WorldWideScience

Sample records for videotaped classroom observations

  1. Tale of the Tape: International Teaching Assistant Noticing during Videotaped Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Gwendolyn M.; Case, Rod E.

    2015-01-01

    International teaching assistants face challenges in learning the norms for teaching in American universities. In order to address this learning curve this article describes a qualitative study of twenty international teaching assistants that examined how these participants viewed observations as part of their professional development. The study…

  2. Interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastlack, M E; Arvidson, J; Snyder-Mackler, L; Danoff, J V; McGarvey, C L

    1991-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the interrater reliability of videotaped observational gait-analysis (VOGA) assessments. Fifty-four licensed physical therapists with varying amounts of clinical experience served as raters. Three patients with rheumatoid arthritis who demonstrated an abnormal gait pattern served as subjects for the videotape. The raters analyzed each patient's most severely involved knee during the four subphases of stance for the kinematic variables of knee flexion and genu valgum. Raters were asked to determine whether these variables were inadequate, normal, or excessive. The temporospatial variables analyzed throughout the entire gait cycle were cadence, step length, stride length, stance time, and step width. Generalized kappa coefficients ranged from .11 to .52. Intraclass correlation coefficients (2,1) and (3,1) were slightly higher. Our results indicate that physical therapists' VOGA assessments are only slightly to moderately reliable and that improved interrater reliability of the assessments of physical therapists utilizing this technique is needed. Our data suggest that there is a need for greater standardization of gait-analysis training.

  3. Observing Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, Charlotte

    2012-01-01

    Classroom observation is a crucial aspect of any system of teacher evaluation. No matter how skilled a teacher is in other aspects of teaching--such as careful planning, working well with colleagues, and communicating with parents--if classroom practice is deficient, that individual cannot be considered a good teacher. Classroom observations can…

  4. Vicarious Desensitization of Test Anxiety Through Observation of Video-taped Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Jay

    1972-01-01

    Procedural variations were compared for a vicarious group treatment of test anxiety involving observation of videotapes depicting systematic desensitization of a model. The theoretical implications of the present study and the feasibility of using videotaped materials to treat test anxiety and other avoidance responses in school settings are…

  5. Classroom observation and feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana GOREA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Classroom observation is a didactic activity from which both the observer and the observed teacher are to win. The present article comments on and discusses the aims of observation, the stages of observation, the methodological recommendations of offering feedback and the need to introduce a system of classroom observation at institutional or even national level, which would contribute to improving the teaching/learning process.

  6. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kawanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    1999-01-01

    Describes the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video survey of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. Part of the Third International Mathematics and Science study, this research project is the first study of videotaped records from national probability samples. (SLD)

  7. Trends in Classroom Observation Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Jodi M.; Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    Observations and ratings of classroom teaching and interactions collected over time are susceptible to trends in both the quality of instruction and rater behavior. These trends have potential implications for inferences about teaching and for study design. We use scores on the Classroom Assessment Scoring System-Secondary (CLASS-S) protocol from…

  8. Flow observation by rod lens and low-light video (videotape script: January 4, 1977)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1977-01-01

    The script of a demonstration videotape made to show the possibilities of coupling rod lenses to low-light video systems to observe internal flow conditions is presented. The illustrations accompanying the text were photographed directly from the video screen. Some up-dated comments appear as footnotes to the original script and a description of the multiscan low-light television system developed to measure velocity is included in the epilogue. The combination of rod lens and low-light video system makes it possible to observe dynamic events in hitherto inaccessible volumes. The pressure and temperature capabilities of the rod lens make it applicable to many engineering uses. This system, in conjunction with electronic image enhancement systems, provides a new dimension in engineering analysis

  9. Guidance for Technology Decisions from Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielefeldt, Talbot

    2012-01-01

    Correlational analysis of two years of classroom observation indicates relationships between technology use and various classroom characteristics, including teacher roles and instructional strategies. Three observers used the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT) to record 144 observations of classrooms participating in a variety of educational…

  10. Using Informal Classroom Observations to Improve Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the variability of principals' classroom observations across schools and to relate classroom observations to the schools' instructional climate. This helps identify the conditions under which classroom observations effectively improve instruction in some schools and not in other schools.…

  11. The TIMSS Videotape Classroom Study: Methods and Findings from an Exploratory Research Project on Eighth-Grade Mathematics Instruction in Germany, Japan, and the United States. A Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigler, James W.; Gonzales, Patrick; Kwanaka, Takako; Knoll, Steffen; Serrano, Ana

    This report presents the methods and preliminary findings of the Videotape Classroom Study, a video study of eighth-grade mathematics lessons in Germany, Japan, and the United States. This exploratory research project is part of the Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS). The study included 231 eighth-grade mathematics…

  12. Conducting Classroom Observations : Stallings 'Classroom Snapshot' Observation System for an Electronic Tablet

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank Group

    2017-01-01

    The “Stallings Classroom Snapshot” instrument, technically called the “Stanford Research Institute Classroom Observation System”, was developed by Professor Jane Stallings for research on the efficiency and quality of basic education teachers in the United States in the 1970s. (Stallings, 1977; Stallings and Mohlman, 1988). The Stallings instrument generates robust quantitative data on the interaction of teachers and students in the classroom, with a high degree of inter-rater rel...

  13. Does a Teacher's Classroom Observation Rating Vary across Multiple Classrooms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Xiaoxuan; Li, Hongli; Leroux, Audrey J.

    2018-01-01

    Classroom observations have been increasingly used for teacher evaluations, and it is important to examine the measurement quality and the use of observation ratings. When a teacher is observed in multiple classrooms, his or her observation ratings may vary across classrooms. In that case, using ratings from one classroom per teacher may not be…

  14. Effective leader behaviors in regularly held staff meetings: Surveyed vs. Videotaped and Video-Coded Observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, Marcella; Hoogeboom, Marcella; Wilderom, Celeste P.M.; Allen, Joseph A.; Lehmann-Willenbrock, Nale; Rogelberg, Steven G.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter, we report on two studies that took an exploratory behavioral approach to leaders in regular staff meetings. The goal of both studies, which used a still rarely deployed observation method, was to identify effective behavioral repertoires of leaders in staff meetings; we specifically

  15. "Keeping SCORE": Reflective Practice through Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C.

    2011-01-01

    Reflective practice means that teachers must subject their own teaching beliefs and practices to critical examination. One way of facilitating reflective practice in ESL teachers is to encourage them to engage in classroom observations as part of their professional development. This paper reports on a case study of a short series of classroom…

  16. Slooh Takes Observing into the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrey, Paige

    2018-01-01

    For many students, studying space is limited to simulations and a vivid imagination. Slooh is providing a new education tool that gives students an authentic experience, mimicking the practices of professional astronomers by bringing real-time astronomical observing to the classroom. Teachers and students have robotic control of Slooh’s global network of ground-based telescopes located at the Institute of Astrophysics in the Canary Islands and at the Catholic University based in Santiago, Chile. Slooh Classroom and Slooh Astrolab are products designed to offer K-12 and higher education an accessible, affordable way to interact with space. The lab manuals provide fully-designed classroom activities that explore celestial objects representing a robust sample of star clusters, nebulae, galaxies, stars, planets, comets and asteroids. Slooh’s education tools provide a unique online platform for the sharing of space content and access to live-hosted shows that discuss current astronomy events, creating a full STEAM experience.

  17. Procedures for Classroom Observations: 1973-1974. Technical Report #19.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miley, Alan

    This report describes classroom observation techniques used to record the behavior of educational specialists (teachers) and students in a kindergarten and a first grade classroom of the Kamehameha Early Education Program (KEEP). Classroom behavior was observed and recorded daily during the 1973-1974 school year. Each student was observed three…

  18. Validating the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure in First and Third Grade Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xin; Pakarinen, Eija; Lerkkanen, Marja-Kristiina; Kikas, Eve; Muotka, Joona; Nurmi, Jari-Erik

    2017-01-01

    The present study reports on the psychometric properties of the Early Childhood Classroom Observation Measure (ECCOM) in Finnish and Estonian first and third grade classrooms. The observation data were collected from 91 first grade teachers and 70 third grade teachers. Teachers' curriculum goals, teaching experience and the classroom size were…

  19. CLASSROOM OBSERVATION- A POWERFUL TOOL FOR CONTINUOUS PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (CPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanjida Halim

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available For making teaching and learning more visible, classroom observation plays a central role. It provides teachers with constructive critical feedback in order to improve their classroom management and instructional techniques. For teachers it is important to observe the interaction between teacher-learner within the classroom because it can determine the learning opportunities that students get. Not only that, classroom observation encourages colleagues to collaborate to improve teacher practice and student learning. Feedback from classroom observations is an effective way for providing teachers with the information they need about their classroom behavior, and it can help them in their continuous professional development (CPD. This paper is based upon a practical approach to professional development among teachers through classroom observation. Since we, as teachers, are not born with innate teaching abilities, in fact, we learn and develop gradually with the help of some practical approaches, and classroom observation is a well-known powerful practical approach in primary and higher education to help teachers improve their teaching quality. This article mainly highlights the importance of classroom observation and its guidelines adapted from Observing Classes-CETaL. Further, it emphasizes the limitations of classroom observation, and suggests the ways to carry it out effectively based upon Observing Classes CETaL Model.

  20. Mealtime behavior among siblings and body mass index of 4-8 year olds: a videotaped observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosli, Rana H; Miller, Alison L; Kaciroti, Niko; Peterson, Karen E; Rosenblum, Katherine; Baylin, Ana; Lumeng, Julie C

    2015-07-15

    Being a last-born child and having a sister have been associated with higher body mass index (BMI). Encouragement to eat that overrides children's self-regulation has been reported to increase the risk of obesogenic eating behaviors. This study sought to test the hypothesis that encouragement to eat during mealtime from older siblings and sisters mediates associations of being last-born or having a sister with higher BMI. Children aged 4-8 years (n = 75) were videotaped while eating a routine evening meal at home with one sibling present. Encouragement to eat (defined as direct prompts to eat or general positive statements about food) delivered to the index child (IC) from the sibling was coded from the videotape. Path analysis was used to examine associations between IC's birth order, sibling's sex, encouragement counts, and IC's measured BMI z-score (BMIz). Being the younger sibling in the sibling dyad was associated with the IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling (β: 0.93, 95 % confidence interval (CI): 0.59, 1.26, p eat from the sibling (β: 0.18, 95 % CI: -0.09, 0.47, p = 0.20). The IC receiving more encouragements to eat from the sibling was associated with lower IC BMIz (β: -0.06, 95 % CI: -0.12, 0.00, p = 0.05). Children were more likely to receive encouragements to eat from older siblings than younger siblings. Being the recipient of encouragements to eat from a sibling was associated with lower, not higher, child BMIz, which may reflect sibling modeling of maternal behavior. Future longitudinal studies are needed to examine whether encouragements to eat from siblings lead to increase in BMI over time. Encouragements from siblings may be a novel intervention target for obesity prevention.

  1. Emotional Bias in Classroom Observations: Within-Rater Positive Emotion Predicts Favorable Assessments of Classroom Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floman, James L.; Hagelskamp, Carolin; Brackett, Marc A.; Rivers, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom observations increasingly inform high-stakes decisions and research in education, including the allocation of school funding and the evaluation of school-based interventions. However, trends in rater scoring tendencies over time may undermine the reliability of classroom observations. Accordingly, the present investigations, grounded in…

  2. Classroom "Cupcake" Celebrations: Observations of Foods Offered and Consumed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isoldi, Kathy K.; Dalton, Sharron; Rodriguez, Desiree P.; Nestle, Marion

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To describe food and beverage types offered and consumed during classroom celebrations at an elementary school in a low-income, urban community. In addition, to report student intake of fresh fruit provided alongside other party foods. Methods: Observations held during 4 classroom celebrations. Food and beverage items were measured and…

  3. The sign language skills classroom observation: a process for describing sign language proficiency in classroom settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, J B; Newell, W; Holcomb, B R; Stinson, M

    2000-10-01

    In collaboration with teachers and students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf (NTID), the Sign Language Skills Classroom Observation (SLSCO) was designed to provide feedback to teachers on their sign language communication skills in the classroom. In the present article, the impetus and rationale for development of the SLSCO is discussed. Previous studies related to classroom signing and observation methodology are reviewed. The procedure for developing the SLSCO is then described. This procedure included (a) interviews with faculty and students at NTID, (b) identification of linguistic features of sign language important for conveying content to deaf students, (c) development of forms for recording observations of classroom signing, (d) analysis of use of the forms, (e) development of a protocol for conducting the SLSCO, and (f) piloting of the SLSCO in classrooms. The results of use of the SLSCO with NTID faculty during a trial year are summarized.

  4. Standardized Observational Assessment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Combined and Predominantly Inattentive Subtypes. II. Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Ivanova, Masha Y.; Antshel, Kevin; Eiraldi, Ricardo B.; Dumenci, Levent

    2009-01-01

    Trained classroom observers used the Direct Observation Form (DOF; McConaughy & Achenbach, 2009) to rate observations of 163 6- to 11-year-old children in their school classrooms. Participants were assigned to four groups based on a parent diagnostic interview and parent and teacher rating scales: Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder…

  5. Developing and Validating a New Classroom Climate Observation Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leff, Stephen S; Thomas, Duane E; Shapiro, Edward S; Paskewich, Brooke; Wilson, Kim; Necowitz-Hoffman, Beth; Jawad, Abbas F

    2011-01-01

    The climate of school classrooms, shaped by a combination of teacher practices and peer processes, is an important determinant for children's psychosocial functioning and is a primary factor affecting bullying and victimization. Given that there are relatively few theoretically-grounded and validated assessment tools designed to measure the social climate of classrooms, our research team developed an observation tool through participatory action research (PAR). This article details how the assessment tool was designed and preliminarily validated in 18 third-, fourth-, and fifth-grade classrooms in a large urban public school district. The goals of this study are to illustrate the feasibility of a PAR paradigm in measurement development, ascertain the psychometric properties of the assessment tool, and determine associations with different indices of classroom levels of relational and physical aggression.

  6. Where Do I Look? Preservice Teachers' Classroom Observation Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Teresa; Bender-Slack, Delane

    2011-01-01

    During field experiences, preservice teachers are typically required to observe mentor teachers in schools, but what exactly are they seeing? This research examined the patterns and variations that existed with regard to preservice teachers' classroom observations during recent field experiences. Data were collected from 24 preservice teachers…

  7. Observing Children's Stress Behaviors in a Kindergarten Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    This study used qualitative methods to determine whether kindergarten children exhibited stress behaviors during the academic work period of the day. Sixteen children (8 male, 8 female) ages 5-6 years were observed. The data consisted of classroom observations by the researcher, open-ended interviews with teachers, artifacts collected from the…

  8. Characterizing Mathematics Classroom Practice: Impact of Observation and Coding Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha; Webb, Noreen M.

    2012-01-01

    Large-scale observational measures of classroom practice increasingly focus on opportunities for student participation as an indicator of instructional quality. Each observational measure necessitates making design and coding choices on how to best measure student participation. This study investigated variations of coding approaches that may be…

  9. Classroom Observation Practice in Career Schools: A Multiple Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Marya G.

    2017-01-01

    Post-secondary career school educational leaders are charged with formulating sufficient, ongoing, and effective faculty development programming to ensure the delivery of quality education in their unique trade-expert led institutions. Classroom observations, which include substantive feedback exchanges from trained personnel are well documented…

  10. Teacher's Approaches in Teaching Literature: Observations of ESL Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustakim, Siti Salina; Mustapha, Ramlee; Lebar, Othman

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to identify the approaches employed by teachers in teaching Contemporary Children's Literature Program to upper primary school. Using classroom observations and interview as research instruments, this paper evaluates the approaches of five ESL teachers teaching Year 5 students and examines the various challenges faced by them in…

  11. Beyond student ratings: peer observation of classroom and clinical teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Ronald A; Naumann, Phyllis L; Appling, Susan E

    2004-01-01

    Peer observation of classroom and clinical teaching has received increased attention over the past decade in schools of nursing to augment student ratings of teaching effectiveness. One essential ingredient is the scale used to evaluate performance. A five-step systematic procedure for adapting, writing, and building any peer observation scale is described. The differences between the development of a classroom observation scale and an appraisal scale to observe clinical instructors are examined. Psychometric issues peculiar to observation scales are discussed in terms of content validity, eight types of response bias, and interobserver reliability. The applications of the scales in one school of nursing as part of the triangulation of methods with student ratings and the teaching portfolio are illustrated. Copies of the scales are also provided.

  12. Relating Teacher PCK and Teacher Practice Using Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barendsen, Erik; Henze, Ineke

    2017-09-01

    Science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been researched in many studies, yet little empirical evidence has been found to determine how this knowledge actually informs teachers' actions in the classroom. To complement previous quantitative studies, there is a need for more qualitative studies to investigate the relationship between teacher knowledge (as formulated by the teacher) and classroom practice, especially in the context of an educational innovation. In this study we explored a possible way to investigate this relationship in an in-depth and systematic fashion. To this end, we conducted a case study with a chemistry teacher in the context of the implementation of a context-based science curriculum in The Netherlands. The teacher's PCK was captured using the Content Representation form by Loughran, Mulhall, and Berry. We used an observation table to monitor classroom interactions in such a way that the observations could be related to specific elements of teachers' PCK. Thus, we were able to give a detailed characterization of the correspondences and differences between the teacher's personal PCK and classroom practice. Such an elaborate description turned out to be a useful basis for discussing mechanisms explaining the relationship between teachers' knowledge and teachers' actions.

  13. What Can You Learn about Writing in School?: A Case Study in an Elementary Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, Susan; And Others

    A two-year study investigated writing in the elementary school. Data collected included field notes from observation of a second/third grade classroom, videotapes of selected classroom activities, weekly journals kept by the teacher reflecting her thoughts on teaching in general and on writing in particular, interviews with the teacher about the…

  14. Uncovering Multivariate Structure in Classroom Observations in the Presence of Rater Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Daniel F.; Yuan, Kun; Savitsky, Terrance D.; Lockwood, J. R.; Edelen, Maria O.

    2015-01-01

    We examine the factor structure of scores from the CLASS-S protocol obtained from observations of middle school classroom teaching. Factor analysis has been used to support both interpretations of scores from classroom observation protocols, like CLASS-S, and the theories about teaching that underlie them. However, classroom observations contain…

  15. Refining MARGINS Mini-Lessons Using Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, E. A.; Manduca, C. A.; McDaris, J. R.; Lee, S.

    2009-12-01

    One of the challenges that we face in developing teaching materials or activities from research findings is testing the materials to determine that they work as intended. Traditionally faculty develop material for their own class, notice what worked and didn’t, and improve them the next year. However, as we move to a community process of creating and sharing teaching materials, a community-based process for testing materials is appropriate. The MARGINS project has piloted such a process for testing teaching materials and activities developed as part of its mini-lesson project (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/index.html). Building on prior work developing mechanisms for community review of teaching resources (e.g. Kastens, 2002; Hancock and Manduca, 2005; Mayhew and Hall, 2007), the MARGINS evaluation team developed a structured classroom observation protocol. The goals of field testing are to a) gather structured, consistent feedback for the lesson authors based on classroom use; b) guide reviewers of these lessons to reflect on research-based educational practice as a framework for their comments; c) collect information on the data and observations that the reviewer used to underpin their review; d) determine which mini-lessons are ready to be made widely available on the website. The protocol guides faculty observations on why they used the activity, the effectiveness of the activity in their classroom, the success of the activity in leading to the desired learning, and what other faculty need to successfully use the activity. Available online (http://serc.carleton.edu/margins/protocol.html), the protocol can be downloaded and completed during instruction with the activity. In order to encourage review of mini-lessons using the protocol, a workshop focused on review and revision of activities was held in May 2009. In preparation for the workshop, 13 of the 28 participants chose to field test a mini-lesson prior to the workshop and reported that they found this

  16. Classroom Writing Environments and Children's Early Writing Skills: An Observational Study in Head Start Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chenyi; Hur, Jinhee; Diamond, Karen E.; Powell, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the classroom writing environment in 31 Head Start classrooms, and explored the relations between the writing environment, children's (N = 262) name-writing, and children's letter knowledge using pathway analysis. Our analyses showed that Head Start classrooms provided opportunities (i.e., writing materials and teachers'…

  17. The Classroom Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM (COPUS): A New Instrument to Characterize University STEM Classroom Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Michelle K.; Jones, Francis H. M.; Gilbert, Sarah L.; Wieman, Carl E.

    2013-01-01

    Instructors and the teaching practices they employ play a critical role in improving student learning in college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses. Consequently, there is increasing interest in collecting information on the range and frequency of teaching practices at department-wide and institution-wide scales. To help facilitate this process, we present a new classroom observation protocol known as the Classroom Observation Protocol for Undergraduate STEM or C...

  18. Classroom observation data and instruction in primary mathematics education: improving design and rigour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carla J.; Davis, Sandra B.

    2014-06-01

    The use of formal observation in primary mathematics classrooms is supported in the literature as a viable method of determining effective teaching strategies and appropriate tasks for inclusion in the early years of mathematics learning. The twofold aim of this study was to (a) investigate predictive relationships between primary mathematics classroom observational data and student achievement data, and (b) to examine the impact of providing periodic classroom observational data feedback to teachers using a Relational-Feedback-Intervention (RFI) Database Model. This observational research effort focused on an empirical examination of student engagement levels in time spent on specific learning activities observed in primary mathematics classrooms as predictors of student competency outcomes in mathematics. Data were collected from more than 2,000 primary classroom observations in 17 primary schools during 2009-2011 and from standardised end-of-year tests for mathematics achievement. Results revealed predictive relationships among several types of teaching and learning tasks with student achievement. Specifically, the use of mathematics concepts, technology and hands-on materials in primary mathematics classrooms was found to produce substantive predictors of increased student mathematics achievement. Additional findings supported the use of periodic classroom observation data reporting as a positive influence on teachers' decisions in determining instructional tasks for inclusion in primary mathematics classrooms. Study results indicate classroom observational research involving a RFI Database Model is a productive tool for improving teaching and learning in primary mathematics classrooms.

  19. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    OpenAIRE

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2012-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers w...

  20. Once is not enough : Establishing reliability criteria for teacher evaluation based on classroom observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, Rikkert; van de Grift, Wim; van Veen, Klaas

    2016-01-01

    Classroom observation is the most implemented method to evaluate teaching. To ensure reliability, researchers often train observers extensively. However, schools have limited resources to train observers and often lesson observation is performed by limitedly trained or untrained colleagues. In this

  1. The Potential of General Classroom Observation: Turkish EFL Teachers' Perceptions, Sentiments, and Readiness for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merç, Ali

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine Turkish EFL teachers' attitudes towards classroom observation. 204 teachers from different school settings responded to an online questionnaire. Data were analyzed according to three types of attitudes towards classroom observation: perceptions, sentiments, and readiness for action. The findings revealed…

  2. A Classroom Observational Study of Qatar's Independent Schools: Instruction and School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Douglas J.; Sadiq, Hissa M.; Lynch, Patricia; Parker, Dawn; Viruru, Radhika; Knight, Stephanie; Waxman, Hersh; Alford, Beverly; Brown, Danielle Bairrington; Rollins, Kayla; Stillisano, Jacqueline; Abu-Tineh, Abdullah M. Hamdan; Nasser, Ramzi; Allen, Nancy; Al-Binali, Hessa; Ellili, Maha; Al-Kateeb, Haithem; Al-Kubaisi, Huda

    2016-01-01

    Qatar initiated a K-12 national educational reform in 2001. However, there is limited information on the instructional practices of the teachers in the reform schools. This project was an observational study of classrooms with a stratified random sample of the first six cohorts of reform schools. Specifically, 156 classrooms were observed in 29…

  3. Evaluating the Validity of Classroom Observations in the Head Start Designation Renewal System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashburn, Andrew J.

    2017-01-01

    Classroom observations are increasingly common in education policies as a means to assess the quality of teachers and/or education programs for purposes of making high-stakes decisions. This article considers one policy, the Head Start Designation Renewal System (DRS), which involves classroom observations to assess the quality of Head Start…

  4. Internet Roadside Cafe #6. [Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Library Association Video/Library Video Network, Towson, MD.

    This 30-minute videotape takes an in-depth look at World Wide Web business transactions, potential risks, client privacy and security issues by asking businesses and consumers how they do business on the Internet. Also featured in the program is advice about choosing a secure password, the use of credit cards for Web purchasing and a review of…

  5. Initiating round robins in the L2 classroom - preliminary observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kristian; Hazel, Spencer

    2011-01-01

    Complementing recent interactional research on the contingent operation of online task accomplishment, this paper deals with a specific way of organizing and managing tasks in plenary L2 classrooms – namely the round robin. This may seem like a “traditional” and rigid form of classroom organizati...... and artefacts and graphic structures that are used not only as mediating tools in the (supposed) learning relevant activity, but also as structurally relevant features to organize the ongoing interaction, in which these activities emerge....

  6. Improving Instruction through a Videotape Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batesky, James

    1979-01-01

    Videotape and a videotape library can be used to expand the quality of instruction of a physical education program by allowing greater diversity of material taught and increased use of professionals and experts in various sports. (JMF)

  7. Empirical development of brief smoking prevention videotapes which target African-American adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, S; Parker, V C; Lopes, C; Crippens, D L; Elder, P; Scholl, D

    1995-07-01

    Two studies are described which provide evaluations for two brief videotapes developed as supplemental materials in the prevention of tobacco use among African-American adolescents. One videotape (the "soap opera") provides a more general audience-oriented presentation of prevention material and it was filmed primarily at a shopping mall, whereas the other videotape (the "rap") provides a "hip-hop generation" presentation, and it was filmed primarily at an outdoor hangout. The first study compared the two videotapes against each other. The second study compared the two videotapes combined in the same presentation, controlling for order of presentation, against a discussion group control. The results of the two studies indicated few differences in receptivity to the two videotapes among primarily African-American and Latino young adolescents. The rap videotape was rated as more accurate in its depiction of the African-American lifestyle, although both videotapes were equally liked. When shown together, the videotapes were not found to be superior in decreasing behavioral intention to smoke compared to a discussion group control. No change in trial of smoking was observed within or across conditions measured over a pre-post summer interval. These data suggest that "culturally sensitive" videotapes have no more of a short-term effect on youth than do other types of brief interventions which involve minority implementers.

  8. Self-Observation Model Employing an Instinctive Interface for Classroom Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gwo-Dong; Nurkhamid; Wang, Chin-Yeh; Yang, Shu-Han; Chao, Po-Yao

    2014-01-01

    In a classroom, obtaining active, whole-focused, and engaging learning results from a design is often difficult. In this study, we propose a self-observation model that employs an instinctive interface for classroom active learning. Students can communicate with virtual avatars in the vertical screen and can react naturally according to the…

  9. Student Observations: Introducing iPads into University Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardley, Leslie J.; Mang, Colin F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the growing trend of using mobile technology in university classrooms, exploring the use of tablets in particular, to identify learning benefits faced by students. Students, acting on their efficacy beliefs, make decisions regarding technology's influence in improving their education. We construct a theoretical model in which…

  10. Language in the Drama Classroom: Observations and Opinions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jude

    1981-01-01

    The importance of talk in the drama classroom is described. Students view talk as either development of vocal skills or preexperience for various kinds of social situations. Teacher talk was dominant, however, and emerged in the form of verbal control through closed questions and instructions to students. (JN)

  11. Observed Changes in Classroom Behavior Utilizing Supportive Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swift, J. Nathan; And Others

    The effects of instructional guides and wait-time feedback upon the classroom interaction of 40 middle school science teachers were investigated in a prior study. The experimental nature of that study produced an artificial situation involving little personal contact between teacher-participants and the research staff. Therefore, a subsample of 10…

  12. Relating Teacher PCK and Teacher Practice Using Classroom Observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendsen, Erik; Henze-Rietveld, I.

    2017-01-01

    Science teachers’ pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has been researched in many studies, yet little empirical evidence has been found to determine how this knowledge actually informs teachers’ actions in the classroom. To complement previous quantitative studies, there is a need for more

  13. Mathematical Observations: The Genesis of Mathematical Discovery in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaugris, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    In his "Proofs and Refutations," Lakatos identifies the "Primitive Conjecture" as the first stage in the pattern of mathematical discovery. In this article, I am interested in ways of reaching the "Primitive Conjecture" stage in an undergraduate classroom. I adapted Realistic Mathematics Education methods in an…

  14. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Classroom. In this section of Resonance, we in'Vite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or in'Vite responses, or ... "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and .... Now we can approach the question from a different viewpoint.

  15. Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butin, Dan

    This paper addresses classroom design trends and the key issues schools should consider for better classroom space flexibility and adaptability. Classroom space design issues when schools embrace technology are discussed, as are design considerations when rooms must accommodate different grade levels, the importance of lighting, furniture…

  16. The 21st Century Physics Classroom: What Students, Teachers, and Classroom Observers Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunal, Dennis W.; Dantzler, John A.; Sunal, Cynthia Szymanski; Turner, Donna P.; Harrell, James W.; Simon, Marsha; Aggarwal, Mohan D.

    2016-01-01

    Before we can effectively apply specific interventions through professional development, it is important to determine what is occurring in our high school physics classrooms. This study investigated common professional practices in physics teaching among a representative sample group of schools and teachers from a diverse, geographically large…

  17. Midwives’ perceptions of communication during videotaped counseling for prenatal anomaly tests: How do they relate to clients’ perceptions and independent observations?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, L.; Gitsels-van der Wal, J.T.; Pereboom, M.T.R.; Spelten, E.R.; Hutton, E.K.; Dulmen, S. van

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to provide insight into Dutch midwives’ self-evaluation of prenatal counseling for anomaly screening in real life practice and, the degree of congruence of midwives’ self-assessments with clients’ perceptions and with observed performance. Methods: Counseling sessions

  18. Live Video Classroom Observation: An Effective Approach to Reducing Reactivity in Collecting Observational Information for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jiwen

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines the significance of live video classroom observations of teaching practice to reduce reactivity (the observer effect) so as to obtain more credible observational information for teacher professional development in a secondary school in the largest city in southern China. Although much has been discussed regarding the use of…

  19. Videotapes

    CERN Document Server

    Chavanne, A

    1989-01-01

    1666 : impact de la creation de l'Academie des Sciences par Colbert, trente ans apres le proces de Galile, et au moment des disparitions de Pascal, Descartes et Fermat. Elle dirigee par le hollandais Huyggens jusqu'a sa fuite de France au moment de la revocation de l'Edit de Nantes. - 1750 : l'Encyclopedie (ou "Dictionnaire raisonne des Sciences, des Arts et des Metiers") de Diderot et d'Alembert, soutenus par Malherbes, Buffon, Condorcet et Rousseau. - 1789 : Revolution francaise. - 8 aout 1793 : l'Assemblee, par une declaration de Marat, dissout l'Academie des Sciences. Celle-ci continue cependant ses travaux pour les poids et mesures jusqu'en 1795. - la Terreur : la condamnation a mort, pas au nom d'une "Revolution qui n'a pas besoin de savants", de trois grands hommes de science : Lavoisier, Bailly et Condorcet. - 1793-1794 : Au printemps 93, le Comite de Salut Publique s'inquiete du demi-million de soldats etrangers de toutes les pays frontaliers qui essaient de penetrer en France pour occuper le pays. C...

  20. Does Class Size in First Grade Relate to Children's Academic and Social Performance or Observed Classroom Processes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allhusen, Virginia; Belsky, Jay; Booth-LaForce, Cathryn L.; Bradley, Robert; Brownwell, Celia A; Burchinal, Margaret; Campbell, Susan B.; Clarke-Stewart, K. Alison; Cox, Martha; Friedman, Sarah L.; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathryn; Houts, Renate M.; Huston, Aletha; Jaeger, Elizabeth; Johnson, Deborah J.; Kelly, Jean F.; Knoke, Bonnie; Marshall, Nancy; McCartney, Kathleen; Morrison, Frederick J.; O'Brien, Marion; Tresch Owen, Margaret; Payne, Chris; Phillips, Deborah; Pianta, Robert; Randolph, Suzanne M.; Robeson, Wendy W.; Spieker, Susan; Lowe Vandell, Deborah; Weinraub, Marsha

    2004-01-01

    This study evaluated the extent to which first-grade class size predicted child outcomes and observed classroom processes for 651 children (in separate classrooms). Analyses examined observed child-adult ratios and teacher-reported class sizes. Smaller classrooms showed higher quality instructional and emotional support, although children were…

  1. How Junior High School English Teachers in Bengkulu City Utilise Published Textbooks in the Classroom: A Classroom Observation Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safnil Safnil

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to find out: (1 how the junior high school English teachers in Bengkulu city exploited the commercially published textbooks for classroom use; (2 if there was a difference in the way the experienced and the inexperienced English language teachers exploited the commercially published textbooks in the classroom; and (3 whether the teachers adapted textbooks or produced their own materials for classroom use. Twelve English teachers (6 experienced and 6 inexperienced teachers from four different junior high schools or SMPs (2 favourite and 2 non-favourite in Bengkulu city were the participants in this study. Data were obtained through a questionnaire, classroom observations, and sample lesson plans. The results of the study revealed that: first, the junior high school English language teachers (ET and IT; (1 used the commercially prescribed textbooks to a large extent; (2 there was not much difference between the way experienced teachers and inexperienced teachers exploited the textbooks; (3 both groups of teachers adapted the textbooks or produced their own teaching materials.

  2. Use of Videotape Feedback with Severely Disturbed Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Jane; Blitstein, Sheldon

    1979-01-01

    Summarizes the design and effects of a group therapy project using videotape feedback with seriously disturbed adolescents. Offers anecdotal evidence that the feedback facilitated the correction of the participants' distorted body images, low self-esteem, lack of capacity for self-observation, and poor peer relationships. (SS)

  3. Darwin's Revolution in Thought: An Illustrated Lecture. Teaching Guide and Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Stephen Jay

    "Darwin's Revolution in Thought" is Stephen Jay Gould's definitive treatise on Charles Darwin. This 50-minute classroom edition videotaped lecture is structured in the form of a paradox and three riddles about Darwin's life. Each is designed to shed light on one of the key features of the theory of natural selection, its philosophical…

  4. Instructional Uses of Videotape: A Symposium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Harold E.; And Others

    This collection of seven articles for the college teacher of speech relates specific ways that videotape has been used in training teachers and in teaching the fundamentals of speech, advanced public speaking, and discussion. Included are articles by (1) Harold E. Nelson, who explains how videotape is used in college speech classes to aid in…

  5. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this section of Resonance, we invite readers to pose questions likely to be raised in a classroom ... sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning ... Is there any well charaderised example of.

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ! Quantum Theory of the Doppler Effed. Generally text books give only the wave ...

  7. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a foru11J. for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Point Set Topological ... a new way of looking at this problem and we will prove.

  8. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ... I shall give the solution to the problem, along with relevant.

  9. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. ... research, could then both inject greater vigour into teaching of ... ture, forestry and fishery sciences, management of natural resources.

  10. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and .... Research Institute, Bangalore ... From Bohr's theory we can calculate v = (En - En -1) / h the ... important reason for the failure of the qualitative arguments. An.

  11. Examining Teacher Effectiveness Using Classroom Observation Scores: Evidence from the Randomization of Teachers to Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Rachel; Steinberg, Matthew P.

    2015-01-01

    Despite policy efforts to encourage multiple measures of performance in newly developing teacher evaluation systems, practical constraints often result in evaluations based predominantly on formal classroom observations. Yet there is limited knowledge of how these observational measures relate to student achievement. This article leverages the…

  12. Sustained Classroom Observation: What Does It Reveal about Changing Teaching Practices?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Tony

    2011-01-01

    In the context of the tension between classroom observation as a form of empowerment and as an instrument of control, the partnership between three 16-19 colleges and a university School of Education in delivering a programme of sustained observation over eight years is explicated. Drawing on the literature about continuing professional…

  13. Exploring Differences in Measurement and Reporting of Classroom Observation Inter-Rater Reliability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Anne Garrison; Gillespie Rouse, Amy; Jones, Francesca

    2018-01-01

    Although inter-rater reliability is an important aspect of using observational instruments, it has received little theoretical attention. In this article, we offer some guidance for practitioners and consumers of classroom observations so that they can make decisions about inter-rater reliability, both for study design and in the reporting of data…

  14. On the representativeness of behavior observation samples in classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiger, Jeffrey H; Miller, Sarah J; Mevers, Joanna Lomas; Mintz, Joslyn Cynkus; Scheithauer, Mindy C; Alvarez, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    School consultants who rely on direct observation typically conduct observational samples (e.g., 1 30-min observation per day) with the hopes that the sample is representative of performance during the remainder of the day, but the representativeness of these samples is unclear. In the current study, we recorded the problem behavior of 3 referred students for 4 consecutive school days between 9:30 a.m. and 2:30 p.m. using duration recording in consecutive 10-min sessions. We then culled 10-min, 20-min, 30-min, and 60-min observations from the complete record and compared these observations to the true daily mean to assess their accuracy (i.e., how well individual observations represented the daily occurrence of target behaviors). The results indicated that when behavior occurred with low variability, the majority of brief observations were representative of the overall levels; however, when behavior occurred with greater variability, even 60-min observations did not accurately capture the true levels of behavior. © Society for the Experimental Analysis of Behavior.

  15. A classroom observation tool for scaffolding reading comprehension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Nienke; van de Grift, Wim; de Bot, Kees; Jansen, Ellen

    An important goal of educational research is to find out which teaching practices are effective in promoting students' learning. In order to assess these practices, adequate observation instruments are needed. Existing observation schemes for language teaching are not suitable to gauge which

  16. Agreement among Classroom Observers of Children's Stylistic Learning Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Helen Hamlet; McDermott, Paul A.; Schaefer, Barbara A.

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the interobserver agreement of the Learning Behavior Scale (LBS) by educators (n=16) observing students in special-education classes (n=72). No significant observer effect was found. Moreover, the LBS produced comparable levels of differential learning styles for assessments of individual children. (Author/MKA)

  17. Observations of Children with Disabilities in Four Elementary Music Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Ellary A.

    2017-01-01

    Much of what we know about music classes comes from observing students without disabilities; there is little empirical research that informs music education practices for students with disabilities in inclusive music settings. The purpose of this study was to systematically observe and describe opportunities for nine students with disabilities to…

  18. What Principals Do to Improve Teaching and Learning: Comparing the Use of Informal Classroom Observations in Two School Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ing, Marsha

    2013-01-01

    Informally observing classrooms is one way that principals can help improve teaching and learning. This study describes the variability of principals' classroom observations across schools and identifies the conditions under which observations relate to the instructional climate in some schools and not others. Data for this study come from…

  19. Formal Classroom Observations: Factors That Affect Their Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Zeba

    2017-01-01

    Formal class room observation is a very delicate topic in any educational institution. It involves a series of emotions and sentiments that come with the package. In this paper, the researcher will attempt to analyze the factors that affect the process in a relatively significant manner and thereby contribute greatly to the success or failure of…

  20. Classroom Composition and Measured Teacher Performance: What Do Teacher Observation Scores Really Measure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Matthew P.; Garrett, Rachel

    2016-01-01

    As states and districts implement more rigorous teacher evaluation systems, measures of teacher performance are increasingly being used to support instruction and inform retention decisions. Classroom observations take a central role in these systems, accounting for the majority of teacher ratings upon which accountability decisions are based.…

  1. IRR (Inter-Rater Reliability) of a COP (Classroom Observation Protocol)--A Critical Appraisal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Ning; Feldman, Jill M.

    2012-01-01

    Notwithstanding broad utility of COPs (classroom observation protocols), there has been limited documentation of the psychometric properties of even the most popular COPs. This study attempted to fill this void by closely examining the item and domain-level IRR (inter-rater reliability) of a COP that was used in a federally funded striving readers…

  2. Five Methods to Score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist and to Examine Group Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ze; Rohrer, David; Chuang, Chi-ching; Fujiki, Mayo; Herman, Keith; Reinke, Wendy

    2015-01-01

    This study compared 5 scoring methods in terms of their statistical assumptions. They were then used to score the Teacher Observation of Classroom Adaptation Checklist, a measure consisting of 3 subscales and 21 Likert-type items. The 5 methods used were (a) sum/average scores of items, (b) latent factor scores with continuous indicators, (c)…

  3. Teacher Interviews, Student Interviews, and Classroom Observations in Combinatorics: Four Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caddle, Mary C.

    2012-01-01

    This research consists of teacher interviews, student interviews, and classroom observations, all based around the mathematical content area of combinatorics. Combinatorics is a part of discrete mathematics concerning the ordering and grouping of distinct elements. The data are used in four separate analyses. The first provides evidence that…

  4. Observations of Children's Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booren, Leslie M; Downer, Jason T; Vitiello, Virginia E

    2012-07-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children's observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children's interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children's interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions.

  5. Observations of Children’s Interactions with Teachers, Peers, and Tasks across Preschool Classroom Activity Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booren, Leslie M.; Downer, Jason T.; Vitiello, Virginia E.

    2014-01-01

    This descriptive study examined classroom activity settings in relation to children’s observed behavior during classroom interactions, child gender, and basic teacher behavior within the preschool classroom. 145 children were observed for an average of 80 minutes during 8 occasions across 2 days using the inCLASS, an observational measure that conceptualizes behavior into teacher, peer, task, and conflict interactions. Findings indicated that on average children’s interactions with teachers were higher in teacher-structured settings, such as large group. On average, children’s interactions with peers and tasks were more positive in child-directed settings, such as free choice. Children experienced more conflict during recess and routines/transitions. Finally, gender differences were observed within small group and meals. The implications of these findings might encourage teachers to be thoughtful and intentional about what types of support and resources are provided so children can successfully navigate the demands of particular settings. These findings are not meant to discourage certain teacher behaviors or imply value of certain classroom settings; instead, by providing an evidenced-based picture of the conditions under which children display the most positive interactions, teachers can be more aware of choices within these settings and have a powerful way to assist in professional development and interventions. PMID:25717282

  6. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    CLASSROOM. Figure 1. An antibubble photographed with a white backdrop. contrast to the case of soap bubbles,. Soap bubbles float in air and descend due to gravity on account of higher density of the soap solution, while antibubbles rise due to buoyancy of the air film and float just below the surface of the soap solution.

  7. The ICAP Active Learning Framework Predicts the Learning Gains Observed in Intensely Active Classroom Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin L. Wiggins

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available STEM classrooms (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics in postsecondary education are rapidly improved by the proper use of active learning techniques. These techniques occupy a descriptive spectrum that transcends passive teaching toward active, constructive, and, finally, interactive methods. While aspects of this framework have been examined, no large-scale or actual classroom-based data exist to inform postsecondary education STEM instructors about possible learning gains. We describe the results of a quasi-experimental study to test the apex of the ICAP framework (interactive, constructive, active, and passive in this ecological classroom environment. Students in interactive classrooms demonstrate significantly improved learning outcomes relative to students in constructive classrooms. This improvement in learning is relatively subtle; similar experimental designs without repeated measures would be unlikely to have the power to observe this significance. We discuss the importance of seemingly small learning gains that might propagate throughout a course or departmental curriculum, as well as improvements with the necessity for faculty to develop and implement similar activities.

  8. The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC): an observational measure of the intentional communication of children with autism in an unstructured classroom setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasco, Greg; Gordon, Rosanna K; Howlin, Patricia; Charman, Tony

    2008-11-01

    The Classroom Observation Schedule to Measure Intentional Communication (COSMIC) was devised to provide ecologically valid outcome measures for a communication-focused intervention trial. Ninety-one children with autism spectrum disorder aged 6 years 10 months (SD 16 months) were videoed during their everyday snack, teaching and free play activities. Inter-rater reliability was high and relevant items showed significant associations with comparable items from concurrent Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule-Generic (Lord et al. 2000, J Autism Dev Disord 30(3):205-223) assessments. In a subsample of 28 children initial differences in rates of initiations, initiated speech/vocalisation and commenting were predictive of language and communication competence 15 months later. Results suggest that the use of observational measures of intentional communication in natural settings is a valuable assessment strategy for research and clinical practice.

  9. Development and construct validity of the Classroom Strategies Scale-Observer Form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Linda A; Fabiano, Gregory; Dudek, Christopher M; Hsu, Louis

    2013-12-01

    Research on progress monitoring has almost exclusively focused on student behavior and not on teacher practices. This article presents the development and validation of a new teacher observational assessment (Classroom Strategies Scale) of classroom instructional and behavioral management practices. The theoretical underpinnings and empirical basis for the instructional and behavioral management scales are presented. The Classroom Strategies Scale (CSS) evidenced overall good reliability estimates including internal consistency, interrater reliability, test-retest reliability, and freedom from item bias on important teacher demographics (age, educational degree, years of teaching experience). Confirmatory factor analyses (CFAs) of CSS data from 317 classrooms were carried out to assess the level of empirical support for (a) a 4 first-order factor theory concerning teachers' instructional practices, and (b) a 4 first-order factor theory concerning teachers' behavior management practice. Several fit indices indicated acceptable fit of the (a) and (b) CFA models to the data, as well as acceptable fit of less parsimonious alternative CFA models that included 1 or 2 second-order factors. Information-theory-based indices generally suggested that the (a) and (b) CFA models fit better than some more parsimonious alternative CFA models that included constraints on relations of first-order factors. Overall, CFA first-order and higher order factor results support the CSS-Observer Total, Composite, and subscales. Suggestions for future measurement development efforts are outlined. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Commentary on two classroom observation systems: moving toward a shared understanding of effective teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Carol McDonald

    2013-12-01

    In this commentary, I make five points: that designing observation systems that actually predict students' outcomes is challenging; second that systems that capture the complex and dynamic nature of the classroom learning environment are more likely to be able to meet this challenge; three, that observation tools are most useful when developed to serve a particular purpose and are put to that purpose; four that technology can help; and five, there are policy implications for valid and reliable classroom observation tools. The two observation systems presented in this special issue represent an important step forward and a move toward policy that promises to make a true difference in what is defined as high quality and effective teaching, what it looks like in the classroom, and how these practices can be more widely disseminated so that all children, including those attending under-resourced schools, can experience effective instruction, academic success and the lifelong accomplishment that follows. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  11. Japanese Classroom Behavior: A Micro-Analysis of Self-Reports versus Classroom Observations--With Implications for Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Mariko T.

    2004-01-01

    This article examines the influence of Japanese cultural values, beliefs, and educational style on Japanese students learning English as a second language in an American classroom. In contrast to the Japanese students' high motivation to learn English, their classroom behavior and roles reflect their own cultural perspectives rather than the…

  12. Exploring Researchers in Dialogue: Linguistic and Educational Perspectives on Observational Data from a Sixth Grade Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helg Fottland

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reflects on a collaborative process between two researchers from different backgrounds conducting a joint-venture classroom observation project focusing on language, communication and special education. Focusing on the connection between explorative learning situations and dialogue in relation to children's learning and identity development, the researchers cooperate on all levels in the research process. The article compares findings when approaching data from two different professional traditions, linguistics and education. The main focus is how each of the researchers approaches the data analysis. The combining of approaches in interpreting and writing is also discussed. Narratives and spoken dialogues are vital in this work; transcripts of video material from a primary school classroom are used as illustrations.

  13. Science Students' Classroom Discourse: Tasha's Umwelt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jenny

    2012-04-01

    Over the past twenty-five years researchers have been concerned with understanding the science student. The need for such research is still grounded in contemporary issues including providing opportunities for all students to develop scientific literacy and the failure of school science to connect with student's lives, interests and personal identities. The research reported here is unusual in its use of discourse analysis in social psychology to contribute to an understanding of the way students make meaning in secondary school science. Data constructed for the study was drawn from videotapes of nine consecutive lessons in a year-seven science classroom in Melbourne, post-lesson video-stimulated interviews with students and the teacher, classroom observation and the students' written work. The classroom videotapes were recorded using four cameras and seven audio tracks by the International Centre for Classroom Research at the University of Melbourne. Student talk within and about their science lessons was analysed from a discursive perspective. Classroom episodes in which students expressed their sense of personal identity and agency, knowledge, attitude or emotion in relation to science were identified for detailed analysis of the function of the discourse used by students, and in particular the way students were positioned by others or positioned themselves. This article presents the discursive Umwelt or life-space of one middle years science student, Tasha. Her case is used here to highlight the complex social process of meaning making in science classrooms and the need to attend to local moral orders of rights and duties in research on student language use, identity and learning in science.

  14. Space Science in Action: Space Exploration [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the human quest to discover what is out in space. Students see the challenges and benefits of space exploration including the development of rocket science, a look back at the space race, and a history of manned space travel. A special section on the Saturn V rocket gives students insight into the…

  15. Adding Feminist Therapy to Videotape Demonstrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konrad, Jennifer L.; Yoder, Janice D.

    2000-01-01

    Provides directions for presenting a 32-minute series of four videotape segments that highlights the fundamental features of four approaches to psychotherapy, extending its reach to include a feminist perspective. Describes the approaches and included segments. Reports that students' comments demonstrate that the video sequence provided a helpful…

  16. Space Science in Action: Earth's Atmosphere [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    In this videotape recording, students learn about the layers of the atmosphere and why each is important to the survival of life on the planet. Students discover why the atmosphere is responsible for weather and see how special aircraft actually fly into hurricanes. Students build their own working barometer in a hands-on activity. Contents…

  17. Shaping Learner Contributions in an EFL Classroom: Implications for L2 Classroom Interactional Competence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Daskin, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the interactional patterns for shaping learner contributions in an EFL classroom with reference to Walsh's classroom interactional competence (CIC). In doing so, an EFL class at an English preparatory school in a Turkish state university was both videotaped and audiotaped in the course of six classroom hours. Conversation…

  18. Laboratories and Demonstrations in Child Development with Unedited Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Debra Ann

    1986-01-01

    Multipurpose demonstrations of child development are easy to produce by videotaping children while they interact with parents, siblings, or friends. Unlike commercial films, videotapes without narration allow students to formulate and test their own research questions. This article describes how to use unedited videotapes for laboratories in…

  19. "Yes! Animation Is Possible with Your Videotape Recorder!"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Alfreda; Martin, Ron

    1987-01-01

    Describes a project in which students are involved in producing an animated videotape recording and discusses the advantages of modern videotape equipment over other film media. An outline of the process covers materials used, storyboard and artwork production, videotaping procedures, and audio dubbing. (CLB)

  20. Within-Day Variability in the Quality of Classroom Interactions during Third and Fifth Grade: Implications for Children's Experiences and Conducting Classroom Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curby, Timothy W.; Stuhlman, Megan; Grimm, Kevin; Mashburn, Andrew; Chomat-Mooney, Lia; Downer, Jason; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of classroom interactions has typically been studied using aggregates of ratings over time. However, within-day ratings may contain important variability. This study investigated within-day variability using the NICHD Study of Early Childcare and Youth Development's observational data during grades 3 and 5. The first question examined…

  1. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    from the usual method of solving a system of linear equa- tions. Indeed, let j(ai) = bi for i ... of us learnt quite early in school- the sum of a finite geo- metric progression ... We first observe : Observation ... of M ( () (which is, of course, the same as the square of ... nonzero elements in the finite field with q elements. If P is a prime.

  2. From Texts to Pictures in Teaching Civics. Participant Observation in Mark’s Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Per-Olof Erixon

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We are now living in a “new media age”, with a dramatic shift from the linguistic to the visual, from books and book pages to screens and windows (Kress, 2003. This article offsets out to explore what happens to educational activities in schools when electronic media and pictures replace written texts. The article draws on interviews and classroom observations of a particular Swedish vocational upper secondary programme, where the social studies teacher observes that students are finding it increasingly difficult to benefit from written texts. Theoretically, the study draws on Meyrowitz (1985/1986 theories concerning the relationship among media, situations and behaviour and the effect of a shift from “print situations” to “electronic situations” on a broad range of social role and Bernstein’s (1996/2000 notions of ‘recontextualisation’, ‘framing’ and ‘classification’. The study shows that classroom relations are changing; hierarchies between students and teachers are being broken down, and classification of subjects is affected in the sense that the students’ own interpretations and references are beginning to govern teaching when pictures and electronic media enter the educational discourse.

  3. Classroom

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    alternatives preferred over the years have been the use of colored beads/seeds and a ... and staining these large cells to observe the darkly stained Barr body1. ... homozygous mother with two apricot alleles (Figure 2A). This demonstrates ...

  4. Observing the interactive qualities of L2 instructional practices in ESL and FSL classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zuniga

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Discourse features that promote the generation of interactionally modified input and output, such as negotiation for meaning, have been shown to significantly enhance second language acquisition. Research has also identified several characteristics of instructional practices that render them more or less propitious to the generation of these discourse features. While various classroom observation studies have successfully measured the communicative orientation of classroom environments, most of the indicators of interactivity analyzed in those studies were obtained through micro-level discourse analyses and not through macro-level analyses of task-related factors shown to directly influence the interactivity of instructional practices. Such a macro-level scale has potential practical implications for teachers and administrators seeking an efficient tool for assessing and improving the interactivity afforded by a given curriculum. The objective of the present study was therefore to develop macro-level scale to determine the extent to which teachers of French and English as a second language use interaction-friendly instructional practices. Using an observation scheme designed to code data on factors shown to influence interactivity, 63 hours of FSL and ESL classes from secondary schools in the Montreal area were observed and analyzed. Results indicate clear differences between the two groups. While both ESL and FSL classes were less teacher-centered than those observed in previous studies, they were still rated as not-very-interactive. Target language differences showed that the FSL classes were more teacher-centered and characterized by fewer interaction-friendly tasks and activities than the ESL classes. Task characteristics, reasons for ESL and FSL differences and recommendations for improvement are discussed.

  5. Impact of a Checklist on Principal-Teacher Feedback Conferences Following Classroom Observations. REL 2018-285

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaly, Kata; Schwartz, Heather L.; Opper, Isaac M.; Grimm, Geoffrey; Rodriguez, Luis; Mariano, Louis T.

    2018-01-01

    Most states' teacher evaluation systems have changed substantially in the past decade. New evaluation systems typically require school leaders to observe teachers' classrooms two to three times a school year instead of once (Doherty & Jacobs, 2015). The feedback that school leaders provide to teachers after these observations is a key but…

  6. Observing Emotional Interactions between Teachers and Students in Elementary School Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Elizabeth M.; Evans, Ian M.; Harvey, Shane T.

    2011-01-01

    Fostering emotional skills in the elementary (primary) school classroom can lead to improved learning outcomes, more prosocial behavior, and positive emotional development. Incorporating emotional skill development into the naturalistic and implicit teaching environment is a key feature of what is meant by the emotional climate of the classroom.…

  7. Who Is Granted Authority in the Mathematics Classroom? An Analysis of the Observed and Perceived Distribution of Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaepe, Fien; De Corte, Erik; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with the way in which authority was established and interpreted by teachers and students in two Flemish sixth-grade mathematics classrooms. Problem-solving lessons during a seven-month observation period were analysed regarding three aspects of teacher-student interactions that explicitly or implicitly reflect who bears…

  8. Legal IEPs: A Common Sense Approach with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    In this 2-hour videotape workshop designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman answers many key questions that have been raised about Individualized Education Programs (IEPs) since the 1997 amendments to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and the 1999 regulations. The videotape reviews the…

  9. All about Mammals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    In this videotape, students learn more about the characteristics of common warm-blooded mammals and what makes them different from other animals. Children also find out how humans are more advanced in structure than other mammals, but how they still share the same basic traits. This videotape correlates to the following National Science Education…

  10. Bringing ocean observations to the classroom - integrating research infrastructure into education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, R.; Hoenner, X.; Mancini, S.; Tattersall, K.; Everett, J. D.; Suthers, I. M.; Steinberg, P.; Doblin, M.; Moltmann, T.

    2016-02-01

    For the past 4 years the Sydney Institute of Marine Science, a partnership of four Australian Universities (Macquarie University, the University of NSW, the University of Sydney and the University of Technology Sydney) has been running a Master's degree course called Topics in Australian Marine Science (TAMS). This course is unique in that the core of the course is built around research infrastructure - the Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS). IMOS, established in 2007, is collecting unprecedented volumes of multi-disciplinary oceanographic data in the ocean and on the continental shelf which is made freely available across the web; IMOS frequently runs `data user workshops' throughout Australia to introduce scientists and managers to the wealth of observations available at their fingertips. The Masters course gives students an understanding of how different measurement platforms work and they explore the data that these platforms collect. Students combine attending seminars and lectures with hands on practicals and personal assignments, all built around access to IMOS data and the many tools available to visualise and analyse. The course attracts a diverse class with many mature students (i.e. > 25 years old) from a range of backgrounds who find that the ease of discovering and accessing data, coupled with the available tools, enables them to easily study the marine environment without the need for high level computational skills. Since its inception the popularity of the course has increased with 38 students undertaking the subject in 2014. The consensus from students and lecturers is that integrating `real' observations into the classroom is beneficial to all, and IMOS is seeking to extend this approach to other university campuses. The talk will describe the experiences from the TAMS course and highlight the IMOS approach to data discovery, availability and access through course examples.

  11. Manifestations of Differential Cultural Capital in a University Classroom: Views from Classroom Observations and Focus Group Discussions in a South African University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edmore Mutekwe

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Based predominantly on Pierre Bourdieu’s social and cultural reproduction theory, particularly his notions of cultural capital and symbolic violence, this paper explores how first year post graduate Diploma in Higher Education (PGDHE university students from diverse socio-linguistic backgrounds differ in the levels at which they understand and express themselves in classroom activities. The paper’s thesis is that the diverse nature of South African classrooms presents a number of challenges not only for students but also for educators in terms of the use of English as a medium of instruction or the language for learning and teaching (LOLT. Owing to the fact that the South African Language in Education Policy (LiEP of 1997 empowers both learners and educators in schools to use any of the eleven South African official languages as a LOLT wherever that is reasonably possible, students whose English backgrounds were deficient in enculturating them in the use of English as a learning tool often encounter challenges in expressing their ideas in the classroom, whether in writing or in oral presentations. The discussion is anchored in the data elicited through two data collection methods, lesson observations in a Diploma in Higher Education, Research class composed of students from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds and through focus group discussion sessions with 40 multi-ethnic Diploma in Higher Education students from the same classroom. The data management and analysis for this study was done thematically, with views emerging from the observations and focus group discussions being clustered into superordinate themes for convenience of the discussion of the findings. The findings of this study were that students from affluent socio-economic backgrounds who enter university with a rich and relevant English linguistic capital, values and attitudes enjoy an enormous advantage compared to their counterparts whose social class and linguistic

  12. Further Insight into the Effectiveness of a Behavioral Teacher Program Targeting ADHD Symptoms Using Actigraphy, Classroom Observations and Peer Ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veenman, Betty; Luman, Marjolein; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    Objective: The Positivity and Rules program (PR program), a low-level behavioral teacher program targeting symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), has shown positive effects on teacher-rated ADHD symptoms and social functioning. This study aimed to assess whether program effects could be confirmed by instruments assessing classroom behavior other than teacher-ratings, given teachers' involvement with the training. Methods: Participants were 114 primary school children (age = 6-13) displaying ADHD symptoms in the classroom, who were randomly assigned to the treatment ( n = 58) or control group ( n = 65). ADHD symptoms were measured using classroom observations and actigraphy, and peer acceptance was measured using peer ratings. Intention-to-treat multilevel analyses were conducted to assess program effects. Results: No beneficial program effects were found for any of the measures. Conclusion: The earlier beneficial program effects on both ADHD symptoms and social functioning reported by teachers, may be explained by a change in the perception of teachers rather than changes in the child's behavior. Other methodological explanations are also discussed, such as differences between instruments in the sensitivity to program-related changes. The current study underlines the importance of using different measures of classroom behavior to study program effects. ClinicalTrials.gov registration number: NCT02518711.

  13. Differentiated Instruction at Work. Reinforcing the Art of Classroom Observation through the Creation of a Checklist for Beginning and Pre-Service Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subban, Pearl; Round, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Professional experience is viewed as integral to shaping philosophy and acquiring skills in the area of classroom teaching. Classrooms are complex places, with educators implementing differentiated strategies to cater for student diversity. Pre-service teachers who observe these lessons often miss the intuitive practices, as there is much to…

  14. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-02-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners' writing performance.

  15. Exploring the Amount and Type of Writing Instruction during Language Arts Instruction in Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puranik, Cynthia S.; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Sidler, Jessica Folsom; Greulich, Luana

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this exploratory investigation was to examine the nature of writing instruction in kindergarten classrooms and to describe student writing outcomes at the end of the school year. Participants for this study included 21 teachers and 238 kindergarten children from nine schools. Classroom teachers were videotaped once each in the fall and winter during the 90 minute instructional block for reading and language arts to examine time allocation and the types of writing instructional practices taking place in the kindergarten classrooms. Classroom observation of writing was divided into student-practice variables (activities in which students were observed practicing writing or writing independently) and teacher-instruction variables (activities in which the teacher was observed providing direct writing instruction). In addition, participants completed handwriting fluency, spelling, and writing tasks. Large variability was observed in the amount of writing instruction occurring in the classroom, the amount of time kindergarten teachers spent on writing and in the amount of time students spent writing. Marked variability was also observed in classroom practices both within and across schools and this fact was reflected in the large variability noted in kindergartners’ writing performance. PMID:24578591

  16. Instructional Practices in Teaching Literature: Observations of ESL Classrooms in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Gurnam Kaur; Fook, Chan Yuen; Kaur, Sarjit

    2010-01-01

    Literature is an expression of life through the medium of language and in the ESL classroom it is often seen as an authentic means of learning the target language. A literature-enriched curriculum not only helps learners improve their reading and writing skills but more importantly helps them internalise grammar and vocabulary. The many benefits…

  17. Usefulness of Videotape Instruction in an Academic Department of Neurology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, David M.; Kaufman, Rita G.

    1983-01-01

    Videotape instruction produced better performance in identification in only certain areas in a neurology clerkship: neuropsychologic phenomena, disorders with subtle or unique movements, and seizures. The choice and cost of equipment and some professional assurances are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  18. Advancing the discussion about systematic classroom behavioral observation, a product review of Tenny, J. (2010). eCOVE observation software. Pacific City, OR: eCOVE Software, LLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froiland, John Mark; Smith, Liana

    2014-05-01

    Applied child psychologists and behavioral consultants often use systematic behavioral observations to inform the psychological assessment and intervention development process for children referred for attention and hyperactivity problems. This article provides a review of the 2010 version of the eCOVE classroom observation software in terms of its utility in tracking the progress of children with attention and hyperactive behaviors and its use in evaluating teacher behaviors that may impede or promote children's attention and positive behavior. The eCOVE shows promise as an efficient tool for psychologists and behavioral consultants who want to evaluate the effects of interventions for children with symptoms of ADHD, ODD, mood disorders and learning disorders; however, some research-based improvements for future models are suggested. The reviewers also share their firsthand experience in using eCOVE to evaluate teacher and student behavior exhibited on a television show about teaching urban high school students and during a movie about an eccentric new kindergarten teacher. Rich examples are provided of using strategic behavioral observations to reveal how to improve the classroom environment so as to facilitate attention, motivation and positive behavior among youth. Broader implications for enhancing the use of systematic behavioral observations in the assessment of children and adolescents with attention disorders and related behavioral problems are discussed. Key issues are examined such as the use of behavioral observations during psychological consultation to prevent the previously found gender bias in referrals for ADHD. Using behavioral observations to enhance differential diagnosis is also discussed.

  19. Observing efl classrooms in primary or secondary schools: a research task in applied linguistics Observing efl classrooms in primary or secondary schools: a research task in applied linguistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Heberle

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Neste trabalho, com base em princípios da gramática funcional de Halliday e de análise crítica do discurso, bem como minha experiência em Lingüística Aplicada, discuto questões relacionadas à observação de aulas de inglês como língua estrangeira. A análise (de cunho etnográfico surge de discussões nas minhas aulas de Lingüística Aplicada e de relatos de alunos sobre as aulas observadas. O estudo visa contribuir para uma conscientização da relevância de uma prática educacional que vai além de, por exemplo, mera listagem de pronomes pessoais com as formas do verbo to be, para uma discussão de tópicos que possam, de alguma forma, integrar perspectivas socioculturais na educação de professores de inglês como língua estrangeira. In this paper, based on principles of systemic-functional grammar and critical discourse analysis, as well as on my experience as a teacher of Applied Linguistics, I discuss issues related to the observation of EFL classes. The analysis (qualitative, ethnographically-based arises from discussions in my Applied Linguistics course and students’ reports on the classes they observed. The study aims at contributing to an awareness of the relevance of an educational practice that goes beyond the mere listing of personal pronouns with the corresponding forms of the verb to be, for instance, and suggests a discussion of topics which could somehow integrate sociocultural perspectives into EFL teacher education.

  20. Collaboration Between Astronomers at UT Austin and K-12 Teachers: Connecting the Experience of Observing and Research with the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Keely D.; Sneden, Christopher; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Preston, Sandra; EXES Teachers Associate Program

    2015-01-01

    McDonald Observatory has a long history of providing teacher professional development (PD), and recently we have developed a new workshop model for more advanced participants. By choosing a select group of middle and high school teachers from those previously involved in our past PD programs, we have created a joint workshop / observing run program for them. After traveling to the observatory, the teachers participate in an actual observing run with a research astronomer. The teachers are trained first-hand how to take observations, operate the telescope, set up the instrument, and monitor observing conditions. The teachers are fully put in the role of observer. They are also given background information before and during the workshop related to the science and data they are helping to collect. The teachers work in teams to both perform the nightly observations with an astronomer, but to also perform new interactive classroom activities with education staff, and use other telescopes on the mountain. This is a unique experience for teachers since it allows them to take the resources and experiences directly back to their classrooms and students. They can directly relate to their students what skills for specific careers in STEM fields are needed. Evaluation from these workshops shows that there is: increased content knowledge among participants, greater impact that will be passed on to their students, and an authentic research experience that can't be replicated in other PD settings. In addition, not only is this program beneficial to the teachers, but this group is benefit to the education program of McDonald Observatory. Building on an existing PD program (with a 16 year history) we have the opportunity to test out new products and new education endeavors with this devoted group of well-trained teachers before bringing them to wider teacher and student audiences. This program is currently supported by the NSF grant AST-1211585 (PI Sneden).

  1. Master's degree in nuclear engineering by videotaped courses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corradini, M.L.; Vogelsang, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    In 1986, a group of northern midwest utilities met with faculty from the nuclear engineering department at the University of Wisconsin (UW) to discuss the possibility of offering graduate courses by videotape for academic credit and earning a master's degree. Four years later, two utility employees from Northern States Power (NSP) and Wisconsin Electric Power Companies (WEPCO) graduated from the University of Wisconsin with master's degrees earned entirely by taking videotape graduate courses at their individual nuclear power plant sites. Within these 4 years, more than a dozen videotaped graduate courses were developed by the faculty of the department in a formalized master's degree program in nuclear engineering and engineering physics. This paper outlines the program's development and its current features

  2. Library orientation on videotape: production planning and administrative support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shedlock, J; Tawyea, E W

    1989-01-01

    New student-faculty-staff orientation is an important public service in a medical library and demands creativity, imagination, teaching skill, coordination, and cooperation on the part of public services staff. The Northwestern University Medical Library (NUML) implemented a video production service in the spring of 1986 and used the new service to produce an orientation videotape for incoming students, new faculty, and medical center staff. Planning is an important function in video production, and the various phases of outlining topics, drafting scripts, matching video sequences, and actual taping of video, voice, and music are described. The NUML orientation videotape demonstrates how reference and audiovisual services merge talent and skills to benefit the library user. Videotape production, however, cannot happen in a vacuum of good intentions and high ideals. This paper also presents the management support and cost analysis needed to make video production services a reality for use by public service departments.

  3. Initial validation of the prekindergarten Classroom Observation Tool and goal setting system for data-based coaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, April D; Zucker, Tricia A; Williams, Jeffrey M; Bhavsar, Vibhuti; Landry, Susan H

    2013-12-01

    Although coaching is a popular approach for enhancing the quality of Tier 1 instruction, limited research has addressed observational measures specifically designed to focus coaching on evidence-based practices. This study explains the development of the prekindergarten (pre-k) Classroom Observation Tool (COT) designed for use in a data-based coaching model. We examined psychometric characteristics of the COT and explored how coaches and teachers used the COT goal-setting system. The study included 193 coaches working with 3,909 pre-k teachers in a statewide professional development program. Classrooms served 3 and 4 year olds (n = 56,390) enrolled mostly in Title I, Head Start, and other need-based pre-k programs. Coaches used the COT during a 2-hr observation at the beginning of the academic year. Teachers collected progress-monitoring data on children's language, literacy, and math outcomes three times during the year. Results indicated a theoretically supported eight-factor structure of the COT across language, literacy, and math instructional domains. Overall interrater reliability among coaches was good (.75). Although correlations with an established teacher observation measure were small, significant positive relations between COT scores and children's literacy outcomes indicate promising predictive validity. Patterns of goal-setting behaviors indicate teachers and coaches set an average of 43.17 goals during the academic year, and coaches reported that 80.62% of goals were met. Both coaches and teachers reported the COT was a helpful measure for enhancing quality of Tier 1 instruction. Limitations of the current study and implications for research and data-based coaching efforts are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Developing Expertise: Using Video to Hone Teacher Candidates' Classroom Observation Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthrell, Kristen; Steadman, Sharilyn C.; Stapleton, Joy; Hodge, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the impact of a video observation model developed for teacher candidates in an early experiences course. Video Grand Rounds (VGR) combines a structured observation protocol, videos, and directed debriefing to enhance teacher candidates' observations skills within nonstructured and field-based observations. A comparative…

  5. [The scientific videotape with digital processing in surgery. The new opportunities offered surgery for videotape recording and postprocessing with the use of information and digital technologies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picardi, N

    1999-01-01

    The facility of the tape recording of a surgical operation, by means of simple manageable apparatuses and at low costs, especially in comparison with the former cinematography, makes it possible for all surgeons to record their own operative activity. Therefore at present the demonstration in video of surgical interventions is very common, but very often the video-tapes show surgical events only in straight chronological succession, as for facts of chronicle news. The simplification of the otherwise sophisticated digital technology of informatics elaboration of images makes more convenient and advisable to assemble the more meaningful sequences for a final product of higher scientific value. The digital technology gives at the best its contribution during the phase of post-production of the video-tape, where the surgeon himself can assemble an end product of more value because aimed to a scientific and rational communication. Thanks to such an elaboration the video-tape can aim not simply to become a good documentary, but also to achieve an educational purpose or becomes a truly scientific film. The initial video will be recorded following a specific project, the script, foreseeing and programming what has to be demonstrated of the surgical operation, establishing therefore in advance the most important steps of the intervention. The sequences recorded will then be assembled not necessarily in a chronological succession but integrating the moving images with static pictures, as drawings, schemes, tables, aside the picture-in picture technique, and besides the vocal descriptive comment. The cinema language has accustomed us to a series of passages among the different sequences as fading, cross-over, "flash-back", aiming to stimulate the psychological associative powers and encourage those critical. The video-tape can be opportunely shortened, paying attention to show only the essential phases of the operation for demonstrate only the core of the problem and utilize

  6. Tips & Techniques: Storytelling with Puppets and Props. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002

    On this 20-minute videotape, two accomplished storytellers share their expertise on using puppets and props to enhance the art of storytelling. Schroeder Cherry uses several types of puppets to tell his educational story about the Underground Railroad, while Karen Quinn-Wisniewski entertains her audience of young children with classic fables,…

  7. Educators Using Information Technology. GIS Video Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    A M Productions Inc., Vancouver (British Columbia).

    This 57-minute videotape covers the "Florida Educators Using Information Technology" session of the "Eco-Informa '96" conference. Two speakers presented examples of environmental educators using information technology. The first speaker, Brenda Maxwell, is the Director and Developer of the Florida Science Institute based at…

  8. All about Fish. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    There is a completely new world to discover in the oceans, lakes, and rivers--a world filled with an amazing variety of fish. While all fish live and breathe underwater, each type looks very different and develops its own unique living habits. In this videotape, students learn more about the body structures of fish as well as how they reproduce…

  9. Me & Isaac Newton. [Videotape and] KIDSNET Guide for Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001

    This videotape records the stories of 7 scientists, 3 women and 4 men who range in age from 33 to 81. Beginning with their earliest scientific questions and including their most personal ponderings, the scientists reveal their histories and professional obligations to affect the world. Director Michael Apted allows the personal adventures of the…

  10. All about Reptiles. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs may be extinct, but reptiles are distant cousins to the beasts that once walked the earth. From snakes and lizards to iguanas and tuataras, children learn what factors make them different from other animals. In this videotape, students explore the mysterious, often misunderstood, world of reptiles and learn about their characteristics…

  11. Doing Things. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. It contains activities from students' everyday life such as eating, washing, and playing. These daily processes are then…

  12. All about Animal Adaptations. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Animals change to better adapt to their environment. Over long periods of time, nature helps the animals adapt by changing their body shape and color as well as adjusting their methods of getting and eating food, defending themselves, and caring for their young. In this videotape, students learn what changes different animals go through in order…

  13. All about Dinosaurs. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Dinosaurs were the rulers of the land 65 million years ago. In this videotape, children learn more about the different kinds of dinosaurs by viewing vivid illustrations and fossil discoveries. Students compare the dinosaurs to their modern kin--snakes, lizards, and crocodiles. Students also listen to different theories to try to answer the big…

  14. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204 People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  15. All about Food Chains. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    Whether animals are herbivores, carnivores, or omnivores, each one is part of an eternal food chain that carries on from one generation to the next. In this videotape, students learn more about terms like "predator,""pre-consumer" and "producer," as well as the cycles of food chains and food webs and how they support…

  16. All about Amphibians. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This videotape teaches children about their favorite amphibious creatures, as well as amphibians' nearest cousins--toads, newts, and salamanders. Young students discover how these amazing creatures can live both in and out of water, learn about the amphibious life cycle, and compare the differences between amphibians and reptiles. This videotape…

  17. Improving Classroom Learning by Collaboratively Observing Human Tutoring Videos while Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Scotty D.; Chi, Michelene T. H.; VanLehn, Kurt

    2009-01-01

    Collaboratively observing tutoring is a promising method for observational learning (also referred to as vicarious learning). This method was tested in the Pittsburgh Science of Learning Center's Physics LearnLab, where students were introduced to physics topics by observing videos while problem solving in Andes, a physics tutoring system.…

  18. Observations of the Middle School Environment: The Context for Student Behavior beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusby, Julie C.; Crowley, Ryann; Sprague, Jeffrey; Biglan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the use of an observation system to measure middle school staff practices, environment characteristics, and student behavior in the school common areas. Data were collected at baseline from 18 middle schools participating in a randomized controlled trial of school-wide Positive Behavior Support. The observations were…

  19. Developing Indicators for a Classroom Observation Tool on Pedagogy and Technology Integration: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmendorf, Douglas C.; Song, Liyan

    2015-01-01

    Rapid advances in technology and increased access to technology tools have created new instructional demands and expectations on teachers. Due to the ubiquitous presence of technology in K-12 schools, teachers are being observed on both their pedagogical and technology integration practices. Applying the technological pedagogical and content…

  20. Once is not enough : Establishing reliability criteria for feedback and evaluative decsions based on classroom observation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Lans, Rikkert M.; van de Grift, Wim J.C.M.; van Veen, Klaas; Fokkens-Bruinsma, Marjon

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of effective teacher evaluation procedures is a global challenge in which lowering the chances that teachers receive inaccurate evaluations is a pertinent goal. This study investigates the minimum number of observations required to guarantee that teachers receive feedback with modest

  1. Classroom Observations: Documenting Shifts in Instruction for Districtwide Improvement. Formative Evaluation Cycle Report for the Math in Common Initiative, Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Rebecca R.; Seago, Nanette M.; Burr, Elizabeth; Broek, Marie; Finkelstein, Neal D.

    2015-01-01

    Math in Common® (MiC) is a five-year initiative that supports a formal network of 10 California school districts as they implement the Common Core State Standards in Mathematics (CCSS-M) across grades K-8. This research brief explores how best to select or develop and use classroom observation systems in order to document instructional shifts and…

  2. Resistance to Classroom Observation in the Context of Teacher Evaluation: Teachers' and Department Heads' Experiences and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Jorge Ávila; Silva, Maria João Tavares

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the main findings of a study that sought to understand how teachers and department heads perceived and experienced the implementation of a classroom observation system in a teacher evaluation context. The data was collected through a teacher and department head survey and interviews with department heads who were responsible for…

  3. Leading a Classroom Discussion: Definition, Supportive Evidence, and Measurement of the "ETS"® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) Assessment Series. Research Memorandum No. RM-16-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witherspoon, Margaret; Sykes, Gary; Bell, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides a description and rationale for a performance assessment of a teaching practice--leading a classroom discussion (LCD)--included in the ETS® National Observational Teaching Examination (NOTE) assessment series. In this assessment, candidates interact with a small class of virtual students represented by avatars in a…

  4. The Effect upon the Behavior and Attitudes of Student Teachers of Training Cooperating Teachers and Student Teachers in the Use of Interaction Analysis as a Classroom Observational Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amidon, Edmund

    In a 2 1/2-year study of the application of interaction analysis (a method of classroom observation) to preservice teacher education, approximately 40 secondary student teachers were involved in an experiment during each of 3 semesters. A 2 by 2 factorial design made it possible to test the influence of 2 independent variables (student teacher…

  5. Naturalistic Observations of Nonverbal Children with Autism: A Study of Intentional Communicative Acts in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Drain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We examined evoked and spontaneous communicative acts in six nonverbal children with autism (10–15 years, M = 12.8, SD = 2.1. All participants attended the same special school for children with autism but were in different classes. Each was observed for 30 minutes during a typical school day. An observer coded the presence/absence of an antecedent, the form and function of the communicative act, and the teacher’s response to the child. One hundred and fifty-five communicative acts were observed, 41% were spontaneous and 59% were evoked. The main antecedents to evoked communicative acts were verbal prompts, and most of the evoked communicative acts were physical in nature (i.e., motor acts and gestures. However, verbalizations and the use of the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS were higher for spontaneous communicative acts. The functions of spontaneous communicative acts were primarily requests. Results showed a substantial number of “nonresponses” from teachers, even following evoked communicative acts. These results suggest that teachers may not actively promote intentional communication as much as possible. Therefore, our findings provide information concerning ways in which educators could facilitate intentional communication in non-verbal children with autism.

  6. Talking about history: discussions in a middle school inclusive classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okolo, Cynthia M; Ferretti, Ralph P; MacArthur, Charles A

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we examined the nature of whole-class discussion and teachers' instruction during discussion about historical topics in one inclusive, middle-grade classroom. We videotaped and analyzed 4 lessons to determine the nature of discussion sequences, rates of participation, and instructional challenges encountered by the teacher and students. We triangulated our analysis of observational data with teacher interviews. The results showed high rates of student participation, with no differences between students with and without disabilities. The teacher initiated and controlled the discussion, and nearly all student responses were from teacher to student rather than from student to student. The teacher encountered three challenges in developing students' understanding, and we identify specific practices she used to address these challenges. Based on students' response to measures administered by project staff and on their scores on statewide tests, this teacher's practices seemed to be highly effective.

  7. Children’s Democratic Experiences in a Collective Writing Process – Analysing Classroom Interaction in Terms of Deliberation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Hultin

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is twofold: firstly, it aims to explore the interactional conditions in terms of democratic qualities constituted in collective writing in a primary school classroom; and secondly, it aims to examine whether a set of deliberative criteria is fruitful as an analytical tool when studying classroom interaction. Theoretically, I turn to New Literacy Studies for understanding the writing classroom as a literacy practice and the actual (collective writing as literacy events. The study has an ethnographic approach in which classroom observations were conducted during a collective writing process involving six nine-year-old children and their teacher. The observations included, two lessons, divided into 3 hours, which were observed, videotaped, and transcribed. The teacher had planned for a strict interactional or didactical order during the collective writing in which the children were to respond individually. However, the children responded in a different manner by starting a vivid dialogue in which they negotiated both the form and the content of the story. The analysis shows some deliberative qualities in this classroom interaction, while some other qualities were not evident. Furthermore, the analysis showed that the set of deliberative criteria was useful in visualizing both existing deliberative qualities in the interaction and the potential for developing such qualities.

  8. A comparison of in-class learner engagement across lecture, problem-based learning, and team learning using the STROBE classroom observation tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, P Adam; Haidet, Paul; Schneider, Virginia; Searle, Nancy; Seidel, Charles L; Richards, Boyd F

    2005-01-01

    Having recently introduced team learning into the preclinical medical curriculum, evidence of the relative impact of this instructional method on in-class learner engagement was sought. To compare patterns of engagement behaviors among learners in class sessions across 3 distinct instructional methods: lecture, problem-based learning (PBL), and team learning. Trained observers used the STROBE classroom observation tool to measure learner engagement in 7 lecture, 4 PBL, and 3 team learning classrooms over a 12-month period. Proportions of different types of engagement behaviors were compared using chi-square. In PBL and team learning, the amount of learner-to-learner engagement was similar and much greater than in lecture, where most engagement was of the learner-to-instructor and self-engagement types. Also, learner-to-instructor engagement appeared greater in team learning than in PBL. Observed engagement behaviors confirm the potential of team learning to foster engagement similar to PBL, but with greater faculty input.

  9. Situated Motivation: A Framework for how EFL Learners are Motivated in the Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Truong Sa Nguyen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In arguing, that defining and categorizing motivation are less practical and applicable to language teaching than examining how learners are motivated in their class, this study investigated sources of motivation of 10 learners studying English as a compulsory subject at IUH University in Vietnam in 2013. The study aimed at answering the two main research questions- a how are the EFL learners motivated in class? and b what is the most applicable framework of motivation to classroom language teaching? Classroom Observation and Stimulated Interview were adopted as data collection techniques. Twelve different lessons were video-taped in about 21 hours in total and over 30 hours of interviews were recorded. Content Analysis procedure was used to code motivational sources. The five groups of coded motivational sources included- the teacher, the classmates, the syllabus, classroom activities, and mood or tone of each lesson. It was observed that the learners’ motivation is closely situated in the classroom context, and therefore, Situated Motivation should be adopted as a framework to bridge the gap between motive frameworks and motivational strategies in language teaching, and for teachers to consider while planning and executing their lessons.

  10. Getting Classroom Observations Right

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, Grover; Chingos, Matthew M.; Lindquist, Katharine

    2015-01-01

    This article contributes to the body of knowledge on teacher evaluation systems by examining the actual design and performance of new teacher-evaluation systems in four school districts that are at the forefront of the effort to evaluate teachers meaningfully. The authors find first that the ratings assigned teachers by the districts'…

  11. Rethinking Classroom Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Emily Dolci; Kaufman, Trent; Doty, Dave

    2014-01-01

    If your professional learning seems stalled, maybe you could put yourself and your colleagues in the driver's seat of professional development. The authors describe a professional learning approach that gives teachers both a say in what they focus their learning on and a chance to practice and refine teaching strategies that they hope to…

  12. PORTAAL: A Classroom Observation Tool Assessing Evidence-Based Teaching Practices for Active Learning in Large Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Sarah L; Converse, Mercedes; Wenderoth, Mary Pat

    2015-01-01

    There is extensive evidence that active learning works better than a completely passive lecture. Despite this evidence, adoption of these evidence-based teaching practices remains low. In this paper, we offer one tool to help faculty members implement active learning. This tool identifies 21 readily implemented elements that have been shown to increase student outcomes related to achievement, logic development, or other relevant learning goals with college-age students. Thus, this tool both clarifies the research-supported elements of best practices for instructor implementation of active learning in the classroom setting and measures instructors' alignment with these practices. We describe how we reviewed the discipline-based education research literature to identify best practices in active learning for adult learners in the classroom and used these results to develop an observation tool (Practical Observation Rubric To Assess Active Learning, or PORTAAL) that documents the extent to which instructors incorporate these practices into their classrooms. We then use PORTAAL to explore the classroom practices of 25 introductory biology instructors who employ some form of active learning. Overall, PORTAAL documents how well aligned classrooms are with research-supported best practices for active learning and provides specific feedback and guidance to instructors to allow them to identify what they do well and what could be improved. © 2015 S. L. Eddy et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  13. Observation of classroom social communication: do children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders spend their time differently than their typically developing peers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olswang, Lesley B; Svensson, Liselotte; Astley, Susan

    2010-12-01

    In this research, the authors examined how social communication profiles during classroom activities differed between children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and typically developing pair-matched peers. Twelve pairs of children were observed in their classrooms 20 min a day for 4 days across 2 weeks. Coders documented classroom social communication by recording performance on handheld computers using the Social Communication Coding System (L. B. Olswang, L. Svensson, T. E. Coggins, J. Beilinson, & A. L. Donaldson, 2006). The Social Communication Coding System consists of 6 behavioral dimensions (prosocial/engaged, passive/disengaged, irrelevant, hostile/coercive, assertive, and adult seeking) that account for all verbal and nonverbal productions during a specified timeframe. The frequency of occurrence and duration of each dimension (as measured by proportion of time and average length of time spent performing each dimension) were recorded. Children with FASD had significantly more occurrences of passive/disengaged and irrelevant behavior, and the proportion and average length of time in these behaviors were larger and longer than those of their peers. Further, children with FASD had significantly more occurrences of prosocial/engaged behavior; however, the proportion and average length of time that they spent being prosocial were smaller and shorter than those of their peers. Implications Results suggest children with mild FASD performed differently than their peers in regard to classroom social communication, which was consistent with parent and teacher behavioral reports.

  14. How do lay people assess the quality of physicians' communicative responses to patients' emotional cues and concerns? An international multicentre study based on videotaped medical consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazzi, M.A.; Bensing, J.; Rimondini, M.; Fletcher, I.; Vliet, L. van; Zimmermann, C.; Deveugele, M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To establish which kind of physician communicative responses to patient cues and concerns are appreciated by lay people. Methods: A balanced sample (259 people) was recruited in public places to participate in a full day observation of four videotaped standardized medical consultations.

  15. Observations of Representational Practices by Indian-Descent Children in a US Preschool Classroom: Connections among People, Spaces and Artifacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braswell, Gregory S.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory study examined children's experiences with producing and comprehending external representations in a preschool classroom. Data collection and analyses focused on how artifacts, spaces, adult-guided routines, and social conventions shape young children's representational development. Participants included 4- and…

  16. Measurement of Child Behavior via Classroom Observations in the Good Behavior Game Professional Development Models Randomized Control Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurki, Anja; Wang, Wei; Li, Yibing; Poduska, Jeanne

    2013-01-01

    The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a classroom-based behavior management strategy aimed at reducing aggressive/disruptive behavior and socializing children into the role of student. GBG, delivered in first and second grades, has been shown to reduce rates of substance abuse and other deleterious outcomes into young adulthood (Brown, C.H. et al 2007,…

  17. Understanding children's science identity through classroom interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mijung

    2018-01-01

    Research shows that various stereotypes about science and science learning, such as science being filled with hard and dry content, laboratory experiments, and male-dominated work environments, have resulted in feelings of distance from science in students' minds. This study explores children's experiences of science learning and science identity. It asks how children conceive of doing science like scientists and how they develop views of science beyond the stereotypes. This study employs positioning theory to examine how children and their teacher position themselves in science learning contexts and develop science identity through classroom interactions. Fifteen students in grades 4-6 science classrooms in Western Canada participated in this study. Classroom activities and interactions were videotaped, transcribed, and analysed to examine how the teacher and students position each other as scientists in the classroom. A descriptive explanatory case analysis showed how the teacher's positioning acted to develop students' science identity with responsibilities of knowledge seeking, perseverance, and excitement about science.

  18. How To Dance through Time. Volume V: Victorian Era Couple Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 55-minute VHS videotape is the fifth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It continues the tradition of the romance of the mid-19th century couple dances, focusing on Victorian era couple dances. The videotape offers 35 variations of the renowned 19th century couple dances, including the waltz, the polka, the galop,…

  19. Technology Is the Answer, But What Was the Question? Audiotape vs. Videotape for Individualized Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabachnick, Barbara Gerson; And Others

    1978-01-01

    In an evaluation of supplementary learning aids students were assigned to one of four learning conditions: (1) videotape plus worksheet, (2) audiotape plus worksheet, (3) combination of audio- and videotape plus worksheet, and (4) worksheet only. Results reported include test scores and ratings of helpfulness, as well as student preferences and…

  20. Good Morning, Good Night. A Day on the Farm. A Live Action Video for Preschoolers [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo Peep Productions, Eureka, MT.

    Some preschool teachers have expressed concern regarding the lack of science instructional material for students age 2 through the preschool years. This videotape was developed to help fill this chasm in our educational system. The videotape provides activities from children's' daily routines, such as eating, playing, and sleeping. It also…

  1. Journey to Planet Earth: The Urban Explosion. The Public Television Series. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This videotape attempts to show students how the uncontrolled development of the world's major cities has led to a series of problems such as air pollution, water pollution, limited room for waste disposal, housing shortages, and loss of farmland. The videotape profiles four mega-cities: Mexico City, Shanghai, Istanbul, and New York City. Students…

  2. Begin with Love[R]. The First Three Months: Connecting with Your Child. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    CIVITAS Initiative, Chicago, IL.

    Hosted by Oprah Winfrey and featuring Dr. Kyle Pruett, this videotape focuses on new parents' relationship with their infant in the first 3 months of life. The 30-minute videotape begins with footage of infants during the newborn period and depicts parents talking about their emotional response to their infant's birth. The video focuses on…

  3. Sherlock Holmes in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faia, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    Describes a three-day classroom activity combining criminal investigations and scientific skills, especially observation skills. Provides detailed classroom procedures with an illustration of eight basic fingerprint patterns and a classification chart. (YP)

  4. The impact of technology on the enactment of inquiry in a technology enthusiast's sixth grade science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waight, Noemi; Abd-El-Khalick, Fouad

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of the use of computer technology on the enactment of inquiry in a sixth grade science classroom. Participants were 42 students (38% female) enrolled in two sections of the classroom and taught by a technology-enthusiast instructor. Data were collected over the course of 4 months during which several inquiry activities were completed, some of which were supported with the use of technology. Non-participant observation, classroom videotaping, and semi-structured and critical-incident interviews were used to collect data. The results indicated that the technology in use worked to restrict rather than promote inquiry in the participant classroom. In the presence of computers, group activities became more structured with a focus on sharing tasks and accounting for individual responsibility, and less time was dedicated to group discourse with a marked decrease in critical, meaning-making discourse. The views and beliefs of teachers and students in relation to their specific contexts moderate the potential of technology in supporting inquiry teaching and learning and should be factored both in teacher training and attempts to integrate technology in science teaching.

  5. Radiologic evaluation of the globus symptom using videotape recorder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Myeong Jin; Chung, Tae Sub; Lee, Jong Tae; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho; Chang, Tae Young; Park, In Yong

    1988-01-01

    The authors examined barium swallow in 213 patients with globus symptom and 79 patients with vague gastric problems without globus symptom. Abnormal findings were more frequently detected on videorecording than on conventional esophagogram. Radiologic findings were transient cricopharyngeal indentation (CPI), residual barium collection and delayed clearing from hypopharynx (RB), laryngeal penetration of barium, barium retention in vallecula and or pyriform sinuses. Among them residual barium in hypopharynx was more frequently detected in patients with globus symptom than in patients without globus symptom. Globus symptom was more frequent in adult women, but age and sex difference did not affect the incidence of the abnormal radiologic findings. Cricopharyngeal indentation was most frequently seen at the level of C5-6 interspace and had a tendency of moving upward gradually during the indentation in about half of the cases. Most of the CPI was seen in early phase of swallowing and was visible within 1 sec. Residual barium collection was mostly seen in C6 or C6-7 level. RB had no cause and effect relationship with CPI, and it was not secondary result of obstructive effect of CPI. The authors think that videotape recording can be a useful method for evaluation of globus symptom. The residual barium collection in hypopharynx can be a significant finding in globus symptom

  6. Analysis of Participant Reactivity in Dyads Performing a Videotaped Conflict-Management Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semeniuk, Yulia Y; Riesch, Susan K

    2011-01-01

    Videotaping is used frequently in nursing research. A threat to the validity of videotaping is participant reactivity, that is, being recorded by a camera may influence the behavior of interest. This paper's purpose is to report how youth ages 10 to 14 years old and their parent viewed participation in a videotaped conflict-management task. Five dyads, who were part of a randomized clinical trial testing an intervention to promote parent-child communication, participated in a structured interview. All parents were mothers. Youth were eighth graders. Three were boys and two were girls. Findings indicated that (a) dyads felt that the videotaped interaction had a progression of feeling unnatural in the beginning to feeling natural toward the end, (b) dyads found it relatively easy to choose a topic of discussion, and (c) dyads felt that the discussions were meaningful. Based on these data, recommendations for researchers to reduce participant reactivity are provided.

  7. WHEN SENSING TEACHES MORE THAN TEXT BOOKS: REVITALIZING TEAM, ICT AND OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING TO THRIVE SOCIO-AFFECTIVE CONSCIOUSNESS IN LANGUAGE CLASSROOM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Suryani

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The flourish of ICT and complexity of today‘s social-cultural and technological issues entails a strong need for a change in education. Today‘s education should be more directed outward by observing what happens in the society instead of just inward by indoctrinating certain perspectives and memorizing facts. Thus, it is not classroomcentred education anymore, but it is now becoming society-centred and being the miniature of society. Today‘s classrooms are expected to facilitate broader and various learning process, dynamic mental process and provide autonomy and creativity for students to construct their own knowledge by observing, sensing and learning from society. Through this process, students can see society as place and source of learning. Learning from society can also trigger social learning. Together, the aspect of observing issues emerging in society and being able to accommodate various perspectives in jointlearning lay the foundation for creating socio-affective conscious learners. This study aims to explore how and what the students can learn by observing, thinking, feeling and proposing problem solving for social, cultural and technological issues in joint-learning and what challenges they encounter during their learning process. The data is grounded on students‘ reflective notes and the result of collaborated problem solving in groups in language classroom. The data shows that the students learn some constellations of socioaffective learning aspects. Those are the exercises of multiple sensory, social learning (awareness, coordination, affinity, sharing, respect, communication, emotional learning (regulation, awareness, positive emotional contagion in group, adaptive. Their sensory, social and affective learning are enhanced by ICT.

  8. Different Regions, Diverse Classrooms? a Study of Primary Classrooms in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNaught, Carmel; Lok, Beatrice; Yin, Hongbiao; Lee, John Chi-Kin; Song, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Classroom experience is shaped by a number of factors. In this paper, we report a classroom observation study in China, illustrating regional variation in students' classroom learning experiences. Through comparing and contrasting observed classroom practices in three different regions in China (Chongqing, Hong Kong and Shanghai), the paper…

  9. The Classroom Animal: Mealworms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Describes appearance, longevity, and changes in each step of the mealworm life cycle. Guidelines for starting a classroom colony are given with housing and care instructions. Suggested observations, activities, and questions for students are included. (DH)

  10. Incremental Validity of Test Session and Classroom Observations in a Multimethod Assessment of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConaughy, Stephanie H.; Harder, Valerie S.; Antshel, Kevin M.; Gordon, Michael; Eiraldi, Ricardo; Dumenci, Levent

    2010-01-01

    This study tested the incremental validity of behavioral observations, over and above parent and teacher reports, for assessing symptoms of Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) in children ages 6 to 12, using the Test Observation Form (TOF) and Direct Observation Form (DOF) from the Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment. The…

  11. The Test Matters: The Relationship between Classroom Observation Scores and Teacher Value Added on Multiple Types of Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossman, Pam; Cohen, Julie; Ronfeldt, Matthew; Brown, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we examined how the relationships between one observation protocol, the Protocol for Language Arts Teaching Observation (PLATO), and value-added measures shift when different tests are used to assess student achievement. Using data from the Measures of Effective Teaching Project, we found that PLATO was more strongly related to the…

  12. Classroom Observations and Reflections: Using Online Streaming Video as a Tool for Overcoming Barriers and Engaging in Critical Thinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barlow, Angela T.; McCrory, Michael R.; Blessing, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    In typical school settings, teachers are not afforded the opportunity to observe the instructional practices of their peers. Time constraints, opportunity, and willingness to participate in observational practices are just three of the factors that may limit teachers' engagement in this type of activity. To provide teachers with opportunities to…

  13. (UNEXPLORED CONTEXTS IN THE TEACHING PRACTICUM IN ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE COURSES: THE PLACE OF CLASSROOM OBSERVATION IN THE REPORTS OF PRE-SERVICE TEACHERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Reichert Assunção Tonelli

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Teaching contexts are essential to establish the relationships between theory and classroom practice. One of the stages in such process consists in observing movements that happens at schools, the actions executed by the teachers and the attitudes and behaviours of the students when contents are taught and the relationships are established. Hence, it was proposed to four pre-service teachers, after they had chosen the teaching context they most identified with and where they would develop their teaching practicum, a moment of reflexion about the role and the importance of previous observation. In this paper we aim at reflecting upon the place of that phase of the teaching practicum considering the chosen contexts: the teaching of English to kindergarteners and to students with special educational needs. Oral texts produced by the pre-service teachers were analyzed based on the theoretical and methodological assumptions of the Sociodiscursive Interactionism, which assumes that all textual production (written and/or oral is part of a socio-cultural-historical context, which determines the context of text production and its use by readers/listeners. Because it is an unexplored performance in English language teaching practicum in the English Language and Literature courses, previous observation of the context was essential for the pre-service teachers decision-making.

  14. Watching for Washback: Observing the Influence of the International English Language Testing System Academic Writing Test in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Previous studies of washback (the influence of a test on teaching and learning) have provided insights into the complexity of educational systems and test use, especially in relation to the role of the teacher, but have given insufficient attention to the relationship between observed practices and test design features. In this article a washback…

  15. Constructivism in Practice: an Exploratory Study of Teaching Patterns and Student Motivation in Physics Classrooms in Finland, Germany and Switzerland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; von Arx, Matthias

    2017-04-01

    For the last three decades, moderate constructivism has become an increasingly prominent perspective in science education. Researchers have defined characteristics of constructivist-oriented science classrooms, but the implementation of such science teaching in daily classroom practice seems difficult. Against this background, we conducted a sub-study within the tri-national research project Quality of Instruction in Physics (QuIP) analysing 60 videotaped physics classes involving a large sample of students ( N = 1192) from Finland, Germany and Switzerland in order to investigate the kinds of constructivist components and teaching patterns that can be found in regular classrooms without any intervention. We applied a newly developed coding scheme to capture constructivist facets of science teaching and conducted principal component and cluster analyses to explore which components and patterns were most prominent in the classes observed. Two underlying components were found, resulting in two scales—Structured Knowledge Acquisition and Fostering Autonomy—which describe key aspects of constructivist teaching. Only the first scale was rather well established in the lessons investigated. Classes were clustered based on these scales. The analysis of the different clusters suggested that teaching physics in a structured way combined with fostering students' autonomy contributes to students' motivation. However, our regression models indicated that content knowledge is a more important predictor for students' motivation, and there was no homogeneous pattern for all gender- and country-specific subgroups investigated. The results are discussed in light of recent discussions on the feasibility of constructivism in practice.

  16. Disclosing Information about Epilepsy and Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: The Effect on Teachers' Understanding of Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wodrich, David L.

    2005-01-01

    In an analog study, 122 continuing education and preservice teachers rated potential sources of one of two students' classroom problems. One student's behavior, described in a cumulative folder and a videotaped teacher/school psychologist conference, matched the symptoms of epilepsy, the other matched the symptoms of type 1 diabetes mellitus.…

  17. From Mouth to Hand: Obstacles in Rendering Verbal Events Faithfully into Standard Orthography. The Classroom Interaction Project Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hays, Harriet Nutt

    This paper reports the initial phase of a series of experiments conducted on a large number of videotapes made for the purpose of analyzing public-school classroom interaction. The experiments originally aimed to preduct the most reliable, efficient and economic way of producing transcriptions which are sufficiently representative of the verbal…

  18. Teaching Pragmatic Particles in the LCTL Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faizah Sari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The success and effectiveness of teaching the LCTL class-room depend on the LCTL research. The study investigated the into-nation contours of seven Indonesian pragmatic particles (kan, ya, kok, lho, dong, deh, and sih to review the functions of the particles. Vide-otaped data of naturally occurring conversations by native speakers of Indonesian were collected. Results indicated the number of into-nation contours for the Indonesian pragmatic particles used by the speakers to organize information (for example, to extend common ground and mark shared knowledge and to convey the speaker’s ex-pression (for example, surprise and emphasis. The particle contour analysis forms a natural link between grammatical and interactional competence and bears an important LCTL pedagogical consequence in terms of both improving teaching materials and bringing the cul-ture closer to the learner. Based on the findings, four strategies in teaching the LCTL classroom are recommended.

  19. Evaluating first-year nursing students' ability to self-assess psychomotor skills using videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Wilda Ellen; Rush, Kathy; Wright, Marjorie

    2009-01-01

    Developing confidence in self-assessment is an important skill in becoming a self-regulated learner. This article describes the process undertaken by a group of educators of incorporating self-assessment in combination with psychomotor skill development with freshman students. Students were videotaped performing a wound-dressing change; the videotaping was immediately followed by a self-assessment of their performance using a faculty-generated checklist. Comparison of faculty and student ratings revealed the tendency for students to overrate their performance and identified discordance between students and faculty on several steps of the procedure. These evaluation findings are discussed and future directions explored.

  20. A cultural study of a science classroom and graphing calculator-based technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Dennis Alan

    Social, political, and technological events of the past two decades have had considerable bearing on science education. While sociological studies of scientists at work have seriously questioned traditional histories of science, national and state educational systemic reform initiatives have been enacted, stressing standards and accountability. Recently, powerful instructional technologies have become part of the landscape of the classroom. One example, graphing calculator-based technology, has found its way from commercial and domestic applications into the pedagogy of science and math education. The purpose of this study was to investigate the culture of an "alternative" science classroom and how it functions with graphing calculator-based technology. Using ethnographic methods, a case study of one secondary, team-taught, Environmental/Physical Science (EPS) classroom was conducted. Nearly half of the 23 students were identified as students with special education needs. Over a four-month period, field data was gathered from written observations, videotaped interactions, audio taped interviews, and document analyses to determine how technology was used and what meaning it had for the participants. Analysis indicated that the technology helped to keep students from getting frustrated with handling data and graphs. In a relatively short period of time, students were able to gather data, produce graphs, and to use inscriptions in meaningful classroom discussions. In addition, teachers used the technology as a means to involve and motivate students to want to learn science. By employing pedagogical skills and by utilizing a technology that might not otherwise be readily available to these students, an environment of appreciation, trust, and respect was fostered. Further, the use of technology by these teachers served to expand students' social capital---the benefits that come from an individual's social contacts, social skills, and social resources.

  1. Observation and analysis of a classroom teaching and learning practice based on augmented reality and serious games on mobile platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvie Barma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative research is part of a learning effort to better understand how serious games are exploited in a science education context. The research team examined this issue by focusing on augmented reality as a technological innovation imbedded on a tablet. Given the current state of knowledge related to serious games and augmented reality, and given the fact that its use in the context of teaching/learning is not extended, this paper focuses on an initial exploration of how a new teaching practice involving a serious game based on an interactive augmented reality solution would impact on students in a physics class. A Design Based Research methodology was applied in a real‑world context within a college‑level physics class. Two conceptual tests containing ten questions on spatial notions regarding electromagnetic fields were administered to two control groups and two groups using the proposed serious game. The latter groups were administrated a game evaluation questionnaire as well. Thematic interpretation of students written responses to the evaluation questionnaire as well as the lessons and observations we derived from the in-class experimentation are provided and discussed in the paper.

  2. Brief Report: Recognition of Autism Spectrum Disorder before One Year of Age: A Retrospective Study Based on Home Videotapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Emily; Dawson, Geraldine; Osterling, Julie; Dinno, Nuhad

    2000-01-01

    This retrospective study compared videotape footage at 8-10 months of 15 children later known to have autism spectrum disorder and videotapes of 15 same-age children with typical development. The strongest finding was that infants with early onset autism were much less likely to orient when their name was called than typically developing infants.…

  3. Animal Classification. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They learn what the terms "kingdom", "phylum", and "order" mean, and discover how the 3.5 million-plus organisms found on Earth fit into…

  4. All about Endangered and Extinct Animals. Animal Life for Children. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    While there are thousands of different animals in the world, some have been extinct for many years and others are on the verge of extinction. In this videotape, students learn about the natural and man-made factors that lead to the endangerment and extinction of animals. Children find out why it is essential for people to help all forms of…

  5. Endangered & Extinct Animals. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Due to environmental factors and human interference, many of Earth's creatures have ceased to exist or are on the verge of extinction. In…

  6. Understanding IDEA 1997 and the 1999 Regulations with Barbara Bateman. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Exceptional Children, Reston, VA. Div. for Learning Disabilities.

    The United States Congress amended the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) in 1997 to reflect changes in the special education field over the previous twenty years. In this 2-hour videotape recording designed for teachers, administrators, parents, and others, Dr. Barbara Bateman presents her insights about changes in IDEA law and…

  7. Making the Case for Public-Private Child Care Partnerships: Child Care Partnership Project. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finance Project, Washington, DC.

    The quality of child care in the United States has important implications for school preparedness, welfare reform, economic vitality, and the quality of family life. In this 8-minute videotape, business leaders describe why child care makes good business sense. Visuals explain the importance of early childhood for school and life success, and the…

  8. Fish. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. There are many types of fish that live in oceans, lakes, and streams. Students learn about fish characteristics and environmental habitats,…

  9. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume I: 15th-19th Centuries. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This VHS videotape recording is the first in a two-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It focuses on the 15th-19th centuries, including Renaissance nobility, Baroque extravagance, Regency refinement, and Victorian romanticism. Each era reflects the changing relationships between men and women through the…

  10. Photocopying and Videotaping for Educational Purposes: The Doctrine of Fair Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Photocopying guidelines of the 1976 amendments to the Copyright Act have been further legitimized by a 1982 settlement involving New York University. Important recent developments concerning videotape copyrights include the 1981 guidelines of the House Judiciary Committee and the 1984 United States Supreme Court case, "Sony Corporation v.…

  11. Marine & Other Invertebrates. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. Invertebrate animals include a vast array of spineless creatures. In this video, students discover marine lifeforms such as jellyfish,…

  12. The Effectiveness of Substance Abuse Prevention Videotapes with Mexican American Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Joan M.; Buki, Lydia P.; Horan, John J.; Ceperich, Sherry Dyche; Burows, Deborah Dyer

    1999-01-01

    The effectiveness of three substance-abuse-prevention videotapes derived from contrasting theoretical frameworks was evaluated using 312 rural Mexican-American students in grades seven through eight. The assertion-training video produced higher levels of assertiveness among ninth-graders; the others had no impact. Discusses the importance of…

  13. Dancetime! 500 Years of Social Dance. Volume II: 20th Century. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 50-minute VHS videotape is the second in a 2-volume series that presents 500 years of social dance, music, and fashion. It features dance and music of the 20th century, including; 1910s: animal dances, castle walk, apache, and tango; 1920s: black bottom and charleston; 1930s: marathon, movie musicals, big apple, and jitterbug; 1940s: rumba;…

  14. Reptiles. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The ancestors of reptiles date back to the dinosaurs. After the dinosaurs died out, it was one of the best-adapted species that survived and…

  15. How To Dance through Time. Volume III: The Majesty of Renaissance Dance. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 42-minute VHS videotape is the third in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It highlights the intricacies of an Italian court dance suite, which mirrors the episodic changes of courtship. Nido D'Amore" (The Nest of Love) exposes the technique for all the dance suites of the era, and features The Opening (which…

  16. Insects & Other Arthropods. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. They also learn that there are more species of insects than any other animal class in the world. Insects are incredible creatures with many…

  17. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Initiative and Social Relations. [with] Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Michelle

    As preschoolers develop the ability to carry out their ideas and play alone and with others, they are developing the foundation for social competence. This booklet and a companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support nine High/Scope key experiences in initiative and social relations: (1) making and expressing choices, plans,…

  18. High/Scope Preschool Key Experiences: Language and Literacy. [with]Curriculum Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Nancy A.

    During the preschool years, children experience great strides in their ability to use language. This booklet and companion videotape help teachers and parents recognize and support six High/Scope key experiences in language and literacy: (1) talking with others about personally meaningful experiences; (2) describing objects, events, and relations;…

  19. Animal Interdependency. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. No organism on Earth can exist independently. Students find out more about animal relationships such as predator/prey relationships and…

  20. Presenting Social Issues with Videotape [and] Teaming Up to Take a Risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agosta, Diana; Jackson, Dick

    1991-01-01

    Two articles discuss the use of media in schools. One describes the use of videotapes to present social issues; the second describes the use of an integrated learning system with ninth and tenth grade at-risk students to improve their rate of attendance, academic achievement, and self-esteem. (LRW)

  1. Food Chains. Animal Life in Action[TM]. Schlessinger Science Library. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000

    This 23-minute videotape for grades 5-8, presents the myriad of animal life that exists on the planet. Students can view and perform experiments and investigations that help explain animal traits and habits. The food chain provides a clear example of how life continues year after year. Students learn how the cycle of energy starts with the sun,…

  2. Outdoor Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Valynda

    2010-01-01

    An outdoor classroom is the ideal vehicle for community involvement: Parents, native plant societies, 4-H, garden clubs, and master naturalists are all resources waiting to be tapped, as are local businesses offering support. If you enlist your community in the development and maintenance of your outdoor classroom, the entire community will…

  3. Flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, Tobias Kidde; Jørgensen, Søren

    2016-01-01

    Artiklen beskriver Flipped Classroom som et didaktisk princip, der kan være med til at organisere og tilrettelægge en undervisning, med fokus på forskellige læringsformer. Det handler om at forstå Flipped Classroom som en opdeling i 2 faser og 3 led, som samlet set skaber en didaktisk organisering....

  4. Observation, innovation and triangulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hetmar, Vibeke

    2007-01-01

    on experiences from a pilot project in three different classrooms methodological possibilities and problems are presented and discussed: 1) educational criticism, including the concepts of positions, perspectives and connoisseurship, 2) classroom observations and 3) triangulation as a methodological tool....

  5. Pre-Service Teachers and Classroom Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrino, Anthony M.

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the classroom practices of five pre-service teachers from three secondary schools in a large southeastern state. Through classroom observations, survey responses, reviews of refection logs, and focus-group interview responses, we centered on the issue of developing classroom authority as a means to effective classroom…

  6. Factors Affecting the Implementation of Argument in the Elementary Science Classroom. A Longitudinal Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anita M.; Hand, Brian

    2009-01-01

    This longitudinal case study describes the factors that affect an experienced teacher’s attempt to shift her pedagogical practices in order to implement embedded elements of argument into her science classroom. Research data was accumulated over 2 years through video recordings of science classes. The Reformed Teacher Observation Protocol (RTOP) is an instrument designed to quantify changes in classroom environments as related to reform as defined by the National Research Council ( National science education standards. Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1996b) and the National Research Council ( Fulfilling the promise: Biology education in the nation’s schools, Washington, DC: National Academy Press, 1990) and was used to analyze videotaped science lessons. Analysis of the data shows that there was a significant shift in the areas of teacher questioning, and student voice. Several levels of subsequent analysis were completed related to teacher questioning and student voice. The data suggests a relationship between these areas and the implementation of scientific argument. Results indicate that the teacher moved from a traditional, teacher-centered, didactic teaching style to instructional practices that allowed the focus and direction of the lesson to be affected by student voice. This was accomplished by a change in teacher questioning that included a shift from factual recall to more divergent questioning patterns allowing for increased student voice. As student voice increased, students began to investigate ideas, make statements or claims and to support these claims with strong evidence. Finally, students were observed refuting claims in the form of rebuttals. This study informs professional development related to experienced teachers in that it highlights pedagogical issues involved in implementing embedded elements of argument in the elementary classroom.

  7. Exploring How Second Grade Elementary Teachers Translate Their Nature of Science Views into Classroom Practice After a Graduate Level Nature of Science Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deniz, Hasan; Adibelli, Elif

    2015-12-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the factors mediating the translation of second grade teachers' nature of science (NOS) views into classroom practice after completing a graduate level NOS course. Four second grade in-service elementary teachers comprised the sample of this study. Data were collected from several sources during the course of this study. The primary data sources were (a) assessment of the elementary teachers' NOS views before and after the graduate level NOS course using the Views of Nature of Science Questionnaire Version B (VNOS-B) (Lederman et al., 2002) coupled with interviews, and (b) a classroom observation and videotaped recording of the elementary teachers' best NOS lessons coupled with interview. We identified three distinct but related factors that mediated the translation of NOS views into classroom practice: the teachers' perspectives about the developmental appropriateness of the NOS aspect, the teachers' selection of target NOS aspects, and the relative importance placed by teachers on each NOS aspect.

  8. Childhood videotaped social and neuromotor precursors of schizophrenia: a prospective investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiffman, Jason; Walker, Elaine; Ekstrøm, Morten

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The authors examined videotaped behaviors of children who developed schizophrenia as adults and of comparison subjects to disclose possible social and neuromotor deficits foreshadowing later development of schizophrenia. METHOD: In 1972, a sample of 265 11-13-year-old Danish children...... were filmed under standardized conditions while they were eating lunch. The examination was part of a larger study investigating early signs of schizophrenia spectrum disorders. Many of the subjects had a parent with schizophrenia, leaving them at high risk for developing a schizophrenia spectrum...... disorder. In 1991, adult psychiatric outcome data were obtained for 91.3% (N=242). This study systematically analyzed the videotapes to determine whether the children who developed schizophrenia as adults evidenced greater social and/or neuromotor deficits than children who did not develop a psychiatric...

  9. Computers and Classroom Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Janet Ward

    This book explores the meaning of computer technology in schools. The book is based on data gathered from a two-year observation of more than 30 different classrooms in an urban high school: geometry classes in which students used artificially intelligent tutors; business classes in which students learned word processing; and computer science…

  10. Differentiation in Classroom Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mottelson, Martha

    Differentiation in School Practice is an ongoing research project currently being carried out in UCC’s research department by myself and my coworker Christina Jørgensen. The project includes a field study of everyday life in a Danish 5th grade classroom with the aim to observe, describe and analyze...

  11. Classroom Social Signal Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raca, Mirko; Dillenbourg, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We present our efforts towards building an observational system for measuring classroom activity. The goal is to explore visual cues which can be acquired with a system of video cameras and automatically processed to enrich the teacher's perception of the audience. The paper will give a brief overview of our methodology, explored features, and…

  12. A Tale of Two Settings: The Lab and the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-08-08

    employed in this study were intensive and extensive classroom observation and repeated extended interviews with students and teachers. Classroom observers...instruction were observed during both years of the study, resulting in a very large data base gathered during almost 500 hours of classroom observation . With

  13. The Classroom Animal: Daddy Longlegs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes some of the characteristics of the common harvestmen, or daddy longlegs, and the true spider. Provides information on harvestmen's habitats and life cycles and includes tips on housing and observing these organisms in science classrooms. (TW)

  14. Virtual Classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Ove

    2013-01-01

    In the Scandinavian countries: Sweden, Norway and Denmark, the project GNU (Grænseoverskridende Nordisk Undervisning, i.e. Transnational Nordic Teaching) is experimenting with ways of conducting teaching across the borders in the elementary schools. The cloud classes are organised with one class...... and benefits in regard to learning and pedagogy with virtual classroom....

  15. Classroom Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzard, David

    2017-01-01

    Australian company Antarctica Flights runs summer sightseeing trips out of Australian capital cities to tour the Antarctic coast. The Laby Foundation of the University of Melbourne, through its "Classroom Antarctica" program, sponsored Kent Street High School science teacher, Ms Suzy Urbaniak and 18 of her students to take the trip, to…

  16. Profiles of classroom behavior in high schools: associations with teacher behavior management strategies and classroom composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pas, Elise T; Cash, Anne H; O'Brennan, Lindsey; Debnam, Katrina J; Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-04-01

    Although there has been considerable attention to the issue of classroom management and processes in educational reform models, there has been relatively limited research on these factors in high schools. The current study utilized observational data from 1262 classrooms in 52 high schools to examine teacher classroom management strategies and ratings of student compliance, engagement, and social disruption. Latent profile analysis (LPA) was conducted to examine specific patterns of classroom-wide student behavior in relation to teachers' use of classroom management strategies and classroom composition. The LPA revealed three distinct classroom behavioral profiles where students consistently met behavioral expectations (71%), inconsistently met expectations (23%), and were noncompliant (6%). Analyses indicated a functional association between patterns of student behavior and teachers' classroom management. In classrooms where students consistently met expectations, teachers provided more opportunities to respond and less disapproval and reactive behavioral management. Classrooms with noncompliant students had teachers who used the most disapproval and reactive behavior management. In addition, classrooms characterized as consistent had fewer males and more White students than classrooms characterized by inconsistent and noncompliant behaviors. These findings highlight the link between student patterns of behavior and teacher classroom management and have important implications for screening and professional development. Copyright © 2014 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Students' beliefs, attitudes, and conceptual change in a traditional and a constructivistic high school physics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, April Dean

    In this study, the relationships between student beliefs about the nature of science, student attitudes, and conceptual change about the nature of forces were investigated within a traditional and within a constructivistic high school physics classroom. Students in both classrooms were honors students taking a first year high school physics course and were primarily white and middle to upper SES. Students in the traditional classroom were all high ability juniors, and physics instruction was integrated with pre-calculus. Students in the constructivistic classroom were a mixture of juniors and seniors. Due to the interrelated nature of these factors and the complexity of their interactions, a naturalistic inquiry design was chosen. The data sources included videotape of 7-9 weeks of instruction; analysis of the videotapes using the Secondary Teacher Analysis Matrix (Gallagher & Parker, 1995); field notes; pretest/posttest assessment with the Force Concept Inventory (Hestenes, Wells, & Swackhammer, 1992); student responses from the Views on Science-Technology-Society questionnaire (Aikenhead & Ryan, 1992), the Questionnaire for the Assessment of a Science Course (Chiappetta, 1995), and the Constructivist Learning Environment Survey (Taylor, Fraser, & White, 1994); student interviews; and teacher interviews. In the traditional classroom, (a) students did not think that physics was relevant to everyday experiences; (b) high conceptual change students were more likely to have an angular world view (Cobern, 1993) and have views more similar to the teacher's about the nature of science; and (c) high conceptual change students were able to develop an internally consistent understanding of the content; however, that content appeared to be isolated knowledge in some students. In the constructivistic classroom, (a) students saw physics as relevant and useful; (b) there was no difference in world view or agreement with the teacher's views on the nature of science between high

  18. Beyond Lecture and Non-Lecture Classrooms: LA-student interactions in Active Learning Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Dayana; Kornreich, Hagit; Rodriguez, Idaykis; Monslave, Camila; Pena-Flores, Norma

    Our expanded multi-site study on active learning classrooms supported by Learning Assistants (LAs) aims to understand the connections between three classroom elements: the activity, student learning, and how LAs support the learning process in the classroom. At FIU, LAs are used in a variety of active learning settings, from large auditorium settings to studio classroom with movable tables. Our study uses the COPUS observation protocol as a way to characterize LAs behaviors in these classrooms. With a focus on LA-student interactions, our analysis of how LAs interact with students during a 'learning session' generated new observational codes for specific new categories of LA roles. Preliminary results show that LAs spend more time interacting with students in some classes, regardless of the classroom setting, while in other classrooms, LA-student interactions are mostly brief. We discuss how LA-student interactions contribute to the dynamics and mechanism of the socially shared learning activity.

  19. Smiles count but minutes matter: responses to classroom exercise breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howie, Erin K; Newman-Norlund, Roger D; Pate, Russell R

    2014-09-01

    To determine the subjective responses of teachers and students to classroom exercise breaks, and how responses varied by duration. This mixed-methods experimental study included focus groups with teachers (N = 8) and 4(th)- and 5(th)-grade students (N = 96). Students participated in 5-, 10-, and 20-minute exercise breaks and 10 minutes of sedentary activity. In an additional exploratory analysis, video-tapes of each condition were coded and compared for positive affect. Students and teachers discussed multiple benefits, but teachers discussed barriers to implementing regular breaks of 5-minutes or more. Students exhibited higher positive affect during each exercise condition. Classroom exercise breaks are an enjoyable way to increase physical activity, but additional support may be needed to encourage teachers to implement breaks of 5 minutes or longer.

  20. Constraints on communication in classrooms for the deaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, T J; Reich, C F

    1993-03-01

    One explanation for the relatively low scholastic achievement of deaf students is the character of communication in the classroom. Unlike aural communication methods, line-of-sight methods share the limitation that the receiver of the message must look at the sender. To assess the magnitude of this constraint, we measured the amount of time signers were looked at by potential receivers in typical secondary school classes for the deaf. Videotaped segments indicated that on average the messages sent by teachers and students were seen less than half the time. Students frequently engaged in collateral conversations. The constraints of line-of-sight communication are profound and should be addressed by teaching techniques, classroom layout, and possibly, the use of computer-communication technology.

  1. Quantification of video-taped images in microcirculation research using inexpensive imaging software (Adobe Photoshop).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, J; Krummenauer, F; Lehr, H A

    2000-04-01

    Study end-points in microcirculation research are usually video-taped images rather than numeric computer print-outs. Analysis of these video-taped images for the quantification of microcirculatory parameters usually requires computer-based image analysis systems. Most software programs for image analysis are custom-made, expensive, and limited in their applicability to selected parameters and study end-points. We demonstrate herein that an inexpensive, commercially available computer software (Adobe Photoshop), run on a Macintosh G3 computer with inbuilt graphic capture board provides versatile, easy to use tools for the quantification of digitized video images. Using images obtained by intravital fluorescence microscopy from the pre- and postischemic muscle microcirculation in the skinfold chamber model in hamsters, Photoshop allows simple and rapid quantification (i) of microvessel diameters, (ii) of the functional capillary density and (iii) of postischemic leakage of FITC-labeled high molecular weight dextran from postcapillary venules. We present evidence of the technical accuracy of the software tools and of a high degree of interobserver reliability. Inexpensive commercially available imaging programs (i.e., Adobe Photoshop) provide versatile tools for image analysis with a wide range of potential applications in microcirculation research.

  2. Methods and results of implementing a commercially available videotaped health physics training program in a multi-disciplined DOE facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neal, B.L.

    1979-01-01

    Sandia, a prime contractor for DOE, is a multi-disciplined research and development laboratory. Its various activities include the operations of two nuclear reactors, several multi-kilocurie gamma irradiation facilities, a transuranic hot cell facility, various and numerous particle accelerators and x-ray generators, and many other areas involving employees working with or around radioactive materials or radiation producing machines. Since March 1979, Sandia has conducted a formalized basic radiation safety training program using a commercially available videotaped training package. The videotapes are generic in nature and are accompanied with hard copy text material, vu-graphs, quizzes, and an instructor's guide. Sandia's overall training program and the methods, results, and problem areas of implementing an off the shelf, commercially available videotaped training program are described. Results are summarized using an instructor/course/student evaluation form

  3. A controlled evaluation of an eating disorders primary prevention videotape using the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Twigg, Kylie; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Paxton, Susan J

    2002-11-01

    The aim was to extend findings related to a previously reported eating disorders prevention program by comparing treatment and control groups, adding a follow-up, and examining whether receiver characteristics, personal relevance and need for cognition (NFC), could predict attitude change in early adolescent girls. Grade 7 girls were either shown a brief prevention videotape on dieting and body image (n = 104) or given no intervention (n = 114). All girls completed pre-, post- and 1-month follow-up questionnaires. The intervention group resulted in significantly more positive changes in attitude and knowledge at post-intervention, but only in knowledge at follow-up. There was no strong evidence that pre-intervention characteristics of recipients predicted responses to the videotape intervention when changes were compared to the control group. This prevention videotape appeared to have positive immediate effects, but additional intervention (e.g., booster sessions) may be required for longer-term change. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  4. The Classroom Animal: Crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1985-01-01

    Suggests using crickets for classroom activities, providing background information on their anatomy and reproduction and tips on keeping individual organisms or a breeding colony in the classroom. (JN)

  5. Ethnographic analysis: a study of classroom environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, L A

    1994-05-01

    Occupational therapists assess and adapt an environment to enhance clients' abilities to function. Therapists working in schools may assess several classroom environments in a week. Identifying relevant information in an efficient manner is essential yet presents a challenge for school therapists. In this study, ethnographic research methodology was used to analyze the plethora of data gained from observations in eight classrooms. Three major categories were identified to structure observations: activities, people, and communication. These categories were used to compile a Classroom Observation Guide that gives therapists relevant questions to ask in each category. Using the Classroom Observation Guide, occupational therapists can recommend classroom activities that suit a particular teacher's style. For example, working with a teacher who prefers structural activities with clear time and space boundaries for one specific purpose, a therapist might suggest organized sensorimotor games with a distinct purpose to be carried out for a given time period.

  6. Applying the elaboration likelihood model of persuasion to a videotape-based eating disorders primary prevention program for adolescent girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, Giselle F; Wertheim, Eleanor H

    2004-01-01

    This study applied principles from the Elaboration Likelihood Model of Persuasion to the prevention of disordered eating. Early adolescent girls watched either a preventive videotape only (n=114) or video plus post-video activity (verbal discussion, written exercises, or control discussion) (n=187); or had no intervention (n=104). Significantly more body image and knowledge improvements occurred at post video and follow-up in the intervention groups compared to no intervention. There were no outcome differences among intervention groups, or between girls with high or low elaboration likelihood. Further research is needed in integrating the videotape into a broader prevention package.

  7. The influence of classroom aggression and classroom climate on aggressive-disruptive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Duane E; Bierman, Karen L; Powers, C J

    2011-01-01

    Research suggests that early classroom experiences influence the socialization of aggression. Tracking changes in the aggressive behavior of 4,179 children from kindergarten to second-grade (ages 5-8), this study examined the impact of 2 important features of the classroom context--aggregate peer aggression and climates characterized by supportive teacher-student interactions. The aggregate aggression scores of children assigned to first-grade classrooms predicted the level of classroom aggression (assessed by teacher ratings) and quality of classroom climate (assessed by observers) that emerged by the end of Grade 1. Hierarchical linear model analyses revealed that first-grade classroom aggression and quality of classroom climate made independent contributions to changes in student aggression, as students moved from kindergarten to second grade. Implications for policy and practice are discussed. © 2011 The Authors. Child Development © 2011 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.

  8. Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said--Gender, Language, & Communication [and] Deborah Tannen: In Depth. Part 2. [Videotapes and Teaching Guide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannen, Deborah

    These curriculum-related materials include two videotapes and a 36-page teaching guide. The first videotape, "Deborah Tannen: He Said, She Said," with a running time of 50 minutes discusses: boys and girls, status and connection, directness and indirectness, public talk and private talk, ritual opposition, and conversational style, and a…

  9. Gathering the Dreamers: The Transformation Process to a Learner-Centered School. The Reinventing School Series. Part Two and Viewing Guide. Videotape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrello, Leonard C.; DiLaura, Nancy

    This videotape and viewing guide present an emerging learner-centered paradigm of teaching and learning and answer questions of why and how a staff changes its practices. The viewing guide describes the elementary school in the videotape, noting the full inclusion of 50 students identified as disabled, the team approach in which teachers are…

  10. Enhancing traditional, televised, and videotaped courses with Web-based technologies: a comparison of student satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sole, M L; Lindquist, M

    2001-01-01

    Varied distance learning strategies can be used to deliver nursing courses, including interactive television, videotape, and Web-based approaches. (1) To assess student assess student satisfaction with a critical care elective course offered simultaneously via traditional and distance learning formats in which Web-based strategies were added, and (2) to compare satisfaction of students taking the traditional course versus those taking the class via distance technology. Students (n = 113) who took the course during the spring 1998 and 1999 semesters completed a teacher-constructed evaluation at the end of the semester. Mean ratings on the evaluation were positive. Ratings of interaction, communication with instructor, and facilitation of learning were higher from students who took the traditional course. The application of Web-based technologies may be one factor for the overall course satisfaction. However, it is important to continue to evaluate strategies that work best for students taking courses via distance technology.

  11. Exclusively Visual Analysis of Classroom Group Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data…

  12. Instructional Quality Features in Videotaped Biology Lessons: Content-Independent Description of Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfner, Tobias; Förtsch, Christian; Boone, William; Neuhaus, Birgit J.

    2017-09-01

    A number of studies on single instructional quality features have been reported for mathematics and science instruction. For summarizing single instructional quality features, researchers have created a model of three basic dimensions (classroom management, supportive climate, and cognitive activation) of instructional quality mainly through observing mathematics instruction. Considering this model as valid for all subjects and as usable for describing instruction, we used it in this study which aimed to analyze characteristics of instructional quality in biology lessons of high-achieving and low-achieving classes, independently of content. Therefore, we used the data of three different previous video studies of biology instruction conducted in Germany. From each video study, we selected three high-achieving and three low-achieving classes (N = 18 teachers; 35 videos) for our multiple-case study, in which conspicuous characteristics of instructional quality features were qualitatively identified and qualitatively analyzed. The amount of these characteristics was counted in a quantitative way in all the videos. The characteristics we found could be categorized using the model of three basic dimensions of instructional quality despite some subject-specific differences for biology instruction. Our results revealed that many more characteristics were observable in high-achieving classes than in low-achieving classes. Thus, we believe that this model could be used to describe biology instruction independently of the content. We also make the claims about the qualities for biology instruction—working with concentration in a content-structured environment, getting challenged in higher order thinking, and getting praised for performance—that could have positive influence on students' achievement.

  13. Effective Factors in Interactions within Japanese EFL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftoon, Parviz; Ziafar, Meisam

    2013-01-01

    Classroom interactional patterns depend on some contextual, cultural and local factors in addition to the methodologies employed in the classroom. In order to delineate such factors, the focus of classroom interaction research needs to shift from the observables to the unobservables like teachers' and learners' psychological states and cultural…

  14. How To Dance through Time. Volume VI: A 19th Century Ball--The Charm of Group Dances. [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teten, Carol

    This 48-minute VHS videotape is the sixth in a series of "How To Dance Through Time" videos. It shows the festivity of the 19th century group dances, enabling the viewer to plan and participate in the elegant opening to the ball, a refined square dance, and flirtatious Cotillion dancing games. Professional dancers demonstrate the…

  15. Looking for attributes of powerful teaching for numeracy in tasmanian K-7 classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beswick, Kim; Swabey, Karen; Andrew, Rob

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports on the development and use of a classroom observation reflection tool designed to measure the extent to which pedagogies acknowledged in the literature as contributing to effective teaching of mathematics for numeracy are present in classrooms. The observation schedule was used in conjunction with a record of classroom activity to examine numeracy pedagogies in a sample of Tasmanian classrooms from Kindergarten to Year 7. Low levels of intellectual challenge in highly socially supportive classrooms were typical.

  16. An Empirical Investigation of the Dimensionality of the Physical Literacy Environment in Early Childhood Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dynia, Jaclyn M.; Schachter, Rachel E.; Piasta, Shayne B.; Justice, Laura M.; O'Connell, Ann A.; Yeager Pelatti, Christina

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated the dimensionality of the physical literacy environment of early childhood education classrooms. Data on the classroom physical literacy environment were collected from 245 classrooms using the Classroom Literacy Observation Profile. A combination of confirmatory and exploratory factor analysis was used to identify five…

  17. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-01-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and…

  18. Discipline and Rules in Four Hong Kong Kindergarten Classrooms: A Qualitative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Joyce; Grieshaber, Susan Jane; Walsh, Kerryann

    2017-01-01

    Classroom discipline is a topic of international interest and teachers are bombarded with advice regarding how to and why they should manage children's behaviour in their classrooms. This paper draws on data related to classroom discipline gathered from a detailed classroom observation schedule, teacher interviews, and field notes with four…

  19. System for assessing classroom attention.

    OpenAIRE

    Raca Mirko; Dillenbourg Pierre

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we give a preview of our system for automatically evaluating attention in the classroom. We demonstrate our current behaviour metrics and preliminary observations on how they reflect the reactions of people to the given lecture. We also introduce foundations of our hypothesis on peripheral awareness of students during lectures.

  20. Evaluation of nursing faculty through observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L H

    1998-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess current use and faculty perceptions of classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation in schools of nursing. Baccalaureate schools of nursing were surveyed to determine current use of classroom observation and its worth from the perception of administrators and faculty. Although most schools used classroom observation as a method of faculty evaluation, further clarification and research is needed in the following areas: purpose of classroom observation; number of observations necessary; weight given to classroom observation in relation to other evaluation methods; and tools used.

  1. Patterns of interactions at grade 5 classroom in learning the topic of statistics viewed from cognitive load theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setianingsih, R.

    2018-01-01

    The nature of interactions that occurs among teacher, students, learning sources, and learning environment creates different settings to enhance learning. Any setting created by a teacher is affected by 3 (three) types of cognitive load: intrinsic cognitive load, extraneous cognitive load, and germane cognitive load. This study is qualitative in nature, aims to analyse the patterns of interaction that are constituted in mathematics instructions by taking into account the cognitive load theory. The subjects of this study are 21 fifth-grade students who learn mathematics in small groups and whole-class interactive lessons. The data were collected through classroom observations which were videotaped, while field notes were also taken. The data analysis revealed that students engaged in productive interaction and inquiry while they were learning mathematics in small groups or in whole class setting, in which there was a different type of cognitive load that dominantly affecting the learning processes at each setting. During learning mathematics in whole class setting, the most frequently found interaction patterns were to discuss and compare solution based on self-developed models, followed by expressing opinions. This is consistent with the principles of mathematics learning, which gives students wide opportunities to construct mathematical knowledge through individual learning, learning in small groups as well as learning in whole class settings. It means that by participating in interactive learning, the students are habitually engaged in productive interactions and high level of mathematical thinking.

  2. Tracing Growth of Teachers' Classroom Interactions with Representations of Functions in the Connected Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Brian Lee

    The purpose of this study is to create an empirically based theoretic model of change of the use and treatment of representations of functions with the use of Connected Classroom Technology (CCT) using data previously collected for the Classroom Connectivity in Promoting Mathematics and Science Achievement (CCMS) project. Qualitative analysis of videotapes of three algebra teachers' instruction focused on different categories thought to influence teaching representations with technology: representations, discourse, technology, and decisions. Models for rating teachers low, medium, or high for each of these categories were created using a priori codes and grounded methodology. A cross case analysis was conducted after the completion of the case studies by comparing and contrasting the three cases. Data revealed that teachers' decisions shifted to incorporate the difference in student ideas/representations made visible by the CCT into their instruction and ultimately altered their orientation to mathematics teaching. The shift in orientation seemed to lead to the teachers' growth with regards to representations, discourse, and technology.

  3. A videotaped intervention to enhance child control and reduce anxiety of the pain of dental injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, P; Raadal, M; Naidu, S; Yoshida, T; Kvale, G; Milgrom, P

    2003-12-01

    While the psychological literature shows that perceptions of uncontrollability contribute to anxiety and other pathologies, interventions that enhance perceived control have been shown to reduce anxiety. This study attempted to assess a brief videotape to enhance child perceived control in a dental setting. 101 children aged 7-9 years completed warm-up procedures and viewed either: a) the experimental intervention, a 2 minutes video of a dentist explaining what an injection will feel like and proposing hand raising as a signal mechanism; or b) the control condition, a 2 minutes video of Disneyland. Fear of dental injections was assessed on a 10 cm visual analogue scale before and after the intervention. In the experimental group there was a significant fear reduction from pre- to post-intervention, while this was not the case in the control group. Children with higher pre-existing levels of fear benefited more from the intervention than children with lower levels of fear. The results of this pilot study suggest that intervention packages that impact child control have promise in lowering anxiety.

  4. Provider Education about Glaucoma and Glaucoma Medications during Videotaped Medical Visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betsy Sleath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The purpose of this study was to examine how patient, physician, and situational factors are associated with the extent to which providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications, and which patient and provider characteristics are associated with whether providers educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications. Methods. Patients with glaucoma who were newly prescribed or on glaucoma medications were recruited and a cross-sectional study was conducted at six ophthalmology clinics. Patients’ visits were videotape recorded and patients were interviewed after visits. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze the data. Results. Two hundred and seventy-nine patients participated. Providers were significantly more likely to educate patients about glaucoma and glaucoma medications if they were newly prescribed glaucoma medications. Providers were significantly less likely to educate African American patients about glaucoma. Providers were significantly less likely to educate patients of lower health literacy about glaucoma medications. Conclusion. Eye care providers did not always educate patients about glaucoma or glaucoma medications. Practice Implications. Providers should consider educating more patients about what glaucoma is and how it is treated so that glaucoma patients can better understand their disease. Even if a patient has already been educated once, it is important to reinforce what has been taught before.

  5. Border Collie Collapse: Owner Survey Results and Veterinary Description of Videotaped Episodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Susan; Minor, Katie; Shmon, Cindy L; Shelton, G Diane; Patterson, Edward E; Mickelson, James R

    Completed surveys were obtained from owners of 165 border collies experiencing repeated episodes of abnormal gait or collapse during strenuous exercise. Unremarkable veterinary evaluation and lack of disease progression over time made common systemic, cardiac, and neurologic causes of exercise intolerance unlikely. Survey questions addressed signalment, age of onset, description of episodes, and owner perception of factors associated with collapse. Most dogs were young adults (median 2 yr) when episodes began, and they had experienced from 2 to more than 100 episodes (median 6) prior to their owners completing the survey. Retrieving was the activity most commonly associated with episodes (112/165 dogs, 68%), followed by herding stock (39/165 dogs, 24%). Owners reported that high environmental temperatures (111/165 dogs, 67%) and excitement (67/165 dogs, 41%) increased the likelihood of their dog having an episode during strenuous activity. Veterinary evaluation of videotapes of presumed border collie collapse (BCC) episodes (40 dogs) were used to provide a description of the typical features of BCC episodes. Altered mentation, symmetrical ataxia affecting all four limbs, increased pelvic limb extensor tone and toe scuffing or knuckling, truncal swaying, and falling to the side were common features, suggesting that BCC may be an episodic diffuse central nervous system disorder.

  6. Using case studies and videotaped vignettes to facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooper, Barbara L

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking skills are an essential component of nursing and crucial to nursing practice. Case studies with videotaped vignettes were used to help facilitate the development of critical thinking skills in new graduate nurses. Results revealed a statistically significant increase (p = .041) on the overall Health Sciences Reasoning Test score. It is essential for educators to be aware of educational strategies that can affect the development of critical thinking skills.

  7. Classroom Management. TESOL Classroom Practice Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Thomas S. C., Ed.

    2008-01-01

    This series captures the dynamics of the contemporary ESOL classroom. It showcases state-of-the-art curricula, materials, tasks, and activities reflecting emerging trends in language education and seeks to build localized language teaching and learning theories based on teachers' and students' unique experiences in and beyond the classroom. Each…

  8. Encouraging Classroom Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Joseph McKee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Classroom discussion has the potential to enhance the learning environment and encourages students to become active participants in the educational process. Student participation in classroom discussion has been shown to significantly improve the student learning experience. Research suggests that classroom discussion is an effective method for encouraging student classroom participation and for motivating student learning beyond the classroom. Participation in classroom discussion encourages students to become active collaborators in the learning process, while at the same time providing instructors with a practical method of assessing student learning. Classroom discussion is an effective tool for developing higher-level cognitive skills like critical thinking. Despite the potential discussion holds for student learning, many in academia lament the lack of participation in the classroom. The lack of student participation in classroom discussion is not a recent problem; it is one that has frustrated instructors for decades. Instructors report that some of the more current methods for encouraging classroom discussion can be exasperating and at times non-productive. This two-year study of 510 college and university students provides insight into the reasons why some students do not participate in classroom discussion. This study, which also elicited input from sixteen college and university professors and two high school teachers, offers some suggestions for creating and encouraging an environment conducive to student participation in the classroom.

  9. Better Classroom Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kecskemeti, Maria; Winslade, John

    2016-01-01

    The usual approaches to classroom relationships are either teacher-centred or student-centred. This book breaks new ground in its exploration of relationship-centred classrooms. In relationship-centred classrooms, the teacher and the student are equally important. That shifts the focus to the quality of their interaction and whether it is…

  10. Chapman's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 621 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  11. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  12. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  13. Sebastian Pinnacles Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  14. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  15. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  16. Eau Galllie Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 609 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes tken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  17. Cocoa Beach Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  18. Cape Canaveral Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 616 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  19. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  20. Apparent and Actual Use of Observational Frameworks by Experienced Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satern, Miriam N.

    This study investigated observational strategies that were used by six experienced physical education teachers when viewing a videotape of motor skills (standing vertical jump, overarm throw, tennis serve, basketball jump shot and dance sequence). Four observational frameworks were proposed as being representative of subdisciplinary knowledge…

  1. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHIRIN HABIBI KHORASANI

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students’ ability in taking informed consent from patients. Methods: This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics course before their ‘clinical clerkship’training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group (n=28 was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1 (n=22 were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issues through the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics of informed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anova test. P-value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The mean scores results of A2, A1 and B group were found to be 7.21, 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8, respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (p<0.001, followed by A1 group (p<0.05, while was the least in the B group (p=0.875. Conclusion: According to this research, lecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better. It should be considered that mixed methods of teaching should be used together for better result.

  2. Using video-taped examples of standardized patient to teach medical students taking informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi Khorasani, Shirin; Ebrahimi, Sedigheh

    2015-04-01

    Medical student should be trained in medical ethics and one of the most essential issues in this field is taking informed consents. In this research, we compared the effect of effectiveness of teaching methods on students' ability intaking informed consent from patients. This semi-experimental study was carried out on fifty eight subjects from the 4th-year students  of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences who attended in medical ethics coursebefore their 'clinical clerkship'training.Method of sampling was census and students were randomly allocated into two groups of control group(n=28) was trained in traditional lecture-based class and the case groupnamed as A1(n=22) were taught by video-taped examples of standardized patient.Then A1 group attended in traditional lecture-based classes named as A2. The groups were evaluated in terms the ability of recognition of ethical issuesthrough the scenario based ethical examination before and after each training. Scenarios were related to the topics ofinformed consent. Data were analyzed by SPSS 14 software using descriptive statistics and anovatest.P-Value less than 0.05 was considered as significant. The mean scores results of A2, A1and B groupwere found to be7.21 , 5.91 and 5.73 out of 8,respectively. Comparison between the groups demonstrated that the ability of taking informed consent was significantly higher in A2 group (plecture-based teaching is still of great value in teaching medical ethics, but when combined with standardized patient, the outcome will be much better.it should be considered that mixed methodsof teaching should be used together for better result.

  3. Mistake management in a foreign language classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Volkova, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the thesis is to design general recomendations on mistake management in a foreign language classroom which would meet both teachers' and learners' requirements and methods of mistake management in a foreign language classroom which would contribute to development of learners' communicative competence. The following methods were used in the research: analysis of literature on pedagogy, psychology and methodology of foreign language teaching, interview, questionnaire and observation....

  4. Caregiver Cognition and Behavior in Day-Care Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Susan D.

    A study examined the relationship between change in daycare children's classroom behavior and the teacher's socialization behavior. Various behaviors of 69 children in 24 classrooms were observed and coded in the fall and spring of the school year. Observers coded teacher behavior according to the Caregiver Interaction Scale, which assesses…

  5. A Guide to Parent Observation in the Primary Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battle, Judy Shepps

    2016-01-01

    Just as the classroom guide must prepare for observation in the classroom, so too should parents prepare themselves for classroom observation. What is the purpose of their observation? What is the procedure? What should they note? What points of awareness should they keep in mind? Using the format of a letter to parents preparing to observe in a…

  6. Equity Analytics: A Methodological Approach for Quantifying Participation Patterns in Mathematics Classroom Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholz, Daniel L.; Shah, Niral

    2018-01-01

    Equity in mathematics classroom discourse is a pressing concern, but analyzing issues of equity using observational tools remains a challenge. In this article, we propose equity analytics as a quantitative approach to analyzing aspects of equity and inequity in classrooms. We introduce a classroom observation tool that focuses on relatively…

  7. Evaluating Classroom Interaction with the iPad®: An Updated Stalling's Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, Gregory; Schep, Lourens; Borden, Lisa Lunney; Murray-Orr, Anne; Orr, Jeff; MacKinnon, Paula

    2016-01-01

    A large study of classrooms in the Caribbean context necessitated the use of a validated classroom observation tool. In practice, the paper-version Stalling's instrument (Stallings & Kaskowitz 1974) presented specific challenges with respect to (a) facile data collection and (b) qualitative observations of classrooms. In response to these…

  8. The Lions Quest Program in Turkey: Teachers' Views and Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol-Guven, Mine

    2016-01-01

    This is a pilot study to explore the classroom implementation of the Lions Quest Program in Turkey. Teachers of first through eighth grades at two elementary schools who applied the program were interviewed about the program and their classroom practices while they were also observed and their classrooms were also observed. Considerable program…

  9. Perception Shapes Experience: The Influence of Actual and Perceived Classroom Environment Dimensions on Girls' Motivations for Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Juliette; Watt, Helen M. G.

    2013-01-01

    The classroom environment influences students' academic outcomes, but it is often students' perceptions that shape their classroom experiences. Our study examined the extent to which observed classroom environment features shaped perceptions of the classroom, and explained levels of, and changes in, girls' motivation in junior secondary school…

  10. Social Inclusion: Teachers as Facilitators in Peer Acceptance of Students with Disabilities in Regular Classrooms in Tamil Nadu, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Ruffina; Kuyini, Ahmed Bawa

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the impact of classroom teachers' attitudes towards inclusive education, teachers' self-efficacy and classroom practices on the social status of students with disabilities in inclusive classrooms in Tamil Nadu, India. Questionnaires, interviews and classroom observations were employed to gather data. The data analysis included…

  11. 34 CFR 300.310 - Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... specific learning disability, must decide to— (1) Use information from an observation in routine classroom... (including the regular classroom setting) to document the child's academic performance and behavior in the... of the child's academic performance in the regular classroom after the child has been referred for an...

  12. Virtual classroom project

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    This project aims to provide students with disabilities the same in class learning experience through virtual reality technology, 360-degree video capture, and the use of Arduino units. These technologies will be combined to facilitate communication between teachers in physical classrooms with students in virtual classrooms. The goal is to provide a person who is affected by a disability (which makes it hard to be in a traditional classroom) the same benefits of a safe and interactive learnin...

  13. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fezile Ozdamli

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and provide to make it recognize more by educators and researchers. With this aim, in the study what flipped classroom approach is, flipped classroom technology models, its advantages and limitations were explained.

  14. Managing Classroom Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, James D.

    Schools need to meet unique problems through the development of special classroom management techniques. Factors which contribute to classroom problems include lack of supervision at home, broken homes, economic deprivation, and a desire for peer attention. The educational atmosphere should encourage creativity for both the student and the…

  15. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to· teaching and learning science. Logarithm and agM. In [1] we had discussed the evaluation.

  16. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    raised in a classroom situation. We may suggest strategies for dealing with them, or invite responses, or both. "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. Proving a Result in Combinatorics using Equations.

  17. Relationships in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Graça Duarte; Sardinha, Susana; Reis, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Climate in the classroom is one of the determining factors in the development of practices in Inclusive Education. Many factors contribute to the climate in the classroom. However, there are predominance on affective-relational factors, with impact on action, norms and values, social interactions and learning processes. In this paper, the authors…

  18. Flipped Classroom, active Learning?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Dyreborg; Levinsen, Henrik; Philipps, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Action research is conducted in three physics classes over a period of eighteen weeks with the aim of studying the effect of flipped classroom on the pupils agency and learning processes. The hypothesis is that flipped classroom teaching will potentially allocate more time to work actively...

  19. Flipped Classroom Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdamli, Fezile; Asiksoy, Gulsum

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly…

  20. Mathematics difficulties & classroom leadership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Maria Christina Secher

    2016-01-01

    This article investigates possible links between inclusion, students, for whom mathematics is extensively difficult, and classroom leadership through a case study on teaching strategies and student participation in four classrooms at two different primary schools in Denmark. Three sets of results...... are presented: 1) descriptions of the teachers’ classroom leadership to include all their students in the learning community, 2) the learning community produced by stated and practiced rules for teaching and learning behavior, 3) the classroom behavior of students who experience difficulties with mathematics....... The findings suggest that the teachers’ pedagogical choices and actions support an active learning environment for students in diverse learning needs, and that the teachers practise dimensions of inclusive classroom leadership that are known to be successful for teaching mathematics to all students. Despite...

  1. Evaluation of two videotape instruction programmes on how to break bad news--for Cantonese-speaking medical students in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betson, C L; Fielding, R; Wong, G; Chung, S F; Nestel, D F

    1997-12-01

    To evaluate a culture-specific videotape on how to 'break bad news' and another videotape produced by a western university, and to determine if the language of presentation influenced the students' perceived abilities to execute basic skills. Third year medical students at the Faculty of Medicine, the University of Hong Kong. Longitudinal study with experimental design. Two instructional tapes on breaking bad news; one using Chinese speaking role models and one using English. In both groups, self-efficacy summed scores increased from 26.8 (95% CI = 25.9-27.7) at the pre-test to 29.0 (95% CI = 28.4-29.6). The biggest changes occurred in perceived self-efficacy regarding specific skills. However, students using the Chinese tape rated skills as more useful than those using the English tape. The videotapes were useful in teaching communication skills. Culturally relevant audiovisual materials were more effective.

  2. Acoustics and sociolinguistics: Patterns of communication in hearing impairing classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKellin, William; Shahin, Kimary; Jamieson, Janet; Hodgson, Murray; Pichora-Fuller, Kathleen

    2005-04-01

    In elementary school classes, noise during student led activities is often taken as evidence of successful interaction and learning. In this complex social environment of elementary school classrooms, acquisition of complex language and social skills-the focus of activities in early education-is expected to take place in hearing-hostile environments. Communication and language processing in these contexts requires interactive strategies, discourse forms, and syntactic structures different from the educationally desired forms used in acoustically advantageous environments. Recordings were made of the interaction of groups of students in grades 1-3, 5, and 7 during collaborative group work in their regular classrooms. Each student wore microphones at the ear level and head-mounted video cameras. Each group as a whole was also audio- and videotaped and noise level readings were recorded. Analysis of the acoustical and phonological properties of language heard by each student has demonstrated that the language variety used in these noisy and reverberant settings is similar to that of individuals with hearing impairments. This paper reports similarities between the syntactic structures and pragmatic strategies used by hearing impaired children and normally hearing children in noisy contexts. [Work supported by Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies, University of British Columbia.

  3. Language to Language: Nurturing Writing Development in Multilingual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shagoury, Ruth

    2009-01-01

    The author spent four years embedded in a multilingual kindergarten classroom in which children spoke six different languages and several more years observing multilingual Head Start classrooms. She shares numerous examples of young dual language learners actively figuring out the way written language works in their first and second languages.…

  4. Preliminary Lessons about Supporting Participation and Learning in Inclusive Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morningstar, Mary E.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Lee, Hyunjoo; Born, Kiara

    2015-01-01

    This descriptive study examined observational data collected in inclusive classrooms from six schools that were operating schoolwide inclusive policies and practices. Illustrative evidence of classroom practices supporting learning and participation of all students, including students with significant disabilities, adds to an understanding of…

  5. Teacher-Student Interactions in Desegregated Classrooms in South Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeyar, Saloshna; Killen, Roy

    2006-01-01

    This study explored the state of desegregation and integration in South African schools 11 years after the demise of Apartheid. Three classrooms in three desegregating schools with different histories and race profiles were visited. Overall, each classroom was visited on 10 occasions over a period of 2 weeks. Direct observation was the main data…

  6. Understanding Children's Self-Regulation within Different Classroom Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmons, Kristy; Pelletier, Janette; Corter, Carl

    2016-01-01

    In this study, children's self-regulation was observed, along with other social and academic activities in kindergarten classrooms during whole group, small group, transition and play contexts. We examined how children's self-regulation and engagement differed among classroom grouping, play and transition contexts. Results showed that students…

  7. Managing Your Classroom for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Harry; Wong, Rosemary; Rogers, Karen; Brooks, Amanda

    2012-01-01

    Effective teachers view classroom management as a process of organizing and structuring classroom events for student learning. Creating a well-managed classroom with established procedures is the priority of a teacher the first two weeks of school. In an elementary classroom where each day may have a different array of subjects and at different…

  8. Teacher Logs: A Tool for Gaining a Comprehensive Understanding of Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glennie, Elizabeth J.; Charles, Karen J.; Rice, Olivia N.

    2017-01-01

    Examining repeated classroom encounters over time provides a comprehensive picture of activities. Studies of instructional practices in classrooms have traditionally relied on two methods: classroom observations, which are expensive, and surveys, which are limited in scope and accuracy. Teacher logs provide a "real-time" method for…

  9. Understanding Teacher Behavior in the Classroom: A Must for Sound Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lorin W.

    1986-01-01

    More information is necessary about constraints placed on teachers before sound classroom performance evaluations can be conducted. Results of an observational instrument utilized in South Carolina, "Describing Practices and Intentions of Classroom Teachers," isolates classroom factors associated with appropriateness of teachers'…

  10. Classroom Research by Classroom Teachers, 1992.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Michael, Ed.

    1992-01-01

    This volume celebrates teachers as life-long learners of the art of teaching, by presenting 21 action research studies designed and implemented by classroom teachers. A "How To Get Started" section outlines action research steps and offers worksheets. Descriptions of the research studies begin with ethnographic studies, which include "Adopt a…

  11. Classroom Simulation for Trainee Teachers Using 3D Virtual Environments and Simulated Smartbot Student Behaviours

    OpenAIRE

    Alotaibi, Fahad Mazaed

    2014-01-01

    his thesis consists of an analysis of a classroom simulation using a Second Life (SL) experiment that aims to investigate the teaching impact on smartbots (virtual students) from trainee teacher avatars with respect to interaction, simulated behaviour, and observed teaching roles. The classroom-based SL experiments’ motivation is to enable the trainee teacher to acquire the necessary skills and experience to manage a real classroom environment through simulations of a real classroom. This ty...

  12. Teaching and Learning Science in Authoritative Classrooms: Teachers' Power and Students' Approval in Korean Elementary Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeong-A.; Kim, Chan-Jong

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to understand interactions in Korean elementary science classrooms, which are heavily influenced by Confucianism. Ethnographic observations of two elementary science teachers' classrooms in Korea are provided. Their classes are fairly traditional teaching, which mean teacher-centered interactions are dominant. To understand the power and approval in science classroom discourse, we have adopted Critical Discourse Analysis (CDA). Based on CDA, form and function analysis was adopted. After the form and function analysis, all episodes were analyzed in terms of social distance. The results showed that both teachers exercised their power while teaching. However, their classes were quite different in terms of getting approval by students. When a teacher got students' approval, he could conduct the science lesson more effectively. This study highlights the importance of getting approval by students in Korean science classrooms.

  13. Investigating EFL Classroom Interaction Process in Iraqi Intermediate Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muna Mohammed Abbas Alkhateeb

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent times, the traditional interaction structures of English both language classrooms and roles of teachers and students are gradually changing. This marks the shift from the teacher-centered classrooms to student-centered classrooms; moving towards ‘student-centered learning’ and‘collaborative working modes’. The contemporary educational world views teachers and students as communicators. In such situations students get more opportunity to ‘participate’, ‘observe’, ‘reflect on’ and ‘practice social ways’. These opportunities expose the students to a more ‘meaning-making’ and ‘knowledge construction processes’. The shift from traditional teaching and learning process to the contemporary one has posed great challenges for teachers, who are always working under pressure to complete the syllabus designed for the academic year. In such a situation it is very important to ascertain if this idea of student-centered classroom is present in the recent classroom. Educationally oriented research into classroom interaction makes it essential for further studies into the classroom interaction in the modern classroom. Hence, this study aims to observe the interaction process that takes place in English classrooms of four government schools in Hilla (Centre of Babylon Governorate. This paper also suggests measures to improve classroom interaction and language learning in the English classes. The main findings from the study are as follows: (a the classroom interaction is teacher-centered, (b teachers partially facilitate learning, the classrooms are controlled by teachers (c the ratio of the teacher-talk is more than student-talk."

  14. Children's self-allocation and use of classroom curricular time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, J; Worrall, N

    1992-02-01

    A class of 9-10 year-olds (N = 12) in a British primary school were observed as it moved over a one-year period through three types of classroom environment, traditional directive, transitional negotiative and established negotiative. Each environment offered the children a differing relationship with curricular time, its control and allocation, moving from teacher-allocated time to child allocation. Pupil self-report and classroom observation indicated differences in the balance of curricular spread and allocated time on curricular subject in relation to the type of classroom organisation and who controlled classroom time. These differences were at both class and individual child level. The established negotiative environment recorded the most equitable curricular balance, traditional directive the least. While individual children responded differently within and across the three classroom environments, the established negotiative where time was under child control recorded preference for longer activity periods compared to where the teacher controlled time allocations.

  15. For the Classroom: Scrimshaw.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Procedures are described for practicing the art of scrimshaw in the classroom. Several materials are suggested for use. These include beef soup bones, old piano keys, nails, sandpaper, and lampblack or charcoal. (SA)

  16. Culture in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medin, Douglas L.; Bang, Megan

    2014-01-01

    Culture plays a large but often unnoticeable role in what we teach and how we teach children. We are a country of immense diversity, but in classrooms the dominant European-American culture has become the language of learning.

  17. Goodbye Classrooms (Redux).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geber, Beverly

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the location of corporate training in view of modern technology. Indicates that training will be brought out of the classroom and to the work station. Describes training programs offered at several large corporations. (JOW)

  18. Classroom -RE-SONANCE

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "Classroom" is equally a forum for raising broader issues and sharing personal experiences and viewpoints on matters related to teaching and learning science. ! Energy transfer in an elastic collision. One may intuitively feel that in an elastic ...

  19. Constructive Classroom Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollard, Norin; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Reviews classroom management strategies that are child-centered and consistent with constructivist approaches to education, in which teachers create situations that facilitate learning. Describes strategies including techniques for establishing dialog, cognitive interventions (including self management and conflict resolution), cognitive…

  20. Flipped Classroom Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Fezile Ozdamli; Gulsum Asiksoy

    2016-01-01

    Flipped classroom is an active, student-centered approach that was formed to increase the quality of period within class. Generally this approach whose applications are done mostly in Physical Sciences, also attracts the attention of educators and researchers in different disciplines recently. Flipped classroom learning which wide-spreads rapidly in the world, is not well recognized in our country. That is why the aim of study is to attract attention to its potential in education field and pr...

  1. Classroom Games: Making Money

    OpenAIRE

    Susan K. Laury; Charles A. Holt

    2000-01-01

    Economics is often taught at a level of abstraction that can hinder some students from gaining basic intuition. However, lecture and textbook presentations can be complemented with classroom exercises in which students make decisions and interact. The approach can increase interest in and decrease skepticism about economic theory. This feature offers short descriptions of classroom exercises for a variety of economics courses, with something of an emphasis on the more popular undergraduate co...

  2. A case study of an experienced teacher's beliefs and practice during implementation of an inquiry-based approach in her elementary science classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Anita Marie Benna

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between one teacher's beliefs and her practices. This study examined this relationship during the implementation of reform by the teacher in the area of science as recommended by the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996). This study was a single case study of one experienced elementary teacher who was implementing the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach in her science classroom. The study's focus was on the relationship between the teacher's beliefs and her practice during this innovation, as well as the factors that influenced that relationship. Data were collected from multiple sources such as routinely scheduled interviews, classroom observations, researcher's fieldnotes, teacher's written reflections, professional development liaison reflections, student responses, video-tape analysis, think-aloud protocol, audio-tapes of student discourse, metaphor analysis, and Reformed Teacher Observation Protocol (RTOP) scores. Data analysis was conducted using two different approaches: constant comparative method and RTOP scores. Results indicate that a central belief of this teacher was her beliefs about how students learn. This belief was entangled with other more peripheral beliefs such as beliefs about the focus of instruction and beliefs about student voice. As the teacher shifted her central belief from a traditional view of learning to one that is more closely aligned with a constructivist' view, these peripheral beliefs also shifted. This study also shows that the teacher's beliefs and her practice were consistent and entwined throughout the study. As her beliefs shifted, so did her practice and it supports Thompson's (1992) notion of a dialectic relationship between teacher beliefs and practice. Additionally, this study provides implications for teacher education and professional development. As teachers implement reform efforts related to inquiry in their science classrooms, professional

  3. Everyday classroom assessment practices in science classrooms in Sweden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, María del Carmen; Jakobsson, Anders

    2014-12-01

    The focus of this study is to examine to what extent and in what ways science teachers practice assessment during classroom interactions in everyday activities in an upper-secondary school in Sweden. We are science teachers working now with a larger research project on assessment in science education that seeks to examine teachers' assessment practices in the upper-secondary school. Framing questions include: are teachers performing an integrated assessment of students' skills as the national curriculum mandates? If so, what do the instructional discourses look like in those situations and what are students' experiences regarding their agency on learning and assessment? We emphasize the social, cultural and historic character of assessment and sustain a situated character of learning instead of the notion that learning is "stored inside the head". Teacher led lessons in three science classrooms were video-recorded and analyzed by combining ethnographic and discourse methods of analysis. Both methods are appropriate to the theoretical foundation of our approach on learning and can give some answers to questions about how individuals interact socially, how their experience is passed on to next generations through language and how language use may reveal cultural changes in the studied context. Making the study of action in a classroom the focal point of sociocultural analysis supports the examination of assessment processes and identification of the social roles in which teachers and students are immersed. Such an approach requires observations of how teachers act in authentic teaching situations when they interact with their students in classroom making possible to observe negotiation processes, agencies when both teachers and students are involved in every-day activities. Our study showed that teachers mostly ignored students' questions and that students solved their own problems by helping each other. Teachers did not provide opportunities for students to discuss

  4. Breaststroke learning through the use of videotape feedback. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/1980-0037.2013v15n2p204

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela de Castro Ferracioli

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available People from all age groups and social backgrounds have always sought to learn swimming. However, the swimming learning process is usually considered repetitive and tiring, requiring the teacher to use methods that motivate students to join the practice without ignoring the need for improvement in their performance. This study assessed motivation during a breaststroke learning process in students who received videotape feedback, verbal feedback, and who did not receive any feedback during practice. Thirty seven swimming inexperienced students were divided into three groups: Video (n=13, which received videotape feedback; Verbal (n=15, which received verbal feedback; and Control (n=9, which did not receive any feedback during experimental phases (pre-test, acquisition (5 days, post-test and retention. Participants completed a questionnaire based on Likert scale for motivation assessment. Scores were given to their performance by a swimming teacher to assess breaststroke learning during each experimental phase. Results of motivation assessment showed that students who received feedback (videotape or verbal felt more motivated during practice than those who did not receive any feedback. Regarding the breaststroke learning, all participants improved their performance along experimental phases, but, during the retention one, Verbal group’s performance was considered superior to the Control group’s performance. This study concluded that the use of videotape and verbal feedback has motivational results on breaststroke learning, and that it is effective in the learning process.

  5. Examining the content of weight, nutrition and physical activity advices provided by Dutch practice nurses in primary care: analysis of videotaped consultations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dillen, S.M.E. van; Noordman, J.; Dulmen, S. van; Hiddink, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objective: To examine the content of Dutch practice nurses’ (PNs’) advices about weight, nutrition and physical activity to overweight and obese patients. Subjects/Methods: A 100 videotaped real-life PN consultations (The Netherlands, 2010/2011) with overweight or obese patients were

  6. Reliability and validity of videotaped functional performance tests in ACL-injured subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    von Porat, Anette; Holmström, Eva; Roos, Ewa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In clinical practice, visual observation is often used to determine functional impairment and to evaluate treatment following a knee injury. The aim of this study was to evaluate the reliability and validity of observational assessments of knee movement pattern quality......, crossover hop on one leg and one-leg hop. The videos were observed by four physiotherapists, and the knee movement pattern quality, a feature of the loading strategy of the lower extremity, was scored on an 11-point rating scale. To assess the criterion validity, the observational rating was correlated...... obtained between the observers' assessment and knee flexion angle, r = 0.37-0.61. The crossover hop test or one-leg hop test was ranked as the most useful test in 172 of 192 occasions (90%) when assessing knee function. CONCLUSION: The moderate to good inter-observer reliability and the moderate criterion...

  7. Supporting students' strategic competence: a case of a sixth-grade mathematics classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, İ. Elif Yetkin; Pape, Stephen J.

    2012-06-01

    Mathematics education research has documented several classroom practices that might influence student self-regulation. We know little, however, about the ways these classroom practices could be structured in real classroom settings. In this exploratory case study, we purposefully selected a sixth-grade mathematics teacher who had participated in a professional development program focussed on NCTM standards and SRL in the mathematics classroom for extensive classroom observation. The purpose was to explore how and to what extend she structured classroom practices to support strategic competence in her students. Four features of classroom practices were found as evidence for how strategic competence was potentially supported in this classroom: (a) allowing autonomy and shared responsibility during the early stages of learning, (b) focusing on student understanding, (c) creating contexts for students to learn about strategic learning and to exercise strategic behaviour, and (d) helping students to personalise strategies by recognising their ideas and strategic behaviours.

  8. Homotolerance and Heteronormativity in Norwegian Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothing, Ase

    2008-01-01

    This article is based on classroom observations and discusses sexual education that addresses homosexuality. Tolerance of queer lifestyles as well as support for judicial equality between heterosexual and homosexual couples is generally perceived as being high in the Norwegian political context. Norwegian sexual politics is, however, based on a…

  9. Silent Film in the German Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, David

    In addition to using films in the German classroom to introduce students to German culture and history, it is important to show and study the film as film. This procedure emphasizes the importance of the film as a part of creative arts in Germany and demands student participation in observation and discussion. Many German silent films are…

  10. The Elephant in the Classroom: The Impact of Misbehavior on Classroom Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Nancy J.; Jones, Cathy R.; Costner, Richard H.; Savage-Davis, Emma; Hunt, Gilbert H.

    2010-01-01

    The research discussed here is based on a one year study of 34 second and fourth grade teachers and their 588 students. Data were collected in 40 minute observational segments; six unannounced observations took place in each teacher's classroom for a total of 240 minutes per teacher. The data were analyzed in SPSS as quantitative data. Half of the…

  11. Classroom listening assessment: strategies for speech-language pathologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Cheryl DeConde

    2012-11-01

    Emphasis on classroom listening has gained importance for all children and especially for those with hearing loss and special listening needs. The rationale can be supported from trends in educational placements, the Response to Intervention initiative, student performance and accountability, the role of audition in reading, and improvement in hearing technologies. Speech-language pathologists have an instrumental role advocating for the accommodations that are necessary for effective listening for these children in school. To identify individual listening needs and make relevant recommendations for accommodations, a classroom listening assessment is suggested. Components of the classroom listening assessment include observation, behavioral assessment, self-assessment, and classroom acoustics measurements. Together, with a strong rationale, the results can be used to implement a plan that results in effective classroom listening for these children. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  12. Becoming Galileo in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavicchi, Elizabeth

    2011-04-01

    Galileo's contributions are so familiar as to be taken for granted, obscuring the exploratory process by which his discoveries arose. The wonder that Galileo experienced comes alive for undergraduates and teachers that I teach, when they find themselves taking Galileo's role by means of their own explorations. These classroom journeys include: sighting through picture frames to understand perspective, watching the night sky, experimenting with lenses and motion, and responding to Galileo's story. In teaching, I use critical exploration, the research pedagogy developed by Eleanor Duckworth that arose historically from both the clinical interviewing of Jean Piaget and B"arbel Inhelder and the Elementary Science Study of the 1960s. During critical explorations, the teacher supports students' investigations by posing provocative experiences while interactively following students' emergent understandings. In the context of Galileo, students learned to observe carefully, trust their observations, notice things they had never noticed before, and extend their understanding in the midst of pervasive confusion. Personal investment moved students to question assumptions that they had never critically evaluated. By becoming Galileo in today's classroom, we found the ordinary world no less intriguing and unsettling to explore, as the historical world of protagonists in Galileo's Dialogue.

  13. Relationships in the Flipped Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett M. McCollum

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the effectiveness of flipped classrooms in chemistry, and identifies relationships as a major factor impacting the success of flipped instruction methods. Examination of student interview data reveals factors that affect the development of peer-peer, peer-peer leader, and peer-expert relationships in first-year general chemistry and second-year organic chemistry flipped classrooms. Success was measured in terms of student perceptions of the effectiveness of the instruction, as well as student academic development. Furthermore, analysis of research participant interviews reveals that academic reading circles, open-response multiple-attempt group quizzes, and peer leaders are important elements of a text-centric flipped approach at a small-classroom, commuter-campus university. Student reflections and classroom observations provide further support for these conclusions. Cet étude examine l’efficacité des salles de classe inversées en chimie et identifie la création de liens en tant que facteur important qui affecte la réussite des méthodes d’instruction inversée. L’examen des données provenant d’entrevues avec les étudiants révèle les facteurs qui affectent le développement des rapports d’étudiant à étudiant, d’étudiant à leader et d’étudiant à expert dans un cours inversé de chimie générale de première année et dans un cours de chimie organique de deuxième année. La réussite a été mesurée en termes de perceptions des étudiants de l’efficacité de l’instruction, ainsi que du développement académique des étudiants. De plus, l’analyse des entrevues des participants à la recherche révèle que les cercles de lecture universitaires, les tests de groupes à essais multiples et à réponses ouvertes, ainsi que les leaders de groupes sont des éléments importants d’une approche inversée centrée sur un texte en petite salle de classe, dans une université de banlieusards. Les

  14. Classroom Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom Resources Learning Center Community Outreach Learning Experiences School Competitions Teacher Programs Classroom every student and that is free from harassment and discrimination based upon race, color, religion

  15. The Dirt on Outdoor Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Steve

    2000-01-01

    Explains the planning procedure for outdoor classrooms and introduces an integrated unit on monarch butterflies called the Monarch Watch program. Makes recommendations to solve financial problems of outdoor classrooms. (YDS)

  16. When classroom becomes school

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noer, Vibeke Røn

    (Christensen, 2013), this presentation will focus on ‘what’s happening in the classroom’ when classroom is ‘school’ among fellow students opposed to ‘real nursing practice’ among future colleagues. Focusing on student strategies in the classroom, the presentation will further elaborate on the inherent...... & Perrenoud, 2006). In Denmark alone changes have been made numerously times in the last two decades. Concurrently, a considerable amount of studies has been published focusing on the nursing education, stressing a call for transformation. Division of learning contexts into clinical and classroom settings...... is a strong marker of the nursing education and has as such also been of interest for research. There is a large number of studies (e.g. Larsen, 2000; Johnsen, 2003; Kragelund, 2006; Voigt, 2007; Henriksen, 2009; Højbjerg, 2011) that explore the learning contexts in the nursing education. However, most...

  17. Inverting the Linear Algebra Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbert, Robert

    2014-01-01

    The inverted classroom is a course design model in which students' initial contact with new information takes place outside of class meetings, and students spend class time on high-level sense-making activities. The inverted classroom model is so called because it inverts or "flips" the usual classroom design where typically class…

  18. The flipped classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Triantafyllou, Evangelia

    2015-01-01

    One of the novel ideas in teaching that heavily relies on current technology is the “flipped classroom” approach. In a flipped classroom the traditional lecture and homework sessions are inverted. Students are provided with online material in order to gain necessary knowledge before class, while...... class time is devoted to clarifications and application of this knowledge. The hypothesis is that there could be deep and creative discussions when teacher and students physically meet. This paper presents design considerations for flipped classrooms, and discusses how Moodle can facilitate...... with a discussion of the opportunities and challenges when implementing the flipped model in a virtual learning environment (VLE) like Moodle....

  19. Corrective feedback, learner uptake, and feedback perception in a Chinese as a foreign language classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfeng Fu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The role of corrective feedback in second language classrooms has received considerable research attention in the past few decades. However, most of this research has been conducted in English-teaching settings, either ESL or EFL. This study examined teacher feedback, learner uptake as well as learner and teacher perception of feedback in an adult Chinese as a foreign language classroom. Ten hours of classroom interactions were videotaped, transcribed and coded for analysis. Lyster and Ranta’s (1997 coding system involving six types of feedback was initially used to identify feedback frequency and learner uptake. However, the teacher was found to use a number of additional feedback types. Altogether, 12 types of feedback were identified: recasts, delayed recasts, clarification requests, translation, metalinguistic feedback, elicitation, explicit correction, asking a direct question, repetition, directing question to other students, re-asks, and using L1-English. Differences were noted in the frequency of some of the feedback types as well as learner uptake compared to what had been reported in some previous ESL and EFL studies. With respect to the new feedback types, some led to noticeable uptake. As for the students’ and teacher’s perceptions, they did not match and both the teacher and the students were generally not accurate in perceiving the frequency of each feedback type. The findings are discussed in terms of the role of context in affecting the provision and effectiveness of feedback and its relationship to student and teacher perception of feedback.

  20. The relationship between EFL teachers’ beliefs and actual practices of classroom management

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Aliakbari; Mohsen Heidarzadi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at analyzing Iranian EFL teachers’ beliefs toward classroom management and the relationship between teachers’ beliefs and their actual practices of classroom management in regard with individual variables such as gender, education degree, and teaching experience. The data were collected using a behavior and instructional management scale inventory and direct class observation through a researcher made classroom management observation checklist. The findings showed that EFL te...

  1. Animals in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Use of animals in middle school science classrooms is a curriculum component worthy of consideration, providing proper investigation and planning are addressed. A responsible approach to this action, including safety, must be adopted for success. In this month's column, the author provides some suggestions on incorporating animals into the…

  2. Multiculturalism in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Carl; Clark, Aaron; DeLuca, V. William; Kelly, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The changing demographics of U.S. society have prompted a focus on multiculturalism in today's classrooms. Educators and students are expected to be aware of the individual differences and characteristics that exist and use these attributes to everyone's advantage. This awareness begins with developing a broad understanding of the diverse…

  3. Flipping the Classroom Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riendeau, Diane

    2013-02-01

    I received many emails following the first column on flipping the classroom. Many of my local colleagues also approached me at our physics alliance, Physics Northwest. Teachers are very interested in this new pedagogy. As I result, I wanted to share some more videos to inspire you.

  4. The CAS Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Sue

    2004-01-01

    The Victorian Curriculum and Assessment Authority (VCAA) Computer Algebra System (CAS)Pilot study (2001-2005) is monitoring the use of CAS in senior secondary mathematics. This article explores the author's experiences in the CAS classroom and delineates changes in teaching style, as a result of the introduction of CAS into the senior mathematics…

  5. Classroom Management and Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jere E.

    1982-01-01

    Survey results show that planning and constant vigilance are the price of effective teaching. Effective classroom management involves awareness, good organizational skills, preparation, letting students know what is expected of them and following through, and the ability to diagnose student problems. (CT)

  6. Classroom Contexts for Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A.; Kaufman, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Various factors influence the development of creative potential, including everything from individual differences to the kinds of experiences and opportunities that creators experience throughout the lifespan. When it comes to nurturing creativity in the classroom, the learning environment is one of the most important factors--determining, in…

  7. My Classroom: Philippines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Cerise

    2017-01-01

    In his first teaching assignment, as a fifth-grade English teacher, Edgar Manaran had only 20 desks for 48 students. Yet he was able to apply productive classroom strategies throughout his 25-hour teaching week. Some of his students sat on plastic chairs due to the shortage of desks, but that did not change the dynamic of Mr. Manaran's classes. He…

  8. Tips from the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    TESOL Journal, 1993

    1993-01-01

    Seven articles on classroom icebreakers are compiled: "Picture Stories and Other Opportunities" (Joy Egbert, Deborah Hanley, Rosemary Delaney); "Hey, What's Your Name" (Janet Leamy); "Surprise!" (Lynne Burgess); "Memory Game" (Sally Winn); "Picturesque" (Margaret Beiter); "The Name Game" (Jeanne-Marie Garcia); "Exercise the Body--And the Mind…

  9. "Frankenstein" in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veidemanis, Gladys V.

    1986-01-01

    Presents five reasons for classroom study of Mary Shelley's gothic work: (1)intriguing style and subject matter, brevity and novelty; (2)narrative versatility; (3)representation of the Romantic Era in English literature; (4)female authorship; (5)significance of the central theme of "scientific aims pursued in reckless disregard of human…

  10. Learning in Tomorrow's Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard F.

    2015-01-01

    Teaching today remains the most individualistic of all the professions, with educators characteristically operating in a highly fragmented world of "their" courses, "their" skills, and "their" students. Learning will occur in the classrooms of the future through a sustainable set of complementary capabilities:…

  11. Discussion in Postsecondary Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curt Dudley-Marling

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Spoken language is, arguably, the primary means by which teachers teach and students learn. Much of the literature on language in classrooms has focused on discussion that is seen as both a method of instruction and a curricular outcome. While much of the research on discussion has focused on K-12 classrooms, there is also a body of research examining the efficacy of discussion in postsecondary settings. This article provides a review of this literature in order to consider the effect of discussion on student learning in college and university classrooms, the prevalence of discussion in postsecondary settings, and the quality of discussion in these settings. In general, the results of research on the efficacy of discussion in postsecondary settings are mixed. More seriously, researchers have not been explicit about the meaning of discussion and much of what is called discussion in this body of research is merely recitation with minimal levels of student participation. Although the research on discussion in college and university classrooms is inconclusive, some implications can be drawn from this review of the research including the need for future researchers to clearly define what they mean by “discussion.”

  12. Singing Smoothes Classroom Transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Sarah E.

    2012-01-01

    Just as humming a merry tune helped Snow White and her furry animal friends to quickly clean a filthy cottage in the movie "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" (Disney & Cottrell, 1937), singing can be an effective way to help keep young children fully engaged during classroom transitions. The purposes of this article are to: (1) consider why…

  13. The Classroom Animal: Snails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David S.

    1985-01-01

    Points out that snails are interesting and easily-managed classroom animals. One advantage of this animal is that it requires no special attention over weekends or holidays. Background information, anatomy, reproduction, and feeding are discussed, along with suggestions for housing aquatic and/or land snails. (DH)

  14. The Fifth Grade Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Michael; And Others

    An interdisciplinary design project report investigates the relationship of the fifth grade educational facility to the student and teacher needs in light of human and environmental factors. The classroom, activity and teaching spaces are analyzed with regard to the educational curriculum. Specifications and design criteria concerning equipment…

  15. Effective Classroom Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Azlin Norhaini; Eng, Wong Kim; Rasul, Mohamad Sattar; Hamzah, Mohd Izham Mohd; Hamid, Aida Hanim A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper attempts to explore and identify the characteristics of an effective teacher who teaches English as a second language to 10 year old students from different ethnics, various social economic background and multi-level language ability, at a private primary school in Malaysia. The study focused on classroom management using a case study…

  16. A Comparison of Self-Monitoring with and without Reinforcement to Improve On-Task Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tonya N.; Dacus, Sharon; Bankhead, Jenna; Haupert, Megan; Fuentes, Lisa; Zoch, Tamara; Kang, Soyeon; Attai, Shanna; Lang, Russell

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of a self-monitoring and self-monitoring plus reinforcement intervention on classroom behavior. A typically-developing high school student demonstrating difficulty staying on-task during classroom instruction was observed in three classroom settings associated with high levels of off-task behavior. During…

  17. The Social Context of Reference Work: Assessing the Effects of Gender and Communication Skill on Observers' Judgments of Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Roma M.; Michell, B. Gillian

    1986-01-01

    Public library users made judgments about the competence of reference librarians whom they observed in videotaped interviews. Two social factors were varied in the interviews: the gender of the librarian, patron, and observers; and the communication behavior exhibited by the reference librarian toward the patron. Nineteen references are cited.…

  18. Effortful control and school adjustment: The moderating role of classroom chaos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Rebecca H; Valiente, Carlos; Eisenberg, Nancy; Hernandez, Maciel M; Thompson, Marilyn; Spinrad, Tracy; VanSchyndel, Sarah; Silva, Kassondra; Southworth, Jody

    2017-11-01

    Guided by the person by environment framework, the primary goal of this study was to determine whether classroom chaos moderated the relation between effortful control and kindergarteners' school adjustment. Classroom observers reported on children's ( N = 301) effortful control in the fall. In the spring, teachers reported on classroom chaos and school adjustment outcomes (teacher-student relationship closeness and conflict, and school liking and avoidance). Cross-level interactions between effortful control and classroom chaos predicting school adjustment outcomes were assessed. A consistent pattern of interactions between effortful control and classroom chaos indicated that the relations between effortful control and the school adjustment outcomes were strongest in high chaos classrooms. Post-hoc analyses indicated that classroom chaos was associated with poor school adjustment when effortful control was low, suggesting that the combination of high chaos and low effortful control was associated with the poorest school outcomes.

  19. Science Teacher Beliefs and Classroom Practice Related to Constructivism in Different School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savasci, Funda; Berlin, Donna F.

    2012-02-01

    Science teacher beliefs and classroom practice related to constructivism and factors that may influence classroom practice were examined in this cross-case study. Data from four science teachers in two schools included interviews, demographic questionnaire, Classroom Learning Environment Survey (preferred/perceived), and classroom observations and documents. Using an inductive analytic approach, results suggested that the teachers embraced constructivism, but classroom observations did not confirm implementation of these beliefs for three of the four teachers. The most preferred constructivist components were personal relevance and student negotiation; the most perceived component was critical voice. Shared control was the least preferred, least perceived, and least observed constructivist component. School type, grade, student behavior/ability, curriculum/standardized testing, and parental involvement may influence classroom practice.

  20. South Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 610 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  1. Central Experimental Oculina Research Reserve, Clelia Dive 612 2001 Digital Imagery - Captured from Videotapes taken during Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Digitial imagery, mpegs and jpegs, captured from mini-DV magnetic videotapes collected with an underwater 3-chip CCD color video camera, deployed from the research...

  2. CLASSROOM INTERACTION ANALYSIS IN INDONESIAN EFL SPEAKING CLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Sinta Hoerun Nisa

    2014-01-01

    This study entitles “Classroom Interaction Analysis in the EFL Speaking Class” aimed at analyzing the categories of teacher talk, student talk and classroom interaction types used during EFL speaking class. The research employed a qualitative design and applied a case study. Subjects of the research were an English teacher and 25 students at the second semester of English Education Department of the University of Kuningan. The data were gained through naturalistic observation and document ana...

  3. ICT as a tool for collaboration in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob; Georgsen, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents data and results from a study on collaboration and self-directed learning in two second year-classes in a Danish school. Learners at ages eight and nine use interactive screens as a learning tool, and more than 150 hours of video data have been collected from the classrooms ov...... and communicative skills require careful pre-teaching planning and classroom-observations by the teachers in charge....

  4. Lifestyle counseling in hypertension-related visits – analysis of video-taped general practice visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Dulmen Sandra

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The general practitioner (GP can play an important role in promoting a healthy lifestyle, which is especially relevant in people with an elevated risk of cardiovascular diseases due to hypertension. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the frequency and content of lifestyle counseling about weight loss, nutrition, physical activity, and smoking by GPs in hypertension-related visits. A distinction was made between the assessment of lifestyle (gathering information or measuring weight or waist circumference and giving lifestyle advice (giving a specific advice to change the patient's behavior or referring the patient to other sources of information or other health professionals. Methods For this study, we observed 212 video recordings of hypertension-related visits collected within the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice in 2000/2001. Results The mean duration of visits was 9.8 minutes (range 2.5 to 30 minutes. In 40% of the visits lifestyle was discussed (n = 84, but in 81% of these visits this discussion lasted shorter than a quarter of the visit. An assessment of lifestyle was made in 77 visits (36%, most commonly regarding body weight and nutrition. In most cases the patient initiated the discussion about nutrition and physical activity, whereas the assessment of weight and smoking status was mostly initiated by the GP. In 35 visits (17% the GP gave lifestyle advice, but in only one fifth of these visits the patient's motivation or perceived barriers for changing behavior were assessed. Supporting factors were not discussed at all. Conclusion In 40% of the hypertension-related visits lifestyle topics were discussed. However, both the frequency and quality of lifestyle advice can be improved.

  5. Characterizing Teaching in Introductory Geology Courses: Measuring Classroom Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, D. A.; van der Hoeven Kraft, K. J.; McConnell, D. A.; Vislova, T.

    2013-01-01

    Most research about reformed teaching practices in the college science classroom is based on instructor self-report. This research describes what is happening in some introductory geology courses at multiple institutions across the country using external observers. These observations are quantified using the Reformed Teaching Observation Protocol…

  6. Communication Strategies Used by High School English Language Learners in Multilingual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spromberg, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    In this study, twenty-five high school English language learners were observed in their classrooms in a New York City public school while they worked in small groups. All observations were video recorded or done by the researcher while in the classrooms. The videos were then transcribed. Communication strategies that the participants used were…

  7. Capturing Communication Supporting Classrooms: The Development of a Tool and Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockrell, Julie E.; Bakopoulou, Ioanna; Law, James; Spencer, Sarah; Lindsay, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing emphasis on supporting the oral language needs of children in the classroom. A variety of different measures have been developed to assist this process but few have been derived systematically from the available research evidence. A Communication Supporting Classrooms Observation Tool (CsC Observation Tool) for children aged…

  8. The Effects of a School-Based Functional Analysis on Subsequent Classroom Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tonya N.; Durand, Shannon; Fuentes, Lisa; Dacus, Sharon; Blenden, Kara

    2014-01-01

    In this study we analyzed the effects of conducting a school-based functional analysis on subsequent classroom behavior. Each participant was observed in the classroom during activities that were reported by teachers to result in high levels of challenging behavior. Participants were observed during (a) baseline, prior to the administration of a…

  9. Comparative effectiveness of videotape and handout mode of instructions for teaching exercises: skill retention in normal children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Garima

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Teaching of motor skills is fundamental to physical therapy practice. In order to optimize the benefits of these teaching and training efforts, various forms of patient education material are developed and handed out to patients. One very important fact has been overlooked. While comparative effectiveness of various modes of instruction has been studied in adults, attention has not been paid to the fact that learning capabilities of children are different from that of adults. The intent of the present study is to compare the effectiveness of video and handout mode of instructions specifically on children. Methods A total of 115 normal elementary-age children aged 10 to 12 years of age were studied. The children were randomized into two groups: A the video group, and B the handout group. The video group viewed the video for physical therapy exercises while the handout group was provided with paper handouts especially designed according to the readability of their age group. Results Statistical analysis using the student's't' test showed that subjects of both the video and handout groups exhibited equal overall performance accuracy. There was no significant difference between the groups both in acquisition and retention accuracy tests. Conclusion The findings of the present study suggest that if the readability and instructional principles applicable to different target age groups are strictly adhered to, then both video as well as handout modes of instructions result in similar feedback and memory recall in ten to twelve year-old children. Principles of readability related to the patient age are of utmost importance when designing the patient education material. These findings suggest that the less expensive handouts can be an effective instructional aid for teaching exercises to children with various neuromuscular, rheumatic, and orthopedics conditions and the most costly videotape techniques are not necessarily better.

  10. What do people appreciate in physicians' communication? An international study with focus groups using videotaped medical consultations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzi, Maria A; Rimondini, Michela; Deveugele, Myriam; Zimmermann, Christa; Moretti, Francesca; van Vliet, Liesbeth; Deledda, Giuseppe; Fletcher, Ian; Bensing, Jozien

    2015-10-01

    The literature shows that the quality of communication is usually determined from a professional perspective. Patients or lay people are seldom involved in the development of quality indicators or communication. To give voice to the lay people perspective on what constitutes 'good communication' by evoking their reactions to variations in physician communication. Lay people from four different countries watched the same videotaped standardized medical encounters and discussed their preferences in gender-specific focus groups who were balanced in age groups. Two hundred and fifty-nine lay people (64 NL, 72 IT, 75 UK and 48 BE) distributed over 35 focus groups of 6-8 persons each. Comments on doctors' behaviours were classified by the GULiVer framework in terms of contents and preferences. Participants prevalently discussed 'task-oriented expressions' (39%: competency, self-confident, providing solutions), 'affective oriented/emotional expressions' (25%: empathy, listening, reassuring) and 'process-oriented expressions' (23%: flexibility, summarizing, verifying). 'Showing an affective attitude' was most appreciated (positive percentage within category: 93%, particularly facilitations and inviting attitude), followed by 'providing solution' (85%). Among disfavoured behaviour, repetitions (88%), 'writing and reading' (54%) and asking permission (42%) were found. Although an affective attitude is appreciated by nearly everybody, people may vary widely in their communication needs and preferences: what is 'good communication' for one person may be disliked or even a source of irritation for another. A physician should be flexible and capable of adapting the consultation to the different needs of different patients. This challenges the idea of general communication guidelines. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. CLASSROOM CULTURE OF PERFORMANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia FĂT

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents the results obtained during an enquiry based on a questionnaire about the classroom culture. This concept it is understood as a micro-society with its own characteristics derived from the dynamic of socialization and training process. This research aims to investigate certain specific aspects of micro-sociology and emphasis on classroom culture. A relatively new concept is reflected by the normative consensus or the integrated system of values that belongs to the teachers, pupils and school, as a social entity. The integrative ensemble of values, class cohesion degree and training strategies are only a few of the aspects described by 62 pupils aged 17-18 years old, from a very prestigious school in Bucharest. The perception of pupils regarding our concept is the effect of the relational practices and training used constantly by the teachers. Those practices reflect the school’s focus mostly on cognitive performance.

  12. Exploring gender differences in the EFL classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Norma Constanza Durán

    2011-01-01

    This article aims to describe a case study which explores teacher and students' conceptions about gender in an EFL setting and the way they are manifested in their discourse patterns. This exploratory case study was carried out with a group of eleventh grade students and an English teacher at Liceo de la Universidad Católica high school in Bogotá Colombia. The data collected included direct observation of classroom interaction, audio and video recording of the teacher and students' interactio...

  13. Revisiting Classroom Routines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Gloria Lodato

    2016-01-01

    Most co-teachers agree that there just isn't enough time for co-teachers to appropriately and effectively preplan every aspect of every activity in every lesson. This lack of time leads co-teachers to turn to models that fail to maximize the benefits of a two-teacher classroom. Wilson suggests that if co-teachers use their limited planning time to…

  14. Quantifying ADHD classroom inattentiveness, its moderators, and variability: a meta-analytic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofler, Michael J; Rapport, Mark D; Alderson, R Matt

    2008-01-01

    Most classroom observation studies have documented significant deficiencies in the classroom attention of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) compared to their typically developing peers. The magnitude of these differences, however, varies considerably and may be influenced by contextual, sampling, diagnostic, and observational differences. Meta-analysis of 23 between-group classroom observation studies using weighted regression, publication bias, goodness of fit, best case, and original metric analyses. Across studies, a large effect size (ES = .73) was found prior to consideration of potential moderators. Weighted regression, best case, and original metric estimation indicate that this effect may be an underestimation of the classroom visual attention deficits of children with ADHD. Several methodological factors-classroom environment, sample characteristics, diagnostic procedures, and observational coding schema-differentially affect observed rates of classroom attentive behavior for children with ADHD and typically developing children. After accounting for these factors, children with ADHD were on-task approximately 75% of the time compared to 88% for their classroom peers (ES = 1.40). Children with ADHD were also more variable in their attentive behavior across studies. The present study confirmed that children with ADHD exhibit deficient and more variable visual attending to required stimuli in classroom settings and provided an aggregate estimation of the magnitude of these deficits at the group level. It also demonstrated the impact of situational, sampling, diagnostic, and observational variables on observed rates of on-task behavior.

  15. Classroom Texting in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettijohn, Terry F.; Frazier, Erik; Rieser, Elizabeth; Vaughn, Nicholas; Hupp-Wilds, Bobbi

    2015-01-01

    A 21-item survey on texting in the classroom was given to 235 college students. Overall, 99.6% of students owned a cellphone and 98% texted daily. Of the 138 students who texted in the classroom, most texted friends or significant others, and indicate the reason for classroom texting is boredom or work. Students who texted sent a mean of 12.21…

  16. The Classroom Animal: Box Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1986-01-01

    Provides basic information on the anatomy, physiology, behaviors, and distribution patterns of the box turtle. Offers suggestions for the turtle's care and maintenance in a classroom environment. (ML)

  17. Touch, learn, play - what children do with an iPad in the classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Gasparini, Andrea A.

    2011-01-01

    This thesis presents a case study of technology acceptance of iPad as a classroom tool. The study spans an eleven months period within the context of a rural Norwegian elementary school. Six iPads were introduced into classroom information ecology of a fourth grade class. Through ethnography-based observations, workshops, questionnaires and interviews, changes in the classroom information ecology are documented. In cooperation with the teacher, some parts of the curriculum have been adapte...

  18. Secure surveillance videotapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resnik, W.M.; Kadner, S.P.; Olsen, R.; Chitumbo, K.; Pepper, S.

    1995-01-01

    With assistance from the US Program for Technical Assistance to IAEA Safeguards (POTAS), Aquila Technologies Group developed the Tamper-Resistant Analog Media (TRAM-1000) system to provide standard VHS surveillance video tapes with an enhanced tamper-indicating capability. This project represents further implementation of the partnership approach in facilities including light water reactors with MOX facilities. These facilities use Uniplex Digiquad system video tapes. The partnership approach ensures that one organization can exchange the tapes in a machine without the presence of the other, without losing continuity of information. The TRAM-1000 system development project was accomplished in two stages. In the first stage of the project, the original system delivered to the IAEA, consists of three parts: (1) the tamper detection unit, (2) a specially augmented VHS video tape, and (3) an HP-95 reader. The tamper detection unit houses a VACOSS active fiber-optic seal and an electronic identification tag (E-TAG) reader. In the second stage of the project, the original TRAM-1000 was modified to its current design based on agency input. After delivery of the original TRAM-1000 system to the IAEA, it was reviewed by inspectors. The inspectors felt that the initial system's tape storage/transport method could be simplified. Rather than threading the fiber through the tape spindles, the inspectors suggested that the tape be placed in a bag capable of being sealed. Also, a more flexible fiber-optic cable was recommended. As a result of these suggestions, Aquila developed a tamper-proof bag specifically for holding a surveillance video tape and sealable with a VACOSS fiber optical seal

  19. Bug City: Beetles [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  20. Bug City: Bees [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic photography,…

  1. Bug City: Ants [Videotape].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998

    "Bug City" is a video series created to help children (grades 1-6) learn about insects and other small critters. All aspects of bug life are touched upon including body structure, food, habitat, life cycle, mating habits, camouflage, mutualism (symbiosis), adaptations, social behavior, and more. Each program features dramatic microscopic…

  2. Global Classroom - videokonference i undervisning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemming Nielsen

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Efter fem år med videokonference gør VUC Storstrøm status for udvikling og implementering. Visionen peger i retning af yderligere digitalisering og satsning på kvalitetsudviklin og fleksibilitet via investeringer i teknologi og kompetenceudvikling. I 2011 kon en ny avanceret teknologisk platform til, som giver studerende mulighed for at vælge frit mellem fysisk tilstedeværelse og tilstedeværelse via individuel videokonference hjemmefra eller en andet ekstern lokation. I artiklen redegøres for baggrund og formål, forudsætninger for indførelse af fleksibel videokonference, samt for udbyttet for de studerende og underviserne. Artiklen er baseret på interne evalueringer, en artikel fra forskere på Aalborg Universitet, indtryk fra 2 specialer fra hhv. Århus Universitet og IT-U / Aalborg Universitet, samt forfatterens egne i agttagelser som projektleder i organisationen. English abstract After five years of using videoconferencing in teaching the Adult Education Centre Storstroem (VUC Storstroem looks back on the development and implementation of the new ICT based learning platform. The vision suggests further digitization and focus on quality and flexibility through investment in technology and skills. Since 2011 VUC Storstroem has used a didactic organization called Global Classroom which gives students the opportunity to choose freely between physical presence and presence through individual video conference from home or another remote site. This article explains the background and purpose and the preconditions for the introduction of flexible video conferencing in classroom teaching, as well as the benefits for the students and teachers. The article is based on internal evaluations, two articles from researchers at Aalborg University, impressions from a thesis from the IT-U / Aalborg University, and author's own observations as a project manager in the organization.

  3. Global Classroom - videokonference i undervisning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flemming Nielsen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Efter fem år med videokonference gør VUC Storstrøm status for udvikling og implementering. Visionen peger i retning af yderligere digitalisering og satsning på kvalitetsudviklin og fleksibilitet via investeringer i teknologi og kompetenceudvikling. I 2011 kon en ny avanceret teknologisk platform til, som giver studerende mulighed for at vælge frit mellem fysisk tilstedeværelse og tilstedeværelse via individuel videokonference hjemmefra eller en andet ekstern lokation. I artiklen redegøres for baggrund og formål, forudsætninger for indførelse af fleksibel videokonference, samt for udbyttet for de studerende og underviserne. Artiklen er baseret på interne evalueringer, en artikel fra forskere på Aalborg Universitet, indtryk fra 2 specialer fra hhv. Århus Universitet og IT-U / Aalborg Universitet, samt forfatterens egne i agttagelser som projektleder i organisationen. English abstract After five years of using videoconferencing in teaching the Adult Education Centre Storstroem (VUC Storstroem looks back on the development and implementation of the new ICT based learning platform. The vision suggests further digitization and focus on quality and flexibility through investment in technology and skills. Since 2011 VUC Storstroem has used a didactic organization called Global Classroom which gives students the opportunity to choose freely between physical presence and presence through individual video conference from home or another remote site. This article explains the background and purpose and the preconditions for the introduction of flexible video conferencing in classroom teaching, as well as the benefits for the students and teachers. The article is based on internal evaluations, two articles from researchers at Aalborg University, impressions from a thesis from the IT-U / Aalborg University, and author's own observations as a project manager in the organization.

  4. Banzhuren and Classrooming: Democracy in the Chinese Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiacheng; Chen, Jing

    2013-01-01

    The issue of education and democracy has become more and more important in China. This paper firstly explains the theory of democracy in Chinese classrooms, and then focuses on the Chinese banzhuren who is responsible for classrooming, an important educational area equal to instruction. We illustrate how Chinese students achieve development…

  5. Impact of Multi-Night Experimentally Induced Short Sleep on Adolescent Performance in a Simulated Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Dean W; Field, Julie; Milller, Megan M; Miller, Lauren E; LeBlond, Elizabeth

    2017-02-01

    Investigate whether a realistic "dose" of shortened sleep, relative to a well-rested state, causes a decline in adolescents' learning and an increase in inattentive and sleepy behaviors in a simulated classroom setting. Eighty-seven healthy 14.0- to 16.9-year olds underwent a 3-week sleep manipulation protocol, including two 5-night sleep manipulation conditions presented in a randomly counterbalanced within-subjects cross-over design. Wake time was held constant. Bedtimes were set to induce Short Sleep (SS; 6.5 hours in bed) versus Healthy Sleep (HS; 10 hours in bed). During the morning at the end of each condition, participants underwent a simulated classroom procedure in which they viewed lecture-based educational videotapes and completed relevant quizzes. Their behaviors in the simulated classroom were later coded by condition-blind raters for evidence of inattention and sleepiness. Adolescents had a longer average sleep period during HS (9.1 hours) than SS (6.5 hours). Compared to scores during HS, adolescents scored significantly lower on the quiz, showed more behaviors suggestive of inattention and sleepiness in the simulated classroom, and were reported by adolescents themselves and by their parents to be more inattentive and sleepy during SS. However, the impact of the manipulation on quiz scores was not mediated by changes in attention or sleepiness. Although effect sizes were modest, these findings suggest that previously-reported correlations between sleep duration and academic performance reflect true cause-effect relationships. Findings add to the growing evidence that the chronically shortened sleep experienced by many adolescents on school nights adversely impacts their functioning and health. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Model for behavior observation training programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berghausen, P.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Continued behavior observation is mandated by ANSI/ANS 3.3. This paper presents a model for behavior observation training that is in accordance with this standard and the recommendations contained in US NRC publications. The model includes seventeen major topics or activities. Ten of these are discussed: Pretesting of supervisor's knowledge of behavior observation requirements, explanation of the goals of behavior observation programs, why behavior observation training programs are needed (legal and psychological issues), early indicators of emotional instability, use of videotaped interviews to demonstrate significant psychopathology, practice recording behaviors, what to do when unusual behaviors are observed, supervisor rationalizations for noncompliance, when to be especially vigilant, and prevention of emotional instability

  7. Does burnout among doctors affect their involvement in patients' mental health problems? A study of videotaped consultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Bakker Dinny H

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background General practitioners' (GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction may affect their patient care negatively, but it is unknown if these negative feelings also affect their mental health care. GPs' available time, together with specific communication tools, are important conditions for providing mental health care. We investigated if GPs who feel burnt out or dissatisfied with the time available for their patients, are less inclined to encourage their patients to disclose their distress, and have shorter consultations, in order to gain time and energy. This may result in less psychological evaluations of patients' complaints. Methods We used 1890 videotaped consultations from a nationally representative sample of 126 Dutch GPs to analyse GPs' communication and the duration of their consultations. Burnout was subdivided into emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and reduced accomplishment. Multilevel regression analyses were used to investigate which subgroups of GPs differed significantly. Results GPs with feelings of exhaustion or dissatisfaction with the available time have longer consultations compared to GPs without these feelings. Exhausted GPs, and GPs with feelings of depersonalisation, talk more about psychological or social topics in their consultations. GPs with feelings of reduced accomplishment are an exception: they communicate less affectively, are less patient-centred and have less eye contact with their patients compared to GPs without reduced accomplishment. We found no relationship between GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the available time and their psychological evaluations of patients' problems. Conclusion GPs' feelings of burnout or dissatisfaction with the time available for their patients do not obstruct their diagnosis and awareness of patients' psychological problems. On the contrary, GPs with high levels of exhaustion or depersonalisation, and GPs who are dissatisfied with the

  8. How Students and Field Geologists Reason in Integrating Spatial Observations from Outcrops to Visualize a 3-D Geological Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastens, Kim A.; Agrawal, Shruti; Liben, Lynn S.

    2009-01-01

    Geologists and undergraduate students observed eight artificial "rock outcrops" in a realistically scaled field area, and then tried to envision a geological structure that might plausibly be formed by the layered rocks in the set of outcrops. Students were videotaped as they selected which of fourteen 3-D models they thought best…

  9. HTML5 digital classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Osborn, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    This training package - complete with full-color book and instructional video - is the easiest way to learn HTML5!HTML5 boasts extensive new features that allow you to create dynamic web pages and present users with amazing multimedia experiences, and this one-of-a-kind training package is your guide to creating websites that wow! HTML5 Digital Classroom provides step-by-step instruction to help you gain the essential HTML5 knowledge you need to master the latest HTML5 specifications. This book-and-video package will have you creating web pages and web applications using HTML5, styling using

  10. Sharing Power in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard-Amato, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    Suggests that be sharing power in the classroom teachers allow the development of participatory classrooms in which all students can thrive. Examines participatory teaching and critical pedagogy, components of the participatory learning experience, manifestations of participatory teaching, an application of the language experience approach,…

  11. Improving Technology in Agriscience Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Krista

    2014-01-01

    Teachers must make persistent efforts in integrating technology in the classroom. In Georgia agriscience curriculum, no data are available regarding the type and amount of technology integration used in the classrooms. Some teachers integrate actively while others incorporate very little technology in their teaching. The purpose of this…

  12. Fight Obesity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bratsis, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    U.S. health experts declared obesity an epidemic over a decade ago. Schools have tried to implement prevention programs for students, but as budgets shrink, educating students about obesity is increasingly falling to classroom instructors, including science teachers. The good news is that obesity-related classroom activities can be engaging, and…

  13. Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beghetto, Ronald A., Ed.; Kaufman, James C., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    "Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom" is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative…

  14. Working Alliances in College Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    I explain how professors can establish working alliances with students to cultivate a climate conducive to learning. This process involves (a) attending to the emotional bonds that exist in the college classroom, (b) developing shared educational goals and tasks to promote a common sense of purpose, and (c) addressing classroom conflict to repair…

  15. Inverting an Introductory Statistics Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraut, Gertrud L.

    2015-01-01

    The inverted classroom allows more in-class time for inquiry-based learning and for working through more advanced problem-solving activities than does the traditional lecture class. The skills acquired in this learning environment offer benefits far beyond the statistics classroom. This paper discusses four ways that can make the inverted…

  16. Mendel in the Modern Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Mike U.; Gericke, Niklas M.

    2015-01-01

    Mendel is an icon in the history of genetics and part of our common culture and modern biology instruction. The aim of this paper is to summarize the place of Mendel in the modern biology classroom. In the present article we will identify key issues that make Mendel relevant in the classroom today. First, we recount some of the historical…

  17. Classroom Furniture: The Mod Squad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raths, David

    2012-01-01

    This is the first article in a six-part series on the elements of a collaborative classroom: furniture, social media, video/web conferencing tools, collaborative software, interactive devices, and mobile devices. With most universities facing tight budgets, convincing administrators to invest in expensive new classrooms is a challenge. Many higher…

  18. Classroom Implementation. Issues in Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinowski, Patricia A., Ed.

    This booklet, second in a series on issues in assessment, seeks to describe an initiative supported by Finger Lakes Community College (New York) to use classroom assessment techniques (CATs) in different academic areas and to present an overview of some assessment approaches that have been used in the classroom. Papers include: (1) "Enhancing…

  19. Science beyond the Classroom Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feasey, Rosemary; Bianchi, Lynne

    2011-01-01

    There have been many years of innovation in primary science education. Surprisingly, however, most of this has taken place within the confines of the classroom. What primary science has not yet done with universal success is step outside the classroom boundaries to use the school grounds for teaching and learning across all aspects of the science…

  20. Incivility in the Accounting Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinney, Laurie; Elder, Bruce; Seaton, Lloyd

    2010-01-01

    Classroom incivility is any action that interferes with a harmonious and cooperative learning atmosphere in the classroom (Feldman, 2001). We compared the perceptions of accounting faculty to the perceptions of cross-disciplinary faculty relating to both the definition of student actions as incivility and the occurrence of incivility. We also…

  1. Technology and At-Risk Young Readers and Their Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blachowicz, Camille L. Z.; Bates, Ann; Berne, Jennifer; Bridgman, Teresa; Chaney, Jeanne; Perney, Jan

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the ways in which 18 first-grade teachers and their students in 11 high-risk urban schools began to use literacy-focused technology. The goal of the study was to observe the technology in use by the students, to observe the classroom dynamics and teachers' instructional choices centered around technology use, to look at student…

  2. Seeing Eye to Eye: Predicting Teacher-Student Agreement on Classroom Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Cappella, Elise; Wagner, Caroline; Atkins, Marc S.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the association between classroom characteristics and teacher-student agreement in perceptions of students’ classroom peer networks. Social network, peer nomination, and observational data were collected from a sample of second through fourth grade teachers (N=33) and students (N=669) in 33 classrooms across five high poverty urban schools. Results demonstrate that variation in teacher-student agreement on the structure of students’ peer networks can be explained, in part, by developmental factors and classroom characteristics. Developmental increases in network density partially mediated the positive relationship between grade level and teacher-student agreement. Larger class sizes and higher levels of normative aggressive behavior resulted in lower levels of teacher-student agreement. Teachers’ levels of classroom organization had mixed influences, with behavior management negatively predicting agreement, and productivity positively predicting agreement. These results underscore the importance of the classroom context in shaping teacher and student perceptions of peer networks. PMID:21666768

  3. Classroom Interaction in Teaching English as Foreign Language at Lower Secondary Schools in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Sundari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to develop a deep understanding of interaction in language classroom in foreign language context. Interviews, as major instrument, to twenty experienced English language teachers from eight lower secondary schools (SMP were conducted in Jakarta, completed by focus group discussions and class observation/recordings. The gathered data was analyzed according to systematic design of grounded theory analysis method through 3-phase coding. A model of classroom interaction was formulated defining several dimensions in interaction. Classroom interaction can be more comprehended under the background of interrelated factors: interaction practices, teacher and student factors, learning objectives, materials, classroom contexts, and outer contexts surrounding the interaction practices. The developed model of interaction for language classroom is notably to give deep descriptions on how interaction substantially occurs and what factors affect it in foreign language classrooms at lower secondary schools from teachers’ perspectives.

  4. Young Scientist in Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rosa

    Bringing space exploration recent results and future challenges and opportunities to the knowledge of students has been a preoccupation of educators and space agencies for quite some time. The will to foster student’s interest and reawaken their interest for science topics and in particular research is something occupying the minds of educators in all corners of the globe. But the challenge is growing literally at the speed of light. We are in the age of “Big Data”. Information is available, opportunities to build smart algorithms flourishing. The problem at hand is how we are going to make use of all this possibilities. How can we prepare students to the challenges already upon them? How can we create a scientifically literate and conscious new generation? They are the future of mankind and therefore this is a priority and should quickly be recognized as such. Empowering teachers for this challenge is the key to face the challenges and hold the opportunities. Teachers and students need to learn how to establish fruitful collaboration in the pursuit of meaningful teaching and learning experiences. Teachers need to embrace the opportunities this ICT world is offering and accompany student’s path as tutors and not as explorers themselves. In this training session we intend to explore tools and repositories that bring real cutting edge science to the hands of educators and their students. A full space exploration will be revealed. Planetarium Software - Some tools tailored to prepare an observing session or to explore space mission’s results will be presented in this topic. Participants will also have the opportunity to learn how to plan an observing session. This reveals to be an excellent tool to teach about celestial movements and give students a sense of what it means to explore for instance the Solar System. Robotic Telescopes and Radio Antennas - Having planned an observing session the participants will be introduced to the use of robotic telescopes, a

  5. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  6. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...

  7. Mathematics and Science Learning Opportunities in Preschool Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piasta, Shayne B.; Pelatti, Christina Yeager; Miller, Heather Lynnine

    2014-01-01

    Research findings The present study observed and coded instruction in 65 preschool classrooms to examine (a) overall amounts and (b) types of mathematics and science learning opportunities experienced by preschool children as well as (c) the extent to which these opportunities were associated with classroom and program characteristics. Results indicated that children were afforded an average of 24 and 26 minutes of mathematics and science learning opportunities, respectively, corresponding to spending approximately 25% of total instructional time in each domain. Considerable variability existed, however, in the amounts and types of mathematics and science opportunities provided to children in their classrooms; to some extent, this variability was associated with teachers’ years of experience, teachers’ levels of education, and the socioeconomic status of children served in the program. Practice/policy Although results suggest greater integration of mathematics and science in preschool classrooms than previously established, there was considerable diversity in the amounts and types of learning opportunities provided in preschool classrooms. Affording mathematics and science experiences to all preschool children, as outlined in professional and state standards, may require additional professional development aimed at increasing preschool teachers’ understanding and implementation of learning opportunities in these two domains in their classrooms. PMID:25489205

  8. Classroom acoustics and intervention strategies to enhance the learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Christal

    The classroom environment can be an acoustically difficult atmosphere for students to learn effectively, sometimes due in part to poor acoustical properties. Noise and reverberation have a substantial influence on room acoustics and subsequently intelligibility of speech. The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA, 1995) developed minimal standards for noise and reverberation in a classroom for the purpose of providing an adequate listening environment. A lack of adherence to these standards may have undesirable consequences, which may lead to poor academic performance. The purpose of this capstone project is to develop a protocol to measure the acoustical properties of reverberation time and noise levels in elementary classrooms and present the educators with strategies to improve the learning environment. Noise level and reverberation will be measured and recorded in seven, unoccupied third grade classrooms in Lincoln Parish in North Louisiana. The recordings will occur at six specific distances in the classroom to simulate teacher and student positions. The recordings will be compared to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards for noise and reverberation. If discrepancies are observed, the primary investigator will serve as an auditory consultant for the school and educators to recommend remediation and intervention strategies to improve these acoustical properties. The hypothesis of the study is that the classroom acoustical properties of noise and reverberation will exceed the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association standards; therefore, the auditory consultant will provide strategies to improve those acoustical properties.

  9. Classroom climate in Serbia: The perspective of primary school teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ševkušić Slavica

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this research is to gain insight into the classroom climate in schools in Serbia from the perspective of teachers. To realize this goal, we set up two research questions: (1 How do teachers assess the importance of certain aspects of the classroom climate and their own engagement in creating favourable climate, and (2 which factors determine the quality of classroom climate. We considered four dimensions of classroom climate: equality in communication, social relationships between students, respect for students’ feelings and the organizing group work. The sample consisted of primary school teachers in Serbia (N=1441, who completed a questionnaire made for our research needs. The results of factor analysis confirmed the initial assumption that the selected dimensions are related in terms of their belonging to the same construct and sufficiently different to be considered as selfcontained. The obtained results show that teachers in Serbia highly value the importance of all researched aspects of the classroom climate and believe that they are engaged to a large extent in creating a positive classroom climate. Also, it was shown that teachers’ gender and the teaching level are the most important determinants of classroom climate quality. Bearing in mind the limitations of the applied instrument it is concluded that the results should be considered with caution and that future research should include students’ perspective, direct class observation and qualitative methods to gain a more objective and more comprehensive understanding of the classroom climate. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 179034: From encouraging initiative, cooperation and creativity in education to new roles and identities in society i br. 47008: Improving the quality and accessibility of education in modernization processes in Serbia

  10. Evaluation of a flipped classroom approach to learning introductory epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiau, Stephanie; Kahn, Linda G; Platt, Jonathan; Li, Chihua; Guzman, Jason T; Kornhauser, Zachary G; Keyes, Katherine M; Martins, Silvia S

    2018-04-02

    Although the flipped classroom model has been widely adopted in medical education, reports on its use in graduate-level public health programs are limited. This study describes the design, implementation, and evaluation of a flipped classroom redesign of an introductory epidemiology course and compares it to a traditional model. One hundred fifty Masters-level students enrolled in an introductory epidemiology course with a traditional format (in-person lecture and discussion section, at-home assignment; 2015, N = 72) and a flipped classroom format (at-home lecture, in-person discussion section and assignment; 2016, N = 78). Using mixed methods, we compared student characteristics, examination scores, and end-of-course evaluations of the 2016 flipped classroom format and the 2015 traditional format. Data on the flipped classroom format, including pre- and post-course surveys, open-ended questions, self-reports of section leader teaching practices, and classroom observations, were evaluated. There were no statistically significant differences in examination scores or students' assessment of the course between 2015 (traditional) and 2016 (flipped). In 2016, 57.1% (36) of respondents to the end-of-course evaluation found watching video lectures at home to have a positive impact on their time management. Open-ended survey responses indicated a number of strengths of the flipped classroom approach, including the freedom to watch pre-recorded lectures at any time and the ability of section leaders to clarify targeted concepts. Suggestions for improvement focused on ways to increase regular interaction with lecturers. There was no significant difference in students' performance on quantitative assessments comparing the traditional format to the flipped classroom format. The flipped format did allow for greater flexibility and applied learning opportunities at home and during discussion sections.

  11. Toward the virtual classroom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihlman, M.; Dirks, D.H.

    1990-01-03

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) encourages its employees to remotely attend classes given by Stanford University, University of California at Davis, and the National Technological University (NTU). To improve the quality of education for LLNL employees, we are cooperating with Stanford University in upgrading the Stanford Instructional Television Network (SITN). A dedicated high-speed communication link (Tl) between Stanford and LLNL will be used for enhanced services such as videoconferencing, real time classnotes distribution, and electronic distribution of homework assignments. The new network will also allow students to take classes from their offices with the ability to ask the professor questions via an automatically dialed telephone call. As part of this upgrade, we have also proposed a new videoconferencing based classroom environment where students taking remote classes would feel as though they are attending the live class. All paperwork would be available in near real time and students may converse normally with, and see, other remote students as though they were all in the same physical location. We call this the Virtual Classroom.'' 1 ref., 6 figs.

  12. Cocoa Beach, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 617 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of from fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance...

  13. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 618 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  14. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 614 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  15. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 615 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  16. Sebastian Pinnacles, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 619 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  17. Jeff's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 606 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  18. Chapman's Reef, Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 620 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data are from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  19. Jeff's Reef Oculina Banks Clelia Dive 607 Narrative 2001 - Videotape and Visual Observations from Submersible Dives to the Oculina Banks Deep Sea Coral Reefs (NODC Accession 0047190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These are data from one of fourteen 2001 submersible "Clelia" dives. Narratives including habitat descriptions and estimates of megafaunal species abundance were...

  20. Analysis of scientific argumentation in two physical chemistry classrooms using the POGIL approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Alena C.

    The benefits of facilitating argumentation in science education have been well reported (Jimenez-Aleixandre & Erduran, 2007). Engaging in argumentation has shown to model authentic scientific inquiry as well as promote development of content knowledge. However, less emphasis has been placed on facilitating argumentation in upper level undergraduate courses, though it is important for evaluating undergraduate curricula to characterize upper level students' scientific reasoning. This work considers two implementations of the POGIL physical chemistry curriculum and evaluates the classroom argumentation. The researchers aimed to consider the content of the arguments and dialectical features characteristic of socially constructed arguments (Nielson, 2013). To do this, whole class sessions were videotaped and Toulmin's Argument Pattern (TAP) was used to identify the arguments generated during the class (Erduran, Simon, & Osborne, 2004). A learning progression on chemical thinking (Sevian & Talanquer, 2014) was used as a domain-specific measure of argument quality. Results show differences in argumentation between and across both classrooms that can be explained by analysis of instructor facilitation and the POGIL curriculum. The results from this work will be used to make recommendations for instructor facilitation of argumentation and reform of the POGIL curriculum.

  1. Using the ICOT Instrument to Improve Instructional Technology Usage in the ABE Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Brannon W.

    2011-01-01

    The International Society for Technology (ISTE) in Education promotes the use of a specific tool--the ISTE Classroom Observation Tool (ICOT)--to measure and improve the use of instructional technologies in Adult Basic Education (ABE) classrooms. The purpose of this article is to describe an application process for the use of the ICOT instrument…

  2. Exploring the Classroom Practices That May Enable a Compassionate Approach to Financial Literacy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-01-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The…

  3. An Inquiry-Based Approach to Critical Literacy: Pedagogical Nuances of a Second Grade Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Pamela; Cleovoulou, Yiola

    2014-01-01

    This case study explores the pedagogy and practices of an elementary school teacher who combines inquiry pedagogy and critical literacy. The authors gathered data for this analysis by conducting two interviews with a classroom teacher and observing classroom practices 12 times over a 6 month period. Through a general inductive approach to…

  4. Classroom Conversation Analysis and Critical Reflective Practice: Self-Evaluation of Teacher Talk Framework in Focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghafarpour, Hajar

    2017-01-01

    The uniqueness of the Language Classroom and its complexity raises a need for foreign language teachers to develop necessary skills and knowledge to observe, analyse and evaluate their classroom discourse. Hence, interactional awareness of language teachers is an integral part of pedagogical and practical knowledge. In this article, the…

  5. Supporting Elementary Age Students with Significant Disabilities in General Education Classrooms: Personal Perspectives on Inclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coots, Jennifer J.; Bishop, Kathryn D.; Grenot-Scheyer, Marquita

    1998-01-01

    Findings of a study in which four elementary general-education teachers commented on the inclusion of students with significant disabilities within general-education classrooms indicated that children with disabilities were described and observed as full classroom members. Difficulties were related to designing and implementing appropriate and…

  6. The Emergence of Student Creativity in Classroom Settings: A Case Study of Elementary Schools in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Younsoon; Chung, Hye Young; Choi, Kyoulee; Seo, Choyoung; Baek, Eunjoo

    2013-01-01

    This research explores the emergence of student creativity in classroom settings, specifically within two content areas: science and social studies. Fourteen classrooms in three elementary schools in Korea were observed, and the teachers and students were interviewed. The three types of student creativity emerging in the teaching and learning…

  7. The socially responsible feminist EFL classroom a Japanese perspective on identities, beliefs and practices

    CERN Document Server

    Yoshihara, Reiko

    2017-01-01

    This book explores the realities of feminist EFL teachers' lives through interviews and classroom observations with eight EFL teachers at Japanese universities. The data contained in the book broaden our understanding of feminist teaching in the language classroom while also providing suggestions for practice.

  8. Learning to Estimate Slide Comprehension in Classrooms with Support Vector Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pattanasri, N.; Mukunoki, M.; Minoh, M.

    2012-01-01

    Comprehension assessment is an essential tool in classroom learning. However, the judgment often relies on experience of an instructor who makes observation of students' behavior during the lessons. We argue that students should report their own comprehension explicitly in a classroom. With students' comprehension made available at the slide…

  9. In-Depth Analysis of Handwriting Curriculum and Instruction in Four Kindergarten Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vander Hart, Nanho; Fitzpatrick, Paula; Cortesa, Cathryn

    2010-01-01

    The quality of handwriting curriculum and instructional practices in actual classrooms was investigated in an in-depth case study of four inner city kindergarten classrooms using quantitative and qualitative methods. The handwriting proficiency of students was also evaluated to assess the impact of the instructional practices observed. The…

  10. "Ganchulinas" and "Rainbowli" Colors: Young Multilingual Children Play with Language in Head Start Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axelrod, Ysaaca

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this ethnographic case study was to study the language development of 4-year-old emergent bilinguals in a bilingual (Spanish/English) Head Start classroom with flexible language practices. Data were collected throughout the 10-month school year by visiting the classroom 2-3 times per week. Data include: field notes (observations and…

  11. Pre Business College Freshman Perception of Classroom Behavior: An Analysis among and between Genders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Melody W.; Mundrake, George A.; Brown, Betty J.

    2009-01-01

    The focus of this study was 1) to identify pre business college freshman observed classroom behavior (personal, technical, and collaborative behaviors) in high school versus college, and to compare by gender (male to male; female to female), and 2) to identify pre business college freshman perceptions of classroom behavior in college, and to…

  12. Peer-Assisted Learning and Interactions in Inclusive Music Classrooms: Benefits, Research, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellison, Judith; Brown, Laura; Draper, Ellary

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary music classrooms include a beautiful mosaic of individual children from diverse backgrounds, children who vary considerably in their capabilities, interests, and levels of motivation. Some of the variations we observe are related to social skills and knowledge. The effects of appropriate classroom behavior and positive social…

  13. A Vision of Improvement of Learning: South African Teachers' Conceptions of Classroom Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethusha, Mantsose Jane

    2013-01-01

    This article explored conceptions that teachers hold about classroom assessment and how these conceptions influence their classroom assessment practices. The qualitative study employed a case study approach. Semi-structured interviews, observations and document analyses were used. The study utilized Brown's (2004) conceptual framework on…

  14. Fostering Ecological Literacy: A Case Study of the Saint John Harbour in Two High School English Language Arts Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Velta

    Integrating environmental education into curriculum in a way that tackles the holistic and complicated nature of multi-dimensional issues continues to be a challenge for educators and administrators. There is potential in using ecological literacy to introduce local environmental case studies into English Language Arts high school classrooms. This research examines the experiences of two ELA classrooms in one Saint John, NB, high school with a two-week unit based on stakeholder relationships within the Saint John Harbour. Through presentations by guest speakers and research sourced from local community groups, students learned about the highly complex environmental issues that inform management decisions for the Harbour. Using these materials as background, students participated in a mock stakeholders meeting. Case study methodology was used to explore student learning in both a higher-level and a lower-level grade 10 ELA class. Data for the analysis included: cognitive mapping exercises; oral and written classroom assignments and activities; a videotape of the mock stakeholder meetings; a focus group interview with selected students; and researcher field notes. Data demonstrated significant student learning about environmental issues including increased sophistication in describing links between and among environmental issues affecting the harbour, and much more complex understandings of the positions and roles of the various stakeholder groups. Some important areas of resistance to new learning were also evident. Implications for practice and policy and recommendations for future research are discussed.

  15. The Effectiveness of Classroom Capture Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Maire B.; Burns, Colleen E.; Mitch, Nathan; Gomez, Melissa M.

    2012-01-01

    The use of classroom capture systems (systems that capture audio and video footage of a lecture and attempt to replicate a classroom experience) is becoming increasingly popular at the university level. However, research on the effectiveness of classroom capture systems in the university classroom has been limited due to the recent development and…

  16. Classroom Management: What Does Research Tell Us?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postholm, May Britt

    2013-01-01

    The article reviews studies that focus on classroom management. The aim of classroom management is twofold. The first is to establish a quiet and calm environment in the classroom so that the pupils can take part in meaningful learning in a subject. The second aim is that classroom management contributes to the pupils' social and moral…

  17. Examining the Flipped Classroom through Action Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Chung Kwan

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in using a flipped classroom format in day-to-day teaching. Direct computer-based individual instruction outside the classroom and interactive group learning activities inside the classroom are the two essential components of the flipped classroom model. By watching instructional videos, students can work through some…

  18. Optimizing the use of video-tapes of clinical sessions: the data-mining approach for scale construction and theory building for bereaved persons in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Amy Yin Man

    2010-01-01

    Video-taping clinical sessions is a common practice among social workers so that the tapes may be used for clinical supervision and reviewed with the individuals or families involved. They are usually underused for research purposes. This article reports on an innovative research method using such tapes as a basis for clinical data mining to explore the bereavement experience of Chinese people in Hong Kong. Using this data, a rich item pool, containing both negative and positive reactions, was generated to allow the development of a culturally relevant measurement tool of grief reactions. The data also facilitated theory building in the area of grief and bereavement. This study extended the use of video-tapes in clinical sessions for research purposes and helped to collect reliable and timely data in a non-intrusive way. It has also advanced the use of quantitative data in the clinical data-mining approach. The study encouraged collaboration between clinicians and researchers to develop knowledge and skills about their special target group of clients.

  19. Trout in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Thomas

    2014-05-01

    Trout in the Classroom (TIC) is a conservation-oriented environmental education program for elementary, middle, and high school students. During the year each teacher tailors the program to fit his or her curricular needs. Therefore, each TIC program is unique. TIC has interdisciplinary applications in science, social studies, mathematics, language arts, fine arts, and physical education. In the program, students and teachers raise trout from fertilized eggs supplied by Virginia Department of Game and Inland Fisheries (VGIF) hatcheries, in aquariums equipped with special chillers designed to keep the water near 50 degrees F. The students make daily temperature measurements, and monitor pH, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, and ammonia levels. They record their data, plot trends, and make sure that the water quality is sufficient to support trout development. The fingerlings, which hatch in late October, are almost an inch and a half long by mid-January. And towards the end of the school year, students will release the fry into VGIF approved watersheds. TIC programs have been in place all across the country for more than 20 years, and are the result of numerous collaborations between teachers, volunteers, government agencies, and local organizations like Trout Unlimited. The programs were designed specifically for teachers who wanted to incorporate more environmental education into their curriculum. While the immediate goal of Trout in the Classroom is to increase student knowledge of water quality and cold water conservation, its long-term goal is to reconnect an increasingly urbanized population of youth to the system of streams, rivers, and watersheds that sustain them. Successful programs have helped: connect students to their local environments and their local watersheds; teach about watershed health and water quality, and; get students to care about fish and the environment. In Virginia, the TIC program is now in its 8th year. Over the past year, the program

  20. Association between substandard classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverinen-Shaughnessy, U; Moschandreas, D J; Shaughnessy, R J

    2011-04-01

    This study focuses on the relationship between classroom ventilation rates and academic achievement. One hundred elementary schools of two school districts in the southwest United States were included in the study. Ventilation rates were estimated from fifth-grade classrooms (one per school) using CO(2) concentrations measured during occupied school days. In addition, standardized test scores and background data related to students in the classrooms studied were obtained from the districts. Of 100 classrooms, 87 had ventilation rates below recommended guidelines based on ASHRAE Standard 62 as of 2004. There is a linear association between classroom ventilation rates and students' academic achievement within the range of 0.9-7.1 l/s per person. For every unit (1 l/s per person) increase in the ventilation rate within that range, the proportion of students passing standardized test (i.e., scoring satisfactory or above) is expected to increase by 2.9% (95%CI 0.9-4.8%) for math and 2.7% (0.5-4.9%) for reading. The linear relationship observed may level off or change direction with higher ventilation rates, but given the limited number of observations, we were unable to test this hypothesis. A larger sample size is needed for estimating the effect of classroom ventilation rates higher than 7.1 l/s per person on academic achievement. The results of this study suggest that increasing the ventilation rates toward recommended guideline ventilation rates in classrooms should translate into improved academic achievement of students. More studies are needed to fully understand the relationships between ventilation rate, other indoor environmental quality parameters, and their effects on students' health and achievement. Achieving the recommended guidelines and pursuing better understanding of the underlying relationships would ultimately support both sustainable and productive school environments for students and personnel. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  1. EFFECTIVENESS OF FLIPPED CLASSROOM IN MATHEMATICS TEACHING

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. N. Ramakrishnan; Mrs. J. Johnsi Priya

    2016-01-01

    Flipped Classroom is an instructional strategy and a type of blended learning that reverses the traditional learning environment by delivering instructional content, often online, outside of the classroom. It moves activities, including those that may have traditionally been considered homework, into the classroom. In a flipped classroom, students watch online lectures, collaborate in online discussions, or carry out research at home and engage in concepts in the classroom with the guidance o...

  2. The Social Network Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunus, Peter

    Online social networking is an important part in the everyday life of college students. Despite the increasing popularity of online social networking among students and faculty members, its educational benefits are largely untested. This paper presents our experience in using social networking applications and video content distribution websites as a complement of traditional classroom education. In particular, the solution has been based on effective adaptation, extension and integration of Facebook, Twitter, Blogger YouTube and iTunes services for delivering educational material to students on mobile platforms like iPods and 3 rd generation mobile phones. The goals of the proposed educational platform, described in this paper, are to make the learning experience more engaging, to encourage collaborative work and knowledge sharing among students, and to provide an interactive platform for the educators to reach students and deliver lecture material in a totally new way.

  3. Tablets in the classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Bente Tobiesen

    2013-01-01

    This paper focuses on the multiple agents of educational change associated with the implementation of ICTs in elementary schooling. The focus of the paper is on emergent patterns of change, i.e. the way technologies are adapted over time in different configurations that involve both pupils......, teachers, activities and the different resources used in the classroom. The paper focuses on the concept of socio-material bricolage (Johri 2011) as an approach to understanding how digital devices contribute to constructing both relevant and innovative practices in teaching and learning in schools...... a school development project in Denmark where five classes of seventh graders were given iPads on a one pupil one device basis for the school year of 2012-13....

  4. Green space as classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentsen, Peter; Schipperijn, Jasper; Jensen, Frank Søndergaard

    2013-01-01

    More and more Danish teachers have started introducing curriculum-based outdoor learning as a weekly or biweekly ‘outdoor school’ day for school children. This move towards schooling in non-classroom spaces presents a challenge for green space managers. Basic managerial knowledge related to what......, who, when and where has thus far only been supported by anecdotal evidence, but seems fundamental to the decision-making of a range of green space providers. The present study aims to describe, characterise and discuss outdoor teachers’ use, preferences and ecostrategies in relation to green space....... A nationwide survey was conducted among Danish teachers practising outdoor teaching (107 respondents), and it showed that a majority used and preferred forest areas. The outdoor teachers used mainly school grounds and local green space for their outdoor teaching with a majority using the same place or mostly...

  5. The current practice of using multiple representations in year 4 science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuenmanee, Chanoknat; Thathong, Kongsak

    2018-01-01

    Multiple representations have been widely used as a reasoning tool for understanding complex scientific concepts. Thus this study attempted to investigate the current practice of using multiple representations on Year 4 science classrooms in terms of modes and levels which appear in curriculum documents, teaching plans, tasks and assessments, teaching practices, and students' behaviors. Indeed, documentary analysis, classroom observation, and interview were used as the data collection methods. First of all, Year 4 science documents were analyzed. Then classroom observation was used as a collecting method to seek what actually happen in the classroom. Finally, in-depth interviews were used to gather more information and obtain meaningful data. The finding reveals that many modes of verbal, visual, and tactile representations within three levels of representations are posed in Year 4 documents. Moreover, according to classroom observations and interviews, there are three main points of applying multiple representations into classrooms. First of all, various modes of representations were used, however, a huge number of them did not come together with the levels. The levels of representations, secondly, macroscopic and cellular levels were introduced into all classrooms while symbolic level was provided only in some classrooms. Finally, the connection of modes and levels pointed out that modes of representations were used without the considerations on the levels of them. So, it seems to be that teaching practice did not meet the aims of curriculum. Therefore, these issues were being considered in order to organize and design the further science lessons.

  6. Streaming Seismograms into Earth-Science Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammon, C. J.

    2011-12-01

    Seismograms are the fundamental observations upon which seismology is based; they are central to any course in seismology and important for any discussion of earthquake-related phenomena based on seismic observations. Advances in the collection and distribution of seismic data have made the use of research-quality seismograms in any network capable classroom feasible. The development of large, deep seismogram archives place an unprecedented quantity of high-quality data within reach of the modern classroom environment. I describe and discuss several computer tools and classroom activities that I use in introductory (general education) and advanced undergraduate courses that present near real-time research-quality seismic observations in the classroom. The Earth Motion Monitor Application (EMMA), is a MacOS application that presents a visually clear seismogram display that can be projected in classrooms with internet access. Seismic signals from thousands of station are available from the IRIS data center and the bandwidth can be tailored to the particular type of signal of interest (large event, low frequencies; small event, high frequencies). In introductory classes for non-science students, the near realtime display routinely shows magnitude 4.0-5.0 earthquake-generated signals, demonstrating to students the frequency of earthquake occurrence. Over the next few minutes as the waves travel through and across the planet, their arrival on the seismogram display provides some basic data for a qualitative estimate of the event's general location. When a major or great earthquake occurs, a broad-band display of signals from nearby stations can dramatically and dynamically illuminate the frequent activity associated with the aftershock sequence. Routine use of the display (while continuing the traditional classroom activities) provides students with a significant dose of seismogram study. Students generally find all the signals, including variations in seismic

  7. Learning about Language in Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio-Ruane, Susan

    1985-01-01

    Research on communication in classrooms is reviewed to provide implications for the writing process. Studies address language, social identity, and teacher expectation. The importance of meaning as the focus of writing is stressed. (CL)

  8. The Classroom Animal: Snapping Turtles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, David C.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the distinctive features of the common snapping turtle. Discusses facts and misconceptions held about the turtle. Provides guidelines for proper care and treatment of a young snapper in a classroom environment. (ML)

  9. Instructional Style Meets Classroom Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novelli, Joan

    1991-01-01

    Nine elementary teachers explain how they design their classrooms to match and support their instructional styles. The teachers focus on whole language programs, student portfolios, science activity set-ups, technology transformation, learning center strategies, and space utilization. (SM)

  10. Concussion Management in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Danielle M; Caperell, Kerry S

    2016-12-01

    There is a new emphasis on the team approach to pediatric concussion management, particularly in the classroom. However, it is expected that educators are unfamiliar with the "Returning to Learning" recommendations. The authors' primary objective was to assess and improve high school educators' knowledge regarding concussions and management interventions using an online education tool. A total of 247 high school educators completed a 12 question pretest to assess core knowledge of concussions and classroom management followed by a 20-minute online literature-based education module. Participants then completed an identical posttest. The improvement in core knowledge was statistically significant (P weakness were the description and identification of concussions. Questions regarding concussion classroom management also showed a statistically significant increase in scores (P knowledge of educators regarding concussions and classroom management as well as the significant improvement after an online educational module. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. Behavior Modification in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Mryon; Whitman, Joan

    1971-01-01

    This article presents the theoretical rationale for behavior modification, principally through its comparison with traditional psychotherapies, and suggests some behavior modification techniques for the classroom management of maladaptive behavior. (Author)

  12. Collaboration systems for classroom instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C. Y. Roger; Meliksetian, Dikran S.; Chang, Martin C.

    1996-01-01

    In this paper we discuss how classroom instruction can benefit from state-of-the-art technologies in networks, worldwide web access through Internet, multimedia, databases, and computing. Functional requirements for establishing such a high-tech classroom are identified, followed by descriptions of our current experimental implementations. The focus of the paper is on the capabilities of distributed collaboration, which supports both synchronous multimedia information sharing as well as a shared work environment for distributed teamwork and group decision making. Our ultimate goal is to achieve the concept of 'living world in a classroom' such that live and dynamic up-to-date information and material from all over the world can be integrated into classroom instruction on a real-time basis. We describe how we incorporate application developments in a geography study tool, worldwide web information retrievals, databases, and programming environments into the collaborative system.

  13. Generalizing from Observations of Mathematics Teachers' Instructional Practice Using the Instructional Quality Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Anne Garrison; Kim, Sungyeun

    2015-01-01

    One crucial question for researchers who study teachers' classroom practice is how to maximize information about what is happening in classrooms while minimizing costs. This report extends prior studies of the reliability of the Instructional Quality Assessment (IQA), a widely used classroom observation toolkit, and offers insight into the often…

  14. Designing User Centred Intelligent Classroom Lighting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgieva, Diana Zdravkova; Schledermann, Kathrine Marie; Nielsen, Stine Maria Louring

    2018-01-01

    Through a case study, this paper presents a new way of designing intelligent classroom lighting to meet the users’ needs. A mix of ethnographic methods (field observations and interviews) were used to investigate the everyday learning activities at a middle school in Copenhagen in order...... to determine how lighting can support the learning environment. Based on the investigations, lighting design criteria and three predefined lighting scenes are proposed as a new design for meeting the needs of students and teachers during three types of activities. The scenes focus on smartboard visibility...

  15. THE USE OF MOTHER TONGUE IN EFL CLASSROOMS WITH YOUNG ENGLISH LEARNERS IN KORÇA, ALBANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorela KAÇAUNI KONOMI

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to show to what extent English teachers speak the MT (Albanian in the EFL classrooms when they teach Young English Learners in a public school in Korça, Albania. To achieve this, the researcher analyzed the data collected from four classroom observations in grades 3 up to 6. Three English teachers were interviewed and compared to show how much they used Albanian and reasons why they used it. The data obtained from the classroom observations and interviews showed that all the teachers used Albanian in the EFL classrooms in different extents and for different reasons.

  16. Mapping Science in Discourse-based Inquiry Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeneayhu, Demeke Gesesse

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate how discourse-based inquiry science lessons provided opportunities for students to develop a network of semantic relations among core ideas and concepts in science. It was a naturalistic inquiry classroom lessons observation study on three science teachers--- a middle school science teacher and two high school physics teachers in an urban school district located in the Western New York region. Discourse and thematic analysis drawn from the theory of Systemic Functional Linguistics were utilized as guiding framework and analysis tools. Analysis of the pre-observation and post-observation interviews of the participant teachers revealed that all of the three teachers participated in at least one inquiry-based science teaching teacher professional development program and they all thought their classroom teaching practice was inquiry-based. Analysis of their classroom lesson videos that each participant teacher taught on a specific science topic revealed that the middle school teacher was found to be a traditional teacher-dominated classroom whereas the two high school physics teachers' classroom teaching approach was found to be discourse-based inquiry. One of the physics teachers who taught on a topic of Magnetic Interaction used relatively structured and guided-inquiry classroom investigations. The other physics teacher who taught on a topic of Color Mixing utilized open-ended classroom investigations where the students planned and executed the series of classroom science investigations with minimal guidance from the teacher. The traditional teacher-based classroom communicative pattern was found to be dominated by Triadic Dialogue and most of the science thematics were jointly developed by the teacher and the students, but the students' role was limited to providing responses to the teacher's series questions. In the guided-inquiry classroom, the common communicative pattern was found to be True Dialogue and most

  17. Why classroom climate matters for children high in anxious solitude: A study of differential susceptibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Kathleen; Coplan, Robert J

    2018-03-01

    The goal of the current study was to examine the complex links among anxious solitude, classroom climate, engagement, achievement, and gender. In particular, drawing upon the differential susceptibility hypothesis (Belsky, 1997), we investigated if children high in anxious solitude were particularly sensitive and responsive to the classroom environment. Participants were N = 712 children in Grade 3, drawn from the National Institute of Child and Human Development (NICHD) Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development data set. Classroom climate and engagement were assessed using the Classroom Observation Scale (NICHD, 1998). Teachers completed the Teacher Report Form (Achenbach, 1991) as a measure of anxious solitude and the Academic Rating Scale (NICHD, 2010) as a measure of achievement. Hypothesized associations among variables were tested by way of a moderated-mediation model. Among the results, engagement was found to mediate the relation between classroom climate and achievement. In addition, anxious solitude and gender were found to moderate the relation between classroom climate and engagement. Support for the differential susceptibility hypothesis was found, suggesting that children high in anxious solitude may be more reactive (both positively and negatively) to elements of the classroom environment. In addition, gender differences were observed, indicating that boys may be more responsive to the classroom environment as compared with girls. Implications for future research and educational policies are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2018 APA, all rights reserved).

  18. Children's behavioral regulation and literacy: The impact of the first grade classroom environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Stephanie L; Connor, Carol McDonald; McClelland, Megan M

    2015-10-01

    Classroom learning environments are an important source of influence on children's development, particularly with regard to literacy achievement and behavioral regulation, both of which require the coordination of task inhibition, attention, and working memory. Classroom observations were conducted in 18 schools and 51 first grade classrooms for 500 children. The non-instructional activities were recorded for each student in the classroom. Hierarchical linear modeling revealed that children with weaker fall behavioral regulation were more likely to attend classrooms where more time was spent in disruptions and wasted instructional time over the course of the school year, such as waiting for the teacher to gather materials before beginning instruction. For literacy outcomes, children who were in classrooms where more time in disruptions, transitions, and waiting was observed showed weaker literacy skill gains in the spring compared to children in classrooms with lesser amounts of such unproductive non-instructional time and this effect was generally greater for students with initial weaker skills. These results also reveal that the classroom environment and the incoming characteristics of the students themselves influence students' development of behavioral regulation and literacy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Analyzing Differentiation in the Classroom: Using the COS-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanTassel-Baska, Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The use of a classroom observation tool to monitor differentiation strategies is described, and relevant research findings using the form are reported. The advantages for using this approach to document differentiation are discussed as are the reasons teachers may question its intent. Applications for practice include its use as a self-assessment…

  20. Technology Integration in Elementary Classrooms: Teaching Practices of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This study examines how and why student teachers integrated technology to enhance instruction in elementary classrooms. The participants were 31 student teachers who completed an assignment of eight weeks. Multiple data sets including observation notes of 347 lessons were obtained from three key groups for data triangulation. Results reveal that…

  1. Implementation Strategies of Inclusive Education in Cypriot Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, Panayiotis; Hajisoteriou, Christina

    2013-01-01

    This research examined the implementation strategies used by the participant teachers in order to practice inclusion in their classrooms. To this end, we investigated the participant teachers' perceptions of their roles and the barriers faced in the implementation of inclusion. Interviews and observations were carried out with four teachers in…

  2. A Chinese EFL Teacher's Classroom Assessment Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoying

    2017-01-01

    This article reports on a case study of how an experienced EFL teacher assessed her students in her oral English course at a university in China. Data were collected over one semester through document analysis, classroom observation and recording, interviews, and student journals. Analysis revealed that the teacher assessed her students through…

  3. Arts Integration: What Is Really Happening in the Elementary Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Researching how Arts Integration is practiced in a primary school, this article explores how elementary teachers understand, implement, and experience Arts Integration. Weaving together personal experiences, teacher interviews, focus group sessions, classroom observations, and written texts, I investigate how the arts are often devalued in Arts…

  4. Building an Outdoor Classroom for Field Geology: The Geoscience Garden

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldron, John W. F.; Locock, Andrew J.; Pujadas-Botey, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Many geoscience educators have noted the difficulty that students experience in transferring their classroom knowledge to the field environment. The Geoscience Garden, on the University of Alberta North Campus, provides a simulated field environment in which Earth Science students can develop field observation skills, interpret features of Earth's…

  5. Critique and Process: Signature Pedagogies in the Graphic Design Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motley, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    Like many disciplines in design and the visual fine arts, critique is a signature pedagogy in the graphic design classroom. It serves as both a formative and summative assessment while also giving students the opportunity to practice the habits of graphic design. Critiques help students become keen observers of relevant disciplinary criteria;…

  6. Children of Divorce: The Impact on Classroom Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinoda, Kevin Seiji

    This paper presents research on the influence of divorce on the classroom behavior of school-aged children. It attempts to uncover some contributing factors that may play a role in how a child deals with divorce. It explores the role of the teacher and school in the intervention and discusses what teachers have observed in working with children of…

  7. Identifying Learning Preferences in Vocational Education and Training Classroom Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter J.

    2006-01-01

    This research was designed to assess whether teachers and trainers of vocational learners noted and valued differences in individual learning preferences and, if so, how those differences were observed in natural classroom, workshop or other formal learning settings. Data were collected from six vocational education and training (VET) learning…

  8. I Have a Banana Tree in My Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Patricia A.

    2007-01-01

    When the banana is growing, the broadest part of the banana is located at the bottom, while the tapered end points upward. It appears upside down, however, from the banana tree's perspective, it is growing right side up. The author observes that the students in her classroom labeled by society as "at risk," are also, in a sense, "upside down."…

  9. Operating Classroom Aesthetic Reading Environment to Raise Children's Reading Motivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Mei-Ju; Cheng, Jui-Ching; Cheng, Ya-Wen

    2016-01-01

    This research aims to explore how preschool educators understand about raising children's reading motivation through operating classroom aesthetic reading environment. With one year qualitative research, sixteen 4-6 years old young were observed and interviewed. The first stage interviews were undergone with environmental guidance. After the…

  10. Group and Gender in Japanese and American Elementary Classrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, V. Lee; And Others

    1991-01-01

    The individualism versus collectivism and androgynous versus gender-differentiated handling of children were studied in 10 Japanese (Chiba City) and 9 U.S. (Ann Arbor, Michigan) fifth grade classrooms with 407 and 246 students, respectively. Implications of the observed cultural variations in teacher behavior are discussed as they relate to…

  11. Genre-Based Teaching and Assessment in Secondary English Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Icy

    2012-01-01

    This study investigates how genre can be used as an organisational principle to interweave teaching and assessment in the L2 school context. Relying on data from interviews and lesson observations gathered from two Secondary 1 (that is, Grade 7) Hong Kong classrooms, the study sought to discover how teachers implemented genre-based teaching and…

  12. Using the GLOBE Program To Enhance Classroom Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramey, Linda K.; Tomlin, James

    The Wright State University Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) Franchise has developed a project to fill the need for direct, strong connections linking science, mathematics and technology to classroom curriculum and students' learning of integrated, relevant content. GLOBE is an international project that involves…

  13. Transactional Analysis in the Classroom, Staffroom and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrow, Giles

    2015-01-01

    The author considers the application of transactional analysis (TA) in the field of education. Initially, the focus is on the use of TA in reducing conflict in the classroom and staffroom before offering observations about its broader relevance to contemporary UK schooling. Concepts covered include the egostate model of personality, functional…

  14. Second graders’ collaborative learning around touchscreens in their classroom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Jacob

    and ethnographic observations, all from a year-long study of naturally occurring activities in two second grade classrooms at a public school in Denmark. The way of seeing and making visible children’s collaboration around touchscreens presented in this thesis is informed by CSCL, ethnomethodology and embodied...

  15. Developing Intentionality and L2 Classroom Task-Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelma, Juup

    2014-01-01

    This paper extends work on "intentionality", from philosophy, psychology and education to an exploration of learners' meaning-making in L2 classroom task-engagement. The paper draws on both phenomenological and folk-psychological perspectives on intentionality, and employs John R. Searle's intrinsic (mental) and derived (observable)…

  16. Communicative English Language Teaching in Egypt: Classroom Practice and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mona Kamal; Ibrahim, Yehia A.

    2017-01-01

    Following a "mixed methods" approach, this research is designed to examine whether teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in Egypt's public schools matches the communicative English language teaching (CELT) approach. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from 50 classroom observations, 100 questionnaire responses from…

  17. Language practices in school-based Grade R classrooms | Lenyai ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The investigation on language practices aimed at establishing how the language of learning policy formulated by the Department of Education in South Africa was interpreted at classroom level. The study focused on language activities in schoolbased Grade R classes to observe how learners' home language was used as ...

  18. Living Classrooms: Learning Guide for Famous & Historic Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Forest Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This guide provides information to create and care for a Famous and Historic Trees Living Classroom in which students learn American history and culture in the context of environmental change. The booklet contains 10 hands-on activities that emphasize observation, critical thinking, and teamwork. Worksheets and illustrations provide students with…

  19. "Flipping the Coin": Models for Social Justice in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, Tony

    1998-01-01

    Offers a rationale for developing a theory of social justice to support educational research. Using the work of John Rawls and others, explores injustices present within schools and classrooms observable through experiences of powerlessness, violence, exploitation, marginalization, and cultural imperialism. Calls for a transformational focus for…

  20. Backyard Botany: Using GPS Technology in the Science Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    March, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    Global Positioning System (GPS) technology can be used to connect students to the natural world and improve their skills in observation, identification, and classification. Using GPS devices in the classroom increases student interest in science, encourages team-building skills, and improves biology content knowledge. Additionally, it helps…

  1. Dialogue in mathematics classrooms: Beyond question-and- answer methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Brodie

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores different kinds of interaction observed in South African mathematics classrooms in order to unpack the notion of participation in mathematics learning. It argues that conventional question-and-answer methods do not promote the kind of interaction that the new South African curriculum calls for. It presents more appropriate kinds of interactions, where teachers maintain high task demands, respond to genuine learner questions and support conversations among learners. The paper argues that combinations of different kinds of interaction are  most likely to support learner participation and mathematical thinking in classrooms.

  2. An Investigation into Student Engagement in Higher Education Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Witkowski, PhD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on a one-year research project that used peer coaching and collaboration between two reading professors to study the effects of collaborative classroom activities on student engagement. In order to address professors’ concerns about student participation, two undergraduate reading-methods classes were revised through the inclusion of more collaborative learning activities. Classroom observations were conducted to take notes on both pedagogical methods and student response to these methods. Students were also asked to self-assess their engagement in behavioral, cognitive, and affective domains. The results of this research were then used to revise pedagogical techniques in these and other classes.

  3. Undesirable Behaviors Elementary School Classroom Teachers Encounter in the Classroom and Their Reasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.G. Balcik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to determine how often elementary school teachers encounter undesirable behaviors in the classroom and what their thoughts regarding possible reasons of these behaviors are. The teachers’ opininon about the prevalence of these behaviors and their possible reasons were evaluated according to gender, marital status, level of class being taught, size of class being taught and it was tried to be determined if there were significant differences between variables. The measurement tool was applied to a total of 54 teachers at 5 schools in Gölcük district of the Kocaeli province. The data collection tool is composed of three sections. The first section is for establishing teachers’ personal information. In this study, as a data collection tool, a questionnaire was used. When preparing questions for the questionnaire, following the examination of resources available, the questionnaire prepared by Aksoy (1999 and used in the thesis study entitled “Classroom Management and Student Discipline in Elementary Schools of Ankara” and also used in the thesis study by Boyraz (2007 entitled “Discipline Problems that Candidate Teachers Servicing at Elementary Schools Encounter in the Classroom” was employed. Although the validity and reliability of the questionnaire was tested by Aksoy (1999 and Boyraz (2007, the reliability study for the questionnaire was retested and found to be 0,9. The questionnaire include 42 items. 19 of them are related to the reasons of undesirable behaviors observed in the classroom and 23 of them are related to undesirable behaviors observed in the classroom.

  4. Teachers' goal orientations: Effects on classroom goal structures and emotions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Hall, Nathan C; Goetz, Thomas; Frenzel, Anne C

    2017-03-01

    Prior research has shown teachers' goal orientations to influence classroom goal structures (Retelsdorf et al., 2010, Learning and Instruction, 20, 30) and to also impact their emotions (Schutz et al., 2007, Emotion in education, Academic Press, Amsterdam, the Netherlands). However, empirical research evaluating possible causal ordering and mediation effects involving these variables in teachers is presently lacking. The present 6-month longitudinal study investigated the relations between varied motivational, behavioural, and emotional variables in practising teachers. More specifically, this study examined the reciprocal, longitudinal relations between teachers' achievement goals, classroom goal structures, and teaching-related emotions, as well as cumulative mediational models in which observed causal relations were evaluated. Participants were 495 practising teachers from Canada (86% female, M = 42 years). Teachers completed a web-based questionnaire at two time points assessing their instructional goals, perceived classroom goal structures, achievement emotions, and demographic items. Results from cross-lagged analyses and structural equation modelling showed teachers' achievement goals to predict their perceived classroom goal structures that, in turn, predicted their teaching-related emotions. The present results inform both Butler's (2012, Journal of Educational Psychology, 104, 726) theory on teachers' achievement goals and Frenzel's (2014, International handbook of emotions in education, Routledge, New York, NY) model of teachers' emotions in showing teachers' instructional goals to both directly predict their teaching-related emotions, as well as indirectly through the mediating effects of classroom goal structures. © 2016 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Question Asking in the Science Classroom: Teacher Attitudes and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshach, Haim; Dor-Ziderman, Yair; Yefroimsky, Yana

    2014-02-01

    Despite the wide agreement among educators that classroom learning and teaching processes can gain much from student and teacher questions, their potential is not fully utilized. Adopting the view that reporting both teachers' (of varying age groups) views and actual classroom practices is necessary for obtaining a more complete view of the phenomena at hand, the present study closely examines both cognitive and affective domains of: (a) teachers' views (via interviews) concerning: (1) importance and roles of teacher and student questions, (2) teacher responses, and (3) planning and teacher training; and (b) teachers' actual practices (via classroom observations) concerning: (1) number and (2) level of teacher and student questions, as well as (3) teachers' responses to questions. The data were collected from 3 elementary, 3 middle, and 3 high school science teachers and their respective classroom students. The findings lay out a wide view of classroom questioning and teachers' responses, and relate what actually occurs in classes to teachers' stated views. Some of the study's main conclusions are that a gap exists between how science researchers and teachers view the role of teacher questions: the former highlight the cognitive domain, while the latter emphasize the affective domain.

  6. Classroom Environment in the Implementation of an Innovative Curriculum Project in Science Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Mercedes; Pias, Rosa; Membiela, Pedro; Dapia, Dolores

    1998-01-01

    Analyzes the perceptions of students, teachers, and external observers in order to study the influence of classroom environment on the implementation of an innovative project in science education. Contains 33 references. (DDR)

  7. Turkish preservice science teachers' socioscientific issues-based teaching practices in middle school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genel, Abdulkadir; Sami Topçu, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Despite a growing body of research and curriculum reforms including socioscientific issues (SSI) across the world, how preservice science teachers (PST) or in-service science teachers can teach SSI in science classrooms needs further inquiry. Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe the abilities of PSTs to teach SSI in middle school science classrooms, and the research question that guided the present study is: How can we characterize Turkish PSTs' SSI-based teaching practices in middle school science classrooms (ages 11-14)? Sample: In order to address the research question of this study, we explored 10 Turkish PSTs' SSI-based teaching practices in middle school science classrooms. A purposeful sampling strategy was used, thus, PSTs were specifically chosen because they were ideal candidates to teach SSI and to integrate SSI into the science curricula since they were seniors in the science education program who had to take the field experience courses. Design and method: The participants' SSI teaching practices were characterized in light of qualitative research approach. SSI-based teaching practices were analyzed, and the transcripts of all videotape recordings were coded by two researchers. Results: The current data analysis describes Turkish PSTs' SSI-based teaching practices under five main categories: media, argumentation, SSI selection and presentation, risk analysis, and moral perspective. Most of PSTs did not use media resources in their lesson and none of them considered moral perspective in their teaching. While the risk analyses were very simple and superficial, the arguments developed in the classrooms generally remained at a simple level. PSTs did not think SSI as a central topic and discussed these issues in a very limited time and at the end of the class period. Conclusions: The findings of this study manifest the need of the reforms in science education programs. The present study provides evidence that moral, media

  8. The effects of stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krendl, Anne; Gainsburg, Izzy; Ambady, Nalini

    2012-02-01

    Although the effects of negative stereotypes and observer pressure on athletic performance have been well researched, the effects of positive stereotypes on performance, particularly in the presence of observers, is not known. In the current study, White males watched a video either depicting Whites basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (positive stereotype), Black basketball players as the best free throwers in the NBA (negative stereotype), or a neutral sports video (control). Participants then shot a set of free throws, during which half the participants were also videotaped (observer condition), whereas the other half were not (no observer condition). Results demonstrated that positive stereotypes improved free throw performance, but only in the no observer condition. Interestingly, observer pressure interacted with the positive stereotype to lead to performance decrements. In the negative stereotype condition, performance decrements were observed both in the observer and no observer conditions.

  9. 21st CENTURY LEARNING: IS ICT REALLY INTEGRATED IN EFL CLASSROOM OR MERELY SEGREGATED OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ririn Ovilia

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 21st century, along with the rapid development of technology, the teachers begin to involve Information and Communication Technology (ICT in EFL learning. However, the case arises whether the use of ICT is really integrated or merely segregated outside the classroom. This study was a case study which attempted to see the practice of integrating ICT in EFL classroom, particularly in Charis School?a private Junior High School in Malang, and to investigate the students� and teacher�s perceptions toward the learning process. The instruments were interview guide, observation sheet, and questionnaire. The results of this study showed that the teacher was aware to integrate ICT in EFL classroom and the students showed positive attitudes in the learning process.

  10. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2018-06-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  11. The construction of different classroom norms during Peer Instruction: Students perceive differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Turpen

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes variations in instructors’ implementation practices during Peer Instruction (PI and shows how these differences in practices shape different norms of classroom interaction. We describe variations in classroom norms along three dimensions of classroom culture that are integral to Peer Instruction, emphasis on: (1 faculty-student collaboration, (2 student-student collaboration, and (3 sense-making vs answer-making. Based on interpretations by an observing researcher, we place three different PI classrooms along a continuum representing a set of possible norms. We then check these interpretations against students’ perceptions of these environments from surveys collected at the end of the term. We find significant correspondence between the researchers’ interpretations and students’ perceptions of Peer Instruction in these environments. We find that variation in faculty practices can set up what students perceive as discernibly different norms. For interested instructors, concrete classroom practices are described that appear to encourage or discourage these norms.

  12. Exploring the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue, Levon Ellen; O'Brien, Mia; Makar, Katie

    2017-08-01

    From an early age, children are faced with financial dilemmas and are expected to make effective financial decisions about money. In this paper, we explore the classroom practices that may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education. We observed an inquiry-based mathematics lesson in a Year 4 primary school classroom. The financial maths task asked students to decide on the best fundraising option for the school. We used the theory of practice architectures to analyse the interactions in the classroom in order to understand what may have enabled and constrained classroom practices. We found that classroom practices such as engaging with peers through positive and collaborative learning opportunities, making ethical, social and mathematical connections of the task, and considering the impact of financial decisions on others may enable a compassionate approach to financial literacy education.

  13. Look and Do Ancient Greece. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Greek Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Greece [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource, containing a teacher's manual, reproducible student workbook, and a color teaching poster, is designed to accompany a 21-minute videotape program, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "Greek Architecture," looks at elements of architectural construction as applied to Greek structures, and…

  14. Look and Do Ancient Egypt. Teacher's Manual: Primary Program, Ancient Egypt Art & Architecture [and] Workbook: The Art and Architecture of Ancient Egypt [and] K-4 Videotape. History through Art and Architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luce, Ann Campbell

    This resource contains a teaching manual, reproducible student workbook, and color teaching poster, which were designed to accompany a 2-part, 34-minute videotape, but may be adapted for independent use. Part 1 of the program, "The Old Kingdom," explains Egyptian beliefs concerning life after death as evidenced in art, architecture and…

  15. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Laura; Scherr, Rachel E.; Zickler, Todd; Mazur, Eric

    2016-12-01

    Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  16. Exclusively visual analysis of classroom group interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Tucker

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Large-scale audiovisual data that measure group learning are time consuming to collect and analyze. As an initial step towards scaling qualitative classroom observation, we qualitatively coded classroom video using an established coding scheme with and without its audio cues. We find that interrater reliability is as high when using visual data only—without audio—as when using both visual and audio data to code. Also, interrater reliability is high when comparing use of visual and audio data to visual-only data. We see a small bias to code interactions as group discussion when visual and audio data are used compared with video-only data. This work establishes that meaningful educational observation can be made through visual information alone. Further, it suggests that after initial work to create a coding scheme and validate it in each environment, computer-automated visual coding could drastically increase the breadth of qualitative studies and allow for meaningful educational analysis on a far greater scale.

  17. PROFICIENT CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT THROUGH FOCUSED MATHEMATIC TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Samuelsson

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A not entirely unusual position among teachers is that they believe that they must first establish a peaceful classroom before they can begin to teach the subject. This research, shows how a proficient mathematics teacher teaches his subject and thereby creates a quiet and focused classroom and exerts effective leadership, just by teaching mathematics. The researchers observed a male mathematics teacher for almost half a year, i.e. one semester. The results of research present several patterns that the researchers saw during the observations of his teaching. The teacher showed an interest in each student’s mathematical thinking and expressed explicitly how students were expected to learn mathematics. He also directed students’ attention to mathematics and established a culture where all solutions were important in the teaching process. In the teaching process, he used multiple representations to motivate students and a lot of supportive expressions that made them feel that they were able to learn mathematics. He worked patiently to establish structures, and there was almost no disruptive behaviour. Students simply did not have time to interfere because they were so engaged in learning mathematics.

  18. An Investigation of the Use of the "Flipped Classroom" Pedagogy in Secondary English Language Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chi Cheung Ruby

    2017-01-01

    Aim/Purpose: To examine the use of a flipped classroom in the English Language subject in secondary classrooms in Hong Kong. Background: The research questions addressed were: (1) What are teachers' perceptions towards the flipped classroom pedagogy?; (2) How can teachers transfer their flipped classroom experiences to teaching other…

  19. Methodological considerations for observational coding of eating and feeding behaviors in children and their families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesch, Megan H; Lumeng, Julie C

    2017-12-15

    Behavioral coding of videotaped eating and feeding interactions can provide researchers with rich observational data and unique insights into eating behaviors, food intake, food selection as well as interpersonal and mealtime dynamics of children and their families. Unlike self-report measures of eating and feeding practices, the coding of videotaped eating and feeding behaviors can allow for the quantitative and qualitative examinations of behaviors and practices that participants may not self-report. While this methodology is increasingly more common, behavioral coding protocols and methodology are not widely shared in the literature. This has important implications for validity and reliability of coding schemes across settings. Additional guidance on how to design, implement, code and analyze videotaped eating and feeding behaviors could contribute to advancing the science of behavioral nutrition. The objectives of this narrative review are to review methodology for the design, operationalization, and coding of videotaped behavioral eating and feeding data in children and their families, and to highlight best practices. When capturing eating and feeding behaviors through analysis of videotapes, it is important for the study and coding to be hypothesis driven. Study design considerations include how to best capture the target behaviors through selection of a controlled experimental laboratory environment versus home mealtime, duration of video recording, number of observations to achieve reliability across eating episodes, as well as technical issues in video recording and sound quality. Study design must also take into account plans for coding the target behaviors, which may include behavior frequency, duration, categorization or qualitative descriptors. Coding scheme creation and refinement occur through an iterative process. Reliability between coders can be challenging to achieve but is paramount to the scientific rigor of the methodology. Analysis approach

  20. Differential effects of the classroom on African American and non-African American's mathematics achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenke, Katerina; Nguyen, Tutrang; Watts, Tyler W; Sarama, Julie H; Clements, Douglas H

    2017-08-01

    We examined whether African American students differentially responded to dimensions of the observed classroom-learning environment compared with non-African American students. Further, we examined whether these dimensions of the classroom mediated treatment effects of a preschool mathematics intervention targeted at students from low-income families. Three observed dimensions of the classroom (teacher expectations and developmental appropriateness; teacher confidence and enthusiasm; and support for mathematical discourse) were evaluated in a sample of 1,238 preschool students in 101 classrooms. Using multigroup multilevel mediation where African American students were compared to non-African American students, we found that teachers in the intervention condition had higher ratings on the observed dimensions of the classroom compared with teachers in the control condition. Further, ratings on teacher expectations and developmental appropriateness had larger associations with the achievement of African American students than for non-African Americans. Findings suggest that students within the same classroom may react differently to that learning environment and that classroom learning environments could be structured in ways that are beneficial for students who need the most support.

  1. Classroom peer relationships and behavioral engagement in elementary school: the role of social network equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappella, Elise; Kim, Ha Yeon; Neal, Jennifer W; Jackson, Daisy R

    2013-12-01

    Applying social capital and systems theories of social processes, we examine the role of the classroom peer context in the behavioral engagement of low-income students (N = 80) in urban elementary school classrooms (N = 22). Systematic child observations were conducted to assess behavioral engagement among second to fifth graders in the fall and spring of the same school year. Classroom observations, teacher and child questionnaires, and social network data were collected in the fall. Confirming prior research, results from multilevel models indicate that students with more behavioral difficulties or less academic motivation in the fall were less behaviorally engaged in the spring. Extending prior research, classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties-social network equity-had more behaviorally engaged students in the spring, especially in classrooms with higher levels of observed organization (i.e., effective management of behavior, time, and attention). Moreover, social network equity attenuated the negative relation between student behavioral difficulties and behavioral engagement, suggesting that students with behavioral difficulties were less disengaged in classrooms with more equitably distributed and interconnected social ties. Findings illuminate the need to consider classroom peer contexts in future research and intervention focused on the behavioral engagement of students in urban elementary schools.

  2. The Printout: Desktop Pulishing in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balajthy, Ernest; Link, Gordon

    1988-01-01

    Reviews software available to the classroom teacher for desktop publishing and describes specific classroom activities. Suggests using desktop publishing to produce large print texts for students with limited sight or for primary students.(NH)

  3. Have You Considered Gamifying Your Classroom?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Graham

    2018-01-01

    New classroom practices can be brought into the classroom that engage students through their enjoyment of games, while building their confidence and bolstering their understanding that mistakes are valuable stops along the journey to understanding.

  4. Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effective Classroom Management Techniques for Secondary Schools. ... engagement of students in activities, use of innovative instructional strategies by teachers, ... and teachers in their perception regarding the effects of teachers classroom ...

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE An Assessment of Mathematics Classroom ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bdu

    ORIGINAL ARTICLE. An Assessment of Mathematics Classroom Teaching- ... the study was to assess whether the learning classroom environment was compliant with constructivism. ... of our education system. Applefield ... share control of the design, management, and evaluation ..... development of formative assessment.

  6. Teacher classroom practices and Mathematics performance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Mathematics teacher questionnaire, administered as part of the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) 2011, comprised questions pertaining to the classroom practices of Teacher Clarity, Classroom Discussion, Feedback, Formative Assessment, Problem Solving and Metacognitive Strategies, ...

  7. Classroom interventions for children with ADHD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, Yvonne; Gaastra, Geraldina F.; Tucha, Lara I.; Tucha, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    In a typical classroom, children are instructed to remain seated, perform independent seatwork and follow teachers’ instructions. Children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may find these classroom demands particularly difficult to adhere to because, by definition, children with

  8. Classroom Listening Conditions in Indian Primary Schools: A Survey of Four Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayathri Sundaravadhanan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Background noise affects the listening environment inside classrooms, especially for younger children. High background noise level adversely affects not only student speech perception but also teacher vocal hygiene. The current study aimed to give an overview of the classroom listening conditions in selected government primary schools in India. Materials and Methods: Noise measurements were taken in 23 classrooms of four government primary schools in southern India, using a type 2 sound level meter. In each classroom measurements were taken in occupied and unoccupied conditions. Teacher voice level was measured in the same classrooms. In addition, the classroom acoustical conditions were observed and the reverberation time for each classroom was calculated. Results: The mean occupied noise level was 62.1 dBA and 65.6 dBC, and the mean unoccupied level was 62.2 dBA and 65 dBC. The mean unamplified teacher speech-to-noise ratio was 10.6 dBA. Both the occupied and unoccupied noise levels exceeded national and international recommended levels and the teacher speech-to-noise ratio was also found to be inadequate in most classrooms. The estimated reverberation time in all classrooms was greater than 2.6 seconds, which is almost double the duration of accepted standards. In addition, observation of classrooms revealed insufficient acoustical treatment to effectively reduce internal and external noise and minimize reverberation. Conclusion: The results of this study point out the need to improve the listening environment for children in government primary schools in India.

  9. CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES IN AN EFL CLASS

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Fitriani Syarifah; Raynesa Noor Emiliasari

    2017-01-01

    In a foreign language context, classroom management is very important to be considered by the teachers since the target language is taught mostly in classroom. However, managing classroom is not an easy task to do. Most of teachers think it is difficult because they need to organize the class, deal with students‘ behavior and manage the time. Taking the issues above into account, this research was conducted to find out strategies in managing EFL classrooms applied by a teacher ...

  10. Classroom Action Research: Penelitian Tindakan Kelas

    OpenAIRE

    Juliandi, Azuar

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this article is to provide a basic knowledge of classroom action research, systematic proposal and classroom action reporting. The Knowledge is so important because a professional lecturer must be able to understand the problems themselves and their learning environment through classroom action research activities. Various issues in classroom action research, including: planning, process, use of methods, media, resources and learning evaluations and other relevant issues. ...

  11. Nurturing creativity in the classroom

    CERN Document Server

    Kaufman, James C

    2010-01-01

    Nurturing Creativity in the Classroom is a groundbreaking collection of essays by leading scholars, who examine and respond to the tension that many educators face in valuing student creativity but believing that they cannot support it given the curricular constraints of the classroom. Is it possible for teachers to nurture creative development and expression without drifting into curricular chaos? Do curricular constraints necessarily lead to choosing conformity over creativity? This book combines the perspectives of top educators and psychologists to generate practical advice for considering and addressing the challenges of supporting creativity within the classroom. It is unique in its balance of practical recommendations for nurturing creativity and thoughtful appreciation of curricular constraints. This approach helps ensure that the insights and advice found in this collection will take root in educators’ practice, rather than being construed as yet another demand placed on their overflowing plate of ...

  12. Google Tools in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albee, E. M.; Koons, P. O.; Schauffler, M.; Zhu, Y.; Segee, B. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Maine Learning Technology Initiative provides every seventh and eighth grade student in the state with MacBook laptop computers. Limitless education possibilities exist with the inclusion of Google Tools and laptops as learning tools in our modern classrooms. Google Applications allow students to create documents, spreadsheets, charts, graphs, forms, and presentations and easily allows the sharing of information with their fellow classmates and teachers. These applications invite the use of inquiry and critical thinking skills, collaboration among peers, and subject integration to teach students crucial concepts. The benefits for teachers extend into the realm of using Google sites to easily create a teacher website and blog to upload classroom information and create a communication connection for parents and students as well as collaborations between the teachers and University researchers and educators. Google Applications further enhances the possibilities for learning, sharing a wealth of information, and enhancing communication inside and outside of the classroom.

  13. Using 3DClass To Flip Biochemistry Classroom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Silva

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The flipped classroom inverts traditional teaching methods, in order to have studentsprepared for topics and techniques covered in the following meeting. This approach wasadopted in a biochemistry course taught to biology freshmen students at the University ofCampinas, using a Virtual Learning Environment called 3DClass. Before each classroomsession, a quiz was delivered covering the following topic and students were allowed totake quizzes as many times as they wanted. This approach was utilized in order to betterprepare students in classes and to perform lab experiments. Every student attempt wasrecorded in a database. Before each classroom session, the instructors were provided witha summary of the class answers, highlighting questions where students had more difficultyand the ones that scored higher. This kind of information was helpful to design activities tocover the topics where students had more difficulties. Based on the 3DClass records thestudents behaviors were mapped, such as students taking the quizzes seriously, studentsguessing, students answering a quiz until scoring 100%, students that continue answeringafter scoring 100% in order to increase their grades, students that never score 100%.However, the most relevant information 3DClass brought us was the possibility to identifystudent’s confidence in their answers, which could be observed by the analysis of theirattempts for each question. If they had made different choices each try, it would haveindicated a low confidence level, while always providing the same answer indicated ahigher confidence level, even whilst picking incorrect answers. This experiment haverevealed that students coming to the classroom better prepared reflected positively on thedeveloped activities, but the number of students taking the quizzes seriously were not asgreat as we had expected, indicating that more actions should be taken to improvestudents engagement with these activities.

  14. SOCIAL MEDIA AND CLASSROOM ENGAGEMENT: STUDENTS’ PERCEPTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malissa Maria Mahmud

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the course of the last 15 years or so, social media have shown many facets—from connecting people on a global-scale, to penetrating aspects of lives which otherwise might have remained private or limited to a small audience. In the realm of education, social media have also begun to infiltrate the academic world by influencing and shaping students’ perceptions and influencing learning engagement. With millions of students and teachers simultaneously active on social networks, it is significant to observe how the media could influence student-teacher classroom interactions as well as their online communications. Some studies have documented that teachers who disclosed information about themselves on social media were perceived as more credible by students because they were regarded as more relatable. Moreover, students’ stereotyping beliefs and attitudes towards teachers also come into play when formulating perceptions about teachers on social media. For instance, their communications with teachers are often formal and impersonal on social media, as teachers are viewed as authoritative figures. Consequently, students’ perceptions towards teachers would have a significant repercussion on their interpersonal relationships, which in turn impacts students’ motivation and learning engagement. Thus, this research was conducted to establish preliminary findings whether social media shape students’ perceptions and whether these ramifications would result in positive or negative learning engagement. Consequently, the results indicate that students are more susceptible towards teachers who are active on social media because they are perceived as being more akin to a “real person” who can easily be reached for immediate classroom information and instructions. Such accessibilities via social media enable learning processes to be less contrived by just the physical classroom settings.

  15. The Use of Videotape Recordings to Teach Clinical Skills (Evaluation and Remediation) In the Fields of Communicative Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billeaud, Frances P.

    A study was undertaken to evaluate the benefits derived by speech and language pathology students who used video tape recordings to learn diagnosis of communication disorders, to observe professional therapists and therapy programs, and to improve their own clinical techniques through self-observation. The use of video tapes to teach clinical…

  16. Chinese Teachers' Perceptions of Students' Classroom Misbehaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Meixia; Li, Yeping; Li, Xiaobao; Kulm, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    This study focuses on Chinese teachers' perceptions of students' classroom misbehaviour. A questionnaire was designed to assess teachers' general concerns about classroom management, teachers' perceptions of the most frequent and troublesome types of misbehaviour, and teachers' perceived needs for help with improving classroom management. A total…

  17. The Flipped Classroom in Counselor Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Kristen; Milsom, Amy

    2015-01-01

    The flipped classroom is proposed as an effective instructional approach in counselor education. An overview of the flipped-classroom approach, including advantages and disadvantages, is provided. A case example illustrates how the flipped classroom can be applied in counselor education. Recommendations for implementing or researching flipped…

  18. Learning Road Safety Skills in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Freddy Jackson; Gillard, Duncan

    2009-01-01

    This case study demonstrates the effectiveness of a classroom based learning programme in the acquisition of road safety skills. The participant, a child with severe learning disabilities, was taught road safety behaviours in the classroom with the aid of photograph cards. When he had mastered these skills in the classroom, he returned to the…

  19. Validation of the Classroom Behavior Inventory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blunden, Dale; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Factor-analytic methods were used toassess contruct validity of the Classroom Behavior Inventory, a scale for rating behaviors associated with hyperactivity. The Classroom Behavior Inventory measures three dimensions of behavior: Hyperactivity, Hostility, and Sociability. Significant concurrent validity was obtained for only one Classroom Behavior…

  20. Curriculum Connection: Create a Classroom Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donlan, Leni

    1991-01-01

    One elementary teacher runs her classroom as a technology-based token economy. Students hold classroom jobs and use software to track money earned, manage checking accounts, and disburse classroom cash. The strategy boosts math and technology skills. A list of software programs is included. (SM)