WorldWideScience

Sample records for virus predict conversion

  1. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Takaguchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song et al., Science 327, 1018 (2010SCIEAS0036-8075] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  2. Predictability of Conversation Partners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takaguchi, Taro; Nakamura, Mitsuhiro; Sato, Nobuo; Yano, Kazuo; Masuda, Naoki

    2011-08-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies have enabled us to examine the nature of human social behavior in greater detail. By applying an information-theoretic method to the spatiotemporal data of cell-phone locations, [C. Song , ScienceSCIEAS0036-8075 327, 1018 (2010)] found that human mobility patterns are remarkably predictable. Inspired by their work, we address a similar predictability question in a different kind of human social activity: conversation events. The predictability in the sequence of one’s conversation partners is defined as the degree to which one’s next conversation partner can be predicted given the current partner. We quantify this predictability by using the mutual information. We examine the predictability of conversation events for each individual using the longitudinal data of face-to-face interactions collected from two company offices in Japan. Each subject wears a name tag equipped with an infrared sensor node, and conversation events are marked when signals are exchanged between sensor nodes in close proximity. We find that the conversation events are predictable to a certain extent; knowing the current partner decreases the uncertainty about the next partner by 28.4% on average. Much of the predictability is explained by long-tailed distributions of interevent intervals. However, a predictability also exists in the data, apart from the contribution of their long-tailed nature. In addition, an individual’s predictability is correlated with the position of the individual in the static social network derived from the data. Individuals confined in a community—in the sense of an abundance of surrounding triangles—tend to have low predictability, and those bridging different communities tend to have high predictability.

  3. Predicting AD conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yawu; Mattila, Jussi; Ruiz, Miguel �ngel Mu�oz

    2013-01-01

    To compare the accuracies of predicting AD conversion by using a decision support system (PredictAD tool) and current research criteria of prodromal AD as identified by combinations of episodic memory impairment of hippocampal type and visual assessment of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) on MRI...

  4. Structural network efficiency predicts conversion to dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuladhar, A.; van Uden, I.W.M.; Rutten-Jacobs, L.C.A.; van der Holst, H.; van Norden, A.; de Laat, K.; Dijk, E.; Claassen, J.A.H.R.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Markus, H.S.; Norris, David Gordon; de Leeuw, F.E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether structural network connectivity at baseline predicts incident all-cause dementia in a prospective hospital-based cohort of elderly participants with MRI evidence of small vessel disease (SVD). Methods: A total of 436 participants from the Radboud University Nijmegen

  5. Generalized model for predicting methane conversion to syngas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Present work aims to provide a conceptual framework for predicting methane conversion efficiency and CO selectivity in a membrane reactor which may assist in selecting the type of membrane and minimizing the cost of syngas production. A comparative evaluation of the performance of ceramic (inorganic) membrane ...

  6. Outer packet sets and feature prediction of computer virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ling

    2014-10-01

    The packet sets model was proposed by Prof. Shi in 2008. A packet sets is a set pair composed of internal and outer packet sets, and it has dynamic characteristic. Using packet sets theory, this paper gives the feature prediction of computer virus based on outer packet sets. The concept of virus screening-filtering is given, furthermore, the virus screening-filtering order theorem, composite virus screening-filtering theorem and virus screening-filtering rule are presented. A prediction method of computer virus feature is given based on the results. The outer packet sets is a new tool in the research of the prediction of dynamic virus feature.

  7. Predicting Social Anxiety Treatment Outcome Based on Therapeutic Email Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, Mark; Berger, Thomas; Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Szolovits, Peter

    2017-09-01

    Predicting therapeutic outcome in the mental health domain is of utmost importance to enable therapists to provide the most effective treatment to a patient. Using information from the writings of a patient can potentially be a valuable source of information, especially now that more and more treatments involve computer-based exercises or electronic conversations between patient and therapist. In this paper, we study predictive modeling using writings of patients under treatment for a social anxiety disorder. We extract a wealth of information from the text written by patients including their usage of words, the topics they talk about, the sentiment of the messages, and the style of writing. In addition, we study trends over time with respect to those measures. We then apply machine learning algorithms to generate the predictive models. Based on a dataset of 69 patients, we are able to show that we can predict therapy outcome with an area under the curve of 0.83 halfway through the therapy and with a precision of 0.78 when using the full data (i.e., the entire treatment period). Due to the limited number of participants, it is hard to generalize the results, but they do show great potential in this type of information.

  8. Model predictive control of wind energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Yaramasu, Venkata Narasimha R

    2017-01-01

    The authors provide a comprehensive analysis on the model predictive control of power converters employed in a wide variety of variable-speed wind energy conversion systems (WECS). The contents of this book includes an overview of wind energy system configurations, power converters for variable-speed WECS, digital control techniques, MPC, modeling of power converters and wind generators for MPC design. Other topics include the mapping of continuous-time models to discrete-time models by various exact, approximate, and quasi-exact discretization methods, modeling and control of wind turbine grid-side two-level and multilevel voltage source converters. The authors also focus on the MPC of several power converter configurations for full variable-speed permanent magnet synchronous generator based WECS, squirrel-cage induction generator based WECS, and semi-variable-speed doubly fed induction generator based WECS.

  9. Multimodal prediction of conversion to Alzheimer's disease based on incomplete biomarkers

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ritter, Kerstin; Schumacher, Julia; Weygandt, Martin; Buchert, Ralph; Allefeld, Carsten; Haynes, John-Dylan

    2015-01-01

    ...) conversion based on extensive multimodal data with varying degrees of missing values. Based on Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative data from MCI-patients including all available modalities, we predicted the conversion to AD within 3 years...

  10. Prediction of Cepstral Excitation Pulses for Voice Conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Bahja, Fadoua; Di Martino, Joseph; Ibn Elhaj, El Hassan; Aboutajdine, Driss

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Voice conversion is one of useful techniques to enhance pathological speech to be perceived as normal speech, although it concerns also the modifications of normal source speaker's speech to be perceived as if a target speaker had uttered it. The parameters to be converted are obtained by matching the spectral envelope of the vocal tract for the source and the target speech. Gaussian Mixture Models (GMMs) parameters are determined for providing conversion functions. Th...

  11. Nowcast Predictions for Chikungunya Virus-Infected Travelers

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Interactive visualization: http://www.cdc.gov/chikungunya/modeling/index.html. This dataset contains monthly predictions for the spread of chikungunya virus...

  12. Nowcast Predictions for Local Transmission of Chikungunya Virus

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Interactive visualization: http://www.cdc.gov/chikungunya/modeling/index.html. This dataset contains monthly predictions for the spread of chikungunya virus...

  13. Using Conversation Topics for Predicting Therapy Outcomes in Schizophrenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Christine; Purver, Matthew; McCabe, Rose

    2013-01-01

    Previous research shows that aspects of doctor-patient communication in therapy can predict patient symptoms, satisfaction and future adherence to treatment (a significant problem with conditions such as schizophrenia). However, automatic prediction has so far shown success only when based on low-level lexical features, and it is unclear how well these can generalize to new data, or whether their effectiveness is due to their capturing aspects of style, structure or content. Here, we examine the use of topic as a higher-level measure of content, more likely to generalize and to have more explanatory power. Investigations show that while topics predict some important factors such as patient satisfaction and ratings of therapy quality, they lack the full predictive power of lower-level features. For some factors, unsupervised methods produce models comparable to manual annotation. PMID:23943658

  14. Predicting Social Anxiety Treatment Outcome based on Therapeutic Email Conversations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, M.; Berger, Thomas; Schulz, Ava; Stolz, Timo; Szolovits, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Predicting therapeutic outcome in the mental health domain is of utmost importance to enable therapists to provide the most effective treatment to a patient. Using information from the writings of a patient can potentially be a valuable source of information, especially now that more and more

  15. Acoustic and Lexical Representations for Affect Prediction in Spontaneous Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Houwei; Savran, Arman; Verma, Ragini; Nenkova, Ani

    2015-01-01

    In this article we investigate what representations of acoustics and word usage are most suitable for predicting dimensions of affect|AROUSAL, VALANCE, POWER and EXPECTANCY|in spontaneous interactions. Our experiments are based on the AVEC 2012 challenge dataset. For lexical representations, we compare corpus-independent features based on psychological word norms of emotional dimensions, as well as corpus-dependent representations. We find that corpus-dependent bag of words approach with mutual information between word and emotion dimensions is by far the best representation. For the analysis of acoustics, we zero in on the question of granularity. We confirm on our corpus that utterance-level features are more predictive than word-level features. Further, we study more detailed representations in which the utterance is divided into regions of interest (ROI), each with separate representation. We introduce two ROI representations, which significantly outperform less informed approaches. In addition we show that acoustic models of emotion can be improved considerably by taking into account annotator agreement and training the model on smaller but reliable dataset. Finally we discuss the potential for improving prediction by combining the lexical and acoustic modalities. Simple fusion methods do not lead to consistent improvements over lexical classifiers alone but improve over acoustic models.

  16. Smell Loss Predicts Mortality Risk Regardless of Dementia Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekström, Ingrid; Sjölund, Sara; Nordin, Steven; Nordin Adolfsson, Annelie; Adolfsson, Rolf; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Larsson, Maria; Olofsson, Jonas K

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether dementia could explain the association between poor olfactory performance and mortality risk within a decade-long follow-up period. Prospective cohort study. Betula Study, Umeå, Sweden. A population-based sample of adult participants without dementia at baseline aged 40 to 90 (N = 1,774). Olfactory performance using the Scandinavian Odor-Identification Test (SOIT) and self-reported olfactory function; several social, cognitive, and medical risk factors at baseline; and incident dementia during the following decade. Within the 10-year follow-up, 411 of 1,774 (23.2%) participants had died. In a Cox model, the association between higher SOIT score and lower mortality was significant (hazard ratio (HR) = 0.74 per point interval, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.71-0.77, P < .001). The effect was attenuated, but remained significant, after controlling for age, sex, education, and health-related and cognitive variables (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97, P = .001). The association between SOIT score and mortality was retained after controlling for dementia conversion before death (HR = 0.92, 95% CI = 0.87-0.97, P = .001). Similar results were obtained for self-reported olfactory dysfunction. Poor odor identification and poor self-reported olfactory function are associated with greater likelihood of future mortality. Dementia does not attenuate the association between olfactory loss and mortality, suggesting that olfactory loss might mark deteriorating health, irrespective of dementia. © 2017, Copyright the Authors Journal compilation © 2017, The American Geriatrics Society.

  17. Resolving Anomalies in Predicting Electrokinetic Energy Conversion Efficiencies of Nanofluidic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumder, Sagardip; Dhar, Jayabrata; Chakraborty, Suman

    2015-01-01

    We devise a new approach for capturing complex interfacial interactions over reduced length scales, towards predicting electrokinetic energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic devices. By embedding several aspects of intermolecular interactions in continuum based formalism, we show that our simple theory becomes capable of representing complex interconnections between electro-mechanics and hydrodynamics over reduced length scales. The predictions from our model are supported by reported experimental data, and are in excellent quantitative agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. The present model, thus, may be employed to rationalize the discrepancies between low energy conversion efficiencies of nanofluidic channels that have been realized from experiments, and the impractically high energy conversion efficiencies that have been routinely predicted by the existing theories. PMID:26437925

  18. Value of serum nonceruloplasmin copper for prediction of mild cognitive impairment conversion to Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squitti, Rosanna; Ghidoni, Roberta; Siotto, Mariacristina; Ventriglia, Mariacarla; Benussi, Luisa; Paterlini, Anna; Magri, Mariachiara; Binetti, Giuliano; Cassetta, Emanuele; Caprara, Deborah; Vernieri, Fabrizio; Rossini, Paolo M; Pasqualetti, Patrizio

    2014-04-01

    Meta-analyses show that nonbound ceruloplasmin (non-Cp) copper (also known as free or labile copper) in serum is higher in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD). It differentiates subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) from healthy controls. However, a longitudinal study on an MCI cohort has not yet been performed to assess the accuracy of non-Cp copper for the prediction of conversion from MCI to AD during a long-term follow-up. The study included 42 MCI converters and 99 stable MCI subjects. We assessed levels of copper, ceruloplasmin, non-Cp copper, iron, transferrin, ferritin, and APOE genotype. A multiple Cox regression analysis-with age, sex, baseline Mini-Mental State Examination, APOE4, iron, non-Cp copper, transferrin, ferritin, hypercholesterolemia, and hypertension as covariates-was applied to predict the conversion from MCI to AD. Among the evaluated parameters, the only significant predictor of conversion to AD was non-Cp copper (hazard ratio = 1.23, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.47, p = 0.022); for each additional micromole per liter unit (μmol/l) of non-Cp copper, the hazard increased by ~20%. Subjects with non-Cp copper levels >1.6 μmol/l had a hazard conversion rate (50% of conversion in 4 years) that was ~3× higher than those with values ≤1.6 μmol/l (copper association was independent of APOE4. Non-Cp copper appears to predict conversion from MCI to AD. These results encourage healthy life style choices and dietary intervention to modify this risk. © 2014 American Neurological Association.

  19. Role of preoperative sonography in predicting conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosun, Alptekin, E-mail: tosun_alptekin@yahoo.com [Giresun University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Hancerliogullari, Kadir Oymen [Giresun University Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery (Turkey); Serifoglu, Ismail [Bulent Ecevit University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Turkey); Capan, Yavuz [Gaziantep Primer Hospital, Department of Surgery (Turkey); Ozkaya, Enis [Dr. Sami Ulus Maternity and Children' s Health Training and Research Hospital, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Turkey)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: •The purpose of this study was to establish a radiologic view on prediction of conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery. The study may be a guide for the surgeon to prefer laparoscopic or open surgery. -- Abstract: Background: Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is the first step treatment in cholelithiasis. The purpose of this study was to establish a radiologic view on prediction of conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery. Methods: This study included 176 patients who had undergone laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Preoperative ultrasonographic findings were assessed and we gave points to each finding according to results from correlation analysis. After the scoring we investigated the relationship between ultrasonographic findings and conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery. Results: Scoring significantly predicted failure in laparoscopic approach (AUC = 0.758, P = 0.003,). Optimal cut off score was found to be 1.95 with 67% sensitivity and 78% specificity. Score > 1.95 was a risk factor for failure in laparoscopic approach [odds ratio = 7.1(95% CI,2-24.9, P = 0.002)]. There were 8 subjects out of 36(22%) with high score underwent open surgery while 4 out of 128 (3%) subjects with low score needed open surgery (p = 0.002). Negative predictive value of 128/132 = 97%. Mean score of whole study population was 1.28 (range 0–8.8) and mean score of subjects underwent open surgery was 3.6 while it was 1.1 in successful laparoscopic approach group (p < 0.001). Mean Age and BMI were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Sex of subjects did not affect the success of surgery (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The contribution of preoperative ultrasonography is emphasized in many studies. Our study suggests quantitative results on conversion from laparoscopic cholecystectomy to open surgery. We believe that radiologists have to indicate the risk of conversion in their ultrasonography reports.

  20. A point-based tool to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to probable Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Deborah E; Cenzer, Irena S; Yaffe, Kristine; Ritchie, Christine S; Lee, Sei J

    2014-11-01

    Our objective in this study was to develop a point-based tool to predict conversion from amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to probable Alzheimer's disease (AD). Subjects were participants in the first part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Cox proportional hazards models were used to identify factors associated with development of AD, and a point score was created from predictors in the final model. The final point score could range from 0 to 9 (mean 4.8) and included: the Functional Assessment Questionnaire (2‒3 points); magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) middle temporal cortical thinning (1 point); MRI hippocampal subcortical volume (1 point); Alzheimer's Disease Cognitive Scale-cognitive subscale (2‒3 points); and the Clock Test (1 point). Prognostic accuracy was good (Harrell's c = 0.78; 95% CI 0.75, 0.81); 3-year conversion rates were 6% (0‒3 points), 53% (4‒6 points), and 91% (7‒9 points). A point-based risk score combining functional dependence, cerebral MRI measures, and neuropsychological test scores provided good accuracy for prediction of conversion from amnestic MCI to AD. Copyright © 2014 The Alzheimer's Association. All rights reserved.

  1. Improving accuracy of protein-protein interaction prediction by considering the converse problem for sequence representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yong

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the development of genome-sequencing technologies, protein sequences are readily obtained by translating the measured mRNAs. Therefore predicting protein-protein interactions from the sequences is of great demand. The reason lies in the fact that identifying protein-protein interactions is becoming a bottleneck for eventually understanding the functions of proteins, especially for those organisms barely characterized. Although a few methods have been proposed, the converse problem, if the features used extract sufficient and unbiased information from protein sequences, is almost untouched. Results In this study, we interrogate this problem theoretically by an optimization scheme. Motivated by the theoretical investigation, we find novel encoding methods for both protein sequences and protein pairs. Our new methods exploit sufficiently the information of protein sequences and reduce artificial bias and computational cost. Thus, it significantly outperforms the available methods regarding sensitivity, specificity, precision, and recall with cross-validation evaluation and reaches ~80% and ~90% accuracy in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae respectively. Our findings here hold important implication for other sequence-based prediction tasks because representation of biological sequence is always the first step in computational biology. Conclusions By considering the converse problem, we propose new representation methods for both protein sequences and protein pairs. The results show that our method significantly improves the accuracy of protein-protein interaction predictions.

  2. Possibility and Challenges of Conversion of Current Virus Species Names to Linnaean Binomials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postler, Thomas S; Clawson, Anna N; Amarasinghe, Gaya K; Basler, Christopher F; Bavari, Sbina; Benko, Mária; Blasdell, Kim R; Briese, Thomas; Buchmeier, Michael J; Bukreyev, Alexander; Calisher, Charles H; Chandran, Kartik; Charrel, Rémi; Clegg, Christopher S; Collins, Peter L; Juan Carlos, De La Torre; Derisi, Joseph L; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Dolnik, Olga; Dürrwald, Ralf; Dye, John M; Easton, Andrew J; Emonet, Sébastian; Formenty, Pierre; Fouchier, Ron A M; Ghedin, Elodie; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Harrach, Balázs; Hewson, Roger; Horie, Masayuki; Jiang, Dàohóng; Kobinger, Gary; Kondo, Hideki; Kropinski, Andrew M; Krupovic, Mart; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A; Leroy, Eric M; Lukashevich, Igor S; Maisner, Andrea; Mushegian, Arcady R; Netesov, Sergey V; Nowotny, Norbert; Patterson, Jean L; Payne, Susan L; PaWeska, Janusz T; Peters, Clarence J; Radoshitzky, Sheli R; Rima, Bertus K; Romanowski, Victor; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sanfaçon, Hélène; Salvato, Maria S; Schwemmle, Martin; Smither, Sophie J; Stenglein, Mark D; Stone, David M; Takada, Ayato; Tesh, Robert B; Tomonaga, Keizo; Tordo, Noël; Towner, Jonathan S; Vasilakis, Nikos; Volchkov, Viktor E; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Walker, Peter J; Wang, Lin-Fa; Varsani, Arvind; Whitfield, Anna E; Zerbini, F Murilo; Kuhn, Jens H

    2017-05-01

    Botanical, mycological, zoological, and prokaryotic species names follow the Linnaean format, consisting of an italicized Latinized binomen with a capitalized genus name and a lower case species epithet (e.g., Homo sapiens). Virus species names, however, do not follow a uniform format, and, even when binomial, are not Linnaean in style. In this thought exercise, we attempted to convert all currently official names of species included in the virus family Arenaviridae and the virus order Mononegavirales to Linnaean binomials, and to identify and address associated challenges and concerns. Surprisingly, this endeavor was not as complicated or time-consuming as even the authors of this article expected when conceiving the experiment. [Arenaviridae; binomials; ICTV; International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses; Mononegavirales; virus nomenclature; virus taxonomy.]. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Society of Systematic Biologists 2016. This work is written by a US Government employee and is in the public domain in the US.

  3. Possibility and Challenges of Conversion of Current Virus Species Names to Linnaean Binomials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Postler, Thomas S.; Clawson, Anna N.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.; Bavari, Sbina; Benkő, Mária; Blasdell, Kim R.; Briese, Thomas; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Calisher, Charles H.; Chandran, Kartik; Charrel, Rémi; Clegg, Christopher S.; Collins, Peter L.; Juan Carlos, De La Torre; Derisi, Joseph L.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Dolnik, Olga; Dürrwald, Ralf; Dye, John M.; Easton, Andrew J.; Emonet, Sébastian; Formenty, Pierre; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Ghedin, Elodie; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Harrach, Balázs; Hewson, Roger; Horie, Masayuki; Jiāng, Dàohóng; Kobinger, Gary; Kondo, Hideki; Kropinski, Andrew M.; Krupovic, Mart; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A.; Leroy, Eric M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Maisner, Andrea; Mushegian, Arcady R.; Netesov, Sergey V.; Nowotny, Norbert; Patterson, Jean L.; Payne, Susan L.; PaWeska, Janusz T.; Peters, Clarence J.; Radoshitzky, Sheli R.; Rima, Bertus K.; Romanowski, Victor; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sanfaçon, Hélène; Salvato, Maria S.; Schwemmle, Martin; Smither, Sophie J.; Stenglein, Mark D.; Stone, David M.; Takada, Ayato; Tesh, Robert B.; Tomonaga, Keizo; Tordo, Noël; Towner, Jonathan S.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Volchkov, Viktor E.; Wahl-Jensen, Victoria; Walker, Peter J.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Varsani, Arvind; Whitfield, Anna E.; Zerbini, F. Murilo; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2016-10-22

    Botanical, mycological, zoological, and prokaryotic species names follow the Linnaean format, consisting of an italicized Latinized binomen with a capitalized genus name and a lower case species epithet (e.g., Homo sapiens). Virus species names, however, do not follow a uniform format, and, even when binomial, are not Linnaean in style. In this thought exercise, we attempted to convert all currently official names of species included in the virus family Arenaviridae and the virus order Mononegavirales to Linnaean binomials, and to identify and address associated challenges and concerns. Surprisingly, this endeavor was not as complicated or time-consuming as even the authors of this article expected when conceiving the experiment. [Arenaviridae; binomials; ICTV; International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses; Mononegavirales; virus nomenclature; virus taxonomy.

  4. Nonlinear Predictive Control of Wind Energy Conversion System Using Dfig with Aerodynamic Torque Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamel, Ouari; Mohand, Ouhrouche; Toufik, Rekioua; Taib, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    In order to improvement of the performances for wind energy conversions systems (WECS), an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, as an alternative to conventional PI-type control methods, a nonlinear predictive control (NPC) approach is developed for DFIG-based wind turbine. To enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. An explicitly analytical form of the optimal predictive controller is given consequently on-line optimization is not necessary The DFIG is fed through the rotor windings by a back-to-back converter controlled by Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), where the stator winding is directly connected to the grid. The presented simulation results show a good performance in trajectory tracking of the proposed strategy and rejection of disturbances is successfully achieved.

  5. Predictive Factors for Visual Field Conversion: Comparison of Scanning Laser Polarimetry and Optical Coherence Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diekmann, Theresa; Schrems-Hoesl, Laura M; Mardin, Christian Y; Laemmer, Robert; Horn, Folkert K; E Kruse, Friedrich; Schrems, Wolfgang A

    2017-11-30

    The purpose of this study was to compare the ability of scanning laser polarimetry (SLP) and spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) to predict future visual field conversion of subjects with ocular hypertension and early glaucoma. All patients were recruited from the Erlangen glaucoma registry and examined using standard automated perimetry, 24-hour intraocular pressure profile, and optic disc photography. Peripapillary retinal nerve fiber layer thickness (RNFL) measurements were obtained by SLP (GDx-VCC) and SD-OCT (Spectralis OCT). Positive and negative predictive values (PPV, NPV) were calculated for morphologic parameters of SLP and SD-OCT. Kaplan-Meier survival curves were plotted and log-rank tests were performed to compare the survival distributions. Contingency tables and Venn-diagrams were calculated to compare the predictive ability. The study included 207 patients-75 with ocular hypertension, 85 with early glaucoma, and 47 controls. Median follow-up was 4.5 years. A total of 29 patients (14.0%) developed visual field conversion during follow-up. SLP temporal-inferior RNFL [0.667; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.281-0.935] and SD-OCT temporal-inferior RNFL (0.571; 95% CI, 0.317-0.802) achieved the highest PPV; nerve fiber indicator (0.923; 95% CI, 0.876-0.957) and SD-OCT mean (0.898; 95% CI, 0.847-0.937) achieved the highest NPV of all investigated parameters. The Kaplan-Meier curves confirmed significantly higher survival for subjects within normal limits of measurements of both devices (P<0.001). Venn diagrams tested with McNemar test statistics showed no significant difference for PPV (P=0.219) or NPV (P=0.678). Both GDx-VCC and SD-OCT demonstrate comparable results in predicting future visual field conversion if taking typical scans for GDx-VCC. In addition, the likelihood ratios suggest that GDx-VCC's nerve fiber indicator<30 may be the most useful parameter to confirm future nonconversion. (http://www.ClinicalTrials.gov number, NTC

  6. Thermal conversion of filamentous potato virus X into spherical particles with different properties from virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, Nikolai; Ksenofontov, Alexander; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Arkhipenko, Marina; Petrova, Ekaterina; Kondakova, Olga; Kirpichnikov, Mikhail; Atabekov, Joseph; Dobrov, Evgeny; Karpova, Olga

    2016-05-01

    We developed a method for the fast transformation of virions of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in so-called spherical particles (SPs) of different sizes. These SPs turned out to be highly useful for the preparation of different kinds of important biotechnological products. In this communication, we report that a representative of the flexuous helical virus group-potato virus X (PVX), produces SPs as well, but these SPs differ from TMV SPs in several important aspects. PVX SPs may be useful biotechnological devices. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  7. Permeability of the blood-brain barrier predicts conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Stig P; Modvig, Signe; Simonsen, Helle Juhl

    2015-01-01

    in the permeability of the blood-brain barrier in normal-appearing white matter of patients with multiple sclerosis and here, for the first time, we present a study on the capability of blood-brain barrier permeability in predicting conversion from optic neuritis to multiple sclerosis and a direct comparison...... with cerebrospinal fluid markers of inflammation, cellular trafficking and blood-brain barrier breakdown. To this end, we applied dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging at 3 T to measure blood-brain barrier permeability in 39 patients with monosymptomatic optic neuritis, all referred for imaging...... fluid as well as levels of CXCL10 and MMP9 in the cerebrospinal fluid. These findings suggest that blood-brain barrier permeability, as measured by magnetic resonance imaging, may provide novel pathological information as a marker of neuroinflammation related to multiple sclerosis, to some extent...

  8. Animal studies on medicinal herbs: predictability, dose conversion and potential value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcikowski, Ken; Gobe, Glenda

    2014-01-01

    Animal studies testing medicinal herbs are often misinterpreted by both translational researchers and clinicians due to a lack of information regarding their predictability, human dose equivalent and potential value. The most common mistake is to design or translate an animal study on a milligram per kilogram basis. This can lead to underestimation of the toxicity and/or overestimation of the amount needed for human therapy. Instead, allometric scaling, which involves body surface area, should be used. While the differences in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic phases between species will inevitably lead to some degree of error in extrapolation of results regardless of the conversion method used, correct design and interpretation of animal studies can provide information that is not able to be provided by in vitro studies, computer modeling or even traditional use. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Economic conditions predict prevalence of West Nile virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Harrigan

    Full Text Available Understanding the conditions underlying the proliferation of infectious diseases is crucial for mitigating future outbreaks. Since its arrival in North America in 1999, West Nile virus (WNV has led to population-wide declines of bird species, morbidity and mortality of humans, and expenditures of millions of dollars on treatment and control. To understand the environmental conditions that best explain and predict WNV prevalence, we employed recently developed spatial modeling techniques in a recognized WNV hotspot, Orange County, California. Our models explained 85-95% of the variation of WNV prevalence in mosquito vectors, and WNV presence in secondary human hosts. Prevalence in both vectors and humans was best explained by economic variables, specifically per capita income, and by anthropogenic characteristics of the environment, particularly human population and neglected swimming pool density. While previous studies have shown associations between anthropogenic change and pathogen presence, results show that poorer economic conditions may act as a direct surrogate for environmental characteristics related to WNV prevalence. Low-income areas may be associated with higher prevalence for a number of reasons, including variations in property upkeep, microhabitat conditions conducive to viral amplification in both vectors and hosts, host community composition, and human behavioral responses related to differences in education or political participation. Results emphasize the importance and utility of including economic variables in mapping spatial risk assessments of disease.

  10. Conversion of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease predicted by hippocampal atrophy maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolova, Liana G; Dutton, Rebecca A; Dinov, Ivo D; Hayashi, Kiralee M; Toga, Arthur W; Cummings, Jeffrey L; Thompson, Paul M

    2006-05-01

    While most patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) transition to Alzheimer disease (AD), others develop non-AD dementia, remain in the MCI state, or improve. To test the following hypotheses: smaller hippocampal volumes predict conversion of MCI to AD, whereas larger hippocampal volumes predict cognitive stability and/or improvement; and patients with MCI who convert to AD have greater atrophy in the CA1 hippocampal subfield and subiculum. Prospective longitudinal cohort study. University of California-Los Angeles Alzheimer's Disease Research Center. We followed up 20 MCI subjects clinically and neuropsychologically for 3 years. Baseline regional hippocampal atrophy was analyzed with region-of-interest and 3-dimensional hippocampal mapping techniques. During the 3-year study, 6 patients developed AD (MCI-c), 7 remained stable (MCI-nc), and 7 improved (MCI-i). Patients with MCI-c had 9% smaller left and 13% smaller right mean hippocampal volumes compared with MCI-nc patients. Radial atrophy maps showed greater atrophy of the CA1 subregion in MCI-c. Patients with MCI-c had significantly smaller hippocampi than MCI-i patients (left, 24%; right, 27%). Volumetric analyses showed a trend for greater hippocampal atrophy in MCI-nc relative to MCI-i patients (eg, 16% volume loss). After permutation tests corrected for multiple comparison, the atrophy maps showed a significant difference on the right. Subicular differences were seen between MCI-c and MCI-i patients, and MCI-nc and MCI-i patients. Multiple linear regression analysis confirmed the group effect to be highly significant and independent of age, hemisphere, and Mini-Mental State Examination scores at baseline. Smaller hippocampi and specifically CA1 and subicular involvement are associated with increased risk for conversion from MCI to AD. Patients with MCI-i tend to have larger hippocampal volumes and relative preservation of both the subiculum and CA1.

  11. Possibility and challenges of conversion of current virus species names to Linnaean binomials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Postler; Clawson, Anna N.; Amarasinghe, Gaya K.; Basler, Christopher F.; Bavari, Sina; Benko, Maria; Blasdell, Kim R.; Briese, Thomas; Buchmeier, Michael J.; Bukreyev, Alexander; Calisher, Charles H.; Chandran, Kartik; Charrel, Remi; Clegg, Christopher S.; Collins, Peter L.; De la Torre, Juan Carlos; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Dietzgen, Ralf G.; Dolnik, Olga; Durrwald, Ralf; Dye, John M.; Easton, Andrew J.; Emonet, Sebastian; Formenty, Pierre; Fouchier, Ron A. M.; Ghedin, Elodie; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul; Harrach, Balazs; Hewson, Roger; Horie, Masayuki; Jiang, Daohong; Kobinger, Gary P.; Kondo, Hideki; Kropinski, Andrew; Krupovic, Mart; Kurath, Gael; Lamb, Robert A.; Leroy, Eric M.; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Maisner, Andrea; Mushegian, Arcady; Netesov, Sergey V.; Nowotny, Norbert; Patterson, Jean L.; Payne, Susan L.; Paweska, Janusz T.; Peters, C.J.; Radoshitzky, Sheli; Rima, Bertus K.; Romanowski, Victor; Rubbenstroth, Dennis; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Sanfacon, Helene; Salvato , Maria; Schwemmle, Martin; Smither, Sophie J.; Stenglein, Mark; Stone, D.M.; Takada , Ayato; Tesh, Robert B.; Tomonaga, Keizo; Tordo, N.; Towner, Jonathan S.; Vasilakis, Nikos; Volchkov, Victor E.; Jensen, Victoria; Walker, Peter J.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Varsani, Arvind; Whitfield , Anna E.; Zerbini, Francisco Murilo; Kuhn, Jens H.

    2017-01-01

    Botanical, mycological, zoological, and prokaryotic species names follow the Linnaean format, consisting of an italicized Latinized binomen with a capitalized genus name and a lower case species epithet (e.g., Homo sapiens). Virus species names, however, do not follow a uniform format, and, even when binomial, are not Linnaean in style. In this thought exercise, we attempted to convert all currently official names of species included in the virus family Arenaviridae and the virus order Mononegavirales to Linnaean binomials, and to identify and address associated challenges and concerns. Surprisingly, this endeavor was not as complicated or time-consuming as even the authors of this article expected when conceiving the experiment.

  12. Predictive value of serum gelsolin in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-03-08

    Mar 8, 2012 ... proposed as a prognostic marker in acute liver injury, but its relationship with human hepatitis B virus. (HBV)-related hepatitis ... Key words: Gelsolin, hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related chronic liver disease, predictive value. INTRODUCTION ..... and immunity composition attack of bacteria (Bucki et al.,. 2008a).

  13. Predictive Models for Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Spread Dynamics, Considering Frankliniella occidentalis Specific Life Processes as Influenced by the Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamella Akoth Ogada

    Full Text Available Several models have been studied on predictive epidemics of arthropod vectored plant viruses in an attempt to bring understanding to the complex but specific relationship between the three cornered pathosystem (virus, vector and host plant, as well as their interactions with the environment. A large body of studies mainly focuses on weather based models as management tool for monitoring pests and diseases, with very few incorporating the contribution of vector's life processes in the disease dynamics, which is an essential aspect when mitigating virus incidences in a crop stand. In this study, we hypothesized that the multiplication and spread of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV in a crop stand is strongly related to its influences on Frankliniella occidentalis preferential behavior and life expectancy. Model dynamics of important aspects in disease development within TSWV-F. occidentalis-host plant interactions were developed, focusing on F. occidentalis' life processes as influenced by TSWV. The results show that the influence of TSWV on F. occidentalis preferential behaviour leads to an estimated increase in relative acquisition rate of the virus, and up to 33% increase in transmission rate to healthy plants. Also, increased life expectancy; which relates to improved fitness, is dependent on the virus induced preferential behaviour, consequently promoting multiplication and spread of the virus in a crop stand. The development of vector-based models could further help in elucidating the role of tri-trophic interactions in agricultural disease systems. Use of the model to examine the components of the disease process could also boost our understanding on how specific epidemiological characteristics interact to cause diseases in crops. With this level of understanding we can efficiently develop more precise control strategies for the virus and the vector.

  14. A Supervised Approach to Predict the Hierarchical Structure of Conversation Threads for Comments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Balali

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available User-generated texts such as comments in social media are rich sources of information. In general, the reply structure of comments is not publicly accessible on the web. Websites present comments as a list in chronological order. This way, some information is lost. A solution for this problem is to reconstruct the thread structure (RTS automatically. RTS predicts a semantic tree for the reply structure, useful for understanding users’ behaviours and facilitating follow of the actual conversation streams. This paper works on RTS task in blogs, online news agencies, and news websites. These types of websites cover various types of articles reflecting the real-world events. People with different views participate in arguments by writing comments. Comments express opinions, sentiments, or ideas about articles. The reply structure of threads in these types of websites is basically different from threads in the forums, chats, and emails. To perform RTS, we define a set of textual and nontextual features. Then, we use supervised learning to combine these features. The proposed method is evaluated on five different datasets. The accuracy of the proposed method is compared with baselines. The results reveal higher accuracy for our method in comparison with baselines in all datasets.

  15. Predicting the host of influenza viruses based on the word vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beibei Xu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Newly emerging influenza viruses continue to threaten public health. A rapid determination of the host range of newly discovered influenza viruses would assist in early assessment of their risk. Here, we attempted to predict the host of influenza viruses using the Support Vector Machine (SVM classifier based on the word vector, a new representation and feature extraction method for biological sequences. The results show that the length of the word within the word vector, the sequence type (DNA or protein and the species from which the sequences were derived for generating the word vector all influence the performance of models in predicting the host of influenza viruses. In nearly all cases, the models built on the surface proteins hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA (or their genes produced better results than internal influenza proteins (or their genes. The best performance was achieved when the model was built on the HA gene based on word vectors (words of three-letters long generated from DNA sequences of the influenza virus. This results in accuracies of 99.7% for avian, 96.9% for human and 90.6% for swine influenza viruses. Compared to the method of sequence homology best-hit searches using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, the word vector-based models still need further improvements in predicting the host of influenza A viruses.

  16. Prediction of common epitopes on hemagglutinin of the influenza A virus (H1 subtype).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Chunyan; Xie, Xin; Li, Huijin; Zhao, Penghua; Zhao, Xiangrong; Sun, Jingying; Wang, Haifang; Liu, Yang; Li, Yan; Hu, Qiaoxia; Hu, Jun; Li, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Influenza A virus infection is a persistent threat to public health worldwide due to hemagglutinin (HA) variation. Current vaccines against influenza A virus provide immunity to viral isolates similar to vaccine strains. Antibodies against common epitopes provide immunity to diverse influenza virus strains and protect against future pandemic influenza. Therefore, it is vital to analyze common HA antigenic epitopes of influenza virus. In this study, 14 strains of monoclonal antibodies with high sensitivity to common epitopes of influenza virus antigens identified in our previous study were selected as the tool to predict common HA epitopes. The common HA antigenic epitopes were divided into four categories by ELISA blocking experiments, and separately, into three categories according to the preliminary results of computer simulation. Comparison between the results of computer simulations and ELISA blocking experiments indicated that at least two classes of common epitopes are present in influenza virus HA. This study provides experimental data for improving the prediction of HA epitopes of influenza virus (H1 subtype) and the development of a potential universal vaccine as well as a novel approach for the prediction of epitopes on other pathogenic microorganisms. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Defects in Silicon. [to predict energy conversion efficiency of silicon samples for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Qidwai, H. A.; Bruce, T.

    1979-01-01

    The evaluation and prediction of the conversion efficiency for a variety of silicon samples with differences in structural defects, such as grain boundaries, twin boundaries, precipitate particles, dislocations, etc. are discussed. Quantitative characterization of these structural defects, which were revealed by etching the surface of silicon samples, is performed by using an image analyzer. Due to different crystal growth and fabrication techniques the various types of silicon contain a variety of trace impurity elements and structural defects. The two most important criteria in evaluating the various silicon types for solar cell applications are cost and conversion efficiency.

  18. Predicting attitude toward methamphetamine use: the role of antidrug campaign exposure and conversations about meth in Montana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Adam S

    2014-01-01

    This investigation utilized the integrative model of behavioral prediction to assess the Montana Meth Project (MMP) campaign by testing theoretical antecedents of attitude toward methamphetamine (meth) use. College students in Montana (N = 403) were surveyed about their exposure to MMP ads and communication about meth in conversation. Structural equation modeling showed that the data fit the specified model well. Significant parameters indicated that only beliefs about the negative relational outcomes of meth use, and not about personal well-being or physical appearance, were related to attitude. Attention, rather than encoded exposure, to MMP ads related to each belief about meth use. Conversation frequency related to engagement with MMP ads, and a conversational partner's conveyed attitude toward meth use related to personal and physical beliefs as well as attitudes. Theoretical and practical implications of the findings are discussed.

  19. A Machine Learning Approach for MicroRNA Precursor Prediction in Retro-transcribing Virus Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Müşerref Duygu Saçar; Toprak, Mustafa; Allmer, Jens

    2016-12-01

    Identification of microRNA (miRNA) precursors has seen increased efforts in recent years. The difficulty in experimental detection of pre-miRNAs increased the usage of computational approaches. Most of these approaches rely on machine learning especially classification. In order to achieve successful classification, many parameters need to be considered such as data quality, choice of classifier settings, and feature selection. For the latter one, we developed a distributed genetic algorithm on HTCondor to perform feature selection. Moreover, we employed two widely used classification algorithms libSVM and random forest with different settings to analyze the influence on the overall classification performance. In this study we analyzed 5 human retro virus genomes; Human endogenous retrovirus K113, Hepatitis B virus (strain ayw), Human T lymphotropic virus 1, Human T lymphotropic virus 2, Human immunodeficiency virus 2, and Human immunodeficiency virus 1. We then predicted pre-miRNAs by using the information from known virus and human pre-miRNAs. Our results indicate that these viruses produce novel unknown miRNA precursors which warrant further experimental validation.

  20. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    OpenAIRE

    Bastida-González Fernando; Celaya-Trejo Yersin; Correa-Basurto José; Zárate-Segura Paola

    2016-01-01

    The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR). This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-...

  1. Prediction of Negative Conversion Days of Childhood Nephrotic Syndrome Based on the Improved Backpropagation Neural Network with Momentum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-jun Liu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Childhood nephrotic syndrome is a chronic disease harmful to growth of children. Scientific and accurate prediction of negative conversion days for children with nephrotic syndrome offers potential benefits for treatment of patients and helps achieve better cure effect. In this study, the improved backpropagation neural network with momentum is used for prediction. Momentum speeds up convergence and maintains the generalization performance of the neural network, and therefore overcomes weaknesses of the standard backpropagation algorithm. The three-tier network structure is constructed. Eight indicators including age, lgG, lgA and lgM, etc. are selected for network inputs. The scientific computing software of MATLAB and its neural network tools are used to create model and predict. The training sample of twenty-eight cases is used to train the neural network. The test sample of six typical cases belonging to six different age groups respectively is used to test the predictive model. The low mean absolute error of predictive results is achieved at 0.83. The experimental results of the small-size sample show that the proposed approach is to some degree applicable for the prediction of negative conversion days of childhood nephrotic syndrome.

  2. Predicting virus evolution: the relationship between genetic robustness and evolvability of thermotolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogbunugafor, C B; McBride, R C; Turner, P E

    2009-01-01

    Evolutionary biologists often seek to infer historical patterns of relatedness among organisms using phylogenetic methods and to gauge the evolutionary processes that determine variation among individuals in extant populations. But relatively less effort is devoted to making evolutionary biology a truly predictive science, where future evolutionary events are precisely foreseen. Accurate predictions of evolvability would be particularly useful in the evolution of infectious diseases, such as the ability to preemptively address the challenge of pathogens newly emerging in humans and other host populations. Experimental evolution of microbes allows the possibility to rigorously test hypotheses regarding pathogen evolvability. Here, we review how genetic robustness was a useful predictor in gauging which variants of RNA virus varphi6 should evolve faster in a novel high-temperature environment. We also present new data on the relative survival of robust and brittle viruses across elevated temperatures and durations of ultraviolet exposure, to infer a possible mechanism for robustness. Our work suggests that virus adaptability in a new environment can be predicted given knowledge of virus canalization in the face of mutational input. These results hint that accurate predictions of virus evolvability are a realistic possibility, at least under circumstances of adaptive thermotolerance.

  3. Value of diagnostic tests to predict conversion to Alzheimer's disease in young and old patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmand, Ben; Eikelenboom, Piet; van Gool, Willem A

    2012-01-01

    Using the database of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative, we examined the value of neuropsychological assessment, structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, and FDG-PET scanning with respect to prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). We tested the hypothesis that CSF biomarkers and FDG-PET would lose prognostic value when applied in patients older than 75 years, whereas MRI and neuropsychological testing would not. At baseline 175 patients had MCI, mostly amnestic. They were followed during a mean of 2.7 years, and 81 patients converted to AD after a mean of 1.6 years. Logistic regression analyses showed that neuropsychological assessment and MRI variables predicted conversion with 63 to 67% classification success both in patients younger and older than 75 years, while CSF biomarkers attained this success rate only in patients younger than 75 years. For FDG-PET, this rate was 57% in the total sample. We conclude that the diagnostic yield of different techniques in predicting conversion from MCI to AD is moderate, and that it is affected by age of the subject under study. MRI and neuropsychological assessment remain informative in patients older than 75 years, unlike CSF biomarkers.

  4. Prediction of biological functions on glycosylation site migrations in human influenza H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shisheng; Wang, Qinzhe; Zhao, Fei; Chen, Wentian; Li, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Protein glycosylation alteration is typically employed by various viruses for escaping immune pressures from their hosts. Our previous work had shown that not only the increase of glycosylation sites (glycosites) numbers, but also glycosite migration might be involved in the evolution of human seasonal influenza H1N1 viruses. More importantly, glycosite migration was likely a more effectively alteration way for the host adaption of human influenza H1N1 viruses. In this study, we provided more bioinformatics and statistic evidences for further predicting the significant biological functions of glycosite migration in the host adaptation of human influenza H1N1 viruses, by employing homology modeling and in silico protein glycosylation of representative HA and NA proteins as well as amino acid variability analysis at antigenic sites of HA and NA. The results showed that glycosite migrations in human influenza viruses have at least five possible functions: to more effectively mask the antigenic sites, to more effectively protect the enzymatic cleavage sites of neuraminidase (NA), to stabilize the polymeric structures, to regulate the receptor binding and catalytic activities and to balance the binding activity of hemagglutinin (HA) with the release activity of NA. The information here can provide some constructive suggestions for the function research related to protein glycosylation of influenza viruses, although these predictions still need to be supported by experimental data.

  5. Predicting Zoonotic Risk of Influenza A Viruses from Host Tropism Protein Signature Using Random Forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L. P. Eng

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Influenza A viruses remain a significant health problem, especially when a novel subtype emerges from the avian population to cause severe outbreaks in humans. Zoonotic viruses arise from the animal population as a result of mutations and reassortments, giving rise to novel strains with the capability to evade the host species barrier and cause human infections. Despite progress in understanding interspecies transmission of influenza viruses, we are no closer to predicting zoonotic strains that can lead to an outbreak. We have previously discovered distinct host tropism protein signatures of avian, human and zoonotic influenza strains obtained from host tropism predictions on individual protein sequences. Here, we apply machine learning approaches on the signatures to build a computational model capable of predicting zoonotic strains. The zoonotic strain prediction model can classify avian, human or zoonotic strains with high accuracy, as well as providing an estimated zoonotic risk. This would therefore allow us to quickly determine if an influenza virus strain has the potential to be zoonotic using only protein sequences. The swift identification of potential zoonotic strains in the animal population using the zoonotic strain prediction model could provide us with an early indication of an imminent influenza outbreak.

  6. Predicted 3D Model of the Rabies Virus Glycoprotein Trimer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bastida-González Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The RABVG ectodomain is a homotrimer, and trimers are often called spikes. They are responsible for the attachment of the virus through the interaction with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM, and the p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR. This makes them relevant in viral pathogenesis. The antigenic structure differs significantly between the trimers and monomers. Surfaces rich in hydrophobic amino acids are important for trimer stabilization in which the C-terminal of the ectodomain plays an important role; to understand these interactions between the G proteins, a mechanistic study of their functions was performed with a molecular model of G protein in its trimeric form. This verified its 3D conformation. The molecular modeling of G protein was performed by a I-TASSER server and was evaluated via a Rachamandran plot and ERRAT program obtained 84.64% and 89.9% of the residues in the favorable regions and overall quality factor, respectively. The molecular dynamics simulations were carried out on RABVG trimer at 310 K. From these theoretical studies, we retrieved the RMSD values from Cα atoms to assess stability. Preliminary model of G protein of rabies virus stable at 12 ns with molecular dynamics was obtained.

  7. Predictive value of serum gelsolin in hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gelsolin, an actin-binding protein, which serves as a substrate of caspase in tissue injury has been proposed as a prognostic marker in acute liver injury, but its relationship with human hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related hepatitis at various stages is still unclear. This study was conducted in order to investigate the predictive ...

  8. Prediction of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease based on bayesian data mining with ensemble learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, R; Young, K; Chao, L L; Miller, B; Yaffe, K; Weiner, M W; Herskovits, E H

    2012-03-01

    Prediction of disease progress is of great importance to Alzheimer disease (AD) researchers and clinicians. Previous attempts at constructing predictive models have been hindered by undersampling, and restriction to linear associations among variables, among other problems. To address these problems, we propose a novel Bayesian data-mining method called Bayesian Outcome Prediction with Ensemble Learning (BOPEL). BOPEL uses a Bayesian-network representation with boosting, to allow the detection of nonlinear multivariate associations, and incorporates resampling-based feature selection to prevent over-fitting caused by undersampling. We demonstrate the use of this approach in predicting conversion to AD in individuals with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), based on structural magnetic-resonance and magnetic-resonance- spectroscopy data. This study includes 26 subjects with amnestic MCI: the converter group (n = 8) met MCI criteria at baseline, but converted to AD within five years, whereas the non-converter group (n = 18) met MCI criteria at baseline and at follow-up. We found that BOPEL accurately differentiates MCI converters from non-converters, based on the baseline volumes of the left hippocampus, the banks of the right superior temporal sulcus, the right entorhinal cortex, the left lingual gyrus, and the rostral aspect of the left middle frontal gyrus. Prediction accuracy was 0.81, sensitivity was 0.63 and specificity was 0.89. We validated the generated predictive model with an independent data set constructed from the Alzheimer Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database, and again found high predictive accuracy (0.75).

  9. FaceTube: predicting personality from facial expressions of emotion in online conversational video

    OpenAIRE

    Biel, Joan-Isaac; Teijeiro-Mosquera, Lucia; Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The advances in automatic facial expression recognition make it possible to mine and characterize large amounts of data, opening a wide research domain on behavioral understanding. In this paper, we leverage the use of a state-of-theart facial expression recognition technology to characterize users of a popular type of online social video, conversational vlogs. First, we propose the use of several activity cues to characterize vloggers based on frame-by-frame estimates of facial expressions o...

  10. Prediction of protein-protein interactions between viruses and human by an SVM model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Guangyu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several computational methods have been developed to predict protein-protein interactions from amino acid sequences, but most of those methods are intended for the interactions within a species rather than for interactions across different species. Methods for predicting interactions between homogeneous proteins are not appropriate for finding those between heterogeneous proteins since they do not distinguish the interactions between proteins of the same species from those of different species. Results We developed a new method for representing a protein sequence of variable length in a frequency vector of fixed length, which encodes the relative frequency of three consecutive amino acids of a sequence. We built a support vector machine (SVM model to predict human proteins that interact with virus proteins. In two types of viruses, human papillomaviruses (HPV and hepatitis C virus (HCV, our SVM model achieved an average accuracy above 80%, which is higher than that of another SVM model with a different representation scheme. Using the SVM model and Gene Ontology (GO annotations of proteins, we predicted new interactions between virus proteins and human proteins. Conclusions Encoding the relative frequency of amino acid triplets of a protein sequence is a simple yet powerful representation method for predicting protein-protein interactions across different species. The representation method has several advantages: (1 it enables a prediction model to achieve a better performance than other representations, (2 it generates feature vectors of fixed length regardless of the sequence length, and (3 the same representation is applicable to different types of proteins.

  11. Subclinical primary psychopathy, but not physical formidability or attractiveness, predicts conversational dominance in a zero-acquaintance situation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph H Manson

    Full Text Available The determinants of conversational dominance are not well understood. We used videotaped triadic interactions among unacquainted same-sex American college students to test predictions drawn from the theoretical distinction between dominance and prestige as modes of human status competition. Specifically, we investigated the effects of physical formidability, facial attractiveness, social status, and self-reported subclinical psychopathy on quantitative (proportion of words produced, participatory (interruptions produced and sustained, and sequential (topic control dominance. No measure of physical formidability or attractiveness was associated with any form of conversational dominance, suggesting that the characteristics of our study population or experimental frame may have moderated their role in dominance dynamics. Primary psychopathy was positively associated with quantitative dominance and (marginally overall triad talkativeness, and negatively associated (in men with affect word use, whereas secondary psychopathy was unrelated to conversational dominance. The two psychopathy factors had significant opposing effects on quantitative dominance in a multivariate model. These latter findings suggest that glibness in primary psychopathy may function to elicit exploitable information from others in a relationally mobile society.

  12. Integrating Decision Tree and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for Subtype Prediction of Human Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaluri, Pavan K.; Chen, Zhengxin; Weerakoon, Aruna M.; Lu, Guoqing

    Multiple criteria decision making (MCDM) has significant impact in bioinformatics. In the research reported here, we explore the integration of decision tree (DT) and Hidden Markov Model (HMM) for subtype prediction of human influenza A virus. Infection with influenza viruses continues to be an important public health problem. Viral strains of subtype H3N2 and H1N1 circulates in humans at least twice annually. The subtype detection depends mainly on the antigenic assay, which is time-consuming and not fully accurate. We have developed a Web system for accurate subtype detection of human influenza virus sequences. The preliminary experiment showed that this system is easy-to-use and powerful in identifying human influenza subtypes. Our next step is to examine the informative positions at the protein level and extend its current functionality to detect more subtypes. The web functions can be accessed at http://glee.ist.unomaha.edu/.

  13. Predictive & Prognostic Controller for Wide Band Gap (Silicon Carbide) Power Conversion (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Davis, Gregg; Casey, Leo; Jordan, Brett; Scofield, Jim; Keller, Kirby; Sheahan, Jim; Roach, Jeffrey; Scherrer, Michael; Singh, Ranbir

    2006-01-01

    This report was developed under a SBIR contract. This paper presents an approach to predictive control and prognostication intended to increase the confidence levels for power converters in aerospace applications...

  14. Emotional experiences predict the conversion of individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome to psychosis: A six-month follow up study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fa Zhan Chen

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study explored the conversion rate in individuals with Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (APS and potential predictor for transition in China. Sixty-three participants were identified as APS were followed up six months later. The results showed that 17% of individuals with APS converted to psychosis. The converters exhibited poorer emotional experience and expression than the non-converters at baseline. A further binary logistic regression analysis showed that emotional experience could predict the transition (Wald = 4.18, p = 0.041, 95% CI = 1.04~6.82. The current study suggested an important role of emotional processing in the prediction of the development of full-blown psychosis.

  15. Model Predictive Control-based Power take-off Control of an Oscillating Water Column Wave Energy Conversion System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajapakse, G.; Jayasinghe, S. G.; Fleming, A.; Shahnia, F.

    2017-07-01

    Australia’s extended coastline asserts abundance of wave and tidal power. The predictability of these energy sources and their proximity to cities and towns make them more desirable. Several tidal current turbine and ocean wave energy conversion projects have already been planned in the coastline of southern Australia. Some of these projects use air turbine technology with air driven turbines to harvest the energy from an oscillating water column. This study focuses on the power take-off control of a single stage unidirectional oscillating water column air turbine generator system, and proposes a model predictive control-based speed controller for the generator-turbine assembly. The proposed method is verified with simulation results that show the efficacy of the controller in extracting power from the turbine while maintaining the speed at the desired level.

  16. Propidium Monoazide Coupled with PCR Predicts Infectivity of Enteric Viruses in Swine Manure and Biofertilized Soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fongaro, Gislaine; Hernández, Marta; García-González, María Cruz; Barardi, Célia Regina Monte; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    2016-03-01

    The use of propidium monoazide (PMA) coupled with real-time PCR (RT-qPCR or qPCR for RNA or DNA viruses, respectively) was assessed to discriminate infectious enteric viruses in swine raw manure, swine effluent from anaerobic biodigester (AB) and biofertilized soils. Those samples were spiked either with infectious and heat-inactivated human adenovirus-2 (HAdV-2) or mengovirus (vMC0), and PMA-qPCR/RT-qPCR allowed discriminating inactivated viruses from the infective particles, with significant reductions (>99.9%). Then, the procedure was further assayed to evaluate the presence and stability of two non-cultivable viruses (porcine adenovirus and rotavirus A) in natural samples (swine raw manure, swine effluent from AB and biofertilized soils); it demonstrated viral inactivation during the storage period at 23 °C. As a result, the combination of PMA coupled to real-time PCR can be a promising alternative for prediction of viral infectivity in comparison to more labour-intensive and costly techniques such as animal or tissue-culture infectivity methods, and for those viruses that do not have currently available cell culture techniques.

  17. Serum MHPG Strongly Predicts Conversion to Alzheimer's Disease in Behaviorally Characterized Subjects with Down Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, Alain D.; Coppus, Antonia M. W.; Vermeiren, Yannick; Aerts, Tony; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Kremer, Berry P.; Naude, Pieter J. W.; Van Dam, Debby; De Deyn, Peter P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Down syndrome (DS) is the most prevalent genetic cause of intellectual disability. Early-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) frequently develops in DS and is characterized by progressive memory loss and behavioral and psychological signs and symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Predicting and

  18. 3D protein structure prediction of influenza A virus based on optimization genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jie; Jin, Pei-Xuan; Xu, Hong-xing

    2014-05-01

    The 3D structure of close polymer is constituted by the interaction of close contact couples among amino acid residues. In this paper, 3D protein structure of influenza A virus was predicted. Twenty kinds of amino acid residues were divided into four categories according to the number of close contact couples. The stable structure with minimum energy was obtained by using optimization genetic algorithm. The HNXP 3D lattice model was established to predict the 3D protein structure. It can be concluded that the two kinds of structures are significantly similar by computing the similarity.

  19. Pseudo-chaotic oscillations in CRISPR-virus coevolution predicted by bifurcation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berezovskaya, Faina S; Wolf, Yuri I; Koonin, Eugene V; Karev, Georgy P

    2014-07-02

    The CRISPR-Cas systems of adaptive antivirus immunity are present in most archaea and many bacteria, and provide resistance to specific viruses or plasmids by inserting fragments of foreign DNA into the host genome and then utilizing transcripts of these spacers to inactivate the cognate foreign genome. The recent development of powerful genome engineering tools on the basis of CRISPR-Cas has sharply increased the interest in the diversity and evolution of these systems. Comparative genomic data indicate that during evolution of prokaryotes CRISPR-Cas loci are lost and acquired via horizontal gene transfer at high rates. Mathematical modeling and initial experimental studies of CRISPR-carrying microbes and viruses reveal complex coevolutionary dynamics. We performed a bifurcation analysis of models of coevolution of viruses and microbial host that possess CRISPR-Cas hereditary adaptive immunity systems. The analyzed Malthusian and logistic models display complex, and in particular, quasi-chaotic oscillation regimes that have not been previously observed experimentally or in agent-based models of the CRISPR-mediated immunity. The key factors for the appearance of the quasi-chaotic oscillations are the non-linear dependence of the host immunity on the virus load and the partitioning of the hosts into the immune and susceptible populations, so that the system consists of three components. Bifurcation analysis of CRISPR-host coevolution model predicts complex regimes including quasi-chaotic oscillations. The quasi-chaotic regimes of virus-host coevolution are likely to be biologically relevant given the evolutionary instability of the CRISPR-Cas loci revealed by comparative genomics. The results of this analysis might have implications beyond the CRISPR-Cas systems, i.e. could describe the behavior of any adaptive immunity system with a heritable component, be it genetic or epigenetic. These predictions are experimentally testable. This manuscript was reviewed by

  20. Prediction of biomass conversion process for oil palm fronds in a downdraft gasifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atnaw, Samson M.; Sulaiman, Shaharin A.; Ahmad, M. Redzuan T.

    2012-06-01

    With no previous work on gasification of oil palm fronds (OPF), the design of a gasifier with optimum performance for such a biomass can be difficult. Prediction of the optimum operating condition using computer software can avoid costly trial and error designs. The objective of this work is to simulate biomass gasification process in a downdraft gasifier using OPF as a feedstock by means of Aspen Plus software. Three different equilibrium models were proposed using the unit operation models of ASPEN. Prediction of syngas composition obtained from each model was compared with experimental results from literature in order to select the best model that gives more reliable results. The optimum operating conditions that would result in the best composition of syngas was determined based on the prediction of the models. Sensitivity analysis has been carried out to investigate, the effect of temperature (500°C - 1000°C), and equivalence ratio (ER) (0.2 < ER < 0.53), to the resulting composition of syngas. From the work, it is found that rate of production of CO in the syngas increases with temperature, while the trend is decreasing for CO2. The rate of production of H2 is nearly constant for temperature values above 700°C. In addition, the rate of production of CO2 increases with equivalence ratio while that of H2 is predicted to decrease at higher equivalence ratio. The rate of production of CH2 tends to be only in trace amount for equivalence ratio values above 0.3, while a maximum output of CO is achieved at lower equivalence ratio less than 0.3, and higher oxidation zone temperature value, above 800°C. The simulation results showed that the operating condition would be optimum at higher temperature range of above 800°C, and equivalence ratio value of 0.3.

  1. The use of early summer mosquito surveillance to predict late summer West Nile virus activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Rochlin, Ilia; Campbell, Scott R.

    2010-01-01

    Utility of early-season mosquito surveillance to predict West Nile virus activity in late summer was assessed in Suffolk County, NY. Dry ice-baited CDC miniature light traps paired with gravid traps were set weekly. Maximum-likelihood estimates of WNV positivity, minimum infection rates, and % positive pools were generally well correlated. However, positivity in gravid traps was not correlated with positivity in CDC light traps. The best early-season predictors of WNV activity in late summer (estimated using maximum-likelihood estimates of Culex positivity in August and September) were early date of first positive pool, low numbers of mosquitoes in July, and low numbers of mosquito species in July. These results suggest that early-season entomological samples can be used to predict WNV activity later in the summer, when most human cases are acquired. Additional research is needed to establish which surveillance variables are most predictive and to characterize the reliability of the predictions.

  2. [From the prehypertensive adolescent to the hypertensive adult. Is possible to predict the conversion?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Fernández, Guillermo Alberto; Grau-Abalo, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    There are many risk factors for developing hypertension. In the XXI century, smarter ways to investigate are needed, so preventing the turning of an adolescent into a hypertensive adult must be a priority. The aim of this paper is to predict the risk of hypertension onset in adulthood, from cardiovascular tension and risk stratification since adolescence. A representative sample of 125 adolescents from the project "Pesquisaje Escolar en la Adolescencia de Hipertensión Arterial" (PESESCAD-HTA) was studied. They were diagnosed with prehypertension in 2001, and were followed for eight years (96 months) until January 2009. Two predictive indexes were obtained. The first, based on the total cardiovascular risk and the second from the multiplication of these risks with an accuracy index for each of 61.6% and 70.4%, respectively. The index based on the multiplication of cardiovascular risk can predict, with adequate accuracy, the turning of a prehypertensive adolescent into hypertensive once he/she reaches adulthood.

  3. Stochastic Model Predictive Fault Tolerant Control Based on Conditional Value at Risk for Wind Energy Conversion System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Tao Shi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Wind energy has been drawing considerable attention in recent years. However, due to the random nature of wind and high failure rate of wind energy conversion systems (WECSs, how to implement fault-tolerant WECS control is becoming a significant issue. This paper addresses the fault-tolerant control problem of a WECS with a probable actuator fault. A new stochastic model predictive control (SMPC fault-tolerant controller with the Conditional Value at Risk (CVaR objective function is proposed in this paper. First, the Markov jump linear model is used to describe the WECS dynamics, which are affected by many stochastic factors, like the wind. The Markov jump linear model can precisely model the random WECS properties. Second, the scenario-based SMPC is used as the controller to address the control problem of the WECS. With this controller, all the possible realizations of the disturbance in prediction horizon are enumerated by scenario trees so that an uncertain SMPC problem can be transformed into a deterministic model predictive control (MPC problem. Finally, the CVaR object function is adopted to improve the fault-tolerant control performance of the SMPC controller. CVaR can provide a balance between the performance and random failure risks of the system. The Min-Max performance index is introduced to compare the fault-tolerant control performance with the proposed controller. The comparison results show that the proposed method has better fault-tolerant control performance.

  4. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  5. UPDATE February 2012 - The Food Crises: Predictive validation of a quantitative model of food prices including speculators and ethanol conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Lagi, Marco; Bertrand, Karla Z; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2012-01-01

    Increases in global food prices have led to widespread hunger and social unrest---and an imperative to understand their causes. In a previous paper published in September 2011, we constructed for the first time a dynamic model that quantitatively agreed with food prices. Specifically, the model fit the FAO Food Price Index time series from January 2004 to March 2011, inclusive. The results showed that the dominant causes of price increases during this period were investor speculation and ethanol conversion. The model included investor trend following as well as shifting between commodities, equities and bonds to take advantage of increased expected returns. Here, we extend the food prices model to January 2012, without modifying the model but simply continuing its dynamics. The agreement is still precise, validating both the descriptive and predictive abilities of the analysis. Policy actions are needed to avoid a third speculative bubble that would cause prices to rise above recent peaks by the end of 2012.

  6. Allocentric spatial memory testing predicts conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia: an initial proof-of-concept study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth A Wood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The hippocampus is one of the first regions to exhibit neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease (AD and knowledge of its role in allocentric spatial memory may therefore aid early diagnosis of AD. The 4 Mountains Test (4MT is a short and easily administered test of spatial memory based on the cognitive map theory of hippocampal function as derived from rodent single cell and behavioral studies. The 4MT has been shown in previous cross-sectional studies to be sensitive and specific for mild cognitive impairment due to AD. This report describes the initial results of a longitudinal study testing the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory is predictive of conversion from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.Fifteen patients with mild cognitive impairment underwent baseline testing on the 4MT in addition to CSF amyloid/tau biomarker studies, volumetric MRI and neuropsychological assessment including the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test (RAVLT and Trail Making Test B (TMT-B. At 24 months, 9/15 patients had converted to AD dementia. The 4MT predicted conversion to AD with 93% accuracy (Cohen’s d = 2.52. The predictive accuracies of the comparator measures were as follows: CSF tau/β-amyloid1-42 ratio 92% (d = 1.81, RAVLT 64% (d = 0.41, TMT-B 78% (d = 1.56, and hippocampal volume 77% (d = 0.65. CSF tau levels were strongly negative correlated with 4MT scores (r = -0.71. This proof-of-concept study provides initial support for the hypothesis that allocentric spatial memory testing is a predictive cognitive marker of hippocampal neurodegeneration in pre-dementia AD. The 4MT is a brief, noninvasive, straightforward spatial memory test and is therefore ideally suited for use in routine clinical diagnostic practice. This is of particular importance given the current unmet need for simple accurate diagnostic tests for early AD and the ongoing development of potential disease-modifying therapeutic agents which may be more efficacious when given

  7. Real time simulation of nonlinear generalized predictive control for wind energy conversion system with nonlinear observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouari, Kamel; Rekioua, Toufik; Ouhrouche, Mohand

    2014-01-01

    In order to make a wind power generation truly cost-effective and reliable, an advanced control techniques must be used. In this paper, we develop a new control strategy, using nonlinear generalized predictive control (NGPC) approach, for DFIG-based wind turbine. The proposed control law is based on two points: NGPC-based torque-current control loop generating the rotor reference voltage and NGPC-based speed control loop that provides the torque reference. In order to enhance the robustness of the controller, a disturbance observer is designed to estimate the aerodynamic torque which is considered as an unknown perturbation. Finally, a real-time simulation is carried out to illustrate the performance of the proposed controller. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Lagrangian particle model to predict the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, D.; Reiczigel, J.; Rubel, F.

    Airborne spread of bioaerosols in the boundary layer over a complex terrain is simulated using a Lagrangian particle model, and applied to modelling the airborne spread of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus. Two case studies are made with study domains located in a hilly region in the northwest of the Styrian capital Graz, the second largest town in Austria. Mountainous terrain as well as inhomogeneous and time varying meteorological conditions prevent from application of so far used Gaussian dispersion models, while the proposed model can handle these realistically. In the model, trajectories of several thousands of particles are computed and the distribution of virus concentration near the ground is calculated. This allows to assess risk of infection areas with respect to animal species of interest, such as cattle, swine or sheep. Meteorological input data like wind field and other variables necessary to compute turbulence were taken from the new pre-operational version of the non-hydrostatic numerical weather prediction model LMK ( Lokal-Modell-Kürzestfrist) running at the German weather service DWD ( Deutscher Wetterdienst). The LMK model provides meteorological parameters with a spatial resolution of about 2.8 km. To account for the spatial resolution of 400 m used by the Lagrangian particle model, the initial wind field is interpolated upon the finer grid by a mass consistent interpolation method. Case studies depict a significant influence of local wind systems on the spread of virus. Higher virus concentrations at the upwind side of the hills and marginal concentrations in the lee are well observable, as well as canalization effects by valleys. The study demonstrates that the Lagrangian particle model is an appropriate tool for risk assessment of airborne spread of virus by taking into account the realistic orographic and meteorological conditions.

  9. Prediction of virus-host protein-protein interactions mediated by short linear motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerra, Andrés; Bucheli, Victor A; Moreno, Pedro A

    2017-03-09

    Short linear motifs in host organisms proteins can be mimicked by viruses to create protein-protein interactions that disable or control metabolic pathways. Given that viral linear motif instances of host motif regular expressions can be found by chance, it is necessary to develop filtering methods of functional linear motifs. We conduct a systematic comparison of linear motifs filtering methods to develop a computational approach for predicting motif-mediated protein-protein interactions between human and the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1). We implemented three filtering methods to obtain linear motif sets: 1) conserved in viral proteins (C), 2) located in disordered regions (D) and 3) rare or scarce in a set of randomized viral sequences (R). The sets C,D,R are united and intersected. The resulting sets are compared by the number of protein-protein interactions correctly inferred with them - with experimental validation. The comparison is done with HIV-1 sequences and interactions from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID). The number of correctly inferred interactions allows to rank the interactions by the sets used to deduce them: D∪R and C. The ordering of the sets is descending on the probability of capturing functional interactions. With respect to HIV-1, the sets C∪R, D∪R, C∪D∪R infer all known interactions between HIV1 and human proteins mediated by linear motifs. We found that the majority of conserved linear motifs in the virus are located in disordered regions. We have developed a method for predicting protein-protein interactions mediated by linear motifs between HIV-1 and human proteins. The method only use protein sequences as inputs. We can extend the software developed to any other eukaryotic virus and host in order to find and rank candidate interactions. In future works we will use it to explore possible viral attack mechanisms based on linear motif mimicry.

  10. Computational prediction of vaccine strains for human influenza A (H3N2) viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrück, L; Klingen, T R; McHardy, A C

    2014-10-01

    Human influenza A viruses are rapidly evolving pathogens that cause substantial morbidity and mortality in seasonal epidemics around the globe. To ensure continued protection, the strains used for the production of the seasonal influenza vaccine have to be regularly updated, which involves data collection and analysis by numerous experts worldwide. Computer-guided analysis is becoming increasingly important in this problem due to the vast amounts of generated data. We here describe a computational method for selecting a suitable strain for production of the human influenza A virus vaccine. It interprets available antigenic and genomic sequence data based on measures of antigenic novelty and rate of propagation of the viral strains throughout the population. For viral isolates sampled between 2002 and 2007, we used this method to predict the antigenic evolution of the H3N2 viruses in retrospective testing scenarios. When seasons were scored as true or false predictions, our method returned six true positives, three false negatives, eight true negatives, and one false positive, or 78% accuracy overall. In comparison to the recommendations by the WHO, we identified the correct antigenic variant once at the same time and twice one season ahead. Even though it cannot be ruled out that practical reasons such as lack of a sufficiently well-growing candidate strain may in some cases have prevented recommendation of the best-matching strain by the WHO, our computational decision procedure allows quantitative interpretation of the growing amounts of data and may help to match the vaccine better to predominating strains in seasonal influenza epidemics. Importance: Human influenza A viruses continuously change antigenically to circumvent the immune protection evoked by vaccination or previously circulating viral strains. To maintain vaccine protection and thereby reduce the mortality and morbidity caused by infections, regular updates of the vaccine strains are required. We

  11. A Network Integration Approach to Predict Conserved Regulators Related to Pathogenicity of Influenza and SARS-CoV Respiratory Viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Hugh D.; Eisfeld, Amie J.; Sims, Amy; McDermott, Jason E.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Tchitchek, Nicholas; Josset, Laurence; Li, Chengjun; Ellis, Amy L.; Chang, Jean H.; Heegel, Robert A.; Luna, Maria L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Shukla, Anil K.; Metz, Thomas O.; Neumann, Gabriele; Benecke, Arndt; Smith, Richard D.; Baric, Ralph; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Katze, Michael G.; Waters, Katrina M.

    2013-07-25

    Respiratory infections stemming from influenza viruses and the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome corona virus (SARS-CoV) represent a serious public health threat as emerging pandemics. Despite efforts to identify the critical interactions of these viruses with host machinery, the key regulatory events that lead to disease pathology remain poorly targeted with therapeutics. Here we implement an integrated network interrogation approach, in which proteome and transcriptome datasets from infection of both viruses in human lung epithelial cells are utilized to predict regulatory genes involved in the host response. We take advantage of a novel “crowd-based” approach to identify and combine ranking metrics that isolate genes/proteins likely related to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV and influenza virus. Subsequently, a multivariate regression model is used to compare predicted lung epithelial regulatory influences with data derived from other respiratory virus infection models. We predicted a small set of regulatory factors with conserved behavior for consideration as important components of viral pathogenesis that might also serve as therapeutic targets for intervention. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating diverse ‘omic datasets to predict and prioritize regulatory features conserved across multiple pathogen infection models.

  12. PREDICTING ATTENUATION OF VIRUSES DURING PERCOLATION IN SOILS: 2. USER'S GUIDE TO THE VIRULO 1.0 COMPUTER MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the EPA document Predicting Attenuation of Viruses During Percolation in Soils 1. Probabilistic Model the conceptual, theoretical, and mathematical foundations for a predictive screening model were presented. In this current volume we present a User's Guide for the computer mo...

  13. Characterization of selected Ohio coals to predict their conversion behavior relative to 104 North American Coals. [Factors correlating with liquefaction behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitacre, T. P.; Hunt, T. J.; Kneller, W. A.

    1982-02-01

    Twenty-six coal samples from Ohio were collected as washed and seam samples, and lithobodies within the seams. Characterization of these samples included determination of % maceral, % anti R/sub max/, LTA, chlorine content and proximate/ultimate and qualitative mineral analyses. These data were compared to data from a similar project by Yarzab, R.F., et al., 1980 completed at Pennsylvania State University using tetralin as the hydrogen donor solvent. The characteristics of these coals were correlated with liquefaction conversion and other data accrued on 104 North American coals by statistical analyses. Utilizing percent carbon, sulfur, volatile matter, reflectance, vitrinite and total reactive macerals, Q-mode cluster analysis demonstrated that Ohio coals are more similar to the coals of the Interior province than to those of the Appalachian province. Linear multiple regression analysis for the 104 North American coals provided a prediction equation for conversion (R = .96). The predicted conversion values for the samples range from 58.8 to 79.6%, with the Lower Kittanning (No. 5) and the Middle Kittanning (No. 6) coal seams showing the highest predicted percent conversion (respectively, 73.4 and 72.2%). The moderately low FSI values for the No. 5 and No. 6 coals (respectively, 2.5 and 3) and their moderately high alkaline earth content (respectively, 0.69 and 0.74%) suggest that these coals possess the best overall properties for conversion. Stepwise regression has indicated that the most important coal characteristics affecting conversion are, in decreasing order of importance: % volatile matter, % vitrinite and % total sulfur. Conversion processes can be expected to produce higher yields with Ohio coals due to the presence of such mineral catalysts as pyrite and kaolinite. It is believed that the presence of these disposable catalysts increases the marketability of Ohio coals.

  14. Predicting the benefits of banana bunchy top virus exclusion from commercial plantations in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David C; Liu, Shuang; Edwards, Jacqueline; Villalta, Oscar N; Aurambout, Jean-Philippe; Kriticos, Darren J; Drenth, Andre; De Barro, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    Benefit cost analysis is a tried and tested analytical framework that can clearly communicate likely net changes in producer welfare from investment decisions to diverse stakeholder audiences. However, in a plant biosecurity context, it is often difficult to predict policy benefits over time due to complex biophysical interactions between invasive species, their hosts, and the environment. In this paper, we demonstrate how a break-even style benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to biosecurity decision-makers using the example of banana bunchy top virus, a plant pathogen targeted for eradication from banana growing regions of Australia. We develop an analytical approach using a stratified diffusion spread model to simulate the likely benefits of exclusion of this virus from commercial banana plantations over time relative to a nil management scenario in which no surveillance or containment activities take place. Using Monte Carlo simulation to generate a range of possible future incursion scenarios, we predict the exclusion benefits of the disease will avoid Aus$15.9-27.0 million in annual losses for the banana industry. For these exclusion benefits to be reduced to zero would require a bunchy top re-establishment event in commercial banana plantations three years in every four. Sensitivity analysis indicates that exclusion benefits can be greatly enhanced through improvements in disease surveillance and incursion response.

  15. Predicting the benefits of banana bunchy top virus exclusion from commercial plantations in Australia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Cook

    Full Text Available Benefit cost analysis is a tried and tested analytical framework that can clearly communicate likely net changes in producer welfare from investment decisions to diverse stakeholder audiences. However, in a plant biosecurity context, it is often difficult to predict policy benefits over time due to complex biophysical interactions between invasive species, their hosts, and the environment. In this paper, we demonstrate how a break-even style benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to biosecurity decision-makers using the example of banana bunchy top virus, a plant pathogen targeted for eradication from banana growing regions of Australia. We develop an analytical approach using a stratified diffusion spread model to simulate the likely benefits of exclusion of this virus from commercial banana plantations over time relative to a nil management scenario in which no surveillance or containment activities take place. Using Monte Carlo simulation to generate a range of possible future incursion scenarios, we predict the exclusion benefits of the disease will avoid Aus$15.9-27.0 million in annual losses for the banana industry. For these exclusion benefits to be reduced to zero would require a bunchy top re-establishment event in commercial banana plantations three years in every four. Sensitivity analysis indicates that exclusion benefits can be greatly enhanced through improvements in disease surveillance and incursion response.

  16. Prediction and identification of mouse cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitopes in Ebola virus glycoproteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Shipo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ebola viruses (EBOVs cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality rate. At present, there are no licensed vaccines or efficient therapies to combat EBOV infection. Previous studies have shown that both humoral and cellular immune responses are crucial for controlling Ebola infection. CD8+ T cells play an important role in mediating vaccine-induced protective immunity. The objective of this study was to identify H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in EBOV glycoproteins (GPs. Results Computer-assisted algorithms were used to predict H-2d-specific T cell epitopes in two species of EBOV (Sudan and Zaire GP. The predicted peptides were synthesized and identified in BALB/c mice immunized with replication-deficient adenovirus vectors expressing the EBOV GP. Enzyme-linked immunospot assays and intracellular cytokine staining showed that the peptides RPHTPQFLF (Sudan EBOV, GPCAGDFAF and LYDRLASTV (Zaire EBOV could stimulate splenoctyes in immunized mice to produce large amounts of interferon-gamma. Conclusion Three peptides within the GPs of two EBOV strains were identified as T cell epitopes. The identification of these epitopes should facilitate the evaluation of vaccines based on the Ebola virus glycoprotein in a BALB/c mouse model.

  17. Dinucleotide Composition in Animal RNA Viruses Is Shaped More by Virus Family than by Host Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giallonardo, Francesca; Schlub, Timothy E; Shi, Mang; Holmes, Edward C

    2017-04-15

    whether dinucleotide composition can be used to accurately predict host species. Using a comparative analysis, we show that dinucleotide composition has a strong phylogenetic association across different RNA virus families, such that dinucleotide composition can predict the family from which a virus sequence has been isolated. Conversely, dinucleotide composition has a poorer predictive power for the different host species within a virus family and across different virus families, indicating that the host has a relatively small impact on the dinucleotide composition of a virus genome. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. Conversion to Resection in Patients Receiving Systemic Chemotherapy for Unresectable and/or Metastatic Colorectal Cancer-Predictive Factors and Prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Soichiro; Kawai, Kazushige; Hata, Keisuke; Kiyomatsu, Tomomichi; Tanaka, Toshiaki; Nishikawa, Takeshi; Otani, Kensuke; Yasuda, Koji; Sasaki, Kazuhito; Kaneko, Manabu; Murono, Koji

    2017-10-19

    Systemic chemotherapy increases the possibility of resection in patients with initially unresectable colorectal cancer (CRC), especially patients with hepatic metastasis. However, the predictive factors and prognosis of conversion to resection after chemotherapy in patients with various organ metastases remain largely unknown. We reviewed the data from metastatic CRC (mCRC) patients who had received oxaliplatin- or irinotecan-based systemic chemotherapy from 2005 to 2016. The predictors for conversion to surgery were assessed by multivariate analyses. Cancer-free survival and overall survival after the initiation of treatment were compared between patients who had undergone successful conversion therapy and those who had undergone surgery first for resectable stage IV CRC. Of 99 mCRC patients receiving first-line chemotherapy, 23 underwent secondary surgical resection. Single organ metastasis, the presence of liver metastases, and the use of biologic agents were independent predictors of successful conversion therapy. The long-term survival of patients who underwent successful secondary surgery did not differ significantly from that of the 112 patients with resectable stage IV CRC who had undergone surgery first. Liver metastases and single organ metastasis were more likely to be resected after chemotherapy than were other metastatic lesions in mCRC. The use of biologic agents contributed to the increased conversion rate. Successful conversion resulted in outcomes similar to those of resectable stage IV CRC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Genome-assisted prediction of a quantitative trait measured in parents and progeny: application to food conversion rate in chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Guilherme JM

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Accuracy of prediction of yet-to-be observed phenotypes for food conversion rate (FCR in broilers was studied in a genome-assisted selection context. Data consisted of FCR measured on the progeny of 394 sires with SNP information. A Bayesian regression model (Bayes A and a semi-parametric approach (Reproducing kernel Hilbert Spaces regression, RKHS using all available SNPs (p = 3481 were compared with a standard linear model in which future performance was predicted using pedigree indexes in the absence of genomic data. The RKHS regression was also tested on several sets of pre-selected SNPs (p = 400 using alternative measures of the information gain provided by the SNPs. All analyses were performed using 333 genotyped sires as training set, and predictions were made on 61 birds as testing set, which were sons of sires in the training set. Accuracy of prediction was measured as the Spearman correlation (r¯S MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafmOCaiNbaebadaWgaaWcbaGaem4uamfabeaaaaa@2EB5@ between observed and predicted phenotype, with its confidence interval assessed through a bootstrap approach. A large improvement of genome-assisted prediction (up to an almost 4-fold increase in accuracy was found relative to pedigree index. Bayes A and RKHS regression were equally accurate (r¯S MathType@MTEF@5@5@+=feaagaart1ev2aaatCvAUfKttLearuWrP9MDH5MBPbIqV92AaeXatLxBI9gBaebbnrfifHhDYfgasaacPC6xNi=xH8viVGI8Gi=hEeeu0xXdbba9frFj0xb9qqpG0dXdb9aspeI8k8fiI+fsY=rqGqVepae9pg0db9vqaiVgFr0xfr=xfr=xc9adbaqaaeGaciGaaiaabeqaaeqabiWaaaGcbaGafmOCaiNbaebadaWgaaWcbaGaem4uamfabeaaaaa@2EB5@ = 0.27 when all 3481 SNPs were included in the model. However, RKHS with 400 pre-selected informative SNPs was more accurate than Bayes A with all SNPs.

  20. VIRUSES

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and-mouth disease in livestock was an infectious particle smaller than any bacteria. This was the first clue to the nature of viruses, genetic entities that lie somewhere in the gray area between living and non-living states.

  1. Stress hormones predict a host superspreader phenotype in the West Nile virus system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervasi, Stephanie; Burgan, Sarah; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Unnasch, Thomas R.; Martin, Lynn B.

    2017-01-01

    Glucocorticoid stress hormones, such as corticosterone (CORT), have profound effects on the behaviour and physiology of organisms, and thus have the potential to alter host competence and the contributions of individuals to population- and community-level pathogen dynamics. For example, CORT could alter the rate of contacts among hosts, pathogens and vectors through its widespread effects on host metabolism and activity levels. CORT could also affect the intensity and duration of pathogen shedding and risk of host mortality during infection. We experimentally manipulated songbird CORT, asking how CORT affected behavioural and physiological responses to a standardized West Nile virus (WNV) challenge. Although all birds became infected after exposure to the virus, only birds with elevated CORT had viral loads at or above the infectious threshold. Moreover, though the rate of mortality was faster in birds with elevated CORT compared with controls, most hosts with elevated CORT survived past the day of peak infectiousness. CORT concentrations just prior to inoculation with WNV and anti-inflammatory cytokine concentrations following viral exposure were predictive of individual duration of infectiousness and the ability to maintain physical performance during infection (i.e. tolerance), revealing putative biomarkers of competence. Collectively, our results suggest that glucocorticoid stress hormones could directly and indirectly mediate the spread of pathogens.

  2. Structural conversion of the transformer protein RfaH: new insights derived from protein structure prediction and molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasco, Nicole; Barone, Daniela; Vitagliano, Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Recent structural investigations have shown that the C-terminal domain (CTD) of the transcription factor RfaH undergoes unique structural modifications that have a profound impact into its functional properties. These modifications cause a complete change in RfaH(CTD) topology that converts from an α-hairpin to a β-barrel fold. To gain insights into the determinants of this major structural conversion, we here performed computational studies (protein structure prediction and molecular dynamics simulations) on RfaH(CTD). Although these analyses, in line with literature data, suggest that the isolated RfaH(CTD) has a strong preference for the β-barrel fold, they also highlight that a specific region of the protein is endowed with a chameleon conformational behavior. In particular, the Leu-rich region (residues 141-145) has a good propensity to adopt both α-helical and β-structured states. Intriguingly, in the RfaH homolog NusG, whose CTD uniquely adopts the β-barrel fold, the corresponding region is rich in residues as Val or Ile that present a strong preference for the β-structure. On this basis, we suggest that the presence of this Leu-rich element in RfaH(CTD) may be responsible for the peculiar structural behavior of the domain. The analysis of the sequences of RfaH family (PfamA code PF02357) unraveled that other members potentially share the structural properties of RfaH(CTD). These observations suggest that the unusual conformational behavior of RfaH(CTD) may be rare but not unique.

  3. Baseline shape diffeomorphometry patterns of subcortical and ventricular structures in predicting conversion of mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xiaoying; Holland, Dominic; Dale, Anders M; Younes, Laurent; Miller, Michael I

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel predictor for the conversion from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to Alzheimer's disease (AD). This predictor is based on the shape diffeomorphometry patterns of subcortical and ventricular structures (left and right amygdala, hippocampus, thalamus, caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, and lateral ventricle) of 607 baseline scans from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database, including a total of 210 healthy control subjects, 222 MCI subjects, and 175 AD subjects. The optimal predictor is obtained via a feature selection procedure applied to all of the 14 sets of shape features via linear discriminant analysis, resulting in a combination of the shape diffeomorphometry patterns of the left hippocampus, the left lateral ventricle, the right thalamus, the right caudate, and the bilateral putamen. Via 10-fold cross-validation, we substantiate our method by successfully differentiating 77.04% (104/135) of the MCI subjects who converted to AD within 36 months and 71.26% (62/87) of the non-converters. To be specific, for the MCI-converters, we are capable of correctly predicting 82.35% (14/17) of subjects converting in 6 months, 77.5% (31/40) of subjects converting in 12 months, 74.07% (20/27) of subjects converting in 18 months, 78.13% (25/32) of subjects converting in 24 months, and 73.68% (14/19) of subject converting in 36 months. Statistically significant correlation maps were observed between the shape diffeomorphometry features of each of the 14 structures, especially the bilateral amygdala, hippocampus, lateral ventricle, and two neuropsychological test scores--the Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Behavior Section and the Mini-Mental State Examination.

  4. Homology Modeling and Conformational Epitope Prediction of Envelope Protein of Alkhumra Haemorrhagic Fever Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naghmeh Poorinmohammad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to generate in silico 3D-structure of the envelope protein of AHFV using homology modeling method to further predict its conformational epitopes and help other studies to investigate itsstructural features using the model.Methods: A 3D-structure prediction was developed for the envelope protein of Alkhumra haemorrhagic fever virus (AHFV, an emerging tick-borne flavivirus, based on a homology modeling method using M4T and Modwebservers, as the 3D-structure of the protein is not available yet. Modeled proteins were validated using Modfold 4 server and their accuracies were calculated based on their RSMDs. Having the 3D predicted model with high quality, conformational epitopes were predicted using DiscoTope 2.0.Results: Model generated by M4T was more acceptable than the Modweb-generated model. The global score and Pvalue calculated by Modfold 4 ensured that a certifiable model was generated by M4T, since its global score was almost near 1 which is the score for a high resolution X-ray crystallography structure. Furthermore, itsthe P-value was much lower than 0.001 which means that the model is completely acceptable. Having 0.46 Å rmsd, this model was shown to be highly accurate. Results from DiscoTope 2.0 showed 26 residues as epitopes, forming conformational epitopes of the modeled protein.Conclusion: The predicted model and epitopes for envelope protein of AHFV can be used in several therapeutic and diagnostic approaches including peptide vaccine development, structure based drug design or diagnostic kit development in order to facilitate the time consuming experimental epitope mapping process.

  5. Single-Step Conversion of Cells to Retrovirus Vector Producers with Herpes Simplex Virus–Epstein-Barr Virus Hybrid Amplicons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena-Esteves, Miguel; Saeki, Yoshinaga; Camp, Sara M.; Chiocca, E. Antonio; Breakefield, Xandra O.

    1999-01-01

    We report here on the development and characterization of a novel herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) amplicon-based vector system which takes advantage of the host range and retention properties of HSV–Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) hybrid amplicons to efficiently convert cells to retrovirus vector producer cells after single-step transduction. The retrovirus genes gag-pol and env (GPE) and retroviral vector sequences were modified to minimize sequence overlap and cloned into an HSV-EBV hybrid amplicon. Retrovirus expression cassettes were used to generate the HSV-EBV-retrovirus hybrid vectors, HERE and HERA, which code for the ecotropic and the amphotropic envelopes, respectively. Retrovirus vector sequences encoding lacZ were cloned downstream from the GPE expression unit. Transfection of 293T/17 cells with amplicon plasmids yielded retrovirus titers between 106 and 107 transducing units/ml, while infection of the same cells with amplicon vectors generated maximum titers 1 order of magnitude lower. Retrovirus titers were dependent on the extent of transduction by amplicon vectors for the same cell line, but different cell lines displayed varying capacities to produce retrovirus vectors even at the same transduction efficiencies. Infection of human and dog primary gliomas with this system resulted in the production of retrovirus vectors for more than 1 week and the long-term retention and increase in transgene activity over time in these cell populations. Although the efficiency of this system still has to be determined in vivo, many applications are foreseeable for this approach to gene delivery. PMID:10559361

  6. Appraising the performance of genotyping tools in the prediction of coreceptor tropism in HIV-1 subtype C viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crous Saleema

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection, transmitted viruses generally use the CCR5 chemokine receptor as a coreceptor for host cell entry. In more than 50% of subtype B infections, a switch in coreceptor tropism from CCR5- to CXCR4-use occurs during disease progression. Phenotypic or genotypic approaches can be used to test for the presence of CXCR4-using viral variants in an individual’s viral population that would result in resistance to treatment with CCR5-antagonists. While genotyping approaches for coreceptor-tropism prediction in subtype B are well established and verified, they are less so for subtype C. Methods Here, using a dataset comprising V3 loop sequences from 349 CCR5-using and 56 CXCR4-using HIV-1 subtype C viruses we perform a comparative analysis of the predictive ability of 11 genotypic algorithms in their prediction of coreceptor tropism in subtype C. We calculate the sensitivity and specificity of each of the approaches as well as determining their overall accuracy. By separating the CXCR4-using viruses into CXCR4-exclusive (25 sequences and dual-tropic (31 sequences we evaluate the effect of the possible conflicting signal from dual-tropic viruses on the ability of a of the approaches to correctly predict coreceptor phenotype. Results We determined that geno2pheno with a false positive rate of 5% is the best approach for predicting CXCR4-usage in subtype C sequences with an accuracy of 94% (89% sensitivity and 99% specificity. Contrary to what has been reported for subtype B, the optimal approaches for prediction of CXCR4-usage in sequence from viruses that use CXCR4 exclusively, also perform best at predicting CXCR4-use in dual-tropic viral variants. Conclusions The accuracy of genotyping approaches at correctly predicting the coreceptor usage of V3 sequences from subtype C viruses is very high. We suggest that genotyping approaches can be used to test for coreceptor tropism in HIV-1

  7. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Primary Postpartum Hemorrhage: Predictive Factors of Need for Embolic Material Conversion of Gelatin Sponge Particles to N-Butyl Cyanoacrylate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanahashi, Yukichi; Goshima, Satoshi, E-mail: gossy@par.odn.ne.jp [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kondo, Hiroshi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Ando, Tomohiro; Noda, Yoshifumi; Kawada, Hiroshi; Kawai, Nobuyuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan); Kotoku, Junichi [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiological Technology, Faculty of Medical Technology (Japan); Furui, Shigeru [Teikyo University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (Japan); Matsuo, Masayuki [Gifu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    PurposeTo identify predictive factors for embolic material conversion to N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) for the treatment of primary postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) after failed transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) using gelatin sponge (GS).Materials and MethodsInstitutional review board approval was obtained. We retrospectively studied 62 consecutive women with primary PPH who underwent TAE between January 2006 and March 2015. Five of them were excluded for the following: cardiopulmonary arrest at arrival (n = 1), uterine inversion (n = 1), and hysterectomy after TAE (n = 3). Remaining 57 women (age range, 21–43 years; mean, 32.6 years) comprised study population. TAE was initially performed using GS in all cases and then converted to NBCA after two embolizations using GS with persistent hemodynamic instability or vaginal bleeding. The patients’ background, uterine height, vital signs, laboratory tests, disseminated intravascular coagulation score, and details of procedure were reviewed. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to determine factors related to embolic material conversion.ResultsTechnical success rate was 100%. Fourteen patients (25%) needed embolic material conversion to NBCA. Univariate analysis showed that uterine height, systolic blood pressure (sBP), and hemoglobin level were significantly related to embolic material conversion to NBCA (P = 0.029, 0.030, and 0.042). Logistic regression analysis showed that uterine height (odds ratio, 1.37; P = 0.025) and sBP (odds ratio, 0.96; P = 0.003) were associated with embolic material conversion to NBCA.ConclusionUterine height and sBP can be predictive factors for embolic material conversion to NBCA for the treatment of PPH.Level of EvidenceLevel 4, Case Control Study.

  8. Smear grading and the Mantoux skin test can be used to predict sputum smear conversion in patients suffering from tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saffari, Mahmood

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Smear scores and induration sizes resulting from the PPD (tuberculin purified protein derivative test can serve as indicators of whether a patient suffering from tuberculosis shows smear conversion or not. Methods: Using microbiological methods smear and sputum tests, patients diagnosed as infected with between 2002 and 2015 were included in this study. All of the assumed factors that may have a role in smear conversion were studied, in addition to the prolongation of tuberculosis. Results: 398 of 512 patients fulfilled all the inclusion criteria and formed the basis of this study. 215 patients (54% were females and 183 (46% were males. The median age for both men and women was 36 years. We found a statistically significant difference between the size of induration resulting from the PPD skin test and the rate of non-conversion (=0.002. Further univariate analysis also showed that smear grading and an induration size of ≥10 mm were independently associated with delayed smear conversion. Patients with cavitary lesions showed a higher rate of non-conversion after two months, which was not significant. We could not find any association between some of the variables, such as age, sex, weight, smoking, alcoholism, addictions, respiratory diseases, diabetes mellitus, alternative anti-TB treatment, and smear conversion. Conclusion: Intensified treatment and precautions against transmission should be especially considered for TB patients with high smear grading and an induration size of more than 10 mm.

  9. Supervised learning classification models for prediction of plant virus encoded RNA silencing suppressors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenia Jagga

    Full Text Available Viral encoded RNA silencing suppressor proteins interfere with the host RNA silencing machinery, facilitating viral infection by evading host immunity. In plant hosts, the viral proteins have several basic science implications and biotechnology applications. However in silico identification of these proteins is limited by their high sequence diversity. In this study we developed supervised learning based classification models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins in plant viruses. We developed four classifiers based on supervised learning algorithms: J48, Random Forest, LibSVM and Naïve Bayes algorithms, with enriched model learning by correlation based feature selection. Structural and physicochemical features calculated for experimentally verified primary protein sequences were used to train the classifiers. The training features include amino acid composition; auto correlation coefficients; composition, transition, and distribution of various physicochemical properties; and pseudo amino acid composition. Performance analysis of predictive models based on 10 fold cross-validation and independent data testing revealed that the Random Forest based model was the best and achieved 86.11% overall accuracy and 86.22% balanced accuracy with a remarkably high area under the Receivers Operating Characteristic curve of 0.95 to predict viral RNA silencing suppressor proteins. The prediction models for plant viral RNA silencing suppressors can potentially aid identification of novel viral RNA silencing suppressors, which will provide valuable insights into the mechanism of RNA silencing and could be further explored as potential targets for designing novel antiviral therapeutics. Also, the key subset of identified optimal features may help in determining compositional patterns in the viral proteins which are important determinants for RNA silencing suppressor activities. The best prediction model developed in the study is available as a

  10. Utility of combinations of biomarkers, cognitive markers, and risk factors to predict conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease in patients in the Alzheimer's disease neuroimaging initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomar, Jesus J; Bobes-Bascaran, Maria T; Conejero-Goldberg, Concepcion; Davies, Peter; Goldberg, Terry E

    2011-09-01

    Biomarkers have become increasingly important in understanding neurodegenerative processes associated with Alzheimer disease. Markers include regional brain volumes, cerebrospinal fluid measures of pathological Aβ1-42 and total tau, cognitive measures, and individual risk factors. To determine the discriminative utility of different classes of biomarkers and cognitive markers by examining their ability to predict a change in diagnostic status from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. Longitudinal study. We analyzed the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative database to study patients with mild cognitive impairment who converted to Alzheimer disease (n = 116) and those who did not convert (n = 204) within a 2-year period. We determined the predictive utility of 25 variables from all classes of markers, biomarkers, and risk factors in a series of logistic regression models and effect size analyses. The Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative public database. Primary outcome measures were odds ratios, pseudo- R(2)s, and effect sizes. In comprehensive stepwise logistic regression models that thus included variables from all classes of markers, the following baseline variables predicted conversion within a 2-year period: 2 measures of delayed verbal memory and middle temporal lobe cortical thickness. In an effect size analysis that examined rates of decline, change scores for biomarkers were modest for 2 years, but a change in an everyday functional activities measure (Functional Assessment Questionnaire) was considerably larger. Decline in scores on the Functional Assessment Questionnaire and Trail Making Test, part B, accounted for approximately 50% of the predictive variance in conversion from mild cognitive impairment to Alzheimer disease. Cognitive markers at baseline were more robust predictors of conversion than most biomarkers. Longitudinal analyses suggested that conversion appeared to be driven less by changes in the neurobiologic

  11. Prediction of protein-protein interactions in dengue virus coat proteins guided by low resolution cryoEM structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Narayanaswamy

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus along with the other members of the flaviviridae family has reemerged as deadly human pathogens. Understanding the mechanistic details of these infections can be highly rewarding in developing effective antivirals. During maturation of the virus inside the host cell, the coat proteins E and M undergo conformational changes, altering the morphology of the viral coat. However, due to low resolution nature of the available 3-D structures of viral assemblies, the atomic details of these changes are still elusive. Results In the present analysis, starting from Cα positions of low resolution cryo electron microscopic structures the residue level details of protein-protein interaction interfaces of dengue virus coat proteins have been predicted. By comparing the preexisting structures of virus in different phases of life cycle, the changes taking place in these predicted protein-protein interaction interfaces were followed as a function of maturation process of the virus. Besides changing the current notion about the presence of only homodimers in the mature viral coat, the present analysis indicated presence of a proline-rich motif at the protein-protein interaction interface of the coat protein. Investigating the conservation status of these seemingly functionally crucial residues across other members of flaviviridae family enabled dissecting common mechanisms used for infections by these viruses. Conclusions Thus, using computational approach the present analysis has provided better insights into the preexisting low resolution structures of virus assemblies, the findings of which can be made use of in designing effective antivirals against these deadly human pathogens.

  12. Transduction of pancreatic islets with pseudotyped adeno-associated virus: effect of viral capsid and genome conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nan; Clément, Nathalie; Chen, Dongmei; Fu, Shuang; Zhang, Haojiang; Rebollo, Patricia; Linden, R Michael; Bromberg, Jonathan S

    2005-09-15

    Recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors currently show promise for islet gene therapy. In the presence of complementing AAV2 Rep proteins, AAV2 genomes can be packaged with other serotype capsids to assemble infectious virions. During transduction, the ssDNA to dsDNA conversion is one of the major rate-limiting steps that contribute to the slow onset of transgene expression. Using pseudotyping strategy, we produced double-stranded (dsAAV) and single-stranded (ssAAV) rAAV2 genomes carrying the GFP reporter gene packaged into AAV1, AAV2, and AAV5 capsids. The ability of cross-packaged AAV1, AAV2, and AAV5 at the same genome containing particle (gcp) concentration to transduce murine and human pancreatic islets was evaluated by GFP positive cell percentage. Transgenic expression was also determined by transplant transduced human islet into SCID mice. Pseudotyped rAAV2/1 based vectors transduced murine islets at greater efficiency than either rAAV2/2 or rAAV2/5 vectors. For human islets transduction, the rAAV2/2 vector was more efficient than rAAV2/1 or rAAV2/5 vectors. rAAV2/2 transduced human islets more efficiently than murine islets, while rAAV2/1 transducted murine islets more efficiently than human islets. dsAAV, which do not require second strand synthesis and thus are potentially more efficient, evidenced 5 fold higher transduction ability than ssAAV vectors. Pseudotyped rAAV transduced islet grafts maintained normal function, expressed transgenic product persistently in vivo, and reversed diabetes. The transduction efficiency of rAAV vectors was dependent on the cross-packaged capsid. The vector capsids permit species-specific transduction. For human islets, dsAAV2/2 vectors may be the most efficient vector for clinical development.

  13. Is response to anti-hepatitis C virus treatment predictive of mortality in hepatitis C virus/HIV-positive patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Lars; Raben, Dorthe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term clinical outcomes after hepatitis C virus (HCV) treatment of HIV/HCV patients are not well described. We aimed to compare the risk of all-cause and liver-related death (LRD) according to HCV treatment response in HIV/HCV patients in the multicohort study Collaboration...

  14. Emphysema Distribution and Diffusion Capacity Predict Emphysema Progression in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Janice M; Malagoli, Andrea; Santoro, Antonella; Besutti, Giulia; Ligabue, Guido; Scaglioni, Riccardo; Dai, Darlene; Hague, Cameron; Leipsic, Jonathon; Sin, Don D.; Man, SF Paul; Guaraldi, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and emphysema are common amongst patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We sought to determine the clinical factors that are associated with emphysema progression in HIV. Methods 345 HIV-infected patients enrolled in an outpatient HIV metabolic clinic with ≥2 chest computed tomography scans made up the study cohort. Images were qualitatively scored for emphysema based on percentage involvement of the lung. Emphysema progression was defined as any increase in emphysema score over the study period. Univariate analyses of clinical, respiratory, and laboratory data, as well as multivariable logistic regression models, were performed to determine clinical features significantly associated with emphysema progression. Results 17.4% of the cohort were emphysema progressors. Emphysema progression was most strongly associated with having a low baseline diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (DLCO) and having combination centrilobular and paraseptal emphysema distribution. In adjusted models, the odds ratio (OR) for emphysema progression for every 10% increase in DLCO percent predicted was 0.58 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.41–0.81). The equivalent OR (95% CI) for centrilobular and paraseptal emphysema distribution was 10.60 (2.93–48.98). Together, these variables had an area under the curve (AUC) statistic of 0.85 for predicting emphysema progression. This was an improvement over the performance of spirometry (forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio), which predicted emphysema progression with an AUC of only 0.65. Conclusion Combined paraseptal and centrilobular emphysema distribution and low DLCO could identify HIV patients who may experience emphysema progression. PMID:27902753

  15. Predicting Ebola infection: A malaria-sensitive triage score for Ebola virus disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary-Anne Hartley

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The non-specific symptoms of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD pose a major problem to triage and isolation efforts at Ebola Treatment Centres (ETCs. Under the current triage protocol, half the patients allocated to high-risk "probable" wards were EVD(-: a misclassification speculated to predispose nosocomial EVD infection. A better understanding of the statistical relevance of individual triage symptoms is essential in resource-poor settings where rapid, laboratory-confirmed diagnostics are often unavailable.This retrospective cohort study analyses the clinical characteristics of 566 patients admitted to the GOAL-Mathaska ETC in Sierra Leone. The diagnostic potential of each characteristic was assessed by multivariate analysis and incorporated into a statistically weighted predictive score, designed to detect EVD as well as discriminate malaria. Of the 566 patients, 28% were EVD(+ and 35% were malaria(+. Malaria was 2-fold more common in EVD(- patients (p<0.05, and thus an important differential diagnosis. Univariate analyses comparing EVD(+ vs. EVD(- and EVD(+/malaria(- vs. EVD(-/malaria(+ cohorts revealed 7 characteristics with the highest odds for EVD infection, namely: reported sick-contact, conjunctivitis, diarrhoea, referral-time of 4-9 days, pyrexia, dysphagia and haemorrhage. Oppositely, myalgia was more predictive of EVD(- or EVD(-/malaria(+. Including these 8 characteristics in a triage score, we obtained an 89% ability to discriminate EVD(+ from either EVD(- or EVD(-/malaria(+.This study proposes a highly predictive and easy-to-use triage tool, which stratifies the risk of EVD infection with 89% discriminative power for both EVD(- and EVD(-/malaria(+ differential diagnoses. Improved triage could preserve resources by identifying those in need of more specific differential diagnostics as well as bolster infection prevention/control measures by better compartmentalizing the risk of nosocomial infection.

  16. Clinically Isolated Syndrome According to McDonald 2010: Intrathecal IgG Synthesis Still Predictive for Conversion to Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Schwenkenbecher

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available While the revised McDonald criteria of 2010 allow for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS in an earlier stage, there is still a need to identify the risk factors for conversion to MS in patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS. Since the latest McDonald criteria were established, the prognostic role of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF and visual evoked potentials (VEP in CIS patients is still poorly defined. We conducted a monocentric investigation including patients with CIS in the time from 2010 to 2015. Follow-ups of 120 patients revealed that 42% converted to MS. CIS patients with positive oligoclonal bands (OCB were more than twice as likely to convert to MS as OCB negative patients (hazard ratio = 2.6. The probability to develop MS was even higher when a quantitative intrathecal IgG synthesis was detected (hazard ratio = 3.8. In patients with OCB, VEP did not add further information concerning the conversion rate to MS. In patients with optic neuritis and negative OCB, a significantly higher rate converted to MS when VEP were delayed. In conclusion, the detection of an intrathecal IgG synthesis increases the conversion probability to MS. Pathological VEP can help to predict the conversion rate to MS in patients with optic neuritis without an intrathecal IgG synthesis.

  17. A Hierarchical Approach Embedding Hydrologic and Population Modeling for a West Nile Virus Vector Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Y.; Silvestri, S.; Marani, M.; Saltarin, A.; Chillemi, G.

    2012-12-01

    We applied a hierarchical state space model to predict the abundance of Cx.pipiens (a West Nile Virus vector) in the Po River Delta Region, Northeastern Italy. The study area has large mosquito abundance, due to a favorable environment and climate as well as dense human population. Mosquito data were collected on a weekly basis at more than 20 sites from May to September in 2010 and 2011. Cx.pipiens was the dominant species in our samples, accounting for about 90% of the more than 300,000 total captures. The hydrological component of the model accounted for evapotranspiration, infiltration and deep percolation to infer, in a 0D context, the local dynamics of soil moisture as a direct exogenous forcing of mosquito dynamics. The population model had a Gompertz structure, which included exogenous meteorological forcings and delayed internal dynamics. The models were coupled within a hierarchical statistical structure to overcome the relatively short length of the samples by exploiting the large number of concurrent observations available. The results indicated that Cx.pipiens abundance had significant density dependence at 1 week lag, which approximately matched its development time from larvae to adult. Among the exogenous controls, temperature, daylight hours, and soil moisture explained most of the dynamics. Longer daylight hours and lower soil moisture values resulted in higher abundance. The negative correlation of soil moisture and mosquito population can be explained with the abundance of water in the region (e.g. due to irrigation) and the preference for eutrophic habitats by Cx.pipien. Variations among sites were explained by land use factors as represented by distance to the nearest rice field and NDVI values: the carrying capacity decreased with increased distance to the nearest rice filed, while the maximum growth rate was positively related with NDVI. The model shows a satisfactory performance in predicting (potentially one week in advance) mosquito

  18. Factors predicting life-threatening infections with respiratory syncytial virus in adult patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Yoon; Kim, Taeeun; Jang, Young Rock; Kim, Min-Chul; Chong, Yong Pil; Lee, Sang-Oh; Choi, Sang-Ho; Kim, Yang Soo; Woo, Jun Hee; Kim, Sung-Han

    2017-05-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a significant cause of acute respiratory illness with a clinical spectrum ranging from self-limiting upper respiratory infection to severe lower respiratory infection in elderly persons as well as young children. However, there are limited data on risk factors for life-threatening infections that could guide the appropriate use of antiviral agents in adult patients with RSV. We conducted a retrospective cohort study from October 2013 to September 2015. Adult patients with RSV who visited the emergency department were enrolled. Primary outcome was life-threatening infection (admission to intensive care unit, need for ventilator care or in-hospital death). A total of 227 patients were analysed. Thirty-four (15%) were classified as having life-threatening infections. By logistic regression, lower respiratory infection, chronic lung disease and bacterial co-infection were independent predictors of life-threatening infections. We developed a simple clinical scoring system using these variables (lower respiratory tract infection = score 4, chronic respiratory disease = score 3, bacterial co-infection = score 3 and fever ≥38 °C = score 2) to predict life-threatening infection. A score of >5 differentiated life-threatening RSV from non-life-threatening RSV with 82% sensitivity (95% CI, 66-93) and 72% specificity (95% CI, 65-78). The use of a clinical scoring system based on lower respiratory infection, chronic respiratory disease, bacterial co-infection and fever appears to be useful for outcome prediction and risk stratification in order to select patients who may need early antiviral therapy.

  19. Performance of diagnostic biomarkers in predicting liver fibrosis among hepatitis C virus-infected Egyptian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasser E Nassef

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to identify specific markers that mirror liver fibrosis progression as an alternative to biopsy when biopsy is contraindicated, especially in children. After liver biopsies were performed, serum samples from 30 hepatitis C virus (HCV paediatric patients (8-14 years were analysed and compared with samples from 30 healthy subjects. All subjects were tested for the presence of serum anti-HCV antibodies. Direct biomarkers for liver fibrosis, including transforming growth factor-β1, tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, hyaluronic acid (HA, procollagen type III amino-terminal peptide (PIIINP and osteopontin (OPN, were measured. The indirect biomarkers aspartate and alanine aminotransferases, albumin and bilirubin were also tested. The results revealed a significant increase in the serum marker levels in HCV-infected children compared with the healthy group, whereas albumin levels exhibited a significant decrease. Significantly higher levels of PIIINP, TIMP-1, OPN and HA were detected in HCV-infected children with moderate to severe fibrosis compared with children with mild fibrosis (p < 0.05. The diagnostic accuracy of these direct biomarkers, represented by sensitivity, specificity and positive predictive value, emphasises the utility of PIIINP, TIMP-1, OPN and HA as indicators of liver fibrosis among HCV-infected children.

  20. In silico prediction of B- and T- cell epitope on Lassa virus proteins for peptide based subunit vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sitansu Kumar; Yadav, Soni; Kumar, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    Lassa fever is a severe, often-fatal and one of the most virulent disease in primates. However, the mechanism of escape of virus from the T-cell mediated immune response of the host cell is not explained in any studies yet. In our studies we had aimed to predict B- and T- cell epitope of Lassa virus protein, for impaling the futuristic approach of developing preventive measures against this disease, further we can also study its presumed viral- host mechanism. Peptide based subunit vaccine was developed from all four protein against Lassa virus. We adopted sequence, 3D structure and fold level in silico analysis to predict B-cell and T-cell epitopes. The 3-D structure was determined for all protein by homology modeling and the modeled structure validated. One T-cell epitope from Glycoprotein (WDCIMTSYQ) and one from Nucleoprotein (WPYIASRTS) binds to maximum no of MHC class I and MHC class II alleles. They also specially bind to HLA alleles namely, A*0201, A*2705, DRB*0101 and DRB*0401. Taken together, the results indicate the Glycoprotein and nucleoprotein are most suitable vaccine candidates against Lassa virus.

  1. Prediction of steps in the evolution of variola virus host range.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Smithson

    Full Text Available Variola virus, the agent of smallpox, has a severely restricted host range (humans but a devastatingly high mortality rate. Although smallpox has been eradicated by a World Health Organization vaccination program, knowledge of the evolutionary processes by which human super-pathogens such as variola virus arise is important. By analyzing the evolution of variola and other closely related poxviruses at the level of single nucleotide polymorphisms we detected a hotspot of genome variation within the smallpox ortholog of the vaccinia virus O1L gene, which is known to be necessary for efficient replication of vaccinia virus in human cells. These mutations in the variola virus ortholog and the subsequent loss of the functional gene from camelpox virus and taterapox virus, the two closest relatives of variola virus, strongly suggest that changes within this region of the genome may have played a key role in the switch to humans as a host for the ancestral virus and the subsequent host-range restriction that must have occurred to create the phenotype exhibited by smallpox.

  2. Prediction of conserved sites and domains in glycoproteins B, C and D of herpes viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasheed, Muhammad Asif; Ansari, Abdur Rahman; Ihsan, Awais; Navid, Muhammad Tariq; Ur-Rehman, Shahid; Raza, Sohail

    2018-01-17

    Glycoprotein B (gB), C (gC) and D (gD) of herpes simplex virus are implicated in virus adsorption and penetration. The gB, gC and gD are glycoproteins for different processes of virus binding and attachment to the host cells. Moreover, their expression is necessary and sufficient to induce cell fusion in the absence of other glycoproteins. Egress of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and other herpes viruses from cells involves extensive modification of cellular membranes and sequential envelopment, de-envelopment and re-envelopment steps. Viral glycoproteins are important in these processes, and frequently two or more glycoproteins can largely suffice in any step. Hence, we target the 3 important glycoproteins (B, C and D) of eight different herpes viruses of different species. These species include human (HSV1 and 2), bovine (BHV1), equine (EHV1 and 4), chicken (ILT1 and MDV2) and pig (PRV1). By applying different bioinformatics tools, we highlighted the conserved sites in these glycoproteins which might be most significant regarding attachment and infection of the viruses. Moreover the conserved domains in these glycoproteins are also highlighted. From this study, we will able to analyze the role of different viral glycoproteins of different species during herpes virus adsorption and penetration. Moreover, this study will help to construct the antivirals that target the glycoproteins of different herpes viruses. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Solar thermal conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the fundamentals of the conversion of solar energy into mechanical work (or electricity via generators) is given. Both past and present work on several conversion concepts are discussed. Solar collectors, storage systems, energy transport, and various types of engines are examined. Ongoing work on novel concepts of collectors, energy storage and thermal energy conversion are outlined and projections for the future are described. Energy costs for various options are predicted and margins and limitations are discussed.

  4. Prediction of efficacy for conversion from adjunctive therapy to monotherapy with eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg once daily for partial-onset epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunkaraneni, Soujanya; Passarell, Julie A; Ludwig, Elizabeth A; Fiedler-Kelly, Jill; Pitner, Janet K; Grinnell, Todd A; Blum, David

    2017-01-01

    Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) is a once-daily (QD) oral antiepileptic drug (AED) indicated for partial-onset seizures (POS). Clinical studies of gradual conversion to ESL 1,200 and 1,600 mg QD monotherapies were previously conducted in patients with POS who were not well-controlled by 1 or 2 AEDs. This report describes modeling and simulation of plasma eslicarbazepine (primary active metabolite of ESL) concentrations and time to monotherapy study exit to predict efficacy for conversion to ESL monotherapy at a lower dose of 800 mg, as an option for patients requiring or not tolerating higher doses since this regimen is effective in adjunctive therapy for POS. A previously developed population pharmacokinetic model for ESL monotherapy was used to predict minimum plasma eslicarbazepine concentration (Cmin) in 1,500 virtual patients taking 1 (n=1,000) or 2 (n=500) AEDs at baseline, treated with ESL 400 mg QD for 1 week, followed by 800 mg QD for 17 weeks (similar to ESL monotherapy trials where the other AEDs were withdrawn during the first 6 weeks following titration to the randomized ESL dose). Model-predicted Cmin as a time-varying covariate and number of baseline AEDs were used to determine the weekly probability of each patient meeting exit criteria (65.3% threshold) indicative of worsening seizure control in 500 simulated ESL monotherapy trials. A previously developed extended Cox proportional hazards exposure-response model was used to relate time-varying eslicarbazepine exposure to the time to study exit. For virtual patients receiving ESL monotherapy (800 mg QD), the 95% upper prediction limit for exit rate at 112 days of 34.9% in patients taking 1 AED at baseline was well below the 65.3% threshold from historical control trials, while the estimate for patients taking 2 AEDs (70.6%) was slightly above the historical control threshold. This model-based assessment supports conversion to ESL 800 mg QD monotherapy for POS in adults taking 1 AED. For patients

  5. Conversational Dominance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Helmut; Poth, Annette

    Details of conversational behavior can often not be interpreted until the social interaction, including the rights and obligations of the participants, their intent, the topic, etc., has been defined. This paper presents a model of conversation in which the conversational image a person presents in a given conversational situation is a function of…

  6. Rapid slowing of the atrial fibrillatory rate after administration of AZD7009 predicts conversion of atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aunes, Maria; Egstrup, Kenneth; Frison, Lars

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Effects on the atrial fibrillatory rate (AFR) were studied during infusion with the combined potassium and sodium channel blocker AZD7009. METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) were randomized to AZD7009 or placebo. Thirty-five patients converted to si...... fpm (p=0.02), and at 10 min, -133 vs. -111 fpm (p=0.048). The AFR-SD and the exponential decay decreased. A small left atrial area was the only baseline predictor of conversion to SR. CONCLUSIONS: AZD7009 produced a significantly more rapid decrease of the AFR in converters than in non...

  7. Predicting the Benefits of Banana Bunchy Top Virus Exclusion from Commercial Plantations in Australia: e42391

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    David C Cook; Shuang Liu; Jacqueline Edwards; Oscar N Villalta; Jean-Philippe Aurambout; Darren J Kriticos; Andre Drenth; Paul J De Barro

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, we demonstrate how a break-even style benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to biosecurity decision-makers using the example of banana bunchy top virus, a plant pathogen...

  8. Predicting the benefits of banana bunchy top virus exclusion from commercial plantations in Australia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cook, David C; Liu, Shuang; Edwards, Jacqueline; Villalta, Oscar N; Aurambout, Jean-Philippe; Kriticos, Darren J; Drenth, Andre; De Barro, Paul J

    2012-01-01

    .... In this paper, we demonstrate how a break-even style benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to biosecurity decision-makers using the example of banana bunchy top virus, a plant pathogen...

  9. Bioinformatics prediction of swine MHC class I epitopes from Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welner, Simon; Nielsen, Morten; Lund, Ole

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) causes one of the most important diseases in all swine producing countries. The infection has a high impact on animal welfare, food safety and production economics. PRRSV possesses multiple immunoevasive strategies, from suppression...

  10. Cell tropism predicts long-term nucleotide substitution rates of mammalian RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison L Hicks

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The high rates of RNA virus evolution are generally attributed to replication with error-prone RNA-dependent RNA polymerases. However, these long-term nucleotide substitution rates span three orders of magnitude and do not correlate well with mutation rates or selection pressures. This substitution rate variation may be explained by differences in virus ecology or intrinsic genomic properties. We generated nucleotide substitution rate estimates for mammalian RNA viruses and compiled comparable published rates, yielding a dataset of 118 substitution rates of structural genes from 51 different species, as well as 40 rates of non-structural genes from 28 species. Through ANCOVA analyses, we evaluated the relationships between these rates and four ecological factors: target cell, transmission route, host range, infection duration; and three genomic properties: genome length, genome sense, genome segmentation. Of these seven factors, we found target cells to be the only significant predictors of viral substitution rates, with tropisms for epithelial cells or neurons (P<0.0001 as the most significant predictors. Further, one-tailed t-tests showed that viruses primarily infecting epithelial cells evolve significantly faster than neurotropic viruses (P<0.0001 and P<0.001 for the structural genes and non-structural genes, respectively. These results provide strong evidence that the fastest evolving mammalian RNA viruses infect cells with the highest turnover rates: the highly proliferative epithelial cells. Estimated viral generation times suggest that epithelial-infecting viruses replicate more quickly than viruses with different cell tropisms. Our results indicate that cell tropism is a key factor in viral evolvability.

  11. Novel circular single-stranded DNA viruses identified in marine invertebrates reveal high sequence diversity and consistent predicted intrinsic disorder patterns within putative structural proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Karyna; Schenck, Ryan O; Harbeitner, Rachel C; Lawler, Stephanie N; Breitbart, Mya

    2015-01-01

    Viral metagenomics has recently revealed the ubiquitous and diverse nature of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses that encode a conserved replication initiator protein (Rep) in the marine environment. Although eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding ssDNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses were originally thought to only infect plants and vertebrates, recent studies have identified these viruses in a number of invertebrates. To further explore CRESS-DNA viruses in the marine environment, this study surveyed CRESS-DNA viruses in various marine invertebrate species. A total of 27 novel CRESS-DNA genomes, with Reps that share less than 60.1% identity with previously reported viruses, were recovered from 21 invertebrate species, mainly crustaceans. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep revealed a novel clade of CRESS-DNA viruses that included approximately one third of the marine invertebrate associated viruses identified here and whose members may represent a novel family. Investigation of putative capsid proteins (Cap) encoded within the eukaryotic CRESS-DNA viral genomes from this study and those in GenBank demonstrated conserved patterns of predicted intrinsically disordered regions (IDRs), which can be used to complement similarity-based searches to identify divergent structural proteins within novel genomes. Overall, this study expands our knowledge of CRESS-DNA viruses associated with invertebrates and explores a new tool to evaluate divergent structural proteins encoded by these viruses.

  12. Maternal Neutralization-Resistant Virus Variants Do Not Predict Infant HIV Infection Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Caitlin; Omenda, Maxwel M; Chohan, Vrasha; Odem-Davis, Katherine; Richardson, Barbra A; Nduati, Ruth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2016-02-02

    Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) of HIV provides a setting for studying immune correlates of protection. Neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are suggested to contribute to a viral bottleneck during MTCT, but their role in blocking transmission is unclear, as studies comparing the NAb sensitivities of maternal viruses have yielded disparate results. We sought to determine whether transmitting mothers differ from nontransmitting mothers in the ability to neutralize individual autologous virus variants present at transmission. Ten transmitting and 10 nontransmitting HIV-infected mothers at high risk of MTCT were included in this study. Full-length HIV envelope genes (n = 100) were cloned from peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained near transmission from transmitting mothers and at similar time points from nontransmitting mothers. Envelope clones were tested as pseudoviruses against contemporaneous, autologous maternal plasma in neutralization assays. The association between transmission and the log2 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) for multiple virus variants per mother was estimated by using logistic regression with clustered standard errors. t tests were used to compare proportions of neutralization-resistant viruses. Overall, transmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 317 (interquartile range [IQR], 202 to 521), and nontransmitting mothers had a median IC50 of 243 (IQR, 95 to 594). Transmission risk was not significantly associated with autologous NAb activity (odds ratio, 1.25; P = 0.3). Compared to nontransmitting mothers, transmitting mothers had similar numbers of or fewer neutralization-resistant virus variants, depending on the IC50 neutralization resistance cutoff. In conclusion, HIV-infected mothers harbor mostly neutralization-sensitive viruses, although resistant variants were detected in both transmitting and nontransmitting mothers. These results suggest that MTCT during the breastfeeding period is not driven solely by the presence of maternal

  13. Hairpin RNA-mediated silencing of Plum pox virus P1 and HC-Pro genes for efficient and predictable resistance to the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola-Negri, Elisa; Brunetti, Angela; Tavazza, Mario; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2005-12-01

    We report the application of the hairpin-mediated RNA silencing technology for obtaining resistance to Plum pox virus (PPV) infection in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Four sequences, covering the P1 and silencing suppressor HC-Pro genes of an Italian PPV M isolate, were introduced into N. benthamiana plants as two inverted repeats separated by an intron sequence under the transcriptional control of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter. In a leaf disk infection assay, 38 out of 40 T0 transgenic plants were resistant to PPV infection. Eight lines, 2 for each construct, randomly selected among the 38 resistant plants were further analysed. Two hundred forty eight out of 253 T1 transgenic plants were resistant to local and systemic PPV infection. All transgenic single locus lines were completely resistant. These data indicate that the RNA silencing of PPV P1/HCPro sequences results in an efficient and predictable PPV resistance, which may be utilized in obtaining stone fruit plants resistant to the devastating Sharka disease.

  14. Genomic prediction of piglet response to infection with one of two porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waide, Emily H; Tuggle, Christopher K; Serão, Nick V L; Schroyen, Martine; Hess, Andrew; Rowland, Raymond R R; Lunney, Joan K; Plastow, Graham; Dekkers, Jack C M

    2018-02-01

    Genomic prediction of the pig's response to the porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus (PRRSV) would be a useful tool in the swine industry. This study investigated the accuracy of genomic prediction based on porcine SNP60 Beadchip data using training and validation datasets from populations with different genetic backgrounds that were challenged with different PRRSV isolates. Genomic prediction accuracy averaged 0.34 for viral load (VL) and 0.23 for weight gain (WG) following experimental PRRSV challenge, which demonstrates that genomic selection could be used to improve response to PRRSV infection. Training on WG data during infection with a less virulent PRRSV, KS06, resulted in poor accuracy of prediction for WG during infection with a more virulent PRRSV, NVSL. Inclusion of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are in linkage disequilibrium with a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome 4 was vital for accurate prediction of VL. Overall, SNPs that were significantly associated with either trait in single SNP genome-wide association analysis were unable to predict the phenotypes with an accuracy as high as that obtained by using all genotyped SNPs across the genome. Inclusion of data from close relatives into the training population increased whole genome prediction accuracy by 33% for VL and by 37% for WG but did not affect the accuracy of prediction when using only SNPs in the major QTL region. Results show that genomic prediction of response to PRRSV infection is moderately accurate and, when using all SNPs on the porcine SNP60 Beadchip, is not very sensitive to differences in virulence of the PRRSV in training and validation populations. Including close relatives in the training population increased prediction accuracy when using the whole genome or SNPs other than those near a major QTL.

  15. Prediction of the methane conversion factor (Ym) for dairy cows on the basis of national farm data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellwing, Anne Louise Frydendahl; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis; Brask, Maike

    2016-01-01

    Methane constitutes a significant loss of feed gross energy in ruminants, and there is an ongoing struggle for identifying feed and animal characteristics feasible for documentation of National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. The aim of the current study was to develop a model that predicts the metha......, in the model with energy-corrected milk yield. In conclusion, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change default value for Ym of 6.5% overestimates. Ym for both Holstein and Jersey cows fed rations typically used in intensive dairy producing countries in northern Europe.......Methane constitutes a significant loss of feed gross energy in ruminants, and there is an ongoing struggle for identifying feed and animal characteristics feasible for documentation of National Greenhouse Gas Inventories. The aim of the current study was to develop a model that predicts the methane...

  16. Positive emotional style predicts resistance to illness after experimental exposure to rhinovirus or influenza a virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Sheldon; Alper, Cuneyt M; Doyle, William J; Treanor, John J; Turner, Ronald B

    2006-01-01

    In an earlier study, positive emotional style (PES) was associated with resistance to the common cold and a bias to underreport (relative to objective disease markers) symptom severity. This work did not control for social and cognitive factors closely associated with PES. We replicate the original study using a different virus and controls for these alternative explanations. One hundred ninety-three healthy volunteers ages 21 to 55 years were assessed for a PES characterized by being happy, lively, and calm; a negative emotional style (NES) characterized by being anxious, hostile, and depressed; other cognitive and social dispositions; and self-reported health. Subsequently, they were exposed by nasal drops to a rhinovirus or influenza virus and monitored in quarantine for objective signs of illness and self-reported symptoms. For both viruses, increased PES was associated with lower risk of developing an upper respiratory illness as defined by objective criteria (adjusted odds ratio comparing lowest with highest tertile = 2.9) and with reporting fewer symptoms than expected from concurrent objective markers of illness. These associations were independent of prechallenge virus-specific antibody, virus type, age, sex, education, race, body mass, season, and NES. They were also independent of optimism, extraversion, mastery, self-esteem, purpose, and self-reported health. We replicated the prospective association of PES and colds and PES and biased symptom reporting, extended those results to infection with an influenza virus, and "ruled out" alternative hypotheses. These results indicate that PES may play a more important role in health than previously thought.

  17. Soluble CD163 does not predict first-time myocardial infarction in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Andreas; Møller, Holger Jon; Katzenstein, Terese Lea

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Soluble CD163 (sCD163) has been associated with arterial inflammation and non-calcified plaques in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals and has therefore been suggested as a predictive biomarker of myocardial infarction (MI). METHODS: We conducted a nested case......-control study of 55 cases with first-time MI and 182 controls matched for age, duration of antiretroviral therapy (ART), gender, smoking, and no known cardiovascular disease. All patients had four available plasma samples, 1: Before initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART), 2: Three months after ART, 3: One...

  18. Prediction of efficacy for conversion from adjunctive therapy to monotherapy with eslicarbazepine acetate 800 mg once daily for partial-onset epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunkaraneni S

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Soujanya Sunkaraneni,1 Julie A Passarell,2 Elizabeth A Ludwig,2 Jill Fiedler-Kelly,2 Janet K Pitner,1 Todd A Grinnell,1 David Blum1 1Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., Marlborough, MA, USA; 2Cognigen Corporation (a SimulationsPlus company, Buffalo, NY, USA Purpose: Eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL is a once-daily (QD oral antiepileptic drug (AED indicated for partial-onset seizures (POS. Clinical studies of gradual conversion to ESL 1,200 and 1,600 mg QD monotherapies were previously conducted in patients with POS who were not well-controlled by 1 or 2 AEDs. This report describes modeling and simulation of plasma eslicarbazepine (primary active metabolite of ESL concentrations and time to monotherapy study exit to predict efficacy for conversion to ESL monotherapy at a lower dose of 800 mg, as an option for patients requiring or not tolerating higher doses since this regimen is effective in adjunctive therapy for POS. Patients and methods: A previously developed population pharmacokinetic model for ESL monotherapy was used to predict minimum plasma eslicarbazepine concentration (Cmin in 1,500 virtual patients taking 1 (n=1,000 or 2 (n=500 AEDs at baseline, treated with ESL 400 mg QD for 1 week, followed by 800 mg QD for 17 weeks (similar to ESL monotherapy trials where the other AEDs were withdrawn during the first 6 weeks following titration to the randomized ESL dose. Model-predicted Cmin as a time-varying covariate and number of baseline AEDs were used to determine the weekly probability of each patient meeting exit criteria (65.3% threshold indicative of worsening seizure control in 500 simulated ESL monotherapy trials. A previously developed extended Cox proportional hazards exposure–response model was used to relate time-varying eslicarbazepine exposure to the time to study exit. Results: For virtual patients receiving ESL monotherapy (800 mg QD, the 95% upper prediction limit for exit rate at 112 days of 34.9% in patients taking 1

  19. Can reconstructed land surface temperature data from space predict a West Nile Virus outbreak?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andreo, V.; Metz, J.C.M.; Neteler, M.; Rosà, R.; Marcantonio, M.; Billinis, C.; Rizzoli, A.; Papa, Anne-Laure

    2017-01-01

    Temperature is one of the main drivers of ecological processes. The availability of temporally and spatially continuous temperature time series is crucial in different research and application fields, such as epidemiology and control of zoonotic diseases. In 2010, several West Nile virus (WNV)

  20. Predicting the presence of whiteflies and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Florida tomato fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida is one of the leading states for production of fresh market tomatoes. Production is severely affected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The objective of this study was to identify landscape and climatic factors that drive whitefly populations and TYLCV incidence in commercial tomato ...

  1. Titration of IgG antibodies against varicella zoster virus before bone marrow transplantation is not predictive of future zoster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, A; Grint, P; Brenner, M K; Prentice, H G; Griffiths, P D

    1989-02-01

    Serum antibodies to varicella zoster virus (VZV) were measured in 77 patients about to undergo allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, and in 65 of their donors. Ten patients developed zoster within the first 6 months following transplant. There was no significant difference in the mean pretransplant antibody titre between those patients who did or did not subsequently develop zoster. Likewise, the level of antibody to VZV amongst donors had no effect on the subsequent development of zoster. We conclude that the pretransplant level of antibody to VZV is not predictive of subsequent zoster infection, and would not be helpful in identifying patients for trials of antiviral prophylaxis. These results contrast with those previously found for another herpesvirus, herpes simplex (HSV), where antibody level pretransplant is predictive of future HSV recurrence.

  2. Factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease-infected patients: A cross-sectional, descriptive survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Soo; Choi, Jeong Sil

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify factors predicting clinical nurses' willingness to care for Ebola virus disease (EVD)-infected patients. Data were collected from 179 nurses employed at 10 hospitals in Korea using self-reporting questionnaires. Only 26.8% of the participants were willing to care for EVD-infected patients. Factors predicting their willingness to provide care were their belief in public service, risk perception, and age. Nurses' willingness to provide care was high when their belief in public service was high, low when their risk perception was high, and low as their age increased. In order to strengthen nurses' willingness to care for EVD-infected patients, education that targets the enhancement of belief in public service should be included in nurse training. Efforts should be directed toward lowering EVD risk perception and developing systematic responses through government-led organized support. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  3. Herpes simplex virus-2 genital tract shedding is not predictable over months or years in infected persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dhankani

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2 is a chronic reactivating infection that leads to recurrent shedding episodes in the genital tract. A minority of episodes are prolonged, and associated with development of painful ulcers. However, currently, available tools poorly predict viral trajectories and timing of reactivations in infected individuals. We employed principal components analysis (PCA and singular value decomposition (SVD to interpret HSV-2 genital tract shedding time series data, as well as simulation output from a stochastic spatial mathematical model. Empirical and model-derived, time-series data gathered over >30 days consists of multiple complex episodes that could not be reduced to a manageable number of descriptive features with PCA and SVD. However, single HSV-2 shedding episodes, even those with prolonged duration and complex morphologies consisting of multiple erratic peaks, were consistently described using a maximum of four dominant features. Modeled and clinical episodes had equivalent distributions of dominant features, implying similar dynamics in real and simulated episodes. We applied linear discriminant analysis (LDA to simulation output and identified that local immune cell density at the viral reactivation site had a predictive effect on episode duration, though longer term shedding suggested chaotic dynamics and could not be predicted based on spatial patterns of immune cell density. These findings suggest that HSV-2 shedding patterns within an individual are impossible to predict over weeks or months, and that even highly complex single HSV-2 episodes can only be partially predicted based on spatial distribution of immune cell density.

  4. Sequence and structure prediction of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of lily symptomless virus isolated from L. × 'Casablanca'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pinsan; Li, Huangai; Liu, Jiwen; Luan, Yushi; Yin, Yalei; Bai, Jianfang

    2011-06-01

    The DNA sequence of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) gene of lily symptomless virus (LSV), a lily-infecting member of the genus Carlavirus, was determined from nine overlapping cDNA fragments of different sizes. The complete sequence of this RdRp gene (HM070294) consisted of 5,847 nucleotides coding for a protein of 220 kDa. It had 97-98% sequence identity with RdRps of other known isolates at both the DNA and the amino acid level. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this RdRp (designated as RdRp-DL) was closely related to the RdRp of the Korean isolate (AM516059), as well as to the RdRps from Passiflora latent virus (PLV) and Kalanchoe latent virus (KLV) of the genus Carlavirus. Hydrophobic analysis of RdRp-DL revealed a hydrophobic N-terminus and a hydrophilic C-terminus. Helices and Loops were the major secondary structures of RdRp-DL. In addition, RdRp-DL also had three coil structures. Four conserved domains were identified: typoviral methyltransferase, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, P-loop-containing nucleoside triphosphate hydrolases and carlavirus endopeptidase. A model of the tertiary structure predicted by I-TASSER was obtained for each of these conserved domains. This is the first report of a detailed phylogenetic analysis of LSV RdRp with those of other members of the genus Carlavirus, and the first to predict the domain structures of LSV RdRp.

  5. Solar energy conversion systems

    CERN Document Server

    Brownson, Jeffrey R S

    2013-01-01

    Solar energy conversion requires a different mind-set from traditional energy engineering in order to assess distribution, scales of use, systems design, predictive economic models for fluctuating solar resources, and planning to address transient cycles and social adoption. Solar Energy Conversion Systems examines solar energy conversion as an integrative design process, applying systems thinking methods to a solid knowledge base for creators of solar energy systems. This approach permits different levels of access for the emerging broad audience of scientists, engineers, architects, planners

  6. Using multiple linear regression and physicochemical changes of amino acid mutations to predict antigenic variants of influenza A/H3N2 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Haibo; Wei, Xiaomei; Huang, Yu; Hu, Bin; Fang, Yaping; Wang, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Among human influenza viruses, strain A/H3N2 accounts for over a quarter of a million deaths annually. Antigenic variants of these viruses often render current vaccinations ineffective and lead to repeated infections. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict antigenic variants of the A/H3N2 strain. First, 18 critical antigenic amino acids in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein were recognized using a scoring method combining phi (ϕ) coefficient and information entropy. Next, a prediction model was developed by integrating multiple linear regression method with eight types of physicochemical changes in critical amino acid positions. When compared to other three known models, our prediction model achieved the best performance not only on the training dataset but also on the commonly-used testing dataset composed of 31878 antigenic relationships of the H3N2 influenza virus.

  7. Early myeloid dendritic cell dysregulation is predictive of disease progression in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viskam Wijewardana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC are lost from blood in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but the mechanism for this loss and its relationship to disease progression are not known. We studied the mDC response in blood and lymph nodes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques with different disease outcomes. Early changes in blood mDC number were inversely correlated with virus load and reflective of eventual disease outcome, as animals with stable infection that remained disease-free for more than one year had average increases in blood mDC of 200% over preinfection levels at virus set-point, whereas animals that progressed rapidly to AIDS had significant loss of mDC at this time. Short term antiretroviral therapy (ART transiently reversed mDC loss in progressor animals, whereas discontinuation of ART resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in mDC over preinfection levels only in stable animals, approaching 10-fold in some cases. Progressive SIV infection was associated with increased CCR7 expression on blood mDC and an 8-fold increase in expression of CCL19 mRNA in lymph nodes, consistent with increased mDC recruitment. Paradoxically, lymph node mDC did not accumulate in progressive infection but rather died from caspase-8-dependent apoptosis that was reduced by ART, indicating that increased recruitment is offset by increased death. Lymph node mDC from both stable and progressor animals remained responsive to exogenous stimulation with a TLR7/8 agonist. These data suggest that mDC are mobilized in SIV infection but that an increase in the CCR7-CCL19 chemokine axis associated with high virus burden in progressive infection promotes exodus of activated mDC from blood into lymph nodes where they die from apoptosis. We suggest that inflamed lymph nodes serve as a sink for mDC through recruitment, activation and death that contributes to AIDS pathogenesis.

  8. A novel dynamic model for predicting outcome in patients with hepatitis B virus related acute-on-chronic liver failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Ran; Duan, Zhonghui; Liu, Haixia; Chen, Li; Yu, Hongwei; Ren, Meixin; Zhu, Yueke; Jin, Chenggang; Han, Tao; Gao, Zhiliang; Meng, Qinghua

    2017-12-12

    It is challenging to predict the outcome of patients with hepatitis B virus related acute-on-chronic liver failure (HBV-ACLF) through existing prognostic models. Our aim was to establish a novel dynamic model to improve the predictive efficiency of 30-day mortality in HBV-ACLF patients. 305 patients who were diagnosed as HBV-ACLF (derivation cohort, n=211; validation cohort, n=94) were included in this study. The HBV-ACLF dynamic (HBV-ACLFD) model was constructed based on the daily levels of predictive variables in 7 days after diagnosis combined with baseline risk factors by multivariate logistic regression analysis. The HBV-ACLFD model was compared with the Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) score, end-stage liver disease (MELD) score, and MELD within corporation of serum sodium (MELD-Na) score by the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curves (AUROC). The HBV-ACLFD model demonstrated excellent discrimination with AUROC of 0.848 in the derivation cohort and of 0.813 in the validation cohort (p=0.620). The performance of the HBV-ACLFD model appeared to be superior to MELD score, MELD-Na score and CTP score (P<0.0001). The HBV-ACLFD model can accurately predict 30-day mortality in patients with HBV-ACLF, which is helpful to select appropriate clinical procedures, so as to relieve the social and economic burden.

  9. Study for engine conversion from gasoline to natural gas by using the two-zone combustion predictive model; Estudio de la conversion del motor de gasolina a gas natural mediante modelo de combustion predictivo de dos zonas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henry, Espinoza; Moreno, Jesus; Perez, Andres [Universidad de Oriente, Puerto la Cruz (Venezuela). Dept. de Mecanica; Baduy, Franklin [Universidad Central de Venezuela, Caracas (Venezuela). Dept. de Termoenergetica

    1995-07-01

    Great scale conversion of automation engines is a policy used by many countries as a strategy to save gasoline. Previous studies on the effects that this transformation can have over the engine performance are required for the implantation of this type of conversion. also, modifications in components and tuning for each engine have to be analyzed. This paper studies the effect of the conversion from gasoline to natural gas over the engine output, indicate mean pressure, combustion rate etc. It also analyze how to find the starting angle and the best air/fuel ratio for a specific engine, using a two-zone combustion model. (author)

  10. Experimental Confirmation of Nonlinear-Model- Predictive Control Applied Offline to a Permanent Magnet Linear Generator for Ocean-Wave Energy Conversion

    KAUST Repository

    Tom, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    To further maximize power absorption in both regular and irregular ocean wave environments, nonlinear-model-predictive control (NMPC) was applied to a model-scale point absorber developed at the University of California Berkeley, Berkeley, CA, USA. The NMPC strategy requires a power-takeoff (PTO) unit that could be turned on and off, as the generator would be inactive for up to 60% of the wave period. To confirm the effectiveness of this NMPC strategy, an in-house-designed permanent magnet linear generator (PMLG) was chosen as the PTO. The time-varying performance of the PMLG was first characterized by dry-bench tests, using mechanical relays to control the electromagnetic conversion process. The on/off sequencing of the PMLG was tested under regular and irregular wave excitation to validate NMPC simulations using control inputs obtained from running the choice optimizer offline. Experimental results indicate that successful implementation was achieved and absorbed power using NMPC was up to 50% greater than the passive system, which utilized no controller. Previous investigations into MPC applied to wave energy converters have lacked the experimental results to confirm the reported gains in power absorption. However, after considering the PMLG mechanical-to-electrical conversion efficiency, the electrical power output was not consistently maximized. To improve output power, a mathematical relation between the efficiency and damping magnitude of the PMLG was inserted in the system model to maximize the electrical power output through continued use of NMPC which helps separate this work from previous investigators. Of significance, results from latter simulations provided a damping time series that was active over a larger portion of the wave period requiring the actuation of the applied electrical load, rather than on/off control.

  11. Divergent selection for postweaning feed conversion in beef cattle: predicted response based on an index of feed intake and gain vs fee: gain ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M E

    1987-10-01

    As part of a divergent selection experiment (high vs low feed conversion) designed to obtain realized genetic parameter estimates for postweaning feed conversion, 35 Angus bull calves were selected each year from 1979 through 1983 to be fed in a 140-d postweaning performance test. From these 35 individually-fed bulls, the three most efficient and three least efficient (in terms of kilograms of total digestible nutrients required per kilogram of gain) were selected each year to each be mated to approximately 20 purebred Angus cows in a test herd. In the last 2 yr of the experiment, feed:gain ratios were adjusted for differences in maintenance requirements before selection. An alternative to selection based on feed/gain or adjusted feed/gain would have been to select on an index of feed intake and gain (Index3 = -1.0 feed intake + 3.87 gain) where feed intake was either unadjusted or adjusted (AdjIndex3) for differences in maintenance requirements. Residual correlations (year effects removed) among the four selection critera were large ([r[ greater than or equal to .76; P less than .01) as were correlations among ranks of the bulls based on the four selection criteria ([r[ greater than or equal to .75). Predicted genetic change for fee:gain ratio in both the high and low directions was greatest when selection was based on feed:gain ratio or Index3. Genetic changes expected to result from selection for feed:gain ratio or Index3 were similar, as were genetic changes expected due to selection for adjusted feed:gain ratio or AdjIndex3.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. A cascaded QSAR model for efficient prediction of overall power conversion efficiency of all-organic dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongzhi; Zhong, Ziyan; Li, Lin; Gao, Rui; Cui, Jingxia; Gao, Ting; Hu, Li Hong; Lu, Yinghua; Su, Zhong-Min; Li, Hui

    2015-05-30

    A cascaded model is proposed to establish the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) between the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE) and quantum chemical molecular descriptors of all-organic dye sensitizers. The cascaded model is a two-level network in which the outputs of the first level (JSC, VOC, and FF) are the inputs of the second level, and the ultimate end-point is the overall PCE of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The model combines quantum chemical methods and machine learning methods, further including quantum chemical calculations, data division, feature selection, regression, and validation steps. To improve the efficiency of the model and reduce the redundancy and noise of the molecular descriptors, six feature selection methods (multiple linear regression, genetic algorithms, mean impact value, forward selection, backward elimination, and +n-m algorithm) are used with the support vector machine. The best established cascaded model predicts the PCE values of DSSCs with a MAE of 0.57 (%), which is about 10% of the mean value PCE (5.62%). The validation parameters according to the OECD principles are R(2) (0.75), Q(2) (0.77), and Qcv2 (0.76), which demonstrate the great goodness-of-fit, predictivity, and robustness of the model. Additionally, the applicability domain of the cascaded QSAR model is defined for further application. This study demonstrates that the established cascaded model is able to effectively predict the PCE for organic dye sensitizers with very low cost and relatively high accuracy, providing a useful tool for the design of dye sensitizers with high PCE. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. VIRsiRNApred: a web server for predicting inhibition efficacy of siRNAs targeting human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Abid; Thakur, Nishant; Kumar, Manoj

    2013-12-11

    Selection of effective viral siRNA is an indispensable step in the development of siRNA based antiviral therapeutics. Despite immense potential, a viral siRNA efficacy prediction algorithm is still not available. Moreover, performances of the existing general mammalian siRNA efficacy predictors are not satisfactory for viral siRNAs. Therefore, we have developed "VIRsiRNApred" a support vector machine (SVM) based method for predicting the efficacy of viral siRNA. In the present study, we have employed a new dataset of 1725 viral siRNAs with experimentally verified quantitative efficacies tested under heterogeneous experimental conditions and targeting as many as 37 important human viruses including HIV, Influenza, HCV, HBV, SARS etc. These siRNAs were divided into training (T1380) and validation (V345) datasets. Important siRNA sequence features including mono to penta nucleotide frequencies, binary pattern, thermodynamic properties and secondary structure were employed for model development. During 10-fold cross validation on T1380 using hybrid approach, we achieved a maximum Pearson Correlation Coefficient (PCC) of 0.55 between predicted and actual efficacy of viral siRNAs. On V345 independent dataset, our best model achieved a maximum correlation of 0.50 while existing general siRNA prediction methods showed PCC from 0.05 to 0.18. However, using leave one out cross validation PCC was improved to 0.58 and 0.55 on training and validation datasets respectively. SVM performed better than other machine learning techniques used like ANN, KNN and REP Tree. VIRsiRNApred is the first algorithm for predicting inhibition efficacy of viral siRNAs which is developed using experimentally verified viral siRNAs. We hope this algorithm would be useful in predicting highly potent viral siRNA to aid siRNA based antiviral therapeutics development. The web server is freely available at http://crdd.osdd.net/servers/virsirnapred/.

  14. Human Papilloma Virus Infection Does Not Predict Response to Interferon Therapy in Ocular Surface Squamous Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galor, Anat; Garg, Nisha; Nanji, Afshan; Joag, Madhura; Nuovo, Gerard; Palioura, Sotiria; Wang, Gaofeng; Karp, Carol L

    2015-11-01

    To identify the frequency of human papilloma virus (HPV) in ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN) and to evaluate differences in clinical features and treatment response of tumors with positive versus negative HPV results. Retrospective case series. Twenty-seven patients with OSSN. Ocular surface squamous neoplasia specimens were analyzed for the presence of HPV. Clinical features and response to interferon were determined retrospectively and linked to the presence (versus absence) of HPV. Clinical characteristics of OSSN by HPV status. Twenty-one of 27 tumors (78%) demonstrated positive HPV results. The HPV genotypes identified included HPV-16 in 10 tumors (48%), HPV-31 in 5 tumors, HPV-33 in 1 tumor, HPV-35 in 2 tumors, HPV-51 in 2 tumors, and a novel HPV in 3 tumors (total of 23 tumors because 1 tumor had 3 identified genotypes). Tumors found in the superior limbus were more likely to show positive HPV results (48% vs. 0%; P=0.06, Fisher exact test). Tumors with positive HPV-16 results were larger (68 vs. 34 mm2; P=0.08, Mann-Whitney U test) and were more likely to have papillomatous morphologic features (50% vs. 12%; P=0.07, Fisher exact test) compared with tumors showing negative results for HPV-16. Human papilloma virus status was not found to be associated with response to interferon therapy (P=1.0, Fisher exact test). Metrics found to be associated with a nonfavorable response to interferon were male gender and tumors located in the superior conjunctivae. The presence of HPV in OSSN seems to be more common in lesions located in the nonexposed, superior limbus. Human papilloma virus presence does not seem to be required for a favorable response to interferon therapy. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Ophthalmology. All rights reserved.

  15. Predicting Early Viral Control under Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy for Chronic Hepatitis C Virus Using Pretreatment Immunological Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A. Hutchinson

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent introduction of all-oral direct-acting antiviral (DAA treatment has revolutionized care of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Regrettably, the high cost of DAA treatment is burdensome for healthcare systems and may be prohibitive for some patients who would otherwise benefit. Understanding how patient-related factors influence individual responses to DAA treatment may lead to more efficient prescribing. In this observational study, patients with chronic HCV infection were comprehensively monitored by flow cytometry to identify pretreatment immunological variables that predicted HCV RNA negativity within 4 weeks of commencing DAA treatment. Twenty-three patients [genotype 1a (n = 10, 1b (n = 9, and 3 (n = 4] were treated with daclatasvir plus sofosbuvir (SOF (n = 15, ledipasvir plus SOF (n = 4, or ritonavir-boosted paritaprevir, ombitasvir, and dasabuvir (n = 4. DAA treatment most prominently altered the distribution of CD8+ memory T cell subsets. Knowing only pretreatment frequencies of CD3+ and naive CD8+ T cells allowed correct classification of 83% of patients as “fast” (HCV RNA-negative by 4 weeks or “slow” responders. In a prospective cohort, these parameters correctly classified 90% of patients. Slow responders exhibited higher frequencies of CD3+ T cells, CD8+ TEM cells, and CD5high CD27− CD57+ CD8+ chronically activated T cells, which is attributed to bystander hyperactivation of virus-non-specific CD8+ T cells. Taken together, non-specific, systemic CD8+ T cell activation predicted a longer time to viral clearance. This discovery allows pretreatment identification of individuals who may not require a full 12-week course of DAA therapy; in turn, this could lead to individualized prescribing and more efficient resource allocation.

  16. Conversation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiffrin, Deborah

    1990-01-01

    Summarizes the current state of research in conversation analysis, referring primarily to six different perspectives that have developed from the philosophy, sociology, anthropology, and linguistics disciplines. These include pragmatics; speech act theory; interactional sociolinguistics; ethnomethodology; ethnography of communication; and…

  17. Copper subtype of Alzheimer's disease (AD): meta-analyses, genetic studies and predictive value of non-ceruloplasmim copper in mild cognitive impairment conversion to full AD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squitti, Rosanna

    2014-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. A myriad of complex factors contribute to AD, promoting the deposition in plaques of amyloid-beta (Aβ), which is the main constituent of this pathognomonic sign of AD at autopsy brain inspection. Aβ toxicity is related to oxidative stress, which results in synaptic loss in specific brain areas, eventually leading to cognitive decline. Metal, and especially copper, dyshomeostasis is a key factor in these processes. Recent studies have demonstrated that the serum fraction of copper that is not bound to ceruloplasmin (Non-Cp copper, also known as 'free' or labile copper) increases in a percentage of AD patients and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) subjects; this is considered a precursor of AD. Non-Cp copper is the exchangeable fraction of low molecular weight copper in serum. It is distinguished from the copper structurally bound to the ceruloplasmin protein, a master protein of iron metabolism. Non-Cp copper levels are higher than normal reference values (range 0-1.6μmol/L) in about 50% of amnestic MCI subjects and 60% of AD patients, typifying them in a subset of AD. Meta-analyses, genetic studies and a prognostic study evaluating the predictive value of Non-Cp copper in MCI conversion to full AD demonstrate the existence of this copper phenotype of AD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  18. High-sensitivity C-reactive protein is predictive of successful cardioversion for atrial fibrillation and maintenance of sinus rhythm after conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Eiichi; Arakawa, Tomoharu; Uchiyama, Tatsushi; Kodama, Itsuo; Hishida, Hitoshi

    2006-04-14

    Cardioversion for atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most effective treatment for the restoration of sinus rhythm (SR). Recently, an elevated level of hs-CRP has been shown to be associated with AF burden, suggesting that inflammation increases the propensity for persistence of AF. We examined whether the level of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was predictive of the outcome of cardioversion for AF. One hundred and six patients with a history of symptomatic AF lasting > or =1 day (age 63+/-14 years, mean+/-S.D.) underwent cardioversion. Echocardiography and hs-CRP assay were performed immediately prior to cardioversion. SR was restored in 84 patients (79%). By using selected cutoff values, multiple discriminant analysis revealed significant associations between successful cardioversion and a shorter duration of AF (AF duration or =60%, OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.86-0.99), and lower hs-CRP level (hs-CRP or =0.06 mg/dL, Cox proportional-hazards regression model found that only hs-CRP level was an independent predictor of AF recurrence (OR 5.30, 95% CI 2.46-11.5) after adjustment for coexisting cardiovascular risks. When patients were divided by the hs-CRP level of 0.06 mg/dL, percentage of maintenance of SR below and above the cutoff was 53% and 4%, respectively (log-rank test, pmaintenance of SR after conversion.

  19. Homology Modeling and Analysis of Structure Predictions of the Bovine Rhinitis B Virus RNA Dependent RNA Polymerase (RdRp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devendra K. Rai

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Rhinitis B Virus (BRBV is a picornavirus responsible for mild respiratory infection of cattle. It is probably the least characterized among the aphthoviruses. BRBV is the closest relative known to Foot and Mouth Disease virus (FMDV with a ~43% identical polyprotein sequence and as much as 67% identical sequence for the RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, which is also known as 3D polymerase (3Dpol. In the present study we carried out phylogenetic analysis, structure based sequence alignment and prediction of three-dimensional structure of BRBV 3Dpol using a combination of different computational tools. Model structures of BRBV 3Dpol were verified for their stereochemical quality and accuracy. The BRBV 3Dpol structure predicted by SWISS-MODEL exhibited highest scores in terms of stereochemical quality and accuracy, which were in the range of 2Å resolution crystal structures. The active site, nucleic acid binding site and overall structure were observed to be in agreement with the crystal structure of unliganded as well as template/primer (T/P, nucleotide tri-phosphate (NTP and pyrophosphate (PPi bound FMDV 3Dpol (PDB, 1U09 and 2E9Z. The closest proximity of BRBV and FMDV 3Dpol as compared to human rhinovirus type 16 (HRV-16 and rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV 3Dpols is also substantiated by phylogeny analysis and root-mean square deviation (RMSD between C-α traces of the polymerase structures. The absence of positively charged α-helix at C terminal, significant differences in non-covalent interactions especially salt bridges and CH-pi interactions around T/P channel of BRBV 3Dpol compared to FMDV 3Dpol, indicate that despite a very high homology to FMDV 3Dpol, BRBV 3Dpol may adopt a different mechanism for handling its substrates and adapting to physiological requirements. Our findings will be valuable in the

  20. Altered specificity of single-chain antibody fragments bound to pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus after conversion of the phage-bound to the soluble form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaku Yoshihiro

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In 2009, a novel influenza A/H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm quickly spread worldwide and co-circulated with then-existing seasonal H1N1 virus (sH1N1. Distinguishing between these 2 viruses was necessary to better characterize the epidemiological properties of the emergent virus, including transmission patterns, pathogenesis, and anti-influenza drug resistance. This situation prompted us to develop a point-of-care virus differentiation system before entering the 2009–2010 influenza season. Aiming to establish H1N1pdm-specific detection tools rapidly, we employed phage display libraries to select H1N1pdm-specific single-chain variable fragments (scFvs. Findings Human single-fold scFv libraries (Tomlinson I + J underwent selection for the ability to bind H1N1pdm virus particles. Three rounds of panning brought 1152 phage-bound scFvs, of which 58 clones reacted with H1N1pdm specifically or preferentially over sH1N1 in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. After conversion of the scFvs to soluble form, 7 clones demonstrating high/stable expression were finally obtained. However, all the soluble scFvs except No. 29 were found to have lost their specificity/preference for H1N1pdm in ELISA. The specificity/preference of No. 29 was also confirmed by immunofluorescence assay and immunoprecipitation, and the viral nucleoprotein was identified by ELISA as its target protein. The change in specificity associated with scFv conversion from phage-bound to soluble form could be due to loss of phage scaffold pIII protein, which likely provides structural support for the scFv antigen-binding site. It is also possible that the similar antigenic properties of H1N1pdm and sH1N1 led to the observed alterations in scFv specificity. Discussion Using a phage display library, we obtained 7 soluble scFv clones reactive against H1N1pdm; however, only 1 showed specificity/preference toward H1N1pdm. Our results confirmed that using phage display

  1. The 5' non-translated region of Varroa destructor virus 1 (genus Iflavirus): structure prediction and IRES activity in Lymantria dispar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ongus, J.R.; Roode, E.C.; Pleij, C.W.A.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2006-01-01

    Structure prediction of the 5' non-translated region (NTR) of four iflavirus RNAs revealed two types of potential internal ribosome entry site (IRES), which are discriminated by size and level of complexity, in this group of viruses. In contrast to the intergenic IRES of dicistroviruses, the

  2. Population based external validation of a European predictive model for respiratory syncytial virus hospitalization of premature infants born 33 to 35 weeks of gestational age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Lone G; Fullarton, John R; Carbonell-Estrany, Xavier

    2010-01-01

    Prospectively collected population-based data on 2529 Danish infants born at 33 to 35 weeks of gestation were used to validate an European predictive model of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalization. The model was found to be robust with a diagnostic accuracy of 65.9% to distinguish...

  3. The demographic and socioeconomic factors predictive for populations at high-risk for La Crosse virus infection in West Virginia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew D Haddow

    Full Text Available Although a large body of literature exists for the environmental risk factors for La Crosse virus (LACV transmission, the demographic and socioeconomic risk factors for developing LACV infection have not been investigated. Therefore, this study investigated the demographic and socioeconomic risk factors for LACV infection in West Virginia from 2003 to 2007, using two forward stepwise discriminant analyses. The discriminant analyses were used to evaluate a number of demographic and socioeconomic factors for their ability to predict: 1 those census tracts with at least one reported case of LACV infection versus those census tracts with no reported cases of LACV infection and 2 to evaluate significantly high-risk clusters for LACV infection versus significantly low-risk clusters for LACV infection. In the first model, a high school education diploma or a general education diploma or less and a lower housing densitywere found to be predictive of those census tracts with at least one case of LACV infection. A high school or a general education diploma or less, lower housing density, and housing built in 1969 and earlier were all found to be predictive of those census tracts displaying high-risk clusters versus census tracts displaying low-risk clusters in the second model. The cluster discriminant analysis was found to be more predictive than the census tract discriminant analysis as indicated by the Eigenvalues, canonical correlation, and grouping accuracy. The results of this study indicate that socioeconomically disadvantaged populations are at the highest risk for LACV infection and should be a focus of LACV infection prevention efforts.

  4. Direct Conversion of Energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corliss, William R

    1964-01-01

    Topics include: direct versus dynamic energy conversion; laws governing energy conversion; thermoelectricity; thermionic conversion; magnetohydrodynamic conversion; chemical batteries; the fuel cell; solar cells; nuclear batteries; and advanced concepts including ferroelectric conversion and thermomagnetic conversion.

  5. Factors predicting kidney damage in Puumala virus infected patients in Southern Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skarphedinsson, S; Thiesson, H C; Shakar, S A

    2015-01-01

    infections the decrease of platelet counts preceded acute kidney failure. Multivariable logistic regression demonstrated that recent activities in the forest, platelet counts, and flu-like symptoms predicted estimated glomerular filtration rates less than 30 mL/min/1.73 m², but not age, gender, fever, nor...

  6. In Silico Prediction and Experimental Confirmation of HA Residues Conferring Enhanced Human Receptor Specificity of H5N1 Influenza A Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmier, Sonja; Mostafa, Ahmed; Haarmann, Thomas; Bannert, Norbert; Ziebuhr, John; Veljkovic, Veljko; Dietrich, Ursula; Pleschka, Stephan

    2015-06-01

    Newly emerging influenza A viruses (IAV) pose a major threat to human health by causing seasonal epidemics and/or pandemics, the latter often facilitated by the lack of pre-existing immunity in the general population. Early recognition of candidate pandemic influenza viruses (CPIV) is of crucial importance for restricting virus transmission and developing appropriate therapeutic and prophylactic strategies including effective vaccines. Often, the pandemic potential of newly emerging IAV is only fully recognized once the virus starts to spread efficiently causing serious disease in humans. Here, we used a novel phylogenetic algorithm based on the informational spectrum method (ISM) to identify potential CPIV by predicting mutations in the viral hemagglutinin (HA) gene that are likely to (differentially) affect critical interactions between the HA protein and target cells from bird and human origin, respectively. Predictions were subsequently validated by generating pseudotyped retrovirus particles and genetically engineered IAV containing these mutations and characterizing potential effects on virus entry and replication in cells expressing human and avian IAV receptors, respectively. Our data suggest that the ISM-based algorithm is suitable to identify CPIV among IAV strains that are circulating in animal hosts and thus may be a new tool for assessing pandemic risks associated with specific strains.

  7. CHLORELLA VIRUSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Takashi; Onimatsu, Hideki; Van Etten, James L.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella viruses or chloroviruses are large, icosahedral, plaque‐forming, double‐stranded‐DNA—containing viruses that replicate in certain strains of the unicellular green alga Chlorella. DNA sequence analysis of the 330‐kbp genome of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV‐1), the prototype of this virus family (Phycodnaviridae), predict ∼366 protein‐encoding genes and 11 tRNA genes. The predicted gene products of ∼50% of these genes resemble proteins of known function, including many that are completely unexpected for a virus. In addition, the chlorella viruses have several features and encode many gene products that distinguish them from most viruses. These products include: (1) multiple DNA methyltransferases and DNA site‐specific endonucleases, (2) the enzymes required to glycosylate their proteins and synthesize polysaccharides such as hyaluronan and chitin, (3) a virus‐encoded K+ channel (called Kcv) located in the internal membrane of the virions, (4) a SET domain containing protein (referred to as vSET) that dimethylates Lys27 in histone 3, and (5) PBCV‐1 has three types of introns; a self‐splicing intron, a spliceosomal processed intron, and a small tRNA intron. Accumulating evidence indicates that the chlorella viruses have a very long evolutionary history. This review mainly deals with research on the virion structure, genome rearrangements, gene expression, cell wall degradation, polysaccharide synthesis, and evolution of PBCV‐1 as well as other related viruses. PMID:16877063

  8. A remote sensing tool to monitor and predict epidemiologic outbreaks of Hanta virus infections and Lyme disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, M.; Verstraeten, W. W.; Amipour, S.; Wambacq, J.; Aerts, J.-M.; Maes, P.; Berckmans, D.; Lagrou, K.; van Ranst, M.; Coppin, P.

    2009-04-01

    Lyme disease and Hanta virus infection are the result of the conjunction of several climatic and ecological conditions. Although both affections have different causal agents, they share an important characteristic which is the fact that rodents play an important role in the contagion. One of the most important agents in the dispersion of these diseases is the bank vole (Clethrionomys glareoulus). The bank vole is a common host for both, the Borrelia bacteria which via the ticks (Ixodes ricinus) reaches the human body and causes the Lyme disease, and the Nephropatia epidemica which is caused by Puumala Hantavirus and affects kidneys in humans. The prefered habitat of bank voles is broad-leaf forests with an important presence of beeches (Fagus sylvatica) and oaks (Quercus sp.) and a relatively dense low vegetation layer. These vegetation systems are common in West-Europe and their dynamics have a great influence in the bank voles population and, therefore, in the spreading of the infections this study is concerned about. The fact that the annual seed production is not stable in time has an important effect in bank voles population and, as it has been described in other studies, in the number of reported cases of Hanta virus infections and Lyme disease. The years in which an abundant production of seeds is observed are referred to as mast years which are believed to obey to cyclic patterns and to certain climatologically characteristics of the preceding years. Statistical analysis have confirmed the correlation in the behaviour of the number of infected cases and the presence of mast years. This project aims at the design of a remote sensing based system (INFOPRESS - INFectious disease Outbreak Prediction REmote Sensing based System) that should enable local and national health care instances to predict and locate the occurrence of infection outbreaks and design policies to counteract undesired effects. The predictive capabilities of the system are based on the

  9. Prediction of conversion to psychosis: review and future directions Previsão de conversão para psicose: revisão e perspectivas futuras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dylan G. Gee

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews recent findings on predictors of conversion to psychosis among youth deemed at ultra high risk (UHR based on the presence of subpsychotic-intensity symptoms or genetic risk for psychosis and a recent decline in functioning. Although transition rates differ between studies, the most well powered studies have observed rates of conversion to full psychosis in the 30-40% range over 2-3 years of follow-up. Across studies, severity of subthreshold positive symptoms, poorer social functioning, and genetic risk for schizophrenia appear to be consistent predictors of conversion to psychosis, with algorithms combining these indicators achieving positive predictive power > 80%. Nevertheless, a substantial fraction of UHR cases do not convert to psychosis. Recent work indicates that UHR cases who present with lower levels of negative symptoms and higher levels of social functioning are more likely to recover symptomatically and no longer meet criteria for an at-risk mental state. In general, it appears that about 1/3 of UHR cases convert to psychosis, about 1/3 do not convert but remain symptomatic and functionally impaired, and about 1/3 recover symptomatically and functionally. Continued efforts to detect early risk for psychosis are critical for informing early intervention and provide increasing promise of delaying or even preventing the onset of psychosis.O presente artigo revisa os achados recentes sobre os preditores de conversão para psicose entre jovens considerados de ultra alto risco (UAR com base na presença de sintomas de intensidade sub-psicótica e risco genético para psicose e declínio recente no funcionamento mental. Apesar das taxas de transição serem diferentes entre os estudos, os estudos de mais peso encontraram taxas de conversão para psicose entre 30% e 40% em pacientes acompanhados por dois a três anos. Entre os estudos, gravidade de sintomas positivos sub-clínicos, pior relacionamento social e risco gen

  10. Bridging the Gap Between Experimental Data and Model Parameterization for Chikungunya Virus Transmission Predictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Rebecca C; Mores, Christopher N; Wearing, Helen J

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) has experienced 2 major expansion events in the last decade. The most recently emerged sublineage (ECSA-V) was shown to have increased efficiency in a historically secondary vector, Aedes albopictus, leading to speculation that this was a major factor in expansion. Subsequently, a number of experimental studies focused on the vector competence of CHIKV, as well as transmission modeling efforts. Mathematical models have used these data to inform their own investigations, but some have incorrectly parameterized the extrinsic incubation period (EIP) of the mosquitoes, using vector competence data. Vector competence and EIP are part of the same process but are not often correctly reported together. Thus, the way these metrics are used for model parameterization can be problematic. We offer suggestions for bridging this gap for the purpose of standardization of reporting and to promote appropriate use of experimental data in modeling efforts. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Predicting the Benefits of Banana Bunchy Top Virus Eradication in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    David C Cook; Liu, Shuang; Edwards, Jacky; Villalta, Oscar; Aurambout, Jean-Philippe; Kriticos, Darren J.; Drenth, Andre; De Barro, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Benefit cost analysis is a tried and tested analytical framework that can clearly communicate likely net changes in social welfare from investment decisions to diverse stakeholder audiences. However, in a plant biosecurity context, it is often difficult to predict policy benefits over time due to complex biophysical interaction between invasive species and their hosts. In this paper, we demonstrate how benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to biosecurity decision-makers using the exam...

  12. Predicting the Benefits of Banana Bunchy Top Virus Exclusion from Commercial Plantations in Australia

    OpenAIRE

    David C Cook; Shuang Liu; Jacqueline Edwards; Villalta, Oscar N.; Jean-Philippe Aurambout; Kriticos, Darren J.; Andre Drenth; De Barro, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Benefit cost analysis is a tried and tested analytical framework that can clearly communicate likely net changes in producer welfare from investment decisions to diverse stakeholder audiences. However, in a plant biosecurity context, it is often difficult to predict policy benefits over time due to complex biophysical interactions between invasive species, their hosts, and the environment. In this paper, we demonstrate how a break-even style benefit cost analysis remains highly relevant to bi...

  13. The Concept of Conversion Factors and Reference Crops for the Prediction of 137Cs Root Uptake: Field Verification in Post-Chernobyl Landscape, 30 Years after Nuclear Accident

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komissarova, Olga; Paramonova, Tatiana

    2017-04-01

    One of the notable lessons obtained from nuclear accidents could be revealing the general features of 137Cs root uptake by agricultural crops for prediction the radionuclide accumulation in plants and its further distribution via food chains. Transfer factors (TFs) (the ratio of 137Cs activities in vegetation and in soil) have become a basis for such assessment when the characteristics of radioactive contamination, soil properties and phylogenetic features of different plant taxons important for root uptake are known. For the sake of simplicity the concept of conversion factor (CF) was accepted by IAEA (2006) to obtain unknown value of TF from the TF value of the reference crop cultivated on the same soil. Cereals were selected like reference group of agricultural crops. Presuming TF for cereals equal 1, CFs for tubers and fodder leguminous are 4, for grasses - 4.5, for leafy vegetables - 9, ets. To verify TFs and corresponding CFs values under environmental conditions of post-Chernobyl agricultural landscape the study in the area of Plavsky radioactive hotspot (Tula region, Russia) was conducted. Nowadays, after 30 years after the Chernobyl accident ( the first half-life period of 137Cs), arable chernozems of the territory are still polluted at the level 126-282 kBq/m2. The main crops of field rotation: wheat and barley (cereals), potatoes (tubers), soybean (leguminous), amaranth (non-leafy vegetables), rape ("other crops"), as well as galega-bromegrass mixture (cultivated species of grasses) and pasture grasses of semi-natural dry and wet meadows have been studied. Accumulation parameters of 137Cs in aboveground biomass, belowground biomass and edible parts of the plants were examined separately. Experimentally obtained 137Cs TFs in cereals are 0.24-0.32 for total biomass, 0.07-0.14 for aerial parts, 0.54-0.64 for roots and 0.01-0.02 for grain. Thus, (i) 137Cs transfer in grain of wheat and barley is insignificant and (ii) corresponding TFs values in both crops

  14. Classification of Alzheimer's disease and prediction of mild cognitive impairment-to-Alzheimer's conversion from structural magnetic resource imaging using feature ranking and a genetic algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beheshti, Iman; Demirel, Hasan; Matsuda, Hiroshi

    2017-04-01

    We developed a novel computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system that uses feature-ranking and a genetic algorithm to analyze structural magnetic resonance imaging data; using this system, we can predict conversion of mild cognitive impairment (MCI)-to-Alzheimer's disease (AD) at between one and three years before clinical diagnosis. The CAD system was developed in four stages. First, we used a voxel-based morphometry technique to investigate global and local gray matter (GM) atrophy in an AD group compared with healthy controls (HCs). Regions with significant GM volume reduction were segmented as volumes of interest (VOIs). Second, these VOIs were used to extract voxel values from the respective atrophy regions in AD, HC, stable MCI (sMCI) and progressive MCI (pMCI) patient groups. The voxel values were then extracted into a feature vector. Third, at the feature-selection stage, all features were ranked according to their respective t-test scores and a genetic algorithm designed to find the optimal feature subset. The Fisher criterion was used as part of the objective function in the genetic algorithm. Finally, the classification was carried out using a support vector machine (SVM) with 10-fold cross validation. We evaluated the proposed automatic CAD system by applying it to baseline values from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) dataset (160 AD, 162 HC, 65 sMCI and 71 pMCI subjects). The experimental results indicated that the proposed system is capable of distinguishing between sMCI and pMCI patients, and would be appropriate for practical use in a clinical setting. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrafamilial transmission of hepatitis C virus: infection of the father predicts the risk of perinatal transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Bartolini, Elisa; Azzari, Chiara; Becciolini, Laura; Moriondo, Maria; de Martino, Maurizio; Resti, Massimo

    2008-11-01

    The aims of the present study were to evaluate in a cohort of mothers infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) the prevalence of HCV infection of their sexual partners, the influence of infection of the partners on perinatal transmission, and whether this influence is mediated by other well known risk factors for perinatal transmission. Forty-nine consecutive mothers infected with HCV who transmitted infection to their offspring and, as a control group, 557 consecutive mothers infected with HCV who did not transmit infection, together with their children and the fathers of the children who were also the sexual partners of the mothers were evaluated. History of intravenous drug use was significantly more frequent in women with partners infected with HCV than in women with partners not infected [115/180 (63.9%) vs. 87/401 (21.7%); relative risk (RR): 6.38, 95% confidence intervals (CI): 4.34-9.39, P < 10(-3)]. HCV infection was more frequent in the partners of mothers who transmitted perinatally HCV [23/49 (46.9%) vs. 174/557 (31.2%); RR: 1.95, 95%CI: 1.08-3.51, P = 0.03]. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that paternal HCV infection is not a risk factor per se for perinatal HCV transmission, but its role is dependent on maternal intravenous drug use [adjusted RR: 1.23 (95%CI: 0.44-3.39, P = 0.6)]. In conclusion, the present study shows that partners of mothers infected with HCV with a history of intravenous drug use were at a higher risk of HCV infection. HCV infection of the father seems to be associated with perinatal transmission but this relationship is dependent on maternal history of intravenous drug use. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Prediction and identification of T cell epitopes in the H5N1 influenza virus nucleoprotein in chicken.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxia Hou

    Full Text Available T cell epitopes can be used for the accurate monitoring of avian influenza virus (AIV immune responses and the rational design of vaccines. No T cell epitopes have been previously identified in the H5N1 AIV virus nucleoprotein (NP in chickens. For the first time, this study used homology modelling techniques to construct three-dimensional structures of the peptide-binding domains of chicken MHC class Ι molecules for four commonly encountered unique haplotypes, i.e., B4, B12, B15, and B19. H5N1 AIV NP was computationally parsed into octapeptides or nonapeptides according to the peptide-binding motifs of MHC class I molecules of the B4, B12, B15 and B19 haplotypes. Seventy-five peptide sequences were modelled and their MHC class I molecule-binding abilities were analysed by molecular docking. Twenty-five peptides (Ten for B4, six for B12, two for B15, and seven for B19 were predicted to be potential T cell epitopes in chicken. Nine of these peptides and one unrelated peptide were manually synthesized and their T cell responses were tested in vitro. Spleen lymphocytes were collected from SPF chickens that had been immunised with a NP-expression plasmid, pCAGGS-NP, and they were stimulated using the synthesized peptides. The secretion of chicken IFN-γ and the proliferation of CD8(+ T cells were tested using an ELISA kit and flow cytometry, respectively. The significant secretion of chicken IFN-γ and proliferation of CD8(+ T lymphocytes increased by 13.7% and 11.9% were monitored in cells stimulated with peptides NP(89-97 and NP(198-206, respectively. The results indicate that peptides NP(89-97 (PKKTGGPIY and NP(198-206 (KRGINDRNF are NP T cell epitopes in chicken of certain haplotypes. The method used in this investigation is applicable to predicting T cell epitopes for other antigens in chicken, while this study also extends our understanding of the mechanisms of the immune response to AIV in chicken.

  17. The Role of Conversation Policy in Carrying Out Agent Conversations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Link, Hamilton E.; Phillips, Laurence R.

    1999-05-20

    Structured conversation diagrams, or conversation specifications, allow agents to have predictable interactions and achieve predefined information-based goals, but they lack the flexibility needed to function robustly in an unpredictable environment. We propose a mechanism that combines a typical conversation structure with a separately established policy to generate an actual conversation. The word "policy" connotes a high-level direction external to a specific planned interaction with the environment. Policies, which describe acceptable procedures and influence decisions, can be applied to broad sets of activity. Based on their observation of issues related to a policy, agents may dynamically adjust their communication patterns. The policy object describes limitations, constraints, and requirements that may affect the conversation in certain circumstances. Using this new mechanism of interaction simplifies the description of individual conversations and allows domain-specific issues to be brought to bear more easily during agent communication. By following the behavior of the conversation specification when possible and deferring to the policy to derive behavior in exceptional circumstances, an agent is able to function predictably under normal situations and still act rationally in abnormal situations. Different conversation policies applied to a given conversation specification can change the nature of the interaction without changing the specification.

  18. Predictive power of biomarkers of oxidative stress and inflammation in patients with hepatitis C virus-associated hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Akira; Kono, Hiroshi; Gupta, Mayetri; Asakawa, Masami; Suzuki, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Masanori; Fujii, Hideki; Rusyn, Ivan

    2007-03-01

    This study evaluated the relationship between inflammation, intra-hepatic oxidative stress, oxidative DNA damage and the progression of liver carcinogenesis in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected humans. Non-cancerous liver tissues were collected from 30 patients with an HCV-associated solitary hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who received curative tumor removal. After surgery, the patients were followed at monthly intervals at the outpatient clinic. Distribution of the inflammatory cells (CD68+), the number of 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) DNA adducts and 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) protein adducts and the expression of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE) were determined by immunohistochemical analysis in serial liver sections from tumor-free parenchyma at the surgical margin around the tumor. Significant positive correlations were observed between the number of CD68+ cells, the amount of HNE protein adducts, and the number of 8-OHdG adducts in liver tissue of patients with HCC and HCV. The cumulative disease-free survival was significantly shorter in patients with the highest percentage of 8-OHdG-positive hepatocytes. Using a Cox proportional hazard model, 8-OHdG, HNE and CD68 were determined to be good biomarkers for predicting disease-free survival in patients with HCC and HCV. These results support the hypothesis that HCV-induced inflammation causes oxidative DNA damage and promotes hepatocarcinogenesis which directly affects the clinical outcome. Since patients with greater intra-hepatic oxidative stress had a higher incidence of HCC recurrence, we suggest that oxidative stress biomarkers could potentially be used as a useful clinical diagnostic tool to predict the duration of disease-free survival in patients with HCV-associated HCC.

  19. Laser energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalufka, N. W.

    1989-01-01

    The conversion of laser energy to other, more useful, forms is an important element of any space power transmission system employing lasers. In general the user, at the receiving sight, will require the energy in a form other than laser radiation. In particular, conversion to rocket power and electricity are considered to be two major areas where one must consider various conversion techniques. Three systems (photovoltaic cells, MHD generators, and gas turbines) have been identified as the laser-to-electricity conversion systems that appear to meet most of the criteria for a space-based system. The laser thruster also shows considerable promise as a space propulsion system. At this time one cannot predict which of the three laser-to-electric converters will be best suited to particular mission needs. All three systems have some particular advantages, as well as disadvantages. It would be prudent to continue research on all three systems, as well as the laser rocket thruster. Research on novel energy conversion systems, such as the optical rectenna and the reverse free-electron laser, should continue due to their potential for high payoff.

  20. Conversational sensemaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Webberley, Will; Braines, Dave

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in natural language question-answering systems and context-aware mobile apps create opportunities for improved sensemaking in a tactical setting. Users equipped with mobile devices act as both sensors (able to acquire information) and effectors (able to act in situ), operating alone or in collectives. The currently- dominant technical approaches follow either a pull model (e.g. Apple's Siri or IBM's Watson which respond to users' natural language queries) or a push model (e.g. Google's Now which sends notifications to a user based on their context). There is growing recognition that users need more flexible styles of conversational interaction, where they are able to freely ask or tell, be asked or told, seek explanations and clarifications. Ideally such conversations should involve a mix of human and machine agents, able to collaborate in collective sensemaking activities with as few barriers as possible. Desirable capabilities include adding new knowledge, collaboratively building models, invoking specific services, and drawing inferences. As a step towards this goal, we collect evidence from a number of recent pilot studies including natural experiments (e.g. situation awareness in the context of organised protests) and synthetic experiments (e.g. human and machine agents collaborating in information seeking and spot reporting). We identify some principles and areas of future research for "conversational sensemaking".

  1. Conversational sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preece, Alun; Gwilliams, Chris; Parizas, Christos; Pizzocaro, Diego; Bakdash, Jonathan Z.; Braines, Dave

    2014-05-01

    Recent developments in sensing technologies, mobile devices and context-aware user interfaces have made it pos- sible to represent information fusion and situational awareness for Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) activities as a conversational process among actors at or near the tactical edges of a network. Motivated by use cases in the domain of Company Intelligence Support Team (CoIST) tasks, this paper presents an approach to information collection, fusion and sense-making based on the use of natural language (NL) and controlled nat- ural language (CNL) to support richer forms of human-machine interaction. The approach uses a conversational protocol to facilitate a ow of collaborative messages from NL to CNL and back again in support of interactions such as: turning eyewitness reports from human observers into actionable information (from both soldier and civilian sources); fusing information from humans and physical sensors (with associated quality metadata); and assisting human analysts to make the best use of available sensing assets in an area of interest (governed by man- agement and security policies). CNL is used as a common formal knowledge representation for both machine and human agents to support reasoning, semantic information fusion and generation of rationale for inferences, in ways that remain transparent to human users. Examples are provided of various alternative styles for user feedback, including NL, CNL and graphical feedback. A pilot experiment with human subjects shows that a prototype conversational agent is able to gather usable CNL information from untrained human subjects.

  2. Concentration-Dependent Antagonism and Culture Conversion in Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockwood, Neesha; Pasipanodya, Jotam G; Denti, Paolo; Sirgel, Frederick; Lesosky, Maia; Gumbo, Tawanda; Meintjes, Graeme; McIlleron, Helen; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2017-05-15

    There is scant evidence to support target drug exposures for optimal tuberculosis outcomes. We therefore assessed whether pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) parameters could predict 2-month culture conversion. One hundred patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (65% human immunodeficiency virus coinfected) were intensively sampled to determine rifampicin, isoniazid, and pyrazinamide plasma concentrations after 7-8 weeks of therapy, and PK parameters determined using nonlinear mixed-effects models. Detailed clinical data and sputum for culture were collected at baseline, 2 months, and 5-6 months. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined on baseline isolates. Multivariate logistic regression and the assumption-free multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS) were used to identify clinical and PK/PD predictors of 2-month culture conversion. Potential PK/PD predictors included 0- to 24-hour area under the curve (AUC0-24), maximum concentration (Cmax), AUC0-24/MIC, Cmax/MIC, and percentage of time that concentrations persisted above the MIC (%TMIC). Twenty-six percent of patients had Cmax of rifampicin conversion using multivariate logistic regression after adjusting for MIC. However, MARS identified negative interactions between isoniazid Cmax and rifampicin Cmax/MIC ratio on 2-month culture conversion. If isoniazid Cmax was conversion. For patients with isoniazid Cmax >4.6 mg/L, higher isoniazid exposures were associated with improved rates of culture conversion. PK/PD analyses using MARS identified isoniazid Cmax and rifampicin Cmax/MIC thresholds below which there is concentration-dependent antagonism that reduces 2-month sputum culture conversion.

  3. Poxvirus antigen staining of immune cells as a biomarker to predict disease outcome in monkeypox and cowpox virus infection in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Infection of non-human primates (NHPs such as rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with monkeypox virus (MPXV or cowpox virus (CPXV serve as models to study poxvirus pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccines and anti-orthopox therapeutics. Intravenous inoculation of macaques with high dose of MPXV (>1-2×10(7 PFU or CPXV (>10(2 PFU results in 80% to 100% mortality and 66 to 100% mortality respectively. Here we report that NHPs with positive detection of poxvirus antigens in immune cells by flow cytometric staining, especially in monocytes and granulocytes succumbed to virus infection and that early positive pox staining is a strong predictor for lethality. Samples from four independent studies were analyzed. Eighteen NHPs from three different experiments were inoculated with two different MPXV strains at lethal doses. Ten NHPs displayed positive pox-staining and all 10 NHPs reached moribund endpoint. In contrast, none of the three NHPs that survived anticipated lethal virus dose showed apparent virus staining in the monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, three NHPs that were challenged with a lethal dose of MPXV and received cidofovir treatment were pox-antigen negative and all three NHPs survived. Furthermore, data from a CPXV study also demonstrated that 6/9 NHPs were pox-antigen staining positive and all 6 NHPs reached euthanasia endpoint, while the three survivors were pox-antigen staining negative. Thus, we conclude that monitoring pox-antigen staining in immune cells can be used as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of virus infection. Future studies should focus on the mechanisms and implications of the pox-infection of immune cells and the correlation between pox-antigen detection in immune cells and disease progression in human poxviral infection.

  4. Converse Piezoelectricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springborg, Michael; Kirtman, Bernard

    2013-03-01

    Piezoelectricity results from a coupling between responses to mechanical and electric perturbations and leads to changes in the polarization due to strain or stress or, alternatively, the occurrence of strain as a function of an applied external, electrostatic field (i.e., converse piezoelectricity). Theoretical studies of those properties for extended systems require accordingly that their dipole moment or polarization can be calculated. However, whereas the definition of the operator for the dipole moment for any finite system is trivial, it is only within the last 2 decades that the expressions for the equivalent operator in the independent-particle approximation for the infinite and periodic system have been presented. Here, we demonstrate that the so called branch dependence of the polarization for the infinite, periodic system is related to physical observables in contrast to what often is assumed. This is related to the finding that converse piezoelectric properties depend both on the surfaces of the samples of interest even for samples with size well above the thermodynamic limit. However, we shall demonstrate that these properties can be calculated without explicitly taking the surfaces into account. Both the foundations and results for real system shall be presented.

  5. Mumps-specific cross-neutralization by MMR vaccine-induced antibodies predicts protection against mumps virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Sigrid; Ten Hulscher, Hinke I; Schurink-van 't Klooster, Tessa M; de Melker, Hester E; Boland, Greet J; Kaaijk, Patricia; van Els, Cécile A C M; Koopmans, Marion P G; van Binnendijk, Rob S

    2016-07-29

    Similar to other recent mumps genotype G outbreaks worldwide, most mumps patients during the recent mumps genotype G outbreaks in the Netherlands had received 2 doses of measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine during childhood. Here, we investigate the capacity of vaccine-induced antibodies to neutralize wild type mumps virus strains, including mumps virus genotype G. In this study, we tested 105 pre-outbreak serum samples from students who had received 2 MMR vaccine doses and who had no mumps virus infection (n=76), symptomatic mumps virus infection (n=10) or asymptomatic mumps virus infection (n=19) during the mumps outbreaks. In all samples, mumps-specific IgG concentrations were measured by multiplex immunoassay and neutralization titers were measured against the Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain and against wild type genotype G and genotype D mumps virus strains. The correlation between mumps-specific IgG concentrations and neutralization titers against Jeryl Lynn was poor, which suggests that IgG concentrations do not adequately represent immunological protection against mumps virus infection by antibody neutralization. Pre-outbreak neutralization titers in infected persons were significantly lower against genotype G than against the vaccine strain. Furthermore, antibody neutralization of wild type mumps virus genotype G and genotype D was significantly reduced in pre-outbreak samples from infected persons as compared with non-infected persons. No statistically significant difference was found for the vaccine strain. The sensitivity/specificity ratio was largest for neutralization of the genotype G strain as compared with the genotype D strain and the vaccine strain. The reduced neutralization of wild type mumps virus strains in MMR vaccinated persons prior to infection indicates that pre-outbreak mumps virus neutralization is partly strain-specific and that neutralization differs between infected and non-infected persons. Therefore, we recommend the use of wild

  6. The predicted effects of inlet velocity and reactor size on methane conversion and carbon yield of catalytic decomposition of methane in a fluidized-bed reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muharam, Yuswan; Hendrik

    2017-03-01

    The effects of inlet gas velocity and reactor size on methane conversion and carbon yield of methane decomposition on a Ni-Cu-Al catalyst in a fluidized-bed reactor was investigated in this research. Phenomenological modelling and simulation of the reactor were performed to achieve the objective. The axisymmetric 2D model of the reactor comprises gas- and solid-phase mass balances, energy balance and momentum balance. Axial and radial dispersion concepts in gas and solid phases are applied on the description of the non-ideal flow pattern in the reactor. Solid-phase dispersion takes into account aggregation as the result of the carbon nanotubes growth on the catalyst surface. Simulation results exhibit that when the inlet velocity escalates from 0.017 m/s to 0.030 m/s, the methane conversion rises from 77% to 90%, and the carbon nanotube yield increases from 0.68 g/g catalyst to 1.5 g/g catalyst. The methane conversion in the reactor with the diameter of 0.14 m is 49% and increases to 77% when the diameter enlarges twice with the constant aspect ratio of 2.82. The carbon nanotube yield decreases from 0.86 g/g catalyst to 0.66 g/g catalyst in 5-hour operation with the increase in the size.

  7. Total lymphocyte count as a surrogate marker to predict CD4 count in human immunodeficiency virus-infected children: a retrospective evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuming; Li, Yuqian; Wang, Chongjian; Liang, Shuying; Guo, Jinling; Li, Zizhao; Zhang, Meixi; Li, Wenjie

    2012-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted, and 576 human immunodeficiency virus-infected children with total lymphocyte count (TLC) and CD4 count were recruited from China. Spearman rank order correlation and receiver-operating characteristic were used. An overall positive correlation was noted between TLC and CD4 count (prehighly active antiretroviral therapy [pre-HAART], r = 0.789, 6 months of HAART, r = 0.642, 12 months of HAART, r = 0.691, P = 0.001). TLC ≤ 2600 cells/mm(3) predicted a CD4 count of ≤ 350 cells/mm(3) with 82.9% sensitivity, 79.6% specificity pre-HAART. Meanwhile, the optimum prediction for CD4 count of ≤ 350 cells/mm(3) was a TLC of ≤ 2400 cells/mm at 6 months (73.6% sensitivity and 74.1% specificity) and 12 months (81.7% sensitivity and 76.5% specificity) of HAART. TLC can be used as a surrogate marker for predicting CD4 count of human immunodeficiency virus-infected children before and during HAART in resource-limited countries.

  8. Predicting length of stay and conversion to open cholecystectomy for acute cholecystitis using the 2013 Tokyo Guidelines in a US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Wright, G; Stilwell, Kellen; Johnson, Jared; Hefty, Matthew T; Chung, Mathew H

    2015-11-01

    The 2013 Tokyo Guidelines (TG13) for acute cholecystitis have not been studied extensively in US populations. A retrospective review of patients with acute cholecystitis within a single system from 2009 to 2013 was performed. The diagnosis and severity of acute cholecystitis were assigned by the TG13. The primary outcome measures were length of stay and conversion to open cholecystectomy. Four hundred and forty-five patients with acute cholecystitis were studied. For all patients, length of stay (P acute cholecystitis. © 2015 Japanese Society of Hepato-Biliary-Pancreatic Surgery.

  9. Reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza virus with circulating human and avian influenza viruses: public health risk implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stincarelli, Maria; Arvia, Rosaria; De Marco, Maria Alessandra; Clausi, Valeria; Corcioli, Fabiana; Cotti, Claudia; Delogu, Mauro; Donatelli, Isabella; Azzi, Alberta; Giannecchini, Simone

    2013-08-01

    Exploring the reassortment ability of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 (A/H1N1pdm09) influenza virus with other circulating human or avian influenza viruses is the main concern related to the generation of more virulent or new variants having implications for public health. After different coinfection experiments in human A549 cells, by using the A/H1N1pdm09 virus plus one of human seasonal influenza viruses of H1N1 and H3N2 subtype or one of H11, H10, H9, H7 and H1 avian influenza viruses, several reassortant viruses were obtained. Among these, the HA of H1N1 was the main segment of human seasonal influenza virus reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Conversely, HA and each of the three polymerase segments, alone or in combination, of the avian influenza viruses mainly reassorted in the A/H1N1pdm09 virus backbone. Of note, A/H1N1pdm09 viruses that reassorted with HA of H1N1 seasonal human or H11N6 avian viruses or carried different combination of avian origin polymerase segments, exerted a higher replication effectiveness than that of the parental viruses. These results confirm that reassortment of the A/H1N1pdm09 with circulating low pathogenic avian influenza viruses should not be misjudged in the prediction of the next pandemic. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. FLIRT-ing with Zika: A Web Application to Predict the Movement of Infected Travelers Validated Against the Current Zika Virus Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, Andrew; Allen, Toph; Whiting, Karissa; Breit, Nathan; Arnold, Brock

    2016-06-10

     Beginning in 2015, Zika virus rapidly spread throughout the Americas and has been linked to neurological and autoimmune diseases in adults and babies. Developing accurate tools to anticipate Zika spread is one of the first steps to mitigate further spread of the disease. When combined, air traffic data and network simulations can be used to create tools to predict where infectious disease may spread to and aid in the prevention of infectious diseases. Specific goals were to: 1) predict where travelers infected with the Zika Virus would arrive in the U.S.; and, 2) analyze and validate the open access web application's (i.e., FLIRT) predictions using data collected after the prediction was made. FLIRT was built to predict the flow and likely destinations of infected travelers through the air travel network. FLIRT uses a database of flight schedules from over 800 airlines, and can display direct flight traffic and perform passenger simulations between selected airports. FLIRT was used to analyze flights departing from five selected airports in locations where sustained Zika Virus transmission was occurring. FLIRT's predictions were validated against Zika cases arriving in the U.S. from selected airports during the selected time periods.  Kendall's τ and Generalized Linear Models were computed for all permutations of FLIRT and case data to test the accuracy of FLIRT's predictions. FLIRT was found to be predictive of the final destinations of infected travelers in the U.S. from areas with ongoing transmission of Zika in the Americas from 01 February 2016 - 01 to April 2016, and 11 January 2016 to 11 March 2016 time periods. MIA-FLL, JFK-EWR-LGA, and IAH were top ranked at-risk metro areas, and Florida, Texas and New York were top ranked states at-risk for the future time period analyzed (11 March 2016 - 11 June 2016). For the 11 January 2016 to 11 March 2016 time period, the region-aggregated model indicated 7.24 (95% CI 6.85 - 7.62) imported Zika cases per 100

  11. Infection of nonhost species dendritic cells in vitro with an attenuated myxoma virus induces gene expression that predicts its efficacy as a vaccine vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S; Foulon, E; Pignolet, B; Deplanche, M; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; Bertagnoli, S; Meyer, G; Foucras, G

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant myxoma virus (MYXV) can be produced without a loss of infectivity, and its highly specific host range makes it an ideal vaccine vector candidate, although careful examination of its interaction with the immune system is necessary. Similar to rabbit bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), ovine dendritic cells can be infected by SG33, a MYXV vaccine strain, and support recombinant antigen expression. The frequency of infected cells in the nonhost was lower and the virus cycle was abortive in these cell types. Among BM-DC subpopulations, Langerhans cell-like DCs were preferentially infected at low multiplicities of infection. Interestingly, ovine BM-DCs remained susceptible to MYXV after maturation, although apoptosis occurred shortly after infection as a function of the virus titer. When gene expression was assessed in infected BM-DC cultures, type I interferon (IFN)-related and inflammatory genes were strongly upregulated. DC gene expression profiles were compared with the profiles produced by other poxviruses in interaction with DCs, but very few commonalities were found, although genes that were previously shown to predict vaccine efficacy were present. Collectively, these data support the idea that MYXV permits efficient priming of adaptive immune responses and should be considered a promising vaccine vector along with other poxviruses.

  12. Infection of Nonhost Species Dendritic Cells In Vitro with an Attenuated Myxoma Virus Induces Gene Expression That Predicts Its Efficacy as a Vaccine Vector ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S.; Foulon, E.; Pignolet, B.; Deplanche, M.; Caubet, C.; Tasca, C.; Bertagnoli, S.; Meyer, G.; Foucras, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant myxoma virus (MYXV) can be produced without a loss of infectivity, and its highly specific host range makes it an ideal vaccine vector candidate, although careful examination of its interaction with the immune system is necessary. Similar to rabbit bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), ovine dendritic cells can be infected by SG33, a MYXV vaccine strain, and support recombinant antigen expression. The frequency of infected cells in the nonhost was lower and the virus cycle was abortive in these cell types. Among BM-DC subpopulations, Langerhans cell-like DCs were preferentially infected at low multiplicities of infection. Interestingly, ovine BM-DCs remained susceptible to MYXV after maturation, although apoptosis occurred shortly after infection as a function of the virus titer. When gene expression was assessed in infected BM-DC cultures, type I interferon (IFN)-related and inflammatory genes were strongly upregulated. DC gene expression profiles were compared with the profiles produced by other poxviruses in interaction with DCs, but very few commonalities were found, although genes that were previously shown to predict vaccine efficacy were present. Collectively, these data support the idea that MYXV permits efficient priming of adaptive immune responses and should be considered a promising vaccine vector along with other poxviruses. PMID:21835800

  13. Altered specificity of single-chain antibody fragments bound to pandemic H1N1-2009 influenza virus after conversion of the phage-bound to the soluble form

    OpenAIRE

    Kaku, Yoshihiro; Noguchi, Akira; Okutani, Akiko; Inoue, Satoshi; Tanabayashi, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Yoshie; Hotta, Akitoyo; Suzuki, Michio; Sugiura, Naoko; Yamada, Akio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In 2009, a novel influenza A/H1N1 virus (H1N1pdm) quickly spread worldwide and co-circulated with then-existing seasonal H1N1 virus (sH1N1). Distinguishing between these 2 viruses was necessary to better characterize the epidemiological properties of the emergent virus, including transmission patterns, pathogenesis, and anti-influenza drug resistance. This situation prompted us to develop a point-of-care virus differentiation system before entering the 2009–2010 influenza ...

  14. A novel computer algorithm improves antibody epitope prediction using affinity-selected mimotopes: a case study using monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus E protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denisova, Galina F; Denisov, Dimitri A; Yeung, Jeffrey; Loeb, Mark B; Diamond, Michael S; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2008-11-01

    Understanding antibody function is often enhanced by knowledge of the specific binding epitope. Here, we describe a computer algorithm that permits epitope prediction based on a collection of random peptide epitopes (mimotopes) isolated by antibody affinity purification. We applied this methodology to the prediction of epitopes for five monoclonal antibodies against the West Nile virus (WNV) E protein, two of which exhibit therapeutic activity in vivo. This strategy was validated by comparison of our results with existing F(ab)-E protein crystal structures and mutational analysis by yeast surface display. We demonstrate that by combining the results of the mimotope method with our data from mutational analysis, epitopes could be predicted with greater certainty. The two methods displayed great complementarity as the mutational analysis facilitated epitope prediction when the results with the mimotope method were equivocal and the mimotope method revealed a broader number of residues within the epitope than the mutational analysis. Our results demonstrate that the combination of these two prediction strategies provides a robust platform for epitope characterization.

  15. Ebinformatics: Ebola fuzzy informatics systems on the diagnosis, prediction and recommendation of appropriate treatments for Ebola virus disease (EVD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olugbenga Oluwagbemi

    Full Text Available Ebola Virus Disease (EVD also known as the Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a very deadly infectious disease to humankind. Therefore, a safer and complementary method of diagnosis is to employ the use of an expert system in order to initiate a platform for pre-clinical treatments, thus acting as a precursor to comprehensive medical diagnosis and treatments. This work presents a design and implementation of informatics software and a knowledge-based expert system for the diagnosis, and provision of recommendations on the appropriate type of recommended treatment to the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD.In this research an Ebola fuzzy informatics system was developed for the purpose of diagnosing and providing useful recommendations to the management of the EVD in West Africa and other affected regions of the world. It also acts as a supplementary resource in providing medical advice to individuals in Ebola – ravaged countries. This aim was achieved through the following objectives: (i gathering of facts through the conduct of a comprehensive continental survey to determine the knowledge and perception level of the public about factors responsible for the transmission of the Ebola Virus Disease (ii develop an informatics software based on information collated from health institutions on basic diagnosis of the Ebola Virus Disease-related symptoms (iii adopting and marrying the knowledge of fuzzy logic and expert systems in developing the informatics software. Necessary requirements were collated from the review of existing expert systems, consultation of journals and articles, and internet sources. Online survey was conducted to determine the level at which individuals are aware of the factors responsible for the transmission of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD. The expert system developed, was designed to use fuzzy logic as its inference mechanism along with a set of rules. A knowledge base was created to help provide diagnosis on the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD

  16. Pretransplant serum hepatitis C virus RNA levels predict response to antiviral treatment after living donor liver transplantation.

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshihide Ueda; Toshimi Kaido; Yasuhiro Ogura; Kohei Ogawa; Atsushi Yoshizawa; Koichiro Hata; Yasuhiro Fujimoto; Aya Miyagawa-Hayashino; Hironori Haga; Hiroyuki Marusawa; Satoshi Teramukai; Shinji Uemoto; Tsutomu Chiba

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given the limited efficacy and high adverse event rate associated with treatment of recurrent hepatitis C after liver transplantation, an individualized treatment strategy should be considered. The aim of this study was to identify predictors of response to antiviral therapy for hepatitis C after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) and to study the associated adverse events. METHODS: A retrospective chart review was performed on 125 hepatitis C virus (HCV)-positive LDLT reci...

  17. Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Sornette, Didier

    2010-01-01

    This chapter first presents a rather personal view of some different aspects of predictability, going in crescendo from simple linear systems to high-dimensional nonlinear systems with stochastic forcing, which exhibit emergent properties such as phase transitions and regime shifts. Then, a detailed correspondence between the phenomenology of earthquakes, financial crashes and epileptic seizures is offered. The presented statistical evidence provides the substance of a general phase diagram for understanding the many facets of the spatio-temporal organization of these systems. A key insight is to organize the evidence and mechanisms in terms of two summarizing measures: (i) amplitude of disorder or heterogeneity in the system and (ii) level of coupling or interaction strength among the system's components. On the basis of the recently identified remarkable correspondence between earthquakes and seizures, we present detailed information on a class of stochastic point processes that has been found to be particu...

  18. Ebola Virus and Marburg Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebola virus and Marburg virus Overview Ebola virus and Marburg virus are related viruses that cause hemorrhagic fevers — illnesses marked by severe bleeding (hemorrhage), organ failure and, in many ...

  19. Baseline Hepatitis B Virus DNA Level is a Promising Factor for Predicting the 3 (rd) Month Virological Response to Entecavir Therapy: A Study of Strict Defined Hepatitis B virus Induced Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yang; Wu, Xiao-Ning; Shi, Yi-Wen; Wei, Wei; Yang, Ai-Ting; Sun, Ya-Meng; Zhao, Wen-Shan; You, Hong

    2015-07-20

    Cirrhosis is a common complication of chronic hepatitis B. It remains unclear if viral and biochemical parameters at baseline affect virological response to entecavir and therefore warrant investigation. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of entecavir therapy by monitoring virological response at the end of the 3 rd month of treatment and try to figure out whether baseline factors could help predict it in a cohort of hepatitis B virus (HBV) compensated cirrhosis patients and to determine the cut-off value of a predicting parameter. A total of 91 nucleos(t)ide-naïve patients with HBV induced cirrhosis (compensatory stage) were enrolled in a prospective cohort. HBV DNA and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were tested at baseline and monitored every 3-6 months after starting therapy. Of all 91 patients, the median follow-up time was 12 (9-24) months. Overall, 64 patients (70.3%) achieved virological response in the 3 rd month. Univariate analysis showed that the 3 rd month virological response can be predicted by baseline HBV DNA levels (P rd month (P = 0.001). Area under receiver operating characteristic curve for determining the 3 rd month virological response by baseline HBV DNA was 77.6% (95% CI: 66.7-85.2%), with a best cut-off value of 5.8 log 10 . Baseline HBV DNA, HBeAg negativity, and ALT were independent factors contributing to virological response at the 3 rd month. Further, multiple regression showed that HBV DNA level was the only parameter predicting full virological response as early as the 3 rd month, in this cirrhosis cohort.

  20. Performance on the RI-48 Cued Recall Test Best Predicts Conversion to Dementia at the 5- and 10-Year Follow-Ups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanseeuw, Bernard; Ivanoiu, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    TheRI-48 cued recall test was devised to discriminate between healthy elderly and patients with mild cognitive impairment who are at risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, no long-term follow-up studies have been conducted using this test. We analyzed the predictive power of the RI-48 test for determining the patients who will convert to AD dementia within the decade after testing. During 10 years, we followed up 40 non-demented patients who attended our Memory Clinic and underwent complete neuropsychological evaluation including the RI-48. Of the 40 patients, 21 developed dementia (converters, CO) and 19 remained stable patients (SP). Of the tests performed at inclusion, only the RI-48 (p RI-48 had the best overall diagnostic accuracy at 5- and at 10-year follow-ups.

  1. Serious Illness Conversations in ESRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Ernest I; Bernacki, Rachelle E; Block, Susan D

    2017-05-08

    Dialysis-dependent ESRD is a serious illness with high disease burden, morbidity, and mortality. Mortality in the first year on dialysis for individuals over age 75 years old approaches 40%, and even those with better prognoses face multiple hospitalizations and declining functional status. In the last month of life, patients on dialysis over age 65 years old experience higher rates of hospitalization, intensive care unit admission, procedures, and death in hospital than patients with cancer or heart failure, while using hospice services less. This high intensity of care is often inconsistent with the wishes of patients on dialysis but persists due to failure to explore or discuss patient goals, values, and preferences in the context of their serious illness. Fewer than 10% of patients on dialysis report having had a conversation about goals, values, and preferences with their nephrologist, although nearly 90% report wanting this conversation. Many nephrologists shy away from these conversations, because they do not wish to upset their patients, feel that there is too much uncertainty in their ability to predict prognosis, are insecure in their skills at broaching the topic, or have difficulty incorporating the conversations into their clinical workflow. In multiple studies, timely discussions about serious illness care goals, however, have been associated with enhanced goal-consistent care, improved quality of life, and positive family outcomes without an increase in patient distress or anxiety. In this special feature article, we will ( 1 ) identify the barriers to serious illness conversations in the dialysis population, ( 2 ) review best practices in and specific approaches to conducting serious illness conversations, and ( 3 ) offer solutions to overcome barriers as well as practical advice, including specific language and tools, to implement serious illness conversations in the dialysis population. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  2. A Prospective Study on the Predictive Value of Plasma BK Virus-DNA Load for Hemorrhagic Cystitis in Pediatric Patients After Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesaro, Simone; Tridello, Gloria; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Abate, Davide; Tumino, Manuela; Carucci, Nicolina; Varotto, Stefania; Cannata, Elisa; Pegoraro, Anna; Barzon, Luisa; Palù, Giorgio; Messina, Chiara

    2015-06-01

    In hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), late hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) has been associated with BK virus (BKV) infection. We assessed the value of plasma BKV load in predicting HC. Plasma and urine BKV-DNA load were assessed prospectively in 107 pediatric patients. Twenty patients developed grade II and III HC, with 100-day cumulative incidence of 18.8%. At diagnosis of HC, the median load of BKV DNA was 2.3 × 10(3) copies/mL. A plasma BKV-DNA load of 10(3) copies/mL had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 86% with a negative predictive value (NPV) of 100% and a positive predictive value (PPV) of 39% for HC. A urine BKV-DNA load of >10(7) copies/mL had a sensitivity of 86% and a specificity of 60% with a NPV of 98% and a PPV of 14% for HC. A BKV load of 10(3) copies/mL on plasma was significantly associated with HC in multivariate analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 6.1; P = .0006). Patients with HC had a significantly higher risk of mortality than patients who did not have HC (HR, 2.6; P = .018). The above values were used to monitor plasma BKV-DNA load, and they provided a better prediction of patients at risk of HC than urine BKV-DNA load. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Evaluation of Ground-Motion Modeling Techniques for Use in Global ShakeMap - A Critique of Instrumental Ground-Motion Prediction Equations, Peak Ground Motion to Macroseismic Intensity Conversions, and Macroseismic Intensity Predictions in Different Tectonic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Trevor I.; Wald, David J.

    2009-01-01

    Regional differences in ground-motion attenuation have long been thought to add uncertainty in the prediction of ground motion. However, a growing body of evidence suggests that regional differences in ground-motion attenuation may not be as significant as previously thought and that the key differences between regions may be a consequence of limitations in ground-motion datasets over incomplete magnitude and distance ranges. Undoubtedly, regional differences in attenuation can exist owing to differences in crustal structure and tectonic setting, and these can contribute to differences in ground-motion attenuation at larger source-receiver distances. Herein, we examine the use of a variety of techniques for the prediction of several ground-motion metrics (peak ground acceleration and velocity, response spectral ordinates, and macroseismic intensity) and compare them against a global dataset of instrumental ground-motion recordings and intensity assignments. The primary goal of this study is to determine whether existing ground-motion prediction techniques are applicable for use in the U.S. Geological Survey's Global ShakeMap and Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER). We seek the most appropriate ground-motion predictive technique, or techniques, for each of the tectonic regimes considered: shallow active crust, subduction zone, and stable continental region.

  4. Utility of Electronic Medical record-based Fibrosis Scores in Predicting Advanced Cirrhosis in Patients with Hepatitic C Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammad Qasim; Anand, Vijay; Hessefort, Norbert; Hassan, Ammar; Ahsan, Alya; Sonnenberg, Amnon; Fimmel, Claus J

    2017-03-01

    To determine whether advanced cirrhosis - defined by the detection of nodular liver contours or portal venous collaterals on imaging studies - could be predicted by fibrosis algorithms, calculated using laboratory and demographic features extracted from patients' electronic medical records. To this end, we compared seven EMR-based fibrosis scores with liver imaging studies in a cohort of HCV patients. A search of our health system's patient data warehouse identified 867 patients with chronic HCV infection. A total of 565 patients had undergone at least one liver imaging study and had no confounding medical condition affecting the imaging features or fibrosis scores. Demographic and laboratory data were used to calculate APRI, Fib4, Fibrosis Index, Forns, GUCI, Lok Index and Vira-HepC scores for all viremic patients who had undergone liver imaging. Data points selected for the calculation of these scores were based on laboratory results obtained within the shortest possible time from the imaging study. Areas under the receiver operating curves (AUROC), optimum cut-offs, sensitivities, specificities and positive and negative predictive values were calculated for each score. Seven algorithms were performed similarly in predicting cirrhosis. Sensitivities ranged from 0.65 to 1.00, specificities from 0.67 to 0.90, positive predictive values from 0.33 to 0.38, and negative predictive values from 0.93 to 1.00. No individual test was superior, as the confidence intervals of all AUROCs overlapped. EMR-based scoring systems performed relatively well in ruling out advanced, radiologically-defined cirrhosis. However, their moderate sensitivity and positive predictive values limit their reliability for EMR-based diagnosis.

  5. Predicting and Evaluating the Epidemic Trend of Ebola Virus Disease in the 2014-2015 Outbreak and the Effects of Intervention Measures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuiyuan Guo

    Full Text Available We constructed dynamic Ebola virus disease (EVD transmission models to predict epidemic trends and evaluate intervention measure efficacy following the 2014 EVD epidemic in West Africa. We estimated the effective vaccination rate for the population, with basic reproduction number (R0 as the intermediate variable. Periodic EVD fluctuation was analyzed by solving a Jacobian matrix of differential equations based on a SIR (susceptible, infective, and removed model. A comprehensive compartment model was constructed to fit and predict EVD transmission patterns, and to evaluate the effects of control and prevention measures. Effective EVD vaccination rates were estimated to be 42% (31-50%, 45% (42-48%, and 51% (44-56% among susceptible individuals in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, respectively. In the absence of control measures, there would be rapid mortality in these three countries, and an EVD epidemic would be likely recur in 2035, and then again 8~9 years later. Oscillation intervals would shorten and outbreak severity would decrease until the periodicity reached ~5.3 years. Measures that reduced the spread of EVD included: early diagnosis, treatment in isolation, isolating/monitoring close contacts, timely corpse removal, post-recovery condom use, and preventing or quarantining imported cases. EVD may re-emerge within two decades without control and prevention measures. Mass vaccination campaigns and control and prevention measures should be instituted to prevent future EVD epidemics.

  6. Special issue: Plasma Conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nozaki, T.; Bogaerts, A.; Tu, X.; van de Sanden, M. C. M.

    2017-01-01

    With growing concern of energy and environmental issues, the combination of plasma and heterogeneous catalysts receives special attention in greenhouse gas conversion, nitrogen fixation and hydrocarbon chemistry. Plasma gas conversion driven by renewable electricity is particularly important for the

  7. Identifying protein biomarkers in predicting disease severity of dengue virus infection using immune-related protein microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soe, Hui Jen; Yong, Yean K; Al-Obaidi, Mazen M Jamil; Raju, Chandramathi Samudi; Gudimella, Ranganath; Manikam, Rishya; Sekaran, Shamala Devi

    2018-02-01

    Dengue virus is one of the most widespread flaviviruses that re-emerged throughout recent decades. The progression from mild dengue to severe dengue (SD) with the complications such as vascular leakage and hemorrhage increases the fatality rate of dengue. The pathophysiology of SD is not entirely clear. To investigate potential biomarkers that are suggestive of pathogenesis of SD, a small panel of serum samples selected from 1 healthy individual, 2 dengue patients without warning signs (DWS-), 2 dengue patients with warning signs (DWS+), and 5 patients with SD were subjected to a pilot analysis using Sengenics Immunome protein array. The overall fold changes of protein expressions and clustering heat map revealed that PFKFB4, TPM1, PDCL3, and PTPN20A were elevated among patients with SD. Differential expression analysis identified that 29 proteins were differentially elevated greater than 2-fold in SD groups than DWS- and DWS+. From the 29 candidate proteins, pathways enrichment analysis also identified insulin signaling and cytoskeleton pathways were involved in SD, suggesting that the insulin pathway may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of SD.

  8. Alanine transaminase levels in the year before pregnancy predict the risk of hepatitis C virus vertical transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indolfi, Giuseppe; Azzari, Chiara; Moriondo, Maria; Lippi, Francesca; de Martino, Maurizio; Resti, Massimo

    2006-07-01

    Vertical transmission is the most common route of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in children. Transmission risk factors have been described, but most risk factors can only be evaluated using expensive laboratory exams. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether maternal alanine transaminase (ALT) levels before pregnancy correlate with HCV vertical transmission. Seventy-four transmitting and 403 nontransmitting mothers were evaluated. All mothers enrolled had two ALT determinations in the last year before pregnancy, at least 6 months apart. Mothers were divided into two groups: mothers with persistently normal serum ALT levels and mothers with abnormal ALT levels. In the second group both mothers with constantly raised or with fluctuating ALT levels (one normal and one raised determination) were included. ALT was defined as raised if higher than twice the upper limit of normal. Abnormal ALT levels were found in 39/74 (52.7%) HCV transmitting mothers and in 146/403 (32.6%) nontransmitting mothers (P = 0.008; relative risk 1.96; 95% confidence limits 1.19-3.23). The risk of transmission from mothers with constantly raised ALT levels was more evident than that from mothers with fluctuating ALT levels. Increased ALT levels may reflect a more severe liver disease and a higher viral load, factors known to be associated with vertical transmission. ALT determination, a simple, widely available and inexpensive test, may help in identifying mothers with an increased risk of HCV vertical transmission. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Direct Conversion of Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corliss, William R.

    This publication is one of a series of information booklets for the general public published by the United States Atomic Energy Commission. Direct energy conversion involves energy transformation without moving parts. The concepts of direct and dynamic energy conversion plus the laws governing energy conversion are investigated. Among the topics…

  10. Preoperative lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio predicts survival in primary hepatitis B-virus positive hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li G

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Guang-Jun Li,1 Juan-Juan Ji,2 Fang Yang,2 Hong-Wei Xu,1 Yu Bai3 1First Department of General Surgery, 2Department of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Pathology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Xin-Xiang Medical University, Henan, People’s Republic of China Background: Both inflammation and immunity are associated with the development of malignancy. The lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio (LMR has been confirmed as a prognostic factor for several malignant diseases. The purpose of our study was to analyze prognostic significance of preoperative LMR in hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection. Patients and methods: A total of 253 patients with primary HBV-positive hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent a curative operation were enrolled in this retrospective study. The relationship between preoperative LMR and survival outcomes was analyzed through Kaplan–Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses. Results: Patients with a high LMR had a significantly higher mean overall survival than those with a low LMR (67 months vs 55 months, P=0.023, and high LMR remained significant for longer survival in the multivariate analysis (hazard ratio, 0.147; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.085–0.253; P=0.021. Furthermore, patients with a high LMR also had a higher median recurrence-free survival than those with a low LMR in univariate analyses (60 months vs 48 months, P=0.026 and multivariate analyses (hazard ratio, 0.317; 95% CI: 0.042–1.023; P=0.032. However, the survival benefit was limited to patients with advanced cancer. Conclusion: LMR was confirmed as an independent prognostic biomarker for primary HBV-positive hepatocellular carcinoma after curative resection. Keywords: lymphocyte-to-monocyte ratio, survival, HBV, hepatocellular carcinoma

  11. Elements of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Elements of Energy Conversion brings together scattered information on the subject of energy conversion and presents it in terms of the fundamental thermodynamics that apply to energy conversion by any process. Emphasis is given to the development of the theory of heat engines because these are and will remain most important power sources. Descriptive material is then presented to provide elementary information on all important energy conversion devices. The book contains 10 chapters and opens with a discussion of forms of energy, energy sources and storage, and energy conversion. This is foll

  12. Computational Prediction of the Heterodimeric and Higher-Order Structure of gpE1/gpE2 Envelope Glycoproteins Encoded by Hepatitis C Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, Holly; Logan, Michael R; Hockman, Darren; Koehler Leman, Julia; Law, John Lok Man; Houghton, Michael

    2017-04-15

    Despite the recent success of newly developed direct-acting antivirals against hepatitis C, the disease continues to be a global health threat due to the lack of diagnosis of most carriers and the high cost of treatment. The heterodimer formed by glycoproteins E1 and E2 within the hepatitis C virus (HCV) lipid envelope is a potential vaccine candidate and antiviral target. While the structure of E1/E2 has not yet been resolved, partial crystal structures of the E1 and E2 ectodomains have been determined. The unresolved parts of the structure are within the realm of what can be modeled with current computational modeling tools. Furthermore, a variety of additional experimental data is available to support computational predictions of E1/E2 structure, such as data from antibody binding studies, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), mutational analyses, peptide binding analysis, linker-scanning mutagenesis, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies. In accordance with these rich experimental data, we have built an in silico model of the full-length E1/E2 heterodimer. Our model supports that E1/E2 assembles into a trimer, which was previously suggested from a study by Falson and coworkers (P. Falson, B. Bartosch, K. Alsaleh, B. A. Tews, A. Loquet, Y. Ciczora, L. Riva, C. Montigny, C. Montpellier, G. Duverlie, E. I. Pecheur, M. le Maire, F. L. Cosset, J. Dubuisson, and F. Penin, J. Virol. 89:10333-10346, 2015, https://doi.org/10.1128/JVI.00991-15). Size exclusion chromatography and Western blotting data obtained by using purified recombinant E1/E2 support our hypothesis. Our model suggests that during virus assembly, the trimer of E1/E2 may be further assembled into a pentamer, with 12 pentamers comprising a single HCV virion. We anticipate that this new model will provide a useful framework for HCV envelope structure and the development of antiviral strategies. IMPORTANCE One hundred fifty million people have been estimated to be infected with hepatitis C virus, and

  13. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basta, T.; Garrett, Roger Antony; Prangishvili,, David

    2009-01-01

    Double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) viruses that infect members of the third domain of life, the Archaea, are diverse and exceptional in both their morphotypes and their genomic properties. The majority of characterized species infect hyperthermophilic hosts and carry morphological features...... which have not been observed for viruses from the other domains of life, the Bacteria and the Eukarya. This exceptional status of the archaeal viruses is reinforced by the finding that a large majority of their predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public sequence databases, and their functions...... remain unknown. One of the viruses, the bicaudavirus ATV (Acidianus two-tailed virus), is quite unique in that it undergoes a major morphological change, growing long tail structures, extracellularly. A small minority of archaeal viruses, which exclusively infect mesophilic or moderately thermophilic...

  14. Predicting Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination and Pap Smear Screening Intentions Among Young Singaporean Women Using the Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evangeline I. Chirayil

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We used the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB to analyze the role of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control as predictors of intentions to obtain Human Papillomavirus (HPV vaccinations or a Papanicolaou (Pap smear in a sample of young Singaporean women. A further aim was to evaluate knowledge of cervical cancer and preventive measures as a possible additional predictor of intentions. A purpose-designed TPB and knowledge questionnaire was completed by 206 women aged 18 to 26 years living in Singapore. Descriptive analyses and structural equation modeling revealed subjective norm as the best predictor, while perceived behavioral control had moderate predictive power. Attitude and knowledge were not significant predictors of intentions. The findings suggest the importance of focusing on subjective norms, rather than factual knowledge, in educational and awareness campaigns that encourage HPV vaccination and Pap smear screening in Singapore.

  15. Sexy gene conversions: locating gene conversions on the X-chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Mark J; Zhang, Liqing

    2009-08-01

    Gene conversion can have a profound impact on both the short- and long-term evolution of genes and genomes. Here, we examined the gene families that are located on the X-chromosomes of human (Homo sapiens), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), mouse (Mus musculus) and rat (Rattus norvegicus) for evidence of gene conversion. We identified seven gene families (WD repeat protein family, Ferritin Heavy Chain family, RAS-related Protein RAB-40 family, Diphosphoinositol polyphosphate phosphohydrolase family, Transcription Elongation Factor A family, LDOC1-related family, Zinc Finger Protein ZIC, and GLI family) that show evidence of gene conversion. Through phylogenetic analyses and synteny evidence, we show that gene conversion has played an important role in the evolution of these gene families and that gene conversion has occurred independently in both primates and rodents. Comparing the results with those of two gene conversion prediction programs (GENECONV and Partimatrix), we found that both GENECONV and Partimatrix have very high false negative rates (i.e. failed to predict gene conversions), which leads to many undetected gene conversions. The combination of phylogenetic analyses with physical synteny evidence exhibits high resolution in the detection of gene conversions.

  16. Accuracy of a point-of-care ELISA test kit for predicting the presence of protective canine parvovirus and canine distemper virus antibody concentrations in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litster, A L; Pressler, B; Volpe, A; Dubovi, E

    2012-08-01

    Canine parvovirus (CPV) and canine distemper virus (CDV) are highly infectious and often fatal diseases with worldwide distributions, and are important population management considerations in animal shelters. A point-of-care ELISA test kit is available to detect serum antibodies to CPV and CDV, and presumptively to predict protective status. The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic accuracy of the test compared to CPV hemagglutination inhibition titers and CDV serum neutralization titers determined by a reference laboratory, using sera collected from dogs housed at animal shelters. The ELISA test was used under both field and laboratory conditions and duplicate specimens were processed using an extra wash step. The test kit yielded accurate results (CPV: sensitivity 92.3%, specificity 93.5%; CDV: sensitivity 75.7%, specificity 91.8%) under field conditions. CDV sensitivity was improved by performing the test under laboratory conditions and using an optical density (OD) meter (laboratory performed 94.0%; OD 88.1%). Point-of-care ELISA testing for serum CPV and CDV antibody titers was demonstrated to be a useful tool for determining antibody status when making decisions regarding the need for CPV and/or CDV vaccination and also in animal shelters for population management. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Artificial neural network for prediction of antigenic activity for a major conformational epitope in the hepatitis C virus NS3 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, James; Wohlhueter, Robert M; Dimitrova, Zoya; Khudyakov, Yury E

    2008-09-01

    Insufficient knowledge of general principles for accurate quantitative inference of biological properties from sequences is a major obstacle in the rationale design of proteins with predetermined activities. Due to this deficiency, protein engineering frequently relies on the use of computational approaches focused on the identification of quantitative structure-activity relationship (SAR) for each specific task. In the current article, a computational model was developed to define SAR for a major conformational antigenic epitope of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) non-structural protein 3 (NS3) in order to facilitate a rationale design of HCV antigens with improved diagnostically relevant properties. We present an artificial neural network (ANN) model that connects changes in the antigenic properties and structure of HCV NS3 recombinant proteins representing all 6 HCV genotypes. The ANN performed quantitative predictions of the enzyme immunoassay (EIA) Signal/Cutoff (S/Co) profiles from sequence information alone with 89.8% accuracy. Amino acid positions and physicochemical factors strongly associated with the HCV NS3 antigenic properties were identified. The positions most significantly contributing to the model were mapped on the NS3 3D structure. The location of these positions validates the major associations found by the ANN model between antigenicity and structure of the HCV NS3 proteins. Matlab code is available at the following URL address: http://bio-ai.myeweb.net/box_widget.html

  18. Investigation of rabies virus glycoprotein carboxyl terminus as an in vitro predictive tool of neurovirulence. A 3R approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Wonhyo; Prehaud, Christophe; Khan, Zakir; Sabeta, Claude; Lafon, Monique

    In the field of live viral vaccines production, there is an unmet need for in vitro tests complying a 3R approach (Refine, Replace and Reduce the use of animal experimentation) to replace the post-licensing safety tests currently assayed in animals. Here, we performed a pilot study evaluating whether virulence of rabies virus, RABV, can be forecast by an in vitro test of neurite outgrowth. The rationale to use neurite outgrowth as a read-out for this test is based on the salient property of the cytoplasmic domain of the G-protein (Cyto-G) of virulent RABV strains - not of attenuated RABV strains - to stimulate neurite outgrowth in vitro. We observed that neurite elongation triggered by the Cyto-Gs encoded by different RABV field isolates correlate with the distinct virulence scores obtained in a mouse model of experimental rabies. Our results cast the idea that it could be feasible to predict RABV virulence by testing the in vitro property of a RABV strain to promote neurite outgrowth without the use of animal experimentation. Copyright © 2017 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Predicted Peptides from Non-Structural Proteins of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Are Able to Induce IFN-γ and IL-10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enric Mateu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available This work describes peptides from non-structural proteins (nsp of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV predicted as potential T cell epitopes by bioinfornatics and tested for their ability to induce IFN-γ and IL-10 responses. Pigs immunized with either genotype 1 or genotype 2 PRRSV attenuated vaccines (n=5/group and unvaccinated pigs (n = 4 were used to test the peptides. Swine leukocyte antigen haplotype of each pig was also determined. Pigs were initially screened for IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT and three peptides were identified; two of them in non-conserved segments of nsp2 and nsp5 and the other in a conserved region of nsp5 peptide. Then, peptides were screened for IL-10 inducing properties. Six peptides were found to induce IL-10 release in PBMC and some of them were also able to inhibit IFN-γ responses on PHA-stimulated cells. Interestingly, the IFN-γ low responder pigs against PRRSV were mostly homozygous for their SLA haplotypes. In conclusion, these results indicate that nsp of PRRSV contain T-cell epitopes inducing IFN-γ responses as well as IL-10 inducing segments with inhibitory capabilities.

  20. Computers and conversation

    CERN Document Server

    Luff, Paul; Gilbert, Nigel G

    1986-01-01

    In the past few years a branch of sociology, conversation analysis, has begun to have a significant impact on the design of human*b1computer interaction (HCI). The investigation of human*b1human dialogue has emerged as a fruitful foundation for interactive system design.****This book includes eleven original chapters by leading researchers who are applying conversation analysis to HCI. The fundamentals of conversation analysis are outlined, a number of systems are described, and a critical view of their value for HCI is offered.****Computers and Conversation will be of interest to all concerne

  1. Epstein-Barr virus and Interleukin-28B polymorphism in the prediction of response to interferon therapy in hepatitis C patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zekri, Abdel-Rahman N; Abdullah, Dina; Osman, Ahmed; El-Rouby, Mahmoud N; Zayed, Naglaa; Esmat, Gamal; Elakel, Wafaa; Hafez, Hanan Abdel

    2015-01-01

    In chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV), viral and host factors are known to be predictors for anti-viral therapy. IL-28B genotype strongly influences treatment outcome, while Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) co-infection could accelerate the course of chronic HCV infection. This study was conducted to assess whether EBV co-infection adds to the predictive value of IL-28B. A total of 105 patients with chronic HCV were classified according to their response to treatment into two groups: 38 sustained virological responders (SVRs) and 67 nonresponders (NRs). Collected sera at baseline and follow-up (FUP) were used for assessing EBV antibodies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the expression of EBV genes (BNLF-1, BZLF-1, and EBER-2) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Collected peripheral blood was used for detecting IL-28B rs.12979860 single-nucleotide polymorphism. Regarding IL-28B genotype frequencies, a significant difference (p=0.003) was observed between SVRs (C/C=51.4%, C/T=48.6%, T/T=0%) and NRs (C/C=25%, C/T=55%, T/T=20%). On assessing EBV infection at baseline and FUP, it was found that 61% and 55% were positive, respectively, with no significant difference between SVRs and NRs. As for anti-viral capsid antigen (VCA) antibodies, the NRs had significantly higher baseline anti-VCA immunoglobulin M (IgM) levels than SVRs (p=0.01). While FUP anti-Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA-1) IgG reported a significant decline within SVR patients (p=0.02), neither baseline nor FUP anti-VCA IgG levels showed a statistically significant viral response. Finally, on comparing EBV markers with CC versus CT and TT genotypes, it was found that FUP anti-VCA IgG levels were significantly increased in CC genotype (p=0.003). Interleukin-28B polymorphism could be a possible predictor of response to pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy (PEG-IFN/RBV). Furthermore, co-infection with EBV did not affect the response to IFN-based therapy in HCV-infected patients. Copyright © 2015

  2. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of

  3. ECHO virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001340.htm ECHO virus To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Enteric cytopathic human orphan (ECHO) viruses are a group of viruses that can lead ...

  4. Beyond Content of Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2017-02-01

    Social interaction is pivotal to the formation of social relationships and groups. Much is known about the importance of interaction content (e.g., the transfer of information). The present review concentrates on the influence of the act of conversing on the emergence of a sense of solidarity, more or less independently of the content. Micro-characteristics of the conversation (e.g., brief silences, smooth turn-taking) can profoundly influence the emergence and the regulation of relationships and of solidarity. We suggest that this might be because the form of a conversation is experienced as an expression of the social structures within the group. Because of its dynamic nature, moreover, the form of conversation provides group members with a continuous gauge of the group's structural features (e.g., its hierarchy, social norms, and shared reality). Therefore, minor changes in the form and flow of group conversation can have considerable consequences for the regulation of social structure.

  5. Political conversations on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    2016-01-01

    Political conversations are according to theories on deliberative democracy essential to well-functioning democracies. Traditionally these conversations have taken place in face-to-face settings, in e.g. party meetings and town meetings. However, social media such as Facebook and Twitter offers new...... possibilities for online political conversations between citizens and politicians. This paper examines the presence on Facebook and Twitter of Members of the Danish national Parliament, the Folketing, and focusses on a quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities taking place in the threads...... following Facebook posts from Danish Members of Parliament (MPs). The paper shows that, in comparison with previous findings from other countries, Danish MPs have a relatively high degree of engagement in political conversations with citizens on Facebook – and that a large number of citizens follow MPs...

  6. Viruses of the Archaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili,, David; Basta, Tamara; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2016-01-01

    Viruses infecting members of Archaea, the third domain of life, constitute an integral, yet unique part of the virosphere. Many of these viruses, specifically the species that infect hyperthermophilic hosts, display morphotypes – for example, bottle shaped, spindle shaped, droplet shaped, coil...... shaped, bacilliform – not known to be associated with the other two cellular domains, Bacteria and Eukarya. The distinctiveness of the hyperthermophilic archaeal viruses extends to their genome sequences: a large majority of the predicted genes yield no sequence matches in public databases and encode...... proteins with exceptional structures and unknown functions. Moreover, the ways in which these viruses interact with their hosts are also unique, as indicated by a unique virion egress mechanism, which involves formation of pyramidal portals on the cell surface. Some viruses that infect extremely halophilic...

  7. In Vitro Neutralization Is Not Predictive of Prophylactic Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies CR6261 and CR9114 against Lethal H2 Influenza Virus Challenge in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Troy C; Lamirande, Elaine W; Bock, Kevin W; Moore, Ian N; Koudstaal, Wouter; Rehman, Muniza; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Goudsmit, Jaap; Subbarao, Kanta

    2017-12-15

    Influenza viruses of the H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 subtypes have caused previous pandemics. H2 influenza viruses represent a pandemic threat due to continued circulation in wild birds and limited immunity in the human population. In the event of a pandemic, antiviral agents are the mainstay for treatment, but broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) may be a viable alternative for short-term prophylaxis or treatment. The hemagglutinin stem binding bNAbs CR6261 and CR9114 have been shown to protect mice from severe disease following challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 and with H1N1, H3N2, and influenza B viruses, respectively. Early studies with CR6261 and CR9114 showed weak in vitro activity against human H2 influenza viruses, but the in vivo efficacy against H2 viruses is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated these antibodies against human- and animal-origin H2 viruses A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 (H2N2) (AA60) and A/swine/MO/4296424/06 (H2N3) (Sw06). In vitro, CR6261 neutralized both H2 viruses, while CR9114 only neutralized Sw06. To evaluate prophylactic efficacy, mice were given CR6261 or CR9114 and intranasally challenged 24 h later with lethal doses of AA60 or Sw06. Both antibodies reduced mortality, weight loss, airway inflammation, and pulmonary viral load. Using engineered bNAb variants, antibody-mediated cell cytotoxicity reporter assays, and Fcγ receptor-deficient (Fcer1g-/-) mice, we show that the in vivo efficacy of CR9114 against AA60 is mediated by Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanisms. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of CR6261 and CR9114 against H2 viruses and emphasize the need for in vivo evaluation of bNAbs.IMPORTANCE bNAbs represent a strategy to prevent or treat infection by a wide range of influenza viruses. The evaluation of these antibodies against H2 viruses is important because H2 viruses caused a pandemic in 1957 and could cross into humans again. We demonstrate that CR6261 and CR9114 are effective against infection with H2 viruses of

  8. Analysis of variable genomic loci in white spot syndrome virus to predict its origins in Procambarus clarkii crayfish farmed in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Wei; Zeng, Yong; Fei, Rong-Mei; Zeng, Ling-Bing; Wei, Kai-Jin

    2011-09-09

    Variable genomic loci were examined in 4 white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) isolates (08HB, 09HB, 08JS and 09JS) from Procambarus clarkii crayfish collected from Jiangsu and Hubei Provinces in China in 2008 and 2009. In ORF75, sequence variation detected in the 4 isolates, as well as in isolates sequenced previously, suggested that WSSV might have segregated into 2 lineages since first emerging as a serious pathogen of farmed shrimp in East Asia in the early-mid 1990s, with one lineage remaining in East Asia and the other separating to South Asia. In ORF23/24, deletions of 9.31, 10.97, or 11.09 kb were evident compared to a reference isolate from Taiwan (WSSV-TW), and, in ORF14/15, deletions of 5.14 or 5.95 kb were evident compared to a reference isolate from Thailand with the largest genome size (TH-96-II). With respect to these genome characteristics, the crayfish isolates 08HB, 09HB and 08JS were similar to WSSV-TW and the isolate 09JS was similar to a reference isolate from China (WSSV-CN). In addition to these loci, sequence variation was evident in ORF94 and ORF125 that might be useful for differentiating isolates and in epidemiological tracing of WSSV spread in crayfish farmed in China. However, as all 4 crayfish isolates possessed a Homologous Region 9 sequence identical to isolate WSSV-TW and another Thailand isolate (WSSV-TH), and as their transposase sequence was identical to isolates WSSV-CN and WSSV-TH, these 2 loci were not useful in predicting their origins.

  9. Use of Wild Bird Surveillance, Human Case Data and GIS Spatial Analysis for Predicting Spatial Distributions of West Nile Virus in Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiakos, George; Papaspyropoulos, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulos, Alexios; Birtsas, Periklis; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Hutchings, Michael R.; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Pervanidou, Danai; Athanasiou, Labrini V.; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsokana, Constantina; Baka, Agoritsa; Manolakou, Katerina; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios; Artois, Marc; Yon, Lisa; Hannant, Duncan; Petrovska, Liljana; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Billinis, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is the causative agent of a vector-borne, zoonotic disease with a worldwide distribution. Recent expansion and introduction of WNV into new areas, including southern Europe, has been associated with severe disease in humans and equids, and has increased concerns regarding the need to prevent and control future WNV outbreaks. Since 2010, 524 confirmed human cases of the disease have been reported in Greece with greater than 10% mortality. Infected mosquitoes, wild birds, equids, and chickens have been detected and associated with human disease. The aim of our study was to establish a monitoring system with wild birds and reported human cases data using Geographical Information System (GIS). Potential distribution of WNV was modelled by combining wild bird serological surveillance data with environmental factors (e.g. elevation, slope, land use, vegetation density, temperature, precipitation indices, and population density). Local factors including areas of low altitude and proximity to water were important predictors of appearance of both human and wild bird cases (Odds Ratio = 1,001 95%CI = 0,723–1,386). Using GIS analysis, the identified risk factors were applied across Greece identifying the northern part of Greece (Macedonia, Thrace) western Greece and a number of Greek islands as being at highest risk of future outbreaks. The results of the analysis were evaluated and confirmed using the 161 reported human cases of the 2012 outbreak predicting correctly (Odds = 130/31 = 4,194 95%CI = 2,841–6,189) and more areas were identified for potential dispersion in the following years. Our approach verified that WNV risk can be modelled in a fast cost-effective way indicating high risk areas where prevention measures should be implemented in order to reduce the disease incidence. PMID:24806216

  10. Use of wild bird surveillance, human case data and GIS spatial analysis for predicting spatial distributions of West Nile virus in Greece.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Valiakos

    Full Text Available West Nile Virus (WNV is the causative agent of a vector-borne, zoonotic disease with a worldwide distribution. Recent expansion and introduction of WNV into new areas, including southern Europe, has been associated with severe disease in humans and equids, and has increased concerns regarding the need to prevent and control future WNV outbreaks. Since 2010, 524 confirmed human cases of the disease have been reported in Greece with greater than 10% mortality. Infected mosquitoes, wild birds, equids, and chickens have been detected and associated with human disease. The aim of our study was to establish a monitoring system with wild birds and reported human cases data using Geographical Information System (GIS. Potential distribution of WNV was modelled by combining wild bird serological surveillance data with environmental factors (e.g. elevation, slope, land use, vegetation density, temperature, precipitation indices, and population density. Local factors including areas of low altitude and proximity to water were important predictors of appearance of both human and wild bird cases (Odds Ratio = 1,001 95%CI = 0,723-1,386. Using GIS analysis, the identified risk factors were applied across Greece identifying the northern part of Greece (Macedonia, Thrace western Greece and a number of Greek islands as being at highest risk of future outbreaks. The results of the analysis were evaluated and confirmed using the 161 reported human cases of the 2012 outbreak predicting correctly (Odds = 130/31 = 4,194 95%CI = 2,841-6,189 and more areas were identified for potential dispersion in the following years. Our approach verified that WNV risk can be modelled in a fast cost-effective way indicating high risk areas where prevention measures should be implemented in order to reduce the disease incidence.

  11. Prediction of Clinical Outcomes in Hepatitis B E Antigen Negative Chronic Hepatitis B Patients with Elevated Hepatitis B Virus DNA Levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jem Ma Ahn

    Full Text Available We investigated whether long-term clinical outcomes such as disease progression or inactive hepatitis B virus (HBV carrier state can be predicted by baseline factors in hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg-negative HBV infected patients with an elevated viral load.A retrospective cohort of 527 HBeAg-negative chronic HBV infected patients with an elevated viral load (HBV DNA ≥ 2,000 IU/ml was assessed for disease progression defined by the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC or cirrhotic complication, as well as becoming an inactive carrier.During a median 3.6 years of follow-up, disease progression was detected in 46 patients (40 with HCC, 6 with cirrhotic complication, and 31 of 309 non-cirrhotic patients became inactive carriers. Older age, male gender, cirrhosis, high HBV DNA levels at baseline, and short antiviral therapy duration were independent risk factors for HCC. Low HBV DNA and quantitative hepatitis B surface antigen (qHBsAg levels were independent predictors for becoming inactive carriers in patients without cirrhosis. In non-cirrhotic patients with both low qHBsAg and HBV DNA levels, the 5-year cumulative incidence of an inactive carrier was 39.8%, while that of disease progression was 1.6%.HBeAg negative patients without cirrhosis can be closely monitored for becoming an inactive carrier when both HBV DNA and qHBsAg levels are low, as the risk of disease progression is low while incidence of an inactive carrier is high.

  12. Use of wild bird surveillance, human case data and GIS spatial analysis for predicting spatial distributions of West Nile virus in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiakos, George; Papaspyropoulos, Konstantinos; Giannakopoulos, Alexios; Birtsas, Periklis; Tsiodras, Sotirios; Hutchings, Michael R; Spyrou, Vassiliki; Pervanidou, Danai; Athanasiou, Labrini V; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos; Tsokana, Constantina; Baka, Agoritsa; Manolakou, Katerina; Chatzopoulos, Dimitrios; Artois, Marc; Yon, Lisa; Hannant, Duncan; Petrovska, Liljana; Hadjichristodoulou, Christos; Billinis, Charalambos

    2014-01-01

    West Nile Virus (WNV) is the causative agent of a vector-borne, zoonotic disease with a worldwide distribution. Recent expansion and introduction of WNV into new areas, including southern Europe, has been associated with severe disease in humans and equids, and has increased concerns regarding the need to prevent and control future WNV outbreaks. Since 2010, 524 confirmed human cases of the disease have been reported in Greece with greater than 10% mortality. Infected mosquitoes, wild birds, equids, and chickens have been detected and associated with human disease. The aim of our study was to establish a monitoring system with wild birds and reported human cases data using Geographical Information System (GIS). Potential distribution of WNV was modelled by combining wild bird serological surveillance data with environmental factors (e.g. elevation, slope, land use, vegetation density, temperature, precipitation indices, and population density). Local factors including areas of low altitude and proximity to water were important predictors of appearance of both human and wild bird cases (Odds Ratio = 1,001 95%CI = 0,723-1,386). Using GIS analysis, the identified risk factors were applied across Greece identifying the northern part of Greece (Macedonia, Thrace) western Greece and a number of Greek islands as being at highest risk of future outbreaks. The results of the analysis were evaluated and confirmed using the 161 reported human cases of the 2012 outbreak predicting correctly (Odds = 130/31 = 4,194 95%CI = 2,841-6,189) and more areas were identified for potential dispersion in the following years. Our approach verified that WNV risk can be modelled in a fast cost-effective way indicating high risk areas where prevention measures should be implemented in order to reduce the disease incidence.

  13. Uranium Conversion & Enrichment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karpius, Peter Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The isotopes of uranium that are found in nature, and hence in ‘fresh’ Yellowcake’, are not in relative proportions that are suitable for power or weapons applications. The goal of conversion then is to transform the U3O8 yellowcake into UF6. Conversion and enrichment of uranium is usually required to obtain material with enough 235U to be usable as fuel in a reactor or weapon. The cost, size, and complexity of practical conversion and enrichment facilities aid in nonproliferation by design.

  14. A Model for Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ayres, Phil

    2012-01-01

    This essay discusses models. It examines what models are, the roles models perform and suggests various intentions that underlie their construction and use. It discusses how models act as a conversational partner, and how they support various forms of conversation within the conversational activity...... of design. Three distinctions are drawn through which to develop this discussion of models in an architectural context. An examination of these distinctions serves to nuance particular characteristics and roles of models, the modelling activity itself and those engaged in it....

  15. Political conversations on Facebook

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mads P.

    2016-01-01

    possibilities for online political conversations between citizens and politicians. This paper examines the presence on Facebook and Twitter of Members of the Danish national Parliament, the Folketing, and focusses on a quantitative mapping of the political conversation activities taking place in the threads...... following Facebook posts from Danish Members of Parliament (MPs). The paper shows that, in comparison with previous findings from other countries, Danish MPs have a relatively high degree of engagement in political conversations with citizens on Facebook – and that a large number of citizens follow MPs......, read posts from the MPs and discuss politics with them and other citizens via the posts made by the MPs....

  16. Energy conversion statics

    CERN Document Server

    Messerle, H K; Declaris, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Energy Conversion Statics deals with equilibrium situations and processes linking equilibrium states. A development of the basic theory of energy conversion statics and its applications is presented. In the applications the emphasis is on processes involving electrical energy. The text commences by introducing the general concept of energy with a survey of primary and secondary energy forms, their availability, and use. The second chapter presents the basic laws of energy conversion. Four postulates defining the overall range of applicability of the general theory are set out, demonstrating th

  17. Wind Energy Conversion Systems Technology and Trends

    CERN Document Server

    2012-01-01

    Wind Energy Conversion System covers the technological progress of wind energy conversion systems, along with potential future trends. It includes recently developed wind energy conversion systems such as multi-converter operation of variable-speed wind generators, lightning protection schemes, voltage flicker mitigation and prediction schemes for advanced control of wind generators. Modeling and control strategies of variable speed wind generators are discussed, together with the frequency converter topologies suitable for grid integration. Wind Energy Conversion System also describes offshore farm technologies including multi-terminal topology and space-based wind observation schemes, as well as both AC and DC based wind farm topologies. The stability and reliability of wind farms are discussed, and grid integration issues are examined in the context of the most recent industry guidelines. Wind power smoothing, one of the big challenges for transmission system operators, is a particular focus. Fault ride th...

  18. Photochemical Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batschelet, William H.; George, Arnold

    1986-01-01

    Describes procedures for two demonstrations: (1) photochemical energy conversion using ferric oxalate actinometry and (2) liquification of gases using Freon 114. Safety precautions are given for both demonstrations, as are procedures and material specifications. (JM)

  19. Hydrothermal conversion of biomass

    OpenAIRE

    Knezevic, D.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis presents research of hydrothermal conversion of biomass (HTC). In this process, hot compressed water (subcritical water) is used as the reaction medium. Therefore this technique is suitable for conversion of wet biomass/ waste streams. By working at high pressures, the evaporation of water and high energy consumption that it requires can be avoided. The main focus of this work was HTC process aiming at production of transportation fuel intermediates. For this study, a new experime...

  20. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2013-01-01

    Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here). The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay). Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition) increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  1. Conversational flow promotes solidarity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namkje Koudenburg

    Full Text Available Social interaction is fundamental to the development of various aspects of "we-ness". Previous research has focused on the role the content of interaction plays in establishing feelings of unity, belongingness and shared reality (a cluster of variables referred to as solidarity here. The present paper is less concerned with content, but focuses on the form of social interaction. We propose that the degree to which conversations flow smoothly or not is, of itself, a cue to solidarity. We test this hypothesis in samples of unacquainted and acquainted dyads who communicate via headsets. Conversational flow is disrupted by introducing a delay in the auditory feedback (vs. no delay. Results of three studies show that smoothly coordinated conversations (compared with disrupted conversations and a control condition increase feelings of belonging and perceptions of group entitativity, independently of conversation content. These effects are driven by the subjective experience of conversational flow. Our data suggest that this process occurs largely beyond individuals' control. We conclude that the form of social interaction is a powerful cue for inferring group solidarity. Implications for the impact of modern communication technology on developing a shared social identity are discussed.

  2. Boiler conversions for biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinni, J. [Tampella Power Inc., Tampere (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Boiler conversions from grate- and oil-fired boilers to bubbling fluidized bed combustion have been most common in pulp and paper industry. Water treatment sludge combustion, need for additional capacity and tightened emission limits have been the driving forces for the conversion. To accomplish a boiler conversion for biofuel, the lower part of the boiler is replaced with a fluidized bed bottom and new fuel, ash and air systems are added. The Imatran Voima Rauhalahti pulverized-peat-fired boiler was converted to bubbling fluidized bed firing in 1993. In the conversion the boiler capacity was increased by 10 % to 295 MWth and NO{sub x} emissions dropped. In the Kymmene Kuusankoski boiler, the reason for conversion was the combustion of high chlorine content biosludge. The emissions have been under general European limits. During the next years, the emission limits will tighten and the boilers will be designed for most complete combustion and compounds, which can be removed from flue gases, will be taken care of after the boiler. (orig.) 3 refs.

  3. Generation of influenza A viruses as live but replication-incompetent virus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Longlong; Xu, Huan; Zhou, Xueying; Zhang, Ziwei; Tian, Zhenyu; Wang, Yan; Wu, Yiming; Zhang, Bo; Niu, Zhenlan; Zhang, Chuanling; Fu, Ge; Xiao, Sulong; Xia, Qing; Zhang, Lihe; Zhou, Demin

    2016-12-02

    The conversion of life-threatening viruses into live but avirulent vaccines represents a revolution in vaccinology. In a proof-of-principle study, we expanded the genetic code of the genome of influenza A virus via a transgenic cell line containing orthogonal translation machinery. This generated premature termination codon (PTC)-harboring viruses that exerted full infectivity but were replication-incompetent in conventional cells. Genome-wide optimization of the sites for incorporation of multiple PTCs resulted in highly reproductive and genetically stable progeny viruses in transgenic cells. In mouse, ferret, and guinea pig models, vaccination with PTC viruses elicited robust humoral, mucosal, and T cell-mediated immunity against antigenically distinct influenza viruses and even neutralized existing infecting strains. The methods presented here may become a general approach for generating live virus vaccines that can be adapted to almost any virus. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  4. Photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gottfried H

    2015-01-01

    This concise primer on photovoltaic solar energy conversion invites readers to reflect on the conversion of solar light into energy at the most fundamental level and encourages newcomers to the field to help find meaningful answers on how photovoltaic solar energy conversion can work (better), eventually contributing to its ongoing advancement. The book is based on lectures given to graduate students in the Physics Department at the University of Oldenburg over the last two decades, yet also provides an easy-to-follow introduction for doctoral and postdoctoral students from related disciplines such as the materials sciences and electrical engineering. Inspired by classic textbooks in the field, it reflects the author’s own ideas on how to understand, visualize and eventually teach the microscopic physical mechanisms and effects, while keeping the text as concise as possible so as to introduce interested readers to the field and balancing essential knowledge with open questions.

  5. Dissenting in Reflective Conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Pernille; Boulus, Nina

    2011-01-01

    Reflective monitoring of research practices is essential. However, we often lack formal training in the practices of doing action research, and descriptions of actual inquiry practice are seldom included in publications. Our aim is to provide a glimpse of self-reflective practices based on our...... gradually evolved into second-person inquiry. We argue that enacting second-person reflective conversations renders alternative strategies for handling uncertainties through articulation of the tacit assumptions within particular empirical situations. Finally, we argue that reflective conversations should...... a methodological reflective approach that provides space for taking seriously uncertainties experienced in the field as these can be a catalyst for learning and sharpening our theoretical and empirical skills as action researchers. Through first-person inquiry, we investigate how our reflective conversations...

  6. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2016-01-01

    This paper shows that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system. Specifically, we prove converse barrier certificate theorems for a class of structurally stable dynamical systems. Other authors have developed a related result by assuming that the dynamical system has neither...... singular points nor closed orbits. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with dynamical systems with multiple singular elements. Hereafter, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorems and highlight the differences between our results and previous work by a number...

  7. Converse Barrier Certificate Theorem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafael; Sloth, Christoffer

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a converse barrier certificate theorem for a generic dynamical system.We show that a barrier certificate exists for any safe dynamical system defined on a compact manifold. Other authors have developed a related result, by assuming that the dynamical system has no singular...... points in the considered subset of the state space. In this paper, we redefine the standard notion of safety to comply with generic dynamical systems with multiple singularities. Afterwards, we prove the converse barrier certificate theorem and illustrate the differences between ours and previous work...

  8. Hydrogen Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-07-27

    Schoeppei, R.J. and Gray, C.L., "The Hydrogen Engine in P^srectl^e", Proceedings 7th international Energy Conversion Encrineering C^ference.: San Dxego...Conversion Engineering Conference, San Diego, Sept. 19/^, pp. 1349-1354. 10. Hausz, W., Leeth, G., and Meyer, C., "Eco-Energy", ibid, pp. 1316-1322. II...75114, . 24. ^schütz, R.H., "Hydrogen Burning Engine Experience", presented at Symposium, see Ref. 8. 25. A. Presto filipo (Pnblio Service’Electric S

  9. Freely flowing conversations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aakjær, Marie Kirstejn; Andrade, David; Dexters, Peter

    the following referred to as UDI) effort was launched in 2008 as an attempt to improve prison life by inviting inmates to participate in organizational development together with staff. The effort has improved prisons by decreasing tension between inmates and guards and by creating more meaningful jobs...... relations by changing conversations. Through the theoretical framework of the complexity approach, we discuss how this may lead to organizational change. Finally we suggest that inviting inmates to take part in conversations about core organizational development may be a fundamental strategy in trying...

  10. Conversational Involvement and Loneliness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Robert A.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the relationship of conversational involvement and loneliness among college students. Found that lonely participants in this study had lower rates of talkativeness, interruptions, and attention than the nonlonely; they were also perceived as less involved and less interpersonally attractive. (PD)

  11. Conversational English Program, 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This second book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  12. Conversational English Program, 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Instituto de Idiomas Yazigi, Sao Paulo (Brazil). Centro de Linguistica Aplicada.

    This first book of a conversational English program for adults contains an introductory section in Portuguese and exercises in English. The text centers around an English-speaking family from the United States that goes to live in Brazil. It contains color photographs with captions followed by exercises. The exercises are in English and involve…

  13. Leadership is a conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groysberg, Boris; Slind, Michael

    2012-06-01

    Globalization and new technologies have sharply reduced the efficacy of command-and-control management and its accompanying forms of corporate communication. In the course of a recent research project, the authors concluded that by talking with employees, rather than simply issuing orders, leaders can promote operational flexibility, employee engagement, and tight strategic alignment. Groysberg and Slind have identified four elements of organizational conversation that reflect the essential attributes of interpersonal conversation: intimacy, interactivity, inclusion, and intentionality. Intimacy shifts the focus from a top-down distribution of information to a bottom-up exchange of ideas. Organizational conversation is less corporate in tone and more casual. And it's less about issuing and taking orders than about asking and answering questions. Interactivity entails shunning the simplicity of monologue and embracing the unpredictable vitality of dialogue. Traditional one-way media-print and broadcast, in particular-give way to social media buttressed by social thinking. Inclusion turns employees into full-fledged conversation partners, entitling them to provide their own ideas, often on company channels. They can create content and act as brand ambassadors, thought leaders, and storytellers. Intentionality enables leaders and employees to derive strategically relevant action from the push and pull of discussion and debate.

  14. Wavelength conversion technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian

    1998-01-01

    Optical wavelength conversion is currently attracting much interest. This is because it enables full flexibility and eases management of WDM fibre networks. The tutorial will review existing and potential application areas. Examples of node architectures and network demonstrators that use wavelen...

  15. Delusions v. conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khripunov, I. [Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    Russian defense conversion is a gloomy story, punctuated by only a few isolated successes. Overall industrial production in the first quarter of 1994 fell 27.4 percent below 1993 levels. Additionally the defense industry has been afflicted by the government`s failure to pay its debts to the industry, which, in the first quarter of 1994 grew from 2.1 trillion to 4.7 trillion rubles. Some members of government realize that the overmilitarized economy is burdensome and wasteful, and that post-Cold Ware reality necessitates a rapid reorientation to civilian purposes. Defense conversion has been called the first and foremost element in Russian economic reform. A converted defense industry must manufacture high-priority equipment in oil, gas, telecommunications, and space ventures. Russian economists estimate that modernization and conversion of the military-industrial comples will cost from $150 billion to $300 billion, which, Russia does not have. The lamentable state of Russia`s defense conversion projects reflects the disarray of the overall economy. The government can turn the defense industry into an asset, both the task will require time, patience, money and innovation.

  16. Mechanochemical Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pines, E.; And Others

    1973-01-01

    Summarizes the thermodynamics of macromolecular systems, including theories and experiments of cyclic energy conversion with rubber and collagen as working substances. Indicates that an early introduction into the concept of chemical potential and solution thermodynamics is made possible through the study of the cyclic processes. (CC)

  17. Electromechanical Energy Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LePage, Wilbur R.

    This programed text on electromechanical energy conversion (motors and generators) was developed under contract with the U.S. Office of Education as Number 12 in a series of materials for use in an electrical engineering sequence. It is intended to be used in conjunction with other materials and with other short texts in the series. (DH)

  18. Physics of energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Krischer, Katharina

    2015-01-01

    Covers the physical basis of the most important energy conversion processes used for energy supply. Provides the fundamentals and a scientific understanding of the physics behind thermal power plants, solar cells and power plants, batteries and fuels cells as well as energy storage devices.

  19. Broadband frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai Højer; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    We demonstrate a method for frequency conversion of broadly tunable or broad bandwidth light in a static, passive setup. Using simple optical components like lenses, mirrors and gratings and a BiBO crystal as the nonlinear material, we are able to frequency double a single-frequency, tunable...

  20. Chikungunya virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikungunya virus infection; Chikungunya ... Where Chikungunya is Found Before 2013, the virus was found in Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Indian and Pacific oceans. In late 2013, outbreaks occurred for the first time in the ...

  1. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through blood transfusions. There have been outbreaks of Zika virus in the United States, Africa, Southeast Asia, the ... not travel to areas where there is a Zika virus outbreak. If you do decide to travel, first ...

  2. Chikungunya Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Gaines, PhD, MPH, MA, CHES Differentiating Chikungunya From Dengue: A Clinical Challenge For Travelers CDC Travelers' Health Chikungunya Virus Home Prevention Transmission Symptoms & Treatment Geographic Distribution Chikungunya virus in the United States ...

  3. Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Funding CDC Activities For Healthcare Providers Clinical Evaluation & Disease Sexual Transmission HIV Infection & Zika Virus Testing for Zika Test Specimens – At Time of Birth Diagnostic Tests Understanding Zika Virus Test Results ...

  4. Epitope identification and in silico prediction of the specificity of antibodies binding to the coat proteins of Potato Virus Y strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keller, H.J.H.G.; Pomp, H.; Bakker, J.; Schots, A.

    2005-01-01

    A phage library containing 2.7 × 10(9) randomly expressed peptides was used to determine the epitopes of three monoclonal antibodies that bind to the coat protein of Potato Virus Y. Construction of the consensus sequences for the peptides obtained after three selection rounds indicated that each

  5. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV- lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.W.J. van Esser (Joost); B. van der Holt (Bronno); E. Meijer (Ellen); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert); J.J. Cornelissen (Jan); R. Trenschel; S.F. Thijsen (Steven); A.M. van Loon (Anton); L.F. Verdonck (Leo); F. Frassoni; A. Bacigalupo; B. Löwenberg (Bob); U.W. Schaefer; J.W. Gratama (Jan-Willem); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractReactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence,

  6. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly thro...

  7. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  8. Rebound from marital conflict and divorce prediction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottman, J M; Levenson, R W

    1999-01-01

    Marital interaction has primarily been examined in the context of conflict resolution. This study investigated the predictive ability of couples to rebound from marital conflict in a subsequent positive conversation. Results showed that there was a great deal of consistency in affect across both conversations. Also examined was the ability of affective interaction to predict divorce over a 4-year period, separately in each of the two conversations. It was possible to predict divorce using affective variables from each conversation, with 82.6% accuracy from the conflict conversation and with 92.7% accuracy from the positive rebound conversation.

  9. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States) Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  10. Protecting Anti-virus Programs From Viral Attacks

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra, Umakant

    2013-01-01

    During a fight between viruses and anti-viruses it is not always predictable that the anti-virus is going to win. There are many malicious viruses which target to attack and paralyze the anti-viruses. It is necessary for an anti-virus to detect and destroy the malware before its own files are detected and destroyed by the malware. The anti-virus may follow thorough testing and auditing procedures to fix all its bugs before releasing the software in the market. Besides the anti-virus may use a...

  11. Predicted protein interactions of IFITMs may shed light on mechanisms of Zika virus-induced microcephaly and host invasion [version 2; referees: 2 approved, 1 approved with reservations, 1 not approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhavi K. Ganapathiraju

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available After the first reported case of Zika virus (ZIKV in Brazil, in 2015, a significant increase in the reported cases of microcephaly was observed. Microcephaly is a neurological condition in which the infant’s head is significantly smaller with complications in brain development. Recently, two small membrane-associated interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins (IFITM1 and IFITM3 have been shown to repress members of the flaviviridae family which includes ZIKV. However, the exact mechanisms leading to the inhibition of the virus are yet unknown. Here, we assembled an interactome of IFITM1 and IFITM3 with known protein-protein interactions (PPIs collected from publicly available databases and novel PPIs predicted using the High-confidence Protein-Protein Interaction Prediction (HiPPIP model. We analyzed the functional and pathway associations of the interacting proteins, and found that there are several immunity pathways (toll-like receptor signaling, cd28 signaling in T-helper cells, crosstalk between dendritic cells and natural killer cells, neuronal pathways (axonal guidance signaling, neural tube closure and actin cytoskeleton signaling and developmental pathways (neural tube closure, embryonic skeletal system development that are associated with these interactors. Our novel PPIs associate cilia dysfunction in ependymal cells to microcephaly, and may also shed light on potential targets of ZIKV for host invasion by immunosuppression and cytoskeletal rearrangements. These results could help direct future research in elucidating the mechanisms underlying host defense to ZIKV and other flaviviruses.

  12. Implications of metric conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laros, R K

    1980-11-01

    The international scientific community is rapidly achieving conversion to the metric system, and the Système International (SI system) has been chosen for use by health scientists. Because the United States remains 1 of only 4 countries not now using part or all of the SI system, there is now a systematic effort toward rapid conversion. Although most of the SI system is not controversial, several SI units are highly so. Examples include joules instead of calories, pascals instead of millimeters of mercury, and moles per liter instead of milligrams per 100 milliliters. Obstetrician-gynecologists need to be familiar with the SI units and to voice their feelings about the various controversial units. There are decisions still to be made, and the time for discussion and advice is now.

  13. Movement coordination during conversation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nida Latif

    Full Text Available Behavioral coordination and synchrony contribute to a common biological mechanism that maintains communication, cooperation and bonding within many social species, such as primates and birds. Similarly, human language and social systems may also be attuned to coordination to facilitate communication and the formation of relationships. Gross similarities in movement patterns and convergence in the acoustic properties of speech have already been demonstrated between interacting individuals. In the present studies, we investigated how coordinated movements contribute to observers' perception of affiliation (friends vs. strangers between two conversing individuals. We used novel computational methods to quantify motor coordination and demonstrated that individuals familiar with each other coordinated their movements more frequently. Observers used coordination to judge affiliation between conversing pairs but only when the perceptual stimuli were restricted to head and face regions. These results suggest that observed movement coordination in humans might contribute to perceptual decisions based on availability of information to perceivers.

  14. Wind energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longrigg, Paul

    1987-01-01

    The wind energy conversion system includes a wind machine having a propeller connected to a generator of electric power, the propeller rotating the generator in response to force of an incident wind. The generator converts the power of the wind to electric power for use by an electric load. Circuitry for varying the duty factor of the generator output power is connected between the generator and the load to thereby alter a loading of the generator and the propeller by the electric load. Wind speed is sensed electro-optically to provide data of wind speed upwind of the propeller, to thereby permit tip speed ratio circuitry to operate the power control circuitry and thereby optimize the tip speed ratio by varying the loading of the propeller. Accordingly, the efficiency of the wind energy conversion system is maximized.

  15. Conversion electron surface imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Irwin, G M; Wehner, A

    1999-01-01

    A method of imaging the Moessbauer absorption over the surface of a sample based on counting conversion electrons emitted from the surface following resonant absorption of gamma radiation is described. This Conversion Electron Surface Imaging (CESI) method is somewhat analogous to Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), particularly chemical shift imaging, and similar tomographic reconstruction techniques are involved in extracting the image. The theory behind the technique and a prototype device is described, as well as the results of proof-of-principle experiments which demonstrate the function of the device. Eventually this same prototype device will be part of a system to determine the spatial variation of the Moessbauer spectrum over the surface of a sample. Applications include imaging of variations of surface properties of steels and other iron containing alloys, as well as other surfaces over which sup 5 sup 7 Fe has been deposited.

  16. Les conversions de cens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Feller

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Dans le cadre d’une recherche entamée sur la circulation des richesses au Moyen Âge, la réflexion s’est dirigée vers la question de la conversion, c’est-à-dire du passage d’une forme à une autre dans la mesure des valeurs (argent contre nature, objets dont l’usage se transforme en s’échangeant, conversions monétaires. Un cycle de trois rencontres est prévu afin de débrouiller une question complexe qui devrait permettre au groupe d’éclairer la question de la valeur des choses au Moyen Âge. La...

  17. Spatial Analysis of West Nile Virus: Predictive Risk Modeling of a Vector-borne Infectious Disease in Illinois by Means of NASA Earth Observation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renneboog, Nathan; Gathings, David; Hemmings, Sarah; Makasa, Emmanuel; Omer, Wigdan; Tipre, Meghan; Wright, Catherine; McAllister, Marilyn; Luvall, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    West Nile Virus is a mosquito-borne virus of the family Flaviviridae. It infects birds and various mammals, including humans, and can cause encephalitis that may prove fatal, notably among vulnerable populations. Since its identification in New York City in 1999, WNV has become established in a broad range of ecological settings throughout North America, infecting more than 25,300 people and killing 1133 as of 2008 (CDC,2009). WNV is transmitted by mosquitoes that feed on infected birds. As a result, the degree of human infection depends on local ecology and human exposure. This study hypothesizes that remote sensing and GIS can be used to analyze environmental determinants of WNV transmission, such as climate, elevation, land cover, and vegetation densities, to map areas of WNV risk for surveillance and intervention.

  18. Clinical linguistics: conversational reflections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crystal, David

    2013-04-01

    This is a report of the main points I made in an informal "conversation" with Paul Fletcher and the audience at the 14th ICPLA conference in Cork. The observations arose randomly, as part of an unstructured 1-h Q&A, so they do not provide a systematic account of the subject, but simply reflect the issues which were raised by the conference participants during that time.

  19. Conversations with Miss Jane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geneviève Fabre

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the wide range of conversations in the autobiography, this essay will attempt to appraise the importance of these verbal exchanges in relation to the overall narrative structure of the book and to the prevalent oral tradition in Louisiana culture, as both an individual and communal expression. The variety of circumstances, the setting and staging, the interlocutors , and the complex intersection of time and place, of stories and History, will be examined; in these conversations with Miss Jane many actors participate, from  the interviewer-narrator, to most characters; even the reader becomes involved.Speaking, hearing, listening, keeping silent is an elaborate ritual that performs many functions; besides conveying news or rumors, it imparts information on the times and on the life of a “representative” woman whose existence - spanning a whole century- is both singular and emblematic. Most importantly this essay will analyse the resonance of an eventful and often dramatic era on her sensibility and conversely show how her evolving sensibility informs that history and draws attention to aspects that might have passed unnoticed or be forever silenced. Jane’s desire for liberty and justice is often challenged as she faces the possibilities of life or death.Conversations build up a complex, often contradictory, but compelling portrait: torn between silence and vehemence, between memories and the urge to meet the future, Jane summons body and mind to find her way through the maze of a fast changing world; self-willed and obstinate she claims her right to speak, to express with wit and wisdom her firm belief in the word, in the ability to express deep seated convictions and faith and a whole array of feelings and emotions.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequence of capsicum chlorosis virus isolated from Phalaenopsis orchid and the prediction of the unexplored genetic information of tospoviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, You-Xiu; Chen, Ching-Chung; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2011-03-01

    Phalaenopsis orchids are popular ornamentals all over the world. A tospovirus, capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV-Ph) had been identified as the cause of chlorotic ringspots on leaves of Phalaenopsis orchids in Taiwan. The tripartite genome of CaCV-Ph was found to contain 3608, 4848 and 8916 nt of S, M and L RNAs, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleocapsid (N) protein confirmed that CaCV-Ph is a member of the watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) serogroup in the genus Tospovirus. Based on the relations among the nonstructural protein (NSs), glycoprotein (GnGc), thrips genera, host and geographical distribution, tospoviruses and thrips could be classified into two major types: WSMoV-Thrips-Asian and Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)-Frankliniella-EuroAmerican. The proline (P(459)) of all tospoviral Gn proteins was indispensable for thrips transmission, but the RGD motif, which is maintained by only six tospoviruses, may not be required for thrips transmission. An RdRp catalytic domain found in the conserved region of the L protein may recognize the typically conserved sequences on the 5' and 3' terminal regions (5' AGAGCAAU 3').

  1. Predictors of conversion from thoracoscopic to open surgery in management of postpneumonic empyema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehab F. Salim

    2016-08-01

    Conclusion: Predictive factors for conversion to thoracotomy in an assumed stage II postpneumonic empyema include long duration, Gram-negative bacterial infection, increased LDH, and increased pleural thickness.

  2. Expression of interferon receptor genes (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA) in the liver may predict outcome after interferon therapy in patients with chronic genotype 2a or 2b hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, K; Tanaka, K; Saito, S; Kitamura, T; Kondo, M; Sakaguchi, T; Morimoto, M; Sekihara, H

    1998-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotype 2a or 2b is associated with a favorable outcome after interferon therapy. However, 19% to 33% of patients do not respond to therapy. We investigated whether interferon receptor gene (IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA) expression in the liver before interferon therapy predicts long-term response to therapy in patients with genotype 2a or 2b HCV infection. Twenty-seven patients who subsequently received interferon-alpha therapy underwent liver biopsies before interferon therapy. Hepatic IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA were determined using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay. Twenty (74%) patients responded to interferon therapy, while the remaining seven (26%) patients were nonresponders. The expression rates of IFNAR1 and IFNAR2 mRNA in the liver were significantly higher in responders than nonresponders (p IFNAR1 or IFNAR2 mRNA predicted complete response to interferon treatment, with a positive predictive value of 100%. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that IFNAR1 and/or IFNAR2 mRNA expression was the only significant predictor of the effectiveness of IFN therapy (p = 0.0002). We conclude that expression of interferon receptor genes in the liver is a useful index for predicting the long-term efficacy of interferon therapy in patients with chronic genotype 2a or 2b HCV infection.

  3. Towards sustainable conversation: Developing environmental ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards sustainable conversation: Developing environmental education processes. ... Southern African Journal of Environmental Education ... paper highlights the importance of seeing environmental education as a process and considers the value of conversation and storytelling in environmental education processes.

  4. Microbial Energy Conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckley, Merry [American Society for Microbiology (ASM), Washington, DC (United States); Wall, Judy D. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    2006-10-01

    The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium March 10-12, 2006, in San Francisco, California, to discuss the production of energy fuels by microbial conversions. The status of research into various microbial energy technologies, the advantages and disadvantages of each of these approaches, research needs in the field, and education and training issues were examined, with the goal of identifying routes for producing biofuels that would both decrease the need for fossil fuels and reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Currently, the choices for providing energy are limited. Policy makers and the research community must begin to pursue a broader array of potential energy technologies. A diverse energy portfolio that includes an assortment of microbial energy choices will allow communities and consumers to select the best energy solution for their own particular needs. Funding agencies and governments alike need to prepare for future energy needs by investing both in the microbial energy technologies that work today and in the untested technologies that will serve the world’s needs tomorrow. More mature bioprocesses, such as ethanol production from starchy materials and methane from waste digestors, will find applications in the short term. However, innovative techniques for liquid fuel or biohydrogen production are among the longer term possibilities that should also be vigorously explored, starting now. Microorganisms can help meet human energy needs in any of a number of ways. In their most obvious role in energy conversion, microorganisms can generate fuels, including ethanol, hydrogen, methane, lipids, and butanol, which can be burned to produce energy. Alternatively, bacteria can be put to use in microbial fuel cells, where they carry out the direct conversion of biomass into electricity. Microorganisms may also be used some day to make oil and natural gas technologies more efficient by sequestering carbon or by assisting in the recovery of oil and

  5. Infrared up-conversion telescope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented to an up-conversion infrared telescope (110) arranged for imaging an associated scene (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared telescope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein a first optical...

  6. Infrared up-conversion microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    There is presented an up-conversion infrared microscope (110) arranged for imaging an associated object (130), wherein the up-conversion infrared microscope (110) comprises a non-linear crystal (120) arranged for up-conversion of infrared electromagnetic radiation, and wherein an objective optical...

  7. Symptoms of influenza virus infection in hospitalized patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dool, C; Hak, E; Wallinga, J; van Loon, A M; Lammers, J W J; Bonten, M J M

    BACKGROUND: During influenza outbreaks, fever and cough are the most accurate symptoms in predicting influenza virus infection in the community. OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of fever, cough, and other symptoms for diagnosing influenza virus infection in hospitalized patients. DESIGN:

  8. Moodle 20 Course Conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Wild, Ian

    2011-01-01

    With clear instructions and plenty of screenshots, this book provides all the support and guidance you will need as you begin to convert your teaching to Moodle. Step-by-step tutorials use real-world examples to show you how to convert to Moodle in the most efficient and effective ways possible. Moodle Course Conversion carefully illustrates how Moodle can be used to teach content and ideas and clearly demonstrates the advantages of doing so. This book is for teachers, tutors, and lecturers who already have a large body of teaching material and want to use Moodle to enhance their course, rathe

  9. Solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Likhtenshtein, Gertz I

    2012-01-01

    Finally filling a gap in the literature for a text that also adopts the chemist?s view of this hot topic, Prof Likhtenshtein, an experienced author and internationally renowned scientist, considers different physical and engineering aspects in solar energy conversion. From theory to real-life systems, he shows exactly which chemical reactions take place when converting light energy, providing an overview of the chemical perspective from fundamentals to molecular harvesting systems and solar cells. This essential guide will thus help researchers in academia and industry better understa

  10. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, T.

    1997-02-18

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate {alpha}-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal. 33 figs.

  11. Catalytic Conversion of Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Osmundsen, Christian Mårup

    with the production of commodity chemicals from the most abundantly available renewable source of carbon, carbohydrates. The production of alkyl lactates by the Lewis acid catalyzed conversion of hexoses is an interesting alternative to current fermentation based processes. A range of stannosilicates were....... The synthesis of these by the cycloaddition of ethylene to furanic compounds, followed by dehydrative aromatization, was demonstrated in good yields, using a strong Brønsted acidic catalyst, WOx/ZrO2. As both ethylene and furanics can be derived from carbohydrates by known processes, this constitutes...

  12. Zinc phosphate conversion coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, Toshifumi

    1997-01-01

    Zinc phosphate conversion coatings for producing metals which exhibit enhanced corrosion prevention characteristics are prepared by the addition of a transition-metal-compound promoter comprising a manganese, iron, cobalt, nickel, or copper compound and an electrolyte such as polyacrylic acid, polymethacrylic acid, polyitaconic acid and poly-L-glutamic acid to a phosphating solution. These coatings are further improved by the incorporation of Fe ions. Thermal treatment of zinc phosphate coatings to generate .alpha.-phase anhydrous zinc phosphate improves the corrosion prevention qualities of the resulting coated metal.

  13. Broadband frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sanders, Nicolai; Jensen, Ole Bjarlin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    We present a simple, passive and static setup for broadband frequency conversion. By using simple optical components like lenses, mirrors and gratings, we obtain the spectral angular dispersion to match the second harmonic generation phasematching angles in a nonlinear BiBO crystal. We are able...... to frequency double a single-frequency diode laser, tunable in the 1020-1090 nm range, with almost equal efficiency for all wavelengths. In the experimental setup, the width of the phasematch was increased with a factor of 50. The method can easily be extended to other wavelength ranges and nonlinear crystals...

  14. Conversing Cooperatively: Using "Mini-Conversations" to Develop Conversational Knowledge and Skill

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Elizabeth B.

    2017-01-01

    Courses: Interpersonal communication, relational communication, language and social interaction, professional communication, interviewing practices. Objectives: This single class activity enables students to understand the theoretical foundations of conversation and to develop their conversational skills by talking in dyads with classmates. Upon…

  15. Virus Crystallography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Elizabeth; Logan, Derek; Stuart, David

    Crystallography provides a means of visualizing intact virus particles as well as their isolated constituent proteins and enzymes (1-3) at near-atomic resolution, and is thus an extraordinarily powerful tool in the pursuit of a fuller understanding of the functioning of these simple biological systems. We have already expanded our knowledge of virus evolution, assembly, antigenic variation, and host-cell interactions; further studies will no doubt reveal much more. Although the rewards are enormous, an intact virus structure determination is not a trivial undertaking and entails a significant scaling up in terms of time and resources through all stages of data collection and processing compared to a traditional protein crystallographic structure determination. It is the methodology required for such studies that will be the focus of this chapter. The computational requirements were satisfied in the late 1970s, and when combined with the introduction of phase improvement techniques utilizing the virus symmetry (4,5), the application of crystallography to these massive macromolecular assemblies became feasible. This led to the determination of the first virus structure (the small RNA plant virus, tomato bushy stunt virus), by Harrison and coworkers in 1978 (6). The structures of two other plant viruses followed rapidly (7,8). In the 1980s, a major focus of attention was a family of animal RNA viruses; the Picornaviridae.

  16. Energy conversion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, L.M.

    1985-09-16

    The energy conversion system includes a photo-voltaic array for receiving solar radiation and converting such radiation to electrical energy. The photo-voltaic array is mounted on a stretched membrane that is held by a frame. Tracking means for orienting the photo-voltaic array in predetermined positions that provide optimal exposure to solar radiation cooperate with the frame. An enclosure formed of a radiation transmissible material includes an inside containment space that accommodates the photo-voltaic array on the stretched membrane, the frame and the tracking means, and forms a protective shield for all such components. The enclosure is preferably formed of a flexible inflatable material and maintains its preferred form, such as a dome, under the influence of a low air pressure furnished to the dome. Under this arrangement the energy conversion system is streamlined for minimizing wind resistance, sufficiently weathproof for providing protection against weather hazards such as hail, capable of using diffused light, lightweight for low-cost construction and operational with a minimal power draw.

  17. Conversion program in Sweden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, E.B. [Studsvik Nuclear AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1997-08-01

    The conversion of the Swedish 50 MW R2 reactor from HEU to LEU fuel has been successfully accomplished over a 16 cycles long process. The conversion started in January 1991 with the introduction of 6 LEU assemblies in the 8*8 core. The first all LEU core was loaded in March 1993 and physics measurements were performed for the final licensing reports. A total of 142 LEU fuel assemblies have been irradiated up until September 1994 without any fuel incident. The operating licence for the R2 reactor was renewed in mid 1994 taking into account new fuel type. The Swedish Nuclear Inspectorate (SKI) pointed out one crucial problem with the LEU operation, that the back end of the LEU fuel cycle has not yet been solved. For the HEU fuel Sweden had the reprocessing alternative. The country is now relying heavily on the success of the USDOEs Off Site Fuels Policy to take back the spent fuel from the research reactors. They have in the meantime increased their intermediate storage facilities. There is, however, a limit both in time and space for storage of MTR-type of assemblies in water. The penalty of the lower thermal neutron flux in LEU cores has been reduced by improvements of the new irradiation rigs and by fine tuning the core calculations. The Studsvik code package, CASMO-SIMULATE, widely used for ICFM in LWRs has been modified to suit the compact MTR type of core.

  18. CHANDIPURA VIRUS

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. CHANDIPURA VIRUS. First isolated from a village called Chandipura near Nagpur in 1965 in India. Belongs to rhabdoviridae family. Used as a Model System to study RNA virus multiplication in the infected cell at molecular level. Notes:

  19. Thermodynamics and energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Struchtrup, Henning

    2014-01-01

    This textbook gives a thorough treatment of engineering thermodynamics with applications to classical and modern energy conversion devices.   Some emphasis lies on the description of irreversible processes, such as friction, heat transfer and mixing, and the evaluation of the related work losses. Better use of resources requires high efficiencies, therefore the reduction of irreversible losses should be seen as one of the main goals of a thermal engineer. This book provides the necessary tools.   Topics include: car and aircraft engines,  including Otto, Diesel and Atkinson cycles, by-pass turbofan engines, ramjet and scramjet;  steam and gas power plants, including advanced regenerative systems, solar tower, and compressed air energy storage; mixing and separation, including reverse osmosis, osmotic powerplants, and carbon sequestration; phase equilibrium and chemical equilibrium, distillation, chemical reactors, combustion processes, and fuel cells; the microscopic definition of entropy.    The book i...

  20. Conversations About Responsible Nanoresearch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjølberg, Kamilla Lein; Strand, Roger

    2011-04-01

    There is currently a strong focus on responsible research in relation to the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. This study presents a series of conversations with nanoresearchers, with the 'European Commission recommendation on a code of conduct for responsible nanosciences and nanotechnologies research' (EC-CoC) as its point of departure. Six types of reactions to the document are developed, illustrating the diversity existing within the scientific community in responses towards this kind of new approaches to governance. Three broad notions of responsible nanoresearch are presented. The article concludes by arguing that while the suggestion put forward in the EC-CoC brings the concept of responsible nanoresearch a long way, one crucial element is to be wanted, namely responsible nanoresearch as increased awareness of moral choices.

  1. Power conversion technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  2. Thermal Energy Conversion Branch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielozer, Matthew C.; Schreiber, Jeffrey, G.; Wilson, Scott D.

    2004-01-01

    The Thermal Energy Conversion Branch (5490) leads the way in designing, conducting, and implementing research for the newest thermal systems used in space applications at the NASA Glenn Research Center. Specifically some of the most advanced technologies developed in this branch can be broken down into four main areas: Dynamic Power Systems, Primary Solar Concentrators, Secondary Solar Concentrators, and Thermal Management. Work was performed in the Dynamic Power Systems area, specifically the Stirling Engine subdivision. Today, the main focus of the 5490 branch is free-piston Stirling cycle converters, Brayton cycle nuclear reactors, and heat rejection systems for long duration mission spacecraft. All space exploring devices need electricity to operate. In most space applications, heat energy from radioisotopes is converted to electrical power. The Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) already supplies electricity for missions such as the Cassini Spacecraft. The focus of today's Stirling research at GRC is aimed at creating an engine that can replace the RTG. The primary appeal of the Stirling engine is its high system efficiency. Because it is so efficient, the Stirling engine will significantly reduce the plutonium fuel mission requirements compared to the RTG. Stirling is also being considered for missions such as the lunar/Mars bases and rovers. This project has focused largely on Stirling Engines of all types, particularly the fluidyne liquid piston engine. The fluidyne was developed by Colin D. West. This engine uses the same concepts found in any type of Stirling engine, with the exception of missing mechanical components. All the working components are fluid. One goal was to develop and demonstrate a working Stirling Fluidyne Engine at the 2nd Annual International Energy Conversion Engineering Conference in Providence, Rhode Island.

  3. Higher Ratio of Serum Alpha-Fetoprotein Could Predict Outcomes in Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Associated Hepatocellular Carcinoma and Normal Alanine Aminotransferase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Il Kim

    Full Text Available The role of serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP levels in the surveillance and diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the value of serially measured serum AFP levels in HCC progression or recurrence after initial treatment.A total of 722 consecutive patients newly diagnosed with HCC and treated at the National Cancer Center, Korea, between January 2004 and December 2009 were enrolled. The AFP ratios between 4-8 weeks post-treatment and those at the time of HCC progression or recurrence were obtained. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to correlate the post-treatment AFP ratios with the presence of HCC progression or recurrence.The etiology of HCC was related to chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection in 562 patients (77.8%, chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in 74 (10.2%, and non-viral cause in 86 (11.9%. There was a significant decrease in serum AFP levels from the baseline to 4 to 8 weeks after treatment (median AFP, 319.6 ng/mL vs. 49.6 ng/mL; p 1.0 was an independently associated with HCC progression or recurrence. Among the different causes of HCC analyzed, this association was significant only for HCC related to chronic hepatitis B (p< 0.001 and non-viral causes (p<0.05, and limited only to patients who had normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT levels.Serial measurements of serum AFP ratios could be helpful in detecting progression or recurrence in treated patients with HBV-HCC and normal ALT.

  4. Polysemy in Design Review Conversations

    OpenAIRE

    Georgiev, Georgi V.; Taura, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role of polysemy, defined as the quality of having multiple meanings, in design review conversations. It examines the polysemy, particularly of nouns, involved in a dataset of design review conversations with reference to design ideas. The purpose is to determine whether polysemy is related to successful development of design ideas and more creative design outcomes. The results show that the polysemy of nouns involved in the conversations of the finally developed, succ...

  5. Paradoxical therapy in conversion disorder

    OpenAIRE

    ATAOĞLU, Ahmet

    2014-01-01

    Paradoxical therapy consists of suggesting that the patient intentionally engages in the unwanted behaviour, such as performing complusive ritual or bringing on a conversion attack. In this study paradoxical intention (PI) was used with to half of the patients with conversion disorders, while the other half were treated with diazepam in order to examine the efficiency of the PI versus diazepam in conversion disorder. Patients treated with PI appeared to have a greater improvement r...

  6. Tumor heterogeneity measured on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography combined with plasma Epstein-Barr Virus load predicts prognosis in patients with primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Sheng-Chieh; Chang, Kai-Ping; Fang, Yu-Hua Dean; Tsang, Ngan-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Hsu, Cheng-Lung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Plasma Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA concentrations predict prognosis in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Recent evidence also indicates that intratumor heterogeneity on F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (18 F-FDG PET) scans is predictive of treatment outcomes in different solid malignancies. Here, we sought to investigate the prognostic value of heterogeneity parameters in patients with primary NPC. Retrospective cohort study. We examined 101 patients with primary NPC who underwent pretreatment 18 F-FDG PET/computed tomography. Circulating levels of EBV DNA were measured in all participants. The following PET heterogeneity parameters were collected: histogram-based heterogeneity parameters, second-order texture features (uniformity, contrast, entropy, homogeneity, dissimilarity, inverse difference moment), and higher-order (coarseness, contrast, busyness, complexity, strength) texture features. The median follow-up time was 5.14 years. Total lesion glycolysis (TLG), tumor heterogeneity measured by histogram-based parameter skewness, and the majority of second-order or higher-order texture features were significantly associated with overall survival (OS) and/or recurrence-free survival (RFS). In multivariate analysis, age (P =.005), EBV DNA load (P = .0002), and uniformity (P = .001) independently predicted OS. Only skewness retained the independent prognostic significance for RFS. Tumor stage, standardized uptake value, or TLG did not show an independent association with survival endpoints. The combination of uniformity, EBV DNA load, and age resulted in a more reliable prognostic stratification (P < .001). Tumor heterogeneity is superior to traditional PET parameters for predicting outcomes in primary NPC. The combination of uniformity with EBV DNA load can improve prognostic stratification in this clinical entity. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:E22-E28, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Graphic Conversation #1, #2, #3

    OpenAIRE

    Harkins, Mike

    2008-01-01

    Exhibited at New Views 2: conversations and dialogues in graphic design: an international symposium defining graphic design for the future. London: College of Communication / Melbourne, Australia: Melbourne Museum

  8. Computer viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    The worm, Trojan horse, bacterium, and virus are destructive programs that attack information stored in a computer's memory. Virus programs, which propagate by incorporating copies of themselves into other programs, are a growing menace in the late-1980s world of unprotected, networked workstations and personal computers. Limited immunity is offered by memory protection hardware, digitally authenticated object programs,and antibody programs that kill specific viruses. Additional immunity can be gained from the practice of digital hygiene, primarily the refusal to use software from untrusted sources. Full immunity requires attention in a social dimension, the accountability of programmers.

  9. Covariance of charged amino acids at positions 322 and 440 of HIV-1 Env contributes to coreceptor specificity of subtype B viruses, and can be used to improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashin, Kieran; Sterjovski, Jasminka; Harvey, Katherine L; Ramsland, Paul A; Churchill, Melissa J; Gorry, Paul R

    2014-01-01

    The ability to determine coreceptor usage of patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains is clinically important, particularly for the administration of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. The envelope glycoprotein (Env) determinants of coreceptor specificity lie primarily within the gp120 V3 loop region, although other Env determinants have been shown to influence gp120-coreceptor interactions. Here, we determined whether conserved amino acid alterations outside the V3 loop that contribute to coreceptor usage exist, and whether these alterations improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms. We demonstrate a significant covariant association between charged amino acids at position 322 in V3 and position 440 in the C4 Env region that contributes to the specificity of HIV-1 subtype B strains for CCR5 or CXCR4. Specifically, positively charged Lys/Arg at position 322 and negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 440 occurred more frequently in CXCR4-using viruses, whereas negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 322 and positively charged Arg at position 440 occurred more frequently in R5 strains. In the context of CD4-bound gp120, structural models suggest that covariation of amino acids at Env positions 322 and 440 has the potential to alter electrostatic interactions that are formed between gp120 and charged amino acids in the CCR5 N-terminus. We further demonstrate that inclusion of a "440 rule" can improve the sensitivity of several V3 sequence-based genotypic algorithms for predicting coreceptor usage of subtype B HIV-1 strains, without compromising specificity, and significantly improves the AUROC of the geno2pheno algorithm when set to its recommended false positive rate of 5.75%. Together, our results provide further mechanistic insights into the intra-molecular interactions within Env that contribute to coreceptor specificity of subtype B HIV-1 strains, and demonstrate that incorporation of Env

  10. Covariance of charged amino acids at positions 322 and 440 of HIV-1 Env contributes to coreceptor specificity of subtype B viruses, and can be used to improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kieran Cashin

    Full Text Available The ability to determine coreceptor usage of patient-derived human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strains is clinically important, particularly for the administration of the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc. The envelope glycoprotein (Env determinants of coreceptor specificity lie primarily within the gp120 V3 loop region, although other Env determinants have been shown to influence gp120-coreceptor interactions. Here, we determined whether conserved amino acid alterations outside the V3 loop that contribute to coreceptor usage exist, and whether these alterations improve the performance of V3 sequence-based coreceptor usage prediction algorithms. We demonstrate a significant covariant association between charged amino acids at position 322 in V3 and position 440 in the C4 Env region that contributes to the specificity of HIV-1 subtype B strains for CCR5 or CXCR4. Specifically, positively charged Lys/Arg at position 322 and negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 440 occurred more frequently in CXCR4-using viruses, whereas negatively charged Asp/Glu at position 322 and positively charged Arg at position 440 occurred more frequently in R5 strains. In the context of CD4-bound gp120, structural models suggest that covariation of amino acids at Env positions 322 and 440 has the potential to alter electrostatic interactions that are formed between gp120 and charged amino acids in the CCR5 N-terminus. We further demonstrate that inclusion of a "440 rule" can improve the sensitivity of several V3 sequence-based genotypic algorithms for predicting coreceptor usage of subtype B HIV-1 strains, without compromising specificity, and significantly improves the AUROC of the geno2pheno algorithm when set to its recommended false positive rate of 5.75%. Together, our results provide further mechanistic insights into the intra-molecular interactions within Env that contribute to coreceptor specificity of subtype B HIV-1 strains, and demonstrate that incorporation

  11. GPU color space conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Patrick; Vondran, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Tetrahedral interpolation is commonly used to implement continuous color space conversions from sparse 3D and 4D lookup tables. We investigate the implementation and optimization of tetrahedral interpolation algorithms for GPUs, and compare to the best known CPU implementations as well as to a well known GPU-based trilinear implementation. We show that a 500 NVIDIA GTX-580 GPU is 3x faster than a 1000 Intel Core i7 980X CPU for 3D interpolation, and 9x faster for 4D interpolation. Performance-relevant GPU attributes are explored including thread scheduling, local memory characteristics, global memory hierarchy, and cache behaviors. We consider existing tetrahedral interpolation algorithms and tune based on the structure and branching capabilities of current GPUs. Global memory performance is improved by reordering and expanding the lookup table to ensure optimal access behaviors. Per multiprocessor local memory is exploited to implement optimally coalesced global memory accesses, and local memory addressing is optimized to minimize bank conflicts. We explore the impacts of lookup table density upon computation and memory access costs. Also presented are CPU-based 3D and 4D interpolators, using SSE vector operations that are faster than any previously published solution.

  12. Geothermal energy conversion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutscher, C.F.

    1997-12-31

    With the termination of favorable electricity generation pricing policies, the geothermal industry is exploring ways to improve the efficiency of existing plants and make them more cost-competitive with natural gas. The Geothermal Energy Conversion Facility (GECF) at NREL will allow researchers to study various means for increasing the thermodynamic efficiency of binary cycle geothermal plants. This work has received considerable support from the US geothermal industry and will be done in collaboration with industry members and utilities. The GECF is being constructed on NREL property at the top of South Table Mountain in Golden, Colorado. As shown in Figure 1, it consists of an electrically heated hot water loop that provides heating to a heater/vaporizer in which the working fluid vaporizes at supercritical or subcritical pressures as high as 700 psia. Both an air-cooled and water-cooled condenser will be available for condensing the working fluid. In order to minimize construction costs, available equipment from the similar INEL Heat Cycle Research Facility is being utilized.

  13. Identification of highly conserved regions in L-segment of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus and immunoinformatic prediction about potential novel vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oany, Arafat Rahman; Ahmad, Shah Adil Ishtiyaq; Hossain, Mohammad Uzzal; Jyoti, Tahmina Pervin

    2015-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a tick-borne zoonotic viral disease with a disease fatality rate between 15% and 70%. Despite the wide range of distribution, the virus (CCHFV) is basically endemic in Africa, Asia, eastern Europe, and the Middle East. Acute febrile illness associated with petechiae, disseminated intravascular coagulation, and multiple-organ failure are the main symptoms of the disease. With all these fatal effects, CCHFV is considered a huge threat as no successful therapeutic approach is currently available for the treatment of this disease. In the present study, we have used the immunoinformatics approach to design a potential epitope-based vaccine against the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase-L of CCHFV. Both the T-cell and B-cell epitopes were assessed, and the epitope "DCSSTPPDR" was found to be the most potential one, with 100% conservancy among all the strains of CCHFV. The epitope was also found to interact with both type I and II major histocompatibility complex molecules and is considered nonallergenic as well. In vivo study of our proposed peptide is advised for novel universal vaccine production, which might be an effective path to prevent CCHF disease.

  14. Relevance of baseline viral genetic heterogeneity and host factors for treatment outcome prediction in hepatitis C virus 1b-infected patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Saludes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Only about 50% of patients chronically infected with HCV genotype 1 (HCV-1 respond to treatment with pegylated interferon-alfa and ribavirin (dual therapy, and protease inhibitors have to be administered together with these drugs increasing costs and side-effects. We aimed to develop a predictive model of treatment response based on a combination of baseline clinical and viral parameters. METHODOLOGY: Seventy-four patients chronically infected with HCV-1b and treated with dual therapy were studied (53 retrospectively -training group-, and 21 prospectively -validation group-. Host and viral-related factors (viral load, and genetic variability in the E1-E2, core and Interferon Sensitivity Determining Region were assessed. Multivariate discriminant analysis and decision tree analysis were used to develop predictive models on the training group, which were then validated in the validation group. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A multivariate discriminant predictive model was generated including the following variables in decreasing order of significance: the number of viral variants in the E1-E2 region, an amino acid substitution pattern in the viral core region, the IL28B polymorphism, serum GGT and ALT levels, and viral load. Using this model treatment outcome was accurately predicted in the training group (AUROC = 0.9444; 96.3% specificity, 94.7% PPV, 75% sensitivity, 81% NPV, and the accuracy remained high in the validation group (AUROC = 0.8148, 88.9% specificity, 90.0% PPV, 75.0% sensitivity, 72.7% NPV. A second model was obtained by a decision tree analysis and showed a similarly high accuracy in the training group but a worse reproducibility in the validation group (AUROC = 0.9072 vs. 0.7361, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: The baseline predictive models obtained including both host and viral variables had a high positive predictive value in our population of Spanish HCV-1b treatment naïve patients. Accurately identifying those

  15. Extraterrestrial Viruses?

    OpenAIRE

    Jurado Hernández, Daniel José

    2017-01-01

    Fundamentals of Life - Origin and Fundamentals of Living Things. Evaluation rubric to evaluate the debate and presentation about the point of view regarding the possibility of viruses from the outer space.

  16. Optimization theory for ballistic conversion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Yanbo; Versluis, Andreas Michel; van den Berg, Albert; Eijkel, Jan C.T.

    2016-01-01

    The growing demand of renewable energy stimulates the exploration of new materials and methods for clean energy. We recently demonstrated a high efficiency and power density energy conversion mechanism by using jetted charged microdroplets, termed as ballistic energy conversion. Hereby, we model and

  17. Cosmopolitanism - Conversation with Stuart Hall

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Stuart

    2006-01-01

    Forty minute conversation between Stuart Hall and Pnina Werbner, filmed and edited by Haim Bresheeth. Synopsis by Sarah Harrison. Conversation between Stuart Hall and Pnina Werbner on the theme of Cosmopolitanism (to be shown at the Association of Social Anthropologists Silver Jubilee conference in 2006), in March 2006

  18. Conversing Life: An Autoethnographic Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelson, Christopher N.; Burton, Rod

    2012-01-01

    This autoethnography is a constructed account of a co-exploration into the nature and effects of a longitudinal dyadic conversation process from a relational constructionist perspective. The conversations, between me as participant autoethnographer and a co-participant, aimed at maximising personal learning for both. Through co-created contexts of…

  19. Wavelength conversion devices and techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stubkjær, Kristian; Jørgensen, Carsten; Danielsen, Søren Lykke

    1996-01-01

    wavelengths in an easy way and preferably without opto-electronic conversion. Here, we will first briefly look at advantages of employing optical wavelength converters in WDM networks and next review the optical wavelength conversion devices with emphasis on recent developments....

  20. Conversational Competence in Academic Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Conversational competence is a process, not a state. Ithaca does not exist, only the voyage to Ithaca. Vibrant campuses are a series of productive conversations. At its core, communicative competence in academic settings mirrors a collective search for meaning regarding the purpose and direction of a campus community. Communicative competence…

  1. HYDROKINETIC ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS: PROSPECTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    hydro-to-electric power system, which is being strongly recognized as a unique and unconventional renewable energy solution, is the marine and hydrokinetic energy conversion technology [8]. Hydrokinetic (In Stream, or water current) energy conversion implies the utilization of the kinetic energy of rivers, streams, tidal ...

  2. Speech Acts and Conversational Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geis, Michael L.

    This book unites speech act theory and conversation analysis to advance a theory of conversational competence, called the Dynamic Speech Act Theory (DSAT). In contrast to traditional speech act theory that focuses almost exclusively on intuitive assessments of isolated, constructed examples, this theory is predicated on the assumption that speech…

  3. Zika Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J.

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especi...

  4. CD44 variant 9 is a potential biomarker of tumor initiating cells predicting survival outcome in hepatitis C virus-positive patients with resected hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakehashi, Anna; Ishii, Naomi; Sugihara, Eiji; Gi, Min; Saya, Hideyuki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-05-01

    This study investigated whether the expression of CD44 variant 9 (CD44v9) might be a functional marker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells in primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) of hepatitis C virus (HCV)(+) patients and provide an indicator of patient survival, as well as associated mechanisms. A total of 90 HCV(+) HCC patients who underwent surgery from 2006 to 2011 were enrolled and monitored for 2-8 years. Expression of CD44v9 was validated immunohistochemically in all HCCs, followed by comparative proteome, survival, and clinicopathological analyses. CD44 variant 8--10 was further evaluated in diethylnitrosamine-induced HCCs of C57Bl/6J mice. Focally localized CD44v(+) cells with a membranous staining pattern were detected in human HCV(+) and mouse HCCs. CD44v9(+) cells of HCCs were predominantly negative for Ki67 and P-p38, indicating decrease of cell proliferation in the CD44v9(+) tumor cell population, likely to be related to suppression of intracellular oxidative stress due to activation of Nrf2-mediated signaling, DNA repair, and inhibition of xenobiotic metabolism. CD44v9 IHC evaluation in 90 HCV(+) HCC cases revealed that positive expression was significantly associated with poor overall and recurrence-free survival, a younger age, poor histological differentiation of HCCs, and high alkaline phosphatase levels compared with patients with negative expression. CD44v9 is concluded to be a potential biomarker of tumor-initiating stem-like cells and a prognostic marker in HCV(+) HCC patients associated with Nrf2-mediated resistance to oxidative stress. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  5. Predictive value of pharmacokinetics-adjusted phenotypic susceptibility on response to ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs) in human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects failing prior PI therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eron, Joseph J; Park, Jeong-Gun; Haubrich, Richard; Aweeka, Francesca; Bastow, Barbara; Pakes, Gary E; Yu, Song; Wu, Hulin; Richman, Douglas D

    2009-06-01

    The activities of protease inhibitors in vivo may depend on plasma concentrations and viral susceptibility. This nonrandomized, open-label study evaluated the relationship of the inhibitory quotient (IQ [the ratio of drug exposure to viral phenotypic susceptibility]) to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) change for ritonavir-enhanced protease inhibitors (PIs). Subjects on PI-based regimens replaced their PIs with ritonavir-enhanced indinavir (IDV/r) 800/200 mg, fosamprenavir (FPV/r) 700/100 mg, or lopinavir (LPV/r) 400/200 mg twice daily. Pharmacokinetics were assessed at day 14; follow-up lasted 24 weeks. Associations between IQ and VL changes were examined. Fifty-three subjects enrolled, 12 on IDV/r, 33 on FPV/r, and 8 on LPV/r. Median changes (n-fold) (FC) of 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) to the study PI were high. Median 2-week VL changes were -0.7, -0.1, and -1.0 log(10) for IDV/r, FPV/r, and LPV/r. With FPV/r, correlations between the IQ and the 2-week change in VL were significant (Spearman's r range, -0.39 to -0.50; P PI-experienced subjects with highly resistant HIV-1, short-term VL responses to RTV-enhanced FPV/r correlated best with baseline susceptibility. The IQ improved correlation in analyses of all arms where a greater range of virologic responses was observed.

  6. PREVALENCE OF THE HEPATITIS C VIRUS AMONG UNIVERSITY EMPLOYEES IN SÃO PAULO, SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL: predictive factors and geoprocessing spatial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cássio Vieira de OLIVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background There are limited studies on the prevalence and risk factors associated with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Objective Identify the prevalence and risk factors for HCV infection in university employees of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. Methods Digital serological tests for anti-HCV have been performed in 3153 volunteers. For the application of digital testing was necessary to withdraw a drop of blood through a needlestick. The positive cases were performed for genotyping and RNA. Chi-square and Fisher’s exact test were used, with P-value 40 years, blood transfusion, injectable drugs, inhalable drugs (InDU, injectable Gluconergam®, glass syringes, tattoos, hemodialysis and sexual promiscuity. Age (P=0.01, OR 5.6, CI 1.4 to 22.8, InDU (P<0.0001, OR=96.8, CI 24.1 to 388.2, Gluconergam® (P=0.0009, OR=44.4, CI 4.7 to 412.7 and hemodialysis (P=0.0004, OR=90.1, CI 7.5 – 407.1 were independent predictors. Spatial analysis of the prevalence with socioeconomic indices, Gross Domestic Product and Human Development Index by the geoprocessing technique showed no positive correlation. Conclusions The prevalence of HCV infection was 0.7%. The independent risk factors for HCV infection were age, InDU, Gluconergan® and hemodialysis. There was no spatial correlation of HCV prevalence with local economic factors.

  7. Interferon gamma-inducible protein 10: a predictive marker of successful treatment response in hepatitis C virus/HIV-coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeremski, Marija; Markatou, Marianthi; Brown, Queenie B; Dorante, Gary; Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Talal, Andrew H

    2007-07-01

    Elevated pretreatment interferon (IFN) gamma-inducible protein 10 (IP-10/CXCL10) levels are a marker of treatment nonresponse in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-monoinfected patients. We undertook this study to determine if IP-10 is a marker of treatment outcome in HCV/HIV-coinfected patients. Nineteen HCV/HIV-coinfected patients were treated with weight-based pegylated (PEG) IFNalpha-2b (1.5 microg/kg) once weekly plus weight-based ribavirin (1000 or 1200 mg) daily for up to 48 weeks. Plasma IP-10, monokine induced by IFNgamma/CXCL9 (Mig), and IFN-inducible T-cell alpha-chemoattractant/CXCL11 (I-TAC) levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on samples obtained frequently during the first 3 PEG-IFN doses and throughout treatment. Median pretreatment plasma IP-10 (interquartile range [IQR]) levels were significantly lower in virological responders (n=6) at 217 (IQR: 181-301) pg/mL compared with nonresponders (n=13) at 900 (IQR: 628-2048) pg/mL (P=0.002), whereas pretreatment Mig and I-TAC levels did not differ significantly. Plasma IP-10 levels of 400 pg/mL before treatment and on days 7 and 14 could be used to identify likely coinfected PEG-IFN/ribavirin nonresponders. PEG-IFN-induced elevations in IP-10 were greater in virological responders than in nonresponders (approximately 10-fold vs. approximately 4-fold) after the first PEG-IFN dose. IP-10 may be a biomarker of HCV treatment outcome in difficult-to-treat HCV/HIV-coinfected patients.

  8. Strong anti-Epstein Barr virus (EBV) or cytomegalovirus (CMV) cellular immune responses predict survival and a favourable response to anti-tuberculosis therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagu, Tumaini; Aboud, Said; Rao, Martin; Matee, Mecky; Axelsson, Rebecca; Valentini, Davide; Mugusi, Ferdinand; Zumla, Alimuddin; Maeurer, Markus

    2017-03-01

    Intact immune responses to cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) represent a biologically and clinically relevant correlate of 'immunological fitness' in humans. However, there is a lack of knowledge concerning anti-EBV or anti-CMV responses in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), in whom aberrant immune responses may promote progression of clinical disease. Venous blood samples were obtained at the time of (sputum smear positive) pulmonary TB diagnosis. A whole blood assay was performed by exposing PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) to a panel of infectious antigens, including CMV, EBV and mycobacterial proteins. Cell culture supernatants were collected after seven days and interferon gamma (IFN-γ) was measured using a sandwich ELISA. Patients received standard first line anti-tuberculosis rifampicin (R)/isoniazid (H)/ethambutol (E)/pyrazinamide (Z) for two months followed by RH for four months. PBMCs from cured patients (after treatment completion) exhibited significantly stronger IFN-γ responses to CMV (p=0.035), EBV (p=0.006) or Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 (p=0.043) at the time of diagnosis as compared to patients who succumbed to TB during treatment. IFN-γ responses to other viral (H5N1, HSV-1) as well as other mycobacterial (Ag85A, Rv2958c, Rv0447c) antigens were not found to be significantly different among patients who were cured or those who succumbed to TB. Increased cellular immune responses to CMV and EBV antigens at the time of diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis are associated with increased survival after a standard six months anti-TB therapy. CVM and EBV antigens may represent "intrinsic markers for immune fitness" and guide improved TB therapies including host-directed therapies. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Ask about Your Treatment Research Newcastle Disease Virus (PDQ®)–Patient Version Overview Go to Health Professional ... Question 8 ). Questions and Answers About Newcastle Disease Virus What is Newcastle disease virus? Newcastle disease virus ( ...

  10. Powassan (POW) Virus Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Professionals Related Topics For International Travelers Powassan (POW) Virus Basics Download this fact sheet formatted for print: ... POW) Virus Fact Sheet (PDF) What is Powassan virus? Powassan (POW) virus is a flavivirus that is ...

  11. Conversions in laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute versus chronic cholecystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selmani, Rexhep; Karagjozov, Aleksandar; Stefanovska, Vesna

    2013-01-01

    Early laparoscopic cholecystectomy imposes itself as an option of choice for treatment of acute cholecystitis, while the rate of conversions to open procedure represents a key parameter for evaluating the outcome. The aim of this paper was to evaluate the results of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy in acute versus chronic cholecystitis through determining the conversion rate in open method, as well as to analye some predictive factors that may impact the decision to convert to open. An analytical case control study was conducted at the University Clinic for Digestive Surgery in Skopje within a period of 27 months. The first group included 62 patients with acute cholecystitis on whom the laparoscopic cholecystectomy was performed in the period from zero to the seventh day from the onset of symptoms. The second group included 62 patients with chronic cholecystitis who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Gender, age, history of cholecystitis, the time passed from the first symptoms till laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the duration of the intervention were analysed as factors that can possibly act on conversion. There were no significant differences (p>0.05) between the group of patients with acute and the one with chronic cholecystitis due to conversion rate. In both groups, there was a significant difference in conversion due to the duration of the laparoscopic cholecystectomy (pacute cholecystitis also due to the time passed from the first symptoms till the laparoscopic intervention (p<0.01). The rate of conversions can be reduced with a prompt approach to predictive factors.

  12. Ecosystem simplification, biodiversity loss and plant virus emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roossinck, Marilyn J; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2015-02-01

    Plant viruses can emerge into crops from wild plant hosts, or conversely from domestic (crop) plants into wild hosts. Changes in ecosystems, including loss of biodiversity and increases in managed croplands, can impact the emergence of plant virus disease. Although data are limited, in general the loss of biodiversity is thought to contribute to disease emergence. More in-depth studies have been done for human viruses, but studies with plant viruses suggest similar patterns, and indicate that simplification of ecosystems through increased human management may increase the emergence of viral diseases in crops. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Roadmap on optical energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriskina, Svetlana V.; Green, Martin A.; Catchpole, Kylie; Yablonovitch, Eli; Beard, Matthew C.; Okada, Yoshitaka; Lany, Stephan; Gershon, Talia; Zakutayev, Andriy; Tahersima, Mohammad H.; Sorger, Volker J.; Naughton, Michael J.; Kempa, Krzysztof; Dagenais, Mario; Yao, Yuan; Xu, Lu; Sheng, Xing; Bronstein, Noah D.; Rogers, John A.; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Wu, Di M.; Wisser, Michael D.; Salleo, Alberto; Dionne, Jennifer; Bermel, Peter; Greffet, Jean-Jacques; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin; Manor, Assaf; Rotschild, Carmel; Raman, Aaswath; Zhu, Linxiao; Fan, Shanhui; Chen, Gang

    2016-07-01

    For decades, progress in the field of optical (including solar) energy conversion was dominated by advances in the conventional concentrating optics and materials design. In recent years, however, conceptual and technological breakthroughs in the fields of nanophotonics and plasmonics combined with a better understanding of the thermodynamics of the photon energy-conversion processes reshaped the landscape of energy-conversion schemes and devices. Nanostructured devices and materials that make use of size quantization effects to manipulate photon density of states offer a way to overcome the conventional light absorption limits. Novel optical spectrum splitting and photon-recycling schemes reduce the entropy production in the optical energy-conversion platforms and boost their efficiencies. Optical design concepts are rapidly expanding into the infrared energy band, offering new approaches to harvest waste heat, to reduce the thermal emission losses, and to achieve noncontact radiative cooling of solar cells as well as of optical and electronic circuitries. Light-matter interaction enabled by nanophotonics and plasmonics underlie the performance of the third- and fourth-generation energy-conversion devices, including up- and down-conversion of photon energy, near-field radiative energy transfer, and hot electron generation and harvesting. Finally, the increased market penetration of alternative solar energy-conversion technologies amplifies the role of cost-driven and environmental considerations. This roadmap on optical energy conversion provides a snapshot of the state of the art in optical energy conversion, remaining challenges, and most promising approaches to address these challenges. Leading experts authored 19 focused short sections of the roadmap where they share their vision on a specific aspect of this burgeoning research field. The roadmap opens up with a tutorial section, which introduces major concepts and terminology. It is our hope that the roadmap

  14. Development of a highly sensitive glycan microarray for quantifying AFP-L3 for early prediction of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Shiou Wu

    Full Text Available The α-fetoprotein fraction L3 (AFP-L3, which is synthesized by malignant cells and incorporates a fucosylated oligosaccharide, has been investigated as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Quantification of AFP-L3 by conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA has not always produced reliable results for serum samples with low AFP, and thus we evaluated the clinical utility of quantifying AFP-L3 using a new and highly sensitive glycan microarray assay. Sera from 9 patients with chronic hepatitis B and 32 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV-related HCC were tested for AFP-L3 level using the glycan microarray. Additionally, we compared receiver operator characteristic curves for the ELISA and glycan microarray methods for determination of the AFP-L3: AFP-L1 ratio in patient samples. This ratio was calculated for 8 HCC patients who underwent transarterial embolization therapy pre- or post-treatment with AFP-L3. Glycan microarrays showed that the AFP-L3 ratio of HBV-related HCC patients was significantly higher than that measured for chronic hepatitis B patients. Overall parameters for estimating AFP-L3% in HCC samples were as follows: sensitivity, 53.13%; specificity, 88.89%; and area under the curve, 0.75. The elevated AFP-L3% in the 8 patients with HBV-related HCC was strongly associated with HCC progression. Following one month of transarterial embolization therapy, the relative mean AFP-L3% decreased significantly. In addition, we compared Fut8 gene expression between paired tumor and non-tumor tissues from 24 patients with HBV-related HCC. The Fut8 mRNA expression was significantly increased in tumorous tissues in these patients than that in non-tumor tissue controls. Higher expression of Fut8 mRNA in tumorous tissues in these patients was associated with poor differentiation than well and moderate differentiation. Our results describe a new glycan microarray for the sensitive and rapid

  15. Development of a highly sensitive glycan microarray for quantifying AFP-L3 for early prediction of hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen-Shiou; Lee, Teng-Yu; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Yen, Chia-Jui; Huang, Wei-Chien; Wu, Chung-Yi; Yu, Yung-Luen

    2014-01-01

    The α-fetoprotein fraction L3 (AFP-L3), which is synthesized by malignant cells and incorporates a fucosylated oligosaccharide, has been investigated as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Quantification of AFP-L3 by conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has not always produced reliable results for serum samples with low AFP, and thus we evaluated the clinical utility of quantifying AFP-L3 using a new and highly sensitive glycan microarray assay. Sera from 9 patients with chronic hepatitis B and 32 patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC were tested for AFP-L3 level using the glycan microarray. Additionally, we compared receiver operator characteristic curves for the ELISA and glycan microarray methods for determination of the AFP-L3: AFP-L1 ratio in patient samples. This ratio was calculated for 8 HCC patients who underwent transarterial embolization therapy pre- or post-treatment with AFP-L3. Glycan microarrays showed that the AFP-L3 ratio of HBV-related HCC patients was significantly higher than that measured for chronic hepatitis B patients. Overall parameters for estimating AFP-L3% in HCC samples were as follows: sensitivity, 53.13%; specificity, 88.89%; and area under the curve, 0.75. The elevated AFP-L3% in the 8 patients with HBV-related HCC was strongly associated with HCC progression. Following one month of transarterial embolization therapy, the relative mean AFP-L3% decreased significantly. In addition, we compared Fut8 gene expression between paired tumor and non-tumor tissues from 24 patients with HBV-related HCC. The Fut8 mRNA expression was significantly increased in tumorous tissues in these patients than that in non-tumor tissue controls. Higher expression of Fut8 mRNA in tumorous tissues in these patients was associated with poor differentiation than well and moderate differentiation. Our results describe a new glycan microarray for the sensitive and rapid quantification of

  16. Direct conversion of fusion energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Markus

    2003-03-01

    Deuterium and tritium are expected to be used as fuel in the first fusion reactors. Energy is released as kinetic energy of ions and neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. One way to convert the kinetic energy to electrical energy, is to let the ions and neutrons hit the reactor wall and convert the heat that is caused by the particle bombardment to electrical energy with ordinary thermal conversion. If the kinetic energy of the ions instead is converted directly to electrical energy, a higher efficiency of the energy conversion is possible. The majority of the fusion energy is released as kinetic energy of neutrons, when deuterium reacts with tritium. Fusion reactions such as the D-D reactions, the D-{sup 3}He reaction and the p-{sup 11}B reaction, where a larger part of the fusion energy becomes kinetic energy of charged particles, appears therefore more suitable for direct conversion. Since they have lower reactivity than the D-T reaction, they need a larger {beta}B{sup 2}{sub 0} to give sufficiently high fusion power density. Because of this, the fusion configurations spherical torus (ST) and field-reversed configuration (FRC), where high {beta} values are possible, appear interesting. Rosenbluth and Hinton come to the conclusion that efficient direct conversion isn't possible in closed field line systems and that open geometries, which facilitate direct conversion, provide inadequate confinement for D-{sup 3}He. It is confirmed in this study that it doesn't seem possible to achieve as high direct conversion efficiency in closed systems as in open systems. ST and FRC fusion power plants that utilize direct conversion seem however interesting. Calculations with the help of Maple indicate that the reactor parameters needed for a D-D ST and a D{sub 3} He ST hopefully are possible to achieve. The best energy conversion option for a D-D or D{sub 3} He ST appears to be direct electrodynamic conversion (DEC) together with ordinary thermal conversion

  17. Conversion of Abbandoned Military Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiva Marcinkevičiūtė

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses the situation of abandoned military sites, their value and significance of their conservation. It also reviews their impact on their environment and their potential in tourism, environmental, economic and social spheres. Further the positive experiences in military sites' conversion are studied. The importance of society's involvement in the conversions is discussed. The situation of XIX-XX age's military object's, the significance of their conservation and their potential in tourism market is separately analysed. The results of two researches are introduced, one of which inquires about the Lithuanian military objects' potential in tourism sphere, another one explores the possibilities of conversion. Article in Lithuanian

  18. Computer Viruses. Technology Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponder, Tim, Comp.; Ropog, Marty, Comp.; Keating, Joseph, Comp.

    This document provides general information on computer viruses, how to help protect a computer network from them, measures to take if a computer becomes infected. Highlights include the origins of computer viruses; virus contraction; a description of some common virus types (File Virus, Boot Sector/Partition Table Viruses, Trojan Horses, and…

  19. Viruses Avian influenza, bovine herpes, bovine viral diarrhea virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... human cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, human immunodeficiency virus I, influenza, lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus, measles, papilloma, rabies, respiratory syncitial virus, simian immunodeficiency virus, simian virus 40. Bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi (Lyme disease), Moraxella bovis, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, ...

  20. Metric Conversion: Remedy or Rip-Off?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenck, John P.

    1975-01-01

    Opinions on metric conversion from seven large industrial organizations reflect inadequate evidence predicating conversion, no compelling need for conversion, opposition to hard conversion, lack of information about the financial and social costs of conversion, and feelings that metrics as the sole language of measurement will be regressive.…

  1. Computer viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohen, F.B.

    1986-01-01

    This thesis investigates a recently discovered vulnerability in computer systems which opens the possibility that a single individual with an average user's knowledge could cause widespread damage to information residing in computer networks. This vulnerability is due to a transitive integrity corrupting mechanism called a computer virus which causes corrupted information to spread from program to program. Experiments have shown that a virus can spread at an alarmingly rapid rate from user to user, from system to system, and from network to network, even when the best-availability security techniques are properly used. Formal definitions of self-replication, evolution, viruses, and protection mechanisms are used to prove that any system that allows sharing, general functionality, and transitivity of information flow cannot completely prevent viral attack. Computational aspects of viruses are examined, and several undecidable problems are shown. It is demonstrated that a virus may evolve so as to generate any computable sequence. Protection mechanisms are explored, and the design of computer networks that prevent both illicit modification and dissemination of information are given. Administration and protection of information networks based on partial orderings are examined, and probably correct automated administrative assistance is introduced.

  2. Cognitive style, cortical stimulation, and the conversion hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, David J M; Hamilton, Roy H; Messing, Samuel B; Desantis, Jennifer H; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    What does it mean to have a "verbal cognitive style?" We adopt the view that a cognitive style represents a cognitive strategy, and we posit the conversion hypothesis - the notion that individuals with a proclivity for the verbal cognitive style tend to code nonverbal information into the verbal domain. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) to disrupt this hypothesized verbal conversion strategy. Following our previous research implicating left supramarginal gyrus (SMG) in the verbal cognitive style, we used an fMRI paradigm to localize left SMG activity for each subject, then these functional peaks became rTMS targets. Left SMG stimulation impaired performance during a task requiring conversion from pictures to verbal labels. The magnitude of this effect was predicted by individuals' level of verbal cognitive style, supporting the hypothesized role of left SMG in the verbal labeling strategy, and more generally supporting the conversion hypothesis for cognitive styles.

  3. Cognitive style, cortical stimulation, and the conversion hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David JM Kraemer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to have a verbal cognitive style? We adopt the view that a cognitive style represents a cognitive strategy, and we posit the conversion hypothesis – the notion that individuals with a proclivity for the verbal cognitive style tend to code nonverbal information into the verbal domain. Here we used repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to disrupt this hypothesized verbal conversion strategy. Following our previous research implicating left supramarginal gyrus (SMG in the verbal cognitive style, we used an fMRI paradigm to localize left SMG activity for each subject, then these functional peaks became rTMS targets. Left SMG stimulation impaired performance during a task requiring conversion from pictures to verbal labels. The magnitude of this effect was predicted by individuals’ level of verbal cognitive style, supporting the hypothesized role of left SMG in the verbal labeling strategy, and more generally supporting the conversion hypothesis for cognitive styles.

  4. Environmental monitoring handbook for coal conversion facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salk, M.S.; DeCicco, S.G. (eds.)

    1978-05-01

    The primary objectives of the Department of Energy's (DOE) coal conversion program are to demonstrate the environmental acceptability, technical feasibility, and economic viability of various technologies for gaseous, liquid, and solid fuels from coal. The Environmental Monitoring Handbook for Coal Conversion Facilities will help accomplish the objective of environmental acceptability by guiding the planning and execution of socioeconomic and environmental monitoring programs for demonstration facilities. These programs will provide information adequate to (1) predict, insofar as is possible, the potential impacts of construction and operation of a coal conversion plant, (2) verify the occurrence of these or any other impacts during construction and operation, (3) determine the adequacy of mitigating measures to protect the environment, (4) develop effluent source terms for process discharges, and (5) determine the effectiveness of pollution control equipment. Although useful in a variety of areas, the handbook is intended primarily for contractors who, as industrial partners with DOE, are building coal conversion plants. For the contractor it is a practical guide on (1) the methodology for developing site- and process-specific environmental monitoring programs, (2) state-of-the-art sampling and analytical techniques, and (3) impact analyses.To correspond to the phases of project activity, the subject matter is divided into four stages of monitoring: (1) a reconnaissance or synoptic survey, (2) preconstruction or baseline, (3) construction, and (4) operation, including process monitoring (prepared by Radian Corp., McLean, Va.). For each stage of monitoring, guidelines are given on socioeconomics, aquatic and terrestrial ecology, air quality and meteorology, surface and groundwater quality, geohydrology and soil survey, and surface water hydrology.

  5. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S.

    2017-01-01

    in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. Methods: WLWH between 18......-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes...... RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. Conclusion: In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies...

  6. Electrostrictive energy conversion in polyurethane nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guyomar, D.; Lebrun, L.; Putson, C.; Cottinet, P.-J.; Guiffard, B.; Muensit, S.

    2009-07-01

    Electrostrictive polymers have demonstrated an ability to convert mechanical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. This energy conversion has been exploited in an extensive range of applications, including sensors and actuators. Recently, electrostrictive polymers have been investigated as electroactive materials for energy harvesting. The present work aims at establishing an analytical modeling based on electrostrictive equations for predicting a current that can be obtained from the first flexural mode of a beam which was attached by the electrostrictive polymers. The study was carried out on polyurethane films, either without filler or filled with nanosized SiC or a carbon nanopowder. Experimental measurements of the harvested current have been compared to the theoretical behavior predicted by the proposed model. A good agreement was observed between the two sets of data, which consequently validated that the modeling can be used to optimize the choice of materials. It was also shown that the incorporation of nanofillers in polyurethane increased the obtained current.

  7. Effective communication during difficult conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polito, Jacquelyn M

    2013-06-01

    A strong interest and need exist in the workplace today to master the skills of conducting difficult conversations. Theories and strategies abound, yet none seem to have found the magic formula with universal appeal and success. If it is such an uncomfortable skill to master is it better to avoid or initiate such conversations with employees? Best practices and evidence-based management guide us to the decision that quality improvement dictates effective communication, even when difficult. This brief paper will offer some suggestions for strategies to manage difficult conversations with employees. Mastering the skills of conducting difficult conversations is clearly important to keeping lines of communication open and productive. Successful communication skills may actually help to avert confrontation through employee engagement, commitment and appropriate corresponding behavior

  8. A Conversation Well Worth Remembering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolven-Allen, John

    2009-01-01

    To mark the 200th anniversary of Charles Darwin's birth, a special event was held at Oxford, which included a "Conversation" between Professor Richard Dawkins and Bishop Richard Harries. Here we present a personal reminiscence of the event.

  9. Compact energy conversion module Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This STTR project delivers a compact vibration-based Energy Conversion Module (ECM) that powers sensors for purposes like structural health monitoring (SHM). NASA...

  10. Ocean energy conversion - A reality

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sarkar, A.

    -depth analysis of application and achievements of OTEC, tidal energy, impact of astronomical forces on tide, prospects of tidal power plants, wave energy conversion and its mathematical approach for both linear and non-linear waves, economic viability, problems...

  11. Conversational topics in transsexual persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Borsel, John; Cayzeele, Miet; Heirman, Eva; T'sjoen, Guy

    2014-06-01

    Abstract In general, speech language therapy for transsexual persons focuses on pitch and pitch variation and more recently also on resonance. Other communicative aspects are dealt with far less often, especially language. This study investigated to what extent conversational topics might need attention in therapy for transsexual persons. A total of 111 males, 116 females, 28 male-to-female and 18 female-to-male transsexuals were asked to indicate on a list with 34 topics how often they speak about each topic (never, sometimes, often) in conversations with males, with females and in a gender mixed group. Results showed that transsexual persons behave in accordance with the desired gender. However, they also tend to adopt a position depending on the gender of their conversational partner. It can be concluded that in general it is not necessary to pay attention to conversational topics in therapy for transsexual persons.

  12. Enzymes for improved biomass conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunecky, Roman; Himmel, Michael E.

    2016-02-02

    Disclosed herein are enzymes and combinations of the enzymes useful for the hydrolysis of cellulose and the conversion of biomass. Methods of degrading cellulose and biomass using enzymes and cocktails of enzymes are also disclosed.

  13. Conversion Tables For PID Controllers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonín VÍTEČEK

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the mutual conversion of the controller adjustable parameters for six different transfer function forms of the PID controllers. These considered forms are the most frequent used in the technical experience.

  14. Energy Conversion in Laser Propulsion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Larson, C

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of energy conversion in laser propulsion is reported and compared to experimental studies of a laboratory scale propulsion device that absorbs laser energy and converts that energy to propellant kinetic energy...

  15. Hendra virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Deborah

    2014-12-01

    Hendra virus infection of horses occurred sporadically between 1994 and 2010 as a result of spill-over from the viral reservoir in Australian mainland flying-foxes, and occasional onward transmission to people also followed from exposure to affected horses. An unprecedented number of outbreaks were recorded in 2011 leading to heightened community concern. Release of an inactivated subunit vaccine for horses against Hendra virus represents the first commercially available product that is focused on mitigating the impact of a Biosafety Level 4 pathogen. Through preventing the development of acute Hendra virus disease in horses, vaccine use is also expected to reduce the risk of transmission of infection to people. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. IL28B, HLA-C, and KIR variants additively predict response to therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus infection in a European Cohort: a cross-sectional study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayaprakash Suppiah

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available To date, drug response genes have not proved as useful in clinical practice as was anticipated at the start of the genomic era. An exception is in the treatment of chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV genotype 1 infection with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin (PegIFN/R. Viral clearance is achieved in 40%-50% of patients. Interleukin 28B (IL28B genotype predicts treatment-induced and spontaneous clearance. To improve the predictive value of this genotype, we studied the combined effect of variants of IL28B with human leukocyte antigen C (HLA-C, and its ligands the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR, which have previously been implicated in HCV viral control.We genotyped chronic hepatitis C (CHC genotype 1 patients with PegIFN/R treatment-induced clearance (n = 417 and treatment failure (n = 493, and 234 individuals with spontaneous clearance, for HLA-C C1 versus C2, presence of inhibitory and activating KIR genes, and two IL28B SNPs, rs8099917 and rs12979860. All individuals were Europeans or of European descent. IL28B SNP rs8099917 "G" was associated with absence of treatment-induced clearance (odds ratio [OR] 2.19, p = 1.27×10(-8, 1.67-2.88 and absence of spontaneous clearance (OR 3.83, p = 1.71×10(-14, 2.67-5.48 of HCV, as was rs12979860, with slightly lower ORs. The HLA-C C2C2 genotype was also over-represented in patients who failed treatment (OR 1.52, p = 0.024, 1.05-2.20, but was not associated with spontaneous clearance. Prediction of treatment failure improved from 66% with IL28B to 80% using both genes in this cohort (OR 3.78, p = 8.83×10(-6, 2.03-7.04. There was evidence that KIR2DL3 and KIR2DS2 carriage also altered HCV treatment response in combination with HLA-C and IL28B.Genotyping for IL28B, HLA-C, and KIR genes improves prediction of HCV treatment response. These findings support a role for natural killer (NK cell activation in PegIFN/R treatment-induced clearance, partially mediated by IL28B.

  17. Paradoxical therapy in conversion reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Ataoglu, Ahmet; Ozcetin, Adnan; Icmeli, Celalettin; Ozbulut, Omer

    2003-01-01

    Paradoxical therapy consists of suggesting that the patient intentionally engages in the unwanted behaviour such as performing compulsive ritual or wanting a conversion attack. In this study, the subjects were selected by the emergency unit psychiatrist from patients who were admitted to the emergency unit with pseudoseizure. The diagnoses was based on DSM-IV criteria. Paradoxical intention was applied to half of the 30 patients with conversion disorders; the other half were treated with diaz...

  18. Limits in virus filtration capability? Impact of virus quality and spike level on virus removal with xenotropic murine leukemia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roush, David J; Myrold, Adam; Burnham, Michael S; And, Joseph V; Hughes, Joseph V

    2015-01-01

    aggregate (5 vol/vol %). Significant differences were seen for the process performance over a number of lots of the less-pure Ultra 1 virus preparations. Experiments utilizing a developmental lot of the chromatographic purified XMuLV (Ultra 2 Development lot) that had elevated levels of host cell residuals (vs. the final Ultra 2 preparations) suggest that these contaminant residuals can impact virus filter fouling, even if the virus prep is essentially monodisperse. Process studies utilizing an Ultra 2 virus with substantially less host cell residuals and highly monodispersed virus particles demonstrated superior performance and an LRV in excess of 7.7 log10 . A model was constructed demonstrating the linear dependence of filtration flux versus filter loading which can be used to predict the V75 for a range of virus spike levels conditions using this highly purified virus. Fine tuning the virus spike level with this model can ultimately maximize the LRV for the virus filter step, essentially adding the LRV equivalent of another process step (i.e. protein A or CEX chromatography). © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  19. Data mining of routine laboratory tests can predict liver disease progression in Egyptian diabetic patients with hepatitis C virus (G4) infection: a cohort study of 71 806 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Yasmin; Awad, Abobakr; Alakel, Wafaa; Doss, Wahid; Awad, Tahany; Mabrouk, Mahasen

    2018-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and diabetes mellitus (DM) are prevalent diseases worldwide, associated with significant morbidity, mortality, and mutual association. The aims of this study were as follows: (i) find the prevalence of DM among 71 806 Egyptian patients with chronic HCV infection and its effect on liver disease progression and (ii) using data mining of routine tests to predict hepatic fibrosis in diabetic patients with HCV infection. A retrospective multicentered study included laboratory and histopathological data of 71 806 patients with HCV infection collected by Egyptian National Committee for control of viral hepatitis. Using data mining analysis, we constructed decision tree algorithm to assess predictors of fibrosis progression in diabetic patients with HCV. Overall, 12 018 (16.8%) patients were diagnosed as having diabetes [6428: fasting blood glucose ≥126 mg/dl (9%) and 5590: fasting blood glucose ≥110-126 mg/dl (7.8%)]. DM was significantly associated with advanced age, high BMI and α-fetoprotein (AFP), and low platelets and serum albumin (P≤0.001). Advanced liver fibrosis (F3-F4) was significantly correlated with DM (P≤0.001) irrespective of age. Of 16 attributes, decision tree model for fibrosis showed AFP was most decisive with cutoff of 5.25 ng/ml as starting point of fibrosis. AFP level greater than cutoff in patients was the first important splitting attribute; age and platelet count were second important splitting attributes. (i) Chronic HCV is significantly associated with DM (16.8%). (ii) Advanced age, high BMI and AFP, low platelets count and albumin show significant association with DM in HCV. (iii) AFP cutoff of 5.25 is a starting point of fibrosis development and integrated into mathematical model to predict development of liver fibrosis in diabetics with HCV (G4) infection.

  20. Marburg virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdle, W R

    1976-01-01

    Marburg virus disease, which produced 20 per cent mortality when it first occured during 1967 in Germany and Yugoslavia, recently appeared again in South Africa. The source of the first outbreak was monkeys shipped from Africa; the origin of the second episode is unclear. Because distribution of the virus in nature is unknown, its threat to man cannot be readily determined. Differential laboratory diagnoses of hemorrhagic fevers should be encouraged in order to learn more about the epidemiology of these diseases and to better assess the risks which their etiologic agents may pose for attending medical personnel.

  1. Learning-Disabled Children as Conversational Partners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahue, Mavis

    1983-01-01

    Research is reviewed on conversational competence in learning disabled (LD) children. LD children are viewed as eager to fulfill conversational responsibilities while compensating for linguistic inadequacies. Findings emphasize the importance of teaching conversational skills. (CL)

  2. Remote sensing and geographic information systems to predict the density of ruminants, hosts of Rift Valley fever virus in the Sahel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pin-Diop, Raphaëlle; Touré, Ibra; Lancelot, Renaud; Ndiaye, Magatte; Chavernac, David

    2007-01-01

    Rift Valley fever (RVF) is an acute arboviral disease of domestic ungulates and humans in Africa and the Middle East. Since the first epidemic in 1987, Senegal has been confronted with recurrent episodes of the disease. This study aimed to model spatial distribution of ruminants in the agropastoral area of Barkedji (Senegal) where the disease is enzootic. In this Sahelian ecosystem, livestock distribution mainly depends on the availability of resources. Accordingly, remote sensing and geographic information systems (GIS) were used to seek environmental indicators of livestock density. A high-resolution Landsat image was associated with landscape field data to describe the land-cover. A series of normalized difference vegetation index values gave an estimation of the phytomass. In addition the compounds of herders in the study zone were located and sampled. Three surveys were conducted during the rainy season to record the number of herds in each compound of the sample. All these data were overlaid in the GIS. A discriminant analysis was performed to associate the observed herd density with environmental data and to develop a predictive model for the entire study zone. The final result was a 1-km resolution raster map of herd density during a normal rainy season.

  3. Evaluation of Non-Viral Surrogate Markers as Predictive Indicators for Monitoring Progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection: An Eight-Year Analysis in a Regional Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafatpanah, Houshang; Essmailian, Leila; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rosita; Norouzi, Mehdi; Sarvghad, Mohammad Reza; Hosseinpour, Ali Mohammad; Sharebiani, Hiva; Rezaee, S A Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Suitable methods for clinical monitoring of HIV-infected patients are crucial in resource-poor settings. Demographic data, clinical staging, and laboratory findings for 112 asymptomatic subjects positive for HIV were assessed at the first admission and the last visit from 2002 to 2010. Cox regression analysis showed hemoglobin (Hb) (HR = 0.643, P = 0.021) to be a predictive indicator for disease progression, while CD4, CD8, and platelet counts showed low HRs, despite having significant probability values. Hb and total lymphocyte count (TLC) rapidly declined from stage II to III (10.9 and 29.6%, respectively). Reduced CD4 and platelet counts and Hb during stage I were associated with disease progression, and TLC was correlated with CD4 counts at the last follow-up (P analysis suggested that a TLC cutoff of 1,800 cell/mm(3) was more reliable in this region. Statistical analysis and data mining findings showed that Hb and TLC, and their rapid decline from stage II to III, in addition to reduced platelet count, could be valuable markers for a surrogate algorithm for monitoring of HIV-infected subjects and starting anti-viral therapy in the absence of sophisticated detection assays.

  4. The Wavelength Conversion in WDM Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Bahleda

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article we deal with a problem of wavelength conversion in WDM networks and with the wavelength conversion impact on throughput of network. The throughput of networks is determined in terms of blocking probability. The optical networks can be built without wavelength conversion or with full or limited wavelength conversion. Different traffic models are designed for different types of wavelength conversions, which describe performance of wavelength conversion. I describe some results of these models.

  5. Presbycusis and Conversation: Elderly Interactants Adjusting to Multiple Hearing Losses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaume, William A.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the hypothesis predicting that losses in a speaker's content and relational listening abilities associated with presbycusis will have significant actor effects on a speaker's own conversational behavior such that he will exhibit decreased aligning actions, decreased relational dynamism, and decreased verbal immediacy. (24 references) (CK)

  6. Bacterial vaginosis, human papilloma virus and herpes viridae do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding in women living with HIV in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessman, Maria; Thorsteinsson, Kristina; Jensen, Jørgen S; Storgaard, Merete; Rönsholt, Frederikke F; Johansen, Isik S; Pedersen, Gitte; Nørregård Nielsen, Lars; Bonde, Jesper; Katzenstein, Terese L; Weis, Nina; Lebech, Anne-Mette

    2017-05-31

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) has been found to be associated with HIV acquisition and transmission. This is suggested to be due to higher HIV RNA levels in cervicovaginal fluids in women living with HIV (WLWH) with BV, as bacteria associated with BV may induce viral replication and shedding in the genital tract despite undetectable HIV RNA plasma viral load. We examined the prevalence and diagnostic predictors of BV and HIV-1 RNA vaginal shedding in women living with HIV (WLWH) in Denmark, taking into account the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes viridae. WLWH between 18-51 years were recruited from six Departments of Infectious Diseases in Denmark during enrolment in the SHADE cohort; a prospective cohort study of WLWH attending regular outpatient care. BV was diagnosed by microscopy of vaginal swabs and PCR was used for detection of BV-associated bacteria, HPV, herpes viridae, and vaginal HIV viral load. Median age of the 150 included women was 41 years; ethnicity was predominantly White (35%) or Black (47%). The majority (96%) was on ART and had undetectable (85%) plasma HIV RNA (<40 copies/mL). BV was diagnosed in 32%. Overall, 11% had detectable vaginal HIV RNA. Both before and after adjustment for BV, age, ethnicity, plasma HIV RNA, CD4 cell count, herpes viridae and HPV, we found no significant predictors of HIV RNA vaginal shedding. In well-treated WLWH, BV, herpes viridae or HPV do not predict vaginal HIV RNA shedding. This implies that HIV shedding does not seem to be increased by BV.

  7. Mechanisms of ectopic gene conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, P J

    2010-11-29

    Gene conversion (conversion), the unidirectional transfer of DNA sequence information, occurs as a byproduct of recombinational repair of broken or damaged DNA molecules. Whereas excision repair processes replace damaged DNA by copying the complementary sequence from the undamaged strand of duplex DNA, recombinational mechanisms copy similar sequence, usually in another molecule, to replace the damaged sequence. In mitotic cells, the other molecule is usually a sister chromatid, and the repair does not lead to genetic change. Less often a homologous chromosome or homologous sequence in an ectopic position is used. Conversion results from repair in two ways. First, if there was a double-strand gap at the site of a break, homologous sequence will be used as the template for synthesis to fill the gap, thus transferring sequence information in both strands. Second, recombinational repair uses complementary base pairing, and the heteroduplex molecule formed is a source of conversion, both as heteroduplex and when donor (undamaged template) information is retained after correction of mismatched bases in heteroduplex. There are mechanisms that favor the use of sister molecules that must fail before ectopic homology can be used. Meiotic recombination events lead to the formation of crossovers required in meiosis for orderly segregation of pairs of homologous chromosomes. These events result from recombinational repair of programmed double-strand breaks, but in contrast with mitotic recombination, meiotic recombinational events occur predominantly between homologous chromosomes, so that transfer of sequence differences by conversion is very frequent. Transient recombination events that do not form crossovers form both between homologous chromosomes and between regions of ectopic homology, and leave their mark in the occurrence of frequent non-crossover conversion, including ectopic conversion.

  8. Mechanisms of Ectopic Gene Conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.J. Hastings

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion (conversion, the unidirectional transfer of DNA sequence information, occurs as a byproduct of recombinational repair of broken or damaged DNA molecules. Whereas excision repair processes replace damaged DNA by copying the complementary sequence from the undamaged strand of duplex DNA, recombinational mechanisms copy similar sequence, usually in another molecule, to replace the damaged sequence. In mitotic cells the other molecule is usually a sister chromatid, and the repair does not lead to genetic change. Less often a homologous chromosome or homologous sequence in an ectopic position is used. Conversion results from repair in two ways. First, if there was a double-strand gap at the site of a break, homologous sequence will be used as the template for synthesis to fill the gap, thus transferring sequence information in both strands. Second, recombinational repair uses complementary base pairing, and the heteroduplex molecule so formed is a source of conversion, both as heteroduplex and when donor (undamaged template information is retained after correction of mismatched bases in heteroduplex. There are mechanisms that favour the use of sister molecules that must fail before ectopic homology can be used. Meiotic recombination events lead to the formation of crossovers required in meiosis for orderly segregation of pairs of homologous chromosomes. These events result from recombinational repair of programmed double-strand breaks, but in contrast with mitotic recombination, meiotic recombinational events occur predominantly between homologous chromosomes, so that transfer of sequence differences by conversion is very frequent. Transient recombination events that do not form crossovers form both between homologous chromosomes and between regions of ectopic homology, and leave their mark in the occurrence of frequent non-crossover conversion, including ectopic conversion.

  9. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS — ONCOGENIC VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  10. Conversion chimique du gaz naturel Chemical Conversion of Natural Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaumette P.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Dans cet article sont passés en revue les travaux de recherche et développement et les procédés existants dans le domaine de la conversion chimique du gaz naturel. Les deux voies possibles, conversion directe du méthane et conversion indirecte, via le gaz de synthèse, sont présentées. Tant la préparation d'hydrocarbures utilisables comme carburants, que celle des composés de bases pour la pétrochimie ou la chimie sont évoquées. L'accent est mis sur l'étape clé du développement de chaque procédé qui, selon le produit visé, consiste en la mise au point d'un nouveau système catalytique, en un changement de la technologie du réacteur, ou en la mise au point d'une section fractionnement moins complexe. This article reviews the research and development work and the existing processes in the area of chemical conversion of natural gas. The two possible methods, direct conversion of methane and indirect conversion via synthesis gas, are discussed. The preparation of hydrocarbons that can be used as fuels and the production of building blocks for the petrochemical and chemical industries are both dealt with. The accent is placed on the key step in developing each process. Depending on the target product, this key step consists in working out a new catalytic system, changing reactor technology or engineering a less complex fractionation section.

  11. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cairns, E. J.

    1993-06-01

    This report is the 1992 annual progress report for the Energy Conversion and Storage Program, a part of the Energy and Environment Division of the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. Work described falls into three broad areas: electrochemistry; chemical applications; and materials applications. The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies principles of chemistry and materials science to solve problems in several areas: (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes and chemical species, and (5) study and application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Chemical applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing product and waste streams from synfuel plants, coal gasifiers, and biomass conversion processes. Materials applications research includes evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as development of novel preparation techniques. For example, techniques such as sputtering, laser ablation, and poised laser deposition are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  12. Conversation level syntax similarity metric.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boghrati, Reihane; Hoover, Joe; Johnson, Kate M; Garten, Justin; Dehghani, Morteza

    2017-07-11

    The syntax and semantics of human language can illuminate many individual psychological differences and important dimensions of social interaction. Accordingly, psychological and psycholinguistic research has begun incorporating sophisticated representations of semantic content to better understand the connection between word choice and psychological processes. In this work we introduce ConversAtion level Syntax SImilarity Metric (CASSIM), a novel method for calculating conversation-level syntax similarity. CASSIM estimates the syntax similarity between conversations by automatically generating syntactical representations of the sentences in conversation, estimating the structural differences between them, and calculating an optimized estimate of the conversation-level syntax similarity. After introducing and explaining this method, we report results from two method validation experiments (Study 1) and conduct a series of analyses with CASSIM to investigate syntax accommodation in social media discourse (Study 2). We run the same experiments using two well-known existing syntactic metrics, LSM and Coh-Metrix, and compare their results to CASSIM. Overall, our results indicate that CASSIM is able to reliably measure syntax similarity and to provide robust evidence of syntax accommodation within social media discourse.

  13. Oropuche virus: A virus present but ignored

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salim Mattar V.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Bunyaviruses are RNA viruses that affect animals and plants; they have five genera and four of them affect humans: Orthobunyavirus, Nairovirus, Phlebovirus and Hantavirus. All of them are Arbovirus, except Hantavirus. The Orthobunyaviruses comprise Oropouche, Tahyna, La Crosse virus, California encephalitis virus and Heartland virus recently discovered (1. Except for Heartland virus which is transmitted by ticks of the genus Amblyoma, these Phleboviruses have as vectors mosquitoes, which bite small mammals which are able to be as reservoirs amplifiers.

  14. Conversational flow and entitativity: the role of status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koudenburg, Namkje; Postmes, Tom; Gordijn, Ernestine H

    2014-06-01

    This study examines the process by which perceptions of conversational flow foster an emergent sense of group entitativity. We propose that conversational flow influences more than just the quality of interpersonal relations: it signals entitativity - social unity at the group level. We predicted that when conversations are intermitted by brief silences after a target has spoken, this is perceived as disruptive for targets of low social status within the group: For low-status group members, such pauses raise concerns over respect and inclusion. However, for high-status group members, a similar intermission may be interpreted as an acknowledgement of their distinctive position in the group, and may therefore bolster the hierarchy and unity of the group. Two experiments support these hypotheses. Study 1 (N = 77) manipulated status in conversations of a target participant with confederates. Study 2 (N = 138) replicates the effect among participants who watch a videotaped conversation. Both studies show the predicted pattern, and suggest that belonging (Study 1) and perceived respect (Study 2) may mediate effects of condition on perceptions of group entitativity. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  15. Health policy model: long-term predictive results associated with the management of hepatitis C virus-induced diseases in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Marcellusi, Andrea; Andreoni, Massimo; Gasbarrini, Antonio; Salomone, Salvatore; Craxì, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    treated with anti-HCV drugs. A reduction of health care costs is associated with a prevalence decrease. Indeed, once the spending peak is reached during this decade (about €527 million), the model predicts a cost reduction in the following 18 years. In 2030, based on the more effective treatments currently available, the direct health care cost associated with the management of HCV patients may reach €346 million (-34.3% compared to 2012). The first scenario (new treatment in 2015 with SVR =90% and same number of treated patients) was associated with a significant reduction in HCV-induced clinical consequences (prevalence =-3%) and a decrease in direct health care expenses, corresponding to €11.1 million. The second scenario (increase in treated patients to 12,790) produced an incremental cost reduction of €7.3 million, reaching a net decrease equal to €18.4 million. In the third scenario (treated patients =16,770), a higher net direct health care cost decrease versus the base-case (€44.0 million) was estimated. Our model showed that the introduction of new treatments that are more effective could result in a quasi-eradication of HCV, with a very strong reduction in prevalence.

  16. Topologically Protected Complete Polarization Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yu; Xiao, Meng; Fan, Shanhui

    2017-10-01

    We consider the process of conversion between linear polarizations as light is reflected from a photonic crystal slab. We observe that, over a wide range of frequencies, complete polarization conversion can be found at isolated wave vectors. Moreover, such an effect is topological: the complex reflection coefficients have a nonzero winding number in the wave vector space. We also show that bound states in continuum in this system have their wave vectors lying on the critical coupling curve that defines the condition for complete polarization conversion. Our work points to the use of topological photonics concepts for the control of polarization, and suggests the exploration of topological properties of scattering matrices as a route towards creating robust optical devices.

  17. Blind-date Conversation Joining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Cesari

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available We focus on a form of joining conversations among multiple parties in service-oriented applications where a client may asynchronously join an existing conversation without need to know in advance any information about it. More specifically, we show how the correlation mechanism provided by orchestration languages enables a form of conversation joining that is completely transparent to clients and that we call 'blind-date joining'. We provide an implementation of this strategy by using the standard orchestration language WS-BPEL. We then present its formal semantics by resorting to COWS, a process calculus specifically designed for modelling service-oriented applications. We illustrate our approach by means of a simple, but realistic, case study from the online games domain.

  18. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in plant virus suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchenko, E. K.; Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Pershin, S. M.; Savichev, V. I.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-11-01

    The study deals with laser pulse interaction with plant viruses: we investigated tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and two types of potato viruses (PVX and PVA) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water. We used 20 ns ruby laser pulses for excitation. We employed Fabry–Pérot interferometers to record spectra of the light passing through the sample and reflected from it. For TMV and PVX in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer, same as for PVA in water, we observed additional spectral lines corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). We believe we were the first to measure SLFRS frequency shifts, conversion efficiency and threshold. High conversion efficiency of the scattered light is evidence of laser pulses efficiently exciting gigahertz vibrations in viruses. SLFRS can be used to identify and affect biological nanoparticles.

  19. Mengenal Hanta Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Wijayanti, Tri

    2009-01-01

    Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS).

  20. Viruses of hyperthermophilic Crenarchaea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.

    2005-01-01

    , when one examines the archaeal viruses, the picture appears complex. Most viruses that are known to infect members of the kingdom Euryarchaeota resemble bacterial viruses, whereas those associated with the kingdom Crenarchaeota show little resemblance to either bacterial or eukaryal viruses....... This review summarizes our current knowledge of this group of exceptional and highly diverse archaeal viruses....

  1. Determinants of host species range in plant viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moury, Benoît; Fabre, Frédéric; Hébrard, Eugénie; Froissart, Rémy

    2017-04-01

    Prediction of pathogen emergence is an important field of research, both in human health and in agronomy. Most studies of pathogen emergence have focused on the ecological or anthropic factors involved rather than on the role of intrinsic pathogen properties. The capacity of pathogens to infect a large set of host species, i.e. to possess a large host range breadth (HRB), is tightly linked to their emergence propensity. Using an extensive plant virus database, we found that four traits related to virus genome or transmission properties were strongly and robustly linked to virus HRB. Broader host ranges were observed for viruses with single-stranded genomes, those with three genome segments and nematode-transmitted viruses. Also, two contrasted groups of seed-transmitted viruses were evidenced. Those with a single-stranded genome had larger HRB than non-seed-transmitted viruses, whereas those with a double-stranded genome (almost exclusively RNA) had an extremely small HRB. From the plant side, the family taxonomic rank appeared as a critical threshold for virus host range, with a highly significant increase in barriers to infection between plant families. Accordingly, the plant-virus infectivity matrix shows a dual structure pattern: a modular pattern mainly due to viruses specialized to infect plants of a given family and a nested pattern due to generalist viruses. These results contribute to a better prediction of virus host jumps and emergence risks.

  2. Review of betavoltaic energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1993-01-01

    Betavoltaic energy conversion refers to the generation of power by coupling a beta source to a semiconductor junction device. The theory of betavoltaic energy conversion and some past studies of the subject are briefly reviewed. Calculations of limiting efficiencies for semiconductor cells versus bandgap are presented along with specific studies for Pm-147 and Ni-63 fueled devices. The approach used for fabricating Pm-147 fueled batteries by the author in the early 1970's is reviewed. Finally, the potential performance of advanced betavoltaic power sources is considered.

  3. Health policy model: long-term predictive results associated with the management of hepatitis C virus-induced diseases in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennini FS

    2014-06-01

    randomized clinical trial (RCT relating to boceprevir and telaprevir. For genotypes 2/3 patients it was assumed that treatment efficacy with dual therapy was equal to a SVR rate from the literature. According to the aim of this study, only direct health care costs (hospital admissions, drugs, treatment, and care of patients incurred by the Italian NHS have been included in the model. Costs have been extrapolated using the published scientific literature available in Italy and actualized with the 2012 ISTAT (Istituto Nazionale di Statistica Price Index system for monetary revaluation. Three different scenarios were assumed in order to evaluate the impact of future anti-HCV treatments on the burden of disease.Results: Overall, in Italy, 1.2 million infected subjects were estimated in 2012. Of these, about 211,000 patients were diagnosed, while only about 11,800 subjects were actually being treated with anti-HCV drugs. A reduction of health care costs is associated with a prevalence decrease. Indeed, once the spending peak is reached during this decade (about €527 million, the model predicts a cost reduction in the following 18 years. In 2030, based on the more effective treatments currently available, the direct health care cost associated with the management of HCV patients may reach €346 million (−34.3% compared to 2012. The first scenario (new treatment in 2015 with SVR =90% and same number of treated patients was associated with a significant reduction in HCV-induced clinical consequences (prevalence =−3% and a decrease in direct health care expenses, corresponding to €11.1 million. The second scenario (increase in treated patients to 12,790 produced an incremental cost reduction of €7.3 million, reaching a net decrease equal to €18.4 million. In the third scenario (treated patients =16,770, a higher net direct health care cost decrease versus the base-case (€44.0 million was estimated.Conclusion: Our model showed that the introduction of new treatments

  4. Isolation of genetically diverse Marburg viruses from Egyptian fruit bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan S Towner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1% bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans.

  5. Conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhle, J; Disanto, G; Dobson, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We explored which clinical and biochemical variables predict conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in a large international cohort. METHODS: Thirty-three centres provided serum samples from 1047 CIS cases with...... positivity was associated with higher EBNA-1 IgG titres. CONCLUSIONS: We validated MRI lesion load, OCB and age at CIS as the strongest independent predictors of conversion to CDMS in this multicentre setting. A role for vitamin D is suggested but requires further investigation....

  6. Be-CoDiS: A Mathematical Model to Predict the Risk of Human Diseases Spread Between Countries--Validation and Application to the 2014-2015 Ebola Virus Disease Epidemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivorra, Benjamin; Ngom, Diène; Ramos, Ángel M

    2015-09-01

    Ebola virus disease is a lethal human and primate disease that currently requires a particular attention from the international health authorities due to important outbreaks in some Western African countries and isolated cases in the UK, the USA and Spain. Regarding the emergency of this situation, there is a need for the development of decision tools, such as mathematical models, to assist the authorities to focus their efforts in important factors to eradicate Ebola. In this work, we propose a novel deterministic spatial-temporal model, called Between-Countries Disease Spread (Be-CoDiS), to study the evolution of human diseases within and between countries. The main interesting characteristics of Be-CoDiS are the consideration of the movement of people between countries, the control measure effects and the use of time-dependent coefficients adapted to each country. First, we focus on the mathematical formulation of each component of the model and explain how its parameters and inputs are obtained. Then, in order to validate our approach, we consider two numerical experiments regarding the 2014-2015 Ebola epidemic. The first one studies the ability of the model in predicting the EVD evolution between countries starting from the index cases in Guinea in December 2013. The second one consists of forecasting the evolution of the epidemic by using some recent data. The results obtained with Be-CoDiS are compared to real data and other model outputs found in the literature. Finally, a brief parameter sensitivity analysis is done. A free MATLAB version of Be-CoDiS is available at: http://www.mat.ucm.es/momat/software.htm.

  7. Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Didier; Gubler, Duane J

    2016-07-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus) in the genus Flavivirus and the family Flaviviridae. ZIKV was first isolated from a nonhuman primate in 1947 and from mosquitoes in 1948 in Africa, and ZIKV infections in humans were sporadic for half a century before emerging in the Pacific and the Americas. ZIKV is usually transmitted by the bite of infected mosquitoes. The clinical presentation of Zika fever is nonspecific and can be misdiagnosed as other infectious diseases, especially those due to arboviruses such as dengue and chikungunya. ZIKV infection was associated with only mild illness prior to the large French Polynesian outbreak in 2013 and 2014, when severe neurological complications were reported, and the emergence in Brazil of a dramatic increase in severe congenital malformations (microcephaly) suspected to be associated with ZIKV. Laboratory diagnosis of Zika fever relies on virus isolation or detection of ZIKV-specific RNA. Serological diagnosis is complicated by cross-reactivity among members of the Flavivirus genus. The adaptation of ZIKV to an urban cycle involving humans and domestic mosquito vectors in tropical areas where dengue is endemic suggests that the incidence of ZIKV infections may be underestimated. There is a high potential for ZIKV emergence in urban centers in the tropics that are infested with competent mosquito vectors such as Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  8. Predicting Collaboration based on Students' Pauses in Online CSCL Conversations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denisleam, Sibel; Dascalu, Mihai; Trausan-Matu, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    As Computer Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL) gains a broader usage as a viable alternative to traditional educational scenarios, the need for automated tools capable of evaluating active participation and collaboration among peers in online discussions increases. In this study, we validate a

  9. Generalized model for predicting methane conversion to syngas in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ijest.v8i4.2. 1. Introduction. Rapid innovations in technologies and fast paced economic development across the globe are foretokens to edify the necessity of sustainable energy resources. Annual Energy Outlook 2012 ...

  10. Thermoacoustic power conversion using a piezoelectric transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Carl; Raspet, Richard

    2010-07-01

    The predicted efficiency of a simple thermoacoustic waste heat power conversion device has been investigated as part of a collaborative effort combining a thermoacoustic engine with a piezoelectric transducer. Symko et al. [Microelectron. J. 35, 185-191 (2004)] at the University of Utah built high frequency demonstration engines for this application, and Lynn [ASMDC report, accession number ADA491030 (2008)] at the University of Washington designed and built a high efficiency piezoelectric unimorph transducer for electroacoustic conversion. The design presented in this paper is put forward to investigate the potential of a simple high frequency, air filled, standing wave thermoacoustic device to be competitive with other small generator technologies such as thermoelectric devices. The thermoacoustic generator is simulated using a low-amplitude approximation for thermoacoustics and the acoustic impedance of the transducer is modeled using an equivalent circuit model calculated from the transducer's mechanical and electrical properties. The calculations demonstrate that a device performance of around 10% of Carnot efficiency could be expected from the design which is competitive with currently available thermoelectric generators.

  11. Epitope prediction methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karosiene, Edita

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules play a crucial role in adaptive immunity by sampling peptides from self and non-self proteins to be recognised by the immune system. MHC molecules present peptides on cell surfaces for recognition by CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes that can initiate......-MHC prediction methods, and over the last decade several such methods have been successfully developed and used for epitope discovery purposes. My PhD project has been dedicated to improve methods for predicting peptide-MHC interactions by developing new strategies for training prediction algorithms based...... virus. The analysis demonstrated the absence of distinct regions of higher epitope density within the virus polyprotein. Also, the density of epitopes among different proteins was demonstrated to mostly depend on protein length and amino acid composition, underlining the importance of identifying...

  12. Epidemiology of virus infection and human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Yang, Hwai-I; Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Chen, Hui-Chi; Chien, Yin-Chu; You, San-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has comprehensively assessed the human carcinogenicity of biological agents. Seven viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), human immunodeficiency virus, type-1 (HIV-1), human T cell lymphotrophic virus, type-1 (HTLV-1), and human papillomavirus (HPV) have been classified as Group 1 human carcinogens by IARC. The conclusions are based on the findings of epidemiological and mechanistic studies. EBV, HPV, HTLV-1, and KSHV are direct carcinogens; HBV and HCV are indirect carcinogens through chronic inflammation; HIV-1 is an indirect carcinogen through immune suppression. Some viruses may cause more than one cancer, while some cancers may be caused by more than one virus. However, only a proportion of persons infected by these oncogenic viruses will develop specific cancers. A series of studies have been carried out to assess the viral, host, and environmental cofactors of EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, HBV/HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma, and HPV-associated cervical carcinoma. Persistent infection and high viral load are important risk predictors of these virus-caused cancers. Risk calculators incorporating host and viral factors have also been developed for the prediction of long-term risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These risk calculators are useful for the triage and clinical management of infected patients. Both clinical trials and national programs of immunization or antiviral therapy have demonstrated a significant reduction in the incidence of cancers caused by HBV, HCV, and HPV. Future researches on gene-gene and gene-environment interaction of oncogenic viruses and human host are in urgent need.

  13. Content Themes in Marital Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sillars, Alan L.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Suggests that prominent themes in the conversations of spouses are metacommunication about relationships. Compares content themes of different marital types (traditional, separate, and independent) and more or less satisfied spouses. Finds marital satisfaction tends to be positively associated with communal and impersonal themes and negatively…

  14. Offshore wind energy conversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilar, L. A.; Stiller, P. H.; Anacona, D. F.

    The paper summarizes the findings of a comprehensive assessment of off-shore wind energy conversion systems. Eight generic types of support platforms are discussed, and their conceptual designs are given. Attention is given to the economics of such systems, emphasizing the busbar energy cost measures. Onshore energy costs are developed in terms of controlling environmental parameters, distance from shore and equipment type.

  15. Caring, conversing, and realizing values

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodges, Bert; Steffensen, Sune Vork; Martin, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Language serves many functions for humans, but three of the most important are coordination, learning, and friendship. All of those functions were well served by the conversations from which this special issue emerged, a conference, ‘‘Grounding language in perception and (inter) action’’, held at...

  16. Humor and Embodied Conversational Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus

    This report surveys the role of humor in human-to-human interaction and the possible role of humor in human-computer interaction. The aim is to see whether it is useful for embodied conversational agents to integrate humor capabilities in their internal model of intelligence, emotions and

  17. Paradoxical therapy in conversion reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ataoglu, Ahmet; Ozcetin, Adnan; Icmeli, Celalettin; Ozbulut, Omer

    2003-08-01

    Paradoxical therapy consists of suggesting that the patient intentionally engages in the unwanted behaviour such as performing compulsive ritual or wanting a conversion attack. In this study, the subjects were selected by the emergency unit psychiatrist from patients who were admitted to the emergency unit with pseudoseizure. The diagnoses was based on DSM-IV criteria. Paradoxical intention was applied to half of the 30 patients with conversion disorders; the other half were treated with diazepam in order to examine the efficiency of the paradoxical intention versus diazepam. In both groups the differences of the anxiety scores at the beginning of the study were found to be insignificant (z=1.08, p=0.28). Of the 15 patients who completed paradoxical intention treatment, 14 (93.3%) responded favorably to paradoxical intention. On the other hand of 15 patients who completed diazepam therapy, 9 (60%) responded well to therapy and 6 patients carried on their conversion symptoms at the end of 6 weeks. Paradoxical intention-treated patients appeared to have greater improvements in anxiety scores (z=2.43, pparadoxical intention can be effective in the treatment of conversion disorder.

  18. A System for Retrospective Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Hank

    1984-01-01

    The Apple-based MITINET system uses several forms of technology (Library of Congress MARC file in microfiche, microcomputers, COM vendor) to produce library database and COM catalog. Cost for MITINET software is based on number of branches or buildings performing conversion, and varies from $250 to $85 per building or branch. (EJS)

  19. Energy Conversion and Storage Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, E.J.

    1992-03-01

    The Energy Conversion and Storage Program applies chemistry and materials science principles to solve problems in (1) production of new synthetic fuels, (2) development of high-performance rechargeable batteries and fuel cells, (3) development of advanced thermochemical processes for energy conversion, (4) characterization of complex chemical processes, and (5) application of novel materials for energy conversion and transmission. Projects focus on transport-process principles, chemical kinetics, thermodynamics, separation processes, organic and physical chemistry, novel materials, and advanced methods of analysis. Electrochemistry research aims to develop advanced power systems for electric vehicle and stationary energy storage applications. Topics include identification of new electrochemical couples for advanced rechargeable batteries, improvements in battery and fuel-cell materials, and the establishment of engineering principles applicable to electrochemical energy storage and conversion. Chemical Applications research includes topics such as separations, catalysis, fuels, and chemical analyses. Included in this program area are projects to develop improved, energy-efficient methods for processing waste streams from synfuel plants and coal gasifiers. Other research projects seek to identify and characterize the constituents of liquid fuel-system streams and to devise energy-efficient means for their separation. Materials Applications research includes the evaluation of the properties of advanced materials, as well as the development of novel preparation techniques. For example, the use of advanced techniques, such as sputtering and laser ablation, are being used to produce high-temperature superconducting films.

  20. Spin conversion on the nanoscale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Yoshichika; Shiraishi, Masashi; Oiwa, Akira; Saitoh, Eiji; Murakami, Shuichi

    2017-09-01

    Spins can act as mediators to interconvert electricity, light, sound, vibration and heat. Here, we give an overview of the recent advances in different sub-disciplines of spintronics that can be associated with the developing field of spin conversion, and discuss future prospects.

  1. HYDROKINETIC ENERGY CONVERSION SYSTEMS: PROSPECTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    Hydrokinetic energy conversion systems utilize the kinetic energy of flowing water bodies with little or no head to generate other useable forms of energy. In the last few years various research and development efforts have been made to bring out this technology from the proof of concept stage and to demonstrate its ...

  2. Facilitating Conversations about Managerial Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Mona Toft

    -based organization in the engineering consulting sector b) a reflection meeting, where the same three managers were gathered, and conversations were facilitated based on identity work in the context of earlier interviews. More specifically, three themes were discussed; flat organizational structure, tensions between...

  3. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  4. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  5. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus ...

  6. Computer Viruses: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, Dan

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the early history and current proliferation of computer viruses that occur on Macintosh and DOS personal computers, mentions virus detection programs, and offers suggestions for how libraries can protect themselves and their users from damage by computer viruses. (LRW)

  7. Virus Ebola Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Wuryadi, Suharyono

    1996-01-01

    Virus Marburg dan Ebola diklasifikasikan sebagai virus yang sangat menular dan dimasukkan dalam klasifikasi sebagai virus/pathogen dengan derajat biosafety 4, sehingga untuk menanganinya diperlukan laboratorium khusus tingkat 4.

  8. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page ... Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your fetus if you ...

  9. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus ... Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Share: PEV002, September 2016 Zika Virus and Pregnancy There are risks to your ...

  10. Narcissus symptomless virus: a new carlavirus of daffodils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Shi, Y-H; Lu, Y-W; Adams, M J; Chen, J-P

    2006-11-01

    A filamentous virus, with particles 600-650 nm long, was purified from Narcissus pseudonarcissus (daffodil) in Hangzhou and an antiserum prepared. After mechanical inoculation, the virus could be detected serologically in Narcissus species but not in some commonly used virus indicators. Infection was symptomless. The complete sequence of the genomic RNA (8281 nt) showed six predicted ORFs typical of carlaviruses. Pairwise comparisons of gene sequences and phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that the new virus should be classified as a carlavirus but that it was not closely related to members of any current species. We propose the name Narcissus symptomless virus (NSV).

  11. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  12. Isolation of a Novel Swine Influenza Virus from Oklahoma in 2011 Which Is Distantly Related to Human Influenza C Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M.; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D.; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution. PMID:23408893

  13. Virus-Bacteria Interactions: An Emerging Topic in Human Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand, Erin A.; Moore, Matthew D.; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-01-01

    Bacteria and viruses often occupy the same niches, however, interest in their potential collaboration in promoting wellness or disease states has only recently gained traction. While the interaction of some bacteria and viruses is well characterized (e.g., influenza virus), researchers are typically more interested in the location of the infection than the manner of cooperation. There are two overarching types of bacterial-virus disease causing interactions: direct interactions that in some way aid the viruses, and indirect interactions aiding bacteria. The virus-promoting direct interactions occur when the virus exploits a bacterial component to facilitate penetration into the host cell. Conversely, indirect interactions result in increased bacterial pathogenesis as a consequence of viral infection. Enteric viruses mainly utilize the direct pathway, while respiratory viruses largely affect bacteria in an indirect fashion. This review focuses on some key examples of how virus-bacteria interactions impact the infection process across the two organ systems, and provides evidence supporting this as an emerging theme in infectious disease. PMID:28335562

  14. Virus-Bacteria Interactions: An Emerging Topic in Human Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almand, Erin A; Moore, Matthew D; Jaykus, Lee-Ann

    2017-03-21

    Bacteria and viruses often occupy the same niches, however, interest in their potential collaboration in promoting wellness or disease states has only recently gained traction. While the interaction of some bacteria and viruses is well characterized (e.g., influenza virus), researchers are typically more interested in the location of the infection than the manner of cooperation. There are two overarching types of bacterial-virus disease causing interactions: direct interactions that in some way aid the viruses, and indirect interactions aiding bacteria. The virus-promoting direct interactions occur when the virus exploits a bacterial component to facilitate penetration into the host cell. Conversely, indirect interactions result in increased bacterial pathogenesis as a consequence of viral infection. Enteric viruses mainly utilize the direct pathway, while respiratory viruses largely affect bacteria in an indirect fashion. This review focuses on some key examples of how virus-bacteria interactions impact the infection process across the two organ systems, and provides evidence supporting this as an emerging theme in infectious disease.

  15. Cancer and viruses: a double-edged sword.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butt, Aisha Q; Miggin, Sinéad M

    2012-07-01

    Oncovirus, synonymously called a 'tumour virus', is a virus that can cause cancer. An oncolytic virus preferentially infects the host's cancer cells and lyses them, causing tumour destruction, and is thus referred to as a 'cancer killing virus'. With an estimated 11% of cancer-associated deaths caused by oncoviruses and the possibility that many cancers may be treated by using oncolytic viruses, the role of viruses in cancer may be viewed as a double-edged sword. A total of seven human cancer viruses have been identified as oncoviruses, having been associated with various cancers. Conversely, a large number of oncolytic viruses have shown great potential towards the treatment of certain types of cancer. Proteomics has now been applied towards understanding the complex interplay that exists between oncoviruses and the immune responses that serve to prevent oncoviral diseases. This review attempts to summarise the neoplastic potential of human tumour associated viruses and associated vaccine successes. The potential use of oncolytic viruses for the therapeutic intervention of cancer will also be discussed. Finally, this review will discuss the enormous potential of proteomics technology in the field of oncovirology. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Computer Virus and Trends

    OpenAIRE

    Tutut Handayani; Soenarto Usna,Drs.MMSI

    2004-01-01

    Since its appearance the first time in the mid-1980s, computer virus has invited various controversies that still lasts to this day. Along with the development of computer systems technology, viruses komputerpun find new ways to spread itself through a variety of existing communications media. This paper discusses about some things related to computer viruses, namely: the definition and history of computer viruses; the basics of computer viruses; state of computer viruses at this time; and ...

  17. Asymptomatic reactivation of JC virus in patients treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yiping; Bord, Evelyn; Tompkins, Troy; Miller, Janice; Tan, Chen S; Kinkel, R Philip; Stein, Marion C; Viscidi, Raphael P; Ngo, Long H; Koralnik, Igor J

    2009-09-10

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) occurs in a fraction of patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab. Most adults who are infected with the JC virus, the etiologic agent in PML, do not have symptoms. We sought to determine whether exposure to natalizumab causes subclinical reactivation and neurotropic transformation of JC virus. We followed 19 consecutive patients with multiple sclerosis who were treated with natalizumab over an 18-month period, performing quantitative polymerase-chain-reaction assays in blood and urine for JC virus reactivation; BK virus, a JC virus-related polyomavirus, was used as a control. We determined JC virus-specific T-cell responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunospot assay and antibody responses by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and analyzed JC virus regulatory-region sequences. After 12 months of natalizumab therapy, the prevalence of JC virus in the urine of the 19 patients increased from a baseline value of 19% to 63% (P=0.02). After 18 months of treatment, JC virus was detectable in 3 of 15 available plasma samples (20%) and in 9 of 15 available samples of peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (60%) (P=0.02). JC virus regulatory-region sequences in blood samples and in most of the urine samples were similar to those usually found in PML. Conversely, BK virus remained stable in urine and was undetectable in blood. The JC virus-specific cellular immune response dropped significantly between 6 and 12 months of treatment, and variations in the cellular immune response over time tended to be greater in patients in whom JC viremia developed. None of the patients had clinical or radiologic signs of PML. Subclinical reactivation of JC virus occurs frequently in natalizumab-treated patients with multiple sclerosis. Viral shedding is associated with a transient drop in the JC virus-specific cellular immune response. 2009 Massachusetts Medical Society

  18. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes. Annual report, October 1990--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G.; Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. [Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (United States)]|[Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)

    1991-12-31

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This program will merge significant advances made in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior. Comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors.

  19. Inferring Social Nature of Conversations from Words: Experiments on a Corpus of Everyday Telephone Conversations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Anthony; Shafran, Izhak; Kaye, Jeffrey

    2014-01-01

    Language is being increasingly harnessed to not only create natural human-machine interfaces but also to infer social behaviors and interactions. In the same vein, we investigate a novel spoken language task, of inferring social relationships in two-party conversations: whether the two parties are related as family, strangers or are involved in business transactions. For our study, we created a corpus of all incoming and outgoing calls from a few homes over the span of a year. On this unique naturalistic corpus of everyday telephone conversations, which is unlike Switchboard or any other public domain corpora, we demonstrate that standard natural language processing techniques can achieve accuracies of about 88%, 82%, 74% and 80% in differentiating business from personal calls, family from non-family calls, familiar from unfamiliar calls and family from other personal calls respectively. Through a series of experiments with our classifiers, we characterize the properties of telephone conversations and find: (a) that 30 words of openings (beginnings) are sufficient to predict business from personal calls, which could potentially be exploited in designing context sensitive interfaces in smart phones; (b) our corpus-based analysis does not support Schegloff and Sack's manual analysis of exemplars in which they conclude that pre-closings differ significantly between business and personal calls - closing fared no better than a random segment; and (c) the distribution of different types of calls are stable over durations as short as 1-2 months. In summary, our results show that social relationships can be inferred automatically in two-party conversations with sufficient accuracy to support practical applications.

  20. Quantitative nanoscale electrostatics of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando-Pérez, M; Cartagena-Rivera, A X; Lošdorfer Božič, A; Carrillo, P J P; San Martín, C; Mateu, M G; Raman, A; Podgornik, R; de Pablo, P J

    2015-11-07

    Electrostatics is one of the fundamental driving forces of the interaction between biomolecules in solution. In particular, the recognition events between viruses and host cells are dominated by both specific and non-specific interactions and the electric charge of viral particles determines the electrostatic force component of the latter. Here we probe the charge of individual viruses in liquid milieu by measuring the electrostatic force between a viral particle and the Atomic Force Microscope tip. The force spectroscopy data of co-adsorbed ϕ29 bacteriophage proheads and mature virions, adenovirus and minute virus of mice capsids is utilized for obtaining the corresponding density of charge for each virus. The systematic differences of the density of charge between the viral particles are consistent with the theoretical predictions obtained from X-ray structural data. Our results show that the density of charge is a distinguishing characteristic of each virus, depending crucially on the nature of the viral capsid and the presence/absence of the genetic material.

  1. Effect of temperature on the in vitro transcriptase reaction of bluetongue virus, epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus and African horsesickness virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Dijk, A.A.; Huismans, H. (Veterinary Research Inst., Onderstepoort (South Africa))

    1982-12-01

    Virions of bluetongue virus (BTV), epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) and African horsesickness virus (AHSV) can be converted to core particles by treatment with chymotrypsin and magnesium. The conversion is characterized by the removal of the 2 outer capsid polypeptides of the virion. The loss of these 2 proteins results in an increase in density from 1,36 g/ml to 1,40 g/ml on CsCl gradients. The BTV, EHDV and AHSV core particles have an associated double-stranded RNA dependent RNA transcriptase that appears to transcribe mRNA optimally at 28 degrees Celsius. It was found, at least in the case of BTV, that this low temperature preference is not an intrinsic characteristic of the transcriptase, but is due to a temperature-dependent inhibition of transcription at high core concentrations.

  2. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-10 HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  3. Impact of virus preparation quality on parvovirus filter performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Ashley; Burnham, Mike; Genest, Paul; Venkiteshwaran, Adith; Chen, Dayue; Hughes, Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Virus-removal filtration technology is commonly used in the manufacturing process for biologics to remove potential viral contaminants. Virus-removal filters designed for retaining parvovirus, one of the smallest mammalian viruses, are considered an industry standard as they can effectively remove broad ranges of viruses. It has long been observed that the performance of virus filters can be influenced by virus preparations used in the laboratory scale studies (PDA, 2010). However, it remains unclear exactly what quality attributes of virus preparations are critical or indicative of virus filter performance as measured by effectiveness of virus removal and filter capacity consistency. In an attempt to better understand the relationship between virus preparation and virus filter performance, we have systematically prepared and analyzed different grades of parvovirus with different purity levels and compared their performance profiles on Viresolve® Pro parvovirus filters using four different molecules. Virus preparations used in the studies were characterized using various methods to measure DNA and protein content as well as the hydrodynamic diameter of virus particles. Our results indicate that the performance of Viresolve® Pro filters can be significantly impacted depending on the purity of the virus preparations used in the spike and recovery studies. More importantly, we have demonstrated that the purity of virus preparations is directly correlated to the measurable biochemical and biophysical properties of the virus preparations such as DNA and protein content and monodispersal status, thus making it possible to significantly improve the consistency and predictability of the virus filter performance during process step validations. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Marine viruses and global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danovaro, Roberto; Corinaldesi, Cinzia; Dell'anno, Antonio; Fuhrman, Jed A; Middelburg, Jack J; Noble, Rachel T; Suttle, Curtis A

    2011-11-01

    Sea-surface warming, sea-ice melting and related freshening, changes in circulation and mixing regimes, and ocean acidification induced by the present climate changes are modifying marine ecosystem structure and function and have the potential to alter the cycling of carbon and nutrients in surface oceans. Changing climate has direct and indirect consequences on marine viruses, including cascading effects on biogeochemical cycles, food webs, and the metabolic balance of the ocean. We discuss here a range of case studies of climate change and the potential consequences on virus function, viral assemblages and virus-host interactions. In turn, marine viruses influence directly and indirectly biogeochemical cycles, carbon sequestration capacity of the oceans and the gas exchange between the ocean surface and the atmosphere. We cannot yet predict whether the viruses will exacerbate or attenuate the magnitude of climate changes on marine ecosystems, but we provide evidence that marine viruses interact actively with the present climate change and are a key biotic component that is able to influence the oceans' feedback on climate change. Long-term and wide spatial-scale studies, and improved knowledge of host-virus dynamics in the world's oceans will permit the incorporation of the viral component into future ocean climate models and increase the accuracy of the predictions of the climate change impacts on the function of the oceans. © 2010 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Conversation, speech acts, and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtgraves, Thomas

    2008-03-01

    Speakers frequently have specific intentions that they want others to recognize (Grice, 1957). These specific intentions can be viewed as speech acts (Searle, 1969), and I argue that they play a role in long-term memory for conversation utterances. Five experiments were conducted to examine this idea. Participants in all experiments read scenarios ending with either a target utterance that performed a specific speech act (brag, beg, etc.) or a carefully matched control. Participants were more likely to falsely recall and recognize speech act verbs after having read the speech act version than after having read the control version, and the speech act verbs served as better recall cues for the speech act utterances than for the controls. Experiment 5 documented individual differences in the encoding of speech act verbs. The results suggest that people recognize and retain the actions that people perform with their utterances and that this is one of the organizing principles of conversation memory.

  6. IMAGE CONVERSION FOR LASER PYROGRAPHY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian PETRU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available All previous studies of pyrography have been focussed on colour obtained through modifying the work parameters. This paper analyses colour nuances obtained by laser woodworking by measuring colour changes digitally. The investigated parameter is colour reproduction by laser technology, using different image conversion methods (Halftone Round, Jarvis, and so on. The changes of image reproduction are analysed globally and colour by colour. The results show that the colour nuances are represented to a more and less degree, according to the conversion method selected. To evaluate the aesthetic changes, CIEL*a*b* colour measurements were applied. The results show that laser burning on wood surfaces has a great influence on wood colour. These findings will be useful to develop innovative design possibilities for wood surfaces for furniture and other products.

  7. Analog-to-digital conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrom, Marcel

    2017-01-01

    This textbook is appropriate for use in graduate-level curricula in analog-to-digital conversion, as well as for practicing engineers in need of a state-of-the-art reference on data converters. It discusses various analog-to-digital conversion principles, including sampling, quantization, reference generation, nyquist architectures and sigma-delta modulation. This book presents an overview of the state of the art in this field and focuses on issues of optimizing accuracy and speed, while reducing the power level. This new, third edition emphasizes novel calibration concepts, the specific requirements of new systems, the consequences of 22-nm technology and the need for a more statistical approach to accuracy. Pedagogical enhancements to this edition include additional, new exercises, solved examples to introduce all key, new concepts and warnings, remarks and hints, from a practitioner’s perspective, wherever appropriate. Considerable background information and practical tips, from designing a PCB, to lay-o...

  8. Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masel, Richard I; Salehi-Khojin, Amin

    2015-04-21

    Electrocatalysts for carbon dioxide conversion include at least one catalytically active element with a particle size above 0.6 nm. The electrocatalysts can also include a Helper Catalyst. The catalysts can be used to increase the rate, modify the selectivity or lower the overpotential of electrochemical conversion of CO.sub.2. Chemical processes and devices using the catalysts also include processes to produce CO, HCO.sup.-, H.sub.2CO, (HCO.sub.2).sup.-, H.sub.2CO.sub.2, CH.sub.3OH, CH.sub.4, C.sub.2H.sub.4, CH.sub.3CH.sub.2OH, CH.sub.3COO.sup.-, CH.sub.3COOH, C.sub.2H.sub.6, (COOH).sub.2, or (COO.sup.-).sub.2, and a specific device, namely, a CO.sub.2 sensor.

  9. Materials for thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, C.

    1988-01-01

    The field of thermoelectric energy conversion is reviewed from both a theoretical and an experimental standpoint. The basic theory is introduced and the thermodynamic and solid state views are compared. An overview of the development of thermoelectric materials is presented with particular emphasis being placed on the most recent developments in high-temperature semiconductors. A number of possible device applications are discussed and the successful use and suitability of these devices for space power is manifest.

  10. Turbines For Optomechanical Energy Conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, G. John

    1996-01-01

    Class of proposed optomechanical energy-conversion machines exploit multiple reflections from precise, high-reflectivity mirrors, some of which fixed to turbinelike rotors that spin at high speeds. Basic idea to increase frequencies of photons (and thus energy of light) by repeated Doppler-shifting reflections from moving mirrors. Gain in optical energy in such reflection proportional to speed of mirror, while loss function of imperfections of mirror.

  11. Fashion Conversation Data on Instagram

    OpenAIRE

    Ha, Yu-I; Kwon, Sejeong; Cha, Meeyoung; Joo, Jungseock

    2017-01-01

    The fashion industry is establishing its presence on a number of visual-centric social media like Instagram. This creates an interesting clash as fashion brands that have traditionally practiced highly creative and editorialized image marketing now have to engage with people on the platform that epitomizes impromptu, realtime conversation. What kinds of fashion images do brands and individuals share and what are the types of visual features that attract likes and comments? In this research, w...

  12. Enzymatic conversion of carbon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiafu; Jiang, Yanjun; Jiang, Zhongyi; Wang, Xueyan; Wang, Xiaoli; Zhang, Shaohua; Han, Pingping; Yang, Chen

    2015-10-07

    With the continuous increase in fossil fuels consumption and the rapid growth of atmospheric CO2 concentration, the harmonious state between human and nature faces severe challenges. Exploring green and sustainable energy resources and devising efficient methods for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization are urgently required. Converting CO2 into fuels/chemicals/materials as an indispensable element for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization may offer a win-win strategy to both decrease the CO2 concentration and achieve the efficient exploitation of carbon resources. Among the current major methods (including chemical, photochemical, electrochemical and enzymatic methods), the enzymatic method, which is inspired by the CO2 metabolic process in cells, offers a green and potent alternative for efficient CO2 conversion due to its superior stereo-specificity and region/chemo-selectivity. Thus, in this tutorial review, we firstly provide a brief background about enzymatic conversion for CO2 capture, sequestration and utilization. Next, we depict six major routes of the CO2 metabolic process in cells, which are taken as the inspiration source for the construction of enzymatic systems in vitro. Next, we focus on the state-of-the-art routes for the catalytic conversion of CO2 by a single enzyme system and by a multienzyme system. Some emerging approaches and materials utilized for constructing single-enzyme/multienzyme systems to enhance the catalytic activity/stability will be highlighted. Finally, a summary about the current advances and the future perspectives of the enzymatic conversion of CO2 will be presented.

  13. A Map Enters the Conversation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munk, Anders Kristian

    'modes of mattering'. In this paper I explore what difference digital cartography can make to STS practice. I draw on three examples from my own work where digitally mediated maps have entered the conversation and made critical, often surprising, differences to the research process. In my first example...... it was trying to chart. I use these examples to discuss the potential modes of mattering afforded by digital cartography in STS....

  14. Metylcyclohexane conversion to light olefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. SCOFIELD

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available This study consists in the evaluation of the catalytic properties of zeolites with different structures in the conversion of methylcyclohexane to light olefins. Results obtained suggest that the steric constrictions of the catalysts used play an important role in hydrogen transfer reactions. Higher selectivities for light olefins (C3= and C4= were observed for zeolites having more closed structures, like MFI and ferrerite, when compared to those having more open ones, like beta, omega and faujasite.

  15. Origins and evolution of viruses of eukaryotes: The ultimate modularity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koonin, Eugene V., E-mail: koonin@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov [National Center for Biotechnology Information, National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20894 (United States); Dolja, Valerian V., E-mail: doljav@science.oregonstate.edu [Department of Botany and Plant Pathology, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97331 (United States); Krupovic, Mart, E-mail: krupovic@pasteur.fr [Institut Pasteur, Unité Biologie Moléculaire du Gène chez les Extrêmophiles, Department of Microbiology, Paris 75015 (France)

    2015-05-15

    Viruses and other selfish genetic elements are dominant entities in the biosphere, with respect to both physical abundance and genetic diversity. Various selfish elements parasitize on all cellular life forms. The relative abundances of different classes of viruses are dramatically different between prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In prokaryotes, the great majority of viruses possess double-stranded (ds) DNA genomes, with a substantial minority of single-stranded (ss) DNA viruses and only limited presence of RNA viruses. In contrast, in eukaryotes, RNA viruses account for the majority of the virome diversity although ssDNA and dsDNA viruses are common as well. Phylogenomic analysis yields tangible clues for the origins of major classes of eukaryotic viruses and in particular their likely roots in prokaryotes. Specifically, the ancestral genome of positive-strand RNA viruses of eukaryotes might have been assembled de novo from genes derived from prokaryotic retroelements and bacteria although a primordial origin of this class of viruses cannot be ruled out. Different groups of double-stranded RNA viruses derive either from dsRNA bacteriophages or from positive-strand RNA viruses. The eukaryotic ssDNA viruses apparently evolved via a fusion of genes from prokaryotic rolling circle-replicating plasmids and positive-strand RNA viruses. Different families of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses appear to have originated from specific groups of bacteriophages on at least two independent occasions. Polintons, the largest known eukaryotic transposons, predicted to also form virus particles, most likely, were the evolutionary intermediates between bacterial tectiviruses and several groups of eukaryotic dsDNA viruses including the proposed order “Megavirales” that unites diverse families of large and giant viruses. Strikingly, evolution of all classes of eukaryotic viruses appears to have involved fusion between structural and replicative gene modules derived from different sources

  16. What's West Nile Virus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... OK for Kids? Your Teeth Heart Murmurs What's West Nile Virus? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's West Nile Virus? Print A A A en español ¿Qué es ... Virus del Nilo Occidental? What exactly is the West Nile virus? And why is everyone talking about mosquitoes ? Even ...

  17. Proteasomes raise the microtubule dynamics in influenza A (H1N1) virus-infected LLC-MK2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fazzi, Alessandra; Razin, Sergey V; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of microtubule networks are known to have an impact on replication of influenza A virus in some cellular models. Here we present evidence suggesting that at late stages of LLC-MK2 cell infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system participates in destabilization of microtubules, and favours virus replication. Chemical inhibition of proteasome activity partially suppresses influenza A virus replication, while stimulation of proteasome activity favours influenza A virus replication. Conversely, in another cellular model, A549 cells, inhibitors and activators of proteasomes have a small effect on influenza A virus replication. These data suggest that influenza A virus might take selective advantage of proteasome functions in order to set up a favourable cytoskeletal "environment" for its replication and spread. Furthermore, the relationship between influenza virus and the host cell is likely to depend on both the cellular model and the virus strain.

  18. Special Issue: Gene Conversion in Duplicated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Innan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is an outcome of recombination, causing non-reciprocal transfer of a DNA fragment. Several decades later than the discovery of crossing over, gene conversion was first recognized in fungi when non-Mendelian allelic distortion was observed. Gene conversion occurs when a double-strand break is repaired by using homologous sequences in the genome. In meiosis, there is a strong preference to use the orthologous region (allelic gene conversion, which causes non-Mendelian allelic distortion, but paralogous or duplicated regions can also be used for the repair (inter-locus gene conversion, also referred to as non-allelic and ectopic gene conversion. The focus of this special issue is the latter, interlocus gene conversion; the rate is lower than allelic gene conversion but it has more impact on phenotype because more drastic changes in DNA sequence are involved.

  19. Conversion Disorder Presenting As Neuritic Leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayal SK

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Conversion disorder is not normally listed amongst the conditions in differential diagnosis of leprosy neuropathy. A case conversion reaction who was initially diagnosed as neuritic leprosy is reported. Patient responded to narcosuggestion and psychotherapy.

  20. Viruses infecting maize

    OpenAIRE

    Krstić, Branka; Stanković, Ivana; Bulajić, Aleksandra

    2014-01-01

    Over 40 plant viruses has been known to cause diseases of maize, but economically the most important yield looses, which in certain years can be total, are caused by viruses from Potyvirus genera, known to be aphid-transmitted in a non-persistant maner. The most important viruses, pathogens of maize, sugar cane and sorghum are considered to be Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV). In Serbia, the prese...

  1. Beet yellows virus replicase and replicative compartments: parallels with other RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gushchin, Vladimir A; Solovyev, Andrey G; Erokhina, Tatyana N; Morozov, Sergey Y; Agranovsky, Alexey A

    2013-01-01

    In eukaryotic virus systems, infection leads to induction of membranous compartments in which replication occurs. Virus-encoded subunits of the replication complex mediate its interaction with membranes. As replication platforms, RNA viruses use the cytoplasmic surfaces of different membrane compartments, e.g., endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi, endo/lysosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and peroxisomes. Closterovirus infections are accompanied by formation of multivesicular complexes from cell membranes of ER or mitochondrial origin. So far the mechanisms for vesicles formation have been obscure. In the replication-associated 1a polyprotein of Beet yellows virus (BYV) and other closteroviruses, the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains (1a central region (CR), 1a CR) is marginally conserved. Computer-assisted analysis predicts several putative membrane-binding domains in the BYV 1a CR. Transient expression of a hydrophobic segment (referred to here as CR-2) of the BYV 1a in Nicotiana benthamiana led to reorganization of the ER and formation of ~1-μm mobile globules. We propose that the CR-2 may be involved in the formation of multivesicular complexes in BYV-infected cells. This provides analogy with membrane-associated proteins mediating the build-up of "virus factories" in cells infected with diverse positive-strand RNA viruses (alpha-like viruses, picorna-like viruses, flaviviruses, and nidoviruses) and negative-strand RNA viruses (bunyaviruses).

  2. Viruses in cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemany, R

    2013-03-01

    Soon after the discovery that viruses cause human disease, started the idea of using viruses to treat cancer. After the initial indiscriminate use, crude preparations of each novel virus in the early twentieth century, a second wave of virotherapy blossomed in the 60s with purified and selected viruses. Responses were rare and short-lived. Immune rejection of the oncolytic viruses was identified as the major problem and virotherapy was abandoned. During the past two decades virotherapy has re-emerged with engineered viruses, with a trend towards using them as tumor-debulking immunostimulatory agents combined with radio or chemotherapy. Currently, oncolytic Reovirus, Herpes, and Vaccinia virus are in late phase clinical trials. Despite the renewed hope, efficacy will require improving systemic tumor targeting, overcoming stroma barriers for virus spread, and selectively stimulating immune responses against tumor antigens but not against the virus. Virotherapy history, viruses, considerations for clinical trials, and hurdles are briefly overviewed.

  3. Wavelength Conversion by using Multiple Fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger, Christian; Iversen, Villy Bæk

    2002-01-01

    We explain how wavelength conversion can be achieved by using multiple fibres, and show that multiple fibres reduce blocking probability in dynamic all-optical networks, whereby the need for conversion in all-optical networks will be limited......We explain how wavelength conversion can be achieved by using multiple fibres, and show that multiple fibres reduce blocking probability in dynamic all-optical networks, whereby the need for conversion in all-optical networks will be limited...

  4. MENGENAL HANTA VIRUS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tri Wijayanti

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Virus Hanta kurang infeksius, kecuali di dalam lingkungan tertentu. Lamanya waktu virus ini dapat bertahan di lingkungan, setelah keluar dari tubuh tikus tidaklah diketahui secara pasti. Tetapi percobaan laboratorium menunjukkan bahwa, daya infektifitasnya tidak dijumpai setelah dua hari pengeringan. Genus hanta virus terdiri dari 22 spesies virus, dapat menyebabkan hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS dan hanta virus pulmonary syndrome (HPS.

  5. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  6. Reading comprehension interaction – a conversation analysis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose is to use current methods of conversation analysis to analyse a typical interaction in order to understand how the use of conversational techniques support reading comprehension. It explores how communicative activity plays out in terms of conversational features such as sequence organisation, response ...

  7. Alpine radar conversion for LAWR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M.; Burlando, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) is a ship-born weather radar system operating in X-band developed by the DHI Group to detect precipitation in urban areas. To date more than thirty units are installed in different settings around the world. A LAWR was also deployed in the Alps, at 3883 m a.s.l. on the Kl. Matterhorn (Valais, Switzerland). This was the highest LAWR of the world and it led to the development of an Alpine LAWR system that, besides featuring important technological improvements needed to withstand the severe Alpine conditions, required the development of a new Alpine Radar COnversion Model (ARCOM), which is the main focus of this contribution. The LAWR system is equipped with the original FURUNO fan-beam slotted antenna and the original logarithmic receiver, which limits the radar observations to the video signal (L) withour providing the reflectivity (Z). The beam is 0.95 deg wide and 20 deg high. It can detect precipitation to a max range of 60 km. In order to account for the limited availability of raw signal and information and the specific mountain set-up, the conversion model had to be developed differently from the state-of-the-art radar conversion technique used for this class of radars. In particular, the ARCOM is based on a model used to simulate a spatial dependent factor, hereafter called ACF, which is in turn function of parameters that take in account climatological conditions, also used in other conversion methods, but additionally accounting for local radar beam features and for orographic forcings such as the effective sampling power (sP), which is modelled by means of antenna pattern, geometric ground clutter and their interaction. The result is a conversion factor formulated to account for a range correction that is based on the increase of the sampling volume, partial beam blocking and local climatological conditions. The importance of the latter in this study is double with respect to the standard conversion technique for this

  8. Viral Aggregation: Impact on Virus Behavior in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerba, Charles P; Betancourt, Walter Q

    2017-07-05

    Aggregates of viruses can have a significant impact on quantification and behavior of viruses in the environment. Viral aggregates may be formed in numerous ways. Viruses may form crystal like structures and aggregates in the host cell during replication or may form due to changes in environmental conditions after virus particles are released from the host cells. Aggregates tend to form near the isoelectric point of the virus, under the influence of certain salts and salt concentrations in solution, cationic polymers, and suspended organic matter. The given conditions under which aggregates form in the environment are highly dependent on the type of virus, type of salts in solution (cation, anion. monovalent, divalent) and pH. However, virus type greatly influences the conditions when aggregation/disaggregation will occur, making predictions difficult under any given set of water quality conditions. Most studies have shown that viral aggregates increase the survival of viruses in the environment and resistance to disinfectants, especially with more reactive disinfectants. The presence of viral aggregates may also result in overestimation of removal by filtration processes. Virus aggregation-disaggregation is a complex process and predicting the behavior of any individual virus is difficult under a given set of environmental circumstances without actual experimental data.

  9. Veterinary research, monitoring and advisory services in connection with the establishment and operation of a communal biomass conversion plant. Partial project 1 (VET-BIO-1). Veterinaer forskning, overvaagning og raadgivning i forbindelse med etablering og drift af biogasfaellesanlaeg. Delprojekt 1 (VET-BIO-1); Modelstudier vedroerende overlevelse af virus i gylle under traditionel opbevaring og under udraadning i biogasanlaeg

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boetner, A.

    1990-08-01

    Land spreading of untreated slurry as fertilizers may cause unpleasant odour and pollution and give rise to occasional dissemination of infectious pathogens. In recent years, however, anaerobic digestion with the production of biogas is being increasingly used in connection with intensive cattle and swine production systems in which large volumes of slurry are produced. The anaerobic digestion of the slurry reduces the odour and pollution and may destroy pathogens or reduce them to acceptable levels. The aim of the project was to investigate the rate of inactivation of a number of epidemiologically important animal viruses (Aujeszky-, IBR-, TGE-, classical swine fever-, BVD-, foot and mouth-, porcine parvo- and swineinfluenza-viruses) in conventionally stored slurry in slurry tanks at 5 and 20 deg. C and during anaerobic digestion in batch reactors at 35, 40, 45, 50 and 55 deg. C. The experiments were carried out using 100-ml laboratory models. The inactivation rate was found to increase with increasing temperature, and a much faster inactivation of the viruses was found during anaerobic digestion compared to conventionally storage at 5 and 20 deg. C. Graphs illustrating the results of these investigations are presented. (author) 23 refs.

  10. Wavelength conversion based spectral imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin

    There has been a strong, application driven development of Si-based cameras and spectrometers for imaging and spectral analysis of light in the visible and near infrared spectral range. This has resulted in very efficient devices, with high quantum efficiency, good signal to noise ratio and high...... resolution for this spectral region. Today, an increasing number of applications exists outside the spectral region covered by Si-based devices, e.g. within cleantech, medical or food imaging. We present a technology based on wavelength conversion which will extend the spectral coverage of state of the art...... visible or near infrared cameras and spectrometers to include other spectral regions of interest....

  11. Ferret airway epithelial cell cultures support efficient replication of influenza B virus but not mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderfield, Ruth A; Parker, Lauren; Stilwell, Peter; Roberts, Kim L; Schepelmann, Silke; Barclay, Wendy S

    2015-08-01

    Ferrets have become the model animal of choice for influenza pathology and transmission experiments as they are permissive and susceptible to human influenza A viruses. However, inoculation of ferrets with mumps virus (MuV) did not lead to successful infections. We evaluated the use of highly differentiated ferret tracheal epithelium cell cultures, FTE, for predicting the potential of ferrets to support respiratory viral infections. FTE cultures supported productive replication of human influenza A and B viruses but not of MuV, whereas analogous cells generated from human airways supported replication of all three viruses. We propose that in vitro strategies using these cultures might serve as a method of triaging viruses and potentially reducing the use of ferrets in viral studies.

  12. Biomass conversion processes for energy and fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, S. S.; Zaborsky, O. R.

    The book treats biomass sources, promising processes for the conversion of biomass into energy and fuels, and the technical and economic considerations in biomass conversion. Sources of biomass examined include crop residues and municipal, animal and industrial wastes, agricultural and forestry residues, aquatic biomass, marine biomass and silvicultural energy farms. Processes for biomass energy and fuel conversion by direct combustion (the Andco-Torrax system), thermochemical conversion (flash pyrolysis, carboxylolysis, pyrolysis, Purox process, gasification and syngas recycling) and biochemical conversion (anaerobic digestion, methanogenesis and ethanol fermentation) are discussed, and mass and energy balances are presented for each system.

  13. Biomass thermochemical conversion program. 1985 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research on this conversion technology for renewable energy through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. The Program is part of DOE's Biofuels and Municipal Waste Technology Division, Office of Renewable Technologies. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1985. 32 figs., 4 tabs.

  14. Biomass thermochemical conversion program: 1987 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1988-01-01

    The objective of the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program is to generate a base of scientific data and conversion process information that will lead to establishment of cost-effective processes for conversion of biomass resources into clean fuels. To accomplish this objective, in fiscal year 1987 the Thermochemical Conversion Program sponsored research activities in the following four areas: Liquid Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology; Gasification Technology; Direct Combustion Technology; Program Support Activities. In this report an overview of the Thermochemical Conversion Program is presented. Specific research projects are then described. Major accomplishments for 1987 are summarized.

  15. Astrophysicists' conversational connections on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Kim; Bowman, Timothy D; Haustein, Stefanie; Peters, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists' activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency) and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions) on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators) and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets). The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions.

  16. Bilingualism Accentuates Children's Conversational Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegal, Michael; Surian, Luca; Matsuo, Ayumi; Geraci, Alessandra; Iozzi, Laura; Okumura, Yuko; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    Background Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3–6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite). Principal Findings In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1) significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1) significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. Conclusions As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1) and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2), these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses. PMID:20140246

  17. Bilingualism accentuates children's conversational understanding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Siegal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although bilingualism is prevalent throughout the world, little is known about the extent to which it influences children's conversational understanding. Our investigation involved children aged 3-6 years exposed to one or more of four major languages: English, German, Italian, and Japanese. In two experiments, we examined the children's ability to identify responses to questions as violations of conversational maxims (to be informative and avoid redundancy, to speak the truth, be relevant, and be polite. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In Experiment 1, with increasing age, children showed greater sensitivity to maxim violations. Children in Italy who were bilingual in German and Italian (with German as the dominant language L1 significantly outperformed Italian monolinguals. In Experiment 2, children in England who were bilingual in English and Japanese (with English as L1 significantly outperformed Japanese monolinguals in Japan with vocabulary age partialled out. CONCLUSIONS: As the monolingual and bilingual groups had a similar family SES background (Experiment 1 and similar family cultural identity (Experiment 2, these results point to a specific role for early bilingualism in accentuating children's developing ability to appreciate effective communicative responses.

  18. Analog-to-digital conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Pelgrom, Marcel J. M

    2013-01-01

    This textbook is appropriate for use in graduate-level curricula in analog to digital conversion, as well as for practicing engineers in need of a state-of-the-art reference on data converters.  It discusses various analog-to-digital conversion principles, including sampling, quantization, reference generation, nyquist architectures and sigma-delta modulation.  This book presents an overview of the state-of-the-art in this field and focuses on issues of optimizing accuracy and speed, while reducing the power level. This new, second edition emphasizes novel calibration concepts, the specific requirements of new systems, the consequences of 45-nm technology and the need for a more statistical approach to accuracy.  Pedagogical enhancements to this edition include more than twice the exercises available in the first edition, solved examples to introduce all key, new concepts and warnings, remarks and hints, from a practitioner’s perspective, wherever appropriate.  Considerable background information and pr...

  19. Religious Conversion, Models and Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Boz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This papers examines the experiences of converts to Islam among Australian women in the milieu of polemic views and debates such as ‘Islam versus the west', which is most visible in the image of the ‘eastern' ‘oppressed' Muslim woman. Employing the experiences of Australian Muslim women converts in Melbourne, issues concerning identity politics, and the individuals and social dimensions of conversion are investigated. While there is an array of literature about Muslim women from various disciplines including anthropology, sociology, politics, cultural studies and gender studies, among others, this paper takes an interdisciplinary approach to examine debates that have based their discussion on the image of the Muslim woman. Marco debates concerning issues such as multiculturalism, integration, Islam and the West debates including the ‘clash of civilizations' have been largely centred on the image of the Muslim women. The debate concerning the inherent conflict between Islam and West intensified after 11th of September 2001 with the terrorist attacks in the United States and the invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and Iraq in 2002. It is during this critical period I interviewed Muslim converts in order to gain first-hand insight into their experiences as Muslims. This paper employs primary data collected during this historical period to examine issues regarding broader issues of identity politics, religious conversion as well as the everyday life experiences of female converts to Islam.

  20. Astrophysicists' conversational connections on Twitter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Holmberg

    Full Text Available Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists' activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets. The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions.

  1. Astrophysicists’ Conversational Connections on Twitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmberg, Kim; Bowman, Timothy D.; Haustein, Stefanie; Peters, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Because Twitter and other social media are increasingly used for analyses based on altmetrics, this research sought to understand what contexts, affordance use, and social activities influence the tweeting behavior of astrophysicists. Thus, the presented study has been guided by three research questions that consider the influence of astrophysicists’ activities (i.e., publishing and tweeting frequency) and of their tweet construction and affordance use (i.e. use of hashtags, language, and emotions) on the conversational connections they have on Twitter. We found that astrophysicists communicate with a variety of user types (e.g. colleagues, science communicators, other researchers, and educators) and that in the ego networks of the astrophysicists clear groups consisting of users with different professional roles can be distinguished. Interestingly, the analysis of noun phrases and hashtags showed that when the astrophysicists address the different groups of very different professional composition they use very similar terminology, but that they do not talk to each other (i.e. mentioning other user names in tweets). The results also showed that in those areas of the ego networks that tweeted more the sentiment of the tweets tended to be closer to neutral, connecting frequent tweeting with information sharing activities rather than conversations or expressing opinions. PMID:25153196

  2. Biological conversion of synthesis gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klasson, K.T.; Basu, R.; Johnson, E.R.; Clausen, E.C.; Gaddy, J.L.

    1992-03-01

    Mass transfer and kinetic studies were carried out for the Rhodospirillum rubrum and Chlorobium thiosulfatophilum bacterial systems. R. rubrum is a photosynthetic anaerobic bacterium which catalyzes the biological water gas shift reaction: CO + H[sub 2]0 [yields] CO[sub 2] + H[sub 2]. C. thiosulfatophilum is also a H[sub 2]S and COS to elemental sulfur. The growth of R. rubrum may be satisfactorily carried out at 25[degree] and 30[degree]C, while CO uptake and thus the conversion of CO best occurs at temperatures of either 30[degree], 32[degree] or 34[degree]C. The rate of conversion of COs and H[sub 2]O to CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2]S may be modeled by a first order rate expression. The rate constant at 30[degree]C was found to be 0.243 h[sup [minus]1]. The growth of C. thiosulfatophilum may be modeled in terms of incoming light intensity using a Monod equation: [mu] = [sub 351] + I[sub o]/[sup 0.152]I[sub o]. Comparisons of the growth of R. rubrum and C. thiosulfatophilum shows that the specific growth rate of C. thiosulfatophilum is much higher at a given light intensity.

  3. Molecular detection and typing of influenza viruses. Are we ready for an influenza pandemic?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MacKay, W.G.; Loon, A.M. van; Niedrig, M.; Meijer, A.; Lina, B.; Niesters, H.G.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We cannot predict when an influenza pandemic will occur or which variant of the virus will cause it. Little information is currently available on the ability of laboratories to detect and subtype influenza viruses including the avian influenza viruses. OBJECTIVES: To assess the ability

  4. The conversational interface talking to smart devices

    CERN Document Server

    McTear, Michael; Griol, David

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the conversational interface, which is becoming the main mode of interaction with virtual personal assistants, smart devices, various types of wearables, and social robots. The book consists of four parts: Part I presents the background to conversational interfaces, examining past and present work on spoken language interaction with computers; Part II covers the various technologies that are required to build a conversational interface along with practical chapters and exercises using open source tools; Part III looks at interactions with smart devices, wearables, and robots, and then goes on to discusses the role of emotion and personality in the conversational interface; Part IV examines methods for evaluating conversational interfaces and discusses future directions. · Presents a comprehensive overview of the various technologies that underlie conversational user interfaces; · Combines descriptions of conversational user interface technologies with a gui...

  5. Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program: 1986 annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiefelbein, G.F.; Stevens, D.J.; Gerber, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    Wood and crop residues constitute a vast majority of the biomass feedstocks available for conversion, and thermochemical processes are well suited for conversion of these materials. Thermochemical conversion processes can generate a variety of products such as gasoline hydrocarbon fuels, natural gas substitutes, or heat energy for electric power generation. The US Department of Energy is sponsoring research on biomass conversion technologies through its Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program. Pacific Northwest Laboratory has been designated the Technical Field Management Office for the Biomass Thermochemical Conversion Program with overall responsibility for the Program. This report briefly describes the Thermochemical Conversion Program structure and summarizes the activities and major accomplishments during fiscal year 1986. 88 refs., 31 figs., 5 tabs.

  6. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E.

    2011-01-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions. PMID:22163336

  7. Viruses Infecting Reptiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel E. Marschang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch’s postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  8. Viruses infecting reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschang, Rachel E

    2011-11-01

    A large number of viruses have been described in many different reptiles. These viruses include arboviruses that primarily infect mammals or birds as well as viruses that are specific for reptiles. Interest in arboviruses infecting reptiles has mainly focused on the role reptiles may play in the epidemiology of these viruses, especially over winter. Interest in reptile specific viruses has concentrated on both their importance for reptile medicine as well as virus taxonomy and evolution. The impact of many viral infections on reptile health is not known. Koch's postulates have only been fulfilled for a limited number of reptilian viruses. As diagnostic testing becomes more sensitive, multiple infections with various viruses and other infectious agents are also being detected. In most cases the interactions between these different agents are not known. This review provides an update on viruses described in reptiles, the animal species in which they have been detected, and what is known about their taxonomic positions.

  9. Immunity to pre-1950 H1N1 influenza viruses confers cross-protection against the pandemic swine-origin 2009 A (H1N1) influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skountzou, Ioanna; Koutsonanos, Dimitrios G; Kim, Jin Hyang; Powers, Ryan; Satyabhama, Lakshmipriyadarshini; Masseoud, Feda; Weldon, William C; Martin, Maria Del Pilar; Mittler, Robert S; Compans, Richard; Jacob, Joshy

    2010-08-01

    The 2009 H1N1 influenza virus outbreak is the first pandemic of the twenty-first century. Epidemiological data reveal that of all the people afflicted with H1N1 virus, 60 y old have pre-existing neutralizing Abs against the 2009 H1N1 virus. This finding suggests that influenza strains that circulated 50-60 y ago might provide cross-protection against the swine-origin 2009 H1N1 influenza virus. To test this, we determined the ability of representative H1N1 influenza viruses that circulated in the human population from 1930 to 2000, to induce cross-reactivity to and cross-protection against the pandemic swine-origin H1N1 virus, A/California/04/09. We show that exposure of mice to the 1947 virus, A/FM/1/47, or the 1934 virus, A/PR/8/34, induced robust cross-protective immune responses and these mice were protected against a lethal challenge with mouse-adapted A/California/04/09 H1N1 virus. Conversely, we observed that mice exposed to the 2009 H1N1 virus were protected against a lethal challenge with mouse-adapted 1947 or 1934 H1N1 viruses. In addition, exposure to the 2009 H1N1 virus induced broad cross-reactivity against H1N1 as well as H3N2 influenza viruses. Finally, we show that vaccination with the older H1N1 viruses, particularly A/FM/1/47, confers protective immunity against the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. Taken together, our data provide an explanation for the decreased susceptibility of the elderly to the 2009 H1N1 outbreak and demonstrate that vaccination with the pre-1950 influenza strains can cross-protect against the pandemic swine-origin 2009 H1N1 influenza virus.

  10. IP-10 predicts the first phase decline of HCV RNA and overall viral response to therapy in patients co-infected with chronic hepatitis C virus infection and HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falconer, Karolin; Askarieh, Galia; Weis, Nina Margrethe

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co-infected pa......The aim of this study was to investigate the utility of baseline plasma interferon-gamma inducible protein-10 (IP-10) levels in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-hepatitis C virus (HCV) co-infected patients. Baseline IP-10 was monitored during HCV combination therapy in 21 HIV-HCV co......-infected patients (HCV genotype 1 (n = 16), 2 (n = 2), and 3 (n = 3)). Lower baseline IP-10 was significantly associated with a rapid decline in HCV RNA, in particular with the first phase reduction, and similar cut-off levels ( 600 pg/ml) as in HCV mono-infected patients apply. In conclusion, baseline IP......-10 therapy in HIV-HCV co-infected patients, and may thus be useful in encouraging such difficult-to-treat patients to initiate therapy....

  11. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation is a frequent event after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) and quantitatively predicts EBV-lymphoproliferative disease following T-cell--depleted SCT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Esser, J W; van der Holt, B; Meijer, E; Niesters, H G; Trenschel, R; Thijsen, S F; van Loon, A M; Frassoni, F; Bacigalupo, A; Schaefer, U W; Osterhaus, A D; Gratama, J W; Löwenberg, B; Verdonck, L F; Cornelissen, J J

    2001-01-01

    Reactivation of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) may evoke a protective cellular immune response or may be complicated by the development of EBV-lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD). So far, very little is known about the incidence, recurrence, and

  12. Development of a swine specific 9-plex Luminex cytokine assay and assessment of immunity after porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccination: Elevated serum IL-12 levels are not predictive of protect

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Luminex multiplex swine cytokine assay was developed to measure 9 cytokines simultaneously in pig serum and tested in a porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine/challenge study. This assay detects innate (IL-1ß, IL-6, IL-8, IFNa, TNFa); regulatory (IL-10), Th1 (IL-12, I...

  13. Measurement and modeling of advanced coal conversion processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solomon, P.R.; Serio, M.A.; Hamblen, D.G. (Advanced Fuel Research, Inc., East Hartford, CT (USA)); Smoot, L.D.; Brewster, B.S. (Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (USA))

    1990-01-01

    The overall objective of this program is the development of predictive capability for the design, scale up, simulation, control and feedstock evaluation in advanced coal conversion devices. This technology is important to reduce the technical and economic risks inherent in utilizing coal, a feedstock whose variable and often unexpected behavior presents a significant challenge. This program will merge significant advances made at Advanced Fuel Research, Inc. (AFR) in measuring and quantitatively describing the mechanisms in coal conversion behavior, with technology being developed at Brigham Young University (BYU) in comprehensive computer codes for mechanistic modeling of entrained-bed gasification. Additional capabilities in predicting pollutant formation will be implemented and the technology will be expanded to fixed-bed reactors. The foundation to describe coal-specific conversion behavior is AFR's Functional Group (FG) and Devolatilization, Vaporization, and Crosslinking (DVC) models, developed under previous and on-going METC sponsored programs. These models have demonstrated the capability to describe the time dependent evolution of individual gas species, and the amount and characteristics of tar and char. The combined FG-DVC model will be integrated with BYU's comprehensive two-dimensional reactor model, PCGC-2, which is currently the most widely used reactor simulation for combustion or gasification. Success in this program will be a major step in improving in predictive capabilities for coal conversion processes including: demonstrated accuracy and reliability and a generalized first principles'' treatment of coals based on readily obtained composition data. The progress during the fifteenth quarterly of the program is presented. 56 refs., 41 figs., 5 tabs.

  14. IFNL4 affects clearance of hepatitis C virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientists have discovered a new human interferon gene, Interferon Lambda 4 (IFNL4), that affects clearance of the hepatitis C virus. They also identified an inherited genetic variant within IFNL4 that predicts how people respond to treatment for hepatit

  15. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  16. Computer aided epitope design as a peptide vaccine component against Lassa virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Ar-Rafi Md; Imtiaz, Syed Hassan; Zerin, Tasnim; Rahman, Tania; Shekhar, Hossain Uddin

    2017-01-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is an arena virus causing hemorrhagic fever and it is endemic in several regions of West Africa. The disease-causing virus records high mortality rate in endemic regions due to lack of appropriate treatment and prevention strategies. Therefore, it is of interest to design and develop viable vaccine components against the virus. We used the Lassa virus envelope glyco-proteins as a vaccine target to identify linear peptides as potential epitopes with immunogenic properties by computer aided epitope prediction tools. We report a T-cell epitope 'LLGTFTWTL' and a B-cell epitope 'AELKCFGNTAVAKCNE' with predicted potential immunogenicity for further in vivo and in vitro consideration.

  17. Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Abe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Of 168 patients with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection-related liver disease, 20 patients who had received 100 mg of lamivudine plus 10 mg/day of adefovir dipivoxil (ADV (ADV group and 124 patients who had received 0.5 mg/day of entecavir or 100 mg/day of lamivudine (non-ADV group for >1 year were enrolled. For comparative analyses, 19 well-matched pairs were obtained from the groups by propensity scores. At the time of enrollment, serum creatinine and phosphate concentrations were similar between the ADV and non-ADV groups; however, urinary phosphate ( and serum bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BAP ( concentrations were significantly higher in the ADV group than in the non-ADV group. Serum BAP was significantly higher at the time of enrollment than before ADV administration in the ADV group (, although there was no significant change in serum BAP concentration in the non-ADV group. There was a significant positive correlation between the period of ADV therapy and ΔBAP (, . Serum BAP concentration increased before increase in serum creatinine concentration and was useful for early detection of adverse events and for developing adequate measures for continuing ADV for chronic HBV infection-related liver disease.

  18. Microturbine Power Conversion Technology Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staunton, R.H.

    2003-07-21

    In this study, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is performing a technology review to assess the market for commercially available power electronic converters that can be used to connect microturbines to either the electric grid or local loads. The intent of the review is to facilitate an assessment of the present status of marketed power conversion technology to determine how versatile the designs are for potentially providing different services to the grid based on changes in market direction, new industry standards, and the critical needs of the local service provider. The project includes data gathering efforts and documentation of the state-of-the-art design approaches that are being used by microturbine manufacturers in their power conversion electronics development and refinement. This project task entails a review of power converters used in microturbines sized between 20 kW and 1 MW. The power converters permit microturbine generators, with their non-synchronous, high frequency output, to interface with the grid or local loads. The power converters produce 50- to 60-Hz power that can be used for local loads or, using interface electronics, synchronized for connection to the local feeder and/or microgrid. The power electronics enable operation in a stand-alone mode as a voltage source or in grid-connect mode as a current source. Some microturbines are designed to automatically switch between the two modes. The information obtained in this data gathering effort will provide a basis for determining how close the microturbine industry is to providing services such as voltage regulation, combined control of both voltage and current, fast/seamless mode transfers, enhanced reliability, reduced cost converters, reactive power supply, power quality, and other ancillary services. Some power quality improvements will require the addition of storage devices; therefore, the task should also determine what must be done to enable the power conversion circuits to

  19. Towards Carbon-Neutral CO2 Conversion to Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Davide; Jones, Matthew D; O'Byrne, Justin P; Griffiths, Owen G; Owen, Rhodri E; Sackville, Emma; McManus, Marcelle; Plucinski, Pawel

    2015-12-07

    With fossil fuels still predicted to contribute close to 80 % of the primary energy consumption by 2040, methods to limit further CO2 emissions in the atmosphere are urgently needed to avoid the catastrophic scenarios associated with global warming. In parallel with improvements in energy efficiency and CO2 storage, the conversion of CO2 has emerged as a complementary route with significant potential. In this work we present the direct thermo-catalytic conversion of CO2 to hydrocarbons using a novel iron nanoparticle-carbon nanotube (Fe@CNT) catalyst. We adopted a holistic and systematic approach to CO2 conversion by integrating process optimization-identifying reaction conditions to maximize conversion and selectivity towards long chain hydrocarbons and/or short olefins-with catalyst optimization through the addition of promoters. The result is the production of valuable hydrocarbons in a manner that can approach carbon neutrality under realistic industrial process conditions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Multiscale Modeling of Virus Structure, Assembly, and Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Eric R.; Arora, Karunesh; Mannige, Ranjan V.; Nguyen, Hung D.; Brooks, Charles L.

    Viruses are traditionally considered as infectious agents that attack cells and cause illnesses like AIDS, Influenza, Hepatitis, etc. However, recent advances have illustrated the potential for viruses to play positive roles for human health, instead of causing disease [1, 2]. For example, viruses can be employed for a variety of biomedical and biotechnological applications, including gene therapy[3], drug delivery[4], tumor targeting[5], and medical imaging[6]. Therefore, it is important to understand quantitatively how viruses operate such that they can be engineered in a predictive manner for beneficial roles.

  1. Predictors of delayed culture conversion among Ugandan patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwine, Daniel; Orikiriza, Patrick; Taremwa, Ivan; Ayebare, Arnold; Logoose, Suzan; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Jindani, Amina; Bonnet, Maryline

    2017-04-24

    Estimates of month-2 culture conversion, a proxy indicator of tuberculosis (TB) treatment efficacy in phase-2 trials can vary by culture-type and geographically with lower rates reported among African sites. The sub-study aimed at comparing TB detection rates of different culture media, within and across rifampicin-based regimens (R10, 15 and 20 mg/Kg) over a 6-month treatment follow-up period, and to establish predictors of month-2 culture non-conversion among HIV-negative TB patients enrolled at RIFATOX trial site in Uganda. Unlike in other Rifatox Trial sites, it is only in Uganda were Lowenstein-Jensen (LJ) and Mycobacteria growth indicator tube (MGIT) were used throughout 6-months for treatment monitoring. Conversion rates were compared at month-2, 4 and 6 across cultures and treatment-type. Binomial regression analysis performed for predictors of month-2 non-conversion. Of the 100 enrolled patients, 45% had converted based on combined LJ and MGIT by month-2, with no significant differences across treatment arms, p = 0.721. LJ exhibited higher conversion rates than MGIT at month-2 (58.4% vs 56.0%, p = 0.0707) and month-4 (98.9% vs 88.4%, p = 0.0391) respectively, more so within the high-dose rifampicin arms. All patients had converted by month-6. Time-to-TB detection (TTD) on MGIT and social service jobs independently predict month-2 non-conversion. The month-2 culture conversion used in phase 2 clinical trials as surrogate marker of treatment efficacy is influenced by the culture method used for monitoring mycobacterial response to TB treatment. Therefore, multi-centric TB therapeutic trials using early efficacy endpoint should use the same culture method across sites. The Time-to-detection of MTB on MGIT prior to treatment and working in Social service jobs bear an increased risk of culture non-conversion at month-2. ISRCTN ISRCTN55670677 . Registered 09th November 2010. Retrospectively registered.

  2. Conversation Analysis in Applied Linguistics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasper, Gabriele; Wagner, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    For the last decade, conversation analysis (CA) has increasingly contributed to several established fields in applied linguistics. In this article, we will discuss its methodological contributions. The article distinguishes between basic and applied CA. Basic CA is a sociological endeavor concerned...... been driven by applied work. After laying out CA's standard practices of data treatment and analysis, this article takes up the role of comparison as a fundamental analytical strategy and reviews recent developments into cross-linguistic and cross-cultural directions. The remaining article focuses...... on learning and development. In conclusion, we address some emerging themes in the relationship of CA and applied linguistics, including the role of multilingualism, standard social science methods as research objects, CA's potential for direct social intervention, and increasing efforts to complement CA...

  3. Electrodynamic tethers for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, W.

    1986-01-01

    Conductive tethers have been proposed as a new method for converting orbital mechanical energy into electrical power for use on-board a satellite (generator mode) or conversely (motor mode) as a method of providing electric propulsion using electrical energy from the satellite. The operating characteristics of such systems are functionally dependent on orbit altitude and inclination. Effects of these relationships are examined to determine acceptable regions of application. To identify system design considerations, a specific set of system performance goals and requirements are selected. The case selected is for a 25 kW auxiliary power system for use on Space Station. Appropriate system design considerations are developed, and the resulting system is described.

  4. Power conversion apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Gui-Jia [Knoxville, TN

    2012-02-07

    A power conversion apparatus includes an interfacing circuit that enables a current source inverter to operate from a voltage energy storage device (voltage source), such as a battery, ultracapacitor or fuel cell. The interfacing circuit, also referred to as a voltage-to-current converter, transforms the voltage source into a current source that feeds a DC current to a current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also provides means for controlling and maintaining a constant DC bus current that supplies the current source inverter. The voltage-to-current converter also enables the current source inverter to charge the voltage energy storage device, such as during dynamic braking of a hybrid electric vehicle, without the need of reversing the direction of the DC bus current.

  5. Photoelectrochemical based direct conversion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kocha, S.; Arent, D.; Peterson, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The goal of this research is to develop a stable, cost effective, photoelectrochemical based system that will split water upon illumination, producing hydrogen and oxygen directly, using sunlight as the only energy input. This type of direct conversion system combines a photovoltaic material and an electrolyzer into a single monolithic device. We report on our studies of two multifunction multiphoton photoelectrochemical devices, one based on the ternary semiconductor gallium indium phosphide, (GaInP{sub 2}), and the other one based on amorphous silicon carbide. We also report on our studies of the solid state surface treatment of GaInP{sub 2} as well as our continuing effort to develop synthetic techniques for the attachment of transition metal complexes to the surface of semiconductor electrodes. All our surface studies are directed at controlling the interface energetics and forming stable catalytic surfaces.

  6. Conversation Simulation and Sensible Surprises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchens, Jason L.

    I have entered the Loebner Prize five times, winning the "most humanlike program" category in 1996 with a surly ELIZA-clone named HeX, but failed to repeat the performance in subsequent years with more sophisticated techniques. Whether this is indicative of an unanticipated improvement in "conversation simulation" technology, or whether it highlights the strengths of ELIZA-style trickery, is as an exercise for the reader. In 2000, I was invited to assume the role of Chief Scientist at Artificial Intelligence Ltd. (Ai) on a project inspired by the advice given by Alan Turing in the final section of his classic paper - our quest was to build a "child machine" that could learn and use language from scratch. In this chapter, I will discuss both of these experiences, presenting my thoughts regarding the Chinese Room argument and Artificial Intelligence (AI) in between.

  7. Nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric effect modulated by voltage for the symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates under magnetic and thermal loadings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao-Miao Zhou

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the tri-layer symmetrical magnetoelectric laminates, a equivalent circuit for the nonlinear resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect is established. Because the nonlinear thermo-magneto-mechanical constitutive equations of magnetostrictive material were introduced, a converse magnetoelectric coefficient model was derived from the equivalent circuit, which can describe the influence of bias electric field, bias magnetic field and ambient temperature on the resonance converse magnetoelectric coupling effect. Especially, the model can well predict the modulation effect of bias electric field/voltage on the magnetism of magnetoelectric composite or the converse magnetoelectric coefficient, which is absolutely vital in applications. Both of the converse magnetoelectric coefficient and the resonance frequency predicted by the model have good agreements with the existing experimental results in qualitatively and quantitatively, and the validity of the model is confirmed. On this basis, according to the model, the nonlinear trends of the resonance converse magnetoelectric effect under different bias voltages, bias magnetic fields and ambient temperatures are predicted. From the results, it can be found that the bias voltage can effectively modulate the curve of the resonance converse magnetoelectric coefficient versus bias magnetic field, and then change the corresponding optimal bias magnetic field of the maximum converse magnetoelectric coefficient; with the increasing volume ratio of piezoelectric layers, the modulation effect of bias voltage becomes more obvious; under different bias magnetic fields, the modulation effect of bias voltage on the converse magnetoelectric effect has nonvolatility in a wide temperature region.

  8. Conversion of bagasse cellulose into ethanol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzens, J.E.

    1997-11-19

    The study conducted by Arkenol was designed to test the conversion of feedstocks such as sugar cane bagasse, sorghum, napier grass and rice straw into fermentable sugars, and then ferment these sugars using natural yeasts and genetically engineered Zymomonis mobilis bacteria (ZM). The study did convert various cellulosic feedstocks into fermentable sugars utilizing the patented Arkenol Concentrated Acid Hydrolysis Process and equipment at the Arkenol Technology Center in Orange, California. The sugars produced using this process were in the concentration range of 12--15%, much higher than the sugar concentrations the genetically engineered ZM bacteria had been developed for. As a result, while the ZM bacteria fermented the produced sugars without initial inhibition, the completion of high sugar concentration fermentations was slower and at lower yield than predicted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). Natural yeasts performed as expected by Arkenol, similar to the results obtained over the last four years of testing. Overall, at sugar concentrations in the 10--13% range, yeast produced 850090% theoretical ethanol yields and ZM bacteria produced 82--87% theoretical yields in 96 hour fermentations. Additional commercialization work revealed the ability to centrifugally separate and recycle the ZM bacteria after fermentation, slight additional benefits from mixed culture ZM bacteria fermentations, and successful utilization of defined media for ZM bacteria fermentation nutrients in lieu of natural media.

  9. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Overview Graphics. VIRUS FAMILIES – contd. Minus strand RNA viruses. Rhabdovirus e.g. rabies. Paramyxovirus e.g. measles, mumps. Orthomyxovirus e.g. influenza. Retroviruses. RSV, HTLV, MMTV, HIV. Notes:

  10. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  11. Hepatitis virus panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003558.htm Hepatitis virus panel To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The hepatitis virus panel is a series of blood tests used ...

  12. Virus Assembly and Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, John E.

    2004-03-01

    We use two techniques to look at three-dimensional virus structure: electron cryomicroscopy (cryoEM) and X-ray crystallography. Figure 1 is a gallery of virus particles whose structures Timothy Baker, one of my former colleagues at Purdue University, used cryoEM to determine. It illustrates the variety of sizes of icosahedral virus particles. The largest virus particle on this slide is the Herpes simplex virus, around 1200Å in diameter; the smallest we examined was around 250Å in diameter. Viruses bear their genomic information either as positive-sense DNA and RNA, double-strand DNA, double-strand RNA, or negative-strand RNA. Viruses utilize the various structure and function "tactics" seen throughout cell biology to replicate at high levels. Many of the biological principles that we consider general were in fact discovered in the context of viruses ...

  13. Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    RSV; Palivizumab; Respiratory syncytial virus immune globulin; Bronchiolitis - RSV ... Crowe JE. Respiratory syncytial virus. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St Geme JW, Schor NF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics . 20th ...

  14. Zika Virus Fact Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sheets Fact files Questions & answers Features Multimedia Contacts Zika virus Fact sheet Updated 6 September 2016 Key facts ... and last for 2-7 days. Complications of Zika virus disease Based on a systematic review of the ...

  15. Zika Virus - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Zika Virus URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/ ... V W XYZ List of All Topics All Zika Virus - Multiple Languages To use the sharing features on ...

  16. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawson, James S., E-mail: james.lawson@unsw.edu.au; Heng, Benjamin [School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences, University of New South Wales, Sydney (Australia)

    2010-04-30

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix.

  17. West Nile Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    West Nile virus (WNV) is an infectious disease that first appeared in the United States in 1999. Infected mosquitoes ... and usually go away on their own. If West Nile virus enters the brain, however, it can be life- ...

  18. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Clinical Guidance & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  19. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ACOG Pregnancy ...

  20. Zika Virus and Pregnancy

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... My ACOG ACOG Departments Donate Shop Career Connection Home Resources & Publications Practice Management Education & Events Advocacy For Patients About ACOG Zika Virus and Pregnancy Home For Patients Zika Virus and Pregnancy Page Navigation ▼ ...

  1. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  2. Design of diamond microcavities for single photon frequency down-conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Zin; Rodriguez, Alejandro W; Loncar, M

    2015-01-01

    We propose monolithic diamond cavities that can be used to convert color-center Fock-state single photons from emission wavelengths to telecommunication bands. We present a detailed theoretical description of the conversion process, analyzing important practical concerns such as nonlinear phase shifts and frequency mismatch. Our analysis predicts sustainable power requirements ($ \\lesssim 1~\\mathrm{W}$) for a chipscale nonlinear device with high conversion efficiencies.

  3. [Mumps vaccine virus transmission].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrashevskaia, E V; Kulak, M V; Otrashevskaia, A V; Karpov, I A; Fisenko, E G; Ignat'ev, G M

    2013-01-01

    In this work we report the mumps vaccine virus shedding based on the laboratory confirmed cases of the mumps virus (MuV) infection. The likely epidemiological sources of the transmitted mumps virus were children who were recently vaccinated with the mumps vaccine containing Leningrad-Zagreb or Leningrad-3 MuV. The etiology of the described cases of the horizontal transmission of both mumps vaccine viruses was confirmed by PCR with the sequential restriction analysis.

  4. Neopterin and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B

    1993-01-01

    to predict the later development of AIDS. The increased neopterin concentrations show that the immune system is activated in HIV infection and demonstrate the presence of an interaction between the virus and the immune system. The most important future use of neopterin measurements may be in fast evaluation...

  5. Quantification of virus syndrome in chili peppers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-15

    Jun 15, 2011 ... One of the most important problems to produce chili crops is the presence of diseases caused by pathogen agents, such as viruses, therefore, there is a substantial necessity to better predict the behavior of the diseases of these crops, determining a more precise quantification of the disease's syndrome that ...

  6. Nairobi sheep disease virus/Ganjam virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M D, Baron; B, Holzer

    2015-08-01

    Nairobi sheep disease virus (NSDV) is a tick-borne virus which causes a severe disease in sheep and goats, and has been responsible for several outbreaks of disease in East Africa. The virus is also found in the Indian subcontinent, where it is known as Ganjam virus. The virus only spreads through the feeding of competent infected ticks, and is therefore limited in its geographic distribution by the distribution of those ticks, Rhipicephalus appendiculata in Africa and Haemaphysalis intermedia in India. Animals bred in endemic areas do not normally develop disease, and the impact is therefore primarily on animals being moved for trade or breeding purposes. The disease caused by NSDV has similarities to several other ruminant diseases, and laboratory diagnosis is necessary for confirmation. There are published methods for diagnosis based on polymerase chain reaction, for virus growth in cell culture and for other simple diagnostic tests, though none has been commercialised. There is no established vaccine against NSDV, although cell-culture attenuated strains have been developed which show promise and could be put into field trials if it were deemed necessary. The virus is closely related to Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, and studies on NSDV may therefore be useful in understanding this important human pathogen.

  7. Surveillance of respiratory viruses.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of respiratory viruses. A 10-year laboratory-based study. J. M. McAnerney, S. Johnson, B. D. Schoub. Respiratory virus isolates made at the National Institute for. Virology from 1982 to 1991 were studied. An active virus surveillance programme, 'viral watch', which recruits throat swab specimens from a network ...

  8. Characteristic of pandemic virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Characteristic of pandemic virus. The virus was highly transmissible. Risk of hospitalization was 2X and risk of death was about 11X more in comparison to seasonal influenza. Virus continues to be susceptible to Osaltamivir, the only drug available. Vaccines are available but ...

  9. ICTV Virus Taxonomy Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simmonds, Peter; Becher, Paul; Bukh, Jens

    2017-01-01

    borne, and many are important human and veterinary pathogens (e.g. yellow fever virus, dengue virus). This is a summary of the current International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV) report on the taxonomy of the Flaviviridae, which is available at www.ictv.global/report/flaviviridae....

  10. Computer Virus Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajala, Judith B.

    2004-01-01

    A computer virus is a program--a piece of executable code--that has the unique ability to replicate. Like biological viruses, computer viruses can spread quickly and are often difficult to eradicate. They can attach themselves to just about any type of file, and are spread by replicating and being sent from one individual to another. Simply having…

  11. Gene conversion in the rice genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Shuqing; Clark, Terry; Zheng, Hongkun

    2008-01-01

    than ten percent. Pseudogenes in the rice genome with low similarity to Arabidopsis genes showed greater likelihood for gene conversion than those with high similarity to Arabidopsis genes. Functional annotations suggest that at least 14 multigene families related to disease or bacteria resistance were......BACKGROUND: Gene conversion causes a non-reciprocal transfer of genetic information between similar sequences. Gene conversion can both homogenize genes and recruit point mutations thereby shaping the evolution of multigene families. In the rice genome, the large number of duplicated genes......-chromosomal conversions distributed between chromosome 1 and 5, 2 and 6, and 3 and 5 are more frequent than genome average (Z-test, P

  12. Solar energy, its conversion and utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farber, E. A.

    1972-01-01

    The work being carried out at the University of Florida Solar Energy and Energy Conversion Laboratory in converting solar energy, our only income, into other needed and useful forms of energy is described. A treatment such as this demonstrates, in proper perspective, how solar energy can benefit mankind with its many problems of shortages and pollution. Descriptions were given of the conversion processes, equipment, and performance. The testing of materials, solar water heating, space heating, cooking and baking, solar distillation, refrigeration and air-conditioning, work with the solar furnace, conversion to mechanical power, hot air engines, solar-heated sewage digestion, conversion to electricity, and other devices will be discussed.

  13. Conversational Agents in E-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry, Alice; Ellis, Richard; Bull, Susan

    This paper discusses the use of natural language or 'conversational' agents in e-learning environments. We describe and contrast the various applications of conversational agent technology represented in the e-learning literature, including tutors, learning companions, language practice and systems to encourage reflection. We offer two more detailed examples of conversational agents, one which provides learning support, and the other support for self-assessment. Issues and challenges for developers of conversational agent systems for e-learning are identified and discussed.

  14. Hospital staff corridor conversations: work in passing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Esther; Bangerter, Adrian; Lê Van, Kim; Navarro, Cécile

    2016-03-01

    First, to document the prevalence of corridor occupations and conversations among the staff of a hospital clinic, and their main features. Second, to examine the activities accomplished through corridor conversations and their interactional organization. Despite extensive research on mobility in hospital work, we still know fairly little about the prevalence and features of hospital staff corridor conversations and how they are organized. We conducted a study combining descriptive statistical analysis and multimodal conversation analysis of video recordings of staff corridor practices in a hospital outpatient clinic in Switzerland. In 2012, we collected 59 hours of video recordings in a corridor of a hospital clinic. We coded and statistically analysed the footage that showed the clinic staff exclusively. We also performed qualitative multimodal conversation analysis on a selection of the recorded staff conversations. Corridor occupations by the clinic staff are frequent and brief and rarely involve stops. Talk events (which include self-talk, face-to-face conversations and telephone conversations) during occupations are also brief and mobile, overwhelmingly focus on professional topics and are particularly frequent when two or more staff members occupy the corridor. The conversations present several interactional configurations and comprise an array of activities consequential to the provision of care and work organization. These practices are related to the fluid work organization of a spatially distributed team in a fast-paced, multitasking environment and should be taken into consideration in any undertaking aimed at improving hospital units' functioning. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Disintegration of beech wood char during thermal conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hindsgaul, Claus

    In the present work the processes occurring in the structures of slowly pyrolysed beech wood char during thermal gasification have been investigated. Emphasis was put on physical changes and gas transport properties during conversion. The highly anisotropic structure of wood was preserved in its...... differences of 3—4 orders of magnitude between the longitudinal and other directions in freshly pyrolysed beech wood char. Diffusion in the longitudinal direction of the beech wood char before gasification corresponded to direct, unobstructed diffusion through its vessel cells. Radial and tangential diffusion...... were limited by Knudsen diffusion through the pits in the wood cell walls for degrees of conversion by gasification up to at least 0.5. A computer model of slab gasification based on the diffusion measurements successfully predicted the mass loss rate during diffusion-limited gasification of beech wood...

  16. Diffusion and conversion impedance in solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Hendriksen, Peter Vang; Koch, Søren

    2008-01-01

    In fuel cell electrodes where the thin, active electrode layer is supported by a porous layer the diffusion processes as well as the change in the gas phase composition due to the conversion of reactants will influence the cell impedance. Two models are developed for the description...... to consumption of reactants and accumulation of products. For simplicity this model is restricted to cases dominated by mass transfer and conversion of the gas supply. Qualitatively the predictions by both models are alike. At high frequencies a Warburg diffusion impedance is seen. Depending on the dimensions...... of the gas volume relative to the supporting layer this may turn towards the real axis as a nernstian diffusion impedance, or directly into the semicircle dominating the low frequency region....

  17. A Conversation with Kristin Antelman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Bonfield

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Only a few information technology organizations predict the future by inventing it.1 One of the canonical examples is Xerox PARC, which in the early 1970′s produced the first mouse, pioneered Graphical User Interfaces, invented Ethernet, and developed the first laser printer, along with dozens of other innovations. Among contemporary organizations, the inheritor of this lineage [...

  18. Single conversion stage amplifier - SICAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ljusev, P.

    2005-12-15

    This Ph.D. thesis presents a thorough analysis of the so called SICAM - SIngle Converter stage AMplifier approach to building direct energy conversion audio power amplifiers. The mainstream approach for building isolated audio power amplifiers today consists of isolated DC power supply and Class D amplifier, which essentially represents a two stage solution, where each of the components can be viewed as separate and independent part. The proposed SICAM solution strives for direct energy conversion from the mains to the audio output, by dedicating the operation of the components one to another and integrating their functions, so that the final audio power amplifier represents a single-stage topology with higher efficiency, lower volume, less board space, lower component count and subsequently lower cost. The SICAM approach is both applicable to non-isolated and isolated audio power amplifiers, but the problems encountered in these two cases are different. Non-isolated SICAM solutions are intended for both AC mains-connected and battery-powered devices. In non-isolated mains-connected SICAMs the main idea is to simplify the power supply or even provide integrated power factor correction (PFC) functions, while still maintaining low component stress and good audio performance by generally decreasing the input voltage level to the Class D audio power amplifier. On the other hand, non-isolated battery-powered SICAMs have to cope with the ever changing battery voltage and provide output voltage levels which are both lower and higher than the battery voltage, while still being simple and single-stage energy conversion solutions. In isolated SICAMs the isolation transformer adjusts the voltage level on the secondary side to the desired level, so the main challenges here are decreasing the size of the magnetic core and reducing the number and size of bulky reactive components as much as possible. The main focus of this thesis is directed towards the isolated SICAMs and

  19. Microarray analysis of Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanai-Balser, Giane M; Duncan, Garry A; Eudy, James D; Wang, Dong; Li, Xiao; Agarkova, Irina V; Dunigan, David D; Van Etten, James L

    2010-01-01

    Paramecium bursaria chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1), a member of the family Phycodnaviridae, is a large double-stranded DNA, plaque-forming virus that infects the unicellular green alga Chlorella sp. strain NC64A. The 330-kb PBCV-1 genome is predicted to encode 365 proteins and 11 tRNAs. To monitor global transcription during PBCV-1 replication, a microarray containing 50-mer probes to the PBCV-1 365 protein-encoding genes (CDSs) was constructed. Competitive hybridization experiments were conducted by using cDNAs from poly(A)-containing RNAs obtained from cells at seven time points after virus infection. The results led to the following conclusions: (i) the PBCV-1 replication cycle is temporally programmed and regulated; (ii) 360 (99%) of the arrayed PBCV-1 CDSs were expressed at some time in the virus life cycle in the laboratory; (iii) 227 (62%) of the CDSs were expressed before virus DNA synthesis begins; (iv) these 227 CDSs were grouped into two classes: 127 transcripts disappeared prior to initiation of virus DNA synthesis (considered early), and 100 transcripts were still detected after virus DNA synthesis begins (considered early/late); (v) 133 (36%) of the CDSs were expressed after virus DNA synthesis begins (considered late); and (vi) expression of most late CDSs is inhibited by adding the DNA replication inhibitor, aphidicolin, prior to virus infection. This study provides the first comprehensive evaluation of virus gene expression during the PBCV-1 life cycle.

  20. Do Viruses Exchange Genes across Superkingdoms of Life?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahana S. Malik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Viruses can be classified into archaeoviruses, bacterioviruses, and eukaryoviruses according to the taxonomy of the infected host. The host-constrained perception of viruses implies preference of genetic exchange between viruses and cellular organisms of their host superkingdoms and viral origins from host cells either via escape or reduction. However, viruses frequently establish non-lytic interactions with organisms and endogenize into the genomes of bacterial endosymbionts that reside in eukaryotic cells. Such interactions create opportunities for genetic exchange between viruses and organisms of non-host superkingdoms. Here, we take an atypical approach to revisit virus-cell interactions by first identifying protein fold structures in the proteomes of archaeoviruses, bacterioviruses, and eukaryoviruses and second by tracing their spread in the proteomes of superkingdoms Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya. The exercise quantified protein structural homologies between viruses and organisms of their host and non-host superkingdoms and revealed likely candidates for virus-to-cell and cell-to-virus gene transfers. Unexpected lifestyle-driven genetic affiliations between bacterioviruses and Eukarya and eukaryoviruses and Bacteria were also predicted in addition to a large cohort of protein folds that were universally shared by viral and cellular proteomes and virus-specific protein folds not detected in cellular proteomes. These protein folds provide unique insights into viral origins and evolution that are generally difficult to recover with traditional sequence alignment-dependent evolutionary analyses owing to the fast mutation rates of viral gene sequences.