry into cells. The results present major opportunities for developing lignin-based antiviral formulations for topical use.

  20. Docking of anti-HIV-1 oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone derivatives as potential HSV-1 DNA polymerase inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Julliane Diniz; Albuquerque, Magaly Girão; Leal, Kátia Zaccur; Santos, Fernanda da Costa; Batalha, Pedro Netto; Brozeguini, Leonardo; Seidl, Peter R.; de Alencastro, Ricardo Bicca; Cunha, Anna Cláudia; de Souza, Maria Cecília B. V.; Ferreira, Vitor F.; Giongo, Viveca A.; Cirne-Santos, Cláudio; Paixão, Izabel C. P.

    2014-09-01

    Although there are many antiviral drugs available for the treatment of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infections, still the synthesis of new anti-HSV candidates is an important strategy to be pursued, due to the emergency of resistant HSV strains mainly in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infected patients. Some 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinolines, such as PNU-183792 (1), show a broad spectrum antiviral activity against human herpes viruses, inhibiting the viral DNA polymerase (POL) without affecting the human POLs. Thus, on an ongoing antiviral research project, our group has synthesized ribonucleosides containing the 1,4-dihydro-4-oxoquinoline (quinolone) heterocyclic moiety, such as the 6-Cl derivative (2), which is a dual antiviral agent (HSV-1 and HIV-1). Molecular dynamics simulations of the complexes of 1 and 2 with the HSV-1 POL suggest that structural modifications of 2 should increase its experimental anti-HSV-1 activity, since its ribosyl and carboxyl groups are highly hydrophilic to interact with a hydrophobic pocket of this enzyme. Therefore, in this work, comparative molecular docking simulations of 1 and three new synthesized oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone HIV-1 inhibitors (3-5), which do not contain those hydrophilic groups, were carried out, in order to access these modifications in the proposition of new potential anti-HSV-1 agents, but maintaining the anti-HIV-1 activity. Among the docked compounds, the oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 3 is the best candidate for an anti-HSV-1 agent, and, in addition, it showed anti-HIV-1 activity (EC50 = 3.4 ± 0.3 μM). Compounds 2 and 3 were used as templates in the design of four new oxoquinoline-acylhydrazones (6-9) as potential anti-HSV-1 agents to increase the antiviral activity of 2. Among the docked compounds, oxoquinoline-acylhydrazone 7 was selected as the best candidate for further development of dual anti-HIV/HSV activity.

  1. The use of human cornea organotypic cultures to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drevets, Peter; Chucair-Elliott, Ana; Shrestha, Priyadarsini; Jinkins, Jeremy; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Carr, Daniel J J

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of human organotypic cornea cultures as a model to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation and neovascularization. Human organotypic cornea cultures were established from corneas with an intact limbus that were retrieved from donated whole globes. One cornea culture was infected with HSV-1 (10(4) plaque-forming units), while the other cornea from the same donor was mock-infected. Supernatants were collected at intervals post-culture with and without infection to determine viral titer (by plaque assay) and pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokine concentration by suspension array analysis. In some experiments, the cultured corneas were collected and evaluated for HSV-1 antigens by immunohistochemical means. Another set of experiments measured susceptibility of human three-dimensional cornea fibroblast constructs, in the presence and absence of TGF-β1, to HSV-1 infection in terms of viral replication and the inflammatory response to infection as a comparison to the organotypic cornea cultures. Organotypic cornea cultures and three-dimensional fibroblast constructs exhibited varying degrees of susceptibility to HSV-1. Fibroblast constructs were more susceptible to infection in terms of infectious virus recovered in a shorter period of time. There were changes in the levels of select pro-angiogenic or proinflammatory cytokines that were dictated as much by the cultures producing them as by whether they were infected with HSV-1 or treated with TGF-β1. Organotypic cornea and three-dimensional fibroblast cultures are likely useful for the identification and short-term study of novel antiviral compounds and virus replication, but are limited in the study of the local immune response to infection.

  2. Association between HSV1 seropositivity and obesity: data from the National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey, 2007-2008.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Karjala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Herpes simplex virus (HSV is among the most common sexually transmitted pathogens in the United States and worldwide. HSV has a high incidence of undetected cases. In addition, there is no treatment, and there is a lack of knowledge why disparities among populations exist. Research studies suggest that fat tissue may participate in body's immune responses, and the impact of obesity on susceptibility to HSV1 infection is not clear. The purpose of this study was to examine whether obesity is a risk factor for HSV1 infection using a large sample from the general population. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This cross-sectional study used data from the National Health and Examination and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES from 2007-2008. Variables, gender, age, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, poverty level, and diabetes represented potential confounders and were included in analyses. The two-tailed Pearson's chi square, student's t test, and a multiple logistic regression analysis were applied to evaluate associations using a significance value of p≤0.05. Adjusted odds ratios with 95% confidence interval represented the degree of these associations. The prevalence of HSV1 infection in US population between 20 and 49 years old was 60.3% (n = 1,536. In this study, having a BMI classified as the obese group (BMI 30-39.9 was significantly associated with HSV1 infection before [unadjusted OR = 1.74 (95% CI 1.20-2.51, p = 0.006] and after controlling for socio-demographic factors [adjusted OR = 1.50 (95%CI 1.06-2.13], p = 0.026]. This association was stronger than three already established risk factors of age, female gender, and poverty level. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides evidence that obesity may play a role in the susceptibility to HSV1 infection. Findings from this study suggest that obesity should be considered when designing preventive measures for HSV1 infection. These results may also

  3. Local CD4 and CD8 T-cell reactivity to HSV-1 antigens documents broad viral protein expression and immune competence in latently infected human trigeminal ganglia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monique van Velzen

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection results in lifelong chronic infection of trigeminal ganglion (TG neurons, also referred to as neuronal HSV-1 latency, with periodic reactivation leading to recrudescent herpetic disease in some persons. HSV-1 proteins are expressed in a temporally coordinated fashion during lytic infection, but their expression pattern during latent infection is largely unknown. Selective retention of HSV-1 reactive T-cells in human TG suggests their role in controlling reactivation by recognizing locally expressed HSV-1 proteins. We characterized the HSV-1 proteins recognized by virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T-cells recovered from human HSV-1-infected TG. T-cell clusters, consisting of both CD4 and CD8 T-cells, surrounded neurons and expressed mRNAs and proteins consistent with in situ antigen recognition and antiviral function. HSV-1 proteome-wide scans revealed that intra-TG T-cell responses included both CD4 and CD8 T-cells directed to one to three HSV-1 proteins per person. HSV-1 protein ICP6 was targeted by CD8 T-cells in 4 of 8 HLA-discordant donors. In situ tetramer staining demonstrated HSV-1-specific CD8 T-cells juxtaposed to TG neurons. Intra-TG retention of virus-specific CD4 T-cells, validated to the HSV-1 peptide level, implies trafficking of viral proteins from neurons to HLA class II-expressing non-neuronal cells for antigen presentation. The diversity of viral proteins targeted by TG T-cells across all kinetic and functional classes of viral proteins suggests broad HSV-1 protein expression, and viral antigen processing and presentation, in latently infected human TG. Collectively, the human TG represents an immunocompetent environment for both CD4 and CD8 T-cell recognition of HSV-1 proteins expressed during latent infection. HSV-1 proteins recognized by TG-resident T-cells, particularly ICP6 and VP16, are potential HSV-1 vaccine candidates.

  4. Detection of circulating tumor cells using oHSV1-hTERT-GFP in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hongjun; Liu, Wenjing; Yang, Shaoxing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Xiaoyan; Qin, Haifeng; Wang, Weixia; Zhao, Changyun

    2017-10-25

    This study was conducted to evaluate the clinical utility of the oHSV1-hTERT-GFP circulating tumor cell (CTC) detection method in the peripheral blood of patients with lung cancer by comparing its sensitivity to the CellSearch CTC detection method. The oHSV1-hTERT-GFP and CellSearch CTC detection methods were compared using peripheral blood samples of patients pathologically diagnosed with lung cancer. A total of 240 patients with lung cancer were recruited, including 89 patients who were newly diagnosed and 151 patients who had previously received treatment. Sixty-six newly diagnosed patients were evaluated using both methods. The CTC detection rates were 71.2% and 33.3% using the oHSV1-hTERT-GFP and CellSearch methods, respectively; this difference was statistically significant (P = 0.000). Among the entire cohort (n = 240), the CTC detection rate using the oHSV1-hTERT-GFP method was 76.3%, with a CTC count of 0-81. The CTC detection rates were 76.7%, 68.9%, and 76.3% in patients with squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and small cell lung cancer, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the CTC detection rates between these different pathological subtypes (P = 0.738). The CTC detection rates of 79.8% and 74.4% in patients with stage I-III and IV lung cancer, respectively, were not significantly different (P = 0.427). The oHSV1-hTERT-GFP method is highly effective for detecting CTCs in patients with lung cancer, independent of pathological type and disease stage, and is ideal for large-scale clinical applications. © 2017 The Authors. Thoracic Cancer published by China Lung Oncology Group and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Ethosomes for the delivery of anti-HSV-1 molecules: preparation, characterization and in vitro activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortesi, R; Ravani, L; Zaid, A N; Menegatti, E; Romagnoli, R; Drechsler, M; Esposito, E

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes the production, characterization and in vitro activity of ethosomes containing two molecules with antiviral activity, such as acyclovir (ACY) and N1-beta-D-ribofuranosyl-pyrazole [3,4d]pyridazin-7(6p-chlorine-phenyl)-one nucleoside (N1CP). Ethosomes were prepared and morphologically characterized by Cryo-TEM. The encapsulation efficiency was 92.3 +/- 2.5% for ACY and 94.2 +/- 2.8% for N1CP. The release of the drug from vesicles, determined by a Franz cell method, indicated that both drugs were released in a controlled manner. In order to possibly guarantee the stability during long-term storage ethosome suspensions was freeze-dried. It was found that the freeze-dried ethosomes' cakes were compact, glassy characterized by low density and quick re-hydration. However, the storage time slightly influences the percentage of drug encapsulation within ethosomes showing a drug leakage after re-hydration around 10%. The antiviral activity against HSV-1 of both drugs was tested by plaque reduction assay in monolayer cultures of Vero cells. Data showed that ethosomes allowed a reduction of the ED50 of N1CP evidencing an increase of its antiviral activity. However, ACY remains more active than N1CP. No differences are appreciable between drug-containing ethosomes before and after freeze-drying. Taken together these results, ethosomal formulation could be possibly proposed as mean for topical administration of anti-herpetic molecules.

  6. Solid-to-fluid DNA transition inside HSV-1 capsid close to the temperature of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sae-Ueng, Udom; Li, Dong; Zuo, Xiaobing; Huffman, Jamie B.; Homa, Fred L.; Rau, Donald; Evilevitch, Alex

    2014-10-01

    DNA in the human Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) capsid is packaged to a tight density. This leads to tens of atmospheres of internal pressure responsible for the delivery of the herpes genome into the cell nucleus. In this study we show that, despite its liquid crystalline state inside the capsid, the DNA is fluid-like, which facilitates its ejection into the cell nucleus during infection. We found that the sliding friction between closely packaged DNA strands, caused by interstrand repulsive interactions, is reduced by the ionic environment of epithelial cells and neurons susceptible to herpes infection. However, variations in the ionic conditions corresponding to neuronal activity can restrict DNA mobility in the capsid, making it more solid-like. This can inhibit intranuclear DNA release and interfere with viral replication. In addition, the temperature of the human host (37 °C) induces a disordering transition of the encapsidated herpes genome, which reduces interstrand interactions and provides genome mobility required for infection.

  7. A truncation mutation of the neurovirulence ICP22 protein produced by a recombinant HSV-1 generated by bacterial artificial chromosome technology targets infected cell nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Robert N; Blaho, John A

    2011-12-01

    The major regulatory protein ICP22 is unique among the immediate early proteins of herpes simplex virus. Viruses deleted for ICP22 replicate well in actively dividing cells, but not in quiescent cells or certain rodent lines. Accordingly, ICP22 represents an understudied herpes simplex virus (HSV) neurovirulence marker which is absolutely essential for viral neurogrowth. We utilized the bacterial artificial chromosome methodology to create a novel ICP22 truncation mutant, termed HSV-1(BACX). The integrity of HSV-1(BACX) was confirmed by detailed polymerase chain reaction analyses and immunoblotting using anti-ICP22 antibody. HSV-1(BACX) showed a reduced replication capacity in rabbit skin cells, consistent with previous studies using ICP22-null viruses. Importantly, HSV-1(BACX) localized to nuclei of infected primate Vero cells in a manner similar to wild-type ICP22. Thus, HSV-1(BACX) will serve as a useful tool to decipher the unusual biological properties and functions of the ICP22 protein.

  8. Lytic HSV-1 infection induces the multifunctional transcription factor Early Growth Response-1 (EGR-1 in rabbit corneal cells

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    McFerrin Harris E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1 infections can cause a number of diseases ranging from simple cold sores to dangerous keratitis and lethal encephalitis. The interaction between virus and host cells, critical for viral replication, is being extensively investigated by many laboratories. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that HSV-1 lytic infection triggers the expression of important multi-functional transcription factor Egr1. The mechanisms of induction are mediated, at least in part, by signaling pathways such as NFκB and CREB. Methods SIRC, VERO, and 293HEK cell lines were infected with HSV-1, and the Egr-1 transcript and protein were detected by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. The localization and expression profile of Egr-1 were investigated further by immunofluorescence microscopy analyses. The recruitment of transcription factors to the Egr-1 promoter during infection was studied by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP. Various inhibitors and dominant-negative mutant were used to assess the mechanisms of Egr-1 induction and their effects were addressed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results Western blot analyses showed that Egr-1 was absent in uninfected cells; however, the protein was detected 24-72 hours post treatment, and the response was directly proportional to the titer of the virus used for infection. Using recombinant HSV-1 expressing EGFP, Egr-1 was detected only in the infected cells. ChIP assays demonstrated that NFкB and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB were recruited to the Egr-1 promoter upon infection. Additional studies showed that inhibitors of NFкB and dominant-negative CREB repressed the Egr-1 induction by HSV-1 infection. Conclusion Collectively, these results demonstrate that Egr-1 is expressed rapidly upon HSV-1 infection and that this novel induction could be due to the NFкB/CREB-mediated transactivation. Egr-1 induction might play a key role in the viral gene

  9. Subcellular Trafficking and Functional Relationship of the HSV-1 Glycoproteins N and M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striebinger, Hannah; Funk, Christina; Raschbichler, Verena; Bailer, Susanne M.

    2016-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein N (gN/UL49.5) is a type I transmembrane protein conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. gN is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum that in the presence of gM is translocated to the trans Golgi network. gM and gN are covalently linked by a single disulphide bond formed between cysteine 46 of gN and cysteine 59 of gM. Exit of gN from the endoplasmic reticulum requires the N-terminal core of gM composed of eight transmembrane domains but is independent of the C-terminal extension of gM. Co-transport of gN and gM to the trans Golgi network also occurs upon replacement of conserved cysteines in gM and gN, suggesting that their physical interaction is mediated by covalent and non-covalent forces. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) mutagenesis generated mutant viruses with wild-type growth behaviour, while full deletion of gM/UL10 resulted in an attenuated phenotype. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 in conjunction with various gM/UL10 mutants reduced average plaque sizes to the same extent as either single gM/UL10 mutant, indicating that gN is nonessential for the function performed by gM. We propose that gN functions in gM-dependent as well as gM-independent processes during which it is complemented by other viral factors. PMID:26999189

  10. Subcellular Trafficking and Functional Relationship of the HSV-1 Glycoproteins N and M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Striebinger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 glycoprotein N (gN/UL49.5 is a type I transmembrane protein conserved throughout the herpesvirus family. gN is a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum that in the presence of gM is translocated to the trans Golgi network. gM and gN are covalently linked by a single disulphide bond formed between cysteine 46 of gN and cysteine 59 of gM. Exit of gN from the endoplasmic reticulum requires the N-terminal core of gM composed of eight transmembrane domains but is independent of the C-terminal extension of gM. Co-transport of gN and gM to the trans Golgi network also occurs upon replacement of conserved cysteines in gM and gN, suggesting that their physical interaction is mediated by covalent and non-covalent forces. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC mutagenesis generated mutant viruses with wild-type growth behaviour, while full deletion of gM/UL10 resulted in an attenuated phenotype. Deletion of gN/UL49.5 in conjunction with various gM/UL10 mutants reduced average plaque sizes to the same extent as either single gM/UL10 mutant, indicating that gN is nonessential for the function performed by gM. We propose that gN functions in gM-dependent as well as gM-independent processes during which it is complemented by other viral factors.

  11. Sensing of HSV-1 by the cGAS-STING pathway in microglia orchestrates antiviral defence in the CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Line S; Lopušná, Katarína; Winther, Henriette

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV-induced t......Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis in industrialized countries. Type I interferon (IFN) is important for control of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Here we show that microglia are the main source of HSV......-induced type I IFN expression in CNS cells and these cytokines are induced in a cGAS-STING-dependent manner. Consistently, mice defective in cGAS or STING are highly susceptible to acute HSE. Although STING is redundant for cell-autonomous antiviral resistance in astrocytes and neurons, viral replication...

  12. Colony Stimulating Factor-1 Receptor Expressing Cells Infiltrating the Cornea Control Corneal Nerve Degeneration in Response to HSV-1 Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Gurung, Hem R; Carr, Meghan M; Carr, Daniel J J

    2017-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a leading cause of neurotrophic keratitis, characterized by decreased or absent corneal sensation due to damage to the sensory corneal innervation. We previously reported the elicited immune response to infection contributes to the mechanism of corneal nerve regression/damage during acute HSV-1 infection. Our aim is to further establish the involvement of infiltrated macrophages in the mechanism of nerve loss upon infection. Macrophage Fas-Induced Apoptosis (MAFIA) transgenic C57BL/6 mice were systemically treated with AP20187 dimerizer or vehicle (VEH), and their corneas, lymph nodes, and blood were assessed for CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cell depletion by flow cytometry (FC). Mice were ocularly infected with HSV-1 or left uninfected. At 2, 4, and/or 6 days post infection (PI), corneas were assessed for sensitivity and harvested for FC, nerve structure by immunohistochemistry, viral content by plaque assay, soluble factor content by suspension array, and activation of signaling pathways by Western blot analysis. C57BL6 mice were used to compare to the MAFIA mouse model. MAFIA mice treated with AP20187 had efficient depletion of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells in the tissues analyzed. The reduction of CD45+CD11b+GFP+ cells recruited to the infected corneas of AP20187-treated mice correlated with preservation of corneal nerve structure and function, decreased protein concentration of inflammatory cytokines, and decreased STAT3 activation despite no changes in viral content in the cornea compared to VEH-treated animals. Our results suggest infiltrated macrophages are early effectors in the nerve regression following HSV-1 infection. We propose the neurodegeneration mechanism involves macrophages, local up-regulation of IL-6, and activation of STAT3.

  13. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

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    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  14. Association between exposure to HSV1 and cognitive functioning in a general population of adolescents. The TRAILS study.

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    Iris Jonker

    Full Text Available Infections with different herpes viruses have been associated with cognitive functioning in psychiatric patients and healthy adults. The aim of this study was to find out whether antibodies to different herpes viruses are prospectively associated with cognitive functioning in a general adolescent population.This study was performed in TRAILS, a large prospective general population cohort (N = 1084, 54% female, mean age 16.2 years (SD 0.6. At age 16, immunoglobulin G antibodies against HSV1, HSV2, CMV and EBV were measured next to high sensitive C-Reactive Protein (hsCRP. Two years later, immediate memory and executive functioning were assessed using the 15 words task and the self ordered pointing task. Multiple linear regression analysis with bootstrapping was performed to study the association between viral infections and cognitive function, adjusting for gender, socioeconomic status, ethnicity, and cannabis use.Presence of HSV1 antibodies was associated with memory function ((B = -0.272, 95% CI = -0.556 to -0.016, p = 0.047, while the association with executive functioning did not reach statistical significance (B = 0.560, 95% CI is -0.053 to 1.184, p = 0.075. The level of HSV1 antibodies was associated with both memory function (B = -0.160, 95% CI = -0.280 to -0.039, p = 0.014 and executive functioning (B = 0.296, 95% CI = 0.011 to 0.578, p = 0.046. Other herpes viruses and hsCRP were not associated with cognitive functioning.Both presence and level of HSV1 antibodies are prospectively associated with reduced cognitive performance in a large cohort of adolescents.

  15. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons.

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    Yanez, Andy A; Harrell, Telvin; Sriranganathan, Heather J; Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-02-07

    Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2) establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF) maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs). Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG) after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN) and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  16. Neurotrophic Factors NGF, GDNF and NTN Selectively Modulate HSV1 and HSV2 Lytic Infection and Reactivation in Primary Adult Sensory and Autonomic Neurons

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    Andy A. Yanez

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex viruses (HSV1 and HSV2 establish latency in peripheral ganglia after ocular or genital infection, and can reactivate to produce different patterns and frequencies of recurrent disease. Previous studies showed that nerve growth factor (NGF maintains HSV1 latency in embryonic sympathetic and sensory neurons. However, adult sensory neurons are no longer dependent on NGF for survival, some populations cease expression of NGF receptors postnatally, and the viruses preferentially establish latency in different populations of sensory neurons responsive to other neurotrophic factors (NTFs. Thus, NGF may not maintain latency in adult sensory neurons. To identify NTFs important for maintaining HSV1 and HSV2 latency in adult neurons, we investigated acute and latently-infected primary adult sensory trigeminal (TG and sympathetic superior cervical ganglia (SCG after NTF removal. NGF and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 reactivation in adult sympathetic neurons. In adult sensory neurons, however, neurturin (NTN and GDNF deprivation induced HSV1 and HSV2 reactivation, respectively, while NGF deprivation had no effects. Furthermore, HSV1 and HSV2 preferentially reactivated from neurons expressing GFRα2 and GFRα1, the high affinity receptors for NTN and GDNF, respectively. Thus, NTN and GDNF play a critical role in selective maintenance of HSV1 and HSV2 latency in primary adult sensory neurons.

  17. Efficacy of the ND:YAG laser therapy on EBV and HSV1 contamination in periodontal pockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Francesco Saverio; Bacci, Giovanni; Martelli, Maria Laura; Nobili, Piero; Boddi, Anna; Rosati, Claudio; Fanti, Elena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective multicenter study was to verify the efficacy of Nd:YAG laser in the treatment of periodontal pockets infected by Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) and Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV1). Subgingival plaque samples of 291 Italian periodontal patients were analyzed by Real Time PCR to evaluate the frequency of both viruses before and after Nd:YAG laser-assisted periodontal treatment. Before treatment, EBV and HSV1 were observed in 29.9% and in 3.8% of periodontal patients respectively, while co-infection with both viruses was detected in 1.7% of cases. Periodontal Nd:YAG laser treatment ("Periodontal Biological Laser-Assisted Therapy", PERIOBLAST) produced statistical significant benefits, especially in EBV periodontal infection: 78.2% of EBV positive patients became EBV-negative following treatment. Results of this preliminary study highlight that EBV is found in periodontal pockets more frequently than HSV1, supporting the theory of the potential role of EBV in the onset and progression of periodontal disease. Moreover, our data showed that Nd:YAG laser-assisted periodontal treatment (Perioblast) is also effective in case of viral infection, validating evidences that it represents a successful alternative approach to traditional periodontal protocols.

  18. Visualization of mouse neuronal ganglia infected by Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) using multimodal non-linear optical microscopy.

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    Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Laliberté, Mathieu; Bertrand-Grenier, Antony; Houle, Marie-Andrée; Blache, Marie-Claire; Légaré, François; Pearson, Angela

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus that causes skin lesions and goes on to enter a latent state in neurons of the trigeminal ganglia. Following stress, the virus may reactivate from latency leading to recurrent lesions. The in situ study of neuronal infections by HSV-1 is critical to understanding the mechanisms involved in the biology of this virus and how it causes disease; however, this normally requires fixation and sectioning of the target tissues followed by treatment with contrast agents to visualize key structures, which can lead to artifacts. To further our ability to study HSV-1 neuropathogenesis, we have generated a recombinant virus expressing a second generation red fluorescent protein (mCherry), which behaves like the parental virus in vivo. By optimizing the application of a multimodal non-linear optical microscopy platform, we have successfully visualized in unsectioned trigeminal ganglia of mice both infected cells by two-photon fluorescence microscopy, and myelinated axons of uninfected surrounding cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. These results represent the first report of CARS microscopy being combined with 2-photon fluorescence microscopy to visualize virus-infected cells deep within unsectioned explanted tissue, and demonstrate the application of multimodal non-linear optical microscopy for high spatial resolution biological imaging of tissues without the use of stains or fixatives.

  19. Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in sexually transmitted diseases - more for screening less for diagnosis: An evaluation of clinical manifestation

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    Dharmishtha G Tada

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 is the cause of most genital herpes. Now, HSV-1 has become an important cause and represents even about 30% of genital herpes in some countries. So, study related to genital herpes should consider both HSV-1 and HSV-2. Aim: To examine trends in HSV-1 and 2 seroprevalence by Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in all type of sexually transmitted disease (STD patients and also to evaluate correlation of serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STD. Materials and Methods: 150 patients attending the STD clinic attached to a tertiary care hospital of Ahmedabad were included in the study. Serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM correlations with clinical manifestations of recurrent and non-recurrent type of genital herpes patients and other non-herpetic STD patients were studied. Results: The overall serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STD seroprevalence were 15.66%. Female has significant higher prevalence (P < 0.05. STD cases and HSV seroprevalence were specially concentrated in persons aged 21 to 30 years. Among those positive with HSV, the distribution of STD are wide spread and found in non-herpetic group at high frequency. Out of total 23 serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM positive, 12 and 11 are distributed in herpetic and non-herpetic STDs, respectively. Discussion and Conclusion: Though serum HSV-1 and 2 IgM in STDs are less diagnostic, they help to see the iceberg part of the infection among the population concerned in recent scenario or in another words, it provides recent infective burden.

  20. Seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in Canadian women screened for enrolment in a herpes simplex virus vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorfinkel, I S; Aoki, F; McNeil, S; Dionne, M; Shafran, S D; Zickler, P; Halperin, S; Langley, J; Bellamy, A; Schulte, J; Heineman, T; Belshe, R

    2013-05-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infections continue to be among the most common and unrecognized sexually transmitted infections in the world. Although treatable, HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections remain incurable. Hence, there is interest in the development of a vaccine to prevent genital herpes. As part of a multicentre, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to test such a vaccine, healthy women 18-30 years were enrolled as volunteers in several Canadian centres between 2005 and 2007. This study reports the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 antibodies in this group. A total of 2694 adult female volunteers in Canada with no known history of herpes simplex were screened for HSV antibodies using Western blot assay (the gold standard for diagnosis of HSV) for potential participation in a randomized, double-blind efficacy field trial of a herpes simplex vaccine. This trial provides a unique opportunity to examine the prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and of antibodies to HSV-2 in women with no known history of herpes simplex infection. The prevalence of antibodies to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 is compared with that found in previous Canadian studies that focused on a more general population. The overall seroprevalence of antibody to HSV-1 was 43%; that of HSV-2 was 2.5% and seropositivity to both was 2%. The prevalence of antibody to both HSV-1 and to HSV-2 increased with age. Seronegativity to both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was 56% in participating centres with populations under 250,000 and 46% in participating centres with populations over 250,000. Significant racial differences in seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 were noted. The likelihood of participants being seropositive to HSV-1 and to HSV-2 was found to increase with age and to positively correlate with the population of the city in which they resided. Hypotheses are proposed to account for differences in racial seropositivity to HSV-1 and to HSV-2.

  1. Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeriis, Morten; van Leeuwen, Theo

    2017-01-01

    This article revisits the concept of vectors, which, in Kress and van Leeuwen’s Reading Images (2006), plays a crucial role in distinguishing between ‘narrative’, action-oriented processes and ‘conceptual’, state-oriented processes. The use of this concept in image analysis has usually focused...... on the most salient vectors, and this works well, but many images contain a plethora of vectors, which makes their structure quite different from the linguistic transitivity structures with which Kress and van Leeuwen have compared ‘narrative’ images. It can also be asked whether facial expression vectors...... should be taken into account in discussing ‘reactions’, which Kress and van Leeuwen link only to eyeline vectors. Finally, the question can be raised as to whether actions are always realized by vectors. Drawing on a re-reading of Rudolf Arnheim’s account of vectors, these issues are outlined...

  2. Performance evaluation of the Aptima HSV-1 and 2 assay for the detection of HSV in cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesion specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam, Soya S; Caliendo, Angela M; Ingersoll, Jessica; Abdul-Ali, Deborah; Kraft, Colleen S

    2017-12-13

    Timely and precise laboratory diagnosis of Herpes simplex viruses (HSV) is required to guide clinical management. The study evaluated limit of detection (LOD) and performance characteristics of the Aptima HSV 1 & 2 assay in comparison to four assays. The multi-center study compared qualitative detection of HSV-1 and 2 by the Aptima HSV-1 and 2 assay (Hologic) to ELVIS culture, Lyra Direct (Quidel), AmpliVue (Quidel) and a laboratory developed test (LDT). LOD was performed using VTM and STM diluted viral concentrations and clinical performance was evaluated using 505 swab specimens. The Aptima LOD studies performed showed a lower detection limit for STM specimens as 1450 copies/mL and 430 copies/mL for HSV1 and HSV-2 respectively; the LOD for VTM specimens was 9370 copies/mL and 8045 copies/mL for HSV-1 and HSV-2 respectively. When the assays were analyzed based on the positive consensus result established the Aptima had 95% of percent positive agreement (PPA) and 100% negative percent agreement (NPA) for the HSV-1. For the HSV-2, the PPA and NPA for Aptima were 96% and 100% respectively. AmpliVue had 1.8% invalid rate, while Lyra had no invalid results but an inhibition rate of 0.8%. Aptima and LDT did not have any invalid or inhibited results. The results indicate that the Aptima HSV-1 & 2 assay is sensitive and the performance characteristics of the Aptima assay is comparable to the assays analyzed for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and 2 from cutaneous and mucocutaneous lesions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. HSV-1 targets lymphatic vessels in the eye and draining lymph node of mice leading to edema in the absence of a functional type I interferon response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant-Hudson, Katie M; Chucair-Elliott, Ana J; Conrady, Christopher D; Cohen, Alex; Zheng, Min; Carr, Daniel J J

    2013-10-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) induces new lymphatic vessel growth (lymphangiogenesis) in the cornea via expression of vascular endothelial growth factor by virally infected epithelial cells. Here, we extend this observation to demonstrate the selective targeting of corneal lymphatics by HSV-1 in the absence of functional type I interferon (IFN) pathway. Specifically, we examined the impact of HSV-1 replication on angiogenesis using type I IFN receptor deficient (CD118(-/-)) mice. HSV-1-induced lymphatic and blood vessel growth into the cornea proper was time-dependent in immunocompetent animals. In contrast, there was an initial robust growth of lymphatic vessels into the cornea of HSV-1-infected CD118(-/-)mice, but such vessels disappeared by day 5 postinfection. The loss was selective as blood vessel integrity remained intact. Magnetic resonance imaging and confocal microscopy analysis of the draining lymph nodes of CD118(-/-) mice revealed extensive edema and loss of lymphatics compared with wild-type mice. In addition to a loss of lymphatic vessels in CD118(-/-) mice, HSV-1 infection resulted in epithelial thinning associated with geographic lesions and edema within the cornea, which is consistent with a loss of lymphatic vasculature. These results underscore the key role functional type I IFN pathway plays in the maintenance of structural integrity within the cornea in addition to the anti-viral characteristics often ascribed to the type I IFN cytokine family. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of antibodies against glycoprotein D (gD) and glycoprotein G (gG) in HSV-1 infected individuals' serum samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Z; Roostaee, M H; Soleimanjahi, M; Zandi, K

    2012-04-01

    Glycoproteins D (gD) and G (gG) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are virus envelope glycoproteins that are able to induce HSV-1 antibody production in infected persons. Therefore, those proteins could be in interest to develop the serodiagnostic test(s) for HSV antibody detection. The aim of present study was the comparison of anti-gD and anti-gG antibodies in HSV-1 infected individuals' serum samples. In this study, recombinant gD and gG were prepared and used for western blot test to detect the antibodies against HSV-1. Our data showed the total gD antibody titer was higher than gG antibody titer in the HSV-1 infected patient's sera but the gG antibody titer was high significantly. According to our results, gD and gG can be used for designing the diagnostic laboratory tests to evaluate total antibody against HSV-1 and HSV-2.

  5. Functional Coexpression of HSV-1 Thymidine Kinase and Green Fluorescent Protein: Implications for Noninvasive Imaging of Transgene Expression

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    Andreas Jacobs

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available Current gene therapy technology is limited by the paucity of methodology for determining the location and magnitude of therapeutic transgene expression in vivo. We describe and validate a paradigm for monitoring therapeutic transgene expression by noninvasive imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk marker gene expression. To test proportional coexpression of therapeutic and marker genes, a model fusion gene comprising green fluorescent protein (gfp and HSV-1-tk genes was generated (tkgfp gene and assessed for the functional coexpression of the gene product, TKGFP fusion protein, in rat 9L gliosarcoma, RG2 glioma, and W256 carcinoma cells. Analysis of the TKGFP protein demonstrated that it can serve as a therapeutic gene by rendering tkgfp transduced cells sensitive to ganciclovir or as a screening marker useful for identifying transduced cells by fluorescence microscopy or fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS. TK and GFP activities in the TKGFP fusion protein were similar to corresponding wild-type proteins and accumulation of the HSV-1-tk-specific radiolabeled substrate, 2′-fluoro-2′-deoxy-1β-D-arabino-furanosyl-5-iodo-uracil (FIAU, in stability transduced clones correlated with gfp-fluorescence intensity over a wide range of expression levels. The tkgfp fusion gene itself may be useful in developing novel cancer gene therapy approaches. Valuable information about the efficiency of gene transfer and expression could be obtained by non-invasive imaging of tkgfp expression with FIAU and clinical imaging devices (gamma camera, positron-emission tomography [PET], single photon emission computed tomography [SPECT], and/or direct visualization of gfp expression in situ by fluorescence microscopy or endoscopy.

  6. Detection of EBV, CMV and HSV-1 in subgingival samples of HIV positive and negative patients with chronic periodontitis.

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    Laura Escalona

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To detect the presence of infection by EBV (Epstein-Barr Virus, CMV (Cytomegalovirus and HSV-1 (Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 in subgingival samples from HIV- positive patients under HAART (High Activity Antiretroviral Therapy, HIV- positive patients without HAART, HIV-negative patients with chronic periodontitis and healthy controls. Methodology: Crevicular fluid samples of 11 HIV+ patients on therapy were evaluated, 6 without antiretroviral therapy, 7 HIV- negative subjects with chronic periodontitis and 7 periodontally-healthy controls. PI (Plaque index, GI (Gingival Index, PD (probing depth and CAL (Clinical Attachment Loss were registered at six sites per each tooth in all teeth and subgingival plaque samples of a tooth were collected per quadrant. Nested PCR was used to detect EBV and endpoint PCR to detect infection by CMV and HSV-1. Results: Clinical parameters showed statistically significant differences between HIV-positive patients and subjects with chronic periodontitis compared with the control group (p<0.05. DNA of EBV was detected mainly in HIV-positive patients under HAART, 91% (10/11. DNA of CMV was detected mainly in patients without HAART, 67% (4/6, while HSV-1 was observed in 27% (3/11 of patients under HAART. In the control group no virus was detected. Coinfection was observed in 50% of HIV patients without HAART, 36% of HIV patients with HAART and 14% of HIV-negative with chronic periodontitis. Conclusion: Viral infection was prevalent in HIV patients under HAART and EBV was the primary viral infection detected in HIV-positive patients with chronic periodontitis.

  7. Different strategies for reducing intestinal background radioactivity associated with imaging HSV1-tk expression using established radionucleoside probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Alessandro; Brader, Peter; Serganova, Inna; Zanzonico, Pat; Cai, Shangde; Lipman, Neil S.; Hricak, Hedvig; Blasberg, Ronald G.

    2011-01-01

    One limitation of HSV1-tk reporter PET imaging with nucleoside analogues is the high background radioactivity in the intestine. We hypothesized that endogenous expression of thymidine kinase in bacterial flora could phosphorylate and trap such radiotracers, contributing to the high radioactivity levels in the bowel and therefore explored different strategies to increase fecal elimination of radiotracer. Methods Intestinal radioactivity was assessed by in vivo microPET imaging and ex vivo tissue sampling following intravenous injection of 18F-FEAU, 124I-FIAU or 18F-FHBG in a germ-free mouse strain. We also explored the use of an osmotic laxative agent and/or a 100% enzymatically hydrolyzed liquid diet. Results No significant differences in intestinal radioactivity were observed between germ-free and normal mice. 18F-FHBG-derived intestinal radioactivity levels were higher than those of 18F-FEAU and 124I-FIAU; the intestine-to-blood ratio was more than 20-fold higher for 18F-FHBG than for 18F-FEAU and 124I-FIAU. The combination of Peptamen and Nulytely lowered intestinal radioactivity levels and increased (2.2-fold) the HSV1-tk transduced xenograft-to-intestine ratio for 18F-FEAU. Conclusions Intestinal bacteria in germ-free mice do not contribute to the high intestinal levels of radioactivity following injection of radionucleoside analogs. The combination of Peptamen and Nulytely increased radiotracer elimination by increasing bowel motility without inducing dehydration. PMID:20128998

  8. Barrier to auto integration factor becomes dephosphorylated during HSV-1 Infection and Can Act as a host defense by impairing viral DNA replication and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamin, Augusta; Thunuguntla, Prasanth; Wicklund, April; Jones, Clinton; Wiebe, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    BAF (Barrier to Autointegration Factor) is a highly conserved DNA binding protein that senses poxviral DNA in the cytoplasm and tightly binds to the viral genome to interfere with DNA replication and transcription. To counteract BAF, a poxviral-encoded protein kinase phosphorylates BAF, which renders BAF unable to bind DNA and allows efficient viral replication to occur. Herein, we examined how BAF phosphorylation is affected by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and tested the ability of BAF to interfere with HSV-1 productive infection. Interestingly, we found that BAF phosphorylation decreases markedly following HSV-1 infection. To determine whether dephosphorylated BAF impacts HSV-1 productive infection, we employed cell lines stably expressing a constitutively unphosphorylated form of BAF (BAF-MAAAQ) and cells overexpressing wild type (wt) BAF for comparison. Although HSV-1 production in cells overexpressing wtBAF was similar to that in cells expressing no additional BAF, viral growth was reduced approximately 80% in the presence of BAF-MAAAQ. Experiments were also performed to determine the mechanism of the antiviral activity of BAF with the following results. BAF-MAAAQ was localized to the nucleus, whereas wtBAF was dispersed throughout cells prior to infection. Following infection, wtBAF becomes dephosphorylated and relocalized to the nucleus. Additionally, BAF was associated with the HSV-1 genome during infection, with BAF-MAAAQ associated to a greater extent than wtBAF. Importantly, unphosphorylated BAF inhibited both viral DNA replication and gene expression. For example, expression of two regulatory proteins, ICP0 and VP16, were substantially reduced in cells expressing BAF-MAAAQ. However, other viral genes were not dramatically affected suggesting that expression of certain viral genes can be differentially regulated by unphosphorylated BAF. Collectively, these results suggest that BAF can act in a phosphorylation-regulated manner to impair

  9. Cytotoxicity and cellular uptake of pyrimidine nucleosides for imaging herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) expression in mammalian cells

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    Morin, Kevin W.; Duan Weili; Xu Lihua; Zhou Aihua; Moharram, Sameh; Knaus, Edward E.; McEwan, Alexander J.B.; Wiebe, Leonard I. E-mail: leonard.wiebe@ualberta.ca

    2004-07-01

    In vivo transfer of the herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV-1 TK) gene, with subsequent administration of antiviral drugs such as ganciclovir, has emerged as a promising gene therapy protocol for treating proliferative disorders. The in vitro cytotoxicities (IC{sub 50}) for two series of 5-iodo- and (E)-5-(2-iodovinyl)-substituted 2'-deoxy- and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-pyrimidine nucleosides ranged from millimolar to low nanomolar concentrations in mammalian tumor cell lines (KBALB; R-970-5; 143B; EMT-6) and their counterparts engineered to express HSV-1 TK (KBALB-STK; 143B-LTK). Their HSV-1 TK selectivity indices ranged from one (nonselective) to one million (highly selective) based on cytotoxicity, with FIRU being the least toxic to all cell lines, and FIAU being most toxic. HSV-1 TK selectivity, based on uptake, ranged from 10 to 140, with IVDU being most selective for HSV-1 TK expressing cells, followed by IVFRU, FIRU, FIAU, IVFAU and finally IUDR. Phosphorylation of [{sup 125}I]FIAU led to incorporation of the radiolabel into nucleic acids, whereas IVFRU and FIRU radioactivity was trapped primarily in the nucleotide pool. These data indicate that cytotoxicity does not depend on initial metabolic trapping (e.g., phosphorylation), but on elaboration of the mononucleotides to more cytotoxic anabolites. Lipophilicities and nucleoside transport rates of the six nucleosides tested were within narrow ranges. This supports the premise that cellular biochemistry, and not cellular bioavailability, is responsible for the observed broad range of cytotoxicity and trapping. In vivo biodistribution studies with 5-[{sup 125}I]iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyribouridine (FIRU), 5-[{sup 125}I]iodo-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyarabinouridine (FIAU) and (E)-5-(2-[{sup 125}I]iodovinyl)-2'-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridine (IVFRU) demonstrate selective accumulation of all three radiotracers in HSV-1 TK-expressing KBABK-STK tumors, compared to their very low

  10. A 17-year old patient with DOCK8 deficiency, severe oral HSV-1 and aggressive periodontitis - a case of virally induced periodontitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betts, K; Abusleme, L; Freeman, A F; Sarmadi, M; Fahle, G; Pittaluga, S; Cuellar-Rodriguez, J; Hickstein, D; Holland, S M; Su, H; Moutsopoulos, N M

    2015-02-01

    We present a 17-year old girl with DOCK-8 deficiency, severe untreated oral HSV-1 infection and associated aggressive periodontitis. DOCK-8 deficiency is a primary immunodeficiency, caused by biallelicloss-of-function mutations in the DOCK8 gene, often leading to severe viral and fungal mucocutaneous infections. Nevertheless, to date DOCK8 has not been associated with severe periodontitis and inflammatory bone loss around teeth. Understanding whether DOCK8 deficiency or severe HSV-1 infection underlies susceptibility to periodontitis is central to this case and may provide insights into susceptibility factors for periodontitis in the general population. Our clinical and microbiological data suggest that severe HSV-1 infection is the driver of periodontal inflammation in this case. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Inhibitory effects of lupene-derived pentacyclic triterpenoids from Bursera simaruba on HSV-1 and HSV-2 in vitro replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Ángel L; Habtemariam, Solomon; Parra, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    The cytotoxicity and antiviral properties of Bursera simaruba against herpes simplex viruses (HSV-1 and HSV-2) were investigated through a bioactivity-guided isolation protocol. The plant material was fractionated using solvent-solvent partitioning, size-exclusion and thin-layer chromatography. The antiviral compounds present in the most active fractions were identified by means of LC-MS and NMR. Three different methods were compared during the evaluation of antiviral activity of samples. Four lupene-related pentacyclic triterpenes were found to be responsible for the anti-herpesvirus effects of B. simaruba and were isolated from this species for the first time. The selective indexes (SI) of B. simaruba-derived samples ranged from 7.7 to 201.9.

  12. Repressor element-1 silencing transcription factor/neuronal restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF can regulate HSV-1 immediate-early transcription via histone modification

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    Hill James M

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During primary infection of its human host, Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 (HSV-1 establishes latency in neurons where the viral genome is maintained in a circular form associated with nucleosomes in a chromatin configration. During latency, most viral genes are silenced, although the molecular mechanisms responsible for this are unclear. We hypothesized that neuronal factors repress HSV-1 gene expression during latency. A search of the HSV-1 DNA sequence for potential regulatory elements identified a Repressor Element-1/Neuronal Restrictive Silencer Element (RE-1/NRSE located between HSV-1 genes ICP22 and ICP4. We predicted that the Repressor Element Silencing Transcription Factor/Neuronal Restrictive Silencer Factor (REST/NRSF regulates expression of ICP22 and ICP4. Results Transient cotransfection indicated that REST/NRSF inhibited the activity of both promoters. In contrast, cotransfection of a mutant form of REST/NRSF encoding only the DNA-binding domain of the protein resulted in less inhibition. Stably transformed cell lines containing episomal reporter plasmids with a chromatin structure showed that REST/NRSF specifically inhibited the ICP4 promoter, but not the ICP22 promoter. REST/NRSF inhibition of the ICP4 promoter was reversed by histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor Trichostatin A (TSA. Additionally, chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP assays indicated that the corepressor CoREST was recruited to the proximity of ICP4 promoter and that acetylation of histone H4 was reduced in the presence of REST/NRSF. Conclusion Since the ICP4 protein is a key transactivator of HSV-1 lytic cycle genes, these results suggest that REST/NRSF may have an important role in the establishment and/or maintenance of HSV-1 gene silencing during latency by targeting ICP4 expression.

  13. Does porphyrin suppres the apoptotic and necrotic effects of bovine herpes virus type-1(BoHV-1) and herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Beyza; Yazici, Zafer

    2016-09-01

    In this study, antiviral effect of porphyrin was investigated. Cooper strain of Bovine Herpes Virus type 1(BoHV-1) and Kos strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) were used to determine the potential of porphyrins to inhibit infection in vitro (with morphological and cytopathological criteria). Apoptotic and necrotic changes were determined by using DAPI and propidium staining. The non-cytotoxic dose of porphyrin (NCD-p) was initially calculated as 312.50µg/mL on MDBK and Vero cells. The apoptotic cell (APC) count was found 10% with BoHV-1 while it was 5.3% with BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells between 6th to 24th hours post infection (hpi). Necrotic cell (NEC) count was 51% with BoHV-1 and 37.8% BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. On the other hand, the APC count was found 23% with HSV-1, while 22% with the HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on Vero cells between 6th to 24th hpi. NEC count was 49% with HSV-1 and 34% HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. The results show that BoHV-1 was inhibited by porphyrin resulting in decreased apoptotic and necrotic changes in MDBK cells. On the contrary, porphyrine was not effective in the inhibition of HSV-1 in terms of apoptosis but it caused necrotic changes in Vero cells.

  14. Stress Hormones Epinephrine and Corticosterone Selectively Modulate Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Productive Infections in Adult Sympathetic, but Not Sensory, Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ives, Angela M; Bertke, Andrea S

    2017-07-01

    Herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) infect and establish latency in peripheral neurons, from which they can reactivate to cause recurrent disease throughout the life of the host. Stress is associated with the exacerbation of clinical symptoms and the induction of recurrences in humans and animal models. The viruses preferentially replicate and establish latency in different subtypes of sensory neurons, as well as in neurons of the autonomic nervous system that are highly responsive to stress hormones. To determine if stress-related hormones modulate productive HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections within sensory and autonomic neurons, we analyzed viral DNA and the production of viral progeny after treatment of primary adult murine neuronal cultures with the stress hormones epinephrine and corticosterone. Both sensory trigeminal ganglion (TG) and sympathetic superior cervical ganglion (SCG) neurons expressed adrenergic receptors (activated by epinephrine) and the glucocorticoid receptor (activated by corticosterone). Productive HSV infection colocalized with these receptors in SCG but not in TG neurons. In productively infected neuronal cultures, epinephrine treatment significantly increased the levels of HSV-1 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons, but no significant differences were found in TG neurons. In contrast, corticosterone significantly decreased the levels of HSV-2 DNA replication and production of viral progeny in SCG neurons but not in TG neurons. Thus, the stress-related hormones epinephrine and corticosterone selectively modulate acute HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections in autonomic, but not sensory, neurons. IMPORTANCE Stress exacerbates acute disease symptoms resulting from HSV-1 and HSV-2 infections and is associated with the appearance of recurrent skin lesions in millions of people. Although stress hormones are thought to impact HSV-1 and HSV-2 through immune system suppression, sensory and autonomic neurons that become

  15. False-negative type-specific glycoprotein G antibody responses in STI clinic patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital herpes, The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rooijen, Martijn S; Roest, Wim; Hansen, Gino; Kwa, David; de Vries, Henry J C

    2016-06-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) type-discriminating antibody tests (glycoprotein G (gG) directed) are used to identify naïve persons and differentiate acute infections from recurrences. We studied test characteristics of three commercially available antibody tests in patients with recurrent (established by viral PCR tests) herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) or herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) genital herpes episodes. Serum samples (at minimum 3 months after t=0) were examined for the presence of gG-1-specific or gG-2-specific antibodies using the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 Immunoblot IgG, the HerpeSelect 1 and 2 enzyme linked immunoassays IgG and the LIAISON HSV-1 and HSV-2 IgG indirect chemiluminescence immunoassays. The immunoblot was HSV-1 positive in 70.6% (95% CI 44.0% to 89.7%), the LIAISON in 88.2% (95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) and the ELISA in 82.4% (95% CI 56.6% to 96.2%) of the 17 patients with a recurrent HSV-1 episode. From 33 patients with a recurrent HSV-2 episode, the immunoblot was HSV-2 positive in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%), the LIAISON in 69.7% (95% CI 51.3% to 84.4%) and the ELISA in 84.8% (95% CI 68.1% to 94.9%). Among 15/17 (88.2%; 95% CI 63.5% to 98.5%) patients with HSV-1 and 30/33 (90.1%; 95% CI 75.7% to 98.1%) patients with HSV-2, HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibodies, respectively, were detected in at least one of the three antibody tests. Commercial type-specific gG HSV-1 or HSV-2 antibody assays were false negative in 12-30% of patients with recurrent HSV-1 or HSV-2 DNA positive genital lesions. The clinical and epidemiological use of type-specific HSV serology can be hampered by false-negative results, especially if based on a single test. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  16. A high resolution melting (HRM) technology-based assay for cost-efficient clinical detection and genotyping of herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieveld, M; Carregosa, A; Benoy, I; Redzic, N; Berth, M; Vanden Broeck, D

    2017-10-01

    Genital herpes can be caused by two very similar viruses, herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 or HSV-2. These two HSV types cannot be distinguished clinically, but genotyping is recommended in the first-episodes of genital herpes to guide counselling and management. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is the preferred diagnostic method for HSV typing. However, commercial qPCR methods use expensive fluorescent labeled probes for detection. Furthermore, most low-cost methods are not able to differentiate between HSV-1 and -2. The aim of this study was to develop a high resolution melting (HRM) technology-based assay for sensitive HSV-1 and HSV-2 detection and genotyping. Using a panel of 46 clinical specimens, the performance of the HRM assay was compared to two commercial HSV tests: the HRM assay detected HSV in all 23 positive samples, with no false positive results (100% concordance with HSV I/II Real-TM assay). Additionally, the HRM assay correctly genotyped both HSV types in a subset of these clinical samples, as determined by the Realstar HSV PCR Kit. The HSV HRM assay provides a cost-effective alternative method to conventional more expensive assays and can be used in routine clinical specimens, in cases where it is particularly necessary to detect and distinguish HSV-1 from -2. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Performance of Focus ELISA Tests for HSV-1 and HSV-2 Antibodies Among University Students With No History of Genital Herpes

    Science.gov (United States)

    NANDA, JOY P.; ROBERTS, JESSICA; ROMPALO, ANNE; MELENDEZ, JOHAN H.; ZENILMAN, JONATHAN

    2009-01-01

    Objectives To define the performance characteristics of the Focus ELISA HSV-1 and HSV-2 assay among 100 university students. Study Design HSV-1 and HSV-2 Focus ELISA and Western Blot assays were performed on sera from university students who reported no history of genital herpes. Results HSV-2 and HSV-1 seroprevalence by Western Blot were 3.4% and 48%, respectively. In this population, the positive predictive value of the Focus HSV-2 ELISA was 37.5%, the sensitivity was 100%, and specificity was 94.1%. The PPV of the Focus HSV-1 ELISA was 96.7%, the sensitivity was 69.0%, and the specificity was 97.8%. Conclusions In this low-prevalence population, the positive predictive value of the Focus HSV-2 ELISA test was low. This finding, together with those reported elsewhere, indicates that caution is warranted when recommending HSV screening in low-prevalence or heterogeneous populations. Consideration should be given to raising the cutoff index value for defining a positive test result. PMID:17457239

  18. Micropropagation of tulip: production of virus-free stock plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podwyszyńska, Małgorzata; Sochacki, Dariusz

    2010-01-01

    We describe here a new tulip micropropagation method based on the cyclic shoot multiplication in presence of the thidiazuron (TDZ), which enables the production of virus-free stock plants, speeds up breeding, and provides new genotypes for the market. In our novel protocol, cyclic shoot multiplication can be performed for 2-3 years by using TDZ instead of other cytokinins, as 6-benzylaminopurine (BAP) and N(6)-(-isopentyl)adenine (2iP). It makes possible to produce 500-2,000 microbulbs from one healthy plant. There are six main stages of tulip micropropagation. Stage 0 is the selection of true-to-type and virus-free plants, confirmed by ELISA. Fragments of flower stems isolated from bulbs are used as initial explants. Shoot multiplication is based on the regeneration of adventitious shoots, which are sub-cultured every 8 weeks. In the Stage 3, the specially prepared shoots are induced by low temperature treatment to form bulbs which finally develop on a sucrose-rich medium at 20 degrees C. Bulbs are then dried for 6 weeks and rooted in vivo. The number of multiplication subcultures should be limited to 5-10 cycles in order to lower the risk of mutation. Virus indexing should be repeated 3-4 times, at the initial stage and then during shoot multiplication. Genetic stability of micropropagated shoots can be confirmed using molecular markers.

  19. Prevalence of Conjunctivitis Infection by HSV-1 in Patients Referring to Hospitals Affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Noor Mohamadian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available

    Background and Objectives: The viruses are the most common cause of eye infection. The most common viruses in conjunctivitis infection include Herpes simplex virus, Adeno virus and Entrovirus. It has been estimated that HSV1 causes 60-90% conjunctival infectionsin adults. Recurrent infection by HSV1 results in Herpes keratitis that is the most common cause for blindness in developing countries. Therefore, a prompt laboratory diagnosis is often very useful. Theaim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of conjunctivitis infection by HSV-1 Hospital affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS in 2009.

     

    Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was doneon 100 tear film and eye swabs specimens from patient with symptoms of viral conjunctivitis. All samples werecollected in viral transport media (VTM and inoculated in Vero cell line. Viral cytopatic effect was compared with control sample. HSV1 DNA wasdetected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Chi-square test was used to for data analysis (p<0.05.

     

    Results: Out of 100 samples under study, 2% were positive samples by cell culture, whereas in PCR9% were positive. Patients with 6-29 years old had the highest rate of HSV1 infection (13.5% than other age groups. There was not any significant relationship between age, sex and infection.

     

    Conclusion: Herpes simplex virus infection is the major cause of conjunctivitis. Taking the recurrent infection and similarity in clinical manifestation to other infections into account, it seems necessary to have a quick and specific diagnosis of HSV for bettertreatment.

     

  20. Prevalence of Conjunctivitis Infection by HSV-1 in Patients Referring to Hospitals Affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS in 2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ataei Pirkooh A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The viruses are the most common cause of eye infection. The most common viruses in conjunctivitis infection include Herpes simplex virus, Adeno virus and Entrovirus. It has been estimated that HSV1 causes 60-90% conjunctival infectionsin adults. Recurrent infection by HSV1 results in Herpes keratitis that is the most common cause for blindness in developing countries. Therefore, a prompt laboratory diagnosis is often very useful. Theaim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of conjunctivitis infection by HSV-1 Hospital affiliated to Iran University of Medical Sciences (IUMS in 2009.Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was doneon 100 tear film and eye swabs specimens from patient with symptoms of viral conjunctivitis. All samples werecollected in viral transport media (VTM and inoculated in Vero cell line. Viral cytopatic effect was compared with control sample. HSV1 DNA wasdetected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Chi-square test was used to for data analysis (p<0.05.Results: Out of 100 samples under study, 2% were positive samples by cell culture, whereas in PCR9% were positive. Patients with 6-29 years old had the highest rate of HSV1 infection (13.5% than other age groups. There was not any significant relationship between age, sex and infection.Conclusion: Herpes simplex virus infection is the major cause of conjunctivitis. Taking the recurrent infection and similarity in clinical manifestation to other infections into account, it seems necessary to have a quick and specific diagnosis of HSV for bettertreatment.

  1. Direct activation of RIP3/MLKL-dependent necrosis by herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) protein ICP6 triggers host antiviral defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xing; Li, Yun; Liu, Shan; Yu, Xiaoliang; Li, Lin; Shi, Cuilin; He, Wenhui; Li, Jun; Xu, Lei; Hu, Zhilin; Yu, Lu; Yang, Zhongxu; Chen, Qin; Ge, Lin; Zhang, Zili; Zhou, Biqi; Jiang, Xuejun; Chen, She; He, Sudan

    2014-01-01

    The receptor-interacting kinase-3 (RIP3) and its downstream substrate mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) have emerged as the key cellular components in programmed necrotic cell death. Receptors for the cytokines of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family and Toll-like receptors (TLR) 3 and 4 are able to activate RIP3 through receptor-interacting kinase-1 and Toll/IL-1 receptor domain-containing adapter inducing IFN-β, respectively. This form of cell death has been implicated in the host-defense system. However, the molecular mechanisms that drive the activation of RIP3 by a variety of pathogens, other than the above-mentioned receptors, are largely unknown. Here, we report that human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection triggers RIP3-dependent necrosis. This process requires MLKL but is independent of TNF receptor, TLR3, cylindromatosis, and host RIP homotypic interaction motif-containing protein DNA-dependent activator of IFN regulatory factor. After HSV-1 infection, the viral ribonucleotide reductase large subunit (ICP6) interacts with RIP3. The formation of the ICP6–RIP3 complex requires the RHIM domains of both proteins. An HSV-1 ICP6 deletion mutant failed to cause effective necrosis of HSV-1–infected cells. Furthermore, ectopic expression of ICP6, but not RHIM mutant ICP6, directly activated RIP3/MLKL-mediated necrosis. Mice lacking RIP3 exhibited severely impaired control of HSV-1 replication and pathogenesis. Therefore, this study reveals a previously uncharacterized host antipathogen mechanism. PMID:25316792

  2. Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 Mediate Species-Specific Modulations of Programmed Necrosis through the Viral Ribonucleotide Reductase Large Subunit R1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaoliang; Li, Yun; Chen, Qin; Su, Chenhe; Zhang, Zili; Yang, Chengkui; Hu, Zhilin; Hou, Jue; Zhou, Jinying; Gong, Ling; Jiang, Xuejun; Zheng, Chunfu; He, Sudan

    2015-11-11

    Receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIP3) and its substrate mixed-lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) are core regulators of programmed necrosis. The elimination of pathogen-infected cells by programmed necrosis acts as an important host defense mechanism. Here, we report that human herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 had opposite impacts on programmed necrosis in human cells versus their impacts in mouse cells. Similar to HSV-1, HSV-2 infection triggered programmed necrosis in mouse cells. However, neither HSV-1 nor HSV-2 infection was able to induce programmed necrosis in human cells. Moreover, HSV-1 or HSV-2 infection in human cells blocked tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced necrosis by preventing the induction of an RIP1/RIP3 necrosome. The HSV ribonucleotide reductase large subunit R1 was sufficient to suppress TNF-induced necrosis, and its RIP homotypic interaction motif (RHIM) domain was required to disrupt the RIP1/RIP3 complex in human cells. Therefore, this study provides evidence that HSV has likely evolved strategies to evade the host defense mechanism of programmed necrosis in human cells. This study demonstrated that infection with HSV-1 and HSV-2 blocked TNF-induced necrosis in human cells while these viruses directly activated programmed necrosis in mouse cells. Expression of HSV R1 suppressed TNF-induced necrosis of human cells. The RHIM domain of R1 was essential for its association with human RIP3 and RIP1, leading to disruption of the RIP1/RIP3 complex. This study provides new insights into the species-specific modulation of programmed necrosis by HSV. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. Repeated social stress enhances the innate immune response to a primary HSV-1 infection in the cornea and trigeminal ganglia of Balb/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Newsom, P; Powell, N D; Bailey, M T; Padgett, D A; Sheridan, J F

    2010-02-01

    Three to 5 days after a primary HSV-1 infection, macrophages infiltrate into the trigeminal ganglia (TG) and produce anti-viral cytokines to reduce viral replication. Previous research demonstrated that social disruption stress (SDR) enhances the trafficking of monocytes/macrophages from the bone marrow to the spleen and increases pro-inflammatory cytokine production in vitro and in vivo. The impact of SDR on the trafficking of these cells to loci of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and subsequent function has not been examined. The following studies were designed to determine whether SDR would enhance the innate immune response during a primary HSV-1 infection by increasing the number of macrophages in the cornea and TG, thus increasing anti-viral cytokine production and reducing viral replication. BALB/c mice were exposed to six cycles of SDR prior to ocular infection with HSV-1 McKrae virus. Flow cytometric analysis of cells from the TG revealed an increase in the percentage of CD11b+ macrophages in SDR mice compared to controls. Immune cell infiltration into the cornea, however, could not be determined due to low cell numbers. Although gene expression of IFN-beta was decreased, SDR increased gene expression of IFN-alpha, and TNF-alpha, in the cornea and TG. Examination of viral proteins showed decreased expression of infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), glycoprotein B (gB), glycoprotein H (gH) and latency-associated transcript (LAT) in the TG, however, expression of ICP0 and gB were elevated in the cornea of SDR mice. These results indicate that the innate immune response to HSV-1 was altered and enhanced by the experience of repeated social defeat. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Interferon Regulator Factor 8 (IRF8 Limits Ocular Pathology during HSV-1 Infection by Restraining the Activation and Expansion of CD8+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    Full Text Available Interferon Regulatory Factor-8 (IRF8 is constitutively expressed in monocytes and B cell lineages and plays important roles in immunity to pathogens and cancer. Although IRF8 expression is induced in activated T cells, the functional relevance of IRF8 in T cell-mediated immunity is not well understood. In this study, we used mice with targeted deletion of Irf8 in T-cells (IRF8KO to investigate the role of IRF8 in T cell-mediated responses during herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1 infection of the eye. In contrast to wild type mice, HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice mounted a more robust anti-HSV-1 immune response, which included marked expansion of HSV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells into the cornea and trigeminal ganglia (TG and enhanced elimination of virus within the trigeminal ganglion. However, the consequence of the enhanced immunological response was the development of ocular inflammation, limbitis, and neutrophilic infiltration into the cornea of HSV-1-infected IRF8KO mice. Surprisingly, we observed a marked increase in virus-specific memory precursor effector cells (MPEC in IRF8KO mice, suggesting that IRF8 might play a role in regulating the differentiation of effector CD8+ T cells to the memory phenotype. Together, our data suggest that IRF8 might play a role in restraining excess lymphocyte proliferation. Thus, modulating IRF8 levels in T cells can be exploited therapeutically to prevent immune-mediated ocular pathology during autoimmune and infectious diseases of the eye.

  5. Determination of HSV-1 UL5 and UL29 gene copy numbers in an HSV complementing Vero cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Ali; Aidoo, Francisca; Gisonni-Lex, Lucy; McNeil, Bryan

    2013-12-01

    The genetic stability of transgenes is a critical characteristic used to assess constructed cell lines used for vaccine production. The evaluation of gene copy numbers by a qPCR method, is one of the most common approaches used to assess the consistency of transgenes in a constructed cell line. The cell line AV529-19 is a Vero-based cell line specifically engineered to express the HSV-1 UL5 and UL29 open reading frames. AV529-19 is used to support the replication of a defective HSV-2 viral candidate vaccine called HSV529. To assess the genetic stability of the UL5 and UL29 transgenes in AV529-19 cells, a digital PCR-based approach was developed. During characterization of the test method, the specificity, accuracy, and intermediate precision of the assay was investigated based on regulatory guidelines. The developed assay was used to monitor the stability of the transgenes in the manufactured AV529-19 cell lines by comparison of transgene copy numbers in the master cell bank (MCB) with their copy numbers in the extended cell bank (ECB). Results showed that the UL29 and UL5 transgenes are stable in that there are one and three copies of the UL29 and UL5 genes, respectively, per cell in both the AV529-19 MCB and ECB. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Synthesis of a probe for monitoring HSV1-tk reporter gene expression using chemical exchange saturation transfer MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Shir, Amnon; Liu, Guanshu; Greenberg, Marc M; Bulte, Jeff W M; Gilad, Assaf A

    2013-12-01

    In experiments involving transgenic animals or animals treated with transgenic cells, it is important to have a method to monitor the expression of the relevant genes longitudinally and noninvasively. An MRI-based reporter gene enables monitoring of gene expression in the deep tissues of living subjects. This information can be co-registered with detailed high-resolution anatomical and functional information. We describe here the synthesis of the reporter probe, 5-methyl-5,6-dihydrothymidine (5-MDHT), which can be used for imaging of the herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) reporter gene expression in rodents by MRI. The protocol also includes data acquisition and data processing routines customized for chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) contrast mechanisms. The dihydropyrimidine 5-MDHT is synthesized through a catalytic hydrogenation of the 5,6-double bond of thymidine to yield 5,6-dihydrothymidine, which is methylated on the C-5 position of the resulting saturated pyrimidine ring. The synthesis of 5-MDHT can be completed within 5 d, and the compound is stable for more than 1 year.

  7. Anti-HSV-1, antioxidant and antifouling phenolic compounds from the deep-sea-derived fungus Aspergillus versicolor SCSIO 41502.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhonghui; Nong, Xuhua; Ren, Zhe; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Qi, Shuhua

    2017-02-15

    Chemical investigation of the deep-sea-derived fungus Aspergillus versicolor SCSIO 41502 resulted in the isolation of three new anthraquinones, aspergilols G-I (1-3), one new diphenyl ether, 4-carbglyceryl-3,3'-dihydroxy-5,5'-dimethyldiphenyl ether (4), and one new benzaldehyde derivative, 2,4-dihydroxy-6-(4-methoxy-2-oxopentyl)-3-methylbenzaldehyde (5), along with 23 known phenolic compounds (6-28). The structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The absolute configuration of 3 was established by CD spectrum and the modified Mosher method. Compounds 2, 3 and 9 had evident antiviral activity towards HSV-1 with EC50 values of 4.68, 6.25, and 3.12μM, respectively. Compounds 15, 18, 20 and 22-24 showed more potent antioxidant activity than l-ascorbic acid with IC50 values of 18.92-52.27μM towards DPPH radicals. Comparison of the structures and antioxidant activities of 1-28 suggests that the number of phenolic hydroxyl group that can freely rotate can significantly affect the antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds. In addition, 4, 22-24 and 27 had significant antifouling activity against Bugula neritina larval settlement with EC50 values of 1.28, 2.61, 5.48, 1.59, and 3.40μg/ml, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Multicenter Evaluation of Meridian Bioscience HSV 1&2 Molecular Assay for Detection of Herpes Simplex Virus 1 and 2 from Clinical Cutaneous and Mucocutaneous Specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faron, Matthew L; Ledeboer, Nathan A; Patel, Anami; Beqa, Safedin H; Yen-Lieberman, Belinda; Kohn, Debra; Leber, Amy L; Mayne, Donna; Northern, William I; Buchan, Blake W

    2016-08-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) causes acute and relapsing symptoms characterized by ulcerative lesions. Laboratory diagnosis of HSV in cutaneous or mucocutaneous lesions has historically been performed with the use of viral cell culture systems; however, these tests are laborious and suffer decreased sensitivity for advanced-stage lesions. The recent availability of FDA-cleared moderately complex assays has resulted in the increased use of molecular diagnostics for the routine detection of HSV in superficial swab specimens. We performed a clinical evaluation of the recently FDA-cleared illumigene HSV 1&2 loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay (Meridian Bioscience, Cincinnati OH) for the detection and differentiation of HSV-1 and HSV-2 in cutaneous and mucocutaneous swab specimens. A total of 1,153 clinical swab specimens were collected and tested at 7 different clinical centers. Each specimen was tested for the presence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 using the illumigene assay, and results were compared to those of the enzyme-linked virus-inducible system (ELVIS) as the reference method. Overall, the illumigene assay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 94.8% and 95.5%, respectively, for the detection of HSV-1. Detection of HSV-2 was similar, with a sensitivity of 98.9% and a specificity of 95.5%. Discrepant analysis was performed using an alternative molecular test (AmpliVue HSV1+2 assay; Quidel Molecular, San Diego, CA) on 91/99 specimens that were recorded as false positive (FP) or false negative (FN) compared to the reference method. In total, 57/78 (73%) FP and 9/13 (69%) FN illumigene results were supported by the AmpliVue result. The illumigene HSV 1&2 assay demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to detect and differentiate HSV in clinical specimens and identified 57 additional specimens that were positive for HSV compared to culture. The use of LAMP eliminates the need for the cycling of temperatures and provides results in less than 60 min

  9. Cold Sores (HSV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can be transmitted during oral sex and cause herpes in the genital area. Herpes simplex virus-1 also can spread ... For Kids For Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Genital Herpes Tips for Taking Care of Your Skin Mononucleosis ...

  10. Dual monitoring using {sup 124}I-FIAU and bioluminescence for HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, T. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kwon, H. C. [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2007-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type I thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) is the most common reporter gene and is used in cancer gene therapy with a prodrug nucleoside analog, ganciclovir (GCV). The aim of this study is to evaluate therapeutic efficacy of suicide gene therapy with 2'-fluoro-2'-deoxy-1-D-arabinofuranosyl-5-[{sup 124}I] iodouracil ({sup 124}I - FIAU) and bioluminescence in retrovirally HSV -tk and firefly luciferase transduced hepatoma model. The HSV -tk and firefly luciferase (Luc) was retrovirally transduced and expressed in MCA rat Morris hepatoma cells. Nude mice with subcutaneous tumors, MCA and MCA-TK-Luc, were subjected to GCV treatment (50mg/Kg/d intraperitoneally) for 5 day. PET imaging and biodistribution with ({sup 124}I-FIAU) were performed at before and after initiation of therapy with GCV. Bioluminescent signal was also measured during GCV treatment. Before GCV treatment, no significant difference in tumor volume was found in tumors between MCA and MCA-TK-Luc. After GCV treatment, tumor volume of MCA-TK-Luc markedly reduced compared to that of MCA. In biodistribution study, {sup 124}I-FIAU uptake after GCV therapy significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels (34.8 13.67 %ID/g vs 7.6 2.59 %ID/g) and bioluminescent signal was also significantly decreased compared with pretreatment levels. In small animal PET imaging, {sup 124}I-FIAU selectively localized in HSV -tk expressing tumor and the therapeutic efficacy of GCV treatment was evaluated by {sup 124}I-FIAU PET imaging. {sup 124}I-FIAU PET and bioluminescence imaging in HSV-tk suicide gene therapy were effective to evaluate the therapeutic response. {sup 124}I-FIAU may serve as an efficient and selective agent for monitoring of transduced HSV1-tk gene expression in vivo in clinical trials.

  11. UV-C irradiation of HSV-1 infected fibroblasts (HSV-FS) enhances human natural killer (NK) cell activity against these targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettera, L.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, P. (New Jersey Medical School, Newark (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Expression of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early gene products has been bound to be sufficient for NK cell mediated lysis of HSV-1 infected FS. To block the targets at various stages in the infectious cycle, HSV-FS were irradiated with UV light for 1 min at 2, 6, and 20 hr post-infection. NK mediated lysis of 2 hr and 5 hr UV treated HSV-FS was 2-fold higher than non-UV treated HSV-FS despite a {gt}99% inhibition in virus yield. In contrast, 20 hr infected targets were lysed less well than 2 and 6 hr targets despite strong glycoprotein expression and induction of high levels of interferon-alpha (IFN-{alpha}) production by effector PBMC's; this lysis was not enhanced by UV treatment. Since NK lysis of HSV-FS has been found to be dependent on an HLA-DR{sup +} accessory cell (AC), lysis of irradiated HSV-FS by PBMC's depleted of AC was measured. Such depletion eradicated NK lysis of the UV treated HSV-FS indicating that irradiation does not overcome the AC requirement for NK lysis. UV irradiation of another HLA-DR{sup +} dependent target, Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infected FS led to a dramatic reduction in both NK lysis and IFN-{alpha} induction. HSV-1 is a DNA virus whose genes are expressed in a cascade fashion whereas VSV is an RNA virus. The authors hypothesize that the enhancement in AC dependent NK activity observed for UV irradiated HSV-FS, but not VSV-FS, targets is due to overproduction of either a cellular or viral gene product which specifically occurs early in the HSV-1 infectious cycle and is downregulated by 20 hr post-infection.

  12. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  13. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe......-1 infection, the most potent inhibition was found with the lectin HPA. These results indicate that lectins may have a broad antiviral effect on enveloped viruses only limited by types of oligosaccharides present on individual viruses.......Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV...... infection in nanomolar-micromolar concentrations, but no anti-HIV effect was found with the lectin HPA, mainly reacting with O-linked oligosaccharides. HSV-1 infectivity was measured in a plaque reduction assay using Vero cells, and while both N- and O-linked oligosaccharide -specific lectins inhibited HSV...

  14. Efficacy of the anti-VZV (anti-HSV3 vaccine in HSV1 and HSV2 recurrent herpes simplex disease: a prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Goaster J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Jacqueline Le Goaster,1 Sylvie Gonzalo,2 Patrice Bourée,1 Frederic Tangy,3 Anne-Lise Haenni41Department of Tropical Diseases, Centre Hospitalo-Universitaire (CHU, University of Paris XI, Le Kremlin Bicêtre, 2Biomnis Laboratory, Ivry-sur-Seine, 3Retro-Virology, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, Pasteur Institute, Paris; 4Jacques Monod Institute, Centre National de Recherche Scientifique (CNRS, University of Paris VII, Paris, FranceBackground: The aim of this study was to evaluate the possibility of using the anti-varicella zoster virus (anti-VZV, also known as anti-HSV3 vaccine against orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1 and genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV2. This was suggested by study of the phylogenetic tree of members of the herpes virus family, which showed a close relationship between VZV (HSV3 and the HSV1 and HSV2 herpes viruses.Methods: The present prospective study was conducted from January 2005 through January 2011. Twenty-four patients afflicted with HSV1 and HSV2 herpes recurrences over a period of years, numbering 6–8 and more recurrences per year, agreed to receive the anti-VZV vaccine. They were compared with 26 nonvaccinated patients presenting with herpes simplex diseases 2–5 times a year. All 50 patients were documented with anti-HSV1, anti-HSV2, and anti-VZV antibody serological testing.Results: From 2005 through 2011, for the 24 anti-VZV vaccinated patients, the average number of herpes relapses decreased to 0, correlated with an increased anti-VZV antibody level and clinical recovery of all patients, whereas no improvement was observed for the 26 nonvaccinated herpes patients.Conclusion: Data for the anti-VZV serological antibody levels tested before and after anti-VZV vaccination showed a significant (P < 0.001 increase among vaccinated patients. This suggests defective anti-VZV immune power in these patients. After 6 years of positive results for anti-VZV vaccine, this is a logical and

  15. Virus-Free Human Placental Cell Lines To Study Genetic Functions | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Section on Cellular Differentiation is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize immortalized virus-free human placental cell lines.

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infectivity with a broad range of lectins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J E; Nielsen, C; Vestergaard, B F

    1991-01-01

    Five lectins with specificity for N- and O-linked oligosaccharides were examined for inhibition of HIV-1 and HSV-1 infectivity in vitro. HIV-1 isolate HTLVIIIB was preincubated with lectin and subsequently inoculated onto MT-4 cells. Lectins specific for N-linked oligosaccharides blocked HIV infe......-1 infection, the most potent inhibition was found with the lectin HPA. These results indicate that lectins may have a broad antiviral effect on enveloped viruses only limited by types of oligosaccharides present on individual viruses....

  17. Efficacy of the Herpes Simplex Virus 2 (HSV-2) Glycoprotein D/AS04 Vaccine against Genital HSV-2 and HSV-1 Infection and Disease in the Cotton Rat Sigmodon hispidus Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukhvalova, Marina; McKay, Jamall; Mbaye, Aissatou; Sanford-Crane, Hannah; Blanco, Jorge C G; Huber, Ashley; Herold, Betsy C

    2015-10-01

    Subunit vaccines based on the herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) glycoprotein D (gD-2) have been the major focus of HSV-2 vaccine development for the past 2 decades. Based on the promising data generated in the guinea pig model, a formulation containing truncated gD-2, aluminum salt, and MPL (gD/AS04) advanced to clinical trials. The results of these trials, however, were unexpected, as the vaccine protected against HSV-1 infection but not against HSV-2. To address this discrepancy, we developed a Depot medroxyprogesterone acetate (DMPA)-treated cotton rat Sigmodon hispidus model of HSV-2 and HSV-1 genital infection. The severity of HSV-1 genital herpes was less than that of HSV-2 genital herpes in cotton rats, and yet the model allowed for comparative evaluation of gD/AS04 immunogenicity and efficacy. Cotton rats were intramuscularly vaccinated using a prime boost strategy with gD/AS04 (Simplirix vaccine) or control vaccine formulation (hepatitis B vaccine FENDrix) and subsequently challenged intravaginally with HSV-2 or HSV-1. The gD/AS04 vaccine was immunogenic in cotton rats and induced serum IgG directed against gD-2 and serum HSV-2 neutralizing antibodies but failed to efficiently protect against HSV-2 disease or to decrease the HSV-2 viral load. However, gD/AS04 significantly reduced vaginal titers of HSV-1 and better protected animals against HSV-1 compared to HSV-2 genital disease. The latter finding is generally consistent with the clinical outcome of the Herpevac trial of Simplirix. Passive transfer of serum from gD/AS04-immunized cotton rats conferred stronger protection against HSV-1 genital disease. These findings suggest the need for alternative vaccine strategies and the identification of new correlates of protection. In spite of the high health burden of genital herpes, there is still no effective intervention against the disease. The significant gap in knowledge on genital herpes pathogenesis has been further highlighted by the recent failure of GSK

  18. An Epigenetic Compound Library Screen Identifies BET Inhibitors That Promote HSV-1 and -2 Replication by Bridging P-TEFb to Viral Gene Promoters through BRD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Ren

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The human HSV-1 and -2 are common pathogens of human diseases. Both host and viral factors are involved in HSV lytic infection, although detailed mechanisms remain elusive. By screening a chemical library of epigenetic regulation, we identified bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4 as a critical player in HSV infection. We show that treatment with pan BD domain inhibitor enhanced both HSV infection. Using JQ1 as a probe, we found that JQ1, a defined BD1 inhibitor, acts through BRD4 protein since knockdown of BRD4 expression ablated JQ1 effect on HSV infection. BRD4 regulates HSV replication through complex formation involving CDK9 and RNAP II; whereas, JQ1 promotes HSV-1 infection by allocating the complex to HSV gene promoters. Therefore, suppression of BRD4 expression or inhibition of CDK9 activity impeded HSV infection. Our data support a model that JQ1 enhances HSV infection by switching BRD4 to transcription regulation of viral gene expression from chromatin targeting since transient expression of BRD4 BD1 or BD1/2 domain had similar effect to that by JQ1 treatment. In addition to the identification that BRD4 is a modulator for JQ1 action on HSV infection, this study demonstrates BRD4 has an essential role in HSV infection.

  19. RIG-I is required for VSV-induced cytokine production by murine glia and acts in combination with DAI to initiate responses to HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crill, Emma K; Furr-Rogers, Samantha R; Marriott, Ian

    2015-12-01

    A defining feature of viral central nervous system (CNS) infection is the rapid onset of severe neuroinflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying glial responses to replicative neurotropic viruses are only now becoming apparent with the discovery of a number of cytosolic sensors for viral nucleic acids. We have described the expression by murine and human glial cells of two disparate pattern recognition receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I) and DNA-dependent activator of interferon regulatory factors (DAI), receptors for viral RNA and DNA moieties, respectively. In the present study, we demonstrate the functional significance of RIG-I expression in primary murine microglia and astrocytes. Our data indicate that murine glial immune responses to a model neurotropic RNA virus, vesicular stomatitis virus, are RIG-I dependent and independent of levels of DAI expression or RNA polymerase III activity. In contrast, maximal glial inflammatory and antiviral responses to the DNA virus herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) are dependent on the expression of both RIG-I and DAI, and require RNA polymerase III activity. These findings indicate that the RNA sensor, RIG-I, acts in parallel with DAI in an RNA polymerase III-dependent manner to initiate glial responses to HSV-1. We therefore suggest that RIG-I plays a significant role in the detection of both RNA and DNA pathogens by microglia and astrocytes. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Evaluation of reactivation of HSV1, HHV6, CMV and EBV in a population of patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caterina Matinato

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Herpes viruses are recognized as important pathogens as a result of viral reactivation in immunocompromised hosts, especially in patients undergoing bone marrow transplantation. Objectives of this study were the assessment of the reactivation of herpes virus HSV1, HHV6, CMV and EBV and the correlation between viral reactivation and progression of transplantation in a population of patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation at Fondazione IRCCS Ospedale Maggiore Ca’ Granda Policlinico, Milan. Viral DNA was detected and quantified by Real Time PCR in a population of 35 patients undergoing allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. The viral reactivation was observed in 7 patients for HSV1 (20%, 6 patients for HHV6 (17.1%, 11 patients for CMV (31.4% and 4 patients for EBV (11.4%. Difference in the incidence of aGVDH between patients with viral reactivation versus those for which there was no reactivation was statistically significant. These data confirm the importance of monitoring viral load for the management of antiviral therapy in order to prevent CMV disease and complications related to herpes viruses reactivation.

  1. Treatment of malignant gliomas with a replicating adenoviral vector expressing herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Nanda (Dharminderkoemar); R. Vogels; M. Havenga; C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); A. Bout; P.S. Smitt

    2001-01-01

    textabstractWe evaluated the interaction between oncolytic, replication-competent adenoviral vectors and the herpes simplex virus-1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) suicide system for the treatment of malignant gliomas. We constructed a panel of

  2. Transduction of striatum and cortex tissues by adeno-associated viral vectors produced by herpes simplex virus- and baculovirus-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H Steve; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Slgirim; Ahn, Ik-Sung; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2012-01-01

    Recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors can be engineered to carry genetic material encoding therapeutic gene products that have demonstrated significant clinical promise. These viral vectors are typically produced in mammalian cells by the transient transfection of two or three plasmids encoding the AAV rep and cap genes, the adenovirus helper gene, and a gene of interest. Although this method can produce high-quality AAV vectors when used with multiple purification protocols, one critical limitation is the difficulty in scaling-up manufacturing, which poses a significant hurdle to the broad clinical utilization of AAV vectors. To address this challenge, recombinant herpes simplex virus type I (rHSV-1)- and recombinant baculovirus (rBac)-based methods have been established recently. These methods are more amenable to large-scale production of AAV vectors than methods using the transient transfection of mammalian cells. To investigate potential applications of AAV vectors produced by rHSV-1- or rBac-based platforms, the in vivo transduction of rHSV-1- or rBac-produced AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) vectors within the rat brain were examined by comparing them with vectors generated by the conventional transfection method. Injection of rHSV-1- or rBac-produced AAV vectors into rat striatum and cortex tissues revealed no differences in cellular tropism (i.e., predominantly neuronal targeting) or anteroposterior spread compared with AAV2 vectors produced by transient transfection. This report represents a step towards validating AAV vectors produced by the rHSV-1- and the rBac-based systems as promising tools, especially for delivering therapeutic molecules to the central nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A spiroketal-enol ether derivative from Tanacetum vulgare selectively inhibits HSV-1 and HSV-2 glycoprotein accumulation in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Ángel L; Habtemariam, Solomon; Abdel Moneim, Ahmed E; Melón, Santiago; Dalton, Kevin P; Parra, Francisco

    2015-07-01

    The inhibitory effects of Tanacetum vulgare rhizome extracts on HSV-1 and HSV-2 in vitro replication were assessed. Unlike extracts obtained from the aerial parts, adsorption inhibition and virucidal activities seemed not to be relevant for the observed antiviral action of tansy rhizome extracts. Instead, the most significant effects were the inhibition of virus penetration and a novel mechanism consisting of the specific arrest of viral gene expression and consequently the decrease of viral protein accumulation within infected cells. Through a bioactivity-guided fractionation protocol we isolated and identified the spiroketal-enol ether derivative (E)-2-(2,4-hexadiynyliden)-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]dec-3-ene as the active compound responsible for this inhibitory effect. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Nucleotide sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) affecting virus entry, cell fusion, and production of glycoprotein gB (VP7)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.J.; Bond, V.C.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1982-10-30

    The tsB5 strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains at least two mutations; one mutation specifies the syncytial phenotype and the other confers temperature sensitivity for virus growth. These functions are known to be located between the prototypic map coordinates 0.30 and 0.42. In this study it was demonstrated that tsB5 enters human embryonic lung (HEL) cells more rapidly than KOS, another strain of HSV-1. The EcoRI restriction fragment F from the KOS strain (map coordinates 0.315 to 0.421) was mapped with eight restriction endonucleases, and 16 recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained varying portions of the KOS genome. Recombinant viruses were generated by marker-rescue and marker-transfer cotransfection procedures, using intact DNA from one strain and a recombinant plasmid containing DNA from the other strain. The region of the crossover between the two nonisogenic strains was inferred by the identification of restriction sites in the recombinants that were characteristic of the parental strains. The recombinants were subjected to phenotypic analysis. Syncytium formation, rate of virus entry, and the production of gB were all separable by the crossovers that produced the recombinants. The KOS sequences which rescue the syncytial phenotype of tsB5 were localized to 1.5 kb (map coordinates 0.345 to 0.355), and the temperature-sensitive mutation was localized to 1.2 kb (0.360 to 0.368), giving an average separation between the mutations of 2.5 kb on the 150-kb genome. DNA sequences that specify a functional domain for virus entry were localized to the nucleotide sequences between the two mutations. All three functions could be encoded by the virus gene specifying the gB glycoprotein.

  5. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Bioactive Material from Chondrus crispus and Codium fragile and Its Effect on Herpes simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Garima; Burlot, Anne-Sophie; Marty, Christel; Critchley, Alan; Hafting, Jeff; Bedoux, Gilles; Bourgougnon, Nathalie; Prithiviraj, Balakrishnan

    2015-01-01

    Codium fragile and Chondrus crispus are, respectively, green and red seaweeds which are abundant along the North Atlantic coasts. We investigated the chemical composition and antiviral activity of enzymatic extracts of C. fragile (CF) and C. crispus (CC). On a dry weight basis, CF consisted of 11% protein, 31% neutral sugars, 0.8% sulfate, 0.6% uronic acids, and 49% ash, while CC contained 27% protein, 28% neutral sugars, 17% sulfate, 1.8% uronic acids, and 25% ash. Enzyme-assisted hydrolysis improved the extraction efficiency of bioactive materials. Commercial proteases and carbohydrases significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001) biomass yield (40%–70% dry matter) as compared to aqueous extraction (20%–25% dry matter). Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced the recovery of protein, neutral sugars, uronic acids, and sulfates. The enzymatic hydrolysates exhibited significant activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) with EC50 of 77.6–126.8 μg/mL for CC and 36.5–41.3 μg/mL for CF, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 0.001 ID50/cells without cytotoxity (1–200 μg/mL). The extracts obtained from proteases (P1) and carbohydrases (C3) were also effective at higher virus MOI of 0.01 ID50/cells without cytotoxity. Taken together, these results indicate the potential application of enzymatic hydrolysates of C. fragile and C. crispus in functional food and antiviral drug discovery. PMID:25603348

  6. Phytochemical analysis and in vitro evaluation of the biological activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of Cedrus libani A. Rich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizzo, Monica Rosa; Saab, Antoine; Tundis, Rosa; Statti, Giancarlo A; Lampronti, Ilaria; Menichini, Francesco; Gambari, Roberto; Cinatl, Jindrich; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm

    2008-01-01

    Cedrus libani are widely used as traditional medicine in Lebanon for treatment of different infection diseases. In the present study we reported the phytochemical composition analyzed by GC-MS of wood essential oil and cones and leaves ethanol extracts. The main components of wood essential oil were himachalol (22.50%), beta-himachalene (21.90%), and alpha-himachalene (10.50%). Leaves ethanol extract was characterized by a high content of germacrene d (29.40%). The same extract obtained from cones essentially contained alpha-pinene (51.0%) and beta-myrcene (13.0%). Moreover, we investigated extracts, essential oil, and identified compounds for their in vitro antiviral activities against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Cytotoxicity was evaluated by MTT assay in Vero cells. Cones and leaves ethanol extracts exhibited an interesting activity with IC50 of 0.50 and 0.66 mg/ml, respectively, at non-cytotoxic concentration. A comparable activity was found when essential oil was tested (IC50 of 0.44 mg/ml).

  7. Enzyme-Assisted Extraction of Bioactive Material from Chondrus crispus and Codium fragile and Its Effect on Herpes simplex Virus (HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garima Kulshreshtha

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Codium fragile and Chondrus crispus are, respectively, green and red seaweeds which are abundant along the North Atlantic coasts. We investigated the chemical composition and antiviral activity of enzymatic extracts of C. fragile (CF and C. crispus (CC. On a dry weight basis, CF consisted of 11% protein, 31% neutral sugars, 0.8% sulfate, 0.6% uronic acids, and 49% ash, while CC contained 27% protein, 28% neutral sugars, 17% sulfate, 1.8% uronic acids, and 25% ash. Enzyme-assisted hydrolysis improved the extraction efficiency of bioactive materials. Commercial proteases and carbohydrases significantly improved (p ≤ 0.001 biomass yield (40%–70% dry matter as compared to aqueous extraction (20%–25% dry matter. Moreover, enzymatic hydrolysis enhanced the recovery of protein, neutral sugars, uronic acids, and sulfates. The enzymatic hydrolysates exhibited significant activity against Herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 with EC50 of 77.6–126.8 μg/mL for CC and 36.5–41.3 μg/mL for CF, at a multiplicity of infection (MOI of 0.001 ID50/cells without cytotoxity (1–200 μg/mL. The extracts obtained from proteases (P1 and carbohydrases (C3 were also effective at higher virus MOI of 0.01 ID50/cells without cytotoxity. Taken together, these results indicate the potential application of enzymatic hydrolysates of C. fragile and C. crispus in functional food and antiviral drug discovery.

  8. Adeno-associated Virus Vectors Efficiently Transduce Mouse and Rabbit Sensory Neurons Coinfected with Herpes Simplex Virus 1 following Peripheral Inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Zachary L; Ertel, Monica K; Lewin, Alfred S; Tuli, Sonal S; Schultz, Gregory S; Neumann, Donna M; Bloom, David C

    2016-09-01

    Following infection of epithelial tissues, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) virions travel via axonal transport to sensory ganglia and establish a lifelong latent infection within neurons. Recent studies have revealed that, following intraganglionic or intrathecal injection, recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors can also infect sensory neurons and are capable of stable, long-term transgene expression. We sought to determine if application of rAAV to peripheral nerve termini at the epithelial surface would allow rAAV to traffic to sensory ganglia in a manner similar to that seen with HSV. We hypothesized that footpad or ocular inoculation with rAAV8 would result in transduction of dorsal root ganglia (DRG) or trigeminal ganglia (TG), respectively. To test this, we inoculated the footpads of mice with various amounts of rAAV as well as rAAV capsid mutants. We demonstrated that this method of inoculation can achieve a transduction rate of >90% of the sensory neurons in the DRG that innervate the footpad. Similarly, we showed that corneal inoculation with rAAV vectors in the rabbit efficiently transduced >70% of the TG neurons in the optic tract. Finally, we demonstrated that coinfection of mouse footpads or rabbit eyes with rAAV vectors and HSV-1 resulted in colocalization in nearly all of the HSV-1-positive neurons. These results suggest that rAAV is a useful tool for the study of HSV-1 infection and may provide a means to deliver therapeutic cargos for the treatment of HSV infections or of dysfunctions of sensory ganglia. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been shown to transduce dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons following direct intraganglionic sciatic nerve injection and intraperitoneal and intravenous injection as well as intrathecal injection. We sought to determine if rAAV vectors would be delivered to the same sensory neurons that herpes simplex virus (HSV-1) infects when applied peripherally at an epithelial surface that had been treated to expose

  9. Production of virus-free orchid Cymbidium aloifolium (L. Sw. by various tissue culture techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shreeti Pradhan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Orchids are affected by many viruses resulting in poor growth, yield and quality, and an overall decline in population. Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV is one of the common orchid viruses found in Cymbidium species but it infects different orchid genera. In this study Cymbidium aloifolium was propagated in vitro using MS medium at different strength (1.0, ½, and ¼ with or without 0.5 mg/l BAP (6-benzylaminopurine and 0.5 mg/l NAA (Naphthalene acetic acid. To provide disease-free planting material, source plant for in vitro propagation needs to be screened for pathogenic viruses. In the present study, in vivo-grown source (mother plants and tissue culture-derived plants of C. aloifolium were tested for CymMV virus using Double antibody sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA. All the tissue cultured plants were found to be 100% virus-free whereas the in vivo grown source plants were highly affected by CymMV virus (83.33%. The virus-free in vitro plantlets were multiplied in large scale and then acclimatized on earthen pot containing a mixture of cocopeat, litter and clay in the ratio of 3:2:1. Eighty five percent of acclimatized plantlets survived making this method an efficient mass production system for high quality virus-free C. aloifolium for commercial floriculture and germplasm preservation.

  10. Synthesis and preliminary evaluation of 9-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl) guanine ([{sup 18}F]FHBG) in HSV1-tk gene transduced hepatoma cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Tae Sup [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Myoung Keun [Yonsei University, Wonju (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2006-08-15

    The HSV1-tk reporter gene system is the most widely used system because of its advantage that direct monitoring is possible without the introduction of a separate reporter gene in case of HSV1-tk suicide gene therapy. In this study, we investigate the usefulness of the reporter probe (substrate), 9-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-3-hydroxymethylbutyl) guanine ([{sup 18}F]FHBG) for non-invasive reporter gene imaging using PET in HSV1-tk expressing hepatoma model. Radiolabeled FHBG was prepared in 8 steps from a commercially available triester. The labeling reaction was carried out by NCA nucleophilic substitution with K[{sup 18}F]/K2.2.2. in acetonitrile using N2-monomethoxytrityl-9-[4-(tosly)-3-monomethoxytritylmethylbutl] guanine as a precursor, followed by deprotection with 1 N HCI. Preliminary biological properties of the probe were evaluated with MCA cells and MCA-tk cells transduced with HSV1-tk reporter gene. In vitro uptake and release-out studies of [{sup 18}F]FHBG were performed, and was analyzed correlation between [{sup 18}F]FHBG uptake ratio according to increasing numeric count of MCA-tk cells and degree of gene expression. MicroPET scan image was obtained with MCA and MCA-tk tumor beating Balb/c-nude mouse model. [{sup 18}F]FHBG was purified by reverse phase semi-HPLC system and collected at around 16-18 min. Radiochemical yield was about 20-25% (corrected for decay), radiochemical purity was > 95% and specific activity was around > 55.5 GBq/ {mu} mol. Specific accumulation of [{sup 18}F]FHBG was observed in HSV1-tk gene transduced MCA-tk cells but not MCA cells, and consecutive 1 hour release-out results showed more than 86% of uptaked [{sup 18}F]FHBG was retained inside of cells. The uptake of [{sup 18}F]FHBG was showed a highly significant linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.995) with increasing percentage of MCA-tk numeric cell count. In microPET scan images, remarkable difference of accumulation was observed for the two type of tumors. [{sup 18}F]FHBG appears

  11. Chimeric HCMV/HSV-1 and Δγ134.5 oncolytic herpes simplex virus elicit immune mediated antigliomal effect and antitumor memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed G. Ghonime

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Malignant gliomas are the most common primary brain tumor and are characterized by rapid and highly invasive growth. Because of their poor prognosis, new therapeutic strategies are needed. Oncolytic virotherapy (OV is a promising strategy for treating cancer that incorporates both direct viral replication mediated and immune mediated mechanisms to kill tumor cells. C134 is a next generation Δγ134.5 oHSV-1 with improved intratumoral viral replication. It remains safe in the CNS environment by inducing early IFN signaling which restricts its replication in non-malignant cells. We sought to identify how C134 performed in an immunocompetent tumor model that restricts its replication advantage over first generation viruses. To achieve this we identified tumors that have intact IFN signaling responses that restrict C134 and first generation virus replication similarly. Our results show that both viruses elicit a T cell mediated anti-tumor effect and improved animal survival but that subtle difference exist between the viruses effect on median survival despite equivalent in vivo viral replication. To further investigate this we examined the anti-tumor activity in immunodeficient mice and in syngeneic models with re-challenge. These studies show that the T cell response is integral to C134 replication independent anti-tumor response and that OV therapy elicits a durable and circulating anti-tumor memory. The studies also show that repeated intratumoral administration can extend both OV anti-tumor effects and induce durable anti-tumor memory that is superior to tumor antigen exposure alone.

  12. Small Neutral Amino Acid Ester Prodrugs of Acyclovir Targeting Amino Acid Transporters on the Cornea: Possible Antiviral Agents against Ocular HSV-1 Infections

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    Katragadda Suresh

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize the affinity and permeability patterns of the amino acid ester prodrugs of acyclovir (ACV, L-alanine-ACV (AACV, L-serine-ACV (SACV, L-serine-succinate-ACV (SSACV and L-cysteine-ACV (CACV on rabbit primary corneal epithelial cell culture (rPCEC and on rabbit cornea. Amino acid prodrugs of acyclovir, AACV, SACV, SSACV and CACV were synthesized in our laboratory. Chemical hydrolysis in aqueous buffer, enzymatic hydrolysis in corneal homogenates and transport across freshly excised rabbit cornea of these prodrugs were studied. SSACV inhibited the uptake of [ 3 H] L-alanine on rPCEC and across the intact rabbit cornea. Lineweaver-Burk plot transformation revealed competitive inhibition between L-alanine and SSACV. In corneal tissue homogenate, the half lives of SSACV, SACV and CACV (t 1/2 were observed to be 3.5 ± 0.4, 9.2 ± 0.6 and 1.8 ± 0.1 hr respectively, whereas AACV was readily converted to the active parent drug acyclovir exhibiting complete degradation before 5 min. Interestingly translocation of SACV across cornea was inhibited in the presence of 5 mM arginine (~51%, a specific substrate for cationic transport system and in presence of BCH (~38%, a substrate specific for large neutral amino acid transport system (LAT or cationic and neutral amino acid transport system (B 0,+ . SACV exhibited higher permeability across cornea along with excellent antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 and varicella-zoster virus (VZV in comparison to ACV. Recognition by multiple transporters, stability in corneal homogenate and changes in physico-chemical properties contributed to the increased permeability of SACV across cornea.

  13. HSV-1/HSV-2 Infection-Related Cancers in Bantu Populations Driving HIV-1 Prevalence in Africa: Tracking the Origin of AIDS at the Onset of the 20th Century

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    Jacqueline Le Goaster

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: At the onset of the 20th century, ancient clinical observations of cancer epidemics in Bantu populations of Sub-Saharan Africa were discovered. They were reported from 1914 to 1960, but remained unexplained. In 1983, in San Francisco, Calif., USA, cancer epidemics were related to infections by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 known as AIDS disease. Yet since 1996, it is known that HIV-1 strains are not the only ones involved. In Sub-Saharan Africa, recurrent orobuccal herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and genital recurrent herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2 appeared many times prior to infection by HIV-1. Case Reports: Data on these ancient medical observations regarding African cancer epidemics can today be referred to as the relationship between the unfortunate immune deficiency of herpes in Bantu populations and HIV-1 viral strains. For centuries, the Bantu populations dispersed in forests were living in close proximity to chimpanzees infected by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV and were exposed to SIV contamination which became HIV-1 in human beings. Presently, these unexplained Bantu cancer epidemics can be linked to the viral partnership of HSV-1/HSV-2 to HIV-1 strains. Conclusion: The key issue is now to prevent HSV-1/HSV-2 diseases related to HIV-1. An anti-herpes treatment administered early during childhood to Bantu populations will offer a mean of preventing herpes diseases related to HIV-1 infection and hence avoid cancer epidemics.

  14. Fruit quality properties of some virus-free grapefruit varieties grafted on different rootstocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şenay KURT

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Sanitation studies against virus and virus like diseases causing large economic losses in citrus plantations in Turkey were begun at Antalya Citrus Research Institute in 1988. As a result of the study, some virus-free grapefruit varieties (Redblush, Rio Red, Ray Ruby, Henderson, Star Ruby and Marsh Seedless budded on Local sour orange and Troyer citrange rootstocks were planted at breeding parcel in 1995. Effects of rootstocks on fruit quality properties were investigated in these grapefruit varieties. Local sour orange and Troyer citrange affected similarly on the fruit quality of grapefruit cultivars. It could be suggested that these rootstocks could be recommended for grapefruit growing.

  15. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with the live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine VC2 stimulates the proliferation of mucosal T cells and germinal center responses resulting in sustained production of highly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent A; Pahar, Bapi; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Veazey, Ronald; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2017-01-23

    We have shown that the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain with mutations in glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 is unable to establish latency in vaccinated animals and produces a robust immune response capable of completely protecting mice against lethal vaginal HSV-1 or HSV-2 infections. To better understand the immune response generated by vaccination with VC2, we tested its ability to elicit immune responses in rhesus macaques. Vaccinated animals showed no signs of disease and developed increasing HSV-1 and HSV-2 reactive IgG 1 after two booster vaccinations, while IgG subtypes IgG 2 and IgG 3 remained at low to undetectable levels. All vaccinated animals produced high levels of cross protective neutralizing antibodies. Flow cytometry analysis of cells isolated from draining lymph nodes showed that VC2 vaccination stimulated significant increases in plasmablast (CD27 high CD38 high ) and mature memory (CD21 - IgM - ) B cells. T cell analysis on cells isolated from draining lymph node biopsies demonstrated a statistically significant increase in proliferating (Ki67 + ) follicular T helper cells and regulatory CXCR5 + CD8 + cytotoxic T cells. Analysis of plasma isolated two weeks post vaccination showed significant increases in circulating CXCL13 indicating increased germinal center activity. Cells isolated from vaginal biopsy samples collected over the course of the study exhibited vaccination-dependent increases in proliferating (Ki67 + ) CD4 + and CD8 + T cell populations. These results suggest that intramuscular vaccination with the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain can stimulate robust IgG 1 antibody responses that persist for >250days post vaccination. In addition, vaccination lead to the maturation of B cells into plasmablast and mature memory B cells, the expansion of follicular T helper cells, and affects in the mucosal immune responses. These data suggest that the HSV VC2 vaccine induces potent immune responses that could help

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  17. Noninvasive theranostic imaging of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR/GCV-CB1954 dual-prodrug therapy in metastatic lung lesions of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Thillai V; Foygel, Kira; Ilovich, Ohad; Paulmurugan, Ramasamy

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is an obdurate cancer type that is not amenable to chemotherapy regimens currently used in clinic. There is a desperate need for alternative therapies to treat this resistant cancer type. Gene-Directed Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (GDEPT) is a superior gene therapy method when compared to chemotherapy and radiotherapy procedures, proven to be effective against many types of cancer in pre-clinical evaluations and clinical trials. Gene therapy that utilizes a single enzyme/prodrug combination targeting a single cellular mechanism needs significant overexpression of delivered therapeutic gene in order to achieve therapy response. Hence, to overcome this obstacle we recently developed a dual therapeutic reporter gene fusion that uses two different prodrugs, targeting two distinct cellular mechanisms in order to achieve effective therapy with a limited expression of delivered transgenes. In addition, imaging therapeutic reporter genes offers additional information that indirectly correlates gene delivery, expression, and functional effectiveness as a theranostic approach. In the present study, we evaluate the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion dual suicide gene therapy system that we recently developed, in MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer lung-metastatic lesions in a mouse model. We compared the therapeutic potential of HSV1-sr39TK-NTR fusion with respective dual prodrugs GCV-CB1954 with HSV1-sr39TK/GCV and NTR/CB1954 single enzyme prodrug system in this highly resistant metastatic lesion of the lungs. In vitro optimization of dose and duration of exposure to GCV and CB1954 was performed in MDA-MB-231 cells. Drug combinations of 1 μg/ml GCV and 10 μM CB1954 for 3 days was found to be optimal regimen for induction of significant cell death, as assessed by FACS analysis. In vivo therapeutic evaluation in animal models showed a complete ablation of lung metastatic nodules of MDA-MB-231 triple negative breast cancer cells following

  18. STAT3 Regulates Proliferation and Survival of CD8+ T Cells: Enhances Effector Responses to HSV-1 Infection, and Inhibits IL-10+ Regulatory CD8+ T Cells in Autoimmune Uveitis

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    Cheng-Rong Yu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available STAT3 regulates CD4+ T cell survival and differentiation. However, its effects on CD8+ T cells are not well understood. Here, we show that in comparison to WT CD8+ T cells, STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells exhibit a preactivated memory-like phenotype, produce more IL-2, proliferate faster, and are more sensitive to activation-induced cell death (AICD. The enhanced proliferation and sensitivity to AICD correlated with downregulation of class-O forkhead transcription factors (FoxO1, FoxO3A, , , Bcl-2, OX-40, and upregulation of FasL, Bax, and Bad. We examined whether STAT3-deficient CD8+ T cells can mount effective response during herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 infection and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU. Compared to WT mice, HSV-1-infected STAT3-deficient mice (STAT3KO produced less IFN- and virus-specific KLRG-1+ CD8+ T cells. STAT3KO mice are also resistant to EAU and produced less IL-17-producing Tc17 cells. Resistance of STAT3KO to EAU correlated with marked expansion of IL-10-producing regulatory CD8+ T cells (CD8-Treg implicated in recovery from autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, increases of IL-6-induced STAT3 activation observed during inflammation may inhibit expansion of CD8-Tregs, thereby impeding recovery from uveitis. These results suggest that STAT3 is a potential therapeutic target for upregulating CD8+ T cell-mediated responses to viruses and suggest the successful therapeutic targeting of STAT3 as treatment for uveitis, derived, in part, from promoting CD8-Treg expansion.

  19. HSV-1 Encephalitis: High Index of Clinical Suspicion, Prompt Diagnosis, and Early Therapeutic Intervention Are the Triptych of Success—Report of Two Cases and Comprehensive Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Patoulias

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV encephalitis is an acute infectious disease of the Central Nervous System (CNS, usually affecting the limbic structures, the median temporal cortex, and the orbitofrontal regions. Its annual incidence has significantly increased over the last 20 years and the mortality rate is 7%, if early diagnosed and treated, and 70%, if left untreated, while it is associated with high rates of morbidity. It should be noted that even when Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF analysis seems normal, imaging studies are not specific and HSV Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR test is negative; the clinician should be more aggressive, if clinical presentation is indicative for HSV encephalitis, by administrating acyclovir early after patient’s admission. The latter may be a vital intervention for the patient, modifying the patient’s clinical course. Through the presentation of two cases of HSV-1 encephalitis that we managed in our department over the last 1 year and after systematic and comprehensive research of the relevant literature, we aim at showing the crucial role of medical history and physical examination, along with the high index of clinical suspicion, in order to make promptly the diagnosis and administer timely intravenous acyclovir, limiting the possibility of complications during the disease’s course.

  20. An alpha-helical domain within the carboxyl terminus of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein B (gB) is associated with cell fusion and resistance to heparin inhibition of cell fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, T P; Melancon, J M; Kousoulas, K G

    2001-08-15

    Previous studies from our laboratory indicated that a 28-amino-acid carboxyl-terminal truncation of gB caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion (Baghian et al., 1993, J Virol 67, 2396-2401). We tested the ability of additional truncations and mutations within gB to cause cell fusion in the recently established virus-free cell fusion assay (Turner et al., 1998, J. Virol. 72, 873-875). Deletion of the carboxyl-terminal 28 amino acids of gB (gBDelta28), which removed part of the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b, caused extensive cell fusion. A gB truncation specified by gBDelta36, which removed the entire H17b domain, caused as much cell fusion as the gBDelta28 truncation. Similarly, gB(A874P) containing a substitution of an Ala with Pro within H17b caused cell fusion. Heparin, a gB-specific inhibitor of virus-induced cell fusion, inhibited both wild-type gB and gB(syn3)-mediated cell fusion. In contrast, fusion of cells transfected with gB(Delta28), gB(Delta36), or gB(A874P) was resistant to heparin inhibition of cell fusion. We concluded the following: (1) The predicted alpha-helical structure of H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB is involved in both virus-induced and virus-free cell fusion. (2) Heparin is a specific inhibitor of gB-mediated fusion in both systems. (3) Resistance to heparin inhibition of gB-mediated cell fusion is associated with the predicted alpha-helical structure H17b within the carboxyl terminus of gB. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  1. About vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffmann, Banesh

    1975-01-01

    From his unusual beginning in ""Defining a vector"" to his final comments on ""What then is a vector?"" author Banesh Hoffmann has written a book that is provocative and unconventional. In his emphasis on the unresolved issue of defining a vector, Hoffmann mixes pure and applied mathematics without using calculus. The result is a treatment that can serve as a supplement and corrective to textbooks, as well as collateral reading in all courses that deal with vectors. Major topics include vectors and the parallelogram law; algebraic notation and basic ideas; vector algebra; scalars and scalar p

  2. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Newell, Homer E

    2006-01-01

    When employed with skill and understanding, vector analysis can be a practical and powerful tool. This text develops the algebra and calculus of vectors in a manner useful to physicists and engineers. Numerous exercises (with answers) not only provide practice in manipulation but also help establish students' physical and geometric intuition in regard to vectors and vector concepts.Part I, the basic portion of the text, consists of a thorough treatment of vector algebra and the vector calculus. Part II presents the illustrative matter, demonstrating applications to kinematics, mechanics, and e

  3. Carbohydrate-Based Ice Recrystallization Inhibitors Increase Infectivity and Thermostability of Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobadloo, Shahrokh M.; Balcerzak, Anna K.; Gargaun, Ana; Muharemagic, Darija; Mironov, Gleb G.; Capicciotti, Chantelle J.; Briard, Jennie G.; Ben, Robert N.; Berezovski, Maxim V.

    2014-07-01

    The inability of vaccines to retain sufficient thermostability has been an obstacle to global vaccination programs. To address this major limitation, we utilized carbohydrate-based ice recrystallization inhibitors (IRIs) to eliminate the cold chain and stabilize the potency of Vaccinia virus (VV), Vesicular Stomatitis virus (VSV) and Herpes virus-1 (HSV-1). The impact of these IRIs was tested on the potency of the viral vectors using a plaque forming unit assay following room temperature storage, cryopreservation with successive freeze-thaw cycles and lyophilization. Viral potency after storage with all three conditions demonstrated that N-octyl-gluconamide (NOGlc) recovered the infectivity of shelf stored VV, 5.6 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 40 days, and HSV-1, 2.7 Log10 PFU mL-1 during 9 days. Carbon-linked antifreeze glycoprotein analogue ornithine-glycine-glycine-galactose (OGG-Gal) increases the recovery of VV and VSV more than 1 Log10 PFU mL-1 after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. In VSV, cryostorage with OGG-Gal maintains high infectivity and reduces temperature-induced aggregation of viral particles by 2 times that of the control. In total, OGG-Gal and NOGlc preserve virus potency during cryostorage. Remarkably, NOGlc has potential to eliminate the cold chain and permit room temperature storage of viral vectors.

  4. Elementary vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Wolstenholme, E Œ

    1978-01-01

    Elementary Vectors, Third Edition serves as an introductory course in vector analysis and is intended to present the theoretical and application aspects of vectors. The book covers topics that rigorously explain and provide definitions, principles, equations, and methods in vector analysis. Applications of vector methods to simple kinematical and dynamical problems; central forces and orbits; and solutions to geometrical problems are discussed as well. This edition of the text also provides an appendix, intended for students, which the author hopes to bridge the gap between theory and appl

  5. Novel functional microRNAs from virus-free and infected Vitis vinifera plants under water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Vitali, Marco; Boccacci, Paolo; Miozzi, Laura; Cuozzo, Danila; Chitarra, Walter; Mannini, Franco; Lovisolo, Claudio; Gambino, Giorgio

    2016-02-02

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs that regulate the post-transcriptional control of several pathway intermediates, thus playing pivotal roles in plant growth, development and response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In recent years, the grapevine genome release, small(s)-RNAseq and degradome-RNAseq together has allowed the discovery and characterisation of many miRNA species, thus rendering the discovery of additional miRNAs difficult and uncertain. Taking advantage of the miRNA responsiveness to stresses and the availability of virus-free Vitis vinifera plants and those infected only by a latent virus, we have analysed grapevines subjected to drought in greenhouse conditions. The sRNA-seq and other sequence-specific molecular analyses have allowed us to characterise conserved miRNA expression profiles in association with specific eco-physiological parameters. In addition, we here report 12 novel grapevine-specific miRNA candidates and describe their expression profile. We show that latent viral infection can influence the miRNA profiles of V. vinifera in response to drought. Moreover, study of eco-physiological parameters showed that photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and hydraulic resistance to water transport were significantly influenced by drought and viral infection. Although no unequivocal cause-effect explanation could be attributed to each miRNA target, their contribution to the drought response is discussed.

  6. Vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Brand, Louis

    2006-01-01

    The use of vectors not only simplifies treatments of differential geometry, mechanics, hydrodynamics, and electrodynamics, but also makes mathematical and physical concepts more tangible and easy to grasp. This text for undergraduates was designed as a short introductory course to give students the tools of vector algebra and calculus, as well as a brief glimpse into these subjects' manifold applications. The applications are developed to the extent that the uses of the potential function, both scalar and vector, are fully illustrated. Moreover, the basic postulates of vector analysis are brou

  7. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, R.A.; Smith, L.M.

    1994-12-27

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site. 2 figures.

  8. Cloning vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Smith, Lloyd M.

    1994-01-01

    A vector comprising a filamentous phage sequence containing a first copy of filamentous phage gene X and other sequences necessary for the phage to propagate is disclosed. The vector also contains a second copy of filamentous phage gene X downstream from a promoter capable of promoting transcription in a bacterial host. In a preferred form of the present invention, the filamentous phage is M13 and the vector additionally includes a restriction endonuclease site located in such a manner as to substantially inactivate the second gene X when a DNA sequence is inserted into the restriction site.

  9. Bilateral single-site intracerebral injection of a nonpathogenic herpes simplex virus-1 vector decreases anxiogenic behavior in MPS VII mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenpei Liu

    Full Text Available Genetic diseases of the brain usually have pathologic lesions distributed throughout, thus requiring global correction. Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 vectors may be especially useful for gene delivery in these disorders since they can spread trans-synaptically along neuronal pathways to distal sites from a localized injection. We have previously shown that a nonpathogenic HSV-1 (strain 1716, which is deleted in the ICP34.5 gene, and expressing the lysosomal enzyme β-glucuronidase (GUSB from the latency-associated transcript (LAT promoter, spreads within the brains of GUSB-deficient mucopolysaccharidosis VII mice to reverse the pathognomonic storage lesions throughout the diseased brain. In this study, we tested the ability of the 1716 LAT-GUSB vector to improve behavioral deficits. The treatment significantly decreased anxiogenic behaviors associated with the mutation, as indicated by open-field behavior and decreased neophobia in a novel object-recognition task. The treated mice also exhibited an improvement in cognitive function associated with the cerebral cortex in a familiar object test. The results indicate the functional therapeutic potential of the 1716 LAT-GUSB vector.

  10. A herpes simplex virus-derived replicative vector expressing LIF limits experimental demyelinating disease and modulates autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nygårdas, Michaela; Paavilainen, Henrik; Müther, Nadine; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Röyttä, Matias; Sodeik, Beate; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has properties that can be exploited for the development of gene therapy vectors. The neurotropism of HSV enables delivery of therapeutic genes to the nervous system. Using a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), we constructed an HSV-1(17(+))-based replicative vector deleted of the neurovirulence gene γ134.5, and expressing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) as a transgene for treatment of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). EAE is an inducible T-cell mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and is used as an animal model for multiple sclerosis. Demyelination and inflammation are hallmarks of both diseases. LIF is a cytokine that has the potential to limit demyelination and oligodendrocyte loss in CNS autoimmune diseases and to affect the T-cell mediated autoimmune response. In this study SJL/J mice, induced for EAE, were treated with a HSV-LIF vector intracranially and the subsequent changes in disease parameters and immune responses during the acute disease were investigated. Replicating HSV-LIF and its DNA were detected in the CNS during the acute infection, and the vector spread to the spinal cord but was non-virulent. The HSV-LIF significantly ameliorated the EAE and contributed to a higher number of oligodendrocytes in the brains when compared to untreated mice. The HSV-LIF therapy also induced favorable changes in the expression of immunoregulatory cytokines and T-cell population markers in the CNS during the acute disease. These data suggest that BAC-derived HSV vectors are suitable for gene therapy of CNS disease and can be used to test the therapeutic potential of immunomodulatory factors for treatment of EAE.

  11. Somatic embryogenesis from seeds in a broad range of Vitis vinifera L. varieties: rescue of true-to-type virus-free plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Tània; Gammoudi, Najet; Peiró, Rosa; Olmos, Antonio; Gisbert, Carmina

    2017-11-29

    Somatic embryogenesis is the preferred method for cell to plant regeneration in Vitis vinifera L. However, low frequencies of plant embryo conversion are commonly found. In a previous work we obtained from cut-seeds of a grapevine infected with the Grapevine leafroll associated viruses 1 and 3 (GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3), high rates of direct regeneration, embryo plant conversion and sanitation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of this procedure for regeneration of other grapevine varieties which include some infected with one to three common grapevine viruses (GLRaV-3, Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)). As grapevine is highly heterozygous, it was necessary to select from among the virus-free plants those that regenerated from mother tissues around the embryo, (true-to-type). Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration were achieved in a first experiment, using cut-seeds from the 14 grapevine varieties Airén, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mencía, Merlot, Monastrell, Petit Verdot, Pinot Blanc (infected by GFLV and GFkV), Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Tempranillo (infected by GFLV), and Verdil. All regenerated plants were confirmed to be free of GFkV whereas at least 68% sanitation was obtained for GFLV. The SSR profiles of the virus-free plants showed, in both varieties, around 10% regeneration from mother tissue (the same genetic make-up as the mother plant). In a second experiment, this procedure was used to sanitize the varieties Cabernet Franc, Godello, Merlot and Valencí Blanc infected by GLRaV-3, GFkV and/or GFLV. Cut-seeds can be used as explants for embryogenesis induction and plant conversion in a broad range of grapevine varieties. The high regeneration rates obtained with this procedure facilitate the posterior selection of true-to-type virus-free plants. A sanitation rate of 100% was obtained for GFkV as this virus is not seed-transmitted. However, the presence of GLRaV-3 and GFLV in

  12. Vector geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Gilbert de B

    2011-01-01

    This brief undergraduate-level text by a prominent Cambridge-educated mathematician explores the relationship between algebra and geometry. An elementary course in plane geometry is the sole requirement for Gilbert de B. Robinson's text, which is the result of several years of teaching and learning the most effective methods from discussions with students. Topics include lines and planes, determinants and linear equations, matrices, groups and linear transformations, and vectors and vector spaces. Additional subjects range from conics and quadrics to homogeneous coordinates and projective geom

  13. VECTOR INTEGRATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, E. G. F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the theory of integration of scalar functions with respect to a measure with values in a, not necessarily locally convex, topological vector space. It focuses on the extension of such integrals from bounded measurable functions to the class of integrable functions, proving

  14. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  15. An introduction to vectors, vector operators and vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Joag, Pramod S

    2016-01-01

    Ideal for undergraduate and graduate students of science and engineering, this book covers fundamental concepts of vectors and their applications in a single volume. The first unit deals with basic formulation, both conceptual and theoretical. It discusses applications of algebraic operations, Levi-Civita notation, and curvilinear coordinate systems like spherical polar and parabolic systems and structures, and analytical geometry of curves and surfaces. The second unit delves into the algebra of operators and their types and also explains the equivalence between the algebra of vector operators and the algebra of matrices. Formulation of eigen vectors and eigen values of a linear vector operator are elaborated using vector algebra. The third unit deals with vector analysis, discussing vector valued functions of a scalar variable and functions of vector argument (both scalar valued and vector valued), thus covering both the scalar vector fields and vector integration.

  16. Vector velocimeter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    for generation of a reference beam, a detector system comprising a first detector arrangement arranged in such a way that the signal beam and the reference beam are incident upon the first detector arrangement with the reference beam propagating at an angle relative to a signal beam, and wherein the first......The present invention relates to a compact, reliable and low-cost vector velocimeter for example for determining velocities of particles suspended in a gas or fluid flow, or for determining velocity, displacement, rotation, or vibration of a solid surface, the vector velocimeter comprising a laser...... assembly for emission of a measurement beam for illumination of an object in a measurement volume with coherent light whereby a signal beam emanating from the object in the measurement volume is formed in response to illumination of the object by the measurement beam, a reference beam generator...

  17. Assessment of genetic and epigenetic changes in virus-free garlic (Allium sativum L.) plants obtained by meristem culture followed by in vitro propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimenez, Magalí Diana; Yañez-Santos, Anahí Mara; Paz, Rosalía Cristina; Quiroga, Mariana Paola; Marfil, Carlos Federico; Conci, Vilma Cecilia; García-Lampasona, Sandra Claudia

    2016-01-01

    This is the first report assessing epigenetic variation in garlic. High genetic and epigenetic polymorphism during in vitro culture was detected.Sequencing of MSAP fragments revealed homology with ESTs. Garlic (Allium sativum) is a worldwide crop of economic importance susceptible to viral infections that can cause significant yield losses. Meristem tissue culture is the most employed method to sanitize elite cultivars.Often the virus-free garlic plants obtained are multiplied in vitro (micro propagation). However, it was reported that micro-propagation frequently produces somaclonal variation at the phenotypic level, which is an undesirable trait when breeders are seeking to maintain varietal stability. We employed amplification fragment length polymorphism and methylation sensitive amplified polymorphism (MSAP) methodologies to assess genetic and epigenetic modifications in two culture systems: virus-free plants obtained by meristem culture followed by in vitro multiplication and field culture. Our results suggest that garlic exhibits genetic and epigenetic polymorphism under field growing conditions. However, during in vitro culture system both kinds of polymorphisms intensify indicating that this system induces somaclonal variation. Furthermore, while genetic changes accumulated along the time of in vitro culture, epigenetic polymorphism reached the major variation at 6 months and then stabilize, being demethylation and CG methylation the principal conversions.Cloning and sequencing differentially methylated MSAP fragments allowed us to identify coding and unknown sequences of A. sativum, including sequences belonging to LTR Gypsy retrotransposons. Together, our results highlight that main changes occur in the initial 6 months of micro propagation. For the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on epigenetic assessment in garlic.

  18. Shoot tip culture and thermotherapy for recovering virus-free plants of garlic Cultura de ápices caulinares e termoterapia na recuperação de plantas livres de vírus de alho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Carlos Torres

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available Garlic shoot tip culture associated with dry heat thermotherapy (cloves exposed to 37°C for 35 days were essential for recovering virus free plants of the cv Amarante. In this condition 70% of the explants developed in vitro and produced plants. A total of 77% of those plants was virus free when indexed by ISEM, which resulted in a final index of 54% of virus free plants from treated cloves. The percentage of regeneration decreased to 20% as the temperature increased up to 40°C. However 90% of those plants were virus free, leading to a final index of 18% virus free plants out of treated cloves.A cultura de ápices caulinares de alho, associada à termoterapia a seco (exposição dos bulbilhos a temperatura de 37°C, por um período de 35 dias foi essencial para recuperação de plantas livres de vírus das cultivar de alho Amarante. Nestas condições, 70% dos explantes inoculados se desenvolveram in vitro e produziram plantas, das quais 77% não apresentaram partículas virais quando indexadas por ISEM. Isto resulta em um índice de aproveitamento de 54% dos bulbilhos submetidos à termoterapia. O aumento da temperatura na termoterapia para 40°C reduziu a regeneração in vitro para 20%, e 90% dessas plantas estavam livres de vírus, com um índice final de aproveitamento de 18%.

  19. Single-Step Conversion of Cells to Retrovirus Vector Producers with Herpes Simplex Virus–Epstein-Barr Virus Hybrid Amplicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Camp, Sara M.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1999-01-01

    We report here on the development and characterization of a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-based vector system which takes advantage of the host range and retention properties of HSV–Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) hybrid amplicons to efficiently convert cells to retrovirus vector producer cells after single-step transduction. The retrovirus genes gag-pol and env (GPE) and retroviral vector sequences were modified to minimize sequence overlap and cloned into an HSV-EBV hybrid amplicon. Retrovirus expression cassettes were used to generate the HSV-EBV-retrovirus hybrid vectors, HERE and HERA, which code for the ecotropic and the amphotropic envelopes, respectively. Retrovirus vector sequences encoding lacZ were cloned downstream from the GPE expression unit. Transfection of 293T/17 cells with amplicon plasmids yielded retrovirus titers between 106 and 107 transducing units/ml, while infection of the same cells with amplicon vectors generated maximum titers 1 order of magnitude lower. Retrovirus titers were dependent on the extent of transduction by amplicon vectors for the same cell line, but different cell lines displayed varying capacities to produce retrovirus vectors even at the same transduction efficiencies. Infection of human and dog primary gliomas with this system resulted in the production of retrovirus vectors for more than 1 week and the long-term retention and increase in transgene activity over time in these cell populations. Although the efficiency of this system still has to be determined in vivo, many applications are foreseeable for this approach to gene delivery. PMID:10559361

  20. Use of tissue culture techniques for producing virus-free plant in garlic and their identification through real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşkın, Hatıra; Baktemur, Gökhan; Kurul, Mehmet; Büyükalaca, Saadet

    2013-01-01

    This study was performed for comparison of meristem culture technique with shoot tip culture technique for obtaining virus-free plant, comparison of micropropagation success of two different nutrient media, and determination of effectiveness of real-time PCR assay for the detection of viruses. Two different garlic species (Allium sativum and Allium tuncelianum) and two different nutrient media were used in this experiment. Results showed that Medium 2 was more successful compared to Medium 1 for both A. tuncelianum and A. sativum (Kastamonu garlic clone). In vitro plants obtained via meristem and shoot tip cultures were tested for determination of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) and leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV) through real-time PCR assay. In garlic plants propagated via meristem culture, we could not detect any virus. OYDV and LYSV viruses were detected in plants obtained via shoot tip culture. OYDV virus was observed in amount of 80% and 73% of tested plants for A. tuncelianum and A. sativum, respectively. LYSV virus was found in amount of 67% of tested plants of A. tuncelianum and in amount of 87% of tested plants of A. sativum in this study.

  1. Use of Tissue Culture Techniques for Producing Virus-Free Plant in Garlic and Their Identification through Real-Time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hatıra Taşkın

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed for comparison of meristem culture technique with shoot tip culture technique for obtaining virus-free plant, comparison of micropropagation success of two different nutrient media, and determination of effectiveness of real-time PCR assay for the detection of viruses. Two different garlic species (Allium sativum and Allium tuncelianum and two different nutrient media were used in this experiment. Results showed that Medium 2 was more successful compared to Medium 1 for both A. tuncelianum and A. sativum (Kastamonu garlic clone. In vitro plants obtained via meristem and shoot tip cultures were tested for determination of onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV and leek yellow stripe virus (LYSV through real-time PCR assay. In garlic plants propagated via meristem culture, we could not detect any virus. OYDV and LYSV viruses were detected in plants obtained via shoot tip culture. OYDV virus was observed in amount of 80% and 73% of tested plants for A. tuncelianum and A. sativum, respectively. LYSV virus was found in amount of 67% of tested plants of A. tuncelianum and in amount of 87% of tested plants of A. sativum in this study.

  2. El silenciamiento de la proteína priónica celular (PrPC mediante RNA de interferencia (siRNA reduce la infección por HSV-1 y HSV-2 en células SK-SY5Y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ortega-Soto

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Las encefalopatías espongiformes transmisibles (EETs son enfermedades neurodegenerativas fatales que afectan a humanos y ciertas especies animales. La hipótesis más aceptada indica que el agente infeccioso, denotado como prion y compuesto principalmente por la Proteína Priónica Scrapie (PrPSc, corresponde a una conformación anormal de una proteína codificada por el huésped denominada Proteína Priónica Celular (PrPC, cuya función es aún desconocida; sin embargo, la expresión ubicua de PrPC así como su elevado grado de conservación entre especies, sugieren un papel importante para esta proteína. En este trabajo se detectó a la PrPC en diferentes tipos celulares incluyendo un cultivo primario de células de peces (Tilapia, Oreochromis spp.. Además, basándonos en la secuencia de la PrPC humana, se diseñó un RNA de interferencia (siRNA con el fin de silenciar el gen PRNP en células neuronales SK-SY5Y. El siRNA diseñado inhibió la expresión de PrPC a lo largo de las 96 h post-transfección y las células silenciadas fueron menos susceptibles a la infección por HSV-1 y HSV-2, en comparación con células no transfectadas con el siRNA.

  3. Remission of invasive, cancer stem-like glioblastoma xenografts using lentiviral vector-mediated suicide gene therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter C Huszthy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Glioblastoma is the most frequent and most malignant primary brain tumor with a poor prognosis. The translation of therapeutic strategies for glioblastoma from the experimental phase into the clinic has been limited by insufficient animal models, which lack important features of human tumors. Lentiviral gene therapy is an attractive therapeutic option for human glioblastoma, which we validated in a clinically relevant animal model. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used a rodent xenograft model that recapitulates the invasive and angiogenic features of human glioblastoma to analyze the transduction pattern and therapeutic efficacy of lentiviral pseudotyped vectors. Both, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus glycoprotein (LCMV-GP and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G pseudotyped lentiviral vectors very efficiently transduced human glioblastoma cells in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, pseudotyped gammaretroviral vectors, similar to those evaluated for clinical therapy of glioblastoma, showed inefficient gene transfer in vitro and in vivo. Both pseudotyped lentiviral vectors transduced cancer stem-like cells characterized by their CD133-, nestin- and SOX2-expression, the ability to form spheroids in neural stem cell medium and to express astrocytic and neuronal differentiation markers under serum conditions. In a therapeutic approach using the suicide gene herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-1-tk fused to eGFP, both lentiviral vectors mediated a complete remission of solid tumors as seen on MRI resulting in a highly significant survival benefit (p<0.001 compared to control groups. In all recurrent tumors, surviving eGFP-positive tumor cells were found, advocating prodrug application for several cycles to even enhance and prolong the therapeutic effect. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, lentiviral pseudotyped vectors are promising candidates for gene therapy of glioma in patients. The inefficient gene delivery

  4. Detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus in its vector Frankliniella occidentalis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Giovanna; Roggero, Piero; Tavella, Luciana

    2003-04-01

    A method for rapid and reliable detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae) in its vector Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera Thripidae) would be a useful tool for studying the epidemiology of this virus. A RT-PCR method developed for this purpose is reported. The method was tested on thrips involved in laboratory transmission trials and on thrips collected in the field, whose capability to transmit TSWV was checked previously by leaf disk assays. The RT-PCR results were consistent with the results obtained by the leaf disk assays. Among thrips involved in laboratory experiments, 97% of the adults that transmitted TSWV were positive by RT-PCR; as did some non-transmitter adults reacted, whereas among field-collected thrips only the individuals able to transmit were positive by RT-PCR. In addition, healthy thrips were allowed to feed as adults on virus-infected leaves for 48 h, and then examined by RT-PCR immediately or after starving or feeding on virus-free plants for various times, to determine if virus ingested (but not transmissible) was also detectable. The virus was detectable immediately after the feed or within 12 and 24 h for individuals starved or fed on virus-free plants, respectively, but not after those periods. Thus, the method could detect rapidly and reliably the virus in vectors from the field, providing 24 h of starving to avoid positive RT-PCR results from thrips simply carrying the virus.

  5. VectorBase

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — VectorBase is a Bioinformatics Resource Center for invertebrate vectors. It is one of four Bioinformatics Resource Centers funded by NIAID to provide web-based...

  6. Custodial vector model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Becciolini, Diego; Franzosi, Diogo Buarque; Foadi, Roshan

    2015-01-01

    We analyze the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) phenomenology of heavy vector resonances with a $SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R$ spectral global symmetry. This symmetry partially protects the electroweak S-parameter from large contributions of the vector resonances. The resulting custodial vector model spectrum...

  7. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, Diana L.; Collins, Casey P.; Hocum, Jonah D.; Leap, David J.; Rae, Dustin T.; Trobridge, Grant D.

    2016-01-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34+ cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy. PMID:26715244

  8. Macro motion vector quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yoon Y.; Woods, John W.

    1995-04-01

    A new algorithm is developed for reducing the bit rate required for motion vectors. This algorithm is a generalization of block matching motion estimation in which the search region is represented as a codebook of motion vectors. The new algorithm, called macro motion vector quantization (MMVQ), generalized our earlier MVQ by coding a group of motion vectors. The codebook is a set of macro motion vectors which represent the block locations of the small neighboring blocks in the previous frame. We develop an interative design algorithm for the codebook. Our experiments show that the variances of displaced frame differences (DFDs) are reduced significantly compared to block matching algorithm (BMA) with the macroblock size.

  9. Antisense RNA directed to the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 mRNA from herpes simplex virus type 1 derived vectors is expressed in CaSki cells and downregulates E7 mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kari, Ilkka; Syrjänen, Stina; Johansson, Bo; Peri, Piritta; He, Bin; Roizman, Bernard; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2007-06-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to be the most important etiologic factor of cervical cancer. There is no HPV specific therapy available for treatment of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and its precursor lesions. The present study elucidates the potential to use herpes simplex virus (HSV) derived vectors for expression of antisense RNA to HPV -16 E7 oncogene. We have constructed replication competent, nonneuroinvasive HSV-1 vectors, deleted of the gamma134.5 gene. The vectors express RNA antisense to the first 100 nucleotides of the HPV-16 E7 gene. We assayed the ability of the antisense E7 vectors R5225 (tk-) and R5226 (tk+), to produce antisense RNA, as well as the consequent effects on E7 mRNA and protein levels in HPV-16 positive CaSki cells. Anti-E7 RNA was expressed by both constructs in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of HPV-16 E7 mRNA was downregulated effectively in CaSki cells infected with the tk- recombinant R5225 or with R5226. The tk+ recombinant R5226 was effective in downregulating E7 protein expression. We have shown that anti-E7 RNA expressed from an HSV vector could efficiently downregulate HPV-16 E7 mRNA and E7 protein expression in CaSki cells. We conclude that HSV vectors may become a useful tool for gene therapy of HPV infections.

  10. Antisense RNA directed to the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 mRNA from herpes simplex virus type 1 derived vectors is expressed in CaSki cells and downregulates E7 mRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Bo

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human papillomavirus (HPV infection is known to be the most important etiologic factor of cervical cancer. There is no HPV specific therapy available for treatment of invasive squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix and its precursor lesions. The present study elucidates the potential to use herpes simplex virus (HSV derived vectors for expression of antisense RNA to HPV -16 E7 oncogene. Results We have constructed replication competent, nonneuroinvasive HSV-1 vectors, deleted of the γ134.5 gene. The vectors express RNA antisense to the first 100 nucleotides of the HPV-16 E7 gene. We assayed the ability of the antisense E7 vectors R5225 (tk- and R5226 (tk+, to produce antisense RNA, as well as the consequent effects on E7 mRNA and protein levels in HPV-16 positive CaSki cells. Anti-E7 RNA was expressed by both constructs in a dose-dependent manner. Expression of HPV-16 E7 mRNA was downregulated effectively in CaSki cells infected with the tk- recombinant R5225 or with R5226. The tk+ recombinant R5226 was effective in downregulating E7 protein expression. Conclusion We have shown that anti-E7 RNA expressed from an HSV vector could efficiently downregulate HPV-16 E7 mRNA and E7 protein expression in CaSki cells. We conclude that HSV vectors may become a useful tool for gene therapy of HPV infections.

  11. Implicit Real Vector Automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-François Degbomont

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the symbolic representation of non-convex real polyhedra, i.e., sets of real vectors satisfying arbitrary Boolean combinations of linear constraints. We develop an original data structure for representing such sets, based on an implicit and concise encoding of a known structure, the Real Vector Automaton. The resulting formalism provides a canonical representation of polyhedra, is closed under Boolean operators, and admits an efficient decision procedure for testing the membership of a vector.

  12. Vectors and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Pettofrezzo, Anthony J

    2005-01-01

    Geared toward undergraduate students, this text illustrates the use of vectors as a mathematical tool in plane synthetic geometry, plane and spherical trigonometry, and analytic geometry of two- and three-dimensional space. Its rigorous development includes a complete treatment of the algebra of vectors in the first two chapters.Among the text's outstanding features are numbered definitions and theorems in the development of vector algebra, which appear in italics for easy reference. Most of the theorems include proofs, and coordinate position vectors receive an in-depth treatment. Key concept

  13. Vector mesons in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    One consequence of the chiral restoration is the mixing of parity partners. We look for a possible signature of the mixing of vector and axial vector mesons in heavy-ion collisions. We suggest an experimental method for its observation. The dynamical evolution of the heavy-ion collision is described by a transport equation of ...

  14. Vector mesons in matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    kfki.hu. Abstract. One consequence of the chiral restoration is the mixing of parity partners. We look for a possible signature of the mixing of vector and axial vector mesons in heavy- ion collisions. We suggest an experimental method for its ...

  15. Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    The two branches of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions...... or meromorphic (allowing poles as singularities) functions. There already exists a well-developed theory for iterative holomorphic dynamical systems, and successful relations found between iteration theory and flows of vector fields have been one of the main motivations for the recent interest in holomorphic...... vector fields. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  16. Vector SIMP dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Soo-Min; Hochberg, Yonit; Kuflik, Eric; Lee, Hyun Min; Mambrini, Yann; Murayama, Hitoshi; Pierre, Mathias

    2017-10-01

    Strongly Interacting Massive Particles (SIMPs) have recently been proposed as light thermal dark matter relics. Here we consider an explicit realization of the SIMP mechanism in the form of vector SIMPs arising from an SU(2) X hidden gauge theory, where the accidental custodial symmetry protects the stability of the dark matter. We propose several ways of equilibrating the dark and visible sectors in this setup. In particular, we show that a light dark Higgs portal can maintain thermal equilibrium between the two sectors, as can a massive dark vector portal with its generalized Chern-Simons couplings to the vector SIMPs, all while remaining consistent with experimental constraints.

  17. Vector Difference Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, W. A.; Schwalm, M. K.; Giona, M.

    1998-03-01

    Space is filled with triangulating graph \\calG to serve as a quadrature grid. A discrete analog of the theory of differential forms is constructed using the associated simplical complex. The role of a basis for Λ^p at a point is played by the set of (p+1) -simplices containing a given vertex. Vector difference operations analogous to div, grad and curl, together with corresponding vector identities and exact difference analogs of the Stokes-type theorems, are obtained in terms of the boundary partial and coboundary d. Difference versions of the full vector Maxwell electromagnetic equations are analyzed on a random structure.

  18. GAP Land Cover - Vector

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This vector dataset is a detailed (1-acre minimum), hierarchically organized vegetation cover map produced by computer classification of combined two-season pairs of...

  19. Tagged Vector Contour (TVC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — The Kansas Tagged Vector Contour (TVC) dataset consists of digitized contours from the 7.5 minute topographic quadrangle maps. Coverage for the state is incomplete....

  20. Syngeneic AAV pseudo-vectors potentiates full vector transduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    An excessive amount of empty capsids are generated during regular AAV vector production process. These pseudo-vectors often remain in final vectors used for animal studies or clinical trials. The potential effects of these pseudo-vectors on AAV transduction have been a major concern. In the current ...

  1. Vector and axial vector mesons at finite temperature

    OpenAIRE

    mallik, S.; Sarkar, Sourav

    2002-01-01

    We consider the thermal correlation functions of vector and axial-vector currents and evaluate corrections to the vector and axial-vector meson pole terms to one loop in chiral perturbation theory. As expected, the pole positions do not shift to leading order in temperature. But the residues decrease with temperature.

  2. A CGMMV genome-replicon vector with partial sequences of coat protein gene efficiently expresses GFP in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jailani, A Abdul Kader; Solanki, Vikas; Roy, Anirban; Sivasudha, T; Mandal, Bikash

    2017-04-02

    A highly infectious clone of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), a cucurbit-infecting tobamovirus was utilized for designing of gene expression vectors. Two versions of vector were examined for their efficacy in expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in Nicotiana benthamiana. When the GFP gene was inserted at the stop codon of coat protein (CP) gene of the CGMMV genome without any read-through codon, systemic expression of GFP, as well as virion formation and systemic symptoms expression were obtained in N. benthamiana. The qRT-PCR analysis showed 23 fold increase of GFP over actin at 10days post inoculation (dpi), which increased to 45 fold at 14dpi and thereafter the GFP expression was significantly declined. Further, we show that when the most of the CP sequence is deleted retaining only the first 105 nucleotides, the shortened vector containing GFP in frame of original CP open reading frame (ORF) resulted in 234 fold increase of GFP expression over actin at 5dpi in N. benthamiana without the formation of virions and disease symptoms. Our study demonstrated that a simple manipulation of CP gene in the CGMMV genome while preserving the translational frame of CP resulted in developing a virus-free, rapid and efficient foreign protein expression system in the plant. The CGMMV based vectors developed in this study may be potentially useful for the production of edible vaccines in cucurbits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Extended Mixed Vector Equilibrium Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijanur Rahaman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study extended mixed vector equilibrium problems, namely, extended weak mixed vector equilibrium problem and extended strong mixed vector equilibrium problem in Hausdorff topological vector spaces. Using generalized KKM-Fan theorem (Ben-El-Mechaiekh et al.; 2005, some existence results for both problems are proved in noncompact domain.

  4. Bunyavirus-Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate McElroy Horne

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Bunyaviridae family is comprised of more than 350 viruses, of which many within the Hantavirus, Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Tospovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are significant human or agricultural pathogens. The viruses within the Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, and Phlebovirus genera are transmitted by hematophagous arthropods, such as mosquitoes, midges, flies, and ticks, and their associated arthropods not only serve as vectors but also as virus reservoirs in many cases. This review presents an overview of several important emerging or re-emerging bunyaviruses and describes what is known about bunyavirus-vector interactions based on epidemiological, ultrastructural, and genetic studies of members of this virus family.

  5. Free topological vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriyelyan, Saak S.; Morris, Sidney A.

    2016-01-01

    We define and study the free topological vector space $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ over a Tychonoff space $X$. We prove that $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is a $k_\\omega$-space if and only if $X$ is a $k_\\omega$-space. If $X$ is infinite, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ contains a closed vector subspace which is topologically isomorphic to $\\mathbb{V}(\\mathbb{N})$. It is proved that if $X$ is a $k$-space, then $\\mathbb{V}(X)$ is locally convex if and only if $X$ is discrete and countable. If $X$ is a metrizable space it is shown ...

  6. Matrix vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenman, Richard L

    2005-01-01

    This outstanding text and reference applies matrix ideas to vector methods, using physical ideas to illustrate and motivate mathematical concepts but employing a mathematical continuity of development rather than a physical approach. The author, who taught at the U.S. Air Force Academy, dispenses with the artificial barrier between vectors and matrices--and more generally, between pure and applied mathematics.Motivated examples introduce each idea, with interpretations of physical, algebraic, and geometric contexts, in addition to generalizations to theorems that reflect the essential structur

  7. Scalar-vector bootstrap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rejon-Barrera, Fernando [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Amsterdam,Science Park 904, Postbus 94485, 1090 GL, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Robbins, Daniel [Department of Physics, Texas A& M University,TAMU 4242, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-01-22

    We work out all of the details required for implementation of the conformal bootstrap program applied to the four-point function of two scalars and two vectors in an abstract conformal field theory in arbitrary dimension. This includes a review of which tensor structures make appearances, a construction of the projectors onto the required mixed symmetry representations, and a computation of the conformal blocks for all possible operators which can be exchanged. These blocks are presented as differential operators acting upon the previously known scalar conformal blocks. Finally, we set up the bootstrap equations which implement crossing symmetry. Special attention is given to the case of conserved vectors, where several simplifications occur.

  8. Multithreading in vector processors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evangelinos, Constantinos; Kim, Changhoan; Nair, Ravi

    2018-01-16

    In one embodiment, a system includes a processor having a vector processing mode and a multithreading mode. The processor is configured to operate on one thread per cycle in the multithreading mode. The processor includes a program counter register having a plurality of program counters, and the program counter register is vectorized. Each program counter in the program counter register represents a distinct corresponding thread of a plurality of threads. The processor is configured to execute the plurality of threads by activating the plurality of program counters in a round robin cycle.

  9. Support Vector Components Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ree, Michiel; Roerdink, Johannes; Phillips, Christophe; Garraux, Gaetan; Salmon, Eric; Wiering, Marco

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we propose a novel method for learning a distance metric in the process of training Support Vector Machines (SVMs) with the radial basis function kernel. A transformation matrix is adapted in such a way that the SVM dual objective of a classification problem is optimized. By using a

  10. Sesquilinear uniform vector integral

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Bucharest, Bucharest,. Academiei Str., 14, 010014, Romania. 2Technical University of Civil ... an integral of scalar functions with respect to vector measures, Dunford and his school introduced the spectral operators, thus founding the present operator theory (see ...

  11. Orthogonalisation of Vectors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 5; Issue 3. Orthogonalisation of Vectors - Matrix Decomposition and Approximation Problems. Rajendra Bhatia. General Article Volume 5 ... Author Affiliations. Rajendra Bhatia1. Indian Statistical Institute 7, SJS Sansanwal Marg, New Delhi 110 016, India.

  12. Calculus with vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Treiman, Jay S

    2014-01-01

    Calculus with Vectors grew out of a strong need for a beginning calculus textbook for undergraduates who intend to pursue careers in STEM. fields. The approach introduces vector-valued functions from the start, emphasizing the connections between one-variable and multi-variable calculus. The text includes early vectors and early transcendentals and includes a rigorous but informal approach to vectors. Examples and focused applications are well presented along with an abundance of motivating exercises. All three-dimensional graphs have rotatable versions included as extra source materials and may be freely downloaded and manipulated with Maple Player; a free Maple Player App is available for the iPad on iTunes. The approaches taken to topics such as the derivation of the derivatives of sine and cosine, the approach to limits, and the use of "tables" of integration have been modified from the standards seen in other textbooks in order to maximize the ease with which students may comprehend the material. Additio...

  13. Vector-borne Infections

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-04-18

    This podcast discusses emerging vector-borne pathogens, their role as prominent contributors to emerging infectious diseases, how they're spread, and the ineffectiveness of mosquito control methods.  Created: 4/18/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 4/27/2011.

  14. Helices and vector bundles

    CERN Document Server

    Rudakov, A N

    1990-01-01

    This volume is devoted to the use of helices as a method for studying exceptional vector bundles, an important and natural concept in algebraic geometry. The work arises out of a series of seminars organised in Moscow by A. N. Rudakov. The first article sets up the general machinery, and later ones explore its use in various contexts. As to be expected, the approach is concrete; the theory is considered for quadrics, ruled surfaces, K3 surfaces and P3(C).

  15. Anisotropic vector Preisach particle

    CERN Document Server

    Fuezi, J

    2000-01-01

    The static 2D vector magnetic behaviour of an anisotropic silicon iron sheet is modelled by a particle which depicts its space-averaged behaviour. The magnitude of magnetization is governed by a classical Preisach operator with the projection of field strength on the magnetization direction as input. Its orientation is determined by the equilibrium between the field strength orientation and the anisotropy of the sheet.

  16. What is a vector?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Eric René; Booth, Mark; Norman, Rachel; Mideo, Nicole; McCallum, Hamish; Fenton, Andy

    2017-01-01

    Many important and rapidly emerging pathogens of humans, livestock and wildlife are ‘vector-borne’. However, the term ‘vector’ has been applied to diverse agents in a broad range of epidemiological systems. In this perspective, we briefly review some common definitions, identify the strengths and weaknesses of each and consider the functional differences between vectors and other hosts from a range of ecological, evolutionary and public health perspectives. We then consider how the use of designations can afford insights into our understanding of epidemiological and evolutionary processes that are not otherwise apparent. We conclude that from a medical and veterinary perspective, a combination of the ‘haematophagous arthropod’ and ‘mobility’ definitions is most useful because it offers important insights into contact structure and control and emphasizes the opportunities for pathogen shifts among taxonomically similar species with similar feeding modes and internal environments. From a population dynamics and evolutionary perspective, we suggest that a combination of the ‘micropredator’ and ‘sequential’ definition is most appropriate because it captures the key aspects of transmission biology and fitness consequences for the pathogen and vector itself. However, we explicitly recognize that the value of a definition always depends on the research question under study. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Opening the black box: re-examining the ecology and evolution of parasite transmission’. PMID:28289253

  17. Lentiviral Vector Mediated Transgenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Isabelle; Verp, Sonia; Offner, Sandra; Trono, Didier

    2011-03-01

    The genetic manipulation of rodents through the generation of fully transgenic animals or via the modification of selective cells or organs is a procedure of paramount importance for biomedical research, either to address fundamental questions or to develop preclinical models of human diseases. Lentiviral vectors occupy the front stage in this scene, as they can mediate the integration and stable expression of transgenes both in vitro and in vivo. Widely used to modify a variety of cells, including re-implantable somatic and embryonic stem cells, lentiviral vectors can also be directly administered in vivo, for instance in the brain. However, perhaps their most spectacular research application is in the generation of transgenic animals. Compared with the three-decade-old DNA pronuclear injection technique, lentivector-mediated transgenesis is simple, cheap, and highly efficient. Furthermore, it can take full advantage of the great diversity of lentiviral vectors developed for other applications, and thus allows for ubiquitous or tissue-specific or constitutive or externally controllable transgene expression, as well as RNAi-mediated gene knockdown. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 1:169-184. © 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  18. Propagating Gateway Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    Generating stocks of Entry and Destination vectors for use in the Gateway recombinatorial cloning system requires transforming them into Escherichia coli strain DB3.1, where they can replicate because this strain is immune to the effects of the ccdB gene carried in the Gateway cassette. However, mutations in the ccdB gene can arise at low frequency, and these mutant plasmids will consequently allow growth of standard cloning strains of E. coli (e.g., DH5α). Therefore, after making new stocks of Gateway plasmids, their ability to grow in cloning strains of E. coli must be tested. This involves obtaining multiple stocks of vector, each arising from a single plasmid grown in a single DB3.1 bacterial colony, and transforming each stock into both DB3.1 and the preferred cloning strain of E. coli in a controlled fashion. Only vector stocks that effectively kill the standard cloning strain (i.e., no or few colonies are obtained after transformation) should be used in Gateway cloning reactions. The sequence can be performed in 3 d. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. Suicide gene approach using a dual-expression lentiviral vector to enhance the safety of ex vivo gene therapy for bone repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaee, F; Sugiyama, O; Virk, M S; Tang, H; Drissi, H; Lichtler, A C; Lieberman, J R

    2014-02-01

    'Ex vivo' gene therapy using viral vectors to overexpress BMP-2 is shown to heal critical-sized bone defects in experimental animals. To increase its safety, we constructed a dual-expression lentiviral vector to overexpress BMP-2 or luciferase and an HSV1-tk analog, Δtk (LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2/Luc). We hypothesized that administering ganciclovir (GCV) will eliminate the transduced cells at the site of implantation. The vector-induced expression of BMP-2 and luciferase in a mouse stromal cell line (W-20-17 cells) and mouse bone marrow cells (MBMCs) was reduced by 50% compared with the single-gene vector. W-20-17 cells were more sensitive to GCV compared with MBMCs (90-95% cell death at 12 days with GCV at 1 μg ml(-1) in MBMCs vs 90-95% cell death at 5 days by 0.1 μg ml(-1) of GCV in W-20-17 cells). Implantation of LV-Δtk-T2A-BMP-2 transduced MBMCs healed a 2 mm femoral defect at 4 weeks. Early GCV treatment (days 0-14) postoperatively blocked bone formation confirming a biologic response. Delayed GCV treatment starting at day 14 for 2 or 4 weeks reduced the luciferase signal from LV-Δtk-T2A-Luc-transduced MBMCs, but the signal was not completely eliminated. These data suggest that this suicide gene strategy has potential for clinical use in the future, but will need to be optimized for increased efficiency.

  20. Comparison of the capability of GDNF, BDNF, or both, to protect nigrostriatal neurons in a rat model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Kong, Lingxin; Wang, Xiaodan; Lu, Xiu-gui; Gao, Qingsheng; Geller, Alfred I

    2005-08-09

    Both glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can protect nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from neurotoxins in rodent and monkey models of Parkinson's disease (PD). These two neurotrophic factors are usually tested individually. This study was designed to compare GDNF, BDNF, or both, for their capabilities to correct behavioral deficits and protect nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of PD. Gene transfer used a helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vector system and a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons. Rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of HSV-1 vectors that express either GDNF or BDNF, or both vectors, followed by intrastriatal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Recombinant GDNF or BDNF was detected in striatal neurons in rats sacrificed at 7 months after gene transfer. Of note, GDNF was significantly more effective than BDNF for both correcting behavioral deficits and protecting nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Expression of both neurotrophic factors was no more effective than expression of only GDNF. These results suggest that GDNF is more effective than BDNF for correcting the rat model of PD, and that there are no detectable benefits from expressing both of these neurotrophic factors.

  1. Comparison of the capability of GDNF, BDNF, or both, to protect nigrostriatal neurons in a rat model of Parkinson’s disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mei; Kong, Lingxin; Wang, Xiaodan; Lu, Xiu-gui; Gao, Qingsheng; Geller, Alfred I.

    2006-01-01

    Both glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) can protect nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from neurotoxins in rodent and monkey models of Parkinson’s disease (PD). These two neurotrophic factors are usually tested individually. This study was designed to compare GDNF, BDNF, or both, for their capabilities to correct behavioral deficits and protect nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons in a rat model of PD. Gene transfer used a helper virus-free Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) vector system and a modified neurofilament heavy gene promoter that supports long-term expression in forebrain neurons. Rats received unilateral intrastriatal injections of HSV-1 vectors that express either GDNF or BDNF, or both vectors, followed by intrastriatal injections of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). Recombinant GDNF or BDNF was detected in striatal neurons in rats sacrificed at 7 months after gene transfer. Of note, GDNF was significantly more effective than BDNF for both correcting behavioral deficits and protecting nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons. Expression of both neurotrophic factors was no more effective than expression of only GDNF. These results suggest that GDNF is more effective than BDNF for correcting the rat model of PD, and that there are no detectable benefits from expressing both of these neurotrophic factors. PMID:16018990

  2. Scalar - vector soliton fiber lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Zhichao; Li, Lei; Luo, Yiyang; Tang, Dingyuan; Shen, Deyuan; Tang, Ming; Fu, Songnian; Zhao, Luming

    2016-01-01

    Rapid progress in passively mode-locked fiber lasers is currently driven by the recent discovery of vector feature of mode-locking pulses, namely, the group velocity-locked vector solitons, the phase locked vector solitons, and the high-order vector solitons. Those vector solitons are fundamentally different from the previously known scalar solitons. Here, we report a fiber laser where the mode-locked pulse evolves as a vector soliton in the strong birefringent segment and is transformed into a regular scalar soliton after the polarizer within the laser cavity. The existence of solutions in a polarization-dependent cavity comprising a periodic combination of two distinct nonlinear waves is novel and likely to be applicable to various other nonlinear systems. For very large local birefringence, our laser approaches the working regime of vector soliton lasers, while it approaches scalar soliton fiber lasers under the conditions of very small birefringence.

  3. Scalar and vector Galileons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Yeinzon; Navarro, Andrés A.

    2017-03-01

    An alternative for the construction of fundamental theories is the introduction of Galileons. These are fields whose action leads to non higher than second-order equations of motion. As this is a necessary but not sufficient condition to make the Hamiltonian bounded from below, as long as the action is not degenerate, the Galileon construction is a way to avoid pathologies both at the classical and quantum levels. Galileon actions are, therefore, of great interest in many branches of physics, specially in high energy physics and cosmology. This proceedings contribution presents the generalities of the construction of both scalar and vector Galileons following two different but complimentary routes.

  4. Architecture and Vector Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Seidlein, Lorenz; Knols, Bart GJ; Kirby, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    of vector-borne diseases have no access to electricity. Many houses in the hot, humid regions of Asia have adapted to the environment, they are built of porous materials and are elevated on stilts features which allow a comfortable climate even in the presence of bednets and screens. In contrast, many...... buildings in Africa and Asia in respect to their indoor climate characteristics and finally, show how state-of-the-art 3D modelling can predict climate characteristics and help to optimize buildings....

  5. Vector wave propagation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fertig, M; Brenner, K-H

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we extend the scalar wave propagation method (WPM) to vector fields. The WPM [Appl. Opt.32, 4984 (1993)] was introduced in order to overcome the major limitations of the beam propagation method (BPM). With the WPM, the range of application can be extended from the simulation of waveguides to simulation of other optical elements like lenses, prisms and gratings. In that reference it was demonstrated that the wave propagation scheme provides valid results for propagation angles up to 85 degrees and that it is not limited to small index variations in the axis of propagation. Here, we extend the WPM to three-dimensional vectorial fields (VWPMs) by considering the polarization dependent Fresnel coefficients for transmission in each propagation step. The continuity of the electric field is maintained in all three dimensions by an enhanced propagation vector and the transfer matrix. We verify the validity of the method by transmission through a prism and by comparison with the focal distribution from vectorial Debye theory. Furthermore, a two-dimensional grating is simulated and compared with the results from three-dimensional RCWA. Especially for 3D problems, the runtime of the VWPM exhibits special advantage over the RCWA.

  6. "Analytical" vector-functions I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Vladimir Todorov

    2017-12-01

    In this note we try to give a new (or different) approach to the investigation of analytical vector functions. More precisely a notion of a power xn; n ∈ ℕ+ of a vector x ∈ ℝ3 is introduced which allows to define an "analytical" function f : ℝ3 → ℝ3. Let furthermore f (ξ )= ∑n =0 ∞ anξn be an analytical function of the real variable ξ. Here we replace the power ξn of the number ξ with the power of a vector x ∈ ℝ3 to obtain a vector "power series" f (x )= ∑n =0 ∞ anxn . We research some properties of the vector series as well as some applications of this idea. Note that an "analytical" vector function does not depend of any basis, which may be used in research into some problems in physics.

  7. Optimality Conditions in Vector Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Jiménez, Manuel Arana; Lizana, Antonio Rufián

    2011-01-01

    Vector optimization is continuously needed in several science fields, particularly in economy, business, engineering, physics and mathematics. The evolution of these fields depends, in part, on the improvements in vector optimization in mathematical programming. The aim of this Ebook is to present the latest developments in vector optimization. The contributions have been written by some of the most eminent researchers in this field of mathematical programming. The Ebook is considered essential for researchers and students in this field.

  8. Estimation of vector velocity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Using a pulsed ultrasound field, the two-dimensional velocity vector can be determined with the invention. The method uses a transversally modulated ultrasound field for probing the moving medium under investigation. A modified autocorrelation approach is used in the velocity estimation. The new...... estimator automatically compensates for the axial velocity, when determining the transverse velocity by using fourth order moments rather than second order moments. The estimation is optimized by using a lag different from one in the estimation process, and noise artifacts are reduced by using averaging...... of RF samples. Further, compensation for the axial velocity can be introduced, and the velocity estimation is done at a fixed depth in tissue to reduce spatial velocity dispersion....

  9. Multistage vector (MSV) therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfram, Joy; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    One of the greatest challenges in the field of medicine is obtaining controlled distribution of systemically administered therapeutic agents within the body. Indeed, biological barriers such as physical compartmentalization, pressure gradients, and excretion pathways adversely affect localized delivery of drugs to pathological tissue. The diverse nature of these barriers requires the use of multifunctional drug delivery vehicles that can overcome a wide range of sequential obstacles. In this review, we explore the role of multifunctionality in nanomedicine by primarily focusing on multistage vectors (MSVs). The MSV is an example of a promising therapeutic platform that incorporates several components, including a microparticle, nanoparticles, and small molecules. In particular, these components are activated in a sequential manner in order to successively address transport barriers. PMID:26264836

  10. Vector-Tensor and Vector-Vector Decay Amplitude Analysis of B0->phi K*0

    CERN Document Server

    Aubert, B; Abrams, G S; Adye, T; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Albert, J; Aleksan, R; Allen, M T; Allison, J; Altenburg, D D; Andreotti, M; Angelini, C; Anulli, F; Arnaud, N; Asgeirsson, D J; Aston, D; Azzolini, V; Baak, M A; Back, J J; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Band, H R; Banerjee, Sw; Bard, D J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Barrett, M; Bartoldus, R; Batignani, G; Battaglia, M; Bauer, J M; Bechtle, P; Beck, T W; Behera, P K; Bellini, F; Benayoun, M; Benelli, G; Berger, N; Bernard, D; Berryhill, J W; Best, D S; Bettarini, S; Bettoni, D; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bhuyan, B; Bianchi, F; Biasini, M; Biesiada, J; Blanc, F; Blaylock, G; Blinov, V E; Bloom, P C; Blount, N L; Bomben, M; Bondioli, M; Bonneaud, G R; Bosisio, L; Boutigny, D; Bowerman, D A; Boyd, J T; Bozzi, C; Brandenburg, G; Brandt, T; Brau, J E; Briand, H; Brown, C M; Brown, D N; Bruinsma, M; Brunet, S; Bucci, F; Buchanan, C; Bugg, W; Bukin, A D; Bula, R; Burchat, P R; Burke, J P; Button-Shafer, J; Buzzo, A; Bóna, M; Cahn, R N; Calabrese, R; Calcaterra, A; Calderini, G; Campagnari, C; Carpinelli, M; Cartaro, C; Cavallo, N; Cavoto, G; Cenci, R; Chai, X; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Chao, M; Charles, E; Charles, M J; Chauveau, J; Chavez, C A; Chen, A; Chen, C; Chen, E; Chen, J C; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, X R; Cheng, B; Cheng, C H; Chia, Y M; Cibinetto, G; Clark, P J; Clarke, C K; Claus, R; Cochran, J; Coleman, J P; Contri, R; Convery, M R; Corwin, L A; Cossutti, F; Cottingham, W N; Couderc, F; Covarelli, R; Cowan, G; Cowan, R; Crawley, H B; Cremaldi, L; Cunha, A; Curry, S; Côté, D; D'Orazio, A; Dahmes, B; Dallapiccola, C; Danielson, N; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Dauncey, P D; David, P; Davier, M; Davis, C L; De Nardo, Gallieno; De Sangro, R; Del Amo-Sánchez, P; Del Buono, L; Del Re, D; Della Ricca, G; Denig, A G; Di Lodovico, F; Di Marco, E; Dingfelder, J C; Dittongo, S; Dong, L; Dorfan, J; Druzhinin, V P; Dubitzky, R S; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W M; Dvoretskii, A; Ebert, M; Eckhart, E A; Eckmann, R; Edgar, C L; Edwards, A J; Egede, U; Eigen, G; Eisner, A M; Elmer, P; Emery, S; Ernst, J A; Eschenburg, V; Eschrich, I; Eyges, V; Fabozzi, F; Faccini, R; Fang, F; Feltresi, E; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Field, R C; Finocchiaro, G; Flacco, C J; Flack, R L; Flächer, H U; Flood, K T; Ford, K E; Ford, W T; Forster, I J; Forti, F; Fortin, D; Foulkes, S D; Franek, B; Frey, R; Fritsch, M; Fry, J R; Fulsom, B G; Gabathuler, E; Gaidot, A; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Gamet, R; Gan, K K; Ganzhur, S F; Gao, Y; Gary, J W; Gaspero, M; Gatto, C; Gaz, A; George, K A; Gill, M S; Giorgi, M A; Gladney, L; Glanzman, T; Godang, R; Golubev, V B; Gowdy, S J; Gradl, W; Graham, M T; Graugès-Pous, E; Grenier, P; Gritsan, A V; Grosdidier, G; Groysman, Y; Guo, Z J; Hadavand, H K; Haire, M; Halyo, V; Hamano, K; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Hamon, O; Harrison, P F; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hartfiel, B L; Hast, C; Hauke, A; Hawkes, C M; Hearty, C; Held, T; Hertzbach, S S; Heusch, C A; Hill, E J; Hirschauer, J F; Hitlin, D G; Hollar, J J; Hong, T M; Honscheid, K; Hopkins, D A; Hrynóva, T; Hufnagel, D; Hulsbergen, W D; Hutchcroft, D E; Höcker, A; Igonkina, O; Innes, W R; Izen, J M; Jackson, P D; Jackson, P S; Jacobsen, R G; Jain, V; Jasper, H; Jawahery, A; Jessop, C P; Judd, D; Kadyk, J A; Kagan, H; Karyotakis, Yu; Kass, R; Kelsey, M H; Kerth, L T; Khan, A; Kim, H; Kim, P; Kirkby, D; Klose, V; Knecht, N S; Koch, H; Kolb, J A; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kovalskyi, D; Kowalewski, R V; Kozanecki, Witold; Kreisel, A; Krishnamurthy, M; Kroeger, R; Kroseberg, J; Kukartsev, G; Kutter, P E; Kyberd, P; La Vaissière, C de; Lacker, H M; Lae, C K; Lafferty, G D; Lanceri, L; Lange, D J; Lankford, A J; Latham, T E; Latour, E; Lau, Y P; Lazzaro, A; Le Diberder, F R; Lee, C L; Lees, J P; Legendre, M; Leith, D W G S; Lepeltier, V; Leruste, P; Lewandowski, B; Li Gioi, L; Li, S; Li, X; Lista, L; Liu, H; Lo Vetere, M; LoSecco, J M; Lockman, W S; Lombardo, V; Long, O; Lopes-Pegna, D; Lopez-March, N; Lou, X C; Lu, M; Luitz, S; Lund, P; Luppi, E; Lusiani, A; Lutz, A M; Lynch, G; Lynch, H L; Lü, C; Lüth, V; MacFarlane, D B; Macri, M M; Mader, W F; Majewski, S A; Malcles, J; Mallik, U; Mancinelli, G; Mandelkern, M A; Marchiori, G; Margoni, M; Marks, J; Marsiske, H; Martínez-Vidal, F; Mattison, T S; Mazur, M A; Mazzoni, M A; McKenna, J A; McMahon, T R; Mclachlin, S E; Meadows, B T; Mellado, B; Menges, W; Merkel, J; Messner, R; Meyer, N T; Meyer, W T; Mihályi, A; Mir, L M; Mishra, K; Mohanty, G B; Monge, M R; Monorchio, D; Moore, T B; Morandin, M; Morganti, M; Morganti, S; Morii, M; Muheim, F; Müller, D R; Nagel, M; Naisbit, M T; Narsky, I; Nash, J A; Nauenberg, U; Neal, H; Negrini, M; Neri, N; Nesom, G; Nicholson, H; Nikolich, M B; Nogowski, R; Nugent, I M; O'Grady, C P; Ocariz, J; Ofte, I; Olaiya, E O; Olivas, A; Olsen, J; Onuchin, A P; Orimoto, T J; Oyanguren, A; Ozcan, V E; Paar, H P; Pacetti, S; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Pan, B; Pan, Y; Panduro, W; Paoloni, E; Paolucci, P; Pappagallo, M; Park, W; Passaggio, S; Patel, P M; Patrignani, C; Patteri, P; Payne, D J; Pelizaeus, M; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Peruzzi, I M; Peters, K; Petersen, B A; Petrella, A; Petzold, A; Piatenko, T; Piccolo, D; Piccolo, M; Piemontese, L; Pierini, M; Piredda, G; Playfer, S; Poireau, V; Polci, F; Pompili, A; Porter, F C; Posocco, M; Potter, C T; Prell, S; Prencipe, E; Prepost, R; Pripstein, M; Pruvot, S; Pulliam, T; Purohit, M V; Qi, N D; Rahatlou, S; Rahimi, A M; Rahmat, R; Rama, M; Ratcliff, B N; Raven, G; Regensburger, J J; Ricciardi, S; Richman, J D; Ritchie, J L; Rizzo, G; Roberts, D A; Robertson, A I; Robertson, S H; Robutti, E; Rodier, S; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Roney, J M; Rong, G; Roodman, A; Roos, L; Rosenberg, E I; Rotondo, M; Roudeau, P; Rubin, A E; Ruddick, W O; Röthel, W; Sacco, R; Saeed, M A; Safai-Tehrani, F; Saleem, M; Salnikov, A A; Salvatore, F; Sanders, D A; Santroni, A; Saremi, S; Satpathy, A; Schalk, T; Schenk, S; Schilling, C J; Schindler, R H; Schofield, K C; Schott, G; Schröder, T; Schröder, H; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schumm, B A; Schune, M H; Schwiening, J; Schwierz, R; Schwitters, R F; Sciacca, C; Sciolla, G; Seiden, A; Sekula, S J; Serednyakov, S I; Serrano, J; Sharma, V; Shen, B C; Sherwood, D J; Simard, M; Simi, G; Simonetto, F; Sinev, N B; Skovpen, Yu I; Smith, A J S; Smith, J G; Snoek, H L; Snyder, A; Sobie, R J; Soffer, A; Sokoloff, M D; Solodov, E P; Spaan, B; Spanier, S M; Spitznagel, M; Spradlin, P; Steinke, M; Stelzer, J; Stocchi, A; Stoker, D P; Stroili, R; Strom, D; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stängle, H; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Summers, D J; Sundermann, J E; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Taras, P; Taylor, F; Telnov, A V; Teodorescu, L; Ter-Antonian, R; Therin, G; Thiebaux, C; Thompson, J M; Tisserand, V; Todyshev, Y K; Toki, W H; Torrence, E; Tosi, S; Touramanis, C; Ulmer, K A; Uwer, U; Van Bakel, N; Vasseur, G; Vavra, J; Vazquez, A; Verderi, M; Viaud, F B; Vitale, L; Voci, C; Voena, C; Volk, A; Wagner, A P; Wagner, S R; Wagoner, D E; Waldi, R; Walker, D; Walsh, J J; Wang, K; Wang, P; Wang, W F; Wappler, F R; Watson, A T; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wenzel, W A; Wilden, L; Williams, D C; Williams, J C; Wilson, F F; Wilson, J R; Wilson, M G; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wong, Q K; Wormser, G; Wren, A C; Wright, D H; Wright, D M; Wu, J; Wu, S L; Wulsin, H W; Xie, Y; Yamamoto, R K; Yarritu, A K; Ye, S; Yi, J I; Yi, K; Young, C C; Yu, Z; Yéche, C; Zain, S B; Zallo, A; Zeng, Q; Zghiche, A; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhao, H W; Zhu, Y S; Ziegler, V; Zito, M; Çuhadar-Dönszelmann, T; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We perform an amplitude analysis of the decays B0->phi K^*_2(1430)0, phi K^*(892)0, and phi(K pi)^0_S-wave with a sample of about 384 million BBbar pairs recorded with the BABAR detector. The fractions of longitudinal polarization f_L of the vector-tensor and vector-vector decay modes are measured to be 0.853 +0.061-0.069 +-0.036 and 0.506 +-0.040 +-0.015, respectively. Overall, twelve parameters are measured for the vector-vector decay and seven parameters for the vector-tensor decay, including the branching fractions and parameters sensitive to CP-violation.

  11. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinnaraja, C; Viswanathan, R

    2015-12-01

    Yellow leaf caused by Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) is a serious constraint to sugarcane production in India and currently the disease epidemics occur on many of the susceptible varieties under field conditions. Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032 with viruliferous aphids. Virus transmission was confirmed through RT-PCR assays and subsequently SCYLV population was established through RT-qPCR. A maximum of 22.3 × 10(3), 3.16 × 10(6) and 4.78 × 10(6) copies of SCYLV-RNA targets were recorded in the plants after 7, 180 and 300 days, respectively. This study showed that the aphid species M. sacchari acts as an effective vector of SCYLV. The relative standard curve method in RT-qPCR efficiently detected the increment in SCYLV copy numbers in sugarcane following transmission through M. sacchari.

  12. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    Although retroviral vector systems have been found to efficiently transduce a variety of cell types in vitro, the use of vectors based on murine leukemia virus in preclinical models of somatic gene therapy has led to the identification of transcriptional silencing in vivo as an important problem...

  13. On the Witt vector Frobenius

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Christopher James; Kedlaya, Kiran

    2014-01-01

    We study the kernel and cokernel of the Frobenius map on the p-typical Witt vectors of a commutative ring, not necessarily of characteristic p. We give many equivalent conditions to surjectivity of the Frobenius map on both finite and infinite length Witt vectors. In particular, surjectivity on f...

  14. Estimation of Motion Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to the estimation of 2-D motion vector fields from time varying image sequences. We use a piecewise smooth model based on coupled vector/binary Markov random fields. We find the maximum a posteriori solution by simulated annealing. The algorithm generate sample...

  15. Vectors on the Basketball Court

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergman, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    An Idea Bank published in the April/May 2009 issue of "The Science Teacher" describes an experiential physics lesson on vectors and vector addition (Brown 2009). Like its football predecessor, the basketball-based investigation presented in this Idea Bank addresses National Science Education Standards Content B, Physical Science, 9-12 (NRC 1996)…

  16. The Neural Support Vector Machine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; van der Ree, Michiel; Embrechts, Mark; Stollenga, Marijn; Meijster, Arnold; Nolte, A; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a new machine learning algorithm for regression and dimensionality reduction tasks. The Neural Support Vector Machine (NSVM) is a hybrid learning algorithm consisting of neural networks and support vector machines (SVMs). The output of the NSVM is given by SVMs that take a

  17. GPU Accelerated Vector Median Filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aras, Rifat; Shen, Yuzhong

    2011-01-01

    Noise reduction is an important step for most image processing tasks. For three channel color images, a widely used technique is vector median filter in which color values of pixels are treated as 3-component vectors. Vector median filters are computationally expensive; for a window size of n x n, each of the n(sup 2) vectors has to be compared with other n(sup 2) - 1 vectors in distances. General purpose computation on graphics processing units (GPUs) is the paradigm of utilizing high-performance many-core GPU architectures for computation tasks that are normally handled by CPUs. In this work. NVIDIA's Compute Unified Device Architecture (CUDA) paradigm is used to accelerate vector median filtering. which has to the best of our knowledge never been done before. The performance of GPU accelerated vector median filter is compared to that of the CPU and MPI-based versions for different image and window sizes, Initial findings of the study showed 100x improvement of performance of vector median filter implementation on GPUs over CPU implementations and further speed-up is expected after more extensive optimizations of the GPU algorithm .

  18. Emerging vector borne diseases – incidence through vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara eSavic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowdays, in intercontinetal countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and popultion of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveilance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, erlichiosis, leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fudamental role at primeraly prevention and then treatment of vector borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases.During a four year period, from 2009-2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analysed for vector borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, erlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis in routine laboratory work. The analysis were done by serological tests – ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis and blood smear for babesiosis, erlichiosis and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on avarege more then half of the samples

  19. Stable piecewise polynomial vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio Pessoa

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Let $N={y>0}$ and $S={y<0}$ be the semi-planes of $mathbb{R}^2$ having as common boundary the line $D={y=0}$. Let $X$ and $Y$ be polynomial vector fields defined in $N$ and $S$, respectively, leading to a discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector field $Z=(X,Y$. This work pursues the stability and the transition analysis of solutions of $Z$ between $N$ and $S$, started by Filippov (1988 and Kozlova (1984 and reformulated by Sotomayor-Teixeira (1995 in terms of the regularization method. This method consists in analyzing a one parameter family of continuous vector fields $Z_{epsilon}$, defined by averaging $X$ and $Y$. This family approaches $Z$ when the parameter goes to zero. The results of Sotomayor-Teixeira and Sotomayor-Machado (2002 providing conditions on $(X,Y$ for the regularized vector fields to be structurally stable on planar compact connected regions are extended to discontinuous piecewise polynomial vector fields on $mathbb{R}^2$. Pertinent genericity results for vector fields satisfying the above stability conditions are also extended to the present case. A procedure for the study of discontinuous piecewise vector fields at infinity through a compactification is proposed here.

  20. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lark L. Coffey

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed.

  1. Chikungunya Virus–Vector Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L.; Failloux, Anna-Bella; Weaver, Scott C.

    2014-01-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that causes chikungunya fever, a severe, debilitating disease that often produces chronic arthralgia. Since 2004, CHIKV has emerged in Africa, Indian Ocean islands, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, causing millions of human infections. Central to understanding CHIKV emergence is knowledge of the natural ecology of transmission and vector infection dynamics. This review presents current understanding of CHIKV infection dynamics in mosquito vectors and its relationship to human disease emergence. The following topics are reviewed: CHIKV infection and vector life history traits including transmission cycles, genetic origins, distribution, emergence and spread, dispersal, vector competence, vector immunity and microbial interactions, and co-infection by CHIKV and other arboviruses. The genetics of vector susceptibility and host range changes, population heterogeneity and selection for the fittest viral genomes, dual host cycling and its impact on CHIKV adaptation, viral bottlenecks and intrahost diversity, and adaptive constraints on CHIKV evolution are also discussed. The potential for CHIKV re-emergence and expansion into new areas and prospects for prevention via vector control are also briefly reviewed. PMID:25421891

  2. Emerging Vector-Borne Diseases - Incidence through Vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savić, Sara; Vidić, Branka; Grgić, Zivoslav; Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Spasojevic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases use to be a major public health concern only in tropical and subtropical areas, but today they are an emerging threat for the continental and developed countries also. Nowadays, in intercontinental countries, there is a struggle with emerging diseases, which have found their way to appear through vectors. Vector-borne zoonotic diseases occur when vectors, animal hosts, climate conditions, pathogens, and susceptible human population exist at the same time, at the same place. Global climate change is predicted to lead to an increase in vector-borne infectious diseases and disease outbreaks. It could affect the range and population of pathogens, host and vectors, transmission season, etc. Reliable surveillance for diseases that are most likely to emerge is required. Canine vector-borne diseases represent a complex group of diseases including anaplasmosis, babesiosis, bartonellosis, borreliosis, dirofilariosis, ehrlichiosis, and leishmaniosis. Some of these diseases cause serious clinical symptoms in dogs and some of them have a zoonotic potential with an effect to public health. It is expected from veterinarians in coordination with medical doctors to play a fundamental role at primarily prevention and then treatment of vector-borne diseases in dogs. The One Health concept has to be integrated into the struggle against emerging diseases. During a 4-year period, from 2009 to 2013, a total number of 551 dog samples were analyzed for vector-borne diseases (borreliosis, babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis) in routine laboratory work. The analysis was done by serological tests - ELISA for borreliosis, dirofilariosis, and leishmaniasis, modified Knott test for dirofilariosis, and blood smear for babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, and anaplasmosis. This number of samples represented 75% of total number of samples that were sent for analysis for different diseases in dogs. Annually, on average more then half of the samples

  3. Vector control of induction machines

    CERN Document Server

    Robyns, Benoit

    2012-01-01

    After a brief introduction to the main law of physics and fundamental concepts inherent in electromechanical conversion, ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" introduces the standard mathematical models for induction machines - whichever rotor technology is used - as well as several squirrel-cage induction machine vector-control strategies. The use of causal ordering graphs allows systematization of the design stage, as well as standardization of the structure of control devices. ""Vector Control of Induction Machines"" suggests a unique approach aimed at reducing parameter sensitivity for

  4. Vector boson scattering at CLIC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilian, Wolfgang; Fleper, Christian [Department Physik, Universitaet Siegen, 57068 Siegen (Germany); Reuter, Juergen [DESY Theory Group, 22603 Hamburg (Germany); Sekulla, Marco [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Linear colliders operating in a range of multiple TeV are able to investigate the details of vector boson scattering and electroweak symmetry breaking. We calculate cross sections with the Monte Carlo generator WHIZARD for vector boson scattering processes at the future linear e{sup +} e{sup -} collider CLIC. By finding suitable cuts, the vector boson scattering signal processes are isolated from the background. Finally, we are able to determine exclusion sensitivities on the non-Standard Model parameters of the relevant dimension eight operators.

  5. Vector independent transmission of the vector-borne bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sluijs, Mirjam Tineke Willemijn; de Smit, Abraham J; Moormann, Rob J M

    2016-01-01

    Bluetongue is an economically important disease of ruminants. The causative agent, Bluetongue virus (BTV), is mainly transmitted by insect vectors. This review focuses on vector-free BTV transmission, and its epizootic and economic consequences. Vector-free transmission can either be vertical, from dam to fetus, or horizontal via direct contract. For several BTV-serotypes, vertical (transplacental) transmission has been described, resulting in severe congenital malformations. Transplacental transmission had been mainly associated with live vaccine strains. Yet, the European BTV-8 strain demonstrated a high incidence of transplacental transmission in natural circumstances. The relevance of transplacental transmission for the epizootiology is considered limited, especially in enzootic areas. However, transplacental transmission can have a substantial economic impact due to the loss of progeny. Inactivated vaccines have demonstrated to prevent transplacental transmission. Vector-free horizontal transmission has also been demonstrated. Since direct horizontal transmission requires close contact of animals, it is considered only relevant for within-farm spreading of BTV. The genetic determinants which enable vector-free transmission are present in virus strains circulating in the field. More research into the genetic changes which enable vector-free transmission is essential to better evaluate the risks associated with outbreaks of new BTV serotypes and to design more appropriate control measures.

  6. Introduction to matrices and vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Schwartz, Jacob T

    2001-01-01

    In this concise undergraduate text, the first three chapters present the basics of matrices - in later chapters the author shows how to use vectors and matrices to solve systems of linear equations. 1961 edition.

  7. All optical vector magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I research project will investigate a novel method of operating an atomic magnetometer to simultaneously measure total magnetic fields and vector magnetic...

  8. GRE Enzymes for Vector Analysis

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Microbial enzyme data that were collected during the 2004-2006 EMAP-GRE program. These data were then used by Moorhead et al (2016) in their ecoenzyme vector...

  9. A Note on Vector Bimeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-11-01

    Phrases: N/A ] 19 RCT lontilue on revrm if necozsary and identify by block number) •"SA Fubini type theorem is obtained for vector bimasure integrals...Abstract A Fubini type theorem is obtained for vector bimeasure integrals. AMS (1980) subject classification: Primary 28B05; Secondary 60G12...Ylinen [11]. In the works mentioned above the authors consistently impose, in their definition of integrability. a Fubini type condition which cannot

  10. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chinnaraja, C; Viswanathan, R

    2015-01-01

    .... Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032...

  11. VectorBase: a home for invertebrate vectors of human pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Daniel; Arensburger, Peter; Atkinson, Peter; Besansky, Nora J.; Bruggner, Robert V.; Butler, Ryan; Campbell, Kathryn S.; Christophides, George K.; Christley, Scott; Dialynas, Emmanuel; Emmert, David; Hammond, Martin; Hill, Catherine A.; Kennedy, Ryan C.; Lobo, Neil F.; MacCallum, M. Robert; Madey, Greg; Megy, Karine; Redmond, Seth; Russo, Susan; Severson, David W.; Stinson, Eric O.; Topalis, Pantelis; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Birney, Ewan; Gelbart, William M.; Kafatos, Fotis C.; Louis, Christos; Collins, Frank H.

    2007-01-01

    VectorBase () is a web-accessible data repository for information about invertebrate vectors of human pathogens. VectorBase annotates and maintains vector genomes providing an integrated resource for the research community. Currently, VectorBase contains genome information for two organisms: Anopheles gambiae, a vector for the Plasmodium protozoan agent causing malaria, and Aedes aegypti, a vector for the flaviviral agents causing Yellow fever and Dengue fever. PMID:17145709

  12. Decays of the vector glueball

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giacosa, Francesco; Sammet, Julia; Janowski, Stanislaus

    2017-06-01

    We calculate two- and three-body decays of the (lightest) vector glueball into (pseudo)scalar, (axial-)vector, as well as pseudovector and excited vector mesons in the framework of a model of QCD. While absolute values of widths cannot be predicted because the corresponding coupling constants are unknown, some interesting branching ratios can be evaluated by setting the mass of the yet hypothetical vector glueball to 3.8 GeV as predicted by quenched lattice QCD. We find that the decay mode ω π π should be one of the largest (both through the decay chain O →b1π →ω π π and through the direct coupling O →ω π π ). Similarly, the (direct and indirect) decay into π K K*(892 ) is sizable. Moreover, the decays into ρ π and K*(892 )K are, although subleading, possible and could play a role in explaining the ρ π puzzle of the charmonium state ψ (2 S ) thanks to a (small) mixing with the vector glueball. The vector glueball can be directly formed at the ongoing BESIII experiment as well as at the future PANDA experiment at the FAIR facility. If the width is sufficiently small (≲100 MeV ) it should not escape future detection. It should be stressed that the employed model is based on some inputs and simplifying assumptions: the value of glueball mass (at present, the quenched lattice value is used), the lack of mixing of the glueball with other quarkonium states, and the use of few interaction terms. It then represents a first step toward the identification of the main decay channels of the vector glueball, but shall be improved when corresponding experimental candidates and/or new lattice results will be available.

  13. The biological control of disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Amarasekare, Priyanga

    2012-09-21

    Vector-borne diseases are common in nature and can have a large impact on humans, livestock and crops. Biological control of vectors using natural enemies or competitors can reduce vector density and hence disease transmission. However, the indirect interactions inherent in host-vector disease systems make it difficult to use traditional pest control theory to guide biological control of disease vectors. This necessitates a conceptual framework that explicitly considers a range of indirect interactions between the host-vector disease system and the vector's biological control agent. Here we conduct a comparative analysis of the efficacy of different types of biological control agents in controlling vector-borne diseases. We report three key findings. First, highly efficient predators and parasitoids of the vector prove to be effective biological control agents, but highly virulent pathogens of the vector also require a high transmission rate to be effective. Second, biocontrol agents can successfully reduce long-term host disease incidence even though they may fail to reduce long-term vector densities. Third, inundating a host-vector disease system with a natural enemy of the vector has little or no effect on reducing disease incidence, but inundating the system with a competitor of the vector has a large effect on reducing disease incidence. The comparative framework yields predictions that are useful in developing biological control strategies for vector-borne diseases. We discuss how these predictions can inform ongoing biological control efforts for host-vector disease systems. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  14. Zika Virus Mosquito Vectors: Competence, Biology, and Vector Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Elizabeth B; Kramer, Laura D

    2017-12-16

    Zika virus (ZIKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) has become one of the most medically important mosquito-borne viruses because of its ability to cause microcephaly in utero and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. This virus emerged from its sylvatic cycle in Africa to cause an outbreak in Yap, Federated States of Micronesia in 2007, French Polynesia in 2014, and most recently South America in 2015. The rapid expansion of ZIKV in the Americas largely has been due to the biology and behavior of its vector, Aedes aegypti. Other arboviruses transmitted by Ae. aegypti include the 2 flaviviruses dengue virus and yellow fever virus and the alphavirus chikungunya virus, which are also (re)emerging viruses in the Americas. This mosquito vector is highly domesticated, living in close association with humans in urban households. Its eggs are desiccation resistant, and the larvae develop rapidly in subtropical and tropical environments. Climate warming is facilitating range expansion of Ae. aegypti, adding to the threat this mosquito poses to human health, especially in light of the difficulty controlling it. Aedes albopictus, another highly invasive arbovirus vector that has only been implicated in one country (Gabon), is an important vector of ZIKV, but because of its wide geographic distribution may become a more important vector in the future. This article discusses the historical background of ZIKV and the biology and ecology of these 2 vectors. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Generalized Selection Weighted Vector Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rastislav Lukac

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a class of nonlinear multichannel filters capable of removing impulsive noise in color images. The here-proposed generalized selection weighted vector filter class constitutes a powerful filtering framework for multichannel signal processing. Previously defined multichannel filters such as vector median filter, basic vector directional filter, directional-distance filter, weighted vector median filters, and weighted vector directional filters are treated from a global viewpoint using the proposed framework. Robust order-statistic concepts and increased degree of freedom in filter design make the proposed method attractive for a variety of applications. Introduced multichannel sigmoidal adaptation of the filter parameters and its modifications allow to accommodate the filter parameters to varying signal and noise statistics. Simulation studies reported in this paper indicate that the proposed filter class is computationally attractive, yields excellent performance, and is able to preserve fine details and color information while efficiently suppressing impulsive noise. This paper is an extended version of the paper by Lukac et al. presented at the 2003 IEEE-EURASIP Workshop on Nonlinear Signal and Image Processing (NSIP '03 in Grado, Italy.

  16. A generalized nonlocal vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Bacim; Liu, Kuo; Gunzburger, Max

    2015-10-01

    A nonlocal vector calculus was introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) that has proved useful for the analysis of the peridynamics model of nonlocal mechanics and nonlocal diffusion models. A formulation is developed that provides a more general setting for the nonlocal vector calculus that is independent of particular nonlocal models. It is shown that general nonlocal calculus operators are integral operators with specific integral kernels. General nonlocal calculus properties are developed, including nonlocal integration by parts formula and Green's identities. The nonlocal vector calculus introduced in Du et al. (Math Model Meth Appl Sci 23:493-540, 2013) is shown to be recoverable from the general formulation as a special example. This special nonlocal vector calculus is used to reformulate the peridynamics equation of motion in terms of the nonlocal gradient operator and its adjoint. A new example of nonlocal vector calculus operators is introduced, which shows the potential use of the general formulation for general nonlocal models.

  17. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Niels

    2008-01-01

    Current ultrasonic blood flow velocity measurement systems are subject to a number of limitations, including limited frame rate, aliasing artifacts, and that only the velocity component along the ultrasound beam is estimated. This dissertation aims at solving some of these problems. The main part...... of the thesis considers a method for estimating the two-dimensional velocity vector within the image plane. This method, called synthetic aperture vector flow imaging, is first shortly reviewed. The main contribution of this work is partly an analysis of the method with respect to focusing effects, motion...... estimation. The method can be used for increasing the frame rate of color flow maps or alternatively for a new imaging modality entitled quadroplex imaging, featuring a color flow map and two independent spectrograms at a high frame rate. The second is an alternative method for ultrasonic vector velocity...

  18. Gauge Theories of Vector Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glashow, S. L.; Gell-Mann, M.

    1961-04-24

    The possibility of generalizing the Yang-Mills trick is examined. Thus we seek theories of vector bosons invariant under continuous groups of coordinate-dependent linear transformations. All such theories may be expressed as superpositions of certain "simple" theories; we show that each "simple theory is associated with a simple Lie algebra. We may introduce mass terms for the vector bosons at the price of destroying the gauge-invariance for coordinate-dependent gauge functions. The theories corresponding to three particular simple Lie algebras - those which admit precisely two commuting quantum numbers - are examined in some detail as examples. One of them might play a role in the physics of the strong interactions if there is an underlying super-symmetry, transcending charge independence, that is badly broken. The intermediate vector boson theory of weak interactions is discussed also. The so-called "schizon" model cannot be made to conform to the requirements of partial gauge-invariance.

  19. 3-D Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holbek, Simon

    ultrasonic vector flow estimation and bring it a step closer to a clinical application. A method for high frame rate 3-D vector flow estimation in a plane using the transverse oscillation method combined with a 1024 channel 2-D matrix array is presented. The proposed method is validated both through phantom......For the last decade, the field of ultrasonic vector flow imaging has gotten an increasingly attention, as the technique offers a variety of new applications for screening and diagnostics of cardiovascular pathologies. The main purpose of this PhD project was therefore to advance the field of 3-D...... hampers the task of real-time processing. In a second study, some of the issue with the 2-D matrix array are solved by introducing a 2-D row-column (RC) addressing array with only 62 + 62 elements. It is investigated both through simulations and via experimental setups in various flow conditions...

  20. Toward lattice fractional vector calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2014-09-01

    An analog of fractional vector calculus for physical lattice models is suggested. We use an approach based on the models of three-dimensional lattices with long-range inter-particle interactions. The lattice analogs of fractional partial derivatives are represented by kernels of lattice long-range interactions, where the Fourier series transformations of these kernels have a power-law form with respect to wave vector components. In the continuum limit, these lattice partial derivatives give derivatives of non-integer order with respect to coordinates. In the three-dimensional description of the non-local continuum, the fractional differential operators have the form of fractional partial derivatives of the Riesz type. As examples of the applications of the suggested lattice fractional vector calculus, we give lattice models with long-range interactions for the fractional Maxwell equations of non-local continuous media and for the fractional generalization of the Mindlin and Aifantis continuum models of gradient elasticity.

  1. Learning with Support Vector Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Campbell, Colin

    2010-01-01

    Support Vectors Machines have become a well established tool within machine learning. They work well in practice and have now been used across a wide range of applications from recognizing hand-written digits, to face identification, text categorisation, bioinformatics, and database marketing. In this book we give an introductory overview of this subject. We start with a simple Support Vector Machine for performing binary classification before considering multi-class classification and learning in the presence of noise. We show that this framework can be extended to many other scenarios such a

  2. Topological vector spaces and distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Horvath, John

    2012-01-01

    ""The most readable introduction to the theory of vector spaces available in English and possibly any other language.""-J. L. B. Cooper, MathSciNet ReviewMathematically rigorous but user-friendly, this classic treatise discusses major modern contributions to the field of topological vector spaces. The self-contained treatment includes complete proofs for all necessary results from algebra and topology. Suitable for undergraduate mathematics majors with a background in advanced calculus, this volume will also assist professional mathematicians, physicists, and engineers.The precise exposition o

  3. VECTOR MAPS IN MOBILE ROBOTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ales Jelinek

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to provide a brief overview of vector map techniques used in mobile robotics and to present current state of the research in this field at the Brno University of Technology. Vector maps are described as a part of the simultaneous localization and mapping (SLAM problem in the environment without artificial landmarks or global navigation system. The paper describes algorithms from data acquisition to map building but particular emphasis is put on segmentation, line extraction and scan matching algorithms. All significant algorithms are illustrated with experimental results.

  4. Recurrent intraoral HSV-1 infection: A retrospective study of 58 immunocompetent patients from Eastern Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovaru, Serban; Parlatescu, Ioanina; Tovaru, Mihaela; Cionca, Lucia; Arduino, Paolo-Giacomo

    2011-03-01

    To revise the clinical features of the recurrent intraoral herpetic infection (RIOH) with respect to precipitating factors, demographic, clinical features and outcome. Fifty-eight, unrelated Caucasian, immunocompetent patients with positive laboratory test for intraoral Herpes simplex virus infection were studied. The mean age in the women's group (n=42) was 41.23 years (± 21.73) and in the men's group was 32.25 years (±15.68). Possible trigger factors were identified in 9 cases (15.5%). General symptoms were noted in 20 cases (34.48%). Most of patients in this study presented multiple lesions. 14 patients had vermillion lesions associated with intraoral lesions. In most of the cases both fixed and mobile mucosa was concomitantly involved. Treatment was prescribed in order to control the symptoms and to shorten the evolution with minimal side effects. Intraoral secondary herpetic infection could be polymorphous and sometimes associated with general symptoms. The recognition of its atypical features may prevent unnecessary and costly investigations and treatments for unrelated though clinically similar-appearing disorders.

  5. Expression of HSV-1 receptors in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease determines susceptibility to oncolytic HSV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, P.Y.; Currier, M.A.; Hansford, L.; Kaplan, D.; Chiocca, E.A.; Uchida, H.; Goins, W.F.; Cohen, J.B.; Glorioso, J.C.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Mo, X.; Cripe, T.P.

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated B-cell lymphoproliferative disease (LPD) after hematopoietic stem cell or solid organ transplantation remains a life-threatening complication. Expression of the virus-encoded gene product, EBER, has been shown to prevent apoptosis via blockade of PKR activation.

  6. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Rabelo Coelho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae. There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV.

  7. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1)

    OpenAIRE

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendon?a, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia; Negri, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/M...

  8. Antiviral Action of Hydromethanolic Extract of Geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica against Antiherpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Guilherme Rabelo; Mendonça, Ronaldo Zucatelli; Vilar, Karina de Senna; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Badari, Juliana Cuoco; Taniwaki, Noemi; Namiyama, Gisleine; de Oliveira, Maria Isabel; Curti, Suely Pires; Evelyn Silva, Patricia; Negri, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    The studies on chemical composition and biological activity of propolis had focused mainly on species Apis mellifera L. (Hymenoptera: Apidae). There are few studies about the uncommon propolis collected by stingless bees of the Meliponini tribe known as geopropolis. The geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica was collected in the region of Barra do Corda, Maranhão state, Brazil. The chemical analysis of hydromethanolic extract of this geopropolis (HMG) was carried out through HPLC-DAD-ESI-MS/MS and the main constituents found were pyrrolizidine alkaloids and C-glycosyl flavones. The presence of alkaloids in extracts of propolis is detected for the first time in this sample. The antiviral activity of HMG was evaluated through viral DNA quantification experiments and electron microscopy experiments. Quantification of viral DNA from herpes virus showed reduction of about 98% in all conditions and concentration tested of the HMG extract. The results obtained were corroborated by transmission electron microscopy, in which the images did not show particle or viral replication complex. The antiviral activity of C-glycosyl flavones was reported for a variety of viruses, being observed at different points in the viral replication. This work is the first report about the antiviral activity of geopropolis from Scaptotrigona postica, in vitro, against antiherpes simplex virus (HSV).

  9. Effects of Acyclovir and IVIG on Behavioral Outcomes after HSV1 CNS Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandran Ramakrishna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV encephalitis (HSE has serious neurological complications, involving behavioral and cognitive impairments that cause significant morbidity and a reduced quality of life. We showed that HSE results from dysregulated central nervous system (CNS inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that CNS inflammation is casually involved in behavioral abnormalities after HSE and that treatment with ACV and pooled human immunoglobulin (IVIG, an immunomodulatory drug, would improve outcomes compared to mice treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS or ACV alone. Anxiety levels were high in HSV-infected PBS and ACV-treated mice compared to mice treated with ACV + IVIG, consistent with reports implicating inflammation in anxiety induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS or stress. Female, but not male, PBS-treated mice were cognitively impaired, and unexpectedly, ACV was protective, while the inclusion of IVIG surprisingly antagonized ACV’s beneficial effects. Distinct serum proteomic profiles were observed for male and female mice, and the antagonistic effects of ACV and IVIG on behavior were paralleled by similar changes in the serum proteome of ACV- and ACV + IVIG-treated mice. We conclude that inflammation and other factors mediate HSV-induced behavioral impairments and that the effects of ACV and IVIG on behavior involve novel mechanisms.

  10. SCALAR AND VECTOR IN COMPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valery F. Ochkov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with two fundamental data types – scalar and vector (array, without the ability of working with them one cannot solve using computer school or university tasks in mathematics, physics, chemistry and other technical training courses. Some fundamentals of teaching computer science at school and university are covered as well. 

  11. Vector description of nonlinear magnetization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rysak, A. E-mail: rysak@tytan.umcs.lublin.pl; Korczak, S.Z

    2001-06-01

    The definition of the nonlinear magnetization, which is usually applied in investigating superconductors is discussed in this paper. The nonlinear magnetization of the superconductor, as the response to the alternating magnetic field, is a periodic time function and is determined by the sequence of complex numbers {chi}{sub n}={chi}{sub n}'+i{chi}{sub n}'', n=1,2,3,.... The sequence {chi}{sub n} is named harmonic susceptibility. Finding some limits in this definition we propose a new description, substituting the complex sequence {chi}{sub n} with the sequence of real covariant vectors. Such a definition of the nonlinear magnetization, allows to determine function M(t) of an investigated system for an arbitrary initial phase {theta}{sub o} of the inducing magnetic field H{sub ac}=h{sub ac} sin({omega}t+{theta}{sub o}). Vector description, in our opinion, is superior to the complex one in respect of explicitness, simplicity, and universality. Circular diagrams are used to illustrate the new vector description. We also show how the vectors of the harmonic susceptibility can be derived from both numeric calculations and experimental data.

  12. Disease Vector Ecology Profile: Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-12-01

    species) only during the pupal and adult stages. Formulations of Bacillus thuringiensis israelensis are economical, operationally feasible, and...12. Bees , Wasps and Hornets ..................................................................................31 B. Snakes...epidemic proportions. Transmission of the plague bacillus by fleas is species- specific. Not all fleas are competent vectors. Xenopsylla cheopis is the

  13. Parallel Sparse Matrix - Vector Product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexandersen, Joe; Lazarov, Boyan Stefanov; Dammann, Bernd

    This technical report contains a case study of a sparse matrix-vector product routine, implemented for parallel execution on a compute cluster with both pure MPI and hybrid MPI-OpenMP solutions. C++ classes for sparse data types were developed and the report shows how these class can be used...

  14. Synthetic Aperture Vector Flow Imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Villagómez Hoyos, Carlos Armando

    The main objective of this project was to continue the development of a synthetic aperture vector flow estimator. This type of estimator is capable of overcoming two of the major limitations in conventional ultrasound systems: 1) the inability to scan large region of interest with high temporal r...

  15. The consequences of poor vectorization

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    This talk briefly discusses the vectorization problem and how it impacts scientific and engineering systems. A simple cost model of designing such system in context of different phases of software lifetime is considered. Finally a concept for scalable solution is presented.

  16. Constraints in vector meson photoproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F

    2000-01-31

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  17. Constraints in Vector Meson Photoproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F.

    2000-01-01

    Constraints are discussed for spin observables extracted from photoproduction of vector mesons. These constraints originate from positivity of the spin density matrix and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data. Spin observables need to be defined in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame.

  18. On Weighted Support Vector Regression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, Xixuan; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2014-01-01

    We propose a new type of weighted support vector regression (SVR), motivated by modeling local dependencies in time and space in prediction of house prices. The classic weights of the weighted SVR are added to the slack variables in the objective function (OF‐weights). This procedure directly...

  19. Portfolio Analysis for Vector Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Classic stock portfolio analysis provides an applied context for Lagrange multipliers that undergraduate students appreciate. Although modern methods of portfolio analysis are beyond the scope of vector calculus, classic methods reinforce the utility of this material. This paper discusses how to introduce classic stock portfolio analysis in a…

  20. Large N Expansion. Vector Models

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Emil; Pacheva, Svetlana

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary version of a contribution to the "Quantum Field Theory. Non-Perturbative QFT" topical area of "Modern Encyclopedia of Mathematical Physics" (SELECTA), eds. Aref'eva I, and Sternheimer D, Springer (2007). Consists of two parts - "main article" (Large N Expansion. Vector Models) and a "brief article" (BPHZL Renormalization).

  1. Vector-meson dominance revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terschlüsen Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesons with electromagnetism is often well described by the concept of vector-meson dominance (VMD. However, there are also examples where VMD fails. A simple chiral Lagrangian for pions, rho and omega mesons is presented which can account for the respective agreement and disagreement between VMD and phenomenology in the sector of light mesons.

  2. Sum rule analysis of vector and axial-vector spectral functions with excited states in vacuum

    OpenAIRE

    Hohler, Paul M.; Rapp, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    We simultaneously analyze vector and axial-vector spectral functions in vacuum using hadronic models constrained by experimental data and the requirement that Weinberg-type sum rules are satisfied. Upon explicit inclusion of an excited vector state, viz. rho', and the requirement that the perturbative continua are degenerate in vector and axial-vector channels, we deduce the existence of an excited axial-vector resonance state, a1', in order that the Weinberg sum rules are satisfied. The resu...

  3. Vector variational inequalities and their relations with vector optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surjeet Kaur Suneja

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, K- quasiconvex, K- pseudoconvex and other related functions have been introduced in terms of their Clarke subdifferentials, where is an arbitrary closed convex, pointed cone with nonempty interior. The (strict, weakly -pseudomonotonicity, (strict K- naturally quasimonotonicity and K- quasimonotonicity of Clarke subdifferential maps have also been defined. Further, we introduce Minty weak (MVVIP and Stampacchia weak (SVVIP vector variational inequalities over arbitrary cones. Under regularity assumption, we have proved that a weak minimum solution of vector optimization problem (VOP is a solution of (SVVIP and under the condition of K- pseudoconvexity we have obtained the converse for MVVIP (SVVIP. In the end we study the interrelations between these with the help of strict K-naturally quasimonotonicity of Clarke subdifferential map.

  4. Introduction to vector velocity imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Udesen, Jesper; Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov

    over the full region of interest and a real time image at a frame rate of 20 Hz can be displayed. Real time videos have been obtained from both our research systems and from commercial BK Medical scanners. The vector velocity images reveal the full complexity of the human blood flow. It is easy to see...... direction and the correct velocity magnitude for any orientation of the vessels. At complex geometries like bifurcations, branching and for valves the approach reveals how the velocity changes magnitude and direction over the cardiac cycle. Vector velocity reveals a wealth of new information that now...... is accessible to the ultrasound community. The displaying and studying of this information is challenging as complex flow changes rapidly over the cardiac cycle....

  5. Vector Galileon and inflationary magnetogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, Debottam; Shankaranarayanan, S.

    2018-01-01

    Cosmological inflation provides the initial conditions for the structure formation. However, the origin of large-scale magnetic fields can not be addressed in this framework. The key issue for this long-standing problem is the conformal invariance of the electromagnetic (EM) field in 4-D. While many approaches have been proposed in the literature for breaking conformal invariance of the EM action, here, we provide a completely new way of looking at the modifications to the EM action and generation of primordial magnetic fields during inflation. We explicitly construct a higher derivative EM action that breaks conformal invariance by demanding three conditions—theory be described by vector potential Aμ and its derivatives, Gauge invariance be satisfied, and equations of motion be linear in second derivatives of vector potential. The unique feature of our model is that appreciable magnetic fields are generated at small wavelengths while tiny magnetic fields are generated at large wavelengths that are consistent with current observations.

  6. Clinical applications of power vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Joseph M

    2009-06-01

    The study of infant vision is closely coupled to the study of the refraction, change in refraction over time, and the effect of spectacle correction on visual development. Frequently, reports are limited to descriptions of spherical equivalent or cylinder power without regard to axis, as data are frequently collected in the clinical format of sphere, cylinder, and axis (S, C, A). Conversion from clinical notation to a power vector representation of refraction allows unambiguous description of how refractions change over time and differ between repeated measurements. This article presents a series of examples of Microsoft Excel spreadsheet formulas that make the conversion from clinical notation to power vector format, and provides examples of useful applications of these methods.

  7. Active set support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicant, David R; Feinberg, Alexander

    2004-03-01

    This paper presents active set support vector regression (ASVR), a new active set strategy to solve a straightforward reformulation of the standard support vector regression problem. This new algorithm is based on the successful ASVM algorithm for classification problems, and consists of solving a finite number of linear equations with a typically large dimensionality equal to the number of points to be approximated. However, by making use of the Sherman-Morrison-Woodbury formula, a much smaller matrix of the order of the original input space is inverted at each step. The algorithm requires no specialized quadratic or linear programming code, but merely a linear equation solver which is publicly available. ASVR is extremely fast, produces comparable generalization error to other popular algorithms, and is available on the web for download.

  8. Lentiviral vectors in cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldham, Robyn Aa; Berinstein, Elliot M; Medin, Jeffrey A

    2015-01-01

    Basic science advances in cancer immunotherapy have resulted in various treatments that have recently shown success in the clinic. Many of these therapies require the insertion of genes into cells to directly kill them or to redirect the host's cells to induce potent immune responses. Other analogous therapies work by modifying effector cells for improved targeting and enhanced killing of tumor cells. Initial studies done using γ-retroviruses were promising, but safety concerns centered on the potential for insertional mutagenesis have highlighted the desire to develop other options for gene delivery. Lentiviral vectors (LVs) have been identified as potentially more effective and safer alternative delivery vehicles. LVs are now in use in clinical trials for many different types of inherited and acquired disorders, including cancer. This review will discuss current knowledge of LVs and the applications of this viral vector-based delivery vehicle to cancer immunotherapy.

  9. Vector fields on singular varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Brasselet, Jean-Paul; Suwa, Tatsuo

    2009-01-01

    Vector fields on manifolds play a major role in mathematics and other sciences. In particular, the Poincaré-Hopf index theorem gives rise to the theory of Chern classes, key manifold-invariants in geometry and topology. It is natural to ask what is the ‘good’ notion of the index of a vector field, and of Chern classes, if the underlying space becomes singular. The question has been explored by several authors resulting in various answers, starting with the pioneering work of M.-H. Schwartz and R. MacPherson. We present these notions in the framework of the obstruction theory and the Chern-Weil theory. The interplay between these two methods is one of the main features of the monograph.

  10. New Approach to Fractal Approximation of Vector-Functions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Igudesman, Konstantin; Davletbaev, Marsel; Shabernev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

      This paper introduces new approach to approximation of continuous vector-functions and vector sequences by fractal interpolation vector-functions which are multidimensional generalization of fractal...

  11. Angles in Complex Vector Spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Scharnhorst, K.

    1999-01-01

    The article reviews some of the (fairly scattered) information available in the mathematical literature on the subject of angles in complex vector spaces. The following angles and their relations are considered: Euclidean, complex, and Hermitian angles, (Kasner's) pseudo-angle, the Kaehler angle (synonyms for the latter used in the literature are: angle of inclination, characteristic deviation, holomorphic deviation, holomorphy angle, Wirtinger angle, slant angle).

  12. GAPS IN SUPPORT VECTOR OPTIMIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STEINWART, INGO [Los Alamos National Laboratory; HUSH, DON [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCOVEL, CLINT [Los Alamos National Laboratory; LIST, NICOLAS [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-29

    We show that the stopping criteria used in many support vector machine (SVM) algorithms working on the dual can be interpreted as primal optimality bounds which in turn are known to be important for the statistical analysis of SVMs. To this end we revisit the duality theory underlying the derivation of the dual and show that in many interesting cases primal optimality bounds are the same as known dual optimality bounds.

  13. Ultrasonic Dynamic Vector Stress Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyman, Joseph S.; Froggatt, Mark

    1992-01-01

    Stress inferred from measurements in specimens rather than in bonded gauges. Ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS) measures changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in material or structure at location touched by device when material or structure put under cyclic load. Includes phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe. Useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and evaluation of designs.

  14. A ocean bottom vector magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaomei; Teng, Yuntian; Wang, Chen; Ma, Jiemei

    2017-04-01

    The new development instrument with a compact spherical coil system and Overhauser magnetometer for measuring the total strength of the magnetic field and the vectors of strength, Delta inclination - Delta declination, meanwhile we also use a triaxial fluxgate instrument of the traditional instrument for geomagnetic vector filed measurement. The advantages of this method are be calibrated by each other and get good performances with automatic operation, good stability and high resolution. Firstly, a brief description of the instrument measurement principles and the key technologies are given. The instrument used a spherical coil system with 34 coils to product the homogeneous volume inside the coils which is large enough to accommodate the sensor of Overhauser total field sensor; the rest of the footlocker-sized ocean-bottom vector magnetometer consists of equipment to run the sensors and records its data (batteries and a data logger), weight to sink it to the sea floor, a remote-controlled acoustic release and flotation to bring the instrument back to the surface. Finally, the accuracy of the instrument was tested in the Geomagnetic station, and the measurement accuracies of total strength and components were better than 0.2nT and 1nT respectively. The figure 1 shows the development instrument structure. it includes six thick glass spheres which protect the sensor, data logger and batteries from the pressures of the deep sea, meanwhile they also provide recycling positive buoyancy; To cushion the glass, the spheres then go inside yellow plastic "hardhats". The triaxial fluxgate is inside No.1 glass spheres, data logger and batteries are inside No.2 glass spheres, the new vector sensor is inside No.3 glass spheres, acoustic communication unit is inside No.4 glass spheres, No.5 and No.6 glass spheres are empty which only provide recycling positive buoyancy. The figure 2 shows the development instrument Physical photo.

  15. Olfaction in vector-host interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2010-01-01

    This book addresses the topic how blood-feeding arthropods interact with their vertebrate hosts. As the transmission of infectious vector-borne pathogens is much dependent on the contact between vector and host, the efficacy of host location is of profound importance. Interruption of vector-host

  16. Herbivore arthropods benefit from vectoring plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Belliure, B.; Janssen, A.; Maris, P.C.; Peters, D.; Sabelis, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    Plants infected with pathogens often attract the pathogens' vectors, but it is not clear if this is advantageous to the vectors. We therefore quantified the direct and indirect (through the host plant) effects of a pathogen on its vector. A positive direct effect of the plant-pathogenic Tomato

  17. Vector and tensor analysis with applications

    CERN Document Server

    Borisenko, A I; Silverman, Richard A

    1979-01-01

    Concise and readable, this text ranges from definition of vectors and discussion of algebraic operations on vectors to the concept of tensor and algebraic operations on tensors. It also includes a systematic study of the differential and integral calculus of vector and tensor functions of space and time. Worked-out problems and solutions. 1968 edition.

  18. New recombinant serotypes of AAV vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Guangping; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Wilson, James M

    2005-06-01

    AAV based vectors can achieve stable gene transfer with minimal vector related toxicities. AAV serotype 2 (AAV2) is the first AAV that was vectored for gene transfer applications. However, the restricted tissue tropism of AAV and its low transduction efficiency have limited its further development as vector. Recent studies using vectors derived from alternative AAV serotypes such as AAV1, 4, 5 and 6 have shown improved potency and broadened tropism of the AAV vector by packaging the same vector genome with different AAV capsids. In an attempt to search for potent AAV vectors with enhanced performance profiles, molecular techniques were employed for the detection and isolation of endogenous AAVs from a variety of human and non-human primate (NHP) tissues. A family of novel primate AAVs consisting of 110 non-redundant species of proviral sequences was discovered and turned to be prevalent in 18-19% of the tissues evaluated. Phylogenetic and functional analyses revealed that primate AAVs are segregated into clades based on phylogenetic relatedness. The members within a clade share functional and serological properties. Initial evaluation in mouse models of vectors based on these novel AAVs for tissue tropism and gene transfer potency led to the identification of some vector with improved gene transfer to different target tissues. Gene therapy treatment of several mouse and canine models with novel AAV vectors achieved long term phenotypic corrections. Vectors based on new primate AAVs could become the next generation of efficient gene transfer vehicles for various gene therapy applications.

  19. Vectorizing and machine-spanning techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giroux, E D

    1983-09-22

    Techniques for vectorizing complex logic are shown using a decoupled sliding-surface calculation that is part of a two-dimensional Lagrangian simulation model. The same source coding can be run on many vector, parallel, and multiprocessor computers with very little or no alteration. The vectorizing techniques have been used for a wide range of problems.

  20. Fubini's Theorem for Vector-Valued Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uglanov, A. V.

    1991-02-01

    The situation is considered when either the transitional or initial measure is vector-valued (the other is, respectively, scalar-valued; thus the product measure is also vector-valued). The integrable function is vector-valued. In this situation two theorems of Fubini type are proved.

  1. On the Distribution of Norm of Vector Projection and Rejection of Two Complex Normal Random Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Maleki

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Vector projection and vector rejection are highly common and useful operations in mathematics, information theory, and signal processing. In this paper, we find the distribution of the norm of projection and rejection vectors when the original vectors are standard complex normally distributed.

  2. Gaussian statistics for palaeomagnetic vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, J.J.; Constable, C.G.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim of treating the statistics of palaeomagnetic directions and intensities jointly and consistently, we represent the mean and the variance of palaeomagnetic vectors, at a particular site and of a particular polarity, by a probability density function in a Cartesian three-space of orthogonal magnetic-field components consisting of a single (unimoda) non-zero mean, spherically-symmetrical (isotropic) Gaussian function. For palaeomagnetic data of mixed polarities, we consider a bimodal distribution consisting of a pair of such symmetrical Gaussian functions, with equal, but opposite, means and equal variances. For both the Gaussian and bi-Gaussian distributions, and in the spherical three-space of intensity, inclination, and declination, we obtain analytical expressions for the marginal density functions, the cumulative distributions, and the expected values and variances for each spherical coordinate (including the angle with respect to the axis of symmetry of the distributions). The mathematical expressions for the intensity and off-axis angle are closed-form and especially manageable, with the intensity distribution being Rayleigh-Rician. In the limit of small relative vectorial dispersion, the Gaussian (bi-Gaussian) directional distribution approaches a Fisher (Bingham) distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a normal distribution. In the opposite limit of large relative vectorial dispersion, the directional distributions approach a spherically-uniform distribution and the intensity distribution approaches a Maxwell distribution. We quantify biases in estimating the properties of the vector field resulting from the use of simple arithmetic averages, such as estimates of the intensity or the inclination of the mean vector, or the variances of these quantities. With the statistical framework developed here and using the maximum-likelihood method, which gives unbiased estimates in the limit of large data numbers, we demonstrate how to

  3. Problems and worked solutions in vector analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Shorter, LR

    2014-01-01

    ""A handy book like this,"" noted The Mathematical Gazette, ""will fill a great want."" Devoted to fully worked out examples, this unique text constitutes a self-contained introductory course in vector analysis for undergraduate and graduate students of applied mathematics.Opening chapters define vector addition and subtraction, show how to resolve and determine the direction of two or more vectors, and explain systems of coordinates, vector equations of a plane and straight line, relative velocity and acceleration, and infinitely small vectors. The following chapters deal with scalar and vect

  4. Integration of vector-valued functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings

    OpenAIRE

    Chakraborty, N. D.; Basu, Santwana

    2011-01-01

    This paper extends the theory of scalar-valued integrable functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings to the case of vector-valued tensor integrable functions with respect to vector measures defined on δ-rings. This paper also generalizes some results of G. F. Stefánsson for tensor integration theory of vector-valued functions with respect to vector measures defined on σ-algebras.

  5. Multiscale vector fields for image pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Kah-Chan; Coggins, James M.

    1990-01-01

    A uniform processing framework for low-level vision computing in which a bank of spatial filters maps the image intensity structure at each pixel into an abstract feature space is proposed. Some properties of the filters and the feature space are described. Local orientation is measured by a vector sum in the feature space as follows: each filter's preferred orientation along with the strength of the filter's output determine the orientation and the length of a vector in the feature space; the vectors for all filters are summed to yield a resultant vector for a particular pixel and scale. The orientation of the resultant vector indicates the local orientation, and the magnitude of the vector indicates the strength of the local orientation preference. Limitations of the vector sum method are discussed. Investigations show that the processing framework provides a useful, redundant representation of image structure across orientation and scale.

  6. Rotations with Rodrigues' vector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pina, E, E-mail: pge@xanum.uam.mx [Prof. Eugenio Mendez Docurro de la, Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas del IPN, Zacatenco 07738, Mexico DF (Mexico)

    2011-09-15

    The rotational dynamics was studied from the point of view of Rodrigues' vector. This vector is defined here by its connection with other forms of parametrization of the rotation matrix. The rotation matrix was expressed in terms of this vector. The angular velocity was computed using the components of Rodrigues' vector as coordinates. It appears to be a fundamental matrix that is used to express the components of the angular velocity, the rotation matrix and the angular momentum vector. The Hamiltonian formalism of rotational dynamics in terms of this vector uses the same matrix. The quantization of the rotational dynamics is performed with simple rules if one uses Rodrigues' vector and similar formal expressions for the quantum operators that mimic the Hamiltonian classical dynamics.

  7. Transversals of Complex Polynomial Vector Fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    Vector fields in the complex plane are defined by assigning the vector determined by the value P(z) to each point z in the complex plane, where P is a polynomial of one complex variable. We consider special families of so-called rotated vector fields that are determined by a polynomial multiplied...... by rotational constants. Transversals are a certain class of curves for such a family of vector fields that represent the bifurcation states for this family of vector fields. More specifically, transversals are curves that coincide with a homoclinic separatrix for some rotation of the vector field. Given...... examples of rotated families to argue this. There will be discussed several open questions concerning the number of transversals that can appear for a certain degree d of a polynomial vector field, and furthermore how transversals are analyzed with respect to bifurcations around multiple equilibrium points....

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-based vector improves the tumor cell killing effect of pituitary tumor in HVJ-liposome-mediated transcriptional targeting suicide gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumo, Tsuyoshi; Ohtsuru, Akira; Tokunaga, Yoshiharu; Namba, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Nagata, Izumi; Yamashita, Shunichi

    2007-08-01

    Although tissue-specific promoters offer a promising approach to the targeting of gene therapy, the activity of such promoters is generally low, which is thus a major limitation, especially when using non-viral vectors. To establish effective transcriptional targeting gene therapy for growth hormone (GH) producing pituitary tumors, an Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) based vector system expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) driven by a rat GH promoter (pEBGTK) was developed. This harbors an EBV nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) gene with an origin of the latent viral DNA replication (OriP) gene of EBV. We constructed an EBV-based luciferase plasmid (pEBGL) as a reporter plasmid. We also generated pGTK and pGL, which are non-EBV counterparts. Metastatic GH3 (mGH3) cells were used in this study. The transfection of pEBGL to mGH3 resulted in approximately a 39 times greater luciferase activity than pGL in vitro. Its expression was also prolonged 144 h after transfection. According to the results of pEBGL gene transfer in in vivo experiments, the luciferase activity was only observed in the tumors, but not detected in other normal tissues. The luciferase activities in tumor tissues were found until day 25 post transfection. During in vitro gene therapy, the transfection by pEBGTK using hemmaglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ) liposome enhances the susceptibility of mGH3 to gancyclovir (GCV) 110 times more than that by pGTK. The in vivo anti-tumor effects of pEBGTK on mGH3-tumor-bearing nude mice were evaluated. The intratumoral injection of HVJ anionic lipososme-enveloped pEBGTK followed by the intra-peritoneal injection of GCV demonstrated a significant growth inhibition against tumors without toxicity, while the tumors treated by other treatment modalities grew progressively. These results demonstrated that the EBV-based vector system can therefore contribute to the improvement of the anti-tumor effects for the HVJ-liposome-mediated transcriptional

  9. Deciphering Babesia-Vector Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Antunes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Understanding host-pathogen-tick interactions remains a vitally important issue that might be better understood by basic research focused on each of the dyad interplays. Pathogens gain access to either the vector or host during tick feeding when ticks are confronted with strong hemostatic, inflammatory and immune responses. A prominent example of this is the Babesia spp.—tick—vertebrate host relationship. Babesia spp. are intraerythrocytic apicomplexan organisms spread worldwide, with a complex life cycle. The presence of transovarial transmission in almost all the Babesia species is the main difference between their life cycle and that of other piroplasmida. With more than 100 species described so far, Babesia are the second most commonly found blood parasite of mammals after trypanosomes. The prevalence of Babesia spp. infection is increasing worldwide and is currently classified as an emerging zoonosis. Babesia microti and Babesia divergens are the most frequent etiological agents associated with human babesiosis in North America and Europe, respectively. Although the Babesia-tick system has been extensively researched, the currently available prophylactic and control methods are not efficient, and chemotherapeutic treatment is limited. Studying the molecular changes induced by the presence of Babesia in the vector will not only elucidate the strategies used by the protozoa to overcome mechanical and immune barriers, but will also contribute toward the discovery of important tick molecules that have a role in vector capacity. This review provides an overview of the identified molecules involved in Babesia-tick interactions, with an emphasis on the fundamentally important ones for pathogen acquisition and transmission.

  10. Bridging the Vector Calculus Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dray, Tevian; Manogue, Corinne

    2003-05-01

    As with Britain and America, mathematicians and physicists are separated from each other by a common language. In a nutshell, mathematics is about functions, but physics is about things. For the last several years, we have led an NSF-supported effort to "bridge the vector calculus gap" between mathematics and physics. The unifying theme we have discovered is to emphasize geometric reasoning, not (just) algebraic computation. In this talk, we will illustrate the language differences between mathematicians and physicists, and how we are trying reconcile them in the classroom. For further information about the project go to: http://www.physics.orst.edu/bridge

  11. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-12-01

    The distribution of dengue vectors, Ae. aegypti and Ae. albopictus, is affected by climatic factors. In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution. The different responses of Ae. aegypti and Ae albopictus to various environments result in a difference in spatial distribution along north-south and urban-rural gradients, and between the indoors and outdoors. In the north-south gradient, climate associated with survival is an important factor in spatial distribution. In the urban-rural gradient, different distribution reflects a difference in adult niches and is modified by geographic and human factors. The direct response of the two species to the environment around houses is related to different spatial distribution indoors and outdoors. Dengue viruses circulate mainly between human and vector mosquitoes, and the vector presence is a limiting factor of transmission. Therefore, spatial distribution of dengue vectors is a significant concern in the epidemiology of the disease.Current technologies such as GIS, satellite imagery and statistical models allow researchers to predict the spatial distribution of vectors in the changing environment. Although it is difficult to confirm the actual effect of environmental and climate changes on vector abundance and vector-borne diseases, environmental changes caused by humans and human behavioral changes due to climate change can be expected to exert an impact on dengue vectors. Longitudinal monitoring of dengue vectors and viruses is therefore necessary.

  12. Capsid Engineering of Adenovirus Vectors: Overcoming Early Vector-Host Interactions for Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, Claudia; Kreppel, Florian

    2017-10-01

    Adenovirus-based vectors comprise the most frequently used vector type in clinical studies to date. Both intense lab research and insights from the clinical trials reveal the importance of a comprehensive understanding of vector-host interactions. Especially for systemic intravenous adenovirus vector delivery, it is paramount to develop safe and efficacious vectors. Very early vector-host interactions that take place in blood long before the first cell is being transduced are phenomena triggered by the surface, shape, and size of the adenovirus vector particles. Not surprisingly, a multitude of different technologies ranging from genetics to chemistry has been developed to alter the adenovirus vector surface. In this review, we discuss the most important technologies and evaluate them for their suitability to overcome hurdles imposed by early vector-host interactions.

  13. Supporting medical decisions with vector decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprogar, M; Kokol, P; Zorman, M; Podgorelec, V; Yamamoto, R; Masuda, G; Sakamoto, N

    2001-01-01

    The article presents the extension of a common decision tree concept to a multidimensional - vector - decision tree constructed with the help of evolutionary techniques. In contrary to the common decision tree the vector decision tree can make more than just one suggestion per input sample. It has the functionality of many separate decision trees acting on a same set of training data and answering different questions. Vector decision tree is therefore simple in its form, is easy to use and analyse and can express some relationships between decisions not visible before. To explore and test the possibilities of this concept we developed a software tool--DecRain--for building vector decision trees using the ideas of evolutionary computing. Generated vector decision trees showed good results in comparison to classical decision trees. The concept of vector decision trees can be safely and effectively used in any decision making process.

  14. Vector assembly of colloids on monolayer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Lingxiang; Yang, Shenyu; Tsang, Boyce; Tu, Mei; Granick, Steve

    2017-06-01

    The key to spontaneous and directed assembly is to encode the desired assembly information to building blocks in a programmable and efficient way. In computer graphics, raster graphics encodes images on a single-pixel level, conferring fine details at the expense of large file sizes, whereas vector graphics encrypts shape information into vectors that allow small file sizes and operational transformations. Here, we adapt this raster/vector concept to a 2D colloidal system and realize `vector assembly' by manipulating particles on a colloidal monolayer substrate with optical tweezers. In contrast to raster assembly that assigns optical tweezers to each particle, vector assembly requires a minimal number of optical tweezers that allow operations like chain elongation and shortening. This vector approach enables simple uniform particles to form a vast collection of colloidal arenes and colloidenes, the spontaneous dissociation of which is achieved with precision and stage-by-stage complexity by simply removing the optical tweezers.

  15. [Spatial vector electrocardiography: technique, perspectives of use].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakutskiĭ, V N; Volobuev, A N; Kriukov, N N; Romanchuk, P I

    2003-01-01

    Potentials of the use of computer synthesis of integral electrical vector of the heart D0 are described. Calculation of spatial angular vector velocity and linear velocity of its movement along trajectory can be carried out in a framework of biophysical dipole model. Spatial presentation of vector is realized and its behavior in accordance with established pathologies discussed. Possible diagnostic value of obtained results and utility of their introduction into clinical practice are stressed.

  16. Genetic manipulation of endosymbionts to control vector and vector borne diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay Prakash Gupta

    Full Text Available Vector borne diseases (VBD are on the rise because of failure of the existing methods of control of vector and vector borne diseases and the climate change. A steep rise of VBDs are due to several factors like selection of insecticide resistant vector population, drug resistant parasite population and lack of effective vaccines against the VBDs. Environmental pollution, public health hazard and insecticide resistant vector population indicate that the insecticides are no longer a sustainable control method of vector and vector-borne diseases. Amongst the various alternative control strategies, symbiont based approach utilizing endosymbionts of arthropod vectors could be explored to control the vector and vector borne diseases. The endosymbiont population of arthropod vectors could be exploited in different ways viz., as a chemotherapeutic target, vaccine target for the control of vectors. Expression of molecules with antiparasitic activity by genetically transformed symbiotic bacteria of disease-transmitting arthropods may serve as a powerful approach to control certain arthropod-borne diseases. Genetic transformation of symbiotic bacteria of the arthropod vector to alter the vector’s ability to transmit pathogen is an alternative means of blocking the transmission of VBDs. In Indian scenario, where dengue, chikungunya, malaria and filariosis are prevalent, paratransgenic based approach can be used effectively. [Vet World 2012; 5(9.000: 571-576

  17. Scalar Calibration of Vector Magnetometers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter; Primdahl, Fritz

    2000-01-01

    The calibration parameters of a vector magnetometer are estimated only by the use of a scalar reference magnetometer. The method presented in this paper differs from those previously reported in its linearized parametrization. This allows the determination of three offsets or signals in the absence...... of a magnetic field, three scale factors for normalization of the axes and three non-orthogonality angles which build up an orthogonal system intrinsically in the sensor. The advantage of this method compared with others lies in its linear least squares estimator, which finds independently and uniquely...... the parameters for a given data set. Therefore, a magnetometer may be characterized inexpensively in the Earth's magnetic-field environment. This procedure has been used successfully in the pre-flight calibration of the state-of-the-art magnetometers on board the magnetic mapping satellites Orsted, Astrid-2...

  18. 3D vector flow imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pihl, Michael Johannes

    The main purpose of this PhD project is to develop an ultrasonic method for 3D vector flow imaging. The motivation is to advance the field of velocity estimation in ultrasound, which plays an important role in the clinic. The velocity of blood has components in all three spatial dimensions, yet...... Oscillation (TO) method, which estimates both the axial and the lateral velocity components. The first part of the scientific contribution demonstrates that a commercial implementation of the TO method is feasible. Afterwards, the method is expanded to a phased array geometry, and performance metrics based......:1 parallel receive beamforming. Simulation results demonstrate the feasibility of the method. In the final part, an experimental investigation of the 3D TO method is presented. Velocity measurements of steady flow were conducted in a flow-rig system, and the data were acquired using an experimental...

  19. An elusive vector dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Ren Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Even though the sensitivity of direct dark matter search experiments reaches the level of about 10−45 cm2, no confident signal of dark matter has been observed. We point out that, if dark matter is a vector boson, the null result in direct dark matter search experiments may be due to the destructive effects in dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering. We illustrate the scenario using a modified Higgs portal model that includes exotic quarks. The significant cancellation can occur for a certain mass gap between new heavy quark and dark matter. As a result, the spin-independent dark-matter–nucleon elastic scattering is so suppressed that the future direct search experiments will hardly observe the signal of dark matter.

  20. Vector optimization set-valued and variational analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Guang-ya; Yang, Xiaogi

    2005-01-01

    This book is devoted to vector or multiple criteria approaches in optimization. Topics covered include: vector optimization, vector variational inequalities, vector variational principles, vector minmax inequalities and vector equilibrium problems. In particular, problems with variable ordering relations and set-valued mappings are treated. The nonlinear scalarization method is extensively used throughout the book to deal with various vector-related problems. The results presented are original and should be interesting to researchers and graduates in applied mathematics and operations research

  1. Extremal vectors and rectifiability | Enflo | Quaestiones Mathematicae

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of extremal vectors of a linear operator with a dense range but not onto on a Hilbert space was introduced by P. Enflo in 1996 as a new approach to study invariant subspaces. Following this, there were several studies on analytic and geometric properties of backward minimal vectors and their applications to ...

  2. Nonlinear dynamics of a vectored thrust aircraft

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, C.B; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    With realistic relations for the aerodynamic coefficients, numerical simulations are applied to study the longitudional dynamics of a thrust vectored aircraft. As function of the thrust magnitude and the thrust vectoring angle the equilibrium state exhibits two saddle-node bifurcations and three...

  3. Clustering Categories in Support Vector Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carrizosa, Emilio; Nogales-Gómez, Amaya; Morales, Dolores Romero

    2017-01-01

    The support vector machine (SVM) is a state-of-the-art method in supervised classification. In this paper the Cluster Support Vector Machine (CLSVM) methodology is proposed with the aim to increase the sparsity of the SVM classifier in the presence of categorical features, leading to a gain in in...

  4. Semantic Vector Space Model: Implementation and Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Geoffrey Z.

    1997-01-01

    Presents the Semantic Vector Space Model, a text representation and searching technique based on the combination of Vector Space Model with heuristic syntax parsing and distributed representation of semantic case structures. In this model, both documents and queries are represented as semantic matrices, and retrieval is achieved by computing…

  5. Construction of expression vectors carrying mouse peroxisomal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pUcD3 eukaryotic expression vector to express tagged-PEP protein for transient transfection analysis and identifying intracellular localization of PEP protein in future experiments. PEP-cDNA was amplified in different PCR reactions using pEGFP-PEP vector and 2 sets of primers introducing specific restriction sites at the ...

  6. Radiative corrections to vector boson masses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1980-01-01

    Weak and e.m. radiative corrections to vector boson masses are computed. Including corrections due to the presently known leptons and quarks, mass shifts of+3080 and +3310 MeV are obtained for the masses of the charged and neutral vector boson.

  7. Deep Support Vector Machines for Regression Problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiering, Marco; Schutten, Marten; Millea, Adrian; Meijster, Arnold; Schomaker, Lambertus

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we describe a novel extension of the support vector machine, called the deep support vector machine (DSVM). The original SVM has a single layer with kernel functions and is therefore a shallow model. The DSVM can use an arbitrary number of layers, in which lower-level layers contain

  8. Malaria vector control: from past to future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavendra, Kamaraju; Barik, Tapan K; Reddy, B P Niranjan; Sharma, Poonam; Dash, Aditya P

    2011-04-01

    Malaria is one of the most common vector-borne diseases widespread in the tropical and subtropical regions. Despite considerable success of malaria control programs in the past, malaria still continues as a major public health problem in several countries. Vector control is an essential part for reducing malaria transmission and became less effective in recent years, due to many technical and administrative reasons, including poor or no adoption of alternative tools. Of the different strategies available for vector control, the most successful are indoor residual spraying and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs), including long-lasting ITNs and materials. Earlier DDT spray has shown spectacular success in decimating disease vectors but resulted in development of insecticide resistance, and to control the resistant mosquitoes, organophosphates, carbamates, and synthetic pyrethroids were introduced in indoor residual spraying with needed success but subsequently resulted in the development of widespread multiple insecticide resistance in vectors. Vector control in many countries still use insecticides in the absence of viable alternatives. Few developments for vector control, using ovitraps, space spray, biological control agents, etc., were encouraging when used in limited scale. Likewise, recent introduction of safer vector control agents, such as insect growth regulators, biocontrol agents, and natural plant products have yet to gain the needed scale of utility for vector control. Bacterial pesticides are promising and are effective in many countries. Environmental management has shown sufficient promise for vector control and disease management but still needs advocacy for inter-sectoral coordination and sometimes are very work-intensive. The more recent genetic manipulation and sterile insect techniques are under development and consideration for use in routine vector control and for these, standardized procedures and methods are available but need thorough

  9. Axial vector Z‧ and anomaly cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Ahmed; Keung, Wai-Yee; Tsao, Kuo-Hsing; Unwin, James

    2017-05-01

    Whilst the prospect of new Z‧ gauge bosons with only axial couplings to the Standard Model (SM) fermions is widely discussed, examples of anomaly-free renormalisable models are lacking in the literature. We look to remedy this by constructing several motivated examples. Specifically, we consider axial vectors which couple universally to all SM fermions, as well as those which are generation-specific, leptophilic, and leptophobic. Anomaly cancellation typically requires the presence of new coloured and charged chiral fermions, and we argue that in a large class of models masses of these new states are expected to be comparable to that of the axial vector. Finally, an axial vector mediator could provide a portal between SM and hidden sector states, and we also consider the possibility that the axial vector couples to dark matter. If the dark matter relic density is set due to freeze-out via the axial vector, this strongly constrains the parameter space.

  10. Cascade Support Vector Machines with Dimensionality Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cascade support vector machines have been introduced as extension of classic support vector machines that allow a fast training on large data sets. In this work, we combine cascade support vector machines with dimensionality reduction based preprocessing. The cascade principle allows fast learning based on the division of the training set into subsets and the union of cascade learning results based on support vectors in each cascade level. The combination with dimensionality reduction as preprocessing results in a significant speedup, often without loss of classifier accuracies, while considering the high-dimensional pendants of the low-dimensional support vectors in each new cascade level. We analyze and compare various instantiations of dimensionality reduction preprocessing and cascade SVMs with principal component analysis, locally linear embedding, and isometric mapping. The experimental analysis on various artificial and real-world benchmark problems includes various cascade specific parameters like intermediate training set sizes and dimensionalities.

  11. Geoacoustic inversion using the vector field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Steven E.

    The main goal of this project was to study the use of the acoustic vector field, separately or in combination with the scalar field, to estimate the depth dependent geoacoustic properties of the seafloor via non-linear inversion. The study was performed in the context of the Sediment Acoustics Experiment 2004 (SAX04) conducted in the Northern Gulf of Mexico (GOM) where a small number of acoustic vector sensors were deployed in close proximity to the seafloor. A variety of acoustic waveforms were transmitted into the seafloor at normal incidence. The acoustic vector sensors were located both above and beneath the seafloor interface where they measured the acoustic pressure and the acoustic particle acceleration. Motion data provided by the buried vector sensors were affected by a suspension response that was sensitive to the mass properties of the sensor, the sediment density and sediment elasticity (e.g., shear wave speed). The suspension response for the buried vector sensors included a resonance within the analysis band of 0.4 to 2.0 kHz. The suspension resonance represented an unknown complex transfer function between the acoustic vector field in the seabed and data representing that field. Therefore, inverse methods developed for this study were required to 1) estimate dynamic properties of the sensor suspension resonance and 2) account for the associated corruption of vector field data. A method to account for the vector sensor suspense response function was integrated directly into the inversion methods such that vector channel data corruption was reduced and an estimate of the shear wave speed in the sediment was returned. Inversions of real and synthetic data sets indicated that information about sediment shear wave speed was carried by the suspension response of the buried sensors, as opposed to being contained inherently within the acoustic vector field.

  12. Biosafety of onco-retroviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenDriessche, Thierry; Collen, Désiré; Chuah, Marinee K L

    2003-12-01

    Extensive gene therapy studies in preclinical models and in clinical trials underscore the relative safety of onco-retroviral vectors. Up until recently, no adverse effects have been reported in nearly 2000 patients that were enrolled in gene therapy clinical trials involving onco-retroviral vectors. However, the main safety concern of using onco-retroviral vectors is related to the risk of malignant transformation following oncogene activation due to random onco-retroviral genomic integration. Based on primate studies, there is an apparent low risk of malignancy that is predominately associated with the occurrence of chronic retroviremia resulting from replication-competent retroviruses (RCR), particularly in immunosuppressed recipient hosts. However, in the latest packaging cell lines and vectors, the risk of RCR-generation has been drastically reduced, primarily by minimizing the homologous overlap between vector and helper sequences. Nevertheless, results from a recent preclinical study in mice and a clinical trial in patients suffering from SCID-X1 strongly suggest that onco-retroviral vectors devoid of RCR can contribute to lymphomagenesis by insertional activation of cellular oncogenes. The risk of inadvertent germline transmission of onco-retroviral vectors appears to be low, especially relative to the endogenous rate of germline insertion, which is known to occur naturally in the human population via transmission of endogenous retro-transposons. The strict dependency of onco-retroviral gene transfer on cell division is an important safety advantage that significantly limits the risks of horizontal transmission. Since improved onco-retroviral vectors or transduction protocols may result in an increased number of retroviral integrations per cell, this may concomitantly increase the risk of malignant transformation. The use of suicide genes, self-inactivating vectors and/or chromosomal insulators is, therefore, warranted to further enhance the safety features

  13. Vector 33: A reduce program for vector algebra and calculus in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, David

    1989-06-01

    This paper describes a package with enables REDUCE 3.3 to perform algebra and calculus operations upon vectors. Basic algebraic operations between vectors and between scalars and vectors are provided, including scalar (dot) product and vector (cross) product. The vector differential operators curl, divergence, gradient and Laplacian are also defined, and are valid in any orthogonal curvilinear coordinate system. The package is written in RLISP to allow algebra and calculus to be performed using notation identical to that for operations. Scalars and vectors can be mixed quite freely in the same expression. The package will be of interest to mathematicians, engineers and scientists who need to perform vector calculations in orthogonal curvilinear coordinates.

  14. GRASS GIS Vector Processing: Towards GRASS 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metz, Markus; Landa, Martin; Petrasova, Anna; Petras, Vaclav; Chemin, Yann; Neteler, Markus

    2014-05-01

    The upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release improves not only raster processing and general design but the vector processing in the first place. GRASS GIS, as a topological GIS, recognizes that the topology plays the key role in the vector processing and analysis. Topology ensures that adjacent geographic components in a single vector map are related. In contrast to non-topological GIS, a border common to two areas exists only once and is shared between the two areas. Topological representation of vector data helps to produce and maintain vector maps with clean geometry as well as enables the user to perform certain analyses that can not be conducted with non-topological or spaghetti data. Non-topological vector data are automatically converted to a topological representation upon import. Further more, various cleaning tools exist to remove non-trivial topological errors. In the upcoming GRASS GIS 7 release the vector library was particularly improved to make it faster and more efficient with an improved internal vector file format. This new topological format reduces memory and disk space requirements, leading to a generally faster processing. Opening an existing vector requires less memory providing additionally support for large files. The new spatial index performs queries faster (compared to GRASS GIS 6 more than 10 times for large vectors). As a new option the user can select a file-based version of the spatial index for large vector data. All topological cleaning tools have been optimized with regard to processing speed, robustness, and system requirements. The topological engine comes with a new prototype for direct read/write support of Simple Features API/OGR. Additionally vector data can be directly exchanged with topological PostGIS 2 databases. Considering the wide spread usage of ESRI Shapefile, a non-topological format for vector data exchange, it is particularly advantageous that GRASS GIS 7 offers advanced cleaning tools. For power users and programmers, the

  15. Correlated Topic Vector for Scene Classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Pengxu; Qin, Fei; Wan, Fang; Zhu, Yi; Jiao, Jianbin; Ye, Qixiang

    2017-07-01

    Scene images usually involve semantic correlations, particularly when considering large-scale image data sets. This paper proposes a novel generative image representation, correlated topic vector, to model such semantic correlations. Oriented from the correlated topic model, correlated topic vector intends to naturally utilize the correlations among topics, which are seldom considered in the conventional feature encoding, e.g., Fisher vector, but do exist in scene images. It is expected that the involvement of correlations can increase the discriminative capability of the learned generative model and consequently improve the recognition accuracy. Incorporated with the Fisher kernel method, correlated topic vector inherits the advantages of Fisher vector. The contributions to the topics of visual words have been further employed by incorporating the Fisher kernel framework to indicate the differences among scenes. Combined with the deep convolutional neural network (CNN) features and Gibbs sampling solution, correlated topic vector shows great potential when processing large-scale and complex scene image data sets. Experiments on two scene image data sets demonstrate that correlated topic vector improves significantly the deep CNN features, and outperforms existing Fisher kernel-based features.

  16. HVJ liposomes and HVJ envelope vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2011-10-01

    This protocol describes techniques for construction of fusion-mediated vectors based on inactivated HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; Sendai virus). HVJ liposomes are constructed by fusing liposomes containing DNA with inactivated HVJ. The HVJ envelope vector, a more simplified vector, incorporates DNA into inactivated HVJ particles without liposomes. Both vectors have many advantages. They can be used to introduce proteins, peptides, oligonucleotides (including antisense oligonucleotides, decoy oligonucleotides, and ribozymes), and short interfering RNA (siRNA), as well as plasmid DNA, into cultured cells in vitro and into organs in vivo. Fusion-mediated delivery avoids the degradation of therapeutic molecules before reaching the cytoplasm. Finally, repeated injection of the vector in vivo is not inhibited and even enhances the effects of the delivered molecules. These vectors have been used in many gene therapy experiments in animal models to address problems such as liver cirrhosis, hearing impairment, ischemic brain damage, peripheral arterial diseases, and cancers. This protocol describes methods for the preparation of HVJ liposomes and of HVJ envelope vectors and their use in delivery of plasmid DNA into various cells and tissues.

  17. Malaria vector control and personal protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Malaria transmission rates and risks can be greatly reduced by vector control, mitigating high malaria incidence and prevalence rates. Methods and strategies for malaria vector control (MVC) have been well documented by WHO, although its implementation varies widely. Technical guidelines for MVC strategies and materials are readily available, but the status and role of MVC have not been reviewed and redefined in terms of programme management and resource allocation. There are huge changes since November 1993 when the last WHO Study Group reviewed vector control for malaria and other mosquito-borne diseases, following the 1992 adoption of the Global Malaria Control Strategy. Operationally, with reform of the health sector in many countries, the centrally managed and vertically structured malaria control programme (MCP) has been superseded by a community-based and decentralized one. This poses challenges for effective implementation of MVC strategies. Therefore it became evident that the role of vector control in malaria control needs to be reconsidered to develop a strategic framework for MVC implementation by national malaria control programmes and other partners. This report of a WHO Study Group on Malaria Vector Control and Personal Protection reviewed the current vector control strategies and their effectiveness in various operational and eco-epidemiological settings, and identified challenges for implementation in different health systems. An outline strategic framework for strengthening malaria vector control implementation was developed. The process of deciding about which mosquito control method is appropriate in a given situation should be guided by an analysis of the level of malaria endemicity and vector bionomics, the eco-epidemiological setting, the health management system and an estimate of the programme sustainability. This report also provides a basis for the development of a strategic framework for strengthening malaria vector control

  18. Meromorphic Vector Fields and Circle Packings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dias, Kealey

    of dynamical systems, continuous and discrete, correspond to the study of differential equations (vector fields) and iteration of mappings respectively. In holomorphic dynamics, the systems studied are restricted to those described by holomorphic (complex analytic) functions or meromorphic (allowing poles...... problems. Since the class of complex polynomial vector fields in the plane is natural to consider, it is remarkable that its study has only begun very recently. There are numerous fundamental questions that are still open, both in the general classification of these vector fields, the decomposition...

  19. Vector analysis for mathematicians, scientists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Simons, S

    1970-01-01

    Vector Analysis for Mathematicians, Scientists and Engineers, Second Edition, provides an understanding of the methods of vector algebra and calculus to the extent that the student will readily follow those works which make use of them, and further, will be able to employ them himself in his own branch of science. New concepts and methods introduced are illustrated by examples drawn from fields with which the student is familiar, and a large number of both worked and unworked exercises are provided. The book begins with an introduction to vectors, covering their representation, addition, geome

  20. Interior point decoding for linear vector channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wadayama, T [Nagoya Institute of Technology, Gokiso, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, 466-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: wadayama@nitech.ac.jp

    2008-01-15

    In this paper, a novel decoding algorithm for low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes based on convex optimization is presented. The decoding algorithm, called interior point decoding, is designed for linear vector channels. The linear vector channels include many practically important channels such as inter-symbol interference channels and partial response channels. It is shown that the maximum likelihood decoding (MLD) rule for a linear vector channel can be relaxed to a convex optimization problem, which is called a relaxed MLD problem.

  1. Some remarks on a generalized vector product

    OpenAIRE

    Primitivo Acosta-Humánez; Moisés Aranda; Reinaldo Núñez

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we use a generalized vector product to construct an exterior form ∧ : (Rn) k → R( n k), where n k = n! (n−k)!k! , k ≤ n. Finally, for n = k − 1 we introduce the reversing operation to study this generalized vector product over palindromic and antipalindromic vectors Resumen. En este artículo usamos un producto vectorial generalizado para construir una forma exterior ∧ : (Rn) k → R( n k), en donde como es natural, n k = n! ...

  2. Gene therapy using retrovirus vectors: vector development and biosafety at clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Knayo; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Retrovirus vectors (gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors) have been considered as promising tools to transfer therapeutic genes into patient cells because they can permanently integrate into host cellular genome. To treat monogenic, inherited diseases, retroviral vectors have been used to add correct genes into patient cells. Conventional gammaretroviral vectors achieved successful results in clinical trials: treated patients had therapeutic gene expression in target cells and had improved symptoms of diseases. However, serious side-effects of leukemia occurred, caused by retroviral insertional mutagenesis (IM). These incidences stressed the importance of monitoring vector integration sites in patient cells as well as of re-consideration on safer vectors. More recently lentiviral vectors which can deliver genes into non-dividing cells started to be used in clinical trials including neurological disorders, showing their efficacy. Vector integration site analysis revealed that lentiviruses integrate less likely to near promoter regions of oncogenes than gammaretroviruses and no adverse events have been reported in lentiviral vector-mediated gene therapy clinical trials. Therefore lentiviral vectors have promises to be applied to a wide range of common diseases in near future. For example, T cells from cancer patients were transduced to express chimeric T cell receptors recognizing their tumour cells enhancing patients' anti-cancer immunity.

  3. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  4. Taxonomy and Biology of Phlebotomine Vectors of Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DIPTERA, *DISEASE VECTORS, *TAXONOMY, *VECTOR ANALYSIS , ANTIBODIES, BIOLOGY , BRAIN, CHROMOSOMES, COLOMBIA, COLONIES( BIOLOGY ), DISEASES, FEMALES... HUMANS , INFECTIOUS DISEASES, LABORATORIES, LEISHMANIA, LEISHMANIASIS, NEUTRALIZATION, PATIENTS, SEROLOGY, STRAINS( BIOLOGY ).

  5. Dengue Vectors and their Spatial Distribution

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Higa, Yukiko

    2011-01-01

    .... In addition, since their life cycles are well adapted to the human environment, environmental changes resulting from human activity such as urbanization exert a great impact on vector distribution...

  6. Regional Disease Vector Ecology Profile: The Koreas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Similarly, the civilian population may experience displacement, homelessness , reduced sanitation, increased exposure to vectors and disease, and...visit either of the following websites: 1. The WHO Searchable Snake/Antivenin Database 2. The Toxinology website ( Australia based) 69 REFERENCES

  7. Viruses vector control proposal: genus Aedes emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Nogueira Reis

    Full Text Available Abstract The dengue fever is a major public health problem in the world. In Brazil, in 2015, there were 1,534,932 cases, being 20,320 cases of severe form, and 811 deaths related to this disease. The distribution of Aedes aegypti, the vector, is extensive. Recently, Zika and Chikungunya viruses had arisen, sharing the same vector as dengue and became a huge public health issue. Without specific treatment, it is urgently required as an effective vector control. This article is focused on reviewing vector control strategies, their effectiveness, viability and economical impact. Among all, the Sterile Insect Technique is highlighted as the best option to be adopted in Brazil, once it is largely effectively used in the USA and Mexico for plagues related to agribusiness.

  8. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  9. Viruses vector control proposal: genus Aedes emphasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Nogueira Reis

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The dengue fever is a major public health problem in the world. In Brazil, in 2015, there were 1,534,932 cases, being 20,320 cases of severe form, and 811 deaths related to this disease. The distribution of Aedes aegypti, the vector, is extensive. Recently, Zika and Chikungunya viruses had arisen, sharing the same vector as dengue and became a huge public health issue. Without specific treatment, it is urgently required as an effective vector control. This article is focused on reviewing vector control strategies, their effectiveness, viability and economical impact. Among all, the Sterile Insect Technique is highlighted as the best option to be adopted in Brazil, once it is largely effectively used in the USA and Mexico for plagues related to agribusiness.

  10. Low Power, Self Calibrated Vector Magnetometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I SBIR project investigates a novel approach to vector magnetometry based on high precision measurements of the total magnetic field. The calibration is...

  11. Inflight parity vector compensation for FDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, S. R.; Motyka, P.; Gai, E.; Deyst, J. J., Jr.

    The performance of a failure detection and isolation (FDI) algorithm applied to a redundant strapdown inertial measurement unit (IMU) is limited by sensor errors such as input axis misalignment, scale factor errors, and biases. This paper presents a technique for improving the performance of FDI algorithms applied to redundant strapdown IMUs. A Kalman filter provides estimates of those linear combinations of sensor errors that affect the parity vector. These estimates are used to form a compensated parity vector which does not include the effects of sensor errors. The compensated parity vector is then used in place of the uncompensated parity vector to make FDI decisions. Simulation results are presented in which the algorithm is tested in a realistic flight environment that includes vehicle maneuvers, the effects of turbulence, and sensor failures. The results show that the algorithm can significantly improve FDI performance, especially during vehicle maneuvers.

  12. Vector optimization theory, applications, and extensions

    CERN Document Server

    Jahn, Johannes

    2011-01-01

    This new edition of a key monograph has fresh sections on the work of Edgeworth and Pareto in its presentation in a general setting of the fundamentals and important results of vector optimization. It examines background material, applications and theories.

  13. Sensorless vector and direct torque control

    CERN Document Server

    Vas, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This is the first comprehensive book on sensorless high performance a.c. drives. It is essential reading for anyone interested in acquiring a solid background on sensorless torque-controlled drives. It presents a detailed and unified treatment of sensorless vector-controlled and direct-torque controlled drive systems. It also discusses the applications of artificial intelligence to drives. Where possible, space vector theory is used and emphasis is laid on detailed mathematical and physical analysis. Sensorless drive schemes for different types of permanent magnet synchronous motors, synchronous reluctance motors, and induction motors are also presented. These include more than twenty vector drives e.g. five types of MRAS-based vector drives, and eleven types of direct-torque-controlled (DTC) drives, e.g. the ABB DTC drive. However, torque-controlled switched reluctance motor drives are also discussed due to their emerging importance. The book also covers various drive applications using artificial intellige...

  14. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R.; Irvine, William T. M.

    2016-12-01

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  15. Insects as vectors: systematics and biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodhain, F

    2015-04-01

    Among the many complex relationships between insects and microorganisms such as viruses, bacteria and parasites, some have resulted in the establishment of biological systems within which the insects act as a biological vector for infectious agents. It is therefore advisable to understand the identity and biology of these vectors in depth, in order to define procedures for epidemiological surveillance and anti-vector control. The following are successively reviewed in this article: Anoplura (lice), Siphonaptera (fleas), Heteroptera (bugs: Cimicidae, Triatoma, Belostomatidae), Psychodidae (sandflies), Simuliidae (black flies), Ceratopogonidae (biting midges), Culicidae (mosquitoes), Tabanidae (horseflies) and Muscidae (tsetse flies, stable flies and pupipara). The authors provide a rapid overview of the morphology, systematics, development cycle and bio-ecology of each of these groups of vectors. Finally, their medical and veterinary importance is briefly reviewed.

  16. Some remarks on a generalized vector product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Primitivo Acosta-Humánez

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we use a generalized vector product to construct an exterior form ∧ : (Rn k → R( n k, where n k = n! (n−k!k! , k ≤ n. Finally, for n = k − 1 we introduce the reversing operation to study this generalized vector product over palindromic and antipalindromic vectors Resumen. En este artículo usamos un producto vectorial generalizado para construir una forma exterior ∧ : (Rn k → R( n k, en donde como es natural, n k = n! (n−k!k! , k ≤ n. Finalmente, para n = k − 1 introducimos la operación reversar para estudiar este producto vectorial generalizado sobre vectores palindrómicos y antipalindrómicos.

  17. Weaving Knotted Vector Fields with Tunable Helicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedia, Hridesh; Foster, David; Dennis, Mark R; Irvine, William T M

    2016-12-30

    We present a general construction of divergence-free knotted vector fields from complex scalar fields, whose closed field lines encode many kinds of knots and links, including torus knots, their cables, the figure-8 knot, and its generalizations. As finite-energy physical fields, they represent initial states for fields such as the magnetic field in a plasma, or the vorticity field in a fluid. We give a systematic procedure for calculating the vector potential, starting from complex scalar functions with knotted zero filaments, thus enabling an explicit computation of the helicity of these knotted fields. The construction can be used to generate isolated knotted flux tubes, filled by knots encoded in the lines of the vector field. Lastly, we give examples of manifestly knotted vector fields with vanishing helicity. Our results provide building blocks for analytical models and simulations alike.

  18. MAGELLAN SURFACE CHARACTERISTICS VECTOR DATA RECORD

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains the Magellan Surface Characteristics Vector Data Record (SCVDR) which is an orbit-by-orbit reduction of Magellan scattering and emission...

  19. VEST: Abstract vector calculus simplification in Mathematica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, J.; Burby, J.; Qin, H.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new package, VEST (Vector Einstein Summation Tools), that performs abstract vector calculus computations in Mathematica. Through the use of index notation, VEST is able to reduce three-dimensional scalar and vector expressions of a very general type to a well defined standard form. In addition, utilizing properties of the Levi-Civita symbol, the program can derive types of multi-term vector identities that are not recognized by reduction, subsequently applying these to simplify large expressions. In a companion paper Burby et al. (2013) [12], we employ VEST in the automation of the calculation of high-order Lagrangians for the single particle guiding center system in plasma physics, a computation which illustrates its ability to handle very large expressions. VEST has been designed to be simple and intuitive to use, both for basic checking of work and more involved computations.

  20. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    1997-01-01

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  1. Application of Vector Triggering Random Decrement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asmussen, J. C.; Ibrahim, S. R.; Brincker, Rune

    result is a Random Decrement function from each measurement. In traditional Random Decrement estimation the triggering condition is a scalar condition, which should only be fulfilled in a single measurement. In vector triggering Random Decrement the triggering condition is a vector condition....... The advantage of this new approach should be a reduction in estimation time without a significant loss of accuracy, since the vector triggering conditions ensure cross information between the measurements in the Random Decrement functions. The different problems with this technique is highlighted in two......This paper deals with applications of the vector triggering Random Decrement technique. This technique is new and developed with the aim of minimizing estimation time and identification errors. The theory behind the technique is discussed in an accompanying paper. The results presented...

  2. Free divisors in prehomogeneous vector spaces

    OpenAIRE

    Granger, Michel; Mond, David; Schulze, Mathias

    2009-01-01

    We study linear free divisors, that is, free divisors arising as discriminants in prehomogeneous vector spaces, and in particular in quiver representation spaces. We give a characterization of the prehomogeneous vector spaces containing such linear free divisors. For reductive linear free divisors, we prove that the numbers of geometric and representation theoretic irreducible components coincide. As a consequence, we find that a quiver can only give rise to a linear free divisor if it has no...

  3. Acoustical vector solitons in anisotropic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamashvili, G. T.; Peikrishvili, M. D.; Koplatadze, R. R.

    2017-04-01

    A theory of acoustical vector solitons of self-induced transparency in anisotropic media is developed. It is shown that, in these systems, a two-component vector soliton oscillating with the difference and sum of the frequencies in the vicinity of the frequency of a carrying acoustic wave may arise. Explicit analytical expressions for the form and parameters of a nonlinear wave depending on the direction of pulse propagation are given.

  4. Trichophoromyia auraensis is a putative vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Bioni Garcia Teles

    Full Text Available The sandfly Trichophoromyia auraensis has recently evolved as a proven vector of Leishmania (Viannia endemic to state of Acre in the north of Brazil. This note is intended to propose a correction in the report of the first occurrence of natural infection of Leishmania (Viannia in this species. We and the other scientific groups reinforced that Tr. auraensis is a possible vector involved in the transmission of American cutaneous leishmaniasis in Acre, Brazil.

  5. Effect of pathogen-resistant vectors on the transmission dynamics of a vector-borne disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arino, Julien; Bowman, Chris; Gumel, Abba; Portet, Stéphanie

    2007-10-01

    A model is introduced for the transmission dynamics of a vector-borne disease with two vector strains, one wild and one pathogen-resistant; resistance comes at the cost of reduced reproductive fitness. The model, which assumes that vector reproduction can lead to the transmission or loss of resistance (reversion), is analyzed in a particular case with specified forms for the birth and force of infection functions. The vector component can have, in the absence of disease, a coexistence equilibrium where both strains survive. In the case where reversion is possible, this coexistence equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when it exists. This equilibrium is still present in the full vector-host system, leading to a reduction of the associated reproduction number, thereby making elimination of the disease more feasible. When reversion is not possible, there can exist an additional equilibrium with only resistant vectors.

  6. Effects of Climate and Climate Change on Vectors and Vector-Borne Diseases: Ticks Are Different.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogden, Nick H; Lindsay, L Robbin

    2016-08-01

    There has been considerable debate as to whether global risk from vector-borne diseases will be impacted by climate change. This has focussed on important mosquito-borne diseases that are transmitted by the vectors from infected to uninfected humans. However, this debate has mostly ignored the biological diversity of vectors and vector-borne diseases. Here, we review how climate and climate change may impact those most divergent of arthropod disease vector groups: multivoltine insects and hard-bodied (ixodid) ticks. We contrast features of the life cycles and behaviour of these arthropods, and how weather, climate, and climate change may have very different impacts on the spatiotemporal occurrence and abundance of vectors, and the pathogens they transmit. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Blocking transmission of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schorderet-Weber, Sandra; Noack, Sandra; Selzer, Paul M; Kaminsky, Ronald

    2017-04-01

    Vector-borne diseases are responsible for significant health problems in humans, as well as in companion and farm animals. Killing the vectors with ectoparasitic drugs before they have the opportunity to pass on their pathogens could be the ideal way to prevent vector borne diseases. Blocking of transmission might work when transmission is delayed during blood meal, as often happens in ticks. The recently described systemic isoxazolines have been shown to successfully prevent disease transmission under conditions of delayed pathogen transfer. However, if the pathogen is transmitted immediately at bite as it is the case with most insects, blocking transmission becomes only possible if ectoparasiticides prevent the vector from landing on or, at least, from biting the host. Chemical entities exhibiting repellent activity in addition to fast killing, like pyrethroids, could prevent pathogen transmission even in cases of immediate transfer. Successful blocking depends on effective action in the context of the extremely diverse life-cycles of vectors and vector-borne pathogens of medical and veterinary importance which are summarized in this review. This complexity leads to important parameters to consider for ectoparasiticide research and when considering the ideal drug profile for preventing disease transmission. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Feature Vector Construction Method for IRIS Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odinokikh, G.; Fartukov, A.; Korobkin, M.; Yoo, J.

    2017-05-01

    One of the basic stages of iris recognition pipeline is iris feature vector construction procedure. The procedure represents the extraction of iris texture information relevant to its subsequent comparison. Thorough investigation of feature vectors obtained from iris showed that not all the vector elements are equally relevant. There are two characteristics which determine the vector element utility: fragility and discriminability. Conventional iris feature extraction methods consider the concept of fragility as the feature vector instability without respect to the nature of such instability appearance. This work separates sources of the instability into natural and encodinginduced which helps deeply investigate each source of instability independently. According to the separation concept, a novel approach of iris feature vector construction is proposed. The approach consists of two steps: iris feature extraction using Gabor filtering with optimal parameters and quantization with separated preliminary optimized fragility thresholds. The proposed method has been tested on two different datasets of iris images captured under changing environmental conditions. The testing results show that the proposed method surpasses all the methods considered as a prior art by recognition accuracy on both datasets.

  9. Black holes in vector-tensor theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Lavinia; Kase, Ryotaro; Minamitsuji, Masato; Tsujikawa, Shinji

    2017-08-01

    We study static and spherically symmetric black hole (BH) solutions in second-order generalized Proca theories with nonminimal vector field derivative couplings to the Ricci scalar, the Einstein tensor, and the double dual Riemann tensor. We find concrete Lagrangians which give rise to exact BH solutions by imposing two conditions of the two identical metric components and the constant norm of the vector field. These exact solutions are described by either Reissner-Nordström (RN), stealth Schwarzschild, or extremal RN solutions with a non-trivial longitudinal mode of the vector field. We then numerically construct BH solutions without imposing these conditions. For cubic and quartic Lagrangians with power-law couplings which encompass vector Galileons as the specific cases, we show the existence of BH solutions with the difference between two non-trivial metric components. The quintic-order power-law couplings do not give rise to non-trivial BH solutions regular throughout the horizon exterior. The sixth-order and intrinsic vector-mode couplings can lead to BH solutions with a secondary hair. For all the solutions, the vector field is regular at least at the future or past horizon. The deviation from General Relativity induced by the Proca hair can be potentially tested by future measurements of gravitational waves in the nonlinear regime of gravity.

  10. Auto-tuning Dense Vector and Matrix-vector Operations for Fermi GPUs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Hans Henrik Brandenborg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider the automatic performance tuning of dense vector and matrix-vector operations on GPUs. Such operations form the backbone of level 1 and level 2 routines in the Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines (BLAS) library and are therefore of great importance in many scientific...... for dense vector and matrix-vector operations by appropriately utilizing the fine-grained parallelism of the GPU. Our tuned kernels display between 25-100% better performance than the current CUBLAS 3.2 library....

  11. Viral Vectors for in Vivo Gene Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thévenot, E.; Dufour, N.; Déglon, N.

    The transfer of DNA into the nucleus of a eukaryotic cell (gene transfer) is a central theme of modern biology. The transfer is said to be somatic when it refers to non-germline organs of a developed individual, and germline when it concerns gametes or the fertilised egg of an animal, with the aim of transmitting the relevant genetic modification to its descendents [1]. The efficient introduction of genetic material into a somatic or germline cell and the control of its expression over time have led to major advances in understanding how genes work in vivo, i.e., in living organisms (functional genomics), but also to the development of innovative therapeutic methods (gene therapy). The efficiency of gene transfer is conditioned by the vehicle used, called the vector. Desirable features for a vector are as follows: Easy to produce high titer stocks of the vector in a reproducible way. Absence of toxicity related to transduction (transfer of genetic material into the target cell, and its expression there) and no immune reaction of the organism against the vector and/or therapeutic protein. Stability in the expression of the relevant gene over time, and the possibility of regulation, e.g., to control expression of the therapeutic protein on the physiological level, or to end expression at the end of treatment. Transduction of quiescent cells should be as efficient as transduction of dividing cells. Vectors currently used fall into two categories: non-viral and viral vectors. In non-viral vectors, the DNA is complexed with polymers, lipids, or cationic detergents (described in Chap. 3). These vectors have a low risk of toxicity and immune reaction. However, they are less efficient in vivo than viral vectors when it comes to the number of cells transduced and long-term transgene expression. (Naked DNA transfer or electroporation is rather inefficient in the organism. This type of gene transfer will not be discussed here, and the interested reader is referred to the

  12. New Approach to Fractal Approximation of Vector-Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Konstantin Igudesman; Marsel Davletbaev; Gleb Shabernev

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces new approach to approximation of continuous vector-functions and vector sequences by fractal interpolation vector-functions which are multidimensional generalization of fractal interpolation functions. Best values of fractal interpolation vector-functions parameters are found. We give schemes of approximation of some sets of data and consider examples of approximation of smooth curves with different conditions.

  13. Vectorization, parallelization and porting of nuclear codes. Vectorization and parallelization. Progress report fiscal 1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, Masaaki; Ogasawara, Shinobu; Kume, Etsuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment; Ishizuki, Shigeru; Nemoto, Toshiyuki; Kawasaki, Nobuo; Kawai, Wataru [Fujitsu Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yatake, Yo-ichi [Hitachi Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    2001-02-01

    Several computer codes in the nuclear field have been vectorized, parallelized and trans-ported on the FUJITSU VPP500 system, the AP3000 system, the SX-4 system and the Paragon system at Center for Promotion of Computational Science and Engineering in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. We dealt with 18 codes in fiscal 1999. These results are reported in 3 parts, i.e., the vectorization and the parallelization part on vector processors, the parallelization part on scalar processors and the porting part. In this report, we describe the vectorization and parallelization on vector processors. In this vectorization and parallelization on vector processors part, the vectorization of Relativistic Molecular Orbital Calculation code RSCAT, a microscopic transport code for high energy nuclear collisions code JAM, three-dimensional non-steady thermal-fluid analysis code STREAM, Relativistic Density Functional Theory code RDFT and High Speed Three-Dimensional Nodal Diffusion code MOSRA-Light on the VPP500 system and the SX-4 system are described. (author)

  14. Improved Coinfection with Amphotropic Pseudotyped Retroviral Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuehong Wu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Amphotropic pseudotyped retroviral vectors have typically been used to infect target cells without prior concentration. Although this can yield high rates of infection, higher rates may be needed where highly efficient coinfection of two or more vectors is needed. In this investigation we used amphotropic retroviral vectors produced by the Plat-A cell line and studied coinfection rates using green and red fluorescent proteins (EGFP and dsRed2. Target cells were primary human fibroblasts (PHF and 3T3 cells. Unconcentrated vector preparations produced a coinfection rate of ∼4% (defined as cells that are both red and green as a percentage of all cells infected. Optimized spinoculation, comprising centrifugation at 1200 g for 2 hours at 15∘C, increased the coinfection rate to ∼10%. Concentration by centrifugation at 10,000 g or by flocculation using Polybrene increased the coinfection rate to ∼25%. Combining the two processes, concentration by Polybrene flocculation and optimized spinoculation, increased the coinfection rate to 35% (3T3 or >50% (PHF. Improved coinfection should be valuable in protocols that require high transduction by combinations of two or more retroviral vectors.

  15. Could dark energy be vector-like?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armendáriz-Picón, C.

    2004-07-01

    In this paper I explore whether a vector field can be the origin of the present stage of cosmic acceleration. In order to avoid violations of isotropy, the vector has be part of a 'cosmic triad', that is, a set of three identical vectors pointing in mutually orthogonal spatial directions. A triad is indeed able to drive a stage of late accelerated expansion in the universe, and there exist tracking attractors that render cosmic evolution insensitive to initial conditions. However, as in most other models, the onset of cosmic acceleration is determined by a parameter that has to be tuned to reproduce current observations. The triad equation of state can be sufficiently close to minus one today, and for tachyonic models it might be even less than that. I briefly analyse linear cosmological perturbation theory in the presence of a triad. It turns out that the existence of non-vanishing spatial vectors invalidates the decomposition theorem, i.e. scalar, vector and tensor perturbations do not decouple from each other. In a simplified case it is possible to analytically study the stability of the triad along the different cosmological attractors. The triad is classically stable during inflation, radiation and matter domination, but it is unstable during (late time) cosmic acceleration. I argue that this instability is not likely to have a significant impact at present.

  16. Emergence and Prevalence of Human Vector-Borne Diseases in Sink Vector Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascalou, Guilhem; Pontier, Dominique; Menu, Frédéric; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a major public health concern in most tropical and subtropical areas, and an emerging threat for more developed countries. Our understanding of the ecology, evolution and control of these diseases relies predominantly on theory and data on pathogen transmission in large self-sustaining ‘source’ populations of vectors representative of highly endemic areas. However, there are numerous places where environmental conditions are less favourable to vector populations, but where immigration allows them to persist. We built an epidemiological model to investigate the dynamics of six major human vector borne-diseases in such non self-sustaining ‘sink’ vector populations. The model was parameterized through a review of the literature, and we performed extensive sensitivity analysis to look at the emergence and prevalence of the pathogen that could be encountered in these populations. Despite the low vector abundance in typical sink populations, all six human diseases were able to spread in 15–55% of cases after accidental introduction. The rate of spread was much more strongly influenced by vector longevity, immigration and feeding rates, than by transmission and virulence of the pathogen. Prevalence in humans remained lower than 5% for dengue, leishmaniasis and Japanese encephalitis, but substantially higher for diseases with longer duration of infection; malaria and the American and African trypanosomiasis. Vector-related parameters were again the key factors, although their influence was lower than on pathogen emergence. Our results emphasize the need for ecology and evolution to be thought in the context of metapopulations made of a mosaic of sink and source habitats, and to design vector control program not only targeting areas of high vector density, but working at a larger spatial scale. PMID:22629337

  17. Reducing the risk of adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector mobilization with AAV type 5 vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, F Curtis; Li, Chengwen; Gray, Steven J; Cockrell, Shelley; Washburn, Michael; Samulski, R Jude

    2009-04-01

    Current adeno-associated virus (AAV) gene therapy vectors package a transgene flanked by the terminal repeats (TRs) of AAV type 2 (AAV2). Although these vectors are replication deficient, wild-type (wt) AAV2 prevalent in the human population could lead to replication and packaging of a type 2 TR (TR2)-flanked transgene in trans during superinfection by a helper virus, leading to "mobilization" of the vector genome from treated cells. More importantly, it appears likely that the majority of currently characterized AAV serotypes as well as the majority of new novel isolates are capable of rescuing and replicating AAV2 vector templates. To investigate this possibility, we flanked a green fluorescent protein transgene with type 2 and, the most divergent AAV serotype, type 5 TRs (TR2 or TR5). Consistent with AAV clades, AAV5 specifically replicated TR5 vectors, while AAV2 and AAV6 replicated TR2-flanked vectors. To exploit this specificity, we created a TR5 vector production system for Cap1 to Cap5. Next, we showed that persisting recombinant AAV genomes flanked by TR2s or TR5s were mobilized in vitro after addition of the cognate AAV Rep (as well as Rep6 for TR2) and adenoviral helper. Finally, we showed that a cell line containing a stably integrated wt AAV2 genome resulted in mobilization of a TR2-flanked vector but not a TR5-flanked vector upon adenoviral superinfection. Based on these data and the relative prevalence of wt AAV serotypes in the population, we propose that TR5 vectors have a significantly lower risk of mobilization and should be considered for clinical use.

  18. Emergence and prevalence of human vector-borne diseases in sink vector populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascalou, Guilhem; Pontier, Dominique; Menu, Frédéric; Gourbière, Sébastien

    2012-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases represent a major public health concern in most tropical and subtropical areas, and an emerging threat for more developed countries. Our understanding of the ecology, evolution and control of these diseases relies predominantly on theory and data on pathogen transmission in large self-sustaining 'source' populations of vectors representative of highly endemic areas. However, there are numerous places where environmental conditions are less favourable to vector populations, but where immigration allows them to persist. We built an epidemiological model to investigate the dynamics of six major human vector borne-diseases in such non self-sustaining 'sink' vector populations. The model was parameterized through a review of the literature, and we performed extensive sensitivity analysis to look at the emergence and prevalence of the pathogen that could be encountered in these populations. Despite the low vector abundance in typical sink populations, all six human diseases were able to spread in 15-55% of cases after accidental introduction. The rate of spread was much more strongly influenced by vector longevity, immigration and feeding rates, than by transmission and virulence of the pathogen. Prevalence in humans remained lower than 5% for dengue, leishmaniasis and Japanese encephalitis, but substantially higher for diseases with longer duration of infection; malaria and the American and African trypanosomiasis. Vector-related parameters were again the key factors, although their influence was lower than on pathogen emergence. Our results emphasize the need for ecology and evolution to be thought in the context of metapopulations made of a mosaic of sink and source habitats, and to design vector control program not only targeting areas of high vector density, but working at a larger spatial scale.

  19. Emergence and prevalence of human vector-borne diseases in sink vector populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilhem Rascalou

    Full Text Available Vector-borne diseases represent a major public health concern in most tropical and subtropical areas, and an emerging threat for more developed countries. Our understanding of the ecology, evolution and control of these diseases relies predominantly on theory and data on pathogen transmission in large self-sustaining 'source' populations of vectors representative of highly endemic areas. However, there are numerous places where environmental conditions are less favourable to vector populations, but where immigration allows them to persist. We built an epidemiological model to investigate the dynamics of six major human vector borne-diseases in such non self-sustaining 'sink' vector populations. The model was parameterized through a review of the literature, and we performed extensive sensitivity analysis to look at the emergence and prevalence of the pathogen that could be encountered in these populations. Despite the low vector abundance in typical sink populations, all six human diseases were able to spread in 15-55% of cases after accidental introduction. The rate of spread was much more strongly influenced by vector longevity, immigration and feeding rates, than by transmission and virulence of the pathogen. Prevalence in humans remained lower than 5% for dengue, leishmaniasis and Japanese encephalitis, but substantially higher for diseases with longer duration of infection; malaria and the American and African trypanosomiasis. Vector-related parameters were again the key factors, although their influence was lower than on pathogen emergence. Our results emphasize the need for ecology and evolution to be thought in the context of metapopulations made of a mosaic of sink and source habitats, and to design vector control program not only targeting areas of high vector density, but working at a larger spatial scale.

  20. Resonance vector soliton of the Rayleigh wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamashvili, G T

    2016-02-01

    A theory of acoustic vector solitons of self-induced transparency of the Rayleigh wave is constructed. A thin resonance transition layer on an elastic surface is considered using a model of a two-dimensional gas of impurity paramagnetic atoms or quantum dots. Explicit analytical expressions for the profile and parameters of the Rayleigh vector soliton with two different oscillation frequencies is obtained, as well as simulations of this nonlinear surface acoustic wave with realistic parameters, which can be used in acoustic experiments. It is shown that the properties of a surface vector soliton of the Rayleigh wave depend on the parameters of the resonance layer, the elastic medium, and the transverse structure of the surface acoustic wave.

  1. Phase interaction of short vector solitons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aseeva, N.V., E-mail: naseeva@hse.ru [Higher School of Economics, Faculty of Business Informatics and Applied Mathematics, State University, Bolshaya Pecherskaya 25/12, 603155 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Gromov, E.M.; Tyutin, V.V. [Higher School of Economics, Faculty of Business Informatics and Applied Mathematics, State University, Bolshaya Pecherskaya 25/12, 603155 Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation)

    2012-01-16

    An interaction of vector solitons in the frame of coupled third-order nonlinear Schrödinger equations taking into account third-order linear dispersion, nonlinear dispersion, and cross-phase modulation terms is considered. Phase nature of the solitons' interaction is shown. In particular, dependence of solitons' trajectories on initial distance between solitons is shown. Conditions of reflection and propagation of solitons through each other are obtained. -- Highlights: ► Short vector soliton's interaction in the frame of CTNSE without SRS is studied. ► Analytical and numerical approaches are considered. ► Phase effects lead to short vector soliton's interaction character change.

  2. On-demand tailored vector beams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Garcia, Benjamin; López-Mariscal, Carlos; Hernandez-Aranda, Raul I; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C

    2017-08-20

    We introduce an effective optical system to produce optical beams with arbitrary, inhomogeneous polarization states. Using our system, we are capable of generating vector beams with discretionarily chosen transverse complex fields in a straightforward way. We generate several different instances of well-known vector beams and the less common spirally polarized vector beams, as well as a full Poincaré beam. We visually show the continual transition between azimuthally and radially polarized beams via a collection of spirally polarized beams. We experimentally determine the polarization states of the generated beams and quantitatively assess the performance of our system. We find that the measured polarization distributions accurately coincide with the intended input polarization distributions.

  3. Risk based surveillance for vector borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bødker, Rene

    an increasing trend in transmission potential over the last 25 years. However the model suggested that the climate in the Baltic See Region has always permitted transmission of these diseases. The model therefore suggests that a presently unknown factor until recently prevented introduction and spread......Increased temperatures and changes in rainfall pattern are likely to facilitate the spread and establishment of new vector borne diseases in the Baltic See Region. There are a large number of potential vector borne threats to the area. Existing endemic vector borne diseases are likely to increase...... and new exotic diseases like Usutu and West Nile Virus may lead to outbreaks in the region. In the worst case the combined effect of climate change and globalization may potentially lead to European outbreaks of important zoonotic mosquito borne infections like Rift Valley Fever in cattle and Japanese...

  4. Generating Series for Nested Bethe Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Khoroshkin

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We reformulate nested relations between off-shell U_q(^gl_N Bethe vectors as a certain equation on generating series of strings of the composed U_q(^gl_N currents. Using inversion of the generating series we find a new type of hierarchical relations between universal off-shell Bethe vectors, useful for a derivation of Bethe equation. As an example of application, we use these relations for a derivation of analytical Bethe ansatz equations [Arnaudon D. et al., Ann. Henri Poincaré 7 (2006, 1217-1268, math-ph/0512037] for the parameters of universal Bethe vectors of the algebra U_q(^gl_2.

  5. Interactions between parasites and insects vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Hurd

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This review stresses the importance of studies that will provide a basic understanding of the pathology of parasite-infected vector insects. This knowledge should be a vital component of the very focussed initiatives currently being funded in the areas of vector control. Vector fecundity reduction is discussed as an example of such pathology. Underlying mechanisms are being investigated in a model system, Hymenolepis diminuta-infected Tenebrio molitor and in Onchocerca-infected blackflies and Plasmodium-infected Anopheles stephensi. In all cases, host vitellogenesis is disrupted by the parasite and, in the tapeworm/beetle model, interaction between the parasite and the endocrine control of the insect's reproductive physiology has been demonstrated.

  6. Efficient intracellular assembly of papillomaviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buck, Christopher B; Pastrana, Diana V; Lowy, Douglas R; Schiller, John T

    2004-01-01

    Although the papillomavirus structural proteins, L1 and L2, can spontaneously coassemble to form virus-like particles, currently available methods for production of L1/L2 particles capable of transducing reporter plasmids into mammalian cells are technically demanding and relatively low-yield. In this report, we describe a simple 293 cell transfection method for efficient intracellular production of papillomaviral-based gene transfer vectors carrying reporter plasmids. Using bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) and human papillomavirus type 16 as model papillomaviruses, we have developed a system for producing papillomaviral vector stocks with titers of several billion transducing units per milliliter. Production of these vectors requires both L1 and L2, and transduction can be prevented by papillomavirus-neutralizing antibodies. The stocks can be purified by an iodixanol (OptiPrep) gradient centrifugation procedure that is substantially more effective than standard cesium chloride gradient purification. Although earlier data had suggested a potential role for the viral early protein E2, we found that E2 protein expression did not enhance the intracellular production of BPV1 vectors. It was also possible to encapsidate reporter plasmids devoid of BPV1 DNA sequences. BPV1 vector production efficiency was significantly influenced by the size of the target plasmid being packaged. Use of 6-kb target plasmids resulted in BPV1 vector yields that were higher than those with target plasmids closer to the native 7.9-kb size of papillomavirus genomes. The results suggest that the intracellular assembly of papillomavirus structural proteins around heterologous reporter plasmids is surprisingly promiscuous and may be driven primarily by a size discrimination mechanism.

  7. Black hole superradiance signatures of ultralight vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baryakhtar, Masha; Lasenby, Robert; Teo, Mae

    2017-08-01

    The process of superradiance can extract angular momentum and energy from astrophysical black holes (BHs) to populate gravitationally bound states with an exponentially large number of light bosons. We analytically calculate superradiant growth rates for vectors around rotating BHs in the regime where the vector Compton wavelength is much larger than the BH size. Spin-1 bound states have superradiance times as short as a second around stellar BHs, growing up to a thousand times faster than their spin-0 counterparts. The fast rates allow us to use measurements of rapidly spinning BHs in x-ray binaries to exclude a wide range of masses for weakly coupled spin-1 particles, 5 ×10-14-2 ×10-11 eV ; lighter masses in the range 6 ×10-20-2 ×10-17 eV start to be constrained by supermassive BH spin measurements at a lower level of confidence. We also explore routes to detection of new vector particles possible with the advent of gravitational wave (GW) astronomy. The LIGO-Virgo Collaboration could discover hints of a new light vector particle in statistical analyses of masses and spins of merging BHs. Vector annihilations source continuous monochromatic gravitational radiation which could be observed by current GW observatories. At design sensitivity, Advanced LIGO may measure up to thousands of annihilation signals from within the Milky Way, while hundreds of BHs born in binary mergers across the observable Universe may superradiate vector bound states and become new beacons of monochromatic gravitational waves.

  8. Application of Bred Vectors To Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corazza, M.; Kalnay, E.; Patil, Dj

    We introduced a statistic, the BV-dimension, to measure the effective local finite-time dimensionality of the atmosphere. We show that this dimension is often quite low, and suggest that this finding has important implications for data assimilation and the accuracy of weather forecasting (Patil et al, 2001). The original database for this study was the forecasts of the NCEP global ensemble forecasting system. The initial differences between the control forecast and the per- turbed forecasts are called bred vectors. The control and perturbed initial conditions valid at time t=n(t are evolved using the forecast model until time t=(n+1) (t. The differences between the perturbed and the control forecasts are scaled down to their initial amplitude, and constitute the bred vectors valid at (n+1) (t. Their growth rate is typically about 1.5/day. The bred vectors are similar by construction to leading Lya- punov vectors except that they have small but finite amplitude, and they are valid at finite times. The original NCEP ensemble data set has 5 independent bred vectors. We define a local bred vector at each grid point by choosing the 5 by 5 grid points centered at the grid point (a region of about 1100km by 1100km), and using the north-south and east- west velocity components at 500mb pressure level to form a 50 dimensional column vector. Since we have k=5 global bred vectors, we also have k local bred vectors at each grid point. We estimate the effective dimensionality of the subspace spanned by the local bred vectors by performing a singular value decomposition (EOF analysis). The k local bred vector columns form a 50xk matrix M. The singular values s(i) of M measure the extent to which the k column unit vectors making up the matrix M point in the direction of v(i). We define the bred vector dimension as BVDIM={Sum[s(i)]}^2/{Sum[s(i)]^2} For example, if 4 out of the 5 vectors lie along v, and one lies along v, the BV- dimension would be BVDIM[sqrt(4), 1, 0

  9. Integrated vector management for malaria control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Impoinvil Daniel E

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Integrated vector management (IVM is defined as "a rational decision-making process for the optimal use of resources for vector control" and includes five key elements: 1 evidence-based decision-making, 2 integrated approaches 3, collaboration within the health sector and with other sectors, 4 advocacy, social mobilization, and legislation, and 5 capacity-building. In 2004, the WHO adopted IVM globally for the control of all vector-borne diseases. Important recent progress has been made in developing and promoting IVM for national malaria control programmes in Africa at a time when successful malaria control programmes are scaling-up with insecticide-treated nets (ITN and/or indoor residual spraying (IRS coverage. While interventions using only ITNs and/or IRS successfully reduce transmission intensity and the burden of malaria in many situations, it is not clear if these interventions alone will achieve those critical low levels that result in malaria elimination. Despite the successful employment of comprehensive integrated malaria control programmes, further strengthening of vector control components through IVM is relevant, especially during the "end-game" where control is successful and further efforts are required to go from low transmission situations to sustained local and country-wide malaria elimination. To meet this need and to ensure sustainability of control efforts, malaria control programmes should strengthen their capacity to use data for decision-making with respect to evaluation of current vector control programmes, employment of additional vector control tools in conjunction with ITN/IRS tactics, case-detection and treatment strategies, and determine how much and what types of vector control and interdisciplinary input are required to achieve malaria elimination. Similarly, on a global scale, there is a need for continued research to identify and evaluate new tools for vector control that can be integrated with

  10. Vector domain decomposition schemes for parabolic equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabishchevich, P. N.

    2017-09-01

    A new class of domain decomposition schemes for finding approximate solutions of timedependent problems for partial differential equations is proposed and studied. A boundary value problem for a second-order parabolic equation is used as a model problem. The general approach to the construction of domain decomposition schemes is based on partition of unity. Specifically, a vector problem is set up for solving problems in individual subdomains. Stability conditions for vector regionally additive schemes of first- and second-order accuracy are obtained.

  11. [Conflicts and vector-borne diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2010-01-11

    Based on literature and personal experiences, vector-borne diseases and conflicts are reviewed. Simple rapid diagnostic tests for three important parasitoses are available. Resort is often made to case definitions and to presumptive treatment. Resistance is an emerging problem. Vaccines are still not available for most diseases. Promising preventive methods, including long-lasting impregnated bed-nets and tents, are available. War has been an impetus for disclosing life-cycles of vector-borne diseases and for control methods; peace, reconciliation and poverty reduction are required to achieve lasting control.

  12. Vectorized algorithms for spiking neural network simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brette, Romain; Goodman, Dan F M

    2011-06-01

    High-level languages (Matlab, Python) are popular in neuroscience because they are flexible and accelerate development. However, for simulating spiking neural networks, the cost of interpretation is a bottleneck. We describe a set of algorithms to simulate large spiking neural networks efficiently with high-level languages using vector-based operations. These algorithms constitute the core of Brian, a spiking neural network simulator written in the Python language. Vectorized simulation makes it possible to combine the flexibility of high-level languages with the computational efficiency usually associated with compiled languages.

  13. Retrotransposon vectors for gene delivery in plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Yi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons are abundant components of plant genomes, and although some plant retrotransposons have been used as insertional mutagens, these mobile genetic elements have not been widely exploited for plant genome manipulation. In vertebrates and yeast, retrotransposons and retroviruses are routinely altered to carry additional genes that are copied into complementary (cDNA through reverse transcription. Integration of cDNA results in gene delivery; recombination of cDNA with homologous chromosomal sequences can create targeted gene modifications. Plant retrotransposon-based vectors, therefore, may provide new opportunities for plant genome engineering. Results A retrotransposon vector system was developed for gene delivery in plants based on the Tnt1 element from Nicotiana tabacum. Mini-Tnt1 transfer vectors were constructed that lack coding sequences yet retain the 5' and 3' long terminal repeats (LTRs and adjacent cis sequences required for reverse transcription. The internal coding region of Tnt1 was replaced with a neomycin phosphotransferase gene to monitor replication by reverse transcription. Two different mini-Tnt1 s were developed: one with the native 5' LTR and the other with a chimeric 5' LTR that had the first 233 bp replaced by the CaMV 35 S promoter. After transfer into tobacco protoplasts, both vectors undergo retrotransposition using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by endogenous Tnt1 elements. The transposition frequencies of mini-Tnt1 vectors are comparable with native Tnt1 elements, and like the native elements, insertion sites are within or near coding sequences. In this paper, we provide evidence that template switching occurs during mini-Tnt1 reverse transcription, indicating that multiple copies of Tnt1 mRNA are packaged into virus-like particles. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that mini-Tnt1 vectors can replicate efficiently in tobacco cells using GAG and POL proteins provided in trans by

  14. Variable ordering structures in vector optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Eichfelder, Gabriele

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to vector optimization with variable ordering structures, i.e., to optimization problems with a vector-valued objective function where the elements in the objective space are compared based on a variable ordering structure: instead of a partial ordering defined by a convex cone, we see a whole family of convex cones, one attached to each element of the objective space. The book starts by presenting several applications that have recently sparked new interest in these optimization problems, and goes on to discuss fundamentals and important results on a wide ra

  15. Vector Fields European user group meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    The "Vector Fields European user group meeting" will take place at CERN on 26 and 27 September 2007. Within this framework two workshops are organized at the CERN Training Centre: 24 September 2007
 Modelling Magnets with Opera 25 September 2007
Modelling of Charged Particle Beam Devices with Opera If you are interested in attending the workshop or the user group meeting please contact Julie Shepherd (Vector Fields) or Pierre Baehler (CERN) directly at: Julie.Shepherd@vectorfields.co.uk, +44 (0) 1865 854933 or +44 (0) 1865 370151 Pierre.Baehler@cern.ch, 75016 / 160156.

  16. Learning and Memory in Disease Vector Insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinauger, Clément; Lahondère, Chloé; Cohuet, Anna; Lazzari, Claudio R; Riffell, Jeffrey A

    2016-10-01

    Learning and memory plays an important role in host preference and parasite transmission by disease vector insects. Historically there has been a dearth of standardized protocols that permit testing their learning abilities, thus limiting discussion on the potential epidemiological consequences of learning and memory to a largely speculative extent. However, with increasing evidence that individual experience and associative learning can affect processes such as oviposition site selection and host preference, it is timely to review the recently acquired knowledge, identify research gaps and discuss the implication of learning in disease vector insects in perspective with control strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Constraints on vector meson photoproduction spin observables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, Frank

    2000-01-01

    Extraction of spin observables from vector meson photoproduction on a nucleon target is described. Starting from density matrix elements in the vector meson's rest frame, we transform to spin observables in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame. Several constraints on the transformed density matrix and on the spin observables follow from requiring that the angular distribution and the density matrix be positive definite. A set of constraints that are required in order to extract meaningful spin observables from forthcoming data are enunciated.

  18. Vector coherent states for nanoparticle systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aremua, Isiaka [Institut de Mathematiques et de Sciences Physiques (IMSP), University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 613 Porto-Novo (Benin); Hounkonnou, Mahouton Norbert, E-mail: iaremua@imsp-uac.org, E-mail: norbert.hounkonnou@cipma.uac.bj [International Chair of Mathematical Physics and Applications (ICMPA-UNESCO Chair), University of Abomey-Calavi, 072 BP 50 Cotonou (Benin)

    2011-11-18

    The first part of this work deals with a formalism of vector coherent states construction for a system of M Fermi-type modes associated with N bosonic modes. Then follows a generalization to a Hamiltonian describing the translational motion of the center of mass of a nanoparticle. The latter gives rise to a new mechanism for the electronic energy relaxation in nanocrystals, intensively studied today in condensed matter physics. Finite degeneracies of the involved Hamiltonian systems are also investigated. The defined vector coherent states satisfy relevant mathematical properties of continuity, resolution of identity, temporal stability and action identity. (paper)

  19. Vector Fields and Flows on Differentiable Stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    A. Hepworth, Richard

    2009-01-01

    and uniqueness of flows on a manifold as well as the author's existing results for orbifolds. It sets the scene for a discussion of Morse Theory on a general proper stack and also paves the way for the categorification of other key aspects of differential geometry such as the tangent bundle and the Lie algebra......This paper introduces the notions of vector field and flow on a general differentiable stack. Our main theorem states that the flow of a vector field on a compact proper differentiable stack exists and is unique up to a uniquely determined 2-cell. This extends the usual result on the existence...

  20. The Cross Product of Two Vectors Is Not Just Another Vector--A Major Misconception Being Perpetuated in Calculus and Vector Analysis Textbooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elk, Seymour B.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that the cross product of two vectors can be more easily and accurately explained by starting from the perspective of dyadics because then the concept of vector multiplication has a simple geometrical picture that encompasses both the dot and cross products in any number of dimensions in terms of orthogonal unit vector components. (AIM)

  1. [Sendai virus vector: vector development and its application to health care and biotechnology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Akihiro

    2007-06-01

    Sendai virus (SeV) is an enveloped virus with a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA genome and a member of the paramyxovirus family. We have developed SeV vector which has shown a high efficiently of gene transfer and expression of foreign genes to a wide range of dividing and non-dividing mammalian cells and tissues. One of the characteristics of the vector is that the genome is located exclusively in the cytoplasm of infected cells and does not go through a DNA phase; thus there is no concern about unwanted integration of foreign sequences into chromosomal DNA. Therefore, this new class of "cytoplasmic RNA vector", an RNA vector with cytoplasmic expression, is expected to be a safer and more efficient viral vector than existing vectors for application to human therapy in various fields including gene therapy and vaccination. In this review, I describe development of Sendai virus vector, its application in the field of biotechnology and clinical application aiming to treat for a large number of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular disease, infectious diseases and neurologic disorders.

  2. Host and vector-dependent effects on the risk of germline transmission of AAV vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Favaro, Patricia; Downey, Harre D; Zhou, J Shangzhen; Wright, J Fraser; Hauck, Bernd; Mingozzi, Federico; High, Katherine A; Arruda, Valder R

    2009-06-01

    The assessment of the risk of germline transmission of vector-coded sequences is critical for clinical translation of gene transfer strategies. We used rabbit models to analyze the risk of germline transmission of adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors. Intravenous injection of AAV-2 or AAV-8 resulted in liver-mediated, long-term expression of therapeutic levels of human factor IX (hFIX) in a dose-dependent manner. In high-dose cohorts, AAV-8 resulted in twofold higher levels of circulating hFIX and of vector DNA in liver compared to AAV-2. Vector sequences were found in the semen of all rabbits. The kinetics of vector clearance from semen was dose- and time-dependent but serotype-independent. No late recurrence of AAV-8 sequences was found in the semen over several consecutive cycles of spermatogenesis. In a novel rabbit model, AAV-2 or AAV-8 sequences were detected in the semen of vasectomized animals that lack germ cells. Therefore, structures of the genitourinary (GU) tract, as well as the testis, contribute significantly to vector shedding in the semen. Collectively, data from these two models suggest that the risk of inadvertent germline transmission in males by AAV-8 vectors is low, similar to that of AAV-2, and that AAV dissemination to the semen is in part modulated by host-dependent factors.

  3. Integrating Transgenic Vector Manipulation with Clinical Interventions to Manage Vector-Borne Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Kenichi W; Gould, Fred; Lloyd, Alun L

    2016-03-01

    Many vector-borne diseases lack effective vaccines and medications, and the limitations of traditional vector control have inspired novel approaches based on using genetic engineering to manipulate vector populations and thereby reduce transmission. Yet both the short- and long-term epidemiological effects of these transgenic strategies are highly uncertain. If neither vaccines, medications, nor transgenic strategies can by themselves suffice for managing vector-borne diseases, integrating these approaches becomes key. Here we develop a framework to evaluate how clinical interventions (i.e., vaccination and medication) can be integrated with transgenic vector manipulation strategies to prevent disease invasion and reduce disease incidence. We show that the ability of clinical interventions to accelerate disease suppression can depend on the nature of the transgenic manipulation deployed (e.g., whether vector population reduction or replacement is attempted). We find that making a specific, individual strategy highly effective may not be necessary for attaining public-health objectives, provided suitable combinations can be adopted. However, we show how combining only partially effective antimicrobial drugs or vaccination with transgenic vector manipulations that merely temporarily lower vector competence can amplify disease resurgence following transient suppression. Thus, transgenic vector manipulation that cannot be sustained can have adverse consequences-consequences which ineffective clinical interventions can at best only mitigate, and at worst temporarily exacerbate. This result, which arises from differences between the time scale on which the interventions affect disease dynamics and the time scale of host population dynamics, highlights the importance of accounting for the potential delay in the effects of deploying public health strategies on long-term disease incidence. We find that for systems at the disease-endemic equilibrium, even modest

  4. Broad patterns in domestic vector-borne Trypanosoma cruzi transmission dynamics: synanthropic animals and vector control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jennifer K; Bartsch, Sarah M; Lee, Bruce Y; Dobson, Andrew P

    2015-10-22

    Chagas disease (caused by Trypanosoma cruzi) is the most important neglected tropical disease (NTD) in Latin America, infecting an estimated 5.7 million people in the 21 countries where it is endemic. It is one of the NTDs targeted for control and elimination by the 2020 London Declaration goals, with the first goal being to interrupt intra-domiciliary vector-borne T. cruzi transmission. A key question in domestic T. cruzi transmission is the role that synanthropic animals play in T. cruzi transmission to humans. Here, we ask, (1) do synanthropic animals need to be targeted in Chagas disease prevention policies?, and (2) how does the presence of animals affect the efficacy of vector control? We developed a simple mathematical model to simulate domestic vector-borne T. cruzi transmission and to specifically examine the interaction between the presence of synanthropic animals and effects of vector control. We used the model to explore how the interactions between triatomine bugs, humans and animals impact the number and proportion of T. cruzi-infected bugs and humans. We then examined how T. cruzi dynamics change when control measures targeting vector abundance are introduced into the system. We found that the presence of synanthropic animals slows the speed of T. cruzi transmission to humans, and increases the sensitivity of T. cruzi transmission dynamics to vector control measures at comparable triatomine carrying capacities. However, T. cruzi transmission is amplified when triatomine carrying capacity increases with the abundance of syntathoropic hosts. Our results suggest that in domestic T. cruzi transmission scenarios where no vector control measures are in place, a reduction in synanthropic animals may slow T. cruzi transmission to humans, but it would not completely eliminate transmission. To reach the 2020 goal of interrupting intra-domiciliary T. cruzi transmission, it is critical to target vector populations. Additionally, where vector control measures

  5. Imaging of Sleeping Beauty-Modified CD19-Specific T Cells Expressing HSV1-Thymidine Kinase by Positron Emission Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Amer M; Manuri, Pallavi R; Olivares, Simon; Flores, Leo; Mi, Tiejuan; Huls, Helen; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Turkman, Nashaat; Paolillo, Vincenzo; Roszik, Jason; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A; Alauddin, Mian; Gelovani, Juri; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2016-12-01

    We have incorporated a positron emission tomography (PET) functionality in T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to non-invasively monitor the adoptively transferred cells. We engineered T cells to express CD19-specific CAR, firefly luciferase (ffLuc), and herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (TK) using the non-viral-based Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system adapted for human application. Electroporated primary T cells were propagated on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells. After 4 weeks, 90 % of cultured cells exhibited specific killing of CD19(+) targets in vitro, could be ablated by ganciclovir, and were detected in vivo by bioluminescent imaging and PET following injection of 2'-deoxy-2'-[(18)F]fluoro-5-ethyl-1-β-D-arabinofuranosyl-uracil ([(18)F]FEAU). This is the first report demonstrating the use of SB transposition to generate T cells which may be detected using PET laying the foundation for imaging the distribution and trafficking of T cells in patients treated for B cell malignancies.

  6. A serious adverse surgical event: Management of suspected HSV-1 keratitis in a donor cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Rebecca; Steger, Bernhard; Chen, Jern Y; Romano, Vito

    2017-01-01

    To describe the management of a serious adverse event in a patient undergoing penetrating keratoplasty (PK). A 68-year-old man underwent PK for an aphakic bullous keratopathy following previous complicated cataract surgery. He had no past history of herpetic disease. Storage of the corneoscleral disc in the transport bottle precluded microscopic examination. After placement of the trephined donor cornea on the open eye of the recipient, a large dendritiform geographic ulcer was noted on the donor cornea. A replacement cornea was used after changing potentially contaminated instruments. Intravenous antiviral treatment was commenced intraoperatively to reduce the risk of infection to the central nervous system. Postoperatively, oral and topical antiviral treatment was commenced and 6 months following surgery the patient developed a geographic corneal ulcer at the graft host interface. Containers to transport corneoscleral discs should enable microscopic examination by the surgeon prior to use. High dose systemic antivirals may reduce the risk of herpetic disease involving the posterior segment of the eye and neuroretina in the aphakic eye and spread to the central nervous system.

  7. Activation of endogenous retrovirus reverse transcriptase in multiple sclerosis patient lymphocytes by inactivated HSV-1, HHV-6 and VZV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brudek, Tomasz; Lühdorf, Pernille; Christensen, Tove

    2007-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and herpesviruses have been associated with the development of multiple sclerosis (MS). These virus groups interact with each other and have been shown to induce synergistic immune responses. Here, we focus on the possible role of herpesviruses as contributing...

  8. New Constraints on Light Vectors Coupled to Anomalous Currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, Jeff A.; Lasenby, Robert; Pospelov, Maxim

    2017-10-01

    We derive new constraints on light vectors coupled to standard model (SM) fermions, when the corresponding SM current is broken by the chiral anomaly. The cancellation of the anomaly by heavy fermions results, in the low-energy theory, in Wess-Zumino-type interactions between the new vector and the SM gauge bosons. These interactions are determined by the requirement that the heavy sector preserves the SM gauge groups and lead to (energy /vector mass )2 enhanced rates for processes involving the longitudinal mode of the new vector. Taking the example of a vector coupled to a vector coupled to SM baryon number, Z decays and flavor-changing neutral current meson decays via the new vector can occur with (weak scale /vector mass )2 enhanced rates. These processes place significantly stronger coupling bounds than others considered in the literature, over a wide range of vector masses.

  9. Effect of genome size on AAV vector packaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhijian; Yang, Hongyan; Colosi, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vector genomes have been limited to 5 kilobases (kb) in length because their packaging limit was thought to be similar to the size of the parent AAV genome. Recent reports claim that significantly larger vector genomes can be packaged intact. We examined the packaged vector genomes from plasmid-encoded AAV vectors that ranged from 4.7 to 8.7 kb in length, using AAV types 2, 5, and 8 capsids. Southern blot analysis indicated that packaged AAV vector genomes never exceeded 5.2 kb in length irrespective of the size of the plasmid-encoded vector or the capsid type. This result was confirmed by vector genome probing with strand-specific oligonucleotides. The packaged vector genomes derived from plasmid-encoded vectors exceeding 5 kb were heterogeneous in length and truncated on the 5' end. Despite their truncated genomes, vector preparations produced from plasmid-encoded vectors exceeding 5.2 kb mediated reporter gene expression in vitro at high multiplicity of infection (MOI). The efficiency of expression was substantially lower than that of reporter vectors with genomes <5 kb in length. We propose that transcriptionally functional, intact vector genomes are generated in cells transduced at high MOI from the fragmentary genomes of these larger vectors, probably by recombination.

  10. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    containing water in the laboratory. The daily dietary ... regions of cultivation and between plants of the same accession (Dawit Tadesse, 1993). In Ethiopia, the ... Lysine is the amino acid that is most often deficient in other grain foods such as ...

  11. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    The average consecutive year's standardized raw data were considered for statistical analysis. Statistical analysis was computed using the computer program Gen Stat discovery, edition 3 and. NTSYpc, version 2 (Rohlf, 1998). RESULTS AND DISCUSSION. Enset agro-morphological diversity determined by cluster analysis.

  12. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    Gerendes, J., Zhu, Z., Bendixen, R., Ratcliffe, R.G. and. Sattelmacxher, B. (1997). Physiological and biochemical processes related to ammonium toxicity in higher plants. Z. Pflanzen Ernahrung und Bodenkunde 160:239–251. 17. Haynes, R.J., Cameron, K.C., Goh, K.M. and. Sherlock, R.R. (1986). Mineral Nitrogen in Plant.

  13. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    translatable coat protein (CP) gene fragments of Potato virus Y (PVY), Potato leafroll virus (PLRV) and. Potato virus X (PVX) with and without selectable marker gene was conducted using Agrobacterium- mediated transformation. Preliminary ...... Plant–cell. 5:1749–1759. 30. Lu, H-J., Zhou, X.R., Gong, Z–X. and Upadhyaya,.

  14. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    ABSTRACT: The area between Gohatsion town and the Abay River in Central Ethiopia is witnessing severe problems of landslides during rainy seasons. These landslides in the area affect the safe functioning of the road, which is an essential link between Addis Ababa and the northwestern part of the country. In the present ...

  15. Determination of scanned virus-free potato planting materials by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Positive selection for the identification of virus–free potato planting material was evaluated in four locations in Cameroon. Leaves from asymptomatic plants were randomly collected, the plants marked and tubers collected four weeks later, and screened with DAS-ELISA for PLRV, PVY, PVA, PVX, PVS and PVM presence.

  16. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    ABSTRACT: Enset is an adaptable and drought resistant plant with multiple usages including consumption as co-staple diet in some parts of Ethiopia and has been dubbed “a tree against hunger”. With the plant gaining increased recognition as a food and cash crop, the need for multi- faceted research initiatives appears to ...

  17. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    it severely attacks the vascular system of the plant causing wilting and eventually dieback. (Tesfaye Alemu, 2012). It has been reported that the high cost of pesticides, emergence of fungicide-resistant pathogen biotopes and other social and health related impacts on the environment have increased interest in agricultural ...

  18. Virus free seed potato production through sprout cutting technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to evaluate the performance of sprout cutting for seed potato production against virus infection, a study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC) Foundation Seed Potato Production Farm, Domar, Nilphamary, Bangladesh in 2005 - 2006. Sprout cut seedlings were grown under ...

  19. Virus free seed potato production through sprout cutting technique ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-09-06

    Sep 6, 2010 ... In order to evaluate the performance of sprout cutting for seed potato production against virus infection, a study was conducted at Bangladesh Agricultural Development Corporation (BADC). Foundation Seed Potato Production Farm, Domar, Nilphamary, Bangladesh in 2005 - 2006. Sprout cut seedlings ...

  20. IN VITRO PRODUCTION OF VIRUS FREE SWEET POTATO ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    preferred customer

    ABSTRACT: Wild edible plants are valuable resources in rural livelihoods for supplementing the staple food, ensuring food security, dietary diversification and sustained income. This study aimed to identify and document indigenous uses and management of wild edible plants being used by the. Afar and Oromo ...

  1. Method for transforming a feature vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuis, Raymond N.J.; Chen, C.; Kevenaar, Thomas A.M.; Akkermans, Antonius H.M.

    2007-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method for transforming a feature vector comprising a first and a second feature represented by a first and a second feature value, respectively, into a feature code using an encoder, said feature code usable in an algorithm and having a predetermined number of

  2. Learning Latent Vector Spaces for Product Search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gysel, C.; de Rijke, M.; Kanoulas, E.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce a novel latent vector space model that jointly learns the latent representations of words, e-commerce products and a mapping between the two without the need for explicit annotations. The power of the model lies in its ability to directly model the discriminative relation between

  3. Ecology of parasite-vector interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Koenraadt, C.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Vector-borne diseases continue to be one of the most important determinants affecting human and animal health. Large numbers of people suffer from diseases like malaria, dengue, filariasis and leishmaniasis, especially in the tropics. Whereas these diseases were eradicated from the temperate climate

  4. Bethe vectors for XXX-spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdík, Čestmír; Fuksa, Jan; Isaev, Alexei

    2014-11-01

    The paper deals with algebraic Bethe ansatz for XXX-spin chain. Generators of Yang-Baxter algebra are expressed in basis of free fermions and used to calculate explicit form of Bethe vectors. Their relation to N-component models is used to prove conjecture about their form in general. Some remarks on inhomogeneous XXX-spin chain are included.

  5. Angry Birds Mathematics: Parabolas and Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, John H.

    2013-01-01

    John Lamb, a professor of mathematics education and a teacher of high school precalculus, describes how he developed a way to use the elements of the game Angry Birds® as a platform to engage his students with the concepts of parabolas and vectors. The game could be categorized as a type of microworld game in which students interact with the…

  6. Vector boson production in hadron nuclear collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, W.D. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA)); Whitmore, J. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Lab. for Elementary Particle Science); Toothacker, W.S. (Pennsylvania State Univ., Mont Alto (USA)); Hill, J.C.; Neale, W.W. (Cambridge Univ. (UK)); Lucas, P.; Voyvodic, L. (Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA)); Ammar, R.; Gress, J. (Kansas Univ., Lawrence (USA)); Bishop, J.M.; Biswas, N.N.; Cason, N.M.; Mattingly, M.C.K.; Ruchti, R.C.; Shephard, W.D. (Notre Dame Univ., IN (USA))

    1991-01-31

    We report a search for the production of light quark vector bosons in hadron-nucleus collisions at 100 GeV bombarding energy. We find surprisingly few of these resonances produced. The lack of these particles is though to be due to the absorption by the many modestly energetic nucleons and the few anti-nucleons in the final state. (orig.).

  7. Malaria vector control: current and future strategies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Takken, W.; Knols, B.G.J.

    2009-01-01

    The recently announced call for malaria eradication represents a new page in the history of this disease. This has been triggered by remarkable reductions in malaria resulting from combined application of effective drugs and vector control. However, this strategy is threatened by development of

  8. Generating and measuring nondiffracting vector Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available modulator and an azimuthally varying birefringent plate, known as a q-plate. We extend our control of both the geometric and dynamic phases to perform a polarization and modal decomposition on the vector field. We study both single-charged Bessel beams...

  9. NLO vector boson production with light jets

    CERN Document Server

    Bern, Z; Dixon, L J; Cordero, F Febres; Forde, D; Gleisberg, T; Hoeche, S; Ita, H; Kosower, D A; Maitre, D; Ozeren, K

    2012-01-01

    In this contribution we present recent progress in the computation of next-to-leading order (NLO) QCD corrections for the production of an electroweak vector boson in association with jets at hadron colliders. We focus on results obtained using the virtual matrix element library BLACKHAT in conjunction with SHERPA, focusing on results relevant to understanding the background to top production.

  10. Linearization of germs of hyperbolic vector fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonckaert, P; Naudot, [No Value; Yang, JZ

    2003-01-01

    We develop a normal form to express asymptotically a conjugacy between a germ of resonant vector field and its linear part. We show that such an asymptotic expression can be written in terms of functions of the Logarithmic Mourtada type. To cite this article: P Bonckaert et al., C. R. Acad. Sci.

  11. Perturbations of ultralight vector field dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Cembranos, J A R; Jareño, S J Núñez

    2016-01-01

    We study the dynamics of cosmological perturbations in models of dark matter based on ultralight coherent vector fields. Very much as for scalar field dark matter, we find two different regimes in the evolution: for modes with $k^2\\ll {\\cal H}ma$, we have a particle-like behaviour indistinguishable from cold dark matter, whereas for modes with $k^2\\gg {\\cal H}ma$, we get a wave-like behaviour in which the sound speed is non-vanishing and of order $c_s^2\\simeq k^2/m^2a^2$. This implies that, also in these models, structure formation could be suppressed on small scales. However, unlike the scalar case, the fact that the background evolution contains a non-vanishing homogeneous vector field implies that, in general, the evolution of the three kinds of perturbations (scalar, vector and tensor) can no longer be decoupled at the linear level. More specifically, in the particle regime, the three types of perturbations are actually decoupled, whereas in the wave regime, the three vector field perturbations generate o...

  12. Efficient Multiplicative Updates for Support Vector Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Potluru, Vamsi K.; Plis, Sergie N; Mørup, Morten

    2009-01-01

    The dual formulation of the support vector machine (SVM) objective function is an instance of a nonnegative quadratic programming problem. We reformulate the SVM objective function as a matrix factorization problem which establishes a connection with the regularized nonnegative matrix factorizati...

  13. Generalized Derivative Based Kernelized Learning Vector Quantization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schleif, Frank-Michael; Villmann, Thomas; Hammer, Barbara; Schneider, Petra; Biehl, Michael; Fyfe, Colin; Tino, Peter; Charles, Darryl; Garcia-Osoro, Cesar; Yin, Hujun

    2010-01-01

    We derive a novel derivative based version of kernelized Generalized Learning Vector Quantization (KGLVQ) as an effective, easy to interpret, prototype based and kernelized classifier. It is called D-KGLVQ and we provide generalization error bounds, experimental results on real world data, showing

  14. [Conflicts and vector-borne diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygbjerg, Ib Christian

    2010-01-01

    not available for most diseases. Promising preventive methods, including long-lasting impregnated bed-nets and tents, are available. War has been an impetus for disclosing life-cycles of vector-borne diseases and for control methods; peace, reconciliation and poverty reduction are required to achieve lasting...

  15. Closed-chain principal vector linkages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijk, V.; Flores, Paulo; Viadero, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    For high-speed robotics dynamic balance is an important property for low base vibrations and short cycle times. To consider dynamic balance in the beginning of the design process of a manipulator, mechanism solutions can be synthesized from principal vector linkages, which are fundamental kinematic

  16. Artificial neural networks and support vector mac

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Quantitative structure-property relationships of electroluminescent materials: Artificial neural networks and support vector machines to predict electroluminescence of organic molecules. ALANA FERNANDES GOLIN and RICARDO STEFANI. ∗. Laboratório de Estudos de Materiais (LEMAT), Instituto de Ciências Exatas e da ...

  17. Creating and decomposing vector Bessel beams

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dudley, Angela L

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available -1 58th Annual SAIP Conference, Richards Bay, 8-12 July 2013 Creating and decomposing vector Bessel beams Angela Dudley1,*, Yanming Li2, Thandeka Mhlanga1, Michael Escuti2 and Andrew Forbes1 1 CSIR National Laser Centre, Pretoria, South...

  18. High performance computing on vector systems

    CERN Document Server

    Roller, Sabine

    2008-01-01

    Presents the developments in high-performance computing and simulation on modern supercomputer architectures. This book covers trends in hardware and software development in general and specifically the vector-based systems and heterogeneous architectures. It presents innovative fields like coupled multi-physics or multi-scale simulations.

  19. Vector mesons in strongly interacting matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    higher statistics and inrceased acceptance in particular for low-momentum vector mesons. Keywords. Hadrons ... the mass splittings to decrease due to mass shifts or that the mass distributions of hadrons become softer in .... mass distribution for the most central collisions is compared in figure 3 with the spectral function of a ...

  20. Dual AAV Vectors for Stargardt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapani, Ivana

    2018-01-01

    Stargardt disease (STGD1), due to mutations in the large ABCA4 gene, is the most common inherited macular degeneration in humans. Attempts at developing gene therapy approaches for treatment of STGD1 are currently ongoing. Among all the vectors available for gene therapy of inherited retinal diseases, those based on adeno-associated viruses (AAV) are the most promising given the efficacy shown in various animal models and their excellent safety profile in humans, as confirmed in many ongoing clinical trials. However, one of the main obstacles for the use of AAV is their limited effective packaging capacity of about 5 kb. Taking advantage of the AAV genome's ability to concatemerize , others and we have recently developed dual AAV vectors to overcome this limit. We tested dual AAV vectors for ABCA4 delivery, and found that they transduce efficiently both mouse and pig photoreceptors , and rescue the Abca4-/- mouse retinal phenotype, indicating their potential for gene therapy of STGD1. This chapter details how we designed dual AAV vectors for the delivery of the ABCA4 gene and describes the techniques that can be explored to evaluate dual AAV transduction efficiency in vitro and in the retina, and their efficacy in the mouse model of STGD1.

  1. The Integration Order of Vector Autoregressive Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Franchi, Massimo

    We show that the order of integration of a vector autoregressive process is equal to the difference between the multiplicity of the unit root in the characteristic equation and the multiplicity of the unit root in the adjoint matrix polynomial. The equivalence with the standard I(1) and I(2...

  2. Intraoperative Vector Flow Imaging of the Heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kristoffer Lindskov; Møller-Sørensen, Hasse; Pedersen, Mads Møller

    2013-01-01

    The cardiac flow is complex and multidirectional, and difficult to measure with conventional Doppler ultrasound (US) methods due to the one-dimensional and angle-dependent velocity estimation. The vector velocity method Transverse Oscillation (TO) has been proposed as a solution to this. TO is im...

  3. Arabic Text Classification Using Support Vector Machines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gharib, Tarek F.; Habib, Mena B.; Fayed, Zaki T.

    2009-01-01

    Text classification (TC) is the process of classifying documents into a predefined set of categories based on their content. Arabic language is highly inflectional and derivational language which makes text mining a complex task. In this paper we applied the Support Vector Machines (SVM) model in

  4. Vector meson photoproduction — model independent aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F.

    2000-07-01

    The rich spin structure of vector meson photoproduction allows for a systematic analysis of the angular and energy dependence of the spin observables in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame. Constraints for spin observables based on positivity of the spin density matrix, are discussed and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data.

  5. Vector meson photoproduction - model independent aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloet, W. M.; Tabakin, F

    2000-07-31

    The rich spin structure of vector meson photoproduction allows for a systematic analysis of the angular and energy dependence of the spin observables in the photon-nucleon c.m. frame. Constraints for spin observables based on positivity of the spin density matrix, are discussed and should be part of any future analysis of experimental data.

  6. A variational principle for vector equilibrium problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Proceedings – Mathematical Sciences; Volume 111; Issue 4. A Variational Principle for Vector Equilibrium Problems. K R Kazmi. Volume 111 Issue 4 November 2001 pp 465-470. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pmsc/111/04/0465-0470. Keywords.

  7. A variational principle for vector equilibrium problems

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    , closed and convex set; (Y, P ) be a real ordered topological vector space with a partial order ≤P induced by a solid, pointed, closed and convex cone P with apex at origin, thus x ≤P y ⇐⇒ y − x ∈ P ∀x,y ∈ Y. If intP denotes the topological ...

  8. Vector mesons in strongly interacting matter

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... used to extract experimental information on in-medium properties of hadrons. Results on the light vector mesons ρ, , and , are summarized and compared. Almost all experiments report a softening of the spectral functions with increases in width depending on the density and temperature of the hadronic environment.

  9. Robust Pseudo-Hierarchical Support Vector Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Michael Sass; Sjöstrand, Karl; Olafsdóttir, Hildur

    2007-01-01

    Support vector clustering (SVC) has proven an efficient algorithm for clustering of noisy and high-dimensional data sets, with applications within many fields of research. An inherent problem, however, has been setting the parameters of the SVC algorithm. Using the recent emergence of a method fo...

  10. Teaching Universal Gravitation with Vector Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    Like many high school and college physics teachers, I have found playing vector games to be a useful way of illustrating the concepts of inertia, velocity, and acceleration. Like many, I have also had difficulty in trying to get students to understand Newton's law of universal gravitation, specifically the inverse-square law and its application to…

  11. (AJST) VARIABLE STRUCTURE UNIT VECTOR CONTROL OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    control scheme is proposed for a single power system model dominated by steam powered generators with reheat turbines as used in [2]. However the scheme presented here is unique in adopting a systematic procedure based on the unit vector control algorithm [ 9 ], for the synthesis of the control functions. An analysis ...

  12. Mathematics for engineers III vector calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Baumann, Gerd

    2011-01-01

    This book is part of a four-volume textbook on Engineering Mathematics for undergraduates. Volume III treats vector calculus and differential equations of higher order. The text uses Mathematica as a tool to discuss and to solve examples from mathematics. The basic use of this language is demonstrated by examples.

  13. Polynomial Vector Fields in One Complex Variable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Bodil

    In recent years Adrien Douady was interested in polynomial vector fields, both in relation to iteration theory and as a topic on their own. This talk is based on his work with Pierrette Sentenac, work of Xavier Buff and Tan Lei, and my own joint work with Kealey Dias....

  14. A vector model for error propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.L.; Geraldo, L.P.

    1989-03-01

    A simple vector model for error propagation, which is entirely equivalent to the conventional statistical approach, is discussed. It offers considerable insight into the nature of error propagation while, at the same time, readily demonstrating the significance of uncertainty correlations. This model is well suited to the analysis of error for sets of neutron-induced reaction cross sections. 7 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Meromorphic connections on vector bundles over curves

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Descartes,. 67084 Strasbourg Cedex, France. *Correspond author. E-mail: indranil@math.tifr.res.in; heu@math.unistra.fr. MS received 17 July 2013; revised 20 October 2013. Abstract. We give a criterion for filtered vector bundles over curves to admit a ...

  16. Oracle Inequalities for High Dimensional Vector Autoregressions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callot, Laurent; Kock, Anders Bredahl

    This paper establishes non-asymptotic oracle inequalities for the prediction error and estimation accuracy of the LASSO in stationary vector autoregressive models. These inequalities are used to establish consistency of the LASSO even when the number of parameters is of a much larger order of mag...

  17. morphological identification of malaria vectors within anopheles ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMIN

    Anopheles gambiae s.l. ranked the highest among other species. Further molecular identification of sub-species complex of An. gambiae s.l and An. funestus is strongly recommended in the area. Keywords: Identification, malaria, vectors, anopheles, species. INTRODUCTION. Malaria remains a leading cause of morbidity ...

  18. Generalized vector calculus on convex domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Om P.; Xu, Yufeng

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we apply recently proposed generalized integral and differential operators to develop generalized vector calculus and generalized variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In particular, we present some generalization of Green's and Gauss divergence theorems involving some new operators, and apply these theorems to generalized variational calculus. For fractional power kernels, the formulation leads to fractional vector calculus and fractional variational calculus for problems defined over a convex domain. In special cases, when certain parameters take integer values, we obtain formulations for integer order problems. Two examples are presented to demonstrate applications of the generalized variational calculus which utilize the generalized vector calculus developed in the paper. The first example leads to a generalized partial differential equation and the second example leads to a generalized eigenvalue problem, both in two dimensional convex domains. We solve the generalized partial differential equation by using polynomial approximation. A special case of the second example is a generalized isoperimetric problem. We find an approximate solution to this problem. Many physical problems containing integer order integrals and derivatives are defined over arbitrary domains. We speculate that future problems containing fractional and generalized integrals and derivatives in fractional mechanics will be defined over arbitrary domains, and therefore, a general variational calculus incorporating a general vector calculus will be needed for these problems. This research is our first attempt in that direction.

  19. Students' Difficulties with Vector Calculus in Electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, Laurens; van Kampen, Paul; De Cock, Mieke

    2015-01-01

    Understanding Maxwell's equations in differential form is of great importance when studying the electrodynamic phenomena discussed in advanced electromagnetism courses. It is therefore necessary that students master the use of vector calculus in physical situations. In this light we investigated the difficulties second year students at KU Leuven…

  20. Fractional vector calculus for fractional advection dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meerschaert, Mark M.; Mortensen, Jeff; Wheatcraft, Stephen W.

    2006-07-01

    We develop the basic tools of fractional vector calculus including a fractional derivative version of the gradient, divergence, and curl, and a fractional divergence theorem and Stokes theorem. These basic tools are then applied to provide a physical explanation for the fractional advection-dispersion equation for flow in heterogeneous porous media.

  1. Vector difference calculus for physical lattice models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwalm, W.; Moritz, B.; Giona, M.; Schwalm, M.

    1999-01-01

    A vector difference calculus is developed for physical models defined on a general triangulating graph G, which may be a regular or an extremely irregular lattice, using discrete field quantities roughly analogous to differential forms. The role of the space Λp of p-forms at a point is taken on by the linear space generated at a graph vertex by the geometrical p-simplices which contain it. The vector operations divergence, gradient, and curl are developed using the boundary ∂ and coboundary d. Dot, cross, and scalar products are defined in such a way that discrete analogs of the vector integral theorems, including theorems of Gauss-Ostrogradski, Stokes, and Green, as well as most standard vector identities hold exactly, not as approximations to a continuum limit. Physical conservation laws for the models become theorems satisfied by the discrete fields themselves. Three discrete lattice models are constructed as examples, namely a discrete version of the Maxwell equations, the Navier-Stokes equation for incompressible flow, and the Navier linearized model for a homogeneous, isotropic elastic medium. Weight factors needed for obtaining quantitative agreement with continuum calculations are derived for the special case of a regular triangular lattice. Green functions are developed using a generalized Helmholtz decomposition of the fields.

  2. MHD thrust vectoring of a rocket engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labaune, Julien; Packan, Denis; Tholin, Fabien; Chemartin, Laurent; Stillace, Thierry; Masson, Frederic

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the possibility to use MagnetoHydroDynamics (MHD) to vectorize the thrust of a solid propellant rocket engine exhaust is investigated. Using a magnetic field for vectoring offers a mass gain and a reusability advantage compared to standard gimbaled, elastomer-joint systems. Analytical and numerical models were used to evaluate the flow deviation with a 1 Tesla magnetic field inside the nozzle. The fluid flow in the resistive MHD approximation is calculated using the KRONOS code from ONERA, coupling the hypersonic CFD platform CEDRE and the electrical code SATURNE from EDF. A critical parameter of these simulations is the electrical conductivity, which was evaluated using a set of equilibrium calculations with 25 species. Two models were used: local thermodynamic equilibrium and frozen flow. In both cases, chlorine captures a large fraction of free electrons, limiting the electrical conductivity to a value inadequate for thrust vectoring applications. However, when using chlorine-free propergols with 1% in mass of alkali, an MHD thrust vectoring of several degrees was obtained.

  3. VECTORS OF MALARIA AND FILARIASIS IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoedojo Hoedojo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Malaria at present is still one of the important mosquito-borne diseases in Indonesia. The disease is widespread all over the country and involves nearly all islands. Sixteen Anopheles species have been reconfirmed as malaria vectors. They were distributed geographi­cally as follows: Coastal areas and lagoons ------------------------------------- An sundaicus and An.subpictus Cultivated ricefields and swampy areas -------------------- An.aconitus, An.barbirostris, An.nigerrimus and An.sinensis Forest inland areas in shaded temporary pools, muddy animal wallows and hoof-prints -------------------------------------------------------- An.balabacensis, An.bancrofti, An.farauti, An.koliensis and An.punctulatus Swamp forest edge in ditches with vegeta- ---------------- An.letifer and An.ludlowae don Hilly areas in seepages, streams and clear moving water ---------------------------------------------- Anflavirostris, An.maculatus and Anminimus.   The species (of most general importance is An.sundaicus, which is restricted by its preference for brackish water and is prevalent in coastal areas of Java. Their types in behaviour of An.sundaicus appear as follows : 1. An.sundaicus in South Coast of Java in general. This species is essentially anthropophilic, exophagic and rests outdoor. It shows susceptible to DDT. 2. An.sundaicus in Cilacap, Central Java. This mosquito is a pure anthropophilic form. It bites man in houses and outdoors, rests indoors and is known resistant to DDT. 3. An.sundaicus in Yogyakarta and Purworejo, Central Java. This mosquito is a strong zoophilic species. It rests and prefers to bite outdoors and shows tolerance to DDT. Human filariasis in Indonesia is the result of infection by three endemic species, namely, Wuchereria bancrofti, Brugia malayi, and Brugia timori.W.bancrofti infection is found in both urban and rural areas. Twenty species of mosquitoes are confirmed as filariasis vectors. The urban type bancroftian filariasis

  4. Integrated vector management: a critical strategy for combating vector-borne diseases in South Sudan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanda, Emmanuel; Govere, John M; Macdonald, Michael B; Lako, Richard L; Haque, Ubydul; Baba, Samson P; Mnzava, Abraham

    2013-10-25

    Integrated vector management (IVM) based vector control is encouraged by the World Health Organization (WHO). However, operational experience with the IVM strategy has mostly come from countries with relatively well-established health systems and with malaria control focused programmes. Little is known about deployment of IVM for combating multiple vector-borne diseases in post-emergency settings, where delivery structures are less developed or absent. This manuscript reports on the feasibility of operational IVM for combating vector-borne diseases in South Sudan. A methodical review of published and unpublished documents on vector-borne diseases for South Sudan was conducted via systematic literature search of online electronic databases, Google Scholar, PubMed and WHO, using a combination of search terms. Additional, non-peer reviewed literature was examined for information related to the subject. South Sudan is among the heartlands of vector-borne diseases in the world, characterized by enormous infrastructure, human and financial resource constraints and a weak health system against an increasing number of refugees, returnees and internally displaced people. The presence of a multiplicity of vector-borne diseases in this post-conflict situation presents a unique opportunity to explore the potential of a rational IVM strategy for multiple disease control and optimize limited resource utilization, while maximizing the benefits and providing a model for countries in a similar situation. The potential of integrating vector-borne disease control is enormous in South Sudan. However, strengthened coordination, intersectoral collaboration and institutional and technical capacity for entomological monitoring and evaluation, including enforcement of appropriate legislation are crucial.

  5. Reducing vector-borne disease by empowering farmers in integrated vector management

    OpenAIRE

    Berg, van den, A.E.; Hildebrand, von, A.; Ragunathan, V.; Das, P K

    2007-01-01

    PROBLEM: Irrigated agriculture exposes rural people to health risks associated with vector-borne diseases and pesticides used in agriculture and for public health protection. Most developing countries lack collaboration between the agricultural and health sectors to jointly address these problems. APPROACH: We present an evaluation of a project that uses the "farmer field school" method to teach farmers how to manage vector-borne diseases and how to improve rice yields. Teaching farmers about...

  6. Charmless Hadronic B Decays into Vector, Axial Vector and Tensor Final States at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandini, Paolo; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-06

    We present experimental measurements of branching fraction and longitudinal polarization fraction in charmless hadronic B decays into vector, axial vector and tensor final states with the final dataset of BABAR. Measurements of such kind of decays are a powerful tool both to test the Standard Model and search possible sources of new physics. In this document we present a short review of the last experimental results at BABAR concerning charmless quasi two-body decays in final states containing particles with spin 1 or spin 2 and different parities. This kind of decays has received considerable theoretical interest in the last few years and this particular attention has led to interesting experimental results at the current b-factories. In fact, the study of longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} in charmless B decays to vector vector (VV), vector axial-vector (VA) and axial-vector axial-vector (AA) mesons provides information on the underlying helicity structure of the decay mechanism. Naive helicity conservation arguments predict a dominant longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L} {approx} 1 for both tree and penguin dominated decays and this pattern seems to be confirmed by tree-dominated B {yields} {rho}{rho} and B{sup +} {yields} {Omega}{rho}{sup +} decays. Other penguin dominated decays, instead, show a different behavior: the measured value of f{sub L} {approx} 0.5 in B {yields} {phi}K* decays is in contrast with naive Standard Model (SM) calculations. Several solutions have been proposed such as the introduction of non-factorizable terms and penguin-annihilation amplitudes, while other explanations invoke new physics. New modes have been investigated to shed more light on the problem.

  7. Dispersive approach to QCD: τ lepton hadronic decay in vector and axial-vector channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterenko, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The dispersive approach to QCD, which extends the applicability range of perturbation theory towards the infrared domain, is developed. This approach properly accounts for the intrinsically nonperturbative constraints, which originate in the low-energy kinematic restrictions on pertinent strong interaction processes. The dispersive approach proves to be capable of describing OPAL (update 2012) and ALEPH (update 2014) experimental data on inclusive τ lepton hadronic decay in vector and axial-vector channels in a self-consistent way.

  8. Co-occurrence Vectors from Corpora vs. Distance Vectors from Dictionaries

    CERN Document Server

    Niwa, Y; Niwa, Yoshiki; Nitta, Yoshihiko

    1995-01-01

    A comparison was made of vectors derived by using ordinary co-occurrence statistics from large text corpora and of vectors derived by measuring the inter-word distances in dictionary definitions. The precision of word sense disambiguation by using co-occurrence vectors from the 1987 Wall Street Journal (20M total words) was higher than that by using distance vectors from the Collins English Dictionary (60K head words + 1.6M definition words). However, other experimental results suggest that distance vectors contain some different semantic information from co-occurrence vectors. From no-reply@xxx.lanl.gov Fri Nov 12 12:25 MET 1999 Received: from newmint.cern.ch (newmint.cern.ch [137.138.26.94]) by sundh98.cern.ch (8.8.5/8.8.5) with ESMTP id MAA10923 for ; Fri, 12 Nov 1999 12:25:47 +0100 (MET) Received: from uuu.lanl.gov (uuu.lanl.gov [204.121.6.59]) by newmint.cern.ch (8.9.3/8.9.3) with ESMTP id MAA18850 for ; Fri, 12 Nov 1999 12:25:46 +0100 (MET) Received: from xxx.lanl.gov (xxx.lanl.gov [204.121.6.57]) by uu...

  9. [Construction of human Bcl-6 3'UTR reporter vector and expression vector and their functional assessment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bai-Yu; Cui, Han-Zhi; Yan, Xiang; Huang, Peng; Huang, Hua-Long; Fan, Zhong-Yi; Dou, Jing-Tao

    2015-10-01

    To observe the direct regulation of miR-127 on Bcl-6 and the effect of Bcl-6 in rescuing miR-127-induced cell cycle and cell growth inhibition. The 3'UTR and coding region of human bcl-6 gene were amplified by PCR and cloned into pcDNA3.0-Luc and pcDNA3.0-Flag vectors, respectively. Mutations were introduced into the seed sequences of the predicted miR-127 target sites within the Bcl-6 3'UTR using recombinant PCR. Luciferase assay was used to verify the direct targeted regulation of miR-127 on Bcl-6. In HepG2 cell models with overexpression or knockdown of miR-12, the changes of cell cycle and cell growth were investigated after transfection with the constructed vectors. The recombinant plasmids were successfully obtained as confirmed by double digestion and sequence identification. Luciferase assay showed that in 293T and HepG2 cells, miR-127 inhibited the activation of wild-type Bcl-6 3'UTR reporter vector but not mutated Bcl-6 3'UTR vector. Overexpression of miR-127 induced cell cycle arrest at G(2)/M phase and suppressed the growth of HepG2 cells, and these effects were reversed by Bcl-6 overexpression. We successfully cloned wild-type and mutated 3'UTR reporter vectors and expression vector of bcl-6 gene and confirmed their biological functions.

  10. Quantification of sugarcane yellow leaf virus in sugarcane following transmission through aphid vector, Melanaphis sacchari

    OpenAIRE

    Chinnaraja, C.; Viswanathan, R.

    2015-01-01

    Yellow leaf caused by Sugarcane yellow leaf virus (SCYLV) is a serious constraint to sugarcane production in India and currently the disease epidemics occur on many of the susceptible varieties under field conditions. Studies were conducted on the virus transmission by sugarcane aphid Melanaphis sacchari in sugarcane by inoculating virus-free meristem derived from micro- propagated plants of sugarcane cv Co 86032 with viruliferous aphids. Virus transmission was confirmed through RT-PCR assays...

  11. Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adenovirus vectors can induce activation of endothelial cells: CD40-CD40L interactions partly participate in the endothelial cells activation induced by adenovirus vectors in an NF-kappaB-dependent manner.

  12. Ultrasound Vector Flow Imaging: Part I: Sequential Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov; Yu, Alfred C. H.

    2016-01-01

    The paper gives a review of the most important methods for blood velocity vector flow imaging (VFI) for conventional, sequential data acquisition. This includes multibeam methods, speckle tracking, transverse oscillation, color flow mapping derived vector flow imaging, directional beamforming, an...

  13. Insect vectors of pathogens in selected undisposed refuse dumps in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The occurrence and abundance of these vectors suggests that vector-borne disease transmission is prevalent in Kaduna metropolis. The health implications of the presence of these insects and their role in disease transmission are ...

  14. The tomography of quark-gluon plasma by vector mesons

    CERN Document Server

    Lovas, I

    2003-01-01

    The fireball formed in a heavy ion collisions is characterized by the impact parameter vector b-vector, which is orthogonal to the beam direction and can be determined from the multiplicity and the angular distribution of the reaction products. By appropriate rotations the b-vector vectors of each collision can be oriented into a fixed direction. Using the measured values of the momentum distributions of the vector mesons an integral equation can be formulated for the unknown emission densities (E sub M (r-vector)) and for the unknown absorption densities (DELTA mu sub M (r-vector,p)) of the different vector mesons M(ident to omega sup 0 , rho sup 0 , phi sup 0 , psi sup 0 , psi sup 0 ' UPSILON). (author)

  15. Highly Sensitive Method for Titration of Adenovirus Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Hildegund Ertl, ZhiQuan Xiang, Yan Li, Dongming Zhou, Xiangyang Zhou, Wynetta Giles-Davis & Yi-lin E. Liu ### Abstract Clinical development of vaccines based on adenovirus (Ad) vectors requires accurate techniques to determine vector doses including contents of infectious particles. For vectors derived from Ad virus of human serotype 5 content of infectious particles can readily be determined by plaque assays. Vaccine vectors based on alternative Ad serotypes such as thos...

  16. Sequential selection of random vectors under a sum constraint

    OpenAIRE

    Stanke, Mario

    2004-01-01

    We observe a sequence X1,X2,...,Xn of independent and identically distributed coordinatewise nonnegative d-dimensional random vectors. When a vector is observed it can either be selected or rejected but once made this decision is final. In each coordinate the sum of the selected vectors must not exceed a given constant. The problem is to find a selection policy that maximizes the expected number of selected vectors. For a general absolutely continuous distribution of t...

  17. Topological vector spaces and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bogachev, V I

    2017-01-01

    This book gives a compact exposition of the fundamentals of the theory of locally convex topological vector spaces. Furthermore it contains a survey of the most important results of a more subtle nature, which cannot be regarded as basic, but knowledge which is useful for understanding applications. Finally, the book explores some of such applications connected with differential calculus and measure theory in infinite-dimensional spaces. These applications are a central aspect of the book, which is why it is different from the wide range of existing texts on topological vector spaces. In addition, this book develops differential and integral calculus on infinite-dimensional locally convex spaces by using methods and techniques of the theory of locally convex spaces. The target readership includes mathematicians and physicists whose research is related to infinite-dimensional analysis.

  18. Lepton flavor violation with light vector bosons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Heeck

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available New sub-GeV vector bosons with couplings to muons but not electrons have been discussed in order to explain the muon's magnetic moment, the gap of high-energy neutrinos in IceCube or the proton radius puzzle. If such a light Z′ not only violates lepton universality but also lepton flavor, as expected for example from the recent hint for h→μτ at CMS, the two-body decay mode τ→μZ′ opens up and for MZ′<2mμ gives better constraints than τ→3μ already with 20-year-old ARGUS limits. We discuss the general prospects and motivation of light vector bosons with lepton-flavor-violating couplings.

  19. Landscape epidemiology of vector-borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisen, William K

    2010-01-01

    Landscape epidemiology describes how the temporal dynamics of host, vector, and pathogen populations interact spatially within a permissive environment to enable transmission. The spatially defined focus, or nidus, of transmission may be characterized by vegetation as well as by climate, latitude, elevation, and geology. The ecological complexity, dimensions, and temporal stability of the nidus are determined largely by pathogen natural history and vector bionomics. Host populations, transmission efficiency, and therefore pathogen amplification vary spatially, thereby creating a heterogeneous surface that may be defined by remote sensing and statistical tools. The current review describes the evolution of landscape epidemiology as a science and exemplifies selected aspects by contrasting the ecology of two different recent disease outbreaks in North America caused by West Nile virus, an explosive, highly virulent mosquito-borne virus producing ephemeral nidi, and Borrelia burgdorferi, a slowly amplifying chronic pathogen producing semipermanent nidi.

  20. Measuring Source Code Similarity Using Reference Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Asako; Murao, Hajime

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to measure similarity between program source codes. Different to others, our method doues not compare two source codes directly but compares two reference vectors, where a reference vector is calculated from one source code and a set of reference source codes. This means that our method requires no original source code when considering an application open to public such as a search engine for the program source code on the internet. We have built a simple search system and have evaluated with Java source codes made in the university course of basic programming. Results show that the system can achieve quite high average precision rate in very short time which means the proposed method can measure correct similarity very fast.

  1. Relativistic Thermodynamics: A Modern 4-Vector Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Güémez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the Minkowski relativistic 4-vector formalism, based on Einstein's equation, and the relativistic thermodynamics asynchronous formulation (Grøn (1973, the isothermal compression of an ideal gas is analyzed, considering an electromagnetic origin for forces applied to it. This treatment is similar to the description previously developed by Van Kampen (van Kampen (1969 and Hamity (Hamity (1969. In this relativistic framework Mechanics and Thermodynamics merge in the first law of relativistic thermodynamics expressed, using 4-vector notation, such as ΔUμ  =  Wμ  +  Qμ, in Lorentz covariant formulation, which, with the covariant formalism for electromagnetic forces, constitutes a complete Lorentz covariant formulation for classical physics.

  2. Permutation entropy with vector embedding delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Douglas J.; Kane, Deb M.

    2017-12-01

    Permutation entropy (PE) is a statistic used widely for the detection of structure within a time series. Embedding delay times at which the PE is reduced are characteristic timescales for which such structure exists. Here, a generalized scheme is investigated where embedding delays are represented by vectors rather than scalars, permitting PE to be calculated over a (D -1 ) -dimensional space, where D is the embedding dimension. This scheme is applied to numerically generated noise, sine wave and logistic map series, and experimental data sets taken from a vertical-cavity surface emitting laser exhibiting temporally localized pulse structures within the round-trip time of the laser cavity. Results are visualized as PE maps as a function of embedding delay, with low PE values indicating combinations of embedding delays where correlation structure is present. It is demonstrated that vector embedding delays enable identification of structure that is ambiguous or masked, when the embedding delay is constrained to scalar form.

  3. Directional Transverse Oscillation Vector Flow Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2017-01-01

    A method for estimating vector velocities using transverse oscillation (TO) combined with directional beamforming is presented. In Directional Transverse Oscillation (DTO) a normal focused field is emitted and the received signals are beamformed in the lateral direction transverse to the ultrasound...... beam to increase the amount of data for vector velocity estimation. The approach is self-calibrating as the lateral oscillation period is estimated from the directional signal through a Fourier transform to yield quantitative velocity results over a large range of depths. The approach was extensively...... simulated using Field IIpro and implemented on the experimental SARUS scanner in connection with a BK Medical 8820e convex array transducer. Velocity estimates for DTO are found for beam-to-flow angles of 60, 75, and 90, and vessel depths from 24 to 156 mm. Using 16 emissions the Standard Deviation (SD...

  4. Vector quarks in the Higgs triplet model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Sahar; Frank, Mariana

    2014-08-01

    We analyze the effects of introducing vector fermions in the Higgs triplet model. In this scenario, the model contains, in addition to the Standard Model particle content, one triplet Higgs representation and a variety of vectorlike fermion states, including singlet, doublet, and triplet states. We investigate the electroweak precision variables and impose restrictions on model parameters. We show that, for some representations, introducing vector quarks significantly alters the constraints on the mass of the doubly charged Higgs boson, bringing it in closer agreement with present experimental constraints. We also study the effects of introducing the vectorlike fermions on neutral Higgs phenomenology, in particular on the loop-dominated decays H→γγ and H→Zγ, and the restrictions they impose on the parameter space.

  5. Higgsed Stueckelberg vector and Higgs quadratic divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Durmuş Ali Demir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Here we show that, a hidden vector field whose gauge invariance is ensured by a Stueckelberg scalar and whose mass is spontaneously generated by the Standard Model Higgs field contributes to quadratic divergences in the Higgs boson mass squared, and even leads to its cancellation at one-loop when Higgs coupling to gauge field is fine-tuned. In contrast to mechanisms based on hidden scalars where a complete cancellation cannot be achieved, stabilization here is complete in that the hidden vector and the accompanying Stueckelberg scalar are both free from quadratic divergences at one-loop. This stability, deriving from hidden exact gauge invariance, can have important implications for modeling dark phenomena like dark matter, dark energy, dark photon and neutrino masses. The hidden fields can be produced at the LHC.

  6. Strong decays of light vector mesons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarecke, Dennis; Maris, Pieter; Tandy, Peter C.

    2003-03-01

    The vector meson strong decays ρ→ππ, φ→KK, and K⋆→πK are studied within a covariant approach based on the ladder-rainbow truncation of the QCD Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator and the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the mesons. The model preserves the one-loop behavior of QCD in the ultraviolet regime, has two infrared parameters, and implements quark confinement and dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. The three-point decay amplitudes are described in impulse approximation. The Bethe-Salpeter study motivates a method for estimating the masses of heavier mesons within this model without continuing the propagators into the complex plane. We test the accuracy via the ρ, φ, and K⋆ masses and then produce estimates of the model results for ma1 and mb1, as well as the proposed exotic vector π1(1400).

  7. Vector Potential Quantization and the Quantum Vacuum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constantin Meis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the quantization of the vector potential amplitude of the electromagnetic field to a single photon state starting from the fundamental link equations between the classical electromagnetic theory and the quantum mechanical expressions. The resulting wave-particle formalism ensures a coherent transition between the classical electromagnetic wave theory and the quantum representation. A quantization constant of the photon vector potential is defined. A new quantum vacuum description results directly in having very low energy density. The calculated spontaneous emission rate and Lambs shift for the nS states of the hydrogen atom are in agreement with quantum electrodynamics. This low energy quantum vacuum state might be compatible with recent astrophysical observations.

  8. Elements of mathematics topological vector spaces

    CERN Document Server

    Bourbaki, Nicolas

    2003-01-01

    This is a softcover reprint of the English translation of 1987 of the second edition of Bourbaki's Espaces Vectoriels Topologiques (1981). This second edition is a brand new book and completely supersedes the original version of nearly 30 years ago. But a lot of the material has been rearranged, rewritten, or replaced by a more up-to-date exposition, and a good deal of new material has been incorporated in this book, all reflecting the progress made in the field during the last three decades. Table of Contents. Chapter I: Topological vector spaces over a valued field. Chapter II: Convex sets and locally convex spaces. Chapter III: Spaces of continuous linear mappings. Chapter IV: Duality in topological vector spaces. Chapter V: Hilbert spaces (elementary theory). Finally, there are the usual "historical note", bibliography, index of notation, index of terminology, and a list of some important properties of Banach spaces. (Based on Math Reviews, 1983).

  9. Image coding through predictive vector quantization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Ajai; Ramabadran, Tenkasi V.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a predictive vector quantizer (PVQ) for coding grayscale images. The method described can be regarded as an extension of an existing speech coding algorithm in 1- dimension to 2-dimensional images. The method applies vector quantization (VQ) to innovations generated by the well known scalar differential pulse code modulation (DPCM) method. It tries to exploit the advantages of both the simplicity of DPCM and the high compressibility of VQ. Two types of code books, viz., random and deterministic, are used in the implementation. Performance results of the method with both types of codebooks are presented for industrial radiographic images. The results are also compared with reconstructions obtained using the discrete cosine transform (DCT) method.

  10. Production and titration of lentiviral vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barde, Isabelle; Salmon, Patrick; Trono, Didier

    2010-10-01

    Lentiviral vectors have emerged over the last decade as powerful, reliable, and safe tools for stable gene transfer in a wide variety of mammalian cells. Unlike other vectors derived from oncoretroviruses, they allow for stable gene delivery into most nondividing primary cells, including neurons. This is why lentivectors (LVs) are becoming the most useful and promising tools in the field of neuroscience, not only for research, but also for future gene and cell therapy approaches. LVs derived from HIV-1 have gradually evolved to display many desirable features aimed at increasing both their safety and their versatility. These latest designs are reviewed in this unit. This unit also describes protocols for production and titration of LVs that can be implemented in a research laboratory setting, with an emphasis on standardization to improve transposability of results between laboratories.

  11. Genetically engineering adenoviral vectors for gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlan, Lynda

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral (Ad) vectors are commonly used for various gene therapy applications. Significant advances in the genetic engineering of Ad vectors in recent years has highlighted their potential for the treatment of metastatic disease. There are several methods to genetically modify the Ad genome to incorporate retargeting peptides which will redirect the natural tropism of the viruses, including homologous recombination in bacteria or yeast. However, homologous recombination in yeast is highly efficient and can be achieved without the need for extensive cloning strategies. In addition, the method does not rely on the presence of unique restriction sites within the Ad genome and the reagents required for this method are widely available and inexpensive. Large plasmids containing the entire adenoviral genome (~36 kbp) can be modified within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and genomes easily rescued in Escherichia coli hosts for analysis or amplification. A method for two-step homologous recombination in yeast is described in this chapter.

  12. Approximate gauge symemtry of composite vector bosons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Mahiko

    2010-06-01

    It can be shown in a solvable field theory model that the couplings of the composite vector mesons made of a fermion pair approach the gauge couplings in the limit of strong binding. Although this phenomenon may appear accidental and special to the vector bosons made of a fermion pair, we extend it to the case of bosons being constituents and find that the same phenomenon occurs in more an intriguing way. The functional formalism not only facilitates computation but also provides us with a better insight into the generating mechanism of approximate gauge symmetry, in particular, how the strong binding and global current conservation conspire to generate such an approximate symmetry. Remarks are made on its possible relevance or irrelevance to electroweak and higher symmetries.

  13. Generalized Toeplitz operators and cyclic vectors

    CERN Document Server

    Gassier, G; Zerouali, E H

    2003-01-01

    We give in this paper some asymptotic Von Neumann inequalities for power bounded operators in the class C subrho intersection C sub 1. and some spacial von Neumann inequalities associated with non zero elements of the point spectrum, when it is non void, of generalized Toeplitz operators. Introducing perturbed kernel, we consider classes C sub R which extend the classical classes C subrho. We give results about absolute continuity with respect to the Haar measure for operators in class C sub R intersection C sub 1. This allows us to give new results on cyclic vectors for such operators and provides invariant subspaces for their powers. Relationships between cyclic vectors for T and T* involving generalized Toeplitz operators are given and the commutativity of left brace T right brace', the commutant of T is discussed.

  14. Advection of vector fields by chaotic flows

    CERN Document Server

    Balmforth, N J; Spiegel, E A

    1993-01-01

    We have introduced a new transfer operator for chaotic flows whose leading eigenvalue yields the dynamo rate of the fast kinematic dynamo and applied cycle expansion of the Fredholm determinant of the new operator to evaluation of its spectrum. The theory hs been tested on a normal form model of the vector advecting dynamical flow. If the model is a simple map with constant time between two iterations, the dynamo rate is the same as the escape rate of scalar quantties. However, a spread in Poincaré section return times lifts the degeneracy of the vector and scalar advection rates, and leads to dynamo rates that dominate over the scalar advection rates. For sufficiently large time spreads we have even found repellers for which the magnetic field grows exponentially, even though the scalar densities are decaying exponentially.

  15. Acoustic communication in insect disease vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Felipe de Mello Vigoder; Michael Gordon Ritchie; Gabriella Gibson; Alexandre Afranio Peixoto

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic signalling has been extensively studied in insect species, which has led to a better understanding of sexual communication, sexual selection and modes of speciation. The significance of acoustic signals for a blood-sucking insect was first reported in the XIX century by Christopher Johnston, studying the hearing organs of mosquitoes, but has received relatively little attention in other disease vectors until recently. Acoustic signals are often associated with mating behaviour and se...

  16. Efficient Intracellular Assembly of Papillomaviral Vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Buck, Christopher B.; Diana V Pastrana; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2004-01-01

    Although the papillomavirus structural proteins, L1 and L2, can spontaneously coassemble to form virus-like particles, currently available methods for production of L1/L2 particles capable of transducing reporter plasmids into mammalian cells are technically demanding and relatively low-yield. In this report, we describe a simple 293 cell transfection method for efficient intracellular production of papillomaviral-based gene transfer vectors carrying reporter plasmids. Using bovine papillomav...

  17. THE VECTOR OF METODOLOGY IN FICTION STUDIES

    OpenAIRE

    GOLBAN, PETRU

    2015-01-01

    This study considers fiction, its certain characteristic features, principles and devices (thematic and narrative), and a number of structural elements correlated within interpretative models. The purpose of this study represents the attempt to establish a vector of methodology, i. e. an interpretative modality aimed at stipulating the direction of approach to the fictional text, and which consists of a set of methods, an ordered system of principles of research used for study in the field of...

  18. Vector Addition System Reversible Reachability Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Leroux, Jérôme

    2013-01-01

    International audience; The reachability problem for vector addition systems is a central problem of net theory. This problem is known to be decidable but the complexity is still unknown. Whereas the problem is EXPSPACE-hard, no elementary upper bounds complexity are known. In this paper we consider the reversible reachability problem. This problem consists to decide if two configurations are reachable one from each other, or equivalently if they are in the same strongly connected component o...

  19. Vectors for Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    Medicine, Ankara, Turkey ; and 4Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut Abstract S.c. injection of the Ad-sig-tumor-associated antigen (TAA)/ecdCD40L vector...hMUC1 is over- expressed. (Blood. 2004;104:2704-2713) © 2004 by The American Society of Hematology Introduction We previously reported that subcutaneous...The American Society of Hematology 2704 BLOOD, 1 NOVEMBER 2004 VOLUME 104, NUMBER 9 disrupting the regulation of anchorage-dependent growth, which

  20. Vector-tensor interaction of gravitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong; Guo han-ying

    1982-11-01

    In the paper, by using the equation of motion a particle, we show that the antigravity exist in the vector-tensor model of gravitation. Thus the motion of a particle deviates from the geodesic equation. In Newtonian approximation and weak gravitational field, acceleration of a particle in a spherically symmetric and astatic gravitation field is zero. The result is obviously not in agreement with gravitational phenomena.