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Sample records for virus genome sequence

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of the Embu Virus Strain SPAn880.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, M Sofi; Antwerpen, Markus; Georgi, Enrico; Vette, Philipp; Zoeller, Gudrun; Meyer, Hermann

    2014-12-04

    We report the complete genome sequence of the Embu virus. The genome consists of 185,139 bp and is nearly identical to that of the Cotia virus. This is the first report on the Embu virus genome sequence, which has been considered an unclassified poxvirus until now. Copyright © 2014 Ibrahim et al.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of the Embu Virus Strain SPAn880

    OpenAIRE

    Ibrahim, M. Sofi; Antwerpen, Markus; Georgi, Enrico; Vette, Philipp; Zoeller, Gudrun; Meyer, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of the Embu virus. The genome consists of 185,139 bp and is nearly identical to that of the Cotia virus. This is the first report on the Embu virus genome sequence, which has been considered an unclassified poxvirus until now.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of a Street Rabies Virus from Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Guoqing; Zhen F Fu

    2012-01-01

    A canine rabies virus (RABV) has been used as a street rabies virus in laboratory investigations. Its entire genome was sequenced and found to be closely related to that of canine RABV circulating in Mexico. Sequence comparison indicates that the virus is closely related to those in the “cosmopolitan” group, with high homology (89 to 93%) to clade I of rabies viruses. The virus is now termed dog rabies virus-Mexico (DRV-Mexico).

  4. Draft genome sequence of the Coccolithovirus Emiliania huxleyi virus 203.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Jozef I; Worthy, Charlotte A; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Kimmance, Susan A; Henn, Matthew R; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J

    2011-12-01

    The Coccolithoviridae are a recently discovered group of viruses that infect the marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. Emiliania huxleyi virus 203 (EhV-203) has a 160- to 180-nm-diameter icosahedral structure and a genome of approximately 400 kbp, consisting of 464 coding sequences (CDSs). Here we describe the genomic features of EhV-203 together with a draft genome sequence and its annotation, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of this genome in comparison with the EhV-86 reference genome.

  5. Draft genome sequence of the coccolithovirus Emiliania huxleyi virus 202.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Jozef I; Worthy, Charlotte A; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Kimmance, Susan A; Henn, Matthew R; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Emiliania huxleyi virus 202 (EhV-202) is a member of the Coccolithoviridae, a group of viruses that infect the marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. EhV-202 has a 160- to 180-nm-diameter icosahedral structure and a genome of approximately 407 kbp, consisting of 485 coding sequences (CDSs). Here we describe the genomic features of EhV-202, together with a draft genome sequence and its annotation, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of this genome in comparison with the EhV-86 reference genome.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of the Coccolithovirus Emiliania huxleyi Virus 203

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Jozef I.; Worthy, Charlotte A.; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A.; Kimmance, Susan A.; Henn, Matthew R.; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    The Coccolithoviridae are a recently discovered group of viruses that infect the marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. Emiliania huxleyi virus 203 (EhV-203) has a 160- to 180-nm-diameter icosahedral structure and a genome of approximately 400 kbp, consisting of 464 coding sequences (CDSs). Here we describe the genomic features of EhV-203 together with a draft genome sequence and its annotation, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of this genome in comparison with the EhV-86 refer...

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Coccolithovirus Emiliania huxleyi Virus 202

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Jozef I.; Worthy, Charlotte A.; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A.; Kimmance, Susan A.; Henn, Matthew R.; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Emiliania huxleyi virus 202 (EhV-202) is a member of the Coccolithoviridae, a group of viruses that infect the marine coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi. EhV-202 has a 160- to 180-nm-diameter icosahedral structure and a genome of approximately 407 kbp, consisting of 485 coding sequences (CDSs). Here we describe the genomic features of EhV-202, together with a draft genome sequence and its annotation, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of this genome in comparison with the EhV-86 refe...

  8. Sequence analysis reveals mosaic genome of Aichi virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Xiaohong

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aichi virus is a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus, which demonstrated to be related to diarrhea of Children. In the present study, phylogenetic and recombination analysis based on the Aichi virus complete genomes available in GenBank reveal a mosaic genome sequence [GenBank: FJ890523], of which the nt 261-852 region (the nt position was based on the aligned sequence file shows close relationship with AB010145/Japan with 97.9% sequence identity, while the other genomic regions show close relationship with AY747174/German with 90.1% sequence identity. Our results will provide valuable hints for future research on Aichi virus diversity. Aichi virus is a member of the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family 12 and belongs to a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus. Its presence in fecal specimens of children suffering from diarrhea has been demonstrated in several Asian countries 3456, in Brazil and German 7, in France 8 and in Tunisia 9. Some reports showed the high level of seroprevalence in adults 710, suggesting the widespread exposure to Aichi virus during childhood. The genome of Aichi virus contains 8,280 nucleotides and a poly(A tail. The single large open reading frame (nt 713-8014 according to the strain AB010145 encodes a polyprotein of 2,432 amino acids that is cleaved into the typical picornavirus structural proteins VP0, VP3, VP1, and nonstructural proteins 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D 211. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 519-bp sequences at the 3C-3D (3CD junction, Aichi viruses can be divided into two genotypes A and B with approximately 90% sequence homology 12. Although only six complete genomes of Aichi virus were deposited in GenBank at present, mosaic genomes can be found in strains from different countries.

  9. Sequence analysis reveals mosaic genome of Aichi virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaohong; Zhang, Wen; Xue, Yanjun; Shao, Shihe

    2011-08-05

    Aichi virus is a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus, which demonstrated to be related to diarrhea of Children. In the present study, phylogenetic and recombination analysis based on the Aichi virus complete genomes available in GenBank reveal a mosaic genome sequence [GenBank: FJ890523], of which the nt 261-852 region (the nt position was based on the aligned sequence file) shows close relationship with AB010145/Japan with 97.9% sequence identity, while the other genomic regions show close relationship with AY747174/German with 90.1% sequence identity. Our results will provide valuable hints for future research on Aichi virus diversity.Aichi virus is a member of the Kobuvirus genus of the Picornaviridae family 12 and belongs to a positive-sense and single-stranded RNA virus. Its presence in fecal specimens of children suffering from diarrhea has been demonstrated in several Asian countries 3456, in Brazil and German 7, in France 8 and in Tunisia 9. Some reports showed the high level of seroprevalence in adults 710, suggesting the widespread exposure to Aichi virus during childhood.The genome of Aichi virus contains 8,280 nucleotides and a poly(A) tail. The single large open reading frame (nt 713-8014 according to the strain AB010145) encodes a polyprotein of 2,432 amino acids that is cleaved into the typical picornavirus structural proteins VP0, VP3, VP1, and nonstructural proteins 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B, 3C and 3D 211. Based on the phylogenetic analysis of 519-bp sequences at the 3C-3D (3CD) junction, Aichi viruses can be divided into two genotypes A and B with approximately 90% sequence homology 12. Although only six complete genomes of Aichi virus were deposited in GenBank at present, mosaic genomes can be found in strains from different countries.

  10. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of butterbur mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Masayoshi; Komatsu, Ken; Maejima, Kensaku; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Okano, Yukari; Shiraishi, Takuya; Takahashi, Shuichiro; Kagiwada, Satoshi; Namba, Shigetou

    2009-01-01

    Butterbur mosaic virus (ButMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, was isolated from Japanese butterbur. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of ButMV. The genome of ButMV consists of 8,662 nucleotides in length and is predicted to contain six ORFs. The ButMV replicase and CP genes share 46.4-54.9 and 43.2-62.1% nucleotide and 38.6-46.6 and 31.3-65.0% amino acid sequence identities, respectively, with those of other carlaviruses. Based on phylogenetic analysis, we suggested that ButMV replicase and CP is most closely related to coleus vein necrosis virus and carnation latent virus, respectively. Together, our results demonstrate that ButMV was a distinct species of the genus Carlavirus.

  11. Genome Sequencing of the Behavior Manipulating Virus LbFV Reveals a Possible New Virus Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lepetit, David; Gillet, Benjamin; Hughes, Sandrine; Kraaijeveld, Ken; Varaldi, Julien

    2016-12-01

    Parasites are sometimes able to manipulate the behavior of their hosts. However, the molecular cues underlying this phenomenon are poorly documented. We previously reported that the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina boulardi which develops from Drosophila larvae is often infected by an inherited DNA virus. In addition to being maternally transmitted, the virus benefits from horizontal transmission in superparasitized larvae (Drosophila that have been parasitized several times). Interestingly, the virus forces infected females to lay eggs in already parasitized larvae, thus increasing the chance of being horizontally transmitted. In a first step towards the identification of virus genes responsible for the behavioral manipulation, we present here the genome sequence of the virus, called LbFV. The sequencing revealed that its genome contains an homologous repeat sequence (hrs) found in eight regions in the genome. The presence of this hrs may explain the genomic plasticity that we observed for this genome. The genome of LbFV encodes 108 ORFs, most of them having no homologs in public databases. The virus is however related to Hytrosaviridae, although distantly. LbFV may thus represent a member of a new virus family. Several genes of LbFV were captured from eukaryotes, including two anti-apoptotic genes. More surprisingly, we found that LbFV captured from an ancestral wasp a protein with a Jumonji domain. This gene was afterwards duplicated in the virus genome. We hypothesized that this gene may be involved in manipulating the expression of wasp genes, and possibly in manipulating its behavior.

  12. Sequence analysis of Schmallenberg virus genomes detected in Hungary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehér, Enikő; Marton, Szilvia; Tóth, Ádám György; Ursu, Krisztina; Wernike, Kerstin; Beer, Martin; Dán, Ádám; Bányai, Krisztián

    2017-12-01

    Since its emergence near the German-Dutch border in 2011, Schmallenberg virus (SBV) has been identified in many European countries. In this study, we determined the complete coding sequence of seven Hungarian SBV genomes to expand our knowledge about the genetic diversity of circulating field strains. The samples originated from the first case, an aborted cattle fetus without malformation collected in 2012, and from the blood samples of six adult cattle in 2014. The Hungarian SBV sequences shared ≥99.3% nucleotide (nt) and ≥97.8% amino acid (aa) identity with each other, and ≥98.9 nt and ≥96.7% aa identity with reference strains. Although phylogenetic analyses showed low resolution in general, the M sequences of cattle and sheep origin SBV strains seemed to cluster on different branches. Both common and unique mutation sites were observed in different groups of sequences that might help understanding the evolution of emerging SBV strains.

  13. Insights into Reston virus spillovers and adaption from virus whole genome sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César G Albariño

    Full Text Available Reston virus (family Filoviridae is unique among the viruses of the Ebolavirus genus in that it is considered non-pathogenic in humans, in contrast to the other members which are highly virulent. The virus has however, been associated with several outbreaks of highly lethal hemorrhagic fever in non-human primates (NHPs, specifically cynomolgus monkeys (Macaca fascicularis originating in the Philippines. In addition, Reston virus has been isolated from domestic pigs in the Philippines. To better understand virus spillover events and potential adaption to new hosts, the whole genome sequences of representative Reston virus isolates were obtained using a next generation sequencing (NGS approach and comparative genomic analysis and virus fitness analyses were performed. Nine virus genome sequences were completed for novel and previously described isolates obtained from a variety of hosts including a human case, non-human primates and pigs. Results of phylogenetic analysis of the sequence differences are consistent with multiple independent introductions of RESTV from a still unknown natural reservoir into non-human primates and swine farming operations. No consistent virus genetic markers were found specific for viruses associated with primate or pig infections, but similar to what had been seen with some Ebola viruses detected in the large Western Africa outbreak in 2014-2016, a truncated version of VP30 was identified in a subgroup of Reston viruses obtained from an outbreak in pigs 2008-2009. Finally, the genetic comparison of two closely related viruses, one isolated from a human case and one from an NHP, showed amino acid differences in the viral polymerase and detectable differences were found in competitive growth assays on human and NHP cell lines.

  14. Full genome sequence of Rocio virus reveal substantial variations from the prototype Rocio virus SPH 34675 sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setoh, Yin Xiang; Amarilla, Alberto A; Peng, Nias Y; Slonchak, Andrii; Periasamy, Parthiban; Figueiredo, Luiz T M; Aquino, Victor H; Khromykh, Alexander A

    2017-09-22

    Rocio virus (ROCV) is an arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae. We present an updated sequence of ROCV strain SPH 34675 (GenBank: AY632542.4), the only available full genome sequence prior to this study. Using next-generation sequencing of the entire genome, we reveal substantial sequence variation from the prototype sequence, with 30 nucleotide differences amounting to 14 amino acid changes, as well as significant changes to predicted 3'UTR RNA structures. Our results present an updated and corrected sequence of a potential emerging human-virulent flavivirus uniquely indigenous to Brazil (GenBank: MF461639).

  15. Full-Genome Sequencing of Four Bluetongue Virus Serotype 11 Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, F; Sailleau, C; Rosseel, T; Desprat, A; Viarouge, C; Richardson, J; Eschbaumer, M; Hoffmann, B; De Clercq, K; Bréard, E; Zientara, S

    2015-10-01

    Recently, a contamination incident was described in which the challenge inoculum used in a bluetongue virus serotype 8 (BTV-8) vaccination trial was contaminated with a BTV-11 virus that was closely related to the Belgian BTV-11 virus from 2008. This study reports the first complete genome sequences of four BTV-11 viruses: the BTV-11 contaminant, BTV-11 reference strain, BTV-11 vaccine strain and a recently isolated BTV-11 field strain from Martinique. Full-genome analysis showed that these viruses belong to serotype 11/nucleotype A and cluster together with other western topotype bluetongue viruses. Detailed comparisons of the genomes further indicated that the contaminant was derived from the BTV-11 reference strain, as they were distinguished by a single synonymous nucleotide substitution. The previously reported partial sequence of genome segment 2 of the Belgian BTV-11 was found to be identical to that of the BTV-11 vaccine strain, indicating that it most likely was the BTV-11 vaccine strain. These findings also suggest that the BTV-11 contaminant and the Belgian BTV-11 are not the same viruses. Finally, comparison of the reference and vaccine strain did not allow determining the amino acid substitutions that contribute to the attenuated phenotype. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  16. Complete Genome Sequences of Mumps and Measles Virus Isolates from Three States in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magaña, Laura C; Espinosa, Alex; Marine, Rachel L; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Castro, Christina J; Montmayeur, Anna M; Hacker, Jill K; Scott, Samantha; Whyte, Thomas; Bankamp, Bettina; Oberste, M Steven; Rota, Paul A

    2017-08-17

    We report here the full coding sequence of nine paramyxovirus genomes, including two full-length mumps virus genomes (genotypes G and H) and seven measles virus genomes (genotypes B3 and D4, D8, and D9), from respiratory samples of patients from California, Virginia, and Alabama obtained between 2010 and 2014.

  17. Biological characterization and complete genomic sequence of Carrot thin leaf virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The host range of a cilantro isolate of Carrot thin leaf virus (CTLV-Cs) was determined to include 15 plant species. The virus was also transmitted to 9 of 11 tested apiaceous species by aphids. Complete genomic sequences of CTLV-Cs and a carrot isolate of CTLV were determined. Their genomic sequenc...

  18. Isolation and Genomic Sequence of Hepatitis A Virus from Mixed Frozen Berries in Italy

    OpenAIRE

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Baioni, Laura; Scaltriti, Erika; Chiesa, Edoardo; Cianti, Luca; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pongolini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was detected in two samples of mixed frozen berries linked to Italian hepatitis A outbreak in April and September 2013. Both viruses were fully sequenced by next-generation sequencing and the genomes clustered with HAV complete genomes of sub-genotype IA with nucleotide identities of 95–97 %.

  19. Isolation and genomic sequence of hepatitis A virus from mixed frozen berries in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Baioni, Laura; Scaltriti, Erika; Chiesa, Edoardo; Cianti, Luca; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pongolini, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was detected in two samples of mixed frozen berries linked to Italian hepatitis A outbreak in April and September 2013. Both viruses were fully sequenced by next-generation sequencing and the genomes clustered with HAV complete genomes of sub-genotype IA with nucleotide identities of 95-97%.

  20. Genome Sequence Conservation of Hendra Virus Isolates during Spillover to Horses, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Shawn; Foord, Adam; Hansson, Eric; Davies, Kelly; Wright, Lynda; Morrissy, Chris; Halpin, Kim; Middleton, Deborah; Field, Hume E.; Daniels, Peter; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2010-01-01

    Bat-to-horse transmission of Hendra virus has occurred at least 14 times. Although clinical signs in horses have differed, genome sequencing has demonstrated little variation among the isolates. Our sequencing of 5 isolates from recent Hendra virus outbreaks in horses found no correlation between sequences and time or geographic location of outbreaks. PMID:21029540

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of a Vampire Bat Rabies Virus from French Guiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavergne, Anne; Darcissac, Edith; Bourhy, Hervé; Tirera, Sourakhata; de Thoisy, Benoît; Lacoste, Vincent

    2016-04-07

    A rabies virus was detected in a common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) in French Guiana. Its genomic sequence was obtained and found to be closely related to other hematophagous bat-related viruses that widely circulate in the northern Amazon region. This virus is named AT6. Copyright © 2016 Lavergne et al.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Border Disease Virus Genotype 3 Strain Gifhorn

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Beer, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 3 border disease virus strain Gifhorn has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from pigs. This represents the consensus sequence for the virus used to produce the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) cDNA clone pBeloGif3, which yields...

  3. A comparison of virus genome sequences with their host silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xu-Dong; Yue, Ya-Jie; Wang, Wei; Li, Nan; Shen, Zhong-Yuan

    2016-01-15

    With the recent availability of the genomes of many viruses and the silkworm, Bombyx mori, as well as a variety of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST) programs, a new opportunity to gain insight into the interaction of viruses with the silkworm is possible. This study aims to determine the possible existence of sequence identities between the genomes of viruses and the silkworm and attempts to explain this phenomenon. BLAST searches of the genomes of viruses against the silkworm genome were performed using the resources of the National Center for Biotechnology Information. All studied viruses contained variable numbers of short regions with sequence identity to the genome of the silkworm. The short regions of sequence identity in the genome of the silkworm may be derived from the genomes of viruses in the long history of silkworm-virus interaction. This study is the first to compare these genomes, and may contribute to research on the interaction between viruses and the silkworm. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Full-length sequencing and genomic characterization of Bagaza, Kedougou, and Zika viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuno, G; Chang, G-J J

    2007-01-01

    Many members of the genus Flavivirus are the agents of important diseases of humans, livestock, and wildlife. Currently, no complete genome sequence is available for the three African viruses, Bagaza, Zika, and Kedougou viruses, each representing a distinct virus subgroup according to the latest virus classification. In this study, we obtained a complete genome sequence of each of those three viruses and characterized the open reading frames (ORFs) with respect to gene sizes, cleavage sites, potential glycosylation sites, distribution of cysteine residues, and unique motifs. The sequences of the three viruses were then scanned across the entire length of the ORF against available sequences of other African flaviviruses and selected reference viruses for genetic relatedness. The data collectively indicated that Kedougou virus was close to dengue viruses but nonetheless distinct, while Bagaza virus shared genetic relatedness with West Nile virus in several genomic regions. In the non-coding regions, it was found that a particular organizational pattern of conserved sequences in the 3' terminal region generally correlated with the current virus grouping.

  5. Genomic Sequences of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses Isolated from Florida White-Tailed Deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Lednicky, John A; Loeb, Julia; Sayler, Katherine A; Wisely, Samantha M; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2017-10-26

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotypes 1 and 2 were isolated from Florida white-tailed deer in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and their genomes were completely sequenced. To our knowledge, these are the first full genome sequences for EHDV-1 and -2 from Florida. Copyright © 2017 Subramaniam et al.

  6. Complete genome sequence of the first aichi virus isolated in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen; Chao, David; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    The first Aichi virus (AiV), kvgh99012632/2010, was identified in Taiwan. The entire genome of the AiV isolate was sequenced and compared to known AiV sequences. Genome alignment revealed that the Taiwan AiV strain shares 96.3% nucleotide and 99% amino acid identities with the German strain D/VI2287/2004.

  7. Complete Genome Sequence of Classical Swine Fever Virus Genotype 2.2 Strain Bergen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Lohse, Louise; Becher, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of the genotype 2.2 classical swine fever virus strain Bergen has been determined; this strain was originally isolated from persistently infected domestic pigs in the Netherlands and is characterized to be of low virulence....

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Strain Isolated in Roraima, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Victor C.; Silva, George A. V.; Maito, Rodrigo M.; Granja, Fabiana; Siqueira, Thalita; Acosta, Pablo O. A.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We report the complete genome sequence of a dengue virus serotype 4, genotype II strain isolated in 2010 from a patient with classical dengue fever in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil. PMID:22247521

  9. Improvements to pairwise sequence comparison (PASC): a genome-based web tool for virus classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yiming; Chetvernin, Vyacheslav; Tatusova, Tatiana

    2014-12-01

    The number of viral genome sequences in the public databases is increasing dramatically, and these sequences are playing an important role in virus classification. Pairwise sequence comparison is a sequence-based virus classification method. A program using this method calculates the pairwise identities of virus sequences within a virus family and displays their distribution, and visual analysis helps to determine demarcations at different taxonomic levels such as strain, species, genus and subfamily. Subsequent comparison of new sequences against existing ones allows viruses from which the new sequences were derived to be classified. Although this method cannot be used as the only criterion for virus classification in some cases, it is a quantitative method and has many advantages over conventional virus classification methods. It has been applied to several virus families, and there is an increasing interest in using this method for other virus families/groups. The Pairwise Sequence Comparison (PASC) classification tool was created at the National Center for Biotechnology Information. The tool's database stores pairwise identities for complete genomes/segments of 56 virus families/groups. Data in the system are updated every day to reflect changes in virus taxonomy and additions of new virus sequences to the public database. The web interface of the tool ( http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/sutils/pasc/ ) makes it easy to navigate and perform analyses. Multiple new viral genome sequences can be tested simultaneously with this system to suggest the taxonomic position of virus isolates in a specific family. PASC eliminates potential discrepancies in the results caused by different algorithms and/or different data used by researchers.

  10. Complete genome sequence of narcissus late season yellows virus infecting Chinese narcissus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shuang-Qing; Shen, Jian-Guo; Gao, Fang-Luan; Cai, Wei; Huang, Zhen; Xie, Li-Yan; Wu, Zu-Jian

    2012-09-01

    The complete genome sequence of a Chinese narcissus isolate of narcissus late season yellows virus from Zhangzhou, China (NLSYV-ZZ), was determined to be 9,651 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly (A) tail, by amplification and sequencing of virus RNA. The viral genome contains a single long open reading frame of 9,315 nucleotides encoding a polyprotein of 3,105 amino acids. The polyprotein was predicted to be cleaved into ten mature proteins by three viral proteases. Complete genome sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis indicated that NLSYV-ZZ was most closely related to narcissus yellow stripe virus (NYSV), which was also isolated from narcissus. These viruses shared 69.9 % identity in their complete nucleotide sequences and 77.0 % identity in their polyprotein amino acid sequences.

  11. History and genomic sequence analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 KOS and KOS1.1 sub-strains

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Colgrove, Robert C; Liu, Xueqiao; Griffiths, Anthony; Raja, Priya; Deluca, Neal A; Newman, Ruchi M; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-01

    A collection of genomic DNA sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains has been defined and analyzed, and some information is available about genomic stability upon limited passage of viruses in culture...

  12. Complete genome sequence of sunflower ring blotch virus, a new potyvirus infecting sunflower in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera Mederos, Dariel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2017-06-01

    The complete genome sequence of sunflower ring blotch virus (SuRBV), a previously undescribed potyvirus infecting sunflower in Argentina, is reported. The SuRBV genome comprises 9555 nucleotides (nt) and encodes a polyprotein of 3061 amino acids, flanked by 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 117 and 255 nt, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis showed that SuRBV belongs to the potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup and clusters together with sunflower chlorotic mottle virus and bidens mosaic virus. Percentage nucleotide identity between the whole genomes of SuRBV and BiMV was 70.6%, suggesting SuRBV should be considered a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus.

  13. Genome sequence and comparative virulence of raccoonpox virus: the first North American poxvirus sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischauer, Clare; Upton, Chris; Victoria, Joseph; Jones, Gwendolyn J B; Roper, Rachel L

    2015-09-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of raccoonpox virus (RCNV), a naturally occurring North American poxvirus. This is the first such North American sequence to the best of our knowledge, and the data showed that RCNV forms a new phylogenetic branch between orthopoxviruses and Yoka poxvirus. RCNV shared overall similarity in genome organization with orthopoxviruses, and the proteins in the central conserved region shared approximately 90  % amino acid identity with orthopoxviruses. RCNV proteins shared approximately 81  % amino acid identity with Yokapox virus proteins. RCNV is missing 10 genes normally conserved in orthopoxviruses, most of which are implicated in virulence. These gene deletions may explain the attenuated phenotype of RCNV in mammals. RCNV contained one unique genome region containing approximately 1 kb of DNA sequence that is not present in any reported poxvirus. It contained a unique ORF predicted to encode a protein with a transmembrane domain. RCNV replicates well in mammalian cells, is naturally attenuated and has been shown to be effective as a vaccine vector platform, so we further tested its safety. We showed here that RCNV is substantially more attenuated than even the highly attenuated VACV-A35Del mutant virus in pregnant, nude and severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse models. RCNV was much safer in pregnant mice and was cleared rapidly from tissues, even in immunocompromised animals, whereas the VACV-A35Del mutant retains virulence and persists in tissues. Thus, RCNV is expected to be a superior vaccine vector for infectious diseases and cancer due to its excellent safety profile, reported vaccine efficacy and ability to replicate in mammalian cells.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence Analysis of a Reassortant Strain of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 16 from Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costessi, Adalberto; Pirovano, Walter; Marcacci, Maurilia; Cammà, Cesare; Savini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a reassortant field strain of bluetongue virus serotype 16 (BTV-16), isolated from cattle in the Apulia region of Italy in 2002, has been determined by Illumina sequencing. Sequence comparisons of segment 1 (Seg-1) to Seg-10, except Seg-5, show that BTV-16 strain ITL2002 belongs to the major eastern topotype of BTV. PMID:23969049

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis; Galipienso, Luis

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available. Copyright © 2015 Martínez et al.

  16. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence and affinities of the genomic RNA of Narcissus common latent virus (genus Carlavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H-Y; Chen, J; Adams, M J; Chen, J-P

    2006-08-01

    The complete sequence of an isolate of Narcissus common latent virus (NCLV) from Zhangzhou city, Fujian, China was determined from amplified fragments of purified viral RNA. Excluding the poly(A) tail, the genomic RNA of NCLV was 8539 nucleotides (nt) long and had the typical organization for a member of the genus Carlavirus. The most closely related species were Potato virus M, Hop latent virus and Aconitum latent virus, which had 58-59% nt identity to NCLV in their entire genomes. These relationships were confirmed by a phylogenetic analysis using a composite nucleotide alignment of all the open reading frames.

  18. Genome Sequences of Murine Pneumotropic Virus (Polyomaviridae) Detected in Wild House Mice (Mus musculus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-21

    Using generic PCR, we identified a variant of murine pneumotropic virus (MptV) (family Polyomaviridae) in 3 wild house mice (Mus musculus). The fully amplified and sequenced genomes display considerable differences from the MptV genomes published previously and enlighten us on the natural diversity of rodent polyomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Ben Salem et al.

  19. Elucidation of hepatitis C virus transmission and early diversification by single genome sequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available A precise molecular identification of transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV genomes could illuminate key aspects of transmission biology, immunopathogenesis and natural history. We used single genome sequencing of 2,922 half or quarter genomes from plasma viral RNA to identify transmitted/founder (T/F viruses in 17 subjects with acute community-acquired HCV infection. Sequences from 13 of 17 acute subjects, but none of 14 chronic controls, exhibited one or more discrete low diversity viral lineages. Sequences within each lineage generally revealed a star-like phylogeny of mutations that coalesced to unambiguous T/F viral genomes. Numbers of transmitted viruses leading to productive clinical infection were estimated to range from 1 to 37 or more (median = 4. Four acutely infected subjects showed a distinctly different pattern of virus diversity that deviated from a star-like phylogeny. In these cases, empirical analysis and mathematical modeling suggested high multiplicity virus transmission from individuals who themselves were acutely infected or had experienced a virus population bottleneck due to antiviral drug therapy. These results provide new quantitative and qualitative insights into HCV transmission, revealing for the first time virus-host interactions that successful vaccines or treatment interventions will need to overcome. Our findings further suggest a novel experimental strategy for identifying full-length T/F genomes for proteome-wide analyses of HCV biology and adaptation to antiviral drug or immune pressures.

  20. Elucidation of hepatitis C virus transmission and early diversification by single genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Stoddard, Mark B; Wang, Shuyi; Blair, Lily M; Giorgi, Elena E; Parrish, Erica H; Learn, Gerald H; Hraber, Peter; Goepfert, Paul A; Saag, Michael S; Denny, Thomas N; Haynes, Barton F; Hahn, Beatrice H; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Perelson, Alan S; Korber, Bette T; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Shaw, George M

    2012-01-01

    A precise molecular identification of transmitted hepatitis C virus (HCV) genomes could illuminate key aspects of transmission biology, immunopathogenesis and natural history. We used single genome sequencing of 2,922 half or quarter genomes from plasma viral RNA to identify transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses in 17 subjects with acute community-acquired HCV infection. Sequences from 13 of 17 acute subjects, but none of 14 chronic controls, exhibited one or more discrete low diversity viral lineages. Sequences within each lineage generally revealed a star-like phylogeny of mutations that coalesced to unambiguous T/F viral genomes. Numbers of transmitted viruses leading to productive clinical infection were estimated to range from 1 to 37 or more (median = 4). Four acutely infected subjects showed a distinctly different pattern of virus diversity that deviated from a star-like phylogeny. In these cases, empirical analysis and mathematical modeling suggested high multiplicity virus transmission from individuals who themselves were acutely infected or had experienced a virus population bottleneck due to antiviral drug therapy. These results provide new quantitative and qualitative insights into HCV transmission, revealing for the first time virus-host interactions that successful vaccines or treatment interventions will need to overcome. Our findings further suggest a novel experimental strategy for identifying full-length T/F genomes for proteome-wide analyses of HCV biology and adaptation to antiviral drug or immune pressures.

  1. From Conventional to Next Generation Sequencing of Epstein-Barr Virus Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin Kwok

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic sequences of Epstein–Barr virus (EBV have been of interest because the virus is associated with cancers, such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and conditions such as infectious mononucleosis. The progress of whole-genome EBV sequencing has been limited by the inefficiency and cost of the first-generation sequencing technology. With the advancement of next-generation sequencing (NGS and target enrichment strategies, increasing number of EBV genomes has been published. These genomes were sequenced using different approaches, either with or without EBV DNA enrichment. This review provides an overview of the EBV genomes published to date, and a description of the sequencing technology and bioinformatic analyses employed in generating these sequences. We further explored ways through which the quality of sequencing data can be improved, such as using DNA oligos for capture hybridization, and longer insert size and read length in the sequencing runs. These advances will enable large-scale genomic sequencing of EBV which will facilitate a better understanding of the genetic variations of EBV in different geographic regions and discovery of potentially pathogenic variants in specific diseases.

  2. Complete Genome Sequences of Identical Zika virus Isolates in a Nursing Mother and Her Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Gabriela M.; Lednicky, John A.; Márquez, Marilianna; White, Sarah K.; Loeb, Julia C.; Pacheco, Carlos A.; Nolan, David J.; Paisie, Taylor; Salemi, Marco; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Morris, J. Glenn; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Carrillo, Alejandra S.; Plaza, Juan D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complete genome sequences were obtained for Zika viruses isolated from the breast milk of a Venezuelan patient and her child, who was exclusively breastfeeding at the time. These sequences are the first to be reported from a presumptive autochthonous postnatal transmission case from mother to child in Venezuela. PMID:28450510

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sevenband Grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Kyong-Min; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-12-11

    The draft genome sequence of the nervous necrosis virus (NNV) SGYeosu08, isolated from sevenband grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in Yeosu, South Korea, was cloned and analyzed. The full-length RNA1 was a 3,103-nucleotide-encoding region of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and the RNA2 encoding a coat protein was 1,433 nucleotides in length. This genome sequence might be useful in the development of an accurate diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2014 Kim et al.

  4. Genomic 3' terminal sequence comparison of three isolates of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, I D; Vlasak, R; Nowotny, N; Rodak, L; Carter, M J

    1992-05-15

    Comparison of sequence data is necessary in older to investigate virus origins, identify features common to virulent strains, and characterize genomic organization within virus families. A virulent caliciviral disease of rabbits recently emerged in China. We have sequenced 1100 bases from the 3' ends of two independent European isolates of this virus, and compared these with previously determined calicivirus sequences. Rabbit caliciviruses were closely related, despite the different countries in which isolation was made. This supports the rapid spread of a new virus across Europe. The capsid protein sequences of these rabbit viruses differ markedly from those determined for feline calicivirus, but a hypothetical 3' open reading frame is relatively well conserved between the caliciviruses of these two different hosts and argues for a functional role.

  5. Isolation and Complete Genome Sequencing of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 12 from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P P; Reddy, Y V; Hegde, N R

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes disease mainly in sheep, but can be transmitted via other domestic and wild ruminants, resulting in pecuniary burden and trade restrictions. Segmented genome with the possibility of reassortment, existence of 26 serotypes, geographical restriction in the distribution of many of the serotypes, use of live attenuated vaccines and the lack of complete sequences of viruses isolated from several parts of the globe have complicated our understanding of the origin, movement and distribution of BTV. Recent efforts in genome sequencing of several strains have helped in better comprehending BTV epidemiology. In an effort to contribute to the genetic epidemiology of BTV in India, we report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a BTV serotype 12 virus (designated NMO1). This is the first BTV-12 isolated from India and the second BTV-12 to be sequenced worldwide. The analysis of sequences of this virus suggests that NMO1 derived its segments from viruses belonging to western topotype viruses, as well as those from South-East Asia and India. The results have implications for understanding the origin, emergence/re-emergence and movement of BTV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on robust epidemiological data. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 16 of Goat Origin from India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ravinder; Ranjan, Koushlesh; Kumar, Pawan; Joshi, Chaitanya G.; Reddy, Y. Krishna Mohan; Prasad, Gaya

    2012-01-01

    In this article, we document the first complete genome sequence of an isolate of bluetongue virus serotype 16 (BTV16) from a goat in India. The virus was isolated from an in-contact goat from an animal farm in Chennai where clinical disease occurs in sheep. The total size of the genome is 19,185 bp. The information provided for full-length sequences of all 10 segments will help in understanding the geographical origin and transmission of the Indian isolate of BTV16 as well as its comparison with global isolates of BTV16 of sheep, cattle, and other host species origins. PMID:22787269

  7. Complete Genome Sequences of Four African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Tetravalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the four virus strains included in a South African commercial tetravalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26607890

  8. Complete Genome Sequences of the Three African Horse Sickness Virus Strains from a Commercial Trivalent Live Attenuated Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Peter; Martin, Darren P.; Lourens, Carina W.; Venter, Estelle H.; Weyer, Camilla T.; Joone, Christopher; le Grange, Misha; Harper, Cindy K.; Howell, Peter G.; MacLachlan, N. James

    2015-01-01

    This is a report of the complete genome sequences of plaque-selected isolates of each of the three virus strains included in a South African commercial trivalent African horse sickness attenuated live virus vaccine. PMID:26294618

  9. [Genetic analysis of a genotype F mumps virus based on its complete genome sequence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ai-Li; Jin, Li; Xu, Wen-Bo

    2013-11-01

    Mumps virus strains of genotype F have been circulating in China for decades. To identify genetic variation of mumps virus based on the complete genome sequence of a mumps isolate of genotype F, the complete genome of the genotype F reference strain, MuVi/Shandong. CHN/4.05 [F] was sequenced. Genetic characteristics of this virus were analyzed and compared with the complete genome sequences of others genotypes available in GenBank. The genetic differences in antigenic sites were also compared between the genotype F strain and the vaccine strains. The nucleotide differences between MuVi/Shandong. CHN/4.05 [F] and other genotypes of mumps virus based on the whole genome ranged between 3.8% and 6.5%. The maximum and minimum difference was found between MuVi/Shandong. CHN/4.05 [F] and genotype A (the vaccine strains), and genotype B-N strains, respectively. There were 26 N-glycosylation sites in the strain MuVi/Shandong. CHN/4.05 [F] and all other genotypes of mumps virus, however, one N-glycosylation site was absent from the vaccine strains, which was at the aa position 464-466 of the HN gene. Variation was detected at some of the known antigenic sites of mumps virus strain MuVi/Shandong. CHN/4.05 [F] and the vaccine strains. Genetic variations were detected in the epidemic mumps virus strain in China as well as in other genotypes of mumps virus strains and the vaccine strains across the complete genome. These results indicate the need to further strengthen the surveillance of genetic variation of wild type mumps virus.

  10. Targeted Genome Sequencing Reveals Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 12 Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohrs, Randall J; Lee, Katherine S; Beach, Addilynn; Sanford, Bridget; Baird, Nicholas L; Como, Christina; Graybill, Chiharu; Jones, Dallas; Tekeste, Eden; Ballard, Mitchell; Chen, Xiaomi; Yalacki, David; Frietze, Seth; Jones, Kenneth; Lenac Rovis, Tihana; Jonjić, Stipan; Haas, Jürgen; Gilden, Don

    2017-10-15

    The neurotropic herpesvirus varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establishes a lifelong latent infection in humans following primary infection. The low abundance of VZV nucleic acids in human neurons has hindered an understanding of the mechanisms that regulate viral gene transcription during latency. To overcome this critical barrier, we optimized a targeted capture protocol to enrich VZV DNA and cDNA prior to whole-genome/transcriptome sequence analysis. Since the VZV genome is remarkably stable, it was surprising to detect that VZV32, a VZV laboratory strain with no discernible growth defect in tissue culture, contained a 2,158-bp deletion in open reading frame (ORF) 12. Consequently, ORF 12 and 13 protein expression was abolished and Akt phosphorylation was inhibited. The discovery of the ORF 12 deletion, revealed through targeted genome sequencing analysis, points to the need to authenticate the VZV genome when the virus is propagated in tissue culture. IMPORTANCE Viruses isolated from clinical samples often undergo genetic modifications when cultured in the laboratory. Historically, VZV is among the most genetically stable herpesviruses, a notion supported by more than 60 complete genome sequences from multiple isolates and following multiple in vitro passages. However, application of enrichment protocols to targeted genome sequencing revealed the unexpected deletion of a significant portion of VZV ORF 12 following propagation in cultured human fibroblast cells. While the enrichment protocol did not introduce bias in either the virus genome or transcriptome, the findings indicate the need for authentication of VZV by sequencing when the virus is propagated in tissue culture. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  11. Complete genomic sequence and comparative analysis of the genome segments of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Yanhong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Zhenchen; Qiao, Qi; Zhang, Desheng; Tian, Yuting; Wang, Shuang; Wang, Yongjiang; Yan, Zhaoling

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (family Closteroviridae, genus Crinivirus) features a large bipartite, single-stranded, positive-sense RNA genome. To date, only three complete genomic sequences of SPCSV can be accessed through GenBank. SPCSV was first detected from China in 2011, only partial genomic sequences have been determined in the country. No report on the complete genomic sequence and genome structure of Chinese SPCSV isolates or the genetic relation between isolates from China and other countries is available. The complete genomic sequences of five isolates from different areas in China were characterized. This study is the first to report the complete genome sequences of SPCSV from whitefly vectors. Genome structure analysis showed that isolates of WA and EA strains from China have the same coding protein as isolates Can181-9 and m2-47, respectively. Twenty cp genes and four RNA1 partial segments were sequenced and analyzed, and the nucleotide identities of complete genomic, cp, and RNA1 partial sequences were determined. Results indicated high conservation among strains and significant differences between WA and EA strains. Genetic analysis demonstrated that, except for isolates from Guangdong Province, SPCSVs from other areas belong to the WA strain. Genome organization analysis showed that the isolates in this study lack the p22 gene. We presented the complete genome sequences of SPCSV in China. Comparison of nucleotide identities and genome structures between these isolates and previously reported isolates showed slight differences. The nucleotide identities of different SPCSV isolates showed high conservation among strains and significant differences between strains. All nine isolates in this study lacked p22 gene. WA strains were more extensively distributed than EA strains in China. These data provide important insights into the molecular variation and genomic structure of SPCSV in China as well as genetic relationships among isolates from China

  12. Near-complete genome sequencing of swine vesicular disease virus using the Roche GS FLX sequencing platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Sandra Cathrine Abel; Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne; Samaniego Castruita, Jose Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    that is suitable for sequencing the complete protein-encoding sequences of SVDV isolates in which the RNA is relatively intact. The approach couples a single PCR amplification reaction, using only a single PCR primer set to amplify the near-complete SVDV genome, with deep-sequencing using a small fraction...... with significant genetic distances within the same species of viruses. All reference mappings used an iterative method to avoid bias. Further verification was achieved through phylogenetic analysis against published SVDV genomes and additional Enterovirus B sequences. This approach allows high confidence...... of the capacity of a Roche GS FLX sequencing platform. Sequences were initially verified through one of two criteria; either a match between a de novo assembly and a reference mapping, or a match between all of five different reference mappings performed against a fixed set of starting reference genomes...

  13. Complete genome sequence of keunjorong mosaic virus, a potyvirus from Cynanchum wilfordii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Moon; Lee, Joo-Hee; Choi, Hong Soo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Moon, Jae Sun; Lee, Su-Heon

    2013-08-01

    We have determined the complete genome sequence of keunjorong mosaic virus (KjMV). The KjMV genome is composed of 9,611 nucleotides, excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail. It contains two open reading frames (ORFs), with the large one encoding a polyprotein of 3,070 amino acids and the small overlapping ORF encoding a PIPO protein of 81 amino acids. The KjMV genome shared the highest nucleotide sequence identity (57.5  %) with pepper mottle virus and freesia mosaic virus, two members of the genus Potyvirus. Based on the phylogenetic relatedness to known potyviruses, KjMV appears to be a member of a new species in the genus Potyvirus.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 1 Circulating in Italy, Obtained through a Fast Next-Generation Sequencing Protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcacci, Maurilia; Ancora, Massimo; Mangone, Iolanda; Leone, Alessandra; Marini, Valeria; Cammà, Cesare; Savini, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    A field strain of the bluetongue virus serotype 1 (BTV-1) was isolated from infected sheep in Sardinia, Italy, in October 2013. The genome was sequenced using Ion Torrent technology. BTV-1 strain SAD2013 belongs to the Western topotype of BTV-1, clustering with BTV-1 strains isolated in Europe and northern Africa since 2006. PMID:24526649

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Strains Isolated from the Blood of Patients in Thailand (2014) and Philippines (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Complete genome sequences of Zika Virus strains isolated from the blood of patients in 1 Thailand (2014) and Philippines (2012). 2 Ellison,D.W.1...Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea. 20 21 Running Head: Zika Virus Genomes 22 23 ABSTRACT 24 ZIKV is an arbovirus and member of the family...genome sequences of two Zika Virus (ZIKV) strains, Zika virus /H.sapiens-27 tc/THA/2014/SV0127-14 and Zika virus /H.sapiens-tc/PHL/2012/CPC-0740, isolated

  16. Isolation and complete genome sequencing of Mimivirus bombay, a Giant Virus in sewage of Mumbai, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anirvan Chatterjee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a new Mimiviridae family member, infecting Acanthamoeba castellanii, from sewage in Mumbai, India. The isolated virus has a particle size of about 435 nm and a 1,182,200-bp genome. A phylogeny based on the DNA polymerase sequence placed the isolate as a new member of the Mimiviridae family lineage A and was named as Mimivirus bombay. Extensive presence of Mimiviridae family members in different environmental niches, with remarkably similar genome size and genetic makeup, point towards an evolutionary advantage that needs to be further investigated. The complete genome sequence of Mimivirus bombay was deposited at GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number KU761889.

  17. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  18. Genome sequence of erythromelalgia-related poxvirus identifies it as an ectromelia virus strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge D Mendez-Rios

    Full Text Available Erythromelagia is a condition characterized by attacks of burning pain and inflammation in the extremeties. An epidemic form of this syndrome occurs in secondary students in rural China and a virus referred to as erythromelalgia-associated poxvirus (ERPV was reported to have been recovered from throat swabs in 1987. Studies performed at the time suggested that ERPV belongs to the orthopoxvirus genus and has similarities with ectromelia virus, the causative agent of mousepox. We have determined the complete genome sequence of ERPV and demonstrated that it has 99.8% identity to the Naval strain of ectromelia virus and a slighly lower identity to the Moscow strain. Small DNA deletions in the Naval genome that are absent from ERPV may suggest that the sequenced strain of Naval was not the immediate progenitor of ERPV.

  19. Complete genome sequence of jacquemontia yellow vein virus, a novel begomovirus infecting Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2017-08-01

    Wild plants of the family Convolvulaceae are hosts for a few New World begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae). In this work, we report the complete genome sequence of a new begomovirus infecting the wild convolvulaceous plant Jacquemontia tamnifolia in Venezuela. The cloned bipartite genome showed the organization of typical New World begomoviruses and was found to be phylogenetically related to those of begomoviruses from Venezuela and other Caribbean countries. Several recombination events have been shown to have occurred involving genome fragment exchange with related begomoviruses infecting crops such as tomato and cucurbits and wild plants, including Jacquemontia sp. We propose the name jacquemontia yellow vein virus (JacYVV) for this new begomovirus.

  20. Genome sequence diversity and clues to the evolution of variola (smallpox) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Joseph J; Sammons, Scott A; Frace, A Michael; Osborne, John D; Olsen-Rasmussen, Melissa; Zhang, Ming; Govil, Dhwani; Damon, Inger K; Kline, Richard; Laker, Miriam; Li, Yu; Smith, Geoffrey L; Meyer, Hermann; Leduc, James W; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2006-08-11

    Comparative genomics of 45 epidemiologically varied variola virus isolates from the past 30 years of the smallpox era indicate low sequence diversity, suggesting that there is probably little difference in the isolates' functional gene content. Phylogenetic clustering inferred three clades coincident with their geographical origin and case-fatality rate; the latter implicated putative proteins that mediate viral virulence differences. Analysis of the viral linear DNA genome suggests that its evolution involved direct descent and DNA end-region recombination events. Knowing the sequences will help understand the viral proteome and improve diagnostic test precision, therapeutics, and systems for their assessment.

  1. Reconstruction of putative DNA virus from endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus-like sequences in the rice genome: implications for integration and evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishima Yuji

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant genomes contain various kinds of repetitive sequences such as transposable elements, microsatellites, tandem repeats and virus-like sequences. Most of them, with the exception of virus-like sequences, do not allow us to trace their origins nor to follow the process of their integration into the host genome. Recent discoveries of virus-like sequences in plant genomes led us to set the objective of elucidating the origin of the repetitive sequences. Endogenous rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV-like sequences (ERTBVs have been found throughout the rice genome. Here, we reconstructed putative virus structures from RTBV-like sequences in the rice genome and characterized to understand evolutionary implication, integration manner and involvements of endogenous virus segments in the corresponding disease response. Results We have collected ERTBVs from the rice genomes. They contain rearranged structures and no intact ORFs. The identified ERTBV segments were shown to be phylogenetically divided into three clusters. For each phylogenetic cluster, we were able to make a consensus alignment for a circular virus-like structure carrying two complete ORFs. Comparisons of DNA and amino acid sequences suggested the closely relationship between ERTBV and RTBV. The Oryza AA-genome species vary in the ERTBV copy number. The species carrying low-copy-number of ERTBV segments have been reported to be extremely susceptible to RTBV. The DNA methylation state of the ERTBV sequences was correlated with their copy number in the genome. Conclusions These ERTBV segments are unlikely to have functional potential as a virus. However, these sequences facilitate to establish putative virus that provided information underlying virus integration and evolutionary relationship with existing virus. Comparison of ERTBV among the Oryza AA-genome species allowed us to speculate a possible role of endogenous virus segments against its related disease.

  2. Completed sequence and corrected annotation of the genome of maize Iranian mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbani, Abozar; Izadpanah, Keramatollah; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2017-11-16

    Maize Iranian mosaic virus (MIMV) is a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus that is classified in the genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae. The MIMV genome contains six open reading frames (ORFs) that encode in 3΄ to 5΄ order the nucleocapsid protein (N), phosphoprotein (P), putative movement protein (P3), matrix protein (M), glycoprotein (G) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (L). In this study, we determined the first complete genome sequence of MIMV using Illumina RNA-Seq and 3'/5' RACE. MIMV genome ('Fars' isolate) is 12,426 nucleotides in length. Unexpectedly, the predicted N gene ORF of this isolate and of four other Iranian isolates is 143 nucleotides shorter than that of the MIMV coding-complete reference isolate 'Shiraz 1' (Genbank NC_011542), possibly due to a minor error in the previous sequence. Genetic variability among the N, P, P3 and G ORFs of Iranian MIMV isolates was limited, but highest in the G gene ORF. Phylogenetic analysis of complete nucleorhabdovirus genomes demonstrated a close evolutionary relationship between MIMV, maize mosaic virus and taro vein chlorosis virus.

  3. Simplified large-scale Sanger genome sequencing for influenza A/H3N2 virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Kai Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies and the resultant lower costs of sequencing have enabled production of massive amounts of data, including the generation of full genome sequences of pathogens. However, the small genome size of the influenza virus arguably justifies the use of the more conventional Sanger sequencing technology which is still currently more readily available in most diagnostic laboratories. RESULTS: We present a simplified Sanger-based genome sequencing method for sequencing the influenza A/H3N2 virus in a large-scale format. The entire genome sequencing was completed with 19 reverse transcription-polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs and 39 sequencing reactions. This method was tested on 15 native clinical samples and 15 culture isolates, respectively, collected between 2009 and 2011. The 15 native clinical samples registered quantification cycle values ranging from 21.0 to 30.56, which were equivalent to 2.4×10(3-1.4×10(6 viral copies/µL of RNA extract. All the PCR-amplified products were sequenced directly without PCR product purification. Notably, high quality sequencing data up to 700 bp were generated for all the samples tested. The completed sequence covered 408,810 nucleotides in total, with 13,627 nucleotides per genome, attaining 100% coding completeness. Of all the bases produced, an average of 89.49% were Phred quality value 40 (QV40 bases (representing an accuracy of circa one miscall for every 10,000 bases or higher, and an average of 93.46% were QV30 bases (one miscall every 1000 bases or higher. CONCLUSIONS: This sequencing protocol has been shown to be cost-effective and less labor-intensive in obtaining full influenza genomes. The constant high quality of sequences generated imparts confidence in extending the application of this non-purified amplicon sequencing approach to other gene sequencing assays, with appropriate use of suitably designed primers.

  4. Draft genome sequence of a picorna-like virus associated with gill tissue in clinically normal brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanowicz, Luke; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Adams, Cynthia; Galbraith, Heather S.; Aunins, Aaron W.; Cornman, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Here, we report a draft genome sequence of a picorna-like virus associated with brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, gill tissue. The draft genome comprises 8,681 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tract, and contains two open reading frames. It is most similar to picorna-like viruses that infect invertebrates.

  5. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of dengue type 1 virus isolated from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Esam I; Hashem, Anwar M; El-Kafrawy, Sherif A; Abol-Ela, Said; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Farraj, Suha A; Othman, Norah A; Ben-Helaby, Huda G; Ashshi, Ahmed; Madani, Tariq A; Jamjoom, Ghazi

    2015-01-16

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are mosquito-borne viruses which can cause disease ranging from mild fever to severe dengue infection. These viruses are endemic in several tropical and subtropical regions. Multiple outbreaks of DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 (DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3) have been reported from the western region in Saudi Arabia since 1994. Strains from at least two genotypes of DENV-1 (Asia and America/Africa genotypes) have been circulating in western Saudi Arabia until 2006. However, all previous studies reported from Saudi Arabia were based on partial sequencing data of the envelope (E) gene without any reports of full genome sequences for any DENV serotypes circulating in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the isolation and the first complete genome sequence of a DENV-1 strain (DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011) isolated from a patient from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2011. Whole genome sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed high similarity between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and D1/H/IMTSSA/98/606 isolate (Asian genotype) reported from Djibouti in 1998. Further analysis of the full envelope gene revealed a close relationship between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and isolates reported between 2004-2006 from Jeddah as well as recent isolates from Somalia, suggesting the widespread of the Asian genotype in this region. These data suggest that strains belonging to the Asian genotype might have been introduced into Saudi Arabia long before 2004 most probably by African pilgrims and continued to circulate in western Saudi Arabia at least until 2011. Most importantly, these results indicate that pilgrims from dengue endemic regions can play an important role in the spread of new DENVs in Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world. Therefore, availability of complete genome sequences would serve as a reference for future epidemiological studies of DENV-1 viruses.

  6. Evidence for a Complex Mosaic Genome Pattern in a Full-length Hepatitis C Virus Sequence

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    R.S. Ross

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The genome of the hepatitis C virus (HCV exhibits a high genetic variability. This remarkable heterogeneity is mainly attributed to the gradual accumulation of mutational changes, whereas the contribution of recombination events to the evolution of HCV remains controversial so far. While performing phylogenetic analyses including a large number of sequences deposited in the GenBank, we encountered a full-length HCV sequence (AY651061 that showed evidence for inter-subtype recombination and was, therefore, subjected to a detailed analysis of its molecular structure. The obtained results indicated that AY651061 does not represent a “simple” HCV 1c isolate, but a complex 1a/1c mosaic genome, showing five putative breakpoints in the core to NS3 regions. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a mosaic HCV full- length sequence with multiple breakpoints. The molecular structure of AY651061 is reminiscent of complex homologous recombinant variants occurring among other members of the flaviviridae family, e.g. GB virus C, dengue virus, and Japanese encephalitis virus. Our finding of a mosaic HCV sequence may have important implications for many fields of current HCV research which merit careful consideration.

  7. Direct sequence analysis of amplified dengue virus genomic RNA from cultured cells, mosquitoes and mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, E; Nestorowicz, A; Marshall, I D; Weir, R C; Dalgarno, L

    1992-06-01

    A method is described for direct sequence analysis of selected regions of dengue virus genomic RNA in infected tissues. Using specific primers, total high-molecular-weight infected-cell RNA is reverse transcribed to single-stranded (ss) complementary DNA, amplified using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequenced using ssDNA obtained after lambda exonuclease digestion of one strand of the PCR product (R.G. Higuchi and H. Ochman, Nucleic Acids Research, 17, 5865, 1989). Sequence data for the envelope protein gene of two dengue-3 virus isolates were obtained using RNA from small numbers (10(5)) of cultured mosquito or monkey kidney cells, from one mg of infected mouse brain and from 1/300th of an infected Toxorhynchites amboinensis mosquito. Independent determinations showed that errors occurring during reverse transcription or PCR were not represented to a significant degree in the sequence of the amplified DNA. The method does not depend on extensive passaging of virus or large-scale growth to generate material for sequencing and therefore provides a means of obtaining sequence data for unadapted dengue virus isolates.

  8. Genome Sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sato, Shusei; Andersen, Stig Uggerhøj

    2014-01-01

    The current Lotus japonicus reference genome sequence is based on a hybrid assembly of Sanger TAC/BAC, Sanger shotgun and Illumina shotgun sequencing data generated from the Miyakojima-MG20 accession. It covers nearly all expressed L. japonicus genes and has been annotated mainly based...... on transcriptional evidence. Analysis of repetitive sequences suggests that they are underrepresented in the reference assembly, reflecting an enrichment of gene-rich regions in the current assembly. Characterization of Lotus natural variation by resequencing of L. japonicus accessions and diploid Lotus species...... is currently ongoing, facilitated by the MG20 reference sequence...

  9. Nicotiana small RNA sequences support a host genome origin of cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA.

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    Kiran Zahid

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Satellite RNAs (satRNAs are small noncoding subviral RNA pathogens in plants that depend on helper viruses for replication and spread. Despite many decades of research, the origin of satRNAs remains unknown. In this study we show that a β-glucuronidase (GUS transgene fused with a Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-Sat sequence (35S-GUS:Sat was transcriptionally repressed in N. tabacum in comparison to a 35S-GUS transgene that did not contain the Y-Sat sequence. This repression was not due to DNA methylation at the 35S promoter, but was associated with specific DNA methylation at the Y-Sat sequence. Both northern blot hybridization and small RNA deep sequencing detected 24-nt siRNAs in wild-type Nicotiana plants with sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that the N. tabacum genome contains Y-Sat-like sequences that give rise to 24-nt sRNAs capable of guiding RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM to the Y-Sat sequence in the 35S-GUS:Sat transgene. Consistent with this, Southern blot hybridization detected multiple DNA bands in Nicotiana plants that had sequence homology to Y-Sat, suggesting that Y-Sat-like sequences exist in the Nicotiana genome as repetitive DNA, a DNA feature associated with 24-nt sRNAs. Our results point to a host genome origin for CMV satRNAs, and suggest novel approach of using small RNA sequences for finding the origin of other satRNAs.

  10. Complete genome sequence of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Steven M; Allen, Clare; Varone, Laura; Briano, Juan

    2010-04-01

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a recently described positive-strand RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, S. invicta. The genome of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3(ArgSF )) obtained from the Santa Fe region of Argentina was sequenced in entirety. Assembly of nine overlapping fragments yielded a consensus genome sequence 10,386 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail present on the 3' end (Genbank accession number GU017972). With the exception of the poly(A) tail, the genome length of SINV-3(ArgSF ) was identical to the North American isolate (SINV-3(USDM )). The SINV-3(ArgSF ) genome possessed three major open reading frames (ORFs) (comprised of >or=100 codons) in the sense orientation; SINV-3(USDM ) possessed only two. ORFs 1 and 2 had identical start and stop genome positions for both isolates. Blastp analysis of the translated ORF 1 of SINV-3(ArgSF ) recognized conserved domains for helicase, protease, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These domains and their corresponding positions were identical to those reported for SINV-3(USDM ). ORF 2a, unique to the SINV-3(ArgSF ) genome, was also found in frame 2 and had a canonical start codon located at nucleotide position 8,351 and a stop codon ending at position 8,827. Blastp analysis of the translated amino acid sequence of ORF 2a revealed no significant similarity in the Genbank database. The two SINV-3 isolates exhibited 96.2% nucleotide sequence identity across the entire genome. The amino acid sequences of ORFs 1 and 2 exhibited higher identities (99.0 and 98.2%, respectively) than the corresponding nucleotide regions within the genome. These data indicated that the nucleotide differences between the SINV-3 isolates were largely synonymous. This observation was corroborated by codon substitution rate analysis. Thus, the majority of the SINV-3 codon changes were silent in the two polyproteins, indicating purifying selection pressure on the viral genome.

  11. Combining genomic sequencing methods to explore viral diversity and reveal potential virus-host interactions

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    Cheryl-Emiliane Tien Chow

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Viral diversity and virus-host interactions in oxygen-starved regions of the ocean, also known as oxygen minimum zones (OMZs, remain relatively unexplored. Microbial community metabolism in OMZs alters nutrient and energy flow through marine food webs, resulting in biological nitrogen loss and greenhouse gas production. Thus, viruses infecting OMZ microbes have the potential to modulate community metabolism with resulting feedback on ecosystem function. Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10m and oxygen-starved basin (200m waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. Of 6459 open reading frames (ORFs predicted across all 34 viral fosmids, 77.6% (n=5010 had no homology to reference viral genomes. These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. While functional annotations of fosmid ORFs were limited, recruitment to NCBI’s non-redundant ‘nr’ database and publicly available single-cell genomes identified putative viruses infecting marine thaumarchaeal and SUP05 proteobacteria to provide potential host linkages with relevance to coupled biogeochemical cycling processes in OMZ waters. Taken together, these results highlight the power of coupled analyses of multiple sequence data types, such as viral metagenomic and fosmid sequence data with prokaryotic single cell genomes, to chart viral diversity, elucidate genomic and ecological contexts for previously unclassifiable viral sequences, and identify novel host interactions in natural and engineered ecosystems.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of the Goatpox Virus Strain Gorgan Obtained Directly from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathijs, Elisabeth; Vandenbussche, Frank; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; De Clercq, Kris; Van Borm, Steven

    2016-10-13

    This is a report of the complete genome sequence of the goatpox virus strain Gorgan, which was obtained directly from a commercial live attenuated vaccine (Caprivac, Jordan Bio-Industries Centre). Copyright © 2016 Mathijs et al.

  13. Mosquito-borne Inkoo virus in northern Sweden - isolation and whole genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas; Ahlm, Kristoffer; Näslund, Jonas; Evander, Magnus

    2017-03-23

    Inkoo virus (INKV) is a less known mosquito-borne virus belonging to Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, California serogroup. Studies indicate that INKV infection is mainly asymptomatic, but can cause mild encephalitis in humans. In northern Europe, the sero-prevalence against INKV is high, 41% in Sweden and 51% in Finland. Previously, INKV RNA has been detected in adult Aedes (Ae.) communis, Ae. hexodontus and Ae. punctor mosquitoes and Ae. communis larvae, but there are still gaps of knowledge regarding mosquito vectors and genetic diversity. Therefore, we aimed to determine the occurrence of INKV in its mosquito vector and characterize the isolates. About 125,000 mosquitoes were collected during a mosquito-borne virus surveillance in northern Sweden during the summer period of 2015. Of these, 10,000 mosquitoes were processed for virus isolation and detection using cell culture and RT-PCR. Virus isolates were further characterized by whole genome sequencing. Genetic typing of mosquito species was conducted by cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene amplification and sequencing (genetic barcoding). Several Ae. communis mosquitoes were found positive for INKV RNA and two isolates were obtained. The first complete sequences of the small (S), medium (M), and large (L) segments of INKV in Sweden were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the INKV genome was most closely related to other INKV isolates from Sweden and Finland. Of the three INKV genome segments, the INKV M segment had the highest frequency of non-synonymous mutations. The overall G/C-content of INKV genes was low for the N/NSs genes (43.8-45.5%), polyprotein (Gn/Gc/NSm) gene (35.6%) and the RNA polymerase gene (33.8%) This may be due to the fact that INKV in most instances utilized A or T in the third codon position. INKV is frequently circulating in northern Sweden and Ae. communis is the key vector. The high mutation rate of the INKV M segment may have consequences on virulence.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Double-Stranded RNA Virus from Avocado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villanueva, Francisco; Sabanadzovic, Sead; Valverde, Rodrigo A.

    2012-01-01

    A number of avocado (Persea americana) cultivars are known to contain high-molecular-weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) molecules for which a viral nature has been suggested, although sequence data are not available. Here we report the cloning and complete sequencing of a 13.5-kbp dsRNA virus isolated from avocado and show that it corresponds to the genome of a new species of the genus Endornavirus (family Endornaviridae), tentatively named Persea americana endornavirus (PaEV). PMID:22205720

  15. Analysis of the coding-complete genomic sequence of groundnut ringspot virus suggests a common ancestor with tomato chlorotic spot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Breuil, Soledad; Cañizares, Joaquín; Blanca, José Miguel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; Giolitti, Fabián; Ziarsolo, Peio; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) share biological and serological properties, so their identification is carried out by molecular methods. Their genomes consist of three segmented RNAs: L, M and S. The finding of a reassortant between these two viruses may complicate correct virus identification and requires the characterization of the complete genome. Therefore, we present for the first time the complete sequences of all the genes encoded by a GRSV isolate. The high level of sequence similarity between GRSV and TCSV (over 90 % identity) observed in the genes and proteins encoded in the M RNA support previous results indicating that these viruses probably have a common ancestor.

  16. Sequencing and Analysis of Globally Obtained Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus A and B Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Michael E.; He, Jie; Shrivastava, Susmita; Nelson, Martha I.; Bera, Jayati; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Town, Christopher D.; Lorenzi, Hernan A.; Noyola, Daniel E.; Falcone, Valeria; Gerna, Giuseppe; De Beenhouwer, Hans; Videla, Cristina; Kok, Tuckweng; Venter, Marietjie; Williams, John V.; Henrickson, Kelly J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of respiratory tract infections in children globally, with nearly all children experiencing at least one infection by the age of two. Partial sequencing of the attachment glycoprotein gene is conducted routinely for genotyping, but relatively few whole genome sequences are available for RSV. The goal of our study was to sequence the genomes of RSV strains collected from multiple countries to further understand the global diversity of RSV at a whole-genome level. Methods We collected RSV samples and isolates from Mexico, Argentina, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Australia, South Africa, and the USA from the years 1998-2010. Both Sanger and next-generation sequencing with the Illumina and 454 platforms were used to sequence the whole genomes of RSV A and B. Phylogenetic analyses were performed using the Bayesian and maximum likelihood methods of phylogenetic inference. Results We sequenced the genomes of 34 RSVA and 23 RSVB viruses. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the RSVA genome evolves at an estimated rate of 6.72 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD 5.61 × 10-4 to 7.6 × 10-4) and for RSVB the evolutionary rate was 7.69 × 10-4 substitutions/site/year (95% HPD 6.81 × 10-4 to 8.62 × 10-4). We found multiple clades co-circulating globally for both RSV A and B. The predominant clades were GA2 and GA5 for RSVA and BA for RSVB. Conclusions Our analyses showed that RSV circulates on a global scale with the same predominant clades of viruses being found in countries around the world. However, the distribution of clades can change rapidly as new strains emerge. We did not observe a strong spatial structure in our trees, with the same three main clades of RSV co-circulating globally, suggesting that the evolution of RSV is not strongly regionalized. PMID:25793751

  17. Complete genome sequence of mumps viruses isolated from patients with parotitis, pancreatitis and encephalitis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M; Hamde, Venkat S

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding epidemiology of mumps in India. Mumps vaccine is not included in the Universal Immunization Program of India. The complete genome sequences of Indian mumps virus (MuV) isolates are not available, hence this study was performed. Five isolates from bilateral parotitis and pancreatitis patients from Maharashtra, a MuV isolate from unilateral parotitis patient from Tamil Nadu, and a MuV isolate from encephalitis patient from Uttar Pradesh were genotyped by the standard protocol of the World Health Organization and subsequently complete genomes were sequenced. Indian MuV genomes were compared with published MuV genomes, including reference genotypes and eight vaccine strains for the genetic differences. The SH gene analysis revealed that five MuV isolates belonged to genotype C and two belonged to genotype G strains. The percent nucleotide divergence (PND) was 1.1% amongst five MuV genotype C strains and 2.2% amongst two MuV genotype G strains. A comparison with widely used mumps Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain revealed that Indian mumps isolates had 54, 54, 53, 49, 49, 38, and 49 amino acid substitutions in Chennai-2012, Kushinagar-2013, Pune-2008, Osmanabad-2012a, Osmanabad-2012b, Pune-1986 and Pune-2012, respectively. This study reports the complete genome sequences of Indian MuV strains obtained in years 1986, 2008, 2012 and 2013 that may be useful for further studies in India and globally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete genomic sequence analysis of infectious bronchitis virus Ark DPI strain and its evolution by recombination

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    Gelb Jack

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An infectious bronchitis virus Arkansas DPI (Ark DPI virulent strain was sequenced, analyzed and compared with many different IBV strains and coronaviruses. The genome of Ark DPI consists of 27,620 nucleotides, excluding poly (A tail, and comprises ten open reading frames. Comparative sequence analysis of Ark DPI with other IBV strains shows striking similarity to the Conn, Gray, JMK, and Ark 99, which were circulating during that time period. Furthermore, comparison of the Ark genome with other coronaviruses demonstrates a close relationship to turkey coronavirus. Among non-structural genes, the 5'untranslated region (UTR, 3C-like proteinase (3CLpro and the polymerase (RdRp sequences are 100% identical to the Gray strain. Among structural genes, S1 has 97% identity with Ark 99; S2 has 100% identity with JMK and 96% to Conn; 3b 99%, and 3C to N is 100% identical to Conn strain. Possible recombination sites were found at the intergenic region of spike gene, 3'end of S1 and 3a gene. Independent recombination events may have occurred in the entire genome of Ark DPI, involving four different IBV strains, suggesting that genomic RNA recombination may occur in any part of the genome at number of sites. Hence, we speculate that the Ark DPI strain originated from the Conn strain, but diverged and evolved independently by point mutations and recombination between field strains.

  19. Multiplex PCR method for MinION and Illumina sequencing of Zika and other virus genomes directly from clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, Joshua; Grubaugh, Nathan D; Pullan, Steven T; Claro, Ingra M; Smith, Andrew D; Gangavarapu, Karthik; Oliveira, Glenn; Robles-Sikisaka, Refugio; Rogers, Thomas F; Beutler, Nathan A; Burton, Dennis R; Lewis-Ximenez, Lia Laura; de Jesus, Jaqueline Goes; Giovanetti, Marta; Hill, Sarah C; Black, Allison; Bedford, Trevor; Carroll, Miles W; Nunes, Marcio; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos; Sabino, Ester C; Baylis, Sally A; Faria, Nuno R; Loose, Matthew; Simpson, Jared T; Pybus, Oliver G; Andersen, Kristian G; Loman, Nicholas J

    2017-06-01

    Genome sequencing has become a powerful tool for studying emerging infectious diseases; however, genome sequencing directly from clinical samples (i.e., without isolation and culture) remains challenging for viruses such as Zika, for which metagenomic sequencing methods may generate insufficient numbers of viral reads. Here we present a protocol for generating coding-sequence-complete genomes, comprising an online primer design tool, a novel multiplex PCR enrichment protocol, optimized library preparation methods for the portable MinION sequencer (Oxford Nanopore Technologies) and the Illumina range of instruments, and a bioinformatics pipeline for generating consensus sequences. The MinION protocol does not require an Internet connection for analysis, making it suitable for field applications with limited connectivity. Our method relies on multiplex PCR for targeted enrichment of viral genomes from samples containing as few as 50 genome copies per reaction. Viral consensus sequences can be achieved in 1-2 d by starting with clinical samples and following a simple laboratory workflow. This method has been successfully used by several groups studying Zika virus evolution and is facilitating an understanding of the spread of the virus in the Americas. The protocol can be used to sequence other viral genomes using the online Primal Scheme primer designer software. It is suitable for sequencing either RNA or DNA viruses in the field during outbreaks or as an inexpensive, convenient method for use in the lab.

  20. Complete genome sequence of T'Ho virus, a novel putative flavivirus from the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Loroño-Pino, Maria A; Garcia-Rejon, Julian E; Farfan-Ale, Jose A; Machain-Williams, Carlos; Dorman, Karin S; Lipkin, W Ian; Blitvich, Bradley J

    2017-06-12

    We previously reported the discovery of a novel, putative flavivirus designated T'Ho virus in Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes in the Yucatan Peninsula of Mexico. A 1358-nt region of the NS5 gene was amplified and sequenced but an isolate was not recovered. The complete genome of T'Ho virus was sequenced using a combination of unbiased high-throughput sequencing, 5' and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and Sanger sequencing. The genome contains a single open reading frame of 10,284 nt which is flanked by 5' and 3' untranslated regions of 97 and 556-nt, respectively. Genome sequence alignments revealed that T'Ho virus is most closely related to Rocio virus (67.4% nucleotide identity) and Ilheus virus (65.9%), both of which belong to the Ntaya group, followed by other Ntaya group viruses (58.8-63.3%) and Japanese encephalitis group viruses (62.0-63.7%). Phylogenetic inference is in agreement with these findings. This study furthers our understanding of flavivirus genetics, phylogeny and diagnostics. Because the two closest known relatives of T'Ho virus are human pathogens, T'Ho virus could be an unrecognized cause of human disease. It is therefore important that future studies investigate the public health significance of this virus.

  1. Complete genome sequence of a novel extrachromosomal virus-like element identified in planarian Girardia tigrina

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    Vagner Loura L

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Freshwater planarians are widely used as models for investigation of pattern formation and studies on genetic variation in populations. Despite extensive information on the biology and genetics of planaria, the occurrence and distribution of viruses in these animals remains an unexplored area of research. Results Using a combination of Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH and Mirror Orientation Selection (MOS, we compared the genomes of two strains of freshwater planarian, Girardia tigrina. The novel extrachromosomal DNA-containing virus-like element denoted PEVE (Planarian Extrachromosomal Virus-like Element was identified in one planarian strain. The PEVE genome (about 7.5 kb consists of two unique regions (Ul and Us flanked by inverted repeats. Sequence analyses reveal that PEVE comprises two helicase-like sequences in the genome, of which the first is a homolog of a circoviral replication initiator protein (Rep, and the second is similar to the papillomavirus E1 helicase domain. PEVE genome exists in at least two variant forms with different arrangements of single-stranded and double-stranded DNA stretches that correspond to the Us and Ul regions. Using PCR analysis and whole-mount in situ hybridization, we characterized PEVE distribution and expression in the planarian body. Conclusions PEVE is the first viral element identified in free-living flatworms. This element differs from all known viruses and viral elements, and comprises two potential helicases that are homologous to proteins from distant viral phyla. PEVE is unevenly distributed in the worm body, and is detected in specific parenchyma cells.

  2. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

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    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  3. Complete genome sequence of the first Chinese virulent infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Congcong; Zhao, Yan; Cui, Xianlan; Zhang, Xiaomin; Cui, Hongyu; Xue, Mei; Wang, Yunfeng

    2013-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute respiratory disease caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). The complete genome sequences of five attenuated ILTV vaccine strains and six virulent ILTV strains as well as two Australian ILTV field strains have been published in Australia and the USA so far. To provide the complete genome sequence information of ILTVs from different geographic regions, the whole genome of ILTV LJS09 isolated in China was sequenced. The genome of ILTV LJS09 was 153,201 bp in length, and contained 79 ORFs. Most of the ORFs had high sequence identity with homologous ORFs of reference strains. There was a large fragment deletion within the noncoding region of unique long region (UL) of ILTV LJS09 compared with SA2 and A20 strains. Though the origin binding protein of ILTV LJS09 existed, there was no AT-rich region in strain LJS09. Alignments of the amino acid sequences revealed seven mutations at amino acids 71 (Arg → Lys), 116 (Ala → Val), 207 (Thr → Ile) and 644 (Thr → Ile) on glycoprotein B, 155 (Phe → Ser) and 376 (Arg → His) on glycoprotein D and 8 (Gln→Pro) on glycoprotein L of ILTV LJS09 compared to those of virulent strain (USDA) as ILTV LJS09 did not grow on chicken embryo fibroblasts, suggesting the role of the key seven amino acids in determination of the cell tropism of ILTV LJS09. This is the first complete genome sequence of the virulent strain of ILTV in Asia using the conventional PCR method, which will help to facilitate the future molecular biological research of ILTVs.

  4. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

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    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  5. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  6. A modified RNA-Seq approach for whole genome sequencing of RNA viruses from faecal and blood samples.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth M Batty

    Full Text Available To date, very large scale sequencing of many clinically important RNA viruses has been complicated by their high population molecular variation, which creates challenges for polymerase chain reaction and sequencing primer design. Many RNA viruses are also difficult or currently not possible to culture, severely limiting the amount and purity of available starting material. Here, we describe a simple, novel, high-throughput approach to Norovirus and Hepatitis C virus whole genome sequence determination based on RNA shotgun sequencing (also known as RNA-Seq. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method by sequencing three Norovirus samples from faeces and two Hepatitis C virus samples from blood, on an Illumina MiSeq benchtop sequencer. More than 97% of reference genomes were recovered. Compared with Sanger sequencing, our method had no nucleotide differences in 14,019 nucleotides (nt for Noroviruses (from a total of 2 Norovirus genomes obtained with Sanger sequencing, and 8 variants in 9,542 nt for Hepatitis C virus (1 variant per 1,193 nt. The three Norovirus samples had 2, 3, and 2 distinct positions called as heterozygous, while the two Hepatitis C virus samples had 117 and 131 positions called as heterozygous. To confirm that our sample and library preparation could be scaled to true high-throughput, we prepared and sequenced an additional 77 Norovirus samples in a single batch on an Illumina HiSeq 2000 sequencer, recovering >90% of the reference genome in all but one sample. No discrepancies were observed across 118,757 nt compared between Sanger and our custom RNA-Seq method in 16 samples. By generating viral genomic sequences that are not biased by primer-specific amplification or enrichment, this method offers the prospect of large-scale, affordable studies of RNA viruses which could be adapted to routine diagnostic laboratory workflows in the near future, with the potential to directly characterize within-host viral diversity.

  7. Biological Characterization and Next-Generation Genome Sequencing of the Unclassified Cotia Virus SPAn232 (Poxviridae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Priscila P.; Silva, Patrícia M.; Schnellrath, Laila C.; Jesus, Desyreé M.; Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Renne, Rolf; Attias, Marcia; Condit, Richard C.; Moussatché, Nissin

    2012-01-01

    Cotia virus (COTV) SPAn232 was isolated in 1961 from sentinel mice at Cotia field station, São Paulo, Brazil. Attempts to classify COTV within a recognized genus of the Poxviridae have generated contradictory findings. Studies by different researchers suggested some similarity to myxoma virus and swinepox virus, whereas another investigation characterized COTV SPAn232 as a vaccinia virus strain. Because of the lack of consensus, we have conducted an independent biological and molecular characterization of COTV. Virus growth curves reached maximum yields at approximately 24 to 48 h and were accompanied by virus DNA replication and a characteristic early/late pattern of viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, COTV did not induce detectable cytopathic effects in BSC-40 cells until 4 days postinfection and generated viral plaques only after 8 days. We determined the complete genomic sequence of COTV by using a combination of the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies 454 and Illumina. A unique contiguous sequence of 185,139 bp containing 185 genes, including the 90 genes conserved in all chordopoxviruses, was obtained. COTV has an interesting panel of open reading frames (ORFs) related to the evasion of host defense, including two novel genes encoding C-C chemokine-like proteins, each present in duplicate copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the highest amino acid identity scores with Cervidpoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Yatapoxvirus. However, COTV grouped as an independent branch within this clade, which clearly excluded its classification as an Orthopoxvirus. Therefore, our data suggest that COTV could represent a new poxvirus genus. PMID:22345477

  8. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Asencio, José; Wojciechowska, Klaudia; Baskerville, Maia; Gomez, Annika L; Perry, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy R

    2017-01-02

    In analyzing grapevine clones infected with grapevine red blotch associated virus, we identified a small number of isometric particles of approximately 30nm in diameter from an enriched fraction of leaf extract. A dominant protein of 25kDa was isolated from this fraction using SDS-PAGE and was identified by mass spectrometry as belonging to grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus (GAMaV). Using a combination of three methods RNA-Seq, sRNA-Seq, and Sanger sequencing of RT- and RACE-PCR products, we obtained a full-length genome sequence consisting of 6719 nucleotides without the poly(A) tail. The virus possesses all of the typical conserved functional domains concordant with the genus Marafivirus and lies evolutionarily between citrus sudden death associated virus and oat blue dwarf virus. A large shift in RNA-Seq coverage coincided with the predicted location of the subgenomic RNA involved in coat protein (CP) expression. Genus wide sequence alignments confirmed the cleavage motif LxG(G/A) to be dominant between the helicase and RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), and the RdRp and CP domains. A putative overlapping protein (OP) ORF lacking a canonical translational start codon was identified with a reading frame context more consistent with the putative OPs of tymoviruses and fig fleck associated virus than with those of marafiviruses. BLAST analysis of the predicted GAMaV OP showed a unique relatedness to the OPs of members of the genus Tymovirus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The complete genome sequence of freesia mosaic virus and its relationship to other potyviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, H I; Lim, H R; Song, Y S; Kim, M J; Choi, S H; Song, Y S; Bae, S C; Ryu, K H

    2010-07-01

    We have completed the genomic sequence of a potyvirus, freesia mosaic virus (FreMV), and compared it to those of other known potyviruses. The full-length genome sequence of FreMV consists of 9,489 nucleotides. The large protein contains 3,077 amino acids, with an AUG start codon and UAA stop codon, containing one open reading frame typical of a potyvirus polyprotein. The polyprotein of FreMV-Kr gives rise to eleven proteins (P1, HC-pro, P3, PIPO, 6K1, CI, 6K2, VPg, NIa, NIb and CP), and putative cleavage sites of each protein were identified by sequence comparison to those of other known potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein revealed that FreMV-Kr was most closely related to PeMoV and was related to BtMV, BaRMV and PeLMV, which belong to the BCMV subgroup. This is the first information on the complete genome structure of FreMV, and the sequence information clearly supports the status of FreMV as a member of a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus.

  10. Comparative analysis of full genomic sequences among different genotypes of dengue virus type 3

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    Lin Ting-Hsiang

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the previous study demonstrated the envelope protein of dengue viruses is under purifying selection pressure, little is known about the genetic differences of full-length viral genomes of DENV-3. In our study, complete genomic sequencing of DENV-3 strains collected from different geographical locations and isolation years were determined and the sequence diversity as well as selection pressure sites in the DENV genome other than within the E gene were also analyzed. Results Using maximum likelihood and Bayesian approaches, our phylogenetic analysis revealed that the Taiwan's indigenous DENV-3 isolated from 1994 and 1998 dengue/DHF epidemics and one 1999 sporadic case were of the three different genotypes – I, II, and III, each associated with DENV-3 circulating in Indonesia, Thailand and Sri Lanka, respectively. Sequence diversity and selection pressure of different genomic regions among DENV-3 different genotypes was further examined to understand the global DENV-3 evolution. The highest nucleotide sequence diversity among the fully sequenced DENV-3 strains was found in the nonstructural protein 2A (mean ± SD: 5.84 ± 0.54 and envelope protein gene regions (mean ± SD: 5.04 ± 0.32. Further analysis found that positive selection pressure of DENV-3 may occur in the non-structural protein 1 gene region and the positive selection site was detected at position 178 of the NS1 gene. Conclusion Our study confirmed that the envelope protein is under purifying selection pressure although it presented higher sequence diversity. The detection of positive selection pressure in the non-structural protein along genotype II indicated that DENV-3 originated from Southeast Asia needs to monitor the emergence of DENV strains with epidemic potential for better epidemic prevention and vaccine development.

  11. Complete genome sequences of two distinct and diverse Citrus tristeza virus isolates from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S J; Dawson, T E; Pearson, M N

    2009-01-01

    Two Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from New Zealand that display distinct phenotypes were isolated, examined and sequenced in full. The first isolate, NZ-M16, is largely asymptomatic and non-transmissible by the aphid vector Toxoptera citricida, while the second, NZ-B18, is highly transmissible and induces very severe symptoms on C. sinensis and C. aurantii. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequences showed that both isolates were approximately 90-93% similar to the VT and T318 isolates but possessed only 89% identity to one another. Based on sequence identity, both isolates are VT subtypes, with NZ-M16 being T3-like, while NZ-B18 is a member of a novel subtype with B165 from India.

  12. Surveillance, isolation and complete genome sequence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 in Egyptian cattle

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    Nader M. Sobhy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3 can infect a wide variety of mammals including humans, domestic animals, and wild animals. In the present study, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3 was isolated from nasal swabs of Egyptian cattle presenting with clinical signs of mild pneumonia. The virus was isolated in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK cells and confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The complete genome of Egyptian BPIV-3 strain was sequenced by using next generation (Illumina sequencing. The new isolate classified with genotype A of BPIV-3 and was closely related to the Chinese NM09 strain (JQ063064. Subsequently in 2015–16, a molecular surveillance study was undertaken by collecting and testing samples from cattle and buffaloes with respiratory tract infections. The survey revealed a higher rate of BPIV-3 infection in cattle than in buffaloes. The infection was inversely proportional to the age of the animals and to warm weather. This report should form a basis for further molecular studies on animal viruses in Egypt.

  13. Complete genome sequence of a novel Plum pox virus strain W isolate determined by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Speranskaya, Anna; Belenikin, Maxim; Melnikova, Natalia; Chirkov, Sergei

    2013-10-01

    The near-complete (99.7 %) genome sequence of a novel Russian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate Pk, belonging to the strain Winona (W), has been determined by 454 pyrosequencing with the exception of the thirty-one 5'-terminal nucleotides. This region was amplified using 5'RACE kit and sequenced by the Sanger method. Genomic RNA released from immunocaptured PPV particles was employed for generation of cDNA library using TransPlex Whole transcriptome amplification kit (WTA2, Sigma-Aldrich). The entire Pk genome has identity level of 92.8-94.5 % when compared to the complete nucleotide sequences of other PPV-W isolates (W3174, LV-141pl, LV-145bt, and UKR 44189), confirming a high degree of variability within the PPV-W strain. The isolates Pk and LV-141pl are most closely related. The Pk has been found in a wild plum (Prunus domestica) in a new region of Russia indicating widespread dissemination of the PPV-W strain in the European part of the former USSR.

  14. Deep sequencing reveals the complete genome and evidence for transcriptional activity of the first virus-like sequences identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F; Alzate, Juan F; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-04-03

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%-73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant.

  15. Complete genome sequence analysis of goatpox virus isolated from China shows high variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chi, Xuelin; Li, Wei; Hao, Wenbo; Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Yifan; Rock, Daniel L; Luo, Shuhong; Wang, Shihua

    2014-09-17

    Goatpox virus (GTPV), a member of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family, is the causative agent of variolo caprina (goatpox). GTPV can cause significant economic losses of domestic ruminants in endemic regions and can threaten breeding stocks. In this study, we report on the compilation of the complete genomic sequence of an isolated GTPV field strain FZ (GTPV_FZ). The 150,194bp GTPV genome consists of a central coding region bounded by two identical 2301bp inverted terminal repeats and contains 151 putative genes. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the apparent genetic relationships among Capripoxviruses are close, but sufficient genomic variants in the field isolate strain FZ have been identified to distinguish it from other GTPV strains and other Capripoxvirus species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the p32 and complete GTPV genome can be used to differentiate SPPVs, GTPVs and LSDVs. These data may contribute to the epidemiological study of the Chinese capripoxvirus and help to develop more specific detection methods to distinguish GTPVs, SPPVs and LSDVs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Complete Genomic Sequence and Comparative Analysis of the Tumorigenic Poxvirus Yaba Monkey Tumor Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Craig R.; Amano, Hiroko; Ueda, Yoshiaki; Qin, Jing; Miyamura, Tatsuo; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Li, Xing; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant

    2003-01-01

    The Yatapoxvirus genus of poxviruses is comprised of Yaba monkey tumor virus (YMTV), Tanapox virus, and Yaba-like disease virus (YLDV), which all have the ability to infect primates, including humans. Unlike other poxviruses, YMTV induces formation of focalized histiocytomas upon infection. To gain a greater understanding of the Yatapoxvirus genus and the unique tumor formation properties of YMTV, we sequenced the 134,721-bp genome of YMTV. The genome of YMTV encodes at least 140 open reading frames, all of which are also found as orthologs in the closely related YLDV. However, 13 open reading frames found in YLDV are completely absent from YMTV. Common to both YLDV and YMTV are the unusually large noncoding regions between many open reading frames. To determine whether any of these noncoding regions might be functionally significant, we carried out a comparative analysis between the putative noncoding regions of YMTV and similar noncoding regions from other poxviruses. This approach identified three new gene poxvirus families, defined as orthologs of YMTV23.5L, YMTV28.5L, and YMTV120.5L, which are highly conserved in virtually all poxvirus species. Furthermore, the comparative analysis also revealed a 40-bp nucleotide sequence at approximately 14,700 bases from the left terminus that was 100% identical in the comparable intergene site within members of the Yatapoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, and Capripoxvirus genera and 95% conserved in the Leporipoxvirus genus. This conserved sequence was shown to function as a poxvirus late promoter element in transfected and infected cells, but other functions, such as an involvement in viral replication or packaging, cannot be excluded. Finally, we summarize the predicted immunomodulatory protein repertoire in the Yatapoxvirus genus as a whole. PMID:14645589

  17. Umatilla virus genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis: identification of stretch lagoon orbivirus as a new member of the Umatilla virus species.

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    Manjunatha N Belaganahalli

    Full Text Available The genus Orbivirus, family Reoviridae, includes 22 species of viruses with genomes composed of ten segments of linear dsRNA that are transmitted between their vertebrate hosts by insects or ticks, or with no identified vectors. Full-genome sequence data are available for representative isolates of the insect borne mammalian orbiviruses (including bluetongue virus, as well as a tick borne avian orbivirus (Great Island virus. However, no sequence data are as yet available for the mosquito borne avian orbiviruses.We report full-length, whole-genome sequence data for Umatilla virus (UMAV, a mosquito borne avian orbivirus from the USA, which belongs to the species Umatilla virus. Comparisons of conserved genome segments 1, 2 and 8 (Seg-1, Seg-2 and Seg-8 - encoding the polymerase-VP1, sub-core 'T2' protein and core-surface 'T13' protein, respectively, show that UMAV groups with the mosquito transmitted mammalian orbiviruses. The highest levels of sequence identity were detected between UMAV and Stretch Lagoon orbivirus (SLOV from Australia, showing that they belong to the same virus species (with nt/aa identity of 76.04%/88.07% and 77.96%/95.36% in the polymerase and T2 genes and protein, respectively. The data presented here has assisted in identifying the SLOV as a member of the Umatilla serogroup. This sequence data reported here will also facilitate identification of new isolates, and epidemiological studies of viruses belonging to the species Umatilla virus.

  18. Simple protocol for population (Sanger sequencing for Zika virus genomic regions

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    Gabriela Bastos Cabral

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND A number of Zika virus (ZIKV sequences were obtained using Next-generation sequencing (NGS, a methodology widely applied in genetic diversity studies and virome discovery. However Sanger method is still a robust, affordable, rapid and specific tool to obtain valuable sequences. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to develop a simple and robust Sanger sequencing protocol targeting ZIKV relevant genetic regions, as envelope protein and nonstructural protein 5 (NS5. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV strains obtained using the present protocol and their comparison with previously published NGS sequences were also carried out. METHODS Six Vero cells isolates from serum and one urine sample were available to develop the procedure. Primer sets were designed in order to conduct a nested RT-PCR and a Sanger sequencing protocols. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. FINDINGS Seven complete ZIKV envelope protein (1,571 kb and six partial NS5 (0,798 Kb were obtained using the protocol, with no amplification of NS5 gene from urine sample. Two NS5 sequences presented ambiguities at positions 495 and 196. Nucleotide analysis of a Sanger sequence and consensus sequence of previously NGS study revealed 100% identity. ZIKV strains described here clustered within the Asian lineage. MAIN CONCLUSIONS The present study provided a simple and low-cost Sanger protocol to sequence relevant genes of the ZIKV genome. The identity of Sanger generated sequences with published consensus NGS support the use of Sanger method for ZIKV population studies. The regions evaluated were able to provide robust phylogenetic signals and may be used to conduct molecular epidemiological studies and monitor viral evolution.

  19. Simple protocol for population (Sanger) sequencing for Zika virus genomic regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Gabriela Bastos; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Souza, Renato Pereira de; Cunha, Mariana Sequetin; Luchs, Adriana; Figueiredo, Cristina Adelaide; Brígido, Luís Fernando de Macedo

    2018-01-01

    A number of Zika virus (ZIKV) sequences were obtained using Next-generation sequencing (NGS), a methodology widely applied in genetic diversity studies and virome discovery. However Sanger method is still a robust, affordable, rapid and specific tool to obtain valuable sequences. The aim of this study was to develop a simple and robust Sanger sequencing protocol targeting ZIKV relevant genetic regions, as envelope protein and nonstructural protein 5 (NS5). In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the ZIKV strains obtained using the present protocol and their comparison with previously published NGS sequences were also carried out. Six Vero cells isolates from serum and one urine sample were available to develop the procedure. Primer sets were designed in order to conduct a nested RT-PCR and a Sanger sequencing protocols. Bayesian analysis was used to infer phylogenetic relationships. Seven complete ZIKV envelope protein (1,571 kb) and six partial NS5 (0,798 Kb) were obtained using the protocol, with no amplification of NS5 gene from urine sample. Two NS5 sequences presented ambiguities at positions 495 and 196. Nucleotide analysis of a Sanger sequence and consensus sequence of previously NGS study revealed 100% identity. ZIKV strains described here clustered within the Asian lineage. The present study provided a simple and low-cost Sanger protocol to sequence relevant genes of the ZIKV genome. The identity of Sanger generated sequences with published consensus NGS support the use of Sanger method for ZIKV population studies. The regions evaluated were able to provide robust phylogenetic signals and may be used to conduct molecular epidemiological studies and monitor viral evolution.

  20. Characterization of the complete genomic sequence of genotype II hepatitis A virus (CF53/Berne isolate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Ching, Karen Z; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Nakano, Tatsunori; Siegl, Gunter; Weitz, Manfred; Robertson, Betty H

    2004-10-01

    The complete genomic sequence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) CF53/Berne strain was determined. Pairwise comparison with other complete HAV genomic sequences demonstrated that the CF53/Berne isolate is most closely related to the single genotype VII strain, SLF88. This close relationship was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses of different genomic regions, and was most pronounced within the capsid region. These data indicated that CF53/Berne and SLF88 isolates are related more closely to each other than are subtypes IA and IB. A histogram of the genetic differences between HAV strains revealed four separate peaks. The distance values for CF53/Berne and SLF88 isolates fell within the peak that contained strains of the same subtype, showing that they should be subtypes within a single genotype. The complete genomic data indicated that genotypes II and VII should be considered a single genotype, based upon the complete VP1 sequence, and it is proposed that the CF53/Berne isolate be classified as genotype IIA and strain SLF88 as genotype IIB. The CF53/Berne isolate is cell-adapted, and therefore its sequence was compared to that of two other strains adapted to cell culture, HM-175/7 grown in MK-5 and GBM grown in FRhK-4 cells. Mutations found at nucleotides 3889, 4087 and 4222 that were associated with HAV attenuation and cell adaptation in HM175/7 and GMB strains were not present in the CF53/Berne strain. Deletions found in the 5'UTR and P3A regions of the CF53/Berne isolate that are common to cell-adapted HAV isolates were identified, however.

  1. Complete genome sequence of Fer-de-Lance Virus reveals a novel gene in reptilian Paramyxoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, G.; Batts, W.N.; Ahne, W.; Winton, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The complete RNA genome sequence of the archetype reptilian paramyxovirus, Fer-de-Lance virus (FDLV), has been determined. The genome is 15,378 nucleotides in length and consists of seven nonoverlapping genes in the order 3??? N-U-P-M-F-HN-L 5???, coding for the nucleocapsid, unknown, phospho-, matrix, fusion, hemagglutinin-neuraminidase, and large polymerase proteins, respectively. The gene junctions contain highly conserved transcription start and stop signal sequences and tri-nucleotide intergenic regions similar to those of other Paramyxoviridae. The FDLV P gene expression strategy is like that of rubulaviruses, which express the accessory V protein from the primary transcript and edit a portion of the mRNA to encode P and I proteins. There is also an overlapping open reading frame potentially encoding a small basic protein in the P gene. The gene designated U (unknown), encodes a deduced protein of 19.4 kDa that has no counterpart in other paramyxoviruses and has no similarity with sequences in the National Center for Biotechnology Information database. Active transcription of the U gene in infected cells was demonstrated by Northern blot analysis, and bicistronic N-U mRNA was also evident. The genomes of two other snake paramyxovirus genotypes were also found to have U genes, with 11 to 16% nucleotide divergence from the FDLV U gene. Pairwise comparisons of amino acid identities and phylogenetic analyses of all deduced FDLV protein sequences with homologous sequences from other Paramyxoviridae indicate that FDLV represents a new genus within the subfamily Paramyxovirinae. We suggest the name Ferlavirus for the new genus, with FDLV as the type species.

  2. The Complete Sequence of the First Spodoptera frugiperda Betabaculovirus Genome: A Natural Multiple Recombinant Virus

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    Paola E. Cuartas

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spodoptera frugiperda (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae is a major pest in maize crops in Colombia, and affects several regions in America. A granulovirus isolated from S. frugiperda (SfGV VG008 has potential as an enhancer of insecticidal activity of previously described nucleopolyhedrovirus from the same insect species (SfMNPV. The SfGV VG008 genome was sequenced and analyzed showing circular double stranded DNA of 140,913 bp encoding 146 putative ORFs that include 37 Baculoviridae core genes, 88 shared with betabaculoviruses, two shared only with betabaculoviruses from Noctuide insects, two shared with alphabaculoviruses, three copies of own genes (paralogs and the other 14 corresponding to unique genes without representation in the other baculovirus species. Particularly, the genome encodes for important virulence factors such as 4 chitinases and 2 enhancins. The sequence analysis revealed the existence of eight homologous regions (hrs and also suggests processes of gene acquisition by horizontal transfer including the SfGV VG008 ORFs 046/047 (paralogs, 059, 089 and 099. The bioinformatics evidence indicates that the genome donors of mentioned genes could be alpha- and/or betabaculovirus species. The previous reported ability of SfGV VG008 to naturally co-infect the same host with other virus show a possible mechanism to capture genes and thus improve its fitness.

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry.

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    Jiaorong Meng

    Full Text Available Mulberry vein banding associated virus (MVBaV that infects mulberry plants with typical vein banding symptoms had been identified as a tentative species of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed. The L RNA has 8905 nucleotides (nt and encodes the putative RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp of 2877 aa amino acids (aa in the viral complementary (vc strand. The RdRp of MVBaV shares the highest aa sequence identity (85.9% with that of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, and contains conserved motifs shared with those of the species of the genus Tospovirus. The M RNA contains 4731 nt and codes in ambisense arrangement for the NSm protein of 309 aa in the sense strand and the Gn/Gc glycoprotein precursor (GP of 1,124 aa in the vc strand. The NSm and GP of MVBaV share the highest aa sequence identities with those of Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV and Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV (83.2% and 84.3%, respectively. The S RNA is 3294 nt in length and contains two open reading frames (ORFs in an ambisense coding strategy, encoding a 439-aa non-structural protein (NSs and the 277-aa nucleocapsid protein (N, respectively. The NSs and N also share the highest aa sequence identity (71.1% and 74.4%, respectively with those of CaCV. Phylogenetic analysis of the RdRp, NSm, GP, NSs, and N proteins showed that MVBaV is most closely related to CaCV and GBNV and that these proteins cluster with those of the WSMoV serogroup, and that MVBaV seems to be a species bridging the two subgroups within the WSMoV serogroup of tospoviruses in evolutionary aspect, suggesting that MVBaV represents a distinct tospovirus. Analysis of S RNA sequence uncovered the highly conserved 5'-/3'-ends and the coding regions, and the variable region of IGR with divergent patterns among MVBaV isolates.

  4. Complete genome sequences of three rabies viruses isolated from rabid raccoon dogs and a cow in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2013-12-01

    The complete genomes of three rabies viruses (BD0406CC, BV9901PJ, and 08F40) of two raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides koreensis) and a cow were determined. The genomic organization is typical of rabies viruses, and the open reading frames of the N, P, M, G, and L genes are 1,353, 894, 609, 1,575, and 6,384 bases in length, respectively. The full genome length of the three strains was 11,928 nucleotides, and the sequence similarity between the rabies viruses at the nucleotide level was 98.5-99.5%. Sequence comparisons indicated that these rabies viruses belong to the "Arctic and Arctic-like" group, with high homology to the Eurasian cluster. All Korean strains were clustered with the Mongolia strains, which belong to Arctic-like 1 clade. The 08F40 and BD0406CC strains were constructed with rabies virus strains isolated in Gangwon province. The BV9901PJ strain was closely related to strains isolated in Gyeonggi province in Korea. Three strains were more dependent upon geographical distribution and time period than host species. Complete genome sequencing of different host-origin rabies viruses will provide information that should contribute to understanding the transmission cycle and genetic variability of rabies from different hosts.

  5. Infidelity of SARS-CoV Nsp14-Exonuclease Mutant Virus Replication Is Revealed by Complete Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Lance D.; Becker, Michelle M.; Halpin, Rebecca A.; Li, Kelvin; Venter, Eli; Lu, Xiaotao; Scherbakova, Sana; Graham, Rachel L.; Baric, Ralph S.; Stockwell, Timothy B.; Spiro, David J.; Denison, Mark R.

    2010-01-01

    Most RNA viruses lack the mechanisms to recognize and correct mutations that arise during genome replication, resulting in quasispecies diversity that is required for pathogenesis and adaptation. However, it is not known how viruses encoding large viral RNA genomes such as the Coronaviridae (26 to 32 kb) balance the requirements for genome stability and quasispecies diversity. Further, the limits of replication infidelity during replication of large RNA genomes and how decreased fidelity impacts virus fitness over time are not known. Our previous work demonstrated that genetic inactivation of the coronavirus exoribonuclease (ExoN) in nonstructural protein 14 (nsp14) of murine hepatitis virus results in a 15-fold decrease in replication fidelity. However, it is not known whether nsp14-ExoN is required for replication fidelity of all coronaviruses, nor the impact of decreased fidelity on genome diversity and fitness during replication and passage. We report here the engineering and recovery of nsp14-ExoN mutant viruses of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) that have stable growth defects and demonstrate a 21-fold increase in mutation frequency during replication in culture. Analysis of complete genome sequences from SARS-ExoN mutant viral clones revealed unique mutation sets in every genome examined from the same round of replication and a total of 100 unique mutations across the genome. Using novel bioinformatic tools and deep sequencing across the full-length genome following 10 population passages in vitro, we demonstrate retention of ExoN mutations and continued increased diversity and mutational load compared to wild-type SARS-CoV. The results define a novel genetic and bioinformatics model for introduction and identification of multi-allelic mutations in replication competent viruses that will be powerful tools for testing the effects of decreased fidelity and increased quasispecies diversity on viral replication, pathogenesis, and

  6. Full-length genomic sequence of hepatitis B virus genotype C2 isolated from a native Brazilian patient

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    Mónica Viviana Alvarado-Mora

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The hepatitis B virus (HBV is among the leading causes of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. In Brazil, genotype A is the most frequent, followed by genotypes D and F. Genotypes B and C are found in Brazil exclusively among Asian patients and their descendants. The aim of this study was to sequence the entire HBV genome of a Caucasian patient infected with HBV/C2 and to infer the origin of the virus based on sequencing analysis. The sequence of this Brazilian isolate was grouped with four other sequences described in China. The sequence of this patient is the first complete genome of HBV/C2 reported in Brazil.

  7. Genomic sequencing and comparative analysis of Epstein-Barr virus genome isolated from primary nasopharyngeal carcinoma biopsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin Kwok

    Full Text Available Whether certain Epstein-Barr virus (EBV strains are associated with pathogenesis of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC is still an unresolved question. In the present study, EBV genome contained in a primary NPC tumor biopsy was amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR, and sequenced using next-generation (Illumina and conventional dideoxy-DNA sequencing. The EBV genome, designated HKNPC1 (Genbank accession number JQ009376 is a type 1 EBV of approximately 171.5 kb. The virus appears to be a uniform strain in line with accepted monoclonal nature of EBV in NPC but is heterogeneous at 172 nucleotide positions. Phylogenetic analysis with the four published EBV strains, B95-8, AG876, GD1, and GD2, indicated HKNPC1 was more closely related to the Chinese NPC patient-derived strains, GD1 and GD2. HKNPC1 contains 1,589 single nucleotide variations (SNVs and 132 insertions or deletions (indels in comparison to the reference EBV sequence (accession number NC007605. When compared to AG876, a strain derived from Ghanaian Burkitt's lymphoma, we found 322 SNVs, of which 76 were non-synonymous SNVs and were shared amongst the Chinese GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 isolates. We observed 88 non-synonymous SNVs shared only by HKNPC1 and GD2, the only other NPC tumor-derived strain reported thus far. Non-synonymous SNVs were mainly found in the latent, tegument and glycoprotein genes. The same point mutations were found in glycoprotein (BLLF1 and BALF4 genes of GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 strains and might affect cell type specific binding. Variations in LMP1 and EBNA3B epitopes and mutations in Cp (11404 C>T and Qp (50134 G>C found in GD1, GD2 and HKNPC1 could potentially affect CD8(+ T cell recognition and latent gene expression pattern in NPC, respectively. In conclusion, we showed that whole genome sequencing of EBV in NPC may facilitate discovery of previously unknown variations of pathogenic significance.

  8. Whole genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of human respiratory syncytial virus A and B from Milwaukee, WI 1998-2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Rebuffo-Scheer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV is the leading cause of lower respiratory-tract infections in infants and young children worldwide. Despite this, only six complete genome sequences of original strains have been previously published, the most recent of which dates back 35 and 26 years for RSV group A and group B respectively. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present a semi-automated sequencing method allowing for the sequencing of four RSV whole genomes simultaneously. We were able to sequence the complete coding sequences of 13 RSV A and 4 RSV B strains from Milwaukee collected from 1998-2010. Another 12 RSV A and 5 RSV B strains sequenced in this study cover the majority of the genome. All RSV A and RSV B sequences were analyzed by neighbor-joining, maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogeny methods. Genetic diversity was high among RSV A viruses in Milwaukee including the circulation of multiple genotypes (GA1, GA2, GA5, GA7 with GA2 persisting throughout the 13 years of the study. However, RSV B genomes showed little variation with all belonging to the BA genotype. For RSV A, the same evolutionary patterns and clades were seen consistently across the whole genome including all intergenic, coding, and non-coding regions sequences. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The sequencing strategy presented in this work allows for RSV A and B genomes to be sequenced simultaneously in two working days and with a low cost. We have significantly increased the amount of genomic data that is available for both RSV A and B, providing the basic molecular characteristics of RSV strains circulating in Milwaukee over the last 13 years. This information can be used for comparative analysis with strains circulating in other communities around the world which should also help with the development of new strategies for control of RSV, specifically vaccine development and improvement of RSV diagnostics.

  9. The feasibility of using high resolution genome sequencing of influenza A viruses to detect mixed infections and quasispecies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muthannan A Ramakrishnan

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding availability of de novo sequencing technologies can greatly facilitate efforts to monitor the relatively high mutation rates of influenza A viruses and the detection of quasispecies. Both the mutation rates and the lineages of influenza A viruses are likely to play an important role in the natural history of these viruses and the emergence of phenotypically and antigenically distinct strains.We evaluated quasispecies and mixed infections by de novo sequencing the whole genomes of 10 virus isolates, including eight avian influenza viruses grown in embryonated chicken eggs (six waterfowl isolates - five H3N2 and one H4N6; an H7N3 turkey isolate; and a bald eagle isolate with H1N1/H2N1 mixed infection, and two tissue cultured H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Two waterfowl cloacal swabs were included in the analysis. Full-length sequences of all segments were obtained with 20 to 787-X coverage for the ten viruses and one cloacal swab. The second cloacal swab yielded 15 influenza reads of approximately 230 bases, sufficient for bioinformatic inference of mixed infections or quasispecies. Genomic subpopulations or quasispecies of viruses were identified in four egg grown avian influenza isolates and one cell cultured swine virus. A bald eagle isolate and the second cloacal swab showed evidence of mixed infections with two (H1 and H2 and three (H1, H3, and H4 HA subtypes, respectively. Multiple sequence differences were identified between cloacal swab and the virus recovered using embryonated chicken eggs.We describe a new approach to comprehensively identify mixed infections and quasispecies in low passage influenza A isolates and cloacal swabs and add to the understanding of the ecology of influenza A virus populations.

  10. Full-Genome Sequencing as a Basis for Molecular Epidemiology Studies of Bluetongue Virus in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maan, Sushila; Maan, Narender S.; Belaganahalli, Manjunatha N.; Rao, Pavuluri Panduranga; Singh, Karam Pal; Hemadri, Divakar; Putty, Kalyani; Kumar, Aman; Batra, Kanisht; Krishnajyothi, Yadlapati; Chandel, Bharat S.; Reddy, G. Hanmanth; Nomikou, Kyriaki; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Attoui, Houssam; Hegde, Nagendra R.; Mertens, Peter P. C.

    2015-01-01

    Since 1998 there have been significant changes in the global distribution of bluetongue virus (BTV). Ten previously exotic BTV serotypes have been detected in Europe, causing severe disease outbreaks in naïve ruminant populations. Previously exotic BTV serotypes were also identified in the USA, Israel, Australia and India. BTV is transmitted by biting midges (Culicoides spp.) and changes in the distribution of vector species, climate change, increased international travel and trade are thought to have contributed to these events. Thirteen BTV serotypes have been isolated in India since first reports of the disease in the country during 1964. Efficient methods for preparation of viral dsRNA and cDNA synthesis, have facilitated full-genome sequencing of BTV strains from the region. These studies introduce a new approach for BTV characterization, based on full-genome sequencing and phylogenetic analyses, facilitating the identification of BTV serotype, topotype and reassortant strains. Phylogenetic analyses show that most of the equivalent genome-segments of Indian BTV strains are closely related, clustering within a major eastern BTV ‘topotype’. However, genome-segment 5 (Seg-5) encoding NS1, from multiple post 1982 Indian isolates, originated from a western BTV topotype. All ten genome-segments of BTV-2 isolates (IND2003/01, IND2003/02 and IND2003/03) are closely related (>99% identity) to a South African BTV-2 vaccine-strain (western topotype). Similarly BTV-10 isolates (IND2003/06; IND2005/04) show >99% identity in all genome segments, to the prototype BTV-10 (CA-8) strain from the USA. These data suggest repeated introductions of western BTV field and/or vaccine-strains into India, potentially linked to animal or vector-insect movements, or unauthorised use of ‘live’ South African or American BTV-vaccines in the country. The data presented will help improve nucleic acid based diagnostics for Indian serotypes/topotypes, as part of control strategies. PMID

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Mulberry Vein Banding Associated Virus, a New Tospovirus Infecting Mulberry: e0136196

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiaorong Meng; Pingping Liu; Liling Zhu; Chengwu Zou; Jieqiu Li; Baoshan Chen

    2015-01-01

    ... of the genus Tospovirus based on the homology of N gene sequence to those of tospoviruses. In this study, the complete sequence of the tripartite RNA genome of MVBaV was determined and analyzed...

  12. Complete genome sequence of the first isolate of genotype C bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Misako; Ohkura, Takashi; Shimizu, Madoka; Akiyama, Masanori; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2014-11-26

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) isolates are classified into three genotypes (BPIV3a to -c). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the BPIV3c isolate for the first time in Japan. Our results indicate that new primer sets will be required to detect all genotypes of BPIV3 strains. Copyright © 2014 Konishi et al.

  13. Complete Genome Sequences of Bovine Parainfluenza Virus Type 3 Strain BN-1 and Vaccine Strain BN-CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkura, Takashi; Kokuho, Takehiro; Konishi, Misako; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2013-01-01

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is associated with upper respiratory disease in cattle in many countries. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of the BPIV3 BN-1 strain, isolated from cattle in Japan, and the BN-CE vaccine strain, derived from the BN-1 strain by passages in chicken embryo fibroblasts.

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype E, the First Molecular Characterization from an Imported Case in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar-Escamilla, Noé; Fragoso-Fonseca, David Esaú; Arreguín-Porras, Dulce María; Esteban-Valencia, María Del Carmen; Corona-Valdespino, Estela; Falcón-Acosta, Jaime Israel; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Garcés-Ayala, Fabiola; Ortiz-Alcantara, Joanna María; López-Martinez, Irma; Diaz-Quiñonez, José Alberto; Ramírez-González, José Ernesto

    2016-03-31

    Hepatitis B virus infection is currently a global public health problem. Here, we present the first characterization and complete genome sequence of a strain belonging to genotype E in Mexico, obtained from a foreign carrier with chronic infection. Copyright © 2016 Escobar-Escamilla et al.

  15. Complete genome sequence of phocine distemper virus isolated from a harbor seal (Phoca vitulina) during the 1988 North Sea epidemic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. de Vries (René); R.J. Verbugh (Joyce); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.L. de Swart (Rik)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractPhocine distemper virus (PDV) was identified as the cause of a large morbillivirus outbreak among harbor seals in the North Sea in 1988. PDV is a member of the family Paramyxoviridae, genus Morbillivirus. Until now, no full-genome sequence of PDV has been available.

  16. Complete genome sequence of longan witches' broom-associated virus, a novel member of the family Potyviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Jang-Kyun; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2017-05-13

    The complete genome sequence of a new virus isolated from a longan (Dimocarpus longan Lour.) plant showing witches' broom syndrome was determined. The viral genome is composed of a monopartite single-stranded RNA of 9,428 nucleotides excluding the 3' poly(A) tail and contains one large single open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3086 amino acids. BLAST searches of protein databases showed that the encoded polyprotein has a maximum amino acid sequence identity of 35% (with 85% coverage) to that of the isolate Minnesota of rose yellow mosaic virus (RoYMV; family Potyviridae; genus not assigned). Molecular and phylogenetic analysis of the genome and encoded protein sequences showed that the identified virus has the general features that are characteristic of members of the family Potyviridae although it has extremely low sequence similarity to known members of the family Potyviridae. The name longan witches' broom-associated virus (LWBaV) is proposed for this new virus, which may be considered a member of a new genus in the family Potyviridae.

  17. Whole Genome Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you want to learn. Search form Search Whole Genome Sequencing You are here Home Testing & Services Testing ... the full story, click here . What is whole genome sequencing? Whole genome sequencing is the mapping out ...

  18. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a

  19. Single-Genome Sequencing of Hepatitis C Virus in Donor-Recipient Pairs Distinguishes Modes and Models of Virus Transmission and Early Diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Stoddard, Mark B; Wang, Shuyi; Giorgi, Elena E; Blair, Lily M; Learn, Gerald H; Hahn, Beatrice H; Alter, Harvey J; Busch, Michael P; Fierer, Daniel S; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Perelson, Alan S; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Shaw, George M

    2015-10-14

    Despite the recent development of highly effective anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and development of an effective vaccine. A precise molecular identification of transmitted/founder (T/F) HCV genomes that lead to productive clinical infection could play a critical role in vaccine research, as it has for HIV-1. However, the replication schema of these two RNA viruses differ substantially, as do viral responses to innate and adaptive host defenses. These differences raise questions as to the certainty of T/F HCV genome inferences, particularly in cases where multiple closely related sequence lineages have been observed. To clarify these issues and distinguish between competing models of early HCV diversification, we examined seven cases of acute HCV infection in humans and chimpanzees, including three examples of virus transmission between linked donors and recipients. Using single-genome sequencing (SGS) of plasma vRNA, we found that inferred T/F sequences in recipients were identical to viral sequences in their respective donors. Early in infection, HCV genomes generally evolved according to a simple model of random evolution where the coalescent corresponded to the T/F sequence. Closely related sequence lineages could be explained by high multiplicity infection from a donor whose viral sequences had undergone a pretransmission bottleneck due to treatment, immune selection, or recent infection. These findings validate SGS, together with mathematical modeling and phylogenetic analysis, as a novel strategy to infer T/F HCV genome sequences. Despite the recent development of highly effective, interferon-sparing anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) drugs, the global burden of this pathogen remains immense. Control or eradication of HCV will likely require the broad application of antiviral drugs and the development of an effective

  20. History and genomic sequence analysis of the herpes simplex virus 1 KOS and KOS1.1 sub-strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colgrove, Robert C; Liu, Xueqiao; Griffiths, Anthony; Raja, Priya; Deluca, Neal A; Newman, Ruchi M; Coen, Donald M; Knipe, David M

    2016-01-01

    A collection of genomic DNA sequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) strains has been defined and analyzed, and some information is available about genomic stability upon limited passage of viruses in culture. The nature of genomic change upon extensive laboratory passage remains to be determined. In this report we review the history of the HSV-1 KOS laboratory strain and the related KOS1.1 laboratory sub-strain, also called KOS (M), and determine the complete genomic sequence of an early passage stock of the KOS laboratory sub-strain and a laboratory stock of the KOS1.1 sub-strain. The genomes of the two sub-strains are highly similar with only five coding changes, 20 non-coding changes, and about twenty non-ORF sequence changes. The coding changes could potentially explain the KOS1.1 phenotypic properties of increased replication at high temperature and reduced neuroinvasiveness. The study also provides sequence markers to define the provenance of specific laboratory KOS virus stocks. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of Illumina de novo assembled and Sanger sequenced viral genomes: A case study for RNA viruses recovered from the plant pathogenic fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Mahmoud E; Varsani, Arvind; Ganley, Austen R D; Pearson, Michael N

    2016-07-02

    The advent of 'next generation sequencing' (NGS) technologies has led to the discovery of many novel mycoviruses, the majority of which are sufficiently different from previously sequenced viruses that there is no appropriate reference sequence on which to base the sequence assembly. Although many new genome sequences are generated by NGS, confirmation of the sequence by Sanger sequencing is still essential for formal classification by the International Committee for the Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), although this is currently under review. To empirically test the validity of de novo assembled mycovirus genomes from dsRNA extracts, we compared the results from Illumina sequencing with those from random cloning plus targeted PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing for viruses from five Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates. Through Sanger sequencing we detected nine viral genomes while through Illumina sequencing we detected the same nine viruses plus one additional virus from the same samples. Critically, the Illumina derived sequences share >99.3 % identity to those obtained by cloning and Sanger sequencing. Although, there is scope for errors in de novo assembled viral genomes, our results demonstrate that by maximising the proportion of viral sequence in the data and using sufficiently rigorous quality controls, it is possible to generate de novo genome sequences of comparable accuracy from Illumina sequencing to those obtained by Sanger sequencing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Complete genome sequence of a strain of Actinidia virus X detected in Ribes nigrum cv. Baldwin showing unusual symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delano; Phelan, James

    2016-02-01

    A Ribes-infecting strain of the potexvirus Actinidia virus X (AVX-RV3124) was isolated from black currant plants (Ribes nigrum cv. Baldwin, accession 3124-03D1) showing symptoms of leaf chlorosis and deformity. This is the first description of the complete genome sequence of an isolate of this virus and the first detection of a potexvirus in Ribes. The genome of AVX-RV3124 consists of 6,888 nucleotides (nt) excluding the poly(A) tail at the 3' terminus. When AVX-RV3124 was compared to the available sequence of the AVX isolate in GenBank (accession no. KC568202), two large indel events (72 nt and 33 nt) were identified in the replicase coding region of RV3124. Evidence of recombination was detected upstream of the 3' terminus of the replicase gene of both virus isolates, providing further evidence of a common origin.

  3. Isolation and full-genome sequence of two reticuloendotheliosis virus strains from mixed infections with Marek's disease virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ke-yan; Zhang, Yan-ping; Zheng, Hui-wen; Lv, Hong-chao; Gao, Yu-long; Wang, Jing-fei; Gao, Hong-lei; Qi, Xiao-le; Cui, Hong-yu; Wang, Yong-qiang; Ren, Xian-gang; Wang, Xiao-mei; Liu, Chang-jun

    2015-06-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), classified as a gammaretrovirus, has a variety of hosts, including chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, and wild birds. REV causes a series of pathological syndromes, especially the immunosuppression of the host, which may lead to an increased susceptibility to other pathogens, thus greatly damaging the poultry industry. Mixed infections of REV and Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been reported in many countries, including China. Previous reports revealed that MDV vaccines were not efficacious, and even less-virulent MDV strains would cause some losses due to mixed infections with REV. Additionally, contaminants in the MDV vaccine might be the main source of REV. In this study, two clinical samples were collected from two flocks of chickens that were diagnosed with MDV. Subsequently, two REV isolates were obtained from the clinical samples. The isolates, named CY1111 and SY1209, were further confirmed through an indirect immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy. Complete genome sequences of the two REV strains were determined to test the relationship between them and other REV strains. Phylogenetic trees showed that the two REV strains were closely related to most REV strains that were isolated from a variety of hosts. Therefore, REVs might spread freely among these hosts under natural conditions. Additionally, most REV strains in China were in the same clade. The present work offers some information regarding REV in China.

  4. Genome sequences of SAT 2 foot-and-mouth disease viruses from Egypt and Palestinian Autonomous Territories (Gaza Strip).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Knowles, Nick J; Hammond, Jef; King, Donald P

    2012-08-01

    Two foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) genome sequences have been determined for isolates collected from recent field outbreaks in North Africa (Egypt) and the Middle East (Palestinian Autonomous Territories). These data represent the first examples of complete genomic sequences for the FMDV SAT 2 topotype VII, which is thought to be endemic in countries immediately to the south of the Sahara desert. Further studies are now urgently required to provide insights into the epidemiological links between these outbreaks and to define the pathogenicity of this emerging lineage.

  5. Draft genome sequence of four coccolithoviruses: Emiliania huxleyi virus EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissimov, Jozef I; Worthy, Charlotte A; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A; Kimmance, Susan A; Henn, Matthew R; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J

    2012-03-01

    The Coccolithoviridae are a group of viruses which infect the marine coccolithophorid microalga Emiliania huxleyi. The Emiliania huxleyi viruses (known as EhVs) described herein have 160- to 180-nm diameter icosahedral structures, have genomes of approximately 400 kbp, and consist of more than 450 predicted coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we describe the genomic features of four newly sequenced coccolithoviruses (EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208) together with their draft genome sequences and their annotations, highlighting the homology and heterogeneity of these genomes to the EhV-86 model reference genome.

  6. Reconstruction of the Transmission History of RNA Virus Outbreaks Using Full Genome Sequences: Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Bulgaria in 2011

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valdazo-González, Begoña; Polihronova, Lilyana; Alexandrov, Tsviatko

    2012-01-01

    that describe the origin and transmission pathways of viruses during an epidemic. In the case of notifiable diseases, such as foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), these analyses provide important insights into the epidemiology of field outbreaks that can support disease control programmes. This study reconstructs...... the origin and transmission history of the FMD outbreaks which occurred during 2011 in Burgas Province, Bulgaria, a country that had been previously FMD-free-without-vaccination since 1996. Nineteen full genome sequences (FGS) of FMD virus (FMDV) were generated and analysed, including eight representative...... viruses from all of the virus-positive outbreaks of the disease in the country and 11 closely-related contemporary viruses from countries in the region where FMD is endemic (Turkey and Israel). All Bulgarian sequences shared a single putative common ancestor which was closely related to the index case...

  7. Genome sequence analysis with MonetDB: a case study on Ebola virus diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Cijvat (Robin); S. Manegold (Stefan); M.L. Kersten (Martin); G.W. Klau (Gunnar); A. Schönhuth (Alexander); T. Marschall (Tobias); Y. Zhang (Ying)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractNext-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has led the life sciences into the big data era. Today, sequencing genomes takes little time and cost, but results in terabytes of data to be stored and analysed. Biologists are often exposed to excessively time consuming and error-prone data

  8. Genome sequence analysis with MonetDB - A case study on Ebola virus diversity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cijvat, R.; Manegold, S.; Kersten, M.; Klau, G.W.; Schönhuth, A.; Marschall, T.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has led the life sciences into the big data era. Today, sequencing genomes takes little time and cost, but yields terabytes of data to be stored and analyzed. Biologists are often exposed to excessively time consuming and error-prone data management and

  9. Complete Genome Sequences of Four Foot-and-Mouth Disease Viruses of Serotype South African Territories 1 (SAT 1), Topotype X, Isolated from Cattle in Nigeria in 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Ularamu, Hussaini G; Ehizibolo, David O; Haegeman, Andy; Lefebvre, David; Lazarus, David D; Wungak, Yiltawe S; De Vleeschauwer, Annebel R; Van Borm, Steven; De Clercq, Kris

    2017-10-19

    The complete genome sequences of four foot-and-mouth disease viruses of South African territories 1 (SAT 1) serotype are reported. These viruses originate from an outbreak in Nigeria in 2015 and belong to the novel SAT 1 topotype X from the west and central African virus pool. Copyright © 2017 Vandenbussche et al.

  10. Single virus genomics: a new tool for virus discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Zeigler Allen

    Full Text Available Whole genome amplification and sequencing of single microbial cells has significantly influenced genomics and microbial ecology by facilitating direct recovery of reference genome data. However, viral genomics continues to suffer due to difficulties related to the isolation and characterization of uncultivated viruses. We report here on a new approach called 'Single Virus Genomics', which enabled the isolation and complete genome sequencing of the first single virus particle. A mixed assemblage comprised of two known viruses; E. coli bacteriophages lambda and T4, were sorted using flow cytometric methods and subsequently immobilized in an agarose matrix. Genome amplification was then achieved in situ via multiple displacement amplification (MDA. The complete lambda phage genome was recovered with an average depth of coverage of approximately 437X. The isolation and genome sequencing of uncultivated viruses using Single Virus Genomics approaches will enable researchers to address questions about viral diversity, evolution, adaptation and ecology that were previously unattainable.

  11. Discovery and complete genome sequence of a novel circovirus-like virus in the endangered rowi kiwi, Apteryx rowi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Daniel J; Hall, Richard J; Wang, Jing; Moore, Nicole E; Park, Duckchul; McInnes, Kate; Gartrell, Brett D; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2016-10-01

    Circoviruses are circular, non-enveloped, single-stranded DNA viruses around 2000 nucleotides (nt) in length and include the pathogenic species, Porcine circovirus 1 and Beak and feather disease virus, capable of causing significant morbidity and mortality. This group of viruses may be robust to degradation by external environments, and avian circoviruses are known to move between closely related hosts. Using a de novo metagenomic approach, followed by confirmatory PCR, we identify for the first time a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded (CRESS) DNA virus in New Zealand kiwi, Apteryx spp., derived from faecal matter of the rowi kiwi (A. rowi) showing signs of verminous dermatitis. The entire 2085 nt genome was cloned and sequenced and contains both capsid and replicase genes, as well as a conserved 9 nt motif. Phylogenetic analyses place it within Circoviridae, adjacent to other environmental CRESS-DNA viruses, and most closely related to badger circovirus-like virus (Meles meles circovirus-like virus). As the rowi is the most critically endangered kiwi, it is vital to understand the role of rowi kiwi circovirus-like virus as a possible pathogen and also any potential cross-species transmission.

  12. Analyses of the complete sequence of the genome of wheat Eqlid mosaic virus, a novel species in the genus Tritimovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar, M; Izadpanah, K; Masumi, M; Siampour, M; Zare, A; Afsharifar, A

    2008-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of wheat Eqlid mosaic virus (WEqMV) (excluding the poly A tail) comprised 9636 nucleotides including 5' and 3' noncoding regions of 137 and 172 nt, respectively. It contained a single ORF coding for a polyprotein of 3,109 amino acid residues and had a deduced genome organization typical of members of the family Potyviridae and with proteinase cleavage sites very similar to those of the members of the genus Tritimovirus. Pairwise and multiple alignments and phylogenetic analysis showed that WEqMV is a distinct species in the genus Tritimovirus. WEqMV and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) shared the greatest nucleotide sequence identity in the NIb and HC-Pro cistrons (63.2% and 60.8%, respectively) and the lowest sequence identity in the P1 and CP cistrons (51.2% and 51.1%, respectively). Sequence identity for the complete genome of WEqMV and WSMV was 56.8% at the nucleotide level and 50.7% at the amino acid level. WEqMV had 57.2% nucleotide identity and 50.6% amino acid identity with Oat necrotic mottle virus and 52.5% nucleotide identity and 45.5% amino acid identity with Brome streak mosaic virus. The relationship of WEqMV with other members of the family Potyviridae was more distant. Structural analysis of WEqMV protein showed presence of potential transmembrane helices in 6k1, 6k2, and P3 proteins.

  13. Complete genome sequences of two highly divergent Japanese isolates of Plantago asiatica mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komatsu, Ken; Yamashita, Kazuo; Sugawara, Kota; Verbeek, Martin; Fujita, Naoko; Hanada, Kaoru; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Fuji, Shin Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus and has an exceptionally wide host range. It causes severe damage to lilies. Here we report on the complete nucleotide sequences of two new Japanese PlAMV isolates, one from the eudicot weed Viola grypoceras (PlAMV-Vi), and

  14. Complete genomic sequence of an infectious pancreatic necrosis virus isolated from rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Feng; Zhao, Jing-Zhuang; Liu, Miao; Lu, Tong-Yan; Liu, Hong-Bai; Yin, Jiasheng; Xu, Li-Ming

    2017-04-01

    Infectious pancreatic necrosis (IPN) is a significant disease of farmed salmonids resulting in direct economic losses due to high mortality in China. However, no gene sequence of any Chinese infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) isolates was available. In the study, moribund rainbow trout fry samples were collected during an outbreak of IPN in Yunnan province of southwest China in 2013. An IPNV was isolated and tentatively named ChRtm213. We determined the full genome sequence of the IPNV ChRtm213 and compared it with previously identified IPNV sequences worldwide. The sequences of different structural and non-structural protein genes were compared to those of other aquatic birnaviruses sequenced to date. The results indicated that the complete genome sequence of ChRtm213 strain contains a segment A (3099 nucleotides) coding a polyprotein VP2-VP4-VP3, and a segment B (2789 nucleotides) coding a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase VP1. The phylogenetic analyses showed that ChRtm213 strain fell within genogroup 1, serotype A9 (Jasper), having similarities of 96.3% (segment A) and 97.3% (segment B) with the IPNV strain AM98 from Japan. The results suggest that the Chinese IPNV isolate has relative closer relationship with Japanese IPNV strains. The sequence of ChRtm213 was the first gene sequence of IPNV isolates in China. This study provided a robust reference for diagnosis and/or control of IPNV prevalent in China.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Four Coccolithoviruses: Emiliania huxleyi Virus EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208

    OpenAIRE

    Nissimov, Jozef I.; Worthy, Charlotte A.; Rooks, Paul; Napier, Johnathan A.; Kimmance, Susan A.; Henn, Matthew R.; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Allen, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The Coccolithoviridae are a group of viruses which infect the marine coccolithophorid microalga Emiliania huxleyi. The Emiliania huxleyi viruses (known as EhVs) described herein have 160- to 180-nm diameter icosahedral structures, have genomes of approximately 400 kbp, and consist of more than 450 predicted coding sequences (CDSs). Here, we describe the genomic features of four newly sequenced coccolithoviruses (EhV-88, EhV-201, EhV-207, and EhV-208) together with their draft genome sequences...

  16. Full-length genomic sequence of subgenotype IIIA hepatitis A virus isolate in Republic of Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ah-Ra; Lee, Sung-Geun; Kang, Lae-Hyung; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is known to cause acute hepatitis and has significant implications for public health throughout the world. In the Republic of Korea, the number of patients with hepatitis A virus infection has been increasing rapidly since 2006. In this study, the Kor-HAV-F strain was identified as subgenotype IIIA by RT-PCR, and its identity was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and alignment analysis. Moreover, detailed phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Kor-HAV-F strain clustered into subgenotype IIIA, including strains isolated in Japan, Norway, and India. The entire amino acid sequence of the VP1 and 2A regions was compared with that of the reference strains isolated in various countries. We found 2 amino acid changes (T168A and L96P, resp.) in the VP1 and 2A regions, which had not been found in any other hepatitis A virus strain. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the full-length sequence of a hepatitis A virus isolated in the Republic of Korea.

  17. The genome sequence of an isolate of Indian citrus ringspot virus infecting the sweet orange in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K, Prabha; Baranwal, V K

    2012-11-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of an isolate of Mandarivirus infecting the sweet orange [Citrus sinensis (L) Blanco] in the western part of India (Pune) was done. The single-stranded positive-sense RNA genome of Indian citrus ringspot virus (ICRSV) Pune has 7,560 nucleotides (nt), excluding a poly(A) tail, comprised of 27.98% (2,115 nt) A, 32.12% (2,428 nt) C, 19.68% (1,488 nt) G, and 20.22% (1,529 nt) T residues. The genome, organized into six open reading frames (ORFs), shares 97.7% sequence identity with the complete genome of the ICRSV K1 isolate (AF406744.1) infecting the kinnow (Citrus reticulate Blanco, a hybrid between King and Willow mandarins) in north India. The ICRSV Pune genome formed a complex secondary structure with a large number of unpaired cytosine-rich regions, and recombination analysis highlighted potential recombination in the ICRSV genome.

  18. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Piccirillo

    Full Text Available Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV. Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains.

  19. Full Genome Sequence-Based Comparative Study of Wild-Type and Vaccine Strains of Infectious Laryngotracheitis Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Alessandra; Lavezzo, Enrico; Niero, Giulia; Moreno, Ana; Massi, Paola; Franchin, Elisa; Toppo, Stefano; Salata, Cristiano; Palù, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an acute and highly contagious respiratory disease of chickens caused by an alphaherpesvirus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Recently, full genome sequences of wild-type and vaccine strains have been determined worldwide, but none was from Europe. The aim of this study was to determine and analyse the complete genome sequences of five ILTV strains. Sequences were also compared to reveal the similarity of strains across time and to discriminate between wild-type and vaccine strains. Genomes of three ILTV field isolates from outbreaks occurred in Italy in 1980, 2007 and 2011, and two commercial chicken embryo origin (CEO) vaccines were sequenced using the 454 Life Sciences technology. The comparison with the Serva genome showed that 35 open reading frames (ORFs) differed across the five genomes. Overall, 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 27 amino acid differences in 19 ORFs and two insertions in the UL52 and ORFC genes were identified. Similarity among the field strains and between the field and the vaccine strains ranged from 99.96% to 99.99%. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship among them, as well. This study generated data on genomic variation among Italian ILTV strains revealing that, even though the genetic variability of the genome is well conserved across time and between wild-type and vaccine strains, some mutations may help in differentiating among them and may be involved in ILTV virulence/attenuation. The results of this study can contribute to the understanding of the molecular bases of ILTV pathogenicity and provide genetic markers to differentiate between wild-type and vaccine strains.

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of a Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Strain from Vietnam, HUA-14PED96, with a Large Genomic Deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choe, Se-Eun; Park, Kee-Hwan; Lim, Seong-In; Le, Van Phan; Hien, Nguyen Ba; Thach, Pham Ngoc; Phuong, Le Huynh Thanh; An, Byung-Hyun; Han, Song Hee; Cho, In-Soo; An, Dong-Jun

    2016-02-18

    A highly virulent strain of Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) causing severe diarrhea has recently emerged in Vietnam. Genomic sequences from a novel strain, HUA-14PED96, isolated from a Vietnamese piglet with serious diarrhea show relatively high identity with U.S.-like PEDV strains, and have a 72-nt deletion in the open reading frame 1a (ORF1a) gene. Copyright © 2016 Choe et al.

  1. Complete genome sequences of two new virus isolates associated with cotton blue disease resistance breaking in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Anna Karoline Fausto; Romanel, Elisson; Silva, Tatiane da F; Castilhos, Yamá; Schrago, Carlos G; Galbieri, Rafael; Bélot, Jean-Louis; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2015-05-01

    Since 2006, Brazilian cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) crops planted with cultivars that are resistant to cotton blue disease have developed a new disease termed "atypical" cotton blue disease or atypical vein mosaic disease. Here, we describe the complete genomes of two virus isolates associated with this disease. The new virus isolates, called CLRDV-Acr3 and CLRDV-IMA2, were found to have a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity to previously described isolates of cotton leafroll dwarf virus, the causal agent of cotton blue disease. However, their P0 proteins were 86.1 % identical. These results show that this new disease is caused by a new CLRDV genotype that seems to have acquired the ability to overcome cotton blue disease resistance.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of Sacbrood Virus Strain SBM2, Isolated from the Honeybee Apis cerana in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Nga Thi Bich; Le, Thanh Hoa

    2013-01-01

    Here we report the complete genomic sequence of the SBM2 strain (VSBV-SBM2) of the sacbrood virus (SBV) that was isolated from the Asian honeybee (Apis cerana) in Northern Vietnam. The entire sequence excluding the 3' poly(A) tail is 8,834 nucleotides in length and contains a single large open reading frame (ORF) of 8,580 nucleotides (position 178 to 8757), encoding 2,859 amino acids. VSBV-SBM2 shared 90 to 93% nucleotide identity and 95 to 96% amino acid homology to six complete genomes of SBV currently available in GenBank (two from China, three from Korea, and one from the United Kingdom). A hypervariable domain (amino acid [aa] position 712 to 729) and a conserved motif (position 2124 to 2143) in the precursor polypeptide of all seven SBVs are also described.

  3. PhyloMap: an algorithm for visualizing relationships of large sequence data sets and its application to the influenza A virus genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martinetz Thomas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Results of phylogenetic analysis are often visualized as phylogenetic trees. Such a tree can typically only include up to a few hundred sequences. When more than a few thousand sequences are to be included, analyzing the phylogenetic relationships among them becomes a challenging task. The recent frequent outbreaks of influenza A viruses have resulted in the rapid accumulation of corresponding genome sequences. Currently, there are more than 7500 influenza A virus genomes in the database. There are no efficient ways of representing this huge data set as a whole, thus preventing a further understanding of the diversity of the influenza A virus genome. Results Here we present a new algorithm, "PhyloMap", which combines ordination, vector quantization, and phylogenetic tree construction to give an elegant representation of a large sequence data set. The use of PhyloMap on influenza A virus genome sequences reveals the phylogenetic relationships of the internal genes that cannot be seen when only a subset of sequences are analyzed. Conclusions The application of PhyloMap to influenza A virus genome data shows that it is a robust algorithm for analyzing large sequence data sets. It utilizes the entire data set, minimizes bias, and provides intuitive visualization. PhyloMap is implemented in JAVA, and the source code is freely available at http://www.biochem.uni-luebeck.de/public/software/phylomap.html

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of hepatitis B virus genotype F complete genome sequences from Chilean patients with chronic infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venegas, Mauricio; Alvarado-Mora, Mónica V; Villanueva, Rodrigo A; Rebello Pinho, João R; Carrilho, Flair J; Locarnini, Stephen; Yuen, Lilly; Brahm, Javier

    2011-09-01

    Molecular epidemiological data concerning the hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Chile are not known completely. Since the HBV genotype F is the most prevalent in the country, the goal of this study was to obtain full HBV genome sequences from patients infected chronically in order to determine their subgenotypes and the occurrence of resistance-associated mutations. Twenty-one serum samples from antiviral drug-naive patients with chronic hepatitis B were subjected to full-length PCR amplification, and both strands of the whole genomes were fully sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses were performed along with reference sequences available from GenBank (n = 290). The sequences were aligned using Clustal X and edited in the SE-AL software. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses were conducted by Markov Chain Monte Carlo simulations (MCMC) for 10 million generations in order to obtain the substitution tree using BEAST. The sequences were also analyzed for the presence of primary drug resistance mutations using CodonCode Aligner Software. The phylogenetic analyses indicated that all sequences were found to be the HBV subgenotype F1b, clustered into four different groups, suggesting that diverse lineages of this subgenotype may be circulating within this population of Chilean patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. Deciphering human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission and early envelope diversification by single-genome amplification and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Bailes, Elizabeth; Pham, Kimmy T; Salazar, Maria G; Guffey, M Brad; Keele, Brandon F; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Allen, Susan; Manigart, Olivier; Mulenga, Joseph; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Swanstrom, Ronald; Haynes, Barton F; Athreya, Gayathri S; Korber, Bette T M; Sharp, Paul M; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2008-04-01

    Accurate identification of the transmitted virus and sequences evolving from it could be instrumental in elucidating the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and in developing vaccines, drugs, or microbicides to prevent infection. Here we describe an experimental approach to analyze HIV-1 env genes as intact genetic units amplified from plasma virion RNA by single-genome amplification (SGA), followed by direct sequencing of uncloned DNA amplicons. We show that this strategy precludes in vitro artifacts caused by Taq-induced nucleotide substitutions and template switching, provides an accurate representation of the env quasispecies in vivo, and has an overall error rate (including nucleotide misincorporation, insertion, and deletion) of less than 8 x 10(-5). Applying this method to the analysis of virus in plasma from 12 Zambian subjects from whom samples were obtained within 3 months of seroconversion, we show that transmitted or early founder viruses can be identified and that molecular pathways and rates of early env diversification can be defined. Specifically, we show that 8 of the 12 subjects were each infected by a single virus, while 4 others acquired more than one virus; that the rate of virus evolution in one subject during an 80-day period spanning seroconversion was 1.7 x 10(-5) substitutions per site per day; and that evidence of strong immunologic selection can be seen in Env and overlapping Rev sequences based on nonrandom accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations. We also compared the results of the SGA approach with those of more-conventional bulk PCR amplification methods performed on the same patient samples and found that the latter is associated with excessive rates of Taq-induced recombination, nucleotide misincorporation, template resampling, and cloning bias. These findings indicate that HIV-1 env genes, other viral genes, and even full-length viral genomes responsible for productive clinical infection can be identified

  6. Nucleotide sequence analyses of genomic RNAs of peanut stunt virus Mi, the type strain representative of a novel PSV subgroup from China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yan, L.; Xu, Z.; Goldbach, R.W.; Chen, Y.K.; Prins, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Peanut stunt virus strain Mi (PSV-Mi) from China was determined and compared to other viruses of the genus Cucumovirus. The tripartite genome of PSV-Mi encoded five open reading frames (ORFs) typical of cucumoviruses. Distance analyses of four ORFs indicated that

  7. Complete genome sequence of frog virus 3, isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from nicaragua into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saucedo, Bernardo; Hughes, Joseph; Beurden, van Steven J.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal; Gröne, Andrea; Kika, Marja J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Frog virus 3 was isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from Nicaragua via Germany to the Netherlands, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Frog virus 3 isolate Op/2015/Netherlands/UU3150324001 is 107,183 bp long and has a nucleotide similarity of 98.26% to the

  8. Genome sequences of seven foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates collected from serial samples from one persistently infected carrier cow in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several FMDV carrier cattle were identified in Vietnam by recovery of infectious virus from oropharyngeal fluid. This report contains the first near-complete genome sequences of seven viruses isolated from a single carrier animal over the course of one year. Understanding within-host viral evolution...

  9. Comparison of complete genome sequences of dog rabies viruses isolated from China and Mexico reveals key amino acid changes that may be associated with virus replication and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fulai; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhong, Xiangfu; Han, Na; Song, Yunfeng; Zhao, Ling; Cui, Min; Rayner, Simon; Fu, Zhen F

    2014-07-01

    Rabies is a global problem, but its impact and prevalence vary across different regions. In some areas, such as parts of Africa and Asia, the virus is prevalent in the domestic dog population, leading to epidemic waves and large numbers of human fatalities. In other regions, such as the Americas, the virus predominates in wildlife and bat populations, with sporadic spillover into domestic animals. In this work, we attempted to investigate whether these distinct environments led to selective pressures that result in measurable changes within the genome at the amino acid level. To this end, we collected and sequenced the full genome of two isolates from divergent environments. The first isolate (DRV-AH08) was from China, where the virus is present in the dog population and the country is experiencing a serious epidemic. The second isolate (DRV-Mexico) was taken from Mexico, where the virus is present in both wildlife and domestic dog populations, but at low levels as a consequence of an effective vaccination program. We then combined and compared these with other full genome sequences to identify distinct amino acid changes that might be associated with environment. Phylogenetic analysis identified strain DRV-AH08 as belonging to the China-I lineage, which has emerged to become the dominant lineage in the current epidemic. The Mexico strain was placed in the D11 Mexico lineage, associated with the West USA-Mexico border clade. Amino acid sequence analysis identified only 17 amino acid differences in the N, G and L proteins. These differences may be associated with virus replication and virulence-for example, the short incubation period observed in the current epidemic in China.

  10. Genomic library screening for viruses from the human dental plaque revealed pathogen-specific lytic phage sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Jarbou, Ahmed Nasser

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenesis presents an astounding arsenal of virulence factors that allow them to conquer many different niches throughout the course of infection. Principally fascinating is the fact that some bacterial species are able to induce different diseases by expression of different combinations of virulence factors. Nevertheless, studies aiming at screening for the presence of bacteriophages in humans have been limited. Such screening procedures would eventually lead to identification of phage-encoded properties that impart increased bacterial fitness and/or virulence in a particular niche, and hence, would potentially be used to reverse the course of bacterial infections. As the human oral cavity represents a rich and dynamic ecosystem for several upper respiratory tract pathogens. However, little is known about virus diversity in human dental plaque which is an important reservoir. We applied the culture-independent approach to characterize virus diversity in human dental plaque making a library from a virus DNA fraction amplified using a multiple displacement method and sequenced 80 clones. The resulting sequence showed 44% significant identities to GenBank databases by TBLASTX analysis. TBLAST homology comparisons showed that 66% was viral; 18% eukarya; 10% bacterial; 6% mobile elements. These sequences were sorted into 6 contigs and 45 single sequences in which 4 contigs and a single sequence showed significant identity to a small region of a putative prophage in the Corynebacterium diphtheria genome. These findings interestingly highlight the uniqueness of over half of the sequences, whilst the dominance of a pathogen-specific prophage sequences imply their role in virulence.

  11. Genome Sequence of a Novel H14N7 Subtype Influenza A Virus Isolated from a Blue-Winged Teal (Anas discors) Harvested in Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andrew M; Reeves, Andrew B; Poulson, Rebecca L; Carter, Deborah L; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E

    2016-06-09

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir. Copyright © 2016 Ramey et al.

  12. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Reassortant H3N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Yao, Yanfeng; Wang, Huadong; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-05-16

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/2036/2007(H3N6) (DGW-T2036), was isolated from healthy domestic green-winged teals (Anas crecca) in Hunan Province, South China. All eight gene segments of the isolate were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated that this H3N6 virus is a novel reassortant avian influenza virus with a gene constellation originating from multiple ancestors.

  13. Isolation and full-genome sequences of Japanese encephalitis virus genotype I strains from Cambodian human patients, mosquitoes and pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Veasna; Choeung, Rithy; Gorman, Christopher; Laurent, Denis; Crabol, Yoann; Mey, Channa; Peng, Borin; Di Francesco, Juliette; Hul, Vibol; Sothy, Heng; Santy, Ky; Richner, Beat; Pommier, Jean-David; Sorn, San; Chevalier, Véronique; Buchy, Philippe; de Lamballerie, Xavier; Cappelle, Julien; Horwood, Paul Francis; Dussart, Philippe

    2017-09-01

    Japanese encephalitis remains the most important cause of viral encephalitis in humans in several southeast Asian countries, including Cambodia, causing at least 65 000 cases of encephalitis per year. This vector-borne viral zoonosis - caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) - is considered to be a rural disease and is transmitted by mosquitoes, with birds and pigs being the natural reservoirs, while humans are accidental hosts. In this study we report the first two JEV isolations in Cambodia from human encephalitis cases from two studies on the aetiology of central nervous system disease, conducted at the two major paediatric hospitals in the country. We also report JEV isolation from Culextritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes and from pig samples collected in two farms, located in peri-urban and rural areas. Out of 11 reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-positive original samples, we generated full-genome sequences from 5 JEV isolates. Five additional partial sequences of the JEV NS3 gene from viruses detected in five pigs and one complete coding sequence of the envelope gene of a strain identified in a pig were generated. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that JEV detected in Cambodia belonged to genotype I and clustered in two clades: genotype I-a, mainly comprising strains from Thailand, and genotype I-b, comprising strains from Vietnam that dispersed northwards to China. Finally, in this study, we provide proof that the sequenced JEV strains circulate between pigs, Culex tritaeniorhynchus and humans in the Phnom Penh vicinity.

  14. Nucleotide sequence analyses of genomic RNAs of peanut stunt virus Mi, the type strain representative of a novel PSV subgroup from China

    OpenAIRE

    L. Yan; Xu, Z.; Goldbach, R.W.; Chen, Y. K.; Prins, M.W.

    2005-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Peanut stunt virus strain Mi (PSV-Mi) from China was determined and compared to other viruses of the genus Cucumovirus. The tripartite genome of PSV-Mi encoded five open reading frames (ORFs) typical of cucumoviruses. Distance analyses of four ORFs indicated that PSV-Mi differed sufficiently in nucleotide sequence from other PSV strains of subgroups I and II to warrant establishment of a third subgroup of PSV

  15. Nucleotide sequence analyses of genomic RNAs of Peanut stunt virus Mi, the type strain representative of a novel PSV subgroup from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, L Y; Xu, Z Y; Goldbach, R; Kunrong, C; Prins, M

    2005-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Peanut stunt virus strain Mi (PSV-Mi) from China was determined and compared to other viruses of the genus Cucumovirus. The tripartite genome of PSV-Mi encoded five open reading frames (ORFs) typical of cucumoviruses. Distance analyses of four ORFs indicated that PSV-Mi differed sufficiently in nucleotide sequence from other PSV strains of subgroups I and II to warrant establishment of a third subgroup of PSV.

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of the Pokeweed Mosaic Virus (PkMV)-New Jersey Isolate and Its Comparison to PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA

    OpenAIRE

    Di, Rong

    2016-01-01

    Pokeweed mosaic virus (PkMV) causes systemically mosaic symptoms on pokeweed (Phytolacca americana L.) plants. The genome of the PkMV-NJ (New Jersey) isolate was cloned by PCR and sequenced by the Sanger sequencing method. The sequence comparison indicates that PkMV-NJ is more divergent from the other two sequenced isolates, PkMV-MD and PkMV-PA.

  17. Comparative analysis of the complete genome sequence of the California MSW strain of myxoma virus reveals potential host adaptations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Peter J; Rogers, Matthew B; Fitch, Adam; Depasse, Jay V; Cattadori, Isabella M; Hudson, Peter J; Tscharke, David C; Holmes, Edward C; Ghedin, Elodie

    2013-11-01

    Myxomatosis is a rapidly lethal disease of European rabbits that is caused by myxoma virus (MYXV). The introduction of a South American strain of MYXV into the European rabbit population of Australia is the classic case of host-pathogen coevolution following cross-species transmission. The most virulent strains of MYXV for European rabbits are the Californian viruses, found in the Pacific states of the United States and the Baja Peninsula, Mexico. The natural host of Californian MYXV is the brush rabbit, Sylvilagus bachmani. We determined the complete sequence of the MSW strain of Californian MYXV and performed a comparative analysis with other MYXV genomes. The MSW genome is larger than that of the South American Lausanne (type) strain of MYXV due to an expansion of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) of the genome, with duplication of the M156R, M154L, M153R, M152R, and M151R genes and part of the M150R gene from the right-hand (RH) end of the genome at the left-hand (LH) TIR. Despite the extreme virulence of MSW, no novel genes were identified; five genes were disrupted by multiple indels or mutations to the ATG start codon, including two genes, M008.1L/R and M152R, with major virulence functions in European rabbits, and a sixth gene, M000.5L/R, was absent. The loss of these gene functions suggests that S. bachmani is a relatively recent host for MYXV and that duplication of virulence genes in the TIRs, gene loss, or sequence variation in other genes can compensate for the loss of M008.1L/R and M152R in infections of European rabbits.

  18. Determination of the complete genome sequence of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) Ch20101008 and viral molecular evolution in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Peng; Zheng, Xiao-Cong; Shi, Xiu-Jie; Kan, Shi-Fu; Wang, Jin-Jin; He, Jun-Qiang; Zheng, Wei; Yu, Li; Lan, Wen-Sheng; Hua, Qun-Yi; Liu, Hong; Jin, Ning-Yi

    2014-10-01

    This study determined the complete genomic sequence of the infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) strain Ch20101008 isolated from farmed brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) that died from a disease caused by the virus in northeast China. The sequence was determined from 10 overlapping clones obtained through RT-PCR amplification. The whole genome length of Ch20101008 comprised 11,129 nucleotides (nt), and the overall organization was typical of that observed for all other IHNV strains. The phylogenetic analysis results of the 65 IHNV glycoprotein genes and 47 IHNV partial nucleoprotein genes presented five major genogroups (J, U, L, E and M). The J genogroup included the J Nagano and J Shizuoka subgroups. The IHNV Ch20101008 strain belonged to the J Nagano subgroup of the J genogroup and was significantly related to other Chinese IHNV strains. All Chinese IHNV isolates are monophyletic, with a recent common ancestor, except for the BjLL strain. The N, P, M, G, NV and L genes of Ch20101008 were compared with the available IHNV sequences in GenBank. The results indicated that 198 nt were substituted, 53 of which exhibited amino acid change in the Ch20101008 genome. An adenine nucleotide deletion was found at position 4959 of the 5' UTR of the L gene. In the G gene, specific nucleotides and amino acid variations of the Chinese IHNV strains were observed when compared with 23 isolates from other countries. Of the 15 nucleotide sites that changed, seven resulted in amino acid substitution. The data further demonstrated that the J genogroup IHNV was introduced to and evolved in salmon farm environments in China. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Full genome sequences and molecular characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated from human patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formanová, Petra; Černý, Jiří; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Valdés, James J; Kozlova, Irina; Dzhioev, Yuri; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), one of the most important human neuroinfections across Eurasia. Up to date, only three full genome sequences of human European TBEV isolates are available, mostly due to difficulties with isolation of the virus from human patients. Here we present full genome characterization of an additional five low-passage TBEV strains isolated from human patients with severe forms of TBE. These strains were isolated in 1953 within Central Bohemia in the former Czechoslovakia, and belong to the historically oldest human TBEV isolates in Europe. We demonstrate here that all analyzed isolates are distantly phylogenetically related, indicating that the emergence of TBE in Central Europe was not caused by one predominant strain, but rather a pool of distantly related TBEV strains. Nucleotide identity between individual sequenced TBEV strains ranged from 97.5% to 99.6% and all strains shared large deletions in the 3' non-coding region, which has been recently suggested to be an important determinant of virulence. The number of unique amino acid substitutions varied from 3 to 9 in individual isolates, but no characteristic amino acid substitution typical exclusively for all human TBEV isolates was identified when compared to the isolates from ticks. We did, however, correlate that the exploration of the TBEV envelope glycoprotein by specific antibodies were in close proximity to these unique amino acid substitutions. Taken together, we report here the largest number of patient-derived European TBEV full genome sequences to date and provide a platform for further studies on evolution of TBEV since the first emergence of human TBE in Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic and antigenic drift of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) in a closed population evaluated by full genome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Larsen, Lars Erik

    of circulating PRRS viruses in Danish pigs and to investigate the genetic drift of the virus in a closed population with very limited introductions of new animals. The study included phylogenetic analysis of full genome sequences of eight Type 1 and nine Type 2 PRRS viruses, including the very first Danish......Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) viruses are divided into two major genotypes (Type 1 and Type 2) based on their genetic diversity. Type 1 PRRSV is further divided into at least 3 subtypes, but until now only subtype 1 has been detected in Western Europe and North America. Both...... isolated Type 1 virus and the very first Danish Type 2 PRRS virus isolated from a non-vaccinated pig herd. Furthermore, by sequencing ORF5 and ORF7 of 43 Type 1 and 57 Type 2 viruses isolated between 2003 and 2013, the level of genetic diversity was assessed. The results showed a very high genetic...

  1. Complete genome sequence of sweet potato latent virus and its relationship to other potyviruses infecting sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome of sweet potato latent virus (SPLV) was determined to be 10,081 nucleotides long, excluding the 3’ poly (A) tail. The genome contains a single large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3,247 amino acids. Its genomic organization is typical of potyviruses and contains mot...

  2. Hepatitis E Virus in Cambodia: Prevalence among the General Population and Complete Genome Sequence of Genotype 4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroko; Takahashi, Kazuaki; Lim, Olline; Svay, Somana; Chuon, Channarena; Hok, Sirany; Do, Son Huy; Fujimoto, Mayumi; Akita, Tomoyuki; Goto, Noboru; Katayama, Keiko; Arai, Masahiro; Tanaka, Junko

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a growing public health problem in many countries. In this study, we investigated HEV seroprevalence among the general population in the Siem Reap province, Cambodia, and performed HEV genetic analysis with the aim to develop an HEV prevention strategy. This seroepidemiological cross-sectional study conducted from 2010 to 2014 included 868 participants from four different locations in Siem Reap province, Cambodia. They answered questionnaires and provided blood samples for the analysis of hepatitis virus infections. Among the participants (360 men and 508 women; age range, 7-90 years), the prevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 18.4% (95% confidence interval: 15.9-21.0); HEV RNA was detected in two participants (0.23%) and was classified as genotype 3 and 4. Full-length genome of the genotype 4 isolate, CVS-Sie10, was sequenced; it contained 7,222 nucleotides and three ORFs and demonstrated high sequence identity with the swine China isolates swGX40 (95.57%), SS19 (94.37%), and swDQ (91.94%). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that men, elderly people, and house workers were risk groups significantly associated with the positivity for anti-HEV IgG. This is the first report on the detection of HEV genotype 4 in humans in Cambodia and on the complete genome sequence of HEV genotype 4 from this country. Our study demonstrates that new HEV infection cases occur frequently among the general population in Cambodia, and effective preventive measures are required.

  3. The complete genome sequence of an El Amar isolate of plum pox virus (PPV) and its phylogenetic relationship to other PPV strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myrta, A; Varga, A; James, D

    2006-06-01

    The genomic sequence of an El Amar isolate of plum pox virus (PPV) from Egypt was determined by sequencing overlapping cDNA fragments. This is the first complete sequence of a member of the El Amar (EA) strain of PPV. The genome consists of 9791 nt, excluding a poly(A) tail at the 3' terminus. The complete nt sequence of PPV EA is 79-80%, 80%, 77%, and 77% homologous with isolates of strains D/M, Rec (BOR3), C, and W, respectively. The polyprotein identity ranged from 87-91%. Phylogenetic analysis using the complete genome sequence of PPV EA confirmed its strain status. No significant recombination signals were identified using PhylPro and SimPlot scans of the PPV EA sequence, however an interesting recombination signal was identified in the P1/HC-Pro region of PPV W3174.

  4. The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV and its implications for our understanding of evolution dynamics in the genus polerovirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aviv Dombrovsky

    Full Text Available We determined the complete sequence and organization of the genome of a putative member of the genus Polerovirus tentatively named Pepper yellow leaf curl virus (PYLCV. PYLCV has a wider host range than Tobacco vein-distorting virus (TVDV and has a close serological relationship with Cucurbit aphid-borne yellows virus (CABYV (both poleroviruses. The extracted viral RNA was subjected to SOLiD next-generation sequence analysis and used as a template for reverse transcription synthesis, which was followed by PCR amplification. The ssRNA genome of PYLCV includes 6,028 nucleotides encoding six open reading frames (ORFs, which is typical of the genus Polerovirus. Comparisons of the deduced amino acid sequences of the PYLCV ORFs 2-4 and ORF5, indicate that there are high levels of similarity between these sequences to ORFs 2-4 of TVDV (84-93% and to ORF5 of CABYV (87%. Both PYLCV and Pepper vein yellowing virus (PeVYV contain sequences that point to a common ancestral polerovirus. The recombination breakpoint which is located at CABYV ORF3, which encodes the viral coat protein (CP, may explain the CABYV-like sequences found in the genomes of the pepper infecting viruses PYLCV and PeVYV. Two additional regions unique to PYLCV (PY1 and PY2 were identified between nucleotides 4,962 and 5,061 (ORF 5 and between positions 5,866 and 6,028 in the 3' NCR. Sequence analysis of the pepper-infecting PeVYV revealed three unique regions (Pe1-Pe3 with no similarity to other members of the genus Polerovirus. Genomic analyses of PYLCV and PeVYV suggest that the speciation of these viruses occurred through putative recombination event(s between poleroviruses co-infecting a common host(s, resulting in the emergence of PYLCV, a novel pathogen with a wider host range.

  5. Analysis of the RdRp, intergenic and structural polyprotein regions, and the complete genome sequence of Kashmir bee virus from infected honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Yoo, Mi-Sun; Kim, Young-Ha; Kim, Nam-Hee; Jung, Ha-Na; Thao, Le Thi Bich; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Nguyen, Lien Thi Kim; Jung, Suk-Chan; Kang, Seung-Won

    2014-08-01

    Kashmir bee virus (KBV) is one of the most common viral infections in honeybees. In this study, a phylogenetic analysis was performed using nine partial nucleotide sequences of RdRp and the structural polyprotein regions of South Korean KBV genotypes, as well as nine previously reported KBV genotypes from various countries and two closely related genotypes of Israeli acute paralysis virus (IAPV) and Acute bee paralysis virus (ABPV). The Korean KBV genotypes were highly conserved with 94-99 % shared identity, but they also shared 88-95 % identity with genotypes from various countries, and they formed a separate KBV cluster in the phylogenetic tree. The complete genome sequence of Korean KBV was also determined and aligned with previously reported complete reference genome sequences of KBV, IAPV, and ABPV to compare different genomic regions. The complete Korean KBV genome shared 93, 79, and 71 % similarity with the complete reference genomes of KBV, IAPV, and ABPV, respectively. The Korean KBV was highly conserved relative to the reference KBV genomes in the intergenic and 3' untranslated region (UTR), but it had a highly variable 5' UTR, whereas there was little divergence in the helicase and 3C-protease of the nonstructural protein, and the external domains of the structural polyprotein region. Thus, genetic recombination and geographical distance may explain the genomic variations between the Korean and reference KBV genotypes.

  6. A novel approach to propagate flavivirus infectious cDNA clones in bacteria by introducing tandem repeat sequences upstream of virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Despite tremendous efforts to improve the methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, the manipulation of flavivirus cDNAs remains a difficult task in bacteria. Here, we successfully propagated DNA-launched type 2 dengue virus (DENV2) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infectious cDNAs by introducing seven repeats of the tetracycline-response element (7×TRE) and a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMVmin) promoter upstream of the viral genome. Insertion of the 7×TRE-CMVmin sequence upstream of the DENV2 or JEV genome decreased the cryptic E. coli promoter (ECP) activity of the viral genome in bacteria, as measured using fusion constructs containing DENV2 or JEV segments and the reporter gene Renilla luciferase in an empty vector. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from DNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs were similar to those of parental viruses. Similarly, RNA-launched DENV2 infectious cDNAs were generated by inserting 7×TRE-CMVmin, five repeats of the GAL4 upstream activating sequence, or five repeats of BamHI linkers upstream of the DENV2 genome. All three tandem repeat sequences decreased the ECP activity of the DENV2 genome in bacteria. Notably, 7×TRE-CMVmin stabilized RNA-launched JEV infectious cDNAs and reduced the ECP activity of the JEV genome in bacteria. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from RNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs displayed patterns similar to those of the parental viruses. These results support a novel methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, which will facilitate research in virology, viral pathogenesis and vaccine development of flaviviruses and other RNA viruses. © 2014 The Authors.

  7. Genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Andy M.; Reeves, Andrew; Poulson, Rebecca L.; Carter, Deborah L.; Davis-Fields, Nicholas; Stallknecht, David E.

    2016-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of a novel H14N7 subtype influenza A virus (IAV) isolated from a blue-winged teal (Anas discors) harvested in Texas, USA. The genomic characteristics of this IAV strain with a previously undetected subtype combination suggest recent viral evolution within the New World wild-bird IAV reservoir.                   

  8. Genome Sequence of Ex-Afghanistan Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus SCT Strain, from an Imported United Kingdom Case in October 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Chamberlain, John; Atkinson, Barry; Logue, Christopher H.; Latham, Jennie; Newman, Edmund N. C.; Hewson, Roger

    2013-01-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a serious human pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic disease with a fatality rate of up to approximately 30%. We have determined the viral genomic sequence from an isolate that caused a fatal case of imported CCHF in the United Kingdom in October 2012.

  9. Genome Sequence of Ex-Afghanistan Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus SCT Strain, from an Imported United Kingdom Case in October 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, John; Atkinson, Barry; Logue, Christopher H; Latham, Jennie; Newman, Edmund N C; Hewson, Roger

    2013-05-16

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a serious human pathogen causing severe hemorrhagic disease with a fatality rate of up to approximately 30%. We have determined the viral genomic sequence from an isolate that caused a fatal case of imported CCHF in the United Kingdom in October 2012.

  10. The genome of Shope fibroma virus, a tumorigenic poxvirus, contains a growth factor gene with sequence similarity to those encoding epidermal growth factor and transforming growth factor alpha.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, W; Upton, C.; Hu, S.L.; Purchio, A F; McFadden, G.

    1987-01-01

    Degenerate oligonucleotide probes corresponding to a highly conserved region common to epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor alpha, and vaccinia growth factor were used to identify a novel growth factor gene in the Shope fibroma virus genome. Sequence analysis indicates that the Shope fibroma growth factor is a distinct new member of this family of growth factors.

  11. A fast and robust method for full genome sequencing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Type 1 and Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    PRRSV is a positive-sense RNA virus with a high degree of genetic variability among isolates. For diagnostic sensitivity and vaccine design it is essential to monitor PRRSV genetic diversity. However, to date only a few full genome sequences of PRRSV isolates have been made publicly available. In...

  12. Whole genome sequence analysis of circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudreault, Natasha N; Jasperson, Dane C; Dubovi, Edward J; Johnson, Donna J; Ostlund, Eileen N; Wilson, William C

    2015-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented through serological surveys, and natural infection by the Culicoides vector has been suggested. The report of isolation of BTV serotype 11 (BTV-11) from 2 separate domestic canine abortion cases in the states of Texas in 2011 and Kansas in 2012, were apparently unrelated to BTV-contaminated vaccination or consumption of BTV-contaminated raw meat as had been previously speculated. To elucidate the origin and relationship of these 2 domestic canine BTV-11 isolates, whole genome sequencing was performed. Six additional BTV-11 field isolates from Texas, Florida, and Washington, submitted for diagnostic investigation during 2011 and 2013, were also fully sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis indicates that the BTV-11 domestic canine isolates are virtually identical, and both share high identity with 2 BTV-11 isolates identified from white-tailed deer in Texas in 2011. The results of the current study further support the hypothesis that a BTV-11 strain circulating in the Midwestern states could have been transmitted to the dogs by the infected Culicoides vector. Our study also expands the short list of available BTV-11 sequences, which may aid BTV surveillance and epidemiology. © 2015 The Author(s).

  13. Complete genome sequence of a new isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 from Solenopsis invicta x richteri hybrid ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren. We report here the full genome (10,383 nucleotides [nt]) of an isolate infecting Solenopsis invicta x richteri hybrids, which we have identified as SI...

  14. Comparison of the genome sequence of FP9, an attenuated, tissue culture-adapted European strain of Fowlpox virus, with those of virulent American and European viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laidlaw, Stephen M; Skinner, Michael A

    2004-02-01

    The 266 kbp genome sequence of plaque-purified, tissue culture-adapted, attenuated European Fowlpox virus FP9 has been determined and compared with the 288 kbp sequence of a pathogenic US strain (FPVUS). FP9 carries 244 of the 260 reported FPVUS ORFs (both viruses also have an unreported orthologue of conserved poxvirus gene A14.5L). Relative to FPVUS, FP9 differed by 118 mutations (26 deletions, 15 insertions and 77 base substitutions), affecting FP9 equivalents of 71 FPVUS ORFs. To help to identify mutations involved in adaptation and attenuation, the virulent parent of FP9, HP1, was sequenced at positions where FP9 differed from FPVUS. At 68 positions, FP9 and HP1 sequences were identical, reflecting differences between American and European lineages. Mutations at the remaining 50 positions in FP9 relative to FPVUS and HP1, involving 46 ORFs, therefore accounted for adaptation and attenuation. ORFs deleted during passage included those encoding members of multigene families: 12 ankyrin repeat proteins, three C-type lectin-like proteins, two C4L/C10L-like proteins, one G-protein coupled receptor protein, one V-type Ig domain protein, two N1R/p28 proteins and one EFc family protein. Tandem ORFs encoding Variola virus B22R orthologues were fused by a 5.8 kbp deletion. Single-copy genes disrupted or deleted during passage included those encoding a homologue of murine T10, a conserved DNA/pantothenate metabolism flavoprotein, photolyase, the A-type inclusion protein and an orthologue of vaccinia A47L. Gene assignments have been updated for DNase II/DLAD, binding proteins for IL-18 and interferon-gamma, phospholipid hydroperoxide glutathione peroxidase (PHGPX/GPX-4) and for a highly conserved homologue of ELOVL4.

  15. Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-08-15

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/3450/2006(H5N1) (DGW-T3450), was isolated from domestic green-winged teals. Genome analysis demonstrated that DGW-T3450 is a novel reassortant strain. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of this strain originated from H5N1 viruses circulating in poultry, while its remaining genes are derived from multiple ancestors, including viruses like those that infect wild birds.

  16. Complete genome sequence and integrated protein localization and interaction map for alfalfa dwarf virus, which combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bejerman, Nicolás, E-mail: n.bejerman@uq.edu.au [Instituto de Patología Vegetal (IPAVE), Centro de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (CIAP), Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria INTA, Camino a 60 Cuadras k 5,5, Córdoba X5020ICA (Argentina); Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Giolitti, Fabián; Breuil, Soledad de; Trucco, Verónica; Nome, Claudia; Lenardon, Sergio [Instituto de Patología Vegetal (IPAVE), Centro de Investigaciones Agropecuarias (CIAP), Instituto Nacional de Tecnología Agropecuaria INTA, Camino a 60 Cuadras k 5,5, Córdoba X5020ICA (Argentina); Dietzgen, Ralf G. [Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation, The University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2015-09-15

    Summary: We have determined the full-length 14,491-nucleotide genome sequence of a new plant rhabdovirus, alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV). Seven open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in the antigenomic orientation of the negative-sense, single-stranded viral RNA, in the order 3′-N-P-P3-M-G-P6-L-5′. The ORFs are separated by conserved intergenic regions and the genome coding region is flanked by complementary 3′ leader and 5′ trailer sequences. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleoprotein amino acid sequence indicated that this alfalfa-infecting rhabdovirus is related to viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus. When transiently expressed as GFP fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves, most ADV proteins accumulated in the cell periphery, but unexpectedly P protein was localized exclusively in the nucleus. ADV P protein was shown to have a homotypic, and heterotypic nuclear interactions with N, P3 and M proteins by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. ADV appears unique in that it combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses. - Highlights: • The complete genome of alfalfa dwarf virus is obtained. • An integrated localization and interaction map for ADV is determined. • ADV has a genome sequence similarity and evolutionary links with cytorhabdoviruses. • ADV protein localization and interaction data show an association with the nucleus. • ADV combines properties of both cytoplasmic and nuclear plant rhabdoviruses.

  17. Chimaeric virus-like particles derived from consensus genome sequences of human rotavirus strains co-circulating in Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khuzwayo C Jere

    Full Text Available Rotavirus virus-like particles (RV-VLPs are potential alternative non-live vaccine candidates due to their high immunogenicity. They mimic the natural conformation of native viral proteins but cannot replicate because they do not contain genomic material which makes them safe. To date, most RV-VLPs have been derived from cell culture adapted strains or common G1 and G3 rotaviruses that have been circulating in communities for some time. In this study, chimaeric RV-VLPs were generated from the consensus sequences of African rotaviruses (G2, G8, G9 or G12 strains associated with either P[4], P[6] or P[8] genotypes characterised directly from human stool samples without prior adaptation of the wild type strains to cell culture. Codon-optimised sequences for insect cell expression of genome segments 2 (VP2, 4 (VP4, 6 (VP6 and 9 (VP7 were cloned into a modified pFASTBAC vector, which allowed simultaneous expression of up to four genes using the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System (BEVS; Invitrogen. Several combinations of the genome segments originating from different field strains were cloned to produce double-layered RV-VLPs (dRV-VLP; VP2/6, triple-layered RV-VLPs (tRV-VLP; VP2/6/7 or VP2/6/7/4 and chimaeric tRV-VLPs. The RV-VLPs were produced by infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 and Trichoplusia ni cells with recombinant baculoviruses using multi-cistronic, dual co-infection and stepwise-infection expression strategies. The size and morphology of the RV-VLPs, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, revealed successful production of RV-VLPs. The novel approach of producing tRV-VLPs, by using the consensus insect cell codon-optimised nucleotide sequence derived from dsRNA extracted directly from clinical specimens, should speed-up vaccine research and development by by-passing the need to adapt rotaviruses to cell culture. Other problems associated with cell culture adaptation, such as possible changes in epitopes, can also be

  18. Chimaeric virus-like particles derived from consensus genome sequences of human rotavirus strains co-circulating in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jere, Khuzwayo C; O'Neill, Hester G; Potgieter, A Christiaan; van Dijk, Alberdina A

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) are potential alternative non-live vaccine candidates due to their high immunogenicity. They mimic the natural conformation of native viral proteins but cannot replicate because they do not contain genomic material which makes them safe. To date, most RV-VLPs have been derived from cell culture adapted strains or common G1 and G3 rotaviruses that have been circulating in communities for some time. In this study, chimaeric RV-VLPs were generated from the consensus sequences of African rotaviruses (G2, G8, G9 or G12 strains associated with either P[4], P[6] or P[8] genotypes) characterised directly from human stool samples without prior adaptation of the wild type strains to cell culture. Codon-optimised sequences for insect cell expression of genome segments 2 (VP2), 4 (VP4), 6 (VP6) and 9 (VP7) were cloned into a modified pFASTBAC vector, which allowed simultaneous expression of up to four genes using the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System (BEVS; Invitrogen). Several combinations of the genome segments originating from different field strains were cloned to produce double-layered RV-VLPs (dRV-VLP; VP2/6), triple-layered RV-VLPs (tRV-VLP; VP2/6/7 or VP2/6/7/4) and chimaeric tRV-VLPs. The RV-VLPs were produced by infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 and Trichoplusia ni cells with recombinant baculoviruses using multi-cistronic, dual co-infection and stepwise-infection expression strategies. The size and morphology of the RV-VLPs, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, revealed successful production of RV-VLPs. The novel approach of producing tRV-VLPs, by using the consensus insect cell codon-optimised nucleotide sequence derived from dsRNA extracted directly from clinical specimens, should speed-up vaccine research and development by by-passing the need to adapt rotaviruses to cell culture. Other problems associated with cell culture adaptation, such as possible changes in epitopes, can also be circumvented

  19. Chimaeric Virus-Like Particles Derived from Consensus Genome Sequences of Human Rotavirus Strains Co-Circulating in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jere, Khuzwayo C.; O'Neill, Hester G.; Potgieter, A. Christiaan; van Dijk, Alberdina A.

    2014-01-01

    Rotavirus virus-like particles (RV-VLPs) are potential alternative non-live vaccine candidates due to their high immunogenicity. They mimic the natural conformation of native viral proteins but cannot replicate because they do not contain genomic material which makes them safe. To date, most RV-VLPs have been derived from cell culture adapted strains or common G1 and G3 rotaviruses that have been circulating in communities for some time. In this study, chimaeric RV-VLPs were generated from the consensus sequences of African rotaviruses (G2, G8, G9 or G12 strains associated with either P[4], P[6] or P[8] genotypes) characterised directly from human stool samples without prior adaptation of the wild type strains to cell culture. Codon-optimised sequences for insect cell expression of genome segments 2 (VP2), 4 (VP4), 6 (VP6) and 9 (VP7) were cloned into a modified pFASTBAC vector, which allowed simultaneous expression of up to four genes using the Bac-to-Bac Baculovirus Expression System (BEVS; Invitrogen). Several combinations of the genome segments originating from different field strains were cloned to produce double-layered RV-VLPs (dRV-VLP; VP2/6), triple-layered RV-VLPs (tRV-VLP; VP2/6/7 or VP2/6/7/4) and chimaeric tRV-VLPs. The RV-VLPs were produced by infecting Spodoptera frugiperda 9 and Trichoplusia ni cells with recombinant baculoviruses using multi-cistronic, dual co-infection and stepwise-infection expression strategies. The size and morphology of the RV-VLPs, as determined by transmission electron microscopy, revealed successful production of RV-VLPs. The novel approach of producing tRV-VLPs, by using the consensus insect cell codon-optimised nucleotide sequence derived from dsRNA extracted directly from clinical specimens, should speed-up vaccine research and development by by-passing the need to adapt rotaviruses to cell culture. Other problems associated with cell culture adaptation, such as possible changes in epitopes, can also be circumvented

  20. Rhizome of life, catastrophes, sequence exchanges, gene creations and giant viruses: How microbial genomics challenges Darwin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky eMerhej

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Darwin’s theory about the evolution of species has been the object of considerable dispute. In this review, we have described seven key principles in Darwin’s book The Origin of Species and tried to present how genomics challenge each of these concepts and improve our knowledge about evolution. Darwin believed that species evolution consists on a positive directional selection ensuring the survival of the fittest. The most developed state of the species is characterized by increasing complexity. Darwin proposed the theory of descent with modification according to which all species evolve from a single common ancestor through a gradual process of small modification of their vertical inheritance. Finally, the process of evolution can be depicted in the form of a tree. However, microbial genomics showed that evolution is better described as the biological changes over time." The mode of change is not unidirectional and does not necessarily favors advantageous mutations to increase fitness it is rather subject to random selection as a result of catastrophic stochastic processes. Complexity is not necessarily the completion of development: several complex organisms have gone extinct and many microbes including bacteria with intracellular lifestyle have streamlined highly effective genomes. Genomes evolve through large events of gene deletions, duplications, insertions and genomes rearrangements rather than a gradual adaptative process. Genomes are dynamic and chimeric entities with gene repertoires that result from vertical and horizontal acquisitions as well as de novo gene creation. The chimeric character of microbial genomes excludes the possibility of finding a single common ancestor for all the genes recorded currently. Genomes are collections of genes with different evolutionary histories that cannot be represented by a single tree of life. A forest, a network or a rhizome of life may be more accurate to represent evolutionary relationships

  1. Rhizome of life, catastrophes, sequence exchanges, gene creations, and giant viruses: how microbial genomics challenges Darwin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merhej, Vicky; Raoult, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Darwin's theory about the evolution of species has been the object of considerable dispute. In this review, we have described seven key principles in Darwin's book The Origin of Species and tried to present how genomics challenge each of these concepts and improve our knowledge about evolution. Darwin believed that species evolution consists on a positive directional selection ensuring the “survival of the fittest.” The most developed state of the species is characterized by increasing complexity. Darwin proposed the theory of “descent with modification” according to which all species evolve from a single common ancestor through a gradual process of small modification of their vertical inheritance. Finally, the process of evolution can be depicted in the form of a tree. However, microbial genomics showed that evolution is better described as the “biological changes over time.” The mode of change is not unidirectional and does not necessarily favors advantageous mutations to increase fitness it is rather subject to random selection as a result of catastrophic stochastic processes. Complexity is not necessarily the completion of development: several complex organisms have gone extinct and many microbes including bacteria with intracellular lifestyle have streamlined highly effective genomes. Genomes evolve through large events of gene deletions, duplications, insertions, and genomes rearrangements rather than a gradual adaptative process. Genomes are dynamic and chimeric entities with gene repertoires that result from vertical and horizontal acquisitions as well as de novo gene creation. The chimeric character of microbial genomes excludes the possibility of finding a single common ancestor for all the genes recorded currently. Genomes are collections of genes with different evolutionary histories that cannot be represented by a single tree of life (TOL). A forest, a network or a rhizome of life may be more accurate to represent evolutionary relationships

  2. Full-length genome sequence analysis of four subgroup J avian leukosis virus strains isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Lulu; Wang, Peikun; Yang, Yongli; Li, Haijuan; Huang, Teng; Wei, Ping

    2017-12-01

    Since 2014, cases of hemangioma associated with avian leukosis virus subgroup J (ALV-J) have been emerging in commercial chickens in Guangxi. In this study, four strains of the subgroup J avian leukosis virus (ALV-J), named GX14HG01, GX14HG04, GX14LT07, and GX14ZS14, were isolated from chickens with clinical hemangioma in 2014 by DF-1 cell culture and then identified with ELISA detection of ALV group specific antigen p27, the detection of subtype specific PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) with ALV-J specific monoclonal antibody. The complete genomes of the isolates were sequenced and it was found that the gag and pol were relatively conservative, while env was variable especially the gp85 gene. Homology analysis of the env gene sequences showed that the env gene of all the four isolates had higher similarities with the hemangioma (HE)-type reference strains than that of the myeloid leukosis (ML)-type strains, and moreover, the HE-type strains' specific deletion of 205-bp sequence covering the rTM and DR1 in 3'UTR fragment was also found in the four isolates. Further analysis on the sequences of subunits of env gene revealed an interesting finding: the gp85 of isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 had a higher similarity with HPRS-103 and much lower similarity with the HE-type reference strains resulting in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HPRS-103 being clustered in the same branch, while gp37 had higher similarities with the HE-type reference strains when compared to that of HPRS-103, resulted in GX14ZS14, GX14HG04, and HE-type reference strains being clustered in the same branch. The results suggested that isolates GX14ZS14 and GX14HG04 may be the recombinant strains of the foreign strain HPRS-103 with the local epidemic HE-type strains of ALV-J.

  3. Complete genome sequence of Jacquemontia yellow mosaic virus, a novel begomovirus from Venezuela related to other New World bipartite begomoviruses infecting Convolvulaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiallo-Olivé, Elvira; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Moriones, Enrique; Navas-Castillo, Jesús

    2014-07-01

    The complete genome of a bipartite begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) infecting Jacquemontia sp. (Convolvulaceae) in Venezuela has been cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis have shown that it represents an isolate of a novel species with closest relatives being two New World bipartite begomoviruses that infect Convolvulaceae, Jacquemontia mosaic Yucatan virus and Merremia mosaic virus. The DNA-As of these begomoviruses, however, share only 77.0-78.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with the DNA-A of the isolate described here, for which a recombinant origin is suggested. Based on the symptoms observed in the field, the name Jacquemontia yellow mosaic virus (JacYMV) is proposed for this novel bipartite begomovirus.

  4. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...... that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...

  5. A fast and robust method for whole genome sequencing of the Aleutian Mink Disease Virus (AMDV) genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagberg, Emma Elisabeth; Krarup, Anders; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    as for the virulent AMDV-Utah strain. Comparisons at nucleotide- and amino acid level showed that, in agreement with existing literature, the highest variability between the two virus strains was found in the left open reading frame, which encodes the non-structural (NS1–3) genes. This paper also reports a number...

  6. Fast and robust methods for full genome sequencing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Type 1 and Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    followed by cycle sequencing of clones. The genome lengths were determined to be 14,876-15,098 and 15,342-15,408 nucleotides long for the Type 1 and Type 2 strains, respectively. These methods will greatly facilitate the generation of more complete genome PRRSV sequences globally which in turn may lead....... In the present study, fast and robust methods for long range RT-PCR amplification and subsequent next generation sequencing (NGS) of PRRSV Type 1 and Type 2 viruses were developed and validated on nine Type 1 and nine Type 2 PRRSV viruses. The methods were shown to generate robust and reliable sequences both...... on primary material and cell culture adapted viruses and the protocols were shown to perform well on all three NGS platforms tested (Roche 454 FLX, Illumina HiSeq 2000, and Ion Torrent PGM™ Sequencer). To complete the sequences at the 5’ end, 5’ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5’ RACE) was conducted...

  7. Two novel circo-like viruses detected in human feces: complete genome sequencing and electron microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignano, Silvana Beres; Nagasse-Sugahara, Teresa Keico; Kisielius, Jonas José; Ueda-Ito, Marli; Brandão, Paulo Eduardo; Curti, Suely Pires

    2013-12-26

    The application of viral metagenomic techniques and a series of PCRs in a human fecal sample enabled the detection of two novel circular unisense DNA viral genomes with 92% nucleotide similarity. The viruses were tentatively named circo-like virus-Brazil (CLV-BR) strains hs1 and hs2 and have genome lengths of 2526 and 2533 nucleotides, respectively. Four major open reading frames (ORFs) were identified in each of the genomes, and differences between the two genomes were primarily observed in ORF 2. Only ORF 3 showed significant amino acid similarities to a putative rolling circle replication initiator protein (Rep), although with low identity (36%). Our phylogenetic analysis, based on the Rep protein, demonstrated that the CLV-BRs do not cluster with members of the Circoviridae, Nanoviridae or Geminiviridae families and are more closely related to circo-like genomes previously identified in reclaimed water and feces of a wild rodent and of a bat. The CLV-BRs are members of a putative new family of circular Rep-encoding ssDNA viruses. Electron microscopy revealed icosahedral (~23 nm) structures, likely reflecting the novel viruses, and rod-shaped viral particles (~65-460 × 21 × 10 nm in length, diameter, and axial canal, respectively). Circo-like viruses have been detected in stool samples from humans and other mammals (bats, rodents, chimpanzees and bovines), cerebrospinal fluid and sera from humans, as well as samples from many other sources, e.g., insects, meat and the environment. Further studies are needed to classify all novel circular DNA viruses and elucidate their hosts, pathogenicity and evolutionary history. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive sequence motifs of 1–6 bp (Schlotterer 2000). They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes (Heller et al. 1982; Ellegren 2004). The origin, evolution and ubiquitous occurrence ...

  9. Complete Genome Sequence of a Rabies Virus Strain Isolated from a Brown Bear (Ursus arctos) in Primorsky Krai, Russia (November 2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shchelkanov, Michael Y; Deviatkin, Andrei A; Ananiev, Vasily Y; Dedkov, Vladimir G; Shipulin, German A; Sokol, Nataliya N; Dombrovskaya, Irina E; Galkina, Irina V; Shmelev, Mikhail E; Gorelikov, Vladimir N; Kozhan, Valentina N; Prosyannikova, Marina N; Aramilev, Sergei V; Fomenko, Pavel V

    2016-07-07

    We report here the complete genome sequence (GenBank KP997032) of rabies virus strain RABV/Ursus arctos/Russia/Primorye/PO-01/2014, isolated in November 2014 from a brown bear (Ursus arctos) that attacked a person in Primorsky Krai (Russian Federation). This strain was clustered into the Eurasian genetic subgroup of genotype 1 (street rage). Copyright © 2016 Shchelkanov et al.

  10. [Cloning and Sequence Analyses of Genome of Swine Hepatitis E Virus(HEV) HN-JY40 Strains Isolated from Henan Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Qin; Liang, Zhenpu; Xu, Feng; Shao, Xinfeng

    2015-05-01

    In the present study, the genomic sequence characteristics of HN-JY40 strains of the hepatitis E virus (HEV) isolated from pigs in Henan Province, China, were analyzed and the evolutionary relationship between HN-JY40 and other sequenced strains examined. The whole genome of HN-JY40 was sequenced and analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends (3' RACE) and 5' RACE. Bioinformatic analyses were carried out with Megalign, Expasy, clustal x, and MEGA 4 software. The genome of HN-JY40 was 7 223 bp in size upon removal of polyA sequences. Sizes were 9 bp and 69 bp at 5' and 3' noncoding regions, respectively. The genome of HN-JY40 was predicted to contain three open reading frames (ORFs): ORF1 (5 124 bp) encoding 1 707 amino acids; ORF2 (2 025 bp) encoding 674 amino acids; ORF3 (345 bp) encoding 114 amino acids. Phylogenetic-tree analyses indicated that HN-JY40 is a typical type-IV virus that belongs to a new subgenotype of HEV genotype 4. We sequenced and analyzed the whole genome of HN-JY40. This strategy elicited the genomic characteristics of the HEV isolated from pigs in Henan Province as well as the evolutionary relationships between HN- JY40 and other HEV isolates from pigs. We revealed that the ORF1 of HN-JY40 (153-432 nt) and human HK 104-2004 had high similarity, which offers molecular evidence for uncovering the interspecies transmission of the HEV.

  11. Genome sequence heterogeneity of Lake Sinai Virus found in honey bees and Orf1/RdRP-based polymorphisms in a single host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravoet, Jorgen; De Smet, Lina; Wenseleers, Tom; de Graaf, Dirk C

    2015-04-02

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are susceptible to a wide range of pathogens, including a broad set of viruses. Recently, next-generation sequencing has expanded the list of viruses with, for instance, two strains of Lake Sinai Virus. Soon after its discovery in the USA, LSV was also discovered in other countries and in other hosts. In the present study, we assemble four almost complete LSV genomes, and show that there is remarkable sequence heterogeneity based on the Orf1, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and capsid protein sequences in comparison to the previously identified LSV 1 and 2 strains. Phylogenetic analyses of LSV sequences obtained from single honey bee specimens further revealed that up to three distinctive clades could be present in a single bee. Such superinfections have not previously been identified for other honey bee viruses. In a search for the putative routes of LSV transmission, we were able to demonstrate the presence of LSV in pollen pellets and in Varroa destructor mites. However, negative-strand analyses demonstrated that the virus only actively replicates in honey bees and mason bees (Osmia cornuta) and not in Varroa mites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Evolutionary analysis of whole-genome sequences confirms inter-farm transmission of Aleutian mink disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagberg, Emma Elisabeth; Pedersen, Anders Gorm; Larsen, Lars E

    2017-01-01

    direction of spread. It was however impossible to infer transmission pathways from the partial NS1 gene tree, since all samples from the case farms branched out from a single internal node. A sliding window analysis showed that there were no shorter genomic regions providing the same phylogenetic resolution......Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is a frequently encountered pathogen associated with mink farming. Previous phylogenetic analyses of AMDV have been based on shorter and more conserved parts of the genome, e.g. the partial NS1 gene. Such fragments are suitable for detection but are less useful...

  13. Analysis of the complete genome sequence and capsid region of black queen cell viruses from infected honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Choe, Se Eun; Kweon, Chang Hee; Yoo, Mi Sun; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Yoon, Byoung-Su; Nguyen, Lien Thi Kim; Nguyen, Thuy Thi Dieu; Quyen, Dong Van; Jung, Suk-Chan; Chang, Ki-Yoon; Kang, Seung Won

    2013-08-01

    Black queen cell virus (BQCV) infection is one of the most common viral infections in honeybees (Apis mellifera). A phylogenetic tree was constructed for 19 partial nucleotide sequences for the capsid region of South Korean BQCV, which were also compared with 10 previously reported BQCV sequences derived from different countries. The Korean BQCV genomes were highly conserved and showed 97-100% identity. They also showed 92-99% similarity with other country genotypes and showed no significant clustering in the phylogenetic tree. In order to investigate this phenomenon in more detail, the complete genome sequence of the Korean BQCV strain was determined and aligned with those from a South African reference strain and European genotypes, Poland4-6 and Hungary10. A phylogenetic tree was then constructed. The Korean BQCV strain showed a high level of similarity (92%) with Hungary10, but low similarity (86%) with the South African reference genotype. Comparison of the Korean and other sequences across different genome regions revealed that the 5'-UTR, the intergenic region, and the capsid regions of the BQCV genome were highly conserved. ORF1 (a non-structural protein coding region) was more variable than ORF2 (a structural protein coding region). The 5'-proximal third of ORF1 was particularly variable and contained several insertions/deletions. This phenomenon may be explained by intra-molecular recombination between the Korean and other BQCV genotypes; this appeared to have happened more with the South African reference strain than with the European genotypes.

  14. Molecular characterization of Citrus tatter leaf virus historically associated with Meyer lemon trees: complete genome sequence and development of biologically active in vitro transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Afunian, Mohammad R; Hilf, Mark E; Gowda, Siddarame; Dawson, William O; Garnsey, Stephen M

    2009-04-01

    Citrus tatter leaf virus isolated from Meyer lemon trees (CTLV-ML) from California and Florida induces bud union incompatibility of citrus trees grafted on the widely used trifoliate and trifoliate hybrid rootstocks. The complete genome sequence of CTLV-ML was determined to be 6,495 nucleotides (nts), with two overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) and a poly (A) tail at the 3' end. The genome organization is similar to other capilloviruses, with ORF1 (nts 37 to 6,354) encoding a putative 242-kDa polyprotein which contains replication-associated domains plus a coat protein (CP), and ORF2 (nts 4,788 to 5,750), which is located within ORF1 in a different reading frame and encodes a putative movement protein. Although the proteins encoded by CTLV-ML possesses 84 to 96% amino acid sequence identity with strains of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), we observed two strikingly different regions in ORF1: variable region I (amino acids 532 to 570) and variable region II (amino acids 1,583 to 1,868), with only 15 to 18 and 56 to 62% identities, respectively, with the corresponding regions of ASGV strains. Conditions for a herbaceous systemic assay host were optimized in which the wild-type virus induced systemic infection in Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Light Red Kidney (LRK) bean plants at 19 or 22 degrees C but not at higher temperatures. In vitro transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones induced systemic symptoms on LRK bean plants similar to that of the wild-type virus. Replication of the recombinant virus was confirmed by hybridization of a 5' positive-stranded RNA-specific probe to a genome-sized RNA and by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction.

  15. How RNA viruses maintain their genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, John N; Fearns, Rachel

    2010-06-01

    RNA genomes are vulnerable to corruption by a range of activities, including inaccurate replication by the error-prone replicase, damage from environmental factors, and attack by nucleases and other RNA-modifying enzymes that comprise the cellular intrinsic or innate immune response. Damage to coding regions and loss of critical cis-acting signals inevitably impair genome fitness; as a consequence, RNA viruses have evolved a variety of mechanisms to protect their genome integrity. These include mechanisms to promote replicase fidelity, recombination activities that allow exchange of sequences between different RNA templates, and mechanisms to repair the genome termini. In this article, we review examples of these processes from a range of RNA viruses to showcase the diverse approaches that viruses have evolved to maintain their genome sequence integrity, focusing first on mechanisms that viruses use to protect their entire genome, and then concentrating on mechanisms that allow protection of the genome termini, which are especially vulnerable. In addition, we discuss examples in which it might be beneficial for a virus to 'lose' its genomic termini and reduce its replication efficiency.

  16. Full-length genome sequence analysis of a Hungarian porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolated from a pig with severe respiratory disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bálint, Ádám; Balka, Gyula; Horváth, Péter; Kecskeméti, Sándor; Dán, Ádám; Farsang, Attila; Szeredi, Levente; Bányai, Krisztián; Bartha, Dániel; Olasz, Ferenc; Belák, Sándor; Zádori, Zoltán

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report the isolation of a type 1 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) strain from a clinical outbreak of severe respiratory problems and high fever. Next-generation sequencing was used to determine the complete genome sequence of the isolate (9625/2012). The virus belongs to a new branch within subtype 1, clade D, and shows the highest similarity to PRRSV Olot/1991 and to the Amervac vaccine strain. Mutation analysis of 9625/2012 revealed no evidence of recombination but did show a high proportion of amino acid substitutions in the putative neutralizing epitopes, suggesting an important role of selective immune pressure in the evolution of PRRSV 9625/2012.

  17. Complete genome sequences of three tomato spotted wilt virus isolates from tomato and pepper plants in Korea and their phylogenetic relationship to other TSWV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Seung; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infects numerous host plants and has three genome segments, called L, M and S. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Korean TSWV isolates (TSWV-1 to -3) infecting tomato and pepper plants. Although the nucleotide sequence of TSWV-1 genome isolated from tomato is very different from those of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 isolated from pepper, the deduced amino acid sequences of the five TSWV genes are highly conserved among all three TSWV isolates. In phylogenetic analysis, deduced RdRp protein sequences of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 were clustered together with two previously reported isolates from Japan and Korea, while TSWV-1 grouped together with a Hawaiian isolate. A phylogenetic tree based on N protein sequences, however, revealed four distinct groups of TSWV isolates, and all three Korean isolates belonged to group II, together with many other isolates, mostly from Europe and Asia. Interestingly, most American isolates grouped together as group I. Together, these results suggested that these newly identified TSWV isolates might have originated from an Asian ancestor and undergone divergence upon infecting different host plants.

  18. Genome Sequence Databases (Overview): Sequencing and Assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapidus, Alla L.

    2009-01-01

    From the date its role in heredity was discovered, DNA has been generating interest among scientists from different fields of knowledge: physicists have studied the three dimensional structure of the DNA molecule, biologists tried to decode the secrets of life hidden within these long molecules, and technologists invent and improve methods of DNA analysis. The analysis of the nucleotide sequence of DNA occupies a special place among the methods developed. Thanks to the variety of sequencing technologies available, the process of decoding the sequence of genomic DNA (or whole genome sequencing) has become robust and inexpensive. Meanwhile the assembly of whole genome sequences remains a challenging task. In addition to the need to assemble millions of DNA fragments of different length (from 35 bp (Solexa) to 800 bp (Sanger)), great interest in analysis of microbial communities (metagenomes) of different complexities raises new problems and pushes some new requirements for sequence assembly tools to the forefront. The genome assembly process can be divided into two steps: draft assembly and assembly improvement (finishing). Despite the fact that automatically performed assembly (or draft assembly) is capable of covering up to 98% of the genome, in most cases, it still contains incorrectly assembled reads. The error rate of the consensus sequence produced at this stage is about 1/2000 bp. A finished genome represents the genome assembly of much higher accuracy (with no gaps or incorrectly assembled areas) and quality ({approx}1 error/10,000 bp), validated through a number of computer and laboratory experiments.

  19. Genomic characterization of Ambrosia asymptomatic virus 1 and evidence of other Tymovirales members in the Oklahoma tallgrass prairie revealed by sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Mukta; Sokhandan Bashir, Nemat; Palmer, Michael W; Melcher, Ulrich

    2014-07-01

    The Plant Virus Biodiversity and Ecology project was undertaken to better understand the nature of plant-viral interactions and the occurrence of non-pathogenic viruses. Plants from the Tallgrass Prairie Preserve (TPP), Osage County, Oklahoma, were surveyed from 2005 to 2008 for the presence of viruses, resulting in the detection, using a virus-like particle enrichment method, of the genome a novel virus, Ambrosia asymptomatic virus 1 (AAV1), from Ambrosia psilostachya DC (western ragweed). Here, we present the genomic organization and genetic variability of AAV1. The virus has a single-stranded RNA genome of about 7408 nt, which has six open reading frames (ORFs). Phylogenetic analysis of the replicase and coat protein ORFs of the virus indicates strongly that the virus should be placed in the genus Mandarivirus. No evidence of recombination was detected. We also report the detection in the TPP of two known viruses and seven other putative viruses, members of the order Tymovirales.

  20. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the foetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV - microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favour of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1 sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker ‘retinoic acid’ in human DNA and (2 comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE consensus sequence (5′–AGGTCA–3′ in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause foetal brain defects (for which maternal-foetal transmission during developing stage may be required. The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although bioinformatic

  1. Retention of 1.2 kbp of 'novel' genomic sequence in two European field isolates and some vaccine strains of Fowlpox virus extends open reading frame fpv241.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmin, Susan A; Manvell, Ruth; Gough, Richard E; Laidlaw, Stephen M; Skinner, Michael A

    2006-12-01

    The emergence of variant fowlpox viruses (FWPVs) and increasing field use of recombinants against avian influenza H5N1 emphasize the need to monitor vaccines and to distinguish them from field strains. Five commercial vaccines, two laboratory viruses and two European field isolates were characterized by PCR and sequencing at 18 loci differing between attenuated FP9 and its pathogenic progenitor. PCR failed to discriminate between the viruses and sequence determination revealed no significant differences at any locus, except for a polymorphic locus encompassed by deletion 24 (9.3 kbp) in FP9. Surprisingly, 'novel' previously unreported sequence (spanning 1.2 kbp) was found in both European field isolates and three of the vaccines. It was absent from the other two vaccines, removed by a 1.2 kbp deletion identical to that surprisingly also observed in the completely sequenced genome of FPV USDA. This locus (H9) adds a potentially useful tool for discriminating between FWPV field isolates and vaccines.

  2. Genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells not an ideal choice as positive control for PCR amplification based detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Bhushan B; Hiremath, Shivaprakash V; Kulkarni, Suyamindra S; Hallikeri, Umesh R; Patil, Basavaraj R; Gai, Pramod B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of the etiology of breast cancer is a crucial research issue for the development of an effective preventive and treatment strategies. Researchers are exploring the possible involvement of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) in causing human breast cancer. Hence, it becomes very important to use a consistent positive control agent in PCR amplification based detection of MMTV-Like Sequence (MMTV-LS) in human breast cancer for accurate and reproducible results. This study was done to investigate the feasibility of using genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to detect MMTV-LS using PCR amplification based detection. MMTV env and SAG gene located at the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were targeted for the PCR based detection. No amplification was observed in case of the genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, the 2.7 kb DNA fragment comprising MMTV env and SAG LTR sequences yielded the products of desired size. From these results it can be concluded that Genomic DNA of MCF-7 cell is not a suitable choice as positive control for PCR or RT-PCR based detection of MMTV-LS. It is also suggested that plasmids containing the cloned genes or sequences of MMTV be used as positive control for detection of MMTV-LS. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The complete genome sequence of a novel Fusarium graminearum RNA virus in a new proposed family within the order Tymovirales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoguang; He, Hao; Yang, Xiufen; Zeng, Hongmei; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua

    2016-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Fusarium graminearum deltaflexivirus 1 (FgDFV1), a novel positive single-stranded (+ss) RNA mycovirus, was sequenced and analyzed. The complete genome of FgDFV1/BJ59 was shown to be 8246 nucleotides (nt) long excluding the poly(A) tail. FgDFV1/BJ59 was predicted to contain a large open reading frame (ORF 1) and four smaller ORFs (2-5). ORF1 encodes a putative replication-associated polyprotein (RP) of 2042 amino acids (aa) and contains three conserved domains, viral RNA methyltransferase (Mtr), viral RNA helicase (Hel) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). ORFs 2-5 encode four putative small hypothetical proteins (12-18 kDa) with unknown biological functions. Phylogenetic analysis based on RP sequences indicated that FgDFV1 is phylogenetically related to soybean leaf-associated mycoflexivirus 1 (SlaMyfV1) and Sclerotinia sclerotiorum deltaflexivirus 1 (SsDFV1), which form a well-supported and independent group belonging to a newly proposed family Deltaflexiviridae within the order Tymovirales. However, FgDFV1 is markedly different from SsDFV1 and SlaMyfV1 in genome organization and nucleotide sequence. FgDFV1 may represent an additional species in the new genus Deltaflexivirus or possibly a new genus in the proposed family Deltaflexiviridae.

  4. Complete nucleotide sequences of the genomes of two isolates of apple chlorotic leaf spot virus from peach (Prunus persica) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Feiqing; Pan, Song; Wu, Zujian; Jiang, Dongmei; Li, Shifang

    2012-04-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of two isolates of apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (Z1 and Z3) collected from peach in Henan Province, China, were determined. The genomes of both Z1 and Z3 were found to contain three open reading frames (ORFs). Sequence analysis showed that genomic sequences of Z1 and Z3 isolates shared 67.4%-82.9% and 67.2%-82.6% identity, respectively, with the other eight isolates of ACLSV that have been reported previously. Based on the putative amino acid sequences of the products of the three ORFs, Z1 and Z3 isolates showed the greatest identity to isolate PBM1 (GenBank accession number AJ243438) from plum and the least identity with isolate Ta Tao5 (GenBank Accession Number: EU223295) from peach. Considering the low level of sequence identity between Z1/Z3 isolate and Ta Tao5 isolate, two types of ACLSV may exist in peach.

  5. Targeted sequencing of plant genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark D. Huynh

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the field of genetics by providing a means for fast and relatively affordable sequencing. With the advancement of NGS, wholegenome sequencing (WGS) has become more commonplace. However, sequencing an entire genome is still not cost effective or even beneficial in all cases. In studies that do not require a whole-...

  6. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV genomic RNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah Mustafa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV. MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV. Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV, a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. METHODOLOGY: Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env, and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  7. Sequences within both the 5' UTR and Gag are required for optimal in vivo packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) genomic RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Farah; Al Amri, Dhuha; Al Ali, Farah; Al Sari, Noor; Al Suwaidi, Sarah; Jayanth, Preethi; Philips, Pretty S; Rizvi, Tahir A

    2012-01-01

    This study mapped regions of genomic RNA (gRNA) important for packaging and propagation of mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). MMTV is a type B betaretrovirus which preassembles intracellularly, a phenomenon distinct from retroviruses that assemble the progeny virion at cell surface just before budding such as the type C human and feline immunodeficiency viruses (HIV and FIV). Studies of FIV and Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (MPMV), a type D betaretrovirus with similar intracellular virion assembly processes as MMTV, have shown that the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) and 5' end of gag constitute important packaging determinants for gRNA. Three series of MMTV transfer vectors containing incremental amounts of gag or 5' UTR sequences, or incremental amounts of 5' UTR in the presence of 400 nucleotides (nt) of gag were constructed to delineate the extent of 5' sequences that may be involved in MMTV gRNA packaging. Real time PCR measured the packaging efficiency of these vector RNAs into MMTV particles generated by co-transfection of MMTV Gag/Pol, vesicular stomatitis virus envelope glycoprotein (VSV-G Env), and individual transfer vectors into human 293T cells. Transfer vector RNA propagation was monitored by measuring transduction of target HeLaT4 cells following infection with viral particles containing a hygromycin resistance gene expression cassette on the packaged RNA. MMTV requires the entire 5' UTR and a minimum of ~120 nucleotide (nt) at the 5' end of gag for not only efficient gRNA packaging but also propagation of MMTV-based transfer vector RNAs. Vector RNAs without the entire 5' UTR were defective for both efficient packaging and propagation into target cells. These results reveal that the 5' end of MMTV genome is critical for both gRNA packaging and propagation, unlike the recently delineated FIV and MPMV packaging determinants that have been shown to be of bipartite nature.

  8. The complete genome sequence of a member of a new species of tobamovirus (rattail cactus necrosis-associated virus) isolated from Aporcactus flagelliformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, N R; Hong, J S; Song, Y S; Chung, B N; Park, J W; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we identified a new tobamovirus from diseased Aporcactus flagelliformis cactus plants, named it rattail cactus necrosis-associated virus (RCNaV), and determined its complete genome sequence. The full RCNaV genome consisted of 6,506 nucleotides and contained four open reading frames coding for proteins of M(r) 128 kDa (3,441 nt), 185 kDa (4,929 nt), 55 kDa (1452 nt), 36 kDa (1,005 nt) and 19 kDa (513 nt) from the 5' to 3' end, respectively. The overall similarities for the four ORFs of RCNaV were from 32.5% to 64.1% and from 17.0% to 67.3% to those of the other tobamoviruses, at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Comparison of the coding and non-coding regions of the virus with those of other tobamoviruses showed that RCNaV is the most closely related to cactus mild mottle virus.

  9. Complete Genome Sequencing and Phylogenetic Analysis of a Getah Virus Strain (Genus Alphavirus, Family Togaviridae) Isolated from Culex tritaeniorhynchus Mosquitoes in Nagasaki, Japan in 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Daisuke; Isawa, Haruhiko; Ejiri, Hiroko; Sasaki, Toshinori; Sunahara, Toshihiko; Futami, Kyoko; Tsuda, Yoshio; Katayama, Yukie; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Minakawa, Noboru; Ohta, Nobuo; Sawabe, Kyoko

    2016-12-01

    Getah virus (GETV; genus Alphavirus, family Togaviridae) is a mosquito-borne virus known to cause disease in horses and pigs. In 2014, for the first time in ∼30 years, a sudden GETV outbreak occurred among racehorses in Ibaraki, Japan. Two years before this outbreak, we obtained multiple GETV isolates from Culex tritaeniorhynchus mosquitoes collected in Nagasaki, Japan and determined the whole genome sequence of GETV isolate 12IH26. Our phylogenetic analysis of GETV strains revealed that the isolate 12IH26 forms a robust clade with the epidemic strains 14-I-605-C1 and 14-I-605-C2 isolated from horses in the 2014 outbreak in Ibaraki. Furthermore, the complete genomic sequence of the isolate 12IH26 was 99.9% identical to those of the 2014 epidemic strains in Ibaraki. Phylogenetic analysis also showed that the recent Japanese GETV strains, including the isolate 12IH26, are closely related to the Chinese and South Korean strains rather than the previous Japanese strains, suggesting that GETV strains may be transported from overseas into Japan through long-distance migration of the infected mosquitoes or migratory birds.

  10. Molecular characterization of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 full and partial genomes by Illumina massively parallel sequencing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pessôa, Rodrigo; Watanabe, Jaqueline Tomoko; Nukui, Youko; Pereira, Juliana; Casseb, Jorge; Kasseb, Jorge; de Oliveira, Augusto César Penalva; Segurado, Aluisio Cotrim; Sanabani, Sabri Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Here, we report on the partial and full-length genomic (FLG) variability of HTLV-1 sequences from 90 well-characterized subjects, including 48 HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (ACs), 35 HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and 7 adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) patients, using an Illumina paired-end protocol. Blood samples were collected from 90 individuals, and DNA was extracted from the PBMCs to measure the proviral load and to amplify the HTLV-1 FLG from two overlapping fragments. The amplified PCR products were subjected to deep sequencing. The sequencing data were assembled, aligned, and mapped against the HTLV-1 genome with sufficient genetic resemblance and utilized for further phylogenetic analysis. A high-throughput sequencing-by-synthesis instrument was used to obtain an average of 3210- and 5200-fold coverage of the partial (n = 14) and FLG (n = 76) data from the HTLV-1 strains, respectively. The results based on the phylogenetic trees of consensus sequences from partial and FLGs revealed that 86 (95.5%) individuals were infected with the transcontinental sub-subtypes of the cosmopolitan subtype (aA) and that 4 individuals (4.5%) were infected with the Japanese sub-subtypes (aB). A comparison of the nucleotide and amino acids of the FLG between the three clinical settings yielded no correlation between the sequenced genotype and clinical outcomes. The evolutionary relationships among the HTLV sequences were inferred from nucleotide sequence, and the results are consistent with the hypothesis that there were multiple introductions of the transcontinental subtype in Brazil. This study has increased the number of subtype aA full-length genomes from 8 to 81 and HTLV-1 aB from 2 to 5 sequences. The overall data confirmed that the cosmopolitan transcontinental sub-subtypes were the most prevalent in the Brazilian population. It is hoped that this valuable genomic data will add to our current understanding of the

  11. The Genomes of Sheeppox and Goatpox Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulman, E. R.; Afonso, C. L.; Lu, Z.; Zsak, L.; Sur, J.-H.; Sandybaev, N. T.; Kerembekova, U. Z.; Zaitsev, V. L.; Kutish, G. F.; Rock, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV) and goatpox virus (GTPV), members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae, are etiologic agents of important diseases of sheep and goats in northern and central Africa, southwest and central Asia, and the Indian subcontinent. Here we report the genomic sequence and comparative analysis of five SPPV and GTPV isolates, including three pathogenic field isolates and two attenuated vaccine viruses. SPPV and GTPV genomes are approximately 150 kbp and are strikingly similar to each other, exhibiting 96% nucleotide identity over their entire length. Wild-type genomes share at least 147 putative genes, including conserved poxvirus replicative and structural genes and genes likely involved in virulence and host range. SPPV and GTPV genomes are very similar to that of lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV), sharing 97% nucleotide identity. All SPPV and GTPV genes are present in LSDV. Notably in both SPPV and GTPV genomes, nine LSDV genes with likely virulence and host range functions are disrupted, including a gene unique to LSDV (LSDV132) and genes similar to those coding for interleukin-1 receptor, myxoma virus M003.2 and M004.1 genes (two copies each), and vaccinia virus F11L, N2L, and K7L genes. The absence of these genes in SPPV and GTPV suggests a significant role for them in the bovine host range. SPPV and GTPV genomes contain specific nucleotide differences, suggesting they are phylogenetically distinct. Relatively few genomic changes in SPPV and GTPV vaccine viruses account for viral attenuation, because they contain 71 and 7 genomic changes compared to their respective field strains. Notable genetic changes include mutation or disruption of genes with predicted functions involving virulence and host range, including two ankyrin repeat proteins in SPPV and three kelch-like proteins in GTPV. These comparative genomic data indicate the close genetic relationship among capripoxviruses, and they suggest that SPPV and GTPV are distinct and likely

  12. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2017-01-01

    Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All s...

  13. Use of Whole Genome Sequence Data To Infer Baculovirus Phylogeny

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herniou, E.A.; Luque, T.; Chen, X.; Vlak, J.M.; Winstanley, D.; Cory, J.S.; O'Reilly, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Several phylogenetic methods based on whole genome sequence data were evaluated using data from nine complete baculovirus genomes. The utility of three independent character sets was assessed. The first data set comprised the sequences of the 63 genes common to these viruses. The second set of

  14. Full genome sequence of a novel circo-like virus detected in an adult European eel Anguilla anguilla showing signs of cauliflower disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doszpoly, Andor; Tarján, Zoltán L; Glávits, Róbert; Müller, Tamás; Benkő, Mária

    2014-05-13

    An adult European eel Anguilla anguilla, showing typical signs of the so-called cauliflower disease, was subjected to pathological and molecular virological examinations. Samples taken from internal organs and the polypoid proliferative tissue from the mouth were examined by PCR for the detection of several viruses. Positive results were obtained with a nested PCR targeting the rep gene of circoviruses. Analysis of the partial rep sequence indicated the presence of a putative novel circovirus, but attempts to isolate it remained unsuccessful. The missing part of the genome was acquired by an inverse nested PCR with 2 specific primer pairs, designed from the newly determined rep sequence, followed by genome walking. The circular full genome was found to consist of 1378 nt (GenBank accession no. KC469701). Two oppositely oriented open reading frames (ORFs) were present, of which one was unambiguously identified as a circoviral rep gene. However, the predicted product of the other ORF, though it is a clear positional counterpart of the cap genes, showed no obvious homology to any known circoviral capsid proteins. A stem-loop-like element in the intergenic region between the 5' ends of the ORFs was also found. Phylogenetic calculations indicated that the novel virus belongs to the genus Circovirus in the family Circoviridae. The relative amount of the viral DNA in the organ samples was estimated by quantitative real-time PCR. The results suggested that the examined fish was caught in an active viremic state, although the role of this circovirus in the etiology of the cauliflower diseases could not be ascertained.

  15. Next-Generation Sequencing and Genome Editing in Plant Virology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Hadidi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Next-generation sequencing (NGS has been applied to plant virology since 2009. NGS provides highly efficient, rapid, low cost DNA or RNA high-throughput sequencing of the genomes of plant viruses and viroids and of the specific small RNAs generated during the infection process. These small RNAs, which cover frequently the whole genome of the infectious agent, are 21-24 nt long and are known as vsRNAs for viruses and vd-sRNAs for viroids. NGS has been used in a number of studies in plant virology including, but not limited to, discovery of novel viruses and viroids as well as detection and identification of those pathogens already known, analysis of genome diversity and evolution, and study of pathogen epidemiology. The genome engineering editing method, clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR-Cas9 system has been successfully used recently to engineer resistance to DNA geminiviruses (family, Geminiviridae by targeting different viral genome sequences in infected Nicotiana benthamiana or Arabidopsis plants. The DNA viruses targeted include tomato yellow leaf curl virus and merremia mosaic virus (begomovirus; beet curly top virus and beet severe curly top virus (curtovirus; and bean yellow dwarf virus (mastrevirus. The technique has also been used against the RNA viruses zucchini yellow mosaic virus, papaya ringspot virus and turnip mosaic virus (potyvirus and cucumber vein yellowing virus (ipomovirus, family, Potyviridae by targeting the translation initiation genes eIF4E in cucumber or Arabidopsis plants. From these recent advances of major importance, it is expected that NGS and CRISPR-Cas technologies will play a significant role in the very near future in advancing the field of plant virology and connecting it with other related fields of biology.Keywords: Next-generation sequencing, NGS, plant virology, plant viruses, viroids, resistance to plant viruses by CRISPR-Cas9

  16. Comparative genomic survey, exon-intron annotation and phylogenetic analysis of NAT-homologous sequences in archaea, protists, fungi, viruses, and invertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously published extensive genomic surveys [1-3], reporting NAT-homologous sequences in hundreds of sequenced bacterial, fungal and vertebrate genomes. We present here the results of our latest search of 2445 genomes, representing 1532 (70 archaeal, 1210 bacterial, 43 protist, 97 fungal,...

  17. The 5′-End Sequence of the Genome of Aichi Virus, a Picornavirus, Contains an Element Critical for Viral RNA Encapsidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Jun; Taniguchi, Koki

    2003-01-01

    Picornavirus positive-strand RNAs are selectively encapsidated despite the coexistence of viral negative-strand RNAs and cellular RNAs in infected cells. However, the precise mechanism of the RNA encapsidation process in picornaviruses remains unclear. Here we report the first identification of an RNA element critical for encapsidation in picornaviruses. The 5′ end of the genome of Aichi virus, a member of the family Picornaviridae, folds into three stem-loop structures (SL-A, SL-B, and SL-C, from the most 5′ end). In the previous study, we constructed a mutant, termed mut6, by exchanging the seven-nucleotide stretches of the middle part of the stem in SL-A with each other to maintain the base pairings of the stem. mut6 exhibited efficient RNA replication and translation but formed no plaques. The present study showed that in cells transfected with mut6 RNA, empty capsids were accumulated, but few virions containing RNA were formed. This means that mut6 has a severe defect in RNA encapsidation. Site-directed mutational analysis indicated that as the mutated region was narrowed, the encapsidation was improved. As a result, the mutation of the 7 bp of the middle part of the stem in SL-A was required for abolishing the plaque-forming ability. Thus, the 5′-end sequence of the Aichi virus genome was shown to play an important role in encapsidation. PMID:12610129

  18. Determination and molecular analysis of the complete genome sequence of two wild-type rabies viruses isolated from a haematophagous bat and a frugivorous bat in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Nobuyuki; Kobayashi, Yuki; Sato, Go; Hirano, Shinji; Itou, Takuya; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2011-06-01

    The complete genome sequences of two Brazilian wild-type rabies viruses (RABV), a BR-DR1 isolate from a haematophagous bat (Desmodus rotundus) and a BR-AL1 isolate from a frugivorous bat (Artibeus lituratus), were determined. The genomes of the BR-DR1 and BR-AL1 had 11,923 and 11,922 nt, respectively, and both encoded the five standard genes of rhabdoviruses. The complete nucleotide sequence identity between the BR-DR1 and BR-AL1 isolates was 97%. The BR-DR1 and BR-AL1 isolates had some conserved functional sites revealed by the fixed isolates, whereas both isolates had unique amino acid substitutions in the antigenic region IV of the nucleocapsid gene. Therefore, it is speculated that both isolates were nearly identical in virologic character. According to our phylogenetic analysis based on the complete genomes, both isolates belonged to genotype 1, and to the previously defined "vampire bat-related RABV lineage" which consisted of mainly D. rotundus- and A. lituratus-isolates; however, a branch pattern with high bootstrap values suggested that BR-DR1 was more closely related to the 9001FRA isolate, which was collected from a dog bitten by a bat in French Guiana, than to BR-AL1. This result suggests that the vampire bat-related RABV lineage includes Brazilian vampire bat and Brazilian frugivorous bat RABV and is further divided into Brazilian vampire bat and Brazilian frugivorous bat RABV sub-lineages. The phylogenetic analysis based on the complete genomes was valuable in discriminating among very closely related isolates.

  19. Use of whole genome deep sequencing to define emerging minority variants in virus envelope genes in herpesvirus treated with novel antimicrobial K21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua G; Prusty, Bhupesh K; Gompels, Ursula A

    2017-10-01

    New antivirals are required to prevent rising antimicrobial resistance from replication inhibitors. The aim of this study was to analyse the range of emerging mutations in herpesvirus by whole genome deep sequencing. We tested human herpesvirus 6 treatment with novel antiviral K21, where evidence indicated distinct effects on virus envelope proteins. We treated BACmid cloned virus in order to analyse mechanisms and candidate targets for resistance. Illumina based next generation sequencing technology enabled analyses of mutations in 85 genes to depths of 10,000 per base detecting low prevalent minority variants (genes including two envelope glycoproteins. Strikingly, treatment with K21 did not accumulate the passage mutations; instead a high frequency mutation was selected in envelope protein gQ2, part of the gH/gL complex essential for herpesvirus infection. This introduced a stop codon encoding a truncation mutation previously observed in increased virion production. There was reduced detection of the glycoprotein complex in infected cells. This supports a novel pathway for K21 targeting virion envelopes distinct from replication inhibition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization and genome sequencing of phage Abp1, a new phiKMV-like virus infecting multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guangtao; Le, Shuai; Peng, Yizhi; Zhao, Yan; Yin, Supeng; Zhang, Lin; Yao, Xinyue; Tan, Yinling; Li, Ming; Hu, Fuquan

    2013-06-01

    While screening for alternative antibiotics against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii, we isolated a virulent A. baumannii bacteriophage Abp1. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the phage had an icosahedral head with a short tail and should be classified as a member of the Podoviridae family. SDS-PAGE showed that Abp1 contained at least one major and nine minor proteins. In a single-step growth test, we demonstrated that Abp1 had a latent period of 10 min and a burst size of 350. Abp1 also had a relatively narrow host range. The entire genome was sequenced, and the final assembly yielded a 42,185 bp, linear, double-stranded DNA molecule with a G+C content of 39.15 % and containing 54 putative genes. Among these genes, 26 were functionally known, leaving 28 unknown putative genes. Abp1 is a new member of the phiKMV-like virus subgroup of the T7 group; its genome sequence is very similar to that of the A. baumannii phage phiAB1.

  1. The sequencing of the complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) and of the RNA2 of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV) isolates from grapevine reveals the possible recombinant origin of GCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiaro, M; Yahyaoui, E; Martelli, G P; Elbeaino, T

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus isolate (TBRV-Mirs) (RNA1, 7,366 nt and RNA2, 4,640 nt) and the RNA2 sequences (4,437; 4,445; and 4,442 nts) of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus isolates (GCMV-H6, -H15, and -H27) were determined. All RNAs contained a single open reading frame encoding polyproteins of 254 kDa (p1) and 149 kDa (p2) for TBRV-Mirs RNA1 and RNA2, respectively, and 146 kDa for GCMV RNA2. p1 of TBRV-Mirs showed the highest identity with TBRV-MJ (94 %), Beet ringspot virus (BRSV, 82 %), and Grapevine Anatolian ringspot virus (GARSV, 66 %), while p2 showed the highest identity with TBRV isolates MJ (89 %) and ED (85 %), followed by BRSV (65 %), GCMV (58 %), and GARSV (57 %). The amino acid identity of RNA2 sequences of four GCMV isolates (three from this study and one from GenBank) ranged from 91 to 98 %, the homing protein being the most variable. The RDP3 program predicted putative intra-species recombination events for GCMV-H6 and recognized GCMV as a putative inter-species recombinant between GARSV and TBRV. In both cases, the recombination events were at the movement protein level.

  2. Genome Sequence Analysis of New Isolates of the Winona Strain of Plum pox virus and the First Definitive Evidence of Intrastrain Recombination Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Delano; Sanderson, Dan; Varga, Aniko; Sheveleva, Anna; Chirkov, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is genetically diverse with nine different strains identified. Mutations, indel events, and interstrain recombination events are known to contribute to the genetic diversity of PPV. This is the first report of intrastrain recombination events that contribute to PPV's genetic diversity. Fourteen isolates of the PPV strain Winona (W) were analyzed including nine new strain W isolates sequenced completely in this study. Isolates of other strains of PPV with more than one isolate with the complete genome sequence available in GenBank were included also in this study for comparison and analysis. Five intrastrain recombination events were detected among the PPV W isolates, one among PPV C strain isolates, and one among PPV M strain isolates. Four (29%) of the PPV W isolates analyzed are recombinants; one of which (P2-1) is a mosaic, with three recombination events identified. A new interstrain recombinant event was identified between a strain M isolate and a strain Rec isolate, a known recombinant. In silico recombination studies and pairwise distance analyses of PPV strain D isolates indicate that a threshold of genetic diversity exists for the detectability of recombination events, in the range of approximately 0.78×10(-2) to 1.33×10(-2) mean pairwise distance. RDP4 analyses indicate that in the case of PPV Rec isolates there may be a recombinant breakpoint distinct from the obvious transition point of strain sequences. Evidence was obtained that indicates that the frequency of PPV recombination is underestimated, which may be true for other RNA viruses where low genetic diversity exists.

  3. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Archibald, A.L.; Bolund, L.; Churcher, C.; Fredholm, M.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Harlizius, B.

    2010-01-01

    Background - The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. Results - Assemblies of the

  4. Phylogenetic analysis of complete genome sequences of hepatitis B virus from an Afro-Colombian community: presence of HBV F3/A1 recombinant strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado-Mora, Mónica V; Romano, Camila M; Gomes-Gouvêa, Michele S; Gutierrez, Maria F; Carrilho, Flair J; Pinho, João R R

    2012-10-24

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is one of the most prevalent viral infections in humans and represents a serious public health problem. In Colombia, our group reported recently the presence of subgenotypes F3, A2 and genotype G in Bogotá. The aim of this study was to characterize the HBV genotypes circulating in Quibdó, the largest Afro-descendant community in Colombia. Sixty HBsAg-positive samples were studied. A fragment of 1306 bp (S/POL) was amplified by nested PCR. Positive samples to S/POL fragment were submitted to PCR amplification of the HBV complete genome. The distribution of HBV genotypes was: A1 (52.17%), E (39.13%), D3 (4.3%) and F3/A1 (4.3%). An HBV recombinant strain subgenotype F3/A1 was found for the first time. This study is the first analysis of complete HBV genome sequences from Afro-Colombian population. It was found an important presence of HBV/A1 and HBV/E genotypes. A new recombinant strain of HBV genotype F3/A1 was reported in this population. This fact may be correlated with the introduction of these genotypes in the times of slavery.

  5. Benchmark Dataset for Whole Genome Sequence Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C L, Biji; S Nair, Achuthsankar

    2017-01-01

    The research in DNA data compression lacks a standard dataset to test out compression tools specific to DNA. This paper argues that the current state of achievement in DNA compression is unable to be benchmarked in the absence of such scientifically compiled whole genome sequence dataset and proposes a benchmark dataset using multistage sampling procedure. Considering the genome sequence of organisms available in the National Centre for Biotechnology and Information (NCBI) as the universe, the proposed dataset selects 1,105 prokaryotes, 200 plasmids, 164 viruses, and 65 eukaryotes. This paper reports the results of using three established tools on the newly compiled dataset and show that their strength and weakness are evident only with a comparison based on the scientifically compiled benchmark dataset. The sample dataset and the respective links are available @ https://sourceforge.net/projects/benchmarkdnacompressiondataset/.

  6. Functional diversification upon leader protease domain duplication in the Citrus tristeza virus genome: Role of RNA sequences and the encoded proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sung-Hwan; Atallah, Osama O; Sun, Yong-Duo; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2018-01-15

    Viruses from the family Closteroviridae show an example of intra-genome duplications of more than one gene. In addition to the hallmark coat protein gene duplication, several members possess a tandem duplication of papain-like leader proteases. In this study, we demonstrate that domains encoding the L1 and L2 proteases in the Citrus tristeza virus genome underwent a significant functional divergence at the RNA and protein levels. We show that the L1 protease is crucial for viral accumulation and establishment of initial infection, whereas its coding region is vital for virus transport. On the other hand, the second protease is indispensable for virus infection of its natural citrus host, suggesting that L2 has evolved an important adaptive function that mediates virus interaction with the woody host. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Real-time, portable genome sequencing for Ebola surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Quick, Joshua; Loman, Nicholas J.; Duraffour, Sophie; Simpson, Jared T.; Severi, Ettore; Cowley, Lauren; Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Raymond; Dudas, Gytis; Mikhail, Amy; Ou?draogo, Nobila; Afrough, Babak; Bah, Amadou; Baum, Jonathan HJ; Becker-Ziaja, Beate

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa is the largest on record, responsible for >28,599 cases and >11,299 deaths 1 . Genome sequencing in viral outbreaks is desirable in order to characterize the infectious agent to determine its evolutionary rate, signatures of host adaptation, identification and monitoring of diagnostic targets and responses to vaccines and treatments. The Ebola virus genome (EBOV) substitution rate in the Makona strain has been estimated at between 0.87 ? 1...

  8. Recurrent targeted genes of hepatitis B virus in the liver cancer genomes identified by a next-generation sequencing-based approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ding

    Full Text Available Integration of the viral DNA into host chromosomes was found in most of the hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs. Here we devised a massive anchored parallel sequencing (MAPS method using next-generation sequencing to isolate and sequence HBV integrants. Applying MAPS to 40 pairs of HBV-related HCC tissues (cancer and adjacent tissues, we identified 296 HBV integration events corresponding to 286 unique integration sites (UISs with precise HBV-Human DNA junctions. HBV integration favored chromosome 17 and preferentially integrated into human transcript units. HBV targeted genes were enriched in GO terms: cAMP metabolic processes, T cell differentiation and activation, TGF beta receptor pathway, ncRNA catabolic process, and dsRNA fragmentation and cellular response to dsRNA. The HBV targeted genes include 7 genes (PTPRJ, CNTN6, IL12B, MYOM1, FNDC3B, LRFN2, FN1 containing IPR003961 (Fibronectin, type III domain, 7 genes (NRG3, MASP2, NELL1, LRP1B, ADAM21, NRXN1, FN1 containing IPR013032 (EGF-like region, conserved site, and three genes (PDE7A, PDE4B, PDE11A containing IPR002073 (3', 5'-cyclic-nucleotide phosphodiesterase. Enriched pathways include hsa04512 (ECM-receptor interaction, hsa04510 (Focal adhesion, and hsa04012 (ErbB signaling pathway. Fewer integration events were found in cancers compared to cancer-adjacent tissues, suggesting a clonal expansion model in HCC development. Finally, we identified 8 genes that were recurrent target genes by HBV integration including fibronectin 1 (FN1 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT1, two known recurrent target genes, and additional novel target genes such as SMAD family member 5 (SMAD5, phosphatase and actin regulator 4 (PHACTR4, and RNA binding protein fox-1 homolog (C. elegans 1 (RBFOX1. Integrating analysis with recently published whole-genome sequencing analysis, we identified 14 additional recurrent HBV target genes, greatly expanding the HBV recurrent target list

  9. Genome sequence of foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O lineage ind-2001d collected in Vietnam in 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is endemic in several countries in Asia and Africa and is considered one of the most important livestock diseases worldwide. Three serotypes of FMD virus (A, O and Asia1) contribute to endemicity in mainland Southeast Asia. In 2015, FMDV lineage Ind-2001 was detected for...

  10. Identification of circo-like virus-Brazil genomic sequences in raw sewage from the metropolitan area of São Paulo: evidence of circulation two and three years after the first detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrignano, Silvana Beres; Nagasse-Sugahara, Teresa Keico; Garrafa, Patrícia; Monezi, Telma Alves; Barrella, Karina Medici; Mehnert, Dolores Ursula

    2017-03-01

    Two novel viruses named circo-like virus-Brazil (CLV-BR) hs1 and hs2 were previously discovered in a Brazilian human fecal sample through metagenomics. CLV-BR hs1 and hs2 possess a small circular DNA genome encoding a replication initiator protein (Rep), and the two genomes exhibit 92% nucleotide identity with each other. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep protein showed that CLV-BRs do not cluster with circoviruses, nanoviruses, geminiviruses or cycloviruses. The aim of this study was to search for CLV-BR genomes in sewage and reclaimed water samples from the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, to verify whether the first detection of these viruses was an isolated finding. Sewage and reclaimed water samples collected concomitantly during the years 2005-2006 were purified and concentrated using methodologies designed for the study of viruses. A total of 177 treated reclaimed water samples were grouped into five pools, as were 177 treated raw sewage samples. Nucleic acid extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and Sanger sequencing were then performed.e. genomes were detected in two pools of sewage samples, p6 and p9. Approximately 28% and 51% of the CLV-BR genome was amplified from p6 and p9, respectively, including 76% of the Rep gene. The detected genomes are most likely related to CLV-BR hs1. Comparative analysis showed several synonymous substitutions within Rep-encoding sequences, suggesting purifying selection for this gene, as has been observed for other eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA) viruses. The results therefore indicated that CLV-BR has continued to circulate in Brazil two and three years after first being detected.

  11. Identification of circo-like virus-Brazil genomic sequences in raw sewage from the metropolitan area of São Paulo: evidence of circulation two and three years after the first detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvana Beres Castrignano

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Two novel viruses named circo-like virus-Brazil (CLV-BR hs1 and hs2 were previously discovered in a Brazilian human fecal sample through metagenomics. CLV-BR hs1 and hs2 possess a small circular DNA genome encoding a replication initiator protein (Rep, and the two genomes exhibit 92% nucleotide identity with each other. Phylogenetic analysis based on the Rep protein showed that CLV-BRs do not cluster with circoviruses, nanoviruses, geminiviruses or cycloviruses. OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to search for CLV-BR genomes in sewage and reclaimed water samples from the metropolitan area of São Paulo, Brazil, to verify whether the first detection of these viruses was an isolated finding. METHODS Sewage and reclaimed water samples collected concomitantly during the years 2005-2006 were purified and concentrated using methodologies designed for the study of viruses. A total of 177 treated reclaimed water samples were grouped into five pools, as were 177 treated raw sewage samples. Nucleic acid extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification and Sanger sequencing were then performed.e FINDINGS CLV-BR genomes were detected in two pools of sewage samples, p6 and p9. Approximately 28% and 51% of the CLV-BR genome was amplified from p6 and p9, respectively, including 76% of the Rep gene. The detected genomes are most likely related to CLV-BR hs1. Comparative analysis showed several synonymous substitutions within Rep-encoding sequences, suggesting purifying selection for this gene, as has been observed for other eukaryotic circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS-DNA viruses. MAIN CONCLUSION The results therefore indicated that CLV-BR has continued to circulate in Brazil two and three years after first being detected.

  12. The Genome Sequence of Drosophila melanogaster

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    ...; Mark D. Adams; Susan E. Celniker; Robert A. Holt; Cheryl A. Evans; Jeannine D. Gocayne; Peter G. Amanatides; Steven E. Scherer; Peter W. Li; Roger A. Hoskins; Richard F. Galle; Reed A. George; Suzanna E. Lewis; Stephen Richards; Michael Ashburner; Scott N. Henderson; Granger G. Sutton; Jennifer R. Wortman; Mark D. Yandell; Qing Zhang; Lin X. Chen; Rhonda C. Brandon; Yu-Hui C. Rogers; Robert G. Blazej; Mark Champe; Barret D. Pfeiffer; Kenneth H. Wan; Clare Doyle; Evan G. Baxter; Gregg Helt; Catherine R. Nelson; George L. Gabor; Miklos; Josep F. Abril; Anna Agbayani; Hui-Jin An; Cynthia Andrews-Pfannkoch; Danita Baldwin; Richard M. Ballew; Anand Basu; James Baxendale; Leyla Bayraktaroglu; Ellen M. Beasley; Karen Y. Beeson; P. V. Benos; Benjamin P. Berman; Deepali Bhandari; Slava Bolshakov; Dana Borkova; Michael R. Botchan; John Bouck; Peter Brokstein; Phillipe Brottier; Kenneth C. Burtis; Dana A. Busam; Heather Butler; Edouard Cadieu; Angela Center; Ishwar Chandra; J. Michael Cherry; Simon Cawley; Carl Dahlke; Lionel B. Davenport; Peter Davies; Beatriz de Pablos; Arthur Delcher; Zuoming Deng; Anne Deslattes Mays; Ian Dew; Suzanne M. Dietz; Kristina Dodson; Lisa E. Doup; Michael Downes; Shannon Dugan-Rocha; Boris C. Dunkov; Patrick Dunn; Kenneth J. Durbin; Carlos C. Evangelista; Concepcion Ferraz; Steven Ferriera; Wolfgang Fleischmann; Carl Fosler; Andrei E. Gabrielian; Neha S. Garg; William M. Gelbart; Ken Glasser; Anna Glodek; Fangcheng Gong; J. Harley Gorrell; Zhiping Gu; Ping Guan; Michael Harris; Nomi L. Harris; Damon Harvey; Thomas J. Heiman; Judith R. Hernandez; Jarrett Houck; Damon Hostin; Kathryn A. Houston; Timothy J. Howland; Ming-Hui Wei

    2000-01-01

    ... of the ∼120-megabase euchromatic portion of the Drosophila genome using a whole-genome shotgun sequencing strategy supported by extensive clone-based sequence and a high-quality bacterial artificial chromosome physical map...

  13. Genome Sequence of Mycobacteriophage Momo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Welkin H; Bina, Elizabeth A; Brahme, Indraneel S; Hill, Amy B; Himmelstein, Philip H; Hunsicker, Sara M; Ish, Amanda R; Le, Tinh S; Martin, Mary M; Moscinski, Catherine N; Shetty, Sameer A; Swierzewski, Tomasz; Iyengar, Varun B; Kim, Hannah; Schafer, Claire E; Grubb, Sarah R; Warner, Marcie H; Bowman, Charles A; Russell, Daniel A; Hatfull, Graham F

    2015-06-18

    Momo is a newly discovered phage of Mycobacterium smegmatis mc(2)155. Momo has a double-stranded DNA genome 154,553 bp in length, with 233 predicted protein-encoding genes, 34 tRNA genes, and one transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) gene. Momo has a myoviral morphology and shares extensive nucleotide sequence similarity with subcluster C1 mycobacteriophages. Copyright © 2015 Pope et al.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences, before and after Mammalian Cell Culture, of Zika Virus Isolated from the Serum of a Symptomatic Male Patient from Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukadida, Celia; Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Piten-Isidro, Elvira; Rivero-Arrieta, Amaranta Y; Luna-Villalobos, Yara A; Martínez-Vargas, Liliane; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofía L; Torres, Klintsy J; Lira, Rosalia; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo; Sevilla-Reyes, Edgar E

    2017-03-23

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arthropod-borne flavivirus associated with severe congenital malformations and neurological complications. Although the ZIKV genome is well characterized, there is limited information regarding changes after cell isolation and culture adaptation. We isolated, and passaged in Vero cells, ZIKV from the serum of a symptomatic male patient and compared the viral genomes before and after culture. Single nucleotide polymorphisms were characteristic among serum-circulating genomes, while such diversity decreased after cell culture. Copyright © 2017 Boukadida et al.

  15. Real-time, portable genome sequencing for Ebola surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bore, Joseph Akoi; Koundouno, Raymond; Dudas, Gytis; Mikhail, Amy; Ouédraogo, Nobila; Afrough, Babak; Bah, Amadou; Baum, Jonathan HJ; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Boettcher, Jan-Peter; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Camino-Sanchez, Alvaro; Carter, Lisa L.; Doerrbecker, Juiliane; Enkirch, Theresa; Dorival, Isabel Graciela García; Hetzelt, Nicole; Hinzmann, Julia; Holm, Tobias; Kafetzopoulou, Liana Eleni; Koropogui, Michel; Kosgey, Abigail; Kuisma, Eeva; Logue, Christopher H; Mazzarelli, Antonio; Meisel, Sarah; Mertens, Marc; Michel, Janine; Ngabo, Didier; Nitzsche, Katja; Pallash, Elisa; Patrono, Livia Victoria; Portmann, Jasmine; Repits, Johanna Gabriella; Rickett, Natasha Yasmin; Sachse, Andrea; Singethan, Katrin; Vitoriano, Inês; Yemanaberhan, Rahel L; Zekeng, Elsa G; Trina, Racine; Bello, Alexander; Sall, Amadou Alpha; Faye, Ousmane; Faye, Oumar; Magassouba, N’Faly; Williams, Cecelia V.; Amburgey, Victoria; Winona, Linda; Davis, Emily; Gerlach, Jon; Washington, Franck; Monteil, Vanessa; Jourdain, Marine; Bererd, Marion; Camara, Alimou; Somlare, Hermann; Camara, Abdoulaye; Gerard, Marianne; Bado, Guillaume; Baillet, Bernard; Delaune, Déborah; Nebie, Koumpingnin Yacouba; Diarra, Abdoulaye; Savane, Yacouba; Pallawo, Raymond Bernard; Gutierrez, Giovanna Jaramillo; Milhano, Natacha; Roger, Isabelle; Williams, Christopher J; Yattara, Facinet; Lewandowski, Kuiama; Taylor, Jamie; Rachwal, Philip; Turner, Daniel; Pollakis, Georgios; Hiscox, Julian A.; Matthews, David A.; O’Shea, Matthew K.; Johnston, Andrew McD; Wilson, Duncan; Hutley, Emma; Smit, Erasmus; Di Caro, Antonino; Woelfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Gabriel, Martin; Weller, Simon A.; Koivogui, Lamine; Diallo, Boubacar; Keita, Sakoba; Rambaut, Andrew; Formenty, Pierre; Gunther, Stephan; Carroll, Miles W.

    2016-01-01

    The Ebola virus disease (EVD) epidemic in West Africa is the largest on record, responsible for >28,599 cases and >11,299 deaths 1. Genome sequencing in viral outbreaks is desirable in order to characterize the infectious agent to determine its evolutionary rate, signatures of host adaptation, identification and monitoring of diagnostic targets and responses to vaccines and treatments. The Ebola virus genome (EBOV) substitution rate in the Makona strain has been estimated at between 0.87 × 10−3 to 1.42 × 10−3 mutations per site per year. This is equivalent to 16 to 27 mutations in each genome, meaning that sequences diverge rapidly enough to identify distinct sub-lineages during a prolonged epidemic 2-7. Genome sequencing provides a high-resolution view of pathogen evolution and is increasingly sought-after for outbreak surveillance. Sequence data may be used to guide control measures, but only if the results are generated quickly enough to inform interventions 8. Genomic surveillance during the epidemic has been sporadic due to a lack of local sequencing capacity coupled with practical difficulties transporting samples to remote sequencing facilities 9. In order to address this problem, we devised a genomic surveillance system that utilizes a novel nanopore DNA sequencing instrument. In April 2015 this system was transported in standard airline luggage to Guinea and used for real-time genomic surveillance of the ongoing epidemic. Here we present sequence data and analysis of 142 Ebola virus (EBOV) samples collected during the period March to October 2015. We were able to generate results in less than 24 hours after receiving an Ebola positive sample, with the sequencing process taking as little as 15-60 minutes. We show that real-time genomic surveillance is possible in resource-limited settings and can be established rapidly to monitor outbreaks. PMID:26840485

  16. Complete genome sequence of mandarin decline Citrus tristeza virus of the Northeastern Himalayan hill region of India: comparative analyses determine recombinant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kajal K; Tarafdar, Avijit; Sharma, Susheel K

    2012-03-01

    The complete genome sequence of a mandarin (Citrus reticulata) decline CTV isolate, Kpg3, of the Darjeeling hills of the Northeastern Himalayan region of India is reported for the first time. The complete Kpg3 genome has 19253 nt, and its nucleotide sequence identity ranged from 79% with the Florida CTV isolate T36 to 94% with the Israel isolate VT, whereas its identity to B165, the other Indian isolate, was 89%. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Kpg3 genome is closely related to isolate VT and distantly to T36 and B165. Recombination analysis indicated that Kpg3 is recombinant and originated through multiple recombination events in which parts of the genome were exchanged between divergent CTV sequences.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Germline Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6A and Analyses Integration Sites Define a New Human Endogenous Virus with Potential to Reactivate as an Emerging Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tweedy, Joshua; Spyrou, Maria Alexandra; Pearson, Max; Lassner, Dirk; Kuhl, Uwe; Gompels, Ursula A

    2016-01-15

    Human herpesvirus-6A and B (HHV-6A, HHV-6B) have recently defined endogenous genomes, resulting from integration into the germline: chromosomally-integrated "CiHHV-6A/B". These affect approximately 1.0% of human populations, giving potential for virus gene expression in every cell. We previously showed that CiHHV-6A was more divergent than CiHHV-6B by examining four genes in 44 European CiHHV-6A/B cardiac/haematology patients. There was evidence for gene expression/reactivation, implying functional non-defective genomes. To further define the relationship between HHV-6A and CiHHV-6A we used next-generation sequencing to characterize genomes from three CiHHV-6A cardiac patients. Comparisons to known exogenous HHV-6A showed CiHHV-6A genomes formed a separate clade; including all 85 non-interrupted genes and necessary cis-acting signals for reactivation as infectious virus. Greater single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) density was defined in 16 genes and the direct repeats (DR) terminal regions. Using these SNPs, deep sequencing analyses demonstrated superinfection with exogenous HHV-6A in two of the CiHHV-6A patients with recurrent cardiac disease. Characterisation of the integration sites in twelve patients identified the human chromosome 17p subtelomere as a prevalent site, which had specific repeat structures and phylogenetically related CiHHV-6A coding sequences indicating common ancestral origins. Overall CiHHV-6A genomes were similar, but distinct from known exogenous HHV-6A virus, and have the capacity to reactivate as emerging virus infections.

  18. Pig genome sequence - analysis and publication strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Archibald, Alan L.; Bolund, Lars; Churcher, Carol

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The pig genome is being sequenced and characterised under the auspices of the Swine Genome Sequencing Consortium. The sequencing strategy followed a hybrid approach combining hierarchical shotgun sequencing of BAC clones and whole genome shotgun sequencing. RESULTS: Assemblies...... of the BAC clone derived genome sequence have been annotated using the Pre-Ensembl and Ensembl automated pipelines and made accessible through the Pre-Ensembl/Ensembl browsers. The current annotated genome assembly (Sscrofa9) was released with Ensembl 56 in September 2009. A revised assembly (Sscrofa10......) is under construction and will incorporate whole genome shotgun sequence (WGS) data providing > 30x genome coverage. The WGS sequence, most of which comprise short Illumina/Solexa reads, were generated from DNA from the same single Duroc sow as the source of the BAC library from which clones were...

  19. Full-genome sequence of influenza A(H5N8) virus in poultry linked to sequences of strains from Asia, the Netherlands, 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouwstra, Ruth; Heutink, Rene; Bossers, Alex; Harders, Frank; Koch, Guus; Elbers, Armin

    2015-01-01

    Genetic analyses of highly pathogenic avian influenza A(H5N8) virus from the Netherlands, and comparison with strains from Europe, South Korea, and Japan, showed a close relation. Data suggest the strains were probably carried to the Netherlands by migratory wild birds from Asia, possibly through

  20. Exceptionally diverse morphotypes and genomes of crenarchaeal hyperthermophilic viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D; Garrett, R A

    2004-01-01

    The remarkable diversity of the morphologies of viruses found in terrestrial hydrothermal environments with temperatures >80 degrees C is unprecedented for aquatic ecosystems. The best-studied viruses from these habitats have been assigned to novel viral families: Fuselloviridae, Lipothrixviridae...... no significant matches to sequences in public databases. This suggests that these hyperthermophilic viruses have exceptional biochemical solutions for biological functions. Specific features of genome organization, as well as strategies for DNA replication, suggest that phylogenetic relationships exist between...... crenarchaeal rudiviruses and the large eukaryal DNA viruses: poxviruses, the African swine fever virus and Chlorella viruses. Sequence patterns at the ends of the linear genome of the lipothrixvirus AFV1 are reminiscent of the telomeric ends of linear eukaryal chromosomes and suggest that a primitive telomeric...

  1. Deep-sequencing of Marburg virus genome during sequential mouse passaging and cell-culture adaptation reveals extensive changes over time

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Haiyan; Audet, Jonathan; Wong, Gary; He, Shihua; Huang, Xueyong; Cutts, Todd; Theriault, Steven; Xu, Bianli; Kobinger, Gary; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2017-01-01

    Marburg virus (MARV) has caused outbreaks of filoviral hemorrhagic fever since its discovery in 1967. The largest and deadliest outbreak occurred in Angola in 2005, with 252 cases and 227 deaths. In 2014, we developed a mouse-adapted MARV, Angola variant through serial passaging in mice. The mouse-adapted MARV exhibits many of the hallmarks of MARV disease in humans. By applying deep-sequencing to every passage of the virus, we are able to study virus evolution in this host with surprising pr...

  2. Value of a newly sequenced bacterial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbosa, Eudes; Aburjaile, Flavia F; Ramos, Rommel Tj

    2014-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have made high-throughput sequencing available to medium- and small-size laboratories, culminating in a tidal wave of genomic information. The quantity of sequenced bacterial genomes has not only brought excitement to the field of genomics but also...... heightened expectations that NGS would boost antibacterial discovery and vaccine development. Although many possible drug and vaccine targets have been discovered, the success rate of genome-based analysis has remained below expectations. Furthermore, NGS has had consequences for genome quality, resulting...... in an exponential increase in draft (partial data) genome deposits in public databases. If no further interests are expressed for a particular bacterial genome, it is more likely that the sequencing of its genome will be limited to a draft stage, and the painstaking tasks of completing the sequencing of its genome...

  3. A Glimpse of the genomic diversity of haloarchaeal tailed viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eSencilo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tailed viruses are the most common isolates infecting prokaryotic hosts residing hypersaline environments. Archaeal tailed viruses represent only a small portion of all characterized tailed viruses of prokaryotes. But even this small dataset revealed that archaeal tailed viruses have many similarities to their counterparts infecting bacteria, the bacteriophages. Shared functional homologues and similar genome organizations suggested that all microbial tailed viruses have common virion architectural and assembly principles. Recent structural studies have provided evidence justifying this thereby grouping archaeal and bacterial tailed viruses into a single lineage. Currently there are 17 haloarchaeal tailed viruses with entirely sequenced genomes. Nine viruses have at least one close relative among the 17 viruses and, according to the similarities, can be divided into three groups. Two other viruses share some homologues and therefore are distantly related, whereas the rest of the viruses are rather divergent (or singletons. Comparative genomics analysis of these viruses offers a glimpse into the genetic diversity and structure of haloarchaeal tailed virus communities.

  4. Twenty years of bacterial genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loman, Nicholas J; Pallen, Mark J

    2015-12-01

    Twenty years ago, the publication of the first bacterial genome sequence, from Haemophilus influenzae, shook the world of bacteriology. In this Timeline, we review the first two decades of bacterial genome sequencing, which have been marked by three revolutions: whole-genome shotgun sequencing, high-throughput sequencing and single-molecule long-read sequencing. We summarize the social history of sequencing and its impact on our understanding of the biology, diversity and evolution of bacteria, while also highlighting spin-offs and translational impact in the clinic. We look forward to a 'sequencing singularity', where sequencing becomes the method of choice for as-yet unthinkable applications in bacteriology and beyond.

  5. Analyzing Influenza Virus Sequences using Binary Encoding Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ham Ching Lam

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Capturing mutation patterns of each individual influenza virus sequence is often challenging; in this paper, we demonstrated that using a binary encoding scheme coupled with dimension reduction technique, we were able to capture the intrinsic mutation pattern of the virus. Our approach looks at the variance between sequences instead of the commonly used p-distance or Hamming distance. We first convert the influenza genetic sequences to a binary strings and form a binary sequence alignment matrix and then apply Principal Component Analysis (PCA to this matrix. PCA also provides identification power to identify reassortant virus by using data projection technique. Due to the sparsity of the binary string, we were able to analyze large volume of influenza sequence data in a very short time. For protein sequences, our scheme also allows the incorporation of biophysical properties of each amino acid. Here, we present various encouraging results from analyzing influenza nucleotide, protein and genome sequences using the proposed approach.

  6. GB virus C (GBV-C) evolutionary patterns revealed by analyses of reference genomes, E2 and NS5B sequences amplified from viral strains circulating in the Lisbon area (Portugal).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parreira, Ricardo; Branco, Cristina; Piedade, João; Esteves, Aida

    2012-01-01

    GBV-C is a non-pathogenic virus that is largely dispersed in different human populations. The phylogenetic analysis of the 5'-untranslated region (5'UTR) of the GBV-C genome has led to the segregation of viral strains into six genotypes, but incongruent results are frequently obtained depending on the genome region analyzed. In this report, different phylogenetic approaches and multivariate statistics were combined to disclose evolutionary patterns that contribute to shape GBV-C evolution. The data here presented indicate: (i) that the phylogenetic noise was mostly determined by the size of the analyzed sequence, rather than by its position on the viral genome; (ii) that most genomic segments in the coding sequence seemed to evolve under a similar evolution model, which was different from that which best fits the 5'UTR, with overall large heterogeneity of rate change across the sequence; (iii) that due to saturation of transversions occurring in the 5'UTR at genetic distances GBV-C evolution extensively, this being shown for both reference genomes and NS5B GBV-C sequences amplified from Portuguese residents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Advantages of genome sequencing by long-read sequencer using SMRT technology in medical area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, Kazuma; Shiroma, Akino; Shimoji, Makiko; Tamotsu, Hinako; Ashimine, Noriko; Ohki, Shun; Shinzato, Misuzu; Minami, Maiko; Nakanishi, Tetsuhiro; Teruya, Kuniko; Satou, Kazuhito; Hirano, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    PacBio RS II is the first commercialized third-generation DNA sequencer able to sequence a single molecule DNA in real-time without amplification. PacBio RS II's sequencing technology is novel and unique, enabling the direct observation of DNA synthesis by DNA polymerase. PacBio RS II confers four major advantages compared to other sequencing technologies: long read lengths, high consensus accuracy, a low degree of bias, and simultaneous capability of epigenetic characterization. These advantages surmount the obstacle of sequencing genomic regions such as high/low G+C, tandem repeat, and interspersed repeat regions. Moreover, PacBio RS II is ideal for whole genome sequencing, targeted sequencing, complex population analysis, RNA sequencing, and epigenetics characterization. With PacBio RS II, we have sequenced and analyzed the genomes of many species, from viruses to humans. Herein, we summarize and review some of our key genome sequencing projects, including full-length viral sequencing, complete bacterial genome and almost-complete plant genome assemblies, and long amplicon sequencing of a disease-associated gene region. We believe that PacBio RS II is not only an effective tool for use in the basic biological sciences but also in the medical/clinical setting.

  8. jpHMM: recombination analysis in viruses with circular genomes such as the hepatitis B virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Abdou-Chekaraou, Mariama; Gordien, Emmanuel; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Zoaulim, Fabien; Dény, Paul; Stanke, Mario

    2012-07-01

    jpHMM is a very accurate and widely used tool for recombination detection in genomic sequences of HIV-1. Here, we present an extension of jpHMM to analyze recombinations in viruses with circular genomes such as the hepatitis B virus (HBV). Sequence analysis of circular genomes is usually performed on linearized sequences using linear models. Since linear models are unable to model dependencies between nucleotides at the 5'- and 3'-end of a sequence, this can result in inaccurate predictions of recombination breakpoints and thus in incorrect classification of viruses with circular genomes. The proposed circular jpHMM takes into account the circularity of the genome and is not biased against recombination breakpoints close to the 5'- or 3'-end of the linearized version of the circular genome. It can be applied automatically to any query sequence without assuming a specific origin for the sequence coordinates. We apply the method to genomic sequences of HBV and visualize its output in a circular form. jpHMM is available online at http://jphmm.gobics.de for download and as a web server for HIV-1 and HBV sequences.

  9. VirusSeq: software to identify viruses and their integration sites using next-generation sequencing of human cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxin; Yao, Hui; Thompson, Erika J; Tannir, Nizar M; Weinstein, John N; Su, Xiaoping

    2013-01-15

    We developed a new algorithmic method, VirusSeq, for detecting known viruses and their integration sites in the human genome using next-generation sequencing data. We evaluated VirusSeq on whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data of 256 human cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Using these data, we showed that VirusSeq accurately detects the known viruses and their integration sites with high sensitivity and specificity. VirusSeq can also perform this function using whole-genome sequencing data of human tissue. VirusSeq has been implemented in PERL and is available at http://odin.mdacc.tmc.edu/∼xsu1/VirusSeq.html. xsu1@mdanderson.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  11. Engineered Viruses as Genome Editing Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoyu; Gonçalves, Manuel A F V

    2016-03-01

    Genome editing based on sequence-specific designer nucleases, also known as programmable nucleases, seeks to modify in a targeted and precise manner the genetic information content of living cells. Delivering into cells designer nucleases alone or together with donor DNA templates, which serve as surrogate homologous recombination (HR) substrates, can result in gene knockouts or gene knock-ins, respectively. As engineered replication-defective viruses, viral vectors are having an increasingly important role as delivery vehicles for donor DNA templates and designer nucleases, namely, zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-associated Cas9 (CRISPR-Cas9) nucleases, also known as RNA-guided nucleases (RGNs). We review this dual role played by engineered viral particles on genome editing while focusing on their main scaffolds, consisting of lentiviruses, adeno-associated viruses, and adenoviruses. In addition, the coverage of the growing body of research on the repurposing of viral vectors as delivery systems for genome editing tools is complemented with information regarding their main characteristics, pros, and cons. Finally, this information is framed by a concise description of the chief principles, tools, and applications of the genome editing field as a whole.

  12. Fungal genome sequencing: basic biology to biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Krishna Kant

    2016-08-01

    The genome sequences provide a first glimpse into the genomic basis of the biological diversity of filamentous fungi and yeast. The genome sequence of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with a small genome size, unicellular growth, and rich history of genetic and molecular analyses was a milestone of early genomics in the 1990s. The subsequent completion of fission yeast, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and genetic model, Neurospora crassa initiated a revolution in the genomics of the fungal kingdom. In due course of time, a substantial number of fungal genomes have been sequenced and publicly released, representing the widest sampling of genomes from any eukaryotic kingdom. An ambitious genome-sequencing program provides a wealth of data on metabolic diversity within the fungal kingdom, thereby enhancing research into medical science, agriculture science, ecology, bioremediation, bioenergy, and the biotechnology industry. Fungal genomics have higher potential to positively affect human health, environmental health, and the planet's stored energy. With a significant increase in sequenced fungal genomes, the known diversity of genes encoding organic acids, antibiotics, enzymes, and their pathways has increased exponentially. Currently, over a hundred fungal genome sequences are publicly available; however, no inclusive review has been published. This review is an initiative to address the significance of the fungal genome-sequencing program and provides the road map for basic and applied research.

  13. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. IMPORTANCE Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and

  14. Genetic Variability of Myxoma Virus Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Christoph; Thürmer, Andrea; Daniel, Rolf; Schultz, Anne-Kathrin; Bulla, Ingo; Schirrmeier, Horst; Mayer, Dietmar; Neubert, Andreas; Czerny, Claus-Peter

    2017-02-15

    Myxomatosis is a recurrent problem on rabbit farms throughout Europe despite the success of vaccines. To identify gene variations of field and vaccine strains that may be responsible for changes in virulence, immunomodulation, and immunoprotection, the genomes of 6 myxoma virus (MYXV) strains were sequenced: German field isolates Munich-1, FLI-H, 2604, and 3207; vaccine strain MAV; and challenge strain ZA. The analyzed genomes ranged from 147.6 kb (strain MAV) to 161.8 kb (strain 3207). All sequences were affected by several mutations, covering 24 to 93 open reading frames (ORFs) and resulted in amino acid substitutions, insertions, or deletions. Only strains Munich-1 and MAV revealed the deletion of 10 ORFs (M007L to M015L) and 11 ORFs (M007L to M008.1L and M149R to M008.1R), respectively. Major differences were observed in the 27 immunomodulatory proteins encoded by MYXV. Compared to the reference strain Lausanne, strains FLI-H, 2604, 3207, and ZA showed the highest amino acid identity (>98.4%). In strains Munich-1 and MAV, deletion of 5 and 10 ORFs, respectively, was observed, encoding immunomodulatory proteins with ankyrin repeats or members of the family of serine protease inhibitors. Furthermore, putative immunodominant surface proteins with homology to vaccinia virus (VACV) were investigated in the sequenced strains. Only strain MAV revealed above-average frequencies of amino acid substitutions and frameshift mutations. Finally, we performed recombination analysis and found signs of recombination in vaccine strain MAV. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship of strain MAV and the MSW strain of Californian MYXV. However, in a challenge model, strain MAV provided full protection against lethal challenges with strain ZA. Myxoma virus (MYXV) is pathogenic for European rabbits and two North American species. Due to sophisticated strategies in immune evasion and oncolysis, MYXV is an important model virus for immunological and pathological research. In

  15. Molecular diagnostics of aleutian mink disease virus: applied use of next generation sequencing and phylogenetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hagberg, Emma Elisabeth

    such as next generation sequencing cheaper and more easily available. Whole genome sequencing and advanced phylogenetic analyses have successfully been applied to describe the molecular evolution and transmission patterns for viruses such as Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Ebola, and avian influenza virus...

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Canine Papillomavirus Type 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luff, Jennifer; Moore, Peter; Zhou, Dan; Wang, Jingang; Usuda, Yukari; Affolter, Verena; Schlegel, Richard

    2012-01-01

    Papillomaviruses are epitheliotropic, nonenveloped, circular, double-stranded DNA viruses within the family Papillomaviridae that are associated with benign and malignant tumors in humans and animals. We report the complete genome sequence of canine papillomavirus type 10 identified from a pigmented plaque located on the head of a mixed-breed bloodhound. PMID:22997424

  17. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkkamp, Harald M I; Kini, R Manjunatha; Pospelov, Alexey S; Vonk, Freek J; Henkel, Christiaan V; Richardson, Michael K

    2016-12-01

    Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy-very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression.

  18. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harald M. I. Kerkkamp

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy—very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression.

  19. Snake Genome Sequencing: Results and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkkamp, Harald M. I.; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Pospelov, Alexey S.; Vonk, Freek J.; Henkel, Christiaan V.; Richardson, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    Snake genome sequencing is in its infancy—very much behind the progress made in sequencing the genomes of humans, model organisms and pathogens relevant to biomedical research, and agricultural species. We provide here an overview of some of the snake genome projects in progress, and discuss the biological findings, with special emphasis on toxinology, from the small number of draft snake genomes already published. We discuss the future of snake genomics, pointing out that new sequencing technologies will help overcome the problem of repetitive sequences in assembling snake genomes. Genome sequences are also likely to be valuable in examining the clustering of toxin genes on the chromosomes, in designing recombinant antivenoms and in studying the epigenetic regulation of toxin gene expression. PMID:27916957

  20. A Short Sequence Motif in the 5 ' Leader of the HIV-1 Genome Modulates Extended RNA Dimer Formation and Virus Replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bel, N.; Das, A.T.; Cornelissen, M.; Abbink, G.E.M.; Berkhout, B.

    2014-01-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via

  1. A short sequence motif in the 5' leader of the HIV-1 genome modulates extended RNA dimer formation and virus replication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bel, Nikki; Das, Atze T.; Cornelissen, Marion; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-01-01

    The 5' leader of the HIV-1 RNA genome encodes signals that control various steps in the replication cycle, including the dimerization initiation signal (DIS) that triggers RNA dimerization. The DIS folds a hairpin structure with a palindromic sequence in the loop that allows RNA dimerization via

  2. Transcription of densovirus endogenous sequences in the Myzus persicae genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clavijo, Gabriel; van Munster, Manuella; Monsion, Baptiste; Bochet, Nicole; Brault, Véronique

    2016-04-01

    Integration of non-retroviral sequences in the genome of different organisms has been observed and, in some cases, a relationship of these integrations with immunity has been established. The genome of the green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (clone G006), was screened for densovirus-like sequence (DLS) integrations. A total of 21 DLSs localized on 10 scaffolds were retrieved that mostly shared sequence identity with two aphid-infecting viruses, Myzus persicae densovirus (MpDNV) and Dysaphis plantaginea densovirus (DplDNV). In some cases, uninterrupted potential ORFs corresponding to non-structural viral proteins or capsid proteins were found within DLSs identified in the aphid genome. In particular, one scaffold harboured a complete virus-like genome, while another scaffold contained two virus-like genomes in reverse orientation. Remarkably, transcription of some of these ORFs was observed in M. persicae, suggesting a biological effect of these viral integrations. In contrast to most of the other densoviruses identified so far that induce acute host infection, it has been reported previously that MpDNV has only a minor effect on M. persicae fitness, while DplDNV can even have a beneficial effect on its aphid host. This suggests that DLS integration in the M. persicae genome may be responsible for the latency of MpDNV infection in the aphid host.

  3. Analysis of the nonstructural and structural polyprotein regions, and complete genome sequences of Israel acute paralysis viruses identified from honeybees (Apis mellifera) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Kondreddy Eswar; Noh, Jin Hyeong; Kim, Young-Ha; Yoo, Mi Sun; Doan, Huong Thi Thanh; Ramya, Mummadireddy; Jung, Suk-Chan; Quyen, Dong Van; Kang, Seung-Won

    2013-09-01

    Phylogenetic trees were constructed for 24 partial nucleotide sequences of the nonstructural polyprotein (ORF1) and structural polyprotein regions (ORF2) of Korean IAPV genotypes, as well as eight previously reported IAPV sequences from various countries. Most of the Korean genotypes formed a distinct cluster, separate from other country genotypes. To investigate this phenomenon in more detail, three complete IAPV genome sequences were identified from different regions in Korea, i.e., Korea1, Korea2, and Korea3. These sequences were aligned with eight previously reported complete genome sequences and various genome regions were compared. The Korean IAPVs were very similar to those from China and Israel, but highly diverged from USA and Australian genotypes. Interestingly, they showed greater variability than the USA and Australian genotypes in ORF1, but highly similar to the Australian genotype in the ORF2 region. Thus, genetic recombination may account for the spatial distance between the Korean IAPV genotypes and those from other countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Deep-sequencing of Marburg virus genome during sequential mouse passaging and cell-culture adaptation reveals extensive changes over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Haiyan; Audet, Jonathan; Wong, Gary; He, Shihua; Huang, Xueyong; Cutts, Todd; Theriault, Steven; Xu, Bianli; Kobinger, Gary; Qiu, Xiangguo

    2017-06-13

    Marburg virus (MARV) has caused outbreaks of filoviral hemorrhagic fever since its discovery in 1967. The largest and deadliest outbreak occurred in Angola in 2005, with 252 cases and 227 deaths. In 2014, we developed a mouse-adapted MARV, Angola variant through serial passaging in mice. The mouse-adapted MARV exhibits many of the hallmarks of MARV disease in humans. By applying deep-sequencing to every passage of the virus, we are able to study virus evolution in this host with surprising precision. We show that two regions go through substantial changes: the intergenic region between NP and VP35, as well as the first 100 amino acids of the VP40 protein. Our results also reveal that there were profound changes during the production of the final virus stock in cell culture. Overall, our results show that a handful of regions carry most of the mutations acquired during the adaptation of the virus to a new host and that many mutations become fixed very early during the adaptation process.

  5. Genome-tools: a flexible package for genome sequence analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, William; Chen, Swaine L

    2002-12-01

    Genome-tools is a Perl module, a set of programs, and a user interface that facilitates access to genome sequence information. The package is flexible, extensible, and designed to be accessible and useful to both nonprogrammers and programmers. Any relatively well-annotated genome available with standard GenBank genome files may be used with genome-tools. A simple Web-based front end permits searching any available genome with an intuitive interface. Flexible design choices also make it simple to handle revised versions of genome annotation files as they change. In addition, programmers can develop cross-genomic tools and analyses with minimal additional overhead by combining genome-tools modules with newly written modules. Genome-tools runs on any computer platform for which Perl is available, including Unix, Microsoft Windows, and Mac OS. By simplifying the access to large amounts of genomic data, genome-tools may be especially useful for molecular biologists looking at newly sequenced genomes, for which few informatics tools are available. The genome-tools Web interface is accessible at http://genome-tools.sourceforge.net, and the source code is available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/genome-tools.

  6. Postcards from the edge: structural genomics of archaeal viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupovic, Mart; White, Malcolm F; Forterre, Patrick; Prangishvili, David

    2012-01-01

    Ever since their discovery, archaeal viruses have fascinated biologists with their unusual virion morphotypes and their ability to thrive in extreme environments. Attempts to understand the biology of these viruses through genome sequence analysis were not efficient. Genomes of archaeoviruses proved to be terra incognita with only a few genes with predictable functions but uncertain provenance. In order to facilitate functional characterization of archaeal virus proteins, several research groups undertook a structural genomics approach. This chapter summarizes the outcome of these efforts. High-resolution structures of 30 proteins encoded by archaeal viruses have been solved so far. Some of these proteins possess new structural folds, whereas others display previously known topologies, albeit without detectable sequence similarity to their structural homologues. Structures of the major capsid proteins have illuminated intriguing evolutionary connections between viruses infecting hosts from different domains of life and also revealed new structural folds not yet observed in currently known bacterial and eukaryotic viruses. Structural studies, discussed here, have advanced our understanding of the archaeal virosphere and provided precious information on different aspects of biology of archaeal viruses and evolution of viruses in general. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Genome sequences of a capulavirus infecting Plantago lanceolata in the Åland archipelago of Finland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susi, Hanna; Laine, Anna-Liisa; Filloux, Denis; Kraberger, Simona; Farkas, Kata; Bernardo, Pauline; Frilander, Mikko J; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2017-07-01

    The discovery and full-genome sequences of two isolates of a fourth capulavirus species are reported. The viruses were discovered during a viral metagenomics survey of uncultivated Plantago lanceolata plants in the Åland archipelago of south western Finland. The newly discovered viruses apparently produce no symptoms in P. lanceolata. They have a genome organization that is very similar to that of the three known capulavirus species and additionally share between 62.9 and 67.1% genome-wide sequence identity with the isolates of these species. It is therefore proposed that these viruses be assigned to a new capulavirus species named "Plantago lanceolata latent virus".

  8. Four novel algal virus genomes discovered from Yellowstone Lake metagenomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weijia; Zhou, Jinglie; Liu, Taigang; Yu, Yongxin; Pan, Yingjie; Yan, Shuling; Wang, Yongjie

    2015-10-13

    Phycodnaviruses are algae-infecting large dsDNA viruses that are widely distributed in aquatic environments. Here, partial genomic sequences of four novel algal viruses were assembled from a Yellowstone Lake metagenomic data set. Genomic analyses revealed that three Yellowstone Lake phycodnaviruses (YSLPVs) had genome lengths of 178,262 bp, 171,045 bp, and 171,454 bp, respectively, and were phylogenetically closely related to prasinoviruses (Phycodnaviridae). The fourth (YSLGV), with a genome length of 73,689 bp, was related to group III in the extended family Mimiviridae comprising Organic Lake phycodnaviruses and Phaeocystis globosa virus 16 T (OLPG). A pair of inverted terminal repeats was detected in YSLPV1, suggesting that its genome is nearly complete. Interestingly, these four putative YSL giant viruses also bear some genetic similarities to Yellowstone Lake virophages (YSLVs). For example, they share nine non-redundant homologous genes, including ribonucleotide reductase small subunit (a gene conserved in nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses) and Organic Lake virophage OLV2 (conserved in the majority of YSLVs). Additionally, putative multidrug resistance genes (emrE) were found in YSLPV1 and YSLPV2 but not in other viruses. Phylogenetic trees of emrE grouped YSLPVs with algae, suggesting that horizontal gene transfer occurred between giant viruses and their potential algal hosts.

  9. Evolutionary genomics of archaeal viruses: unique viral genomes in the third domain of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, D.; Garrett, R. A.; Koonin, E.

    2006-01-01

    . In accord with this distinction, the sequenced genomes of euryarchaeal viruses encode many proteins homologous to bacteriophage capsid proteins. In contrast, initial analysis of the crenarchaeal viral genomes revealed no relationships with bacteriophages and, generally, very few proteins with detectable...... homologs. Here we describe a re-analysis of the proteins encoded by archaeal viruses, with an emphasis on comparative genomics of the unique viruses of Crenarchaeota. Detailed examination of conserved domains and motifs uncovered a significant number of previously unnoticed homologous relationships among...... the proteins of crenarchaeal viruses and between viral proteins and those from cellular life forms and allowed functional predictions for some of these conserved genes. A small pool of genes is shared by overlapping subsets of crenarchaeal viruses, in a general analogy with the metagenome structure...

  10. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Supplementary data: Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of Odontamblyopus rubicundus (Perciformes: Gobiidae): genome characterization and phylogenetic analysis. Tianxing Liu, Xiaoxiao Jin, Rixin Wang and Tianjun Xu. J. Genet. 92, 423–432. Figure 1. Gene map of O. rubicundus mitochondrial genome.

  11. The advent of personal genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drmanac, Radoje

    2011-03-01

    Rapid technological advances are decreasing DNA sequencing costs and making it practical to undertake complete human genome sequencing on a large scale for the first time. Disease studies that involve sequencing hundreds of patient genomes are underway. The all-inclusive sequencing price per genome is expected to reach $1000 over the next few years and will likely decline further in the following years. This dramatic price decline will herald widespread personal genome sequencing and lead to significant improvements in human health and reduced health care costs. Key to realizing these benefits will be medical genomics' and systems biology's success in providing increasing contextual interpretation of biological and medical effects of the detected sequence variants in a genome. Given the substantial potential benefits and the manageability of the health and discrimination risks involved with the possible misuse of this information, we propose that governments and insurance companies support or even require personal genome sequencing. Critical to the widespread acceptance of personal genome sequencing, however, will be the need to educate physicians and the public about the realistic benefits and risks of such an analysis to prevent overinterpretation and misuse of this valuable information.

  12. Complete sequence of the mitochondrial genome of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Odontamblyopus rubicundus is a species of gobiid fishes, inhabits muddy-bottomed coastal waters. In this paper, the first complete mitochondrial genome sequence of O. rubicundus is reported. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence is. 17119 bp in length and contains 13 protein-coding genes, two rRNA ...

  13. A simple method for the parallel deep sequencing of full influenza A genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Marie-Louise; Fordyce, Sarah Louise; Avila Arcos, Maria del Carmen

    2011-01-01

    Given the major threat of influenza A to human and animal health, and its ability to evolve rapidly through mutation and reassortment, tools that enable its timely characterization are necessary to help monitor its evolution and spread. For this purpose, deep sequencing can be a very valuable tool....... This study reports a comprehensive method that enables deep sequencing of the complete genomes of influenza A subtypes using the Illumina Genome Analyzer IIx (GAIIx). By using this method, the complete genomes of nine viruses were sequenced in parallel, representing the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus, H5N1 virus...

  14. Human Genome Sequencing in Health and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Lupski, James R.; Gibbs, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    Following the “finished,” euchromatic, haploid human reference genome sequence, the rapid development of novel, faster, and cheaper sequencing technologies is making possible the era of personalized human genomics. Personal diploid human genome sequences have been generated, and each has contributed to our better understanding of variation in the human genome. We have consequently begun to appreciate the vastness of individual genetic variation from single nucleotide to structural variants. Translation of genome-scale variation into medically useful information is, however, in its infancy. This review summarizes the initial steps undertaken in clinical implementation of personal genome information, and describes the application of whole-genome and exome sequencing to identify the cause of genetic diseases and to suggest adjuvant therapies. Better analysis tools and a deeper understanding of the biology of our genome are necessary in order to decipher, interpret, and optimize clinical utility of what the variation in the human genome can teach us. Personal genome sequencing may eventually become an instrument of common medical practice, providing information that assists in the formulation of a differential diagnosis. We outline herein some of the remaining challenges. PMID:22248320

  15. Presence of rose spring dwarf-associated virus in Chile: partial genome sequence and detection in roses and their colonizing aphids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Paulina A; Engel, Esteban A

    2010-10-01

    Rose is one of the most important cut flowers produced in the world. It is also grown in landscape plantings and public gardens for ornamental purposes. However, there is no detailed information available about viruses infecting roses in Chile. In order to gain insight about the viruses that could be present, a plant showing yellow vein chlorosis in its leaves was collected from a garden in Santiago. Double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) was isolated and after a random primed RT-PCR amplification procedure followed by sequencing, Rose spring dwarf-associated virus (RSDaV) presence was established. In order to widen the survey, several additional symptomatic and asymptomatic plants as well as aphids were screened by RT-PCR using two different pairs of virus-specific primers. RSDaV was detected in 24% of the analyzed samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RSDaV in Chilean rose plants and Rhodobium porosum (Sanderson) aphids.

  16. Analysis of ORF5 and full-length genome sequences of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolates of genotypes 1 and 2 retrieved worldwide provides evidence that recombination is a common phenomenon and may produce mosaic isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Valls, G E; Kvisgaard, L K; Tello, M; Darwich, L; Cortey, M; Burgara-Estrella, A J; Hernández, J; Larsen, L E; Mateu, E

    2014-03-01

    Recombination is currently recognized as a factor for high genetic diversity, but the frequency of such recombination events and the genome segments involved are not well known. In the present study, we initially focused on the detection of recombinant porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) isolates by examining previously published data sets of ORF5 sequences (genotypes 1 and 2) obtained worldwide. We then examined full-length genome sequences in order to determine potential recombination breakpoints along the viral genome. For ORF5, 11 sets of genotype 1 sequences from different geographical areas, including 2 Asian, 1 American, and 7 European regions, and three sets of genotype 2, including sets from China, Mexico, and the United States, were analyzed separately. Potential recombination breakpoints were detected in 10/11 genotype 1 sets, including 9 cases in which the clustering of at least one isolate was different before and after the breakpoints. In genotype 2, potential breakpoints and different tree clustering of at least one strain before and after the breakpoint were observed in 2 out of 3 sets. The results indicated that most of the ORF5 data sets contained at least one recombinant sequence. When the full-length genome sequences were examined, both genotype 1 and 2 sets presented breakpoints (10 and 9, respectively), resulting in significantly different topologies before and after the breakpoints. Mosaic genomes were detected in genotype 1 sequences. These results may have significant implications for the understanding of the molecular epidemiology of PRRSV. PRRSV is one of the most important viruses affecting swine production worldwide, causing big economic losses and sanitary problems. One of the key questions on PRRSV arises from its genetic diversity, which is thought to have a direct impact on immunobiology, epidemiology, diagnosis, and vaccine efficacy. One of the causes of this genetic diversity is recombination among strains

  17. Deep sequencing as a method of typing bluetongue virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pavuluri Panduranga; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Ganesh, Kapila; Nair, Shreeja G; Niranjan, Vidya; Hegde, Nagendra R

    2013-11-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is an economically important endemic disease of livestock in tropics and subtropics. In addition, its recent spread to temperate regions like North America and Northern Europe is of serious concern. Rapid serotyping and characterization of BT virus (BTV) is an essential step in the identification of origin of the virus and for controlling the disease. Serotyping of BTV is typically performed by serum neutralization, and of late by nucleotide sequencing. This report describes the near complete genome sequencing and typing of two isolates of BTV using Illumina next generation sequencing platform. Two of the BTV RNAs were multiplexed with ten other unknown samples. Viral RNA was isolated and fragmented, reverse transcribed, the cDNA ends were repaired and ligated with a multiplex oligo. The genome library was amplified using primers complementary to the ligated oligo and subjected to single and paired end sequencing. The raw reads were assembled using a de novo method and reference-based assembly was performed based on the contig data. Near complete sequences of all segments of BTV were obtained with more than 20× coverage, and single read sequencing method was sufficient to identify the genotype and serotype of the virus. The two viruses used in this study were typed as BTV-1 and BTV-9E. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Genomes and HBV Drug Resistant Variants by Deep Sequencing Analysis of HBV Genomes in Immune Cell Subsets of HBV Mono-Infected and/or Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 (HIV-1) and HBV Co-Infected Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Z.; Nishikawa, S.; Gao, S.; Eksteen, J. B.; Czub, M.; Gill, M. J.; Osiowy, C.; van der Meer, F.; van Marle, G.; Coffin, C. S.

    2015-01-01

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) and the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) can infect cells of the lymphatic system. It is unknown whether HIV-1 co-infection impacts infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) subsets by the HBV. Aims To compare the detection of HBV genomes and HBV sequences in unsorted PBMCs and subsets (i.e., CD4+ T, CD8+ T, CD14+ monocytes, CD19+ B, CD56+ NK cells) in HBV mono-infected vs. HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals. Methods Total PBMC and subsets isolated from 14 HBV mono-infected (4/14 before and after anti-HBV therapy) and 6 HBV/HIV-1 co-infected individuals (5/6 consistently on dual active anti-HBV/HIV therapy) were tested for HBV genomes, including replication indicative HBV covalently closed circular (ccc)-DNA, by nested PCR/nucleic hybridization and/or quantitative PCR. In CD4+, and/or CD56+ subsets from two HBV monoinfected cases, the HBV polymerase/overlapping surface region was analyzed by next generation sequencing. Results All analyzed whole PBMC from HBV monoinfected and HBV/HIV coinfected individuals were HBV genome positive. Similarly, HBV DNA was detected in all target PBMC subsets regardless of antiviral therapy, but was absent from the CD4+ T cell subset from all HBV/HIV-1 positive cases (PHBV monoinfected cases on tenofovir therapy, mutations at residues associated with drug resistance and/or immune escape (i.e., G145R) were detected in a minor percentage of the population. Summary HBV genomes and drug resistant variants were detectable in PBMC subsets from HBV mono-infected individuals. The HBV replicates in PBMC subsets of HBV/HIV-1 patients except the CD4+ T cell subpopulation. PMID:26390290

  19. Clinical sequencing uncovers origins and evolution of Lassa virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G.; Shapiro, B. Jesse; Matranga, Christian B.; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E.; Moses, Lina M.; Folarin, Onikepe A.; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E.; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M.; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M.; Gire, Stephen K.; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D.; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K.; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J.; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M.; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J.; Ryan, Elizabeth M.; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A.; Lukens, Amanda K.; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S.; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G.; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B.; Lander, Eric S.; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F.; Okokhere, Peter O.; Khan, S. Humarr; Grant, Donald S.; Akpede, George O.; Asogun, Danny A.; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z.; Happi, Christian T.; Garry, Robert F.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us how little is known about biosafety level-4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. PMID:26276630

  20. Clinical Sequencing Uncovers Origins and Evolution of Lassa Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Kristian G; Shapiro, B Jesse; Matranga, Christian B; Sealfon, Rachel; Lin, Aaron E; Moses, Lina M; Folarin, Onikepe A; Goba, Augustine; Odia, Ikponmwonsa; Ehiane, Philomena E; Momoh, Mambu; England, Eleina M; Winnicki, Sarah; Branco, Luis M; Gire, Stephen K; Phelan, Eric; Tariyal, Ridhi; Tewhey, Ryan; Omoniwa, Omowunmi; Fullah, Mohammed; Fonnie, Richard; Fonnie, Mbalu; Kanneh, Lansana; Jalloh, Simbirie; Gbakie, Michael; Saffa, Sidiki; Karbo, Kandeh; Gladden, Adrianne D; Qu, James; Stremlau, Matthew; Nekoui, Mahan; Finucane, Hilary K; Tabrizi, Shervin; Vitti, Joseph J; Birren, Bruce; Fitzgerald, Michael; McCowan, Caryn; Ireland, Andrea; Berlin, Aaron M; Bochicchio, James; Tazon-Vega, Barbara; Lennon, Niall J; Ryan, Elizabeth M; Bjornson, Zach; Milner, Danny A; Lukens, Amanda K; Broodie, Nisha; Rowland, Megan; Heinrich, Megan; Akdag, Marjan; Schieffelin, John S; Levy, Danielle; Akpan, Henry; Bausch, Daniel G; Rubins, Kathleen; McCormick, Joseph B; Lander, Eric S; Günther, Stephan; Hensley, Lisa; Okogbenin, Sylvanus; Schaffner, Stephen F; Okokhere, Peter O; Khan, S Humarr; Grant, Donald S; Akpede, George O; Asogun, Danny A; Gnirke, Andreas; Levin, Joshua Z; Happi, Christian T; Garry, Robert F; Sabeti, Pardis C

    2015-08-13

    The 2013-2015 West African epidemic of Ebola virus disease (EVD) reminds us of how little is known about biosafety level 4 viruses. Like Ebola virus, Lassa virus (LASV) can cause hemorrhagic fever with high case fatality rates. We generated a genomic catalog of almost 200 LASV sequences from clinical and rodent reservoir samples. We show that whereas the 2013-2015 EVD epidemic is fueled by human-to-human transmissions, LASV infections mainly result from reservoir-to-human infections. We elucidated the spread of LASV across West Africa and show that this migration was accompanied by changes in LASV genome abundance, fatality rates, codon adaptation, and translational efficiency. By investigating intrahost evolution, we found that mutations accumulate in epitopes of viral surface proteins, suggesting selection for immune escape. This catalog will serve as a foundation for the development of vaccines and diagnostics. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Full genome characterization of the culicoides-borne marsupial orbiviruses: Wallal virus, Mudjinbarry virus and Warrego viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunatha N Belaganahalli

    Full Text Available Viruses belonging to the species Wallal virus and Warrego virus of the genus Orbivirus were identified as causative agents of blindness in marsupials in Australia during 1994/5. Recent comparisons of nucleotide (nt and amino acid (aa sequences have provided a basis for the grouping and classification of orbivirus isolates. However, full-genome sequence data are not available for representatives of all Orbivirus species. We report full-genome sequence data for three additional orbiviruses: Wallal virus (WALV; Mudjinabarry virus (MUDV and Warrego virus (WARV. Comparisons of conserved polymerase (Pol, sub-core-shell 'T2' and core-surface 'T13' proteins show that these viruses group with other Culicoides borne orbiviruses, clustering with Eubenangee virus (EUBV, another orbivirus infecting marsupials. WARV shares 99%/90% aa/nt identities with each other (consistent with membership of the same virus species - Wallal virus. However, WALV and MUDV share <68% aa identity in their larger outer capsid protein VP2(OC1, consistent with membership of different serotypes within the species - WALV-1 and WALV-2 respectively.

  2. Genome-wide characterization of rice black streaked dwarf virus-responsive microRNAs in rice leaves and roots by small RNA and degradome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Zongtao; He, Yuqing; Li, Junmin; Wang, Xu; Chen, Jianping

    2015-04-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small, non-coding RNAs which typically function by guiding cleavage of target mRNAs. They play important roles in development, abiotic stress and responses to pathogens. Four small RNA libraries and four degradome libraries were constructed from the leaves and roots of healthy rice and plants infected with Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV). Analysis of the deep sequencing results showed that the expression patterns of 14 miRNAs in leaves and 16 miRNAs in roots changed significantly in response to RBSDV infection. Some responses were similar in roots and leaves, but many miRNAs responded differently in different tissues. The results were confirmed for selected miRNAs by quantitative real-time PCR. By using degradome sequencing, a total of 104 target transcripts for 17 conserved and 16 non-conserved miRNAs were shown to be responsive to RBSDV infection. Fifteen novel miRNAs were also identified by small RNA and degradome sequencing. The results provide new insights into the regulatory networks of miRNAs and their targets in different plant tissues in response to virus infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk-Ha

    2016-04-01

    The use of next-generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes. The newly generated reference sequences of unstudied minor plants can be annotated by the knowledge of model plants via translational genomics approaches. Here, we reviewed the strategies of translational genomics and suggested perspectives on the current databases of genomic resources and the database structures of translated information on the new genome. As a draft picture of phenotypic annotation, translational genomics on newly sequenced plants will provide valuable assistance for breeders and researchers who are interested in genetic studies. © 2015 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Genomic sequencing of Pleistocene cave bears

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, James P.; Hofreiter, Michael; Smith, Doug; Priest, JamesR.; Rohland, Nadin; Rabeder, Gernot; Krause, Johannes; Detter, J. Chris; Paabo, Svante; Rubin, Edward M.

    2005-04-01

    Despite the information content of genomic DNA, ancient DNA studies to date have largely been limited to amplification of mitochondrial DNA due to technical hurdles such as contamination and degradation of ancient DNAs. In this study, we describe two metagenomic libraries constructed using unamplified DNA extracted from the bones of two 40,000-year-old extinct cave bears. Analysis of {approx}1 Mb of sequence from each library showed that, despite significant microbial contamination, 5.8 percent and 1.1 percent of clones in the libraries contain cave bear inserts, yielding 26,861 bp of cave bear genome sequence. Alignment of this sequence to the dog genome, the closest sequenced genome to cave bear in terms of evolutionary distance, revealed roughly the expected ratio of cave bear exons, repeats and conserved noncoding sequences. Only 0.04 percent of all clones sequenced were derived from contamination with modern human DNA. Comparison of cave bear with orthologous sequences from several modern bear species revealed the evolutionary relationship of these lineages. Using the metagenomic approach described here, we have recovered substantial quantities of mammalian genomic sequence more than twice as old as any previously reported, establishing the feasibility of ancient DNA genomic sequencing programs.

  5. Sequence analysis of an Archaeal virus isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanhe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are profoundly ignorant about the diversity of viruses that infect the domain Archaea. Less than 100 have been identified and described and very few of these have had their genomic sequences determined. Here we report the genomic sequence of a previously undescribed archaeal virus. Results Haloarchaeal strains with 16S rRNA gene sequences 98% identical to Halorubrum saccharovorum were isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia. Two lytic viruses infecting these were isolated from the lake water. The BJ1 virus is described in this paper. It has an icosahedral head and tail morphology and most likely a linear double stranded DNA genome exhibiting terminal redundancy. Its genome sequence has 42,271 base pairs with a GC content of ~65 mol%. The genome of BJ1 is predicted to encode 70 ORFs, including one for a tRNA. Fifty of the seventy ORFs had no identity to data base entries; twenty showed sequence identity matches to archaeal viruses and to haloarchaea. ORFs possibly coding for an origin of replication complex, integrase, helicase and structural capsid proteins were identified. Evidence for viral integration was obtained. Conclusion The virus described here has a very low sequence identity to any previously described virus. Fifty of the seventy ORFs could not be annotated in any way based on amino acid identities with sequences already present in the databases. Determining functions for ORFs such as these is probably easier using a simple virus as a model system.

  6. Sequence analysis of an Archaeal virus isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaling, Eulyn; Haigh, Richard D; Grant, William D; Cowan, Don A; Jones, Brian E; Ma, Yanhe; Ventosa, Antonio; Heaphy, Shaun

    2007-01-01

    Background We are profoundly ignorant about the diversity of viruses that infect the domain Archaea. Less than 100 have been identified and described and very few of these have had their genomic sequences determined. Here we report the genomic sequence of a previously undescribed archaeal virus. Results Haloarchaeal strains with 16S rRNA gene sequences 98% identical to Halorubrum saccharovorum were isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia. Two lytic viruses infecting these were isolated from the lake water. The BJ1 virus is described in this paper. It has an icosahedral head and tail morphology and most likely a linear double stranded DNA genome exhibiting terminal redundancy. Its genome sequence has 42,271 base pairs with a GC content of ~65 mol%. The genome of BJ1 is predicted to encode 70 ORFs, including one for a tRNA. Fifty of the seventy ORFs had no identity to data base entries; twenty showed sequence identity matches to archaeal viruses and to haloarchaea. ORFs possibly coding for an origin of replication complex, integrase, helicase and structural capsid proteins were identified. Evidence for viral integration was obtained. Conclusion The virus described here has a very low sequence identity to any previously described virus. Fifty of the seventy ORFs could not be annotated in any way based on amino acid identities with sequences already present in the databases. Determining functions for ORFs such as these is probably easier using a simple virus as a model system. PMID:17996081

  7. Regions identity between the genome of vertebrates and non-retroviral families of insect viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Gaowei; Li, Jinming

    2011-11-10

    The scope of our understanding of the evolutionary history between viruses and animals is limited. The fact that the recent availability of many complete insect virus genomes and vertebrate genomes as well as the ability to screen these sequences makes it possible to gain a new perspective insight into the evolutionary interaction between insect viruses and vertebrates. This study is to determine the possibility of existence of sequence identity between the genomes of insect viruses and vertebrates, attempt to explain this phenomenon in term of genetic mobile element, and try to investigate the evolutionary relationship between these short regions of identity among these species. Some of studied insect viruses contain variable numbers of short regions of sequence identity to the genomes of vertebrate with nucleotide sequence length from 28 bp to 124 bp. They are found to locate in multiple sites of the vertebrate genomes. The ontology of animal genes with identical regions involves in several processes including chromatin remodeling, regulation of apoptosis, signaling pathway, nerve system development and some enzyme-like catalysis. Phylogenetic analysis reveals that at least some short regions of sequence identity in the genomes of vertebrate are derived the ancestral of insect viruses. Short regions of sequence identity were found in the vertebrates and insect viruses. These sequences played an important role not only in the long-term evolution of vertebrates, but also in promotion of insect virus. This typical win-win strategy may come from natural selection.

  8. First Genome Sequence of Shallot Latent Carlavirus from Allium macrostemon Bunge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Kazusato; Okamura, Kouta; Yasaka, Ryosuke; Fukuda, Shinji; Ishimaru, Kanji; Tomitaka, Yasuhiro; Yamashita, Kazuo

    2017-08-17

    A wild Japanese garlic plant (Allium macrostemon Bunge, wild onion) with leaves showing chlorotic stripes was collected in Saitama Prefecture, Japan. Genome sequencing showed that it was infected with shallot latent carlavirus. The genomic sequence of this virus is reported for the first time from wild onion. Copyright © 2017 Ohshima et al.

  9. Genome Sequence of a Gammaherpesvirus from a Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, Andrew J.; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Kerr, Karen; Jacob, Jessica M.; Landrau, Nelmarie; Michael T Walsh; Wells, Randall S.; Waltzek, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A herpesvirus genome was sequenced directly from a biopsy specimen of a rectal lesion from a female common bottlenose dolphin. This genome sequence comprises a unique region (161,235?bp) flanked by multiple copies of a terminal repeat (4,431?bp) and contains 72 putative genes. The virus was named common bottlenose dolphin gammaherpesvirus 1.

  10. Draft genome sequences of Actinomyces timonensis strain 7400942T and its prophage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlas, Aurore; Gimenez, Grégory; Raoult, Didier; Roux, Véronique

    2012-12-01

    A draft genome sequence of Actinomyces timonensis, an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a human clinical osteoarticular sample, is described here. CRISPR-associated proteins, insertion sequence, and toxin-antitoxin loci were found on the genome. A new virus or provirus, AT-1, was characterized.

  11. Genomic fossils reveal adaptation of non-autonomous pararetroviruses driven by concerted evolution of noncoding regulatory sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Sunlu Chen; Huizhen Zheng; Yuji Kishima

    2017-01-01

    The interplay of different virus species in a host cell after infection can affect the adaptation of each virus. Endogenous viral elements, such as endogenous pararetroviruses (PRVs), have arisen from vertical inheritance of viral sequences integrated into host germline genomes. As viral genomic fossils, these sequences can thus serve as valuable paleogenomic data to study the long-term evolutionary dynamics of virus-virus interactions, but they have rarely been applied for this purpose. All ...

  12. Plantagora: modeling whole genome sequencing and assembly of plant genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Barthelson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Genomics studies are being revolutionized by the next generation sequencing technologies, which have made whole genome sequencing much more accessible to the average researcher. Whole genome sequencing with the new technologies is a developing art that, despite the large volumes of data that can be produced, may still fail to provide a clear and thorough map of a genome. The Plantagora project was conceived to address specifically the gap between having the technical tools for genome sequencing and knowing precisely the best way to use them. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: For Plantagora, a platform was created for generating simulated reads from several different plant genomes of different sizes. The resulting read files mimicked either 454 or Illumina reads, with varying paired end spacing. Thousands of datasets of reads were created, most derived from our primary model genome, rice chromosome one. All reads were assembled with different software assemblers, including Newbler, Abyss, and SOAPdenovo, and the resulting assemblies were evaluated by an extensive battery of metrics chosen for these studies. The metrics included both statistics of the assembly sequences and fidelity-related measures derived by alignment of the assemblies to the original genome source for the reads. The results were presented in a website, which includes a data graphing tool, all created to help the user compare rapidly the feasibility and effectiveness of different sequencing and assembly strategies prior to testing an approach in the lab. Some of our own conclusions regarding the different strategies were also recorded on the website. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Plantagora provides a substantial body of information for comparing different approaches to sequencing a plant genome, and some conclusions regarding some of the specific approaches. Plantagora also provides a platform of metrics and tools for studying the process of sequencing and assembly

  13. Complete Genome Sequence of Capripoxvirus Strain KSGP 0240 from a Commercial Live Attenuated Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandenbussche, Frank; Mathijs, Elisabeth; Haegeman, Andy; Al-Majali, Ahmad; Van Borm, Steven; De Clercq, Kris

    2016-10-20

    Capripoxviruses cause economically important diseases in domestic ruminants in regions endemic for these viruses. We report here the complete genome sequence of the KSGP 0240 vaccine strain from the live attenuated vaccine Kenyavac (JOVAC). Copyright © 2016 Vandenbussche et al.

  14. A physical map of the papaya genome with integrated genetic map and genome sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Ming-Cheng

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papaya is a major fruit crop in tropical and subtropical regions worldwide and has primitive sex chromosomes controlling sex determination in this trioecious species. The papaya genome was recently sequenced because of its agricultural importance, unique biological features, and successful application of transgenic papaya for resistance to papaya ringspot virus. As a part of the genome sequencing project, we constructed a BAC-based physical map using a high information-content fingerprinting approach to assist whole genome shotgun sequence assembly. Results The physical map consists of 963 contigs, representing 9.4× genome equivalents, and was integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence using BAC end sequences and a sequence-tagged high-density genetic map. The estimated genome coverage of the physical map is about 95.8%, while 72.4% of the genome was aligned to the genetic map. A total of 1,181 high quality overgo (overlapping oligonucleotide probes representing conserved sequences in Arabidopsis and genetically mapped loci in Brassica were anchored on the physical map, which provides a foundation for comparative genomics in the Brassicales. The integrated genetic and physical map aligned with the genome sequence revealed recombination hotspots as well as regions suppressed for recombination across the genome, particularly on the recently evolved sex chromosomes. Suppression of recombination spread to the adjacent region of the male specific region of the Y chromosome (MSY, and recombination rates were recovered gradually and then exceeded the genome average. Recombination hotspots were observed at about 10 Mb away on both sides of the MSY, showing 7-fold increase compared with the genome wide average, demonstrating the dynamics of recombination of the sex chromosomes. Conclusion A BAC-based physical map of papaya was constructed and integrated with the genetic map and genome sequence. The integrated map facilitated

  15. Translational genomics for plant breeding with the genome sequence explosion

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kang, Yang Jae; Lee, Taeyoung; Lee, Jayern; Shim, Sangrea; Jeong, Haneul; Satyawan, Dani; Kim, Moon Young; Lee, Suk‐Ha

    2016-01-01

    The use of next‐generation sequencers and advanced genotyping technologies has propelled the field of plant genomics in model crops and plants and enhanced the discovery of hidden bridges between genotypes and phenotypes...

  16. Genome Sequence of the Pea Aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are important agricultural pests and also biological models for studies of insect-plant interactions, symbiosis, virus vectoring, and the developmental causes of extreme phenotypic plasticity. Here we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple published genomes of holometabolous insects. Pea aphids are host-plant specialists, they can reproduce both sexually and asexually, and they have coevolved with an obligate bacterial symbiont. Here we highlight findings from whole genome analysis that may be related to these unusual biological features. These findings include discovery of extensive gene duplication in more than 2000 gene families as well as loss of evolutionarily conserved genes. Gene family expansions relative to other published genomes include genes involved in chromatin modification, miRNA synthesis, and sugar transport. Gene losses include genes central to the IMD immune pathway, selenoprotein utilization, purine salvage, and the entire urea cycle. The pea aphid genome reveals that only a limited number of genes have been acquired from bacteria; thus the reduced gene count of Buchnera does not reflect gene transfer to the host genome. The inventory of metabolic genes in the pea aphid genome suggests that there is extensive metabolite exchange between the aphid and Buchnera, including sharing of amino acid biosynthesis between the aphid and Buchnera. The pea aphid genome provides a foundation for post-genomic studies of fundamental biological questions and applied agricultural problems. PMID:20186266

  17. Plum pox virus (PPV) genome expression in genetically engineered RNAi plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    An important approach to controlling sharka disease caused by Plum pox virus (PPV) is the development of PPV resistant plants using small interfering RNAs (siRNA) technology. In order to evaluate siRNA induced gene silencing, we studied, based on knowledge of the PPV genome sequence, virus genome t...

  18. Novel RNA Virus Genome Discovered in Ghost Ants (Tapinoma melanocephalum) from Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brettell, Laura E; Mordecai, Gideon J; Pachori, Purnima; Martin, Stephen J

    2017-07-27

    Here, we report the full-genome sequence of Milolii virus, a novel single-stranded (positive-sense) RNA virus discovered from Tapinoma melanocephalum ants in Hawaii. The genome is 10,475 nucleotides long, encoding a polyprotein of 3,304 amino acids. Copyright © 2017 Brettell et al.

  19. The characterization of twenty sequenced human genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly Pelak

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available We present the analysis of twenty human genomes to evaluate the prospects for identifying rare functional variants that contribute to a phenotype of interest. We sequenced at high coverage ten "case" genomes from individuals with severe hemophilia A and ten "control" genomes. We summarize the number of genetic variants emerging from a study of this magnitude, and provide a proof of concept for the identification of rare and highly-penetrant functional variants by confirming that the cause of hemophilia A is easily recognizable in this data set. We also show that the number of novel single nucleotide variants (SNVs discovered per genome seems to stabilize at about 144,000 new variants per genome, after the first 15 individuals have been sequenced. Finally, we find that, on average, each genome carries 165 homozygous protein-truncating or stop loss variants in genes representing a diverse set of pathways.

  20. Genome Sequence of Serratia plymuthica V4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleto, S; Van der Auwera, G; Almeida, C; Vieira, M J; Vlamakis, H; Kolter, R

    2014-05-15

    Serratia spp. are gammaproteobacteria and members of the family Enterobacteriaceae. Here, we announce the genome sequence of Serratia plymuthica strain V4, which produces the siderophore serratiochelin and antimicrobial compounds. Copyright © 2014 Cleto et al.

  1. Re-Assembly and Analysis of an Ancient Variola Virus Genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chad Smithson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a major improvement to the assembly of published short read sequencing data from an ancient variola virus (VARV genome by the removal of contig-capping sequencing tags and manual searches for gap-spanning reads. The new assembly, together with camelpox and taterapox genomes, permitted new dates to be calculated for the last common ancestor of all VARV genomes. The analysis of recently sequenced VARV-like cowpox virus genomes showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and amino acid changes in the vaccinia virus (VACV-Cop-O1L ortholog, predicted to be associated with VARV host specificity and virulence, were introduced into the lineage before the divergence of these viruses. A comparison of the ancient and modern VARV genome sequences also revealed a measurable drift towards adenine + thymine (A + T richness.

  2. Re-Assembly and Analysis of an Ancient Variola Virus Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smithson, Chad; Imbery, Jacob; Upton, Chris

    2017-09-08

    We report a major improvement to the assembly of published short read sequencing data from an ancient variola virus (VARV) genome by the removal of contig-capping sequencing tags and manual searches for gap-spanning reads. The new assembly, together with camelpox and taterapox genomes, permitted new dates to be calculated for the last common ancestor of all VARV genomes. The analysis of recently sequenced VARV-like cowpox virus genomes showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and amino acid changes in the vaccinia virus (VACV)-Cop-O1L ortholog, predicted to be associated with VARV host specificity and virulence, were introduced into the lineage before the divergence of these viruses. A comparison of the ancient and modern VARV genome sequences also revealed a measurable drift towards adenine + thymine (A + T) richness.

  3. Genomic Prediction from Whole Genome Sequence in Livestock: The 1000 Bull Genomes Project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayes, Benjamin J; MacLeod, Iona M; Daetwyler, Hans D

    Advantages of using whole genome sequence data to predict genomic estimated breeding values (GEBV) include better persistence of accuracy of GEBV across generations and more accurate GEBV across breeds. The 1000 Bull Genomes Project provides a database of whole genome sequenced key ancestor bulls...

  4. African swine fever virus replication and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Linda K; Chapman, David A G; Netherton, Christopher L; Upton, Chris

    2013-04-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a large icosahedral DNA virus which replicates predominantly in the cytoplasm of infected cells. The ASFV double-stranded DNA genome varies in length from about 170 to 193 kbp depending on the isolate and contains between 150 and 167 open reading frames. These are closely spaced and read from both DNA strands. The virus genome termini are covalently closed by imperfectly base-paired hairpin loops that are present in two forms that are complimentary and inverted with respect to each other. Adjacent to the termini are inverted arrays of different tandem repeats. Head to head concatemeric genome replication intermediates have been described. A similar mechanism of replication to Poxviruses has been proposed for ASFV. Virus genome transcription occurs independently of the host RNA polymerase II and virus particles contain all of the enzymes and factors required for early gene transcription. DNA replication begins in perinuclear factory areas about 6h post-infection although an earlier stage of nuclear DNA synthesis has been reported. The virus genome encodes enzymes required for transcription and replication of the virus genome and virion structural proteins. Enzymes that are involved in a base excision repair pathway may be an adaptation to enable virus replication in the oxidative environment of the macrophage cytoplasm. Other ASFV genes encode factors involved in evading host defence systems and modulating host cell function. Variation between the genomes of different ASFV isolates is most commonly due to gain or loss of members of multigene families, MGFs 100, 110, 300, 360, 505/530 and family p22. These are located within the left terminal 40kbp and right terminal 20kbp. ASFV is the only member of the Asfarviridae, which is one of the families within the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus superfamily. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Genome shotgun sequencing and development of microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADP

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... Analysis of the gerbera genome DNA ('Raon') general library showed that sequences of (AT), (AG),. (AAG) and (AAT) repeats ... Key words: Genetic diversity, genomics, microsatellite isolation, pyrosequencing, SSRs. INTRODUCTION ..... ESTs containing SSRs found in an earlier report: Citrus spp. 6.09% ...

  6. Sequencing Errors Rife in Genome Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Low-frequency genetic variants in cancer genome datasets are often simply artifacts of DNA damage introduced by routine sample preparation, not tumor-driving mutations. A new algorithm found that around three quarters of all the samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas contain large numbers of these sequencing errors. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Refined Pichia pastoris reference genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturmberger, Lukas; Chappell, Thomas; Geier, Martina; Krainer, Florian; Day, Kasey J.; Vide, Ursa; Trstenjak, Sara; Schiefer, Anja; Richardson, Toby; Soriaga, Leah; Darnhofer, Barbara; Birner-Gruenberger, Ruth; Glick, Benjamin S.; Tolstorukov, Ilya; Cregg, James; Madden, Knut; Glieder, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Strains of the species Komagataella phaffii are the most frequently used “Pichia pastoris” strains employed for recombinant protein production as well as studies on peroxisome biogenesis, autophagy and secretory pathway analyses. Genome sequencing of several different P. pastoris strains has provided the foundation for understanding these cellular functions in recent genomics, transcriptomics and proteomics experiments. This experimentation has identified mistakes, gaps and incorrectly annotated open reading frames in the previously published draft genome sequences. Here, a refined reference genome is presented, generated with genome and transcriptome sequencing data from multiple P. pastoris strains. Twelve major sequence gaps from 20 to 6000 base pairs were closed and 5111 out of 5256 putative open reading frames were manually curated and confirmed by RNA-seq and published LC-MS/MS data, including the addition of new open reading frames (ORFs) and a reduction in the number of spliced genes from 797 to 571. One chromosomal fragment of 76 kbp between two previous gaps on chromosome 1 and another 134 kbp fragment at the end of chromosome 4, as well as several shorter fragments needed re-orientation. In total more than 500 positions in the genome have been corrected. This reference genome is presented with new chromosomal numbering, positioning ribosomal repeats at the distal ends of the four chromosomes, and includes predicted chromosomal centromeres as well as the sequence of two linear cytoplasmic plasmids of 13.1 and 9.5 kbp found in some strains of P. pastoris. PMID:27084056

  8. Genome sequence and analysis of Lactobacillus helveticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola eCremonesi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The microbiological characterization of lactobacilli is historically well developed, but the genomic analysis is recent. Because of the widespread use of L. helveticus in cheese technology, information concerning the heterogeneity in this species is accumulating rapidly. Recently, the genome of five L. helveticus strains was sequenced to completion and compared with other genomically characterized lactobacilli. The genomic analysis of the first sequenced strain, L. helveticus DPC 4571, isolated from cheese and selected for its characteristics of rapid lysis and high proteolytic activity, has revealed a plethora of genes with industrial potential including those responsible for key metabolic functions such as proteolysis, lipolysis, and cell lysis. These genes and their derived enzymes can facilitate the production of cheese and cheese derivatives with potential for use as ingredients in consumer foods. In addition, L. helveticus has the potential to produce peptides with a biological function, such as angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory activity, in fermented dairy products, demonstrating the therapeutic value of this species. A most intriguing feature of the genome of L. helveticus is the remarkable similarity in gene content with many intestinal lactobacilli. Comparative genomics has allowed the identification of key gene sets that facilitate a variety of lifestyles including adaptation to food matrices or the gastrointestinal tract.As genome sequence and functional genomic information continues to explode, key features of the genomes of L. helveticus strains continue to be discovered, answering many questions but also raising many new ones.

  9. Sequencing and comparing whole mitochondrial genomes ofanimals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boore, Jeffrey L.; Macey, J. Robert; Medina, Monica

    2005-04-22

    Comparing complete animal mitochondrial genome sequences is becoming increasingly common for phylogenetic reconstruction and as a model for genome evolution. Not only are they much more informative than shorter sequences of individual genes for inferring evolutionary relatedness, but these data also provide sets of genome-level characters, such as the relative arrangements of genes, that can be especially powerful. We describe here the protocols commonly used for physically isolating mtDNA, for amplifying these by PCR or RCA, for cloning,sequencing, assembly, validation, and gene annotation, and for comparing both sequences and gene arrangements. On several topics, we offer general observations based on our experiences to date with determining and comparing complete mtDNA sequences.

  10. Whole Genome Sequencing and Newborn Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Rothwell, Erin

    2016-03-01

    Clinical applications of next generation sequencing are growing at a tremendous pace. Currently the largest application of genetic testing in medicine occurs with newborn screening through state-mandated public health programs, and there are suggestions that sequencing could become a standard component of newborn care within the next decade. As such, newborn screening may appear to be a logical starting point to explore whole genome and whole exome sequencing on a population level. Yet, there are a number of ethical, social and legal implications about the use of a mandatory public health screening program that create challenges for the use of sequencing technologies in this context. Additionally, at this time we still have limited understanding and strategies for managing genomic data, supporting our conclusion that genome sequencing is not justified within population based public health programs for newborn screening.

  11. Potential Links between Hepadnavirus and Bornavirus Sequences in the Host Genome and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoyuki Honda

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Various viruses leave their sequences in the host genomes during infection. Such events occur mainly in retrovirus infection but also sometimes in DNA and non-retroviral RNA virus infections. If viral sequences are integrated into the genomes of germ line cells, the sequences can become inherited as endogenous viral elements (EVEs. The integration events of viral sequences may have oncogenic potential. Because proviral integrations of some retroviruses and/or reactivation of endogenous retroviruses are closely linked to cancers, viral insertions related to non-retroviral viruses also possibly contribute to cancer development. This article focuses on genomic viral sequences derived from two non-retroviral viruses, whose endogenization is already reported, and discusses their possible contributions to cancer. Viral insertions of hepatitis B virus play roles in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. Endogenous bornavirus-like elements, the only non-retroviral RNA virus-related EVEs found in the human genome, may also be involved in cancer formation. In addition, the possible contribution of the interactions between viruses and retrotransposons, which seem to be a major driving force for generating EVEs related to non-retroviral RNA viruses, to cancers will be discussed. Future studies regarding the possible links described here may open a new avenue for the development of novel therapeutics for tumor virus-related cancers and/or provide novel insights into EVE functions.

  12. Zika virus genome biology and molecular pathogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Anyou; Thurmond, Stephanie; Islas, Leonel; Hui, Kingyung; Hai, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging RNA virus in the widespread Flavivirus genus. Recently, ZIKV has rapidly spread around the world and has been implicated in human disease, including neurological disorders, triggering public and scientific attention. Understanding how ZIKV causes disease is the highest priority, yet little is known about this virus. Here we examine the currently published data from ZIKV studies to provide the latest understanding of ZIKV genome biology and molecular pathogenes...

  13. Sulfolobus tengchongensis Spindle-Shaped Virus STSV1: Virus-Host Interactions and Genomic Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiang, X.; Chen, L.; Huang, X

    2005-01-01

    into the host chromosome and existed in a carrier state. The STSV1 DNA was modified in an unusual fashion, presumably by virally encoded modification systems. STSV1 harbors a double-stranded DNA genome of 75,294 bp, which shares no significant sequence similarity to those of fuselloviruses. The viral genome...... features identify STSV1 as a novel virus infecting the genus Sulfolobus....

  14. Sequence recombination and conservation of Varroa destructor virus-1 and deformed wing virus in field collected honey bees (Apis mellifera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Wang

    Full Text Available We sequenced small (s RNAs from field collected honeybees (Apis mellifera and bumblebees (Bombuspascuorum using the Illumina technology. The sRNA reads were assembled and resulting contigs were used to search for virus homologues in GenBank. Matches with Varroadestructor virus-1 (VDV1 and Deformed wing virus (DWV genomic sequences were obtained for A. mellifera but not B. pascuorum. Further analyses suggested that the prevalent virus population was composed of VDV-1 and a chimera of 5'-DWV-VDV1-DWV-3'. The recombination junctions in the chimera genomes were confirmed by using RT-PCR, cDNA cloning and Sanger sequencing. We then focused on conserved short fragments (CSF, size > 25 nt in the virus genomes by using GenBank sequences and the deep sequencing data obtained in this study. The majority of CSF sites confirmed conservation at both between-species (GenBank sequences and within-population (dataset of this study levels. However, conserved nucleotide positions in the GenBank sequences might be variable at the within-population level. High mutation rates (Pi>10% were observed at a number of sites using the deep sequencing data, suggesting that sequence conservation might not always be maintained at the population level. Virus-host interactions and strategies for developing RNAi treatments against VDV1/DWV infections are discussed.

  15. Genomic prediction using QTL derived from whole genome sequence data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    This study investigated the gain in accuracy of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k SNP data. Analyses were performed for Nordic Holstein and Danish Jersey animals, using either...... a genomic BLUP or a Bayesian variable selection model. When using the genomic BLUP model, results showed increases in accuracy of up to two percentage points for production traits in both Holstein and Jersey animals by including the extra variants in the analysis, and an extra 1.5 percentage points...

  16. Genome sequencing for obstetricians & gynaecologists | Kent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... present and future obligations are. Genome sequencing is a new science, much younger than assisted reproduction, and developments in the clinical, moral, ethical, legal and commercial aspects of gene sequencing have to be addressed by doctors. It is our obligation to join that debate. Obstetrics & Gynaecology Forum ...

  17. Cyprinus carpio Genome sequencing and assembly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolder, I.C.R.M.; Plas-Duivesteijn, van der Suzanne J.; Tan, G.; Wiegertjes, G.; Forlenza, M.; Guler, A.T.; Travin, D.Y.; Nakao, M.; Moritomo, T.; Irnazarow, I.; Jansen, H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Sequencing of the common carp (Cyprinus carpio carpio Linnaeus, 1758) genome, with the objective of establishing carp as a model organism to supplement the closely related zebrafish (Danio rerio). The sequenced individual is a homozygous female (by gynogenesis) of R3 x R8 carp, the heterozygous

  18. Harnessing Whole Genome Sequencing in Medical Mycology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuomo, Christina A

    2017-01-01

    Comparative genome sequencing studies of human fungal pathogens enable identification of genes and variants associated with virulence and drug resistance. This review describes current approaches, resources, and advances in applying whole genome sequencing to study clinically important fungal pathogens. Genomes for some important fungal pathogens were only recently assembled, revealing gene family expansions in many species and extreme gene loss in one obligate species. The scale and scope of species sequenced is rapidly expanding, leveraging technological advances to assemble and annotate genomes with higher precision. By using iteratively improved reference assemblies or those generated de novo for new species, recent studies have compared the sequence of isolates representing populations or clinical cohorts. Whole genome approaches provide the resolution necessary for comparison of closely related isolates, for example, in the analysis of outbreaks or sampled across time within a single host. Genomic analysis of fungal pathogens has enabled both basic research and diagnostic studies. The increased scale of sequencing can be applied across populations, and new metagenomic methods allow direct analysis of complex samples.

  19. Comparison of 61 Sequenced Escherichia coli Genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukjancenko, Oksana; Wassenaar, T. M.; Ussery, David

    2010-01-01

    trees, and to identify the pan- and core genomes of this set of sequenced strains. A hierarchical clustering of variable genes allowed clear separation of the strains into clusters, including known pathotypes; clinically relevant serotypes can also be resolved in this way. In contrast, when in silico...... MLST was performed, many of the various strains appear jumbled and less well resolved. The predicted pan-genome comprises 15,741 gene families, and only 993 (6%) of the families are represented in every genome, comprising the core genome. The variable or 'accessory' genes thus make up more than 90...

  20. Genome sequence of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richards, S.; Gibbs, R. A.; Gerardo, N. M.

    2010-01-01

    Aphids are important agricultural pests and also biological models for studies of insect-plant interactions, symbiosis, virus vectoring, and the developmental causes of extreme phenotypic plasticity. Here we present the 464 Mb draft genome assembly of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. This first...... published whole genome sequence of a basal hemimetabolous insect provides an outgroup to the multiple published genomes of holometabolous insects. Pea aphids are host-plant specialists, they can reproduce both sexually and asexually, and they have coevolved with an obligate bacterial symbiont. Here we...... include genes involved in chromatin modification, miRNA synthesis, and sugar transport. Gene losses include genes central to the IMD immune pathway, selenoprotein utilization, purine salvage, and the entire urea cycle. The pea aphid genome reveals that only a limited number of genes have been acquired...

  1. Next Generation Sequencing of Classical Swine Fever Virus and Border Disease virus cloned in Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fahnøe, Ulrik; Höper, Dirk; Beer, martin

    2012-01-01

    artificial chromosomes (BACs). From these BACs, RNA copies of the viral genomes can be transcribed in vitro and upon transfection of these RNAs into mammalian cells, autonomous replication of the viral genome occurs and infectious progeny can be rescued. However, we have observed that virus progeny can...... be rescued only from some of our BAC constructs whereas others are not replication competent. To further analyze this discrepancy we have completely sequenced selected pestivirus BAC DNAs using a 454 Genome Sequencer FLX to evaluate the number/kind of deviations in the cloned genome sequences. In addition...

  2. Deep Sequencing of Norovirus Genomes Defines Evolutionary Patterns in an Urban Tropical Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotten, Matthew; Petrova, Velislava; Phan, My V. T.; Rabaa, Maia A.; Watson, Simon J.; Ong, Swee Hoe; Baker, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Norovirus is a highly transmissible infectious agent that causes epidemic gastroenteritis in susceptible children and adults. Norovirus infections can be severe and can be initiated from an exceptionally small number of viral particles. Detailed genome sequence data are useful for tracking norovirus transmission and evolution. To address this need, we have developed a whole-genome deep-sequencing method that generates entire genome sequences from small amounts of clinical specimens. This novel approach employs an algorithm for reverse transcription and PCR amplification primer design using all of the publically available norovirus sequence data. Deep sequencing and de novo assembly were used to generate norovirus genomes from a large set of diarrheal patients attending three hospitals in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, over a 2.5-year period. Positive-selection analysis and direct examination of protein changes in the virus over time identified codons in the regions encoding proteins VP1, p48 (NS1-2), and p22 (NS4) under positive selection and expands the known targets of norovirus evolutionary pressure. IMPORTANCE The high transmissibility and rapid evolutionary rate of norovirus, combined with a short-lived host immune responses, are thought to be the reasons why the virus causes the majority of pediatric viral diarrhea cases. The evolutionary patterns of this RNA virus have been described in detail for only a portion of the virus genome and never for a virus from a detailed urban tropical setting. We provide a detailed sequence description of the noroviruses circulating in three Ho Chi Minh City hospitals over a 2.5-year period. This study identified patterns of virus change in known sites of host immune response and identified three additional regions of the virus genome under selection that were not previously recognized. In addition, the method described here provides a robust full-genome sequencing platform for community-based virus surveillance. PMID

  3. Genome-wide engineering of an infectious clone of herpes simplex virus type 1 using synthetic genomics assembly methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Lauren M; Grzesik, Peter; Voorhies, Alexander A; Alperovich, Nina; MacMath, Derek; Najera, Claudia D; Chandra, Diya Sabrina; Prasad, Sanjana; Noskov, Vladimir N; Montague, Michael G; Friedman, Robert M; Desai, Prashant J; Vashee, Sanjay

    2017-10-17

    Here, we present a transformational approach to genome engineering of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), which has a large DNA genome, using synthetic genomics tools. We believe this method will enable more rapid and complex modifications of HSV-1 and other large DNA viruses than previous technologies, facilitating many useful applications. Yeast transformation-associated recombination was used to clone 11 fragments comprising the HSV-1 strain KOS 152 kb genome. Using overlapping sequences between the adjacent pieces, we assembled the fragments into a complete virus genome in yeast, transferred it into an Escherichia coli host, and reconstituted infectious virus following transfection into mammalian cells. The virus derived from this yeast-assembled genome, KOS YA , replicated with kinetics similar to wild-type virus. We demonstrated the utility of this modular assembly technology by making numerous modifications to a single gene, making changes to two genes at the same time and, finally, generating individual and combinatorial deletions to a set of five conserved genes that encode virion structural proteins. While the ability to perform genome-wide editing through assembly methods in large DNA virus genomes raises dual-use concerns, we believe the incremental risks are outweighed by potential benefits. These include enhanced functional studies, generation of oncolytic virus vectors, development of delivery platforms of genes for vaccines or therapy, as well as more rapid development of countermeasures against potential biothreats.

  4. Genome Sequence of the Palaeopolyploid soybean

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmutz, Jeremy; Cannon, Steven B.; Schlueter, Jessica; Ma, Jianxin; Mitros, Therese; Nelson, William; Hyten, David L.; Song, Qijian; Thelen, Jay J.; Cheng, Jianlin; Xu, Dong; Hellsten, Uffe; May, Gregory D.; Yu, Yeisoo; Sakura, Tetsuya; Umezawa, Taishi; Bhattacharyya, Madan K.; Sandhu, Devinder; Valliyodan, Babu; Lindquist, Erika; Peto, Myron; Grant, David; Shu, Shengqiang; Goodstein, David; Barry, Kerrie; Futrell-Griggs, Montona; Abernathy, Brian; Du, Jianchang; Tian, Zhixi; Zhu, Liucun; Gill, Navdeep; Joshi, Trupti; Libault, Marc; Sethuraman, Anand; Zhang, Xue-Cheng; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Nguyen, Henry T.; Wing, Rod A.; Cregan, Perry; Specht, James; Grimwood, Jane; Rokhsar, Dan; Stacey, Gary; Shoemaker, Randy C.; Jackson, Scott A.

    2009-08-03

    Soybean (Glycine max) is one of the most important crop plants for seed protein and oil content, and for its capacity to fix atmospheric nitrogen through symbioses with soil-borne microorganisms. We sequenced the 1.1-gigabase genome by a whole-genome shotgun approach and integrated it with physical and high-density genetic maps to create a chromosome-scale draft sequence assembly. We predict 46,430 protein-coding genes, 70percent more than Arabidopsis and similar to the poplar genome which, like soybean, is an ancient polyploid (palaeopolyploid). About 78percent of the predicted genes occur in chromosome ends, which comprise less than one-half of the genome but account for nearly all of the genetic recombination. Genome duplications occurred at approximately 59 and 13 million years ago, resulting in a highly duplicated genome with nearly 75percent of the genes present in multiple copies. The two duplication events were followed by gene diversification and loss, and numerous chromosome rearrangements. An accurate soybean genome sequence will facilitate the identification of the genetic basis of many soybean traits, and accelerate the creation of improved soybean varieties.

  5. Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus strain Deutsch, whole genome shotgun sequencing project first submission of genome sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The size and repetitive nature of the Rhipicephalus microplus genome makes obtaining a full genome sequence difficult. Cot filtration/selection techniques were used to reduce the repetitive fraction of the tick genome and enrich for the fraction of DNA with gene-containing regions. The Cot-selected ...

  6. Sequencing and comparative analysis of the gorilla MHC genomic sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilming, Laurens G.; Hart, Elizabeth A.; Coggill, Penny C.; Horton, Roger; Gilbert, James G. R.; Clee, Chris; Jones, Matt; Lloyd, Christine; Palmer, Sophie; Sims, Sarah; Whitehead, Siobhan; Wiley, David; Beck, Stephan; Harrow, Jennifer L.

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play a critical role in vertebrate immune response and because the MHC is linked to a significant number of auto-immune and other diseases it is of great medical interest. Here we describe the clone-based sequencing and subsequent annotation of the MHC region of the gorilla genome. Because the MHC is subject to extensive variation, both structural and sequence-wise, it is not readily amenable to study in whole genome shotgun sequence such as the recently published gorilla genome. The variation of the MHC also makes it of evolutionary interest and therefore we analyse the sequence in the context of human and chimpanzee. In our comparisons with human and re-annotated chimpanzee MHC sequence we find that gorilla has a trimodular RCCX cluster, versus the reference human bimodular cluster, and additional copies of Class I (pseudo)genes between Gogo-K and Gogo-A (the orthologues of HLA-K and -A). We also find that Gogo-H (and Patr-H) is coding versus the HLA-H pseudogene and, conversely, there is a Gogo-DQB2 pseudogene versus the HLA-DQB2 coding gene. Our analysis, which is freely available through the VEGA genome browser, provides the research community with a comprehensive dataset for comparative and evolutionary research of the MHC. PMID:23589541

  7. Whole genome sequence analysis of unidentified genetically modified papaya for development of a specific detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Ishigaki, Takumi; Noguchi, Akio; Katsumata, Hiroshi; Takasaki, Kazuto; Futo, Satoshi; Sakata, Kozue; Fukuda, Nozomi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi; Tanaka, Hidenori; Akashi, Ryo; Nishimaki-Mogami, Tomoko

    2016-08-15

    Identification of transgenic sequences in an unknown genetically modified (GM) papaya (Carica papaya L.) by whole genome sequence analysis was demonstrated. Whole genome sequence data were generated for a GM-positive fresh papaya fruit commodity detected in monitoring using real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sequences obtained were mapped against an open database for papaya genome sequence. Transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences were identified as a GM papaya developed to resist infection from a Papaya ringspot virus. Based on the transgenic sequences, a specific real-time PCR detection method for GM papaya applicable to various food commodities was developed. Whole genome sequence analysis enabled identifying unknown transgenic construct- and event-specific sequences in GM papaya and development of a reliable method for detecting them in papaya food commodities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Genome characterization and genetic diversity of sweet potato symptomless virus 1: a mastrevirus with an unusual nonanucleotide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Complete genomic sequences of nine isolates of sweet potato symptomless virus 1 (SPSMV-1), a virus of genus Mastrevirus in the family Geminiviridae, was determined to be 2,559-2,602 nucleotides from sweet potato accessions from different countries. These isolates shared genomic sequence identities o...

  9. Multilocus Sequence Typing of Total-Genome-Sequenced Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mette Voldby; Cosentino, Salvatore; Rasmussen, Simon

    2012-01-01

    and between laboratories. Ideally, this information should also allow for comparison to historical data. We developed a Web-based method for MLST of 66 bacterial species based on WGS data. As input, the method uses short sequence reads from four sequencing platforms or preassembled genomes. Updates from......Accurate strain identification is essential for anyone working with bacteria. For many species, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) is considered the "gold standard" of typing, but it is traditionally performed in an expensive and time-consuming manner. As the costs of whole-genome sequencing (WGS......) continue to decline, it becomes increasingly available to scientists and routine diagnostic laboratories. Currently, the cost is below that of traditional MLST. The new challenges will be how to extract the relevant information from the large amount of data so as to allow for comparison over time...

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Sequence Variation—Biology and Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzellos, Stelios; Farrell, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Some key questions in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) biology center on whether naturally occurring sequence differences in the virus affect infection or EBV associated diseases. Understanding the pattern of EBV sequence variation is also important for possible development of EBV vaccines. At present EBV isolates worldwide can be grouped into Type 1 and Type 2, a classification based on the EBNA2 gene sequence. Type 1 EBV is the most prevalent worldwide but Type 2 is common in parts of Africa. Type 1 transforms human B cells into lymphoblastoid cell lines much more efficiently than Type 2 EBV. Molecular mechanisms that may account for this difference in cell transformation are now becoming clearer. Advances in sequencing technology will greatly increase the amount of whole EBV genome data for EBV isolated from different parts of the world. Study of regional variation of EBV strains independent of the Type 1/Type 2 classification and systematic investigation of the relationship between viral strains, infection and disease will become possible. The recent discovery that specific mutation of the EBV EBNA3B gene may be linked to development of diffuse large B cell lymphoma illustrates the importance that mutations in the virus genome may have in infection and human disease. PMID:25436768

  11. Characterizing the citrus cultivar Carrizo genome through 454 shotgun sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belknap, William R; Wang, Yi; Huo, Naxin; Wu, Jiajie; Rockhold, David R; Gu, Yong Q; Stover, Ed

    2011-12-01

    The citrus cultivar Carrizo is the single most important rootstock to the US citrus industry and has resistance or tolerance to a number of major citrus diseases, including citrus tristeza virus, foot rot, and Huanglongbing (HLB, citrus greening). A Carrizo genomic sequence database providing approximately 3.5×genome coverage (haploid genome size approximately 367 Mb) was populated through 454 GS FLX shotgun sequencing. Analysis of the repetitive DNA fraction indicated a total interspersed repeat fraction of 36.5%. Assembly and characterization of abundant citrus Ty3/gypsy elements revealed a novel type of element containing open reading frames encoding a viral RNA-silencing suppressor protein (RNA binding protein, rbp) and a plant cytokinin riboside 5′-monophosphate phosphoribohydrolase-related protein (LONELY GUY, log). Similar gypsy elements were identified in the Populus trichocarpa genome. Gene-coding region analysis indicated that 24.4% of the nonrepetitive reads contained genic regions. The depth of genome coverage was sufficient to allow accurate assembly of constituent genes, including a putative phloem-expressed gene. The development of the Carrizo database (http://citrus.pw.usda.gov/) will contribute to characterization of agronomically significant loci and provide a publicly available genomic resource to the citrus research community.

  12. Sequencing and analysis of a genomic fragment provide an insight into the Dunaliella viridis genomic sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiao-Ming; Tang, Yuan-Ping; Meng, Xiang-Zong; Zhang, Wen-Wen; Li, Shan; Deng, Zhi-Rui; Xu, Zheng-Kai; Song, Ren-Tao

    2006-11-01

    Dunaliella is a genus of wall-less unicellular eukaryotic green alga. Its exceptional resistances to salt and various other stresses have made it an ideal model for stress tolerance study. However, very little is known about its genome and genomic sequences. In this study, we sequenced and analyzed a 29,268 bp genomic fragment from Dunaliella viridis. The fragment showed low sequence homology to the GenBank database. At the nucleotide level, only a segment with significant sequence homology to 18S rRNA was found. The fragment contained six putative genes, but only one gene showed significant homology at the protein level to GenBank database. The average GC content of this sequence was 51.1%, which was much lower than that of close related green algae Chlamydomonas (65.7%). Significant segmental duplications were found within this fragment. The duplicated sequences accounted for about 35.7% of the entire region. Large amounts of simple sequence repeats (microsatellites) were found, with strong bias towards (AC)(n) type (76%). Analysis of other Dunaliella genomic sequences in the GenBank database (total 25,749 bp) was in agreement with these findings. These sequence features made it difficult to sequence Dunaliella genomic sequences. Further investigation should be made to reveal the biological significance of these unique sequence features.

  13. Evolution and Diversity in Human Herpes Simplex Virus Genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatherer, Derek; Ochoa, Alejandro; Greenbaum, Benjamin; Dolan, Aidan; Bowden, Rory J.; Enquist, Lynn W.; Legendre, Matthieu; Davison, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes a chronic, lifelong infection in >60% of adults. Multiple recent vaccine trials have failed, with viral diversity likely contributing to these failures. To understand HSV-1 diversity better, we comprehensively compared 20 newly sequenced viral genomes from China, Japan, Kenya, and South Korea with six previously sequenced genomes from the United States, Europe, and Japan. In this diverse collection of passaged strains, we found that one-fifth of the newly sequenced members share a gene deletion and one-third exhibit homopolymeric frameshift mutations (HFMs). Individual strains exhibit genotypic and potential phenotypic variation via HFMs, deletions, short sequence repeats, and single-nucleotide polymorphisms, although the protein sequence identity between strains exceeds 90% on average. In the first genome-scale analysis of positive selection in HSV-1, we found signs of selection in specific proteins and residues, including the fusion protein glycoprotein H. We also confirmed previous results suggesting that recombination has occurred with high frequency throughout the HSV-1 genome. Despite this, the HSV-1 strains analyzed clustered by geographic origin during whole-genome distance analysis. These data shed light on likely routes of HSV-1 adaptation to changing environments and will aid in the selection of vaccine antigens that are invariant worldwide. PMID:24227835

  14. GeneChip Resequencing of the Smallpox Virus Genome Can Identify Novel Strains: a Biodefense Application▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Tang, Kevin; Osborne, John; Sammons, Scott; Wohlhueter, Robert M.

    2007-01-01

    We developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips, based on the complete genome sequences of 24 strains of smallpox virus (variola virus), for rapid characterization of this human-pathogenic virus. Each GeneChip was designed to analyze a divergent segment of approximately 30,000 bases of the smallpox virus genome. This study includes the hybridization results of 14 smallpox virus strains. Of the 14 smallpox virus strains hybridized, only 7 had sequence information included in the design of the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips; similar information for the remaining strains was not tiled as a reference in these GeneChips. By use of variola virus-specific primers and long-range PCR, 22 overlapping amplicons were amplified to cover nearly the complete genome and hybridized with the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChip set. These GeneChips were successful in generating nucleotide sequences for all 14 of the smallpox virus strains hybridized. Analysis of the data indicated that the GeneChip resequencing by hybridization was fast and reproducible and that the smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips could differentiate the 14 smallpox virus strains characterized. This study also suggests that high-density resequencing GeneChips have potential biodefense applications and may be used as an alternate tool for rapid identification of smallpox virus in the future. PMID:17182757

  15. Sequence adaptations during growth of rescued classical swine fever viruses in cell culture and within infected pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hadsbjerg, Johanne; Friis, Martin Barfred; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    RNA could be detected. However, the animals inoculated with these mutant viruses seroconverted against CSFV. Thus, these mutant viruses were highly attenuated in vivo. All 4 rescued viruses were also passaged up to 20 times in cell culture. Using full genome sequencing, the same two adaptations within...... each of four independent virus populations were observed that restored the coding sequence to that of the parental field strain. These adaptations occurred with different kinetics. The combination of reverse genetics and in depth, full genome sequencing provides a powerful approach to analyse virus...

  16. The genome of an influenza virus from a pilot whale: relation to influenza viruses of gulls and marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Marco; Lange, Jeannette; Kanrai, Pumaree; Pleschka, Stephan; Scholtissek, Christoph; Krumbholz, Andi; Platzer, Matthias; Sauerbrei, Andreas; Zell, Roland

    2014-06-01

    Influenza virus A/whale/Maine/328B/1984 (H13N2) was isolated from a diseased pilot whale. Since only a partial sequence was available, its complete genome was sequenced and compared to the sequences of subtype H13 influenza viruses from shorebirds and various influenza viruses of marine mammals. The data reveal a rare genotype constellation with all gene segments derived of an influenza virus adapted to gulls, terns and waders. In contrast, the phylogenetic trees indicate that the majority of influenza viruses isolated from marine mammals derived from influenza viruses adapted to geese and ducks. We conclude that A/whale/Maine/328B/1984 is the first record of an infection of a marine mammal from a gull-origin influenza virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Global organization of a positive-strand RNA virus genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    Full Text Available The genomes of plus-strand RNA viruses contain many regulatory sequences and structures that direct different viral processes. The traditional view of these RNA elements are as local structures present in non-coding regions. However, this view is changing due to the discovery of regulatory elements in coding regions and functional long-range intra-genomic base pairing interactions. The ∼4.8 kb long RNA genome of the tombusvirus tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV contains these types of structural features, including six different functional long-distance interactions. We hypothesized that to achieve these multiple interactions this viral genome must utilize a large-scale organizational strategy and, accordingly, we sought to assess the global conformation of the entire TBSV genome. Atomic force micrographs of the genome indicated a mostly condensed structure composed of interconnected protrusions extending from a central hub. This configuration was consistent with the genomic secondary structure model generated using high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analysed by primer extension (i.e. SHAPE, which predicted different sized RNA domains originating from a central region. Known RNA elements were identified in both domain and inter-domain regions, and novel structural features were predicted and functionally confirmed. Interestingly, only two of the six long-range interactions known to form were present in the structural model. However, for those interactions that did not form, complementary partner sequences were positioned relatively close to each other in the structure, suggesting that the secondary structure level of viral genome structure could provide a basic scaffold for the formation of different long-range interactions. The higher-order structural model for the TBSV RNA genome provides a snapshot of the complex framework that allows multiple functional components to operate in concert within a confined context.

  18. Optimizing cancer genome sequencing and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Malachi; Miller, Christopher A.; Griffith, Obi L.; Krysiak, Kilannin; Skidmore, Zachary L.; Ramu, Avinash; Walker, Jason R.; Dang, Ha X.; Trani, Lee; Larson, David E.; Demeter, Ryan T.; Wendl, Michael C.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Austin, Rachel E.; Magrini, Vincent; McGrath, Sean D.; Ly, Amy; Kulkarni, Shashikant; Cordes, Matthew G.; Fronick, Catrina C.; Fulton, Robert S.; Maher, Christopher A.; Ding, Li; Klco, Jeffery M.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumors are typically sequenced to depths of 75–100× (exome) or 30–50× (whole genome). We demonstrate that current sequencing paradigms are inadequate for tumors that are impure, aneuploid or clonally heterogeneous. To reassess optimal sequencing strategies, we performed ultra-deep (up to ~312×) whole genome sequencing (WGS) and exome capture (up to ~433×) of a primary acute myeloid leukemia, its subsequent relapse, and a matched normal skin sample. We tested multiple alignment and variant calling algorithms and validated ~200,000 putative SNVs by sequencing them to depths of ~1,000×. Additional targeted sequencing provided over 10,000× coverage and ddPCR assays provided up to ~250,000× sampling of selected sites. We evaluated the effects of different library generation approaches, depth of sequencing, and analysis strategies on the ability to effectively characterize a complex tumor. This dataset, representing the most comprehensively sequenced tumor described to date, will serve as an invaluable community resource (dbGaP accession id phs000159). PMID:26645048

  19. Yeast genome sequencing: the power of comparative genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjaer, Rikke B

    2004-07-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown that the minimum number of genes from each species that need to be compared to produce a reliable phylogeny is about 20. Yeast has also become an attractive model to study speciation in eukaryotes, especially to understand molecular mechanisms behind the establishment of reproductive isolation. Comparison of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide the background to use more yeast species in model studies, to combat pathogens and for efficient manipulation of industrial strains.

  20. The genome sequence of Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wood, [No Value; Gwilliam, R; Rajandream, MA; Lyne, M; Lyne, R; Stewart, A; Sgouros, J; Peat, N; Hayles, J; Baker, S; Basham, D; Bowman, S; Brooks, K; Brown, D; Brown, S; Chillingworth, T; Churcher, C; Collins, M; Connor, R; Cronin, A; Davis, P; Feltwell, T; Fraser, A; Gentles, S; Goble, A; Hamlin, N; Harris, D; Hidalgo, J; Hodgson, G; Holroyd, S; Hornsby, T; Howarth, S; Huckle, EJ; Hunt, S; Jagels, K; James, K; Jones, L; Jones, M; Leather, S; McDonald, S; McLean, J; Mooney, P; Moule, S; Mungall, K; Murphy, L; Niblett, D; Odell, C; Oliver, K; O'Neil, S; Pearson, D; Quail, MA; Rabbinowitsch, E; Rutherford, K; Rutter, S; Saunders, D; Seeger, K; Sharp, S; Skelton, J; Simmonds, M; Squares, R; Squares, S; Stevens, K; Taylor, K; Taylor, RG; Tivey, A; Walsh, S; Warren, T; Whitehead, S; Woodward, J; Volckaert, G; Aert, R; Robben, J; Grymonprez, B; Weltjens, [No Value; Vanstreels, E; Rieger, M; Schafer, M; Muller-Auer, S; Gabel, C; Fuchs, M; Fritzc, C; Holzer, E; Moestl, D; Hilbert, H; Borzym, K; Langer, [No Value; Beck, A; Lehrach, H; Reinhardt, R; Pohl, TM; Eger, P; Zimmermann, W; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Purnelle, B; Goffeau, A; Cadieu, E; Dreano, S; Gloux, S; Lelaure, [No Value; Mottier, S; Galibert, F; Aves, SJ; Xiang, Z; Hunt, C; Moore, K; Hurst, SM; Lucas, M; Rochet, M; Gaillardin, C; Tallada, VA; Garzon, A; Thode, G; Daga, RR; Cruzado, L; Jimenez, J; Sanchez, M; del Rey, F; Benito, J; Dominguez, A; Revuelta, JL; Moreno, S; Armstrong, J; Forsburg, SL; Cerrutti, L; Lowe, T; McCombie, WR; Paulsen, [No Value; Potashkin, J; Shpakovski, GV; Ussery, D; Barrell, BG; Nurse, P

    2002-01-01

    We have sequenced and annotated the genome of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe), which contains the smallest number of protein-coding genes yet recorded for a eukaryote: 4,824. The centromeres are between 35 and 110 kilobases (kb) and contain related repeats including a highly conserved

  1. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus Bamboo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Michelle; Klinzing, David; Wei, Jun-Rong; Gengenbacher, Martin; Rubin, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycobacterium abscessus, an intrinsically multidrug-resistant pathogen, causes chronic incurable lung disease. New drugs for this emerging pathogen represent an urgent unmet medical need. Here, we report a draft genome sequence of M. abscessus Bamboo, a clinical isolate used as a screening strain for drug discovery. PMID:28522728

  2. Genome sequence of bubaline alphaherpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) isolated in Australia in 1972.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheffer, Camila Mengue; Varela, Ana Paula Muterle; Cibulski, Samuel Paulo; Schmidt, Candice; Campos, Fabrício Souza; Paim, Willian Pinto; Dos Santos, Raíssa Nunes; Teixeira, Thais Fumaco; Loiko, Márcia Regina; Tochetto, Caroline; Dos Santos, Helton Fernandes; de Lima, Diane Alves; Cerva, Cristine; Mayer, Fabiana Quoos; Petzhold, Sylio Alfredo; Franco, Ana Cláudia; George, Toby St; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Roehe, Paulo Michel

    2017-05-01

    Bubaline alphaherpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) is a member of the family Herpesviridae, subfamily Alphaherpesvirinae, genus Varicellovirus. To date, no full genome sequence of BuHV has been published. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of bubaline alphaherpesvirus 1 (BuHV1) strain b6 (BuHV1-b6), isolated from a water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in 1972 in Australia. The virus was multiplied in MDBK cells, and the DNA was extracted and subjected to high-throughput sequencing. The reads were aligned and combined into a single genome sequence, with bovine alphaherpesvirus 5 (BoHV5) strain SV507/99 (accession number NC005261) as a reference. The BuHV1-b6 genome is a linear double-stranded DNA molecule, 137,452 bp long, with a GC content of 76.8%. The genome consists of two unique sequences: a long, or UL, sequence (103,818 bp) and a short, or US, sequence (9,586 bp), with the latter being flanked by inverted IR and TR elements of 12,024 bp each. The arrangement is typical of herpesvirus genomes of the D-type. The overall sequence has a 92.2% similarity at the nucleotide level to the reference BoHV5 strain. Our report provides a significant landmark in the history of herpesviruses, represented by the genome sequence of this 44-year-old virus isolate.

  3. Whole-genome sequence of Schistosoma haematobium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Neil D; Jex, Aaron R; Li, Bo; Liu, Shiping; Yang, Linfeng; Xiong, Zijun; Li, Yingrui; Cantacessi, Cinzia; Hall, Ross S; Xu, Xun; Chen, Fangyuan; Wu, Xuan; Zerlotini, Adhemar; Oliveira, Guilherme; Hofmann, Andreas; Zhang, Guojie; Fang, Xiaodong; Kang, Yi; Campbell, Bronwyn E; Loukas, Alex; Ranganathan, Shoba; Rollinson, David; Rinaldi, Gabriel; Brindley, Paul J; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jun; Wang, Jian; Gasser, Robin B

    2012-01-15

    Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease caused by blood flukes (genus Schistosoma; schistosomes) and affecting 200 million people worldwide. No vaccines are available, and treatment relies on one drug, praziquantel. Schistosoma haematobium has come into the spotlight as a major cause of urogenital disease, as an agent linked to bladder cancer and as a predisposing factor for HIV/AIDS. The parasite is transmitted to humans from freshwater snails. Worms dwell in blood vessels and release eggs that become embedded in the bladder wall to elicit chronic immune-mediated disease and induce squamous cell carcinoma. Here we sequenced the 385-Mb genome of S. haematobium using Illumina-based technology at 74-fold coverage and compared it to sequences from related parasites. We included genome annotation based on function, gene ontology, networking and pathway mapping. This genome now provides an unprecedented resource for many fundamental research areas and shows great promise for the design of new disease interventions.

  4. Deep sequencing analysis of apple infecting viruses in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep sequencing of viruses isolated from eight symptomatic apple trees in Korea has generated 52 contigs derived from five viruses: Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV), Apple green crinkle associated virus (AGCaV) and Apricot lat...

  5. Whole genome sequence of a Turkish individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haluk Dogan

    Full Text Available Although whole human genome sequencing can be done with readily available technical and financial resources, the need for detailed analyses of genomes of certain populations still exists. Here we present, for the first time, sequencing and analysis of a Turkish human genome. We have performed 35x coverage using paired-end sequencing, where over 95% of sequencing reads are mapped to the reference genome covering more than 99% of the bases. The assembly of unmapped reads rendered 11,654 contigs, 2,168 of which did not reveal any homology to known sequences, resulting in ∼1 Mbp of unmapped sequence. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP discovery resulted in 3,537,794 SNP calls with 29,184 SNPs identified in coding regions, where 106 were nonsense and 259 were categorized as having a high-impact effect. The homo/hetero zygosity (1,415,123∶2,122,671 or 1∶1.5 and transition/transversion ratios (2,383,204∶1,154,590 or 2.06∶1 were within expected limits. Of the identified SNPs, 480,396 were potentially novel with 2,925 in coding regions, including 48 nonsense and 95 high-impact SNPs. Functional analysis of novel high-impact SNPs revealed various interaction networks, notably involving hereditary and neurological disorders or diseases. Assembly results indicated 713,640 indels (1∶1.09 insertion/deletion ratio, ranging from -52 bp to 34 bp in length and causing about 180 codon insertion/deletions and 246 frame shifts. Using paired-end- and read-depth-based methods, we discovered 9,109 structural variants and compared our variant findings with other populations. Our results suggest that whole genome sequencing is a valuable tool for understanding variations in the human genome across different populations. Detailed analyses of genomes of diverse origins greatly benefits research in genetics and medicine and should be conducted on a larger scale.

  6. A Draft Sequence of the Neandertal Genome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Richard E.; Li, Heng; Zhai, Weiwei; Fritz, Markus Hsi-Yang; Hansen, Nancy F.; Durand, Eric Y.; Malaspinas, Anna-Sapfo; Jensen, Jeffrey D.; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Alkan, Can; Prüfer, Kay; Meyer, Matthias; Burbano, Hernán A.; Good, Jeffrey M.; Schultz, Rigo; Aximu-Petri, Ayinuer; Butthof, Anne; Höber, Barbara; Höffner, Barbara; Siegemund, Madlen; Weihmann, Antje; Nusbaum, Chad; Lander, Eric S.; Russ, Carsten; Novod, Nathaniel; Affourtit, Jason; Egholm, Michael; Verna, Christine; Rudan, Pavao; Brajkovic, Dejana; Kucan, Željko; Gušic, Ivan; Doronichev, Vladimir B.; Golovanova, Liubov V.; Lalueza-Fox, Carles; de la Rasilla, Marco; Fortea, Javier; Rosas, Antonio; Schmitz, Ralf W.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Eichler, Evan E.; Falush, Daniel; Birney, Ewan; Mullikin, James C.; Slatkin, Montgomery; Nielsen, Rasmus; Kelso, Janet; Lachmann, Michael; Reich, David; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    Neandertals, the closest evolutionary relatives of present-day humans, lived in large parts of Europe and western Asia before disappearing 30,000 years ago. We present a draft sequence of the Neandertal genome composed of more than 4 billion nucleotides from three individuals. Comparisons of the Neandertal genome to the genomes of five present-day humans from different parts of the world identify a number of genomic regions that may have been affected by positive selection in ancestral modern humans, including genes involved in metabolism and in cognitive and skeletal development. We show that Neandertals shared more genetic variants with present-day humans in Eurasia than with present-day humans in sub-Saharan Africa, suggesting that gene flow from Neandertals into the ancestors of non-Africans occurred before the divergence of Eurasian groups from each other. PMID:20448178

  7. Genome DNA Sequence Variation, Evolution, and Function in Bacteria and Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishida, Hiromi

    2013-01-01

    Comparative genomics has revealed that variations in bacterial and archaeal genome DNA sequences cannot be explained by only neutral mutations. Virus resistance and plasmid distribution systems have resulted in changes in bacterial and archaeal genome sequences during evolution. The restriction-modification system, a virus resistance system, leads to avoidance of palindromic DNA sequences in genomes. Clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) found in genomes represent yet another virus resistance system. Comparative genomics has shown that bacteria and archaea have failed to gain any DNA with GC content higher than the GC content of their chromosomes. Thus, horizontally transferred DNA regions have lower GC content than the host chromosomal DNA does. Some nucleoid-associated proteins bind DNA regions with low GC content and inhibit the expression of genes contained in those regions. This form of gene repression is another type of virus resistance system. On the other hand, bacteria and archaea have used plasmids to gain additional genes. Virus resistance systems influence plasmid distribution. Interestingly, the restriction-modification system and nucleoid-associated protein genes have been distributed via plasmids. Thus, GC content and genomic signatures do not reflect bacterial and archaeal evolutionary relationships.

  8. Genome sequence of a novel mycovirus of Rhizoctonia solani, a plant pathogenic fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jie; Chen, Chuan-Yuan; Gao, Bi-Da

    2015-08-01

    Here we present the genome sequence of a novel dsRNA virus we designed as Rhizoctonia solani RNA virus HN008 (RsRV-HN008) from a filamentous fungus R. solani. Its genome (7596 nucleotides) contains two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORF1 and ORF2). ORF1 encoded a 128 kDa protein that showed no significant identity to any other virus sequence in the NCBI database. ORF2 encoded a protein with a molecular weight of 140 kDa and shared a low percentage of sequence identity to the RdRps of unclassified dsRNA viruses. Sequence analysis revealed that RsRV-HN008 may be a member of a novel unclassified family of mycoviruses.

  9. Complete genome of a Puumala virus strain from Central Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hanan Sheikh; Drewes, Stephan; Weber de Melo, Vanessa; Schlegel, Mathias; Freise, Jona; Groschup, Martin H; Heckel, Gerald; Ulrich, Rainer G

    2015-04-01

    Puumala virus (PUUV) is one of the predominant hantavirus species in Europe causing mild to moderate cases of haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome. Parts of Lower Saxony in north-western Germany are endemic for PUUV infections. In this study, the complete PUUV genome sequence of a bank vole-derived tissue sample from the 2007 outbreak was determined by a combined primer-walking and RNA ligation strategy. The S, M and L genome segments were 1,828, 3,680 and 6,550 nucleotides in length, respectively. Sliding-window analyses of the nucleotide sequences of all available complete PUUV genomes indicated a non-homogenous distribution of variability with hypervariable regions located at the 3'-ends of the S and M segments. The overall similarity of the coding genome regions to the other PUUV strains ranged between 80.1 and 84.7 % at the level of the nucleotide sequence and between 89.5 and 98.1 % for the deduced amino acid sequences. In comparison to the phylogenetic trees of the complete coding sequences, trees based on partial segments revealed a general drop in phylogenetic support and a lower resolution. The Astrup strain S and M segment sequences showed the highest similarity to sequences of strains from geographically close sites in the Osnabrück Hills region. In conclusion, a primer-walking-mediated strategy resulted in the determination of the first complete nucleotide sequence of a PUUV strain from Central Europe. Different levels of variability along the genome provide the opportunity to choose regions for analyses according to the particular research question, e.g., large-scale phylogenetics or within-host evolution.

  10. Deep sequencing in the management of hepatitis virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quer, Josep; Rodríguez-Frias, Francisco; Gregori, Josep; Tabernero, David; Soria, Maria Eugenia; García-Cehic, Damir; Homs, Maria; Bosch, Albert; Pintó, Rosa María; Esteban, Juan Ignacio; Domingo, Esteban; Perales, Celia

    2017-07-15

    The hepatitis viruses represent a major public health problem worldwide. Procedures for characterization of the genomic composition of their populations, accurate diagnosis, identification of multiple infections, and information on inhibitor-escape mutants for treatment decisions are needed. Deep sequencing methodologies are extremely useful for these viruses since they replicate as complex and dynamic quasispecies swarms whose complexity and mutant composition are biologically relevant traits. Population complexity is a major challenge for disease prevention and control, but also an opportunity to distinguish among related but phenotypically distinct variants that might anticipate disease progression and treatment outcome. Detailed characterization of mutant spectra should permit choosing better treatment options, given the increasing number of new antiviral inhibitors available. In the present review we briefly summarize our experience on the use of deep sequencing for the management of hepatitis virus infections, particularly for hepatitis B and C viruses, and outline some possible new applications of deep sequencing for these important human pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides excluding the 3’-polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyviruses including a s...

  12. Integrated analysis of whole genome and transcriptome sequencing reveals diverse transcriptomic aberrations driven by somatic genomic changes in liver cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichi Shiraishi

    Full Text Available Recent studies applying high-throughput sequencing technologies have identified several recurrently mutated genes and pathways in multiple cancer genomes. However, transcriptional consequences from these genomic alterations in cancer genome remain unclear. In this study, we performed integrated and comparative analyses of whole genomes and transcriptomes of 22 hepatitis B virus (HBV-related hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs and their matched controls. Comparison of whole genome sequence (WGS and RNA-Seq revealed much evidence that various types of genomic mutations triggered diverse transcriptional changes. Not only splice-site mutations, but also silent mutations in coding regions, deep intronic mutations and structural changes caused splicing aberrations. HBV integrations generated diverse patterns of virus-human fusion transcripts depending on affected gene, such as TERT, CDK15, FN1 and MLL4. Structural variations could drive over-expression of genes such as WNT ligands, with/without creating gene fusions. Furthermore, by taking account of genomic mutations causing transcriptional aberrations, we could improve the sensitivity of deleterious mutation detection in known cancer driver genes (TP53, AXIN1, ARID2, RPS6KA3, and identified recurrent disruptions in putative cancer driver genes such as HNF4A, CPS1, TSC1 and THRAP3 in HCCs. These findings indicate genomic alterations in cancer genome have diverse transcriptomic effects, and integrated analysis of WGS and RNA-Seq can facilitate the interpretation of a large number of genomic alterations detected in cancer genome.

  13. Single-virus genomics reveals hidden cosmopolitan and abundant viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, Francisco; Fornas, Oscar; Lluesma Gomez, Monica; Bolduc, Benjamin; de la Cruz Peña, Maria Jose; Martínez, Joaquín Martínez; Anton, Josefa; Gasol, Josep M.; Rosselli, Riccardo; Rodriguez-Valera, Francisco; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Acinas, Silvia G.; Martinez-Garcia, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Microbes drive ecosystems under constraints imposed by viruses. However, a lack of virus genome information hinders our ability to answer fundamental, biological questions concerning microbial communities. Here we apply single-virus genomics (SVGs) to assess whether portions of marine viral communities are missed by current techniques. The majority of the here-identified 44 viral single-amplified genomes (vSAGs) are more abundant in global ocean virome data sets than published metagenome-assembled viral genomes or isolates. This indicates that vSAGs likely best represent the dsDNA viral populations dominating the oceans. Species-specific recruitment patterns and virome simulation data suggest that vSAGs are highly microdiverse and that microdiversity hinders the metagenomic assembly, which could explain why their genomes have not been identified before. Altogether, SVGs enable the discovery of some of the likely most abundant and ecologically relevant marine viral species, such as vSAG 37-F6, which were overlooked by other methodologies. PMID:28643787

  14. A first report and complete genome sequence of alfalfa enamovirus from Sudan

    Science.gov (United States)

    A full genome sequence of a viral pathogen, provisionally named alfalfa enamovirus 2 (AEV-2), was reconstructed from short reads obtained by Illumina RNA sequencing of alfalfa sample originating from Sudan. Ambiguous nucleotides in the resultant consensus assembly and identity of the predicted virus...

  15. Genome sequence of Aspergillus luchuensis NBRC 4314

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Osamu; Machida, Masayuki; Hosoyama, Akira; Goto, Masatoshi; Takahashi, Toru; Futagami, Taiki; Yamagata, Youhei; Takeuchi, Michio; Kobayashi, Tetsuo; Koike, Hideaki; Abe, Keietsu; Asai, Kiyoshi; Arita, Masanori; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Fukuda, Kazuro; Higa, Ken-ichi; Horikawa, Hiroshi; Ishikawa, Takeaki; Jinno, Koji; Kato, Yumiko; Kirimura, Kohtaro; Mizutani, Osamu; Nakasone, Kaoru; Sano, Motoaki; Shiraishi, Yohei; Tsukahara, Masatoshi; Gomi, Katsuya

    2016-01-01

    Awamori is a traditional distilled beverage made from steamed Thai-Indica rice in Okinawa, Japan. For brewing the liquor, two microbes, local kuro (black) koji mold Aspergillus luchuensis and awamori yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are involved. In contrast, that yeasts are used for ethanol fermentation throughout the world, a characteristic of Japanese fermentation industries is the use of Aspergillus molds as a source of enzymes for the maceration and saccharification of raw materials. Here we report the draft genome of a kuro (black) koji mold, A. luchuensis NBRC 4314 (RIB 2604). The total length of nonredundant sequences was nearly 34.7 Mb, comprising approximately 2,300 contigs with 16 telomere-like sequences. In total, 11,691 genes were predicted to encode proteins. Most of the housekeeping genes, such as transcription factors and N-and O-glycosylation system, were conserved with respect to Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae. An alternative oxidase and acid-stable α-amylase regarding citric acid production and fermentation at a low pH as well as a unique glutamic peptidase were also found in the genome. Furthermore, key biosynthetic gene clusters of ochratoxin A and fumonisin B were absent when compared with A. niger genome, showing the safety of A. luchuensis for food and beverage production. This genome information will facilitate not only comparative genomics with industrial kuro-koji molds, but also molecular breeding of the molds in improvements of awamori fermentation. PMID:27651094

  16. Synaptotagmin gene content of the sequenced genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Craxton Molly

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Synaptotagmins exist as a large gene family in mammals. There is much interest in the function of certain family members which act crucially in the regulated synaptic vesicle exocytosis required for efficient neurotransmission. Knowledge of the functions of other family members is relatively poor and the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in plants indicates a role for the family as a whole which is wider than neurotransmission. Identification of the Synaptotagmin genes within completely sequenced genomes can provide the entire Synaptotagmin gene complement of each sequenced organism. Defining the detailed structures of all the Synaptotagmin genes and their encoded products can provide a useful resource for functional studies and a deeper understanding of the evolution of the gene family. The current rapid increase in the number of sequenced genomes from different branches of the tree of life, together with the public deposition of evolutionarily diverse transcript sequences make such studies worthwhile. Results I have compiled a detailed list of the Synaptotagmin genes of Caenorhabditis, Anopheles, Drosophila, Ciona, Danio, Fugu, Mus, Homo, Arabidopsis and Oryza by examining genomic and transcript sequences from public sequence databases together with some transcript sequences obtained by cDNA library screening and RT-PCR. I have compared all of the genes and investigated the relationship between plant Synaptotagmins and their non-Synaptotagmin counterparts. Conclusions I have identified and compared 98 Synaptotagmin genes from 10 sequenced genomes. Detailed comparison of transcript sequences reveals abundant and complex variation in Synaptotagmin gene expression and indicates the presence of Synaptotagmin genes in all animals and land plants. Amino acid sequence comparisons indicate patterns of conservation and diversity in function. Phylogenetic analysis shows the origin of Synaptotagmins in multicellular eukaryotes and their

  17. Descriptive Statistics of the Genome: Phylogenetic Classification of Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Troy; Yang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    The typical process for classifying and submitting a newly sequenced virus to the NCBI database involves two steps. First, a BLAST search is performed to determine likely family candidates. That is followed by checking the candidate families with the pairwise sequence alignment tool for similar species. The submitter's judgment is then used to determine the most likely species classification. The aim of this article is to show that this process can be automated into a fast, accurate, one-step process using the proposed alignment-free method and properly implemented machine learning techniques. We present a new family of alignment-free vectorizations of the genome, the generalized vector, that maintains the speed of existing alignment-free methods while outperforming all available methods. This new alignment-free vectorization uses the frequency of genomic words (k-mers), as is done in the composition vector, and incorporates descriptive statistics of those k-mers' positional information, as inspired by the natural vector. We analyze five different characterizations of genome similarity using k-nearest neighbor classification and evaluate these on two collections of viruses totaling over 10,000 viruses. We show that our proposed method performs better than, or as well as, other methods at every level of the phylogenetic hierarchy. The data and R code is available upon request.

  18. Genomic characterisation of Almpiwar virus, Harrison Dam virus and Walkabout Creek virus; three novel rhabdoviruses from northern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane McAllister

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rhabdoviridae represent a diverse group of viruses with the potential to cause disease in humans, animals and plants. Currently there are nine genera in the family; however a large number of rhabdoviruses remain unassigned. Here we characterise three novel rhabdoviruses genomes. Almpiwar virus (ALMV, isolated from skinks in northern Queensland, is the first completely sequenced rhabdovirus from squamates, with serological studies indicating multiple animal host species. Harrison Dam virus (HARDV and Walkabout Creek virus (WACV were isolated from mosquitoes in the Northern Territory and biting midges in southern Queensland respectively and their vertebrate hosts remain unknown. Serological cross-neutralisation tests with other Australian rhabdoviruses indicate that ALMV, WACV and HARDV are distinct viruses with little antigenic cross-reactivity. Next-generation sequencing revealed that all viruses encode the core proteins common to rhabdoviruses (N, P, M, G and L, plus additional ORFs between the M and G genes. HARDV also contains a small ORF between the G and L genes. Phylogenetic analysis of N and L proteins suggests that HARDV and WACV share a common lineage with the tupaviruses and Sandjimba group, whereas ALMV is a distinct and divergent virus showing no clear relationship to any rhabdovirus except the recently characterised Niahka virus (NIAV.

  19. Crenarchaeal Viruses: Morphotypes and Genomes,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prangishvili, P.; Basta, P.; Garrett, Roger Antony

    2008-01-01

    of the Crenarchaeota generally do not cause the lysis of the host cells during release of viral progeny and they persist in infected cells in stable carrier state. In accordance with this rather unsophisticated virus-host relationship, the studies of transcription of genes in rudiviruses and fusellovirus SSV1...

  20. Genome Sequence of a Gammaherpesvirus from a Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Andrew J; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Kerr, Karen; Jacob, Jessica M; Landrau-Giovannetti, Nelmarie; Walsh, Michael T; Wells, Randall S; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2017-08-03

    A herpesvirus genome was sequenced directly from a biopsy specimen of a rectal lesion from a female common bottlenose dolphin. This genome sequence comprises a unique region (161,235 bp) flanked by multiple copies of a terminal repeat (4,431 bp) and contains 72 putative genes. The virus was named common bottlenose dolphin gammaherpesvirus 1. Copyright © 2017 Davison et al.

  1. Genome transcription/translation of segmented, negative-strand RNA viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geerts-Dimitriadou, C.

    2011-01-01

    The requirements for alignment of capped RNA leader sequences along the viral genome during influenza transcription initiation (“cap-snatching”) have long been an enigma. Previous work on Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) transcription initiation has revealed that this virus displays a

  2. Identifying driver mutations in sequenced cancer genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raphael, Benjamin J; Dobson, Jason R; Oesper, Layla

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput DNA sequencing is revolutionizing the study of cancer and enabling the measurement of the somatic mutations that drive cancer development. However, the resulting sequencing datasets are large and complex, obscuring the clinically important mutations in a background of errors, noise......, and random mutations. Here, we review computational approaches to identify somatic mutations in cancer genome sequences and to distinguish the driver mutations that are responsible for cancer from random, passenger mutations. First, we describe approaches to detect somatic mutations from high-throughput DNA...... sequencing data, particularly for tumor samples that comprise heterogeneous populations of cells. Next, we review computational approaches that aim to predict driver mutations according to their frequency of occurrence in a cohort of samples, or according to their predicted functional impact on protein...

  3. Genome sequence of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkhill, J; Wren, B W; Thomson, N R; Titball, R W; Holden, M T; Prentice, M B; Sebaihia, M; James, K D; Churcher, C; Mungall, K L; Baker, S; Basham, D; Bentley, S D; Brooks, K; Cerdeño-Tárraga, A M; Chillingworth, T; Cronin, A; Davies, R M; Davis, P; Dougan, G; Feltwell, T; Hamlin, N; Holroyd, S; Jagels, K; Karlyshev, A V; Leather, S; Moule, S; Oyston, P C; Quail, M; Rutherford, K; Simmonds, M; Skelton, J; Stevens, K; Whitehead, S; Barrell, B G

    2001-10-04

    The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the systemic invasive infectious disease classically referred to as plague, and has been responsible for three human pandemics: the Justinian plague (sixth to eighth centuries), the Black Death (fourteenth to nineteenth centuries) and modern plague (nineteenth century to the present day). The recent identification of strains resistant to multiple drugs and the potential use of Y. pestis as an agent of biological warfare mean that plague still poses a threat to human health. Here we report the complete genome sequence of Y. pestis strain CO92, consisting of a 4.65-megabase (Mb) chromosome and three plasmids of 96.2 kilobases (kb), 70.3 kb and 9.6 kb. The genome is unusually rich in insertion sequences and displays anomalies in GC base-composition bias, indicating frequent intragenomic recombination. Many genes seem to have been acquired from other bacteria and viruses (including adhesins, secretion systems and insecticidal toxins). The genome contains around 150 pseudogenes, many of which are remnants of a redundant enteropathogenic lifestyle. The evidence of ongoing genome fluidity, expansion and decay suggests Y. pestis is a pathogen that has undergone large-scale genetic flux and provides a unique insight into the ways in which new and highly virulent pathogens evolve.

  4. Sequencing of seven haloarchaeal genomes reveals patterns of genomic flux.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin A Lynch

    Full Text Available We report the sequencing of seven genomes from two haloarchaeal genera, Haloferax and Haloarcula. Ease of cultivation and the existence of well-developed genetic and biochemical tools for several diverse haloarchaeal species make haloarchaea a model group for the study of archaeal biology. The unique physiological properties of these organisms also make them good candidates for novel enzyme discovery for biotechnological applications. Seven genomes were sequenced to ∼20×coverage and assembled to an average of 50 contigs (range 5 scaffolds-168 contigs. Comparisons of protein-coding gene compliments revealed large-scale differences in COG functional group enrichment between these genera. Analysis of genes encoding machinery for DNA metabolism reveals genera-specific expansions of the general transcription factor TATA binding protein as well as a history of extensive duplication and horizontal transfer of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen. Insights gained from this study emphasize the importance of haloarchaea for investigation of archaeal biology.

  5. An efficient and high fidelity method for amplification, cloning and sequencing of complete tospovirus genomic RNA segments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amplification and sequencing of the complete M- and S-RNA segments of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Impatiens necrotic spot virus as a single fragment is useful for whole genome sequencing of tospoviruses co-infecting a single host plant. It avoids issues associated with overlapping amplicon-based ...

  6. Draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis strain 4401292T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Véronique; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Grégory; Gharbi, Reem; Raoult, Didier

    2012-09-01

    A draft genome sequence of Actinomyces massiliensis, an anaerobic bacterium isolated from a patient's blood culture, is described here. CRISPR-associated proteins, insertion sequences, and toxin-antitoxin loci were found on the genome.

  7. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae

    KAUST Repository

    Dippenaar, Anzaan

    2015-10-21

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi.

  8. Sequence analysis of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus of the American type collected from Danish swine herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, K.G.; Hansen, C.M.; Madsen, E.S.

    1998-01-01

    Vaccine-like viruses of American type of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) were detected in serum samples by RT-PCR. The viruses were analysed by nucleotide sequencing of the genomic region encoding open reading frames 2 to 7. During the ongoing study of Danish isolates...

  9. Large-Scale Sequencing: The Future of Genomic Sciences Colloquium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margaret Riley; Merry Buckley

    2009-01-01

    Genetic sequencing and the various molecular techniques it has enabled have revolutionized the field of microbiology. Examining and comparing the genetic sequences borne by microbes - including bacteria, archaea, viruses, and microbial eukaryotes - provides researchers insights into the processes microbes carry out, their pathogenic traits, and new ways to use microorganisms in medicine and manufacturing. Until recently, sequencing entire microbial genomes has been laborious and expensive, and the decision to sequence the genome of an organism was made on a case-by-case basis by individual researchers and funding agencies. Now, thanks to new technologies, the cost and effort of sequencing is within reach for even the smallest facilities, and the ability to sequence the genomes of a significant fraction of microbial life may be possible. The availability of numerous microbial genomes will enable unprecedented insights into microbial evolution, function, and physiology. However, the current ad hoc approach to gathering sequence data has resulted in an unbalanced and highly biased sampling of microbial diversity. A well-coordinated, large-scale effort to target the breadth and depth of microbial diversity would result in the greatest impact. The American Academy of Microbiology convened a colloquium to discuss the scientific benefits of engaging in a large-scale, taxonomically-based sequencing project. A group of individuals with expertise in microbiology, genomics, informatics, ecology, and evolution deliberated on the issues inherent in such an effort and generated a set of specific recommendations for how best to proceed. The vast majority of microbes are presently uncultured and, thus, pose significant challenges to such a taxonomically-based approach to sampling genome diversity. However, we have yet to even scratch the surface of the genomic diversity among cultured microbes. A coordinated sequencing effort of cultured organisms is an appropriate place to begin

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii

    OpenAIRE

    Caverly, Lindsay J.; Spilker, Theodore; LiPuma, John J.

    2016-01-01

    We report the complete genome sequence of a Mycobacterium abscessus subsp. bolletii isolate recovered from a sputum culture from an individual with cystic fibrosis. This sequence is the first completed whole-genome sequence of M. abscessus subsp. bolletii and adds value to studies of M.?abscessus complex genomics.

  11. A novel virus genome discovered in an extreme environment suggests recombination between unrelated groups of RNA and DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diemer Geoffrey S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viruses are known to be the most abundant organisms on earth, yet little is known about their collective origin and evolutionary history. With exceptionally high rates of genetic mutation and mosaicism, it is not currently possible to resolve deep evolutionary histories of the known major virus groups. Metagenomics offers a potential means of establishing a more comprehensive view of viral evolution as vast amounts of new sequence data becomes available for comparative analysis. Results Bioinformatic analysis of viral metagenomic sequences derived from a hot, acidic lake revealed a circular, putatively single-stranded DNA virus encoding a major capsid protein similar to those found only in single-stranded RNA viruses. The presence and circular configuration of the complete virus genome was confirmed by inverse PCR amplification from native DNA extracted from lake sediment. The virus genome appears to be the result of a RNA-DNA recombination event between two ostensibly unrelated virus groups. Environmental sequence databases were examined for homologous genes arranged in similar configurations and three similar putative virus genomes from marine environments were identified. This result indicates the existence of a widespread but previously undetected group of viruses. Conclusions This unique viral genome carries implications for theories of virus emergence and evolution, as no mechanism for interviral RNA-DNA recombination has yet been identified, and only scant evidence exists that genetic exchange occurs between such distinct virus lineages. Reviewers This article was reviewed by EK, MK (nominated by PF and AM. For the full reviews, please go to the Reviewers' comments section.

  12. Whole genome sequence analysis of recently circulating Bluetongue virus serotype 11 strains from the United States including two domestic canine isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a vector-transmitted pathogen that that typically infects and causes disease in domestic and wild ruminants. BTV is also known to infect domestic canines as discovered when dogs were vaccinated with a BTV-contaminated vaccine. Canine BTV infections have been documented thro...

  13. Whole genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of Bluetongue virus serotype 2 strains isolated in the Americas including a novel strain from the western United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bluetongue is caused by an arbovirus which produces widespread edema and tissue necrosis in domestic and wild ruminants that can be fatal. Bluetongue virus serotypes 10, 11, 13, and 17 are typically found throughout the United States (US), while serotype 2 was previously only detected in the southea...

  14. SDT: A Virus Classification Tool Based on Pairwise Sequence Alignment and Identity Calculation

    OpenAIRE

    Muhire, Brejnev Muhizi; Varsani, Arvind; Martin, Darren Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The perpetually increasing rate at which viral full-genome sequences are being determined is creating a pressing demand for computational tools that will aid the objective classification of these genome sequences. Taxonomic classification approaches that are based on pairwise genetic identity measures are potentially highly automatable and are progressively gaining favour with the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV). There are, however, various issues with the calculation of...

  15. Genome wide survey of microsatellites in ssDNA viruses infecting vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Ankit; Mittal, Nikhil; Sharma, Prakash C

    2014-12-01

    Microsatellites or Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) are tandem iterations of one to six base pairs, non-randomly distributed throughout prokaryotic and eukaryotic genomes. Limited knowledge is available about distribution of microsatellites in single stranded DNA (ssDNA) viruses, particularly vertebrate infecting viruses. We studied microsatellite distribution in 118 ssDNA virus genomes belonging to three families of vertebrate infecting viruses namely Circoviridae, Parvoviridae, and Anelloviridae, and found that microsatellites constitute an important component of these virus genomes. Mononucleotide repeats were predominant followed by dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeats. A strong positive relationship existed between number of mononucleotide repeats and genome size among all the three virus families. A similar relationship existed for the occurrence of DTTPH (di-, tri-, tetra-, penta- and hexa-nucleotide) repeats in the families Anelloviridae and Parvoviridae only. Relative abundance and relative density of mononucleotide repeats showed a strong positive relationship with genome size in Circoviridae and Parvoviridae. However, in the case of DTTPH repeats, these features showed a strong relationship with genome size in Circoviridae only. On the other hand, relative microsatellite abundance and relative density of mononucleotide repeats were negatively correlated with GC content (%) in Parvoviridae genomes. On the basis of available annotations, our analysis revealed maximum occurrence of mononucleotide as well as DTTPH repeats in the coding regions of these virus genomes. Interestingly, after normalizing the length of the coding and non-coding regions of each virus genome, we found relative density of microsatellites much higher in the non-coding regions. We understand that the present study will help in the better characterization of the stability, genome organization and evolution of these virus classes and may provide useful leads to decipher the

  16. Genomic characterization of Zika virus isolated from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudhaputri, Frilasita A; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Perkasa, Aditya; Yohan, Benediktus; Haryanto, Sotianingsih; Wiyatno, Ageng; Soebandrio, Amin; Myint, Khin Saw; Ledermann, Jeremy P; Rosenberg, Ronald; Powers, Ann M; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2017-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) JMB-185 strain was isolated from a febrile patient in Jambi, Indonesia in 2014. To understand its genetic characteristics, we performed whole genome sequencing using the Ion Torrent PGM platform on the supernatant of the first passage. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was not closely related to the Brazilian ZIKV associated with microcephaly or isolates from the recent Singapore Zika outbreak. Molecular evolution analysis indicated that JMB-185 strain may have been circulating in the Southeast Asia region, including Indonesia since 2000. We observed high nucleotide sequence identity between Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, and American strains although unique amino acid substitutions were also observed. This report provides information on the genomic characteristics of Indonesian ZIKV which may be used for further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Didelot, Xavier; Bowden, Rory; Wilson, Daniel J; Peto, Tim E A; Crook, Derrick W

    2012-09-01

    Whole-genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here, we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by using next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties, such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. We predict that the application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow.

  18. Transforming clinical microbiology with bacterial genome sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Whole genome sequencing of bacteria has recently emerged as a cost-effective and convenient approach for addressing many microbiological questions. Here we review the current status of clinical microbiology and how it has already begun to be transformed by the use of next-generation sequencing. We focus on three essential tasks: identifying the species of an isolate, testing its properties such as resistance to antibiotics and virulence, and monitoring the emergence and spread of bacterial pathogens. The application of next-generation sequencing will soon be sufficiently fast, accurate and cheap to be used in routine clinical microbiology practice, where it could replace many complex current techniques with a single, more efficient workflow. PMID:22868263

  19. Whole genome sequencing for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Marissa; Goh, Felicia; Wright, Casey M; Sriram, Krishna B; Relan, Vandana; Clarke, Belinda E; Duhig, Edwina E; Bowman, Rayleen V; Yang, Ian A; Fong, Kwun M

    2012-04-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality globally, and carries a dismal prognosis. Improved understanding of the biology of cancer is required to improve patient outcomes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a powerful tool for whole genome characterisation, enabling comprehensive examination of somatic mutations that drive oncogenesis. Most NGS methods are based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of platform-specific DNA fragment libraries, which are then sequenced. These techniques are well suited to high-throughput sequencing and are able to detect the full spectrum of genomic changes present in cancer. However, they require considerable investments in time, laboratory infrastructure, computational analysis and bioinformatic support. Next-generation sequencing has been applied to studies of the whole genome, exome, transcriptome and epigenome, and is changing the paradigm of lung cancer research and patient care. The results of this new technology will transform current knowledge of oncogenic pathways and provide molecular targets of use in the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. Somatic mutations in lung cancer have already been identified by NGS, and large scale genomic studies are underway. Personalised treatment strategies will improve care for those likely to benefit from available therapies, while sparing others the expense and morbidity of futile intervention. Organisational, computational and bioinformatic challenges of NGS are driving technological advances as well as raising ethical issues relating to informed consent and data release. Differentiation between driver and passenger mutations requires careful interpretation of sequencing data. Challenges in the interpretation of results arise from the types of specimens used for DNA extraction, sample processing techniques and tumour content. Tumour heterogeneity can reduce power to detect mutations implicated in oncogenesis. Next-generation sequencing will

  20. Competition between influenza A virus genome segments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivy Widjaja

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV contains a segmented negative-strand RNA genome. How IAV balances the replication and transcription of its multiple genome segments is not understood. We developed a dual competition assay based on the co-transfection of firefly or Gaussia luciferase-encoding genome segments together with plasmids encoding IAV polymerase subunits and nucleoprotein. At limiting amounts of polymerase subunits, expression of the firefly luciferase segment was negatively affected by the presence of its Gaussia luciferase counterpart, indicative of competition between reporter genome segments. This competition could be relieved by increasing or decreasing the relative amounts of firefly or Gaussia reporter segment, respectively. The balance between the luciferase expression levels was also affected by the identity of the untranslated regions (UTRs as well as segment length. In general it appeared that genome segments displaying inherent higher expression levels were more efficient competitors of another segment. When natural genome segments were tested for their ability to suppress reporter gene expression, shorter genome segments generally reduced firefly luciferase expression to a larger extent, with the M and NS segments having the largest effect. The balance between different reporter segments was most dramatically affected by the introduction of UTR panhandle-stabilizing mutations. Furthermore, only reporter genome segments carrying these mutations were able to efficiently compete with the natural genome segments in infected cells. Our data indicate that IAV genome segments compete for available polymerases. Competition is affected by segment length, coding region, and UTRs. This competition is probably most apparent early during infection, when limiting amounts of polymerases are present, and may contribute to the regulation of segment-specific replication and transcription.

  1. Widespread Horizontal Gene Transfer from Circular Single-stranded DNA Viruses to Eukaryotic Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie Jiatao

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to vertical transmission, organisms can also acquire genes from other distantly related species or from their extra-chromosomal elements (plasmids and viruses via horizontal gene transfer (HGT. It has been suggested that phages represent substantial forces in prokaryotic evolution. In eukaryotes, retroviruses, which can integrate into host genome as an obligate step in their replication strategy, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. Unlike retroviruses, few members of other virus families are known to transfer genes to host genomes. Results Here we performed a systematic search for sequences related to circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA viruses in publicly available eukaryotic genome databases followed by comprehensive phylogenetic analysis. We conclude that the replication initiation protein (Rep-related sequences of geminiviruses, nanoviruses and circoviruses have been frequently transferred to a broad range of eukaryotic species, including plants, fungi, animals and protists. Some of the transferred viral genes were conserved and expressed, suggesting that these genes have been coopted to assume cellular functions in the host genomes. We also identified geminivirus-like and parvovirus-like transposable elements in genomes of fungi and lower animals, respectively, and thereby provide direct evidence that eukaryotic transposons could derive from ssDNA viruses. Conclusions Our discovery extends the host range of circular ssDNA viruses and sheds light on the origin and evolution of these viruses. It also suggests that ssDNA viruses act as an unforeseen source of genetic innovation in their hosts.

  2. Elucidating Genetic Variation and Mechanism of Virus Infection of Emiliania huxleyi via Genomic Approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica U Kegel

    2009-01-01

    This thesis aimed at the identification of genes involved in the host-virus interaction of the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi and the virus EhV-86 by taking advantage of EST libraries and DNA microarrays. Microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) was used to investigate the genetic variation of several E. huxleyi strains and to identify genes with respect to virus susceptibility and morphology, e.g. formation of coccoliths.Analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was perfo...

  3. Human genome contains four genes homologous to transforming genes of Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, E H; Gonda, M A; Ellis, R.W.; Scolnick, E M; Lowy, D R

    1982-01-01

    Harvey and Kirsten murine sarcoma viruses each encode a structurally and functionally related 21-kilodalton protein (p21), which is the transforming protein of each virus. Using probes from the 0.9-kilobase (kb) p21-coding region of each virus (called v-Ha-ras and v-Ki-ras, respectively), we have molecularly cloned from normal human genomic DNA the sequences that hybridize to these probes. Four evolutionarily divergent restriction endonuclease fragments were isolated. Two hybridized preferent...

  4. A Draft Genome Sequence for Ensete ventricosum, the Drought-Tolerant “Tree Against Hunger”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Harrison

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a draft genome sequence for enset (Ensete ventricosum available via the Sequence Read Archive (accession number SRX202265 and GenBank (accession number AMZH01. Enset feeds 15 million people in Ethiopia, but is arguably the least studied African crop. Our sequence data suggest a genome size of approximately 547 megabases, similar to the 523-megabase genome of the closely related banana (Musa acuminata. At least 1.8% of the annotated M. acuminata genes are not conserved in E. ventricosum. Furthermore, enset contains genes not present in banana, including reverse transcriptases and virus-like sequences as well as a homolog of the RPP8-like resistance gene. We hope that availability of genome-wide sequence data will stimulate and accelerate research on this important but neglected crop.

  5. An automated annotation tool for genomic DNA sequences using ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Genomic sequence data are often available well before the annotated sequence is published. We present a method for analysis of genomic DNA to identify coding sequences using the GeneScan algorithm and characterize these resultant sequences by BLAST. The routines are used to develop a system for automated ...

  6. Genome-wide comparison of cowpox viruses reveals a new clade related to Variola virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Wojtek Dabrowski

    Full Text Available Zoonotic infections caused by several orthopoxviruses (OPV like monkeypox virus or vaccinia virus have a significant impact on human health. In Europe, the number of diagnosed infections with cowpox viruses (CPXV is increasing in animals as well as in humans. CPXV used to be enzootic in cattle; however, such infections were not being diagnosed over the last decades. Instead, individual cases of cowpox are being found in cats or exotic zoo animals that transmit the infection to humans. Both animals and humans reveal local exanthema on arms and legs or on the face. Although cowpox is generally regarded as a self-limiting disease, immunosuppressed patients can develop a lethal systemic disease resembling smallpox. To date, only limited information on the complex and, compared to other OPV, sparsely conserved CPXV genomes is available. Since CPXV displays the widest host range of all OPV known, it seems important to comprehend the genetic repertoire of CPXV which in turn may help elucidate specific mechanisms of CPXV pathogenesis and origin. Therefore, 22 genomes of independent CPXV strains from clinical cases, involving ten humans, four rats, two cats, two jaguarundis, one beaver, one elephant, one marah and one mongoose, were sequenced by using massive parallel pyrosequencing. The extensive phylogenetic analysis showed that the CPXV strains sequenced clearly cluster into several distinct clades, some of which are closely related to Vaccinia viruses while others represent different clades in a CPXV cluster. Particularly one CPXV clade is more closely related to Camelpox virus, Taterapox virus and Variola virus than to any other known OPV. These results support and extend recent data from other groups who postulate that CPXV does not form a monophyletic clade and should be divided into multiple lineages.

  7. Genomic signal processing for DNA sequence clustering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendizabal-Ruiz, Gerardo; Román-Godínez, Israel; Torres-Ramos, Sulema; Salido-Ruiz, Ricardo A; Vélez-Pérez, Hugo; Morales, J Alejandro

    2018-01-01

    Genomic signal processing (GSP) methods which convert DNA data to numerical values have recently been proposed, which would offer the opportunity of employing existing digital signal processing methods for genomic data. One of the most used methods for exploring data is cluster analysis which refers to the unsupervised classification of patterns in data. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for performing cluster analysis of DNA sequences that is based on the use of GSP methods and the K-means algorithm. We also propose a visualization method that facilitates the easy inspection and analysis of the results and possible hidden behaviors. Our results support the feasibility of employing the proposed method to find and easily visualize interesting features of sets of DNA data.

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of Mycobacterium chimaera Type ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report the draft genome sequence of the type strain Mycobacterium chimaera Fl-0169T, a member of the Mycobacterium avium complex (MAC). M. chimaera Fl-0169T was isolated from a patient in Italy and is highly similar to strains of M. chimaera isolated in Ireland, though Fl-0169T possesses unique virulence genes. Evidence suggests that M. avium, M. intracellulare, and M. chimaera are differently virulent and a comparative genomic analysis is critically needed to identify diagnostic targets that reliably differentiate species of MAC. With treatment costs for Mycobacterium infections estimated to be >$1.8 B annually in the U.S., correct species identification will result in improved treatment selection, lower costs, and improved patient outcomes.

  9. Possible Human Papillomavirus 38 Contamination of Endometrial Cancer RNA Sequencing Samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas Database

    OpenAIRE

    Kazemian, Majid; Ren, Min; Lin, Jian-Xin; Liao, Wei; Spolski, Rosanne; Leonard, Warren J.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are causally associated with a number of human malignancies. In this study, we sought to identify new virus-cancer associations by searching RNA sequencing data sets from >2,000 patients, encompassing 21 cancers from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), for the presence of viral sequences. In agreement with previous studies, we found human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) and HPV18 in oropharyngeal cancer and hepatitis B and C viruses in liver cancer. Unexpectedly, however, we found HPV38, a cuta...

  10. Combined DECS Analysis and Next-Generation Sequencing Enable Efficient Detection of Novel Plant RNA Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hironobu Yanagisawa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of high molecular weight double-stranded RNA (dsRNA within plant cells is an indicator of infection with RNA viruses as these possess genomic or replicative dsRNA. DECS (dsRNA isolation, exhaustive amplification, cloning, and sequencing analysis has been shown to be capable of detecting unknown viruses. We postulated that a combination of DECS analysis and next-generation sequencing (NGS would improve detection efficiency and usability of the technique. Here, we describe a model case in which we efficiently detected the presumed genome sequence of Blueberry shoestring virus (BSSV, a member of the genus Sobemovirus, which has not so far been reported. dsRNAs were isolated from BSSV-infected blueberry plants using the dsRNA-binding protein, reverse-transcribed, amplified, and sequenced using NGS. A contig of 4,020 nucleotides (nt that shared similarities with sequences from other Sobemovirus species was obtained as a candidate of the BSSV genomic sequence. Reverse transcription (RT-PCR primer sets based on sequences from this contig enabled the detection of BSSV in all BSSV-infected plants tested but not in healthy controls. A recombinant protein encoded by the putative coat protein gene was bound by the BSSV-antibody, indicating that the candidate sequence was that of BSSV itself. Our results suggest that a combination of DECS analysis and NGS, designated here as “DECS-C,” is a powerful method for detecting novel plant viruses.

  11. Complete genome sequence analysis of chicken astrovirus isolate from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Amrutlal K; Pandit, Ramesh J; Thakkar, Jalpa R; Hinsu, Ankit T; Pandey, Vinod C; Pal, Joy K; Prajapati, Kantilal S; Jakhesara, Subhash J; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2017-03-01

    Chicken astroviruses have been known to cause severe disease in chickens leading to increased mortality and "white chicks" condition. Here we aim to characterize the causative agent of visceral gout suspected for astrovirus infection in broiler breeder chickens. Total RNA isolated from allantoic fluid of SPF embryo passaged with infected chicken sample was sequenced by whole genome shotgun sequencing using ion-torrent PGM platform. The sequence was analysed for the presence of coding and non-coding features, its similarity with reported isolates and epitope analysis of capsid structural protein. The consensus length of 7513 bp genome sequence of Indian isolate of chicken astrovirus was obtained after assembly of 14,121 high quality reads. The genome was comprised of 13 bp 5'-UTR, three open reading frames (ORFs) including ORF1a encoding serine protease, ORF1b encoding RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) and ORF2 encoding capsid protein, and 298 bp of 3'-UTR which harboured two corona virus stem loop II like "s2m" motifs and a poly A stretch of 19 nucleotides. The genetic analysis of CAstV/INDIA/ANAND/2016 suggested highest sequence similarity of 86.94% with the chicken astrovirus isolate CAstV/GA2011 followed by 84.76% with CAstV/4175 and 74.48%% with CAstV/Poland/G059/2014 isolates. The capsid structural protein of CAstV/INDIA/ANAND/2016 showed 84.67% similarity with chicken astrovirus isolate CAstV/GA2011, 81.06% with CAstV/4175 and 41.18% with CAstV/Poland/G059/2014 isolates. However, the capsid protein sequence showed high degree of sequence identity at nucleotide level (98.64-99.32%) and at amino acids level (97.74-98.69%) with reported sequences of Indian isolates suggesting their common origin and limited sequence divergence. The epitope analysis by SVMTriP identified two unique epitopes in our isolate, seven shared epitopes among Indian isolates and two shared epitopes among all isolates except Poland isolate which carried all distinct epitopes.

  12. Diversity, Distribution, and Evolution of Tomato Viruses in China Uncovered by Small RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Taylor, Angela; Jiao, Chen; Xu, Yimin; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Chenhui; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Quanxi; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2017-06-01

    Tomato is a major vegetable crop that has tremendous popularity. However, viral disease is still a major factor limiting tomato production. Here, we report the tomato virome identified through sequencing small RNAs of 170 field-grown samples collected in China. A total of 22 viruses were identified, including both well-documented and newly detected viruses. The tomato viral community is dominated by a few species, and they exhibit polymorphisms and recombination in the genomes with cold spots and hot spots. Most samples were coinfected by multiple viruses, and the majority of identified viruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis of one of the most dominant tomato viruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), predicts its origin and the time back to its most recent common ancestor. The broadly sampled data have enabled us to identify several unreported viruses in tomato, including a completely new virus, which has a genome of ∼13.4 kb and groups with aphid-transmitted viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus Although both DNA and RNA viruses can trigger the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs), we show that features such as length distribution, paired distance, and base selection bias of vsiRNA sequences reflect different plant Dicer-like proteins and Argonautes involved in vsiRNA biogenesis. Collectively, this study offers insights into host-virus interaction in tomato and provides valuable information to facilitate the management of viral diseases. IMPORTANCE Tomato is an important source of micronutrients in the human diet and is extensively consumed around the world. Virus is among the major constraints on tomato production. Categorizing virus species that are capable of infecting tomato and understanding their diversity and evolution are challenging due to difficulties in detecting such fast-evolving biological entities. Here, we report the landscape of the tomato virome in China, the leading country in

  13. Evaluation of Genome Sequencing Quality in Selected Plant Species Using Expressed Sequence Tags

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shangguan, Lingfei; Han, Jian; Kayesh, Emrul; Sun, Xin; Zhang, Changqing; Pervaiz, Tariq; Wen, Xicheng; Fang, Jinggui

    2013-01-01

    Background With the completion of genome sequencing projects for more than 30 plant species, large volumes of genome sequences have been produced and stored in online databases. Advancements in sequencing technologies have reduced the cost and time of whole genome sequencing enabling more and more plants to be subjected to genome sequencing. Despite this, genome sequence qualities of multiple plants have not been evaluated. Methodology/Principal Finding Integrity and accuracy were calculated to evaluate the genome sequence quality of 32 plants. The integrity of a genome sequence is presented by the ratio of chromosome size and genome size (or between scaffold size and genome size), which ranged from 55.31% to nearly 100%. The accuracy of genome sequence was presented by the ratio between matched EST and selected ESTs where 52.93% ∼ 98.28% and 89.02% ∼ 98.85% of the randomly selected clean ESTs could be mapped to chromosome and scaffold sequences, respectively. According to the integrity, accuracy and other analysis of each plant species, thirteen plant species were divided into four levels. Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays had the highest quality, followed by Brachypodium distachyon, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Glycine max, Sorghum bicolor, Solanum lycopersicum and Fragaria vesca, and Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula and Malus × domestica in that order. Assembling the scaffold sequences into chromosome sequences should be the primary task for the remaining nineteen species. Low GC content and repeat DNA influences genome sequence assembly. Conclusion The quality of plant genome sequences was found to be lower than envisaged and thus the rapid development of genome sequencing projects as well as research on bioinformatics tools and the algorithms of genome sequence assembly should provide increased processing and correction of genome sequences that have already been published. PMID:23922843

  14. Evaluation of genome sequencing quality in selected plant species using expressed sequence tags.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lingfei Shangguan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: With the completion of genome sequencing projects for more than 30 plant species, large volumes of genome sequences have been produced and stored in online databases. Advancements in sequencing technologies have reduced the cost and time of whole genome sequencing enabling more and more plants to be subjected to genome sequencing. Despite this, genome sequence qualities of multiple plants have not been evaluated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDING: Integrity and accuracy were calculated to evaluate the genome sequence quality of 32 plants. The integrity of a genome sequence is presented by the ratio of chromosome size and genome size (or between scaffold size and genome size, which ranged from 55.31% to nearly 100%. The accuracy of genome sequence was presented by the ratio between matched EST and selected ESTs where 52.93% ∼ 98.28% and 89.02% ∼ 98.85% of the randomly selected clean ESTs could be mapped to chromosome and scaffold sequences, respectively. According to the integrity, accuracy and other analysis of each plant species, thirteen plant species were divided into four levels. Arabidopsis thaliana, Oryza sativa and Zea mays had the highest quality, followed by Brachypodium distachyon, Populus trichocarpa, Vitis vinifera and Glycine max, Sorghum bicolor, Solanum lycopersicum and Fragaria vesca, and Lotus japonicus, Medicago truncatula and Malus × domestica in that order. Assembling the scaffold sequences into chromosome sequences should be the primary task for the remaining nineteen species. Low GC content and repeat DNA influences genome sequence assembly. CONCLUSION: The quality of plant genome sequences was found to be lower than envisaged and thus the rapid development of genome sequencing projects as well as research on bioinformatics tools and the algorithms of genome sequence assembly should provide increased processing and correction of genome sequences that have already been published.

  15. Comparison of the locations of homologous fowlpox and vaccinia virus genes reveals major genome reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mockett, B; Binns, M M; Boursnell, M E; Skinner, M A

    1992-10-01

    We have derived a restriction enzyme map for the fowlpox virus FP9 strain. Sites for BamHI, PvuII, PstI and NcoI have been mapped mainly by Southern blotting. The size of the genome derived from the restriction maps (254 kb) corresponds to the figure of 260 +/- 8 kb determined from analysis of genomic DNA by pulsed-field electrophoresis. The map can be compared with a previously published map for a different strain of fowlpox virus using the PstI digest which is common to both studies. Some 65 kb of fowlpox virus sequence, in 11 blocks, as well as individual M13 clones have been aligned with the map. Where those blocks correspond with blocks of homologous genes in vaccinia virus, it is possible to compare the genomic locations for those genes in the two viruses. This comparison reveals that, whereas there are blocks of sequence within which genes exist in the same relative position in the two viruses, the genomic location of those sequence blocks differs widely between the two viruses.

  16. Initial sequencing and comparative analysis of the mouse genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waterston, Robert H.; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Birney, Ewan; Rogers, Jane; Abril, Josep F.; Agarwal, Pankaj; Agarwala, Richa; Ainscough, Rachel; Alexandersson, Marina; An, Peter; Antonarakis, Stylianos E.; Attwood, John; Baertsch, Robert; Bailey, Jonathon; Barlow, Karen; Beck, Stephan; Berry, Eric; Birren, Bruce; Bloom, Toby; Bork, Peer; Botcherby, Marc; Bray, Nicolas; Brent, Michael R.; Brown, Daniel G.; Brown, Stephen D.; Bult, Carol; Burton, John; Butler, Jonathan; Campbell, Robert D.; Carninci, Piero; Cawley, Simon; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Chinwalla, Asif T.; Church, Deanna M.; Clamp, Michele; Clee, Christopher; Collins, Francis S.; Cook, Lisa L.; Copley, Richard R.; Coulson, Alan; Couronne, Olivier; Cuff, James; Curwen, Val; Cutts, Tim; Daly, Mark; David, Robert; Davies, Joy; Delehaunty, Kimberly D.; Deri, Justin; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Dewey, Colin; Dickens, Nicholas J.; Diekhans, Mark; Dodge, Sheila; Dubchak, Inna; Dunn, Diane M.; Eddy, Sean R.; Elnitski, Laura; Emes, Richard D.; Eswara, Pallavi; Eyras, Eduardo; Felsenfeld, Adam; Fewell, Ginger A.; Flicek, Paul; Foley, Karen; Frankel, Wayne N.; Fulton, Lucinda A.; Fulton, Robert S.; Furey, Terrence S.; Gage, Diane; Gibbs, Richard A.; Glusman, Gustavo; Gnerre, Sante; Goldman, Nick; Goodstadt, Leo; Grafham, Darren; Graves, Tina A.; Green, Eric D.; Gregory, Simon; Guigo, Roderic; Guyer, Mark; Hardison, Ross C.; Haussler, David; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Hinrichs, Angela; Hlavina, Wratko; Holzer, Timothy; Hsu, Fan; Hua, Axin; Hubbard, Tim; Hunt, Adrienne; Jackson, Ian; Jaffe, David B.; Johnson, L. Steven; Jones, Matthew; Jones, Thomas A.; Joy, Ann; Kamal, Michael; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Karolchik, Donna; Kasprzyk, Arkadiusz; Kawai, Jun; Keibler, Evan; Kells, Cristyn; Kent, W. James; Kirby, Andrew; Kolbe, Diana L.; Korf, Ian; Kucherlapati, Raju S.; Kulbokas III, Edward J.; Kulp, David; Landers, Tom; Leger, J.P.; Leonard, Steven; Letunic, Ivica; Levine, Rosie; et al.

    2002-12-15

    The sequence of the mouse genome is a key informational tool for understanding the contents of the human genome and a key experimental tool for biomedical research. Here, we report the results of an international collaboration to produce a high-quality draft sequence of the mouse genome. We also present an initial comparative analysis of the mouse and human genomes, describing some of the insights that can be gleaned from the two sequences. We discuss topics including the analysis of the evolutionary forces shaping the size, structure and sequence of the genomes; the conservation of large-scale synteny across most of the genomes; the much lower extent of sequence orthology covering less than half of the genomes; the proportions of the genomes under selection; the number of protein-coding genes; the expansion of gene families related to reproduction and immunity; the evolution of proteins; and the identification of intraspecies polymorphism.

  17. Building the sequence map of the human pan-genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Zheng, Hancheng

    2010-01-01

    Here we integrate the de novo assembly of an Asian and an African genome with the NCBI reference human genome, as a step toward constructing the human pan-genome. We identified approximately 5 Mb of novel sequences not present in the reference genome in each of these assemblies. Most novel...... analysis of predicted genes indicated that the novel sequences contain potentially functional coding regions. We estimate that a complete human pan-genome would contain approximately 19-40 Mb of novel sequence not present in the extant reference genome. The extensive amount of novel sequence contributing...... to the genetic variation of the pan-genome indicates the importance of using complete genome sequencing and de novo assembly....

  18. Sequence variability and geographic distribution of Lassa virus, Sierra Leone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leski, Tomasz A; Stockelman, Michael G; Moses, Lina M; Park, Matthew; Stenger, David A; Ansumana, Rashid; Bausch, Daniel G; Lin, Baochuan

    2015-04-01

    Lassa virus (LASV) is endemic to parts of West Africa and causes highly fatal hemorrhagic fever. The multimammate rat (Mastomys natalensis) is the only known reservoir of LASV. Most human infections result from zoonotic transmission. The very diverse LASV genome has 4 major lineages associated with different geographic locations. We used reverse transcription PCR and resequencing microarrays to detect LASV in 41 of 214 samples from rodents captured at 8 locations in Sierra Leone. Phylogenetic analysis of partial sequences of nucleoprotein (NP), glycoprotein precursor (GPC), and polymerase (L) genes showed 5 separate clades within lineage IV of LASV in this country. The sequence diversity was higher than previously observed; mean diversity was 7.01% for nucleoprotein gene at the nucleotide level. These results may have major implications for designing diagnostic tests and therapeutic agents for LASV infections in Sierra Leone.

  19. Phylogenetic lineage of Tobacco leaf curl virus in Korea and estimation of recombination events implicated in their sequence variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Mi-Kyung; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Auh, Chung-Kyoon; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Kim, Sunghan; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan

    2011-08-01

    New strains of Tobacco leaf curl virus (TbLCV) were isolated from tomato plants in four different local communities of Korea, and hence were designated TbLCV-Kr. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequences of the whole genome and of individual ORFs of these viruses indicated that they are closely related to the Tobacco leaf curl Japan virus (TbLCJV) cluster, which includes Honeysuckle yellow vein virus (HYVV), Honeysuckle yellow vein mosaic virus (HYVMV), and TbLCJV isolates. Four putative recombination events were recognized within these virus sequences, suggesting that the sequence variations observed in these viruses may be attributable to intraspecific and interspecific recombination events involving some TbLCV-Kr isolates, Papaya leaf curl virus (PaLCV), and a local isolate of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [Genomic analysis of Wenzhou virus in rodents from Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K; Lin, X D; Li, M H; Wang, M R; Sun, X Y; Zhang, Y Z

    2017-03-10

    Objective: Arenavirus is a negative single-stranded RNA virus and an important human pathogen, mainly harbored and transmitted by rodents, causing severe diseases, including hemorrhagic fever and encephalitis. Following the discovery of a novel pathogenic arenavirus (Wenzhou virus, WENV), the prevalence of WENV in local small rodents was investigated. Methods: By using RT-PCR, WENV was screened in 48 and 156 rodents sampled from Wenzhou and Longquan, respectively. Results: Consequently, WENV was detected in 5 (10.41%) rodents sampled from Wenzhou. However, no WENV was identified in all the rodents sampled from Longquan. Genetic analysis of complete genome sequences indicated that 4 of 5 virus strains were closely related to the known Wenzhou viruses with high homology. Especially, the L and S segments of Wencheng-Rn-288 strain shared homology of 87.5% and 91.6% with other viruses, respectively. They formed a distinct lineage, suggesting that this strain might be a novel variant of WENV. Conclusions: Our results indicate that WENV has a high prevalence and high genetic diversity among rodents in Wenzhou. As the respiratory disease caused by WENV has been detected in Cambodia, it is necessary to strengthen the surveillance for WENV in China.

  1. Complete nucleotide sequence analysis of Cymbidium mosaic virus ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phylogenetic analyses on the basis of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), triple gene block protein and coat protein (CP) amino acid sequences revealed that CymMV is closely related to the Narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), Scallion virus X (SVX), Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) and Potato aucuba mosaic virus (PAMV).

  2. Mining olive genome through library sequencing and bioinformatics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As one of the initial steps of olive (Olea europaea L.) genome analysis, a small insert genomic DNA library was constructed (digesting olive genomic DNA with SmaI and cloning the digestion products into pUC19 vector) and randomly picked 83 colonies were sequenced. Analysis of the insert sequences revealed 12 clones ...

  3. Comparing virus classification using genomic materials according to different taxonomic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing-Doo

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, three genomic materials--DNA sequences, protein sequences, and regions (domains) are used to compare methods of virus classification. Virus classes (categories) are divided by various taxonomic level of virus into three datasets for 6 order, 42 family, and 33 genera. To increase the robustness and comparability of experimental results of virus classification, the classes are selected that contain at least 10 instances, and meanwhile each instance contains at least one region name. Experimental results show that the approach using region names achieved the best accuracies--reaching 99.9%, 97.3%, and 99.0% for 6 orders, 42 families, and 33 genera, respectively. This paper not only involves exhaustive experiments that compare virus classifications using different genomic materials, but also proposes a novel approach to biological classification based on molecular biology instead of traditional morphology.

  4. Detecting long tandem duplications in genomic sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audemard Eric

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Detecting duplication segments within completely sequenced genomes provides valuable information to address genome evolution and in particular the important question of the emergence of novel functions. The usual approach to gene duplication detection, based on all-pairs protein gene comparisons, provides only a restricted view of duplication. Results In this paper, we introduce ReD Tandem, a software using a flow based chaining algorithm targeted at detecting tandem duplication arrays of moderate to longer length regions, with possibly locally weak similarities, directly at the DNA level. On the A. thaliana genome, using a reference set of tandem duplicated genes built using TAIR,a we show that ReD Tandem is able to predict a large fraction of recently duplicated genes (dS  Conclusions ReD Tandem allows to identify large tandem duplications without any annotation, leading to agnostic identification of tandem duplications. This approach nicely complements the usual protein gene based which ignores duplications involving non coding regions. It is however inherently restricted to relatively recent duplications. By recovering otherwise ignored events, ReD Tandem gives a more comprehensive view of existing evolutionary processes and may also allow to improve existing annotations.

  5. Whole genome sequence analysis of Mycobacterium suricattae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dippenaar, Anzaan; Parsons, Sven David Charles; Sampson, Samantha Leigh; van der Merwe, Ruben Gerhard; Drewe, Julian Ashley; Abdallah, Abdallah Musa; Siame, Kabengele Keith; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas Claudius; van Helden, Paul David; Pain, Arnab; Warren, Robin Mark

    2015-12-01

    Tuberculosis occurs in various mammalian hosts and is caused by a range of different lineages of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). A recently described member, Mycobacterium suricattae, causes tuberculosis in meerkats (Suricata suricatta) in Southern Africa and preliminary genetic analysis showed this organism to be closely related to an MTBC pathogen of rock hyraxes (Procavia capensis), the dassie bacillus. Here we make use of whole genome sequencing to describe the evolution of the genome of M. suricattae, including known and novel regions of difference, SNPs and IS6110 insertion sites. We used genome-wide phylogenetic analysis to show that M. suricattae clusters with the chimpanzee bacillus, previously isolated from a chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) in West Africa. We propose an evolutionary scenario for the Mycobacterium africanum lineage 6 complex, showing the evolutionary relationship of M. africanum and chimpanzee bacillus, and the closely related members M. suricattae, dassie bacillus and Mycobacterium mungi. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Complete genome analysis of three isolates of narcissus late season yellows virus and two of narcissus yellow stripe virus: three species or one?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Jones, Michael G K

    2014-06-01

    Complete genome sequences of two new isolates of narcissus late season yellows virus (NLSYV) from Australia were compared with the other NLSYV genome from China and with two complete genomes of isolates designated narcissus yellow stripe virus (NYSV), one from Australia and the other from China. On the basis of symptoms on natural and experimental host species, and genome sequence identity, the isolates could either be classified as closely related members of three different species or placed together in one taxon. Options for classification of these potyvirus isolates are discussed.

  7. [Progress on whole genome sequencing in woody plants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Ji-Sen; Wang, Zhan-Jun; Chen, Jin-Hui

    2012-02-01

    In recent years, the number of sequencing data of plant whole genome have been increasing rapidly and the whole genome sequencing has been also performed widely in woody plants. However, there are a set of obstacles in investigating the whole genome sequencing in woody plants, which include larger genome, complex genome structure, limitations of assembly, annotation, functional analysis, and restriction of the funds for scientific research. Therefore, to promote the efficiency of the whole genome sequencing in woody plants, the development and defect of this field should be analyzed. The three-generation sequencing technologies (i.e., Sanger sequencing, synthesis sequencing, and single molecule sequencing) were compared in our studies. The progress mainly focused on the whole genome sequencing in four woody plants (Populus, Grapevine, Papaya, and Apple), and the application of sequencing results also was analyzed. The future of whole genome sequencing research in woody plants, consisting of material selection, establishment of genetic map and physical map, selection of sequencing technology, bioinformatic analysis, and application of sequencing results, was discussed.

  8. Complete genome sequence of Methanoculleus marisnigri type strain JR1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Methanoculleus marisnigri Romesser et al. 1981 is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain, JR1, was isolated from anoxic sediments of the Black Sea. M. marisnigri is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. marisnigri type strain JR1 and its annotation. This is part of a Joint Genome Institute 2006 Community Sequencing Program to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  9. Complete genome sequence of Methanocorpusculum labreanum type strain Z

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, Iain [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Sieprawska-Lupa, Magdalena [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Goltsman, Eugene [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Dalin, Eileen [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Barry, Kerrie [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Whitman, W. B. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute

    2009-01-01

    Methanocorpusculum labreanum is a methanogen belonging to the order Methanomicrobiales within the archaeal phylum Euryarchaeota. The type strain Z was isolated from surface sediments of Tar Pit Lake in the La Brea Tar Pits in Los Angeles, California. M. labreanum is of phylogenetic interest because at the time the sequencing project began only one genome had previously been sequenced from the order Methanomicrobiales. We report here the complete genome sequence of M. labreanum type strain Z and its annotation. This is part of a 2006 Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program project to sequence genomes of diverse Archaea.

  10. Accuracy of genomic prediction using imputed whole-genome sequence data in white layers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heidaritabar, M.; Calus, M.P.L.; Megens, H.J.; Vereijken, A.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Bastiaansen, J.W.M.

    2016-01-01

    There is an increasing interest in using whole-genome sequence data in genomic selection breeding programmes. Prediction of breeding values is expected to be more accurate when whole-genome sequence is used, because the causal mutations are assumed to be in the data. We performed genomic

  11. Whole Genome Sequencing of Enterovirus species C Isolates by High-throughput Sequencing: Development of Generic Primers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maël Bessaud

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses are among the most common viruses infecting humans and can cause diverse clinical syndromes ranging from minor febrile illness to severe and potentially fatal diseases. Enterovirus species C (EV-C consists of more than 20 types, among which the 3 serotypes of polioviruses, the etiological agents of poliomyelitis, are included. Biodiversity and evolution of EV-C genomes are shaped by frequent recombination events. Therefore, identification and characterization of circulating EV-C strains require the sequencing of different genomic regions.A simple method was developed to sequence quickly the entire genome of EV-C isolates. Four overlapping fragments were produced separately by RT-PCR performed with generic primers. The four amplicons were then pooled and purified prior to be sequenced by high-throughput technique.The method was assessed on a panel of EV-Cs belonging to a wide-range of types. It can be used to determine full-length genome sequences through de novo assembly of thousands of reads. It was also able to discriminate reads from closely related viruses in mixtures.By decreasing the workload compared to classical Sanger-based techniques, this method will serve as a precious tool for sequencing large panels of EV-Cs isolated in cell cultures during environmental surveillance or from patients, including vaccine-derived polioviruses.

  12. Genome sequence and analysis of the tuber crop potato

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, X.; Pan, S.; Cheng, S.

    2011-01-01

    and assemble 86% of the 844-megabase genome. We predict 39,031 protein-coding genes and present evidence for at least two genome duplication events indicative of a palaeopolyploid origin. As the first genome sequence of an asterid, the potato genome reveals 2,642 genes specific to this large angiosperm clade...

  13. Analysis of complete genomic sequences of isolates of the Sweet potato feathery mottle virus strains C and EA: molecular evidence for two distinct potyvirus species and two P1 protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Untiveros, Milton; Quispe, Dora; Kreuze, Jan

    2010-12-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the isolate C1 of Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV) strain C and the 5' region of several other strains were determined and analyzed together with the sequences of isolates representing the EA, RC and O strains. This provided molecular evidence for the reclassification of SPFMV strains into two species and the occurrence of a complex recombinant isolate. Analysis also revealed a hypervariable domain in the P1 protein, which separates an N-terminal region unique to SPFMV and members of the ipomovirus species Sweet potato mild mottle virus from the C-terminal protease domain, which is conserved among all potyviruses.

  14. HBVRegDB: Annotation, comparison, detection and visualization of regulatory elements in hepatitis B virus sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firth Andrew E

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The many Hepadnaviridae sequences available have widely varied functional annotation. The genomes are very compact (~3.2 kb but contain multiple layers of functional regulatory elements in addition to coding regions. Key regions are subject to purifying selection, as mutations in these regions will produce non-functional viruses. Results These genomic sequences have been organized into a structured database to facilitate research at the molecular level. HBVRegDB is a comparative genomic analysis tool with an integrated underlying sequence database. The database contains genomic sequence data from representative viruses. In addition to INSDC and RefSeq annotation, HBVRegDB also contains expert and systematically calculated annotations (e.g. promoters and comparative genome analysis results (e.g. blastn, tblastx. It also contains analyses based on curated HBV alignments. Information about conserved regions – including primary conservation (e.g. CDS-Plotcon and RNA secondary structure predictions (e.g. Alidot – is integrated into the database. A large amount of data is graphically presented using the GBrowse (Generic Genome Browser adapted for analysis of viral genomes. Flexible query access is provided based on any annotated genomic feature. Novel regulatory motifs can be found by analysing the annotated sequences. Conclusion HBVRegDB serves as a knowledge database and as a comparative genomic analysis tool for molecular biologists investigating HBV. It is publicly available and complementary to other viral and HBV focused datasets and tools http://hbvregdb.otago.ac.nz. The availability of multiple and highly annotated sequences of viral genomes in one database combined with comparative analysis tools facilitates detection of novel genomic elements.

  15. Genome Sequence of Bovine Polyomavirus 1 Detected in a Salers Cow (Bos taurus) from Catalonia, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Nicole; Pérez de Val, Bernat; Martin, Maite; Moens, Ugo; Ehlers, Bernhard

    2016-01-28

    We identified a variant of the first bovine polyomavirus (BPyV1; family Polyomaviridae) in a lymph node of a Salers cow. As the 2 previously published genome sequences of this virus originated from fetal bovine serum and ground beef, respectively, this is the first BPyV1 genome that could be traced back to an individual. Copyright © 2016 Ben Salem et al.

  16. Nucleotide sequence and genomic organization of an ophiovirus associated with lettuce big-vein disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilk, van der F.; Dullemans, A.M.; Verbeek, M.; Heuvel, van den J.F.J.M.

    2002-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an ophiovirus associated with lettuce big-vein disease has been elucidated. The genome consisted of four RNA molecules of approximately 7ò8, 1ò7, 1ò5 and 1ò4 kb. Virus particles were shown to contain nearly equimolar amounts of RNA molecules of both polarities.

  17. Complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of a novel allexivirus from alfalfa (Medicago sativa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species of the family Alphaflexiviridae provisionally named Alfalfa virus S (AVS) was diagnosed in alfalfa samples originating from Sudan. A complete nucleotide sequence of the viral genome consisting of 8,349 nucleotides excluding the 3’ poly(A) tail was determined by Illumina NGS technology ...

  18. Complete genome sequences of seven carlavirus and potyvirus isolates from Narcissus and Hippeastrum plants in Australia, and proposals to clarify their naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Stephen J; Jones, Michael G K

    2012-08-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from two isolates of the carlavirus nerine latent virus from hippeastrum and narcissus plants, two isolates of the potyvirus hippeastrum mosaic virus from a hippeastrum plant, and one isolate each of the potyviruses narcissus degeneration virus, narcissus yellow stripe virus and Vallota speciosa virus from narcissus plants. Proposals are made to clarify the current confusion surrounding the naming of some of these viruses.

  19. An overview of wheat genome sequencing and its implications for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 93; Issue 3. An overview of wheat genome sequencing and its implications for crop improvement. Mehanathan Muthamilarasan Manoj ... Keywords. genetic engineering; marker-assisted breeding; next-generation sequencing; wheat; whole genome sequence; SNP; miRNA.

  20. Next Generation Sequencing at the University of Chicago Genomics Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faber, Pieter [University of Chicago

    2013-04-24

    The University of Chicago Genomics Core provides University of Chicago investigators (and external clients) access to State-of-the-Art genomics capabilities: next generation sequencing, Sanger sequencing / genotyping and micro-arrays (gene expression, genotyping, and methylation). The current presentation will highlight our capabilities in the area of ultra-high throughput sequencing analysis.

  1. Whole genome analysis of sierra nevada virus, a novel mononegavirus in the family nyamiviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Matthew B; Cui, Lijia; Fitch, Adam; Popov, Vsevolod; Travassos da Rosa, Amelia P A; Vasilakis, Nikos; Tesh, Robert B; Ghedin, Elodie

    2014-07-01

    A novel mononegavirus was isolated in 1975 from ticks (Ornithodoros coriaceus) collected during investigation of an outbreak of epizootic bovine abortion (EBA) in northern California. It was originally designated "bovine abortion-tick virus" (BA-T virus). The EBA is now known to be associated with a deltaproteobacterium infection, and not a virus. The BA-T virus had remained uncharacterized until now. We have determined by electron microscopy, serology, and genome sequencing that the BA-T virus is a fourth member of the newly proposed family Nyamiviridae, and we have renamed it Sierra Nevada virus (SNVV). Although antigenically distinct, phylogenetically SNVV is basal to Nyamanini virus (NYMV) and Midway virus (MIDWV), two other tick-borne agents. Although NYMV was found to infect land birds, and MIDWV seabirds, it is presently unknown whether SNVV naturally infects birds or mammals. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  2. Draft genome sequence of Brevibacterium massiliense strain 541308T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roux, Véronique; Robert, Catherine; Gimenez, Grégory; Raoult, Didier

    2012-09-01

    A draft genome sequence of Brevibacterium massiliense, an aerobic bacterium isolated from a human ankle discharge, is described here. CRISPR-associated proteins were found to be encoded in the genome, and analysis of transport proteins was performed.

  3. Variation of the virus-related elements within syntenic genomes of the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Aeropyrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daifuku, Takashi; Yoshida, Takashi; Kitamura, Takayuki; Kawaichi, Satoshi; Inoue, Takahiro; Nomura, Keigo; Yoshida, Yui; Kuno, Sotaro; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2013-10-01

    The increasing number of genome sequences of archaea and bacteria show their adaptation to different environmental conditions at the genomic level. Aeropyrum spp. are aerobic and hyperthermophilic archaea. Aeropyrum camini was isolated from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent, and Aeropyrum pernix was isolated from a coastal solfataric vent. To investigate the adaptation strategy in each habitat, we compared the genomes of the two species. Shared genome features were a small genome size, a high GC content, and a large portion of orthologous genes (86 to 88%). The genomes also showed high synteny. These shared features may have been derived from the small number of mobile genetic elements and the lack of a RecBCD system, a recombinational enzyme complex. In addition, the specialized physiology (aerobic and hyperthermophilic) of Aeropyrum spp. may also contribute to the entire-genome similarity. Despite having stable genomes, interference of synteny occurred with two proviruses, A. pernix spindle-shaped virus 1 (APSV1) and A. pernix ovoid virus 1 (APOV1), and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) elements. Spacer sequences derived from the A. camini CRISPR showed significant matches with protospacers of the two proviruses infecting A. pernix, indicating that A. camini interacted with viruses closely related to APSV1 and APOV1. Furthermore, a significant fraction of the nonorthologous genes (41 to 45%) were proviral genes or ORFans probably originating from viruses. Although the genomes of A. camini and A. pernix were conserved, we observed nonsynteny that was attributed primarily to virus-related elements. Our findings indicated that the genomic diversification of Aeropyrum spp. is substantially caused by viruses.

  4. Breaking the 1000-gene barrier for Mimivirus using ultra-deep genome and transcriptome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claverie Jean-Michel

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mimivirus, a giant dsDNA virus infecting Acanthamoeba, is the prototype of the mimiviridae family, the latest addition to the family of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDVs. Its 1.2 Mb-genome was initially predicted to encode 917 genes. A subsequent RNA-Seq analysis precisely mapped many transcript boundaries and identified 75 new genes. Findings We now report a much deeper analysis using the SOLiD™ technology combining RNA-Seq of the Mimivirus transcriptome during the infectious cycle (202.4 Million reads, and a complete genome re-sequencing (45.3 Million reads. This study corrected the genome sequence and identified several single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our results also provided clear evidence of previously overlooked transcription units, including an important RNA polymerase subunit distantly related to Euryarchea homologues. The total Mimivirus gene count is now 1018, 11% greater than the original annotation. Conclusions This study highlights the huge progress brought about by ultra-deep sequencing for the comprehensive annotation of virus genomes, opening the door to a complete one-nucleotide resolution level description of their transcriptional activity, and to the realistic modeling of the viral genome expression at the ultimate molecular level. This work also illustrates the need to go beyond bioinformatics-only approaches for the annotation of short protein and non-coding genes in viral genomes.

  5. The diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Li, Ruiqiang

    2008-01-01

    Here we present the first diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual. The genome was sequenced to 36-fold average coverage using massively parallel sequencing technology. We aligned the short reads onto the NCBI human reference genome to 99.97% coverage, and guided by the reference genome, we...... used uniquely mapped reads to assemble a high-quality consensus sequence for 92% of the Asian individual's genome. We identified approximately 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inside this region, of which 13.6% were not in the dbSNP database. Genotyping analysis showed that SNP...... identification had high accuracy and consistency, indicating the high sequence quality of this assembly. We also carried out heterozygote phasing and haplotype prediction against HapMap CHB and JPT haplotypes (Chinese and Japanese, respectively), sequence comparison with the two available individual genomes (J...

  6. Complete genome sequence of Arcanobacterium haemolyticum type strain (11018T)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasawong, Montri [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Teshima, Hazuki [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Nolan, Matt [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Glavina Del Rio, Tijana [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tice, Hope [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Liolios, Konstantinos [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Mikhailova, Natalia [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pati, Amrita [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chen, Amy [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Palaniappan, Krishna [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Jeffries, Cynthia [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Rohde, Manfred [HZI - Helmholtz Centre for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany; Sikorski, Johannes [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Pukall, Rudiger [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Goker, Markus [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bristow, James [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Eisen, Jonathan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Markowitz, Victor [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Hugenholtz, Philip [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Klenk, Hans-Peter [DSMZ - German Collection of Microorganisms and Cell Cultures GmbH, Braunschweig, Germany

    2010-01-01

    Vulcanisaeta distributa Itoh et al. 2002 belongs to the family Thermoproteaceae in the phylum Crenarchaeota. The genus Vulcanisaeta is characterized by a global distribution in hot and acidic springs. This is the first genome sequence from a member of the genus Vulcanisaeta and seventh genome sequence in the family Thermoproteaceae. The 2,374,137 bp long genome with its 2,544 protein-coding and 49 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  7. Multiple genome segments determine virulence of bluetongue virus serotype 8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janowicz, Anna; Caporale, Marco; Shaw, Andrew; Gulletta, Salvatore; Di Gialleonardo, Luigina; Ratinier, Maxime; Palmarini, Massimo

    2015-05-01

    nonpathogenic strains) have been described in different geographical locations. However, no data are available to correlate the BTV genotype to virulence. This study shows that BTV virulence is determined by different viral genomic segments. The data obtained will help to characterize thoroughly the pathogenesis of bluetongue. The possibility to determine the pathogenicity of virus isolates on the basis of their genome sequences will help in the design of control strategies that fit the risk posed by new emerging BTV strains. Copyright © 2015, Janowicz et al.

  8. Next-generation sequencing strategies for characterizing the turkey genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalloul, Rami A; Zimin, Aleksey V; Settlage, Robert E; Kim, Sungwon; Reed, Kent M

    2014-02-01

    The turkey genome sequencing project was initiated in 2008 and has relied primarily on next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies. Our first efforts used a synergistic combination of 2 NGS platforms (Roche/454 and Illumina GAII), detailed bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) maps, and unique assembly tools to sequence and assemble the genome of the domesticated turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Since the first release in 2010, efforts to improve the genome assembly, gene annotation, and genomic analyses continue. The initial assembly build (2.01) represented about 89% of the genome sequence with 17X coverage depth (931 Mb). Sequence contigs were assigned to 30 of the 40 chromosomes with approximately 10% of the assembled sequence corresponding to unassigned chromosomes (ChrUn). The sequence has been refined through both genome-wide and area-focused sequencing, including shotgun and paired-end sequencing, and targeted sequencing of chromosomal regions with low or incomplete coverage. These additional efforts have improved the sequence assembly resulting in 2 subsequent genome builds of higher genome coverage (25X/Build3.0 and 30X/Build4.0) with a current sequence totaling 1,010 Mb. Further, BAC with end sequences assigned to the Z/W and MG18 (MHC) chromosomes, ChrUn, or not placed in the previous build were isolated, deeply sequenced (Hi-Seq), and incorporated into the latest build (5.0). To aid in the annotation and to generate a gene expression atlas of major tissues, a comprehensive set of RNA samples was collected at various developmental stages of female and male turkeys. Transcriptome sequencing data (using Illumina Hi-Seq) will provide information to enhance the final assembly and ultimately improve sequence annotation. The most current sequence covers more than 95% of the turkey genome and should yield a much improved gene level of annotation, making it a valuable resource for studying genetic variations underlying economically important traits in poultry.

  9. Simultaneous virus identification and characterization of severe unexplained pneumonia cases using a metagenomics sequencing technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiaohui; Tang, Guangpeng; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Yan; Chen, Tao; Lei, Mingyu; Chen, Wenbing; Yang, Lei; Zhu, Wenfei; Zhuang, Li; Yang, Jing; Feng, Zhaomin; Wang, Dayan; Wang, Dingming; Shu, Yuelong

    2017-03-01

    Many viruses can cause respiratory diseases in humans. Although great advances have been achieved in methods of diagnosis, it remains challenging to identify pathogens in unexplained pneumonia (UP) cases. In this study, we applied next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology and a metagenomic approach to detect and characterize respiratory viruses in UP cases from Guizhou Province, China. A total of 33 oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from hospitalized UP patients and subjected to NGS. An unbiased metagenomic analysis pipeline identified 13 virus species in 16 samples. Human rhinovirus C was the virus most frequently detected and was identified in seven samples. Human measles virus, adenovirus B 55 and coxsackievirus A10 were also identified. Metagenomic sequencing also provided virus genomic sequences, which enabled genotype characterization and phylogenetic analysis. For cases of multiple infection, metagenomic sequencing afforded information regarding the quantity of each virus in the sample, which could be used to evaluate each viruses' role in the disease. Our study highlights the potential of metagenomic sequencing for pathogen identification in UP cases.

  10. Diagnosis and discovery of fungal viruses using deep sequencing of small RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainio, Eeva J; Jurvansuu, Jaana; Streng, Janne; Rajamäki, Minna-Liisa; Hantula, Jarkko; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2015-03-01

    Analysis of virus-derived small RNAs with high-throughput sequencing has been successful for detecting novel viruses in plants and invertebrates. However, the applicability of this method has not been demonstrated in fungi, although fungi were among the first organisms reported to utilize RNA silencing. Here, we used virus-infected isolates of the fungal species complex Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato as a model system to test whether mycovirus genome segments can be detected with small RNA deep sequencing. Species of the genus Heterobasidion are some of the most devastating forest pathogens in boreal forests. These fungi cause wood decay and are commonly infected with species of the family Partitiviridae and the unassigned virus species Heterobasidion RNA virus 6. Small RNA deep sequencing allowed the simultaneous detection of all eight double-stranded RNA virus strains known to be present in the tested samples and one putative mitovirus species (family Narnaviridae) with a single-stranded RNA genome, designated here as Heterobasidion mitovirus 1. Prior to this study, no members of the family Narnaviridae had been described as infecting species of Heterobasidion. Quantification of viral double- and single-stranded RNA with quantitative PCR indicated that co-infecting viral species and viruses with segmented genomes can be detected with small RNA deep sequencing despite vast differences in the amount of RNA. This is the first study demonstrating the usefulness of this method for detecting fungal viruses. Moreover, the results suggest that viral genomes are processed into small RNAs by different species of Heterobasidion. © 2015 The Authors.

  11. Next generation sequencing for studying viruses and RNA silencing-based antiviral defense in crop plants

    OpenAIRE

    Seguin, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this work have been to use next generation sequencing (NGS) and develop bioinformatics tools for plant virus diagnostics and genome reconstruction as well as for investigation of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. In virus-infected plants, the host Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes process viral double-stranded RNAs into 21-24 nucleotide (nt) short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which can potentially associate with Argonaute (AGO) proteins and guide the resulting RNA-induce silen...

  12. Genome of brown tide virus (AaV), the little giant of the Megaviridae, elucidates NCLDV genome expansion and host-virus coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moniruzzaman, Mohammad; LeCleir, Gary R; Brown, Christopher M; Gobler, Christopher J; Bidle, Kay D; Wilson, William H; Wilhelm, Steven W

    2014-10-01

    Aureococcus anophagefferens causes economically and ecologically destructive "brown tides" in the United States, China and South Africa. Here we report the 370,920bp genomic sequence of AaV, a virus capable of infecting and lysing A. anophagefferens. AaV is a member of the nucleocytoplasmic large DNA virus (NCLDV) group, harboring 377 putative coding sequences and 8 tRNAs. Despite being an algal virus, AaV shows no phylogenetic affinity to the Phycodnaviridae family, to which most algae-infecting viruses belong. Core gene phylogenies, shared gene content and genome-wide similarities suggest AaV is the smallest member of the emerging clade "Megaviridae". The genomic architecture of AaV demonstrates that the ancestral virus had an even smaller genome, which expanded through gene duplication and assimilation of genes from diverse sources including the host itself - some of which probably modulate important host processes. AaV also harbors a number of genes exclusive to phycodnaviruses - reinforcing the hypothesis that Phycodna- and Mimiviridae share a common ancestor. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Reconstructing cancer genomes from paired-end sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oesper Layla

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A cancer genome is derived from the germline genome through a series of somatic mutations. Somatic structural variants - including duplications, deletions, inversions, translocations, and other rearrangements - result in a cancer genome that is a scrambling of intervals, or "blocks" of the germline genome sequence. We present an efficient algorithm for reconstructing the block organization of a cancer genome from paired-end DNA sequencing data. Results By aligning paired reads from a cancer genome - and a matched germline genome, if available - to the human reference genome, we derive: (i a partition of the reference genome into intervals; (ii adjacencies between these intervals in the cancer genome; (iii an estimated copy number for each interval. We formulate the Copy Number and Adjacency Genome Reconstruction Problem of determining the cancer genome as a sequence of the derived intervals that is consistent with the measured adjacencies and copy numbers. We design an efficient algorithm, called Paired-end Reconstruction of Genome Organization (PREGO, to solve this problem by reducing it to an optimization problem on an interval-adjacency graph constructed from the data. The solution to the optimization problem results in an Eulerian graph, containing an alternating Eulerian tour that corresponds to a cancer genome that is consistent with the sequencing data. We apply our algorithm to five ovarian cancer genomes that were sequenced as part of The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identify numerous rearrangements, or structural variants, in these genomes, analyze reciprocal vs. non-reciprocal rearrangements, and identify rearrangements consistent with known mechanisms of duplication such as tandem duplications and breakage/fusion/bridge (B/F/B cycles. Conclusions We demonstrate that PREGO efficiently identifies complex and biologically relevant rearrangements in cancer genome sequencing data. An implementation of the PREGO algorithm is

  14. Genome sequencing and annotation of Proteus sp. SAS71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-12-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Proteus sp. strain SAS71, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 3,037,704 bp with a G + C content of 39.3% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDIU00000000.

  15. Genome sequencing and annotation of Stenotrophomonas sp. SAM8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-12-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas sp. strain SAM8, isolated from environmental water. The draft genome size is 3,665,538 bp with a G + C content of 67.2% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDAV00000000.

  16. Genome sequencing and annotation of Morganella sp. SA36.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-12-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Morganella sp. Strain SA36, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 2,564,439 bp with a G + C content of 51.1% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDNQ00000000.

  17. Genome sequencing and annotation of Stenotrophomonas sp. SAM8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy Selim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report draft genome sequence of Stenotrophomonas sp. strain SAM8, isolated from environmental water. The draft genome size is 3,665,538 bp with a G + C content of 67.2% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDAV00000000.

  18. The genomic termini of wild-type and vaccine strains of measles virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Bankamp, Bettina; Xu, Wenbo; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2006-12-01

    The genomic termini from 18 strains of measles virus (MV) including wild-type MVs from the pre-vaccine period, recent wild-type isolates and various vaccine strains were sequenced. The first 25 nucleotides of the 3' terminus and last 52 nucleotides of the 5' terminus were conserved in all of the viruses examined. Nucleotides 26 and 42 of the 3' leader were A and G, respectively, in all genotype A viruses except Edmonston wild-type (Ed-WT). All non-genotype A viruses and Ed-WT had U in both positions. No consistent substitution pattern was found in the 5' trailer region of the genome. The nucleotide substitutions at positions 26 and 42 in the 3' leader region were introduced into a MV-CAT mini-genome to test for their effect on the production of reporter protein in both a vaccinia T7-driven, plasmid-based replication assay as well as in a helper virus system. Regardless of the source of the polymerase proteins or the natural leader sequence of the helper viruses, the mini-genome 26A42G produced more CAT protein than 26U42U. The nucleotide substitution at 26 had the greatest effect on CAT production. These results indicated that naturally occurring nucleotide variations in the 3' leader region can affect the levels of reporter protein synthesis, and presumably affected the level of replication of the virus.

  19. Complete Chloroplast Genome Sequence of Decaisnea insignis: Genome Organization, Genomic Resources and Comparative Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin; Lin, Furong; Huang, Ping; Guo, Wenying; Zheng, Yongqi

    2017-08-30

    Decaisnea insignis is a wild resource plant and is used as an ornamental, medicinal, and fruit plant. High-throughput sequencing of chloroplast genomes has provided insight into the overall evolutionary dynamics of chloroplast genomes and has enhanced our understanding of the evolutionary relationships within plant families. In the present study, we sequenced the complete chloroplast genome of D. insignis and used the data to assess its genomic resources. The D. insignis chloroplast genome is 158,683 bp in length and includes a pair of inverted repeats of 26,167 bp that are separated by small and large single copy regions of 19,162 bp and 87,187 bp, respectively. We identified 83 simple sequence repeats and 18 pairs of large repeats. Most simple-sequence repeats were located in the noncoding sections of the large single-copy/small single-copy region and exhibited a high A/T content. The D. insignis chloroplast genome bias was skewed towards A/T on the basis of codon usage. A phylogenetic tree based on 82 protein-coding genes of 33 angiosperms showed that D. insignis was clustered with Akebia in Lardizabalaceae. Overall, the results of this study will contribute to better understanding the evolution, molecular biology and genetic improvement of D. insignis.

  20. Complete genome sequence of Allochromatium vinosum DSM 180(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissgerber, Thomas; Zigann, Renate; Bruce, David; Chang, Yun-Juan; Detter, John C; Han, Cliff; Hauser, Loren; Jeffries, Cynthia D; Land, Miriam; Munk, A Christine; Tapia, Roxanne; Dahl, Christiane

    2011-12-31

    Allochromatium vinosum formerly Chromatium vinosum is a mesophilic purple sulfur bacterium belonging to the family Chromatiaceae in the bacterial class Gammaproteobacteria. The genus Allochromatium contains currently five species. All members were isolated from freshwater, brackish water or marine habitats and are predominately obligate phototrophs. Here we describe the features of the organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first completed genome sequence of a member of the Chromatiaceae within the purple sulfur bacteria thriving in globally occurring habitats. The 3,669,074 bp genome with its 3,302 protein-coding and 64 RNA genes was sequenced within the Joint Genome Institute Community Sequencing Program.

  1. Mitochondrial genome sequences from wild and cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hisano, Hiroshi; Tsujimura, Mai; Yoshida, Hideya; Terachi, Toru; Sato, Kazuhiro

    2016-10-24

    Sequencing analysis of mitochondrial genomes is important for understanding the evolution and genome structures of various plant species. Barley is a self-pollinated diploid plant with seven chromosomes comprising a large haploid genome of 5.1 Gbp. Wild barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. spontaneum) and cultivated barley (H. vulgare ssp. vulgare) have cross compatibility and closely related genomes, although a significant number of nucleotide polymorphisms have been reported between their genomes. We determined the complete nucleotide sequences of the mitochondrial genomes of wild and cultivated barley. Two independent circular maps of the 525,599 bp barley mitochondrial genome were constructed by de novo assembly of high-throughput sequencing reads of barley lines H602 and Haruna Nijo, with only three SNPs detected between haplotypes. These mitochondrial genomes contained 33 protein-coding genes, three ribosomal RNAs, 16 transfer RNAs, 188 new ORFs, six major repeat sequences and several types of transposable elements. Of the barley mitochondrial genome-encoded proteins, NAD6, NAD9 and RPS4 had unique structures among grass species. The mitochondrial genome of barley was similar to those of other grass species in terms of gene content, but the configuration of the genes was highly differentiated from that of other grass species. Mitochondrial genome sequencing is essential for annotating the barley nuclear genome; our mitochondrial sequencing identified a significant number of fragmented mitochondrial sequences in the reported nuclear genome sequences. Little polymorphism was detected in the barley mitochondrial genome sequences, which should be explored further to elucidate the evolution of barley.

  2. Genome Sequence of the Lager Brewing Yeast, an Interspecies Hybrid

    OpenAIRE

    Nakao, Yoshihiro; Kanamori, Takeshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Kodama, Yukiko; Rainieri, Sandra; Nakamura, Norihisa; Shimonaga, Tomoko; Hattori, Masahira; Ashikari, Toshihiko

    2009-01-01

    This work presents the genome sequencing of the lager brewing yeast (Saccharomyces pastorianus) Weihenstephan 34/70, a strain widely used in lager beer brewing. The 25 Mb genome comprises two nuclear sub-genomes originating from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces bayanus and one circular mitochondrial genome originating from S. bayanus. Thirty-six different types of chromosomes were found including eight chromosomes with translocations between the two sub-genomes, whose breakpoints ar...

  3. Quantitative trait loci markers derived from whole genome sequence data increases the reliability of genomic prediction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum, Rasmus Froberg; Su, Guosheng; Janss, Luc

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the effect on the reliability of genomic prediction when a small number of significant variants from single marker analysis based on whole genome sequence data were added to the regular 54k single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array data. The extra markers were selected...... this study indicate that the reliability of genomic prediction can be increased by including markers significant in genome-wide association studies on whole genome sequence data alongside the 54k SNP set....

  4. Genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of influenza B viruses on a global scale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinky Langat

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The global-scale epidemiology and genome-wide evolutionary dynamics of influenza B remain poorly understood compared with influenza A viruses. We compiled a spatio-temporally comprehensive dataset of influenza B viruses, comprising over 2,500 genomes sampled worldwide between 1987 and 2015, including 382 newly-sequenced genomes that fill substantial gaps in previous molecular surveillance studies. Our contributed data increase the number of available influenza B virus genomes in Europe, Africa and Central Asia, improving the global context to study influenza B viruses. We reveal Yamagata-lineage diversity results from co-circulation of two antigenically-distinct groups that also segregate genetically across the entire genome, without evidence of intra-lineage reassortment. In contrast, Victoria-lineage diversity stems from geographic segregation of different genetic clades, with variability in the degree of geographic spread among clades. Differences between the lineages are reflected in their antigenic dynamics, as Yamagata-lineage viruses show alternating dominance between antigenic groups, while Victoria-lineage viruses show antigenic drift of a single lineage. Structural mapping of amino acid substitutions on trunk branches of influenza B gene phylogenies further supports these antigenic differences and highlights two potential mechanisms of adaptation for polymerase activity. Our study provides new insights into the epidemiological and molecular processes shaping influenza B virus evolution globally.

  5. A Snapshot of the Emerging Tomato Genome Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas A. Mueller

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The genome of tomato ( L. is being sequenced by an international consortium of 10 countries (Korea, China, the United Kingdom, India, the Netherlands, France, Japan, Spain, Italy, and the United States as part of the larger “International Solanaceae Genome Project (SOL: Systems Approach to Diversity and Adaptation” initiative. The tomato genome sequencing project uses an ordered bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC approach to generate a high-quality tomato euchromatic genome sequence for use as a reference genome for the Solanaceae and euasterids. Sequence is deposited at GenBank and at the SOL Genomics Network (SGN. Currently, there are around 1000 BACs finished or in progress, representing more than a third of the projected euchromatic portion of the genome. An annotation effort is also underway by the International Tomato Annotation Group. The expected number of genes in the euchromatin is ∼40,000, based on an estimate from a preliminary annotation of 11% of finished sequence. Here, we present this first snapshot of the emerging tomato genome and its annotation, a short comparison with potato ( L. sequence data, and the tools available for the researchers to exploit this new resource are also presented. In the future, whole-genome shotgun techniques will be combined with the BAC-by-BAC approach to cover the entire tomato genome. The high-quality reference euchromatic tomato sequence is expected to be near completion by 2010.

  6. Identification of hepatotropic viruses from plasma using deep sequencing: a next generation diagnostic tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Law

    Full Text Available We conducted an unbiased metagenomics survey using plasma from patients with chronic hepatitis B, chronic hepatitis C, autoimmune hepatitis (AIH, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, and patients without liver disease (control. RNA and DNA libraries were sequenced from plasma filtrates enriched in viral particles to catalog virus populations. Hepatitis viruses were readily detected at high coverage in patients with chronic viral hepatitis B and C, but only a limited number of sequences resembling other viruses were found. The exception was a library from a patient diagnosed with hepatitis C virus (HCV infection that contained multiple sequences matching GB virus C (GBV-C. Abundant GBV-C reads were also found in plasma from patients with AIH, whereas Torque teno virus (TTV was found at high frequency in samples from patients with AIH and NASH. After taxonomic classification of sequences by BLASTn, a substantial fraction in each library, ranging from 35% to 76%, remained unclassified. These unknown sequences were assembled into scaffolds along with virus, phage and endogenous retrovirus sequences and then analyzed by BLASTx against the non-redundant protein database. Nearly the full genome of a heretofore-unknown circovirus was assembled and many scaffolds that encoded proteins with similarity to plant, insect and mammalian viruses. The presence of this novel circovirus was confirmed by PCR. BLASTx also identified many polypeptides resembling nucleo-cytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV proteins. We re-evaluated these alignments with a profile hidden Markov method, HHblits, and observed inconsistencies in the target proteins reported by the different algorithms. This suggests that sequence alignments are insufficient to identify NCLDV proteins, especially when these alignments are only to small portions of the target protein. Nevertheless, we have now established a reliable protocol for the identification of viruses in plasma that can also be

  7. Full genome sequence of guinea fowl coronavirus associated with fulminating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducatez, Mariette F; Liais, Etienne; Croville, Guillaume; Guérin, Jean-Luc

    2015-06-01

    Guinea fowl coronavirus (GfCoV), a recently characterized avian coronavirus, was identified from outbreaks of fulminating disease (peracute enteritis) in guinea fowl in France. The full-length genomic sequence was determined to better understand its genetic relationship with avian coronaviruses. The full-length coding genome sequence was 26,985 nucleotides long with 11 open reading frames and no hemagglutinin-esterase gene: a genome organization identical to that of turkey coronavirus [5' untranslated region (UTR)-replicase (ORFs 1a, 1ab)-spike (S) protein-ORF3 (ORFs 3a, 3b)-small envelop (E or 3c) protein-membrane (M) protein-ORF5 (ORFs 4b, 4c, 5a, 5b)-nucleocapsid (N) protein (ORFs N and 6b)-3' UTR]. This is the first complete genome sequence of a GfCoV and confirms that the new virus belongs to group gammacoronaviruses.

  8. Complete genome characterization of porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vui, Dam Thi; Thanh, To Long; Tung, Nguyen; Srijangwad, Anchalee; Tripipat, Thitima; Chuanasa, Taksina; Nilubol, Dachrit

    2015-08-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) first emerged in Vietnam in 2009. In this study, the complete genomes of three Vietnamese PEDV isolates were characterized. These three isolates were isolated from 3-day-old pigs experiencing diarrhea. Two isolates were from swine farms in the south, and the other was from northern Vietnam. The whole genome sequences of these isolates are 28,035 nucleotides in length and have characteristics similar to those of other PEDV isolates. All three Vietnamese PEDV isolates share 99.8 % and 99.6 % sequence identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively, and have insertions of four amino acids (GENQ) and one amino acid (N) at positions 56-59 and 140, respectively, and one deletion of two amino acids (DG) at positions 160-161. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome revealed that the three Vietnamese PEDV isolates are grouped together with new variants from China from 2011 to 2012 and are genetically distinct from US isolates and the classical PEDV variant. The results suggest that Vietnamese PEDV isolates are new variants, as evidenced by their genetic composition of insertions and a deletion in the spike gene, and they might have originated from the same ancestor as the Chinese PEDV strain. This study provides a better understanding of the molecular characteristics of PEDV in Vietnam.

  9. Complete genome sequences of four avian paramyxoviruses of serotype 10 isolated from Rockhopper Penguins on the Falkland Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    The first complete genome sequences of four Avian paramyxovirus serotype 10 (APMV-10) isolates are described here. The viruses were isolated from Rockhopper Penguins sampled in 2007 on the Falkland Islands. All four genomes are 15,456 nucleotides in length and phylogenetic analyses show them to be c...

  10. Genomic characterization of a Brazilian TT Virus isolate closely related to SEN virus-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Diniz-Mendes

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available SEN virus (SENV is a circular, single stranded DNA virus that has been first characterized in the serum of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1-infected patient. Eight genotypes of SENV (A-H have been identified and further recognized as variants of TT virus (TTV in the family Circoviridae. Here we describe the first genomic characterization of a SENV isolate (5-A from South America. Using 'universal' primers, able to amplify most, if not all, TTV/SENV genotypes, a segment of > 3 kb was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the serum of an HIV-1 infected patient. The amplicon was cloned and a 3087-nucleotide sequence was determined, that showed a high (85% homology with the sequence of the Italian isolate SENV-F. Proteins encoded by open reading frames (ORFs 1 to 4 consisted of 758, 129, 276, and 267 amino acids, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis, isolate 5-A was classified into TTV genotype 19 (phylogenetic group 3, together with SENV-F and TTV isolate SAa-38.

  11. Genome sequence of the repetitive-sequence-rich Mycoplasma fermentans strain M64.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hung-Wei; Liu, Tze-Tze; Chan, Huang-I; Liu, Yen-Ming; Wu, Keh-Ming; Shu, Hung-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen; Hu, Wensi S; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2011-08-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is a microorganism commonly found in the genitourinary and respiratory tracts of healthy individuals and AIDS patients. The complete genome of the repetitive-sequence-rich M. fermentans strain M64 is reported here. Comparative genomics analysis revealed dramatic differences in genome size between this strain and the recently completely sequenced JER strain.

  12. Genome Sequence of the Repetitive-Sequence-Rich Mycoplasma fermentans Strain M64▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Hung-Wei; Liu, Tze-Tze; Chan, Huang-I; Liu, Yen-Ming; Wu, Keh-Ming; Shu, Hung-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Hsiao, Kwang-Jen; Hu, Wensi S.; Ng, Wailap Victor

    2011-01-01

    Mycoplasma fermentans is a microorganism commonly found in the genitourinary and respiratory tracts of healthy individuals and AIDS patients. The complete genome of the repetitive-sequence-rich M. fermentans strain M64 is reported here. Comparative genomics analysis revealed dramatic differences in genome size between this strain and the recently completely sequenced JER strain. PMID:21642450

  13. Hepatitis C virus genomic RNA dimerization is mediated via a kissing complex intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shetty, Sumangala; Kim, Seungtaek; Shimakami, Tetsuro; Lemon, Stanley M; Mihailescu, Mihaela-Rita

    2010-05-01

    With over 200 million people infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) worldwide, there is a need for more effective and better-tolerated therapeutic strategies. The HCV genome is a positive-sense; single-stranded RNA encoding a large polyprotein cleaved at multiple sites to produce at least ten proteins, among them an error-prone RNA polymerase that confers a high mutation rate. Despite considerable overall sequence diversity, in the 3'-untranslated region of the HCV genomic RNA there is a 98-nucleotide (nt) sequence named X RNA, the first 55 nt of which (X55 RNA) are 100% conserved among all HCV strains. The X55 region has been suggested to be responsible for in vitro dimerization of the genomic RNA in the presence of the viral core protein, although the mechanism by which this occurs is unknown. In this study, we analyzed the X55 region and characterized the mechanism by which it mediates HCV genomic RNA dimerization. Similar to a mechanism proposed previously for the human immunodeficiency 1 virus (HIV-1) genome, we show that dimerization of the HCV genome involves formation of a kissing complex intermediate, which is converted to a more stable extended duplex conformation in the presence of the core protein. Mutations in the dimer linkage sequence loop sequence that prevent RNA dimerization in vitro significantly reduced but did not completely ablate the ability of HCV RNA to replicate or produce infectious virus in transfected cells.

  14. Hepatitis C virus transmission bottlenecks analyzed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gary P; Sherrill-Mix, Scott A; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Quince, Chris; Bushman, Frederic D

    2010-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication in infected patients produces large and diverse viral populations, which give rise to drug-resistant and immune escape variants. Here, we analyzed HCV populations during transmission and diversification in longitudinal and cross-sectional samples using 454/Roche pyrosequencing, in total analyzing 174,185 sequence reads. To sample diversity, four locations in the HCV genome were analyzed, ranging from high diversity (the envelope hypervariable region 1 [HVR1]) to almost no diversity (the 5' untranslated region [UTR]). For three longitudinal samples for which early time points were available, we found that only 1 to 4 viral variants were present, suggesting that productive infection was initiated by a very small number of HCV particles. Sequence diversity accumulated subsequently, with the 5' UTR showing almost no diversification while the envelope HVR1 showed >100 variants in some subjects. Calculation of the transmission probability for only a single variant, taking into account the measured population structure within patients, confirmed initial infection by one or a few viral particles. These findings provide the most detailed sequence-based analysis of HCV transmission bottlenecks to date. The analytical methods described here are broadly applicable to studies of viral diversity using deep sequencing.

  15. Comparative analysis of complete genome sequences of European subtype tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated from Ixodes persulcatus ticks, long-tailed ground squirrel (Spermophilus undulatus), and human blood in the Asian part of Russia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Demina, T. V.; Tkachev, S. E.; Kozlova, I. V.; Doroshchenko, E. K.; Lisak, O. V.; Suntsova, O. V.; Verkhozina, M. M.; Dzhioev, Y. P.; Paramonov, A. I.; Tikunov, A. Y.; Tikunova, N. V.; Zlobin, V. I.; Růžek, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 4 (2017), s. 547-553 ISSN 1877-959X Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : TBEV * complete genome * European subtype * Western Siberia * Eastern Siberia * nucleotide * Amino acid sequence Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.230, year: 2016

  16. Molecular characterization of the complete genome of a street rabies virus WH11 isolated from donkey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tingbo; Yu, Hua; Wu, Jie; Ming, Pinggang; Huang, Sijia; Shen, Zhijun; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Jiaxin; Yu, Bin; Zhou, Dunjin

    2012-12-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a rabies virus isolate WH11, isolated from brain tissue of a rabid donkey in China, was determined and compared with other rabies viruses. This is the first Chinese street strain which was isolated from donkey and the entire length and organization of the virus was similar to that of other rabies viruses. Multiple alignments of amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and large protein of WH11 with those of other rabies viruses were undertaken to examine the conservative degree of functional regions. Phylogenetic analysis using the complete genomic sequence of WH11 determined that this isolate is most closely related with rabies viruses previously isolated in China and the attenuated Chinese vaccine strain CTN181.

  17. Insights into cereal genomes from two draft genome sequences of rice

    OpenAIRE

    Bancroft, Ian

    2002-01-01

    Draft genome sequences have been reported for two subspecies of rice. The drafts include the sequences of an estimated 99% of all rice genes and provide major advances in our understanding of the content and complexity of cereal genomes in general and the rice genome in particular.

  18. Validation of rice genome sequence by optical mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pape Louise

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rice feeds much of the world, and possesses the simplest genome analyzed to date within the grass family, making it an economically relevant model system for other cereal crops. Although the rice genome is sequenced, validation and gap closing efforts require purely independent means for accurate finishing of sequence build data. Results To facilitate ongoing sequencing finishing and validation efforts, we have constructed a whole-genome SwaI optical restriction map of the rice genome. The physical map consists of 14 contigs, covering 12 chromosomes, with a total genome size of 382.17 Mb; this value is about 11% smaller than original estimates. 9 of the 14 optical map contigs are without gaps, covering chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 10, and 12 in their entirety – including centromeres and telomeres. Alignments between optical and in silico restriction maps constructed from IRGSP (International Rice Genome Sequencing Project and TIGR (The Institute for Genomic Research genome sequence sources are comprehensive and informative, evidenced by map coverage across virtually all published gaps, discovery of new ones, and characterization of sequence misassemblies; all totalling ~14 Mb. Furthermore, since optical maps are ordered restriction maps, identified discordances are pinpointed on a reliable physical scaffold providing an independent resource for closure of gaps and rectification of misassemblies. Conclusion Analysis of sequence and optical mapping data effectively validates genome sequence assemblies constructed from large, repeat-rich genomes. Given this conclusion we envision new applications of such single molecule analysis that will merge advantages offered by high-resolution optical maps with inexpensive, but short sequence reads generated by emerging sequencing platforms. Lastly, map construction techniques presented here points the way to new types of comparative genome analysis that would focus on discernment of

  19. Complete sequence of a cryptic virus from hemp (Cannabis sativa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Angelika; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Steger, Gerhard; Schubert, Jörg

    2012-02-01

    Hemp (Cannabis sativa) was found to be a useful propagation host for hop latent virus, a carlavirus. However, when virus preparations were analysed by electron microscopy, along with the expected filamentous particles, spherical particles with a diameter of around 34 nm were found. RNA from virus preparations was purified, and cDNA was prepared and cloned. Sequence information was used to search databases, and the greatest similarity was found with Primula malacoides virus 1, a putative new member of the genus Partitivirus. The full sequences of RNA 1 and RNA 2 of this new hemp cryptic virus were obtained.

  20. A gapless genome sequence of the fungus Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kan, Van Jan A.L.; Stassen, Joost H.M.; Mosbach, Andreas; Lee, Van Der Theo A.J.; Faino, Luigi; Farmer, Andrew D.; Papasotiriou, Dimitrios G.; Zhou, Shiguo; Seidl, Michael F.; Cottam, Eleanor; Edel, Dominique; Hahn, Matthias; Schwartz, David C.; Dietrich, Robert A.; Widdison, Stephanie; Scalliet, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Following earlier incomplete and fragmented versions of a genome sequence for the grey mould Botrytis cinerea, a gapless, near-finished genome sequence for B. cinerea strain B05.10 is reported. The assembly comprised 18 chromosomes and was confirmed by an optical map and a genetic map based on

  1. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM

    OpenAIRE

    Chua, Patric; Har, Zi Mei; Austin, Christopher M.; Yule, Catherine M.; Dykes, Gary A.; Lee, Sui Mae

    2015-01-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA).

  2. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Patric; Har, Zi Mei; Austin, Christopher M; Yule, Catherine M; Dykes, Gary A; Lee, Sui Mae

    2015-09-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA).

  3. Genome sequencing and annotation of Cellulomonas sp. HZM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patric Chua

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the draft genome sequence of Cellulomonas sp. HZM, isolated from a tropical peat swamp forest. The draft genome size is 3,559,280 bp with a G + C content of 73% and contains 3 rRNA sequences (single copies of 5S, 16S and 23S rRNA.

  4. Complete Genome Sequence of the Human Gut Symbiont Roseburia hominis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travis, Anthony J.; Kelly, Denise; Flint, Harry J

    2015-01-01

    We report here the complete genome sequence of the human gut symbiont Roseburia hominis A2-183(T) (= DSM 16839(T) = NCIMB 14029(T)), isolated from human feces. The genome is represented by a 3,592,125-bp chromosome with 3,405 coding sequences. A number of potential functions contributing to host-...

  5. Nearly Complete Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus plantarum Strain NIZO2877

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martino, M.E.; Bayjanov, J.R.; Joncour, P.; Hughes, S.; Gillet, B.; Kleerebezem, M; Siezen, R.; Hijum, S.A.F.T. van; Leulier, F.

    2015-01-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum is a versatile bacterial species that is isolated mostly from foods. Here, we present the first genome sequence of L. plantarum strain NIZO2877 isolated from a hot dog in Vietnam. Its two contigs represent a nearly complete genome sequence.

  6. Draft Genome Sequence of Aspergillus oryzae Strain 3.042

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Guozhong; Yao, Yunping; Qi, Wei; Wang, Chunling; Hou, LiHua; Zeng, Bin; Cao, Xiaohong

    2012-01-01

    Aspergillus oryzae is the most important fungus for the traditional fermentation in China and is particularly important in soy sauce fermentation. We report the 36,547,279-bp draft genome sequence of A. oryzae 3.042 and compared it to the published genome sequence of A. oryzae RIB40.

  7. Mumps virus F gene and HN gene sequencing as a molecular tool to study mumps virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouma, Sigrid; Cremer, Jeroen; Parkkali, Saara; Veldhuijzen, Irene; van Binnendijk, Rob S; Koopmans, Marion P G

    2016-11-01

    Various mumps outbreaks have occurred in the Netherlands since 2004, particularly among persons who had received 2 doses of measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) vaccination. Genomic typing of pathogens can be used to track outbreaks, but the established genotyping of mumps virus based on the small hydrophobic (SH) gene sequences did not provide sufficient resolution. Therefore, we expanded the sequencing to include fusion (F) gene and haemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene sequences in addition to the SH gene sequences from 109 mumps virus genotype G strains obtained between 2004 and mid 2015 in the Netherlands. When the molecular information from these 3 genes was combined, we were able to identify separate mumps virus clusters and track mumps virus transmission. The analyses suggested that multiple mumps virus introductions occurred in the Netherlands between 2004 and 2015 resulting in several mumps outbreaks throughout this period, whereas during some local outbreaks the molecular data pointed towards endemic circulation. Combined analysis of epidemiological data and sequence data collected in 2015 showed good support for the phylogenetic clustering. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Ryun Kwak

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L. are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, Sweet potato virus C (SPVC, Sweet potato virus G (SPVG, Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2, and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV, have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95% incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88% nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses.

  9. Molecular Characterization of Five Potyviruses Infecting Korean Sweet Potatoes Based on Analyses of Complete Genome Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Kim, Jaedeok; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Jung, Mi-Nam; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Lee, Sukchan; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2015-12-01

    Sweet potatoes (Ipomea batatas L.) are grown extensively, in tropical and temperate regions, and are important food crops worldwide. In Korea, potyviruses, including Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV), Sweet potato virus C (SPVC), Sweet potato virus G (SPVG), Sweet potato virus 2 (SPV2), and Sweet potato latent virus (SPLV), have been detected in sweet potato fields at a high (~95%) incidence. In the present work, complete genome sequences of 18 isolates, representing the five potyviruses mentioned above, were compared with previously reported genome sequences. The complete genomes consisted of 10,081 to 10,830 nucleotides, excluding the poly-A tails. Their genomic organizations were typical of the Potyvirus genus, including one target open reading frame coding for a putative polyprotein. Based on phylogenetic analyses and sequence comparisons, the Korean SPFMV isolates belonged to the strains RC and O with >98% nucleotide sequence identity. Korean SPVC isolates had 99% identity to the Japanese isolate SPVC-Bungo and 70% identity to the SPFMV isolates. The Korean SPVG isolates showed 99% identity to the three previously reported SPVG isolates. Korean SPV2 isolates had 97% identity to the SPV2 GWB-2 isolate from the USA. Korean SPLV isolates had a relatively low (88%) nucleotide sequence identity with the Taiwanese SPLV-TW isolates, and they were phylogenetically distantly related to SPFMV isolates. Recombination analysis revealed that possible recombination events occurred in the P1, HC-Pro and NIa-NIb regions of SPFMV and SPLV isolates and these regions were identified as hotspots for recombination in the sweet potato potyviruses.

  10. Haplotype-resolved genome sequencing of a Gujarati Indian individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzman, Jacob O; Mackenzie, Alexandra P; Adey, Andrew; Hiatt, Joseph B; Patwardhan, Rupali P; Sudmant, Peter H; Ng, Sarah B; Alkan, Can; Qiu, Ruolan; Eichler, Evan E; Shendure, Jay

    2011-01-01

    Haplotype information is essential to the complete description and interpretation of genomes, genetic diversity and genetic ancestry. Although individual human genome sequencing is increasingly routine, nearly all such genomes are unresolved with respect to haplotype. Here we combine the throughput of massively parallel sequencing with the contiguity information provided by large-insert cloning to experimentally determine the haplotype-resolved genome of a South Asian individual. A single fosmid library was split into a modest number of pools, each providing ∼3% physical coverage of the diploid genome. Sequencing of each pool yielded reads overwhelmingly derived from only one homologous chromosome at any given location. These data were combined with whole-genome shotgun sequence to directly phase 94% of ascertained heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) into long haplotype blocks (N50 of 386 kilobases (kbp)). This method also facilitates the analysis of structural variation, for example, to anchor novel insertions to specific locations and haplotypes.

  11. The sequence of camelpox virus shows it is most closely related to variola virus, the cause of smallpox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Caroline; Smith, Geoffrey L

    2002-04-01

    Camelpox virus (CMPV) and variola virus (VAR) are orthopoxviruses (OPVs) that share several biological features and cause high mortality and morbidity in their single host species. The sequence of a virulent CMPV strain was determined; it is 202182 bp long, with inverted terminal repeats (ITRs) of 6045 bp and has 206 predicted open reading frames (ORFs). As for other poxviruses, the genes are tightly packed with little non-coding sequence. Most genes within 25 kb of each terminus are transcribed outwards towards the terminus, whereas genes within the centre of the genome are transcribed from either DNA strand. The central region of the genome contains genes that are highly conserved in other OPVs and 87 of these are conserved in all sequenced chordopoxviruses. In contrast, genes towards either terminus are more variable and encode proteins involved in host range, virulence or immunomodulation. In some cases, these are broken versions of genes found in other OPVs. The relationship of CMPV to other OPVs was analysed by comparisons of DNA and predicted protein sequences, repeats within the ITRs and arrangement of ORFs within the terminal regions. Each comparison gave the same conclusion: CMPV is the closest known virus to variola virus, the cause of smallpox.

  12. Draft sequences of the radish (Raphanus sativus L.) genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitashiba, Hiroyasu; Li, Feng; Hirakawa, Hideki; Kawanabe, Takahiro; Zou, Zhongwei; Hasegawa, Yoichi; Tonosaki, Kaoru; Shirasawa, Sachiko; Fukushima, Aki; Yokoi, Shuji; Takahata, Yoshihito; Kakizaki, Tomohiro; Ishida, Masahiko; Okamoto, Shunsuke; Sakamoto, Koji; Shirasawa, Kenta; Tabata, Satoshi; Nishio, Takeshi

    2014-10-01

    Radish (Raphanus sativus L., n = 9) is one of the major vegetables in Asia. Since the genomes of Brassica and related species including radish underwent genome rearrangement, it is quite difficult to perform functional analysis based on the reported genomic sequence of Brassica rapa. Therefore, we performed genome sequencing of radish. Short reads of genomic sequences of 191.1 Gb were obtained by next-generation sequencing (NGS) for a radish inbred line, and 76,592 scaffolds of ≥ 300 bp were constructed along with the bacterial artificial chromosome-end sequences. Finally, the whole draft genomic sequence of 402 Mb spanning 75.9% of the estimated genomic size and containing 61,572 predicted genes was obtained. Subsequently, 221 single nucleotide polymorphism markers and 768 PCR-RFLP markers were used together with the 746 markers produced in our previous study for the construction of a linkage map. The map was combined further with another radish linkage map constructed mainly with expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers into a high-density integrated map of 1,166 cM with 2,553 DNA markers. A total of 1,345 scaffolds were assigned to the linkage map, spanning 116.0 Mb. Bulked PCR products amplified by 2,880 primer pairs were sequenced by NGS, and SNPs in eight inbred lines were identified. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  13. Analysis of high-throughput sequencing and annotation strategies for phage genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R Henn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Bacterial viruses (phages play a critical role in shaping microbial populations as they influence both host mortality and horizontal gene transfer. As such, they have a significant impact on local and global ecosystem function and human health. Despite their importance, little is known about the genomic diversity harbored in phages, as methods to capture complete phage genomes have been hampered by the lack of knowledge about the target genomes, and difficulties in generating sufficient quantities of genomic DNA for sequencing. Of the approximately 550 phage genomes currently available in the public domain, fewer than 5% are marine phage. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To advance the study of phage biology through comparative genomic approaches we used marine cyanophage as a model system. We compared DNA preparation methodologies (DNA extraction directly from either phage lysates or CsCl purified phage particles, and sequencing strategies that utilize either Sanger sequencing of a linker amplification shotgun library (LASL or of a whole genome shotgun library (WGSL, or 454 pyrosequencing methods. We demonstrate that genomic DNA sample preparation directly from a phage lysate, combined with 454 pyrosequencing, is best suited for phage genome sequencing at scale, as this method is capable of capturing complete continuous genomes with high accuracy. In addition, we describe an automated annotation informatics pipeline that delivers high-quality annotation and yields few false positives and negatives in ORF calling. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These DNA preparation, sequencing and annotation strategies enable a high-throughput approach to the burgeoning field of phage genomics.

  14. Ancient Human Genome Sequence of an Extinct Palaeo-Eskimo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Morten; Li, Yingrui; Lindgreen, Stinus

    2010-01-01

    We report here the genome sequence of an ancient human. Obtained from approximately 4,000-year-old permafrost-preserved hair, the genome represents a male individual from the first known culture to settle in Greenland. Sequenced to an average depth of 20x, we recover 79% of the diploid genome, an...... for a migration from Siberia into the New World some 5,500 years ago, independent of that giving rise to the modern Native Americans and Inuit....

  15. Genome sequencing and annotation of Serratia sp. strain TEL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lephoto, Tiisetso E; Gray, Vincent M

    2015-12-01

    We present the annotation of the draft genome sequence of Serratia sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KP711410). This organism was isolated from entomopathogenic nematode Oscheius sp. strain TEL (GenBank accession number KM492926) collected from grassland soil and has a genome size of 5,000,541 bp and 542 subsystems. The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession number LDEG00000000.

  16. RESTseq - Efficient Benchtop Population Genomics with RESTriction Fragment SEQuencing

    OpenAIRE

    Eckart Stolle; Moritz, Robin F.A.

    2013-01-01

    We present RESTseq, an improved approach for a cost efficient, highly flexible and repeatable enrichment of DNA fragments from digested genomic DNA using Next Generation Sequencing platforms including small scale Personal Genome sequencers. Easy adjustments make it suitable for a wide range of studies requiring SNP detection or SNP genotyping from fine-scale linkage mapping to population genomics and population genetics also in non-model organisms. We demonstrate the validity of our approach ...

  17. De novo reconstruction of plant RNA and DNA virus genomes from viral siRNAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In antiviral defense, plants produce massive quantities of 21-24 nucleotide siRNAs. Here we demonstrate that the complete genomes of DNA and RNA viruses and viroids can be reconstructed by deep sequencing and de novo assembly of viral/viroid siRNAs from experimentally- and naturally-infected plants....

  18. The duck genome and transcriptome provide insight into an avian influenza virus reservoir species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Li, Y.; Burt, D.W.; Chen, H.; Groenen, M.A.M.; Crooijmans, R.P.M.A.; Kraus, R.H.S.

    2013-01-01

    The duck (Anas platyrhynchos) is one of the principal natural hosts of influenza A viruses. We present the duck genome sequence and perform deep transcriptome analyses to investigate immune-related genes. Our data indicate that the duck possesses a contractive immune gene repertoire, as in chicken

  19. Virus genome dynamics under different propagation pressures: reconstruction of whole genome haplotypes of West Nile viruses from NGS data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenhoeven, Cornell; Joubert, Fourie; Bastos, Armanda D S; Abolnik, Celia

    2015-02-22

    Extensive focus is placed on the comparative analyses of consensus genotypes in the study of West Nile virus (WNV) emergence. Few studies account for genetic change in the underlying WNV quasispecies population variants. These variants are not discernable in the consensus genome at the time of emergence, and the maintenance of mutation-selection equilibria of population variants is greatly underestimated. The emergence of lineage 1 WNV strains has been studied extensively, but recent epidemics caused by lineage 2 WNV strains in Hungary, Austria, Greece and Italy emphasizes the increasing importance of this lineage to public health. In this study we explored the quasispecies dynamics of minority variants that contribute to cell-tropism and host determination, i.e. the ability to infect different cell types or cells from different species from Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) data of a historic lineage 2 WNV strain. Minority variants contributing to host cell membrane association persist in the viral population without contributing to the genetic change in the consensus genome. Minority variants are shown to maintain a stable mutation-selection equilibrium under positive selection, particularly in the capsid gene region. This study is the first to infer positive selection and the persistence of WNV haplotype variants that contribute to viral fitness without accompanying genetic change in the consensus genotype, documented solely from NGS sequence data. The approach used in this study streamlines the experimental design seeking viral minority variants accurately from NGS data whilst minimizing the influence of associated sequence error.

  20. Whole-Genome Sequences of Thirteen Isolates of Borrelia burgdorferi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schutzer S. E.; Dunn J.; Fraser-Liggett, C. M.; Casjens, S. R.; Qiu, W.-G.; Mongodin, E. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2011-02-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi is a causative agent of Lyme disease in North America and Eurasia. The first complete genome sequence of B. burgdorferi strain 31, available for more than a decade, has assisted research on the pathogenesis of Lyme disease. Because a single genome sequence is not sufficient to understand the relationship between genotypic and geographic variation and disease phenotype, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 13 additional B. burgdorferi isolates that span the range of natural variation. These sequences should allow improved understanding of pathogenesis and provide a foundation for novel detection, diagnosis, and prevention strategies.

  1. A 5'-proximal region of the Citrus tristeza virus genome encoding two leader proteases is involved in virus superinfection exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atallah, Osama O; Kang, Sung-Hwan; El-Mohtar, Choaa A; Shilts, Turksen; Bergua, María; Folimonova, Svetlana Y

    2016-02-01

    Superinfection exclusion (SIE), a phenomenon in which a primary virus infection prevents a secondary infection with the same or closely related virus, has been observed with various viruses. Earlier we demonstrated that SIE by Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) requires viral p33 protein. In this work we show that p33 alone is not sufficient for virus exclusion. To define the additional viral components that are involved in this phenomenon, we engineered a hybrid virus in which a 5'-proximal region in the genome of the T36 isolate containing coding sequences for the two leader proteases L1 and L2 has been substituted with a corresponding region from the genome of a heterologous T68-1 isolate. Sequential inoculation of plants pre-infected with the CTV L1L2T68 hybrid with T36 CTV resulted in superinfection with the challenge virus, which indicated that the substitution of the L1-L2 coding region affected SIE ability of the virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Sequencing of bovine herpesvirus 4 v.test strain reveals important genome features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gillet Laurent

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine herpesvirus 4 (BoHV-4 is a useful model for the human pathogenic gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated Herpesvirus. Although genome manipulations of this virus have been greatly facilitated by the cloning of the BoHV-4 V.test strain as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (BAC, the lack of a complete genome sequence for this strain limits its experimental use. Methods In this study, we have determined the complete sequence of BoHV-4 V.test strain by a pyrosequencing approach. Results The long unique coding region (LUR consists of 108,241 bp encoding at least 79 open reading frames and is flanked by several polyrepetitive DNA units (prDNA. As previously suggested, we showed that the prDNA unit located at the left prDNA-LUR junction (prDNA-G differs from the other prDNA units (prDNA-inner. Namely, the prDNA-G unit lacks the conserved pac-2 cleavage and packaging signal in its right terminal region. Based on the mechanisms of cleavage and packaging of herpesvirus genomes, this feature implies that only genomes bearing left and right end prDNA units are encapsulated into virions. Conclusions In this study, we have determined the complete genome sequence of the BAC-cloned BoHV-4 V.test strain and identified genome organization features that could be important in other herpesviruses.

  3. Progress in Understanding and Sequencing the Genome of Brassica rapa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chang Pyo; Kwon, Soo-Jin; Kim, Jung Sun; Yang, Tae-Jin; Park, Beom-Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo

    2008-01-01

    Brassica rapa, which is closely related to Arabidopsis thaliana, is an important crop and a model plant for studying genome evolution via polyploidization. We report the current understanding of the genome structure of B. rapa and efforts for the whole-genome sequencing of the species. The tribe Brassicaceae, which comprises ca. 240 species, descended from a common hexaploid ancestor with a basic genome similar to that of Arabidopsis. Chromosome rearrangements, including fusions and/or fissions, resulted in the present-day “diploid” Brassica species with variation in chromosome number and phenotype. Triplicated genomic segments of B. rapa are collinear to those of A. thaliana with InDels. The genome triplication has led to an approximately 1.7-fold increase in the B. rapa gene number compared to that of A. thaliana. Repetitive DNA of B. rapa has also been extensively amplified and has diverged from that of A. thaliana. For its whole-genome sequencing, the Brassica rapa Genome Sequencing Project (BrGSP) consortium has developed suitable genomic resources and constructed genetic and physical maps. Ten chromosomes of B. rapa are being allocated to BrGSP consortium participants, and each chromosome will be sequenced by a BAC-by-BAC approach. Genome sequencing of B. rapa will offer a new perspective for plant biology and evolution in the context of polyploidization. PMID:18288250

  4. Using small RNA sequences to diagnose, sequence, and investigate the infectivity characteristics of vegetable-infecting viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Charles; Frizzi, Alessandra; Kao, John; Jia, Lijie; Huang, Mingya; Zhang, Yuanji; Huang, Shihshieh

    2011-07-01

    In a virus-infected plant, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) corresponding to the viral genome form a large proportion of the small RNA population. It is possible to reassemble significant portions of the virus sequence from overlapping siRNA sequences and use these to identify the virus. We tested this technique with a resistance-breaking and a non-resistance-breaking strain of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). We were able to assemble contigs covering 99% of the genomes of both viruses. The abundance of TSWV siRNAs allowed us to detect TSWV at early time points before the onset of symptoms, at levels too low for conventional detection. Combining traditional and bioinformatic detection methods, we also measured how replication of the resistance-breaking strain differed from the non-resistance-breaking strain in susceptible and resistant tomato varieties. We repeated this technique in identification of a squash-infecting geminivirus and also used it to identify an unspecified tospovirus.

  5. The Brachypodium genome sequence: a resource for oat genomics research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oat (Avena sativa) is an important cereal crop used as both an animal feed and for human consumption. Genetic and genomic research on oat is hindered because it is hexaploid and possesses a large (13 Gb) genome. Diploid Avena relatives have been employed for genetic and genomic studies, but only mod...

  6. Genome shotgun sequencing and development of microsatellite ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADP

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... x 10-3 and a bit score >40) hits to different genes, while three aligned to Lactuca sativa cultivar Salinas chloroplast complete genome DNA and three others aligned to Guizotia abyssinica chloroplast complete genome DNA. Characteristics of the genome SSR. SSR motifs found in 'Raon' are summarized in ...

  7. The minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Field, D; Garrity, G; Gray, T

    2008-01-01

    the development of better descriptions of genomic investigations, we have formed the Genomic Standards Consortium (GSC). Here, we introduce the minimum information about a genome sequence (MIGS) specification with the intent of promoting participation in its development and discussing the resources...... that will be required to develop improved mechanisms of metadata capture and exchange. As part of its wider goals, the GSC also supports improving the 'transparency' of the information contained in existing genomic databases....

  8. The diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Wang, Wei; Li, Ruiqiang; Li, Yingrui; Tian, Geng; Goodman, Laurie; Fan, Wei; Zhang, Junqing; Li, Jun; Zhang, Juanbin; Guo, Yiran; Feng, Binxiao; Li, Heng; Lu, Yao; Fang, Xiaodong; Liang, Huiqing; Du, Zhenglin; Li, Dong; Zhao, Yiqing; Hu, Yujie; Yang, Zhenzhen; Zheng, Hancheng; Hellmann, Ines; Inouye, Michael; Pool, John; Yi, Xin; Zhao, Jing; Duan, Jinjie; Zhou, Yan; Qin, Junjie; Ma, Lijia; Li, Guoqing; Yang, Zhentao; Zhang, Guojie; Yang, Bin; Yu, Chang; Liang, Fang; Li, Wenjie; Li, Shaochuan; Li, Dawei; Ni, Peixiang; Ruan, Jue; Li, Qibin; Zhu, Hongmei; Liu, Dongyuan; Lu, Zhike; Li, Ning; Guo, Guangwu; Zhang, Jianguo; Ye, Jia; Fang, Lin; Hao, Qin; Chen, Quan; Liang, Yu; Su, Yeyang; San, A; Ping, Cuo; Yang, Shuang; Chen, Fang; Li, Li; Zhou, Ke; Zheng, Hongkun; Ren, Yuanyuan; Yang, Ling; Gao, Yang; Yang, Guohua; Li, Zhuo; Feng, Xiaoli; Kristiansen, Karsten; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Nielsen, Rasmus; Durbin, Richard; Bolund, Lars; Zhang, Xiuqing; Li, Songgang; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian

    2008-11-06

    Here we present the first diploid genome sequence of an Asian individual. The genome was sequenced to 36-fold average coverage using massively parallel sequencing technology. We aligned the short reads onto the NCBI human reference genome to 99.97% coverage, and guided by the reference genome, we used uniquely mapped reads to assemble a high-quality consensus sequence for 92% of the Asian individual's genome. We identified approximately 3 million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inside this region, of which 13.6% were not in the dbSNP database. Genotyping analysis showed that SNP identification had high accuracy and consistency, indicating the high sequence quality of this assembly. We also carried out heterozygote phasing and haplotype prediction against HapMap CHB and JPT haplotypes (Chinese and Japanese, respectively), sequence comparison with the two available individual genomes (J. D. Watson and J. C. Venter), and structural variation identification. These variations were considered for their potential biological impact. Our sequence data and analyses demonstrate the potential usefulness of next-generation sequencing technologies for personal genomics.

  9. Simple genomes, complex interactions: Epistasis in RNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena, Santiago F.; Solé, Ricard V.; Sardanyés, Josep

    2010-06-01

    Owed to their reduced size and low number of proteins encoded, RNA viruses and other subviral pathogens are often considered as being genetically too simple. However, this structural simplicity also creates the necessity for viral RNA sequences to encode for more than one protein and for proteins to carry out multiple functions, all together resulting in complex patterns of genetic interactions. In this work we will first review the experimental studies revealing that the architecture of viral genomes is dominated by antagonistic interactions among loci. Second, we will also review mathematical models and provide a description of computational tools for the study of RNA virus dynamics and evolution. As an application of these tools, we will finish this review article by analyzing a stochastic bit-string model of in silico virus replication. This model analyzes the interplay between epistasis and the mode of replication on determining the population load of deleterious mutations. The model suggests that, for a given mutation rate, the deleterious mutational load is always larger when epistasis is predominantly antagonistic than when synergism is the rule. However, the magnitude of this effect is larger if replication occurs geometrically than if it proceeds linearly.

  10. Genome Sequencing of Steroid Producing Bacteria Using Ion Torrent Technology and a Reference Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sola-Landa, Alberto; Rodríguez-García, Antonio; Barreiro, Carlos; Pérez-Redondo, Rosario

    2017-01-01

    The Next-Generation Sequencing technology has enormously eased the bacterial genome sequencing and several tens of thousands of genomes have been sequenced during the last 10 years. Most of the genome projects are published as draft version, however, for certain applications the complete genome sequence is required.In this chapter, we describe the strategy that allowe