WorldWideScience

Sample records for videogrammetric angle measurements

  1. Miniature Angle Measuring Interferometer (MIAMI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Robert J.

    The miniature Angle Measuring Interferometer (MIAMI) is a compact laser interferometer that was developed by Ball to satisfy the sensor needs of various pointing and tracking applications. These include: (1) attitude sensing for fast-steering mirrors and other optical elements, (2) structural monitoring and control for optical benches and other structures requiring micro-positioning, and (3) high-precision encoders for use in measuring the angular position of gimballed payloads and drives. MIAMI is constructed from off-the-shelf optical elements, using the inherent precision of the optical faces for alignment when feasible. In the present configuration, the laser light makes eight passes between the sensor head and the retroreflective target, amplifying the sensitivity of this device by a factor of eight. The interference of the two laser beams create fringe patterns, and the separation between fringes is equivalent to one wavelength of laser light (0.6328 micrometers). MIAMI uses interpolation to further subdivide each fringe spacing by a factor of 8 or 16, depending on configuration. MIAMI exhibits excellent performance characteristics, Its angular resolution is 175 nanoradians, and it achieves this with incremental data rates exceeding 5 MHz. MIAMI can accommodate rapid slew rates (greater than 50 deg/sec) and large angular travel (greater than +/- 20 deg). When used as a linear calibration sensor, MIAMI is capable of approxiamtely 10 nanometer linear resolution. The compact design (approximately 5 cubic in.) and light weight (approximately 8 oz) for the sensor head optics make it a very attractive candidate for space sensor applications.

  2. Precision measurements of the CKM angle gamma

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2016-01-01

    The level of CP-violation permitted within the Standard Model cannot account for the matter dominated universe in which we live. Within the Standard Model the CKM matrix, which describes the quark couplings, is expected to be unitary. By making precise measurements of the CKM matrix parameters new physics models can be constrained, or with sufficient precision the effects of physics beyond the standard model might become apparent. The CKM angle gamma is the least well known angle of the unitarity triangle. It is the only angle easily accessible at tree-level, and furthermore has almost no theoretical uncertainties. Therefore it provides an invaluable Standard Model benchmark against which other new physics sensitive tests of the CP-violation can be made. I will discuss recent measurements of gamma using the the Run 1 LHCb dataset, which improve our knowledge of this key parameter.

  3. Weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Di Simone, Andrea; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Talk will cover weak mixing angle measurements at hadron colliders ATLAS and CMS in particular. ATLAS has measured the forward-backward asymmetry for the neutral current Drell Yan process in a wide mass range around the Z resonance region using dielectron and dimuon final states with $\\sqrt{s}$ =7 TeV data. For the dielectron channel, the measurement includes electrons detected in the forward calorimeter which extends the covered phase space. The result is then used to extract a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle. Uncertainties from the limited knowledge on the parton distribution functions in the proton constitute a significant part of the uncertainty and a dedicated study is performed to obtain a PDF set describing W and Z data measured previously by ATLAS. Similar studies from CMS will be reported.

  4. Measurement of Angle Kappa Using Ultrasound Biomicroscopy and Corneal Topography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Joon Hyung; Moon, Nam Ju; Lee, Jeong Kyu

    2017-06-01

    To introduce a new convenient and accurate method to measure the angle kappa using ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM) and corneal topography. Data from 42 eyes (13 males and 29 females) were analyzed in this study. The angle kappa was measured using Orbscan II and calculated with UBM and corneal topography. The angle kappa of the dominant eye was compared with measurements by Orbscan II. The mean patient age was 36.4 ± 13.8 years. The average angle kappa measured by Orbscan II was 3.98° ± 1.12°, while the average angle kappa calculated with UBM and corneal topography was 3.19° ± 1.15°. The difference in angle kappa measured by the two methods was statistically significant (p angle kappa. This method is convenient to use and allows for measurement of the angle kappa without an expensive device.

  5. A new method for measurement of occipitocervical angle by occiput-C3 angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunakornsawat, Sombat; Pluemvitayaporn, Tinnakorn; Pruttikul, Pritsanai; Punpichet, Suppachai; Piyasakulkaew, Chaiwat; Arirachakaran, Alisara; Kongtharvonskul, Jatupon

    2017-12-01

    The description of the measurement technique of the posterior occiput-third cervical spine (OC3) angle-before performing occipitocervical fusion is still controversial. Setting an appropriate alignment in occipitocervical instrumentation is important for successful fixation surgery. Several methods were used for quantifying occipitocervical alignment on the lateral radiograph. This study was performed to describe a measurement technique of OC3 angle and comparing reliability and reproducibility in the measurement of occipitocervical angle with previous method. The purpose of this study was to determine the best technique for assessing this angle. Three hundred and twenty-six lateral cervical spine radiographs from volunteers without spinal disorder were taken in neutral position and collected from June 2011 to December 2012. Analysis consisted of measurement of the OC3 angle and posterior occipitocervical angle. Inter- and intra-observer reliabilities were assessed using limit agreement test. The mean OC3 angle measurements were approximately 107 (94-120) degrees. Intra- and inter-observer error assessed by 95% limit agreement was approximately ±5.5 and ±7.5, while the POCA measurements were approximately 108 (94-120) degrees. Intra- and inter-observer error assessed by 95% limit agreement was approximately ±13.3 and ±18.2. The OC3 angle measurement is a simple method, good inter- and intra-observer reliabilities to measure of the occipitocervical angle. That can be useful to setting the patient's position and facilitate confirmation of the occipitocervical neutral position during occipitocervical fusion.

  6. Dilemma of gonial angle measurement: Panoramic radiograph or lateral cephalogram

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radhakrishnan, Pillai Devu; Varma, Nilambur Kovilakam Sapna; Ajith, Vallikat Velath [Dept. of Orthodontics, Amrita School of Dentistry, Kochi (India)

    2017-06-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of panoramic imaging in measuring the right and left gonial angles by comparing the measured angles with the angles determined using a lateral cephalogram of adult patients with class I malocclusion. The gonial angles of 50 class I malocclusion patients (25 males and 25 females; mean age: 23 years) were measured using both a lateral cephalogram and a panoramic radiograph. In the lateral cephalograms, the gonial angle was measured at the point of intersection of the ramus plane and the mandibular plane. In the panoramic radiographs, the gonial angle was measured by drawing a line tangent to the lower border of the mandible and another line tangent to the distal border of the ascending ramus and the condyle on both sides. The data obtained from both radiographs were statistically compared. No statistically significant difference was observed between the gonial angle measured using the lateral cephalograms and that determined using the panoramic radiographs. Further, there was no statistically significant difference in the measured gonial angle with respect to gender. The results also showed a statistically insignificant difference in the mean of the right and the left gonial angles measured using the panoramic radiographs. As the gonial angle measurements using panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms showed no statistically significant difference, panoramic radiography can be considered in orthodontics for measuring the gonial angle without any interference due to superimposed images.

  7. Graphic angle measure as an electrocochleography evaluation parameter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Karen de Carvalho; Munhoz, Mário Sérgio Lei; Santos, Marco Aurélio Rocha; Moraes, Márcio Flávio Dutra; Chaves, Adriana Gonzaga

    2011-01-01

    To improve electrocochleography's diagnostic sensitivity in Meniére's disease - new assessment methods are being studied. To determine whether or not graphic angle measurement is sensitive and specific to Menière's disease laboratorial diagnosis and if there is an increase in the electrocochleography's sensitivity and specificity when graphic angle measurements are associated with Summating Potential-Action Potential ratio (SP/AP ratio). Electrocochleography's was used to analyze 71 ears from 55 subjects: 41 patients with clinical diagnosis of Menière's disease (MD group), and 14 healthy individuals as control (Group C). Graphic results were analyzed initially to obtain the SP/AP ratio; afterwards, through another program graphic angle measurements were calculated. Sensitivity and specificity values of angle measures, SP/AP ratio, and the association between them varied according to the cutoff point, the highest equilibrium between sensitivity and specificity was observed with the values of 166.25 for angle measurement and 27% for SP/AP relation; 62.79% / 60.71% and 74.42% / 67.86%, respectively. The association between measurements showed a sensitivity increase due to the specificity decrease; 88.37% and 50%, respectively. Angle graphic measurement is not sensitive and specific enough for the laboratorial diagnosis of MD. Angle graphic measurement and SP/AP ratio association proved to be higher in sensitivity, in detriment of exam specificity.

  8. Automated measurement of diagnostic angles for hip dysplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Raedt, Sepp; Mechlenburg, I.; Stilling, M.

    2013-01-01

    A fully automatic method for measuring diagnostic angles of hip dysplasia is presented. The method consists of the automatic segmentation of CT images and detection of anatomical landmarks on the femur and acetabulum. The standard angles used in the diagnosis of hip dysplasia are subsequently...

  9. The wave vane - A device to measure the breaker angle

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chandramohan, P.; Nayak, B.U.; Anand, N.M.

    can easily be fabricated and used to measure the breaker angle. ERROR IN VISUAL ESTIMATION Three trained persons were asked to stand at the same location on the Kar- war beach on the west coast of India, and observe independently the breaker angle... and parallel, the wave directions measured at 16 m water depth were corrected for refraction effects using Snell's law (Shore TABLE 1 Measurement of breaker angles by various methods Date Buoy Visual Wave vane OL b O~ b Hs Tz o~ b (m) (s) (~) (~) (~) 20...

  10. In-plane motion measurement by using digital sampling moiré method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinxing; Chang, Chih-Chen

    2016-04-01

    Digital sampling moiré (DSM) method is a newly developed vision-based technique that uses the phase information of moiré fringes to measure movement of an object. The moiré fringes are generated from a sequence of digital images, containing a cosinusoidal grating pattern attached to the object, through down-sampling and interpolation. As the moiré fringes can magnify the pattern's movement, this technique is expected to provide more accurate displacement measurement than the other vision based approaches. In this study, a method combining DSM with monocular videogrammetric technique is proposed to measure in-plane rotation and translation of structures. In this method, images of a two-dimensional (2D) grating pattern attached to a moving structure are acquired and decomposed into two perpendicular gratings through Fourier transform. The DSM method is used to obtain 2D phase distributions of the gratings which provide an estimation of physical coordinates for those points on the grating pattern. A previously developed monocular videogrammetric technique can then be used to obtain the rotation angle and the translation of the grating pattern. The proposed method is validated using both numerical simulation and laboratory tests.

  11. Adaptive Control of a Vibratory Angle Measuring Gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sungsu

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive control algorithm for realizing a vibratory angle measuring gyroscope so that rotation angle can be directly measured without integration of angular rate, thus eliminating the accumulation of numerical integration errors. The proposed control algorithm uses a trajectory following approach and the reference trajectory is generated by an ideal angle measuring gyroscope driven by the estimate of angular rate and the auxiliary sinusoidal input so that the persistent excitation condition is satisfied. The developed control algorithm can compensate for all types of fabrication imperfections such as coupled damping and stiffness, and mismatched stiffness and un-equal damping term in an on-line fashion. The simulation results show the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed control algorithm that is capable of directly measuring rotation angle without the integration of angular rate. PMID:22163667

  12. Indoor Measurement of Angle Resolved Light Absorption by Black Silicon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Iandolo, Beniamino; Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt

    2017-01-01

    Angle resolved optical spectroscopy of photovoltaic (PV) samples gives crucial information on PV panels under realistic working conditions. Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, performed indoors using a collimated high radiance broadband light source. Our...... indoor method offers a significant simplification as compared to measurements by solar trackers. As a proof-of-concept demonstration, we show characterization of black silicon solar cells. The experimental results showed stable and reliable optical responses that makes our setup suitable for indoor......, angle resolved characterization of solar cells....

  13. Measurement of the angle of superficial tension by images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanez M., Javier; Alonso R., Sergio

    2006-02-01

    When a liquid is deposited on a surface, this one form a certain angle with respect to the surface, where depending on its value, it will conclude that so hard it is his adhesion with the surface. By means of the analysis of images we looked for to measure this angle of superficial tension. In order to make this measurement, we propose a technique by means of projective transformations and one method of regression to estimation parameters to conic fitting.

  14. 2DFFT: Measuring Galactic Spiral Arm Pitch Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Benjamin L.; Berrier, Joel C.; Shields, Douglas W.; Kennefick, Julia; Kennefick, Daniel; Seigar, Marc S.; Lacy, Claud H. S.; Puerari, Ivânio

    2016-08-01

    2DFFT utilizes two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations of images of spiral galaxies to isolate and measure the pitch angles of their spiral arms; this provides a quantitative way to measure this morphological feature and allows comparison of spiral galaxy pitch angle to other galactic parameters and test spiral arm genesis theories. 2DFFT requires fourn.c from Numerical Recipes in C (Press et al. 1989).

  15. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Gersabeck, M

    2009-01-01

    The precise measurement of the CKM unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ is a key goal of the LHCb physics programme. The uncertainty on $\\gamma$, the currently least-well known of the three angles, will be reduced dramatically. Complementary measurements will be made in tree-level processes, and modes where loop diagrams play an important role. The tree-level measurements will cover time-integrated as well as time- dependent measurements in both the $B^0_d$ and the $B^0_s$ sectors. The ensemble of these measurements will provide a powerful test of whether new physics phases contribute to heavy-flavour transitions.

  16. Measurement of angle kappa and centration in refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Choul Yong; Oh, Sei Yeul; Chuck, Roy S

    2012-07-01

    Consideration of angle kappa is important for correct centration of refractive treatments. Decentered refractive treatment can cause photic phenomena including glare, halo, and deterioration of vision. This review highlights the concept of angle kappa, its measurement and distribution in normal populations, and the methods to compensate for large angle kappa in refractive surgery using laser or intraocular lenses (IOLs). Determination of the treatment center is very important in refractive surgery. Moving the ablation center from the center of the entrance pupil to points near visual axis, such as the corneal light reflex (line of sight) or corneal vertex normal, results in less induction of higher order aberrations (including coma aberration) and either the same or better visual outcomes both in hyperopic and myopic eyes when compared to laser ablation centered on the entrance pupil. Decentration of multifocal IOLs can result in deterioration of postoperative visual function with induction of higher order aberrations. The occurrence of photic phenomena positively correlated with preoperative values of angle kappa. There is a growing body of evidence that emphasizes the consideration of angle kappa in refractive surgery. Ignoring angle kappa may sometimes result in decentered treatment and aggravation of visual symptoms. Compensation for angle kappa is important for optimal correction of refractive error by either laser ablation or IOLs, especially for hyperopes and any eyes with large angle kappa.

  17. Normal Foot and Ankle Radiographic Angles, Measurements, and Reference Points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Bradley M; Stasko, Paul A; Gesheff, Martin G; Bhave, Anil

    2016-01-01

    The limb deformity-based principles originate from a standard set of lower extremity radiographic angles and reference points. Objective radiographic measures are the building blocks for surgical planning. Critical preoperative planning and intraoperative and postoperative evaluation of radiographs are essential for proper deformity planning and correction of all foot and ankle cases. A total of 33 angles and reference points were measured on 24 healthy feet. The radiographic measurements were performed on standard weightbearing anteroposterior, lateral, and axial views of the right foot. A total of 4 measurements were made from the axial view, 12 from the lateral view, and 17 from the anteroposterior view. All angles were measured by both senior authors twice, independent of each other. The radiographic angles and measurements presented in the present study demonstrate a comprehensive and useful set of standard angles, measures, and reference points that can be used in clinical and perioperative evaluation of the foot and ankle. The standard radiographic measures presented in the present study provide the foundation for understanding the osseous foot and ankle position in a normal population. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Rotational Angle Measurement of Bridge Support Using Image Processing Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Soo Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Measuring a very small rotational angle accurately and dynamically is indeed a challenging issue, especially in the case of bridge support. Also, existing inclinometers do not have sufficient resolution and accuracy to measure a bridge’s rotational angle. In this study, a new measurement system was developed to provide a practical means for measuring dynamic rotational angle of a bridge support. It features high resolution and accuracy compared with the available systems on the market. By the combinational use of a laser pointer and a vision-based displacement measurement system, the measurement accuracy was significantly increased. The accuracy and applicability were investigated through laboratory tests. From the laboratory tests, it has been found that the developed system can be applicable to bridge support with very small rotational angle. The effectiveness of the developed system was verified through field tests on real bridges. From the full-scale implementation on two PSC girder bridges, it is observed that the proposed system can measure the rotational angle with a high accuracy and reliability.

  19. Doppler angle correction in the measurement of intrarenal parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mennitt K

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Jing Gao¹, Keith Hentel¹, Qiang Zhu², Teng Ma², George Shih¹, Kevin Mennitt¹, Robert Min¹¹Department of Radiology, New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical College, NY, USA; ²Division of Diagnostic Ultrasound, Department of Radiology, Beijing Tongren Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, ChinaBackground: The aim of this study was to assess differences in intrarenal artery Doppler parameters measured without and with Doppler angle correction.Methods: We retrospectively reviewed color duplex sonography in 30 normally functioning kidneys (20 native kidneys in 10 subjects and 10 transplanted kidneys in 10 subjects performed between January 26, 2010 and July 26, 2010. There were 10 age-matched men and10 age-matched women (mean 39.8 ± 12.2, range 21–60 years in this study. Depending on whether the Doppler angle was corrected in the spectral Doppler measurement, Doppler parameters including peak systolic velocity (PSV, end-diastolic velocity (EDV, and resistive index (RI measured at the interlobar artery of the kidney were divided into two groups, ie, initial Doppler parameters measured without Doppler angle correction (Group 1 and remeasured Doppler parameters with Doppler angle correction (Group 2. Values for PSV, EDV, and RI measured without Doppler angle correction were compared with those measured with Doppler angle correction, and were analyzed statistically with a paired-samples t-test.Results: There were statistical differences in PSV and EDV at the interlobar artery in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidney between Group 1 and Group 2 (all P < 0.001. PSV and EDV in Group 1 were significantly lower than in Group 2. RI in Group 1 was the same as that in Group 2 in the upper, mid, and lower poles of the kidneys.Conclusion: Doppler angle correction plays an important role in the accurate measurement of intrarenal blood flow velocity. The true flow velocity converted from the maximum Doppler velocity shift

  20. Autonomous satellite navigation using starlight refraction angle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Xiaolin; Wang, Longhua; Bai, Xinbei; Fang, Jiancheng

    2013-05-01

    An on-board autonomous navigation capability is required to reduce the operation costs and enhance the navigation performance of future satellites. Autonomous navigation by stellar refraction is a type of autonomous celestial navigation method that uses high-accuracy star sensors instead of Earth sensors to provide information regarding Earth's horizon. In previous studies, the refraction apparent height has typically been used for such navigation. However, the apparent height cannot be measured directly by a star sensor and can only be calculated by the refraction angle and an atmospheric refraction model. Therefore, additional errors are introduced by the uncertainty and nonlinearity of atmospheric refraction models, which result in reduced navigation accuracy and reliability. A new navigation method based on the direct measurement of the refraction angle is proposed to solve this problem. Techniques for the determination of the refraction angle are introduced, and a measurement model for the refraction angle is established. The method is tested and validated by simulations. When the starlight refraction height ranges from 20 to 50 km, a positioning accuracy of better than 100 m can be achieved for a low-Earth-orbit (LEO) satellite using the refraction angle, while the positioning accuracy of the traditional method using the apparent height is worse than 500 m under the same conditions. Furthermore, an analysis of the factors that affect navigation accuracy, including the measurement accuracy of the refraction angle, the number of visible refracted stars per orbit and the installation azimuth of star sensor, is presented. This method is highly recommended for small satellites in particular, as no additional hardware besides two star sensors is required.

  1. 2-DOF Angle Measurement of Rocket Nozzle with Multivision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubo Guo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A real-time measurement method is presented for the 2-DOF swing angles of rocket nozzle by the use of multivision and rocket nozzle rotation axes. This method takes offline processing to measure the position of two nozzle rotation axes in image coordinate system by means of multi-vision and identify the rotation transformation relation between image coordinate system and fixed-nozzle coordinate system. During real-time measurement, the nozzle 2-DOF swing angles can be measured with transformation of marker coordinate from image coordinate system to fixed-nozzle coordinate system. This method can effectively resolve the problem of occlusion by markers in wide swing range of the nozzle. Experiments were conducted to validate its correctness and high measurement accuracy.

  2. MPR realignment increases accuracy when measuring femoral neck anteversion angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tommy Hemmert; Torfing, Trine; Overgaard, Søren

    2013-01-01

    To compare two methods of measuring femoral neck anteversion angle (FNA): A 2D method used at Odense University Hospital until 2010, and a method labeled 3D-OUH. The latter method makes corrections to compensate for errors introduced by the individual placement of patients in the CT scanner....

  3. Contact angle hysteresis of liquid drops as means to measure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparison of the results from the different mixed samples with those from the pure zein films showed that force mapping could identify areas rich in protein. The adhesion maps produced were deconvoluted from sample topography and contrasted with the data obtained from contact angle measurements. A comparison of ...

  4. Fluorescence microscopy for measuring fibril angles in pine tracheids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralph O. Marts

    1955-01-01

    Observation and measurement of fibril angles in increment cores or similar small samples from living pine trees was facilitated by the use of fluorescence microscopy. Although some autofluorescence was present, brighter images could be obtained by staining the specimens with a 0.1% aqueous solution of a fluorochrome (Calcozine flavine TG extra concentrated, Calcozine...

  5. Vowel Formants and Angle Measurements in Diachronic Sociophonetic Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines vowel formant data from a corpus of recordings of male speakers of RP born during the course of the twentieth century. It compares average formant positions in the F1/F2 plane for the short vowel FOOT in juxtaposition with LOT (for this Keyword notation see Wells [12......]). The relative positions of the two vowels are represented by a single numerical value, which is the calculated angle from LOT to FOOT relative to the vertical. Changing angle values between the early and the later part of the twentieth century reflect a diachronic process of FOOT-fronting and unrounding which...... measures which demonstrate changing vowel juxtapositions in real time....

  6. Quantifying Stream Bed Gravel Mobility from Friction Angle Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. A.; Dunne, T.

    2012-12-01

    A method to measure friction angles using force gauges was field tested to determine its utility at quantifying critical shear stress in a gravel bedded reach of the San Joaquin River in California. Predictions of mobility from friction angles were compared with observations of the movement of tagged particles from locations for which local shear stress was quantified with a validated 2-D flow model. The observations of movement, distance of travel, and location of the end of travel were made after extended flow releases from Friant dam. Determining the critical shear stress for gravel bed material transport currently depends upon bedload sampling or tracer studies. Often, such measurements can only be made during occasional and untimely flow events, and at limited, suboptimal locations. Yet, theoretical studies conclude that the friction angle is an important control on the critical shear stress for mobility of any grain size, and therefore of the excess shear stress which strongly influences bedload transport rate. The ability to predict bed mobility at ungauged and unmonitored locations is also an important requirement for planning of flow regimes and channel design. Therefore, a method to measure friction angles that can be performed quickly in low flow conditions would prove useful for river management and research. To investigate this promising method friction angle surveys were performed at two riffle sites where differences in bed material size and distribution, and channel slope were observed. The friction angle surveys are sensitive enough to detect differences between the sites as well as spatially and temporally within a single riffle. Low friction angles were observed along the inside of a long bend where sand content was greater (by ~20%) than other surveyed locations. Friction angles decreased slightly after a depositional event associated with transient large woody debris and bank erosion, and increased again after a 5 year return interval flow

  7. Comparison of calculated and measured helicopter rotor lateral flapping angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, W.

    1980-01-01

    Calculated and measured values of helicopter rotor flapping angles in forward flight are compared for a model rotor in a wind tunnel and an autogiro in gliding flight. The lateral flapping angles can be accurately predicted when a calculation of the nonuniform wake-induced velocity is used. At low advance ratios, it is also necessary to use a free wake geometry calculation. For the cases considered, the tip vortices in the rotor wake remain very close to the tip-path plane, so the calculated values of the flapping motion are sensitive to the fine details of the wake structure, specifically the viscous core radius of the tip vortices.

  8. A contact angle measurement by laser glancing incidence method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Feng; Miao, Runcai; Zhang, Yani

    2008-09-01

    A reflection technique to determine a contact angle by laser glancing incidence method, which is based on analyzing the reflection pattern from the up curved liquid surface (UCLS) around a smooth flat plate, is presented. In the experiment, a glass slide is vertically dipped into a tested liquid. Due to the wetting effect, the UCLS is formed around the glass slide. When an expanded and collimated laser beam impinges on the UCLS at glancing incidence, the steady and visible strip-shape dark area reflection patterns are observed. The relation of the dark region width and the maximal height of the UCLS is derived theoretically. The contact angles of distilled water and kerosene on the glass slides are calculated directly by utilizing the dark area width of the reflection patterns. Results show that an effective and practical technique for measuring the contact angle of the Wilhelmy plate is found.

  9. Contact angle measurements at the colemanite and realgar surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koca, Sabiha; Savas, Mehmet

    2004-03-01

    Colemanite is one of the most important boron minerals and covers an important part of Turkey's boron mineral deposits. The friable nature of the colemanite tends to produce a large amount of fines. Flotation appears to be a promising technique to recover colemanite from such fines. During flotation process, selectivity problem arises between colemanite and associated gangue minerals such as realgar. There is a close relationship between floatability of minerals and contact angle. Therefore, surface hydrophobicity of colemanite and realgar minerals were investigated by receding contact angle measurements in the absence and presence of flotation reagents. The water contact angle values at the colemanite surface remained almost unchanged at 32-35° in the solutions of potassium amyl xanthate (KAX), potassium ethyl xanthate (KEX) and petroleum sulphanate (R825) while another petroleum sulphanate (R840), sodium oleate and tallow amine (Armac-T) affected hydrophobicity of colemanite, and the contact angle values increased up to 47°. The contact angle values of 62, 63, 45, 46, 39, and 43° at the realgar surface were obtained in the solutions of KAX, KEX, sodium oleate, R825, R840 and Armac-T, respectively.

  10. Lorentz angle measurement for CO sub 2 /isobutane gas mixtures

    CERN Document Server

    Hoshina, K; Khalatyan, N; Nitoh, O; Okuno, H; Kato, Y; Kobayashi, M; Kurihara, Y; Kuroiwa, H; Nakamura, Y; Sakieda, K; Suzuki, Y; Watanabe, T

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a Lorentz angle measurement system for cool gas mixtures in the course of our R and D for a proposed JLC central drift chamber (JLC-CDC). The measurement system is characterized by the use of two laser beams to produce primary electrons and flash ADCs to read their signals simultaneously. With this new system, we have measured Lorentz angles for CO sub 2 /isobutane gas mixtures with different proportions (95 : 5, 90 :10, and 85 : 15), varying drift field from 0.6 to 2.0 kV/cm and magnetic field up to 1.5 T. The results of the measurement are in good agreement with GARFIELD/MAGBOLTZ simulations.

  11. IMU-based joint angle measurement for gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seel, Thomas; Raisch, Jörg; Schauer, Thomas

    2014-04-16

    This contribution is concerned with joint angle calculation based on inertial measurement data in the context of human motion analysis. Unlike most robotic devices, the human body lacks even surfaces and right angles. Therefore, we focus on methods that avoid assuming certain orientations in which the sensors are mounted with respect to the body segments. After a review of available methods that may cope with this challenge, we present a set of new methods for: (1) joint axis and position identification; and (2) flexion/extension joint angle measurement. In particular, we propose methods that use only gyroscopes and accelerometers and, therefore, do not rely on a homogeneous magnetic field. We provide results from gait trials of a transfemoral amputee in which we compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU)-based methods to an optical 3D motion capture system. Unlike most authors, we place the optical markers on anatomical landmarks instead of attaching them to the IMUs. Root mean square errors of the knee flexion/extension angles are found to be less than 1° on the prosthesis and about 3° on the human leg. For the plantar/dorsiflexion of the ankle, both deviations are about 1°.

  12. IMU-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Gait Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Seel

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This contribution is concerned with joint angle calculation based on inertial measurement data in the context of human motion analysis. Unlike most robotic devices, the human body lacks even surfaces and right angles. Therefore, we focus on methods that avoid assuming certain orientations in which the sensors are mounted with respect to the body segments. After a review of available methods that may cope with this challenge, we present a set of new methods for: (1 joint axis and position identification; and (2 flexion/extension joint angle measurement. In particular, we propose methods that use only gyroscopes and accelerometers and, therefore, do not rely on a homogeneous magnetic field. We provide results from gait trials of a transfemoral amputee in which we compare the inertial measurement unit (IMU-based methods to an optical 3D motion capture system. Unlike most authors, we place the optical markers on anatomical landmarks instead of attaching them to the IMUs. Root mean square errors of the knee flexion/extension angles are found to be less than 1° on the prosthesis and about 3° on the human leg. For the plantar/dorsiflexion of the ankle, both deviations are about 1°.

  13. Carpal angles as measured on CT and MRI: can we simply translate radiographic measurements?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Stephanie; Ghumman, Simranjit S.; Moser, Thomas P. [Hopital Notre-Dame (CHUM), Department of Radiology, Centre Hospitalier de l' Universite de Montreal, Montreal, QC (Canada); Ladouceur, Martin [Research Center CHUM, Montreal, QC (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    To determine the reliability of carpal angles measured on CT and MRI compared to radiography and assess if these measurements are interchangeable. Our institutional ethic research committee approved this study. For this retrospective study, two independent observers measured the scapholunate (SL), capitolunate (CL), radiolunate (RL), and radioscaphoid (RS) angles on 21 sets of exams, with each set including a radiograph, CT, and MRI of the same wrist. Inter- and intra-observer agreements were evaluated with the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Linear mixed models and two-way contingency tables were used to determine if the angles measured on cross-sectional modalities were significantly different from those obtained on radiography. Inter-observer agreement was strong (ICC >0.8) for all angles, except for the RL angle measured on MRI (ICC 0.68). Intra-observer agreement was also strong for all angles, except for the CL angle measured on CT (ICC 0.66). SL angles measured on CT and MRI were not statistically different from those measured on radiographs (p = 0.37 and 0.36, respectively), unlike CL, RL, and RS angles (p < 0.05). Accuracy between modalities varied between 76 and 86 % for the SL angle and ranged between 43 and 76 % for the other angles. CL, RL, and RS angles showed large intermodality variability. Therefore, their measurements on CT or MRI could potentially lead to miscategorization. Conversely, our data showing no significant difference between modalities, SL angle could be measured on CT and MRI to assess wrist instability with a lower risk of error. (orig.)

  14. Measurement of the small angle scattering of polarized neutrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordano, V.; Manduchi, C.; Russo-Manduchi, M.T.; Segato, G.F. (Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica; Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy))

    1980-06-01

    Described herein is an apparatus designed merely for the purpose of extending previous measurements of the differential cross section and polarization of fast neutrons to scattering angles lower than 1/sup 0/. The principles and properties of the device are developed and discussed in detail. The quality of the performance is illustrated by measuring absolute cross sections of 2.50 MeV neutrons scattered by Bi.

  15. Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Anthony, P L; Arroyo, C; Bega, K; Biesiada, J; Bosted, P E; Bower, G; Cahoon, J; Carr, R; Cates, G D; Chen, J P; Chudakov, E; Cooke, M; Decowski, P; Deur, A; Emam, W; Erickson, R; Fieguth, T; Field, C; Gao, J; Gary, M; Gustafsson, K; Hicks, R S; Holmes, R; Hughes, E W; Humensky, T B; Jones, G M; Kaufman, L J; Keller, L; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kumar, K S; La Violette, P; Lhuillier, D; Lombard-Nelsen, R M; Marshall, Z; Mastromarino, P; McKeown, R D; Michaels, R; Niedziela, J; Olson, M; Paschke, K D; Peterson, G A; Pitthan, R; Relyea, D; Rock, S E; Saxton, O; Singh, J; Souder, P A; Szalata, Z M; Turner, J; Tweedie, B; Vacheret, A; Walz, D; Weber, T; Weisend, J; Woods, M; Younus, I

    2005-01-01

    We report on a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in fixed target electron-electron (Moller) scattering: A_PV = -131 +/- 14 (stat.) +/- 10 (syst.) parts per billion, leading to the determination of the weak mixing angle \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff = 0.2397 +/- 0.0010 (stat.) +/- 0.0008 (syst.), evaluated at Q^2 = 0.026 GeV^2. Combining this result with the measurements of \\sin^2\\theta_W^eff at the Z^0 pole, the running of the weak mixing angle is observed with over 6 sigma significance. The measurement sets constraints on new physics effects at the TeV scale.

  16. Making Sense by Measuring Arcs: A Teaching Experiment in Angle Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kevin C.

    2013-01-01

    I discuss a teaching experiment that sought to characterize precalculus students' angle measure understandings. The study's findings indicate that the students initially conceived angle measures in terms of geometric objects. As the study progressed, the students formed more robust understandings of degree and radian measures by constructing an…

  17. Measurement of γ Angle Using B → DK at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00257268

    2013-01-01

    Measurements of the CKM angle via tree-level b ! u and b ! c interference are important for testing the Standard Model through the CKM unitarity constraint. In these proceedings, CP violation measurements with B ! DK decays using 1 fb 1 of data collected in 2011 by LHCb are described, where 2-body ( + , K + K , K + and K + ), 3-body ( K s + and K s K + K ) and 4-body ( K + + and K + + ) D 0 decays are considered. A combined measurement of using the above channels is also presented

  18. Quantum theory of angle and relative-phase measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Scott Roger

    2014-12-01

    The complementarity between time and energy, as well as between an angle and a component of angular momentum, is described at three different layers of understanding. The phenomena of super-resolution are readily apparent in the quantum phase representation which also reveals that entanglement is not required. We modify Schwinger's harmonic oscillator model of angular momentum to include the case of photons. Therein, the quantum angle measurement is shown to be equivalent to the measurement of the relative phase between the two oscillators. Two reasonable ways of dealing with degeneracy are shown to correspond to a conditional measurement which takes a snapshot in absolute time (corresponding to adding probability amplitudes) and a marginal measurement which takes an average in absolute time (corresponding to adding probabilities). The sense in which distinguishability is a "matter of how long we look" is discussed and the meaning of the general theory is illustrated by taking the two oscillators to be circularly polarized photons. It is shown that an odd number of x -polarized photons will never have an angle in correspondence with the y axis, but an even number of x -polarized photons always can! The behavior of an x -polarized coherent state is examined and the snapshot angular distributions are seen to evolve into two counter-rotating peaks resulting in considerable correspondence with the y axis at the time for which a classical linear polarization vector would shrink to zero length. We also demonstrate how the probability distribution of absolute time (herein a measurable quantity, rather than just a parameter) has an influence on how these snapshot angular distributions evolve into a quantum version of the polarization ellipse.

  19. A Multifunctional Joint Angle Sensor with Measurement Adaptability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Quan

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a multifunctional joint sensor with measurement adaptability for biological engineering applications, such as gait analysis, gesture recognition, etc. The adaptability is embodied in both static and dynamic environment measurements, both of body pose and in motion capture. Its multifunctional capabilities lay in its ability of simultaneous measurement of multiple degrees of freedom (MDOF with a single sensor to reduce system complexity. The basic working mode enables 2DOF spatial angle measurement over big ranges and stands out for its applications on different joints of different individuals without recalibration. The optional advanced working mode enables an additional DOF measurement for various applications. By employing corrugated tube as the main body, the sensor is also characterized as flexible and wearable with less restraints. MDOF variations are converted to linear displacements of the sensing elements. The simple reconstruction algorithm and small outputs volume are capable of providing real-time angles and long-term monitoring. The performance assessment of the built prototype is promising enough to indicate the feasibility of the sensor.

  20. Measurement of Angle of Ultrasound Propagation from Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Civale, John; Rivens, Ian; Haar, Gail ter, E-mail: john.civale@icr.ac.uk [Joint Department of Physics, The Royal Marsden Hospital, Institute of Cancer Research, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Acoustic field calibrations often use Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) to quantify the spectral amplitude components of detected acoustic waveforms. The ability of FFTs to provide phase information is often overlooked. This phase data may be useful in determining the angle of propagation of the ultrasound beam. The angle of propagation at the focal peak (and any other point in the field) can be calculated easily and quickly without additional measurement, and may be the quickest and most accurate method of aligning the sound axis with respect to the beamplotting system's co-ordinates. Acoustic fields have been measured experimentally using a system capable of waveform acquisition. Measurements were made using a fibre-optic hydrophone (Precision Acoustics, UK) which provided spatial resolution of <100 {mu}m. Two operating configurations of a 10 strip array HIFU (high intensity focused ultrasound) transducer were tested, as was a single element HIFU device. Theoretical pressure and phase distributions for these transducers were predicted using a linear acoustic field model. Results show that for the single element, radially symmetric device, beam alignment measurements using phase data at the focal peak are in agreement with the more conventional method based on finding the on-axis peak positions. In the case of a transducer with a number of elements de-activated to produce an asymmetric ultrasound source, the angle of propagation at the focal peak was altered, indicating a change in performance of the transducer which otherwise might not have been detected using the 'on-axis peaks' method. Simulations agreed with the experimental data.

  1. Automatic measurement of contact angle in pore-space images

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlRatrout, Ahmed; Raeini, Ali Q.; Bijeljic, Branko; Blunt, Martin J.

    2017-11-01

    A new approach is presented to measure the in-situ contact angle (θ) between immiscible fluids, applied to segmented pore-scale X-ray images. We first identify and mesh the fluid/fluid and fluid/solid interfaces. A Gaussian smoothing is applied to this mesh to eliminate artifacts associated with the voxelized nature of the image, while preserving large-scale features of the rock surface. Then, for the fluid/fluid interface we apply an additional smoothing and adjustment of the mesh to impose a constant curvature. We then track the three-phase contact line, and the two vectors that have a direction perpendicular to both surfaces: the contact angle is found from the dot product of these vectors where they meet at the contact line. This calculation can be applied at every point on the mesh at the contact line. We automatically generate contact angle values representing each invaded pore-element in the image with high accuracy. To validate the approach, we first study synthetic three-dimensional images of a spherical droplet of oil residing on a tilted flat solid surface surrounded by brine and show that our results are accurate to within 3° if the sphere diameter is 2 or more voxels. We then apply this method to oil/brine systems imaged at ambient temperature and reservoir pressure (10MPa) using X-ray microtomography (Singh et al., 2016). We analyse an image volume of diameter approximately 4.6 mm and 10.7 mm long, obtaining hundreds of thousands of values from a dataset with around 700 million voxels. We show that in a system of altered wettability, contact angles both less than and greater than 90° can be observed. This work provides a rapid method to provide an accurate characterization of pore-scale wettability, which is important for the design and assessment of hydrocarbon recovery and carbon dioxide storage.

  2. Coming to Understand Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Curriculum Study Using Context-Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen

    2013-01-01

    This study uses design-based research (DBR) to develop an empirically-substantiated instructional theory about students' development of angle and angle measure, with real-world connections and technological tools through the use of context-aware ubiquitous learning. The research questions guiding this research are: 1) How do students come to…

  3. Measurement of the mechanical properties of angle ply laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing

    2000-10-01

    Design of advanced fiber composite structures requires a knowledge of the strength and stiffness of laminates. For modulus, designs rely on classical lamination theory. For strength a failure criterion is needed. For off-axis plies this is normally a maximum stress criterion, or smoothed out versions such as "Tsai-Wu". They are based on early experiments on long and narrow specimens. However, tests on short and wide specimens gave much higher results both for modulus and strength. These are confirmed by test on tubes, which have been available in the literature and appear to have been ignored by designers. The problem is due to an edge softening effect. The edge softening effect can cause the stiffness and the strength to be undervalued in tensile tests. Experimental data on carbon/epoxy angle ply laminates' tensile properties are presented here based on tests of short and wide specimens and ASTM specimens. The wider specimens gave higher moduli than the narrow ones for lay-up angles of 15°, 30°, and 45°. This trend disappeared when the angles were bigger than 45°. The moduli were within classical lamination theory prediction boundaries. Measured Poisson's ratios were much less than the theoretical values due to the end constraint. The angle ply laminates showed non-elastic deformation at low stress levels except for the 0° and 90° lay-ups. The photoelastic method was used to provide an overall strain image in the gauge area. The images showed a uniform stress distribution when the samples were in the elastic range and a non-uniform stress distribution at higher stresses. The fiber presence was observed from lines or bands visible in the pictures. It is clear from the results that there are ineffective or partially effective regions in the test specimens, and the size of these depend both on ply angle φ and specimen aspect ratio. An edge softening model has been set up based on the results. The model fitted the test data very well for the stiffness but only

  4. Understanding Angle and Angle Measure: A Design-Based Research Study Using Context Aware Ubiquitous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crompton, Helen

    2015-01-01

    Mobile technologies are quickly becoming tools found in the educational environment. The researchers in this study use a form of mobile learning to support students in learning about angle concepts. Design-based research is used in this study to develop an empirically-substantiated local instruction theory about students' develop of angle and…

  5. Measurement of sternal curvature angle on patients with pectus excavatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cory; Zavala-Garcia, Abraham; Teekappanavar, Neha; Lee, Catherine; Idowu, Olajire; Kim, Sunghoon

    2017-01-01

    Pectus excavatum (PE) is a chest deformity characterized by marked sternal depression. The objective of this study was to quantify the sternal curvature observed in patients diagnosed with PE using the sternal curvature angle (SCA). A retrospective review of lateral chest X-rays of patients with PE from 2006 to 2013 was performed. The SCA was measured in a manner similar to the method of Cobb's angle is used to measure spinal curvature. SCA and Haller index were calculated from the chest X-rays for all patients. Lateral chest X-rays of 202 PE and 196 normal control patients were analyzed. The mean SCA ± SD of PE patients was 40.56° ± 12.88° compared to 22.02° ± 7.65° for normal patients. The difference was statistically significant with a p value of pectus excavatum and normal patients was statistically significant. Our data suggest that sternal depression evident in PE patients is not a simple linear depression of the sternum but due to curvature in the sternal body.

  6. Results from the G0 forward angle measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Liu

    2006-07-01

    The results from the G0 forward angle experiment are reported in this talk. The parity-violating asymmetry of elastic e-p scattering has been measured within the range of the four-momentum transfer (Q2) from 0.12 to 1.0 (GeV/c)2, which yields linear combinations of the strange electric and magnetic form factors of the nucleon, G{sub E}{sup s} + etaG{sub M}{sup s}, in the same Q2 range. The G0 results, combined with the measurements from other experiments, indicate that G{sub E}{sup s} and G{sub M}{sup s} are both likely non-zero.

  7. Measurements of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at the LHCb experiment

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00388653; Malde, Sneha

    Two measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$ using $B \\to D K$ and $B^{0} \\to D K^{\\ast 0}$ decays are presented in this thesis. The subsequent $D$ meson decays to the $K_{S}^{0} \\pi^{+} \\pi^{-}$ and $K_{S}^{0} K^{+} K^{-}$ final states are studied using a binned Dalitz plot analysis. The $D$ strong-phase variation over the Dalitz plot is taken from measurements performed at the CLEO-c experiment, making the analysis independent of a model to describe the $D$ decay amplitude. Both measurements are performed using proton-proton collision data collected by the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment in 2011 and 2012, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ at centre-of-mass energies $\\sqrt{s}=$ 7 TeV and 8 TeV. The value $\\gamma=(62\\,^{+15}_{-14})^{\\circ}$ is measured using $B \\to D K$ decays and $\\gamma=(71\\pm20)^{\\circ}$ is measured using $B^{0} \\to D K^{\\ast 0}$ decays, with a second solution for each value corresponding to $\\gamma+180^{\\circ}$. The measurement...

  8. HF Radio Angle-of-Arrival Measurements and Ionosonde Positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lung-Chih Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 2010 a 2nd generation NOAA MF/HF radar, also referred to as the VIPIR ionosonde, has been operated at Hualien, Taiwan (23.8973°N, 121.5503°E. The Hualien VIPIR ionosonde is a modern ionospheric radar, fully digitizing complex signal records and using multiple parallel receiver channels for simultaneous signal measurements from multiple spaced receiving antennas. This paper considers radio direction finding based on interferometric phase measurements from a horizontal antenna array in the Hualien VIPIR ionosonde system. We applied the Hermite normal form method to solve the phase-measurement aliasing and least squares problems and improve the radio angle-of-arrival (AOA measurements. Backward ray-tracing simulation has been proposed to determine radio transmitter position. This paper presents a numerical, step by step ray-tracing method based on the IGRF superimposed onto a phenomenological ionospheric electron density model, the TaiWan Ionospheric Model (TWIM. The proposed methodology is successfully applied to locate two experimental HF radio transmitters at Longquan and Chungli with distance errors within 5 km and less than 5% of the great circle distances.

  9. Measurements of the CKM Angle Alpha at BaBar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stracka, Simone; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2012-04-04

    The authors present improved measurements of the branching fractions and CP-asymmetries fin the B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, B{sup 0} {yields} {pi}{sup 0}{pi}{sup 0}, and B{sup +} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup 0} decays, which impact the determination of {alpha}. The combined branching fractions of B {yields} K{sub 1}(1270){pi} and B {yields} K{sub 1}(1400){pi} decays are measured for the first time and allow a novel determination of {alpha} in the B{sup 0} {yields} {alpha}{sub 1}(1260){sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {-+}} decay channel. These measurements are performed using the final dataset collected by the BaBar detector at the PEP-II B-factory. The primary goal of the experiments based at the B factories is to test the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) picture of CP violation in the standard model of electroweak interactions. This can be achieved by measuring the angles and sides of the Unitarity Triangle in a redundant way.

  10. Approach for measuring the angle of hallux valgus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Materials and Methods: Fifteen age, body weight, and height matched male students were included and those with foot disorders, deformities, or injuries were excluded from the study. The dorsal protrusions of the first metatarsal and the hallux were marked by palpating from three experienced observers; then their barefoot model in standing was collected by a three dimensional laser scanning system. The AoH was defined in the X-Y plane by the angle between the line joining the marks of centre of head and centre of base of metatarsal shaft and the one connecting the marks of the centre of metatarsal head and the hallux. The same procedure was repeated a week later. Besides, other measures based on the footprint, outline, and the radiography were also available for comparisons. Paired t-test, linear regression, and reliability analysis were applied for statistical analysis with significant level of 0.05 and 95% confidence interval. Results: There were no significant differences recorded between the new method and the radiographic method ( P = 0.069. The AoH was superior to the methods of footprint and outline and it displayed a relative higher correlation with the radiographic method (r = 0.94, r2 = 0.89. Moreover both the inter and intraobserver reliabilities of this method were proved to be good. Conclusion: This new method can be used for hallux valgus inspection and evaluation.

  11. A novel computer-based method for measuring the acetabular angle on hip radiographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Seda; Akata, Emin; Sahin, Orcun; Tuncay, Cengiz; Özkan, Hüseyin

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to propose a new computer based method for measuring acetabular angles on hip radiographs and to assess its practicality, sensitivity and reliability for acetabular angle measurement. A total of 314 acetabulum were assessed on 157 pelvic X-ray images. Acetabular angles were measured with both the conventional method (Method 1) and our proposed method (Method 2). All the Acetabular Index (AI) angle, Acetabular Angle (AA) and Acetabular Center (ACM) angle were measured with both methods. The mean AI angle for Method 1 is 11.02° ± 2.7° and the mean AI angle for Method 2 is 10.08° ± 1.88°, the mean AA angle for Method 1 is 39.5° ± 5.3° and the mean AA angle for Method 2 is 39.36° ± 4.68°, the mean ACM angle for Method 1 is 50.5° ± 6.01° and the mean ACM angle for Method 2 is 55.42° ± 12.43°. Our novel automated method appear to be reliable and practical for acetabular angle measurement on hip radiographs. Level III, Diagnostic study. Copyright © 2017 Turkish Association of Orthopaedics and Traumatology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Methods for determining the effect of flatness deviations, eccentricity and pyramidal errors on angle measurements

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kruger, OA

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available , eccentricity and pyramidal errors of the measuring faces. Deviations in the flatness of angle surfaces have been held responsible for the lack of agreement in angle comparisons. An investigation has been carried out using a small-angle generator...

  13. Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klejda, B.

    2005-01-28

    scattering. This value corresponds to a weak mixing angle at Q{sup 2} = 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2} of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}} = 0.2379 {+-} 0.0016 (stat.) {+-} 0.0013 (syst.), which is -0.3 standard deviations away from the Standard Model prediction: sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w{ovr MS}}{sup predicted} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory). The E158 measurement of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w} at a precision of {delta}(sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub w}) = 0.0020 provides new physics sensitivity at the TeV scale.

  14. Measuring system for an attitude angle of a denture using an Inertial Measurement Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekita, Toshiaki; Takeuchi, Syuhei; Minakuchi, Syunsuke

    2017-09-15

    The aim of this study was to assemble and verify a measuring system for 3-D movements (attitude angle) of the denture during function. For the calibration test, the sensor was fixed at the center of the rotary table. Operation and stopping of the rotary table were repeated 8 times, and the direction of rotation was reversed in the middle. The amount of rotation was 1.2 and 2.4°. As a pilot clinical trial, the attitude angles of three upper complete dentures during tapping were measured by this system. The attitude angles calculated by this system reduced by 3-4%. Pitch and roll of Subject III were significantly larger than Subjects I and II (Pmeasurement accuracy of this system was equivalent to that of 3-D motion capture system by four infrared TV cameras. The measuring system using the IMU is reliable and easy to analyze the attitude angle of the denture during function. It may serve a diagnostic appliance to evaluate the quality of the denture. Copyright © 2017 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lower extremity angle measurement with accelerometers - error and sensitivity analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willemsen, A.T.M.; Willemsen, Antoon Th.M.; Frigo, Carlo; Boom, H.B.K.

    1991-01-01

    The use of accelerometers for angle assessment of the lower extremities is investigated. This method is evaluated by an error-and-sensitivity analysis using healthy subject data. Of three potential error sources (the reference system, the accelerometers, and the model assumptions) the last is found

  16. Angle Resolved Performance Measurements on PV Glass and Modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juutilainen, Line Tollund; Thorsteinsson, Sune; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2016-01-01

    The angular response of PV-modules has significant impact on the energy production. This is especially pronounced in BIPV where installation angles often are far from optimal. Nevertheless, a gain in energy yield may be obtained by choosing a proper glass as superstrate. In this work we present...

  17. Measurement of the Euler Angles of Wurtzitic ZnO by Raman Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A Raman spectroscopy-based step-by-step measuring method of Euler angles φ,θ,and  ψ was presented for the wurtzitic crystal orientation on a microscopic scale. Based on the polarization selection rule and coordinate transformation theory, a series of analytic expressions for the Euler angle measurement using Raman spectroscopy were derived. Specific experimental measurement processes were presented, and the measurement of Raman tensor elements and Euler angles of the ZnO crystal were implemented. It is deduced that there is a trigonometric functional relationship between the intensity of each Raman bands of wurtzite crystal and Euler angle ψ, the polarization direction of incident light under different polarization configurations, which can be used to measure the Euler angles. The experimental results show that the proposed method can realize the measurement of Euler angles for wurtzite crystal effectively.

  18. LHCb Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Ali, S

    2014-01-01

    In this poster we present the latest result by the LHCb collaboration in determining the CKM angle $\\gamma$ ($(67.1 \\pm 12)^{\\circ}$). The result is determined by combining several $B \\to Dh$ analyses. Latest results from the decay time dependent $B_{s} \\to D_{s}K$ analysis is also reported, along with a few other decay channels interesting for determination of $\\gamma$ in the future.

  19. Acetabular Cup Abduction Angle Determined by Digital Radiographic Software as Compared to CT-Based Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eytan M Debbi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Measurement of the acetabular cup orientation is critical in patients after total hip arthroplasty (THA. One important measurement is the acetabular abduction angle. The purpose of the present study was to compare the measurements of the acetabular abduction angle using radiographic analysis software with the measurements made by computed tomography (CT analysis software. Methods: CT scans and radiograph exams were performed on 150 patients after THA. The acetabular abduction angle was measured from CT using CT-based image analysis software and from radiographs using the dedicated measurement tools of digital radiographic software. Results: The two measurement systems showed no significant difference in the calculation of the acetabular abduction angle (0.35±5.41°; p=0.425 and a moderate correlation was found between the two methods (r=0.619; p<0.001. Discussion: Digital radiographic software provides an accurate and precise measurement of the acetabular abduction angle.

  20. Automatic control of a drop-foot stimulator based on angle measurement using bioimpedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahrstaedt, Holger; Schauer, Thomas; Shalaby, Raafat; Hesse, Stefan; Raisch, Jörg

    2008-08-01

    The topic of this contribution is iterative learning control of a drop-foot stimulator in which a predefined angle profile during the swing phase is realized. Ineffective dorsiflexion is compensated by feedback-controlled stimulation of the muscle tibialis anterior. The ankle joint measurement is based on changes in the bioimpedance (BI) caused by leg movements. A customized four-channel BI measurement system was developed. The suggested control approach and the new measurement method for the joint angle were successfully tested in preliminary experiments with a neurologically intact subject. Reference angle measurements were taken with a marker-based optical system. An almost linear relation between joint angle and BI was found for the angle range applicable during gait. The desired angle trajectory was closely tracked by the iterative learning controller after three gait cycles. The final root mean square tracking error was below 5 degrees.

  1. Polarization measurement analysis. I. Impact of the full covariance matrix on polarization fraction and angle measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montier, L.; Plaszczynski, S.; Levrier, F.; Tristram, M.; Alina, D.; Ristorcelli, I.; Bernard, J.-P.

    2015-02-01

    With the forthcoming release of high precision polarization measurements, such as from the Planck satellite, the metrology of polarization needs to be improved. In particular, it is important to have full knowledge of the noise properties when estimating polarization fraction and polarization angle, which suffer from well-known biases. While strong simplifying assumptions have usually been made in polarization analysis, we present a method for including the full covariance matrix of the Stokes parameters in estimates of the distributions of the polarization fraction and angle. We thereby quantified the impact of the noise properties on the biases in the observational quantities and derived analytical expressions for the probability density functions of these quantities that take the full complexity of the covariance matrix into account, including the Stokes I intensity components. We performed Monte Carlo simulations to explore the impact of the noise properties on the statistical variance and bias of the polarization fraction and angle. We show that for low variations (< 10%) of the effective ellipticity between the Q and U components around the symmetrical case the covariance matrix may be simplified as is usually done, with a negligible impact on the bias. For S/Ns with intensity lower than 10, the uncertainty on the total intensity is shown to drastically increase the uncertainty of the polarization fraction but not the relative bias of the polarization fraction, while a 10% correlation between the intensity and the polarized components does not significantly affect the bias of the polarization fraction. We compare estimates of the uncertainties that affect polarization measurements, addressing limitations of the estimates of the S/N, and we show how to build conservative confidence intervals for polarization fraction and angle simultaneously. This study, which is the first in a set of papers dedicated to analysing polarization measurements, focuses on the

  2. Reliability of Two Smartphone Applications for Radiographic Measurements of Hallux Valgus Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattos E Dinato, Mauro Cesar; Freitas, Marcio de Faria; Milano, Cristiano; Valloto, Elcio; Ninomiya, André Felipe; Pagnano, Rodrigo Gonçalves

    The objective of the present study was to assess the reliability of 2 smartphone applications compared with the traditional goniometer technique for measurement of radiographic angles in hallux valgus and the time required for analysis with the different methods. The radiographs of 31 patients (52 feet) with a diagnosis of hallux valgus were analyzed. Four observers, 2 with >10 years' experience in foot and ankle surgery and 2 in-training surgeons, measured the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle using a manual goniometer technique and 2 smartphone applications (Hallux Angles and iPinPoint). The interobserver and intermethod reliability were estimated using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs), and the time required for measurement of the angles among the 3 methods was compared using the Friedman test. A very good or good interobserver reliability was found among the 4 observers measuring the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle using the goniometer (ICC 0.913 and 0.821, respectively) and iPinPoint (ICC 0.866 and 0.638, respectively). Using the Hallux Angles application, a very good interobserver reliability was found for measurements of the hallux valgus angle (ICC 0.962) and intermetatarsal angle (ICC 0.935) only among the more experienced observers. The time required for the measurements was significantly shorter for the measurements using both smartphone applications compared with the goniometer method. One smartphone application (iPinPoint) was reliable for measurements of the hallux valgus angles by either experienced or nonexperienced observers. The use of these tools might save time in the evaluation of radiographic angles in the hallux valgus. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Development of a body joint angle measurement system using IMU sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhshi, Saba; Mahoor, Mohammad H; Davidson, Bradley S

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an approach for measuring and monitoring human body joint angles using inertial measurement unit (IMU) sensors. This type of monitoring is beneficial for therapists and physicians because it facilitates remote assessment of patient activities. In our approach, two IMUs are mounted on the upper leg and the lower leg to measure the Euler angles of each segment. The Euler angles are sent via Bluetooth protocols to a pc for calculating the knee joint angle. In our experiments, we utilized a motion capture system to accurately measure the knee joint angle and used this as the ground truth to assess the accuracy of the IMU system. The range of average error of the system across a variety of motion trials was 0.08 to 3.06 degrees. In summary, the accuracy of the IMU measurement system currently outperforms existing wearable systems such as conductive fiber optic sensors and flex-sensors.

  4. Radiographic measures of thoracic kyphosis in osteoporosis: Cobb and vertebral centroid angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, A.M.; Greig, A.M. [University of Melbourne, Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, Victoria (Australia); University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Victoria (Australia); Wrigley, T.V.; Tully, E.A.; Adams, P.E.; Bennell, K.L. [University of Melbourne, Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, School of Physiotherapy, Victoria (Australia)

    2007-08-15

    Several measures can quantify thoracic kyphosis from radiographs, yet their suitability for people with osteoporosis remains uncertain. The aim of this study was to examine the validity and reliability of the vertebral centroid and Cobb angles in people with osteoporosis. Lateral radiographs of the thoracic spine were captured in 31 elderly women with osteoporosis. Thoracic kyphosis was measured globally (T1-T12) and regionally (T4-T9) using Cobb and vertebral centroid angles. Multisegmental curvature was also measured by fitting polynomial functions to the thoracic curvature profile. Canonical and Pearson correlations were used to examine correspondence; agreement between measures was examined with linear regression. Moderate to high intra- and inter-rater reliability was achieved (SEM = 0.9-4.0 ). Concurrent validity of the simple measures was established against multisegmental curvature (r = 0.88-0.98). Strong association was observed between the Cobb and centroid angles globally (r = 0.84) and regionally (r = 0.83). Correspondence between measures was moderate for the Cobb method (r = 0.72), yet stronger for the centroid method (r = 0.80). The Cobb angle was 20% greater for regional measures due to the influence of endplate tilt. Regional Cobb and centroid angles are valid and reliable measures of thoracic kyphosis in people with osteoporosis. However, the Cobb angle is biased by endplate tilt, suggesting that the centroid angle is more appropriate for this population. (orig.)

  5. Surface properties of dental polymers: measurements of contact angles, roughness and fluoride release

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fátima Namen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Earlier studies on some dental materials measured roughness and/or contact angles or fluoride release separately. In the present study, five dental polymers were investigated to ascertain their contact angles, wettability, roughness, and fluoride release in dry or wet conditions. METHODS: Samples for 5 materials were prepared and stored dry or wet in deionized water pH 6.8. Samples were submitted to finishing/polishing procedures, and the measurements in Goniometer, roughness (µm and fluoride analysis RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Except for the Ariston pHc, all the materials displayed high contact angles when measured with water, showing hydrophobic characteristics. Roughness changed the contact angles, especially those of Ariston (α < 0.05. Fluoride did not modify the contact angles, but increased the roughness of the finished material.

  6. Measurement of the $\\vec{\\gamma} p \\to K^+ \\Lambda$ Reaction at Backward Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, K; Sumihama, M; Ahn, D S; Ahn, J K; Akimune, H; Asano, Y; Chang, W C; Daté, S; Ejiri, H; Fukui, S; Fujimura, H; Fujiwara, M; Hasegawa, S; Hosaka, A; Hotta, T; Imai, K; Ishikawa, T; Iwata, T; Julia-Diaz, B; Kato, Y; Kawai, H; Kim, Z Y; Kino, K; Kohri, H; Kumagai, N; Lee, T S H; Makino, S; Matsuda, T; Matsumura, T; Matsuoka, N; Miyabe, M; Miyachi, Y; Morita, M; Muramatsu, N; Nakano, T; Niiyama, M; Nomachi, M; Ohashi, Y; Ooba, T; Ohkuma, H; Oshuev, D S; Ozaki, S; Rangacharyulu, C; Sakaguchi, A; Sasaki, T; Shagin, P M; Shiino, Y; Shimizu, A; Shimizu, H; Sugaya, Y; Toi, Y; Toyokawa, H; Wakai, A; Wang, C W; Wang, S C; Yonehara, K; Yorita, T; Yoshimura, M; Yosoi, M; Zegers, R G T

    2007-01-01

    Cross sections for the $\\gamma p \\to K^+ \\Lambda$ have been measured at backward angles using linearly polarized photons in the range 1.50 to 2.37 GeV. In addition, the beam asymmetry for this reaction has been measured for the first time at backward angles. The $\\Lambda$ was detected at forward angles in the LEPS spectrometer via its decay to $p\\pi^-$ and the K^+ was inferred using the technique of missing mass. These measurements, corresponding to kaons at far backward angles in the center-of-mass frame, complement similar CLAS data at other angles. Comparison with theoretical models shows that the reactions in these kinematics provide further opportunities to investigate the reaction mechanisms of hadron dynamics.

  7. Raman spectroscopy measurement of bilayer graphene's twist angle to boron nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Bin; Wang, Peng; Pan, Cheng; Miao, Tengfei; Wu, Yong; Lau, C. N.; Bockrath, M., E-mail: marc.bockrath@ucr.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K. [Advanced Materials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2015-07-20

    When graphene is placed on hexagonal boron nitride with a twist angle, new properties develop due to the resulting moiré superlattice. Here, we report a method using Raman spectroscopy to make rapid, non-destructive measurements of the twist angle between bilayer graphene and hexagonal boron nitride. The lattice orientation is determined by using flakes with both bilayer and monolayer regions, and using the known Raman signature for the monolayer to measure the twist angle of the entire flake. The widths of the second order Raman peaks are found to vary linearly in the superlattice period and are used to determine the twist angle. The results are confirmed by using transport measurements to infer the superlattice period by the charge density required to reach the secondary resistance peaks. Small twist angles are also found to produce a significant modification of the first order Raman G band peak.

  8. Effectiveness of variable-gain Kalman filter based on angle error calculated from acceleration signals in lower limb angle measurement with inertial sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruyama, Yuta; Watanabe, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The wearable sensor system developed by our group, which measured lower limb angles using Kalman-filtering-based method, was suggested to be useful in evaluation of gait function for rehabilitation support. However, it was expected to reduce variations of measurement errors. In this paper, a variable-Kalman-gain method based on angle error that was calculated from acceleration signals was proposed to improve measurement accuracy. The proposed method was tested comparing to fixed-gain Kalman filter and a variable-Kalman-gain method that was based on acceleration magnitude used in previous studies. First, in angle measurement in treadmill walking, the proposed method measured lower limb angles with the highest measurement accuracy and improved significantly foot inclination angle measurement, while it improved slightly shank and thigh inclination angles. The variable-gain method based on acceleration magnitude was not effective for our Kalman filter system. Then, in angle measurement of a rigid body model, it was shown that the proposed method had measurement accuracy similar to or higher than results seen in other studies that used markers of camera-based motion measurement system fixing on a rigid plate together with a sensor or on the sensor directly. The proposed method was found to be effective in angle measurement with inertial sensors.

  9. A novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle using MEMS tilt sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian'an; Zhu, Xin; Wu, Hao; Zhang, Leping

    2017-10-01

    This paper presents a novel method of measuring spatial rotation angle with a dual-axis micro-electro-mechanical systems tilt sensor. When the sensor is randomly mounted on the surface of the rotating object, there are three unpredictable and unknown mounting position parameters: α, the sensor’s swing angle on the measuring plane; β, the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane; and γ, the angle between the measuring plane and the rotation axis. Thus, the sensor’s spatial rotation model is established to describe the relationship between the measuring axis, rotation axis, and horizontal plane, and the corresponding analytical equations are derived. Furthermore, to eliminate the deviation caused by the uncertain direction of the rotation axis, an extra perpendicularly mounted, single-axis tilt sensor is combined with the dual-axis tilt sensor, forming a three-axis tilt sensor. Then, by measuring the sensors’ three tilts and solving the model’s equations, the object’s spatial rotation angle is obtained. Finally, experimental results show that the developed tilt sensor is capable of measuring spatial rotation angle in the range of  ±180° with an accuracy of 0.2° if the angle between the rotation axis and the horizontal plane is less than 75°.

  10. Quantitative angle-independent flow measurement using relative standard deviation OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Buyun; Zhu, Jiang; Qi, Li; Gao, Yiwei; Huo, Tiancheng; Zhu, Zhuqing; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-02-01

    Incorporating different data processing methods, Optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability for high-resolution micro-angiography and quantitative flow velocity measurement. However, OCT micro-angiography cannot provide quantitative measurement of flow velocity, and the velocity measurement based on Doppler OCT requires the determination of Doppler angles, which are difficult for whole vascular network. In this study, we report a relative standard deviation OCT (RSD-OCT) for the mapping of the flow velocity in a vascular network without the calculation of Doppler angle. From the theoretical analysis and experimental validation, the RSD-OCT is angle-independent and can quantify the flow velocity conveniently after a calibration.

  11. Measuring the Quadriceps Angle by a New Method and Comparison with Goniometer and Radiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahya Sokhangouei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study is to decrease the amount of error when measuring Q–angles using a goniometer by the new method, a private system developed at the I.R's university of social welfare & rehabilitation sciences (USWR by Investigator. Materials & Methods: Fourty subjects with Eighty healthy knees participated in this methodologic study. One investigator participated in data collection who is a licensed physical therapist and has over 6 years of clinical experience in orthopedic physical therapy. He has designed and experienced with new method and computer program. Quadriceps angles measured bilaterally for 40 subjects were recorded. Reliability and validity with new method of the measurements were calculated with Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC & Repeated Measurement for new method and compared it's result with goniometry in contrast with radiography. Results: The ICC for measuring Q-angle with a new method versus the radiography was 0.935, while the ICC for measuring Q-angle with the goniometry versus the radiography was 0.696. The ICC between measures three times obtained with a New Method was 0.974. Conclusion: There is a high association between measures of Q-angle obtained with a new method compared to those obtained with radiography while this association for goniometry is low. Intratester reliability for new method is good and this method can applied as a good measurement method of Q angle.

  12. Research on airborne infrared location technology based on orthogonal multi-station angle measurement method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiang; Chen, Jiaqi; Yang, Rijie; Shan, Zhichao

    2017-11-01

    The passive location method based on angle measurement is studied, the low positioning accuracy and Geometric Dilution of Precision (GDOP) on some target azimuth of dual-station angle measurement location system are founded. Based on the structural characteristics of the airborne platform, an infrared passive angle measurement location method for the single plane is presented. According to the orthogonal method, four measuring stations are loaded onto the airborne platform, they are composed of two orthogonal angle measurement location systems. By choosing the location information of the two systems properly, the GDOP problem can be overcome effectively. Finally, the simulation results show that the method can effectively overcome the GDOP problem and improve the positioning accuracy.

  13. A bioelectrical impedance phase angle measuring system for assessment of nutritional status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guanghao; Huo, Xiaolin; Wu, Changzhe; Zhang, Cheng; Duan, Zhongping

    2014-01-01

    Bioelectrical impedance phase angle has been recommended as a tool to assess nutrition state, but there are no measuring devices have been specially designed for hospital residents. In this study, a system was established for the measurement of bioelectrical impedance phase angle. The electrical composition, calculation method and measuring method of this system are presented in this paper. Experiments showed excellent performance of this system in measuring impedance made of resistors and capacitors. The designed system was also used to measure the bioelectrical impedance phase angle of both healthy subjects and patients with malnutrition, and the results demonstrated that the phase angle of patients with malnutrition is lower than that of healthy subjects (P nutritional status.

  14. Measurements of Cuspal Slope Inclination Angles in Palaeoanthropological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaboutchian, A. V.; Knyaz, V. A.; Leybova, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    Tooth crown morphological features, studied in palaeoanthropology, provide valuable information about human evolution and development of civilization. Tooth crown morphology represents biological and historical data of high taxonomical value as it characterizes genetically conditioned tooth relief features averse to substantial changes under environmental factors during lifetime. Palaeoanthropological studies are still based mainly on descriptive techniques and manual measurements of limited number of morphological parameters. Feature evaluation and measurement result analysis are expert-based. Development of new methods and techniques in 3D imaging creates a background provides for better value of palaeoanthropological data processing, analysis and distribution. The goals of the presented research are to propose new features for automated odontometry and to explore their applicability to paleoanthropological studies. A technique for automated measuring of given morphological tooth parameters needed for anthropological study is developed. It is based on using original photogrammetric system as a teeth 3D models acquisition device and on a set of algorithms for given tooth parameters estimation.

  15. How to Measure Separations and Angles Between Intramolecular Fluorescent Markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Kim; Sung, J.; Spudich, J.A.

    2016-01-01

    firmly; (b) we established how to map with super-resolution between color-separated channels, which should be useful for all dual-color colocalization measurements with either fixed or freely rotating fluorescent molecules. Throughout, we use only simple means: from each color-separated microscope image...

  16. A visual template-matching method for articulation angle measurement

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Saxe, C

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available and proposed sensing methods are limited either in terms of commercial feasibility or measurement accuracy. This paper investigates a vision-based system consisting of a single tractor-mounted camera, a template-matching image processing algorithm...

  17. Measurement of Lumbosacral Angle in Normal Radiographs: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Sep-Oct 2014 | Vol 4 | Issue 5 |. In comparison to the radiographic method, the clinical methods of lumbar lordosis measurement such as goniometry, the software method, flexible ruler, inclinometer, spinal mouse etc., are noninvasive, but since the necessary reliability and.

  18. Contact angle hysteresis of liquid drops as means to measure ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in air under ambient conditions and in water using a wet cell. Layered imaging was used to obtain force–distance curves over the entire image frame of 20 µm × 20. µm at a resolution of 40 × 40 pixels (1600 force curves) and a scan rate of 1 µm s−1: in this type of imaging each pixel encodes the measured force between the ...

  19. High-sensitivity bend angle measurements using optical fiber gratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauf, Abdul; Zhao, Jianlin; Jiang, Biqiang

    2013-07-20

    We present a high-sensitivity and more flexible bend measurement method, which is based on the coupling of core mode to the cladding modes at the bending region in concatenation with optical fiber grating serving as band reflector. The characteristics of a bend sensing arm composed of bending region and optical fiber grating is examined for different configurations including single fiber Bragg grating (FBG), chirped FBG (CFBG), and double FBGs. The bend loss curves for coated, stripped, and etched sections of fiber in the bending region with FBG, CFBG, and double FBG are obtained experimentally. The effect of separation between bending region and optical fiber grating on loss is measured. The loss responses for single FBG and CFBG configurations are compared to discover the effectiveness for practical applications. It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of the double FBG scheme is twice that of the single FBG and CFBG configurations, and hence acts as sensitivity multiplier. The bend loss response for different fiber diameters obtained through etching in 40% hydrofluoric acid, is measured in double FBG scheme that resulted in a significant increase in the sensitivity, and reduction of dead-zone.

  20. New angle measurement device to control the posterior tibial slope angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Matsumoto, Kazu; Akiyama, Haruhiko

    2017-11-17

    Medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy has been associated with an unintentional increase in the posterior tibial slope angle. We aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of a novel bone spreader angle rod to maintain the native posterior tibial slope angle in medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy. Data from 92 consecutive knees in 83 patients who underwent medial opening wedge high tibial osteotomy for knee osteoarthritis between March 2015 and June 2016 were analysed. The osteotomy was performed without the use of a bone spreader angle rod in the first 50 cases (control group) and with the use of the angle rod in the subsequent 42 cases (angle rod group). The wedge insertion angle, defined as the angle between a line drawn along the posterior aspect of the wedge spacer and a line tangential to the posterior aspect of the femoral condyles, and the posterior tibial slope angle were evaluated on pre- and postoperative lateral knee radiographs and postoperative computed tomography images. Wedge insertion angle showed that wedge spacers were inserted in a more direct horizontal direction in the angle rod group than in the control group (16.0 ± 8.8° and 23.0 ± 10.0°, respectively, P angle was significantly smaller in the angle rod group (0.6 ± 1.6°) compared to that in the control group (3.2 ± 3.2°; P angle > 3° (outlier) was identified in 1 case (2.4%) in the angle rod group compared to 27 cases in the control group (54.0%). The direct horizontal insertion of wedge spacers with the assistance of our novel bone spreader angle rod maintains the native posterior tibial slope angle better than conventional methods. IV.

  1. A Vision-Based Dynamic Rotational Angle Measurement System for Large Civil Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Jae Lee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a vision-based rotational angle measurement system for large-scale civil structures. Despite the fact that during the last decade several rotation angle measurement systems were introduced, they however often required complex and expensive equipment. Therefore, alternative effective solutions with high resolution are in great demand. The proposed system consists of commercial PCs, commercial camcorders, low-cost frame grabbers, and a wireless LAN router. The calculation of rotation angle is obtained by using image processing techniques with pre-measured calibration parameters. Several laboratory tests were conducted to verify the performance of the proposed system. Compared with the commercial rotation angle measurement, the results of the system showed very good agreement with an error of less than 1.0% in all test cases. Furthermore, several tests were conducted on the five-story modal testing tower with a hybrid mass damper to experimentally verify the feasibility of the proposed system.

  2. New Light Source Setup for Angle Resolved Light Absorption measurement of PV sample

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light....

  3. New Light Source Setup for Angle Resolved Light Absorption measurement of PV samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff; Thorsteinsson, Sune

    Here, we introduce measurements of angle resolved light absorption by PV cells, using broadband laser driven white light source with a bright, stable, broad spectral range and well collimated light....

  4. A Comparison of Galaxy Spiral Arm Pitch Angle Measurements Using Manual and Automated Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Ian; Treuthardt, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Disk galaxy evolution is dominated by secular processes in the nearby universe. Revealing the morphological characteristics and underlying dynamics of these galaxies is key to understanding their evolution. The arm structure of disk galaxies can generally be described with logarithmic spirals, thereby giving measurements of pitch angle. These measurements are valuable for probing the dynamics and less apparent characteristics of these galaxies (i.e. supermassive black hole mass). Pitch angle measurements are powerful because they can be derived from a single, uncalibrated, broadband image with sufficient contrast, as opposed to more intensive observations. Accurate determination of these measurements can be challenging, however, since pitch angle can vary with radius.There are currently several semi-automated and manual techniques used to determine pitch angle. These are, or will be, used in at least two Zooniverse citizen science projects. The goal of this work is to determine if different, specific techniques return similar pitch angles for the same set of galaxies. We compare the results from a machine vision technique using SPARCFIRE, a non-Euclidean based hand selection of pitch angle, and two methods using 2D Fourier decomposition (i.e. selecting stable regions from the results of direct application to broadband images and application to traced versions of the observed spiral pattern). Each technique is applied to our sample of galaxies and the resulting pitch angles are compared to generated logarithmic spirals to evaluate the match quality.

  5. Improved inverted bubble method for measuring small contact angles at crystal-solution-vapor interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corti, Thierry; Krieger, Ulrich K

    2007-08-10

    We propose and evaluate an improvement of the inverted bubble method, originally proposed by McLachlan and Cox [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 46, 80 (1975)], a technique for measuring small contact angles at crystal-solution-vapor interfaces on a gas bubble under a solid immersed in a test solution. A simple experimental setup is used to evaluate the proposed method. We conclude that the method is suitable for measuring small contact angles with a minimum detectable angle of about 3 degrees . Improvements in instrument design are proposed to lower the detection limit to 0.5 degrees or below.

  6. Quantitative angle-insensitive flow measurement using relative standard deviation OCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Buyun; Qi, Li; Wang, Ling; Yang, Qiang; Zhu, Zhuqing; Huo, Tiancheng; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-10-30

    Incorporating different data processing methods, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability for high-resolution angiography and quantitative flow velocity measurements. However, OCT angiography cannot provide quantitative information of flow velocities, and the velocity measurement based on Doppler OCT requires the determination of Doppler angles, which is a challenge in a complex vascular network. In this study, we report on a relative standard deviation OCT (RSD-OCT) method which provides both vascular network mapping and quantitative information for flow velocities within a wide range of Doppler angles. The RSD values are angle-insensitive within a wide range of angles, and a nearly linear relationship was found between the RSD values and the flow velocities. The RSD-OCT measurement in a rat cortex shows that it can quantify the blood flow velocities as well as map the vascular network in vivo .

  7. Quantitative angle-insensitive flow measurement using relative standard deviation OCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiang; Zhang, Buyun; Qi, Li; Wang, Ling; Yang, Qiang; Zhu, Zhuqing; Huo, Tiancheng; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-10-01

    Incorporating different data processing methods, optical coherence tomography (OCT) has the ability for high-resolution angiography and quantitative flow velocity measurements. However, OCT angiography cannot provide quantitative information of flow velocities, and the velocity measurement based on Doppler OCT requires the determination of Doppler angles, which is a challenge in a complex vascular network. In this study, we report on a relative standard deviation OCT (RSD-OCT) method which provides both vascular network mapping and quantitative information for flow velocities within a wide range of Doppler angles. The RSD values are angle-insensitive within a wide range of angles, and a nearly linear relationship was found between the RSD values and the flow velocities. The RSD-OCT measurement in a rat cortex shows that it can quantify the blood flow velocities as well as map the vascular network in vivo.

  8. Measurement of finger joint angles and maximum finger forces during cylinder grip activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J W; Rim, K

    1991-03-01

    Finger joint angles and finger forces during maximal cylindrical grasping were measured using multi-camera photogrammetry and pressure-sensitive sheets, respectively. The experimental data were collected from four healthy subjects gripping cylinders of five different sizes. For joint angles, an image analysis system was used to digitize slides showing markers. During the calibration of the camera system, both the nonlinear least square and the direct linear transform methods were applied and compared, the former providing the fewer errors; it was used to determine joint angles. Data were collected from the pressure-sensitive grip films by using the same image analysis system as used in the collection of the joint angle data. The method of using pressure-sensitive sheets provided an estimation of the weighted centre of the phalangeal forces. Results indicate that finger flexion angles at the metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints gradually increase as cylinder diameter decreases, but that at the distal interphalangeal joint the angle remains constant throughout all cylinder sizes. It was also found that most of the radio-ulnar deviation and the axial rotation angles at the finger joints deviate from zero, but the deviations are small. For the force measurement, it was found that total finger force increases as cylinder size decreases, and the phalangeal force centres are not located at the mid-points of the phalanges. The data obtained in this experiment would be useful for muscle force predictions and for the design of handles.

  9. Measuring incidence angle for through-the-objective total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burghardt, Thomas P.

    2012-12-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy has the exciting laser beam incident beyond critical angle from the glass side of a glass/aqueous interface formed by the coverslip and aqueous sample. The aqueous side evanescent field decays exponentially with distance from the interface with penetration depth depending on incidence angle. Through-the-objective TIRF has the exciting laser focused at the back focal plane (BFP) creating a refracted parallel beam approaching the interface in the small gap between objective and coverslip, making incidence angle challenging to measure. Objective axial scanning does not affect incidence angle but translates beam and interface intersection detected by the fluorescence center of mass from fluorescent spheres attached to the aqueous side of the interface. Center of mass translation divided by the axial translation is the tangent of the incidence angle that is sampled repeatedly over objective trajectory to obtain a best estimate. Incidence angle is measured for progressively larger radial positions of the focused beam on the BFP. A through-the-objective TIRF microscope, utilizing a micrometer and relay lenses to position the focused beam at the BFP, is calibrated for incidence angle. Calibration depends on microscope characteristics and TIRF objective and is applicable to any interface or sample.

  10. Reliability and validity of measures of hammer toe deformity angle and tibial torsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, O Y; Tuttle, L J; Commean, P K; Mueller, M J

    2009-09-01

    Measures of second-fourth metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) angle (indicator of hammer toe deformity) and clinical measures of tibial torsion have limited evidence for validity and reliability. The purposes of this study are to determine: (1) reliability of using a 3D digitizer (Metrecom) and computed tomography (CT) to measure MTPJ angle for toes 2-4; (2) reliability of goniometer, 3D digitizer, and CT to measure tibial torsion; (3) validity of MTPJ angle measures for toes 2-4 using goniometry and 3D digitizer compared to CT (gold standard) and (4) validity of tibial torsion measures using goniometry and 3D digitizer (Metrecom) compared to CT (gold standard). Twenty-nine subjects participated in this study. 27 feet with hammer toe deformity and 31 feet without hammer toe deformity were tested using standardized gonimetric, 3D digitizer and CT methods. ICCs (3,1), standard error of the measurement (SEM) values, and difference measures were used to characterize intrarater reliability. Pearson correlation coefficients and an analysis of variance were used to determine associations and differences between the measurement techniques. 3D digitizer and CT measures of MTPJ angle had high test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.95-0.96 and 0.98-0.99, respectively; SEM = 2.64-3.35 degrees and 1.42-1.47 degrees, respectively). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures of tibial torsion had good test-retest reliability (ICC = 0.75, 0.85, and 0.98, respectively; SEM = 2.15 degrees, 1.74 degrees, and 0.72 degree, respectively). Both goniometric and 3D digitizer measures of MTPJ angle were highly correlated with CT measures of MTPJ angle (r = 0.84-0.90, r = 0.84-0.88, respectively) and tibial torsion (r = 0.72, r = 0.83). Goniometry, 3D digitizer, and CT measures were all different from each other for measures of hammer toe deformity (p Goniometry measures were different from CT measures and 3D digitizer measures of tibial torsion (p reliable. Goniometer and 3D digitizer measures of

  11. DCE-PWI 3D T1-measurement as function of time or flip angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Peters, David Alberg; Tietze, Anna

    Dynamic Contrast Enhanced Perfusion Weighted Imaging (DCE-PWI) and the preceding T1 measurement is usually performed with a FLASH sequence. For the sake of speed, the 3D T1 measurement is often performed by measuring the signal for a range of flip angles instead of as a function the inversion (or...

  12. ANGLE OF MOUTH OPENING MEASUREMENT - RELIABILITY OF A TECHNIQUE FOR TEMPOROMANDIBULAR-JOINT MOBILITY ASSESSMENT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, P.U.; DEBONT, L.G.M.; Stegenga, B; Boering, G.

    The maximal interincisal distance added to the vertical overlap is generally used as a measure for temporomandibular joint mobility. However, the length of the mandible also has an influence on this measure. The angle of mouth opening as a measure of temporomandibular joint mobility is independent

  13. Calibration of a spinner anemometer for flow angle measurements by use of wind turbine yawing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demurtas, Giorgio; Friis Pedersen, Troels

    The present report describes a method to calibrate a spinner anemometer ow angle measurements. The turbine is yawed several times (5 times approximately 60 with respect to the wind direction) in steady wind (> 6 m/s) and measurements of yaw position (measured by a yaw position sensor) and yaw...

  14. Measurements of Crossflow Instability Modes for HIFiRE 5 at Angle of Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-11-15

    STATES AIR FORCE AFRL-RQ-WP-TP-2017-0170 MEASUREMENTS OF CROSSFLOW INSTABILITY MODES FOR HIFIRE-5 AT ANGLE OF ATTACK Roger L. Kimmel and Matthew...MODES FOR HIFIRE-5 AT ANGLE OF ATTACK 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 61102F 6. AUTHOR(S) Roger L...nor stationary crossflow waves were observed. For increasing angle of attack, transition in the region of high crossflow was observed to move

  15. Evaluation of clinical and radiographic measures and reliability of the quadriceps angle measurement in elderly women with knee osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateus Ramos Amorim

    Full Text Available Introduction Knees osteoarthritis (OA is a complex degenerative disease with intra-articular changes affecting the amplitude of the quadriceps angle (Q. To measure this variable, it is necessary to use reliable protocols aiming at methodological reproducibility. The objective was to evaluate the intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability of clinical and radiographic measures of the Q angle and to investigate the relationship between the degree of OA and the magnitude of this angle in the elderly. Materials and methods 23 volunteers had the Q angle measured by two evaluators at 48-h interval. Clinical measurements were collected by using the universal goniometer in the same position adopted in the radiographic examination. Results The intra-examiner reliability was good (0.722 to 0.763 for radiographic measurements and low (0.518 to 0.574 for clinical assessment, while inter-examiner reliability was moderate (0.634 for radiographic measurements and low (0.499 to the clinics. The correlation analysis between the radiographic values with the OA classification showed no correlation between them (p = 0.824 and r = -0.024. Conclusion Clinically, it is suggested that the radiographic examination is preferable to evaluate the Q angle of elderly women with knee osteoarthritis. Moreover, the magnitude of this angle did not correlate with the degree of impairment of OA in this population.

  16. Measurement errors related to contact angle analysis of hydrogel and silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Michael L; Morgan, Philip B; Maldonado-Codina, Carole

    2009-11-01

    This work sought to undertake a comprehensive investigation of the measurement errors associated with contact angle assessment of curved hydrogel contact lens surfaces. The contact angle coefficient of repeatability (COR) associated with three measurement conditions (image analysis COR, intralens COR, and interlens COR) was determined by measuring the contact angles (using both sessile drop and captive bubble methods) for three silicone hydrogel lenses (senofilcon A, balafilcon A, lotrafilcon A) and one conventional hydrogel lens (etafilcon A). Image analysis COR values were about 2 degrees , whereas intralens COR values (95% confidence intervals) ranged from 4.0 degrees (3.3 degrees , 4.7 degrees ) (lotrafilcon A, captive bubble) to 10.2 degrees (8.4 degrees , 12.1 degrees ) (senofilcon A, sessile drop). Interlens COR values ranged from 4.5 degrees (3.7 degrees , 5.2 degrees ) (lotrafilcon A, captive bubble) to 16.5 degrees (13.6 degrees , 19.4 degrees ) (senofilcon A, sessile drop). Measurement error associated with image analysis was shown to be small as an absolute measure, although proportionally more significant for lenses with low contact angle. Sessile drop contact angles were typically less repeatable than captive bubble contact angles. For sessile drop measures, repeatability was poorer with the silicone hydrogel lenses when compared with the conventional hydrogel lens; this phenomenon was not observed for the captive bubble method, suggesting that methodological factors related to the sessile drop technique (such as surface dehydration and blotting) may play a role in the increased variability of contact angle measurements observed with silicone hydrogel contact lenses.

  17. Simulations of Convection Zone Flows and Measurements from Multiple Viewing Angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, Thomas L.; Hanasoge, Shravan

    2011-01-01

    A deep-focusing time-distance measurement technique has been applied to linear acoustic simulations of a solar interior perturbed by convective flows. The simulations are for the full sphere for r/R greater than 0.2. From these it is straightforward to simulate the observations from different viewing angles and to test how multiple viewing angles enhance detectibility. Some initial results will be presented.

  18. Measurement of the convergence angle in teeth prepared for single crown

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NokarS

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Retention, resistance and marginal integrity mostly depend on tooth preparation. An appropriate convergence angle fulfil this purpose, to high extent. In this study, a new method was used to measure the convergence angle of the teeth prepared for single crowns in Genera! practitioners" offices in Tehran. In order to do this. 325 dyes, prepared by General dentists in Tehran, were collected from 10 laboratories. All dyes wore trimmed at the area below the finishing line and then were scanned (Genius Color page- FIR 6 buccoiingualiy and mesiodistaily. Convergence angle of dyes were also measured with Adobe Photoshop (5.0 software. Data were analyzed by variance analysis test and 1- student bv the help of SPSS software. Results showed that the average convergence angle ranged from 16.18+8.34 to 35.1 8~10.38 which belonged to maxillary canine and mandibular molars, respectively, and the measured convergence angle is more than the ideal value of 10-16 degrees. Dyes of the madibular molars were ma"illar" convergent. These conclusions are helpful for professors, dentistry students and dentists, and arc an indicative of the practice quality of General practitioners in Tehran. Due to the fact that a convergence angle, more than the allowed limitation, endangers retention, resistance and marginal integrity of the restoration, paying attention to the principles of tooth preparation and proper application of instruments and dental cements, can progress fwed restorations quality.

  19. Interpretation of contact angle measurements on two different fluoropolymers for the determination of solid surface tension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavana, H; Simon, F; Grundke, K; Kwok, D Y; Hair, M L; Neumann, A W

    2005-11-15

    Contact angle measurements with a large number of liquids on the semi-fluorinated acryl polymer EGC-1700 films are reported. The surface tension was determined to be gammasv=13.84 mJ/m2 from contact angles of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS) and decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (DMCPS). Inertness of these two liquids makes them ideal for determination of surface tension of low-energy fluoropolymers. On the other hand, contact angles of many other liquids deviated somewhat from a smooth contact angle pattern that represents the EGC-1700 surface tension. It is argued that noninertness of the molecules of these liquids gives rise to specific interactions with the polymer film, causing the deviations. Furthermore, contact angles of a series of n-alkanes (n-hexane to n-hexadecane) showed systematic deviations from this curve, similar to the trend observed for n-alkanes/Teflon AF 1600 systems studied earlier. Adsorption of vapor of short-chain liquids onto the polymer film caused their contact angles to fall above the gammasv=13.84 mJ/m2 curve, and a parallel alignment of molecules of the long-chain n-alkanes in the vicinity of the solid was the explanation for the deviation of their contact angles below it. It is found that vapor adsorption effect is more significant in the case of Teflon AF 1600, while the alignment of liquid molecules close to the surface is more pronounced for EGC-1700.

  20. Q-angle static or dynamic measurements, which is the best choice for patellofemoral pain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Danilo de Oliveira; Briani, Ronaldo Valdir; Pazzinatto, Marcella Ferraz; Gonçalves, Ana Valéria; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando Amâncio; de Azevedo, Fábio Mícolis

    2015-12-01

    The elevated Q-angle seems to be one of the most suggested factors contributing to patellofemoral pain. Females with patellofemoral pain are often evaluated through static clinical tests in clinical practice. However, the adaptations seem to appear more frequently in dynamic conditions. Performing static vs. dynamic evaluations of widely used measures would add to the knowledge in this area. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine the reliability and discriminatory capability of three Q-angle measurements: a static clinical test, peak dynamic knee valgus during stair ascent and a static measurement using a three-dimensional system. Twenty-nine females with patellofemoral pain and twenty-five pain-free females underwent clinical Q-angle measurement and static and dynamic knee valgus measurements during stair ascent, using a three-dimensional system. All measurements were obtained and comparisons between groups, reliability and discriminatory capability were calculated. Peak dynamic knee valgus was found to be greater in the patellofemoral pain group. On the other hand, no significant effects were found for static knee valgus or clinical Q-angle measurements between groups. The dynamic variable demonstrated the best discriminatory capability. Low values of reliability were found for clinical Q-angle, in contrast to the high values found for the three-dimensional system measurements. Based on our findings, avoiding or correcting dynamic knee valgus during stair ascent may be an important component of rehabilitation programs in females with patellofemoral pain who demonstrate excessive dynamic knee valgus. Q-angle static measurements were not different between groups and presented poor values of discriminatory capability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of a Modified AC Bridge Technique for Loss Angle Measurement of a Dielectric Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. C. BERA

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available A Wheatstone’s bridge network like Schering Bridge, DeSauty Bridge etc measures the loss angle or tangent of loss angle (tanδ of a dielectric material. In high voltage application this loss angle is generally measured by high voltage Schering Bridge. But continuous measurement of tan δ is not possible by these techniques. In the present paper a modified operational amplifiers based Schering Bridge network has been proposed for continuous measurement of tanδ in the form of a bridge network output voltage. Mathematical analysis of the proposed bridge network has been discussed in the paper and experimental work has been performed assuming the lossy dielectric material as a series combination of loss less capacitor and a resistor. Experimental results are reported in the paper. From the mathematical analysis and experimental results it is found that the output of the proposed bridge network is almost linearly related with tanδ.

  2. Measurement of contact angles of microscopic droplets by focal length method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Daniel; Geiger, Kirsten; Neckernuss, Tobias; Marti, Othmar; Amirkhani, Masoud

    2017-08-01

    We present a method to measure contact angles of microscopic droplets with a conventional microscope that possesses a precision focus adjustment stage. The droplets are modeled as spherical caps that act as lenses. Their focal length is determined by measuring the distance from the substrate surface to the level where a sharp image of the aperture stop is observed. The lens diameter is found by edge detection of a microscope image of the microdroplets. The spherical cap model relates the focal length and diameter of such lenses to the contact angle of the used liquid with known refractive index. The measurement procedure was applied to condensed water droplets on a silicon substrate covered by its native oxide layer. The results are found to be in good agreement with conventional, goniometric sessile drop measurements of the advancing contact angle.

  3. A laser speckle sensor to measure the distribution of static torsion angles of twisted targets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, B.; Imam, H.; Hanson, Steen Grüner

    1998-01-01

    A novel method for measuring the distribution of static torsion angles of twisted targets is presented. The method is based on Fourier transforming the scattered field in the direction perpendicular to the twist axis, while performing an imaging operation in the direction parallel to the axis....... A cylindrical lens serves to image the closely spaced lateral positions of the target along the twist axis onto corresponding lines of the two dimensional image sensor. Thus, every single line of the image sensor measures the torsion angle of the corresponding surface position along the twist axis of the target....... Experimentally, we measure the distribution of torsion angles in both uniform and non-uniform deformation zones. It is demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the measurements are insensitive to object shape and target distance if the image sensor is placed in the Fourier plane. A straightforward...

  4. APPLICABILITY OF THE COBB ANGLE MEASUREMENT IN IDIOPATHIC SCOLIOSIS USING SCANNED IMAGING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ERASMO DE ABREU ZARDO

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objectives: To compare the measurement of the Cobb angle on printed radiographs and on scanned radiographs viewed through the software "PixViewer". Methods: Preoperative radiographs of 23 patients were evaluated on printed films and through the software "PixViewer". The same evaluator, a spine surgeon, chose the proximal and distal limiting vertebrae of the main curve on printed radiographs, without identification of patients, and measured the Cobb angle based on these parameters. The same parameters and measurements were applied to scanned radiographs. The measurements were compared, as well as the choice of limiting vertebrae. Results: The average variation of the Cobb angle between methods was 1.48 ± 1.73°. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was 0.99, demonstrating excellent reproducibility. Conclusion: The Cobb method can be used to evaluate scoliosis through the "PixViewer" tool with the same reliability as the classic method on printed radiographs.

  5. High resolution and stability roll angle measurement method for precision linear displacement stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Tao; Xia, Guizheng; Hou, Wenmei; Le, Yanfen; Han, Sen

    2017-02-01

    A method for high resolution roll angle measurement of linear displacement stages is developed theoretically and tested experimentally. The new optical configuration is based on a special differential plane mirror interferometer, a wedge prism assembly, and a wedge mirror assembly. The wedge prisms assembly is used as a roll angle sensor, which converts roll angle to the changes of optical path. The special interferometer, composed a polarization splitter plane, a half wave plate, a beam splitter, a retro-reflector and a quarter wave plate, is designed for high resolution measurement of the changes of the optical path. The interferometric beams are a completely common path for the adoption of the centrosymmetrical measurement structure, and the cross talk of the straightness, yaw, and pitch errors is avoided. The angle measurement resolution of the proposed method is 3.5 μrad in theoretical with a phase meter which has a resolution of 2 π /512 . The experimental result also shows the great stability and accuracy of the present roll angle measurement system.

  6. Optical method for measuring optical rotation angle and refractive index of chiral solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiun-You; Chen, Kun-Huang; Chen, Jing-Heng

    2007-11-20

    Based on the phenomena of Brewster's angle and the principles of common-path heterodyne interferometry, we present an optical method for measuring the optical rotation angle and the refractive index of a chiral solution simultaneously in one optical configuration. A heterodyne light beam and a circularly polarized heterodyne light beam are separately guided to project onto the interface of a semicircle glass and a chiral solution. One of the beams is transmitted through the solution, and the other is reflected near Brewster's angle at the interface. Then the two beams pass through polarization components respectively for interference. The phase differences of the two interference signals used to determine the rotation angle and the refractive index become very high with the proper azimuth angles of some polarization components, hence achieving an accurate rotational angle and a refractive index. The feasibility of the measuring method was demonstrated by our experimental results. This method should bear the merits of high accuracy, short sample medium length, and simpler operational endeavor.

  7. Reproducibility of Scleral Spur Identification and Angle Measurements Using Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo J. Cumba

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate intraobserver and interobserver agreement in locating the scleral spur landmark (SSL and anterior chamber angle measurements obtained using Fourier Domain Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomography (ASOCT images. Methods. Two independent, masked observers (SR and AZC identified SSLs on ASOCT images from 31 eyes with open and nonopen angles. A third independent reader, NPB, adjudicated SSL placement if identifications differed by more than 80 μm. Nine months later, SR reidentified SSLs. Intraobserver and interobserver agreement in SSL placement, trabecular-iris space area (TISA750, and angle opening distance (AOD750 were calculated. Results. In 84% of quadrants, SR’s SSL placements during 2 sessions were within 80 μm in both the X- and Y-axes, and in 77% of quadrants, SR and AZC were within 80 μm in both axes. In adjudicated images, 90% of all quadrants were within 80 μm, 88% in nonopen-angle eyes, and 92% in open-angle eyes. The intraobserver and interobserver correlation coefficients (with and without adjudication were above 0.9 for TISA750 and AOD750 for all quadrants. Conclusions. Reproducible identification of the SSL from images obtained with FD-ASOCT is possible. The ability to identify the SSL allows reproducible measurement of the anterior chamber angle using TISA750 and AOD750.

  8. Scanning laser reflection tool for alignment and period measurement of critical-angle transmission gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jungki; Heilmann, Ralf K.; Bruccoleri, Alexander R.; Hertz, Edward; Schatternburg, Mark L.

    2017-08-01

    We report progress toward developing a scanning laser reflection (LR) tool for alignment and period measurement of critical-angle transmission (CAT) gratings. It operates on a similar measurement principle as a tool built in 1994 which characterized period variations of grating facets for the Chandra X-ray Observatory. A specularly reflected beam and a first-order diffracted beam were used to record local period variations, surface slope variations, and grating line orientation. In this work, a normal-incidence beam was added to measure slope variations (instead of the angled-incidence beam). Since normal incidence reflection is not coupled with surface height change, it enables measurement of slope variations more accurately and, along with the angled-incidence beam, helps to reconstruct the surface figure (or tilt) map. The measurement capability of in-grating period variations was demonstrated by measuring test reflection grating (RG) samples that show only intrinsic period variations of the interference lithography process. Experimental demonstration for angular alignment of CAT gratings is also presented along with a custom-designed grating alignment assembly (GAA) testbed. All three angles were aligned to satisfy requirements for the proposed Arcus mission. The final measurement of roll misalignment agrees with the roll measurements performed at the PANTER x-ray test facility.

  9. Investigation of surface porosity measurements and compaction pressure as means to ensure consistent contact angle determinations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, René; Borkenfelt, Simon; Allesø, Morten

    2016-01-01

    .g. increase the wetting from a solid dosage form. Since surface roughness of the compact has been suggested to influence the measurement this study investigated if the surface quality, in terms of surface porosity, had an influence on the measured contact angle. A correlation to surface porosity was observed...

  10. Comparison of two- and three-dimensional measurement of the Cobb angle in scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, Ricarda; Putzer, David; Dammerer, Dietmar; Liebensteiner, Michael; Bach, Christian; Thaler, Martin

    2017-05-01

    The Cobb angle as an objective measure is used to determine the progression of deformity, and is the basis in the planning of conservative and surgical treatment. However, studies have shown that the Cobb angle has two limitations: an inter- and intraobserver variability of the measurement is approximately 3-5 degrees, and high variability regarding the definition of the end vertebra. Scoliosis is a three-dimensional (3D) pathology, and 3D pathologies cannot be completely assessed by two-dimensional (2D) methods, like 2D radiography. The objective of this study was to determine the intraobserver and interobserver reliability of end vertebra definition and Cobb angle measurement using X-rays and 3D computer tomography (CT) reconstructions in scoliotic spines. To assess interoberver variation the Cobb angle and the end vertebra were assessed by five observers in 55 patients using X-rays and 3D CT reconstructions. Definition of end vertebra and measurement of the Cobb angle was repeated two times with a three-week interval. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were used to determine the interobserver and intraobserver reliabilities. 95% prediction limits were provided for measurement errors. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) showed excellent reliability for both methods. The measured Cobb angle was on average 9.2 degrees larger in the 3D CT group (72.8°, range 30-144) than on 2D radiography (63.6°, range 24-152). In scoliosis treatment it is very essential to determine the curve magnitude, which is larger in a 3D measurement compared to 2D radiography.

  11. Quantification of inertial sensor-based 3D joint angle measurement accuracy using an instrumented gimbal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, A; Zhang, J; Deluzio, K; Li, Q

    2011-07-01

    This study quantified the accuracy of inertial sensors in 3D anatomical joint angle measurement with respect to an instrumented gimbal. The gimbal rotated about three axes and directly measured the angles in the ISB recommended knee joint coordinate system. Through the use of sensor attachment devices physically fixed to the gimbal, the joint angle estimation error due to sensor attachment (the inaccuracy of the sensor attachment matrix) was essentially eliminated, leaving only error due to the inertial sensors. The angle estimation error (RMSE) corresponding to the sensor was found to be 3.20° in flexion/extension, 3.42° in abduction/adduction and 2.88° in internal/external rotation. Bland-Altman means of maximum absolute value were -1.63° inflexion/extension, 3.22° in abduction/adduction and -2.61° in internal/external rotation. The magnitude of the errors reported in this study imply that even under ideal conditions irreproducible in human gait studies, inertial angle measurement will be subject to errors of a few degrees. Conversely, the reported errors are smaller than those reported previously in human gait studies, which suggest that the sensor attachment is also significant source of error in inertial gait measurement. The proposed apparatus and methodology could be used to quantify the performance of different sensor systems and orientation estimation algorithms, and to verify experimental protocols before human experimentation. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Detection method of inclination angle in image measurement based on improved triangulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jinfeng; Zhang, Jiye

    2015-02-01

    Image distortion seriously affects the accuracy in microscope image measurement. One source of such distortion is related to the tilting of the microscope stage during laser scanning, thereby resulting in various degrees of inclination angles. This paper describes a novel technique that improves the traditional laser triangulation method by using multiple parallel laser beams that can solve the inclination problem. Moreover, a multi-light-spot measurement device, based on the improved laser triangulation technique, is proposed that can accurately detect the degree and directions of the inclination angles in real time. Furthermore, experimental results generated from a prototype of this device show that the new measurement system can effectively detect small inclination angles at a precision up to ±0.5  μrad.

  13. Inter- and intra-observer reliability of a smartphone application for measuring hallux valgus angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Richard; Kosy, Jonathan D; Cove, Richard

    2013-03-01

    Measurement of radiological angles can be useful in the planning of the management of patients with hallux valgus. A smartphone application offers an alternative way of measuring these angles in a clinic setting. We compared the reliability (inter- and intra-observer) of this method to the use of PACS. Radiographs of 30 feet from new patients referred with hallux valgus were examined and angles (HVA, IMA, and DMAA) recorded using the smartphone application and PACS. The smartphone application provided good inter-observer reliability for HVA and IMA (r=0.93 and r=0.79 respectively). Intra-observer reliability for HVA and IMA was also found to be good (r=0.93-0.97 r=0.82-0.93 respectively). The inter- and intra-observer reliability for using this method to measure DMAA fell below useful levels (rDMAA. Copyright © 2012 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Measurement of knee flexion/extension angle using wearable UWB radios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Maskooki, Arash

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a wearable system using UWB transceivers to measure the knee flexion/extension angle parameter, who is known to be of clinical importance. First, a pair of very small and light antennas is placed on the adjacent segments of knee joint. Then, the range data between these two antennas is acquired using Time of Arrival (TOA) estimator. We further use the measured distance to compute the flexion/extension angle using the law of cosines. The performance of the method was compared with a flexible goniometer by simultaneously measuring knee flexion-extension angle. The experimental results show that the system has reasonable performance and has sufficient accuracy for clinical applications.

  15. Measurements of $B \\to DK$ decays to constrain the CKM unitarity triangle angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Gandini, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    The angle g of the CKM unitarity triangle remains the least precisely measured parameter of the CKM mixing matrix. The precision measurement of this parameter is one of the main goals of the LHCb experiment. We present a wide range of measurements of CP violation and partial rates in B ! DK decays, as well as the latest LHCb measurement of g combining all the individual inputs and including D 0 mixing.

  16. The compangle: a new goniometer for joint angle measurements of the hand. A technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stam, H J; Ardon, M S; den Ouden, A C; Schreuders, T A R; Roebroeck, M E

    2006-03-01

    The accuracy of joint angle measurement of the hand may be negatively influenced by joint swelling, deformation and other obstacles. We developed an alternative goniometer with clear ergonomic advantages, especially for the measurement of small joints. This new concept of goniometry is described and preliminary results on the reliability of the measurements are presented. The intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the standard error of measurements (SEMs) of the alternative goniometer are greater respectively smaller than a conventional goniometer, indicating a better intratester reliability.

  17. Reliability analysis of a smartphone-aided measurement method for the Cobb angle of scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Jun; Liu, Zhen; Xu, Leilei; Wu, Tao; Zheng, Xin; Zhu, Zezhang; Zhu, Feng; Qian, Bangpin; Qiu, Yong

    2012-06-01

    A comparison between the smartphone-aided measurement method and the manual measurement method for the Cobb angle in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. To evaluate the reliability and measurement error for the smartphone-aided Cobb angle measurement method and compare its reliability and measurement error with those of the manual method. The development of smartphones has provided new opportunities that integrate mobile technology into daily clinical practice. Smartphone applications can provide quick assistance in the diagnosis and treatment of disease. Cobbmeter is a smartphone application designed for the measurement of Cobb angle on Apple iPhone smartphones. There is no study on the reliability and measurement error of this smartphone-aided measurement method. : Fifty-three posteroanterior radiographs of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis patients with thoracic scoliosis were used for the standard Cobb method of measurement (manual set) and the smartphone-aided Cobb method of measurement (smartphone set). Five spinal surgeons measured the Cobb angle with the use of both the manual method and the smartphone-aided method. The measurement time was recorded for every measurement. The frequency and the cumulative percent distribution for intraobserver differences were tabulated, both for the individual examiners and for the overall results for the 5 examiners. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) 2-way mixed model on absolute agreement was used to analyze measurement reliability. Summary statistics from analyses of variance calculations were used to provide 95% prediction limits for the error in measurements. A paired t test was used to compare the time consumed for the measurement between both sets. The intraobserver and interobserver ICCs were excellent in the smartphone set and in the manual set. Both the intraobserver ICC and the interobserver ICC were better in the smartphone set than in the manual set. The mean Cobb angle of all measured x-rays was 29

  18. Evaluation of algorithms for calculating bioimpedance phase angle values from measured whole-body impedance modulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Bernt J; Tronstad, Christian; Martinsen, Ørjan G; Grimnes, Sverre

    2011-07-01

    This paper addresses the problem of calculating the bioimpedance phase angle from measurements of impedance modulus. A complete impedance measurement was performed on altogether 20 healthy persons using a Solatron 1260/1294 system. The obtained impedance modulus (absolute impedance value) values were used to calculate the Cole parameters and from them the phase angles. In addition, the phase angles were also calculated using a Kramers-Kronig approach. A correlation analysis for all subjects at each frequency (5, 50, 100 and 200 kHz) for both methods gave R(2) values ranging from 0.7 to 0.96 for the Cole approach and from 0.83 to 0.96 for the Kramers-Kronig approach; thus, both methods gave good results compared with the complete measurement results. From further statistical significance testing of the absolute value of the difference between measured and calculated phase angles, it was found that the Cole equation method gave significantly better agreement for the 50 and 100 kHz frequencies. In addition, the Cole equation method gives the four Cole parameters (R(0), R(∞), τ(z) and α) using measurements at frequencies up to 200 kHz while the Kramers-Kronig method used frequencies up to 500 kHz to reduce the effect of truncation on the calculated results. Both methods gave results that can be used for further bioimpedance calculations, thus improving the application potential of bioimpedance measurement results obtained using relatively inexpensive and portable measurement equipment.

  19. Assessment of novel digital and smartphone goniometers for measurement of canine stifle joint angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Kristin A; Kieves, Nina R; Hart, Juliette L; Foster, Sasha A; Jeffery, Unity; Duerr, Felix M

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate accuracy and reliability of 3 novel goniometers for measurement of canine stifle joint angles and compare the results with those obtained with a universal goniometer (UG). SAMPLE 8 pelvic limbs from 4 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Each limb was secured to a wooden platform at 3 arbitrarily selected fixed stifle joint angles. Goniometry was performed with 2 smartphone-based applications (novel goniometers A and B), a digital goniometer (novel goniometer C), and a UG; 3 evaluators performed measurements in triplicate for each angle with each device. Results were compared with stifle joint angle measurements on radiographs (used as a gold standard). Accuracy was determined by calculation of bias and total error, coefficients of variation were calculated to estimate reliability, and strength of linear association between radiographic and goniometer measurements was assessed by calculation of correlation coefficients. RESULTS Mean coefficient of variation was lowest for the UG (4.88%), followed by novel goniometers B (7.37%), A (7.57%), and C (12.71%). Correlation with radiographic measurements was highest for the UG (r = 0.97), followed by novel goniometers B (0.93), A (0.90), and C (0.78). Constant bias was present for all devices except novel goniometer B. The UG and novel goniometer A had positive constant bias; novel goniometer C had negative constant bias. Total error at 50° and 100° angles was > 5% for all devices. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE None of the devices accurately represented radiographically measured stifle joint angles. Additional veterinary studies are indicated prior to the use of novel goniometers in dogs.

  20. COMPARISON OF COBB ANGLE MEASUREMENT IN SCOLIOSIS BY RESIDENTS AND SPINE EXPERTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Ritter

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: The adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS is a spine deformity that occurs in both the coronal plane and the sagittal plane of patients between 10 and 17 years. The Cobb method is the most widely used to determine the angular value of scoliosis and it is defined as the "gold standard". The goal is to verify the reproducibility of the measured angles between orthopedic residents and spinal pathologies specialists, comparing the variability of the angles measured by professionals with greater and lesser experience. Method: A total of 10 radiographs of patients diagnosed with AIS were assessed. Radiographs were handed over to 7 orthopedists specialized in spine and 14 orthopedic residents. The measurement of the angles for each of the examiners was described using means and standard deviations and intraclass correlations were calculated, as well as the measure of repeatability, and Bland-Altman plots were designed with the results of the measurements of each group of examiners, according to experience, to assess the agreement/reproducibility of Cobb angle measurements. Results: Each examiner obtained a resulting average of 10 cases summation. In order to assess trends in variability of the measurements of the angles of each group graphs were plotted based on the arithmetic mean of each of the 10 cases by the total number of participants in the group versus the standard deviation in each case. Conclusion: There was a poor correlation (ICC=0.4 in the measurement of Cobb in both groups, demonstrating difficulties in the method, which cannot be overcome by the expertise.

  1. Angle Estimation of Simultaneous Orthogonal Rotations from 3D Gyroscope Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara Stančin

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  2. Angle estimation of simultaneous orthogonal rotations from 3D gyroscope measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stančin, Sara; Tomažič, Sašo

    2011-01-01

    A 3D gyroscope provides measurements of angular velocities around its three intrinsic orthogonal axes, enabling angular orientation estimation. Because the measured angular velocities represent simultaneous rotations, it is not appropriate to consider them sequentially. Rotations in general are not commutative, and each possible rotation sequence has a different resulting angular orientation. None of these angular orientations is the correct simultaneous rotation result. However, every angular orientation can be represented by a single rotation. This paper presents an analytic derivation of the axis and angle of the single rotation equivalent to three simultaneous rotations around orthogonal axes when the measured angular velocities or their proportions are approximately constant. Based on the resulting expressions, a vector called the simultaneous orthogonal rotations angle (SORA) is defined, with components equal to the angles of three simultaneous rotations around coordinate system axes. The orientation and magnitude of this vector are equal to the equivalent single rotation axis and angle, respectively. As long as the orientation of the actual rotation axis is constant, given the SORA, the angular orientation of a rigid body can be calculated in a single step, thus making it possible to avoid computing the iterative infinitesimal rotation approximation. The performed test measurements confirm the validity of the SORA concept. SORA is simple and well-suited for use in the real-time calculation of angular orientation based on angular velocity measurements derived using a gyroscope. Moreover, because of its demonstrated simplicity, SORA can also be used in general angular orientation notation.

  3. Comparative research on the methods for measuring the mode deflection angle of cylindrical resonator gyroscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Fan, Zhenfang; Wang, Dongya; Wang, Yanyan; Pan, Yao; Qu, Tianliang; Xu, Guangming

    2016-10-01

    The existence of mode deflection angle in the cylindrical resonator gyroscope (CRG) leads to the signal drift on the detecting nodes of the gyro vibration and significantly decreases the performance of the CRG. Measuring the mode deflection angle efficiently is the foundation of tuning for the imperfect cylindrical shell resonator. In this paper, an optical method based on the measuring gyroscopic resonator's vibration amplitude with the laser Doppler vibrometer and an electrical method based on measuring the output voltage of the electrodes on the resonator are both presented to measure the mode deflection angle. Comparative experiments were implemented to verify the methodology and the results show that both of the two methods could recognize the mode deflection angle efficiently. The precision of the optical method relies on the number and position of testing points distributed on the resonator. The electrical method with simple circuit shows high accuracy of measuring in a less time compared to the optical method and its error source arises from the influence of circuit noise as well as the inconsistent distribution of the piezoelectric electrodes.

  4. Development of a Stiffness-Angle Law for Simplifying the Measurement of Human Hair Stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, I K; Park, S C; Lee, Y R; Bin, S A; Hong, Y D; Eun, D; Lee, J H; Roh, Y S; Kim, B M

    2018-01-25

    This research examines the benefits of caffeine absorption on hair stiffness. In order to test hair stiffness, we have developed an evaluation method that is not only accurate, but also inexpensive. Our evaluation method for measuring hair stiffness culminated in a model, called the Stiffness-Angle Law, which describes the elastic properties of hair and can be widely applied to the development of hair care products. Small molecules (≤ 500 g/mol) such as caffeine can be absorbed into hair. A common shampoo containing 4% caffeine was formulated and applied to hair 10 times, after which the hair stiffness was measured. The caffeine absorption of the treated hair was observed using Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) with a Focal Plane Array (FPA) detector. Our evaluation method for measuring hair stiffness consists of a regular camera and a support for single strands of hair. After attaching the hair to the support, the bending angle of the hair was observed with a camera and measured. Then the hair strand was weighed. The stiffness of the hair was calculated based on our proposed Stiffness-Angle law using three variables: angle, weight of hair, and the distance the hair was pulled across the support. The caffeine absorption was confirmed by FTIR analysis. The concentration of amide bond in the hair certainly increased due to caffeine absorption. After caffeine was absorbed into the hair, the bending angle and weight of the hair changed. Applying these measured changes to the Stiffness-Angle law, it was confirmed that the hair stiffness increased by 13.2% due to caffeine absorption. The theoretical results using the Stiffness-Angle law agree with the visual examinations of hair exposed to caffeine, and also the known results of hair stiffness from a previous report. Our evaluation method combined with our proposed Stiffness-Angle Law effectively provides an accurate and inexpensive evaluation technique for measuring bending stiffness of human hair. This

  5. Measurements of the CKM angle gamma using B^+ --> D K^+ decays at LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00040960

    2013-01-01

    Of the three angles that make up the CKM matrix, the least well known is gamma. A precision measurement of this quantity is highly desirable as it forms one of the arbitrary parameters in the Standard Model. Moreover, this is the one angle of the CKM triangle that can be determined in channels that occur via tree-level decays. While loop-level processes could have sensitivity to physics beyond the standard model, tree level processes are expected to be unaltered. Hence a measurement of gamma in tree level processes leads to a standard model benchmark measurement against which other loop-driven measurements can be compared. The measurements described here are the latest developments from LHCb involving the decay B^+ --> D K^+, where the D meson is either a D^0 or a anti-D^0 and the final state of the D meson is accessible from either flavour state.

  6. Time-related contact angle measurements with human plasma on biomaterial surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakhorst, G; Van der Mei, HC; Van Oeveren, W; Spijker, HT; Busscher, HJ

    Axisymmetric drop shape analysis by profile (ADSA-P) was used to assess in time contact angle changes of human plasma drops placed on four different biomaterials. Results were related with conventional blood compatibility measurements: albumin adsorption, fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion.

  7. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C. Niek; Fu, Freddie H.

    2015-01-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral

  8. Measurement of the CKM angle alpha with the B-factories

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, A

    2006-01-01

    B-meson decays involving b->u transitions are sensitive to the Unitarity Triangle angle alpha (or phi_2). The B-factories at SLAC and KEK have made significant progress toward the measurement of alpha in recent years. This paper summarizes the results of the B-factories' constraints on alpha.

  9. Measurement of the CKM angle gamma from a combination of LHCb results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aaij, R.; Dufour, L.; Mulder, M; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Pellegrino, A.; Tolk, S.; van Veghel, M.

    2016-01-01

    A combination of measurements sensitive to the CKM angle gamma from LHCb is performed. The inputs are from analyses of time-integrated B+ -> DK+, B-0 -> DK*(0), B-0 -> DK+ pi(-) and B+ -> DK+ pi(+) pi(-) tree-level decays. In addition, results from a time-dependent analysis of B-s(0) -> (DsK

  10. Surface mobility and structural transitions of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) probed by dynamic contact angle measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Damme, H.S.; Hogt, A.H.; Feijen, Jan

    1986-01-01

    Dynamic contact angles and contact-angle hysteresis of a series of poly(n-alkyl methacrylates) (PAMA) were investigated using the Wilhelmy plate technique. The mobility of polymer surface chains, segments, and side groups affected the measured contact angles and their hysteresis. A model is

  11. The Availability of Radiological Measurement of Femoral Anteversion Angle: Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Ha Young; Shin, Heesuk; Lee, Eun Shin; Kong, Min Sik; Lee, Seung Hun; Lee, Chang Hee

    2016-04-01

    To assess the intra-rater and inter-rater reliability for measuring femoral anteversion angle (FAA) by a radiographic method using three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction (3D-CT). The study included 82 children who presented with intoeing gait. 3D-CT data taken between 2006 and 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. FAA was measured by 3D-CT. FAA is defined as the angle between the long axis of the femur neck and condylar axis of the distal femur. FAA measurement was performed twice at both lower extremities by each rater. The intra-rater and inter-rater reliability were calculated by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). One hundred and sixty-four lower limbs of 82 children (31 boys and 51 girls, 6.3±3.2 years old) were included. The ICCs of intra-rater measurement for the angle of femoral neck axis (NA) were 0.89 for rater A and 0.96 for rater B, and those of condylar axis (CA) were 0.99 for rater A and 0.99 for rater B, respectively. The ICC of inter-rater measurement for the angle of NA was 0.89 and that of CA was 0.92. By each rater, the ICCs of the intrarater measurement for FAA were 0.97 for rater A and 0.95 for rater B, respectively and the ICC of the inter-rater measurement for FAA was 0.89. The 3D-CT measures for FAA are reliable within individual raters and between different raters. The 3D-CT measures of FAA can be a useful method for accurate diagnosis and follow-up of femoral anteversion.

  12. Effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in composite plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hwanjeong; Choi, Sungho; Lissenden, Cliff J.

    2017-02-01

    Waves propagating in anisotropic media are subject to skewing effects due to the media having directional wave speed dependence, which is characterized by slowness curves. Likewise, the generation of second harmonics is sensitive to micro-scale damage that is generally not detectable from linear features of ultrasonic waves. Here, the effect of skew angle on second harmonic guided wave measurement in a transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate are numerically studied. The strain energy density function for a nonlinear transversely isotropic material is formulated in terms of the Green-Lagrange strain invariants. The guided wave mode pairs for cumulative second harmonic generation in the plate are selected in accordance with the internal resonance criteria - i.e., phase matching and non-zero power flux. Moreover, the skew angle dispersion curves for the mode pairs are obtained from the semi-analytical finite element method using the derivative of the slowness curve. The skew angles of the primary and secondary wave modes are calculated and wave propagation simulations are carried out using COMSOL. Numerical simulations revealed that the effect of skew angle mismatch can be significant for second harmonic generation in anisotropic media. The importance of skew angle matching on cumulative second harmonic generation is emphasized and the accompanying issue of the selection of internally resonant mode pairs for both a unidirectional transversely isotropic lamina and a quasi-isotropic laminate is demonstrated.

  13. Dual-angle, self-calibrating Thomson scattering measurements in RFX-MOD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giudicotti, L., E-mail: leonardo.giudicotti@unipd.it [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Department of Industrial Engineering, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy); Pasqualotto, R. [Department of Industrial Engineering, Padova University, Via Gradenigo 6/a, 35131 Padova (Italy); Fassina, A. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti, 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2014-11-15

    In the multipoint Thomson scattering (TS) system of the RFX-MOD experiment the signals from a few spatial positions can be observed simultaneously under two different scattering angles. In addition the detection system uses optical multiplexing by signal delays in fiber optic cables of different length so that the two sets of TS signals can be observed by the same polychromator. Owing to the dependence of the TS spectrum on the scattering angle, it was then possible to implement self-calibrating TS measurements in which the electron temperature T{sub e}, the electron density n{sub e} and the relative calibration coefficients of spectral channels sensitivity C{sub i} were simultaneously determined by a suitable analysis of the two sets of TS data collected at the two angles. The analysis has shown that, in spite of the small difference in the spectra obtained at the two angles, reliable values of the relative calibration coefficients can be determined by the analysis of good S/N dual‑angle spectra recorded in a few tens of plasma shots. This analysis suggests that in RFX-MOD the calibration of the entire set of TS polychromators by means of the similar, dual-laser (Nd:YAG/Nd:YLF) TS technique, should be feasible.

  14. Elevation angle alignment of quasi optical receiver mirrors of collective Thomson scattering diagnostic by sawtooth measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moseev, D.; Meo, Fernando; Korsholm, Søren Bang

    2012-01-01

    Localized measurements of the fast ion velocity distribution function and the plasma composition measurements are of significant interest for the fusion community. Collective Thomson scattering (CTS) diagnostics allow such measurements with spatial and temporal resolution. Localized measurements...... require a good alignment of the optical path in the transmission line. Monitoring the alignment during the experiment greatly benefits the confidence in the CTS measurements. An in situ technique for the assessment of the elevation angle alignment of the receiver is developed. Using the CTS diagnostic...

  15. Methods for calculating phase angle from measured whole body bioimpedance modulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordbotten, Bernt J.; Martinsen, Ørjan G.; Grimnes, Sverre

    2010-04-01

    Assuming the Cole equation we have developed a method to calculate the Cole parameters (R0, R∞, α, τZ) and the phase angle from four frequency measurements of impedance modulus values. The values obtained compare well with impedance measurements obtained using the Solatron 1294/1260 as obtained when making whole body measurements on five persons. We have also performed calculations using an algorithm based on the Kramers-Kronig approach. The results which are presented show that it is possible to obtain complete body impedance data combining relatively simple measurements with advanced calculation using a laptop. This extends the potential of portable equipment, since the measurements will require less instrumentation.

  16. Dynamic measurement of pennation angle of gastrocnemius muscles during contractions based on ultrasound imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Yongjin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle fascicle pennation angle (PA is an important parameter related to musculoskeletal functions, and ultrasound imaging has been widely used for measuring PA, but manually and frame by frame in most cases. We have earlier reported an automatic method to estimate aponeurosis orientation based on Gabor transform and Revoting Hough Transform (RVHT. Methods In this paper, we proposed a method to estimate the overall orientation of muscle fascicles in a region of interest, in order to complete computing the orientation of the other side of the pennation angle, but the side found by RVHT. The measurements for orientations of both fascicles and aponeurosis were conducted in each frame of ultrasound images, and then the dynamic change of pennation angle during muscle contraction was obtained automatically. The method for fascicle orientation estimation was evaluated using synthetic images with different noise levels and later on 500 ultrasound images of human gastrocnemius muscles during isometric plantarflexion. Results The muscle fascicle orientations were also estimated manually by two operators. From the results it’s found that the proposed automatic method demonstrated a comparable performance to the manual method. Conclusions With the proposed methods, ultrasound measurement for muscle pennation angles can be more widely used for functional assessment of muscles.

  17. Accuracy and repeatability of joint angles measured using a single camera markerless motion capture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz, Anne; Ye, Mao; Shapiro, Robert; Yang, Ruigang; Noehren, Brian

    2014-01-22

    Markerless motion capture systems have developed in an effort to evaluate human movement in a natural setting. However, the accuracy and reliability of these systems remain understudied. Therefore, the goals of this study were to quantify the accuracy and repeatability of joint angles using a single camera markerless motion capture system and to compare the markerless system performance with that of a marker-based system. A jig was placed in multiple static postures with marker trajectories collected using a ten camera motion analysis system. Depth and color image data were simultaneously collected from a single Microsoft Kinect camera, which was subsequently used to calculate virtual marker trajectories. A digital inclinometer provided a measure of ground-truth for sagittal and frontal plane joint angles. Joint angles were calculated with marker data from both motion capture systems using successive body-fixed rotations. The sagittal and frontal plane joint angles calculated from the marker-based and markerless system agreed with inclinometer measurements by motion capture system to accurately measure lower extremity kinematics and provide a first step in using this technology to discern clinically relevant differences in the joint kinematics of patient populations. © 2013 Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Effect of image resolution manipulation in rearfoot angle measurements obtained with photogrammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacco, I C N; Picon, A P; Ribeiro, A P; Sartor, C D; Camargo-Junior, F; Macedo, D O; Mori, E T T; Monte, F; Yamate, G Y; Neves, J G; Kondo, V E; Aliberti, S

    2012-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of image resolution manipulation on the photogrammetric measurement of the rearfoot static angle. The study design was that of a reliability study. We evaluated 19 healthy young adults (11 females and 8 males). The photographs were taken at 1536 pixels in the greatest dimension, resized into four different resolutions (1200, 768, 600, 384 pixels) and analyzed by three equally trained examiners on a 96-pixels per inch (ppi) screen. An experienced physiotherapist marked the anatomic landmarks of rearfoot static angles on two occasions within a 1-week interval. Three different examiners had marked angles on digital pictures. The systematic error and the smallest detectable difference were calculated from the angle values between the image resolutions and times of evaluation. Different resolutions were compared by analysis of variance. Inter- and intra-examiner reliability was calculated by intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The rearfoot static angles obtained by the examiners in each resolution were not different (P > 0.05); however, the higher the image resolution the better the inter-examiner reliability. The intra-examiner reliability (within a 1-week interval) was considered to be unacceptable for all image resolutions (ICC range: 0.08-0.52). The whole body image of an adult with a minimum size of 768 pixels analyzed on a 96-ppi screen can provide very good inter-examiner reliability for photogrammetric measurements of rearfoot static angles (ICC range: 0.85-0.92), although the intra-examiner reliability within each resolution was not acceptable. Therefore, this method is not a proper tool for follow-up evaluations of patients within a therapeutic protocol.

  19. Measurement of the Gamma Angle at the B Factories: Status and Prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zito, m.

    2005-02-08

    The methods to measure the angle{gamma} of the CKM unitarity triangle at the B factories are presented. Special emphasis is given to the measurement of sin(2{beta} + {gamma}) using the B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup {+-}} {pi}{sup {-+}} decays which has already produced results providing an interesting constraint in the {rho} - {eta} plane. Various methods using B {yields} DK decays are also presented.

  20. The Reliability of the Symax Method of Measuring the Radiographic Femoral Varus Angle

    OpenAIRE

    Allpass, Maja; Miles, James Edward; Schmökel, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the practicability of curved osteotomy to correct femoral varus in small breed dogs, and to assess the reliability of the Symax method of measuring the radiographic femoral varus angle (FVA). Methods: Eleven cadaveric femora plus one clinical case were included in this study. The FVA was measured using the Symax method on craniocaudal femoral radiographs. CORA principles were used to plan the curved osteotomy. Following osteotomy and planned correction of the FVA to 0º...

  1. Direct measurement of the beam deflection angle using the axial B-dot field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhong He

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Beam position monitors are an important diagnostics tool for particle accelerator operation and related beam dynamics research. The measurement of the beam deflection angle, or moving direction of a charged particle beam with respect to the beam pipe axis, can provide useful additional information. Beam monitors sensitive to the beam’s azimuthal B-dot field (sometimes referred as B dots are used to measure the displacement (position of the beam centroid, as the beam generates a dipole term of the azimuthal magnetic field. Similarly, a dipole term of the axial magnetic field will be generated by the beam moving in a direction not parallel to the axis of the beam pipe. In this paper, a new method using the axial B-dot field is presented to measure the beam deflection angle directly, including the theoretical background. Simulations using the MAFIA numerical code have been performed, demonstrating a good agreement to the new established analytical model.

  2. Measurement of Optimal Insertion Angle for Iliosacral Screw Fixation Using Three-Dimensional Computed Tomography Scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung-Jae; Jung, Chul-Young; Eastman, Jonathan G; Oh, Hyoung-Keun

    2016-06-01

    Percutaneous iliosacral screw fixation can provide stable fixation with a minimally invasive surgical technique for unstable posterior pelvic ring injuries. This surgical technique is not limited by cases of difficult fracture patterns, sacral dysplasia, and small sacral pedicles that can occur in Asians. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of the sacral dysplasia in the Korean population and determine the optimal direction of iliosacral screws by analyzing pelvic three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT) scans. One hundred adult patients who had pelvic 3D-CT scans were evaluated. The upper sacral morphology was classified into three groups, i.e., normal, transitional, and dysplastic groups; the cross-sectional area of the safe zone was measured in each group. S1 pedicle with a short width of more than 11 mm was defined as safe pedicle. The incidences of safe pedicles at different angles ranging from 0° to 15° were investigated in order to determine optimal angle for screw direction. The incidence of normal, transitional, and dysplastic group was 46%, 32%, and 22%, respectively. There were significant increases of the cross-sectional area of the safe zones by increasing the angles from 0° to 15° in all groups. The incidence of safe pedicles increased similar to the changes in cross-sectional area. The overall incidence of safe pedicles was highest at the 10° tilt angle. The incidence of sacral dysplasia in Koreans was 54%, which is higher than previous studies for Western populations. The cross-sectional area of the safe zone can be increased by anteromedial direction of the iliosacral screw. Considering the diversity of sacral morphology present in the Korean population, a tilt angle of 10° may be the safest angle.

  3. Technical Note: The effect of 2D excitation profile on T1 measurement accuracy using the variable flip angle method with an average flip angle assumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svedin, Bryant T; Parker, Dennis L

    2017-11-01

    To study the accuracy and precision of T 1 estimates using the Variable Flip Angle (VFA) method in 2D and 3D acquisitions. Excitation profiles were simulated using numerical implementation of the Bloch equations for Hamming-windowed sinc excitation pulses with different time-bandwidth products (TBP) of 2, 6, and 10 and for T 1 values of 295 ms and 1045 ms. Experimental data were collected in 5° increments from 5° to 90° for the same T 1 and TBP values. T 1 was calculated for every combination of flip angle with and without a correction for B 1 and slice profile variation. Calculations were also made for flat slice profile such as obtained in 3D acquisition. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to obtain T 1 measurement uncertainty. VFA T 1 measurements in 2D without correction can result in a 40-80% underestimation of true T 1 . Flip angle correction can reduce the underestimation, but results in accurate measurements of T 1 only within a narrow band of flip angle combinations. The narrow band of accuracy increases with TBP, but remains too narrow for any practical range of T 1 values or B 1 variation. Simulated noisy VFA T 1 measurements in 3D were accurate as long as the two angles chosen are on either side of the Ernst angle. Accurate T1 estimates from VFA 2D acquisitions are possible, but only a narrow range of T1 values within a narrow range of flip angle combinations can be accurately calculated using a 2D slice. Unless a better flip angle correction method is used, these results demonstrate that accurate measurements of T1 in 2D cannot be obtained robustly enough for practical use and are more likely obtained by a thin slab 3D VFA acquisition than from multiple-slice 2D acquisitions. VFA T 1 measurements in 3D are accurate for wide ranges of flip angle combinations and T 1 values. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  4. Influence nonstationary ionospheric signal of a signal on accuracy of measurements of angles of arrival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkarev, V.; Petrova, I.; Teplov, V.

    In the report we consider accuracy of angular measurements connected with nonstationary ionospheric signal. The estimation is made for the array antenna with small base. At measurements of angle of arrival in system with small base the mode separation is achieved due to Doppler shift. Therefore influence nonstationary ionospheric signal on the achievable spectral resolution, on mistakes of definition of frequencies and phases of close spectral components has the high profile. For numerical estimations the measurements of angles and phases executed in September - December 2001 on a measuring ionospheric complex of the Kazan State University are used. In the most part (92 %) received spectra are observed two and more components, frequently there are measurements with close spectral components. At definition of phases for close spectral lines with the help of window Fast Fourier Transformation there are distortions, which depend on differences of frequencies and phases of these spectral lines. The beams which have come from different directions, on different antennas will have a various phase difference. It will result in various extent of error in a phase definition, so and to a error in angle definition. The extent of error in angle definition is increased by reduction of a difference of frequencies of spectral components and increase of distinction in arrival directions of beams. We execute accounts for frequency 10 MHz and array antenna consisting of two independent perpendicular bases, crossed in a horizontal plane. Array antenna consists of 4 vertical dipole antennas (height of 10.7 m.), located on a circle by a diameter 15.6. Having compared the received dependence with results of processing of the experimentally received signals, it is possible to make a conclusion, that the accuracy of definition of corners about 1degree is for the system, described by the aerial, a limit at use of classical methods of spectral processing. For achievement of accuracy is

  5. A novel approach to joint flexion/extension angles measurement based on wearable UWB radios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Maskooki, Arash

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for measuring and monitoring human body joint angles, which uses wearable ultrawideband (UWB) transceivers mounted on body segments, is proposed and investigated. The model is based on providing a high ranging accuracy (intersensor distance) between a pair of transceivers placed on the adjacent segments of the joint center of rotation. The measured distance is then used to compute the joint angles based on the law of cosines. The performance of the method was compared with a flexible goniometer by simultaneously measuring joint flexion-extension angles at different angular velocities, ranging between 8 and 90(°) /s. The measurement errors were evaluated by the average differences between two sets of data (ranging from 0.8(°) for slow movement to 2.8(°) for fast movement), by standard deviation (ranging from 1.2(°) to 4.2(°) for various movement speeds) and by the Pearson correlation coefficient (greater than 0.99) which demonstrates the very good performance of the UWB-based approach. The experimental results have shown that the system has sufficient accuracy for clinical applications, such as rehabilitation.

  6. Large field distributed aperture laser semiactive angle measurement system design with imaging fiber bundles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chunyun; Cheng, Haobo; Feng, Yunpeng; Jing, Xiaoli

    2016-09-01

    A type of laser semiactive angle measurement system is designed for target detecting and tracking. Only one detector is used to detect target location from four distributed aperture optical systems through a 4×1 imaging fiber bundle. A telecentric optical system in image space is designed to increase the efficiency of imaging fiber bundles. According to the working principle of a four-quadrant (4Q) detector, fiber diamond alignment is adopted between an optical system and a 4Q detector. The structure of the laser semiactive angle measurement system is, we believe, novel. Tolerance analysis is carried out to determine tolerance limits of manufacture and installation errors of the optical system. The performance of the proposed method is identified by computer simulations and experiments. It is demonstrated that the linear region of the system is ±12°, with measurement error of better than 0.2°. In general, this new system can be used with large field of view and high accuracy, providing an efficient, stable, and fast method for angle measurement in practical situations.

  7. Measurement of the analysing power in proton–proton elastic scattering at small angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bagdasarian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The proton analysing power in p→p elastic scattering has been measured at small angles at COSY-ANKE at 796 MeV and five other beam energies between 1.6 and 2.4 GeV using a polarised proton beam. The asymmetries obtained by detecting the fast proton in the ANKE forward detector or the slow recoil proton in a silicon tracking telescope are completely consistent. Although the analysing power results agree well with the many published data at 796 MeV, and also with the most recent partial wave solution at this energy, the ANKE data at the higher energies lie well above the predictions of this solution at small angles. An updated phase shift analysis that uses the ANKE results together with the World data leads to a much better description of these new measurements.

  8. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  9. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  10. Adsorption of natural surfactants present in sea waters at surfaces of minerals: contact angle measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Boniewicz-Szmyt

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The wetting properties of solid mineral samples (by contact angles in original surfactant-containing sea water (Gulf of Gdańsk, Baltic were characterised under laboratory conditions on a large set (31 samples of well-classified stones of diverse hydrophobicity using the sessile drop (ADSA-P approach, captive bubble and inclined plate methods. An experimental relation between the static contact angle θeq and stone density ρ was obtained in the form θeq = Bρ + C, where B = 12.23 ± 0.92, C = - (19.17 ± 0.77, and r2 = 0.92. The histogram of θeq distribution for polished stone plates exhibited a multimodal feature indicating that the most abundant solid materials (hydrophilic in nature have contact angles θeq = 7.2, 10.7, 15.7 and 19.2º, which appear to be applicable to unspecified field stones as well. The contact angle, a pH-dependent quantity, appears to be a sensitive measure of stone grain size, e.g. granite. The captive bubble method gives reproducible results in studies of porous and highly hydrophilic surfaces such as stones and wood. The authors consider the adsorption of natural sea water surfactants on stone surfaces to be the process responsible for contact angle hysteresis. In the model, an equation was derived for determining the solid surface free energy from the liquid's surface tension γLV it also enabled the advancing θA and receding θR contact angles of this liquid to be calculated. Measurements of contact angle hysteresis Δθ (=θA - θR with surfactant-containing sea water and distilled water (reference on the same stone surfaces allowed the film pressure ΔΠ (1.22 to 8.80 mJ m-2, solid surface free energy ΔγS (-17.03 to -23.61 mJ m-2 and work done by spreading ΔWS (-1.23 to -11.52 mJ m-2 to be determined. The variability in these parameters is attributed to autophobing, an effect operative on a solid surface covered with an adsorptive layer of surfactants. The wetting behaviour of solid particles is of great

  11. LHCb: Measurement of the $\\gamma$ angle from tree decays at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Martín Sánchez, Alexandra

    2011-01-01

    An overview of plans for the measurement of $\\gamma$ at the LHCb experiment will be shown. The $\\gamma$ angle is the parameter of the CKM unitary triangle that is known least well. The LHCb experiment at the CERN LHC aims to perform precision b-physics and CP violation measurements, including improving the knowledge of $\\gamma$. Focus will be put on methods where B mesons decay at the tree level, within the Standard Model framework. The early data recorded by the experiment, from $pp$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 7 TeV, has allowed observations of the first signals of the B decay modes that will be used to perform this measurement.

  12. Hadronic $b$ decays to open charm and a measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$

    CERN Document Server

    Gligorov, V V

    2013-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a general purpose forward spectrometer at the Large Hadron Collider, which exploits the $\\approx$ 300 b cross-section for $b\\bar{b}$ production in 7 TeV proton-proton collisions to make precise measurements of b-hadron properties. The following results, all based on a $1 fb^{-1}$ data sample, are presented here : precision measurements of branching fractions and first observations of B meson decays to doubly charmed nal states; searches for rare B meson decays to open charm nal states; and a measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$.

  13. A measurement of Lorentz angle of radiation-hard pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleppo, Mario E-mail: mario.aleppo@mi.infn.it

    2001-06-01

    Silicon pixel detectors developed to meet LHC requirements were tested in a beam at CERN in the framework of the ATLAS collaboration. The experimental behaviour of irradiated and non-irradiated sensors in a magnetic field is discussed. The measurement of the Lorentz angle for these sensors at different operating conditions is presented. A simple model of the charge drift in silicon before and after irradiation is presented. The good agreement between the model predictions and the experimental results is shown.

  14. Measurements of the CKM Angle beta/phi_1 at B Factories

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Chih-hsiang

    2007-01-01

    We present a review of the measurements of the CKM angle beta (phi_1) by the BaBar and Belle experiments at the asymmetric-energy e+e- B Factories PEP-II and KEKB. The angle beta (phi_1) is measured by time-dependent CP analyses of neutral B meson decays in a Upsilon(4S)->BBbar system, where one B meson is fully reconstructed in a final state that can be accessed to by both B0 and B0bar, usually a CP eigenstate. This angle has been measured at a high precision through B0-> (ccbar)K0 channels. We also review another tree-dominated decay B0-> D(*)0 h0 (h0 = pi0, eta^{'}, omega); tree decays with penguin pollutions, B0->D(*)+-D-+$ and J/psi pi0; and penguin dominated modes, B0-> eta^'K0, K+K-K0, and KsKsKs. A hint of sin2beta (sin2phi_1) in charmless modes less than (ccbar)K0 modes still persists, which may be an indication of possible new physics entering the loop in the penguin diagram.

  15. [Analysis of directional reflectance properties of Lake Taihu using multi-angle measurements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun-sheng; Zhang, Bing; Shen, Qian; Zhang, Hao; Zhang, Fang-fang; Wang, Qiao

    2013-09-01

    The optical field above water is not isotropic. It is important to study the directional reflectance properties of the optical field above water, which is useful for building water quality parameters retrieving models by remote sensing. The bidirectional reflectance distribution function above oceanic waters has been well studied. However, the bidirectional reflectance distribution function above inland waters is still unresolved. The in-situ measured multi-angle remote sensing reflectance above water provides valuable data for studying directional reflectance properties above water. Unfortunately, such data is almost unavailable for inland waters due to the lack of of feasible instrument. Therefore, the authors designed and manufactured a specialized device to measure in situ multi-angle remote sensing reflectance involving with a spectrometer. We carried out an experiment in Lake Taihu to measure in situ multi-angle remote sensing reflectance data with this device. Then, we analyzed the directional properties of the remote sensing reflectance above water surface of Lake Taihu, and their effects on building water quality parameters retrieving models by remote sensing. Finally, we proposed a strategy for building water quality parameters retrieving models, which could reduce the directional effects of the optical field above inland waters.

  16. Method to measure the position offset of multiple light spots in a distributed aperture laser angle measurement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xiaoli; Cheng, Haobo; Xu, Chunyun; Feng, Yunpeng

    2017-02-20

    In this paper, an accurate measurement method of multiple spots' position offsets on a four-quadrant detector is proposed for a distributed aperture laser angle measurement system (DALAMS). The theoretical model is put forward, as well as the corresponding calculation method. This method includes two steps. First, as the initial estimation, integral approximation is applied to fit the distributed spots' offset function; second, the Boltzmann function is employed to compensate for the estimation error to improve detection accuracy. The simulation results attest to the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed method, and tolerance synthesis analysis of DALAMS is conducted to determine the maximum uncertainties of manufacturing and installation. The maximum angle error is less than 0.08° in the prototype distributed measurement system, which shows the stability and robustness for prospective applications.

  17. The Relation of Q Angle and Anthropometric Measures with Ankle Sprain; a Case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Zamani Moghadam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Since most studies on ankle sprain are medical and sports-related and not much epidemiologic and etiologic data from the general population exist in this field, the present study evaluates the relationship between Q angle and anthropometric measures with ankle sprain in the general population.Methods: In the present case-control study, all of the patients over 18 years age presenting to emergency departments (ED of two educational Hospitals, complaining from ankle sprain, were evaluated during more than 1 year. A checklist consisting of demographic data, height, weight, body mass index (BMI, and history of ankle sprain, as well as degree of Q angle was filled for all participants. The correlation of mentioned variables with incidence of ankle sprain was calculated using SPSS 22.Results: 300 patients with ankle sprain were evaluated (53.5% male. Mean age of the patients was 37.03 ± 14.20 years. Mean weight, height, and BMI were 71.71 ± 11.26 (43 – 114, 168.74 ± 8.63 (143 – 190 and 25.14 ± 3.19 (18.41 – 38.95, respectively. Mean Q angle of the patients was 12.78 ± 3.19 degrees (5 – 23. There was a significant correlation between weight (p < 0.001, BMI (p = 0.001, history of sprain (r: 0.26, p < 0.001 and Q angle (p = 0.002 with incidence of ankle sprain. In addition, there was a significant statistical correlation between weight (p = 0.031, BMI (p = 0.020 and Q angle (p = 0.004 with history of ankle sprain. In patients with a history of ankle sprain, Q angle was wider by about 2 degrees.Conclusion: It seems that the prevalence of ankle sprain directly correlates with high weight, BMI, and Q angle and is more prevalent in those with a history of sprain. Although the findings of the present study show a statistically significant correlation between these factors and ankle sprain, the correlation is not clinically significant.

  18. Utilization of an ultrasound beam steering angle for measurements of tissue displacement vector and lateral displacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chikayoshi Sumi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chikayoshi SumiDepartment of Information and Communication Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: A number of ultrasonic displacement/velocity measurement methods have been extensively developed for measurements of blood flow, tissue motion, and strain. Lateral modulation (LM methods have also been reported using steered, crossed beams, and these methods permit measurements of displacement vectors. In this report, a new beam steering method for the transmission and reception of ultrasound is proposed, which can enable measurements of lateral displacements and of arbitrary displacement vectors with a very high degree of accuracy. Because this beam steering method uses only a steering angle, this method is referred to as ASTA. With ASTA, the number of available methods to obtain a displacement vector measurement is limited to previously developed block-matching methods, such as the multidimensional cross-spectrum phase gradient method, and the multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM and the multidimensional Doppler method (MDM using a block-matching method (the methods using block matching are referred to as MAMb and MDMb, respectively. Being dependent on the measurement method, only a lateral displacement measurement can be made even if the methods are multidimensional, ie, previously developed MAM and MDM using a moving average and a mirror setting of the obtained steered beams, and one-dimensional (1D, such as an autocorrelation method. Considerations of beamforming schemes using LM and ASTA show that the simple ASTA beamforming method increases capabilities for real-time measurements and requires a small physical aperture when compared with LM. For lateral displacement measurements (eg, blood flow in a carotid artery, a lateral coordinate must correspond to the direction of the target’s lateral motion, and the steering angle used is as large as possible to increase the measurement accuracy

  19. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlak, Steffen M; Bruetzel, Linda K; Lipfert, Jan

    2017-04-01

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ2(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), where I(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transfer q; k and const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  20. SU-F-I-05: Dose Symmetry for CTDI Equivalent Measurements with Limited Angle CBCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, V [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (United States); McKenney, S [Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, DC (United States); Sunde, P [Radcal, Inc, Monrovia, CA (United States); Feng, W [New York Presbyterian Hospital, Tenafly, NJ (United States); Bakalyar, D [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: CTDI measurements, useful for characterizing the x-ray output for multi-detector CT (MDCT), require a 360° rotation of the gantry; this presents a problem for cone beam CT (CBCT) due to its limited angular rotation. The purpose of this work is to demonstrate a methodology for overcoming this limited angular rotation so that CTDI measurements can also be made on CBCT systems making it possible to compare the radiation output from both types of system with a common metric. Methods: The symmetry of the CTDI phantom allows a 360° CTDI measurement to be replaced with two 180° measurements. A pencil chamber with a real-time digitizer was placed at the center of the head phantom (16 cm, PMMA) and the resulting exposure measurement from a 180° acquisition was doubled. A pair of edge measurements, each obtained with the gantry passing through the same 180 arc, was obtained with the pencil chamber at opposite edges of the diameter of the phantom and then summed. The method was demonstrated on a clinical CT scanner (Philips, Brilliance6) and then implemented on an interventional system (Siemens, Axiom Artis). Results: The equivalent CTDI measurement agreed with the conventional CTDI measurement within 8%. The discrepancy in the two measurements is largely attributed to uncertainties in cropping the waveform to a 180°acquisition. (Note: Because of the reduced fan angle in the CBCT, CTDI is not directly comparable to MDCT values when a 32 cm phantom is used.) Conclusion: The symmetry-based CTDI measurement is an equivalent measurement to the conventional CTDI measurement when the fan angle is large enough to encompass the phantom diameter. This allows a familiar metric of radiation output to be employed on systems with a limited angular rotation.

  1. Research on environment correction algorithm in the minimum deviation angle method for refractive index measuring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chuan; Wang, Shanshan; Zhou, Siyu; Zhu, Qiudong

    2017-02-01

    This paper studies environment correction algorithm in the minimum deviation angle method for refractive index measuring. The principle equation of minimum deviation angle method, based on the refractive index of air and the absolute refractive index of glass specimens is derived. The environmental factors are analyzed which may affect the measurement results in the process of actual measurement. According to thermal characteristics equations of glass, absolute index of refraction of glass for certain material is related to temperature. According to the Edlén equation, refractive index of air is related to temperature, pressure, humidity and so on. Sometimes, the environmental factors are uncontrollable, refractive index will change over the environmental factors, including temperature, pressure and humidity. The correction algorithm of refractive index which modified the measurement results from the non-standard environmental conditions to standard conditions is perfected. It improves the correction accuracy. Taking H-ZK9B for example, the impact of environmental factors on the refractive index is analyzed adopting controlling variable method. The need for environmental factors correction in different accuracy requirements is given. To verify the correction method, two sets of measured refractive index data of the same glass are corrected which measured under different environmental factors. The difference between the two sets of data is less than 1×10-6 with the correction.

  2. Winter precipitation particle size distribution measurement by Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Gwo-Jong; Kleinkort, Cameron; Bringi, V. N.; Notaroš, Branislav M.

    2017-12-01

    From the radar meteorology viewpoint, the most important properties for quantitative precipitation estimation of winter events are 3D shape, size, and mass of precipitation particles, as well as the particle size distribution (PSD). In order to measure these properties precisely, optical instruments may be the best choice. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) is a relatively new instrument equipped with three high-resolution cameras to capture the winter precipitation particle images from three non-parallel angles, in addition to measuring the particle fall speed using two pairs of infrared motion sensors. However, the results from the MASC so far are usually presented as monthly or seasonally, and particle sizes are given as histograms, no previous studies have used the MASC for a single storm study, and no researchers use MASC to measure the PSD. We propose the methodology for obtaining the winter precipitation PSD measured by the MASC, and present and discuss the development, implementation, and application of the new technique for PSD computation based on MASC images. Overall, this is the first study of the MASC-based PSD. We present PSD MASC experiments and results for segments of two snow events to demonstrate the performance of our PSD algorithm. The results show that the self-consistency of the MASC measured single-camera PSDs is good. To cross-validate PSD measurements, we compare MASC mean PSD (averaged over three cameras) with the collocated 2D Video Disdrometer, and observe good agreements of the two sets of results.

  3. Alignment-Free, Self-Calibrating Elbow Angles Measurement Using Inertial Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Philipp; Begin, Marc-Andre; Schauer, Thomas; Seel, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Due to their relative ease of handling and low cost, inertial measurement unit (IMU)-based joint angle measurements are used for a widespread range of applications. These include sports performance, gait analysis, and rehabilitation (e.g., Parkinson's disease monitoring or poststroke assessment). However, a major downside of current algorithms, recomposing human kinematics from IMU data, is that they require calibration motions and/or the careful alignment of the IMUs with respect to the body segments. In this article, we propose a new method, which is alignment-free and self-calibrating using arbitrary movements of the user and an initial zero reference arm pose. The proposed method utilizes real-time optimization to identify the two dominant axes of rotation of the elbow joint. The performance of the algorithm was assessed in an optical motion capture laboratory. The estimated IMU-based angles of a human subject were compared to the ones from a marker-based optical tracking system. The self-calibration converged in under 9.5 s on average and the rms errors with respect to the optical reference system were 2.7° for the flexion/extension and 3.8° for the pronation/supination angle. Our method can be particularly useful in the field of rehabilitation, where precise manual sensor-to-segment alignment as well as precise, predefined calibration movements are impractical.

  4. Measurement of contact angle of copper-bearing shales using the captive bubble method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danuta Szyszka

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the measurement of contact angle of the natural surface of copper-bearing shales immersed in solutions of selected reagents of various concentrations using captive bubble method. It demonstrates that the copper-bearing shales coming from Legnicko-Głogwski Copper Region develop natural hydrophobic properties in surfactant (frother solutions and its hydrophobicity decreases from 82⁰ contact angle in distilled water, 78⁰ in C4E1 solutions, 76⁰ in C4E2 solutions, to 75⁰ in dodecylphenol solutions. These data show that the addition of frother causes a decrease of shale hydrophobicity but it can reduce stability of the thin film between the grain and air bubble. It means that flotation of copperbearing shales in the presence of frother will only be possible provided specific concentrations.

  5. Capacitance and phase-angle measurement for estimating moisture content in nuts and grain nondestructively

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandala, Chari V.; Butts, Chris L.

    2006-03-01

    The design and performance of an electrical instrument that would be useful in estimating the moisture content (mc) of agricultural products such as grain and nuts nondestructively and rapidly is described here. The instrument, here after called the impedance meter, determines the capacitance and phase angle of a sample of the produce (about 100 g), filling the space between two parallel-plate electrodes, at two frequencies 1 and 5 MHz. The measured values were used in a semi-empirical equation to obtain the mc of the sample. In this paper, capacitance and phase angle were determined for in-shell peanuts in the moisture range between 6 and 25% by the impedance meter, and their moisture contents were calculated. The calculated values were compared with the mc values obtained by the standard air-oven method. The estimated values were in good agreement with the standard values. This method is applicable to produce such as corn, wheat and pecans also.

  6. A Novel Method to Measure the Tentorial Angle and the Implications on Surgeries of the Pineal Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Hasan R; Jean, Walter C

    2017-12-16

    There is no standard way to define the angle of the tentorium. The current trend to use the Twining line to define this angle has significant pitfalls. The goal of the current study was to provide a new and accurate way to measure the tentorial angle and demonstrate its impact on surgeries of the pineal region. A new technique (n-angle) to measure the tentorial angle was introduced using the floor of the fourth ventricle and the torcula. Comparisons with older techniques were made to illustrate reliability. Midline sagittal MR images were used to measure the tentorial angle in 240 individuals to obtain population-based data. A cohort of 8 patients who underwent either the infratentorial or the transtentorial approach to the pineal or upper vermian region were examined in search of correlations between tentorial angle and surgical approach. The data in this study showed that the Twining line technique understates the tentorial angle in people with low-lying torcula. The n-angle is more reliable in reflecting the true steepness of the tentorium regardless of torcula position. On average, men have slightly steeper tentoriums. In the clinical cohort, all patients who underwent infratentorial surgery had tentorial angles angles >67°. The n-angle provides a reliable and accurate way to describe the slope of the tentorium. The population-based average of 60° may be a useful measurement to influence the choice of surgical approach, either under or through the tentorium, to the pineal region. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of quadriceps angle measurements using short-arm and long-arm goniometers: correlation with MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Draper, Christine E; Chew, Kelvin T L; Wang, Roberta; Jennings, Fabio; Gold, Garry E; Fredericson, Michael

    2011-02-01

    To compare the reliability of quadriceps-angle (Q-angle) measurements performed using a short-arm goniometer and a long-arm goniometer and to assess the accuracy of goniometer-based Q-angle measurements compared with anatomic Q angles derived from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). An intra- and interobserver reliability study. University hospital. Eighteen healthy subjects with no history of knee pain, trauma, or prior surgery were examined. Two physicians, blinded to subject identity, measured Q angles on both knees of all subjects using 2 goniometers: (1) a short-arm goniometer and (2) a long-arm goniometer. Q angles were derived from axial MRIs of the subjects' hip and knees. The intra- and interobserver reliabilities of each goniometer were assessed using the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The comparison between clinical and MRI-based Q angles was assessed by using the ICC and a paired t-test. Intra- and interobserver reliabilities of the long-arm goniometer (intraobserver ICC, 0.92; interobserver ICC, 0.88) were better than those of the short-arm goniometer (intraobserver ICC, 0.78; interobserver ICC, 0.56). Although both goniometers measured Q angles that were moderately correlated to the MRI-based measurements (ICC, 0.40), the clinical Q angles were underestimated compared with the MRI-based anatomic Q angles (P goniometer, methods to improve the accuracy of clinical Q-angle measurements are needed. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Standardized method for the measurement of Grabb's line and clival-canal angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Jonathan E; Bookland, Markus; Moote, Douglas; Cebulla, Catherine

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE Grabb's line-the perpendicular distance from the basion-C2 line (pB-C2)-is a widely used radiographic measurement with significant clinical implications in patients with a complex Chiari malformation. Rigorous demonstration of the reproducibility of this measurement has not previously been reported. The authors report a standardized measurement technique with excellent inter- and intrarater reliability on T1-weighted sagittal MRI. METHODS The authors developed a standardized measurement technique that included specifications of midline slice selection, landmark and reference line definitions, and measurement technique on T1-weighted sagittal images. Twenty MR images were reviewed by 2 pediatric neurosurgeons, 1 pediatric radiologist, and 1 undergraduate student. Measurements were performed using the technique specified on 2 separate occasions. Intrarater and interrater reliabilities were calculated using the intraclass correlation coefficient. RESULTS A combined interrater reliability of 0.879 was achieved for the pB-C2, and 0.916 for the clival-canal angle, another measure of interest in patients with complex Chiari malformations. Intrarater reliability for these measurements exceeded 0.858 for all 4 reviewers. CONCLUSIONS Grabb's line-the pB-C2-can be measured with excellent reliability using a standardized measurement protocol. Individual clinicians and collaborative databases should consider using validated measurement techniques to guide clinical decision making in patients with craniocervical junction pathology.

  9. The method of contact angle measurements and estimation of work of adhesion in bioleaching of metals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matlakowska Renata

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our method for the measurement of contact angles on the surface of minerals during the bioleaching process because the standard deviation obtained in our measurements achieved unexpectedly low error. Construction of a goniometer connected with a specially prepared computer program allowed us to repeat measurements several times over a short time course, yielding excellent results. After defining points on the outline of the image of a drop and its baseline as well of the first approximation of the outline of the drop, an iterative process is initiated that is aimed at fitting the model of the drop and baseline. In turn, after defining the medium for which measurements were made, the work of adhesion is determined according to Young-Dupré equation. Calculations were made with the use of two methods named the L-M and L-Q methods.

  10. A proposal for the measurement of the weak mixing angle at the HL-LHC

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    A proposal is presented for measuring the weak mixing angle using the forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan dimuon events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 14~\\mathrm{TeV}$ with the CMS detector at the high luminosity LHC (HL-LHC). In addition to the increased luminosity, the upgraded part of the muon system extends the pseudorapidity coverage of the CMS experiment to $|\\eta| < 2.8$ for muons. Since the measurement has higher sensitivity in this pseudorapidity region, both the statistical and systematic uncertainties will be significantly reduced. To estimate the increased potential for this measurement we use a Monte Carlo data sample of pp events corresponding to a luminosity of $3000~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and compare to the recent CMS measurements at $\\sqrt{s} = 8~\\mathrm{TeV}$.

  11. Characterization of the Intrinsic Water Wettability of Graphite Using Contact Angle Measurements: Effect of Defects on Static and Dynamic Contact Angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozbial, Andrew; Trouba, Charlie; Liu, Haitao; Li, Lei

    2017-01-31

    Elucidating the intrinsic water wettability of the graphitic surface has increasingly attracted research interests, triggered by the recent finding that the well-established hydrophobicity of graphitic surfaces actually results from airborne hydrocarbon contamination. Currently, static water contact angle (WCA) is often used to characterize the intrinsic water wettability of graphitic surfaces. In the current paper, we show that because of the existence of defects, static WCA does not necessarily characterize the intrinsic water wettability. Freshly exfoliated graphite of varying qualities, characterized using atomic force microscopy and Raman spectroscopy, was studied using static, advancing, and receding WCA measurements. The results showed that graphite of different qualities (i.e., defect density) always has a similar advancing WCA, but it could have very different static and receding WCAs. This finding indicates that defects play an important role in contact angle measurements, and the static contact angle does not always represent the intrinsic water wettability of pristine graphite. On the basis of the experimental results, a qualitative model is proposed to explain the effect of defects on static, advancing, and receding contact angles. The model suggests that the advancing WCA reflects the intrinsic water wettability of pristine (defect-free) graphite. Our results showed that the advancing WCA for pristine graphite is 68.6°, which indicates that graphitic carbon is intrinsically mildly hydrophilic.

  12. Repeatability, reproducibility, agreement characteristics of 2 SD-OCT devices for anterior chamber angle measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akil, Handan; Dastiridou, Anna; Marion, Kenneth; Francis, Brian; Chopra, Vikas

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the agreement, reproducibility, and repeatability of 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) devices in Schwalbe's line (SL)-based anterior chamber angle parameters. The inferior anterior chamber angle of 65 eyes from 65 participants (33 right eyes and 32 left eyes) were scanned twice with the Nidek RS 3000 Advanced SD-OCT and Cirrus SD-OCT. SL angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL trabecular-iris-space area (SL-TISA) were graded by masked certified graders at the Doheny Image Reading Center. The mean SL-AOD/SL-TISA was 617.3 ± 237.9 µm/0.211 ± 0.086 mm 2 for the Cirrus and 633.7 ± 219.3 µm/0.218 ± 0.080 mm 2 for the Nidek RS 3000 Advanced SD-OCT. The repeatability (intraclass correlation coefficients [ICCs] >0.936) and intergrader reproducibility (ICCs >0.915) in SL-AOD and SL-TISA with Cirrus OCT were excellent. The repeatability (ICCs >0.948) and intergrader reproducibility (ICCs >0.709) in SL-AOD and SL-TISA with the Nidek RS 3000 Advanced SD-OCT were moderate to good. Moderate agreement between the 2 devices was also documented with a mean difference of -15.3 (limits of agreement [LoA] -246.5 to 277.1) mm for SL-AOD and 0.006 (LoA -0.096 to 0.108) mm in SL-TISA. Both devices were able to provide consistent angle measurements, but repeatability and reproducibility were better in Cirrus SD-OCT than in Nidek RS 3000 Advanced SD-OCT. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Plane Angles: why must the radian have a measure equal to the unity?

    OpenAIRE

    Rocco, Héctor Oscar Di; UNCPBA – Argentina

    2009-01-01

    In this article is discussed a subject that generates controversies inthe teaching of Physics: why the radian must be the correct unitfor the measurements of plane angles. The answer is, in ouropinion, in the concepts of Calculus, where the analytical notionsare independent of the geometrical ones. http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7941.2009v26n1p136En este artículo se trata de un asunto que genera polémicas en la enseñanza de la Física: por qué el radián debe tener asignada una medida igual ...

  14. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-01-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, m...

  15. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering Measurements of Magnetic Cluster Sizes in Magnetic Recording Disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toney, Michael F

    2003-06-17

    We describe Small Angle Neutron Scattering measurements of the magnetic cluster size distributions for several longitudinal magnetic recording media. We find that the average magnetic cluster size is slightly larger than the average physical grain size, that there is a broad distribution of cluster sizes, and that the cluster size is inversely correlated to the media signal-to-noise ratio. These results show that intergranular magnetic coupling in these media is small and they provide empirical data for the cluster-size distribution that can be incorporated into models of magnetic recording.

  16. Beyond the alpha angle: Alternative measurements for quantifying cam-type deformities in femoroacetabular impingement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrmann, Christine; Rosskopf, Andrea B; Pfirrmann, Christian W A; Sutter, Reto

    2015-10-01

    To assess alternative measurements to the alpha angle as a tool for distinguishing between symptomatic and asymptomatic cam-type deformities of the femoral head. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examinations of 106 individuals (age 20-50 years) from a previous study on the alpha angle were analyzed, including 53 femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) patients with cam-type deformities and 53 age-/sex-matched asymptomatic volunteers. On radially reformatted MR images two independent radiologists assessed femoral offset and femoral distance (FD) around the femoral head circumference. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) were obtained. The mean offset was smallest in the anterosuperior position for both readers: reader 1 measured 6.2 ± 2.9 mm (standard deviation) in patients and 7.3 ± 1.8 mm in volunteers (P = 0.002, patients vs. volunteers); reader 2 measured 6.1 ± 3.3 mm in patients and 7.1 ± 2.9 mm in volunteers (P = 0.111). The mean FD was highest in the anterosuperior position for reader 1 (patients 3.3 ± 1.4 mm; volunteers 1.7 ± 2.2 mm; P volunteers 2.0 ± 1.5 mm; P = 0.001). Overall interobserver agreement (ICC) was good (offset 0.657/FD 0.632). ROC analysis for offset measurements showed the largest area under the curve in anterosuperior position for reader 1 (0.666) and in posterosuperior position for reader 2 (0.612). For FD measurements, the area under the curve was largest in anterosuperior position for both readers (0.793/0.798). While FD measurements were superior to offset measurements and showed similar results to the alpha angle, neither FD nor offset measurements are a reliable tool for discrimination between FAI patients with cam-type deformities and asymptomatic volunteers. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A measurement of Lorentz angle and spatial resolution of radiation hard silicon pixel sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Seidel, S.C.; Ciocio, A.; Einsweiler, K.; Gilchriese, M.; Joshi, A.; Kleinfelder, S.; Marchesini, R.; Milgrome, O.; Palaio, N.; Pengg, F.; Richardson, J.; Zizka, G.; Ackers, M.; Fischer, P.; Keil, M.; Meuser, S.; Stockmanns, T.; Treis, J.; Wermes, N.; Goessling, C.; Huegging, F.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Barberis, D.; Beccherle, R.; Cervetto, M.; Darbo, G.; Gagliardi, G.; Gemme, C.; Morettini, P.; Netchaeva, P.; Osculati, B.; Parodi, F.; Rossi, L.; Dao, K.; Fasching, D.; Blanquart, L.; Breugnon, P.; Calvet, D.; Clemens, J.-C.; Delpierre, P.; Hallewell, G.; Laugier, D.; Mouthuy, T.; Rozanov, A.; Trouilleau, C.; Valin, I.; Aleppo, M.; Andreazza, A.; Caccia, M.; Lari, T.; Meroni, C.; Ragusa, F.; Troncon, C. E-mail: clara.troncon@mi.infn.itclara.troncon@cern.ch; Vegni, G.; Rohe, T.; Boyd, G.R.; Severini, H.; Skubic, P.L.; Snow, J.; Sicho, P.; Tomasek, L.; Vrba, V.; Holder, M.; Lipka, D.; Ziolkowski, M.; Cauz, D.; D' Auria, S.; Del Papa, C.; Grassman, H.; Santi, L.; Becks, K.H.; Gerlach, P.; Grah, C.; Gregor, I.; Harenberg, T.; Linder, C

    2002-04-01

    Silicon pixel sensors developed by the ATLAS collaboration to meet LHC requirements and to withstand hadronic irradiation to fluences of up to 10{sup 15} n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} have been evaluated using a test beam facility at CERN providing a magnetic field. The Lorentz angle was measured and found to alter from 9.0 deg. before irradiation, when the detectors operated at 150 V bias at B=1.48 T, to 3.1 deg. after irradiation and operating at 600 V bias at 1.01 T. In addition to the effect due to magnetic field variation, this change is explained by the variation of the electric field inside the detectors arising from the different bias conditions. The depletion depths of irradiated sensors at various bias voltages were also measured. At 600 V bias 280 {mu}m thick sensors depleted to {approx}200 {mu}m after irradiation at the design fluence of 1x10{sup 15} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and were almost fully depleted at a fluence of 0.5x10{sup 15} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The spatial resolution was measured for angles of incidence between 0 deg. and 30 deg. The optimal value was found to be better than 5.3 {mu}m before irradiation and 7.4 {mu}m after irradiation.

  18. Phase angle and impedance measurements for nondestructive moisture content determination of in-shell peanuts using a cylindrical sample holder

    Science.gov (United States)

    A simple, low cost instrument that measures impedance and phase angle was used along with a parallel-plate capacitance system to estimate the moisture content (MC) of yellow corn. A sample of corn weighing about 100g was placed between the parallel-plate electrodes and the impedance and phase angle...

  19. Attempted eyelid closure affects intraocular pressure measurement in open-angle glaucoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal, Karim N; Gürses-Ozden, RabIa; Liebmann, Jeffrey M; Ritch, Robert

    2002-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of attempted eyelid closure on intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements in normal-tension (NTG) and high-tension (HTG) open-angle glaucoma patients. Prospective clinical trial. Forty randomly selected eyes of 40 patients underwent corneal pachymetry and IOP measurements using both Goldmann applanation tonometry and Tono-pen XL (Mentor, Inc., Norwell, Massachusetts, USA). Intraocular pressure was measured by the same examiner holding the eyelids open, both with and without the subject simultaneously attempting forced eyelid closure. Subjects were seated during all measurements and waited 5 minutes between measurements with each instrument; the order of measurement was randomized. Twenty NTG and 20 HTG eyes were enrolled. The mean age was 63.0 +/- 13.0 years (range, 31-80 years). The average corneal thickness was 540 +/- 32 microm (range, 480-608 microm) in NTG patients and 552 +/- 40 microm (range, 449-610 microm) in HTG patients (P =.07, analysis of variance [ANOVA]). Using Goldmann applanation tonometry, IOP measurement in eyes with NTG increased by 3.9 +/- 2.0 mm Hg with attempted eyelid closure (P pen XL, IOP measurements increased 4.2 +/- 2.7 mm Hg (P pen XL, measurements increased 4.5 +/- 2.0 mm Hg (P tonometry is a significant and common source of error in eyes with glaucoma and may influence the clinical management and decision-making in the treatment of NTG and HTG.

  20. The influence of age, sex, population group, and dentition on the mandibular angle as measured on a South African sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oettlé, Anna C; Becker, Piet J; de Villiers, Elzabe; Steyn, Maryna

    2009-08-01

    The mandibular angle is measured in physical anthropological assessments of human remains to possibly assist with the determination of sex and population affinity. The purpose of this investigation was to establish how the mandibular angle changes with age and loss of teeth among the sexes in South African population groups. The angles of 653 dried adult mandibles from the Pretoria Bone Collection were measured with a mandibulometer. Males and females of both South African whites and blacks were included. To compensate for imbalances in numbers among subgroups, type IV ANOVA testing was applied. No association was found between age and angle within either of the populations, within sexes, or within dentition groups. The angle was the most obtuse in individuals without molars and with an uneven distribution of molars, and most acute in the group with an even distribution of molars on both sides. Statistically significant differences (P population groups and sexes in the overall sample as well as in the subgroup with absent molar teeth (P = 0.003 for sex, males more acute angle, and P = 0.001 for population group, blacks more acute angle), although a very large overlap existed. No significant differences could be demonstrated between the sexes or populations within the subgroups with molars. We concluded that the loss of molars, especially if complete or uneven, has a considerable effect on the mandibular angle. In the assessment of human remains, the mandibular angle is not very usable in determining sex.

  1. Droplet characteristic measurement in Fourier interferometry imaging and behavior at the rainbow angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briard, Paul; Saengkaew, Sawitree; Wu, Xuecheng; Meunier-Guttin-Cluzel, Siegfried; Chen, Linghong; Cen, Kefa; Gréhan, Gérard

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the possibility of measuring the three-dimensional (3D) relative locations and diameters of a set of spherical particles and discusses the behavior of the light recorded around the rainbow angle, an essential step toward refractive index measurements. When a set of particles is illuminated by a pulsed incident wave, the particles act as spherical light wave sources. When the pulse duration is short enough to fix the particle location (typically about 10 ns), interference fringes between these different spherical waves can be recorded. The Fourier transform of the fringes divides the complex fringe systems into a series of spots, with each spot characterizing the interference between a pair of particles. The analyses of these spots (in position and shape) potentially allow the measurement of particle characteristics (3D relative position, particle diameter, and particle refractive index value).

  2. Interfacial shape and contact-angle measurement of transparent samples with confocal interference microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, D G; Ovryn, B

    2000-04-01

    A model has been developed that predicts the effective optical path through a thick, refractive specimen on a reflective substrate, as measured with a scanning confocal interference microscope equipped with a high-numerical-aperture objective. Assuming that the effective pinhole of the confocal microscope has an infinitesimal diameter, only one ray in the illumination bundle (the magic ray) contributes to the differential optical path length (OPL). A pinhole with finite diameter, however, allows rays within a small angular cone centered on the magic ray to contribute to the OPL. The model was incorporated into an iterative algorithm that allows the measured phase to be corrected for refractive errors by use of an a priori estimate of the sample profile. The algorithm was validated with a reflected-light microscope equipped with a phase-shifting laser-feedback interferometer to measure the interface shape and the 68 degrees contact angle of a silicone-oil drop on a coated silicon wafer.

  3. An Architecture for Measuring Joint Angles Using a Long Period Fiber Grating-Based Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Perez-Ramirez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of signal filters in a real-time form requires a tradeoff between computation resources and the system performance. Therefore, taking advantage of low lag response and the reduced consumption of resources, in this article, the Recursive Least Square (RLS algorithm is used to filter a signal acquired from a fiber-optics-based sensor. In particular, a Long-Period Fiber Grating (LPFG sensor is used to measure the bending movement of a finger. After that, the Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM technique allows us to classify the corresponding finger position along the motion range. For these measures to help in the development of an autonomous robotic hand, the proposed technique can be straightforwardly implemented on real time platforms such as Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA or Digital Signal Processors (DSP. Different angle measurements of the finger’s motion are carried out by the prototype and a detailed analysis of the system performance is presented.

  4. The measurement and modelling of light scattering by phytoplankton cells at narrow forward angles

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacCallum, Iain; Cunningham, Alex; McKee, David

    2004-07-01

    A procedure has been devised for measuring the angular dependence of light scattering from suspensions of phytoplankton cells at forward angles from 0.25° to 8°. The cells were illuminated with a spatially-filtered laser beam and the angular distribution of scattered light measured by tracking a photodetector across the Fourier plane of a collecting lens using a stepper-motor driven stage. The procedure was calibrated by measuring scattering from latex bead suspensions with known size distributions. It was then used to examine the scattering from cultures of the unicellular algae Isochrysis galbana (4 µm × 5 µm), Dunaliella primolecta (6 µm × 7 µm) and Rhinomonas reticulata (5 µm × 11 µm). The results were compared with the predictions of Mie theory. Excellent agreement was obtained for spherical particles. A suitable choice of spherical-equivalent scattering parameters was required to enable reasonable agreement within the first diffraction lobe for ellipsoidal particles.

  5. Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at angle of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debry, Benoit; Komerath, Narayanan M.; Liou, Shiuh-Guang; Caplin, J.; Lenakos, Jason

    1992-01-01

    Measurements of the unsteady vortex flow over a wing-body at high angles of attack were carried out on a generic test model of a pointed body of revolution with double-delta wings. Vortex patterns and trajectories were quantified from digitized laser sheet video images. The velocity-field measurements showed the jetlike flow in the unburst vortex, unsteady secondary structures below the primary core, and then the reversed flow in the burst vortex. Results of hot-film anemometry revealed the presence of peak frequencies in the velocity spectra over the wing and near the trailing edge, which varied linearly with freestream speed and increased as the measurement point moved upstream. Good Strouhal correlation was found with previous results obtained for a smaller generic wing-body model.

  6. The Reliability of the Symax Method of Measuring the Radiographic Femoral Varus Angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Allpass, Maja; Miles, James Edward; Schmökel, Hugo

    2014-01-01

    . The FVA was measured using the Symax method on craniocaudal femoral radiographs. CORA principles were used to plan the curved osteotomy. Following osteotomy and planned correction of the FVA to 0º, the femur was stabilized with a 2.4 mm locking plate and screws (cadavers) or 2.0mm SOP plate (patient). FVA......Objective: To determine the practicability of curved osteotomy to correct femoral varus in small breed dogs, and to assess the reliability of the Symax method of measuring the radiographic femoral varus angle (FVA). Methods: Eleven cadaveric femora plus one clinical case were included in this study...... method for measuring FVA offers satisfactory repeatability and reproducibility. A curved osteotomy used according to CORA principles can practicably correct FVA in small breed dogs. Clinical Relevance: Curved osteotomy is potentially easier to perform on especially small breed dogs and presents other...

  7. Alpha Angle Measurements in Healthy Adult Volunteers Vary Depending on the MRI Plane Acquisition Used.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golfam, Mohammad; Di Primio, Luigia A; Beaulé, Paul E; Hack, Kalesha; Schweitzer, Mark E

    2017-03-01

    It has been shown that cam deformities are located at a more anterosuperior location than was previously described. To establish, in a large group of asymptomatic participants, the normative range of the alpha angle in the anterosuperior location in both the oblique axial and radial views of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. In 197 asymptomatic participants (394 asymptomatic hips) with a mean age of 29.4 years (range, 21.4-50.6 years), T1-weighted MRI scans were studied. The anterosuperior alpha angle measurement was performed by 2 observers using a previously described methodology and also using the radial view. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was determined for interobserver and intraobserver reliability. Descriptive statistics, the Student t test, correlation studies, and the Bland-Altman technique were used for data analysis. The ICC for interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility was 0.74 (good agreement) and 0.84 (very good agreement), respectively. Anterosuperiorly, the mean (±SD) alpha angles in the oblique axial and radial views were 45.11° ± 8.52° and 50.30° ± 7.91°, respectively ( P < .0001). The upper limits of the 95% reference interval for the oblique axial and radial views were 63° and 66°, respectively. In the oblique axial view, the mean (±SD) alpha angle for male participants was 48.3° ± 7.5° compared with 42.6° ± 6.2° for female participants ( P < .0001), and in the radial view, it was 53.0° ± 7.1° compared with 48.1° ± 5.6°, respectively ( P < .0001). Linear regression analysis demonstrated an insignificant relationship between age and alpha angle, regardless of the imaging plane ( r2 = 0.06). We suggest using a higher threshold of 63° (in the oblique axial view) and 66° (in the radial view) at the 1:30 clockface position for the diagnosis of a cam-type deformity. This is significantly higher than 50° to 55° at the 3-o'clock position traditionally used based

  8. Direct Measurement of Static and Dynamic Contact Angles Using a Random Micromodel Considering Geological CO2 Sequestration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Jafari

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The pore-level two-phase fluids flow mechanism needs to be understood for geological CO2 sequestration as a solution to mitigate anthropogenic emission of carbon dioxide. Capillary pressure at the interface of water–CO2 influences CO2 injectability, capacity, and safety of the storage system. Wettability usually measured by contact angle is always a major uncertainty source among important parameters affecting capillary pressure. The contact angle is mostly determined on a flat surface as a representative of the rock surface. However, a simple and precise method for determining in situ contact angle at pore-scale is needed to simulate fluids flow in porous media. Recent progresses in X-ray tomography technique has provided a robust way to measure in situ contact angle of rocks. However, slow imaging and complicated image processing make it impossible to measure dynamic contact angle. In the present paper, a series of static and dynamic contact angles as well as contact angles on flat surface were measured inside a micromodel with random pattern of channels under high pressure condition. Our results showed a wide range of pore-scale contact angles, implying complexity of the pore-scale contact angle even in a highly smooth and chemically homogenous glass micromodel. Receding contact angle (RCA showed more reproducibility compared to advancing contact angle (ACA and static contact angle (SCA for repeating tests and during both drainage and imbibition. With decreasing pore size, RCA was increased. The hysteresis of the dynamic contact angle (ACA–RCA was higher at pressure of one megapascal in comparison with that at eight megapascals. The CO2 bubble had higher mobility at higher depths due to lower hysteresis which is unfavorable. CO2 bubbles resting on the flat surface of the micromodel channel showed a wide range of contact angles. They were much higher than reported contact angle values observed with sessile drop or captive bubble tests on a

  9. Justification and implementation of the coordinate method among potentially possible precise methods for measuring angles between axes of small-angle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudryavtsev, M. D.

    2017-08-01

    A series of studies devoted to the theoretical justification and development of methods and tools for angular measurements based on the use of multiple sources of optical beams with a small angular aperture is continued. The source used in this study is a holographic prism: a fluorite single crystal with a system of superimposed holograms recorded in its bulk, which generates a series of diffracted small-angle beams in the form of a flat fan under illumination by a reference laser. This fan has a high spatial stability, including constancy of angles between any pair of fan beams in a wide range of external conditions. Based on the previously introduced notion of an effective beam axis, potential exact methods for measuring angles between fan beams are considered, and a coordinate method using a coordinate measuring machine and a CCD recorder is substantiated and implemented. The accuracy of the proposed method is analyzed. It is shown that its errors can potentially be reduced to a level of 1″ or even less.

  10. Automatic anatomical calibration for IMU-based elbow angle measurement in disturbed magnetic fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laidig Daniel

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Inertial Measurement Units (IMUs are increasingly used for human motion analysis. However, two major challenges remain: First, one must know precisely in which orientation the sensor is attached to the respective body segment. This is commonly achieved by accurate manual placement of the sensors or by letting the subject perform tedious calibration movements. Second, standard methods for inertial motion analysis rely on a homogeneous magnetic field, which is rarely found in indoor environments. To address both challenges, we introduce an automatic calibration method for joints with two degrees of freedom such as the combined radioulnar and elbow joint. While the user performs arbitrary movements, the method automatically identifies the sensor-to-segment orientations by exploiting the kinematic constraints of the joint. Simultaneously, the method identifies and compensates the influence of magnetic disturbances on the sensor orientation quaternions and the joint angles. In experimental trials, we obtain angles that agree well with reference values from optical motion capture. We conclude that the proposed method overcomes mounting and calibration restrictions and improves measurement accuracy in indoor environments. It therefore improves the practical usability of IMUs for many medical applications.

  11. Effects of enamel abrasion, salivary pellicle, and measurement angle on the optical assessment of dental erosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lussi, Adrian; Bossen, Anke; Höschele, Christoph; Beyeler, Barbara; Megert, Brigitte; Meier, Christoph; Rakhmatullina, Ekaterina

    2012-09-01

    The present study assessed the effects of abrasion, salivary proteins, and measurement angle on the quantification of early dental erosion by the analysis of reflection intensities from enamel. Enamel from 184 caries-free human molars was used for in vitro erosion in citric acid (pH 3.6). Abrasion of the eroded enamel resulted in a 6% to 14% increase in the specular reflection intensity compared to only eroded enamel, and the reflection increase depended on the erosion degree. Nevertheless, monitoring of early erosion by reflection analysis was possible even in the abraded eroded teeth. The presence of the salivary pellicle induced up to 22% higher reflection intensities due to the smoothing of the eroded enamel by the adhered proteins. However, this measurement artifact could be significantly minimized (pmeasurement angles from 45 to 60 deg did not improve the sensitivity of the analysis at late erosion stages. The applicability of the method for monitoring the remineralization of eroded enamel remained unclear in a demineralization/remineralization cycling model of early dental erosion in vitro.

  12. A Precision Low-Energy Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastromarino, P.

    2005-01-26

    The E-158 experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) measures the parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at low Q{sup 2}. This asymmetry, whose Standard Model prediction is roughly -150 parts per billion (ppb), is directly proportional to (1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}), where {theta}{sub W} is the weak mixing angle. Measuring this asymmetry to within 10% provides an important test of the Standard Model at the quantum loop level and probes for new physics at the TeV scale. The experiment employs the SLAC 50 GeV electron beam, scattering it off a liquid hydrogen target. A system of magnets and collimators is used to isolate and focus the Moeller scattering events into an integrating calorimeter. The electron beam is generated at the source using a strained, gradient-doped GaAs photocathode, which produces roughly 5 x 10{sup 11} electrons/pulse (at a beam rate of 120 Hz) with {approx} 80% longitudinal polarization. The helicity of the beam can be rapidly switched, eliminating problems associated with slow drifts. Helicity-correlations in the beam parameters (charge, position, angle and energy) are minimized at the source and corrected for using precision beam monitoring devices.

  13. Consideration of generated beam angles increases the accuracy of ultrasonic displacement measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumi C

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Chikayoshi Sumi, Yuuki Takanashi, Kento IchimaruDepartment of Information and Communication Sciences, Faculty of Science and Technology, Sophia University, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: The development of practical ultrasonic (US tissue displacement measurement methods increases the number of available and useful applications of displacement/strain measurements that can be made (eg, various blood flow measurements and measurements of tissue motion in organs such as the heart, liver, and so forth. Previously developed lateral modulation (LM methods with a multidimensional autocorrelation method (MAM or multidimensional Doppler method (MDM and a steering angle method (ASTA with lateral Doppler method produced accurate displacement vector and lateral displacement measurements, respectively. Such measurements cannot be obtained using only a conventional Doppler technique. Another new method has also been reported, using multiple crossed beams (MCBs to obtain high-accuracy displacement vector measurements; that is, a displacement vector is synthesized using accurately measured axial displacements with previously developed multidimensional displacement measurement methods, including the one-dimensional autocorrelation method (1D AM with a multidimensional moving average (MA, together with conventional rotation processing of global echo data or a coordinate system (ie, a global echo rotation referred to as r method by the negative value of the steering angles used in beamforming. However, in real-world applications, directivities of transmission and reception apertures, scattering, reflection, and attenuation affect the direction and properties of US beams used for conventional axial displacement measurements employing beamforming methods such as a conventional nonsteered, steered, or secta beam, and they also affect ASTA and MCB methods. In this report, to improve accuracy in the measurements of an arbitrary directional displacement and a displacement vector

  14. Three-dimensional reconstruction method for measuring the knee valgus angle of the femur in northern Chinese adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Chen-yu; Xiao, Jian-lin; Zhu, Lan-yu; Li, Xue-zhou; Qin, Yan-guo; Gao, Zhong-li

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a method for measuring the knee valgus angle from the anatomical and mechanical axes on three-dimensional reconstruction imaging models, and to use this method for estimating an average knee valgus angle value for northern Chinese adults. Computed tomographic angiography data in DICOM format for 128 normal femurs from 64 adult subjects were chosen for analysis. After the femur images were subjected to three-dimensional reconstruction, the deepest point in the intercondylar notch (point A), the midpoint of the medullary cavity 20 cm above the knee-joint line (point B), and the landmark of the femoral head rotation center (point C) were identified on each three-dimensional model. The knee valgus angle was defined as the angle enclosed by the distal femoral anatomical axis (line AB) and the femoral mechanical axis (line AC). The average (mean±SD) of knee valgus angle for the 128 femurs was 6.20°±1.20° (range, 3.05° to 10.64°). Significant positive correlations were found between the knee valgus angles of the right and left sides and between the knee valgus angle and age. During total knee arthroplasty, choosing a valgus cut angle of approximately 6° may achieve a good result in reestablishing the natural mechanical alignment of the lower extremity for patients of northern Chinese ethnicity. Larger valgus cut angles should be chosen for older patients.

  15. Three-dimensional reconstruction method for measuring the knee valgus angle of the femur in northern Chinese adults*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tong; Wang, Chen-yu; Xiao, Jian-lin; Zhu, Lan-yu; Li, Xue-zhou; Qin, Yan-guo; Gao, Zhong-li

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a method for measuring the knee valgus angle from the anatomical and mechanical axes on three-dimensional reconstruction imaging models, and to use this method for estimating an average knee valgus angle value for northern Chinese adults. Computed tomographic angiography data in DICOM format for 128 normal femurs from 64 adult subjects were chosen for analysis. After the femur images were subjected to three-dimensional reconstruction, the deepest point in the intercondylar notch (point A), the midpoint of the medullary cavity 20 cm above the knee-joint line (point B), and the landmark of the femoral head rotation center (point C) were identified on each three-dimensional model. The knee valgus angle was defined as the angle enclosed by the distal femoral anatomical axis (line AB) and the femoral mechanical axis (line AC). The average (mean±SD) of knee valgus angle for the 128 femurs was 6.20°±1.20° (range, 3.05° to 10.64°). Significant positive correlations were found between the knee valgus angles of the right and left sides and between the knee valgus angle and age. During total knee arthroplasty, choosing a valgus cut angle of approximately 6° may achieve a good result in reestablishing the natural mechanical alignment of the lower extremity for patients of northern Chinese ethnicity. Larger valgus cut angles should be chosen for older patients. PMID:25091990

  16. A Comparison of Static and Dynamic Measures of Lower Limb Joint Angles in Cycling: Application to Bicycle Fitting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bini Rodrigo Rico

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Configuration of bicycle components to the cyclist (bicycle fitting commonly uses static poses of the cyclist on the bicycle at the 6 o’clock crank position to represent dynamic cycling positions. However, the validity of this approach and the potential use of the different crank position (e.g. 3 o’clock have not been fully explored. Therefore, this study compared lower limb joint angles of cyclists in static poses (3 and 6 o’clock compared to dynamic cycling. Methods. Using a digital camera, right sagittal plane images were taken of thirty cyclists seated on their own bicycles mounted on a stationary trainer with the crank at 3 o’clock and 6 o’clock positions. Video was then recorded during pedalling at a self-selected gear ratio and pedalling cadence. Sagittal plane hip, knee and ankle angles were digitised. Results. Differences between static and dynamic angles were large at the 6 o’clock crank position with greater mean hip angle (4.9 ± 3°, smaller knee angle (8.2 ± 5° and smaller ankle angle (8.2 ± 5.3° for static angles. Differences between static and dynamic angles (< 1.4° were trivial to small for the 3 o’clock crank position. Conclusions. To perform bicycle fitting, joint angles should be measured dynamically or with the cyclist in a static pose at the 3 o’clock crank position.

  17. Femoral rotation unpredictably affects radiographic anatomical lateral distal femoral angle measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To describe the effects of internal and external femoral rotation on radiographic measurements of the anatomical lateral distal femoral angle (a-LDFA) using two methods for defining the anatomical proximal femoral axis (a-PFA). Methods: Digital radiographs were obtained of 14 right...... femora at five degree intervals from 10° external rotation to 10° internal rotation. Using freely available software, a-LDFA measurements were made using two different a-PFA by a single observer on one occasion. Results: Mean a-LDFA was significantly greater at 10° external rotation than at any other...... rotation. The response of individual femora to rotation was unpredictable, although fairly stable within ±5° of zero rotation. Mean a-LDFA for the two a-PFA methods differed by 1.5°, but were otherwise similarly affected by femoral rotation. Clinical significance: If zero femoral elevation can be achieved...

  18. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from a combination of LHCb results

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Arnau Romeu, Joan; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Babuschkin, Igor; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baker, Sophie; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Baszczyk, Mateusz; Batozskaya, Varvara; Batsukh, Baasansuren; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belous, Konstantin; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Betti, Federico; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bezshyiko, Iaroslava; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Boettcher, Thomas; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borgheresi, Alessio; Borghi, Silvia; Borisyak, Maxim; Borsato, Martino; Bossu, Francesco; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Camboni, Alessandro; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Campora Perez, Daniel Hugo; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chatzikonstantinidis, Georgios; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombs, George; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Costa Sobral, Cayo Mar; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Serio, Marilisa; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dungs, Kevin; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Ebert, Marcus; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Fazzini, Davide; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Fernandez Prieto, Antonio; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fini, Rosa Anna; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Franco Lima, Vinicius; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; Garcia Martin, Luis Miguel; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gizdov, Konstantin; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gorelov, Igor Vladimirovich; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Gruberg Cazon, Barak Raimond; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; Hatch, Mark; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hombach, Christoph; Hopchev, P H; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hushchyn, Mikhail; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jiang, Feng; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Kariuki, James Mwangi; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Koliiev, Serhii; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kosmyntseva, Alena; Kozachuk, Anastasiia; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemaitre, Florian; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Maltsev, Timofei; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Merli, Andrea; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Mogini, Andrea; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mulder, Mick; Mussini, Manuel; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Pais, Preema Rennee; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Pastore, Alessandra; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petrov, Aleksandr; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pikies, Malgorzata; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Pomery, Gabriela Johanna; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Poslavskii, Stanislav; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Remon Alepuz, Clara; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Rollings, Alexandra Paige; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sadykhov, Elnur; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schellenberg, Margarete; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubert, Konstantin; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Simone, Saverio; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefko, Pavol; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stemmle, Simon; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tilley, Matthew James; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Toriello, Francis; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Traill, Murdo; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tully, Alison; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valassi, Andrea; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Venkateswaran, Aravindhan; Vernet, Maxime; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voneki, Balazs; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Wark, Heather Mckenzie; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xing, Zhou; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zarebski, Kristian Alexander; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhang, Yu; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhu, Xianglei; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-12-19

    A combination of measurements sensitive to the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from LHCb is performed. The inputs are from analyses of time-integrated $B^{+}\\rightarrow DK^+$, $B_{d}^{0} \\rightarrow D K^{*0}$, $B_{d} \\rightarrow D K^+ \\pi^-$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow D K^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ tree-level decays. In addition, results from a time-dependent analysis of $B_{s}^{0} \\rightarrow D_{s}^{\\mp}K^{\\pm}$ decays are included. The combination yields $\\gamma = (72.2^{+6.8}_{-7.3})^\\circ$, where the uncertainty includes systematic effects. The 95.5% confidence level interval is determined to be $\\gamma \\in [55.9,85.2]^\\circ$. A second combination is investigated, also including measurements from $B^{+} \\rightarrow D \\pi^+$ and $B^{+} \\rightarrow D \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+$ decays, which yields compatible results.

  19. Measuring the angle-dependent photoionization cross section of nitrogen using high-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Makhija, Varun; Le, Anh-Thu; Troß, Jan; Mondal, Sudipta; Jin, Cheng; Kumarappan, Vinod; Trallero-Herrero, Carlos

    2013-10-01

    We exploit the relationship between high harmonic generation (HHG) and the molecular photorecombination dipole to extract the molecular-frame differential photoionization cross section (PICS) in the extreme ultraviolet (XUV) for molecular nitrogen. A shape resonance and a Cooper-type minimum are reflected in the pump-probe time delay measurements of different harmonic orders, where high-order rotational revivals are observed in N2. We observe the energy- and angle-dependent Cooper minimum and shape resonance directly in the laboratory-frame HHG yield by achieving a high degree of alignment, ≥0.8. The interplay between PICS and rotational revivals is confirmed by simulations using the quantitative rescattering theory. Our method of extracting molecular-frame structural information points the way to similar measurements in more complex molecules.

  20. Wearable Conductive Fiber Sensors for Multi-Axis Human Joint Angle Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asada H Harry

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion is one that finds many applications, especially in the medical and rehabilitation fields. There is a lack of acceptable devices available to perform such measurements in the field in a reliable and non-intrusive way over a long period of time. The purpose of this study was therefore to develop such a wearable joint monitoring sensor capable of continuous, day-to-day monitoring. Methods A novel technique of incorporating conductive fibers into flexible, skin-tight fabrics surrounding a joint is developed. Resistance changes across these conductive fibers are measured, and directly related to specific single or multi-axis joint angles through the use of a non-linear predictor after an initial, one-time calibration. Because these sensors are intended for multiple uses, an automated registration algorithm has been devised using a sensitivity template matched to an array of sensors spanning the joints of interest. In this way, a sensor array can be taken off and put back on an individual for multiple uses, with the sensors automatically calibrating themselves each time. Results The wearable sensors designed are comfortable, and acceptable for long-term wear in everyday settings. Results have shown the feasibility of this type of sensor, with accurate measurements of joint motion for both a single-axis knee joint and a double axis hip joint when compared to a standard goniometer used to measure joint angles. Self-registration of the sensors was found to be possible with only a few simple motions by the patient. Conclusion After preliminary experiments involving a pants sensing garment for lower body monitoring, it has been seen that this methodology is effective for monitoring joint motion of the hip and knee. This design therefore produces a robust, comfortable, truly wearable joint monitoring device.

  1. A Precision Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering at Low Q^2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, G.

    2005-01-28

    The electroweak theory has been probed to a high level of precision at the mass scale of the Z{sup 0} through the joint contributions of LEP at CERN and the SLC at SLAC. The E158 experiment at SLAC complements these results by measuring the weak mixing angle at a Q{sup 2} of 0.026 (GeV/c){sup 2}, far below the weak scale. The experiment utilizes a 48 GeV longitudinally polarized electron beam on unpolarized atomic electrons in a target of liquid hydrogen to measure the parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} in Moeller scattering. The tree-level prediction for A{sup PV} is proportional to 1-4 sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}. Since sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} {approx} 0.25, the effect of radiative corrections is enhanced, allowing the E158 experiment to probe for physics effects beyond the Standard Model at the TeV scale. This work presents the results from the first two physics runs of the experiment, covering data collected in the year 2002. The parity-violating asymmetry A{sup PV} was measured to be A{sup PV} = -158 ppb {+-} 21 ppb (stat) {+-} 17 ppb (sys). The result represents the first demonstration of parity violation in Moeller scattering. The observed value of A{sup PV} corresponds to a measurement of the weak mixing angle of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2380 {+-} 0.0016(stat) {+-} 0.0013(sys), which is in good agreement with the theoretical prediction of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2385 {+-} 0.0006 (theory).

  2. Prevalence of increased alpha angles as a measure of cam-type femoroacetabular impingement in youth ice hockey players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippon, Marc J; Ho, Charles P; Briggs, Karen K; Stull, Justin; LaPrade, Robert F

    2013-06-01

    It has been reported that relative to other sports participants, ice hockey players suffer from cam-type femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) in higher numbers. α angles have been reported to increase with the likelihood of symptomatic FAI. It is unclear how prevalent increased α angles, commonly associated with cam FAI, are in asymptomatic young ice hockey players. There would be a higher prevalence of α angles associated with cam FAI in youth ice hockey players than in a non-hockey-playing (skier) youth control group. Cohort study; Level of evidence, 3. A total of 61 asymptomatic youth ice hockey players (aged 10-18 years) and 27 youth skiers (controls) (aged 10-18 years) underwent a clinical hip examination consisting of the flexion/abduction/external rotation (FABER) distance test, impingement testing, and measurement of hip internal rotation. The hip α angle was measured by magnetic resonance imaging, and labral tears and articular cartilage lesions were documented. Hockey players were grouped according to their USA Hockey classification as peewees (ages 10-12 years), bantams (ages 13-15 years), and midgets (ages 16-19 years). Overall, ice hockey players had significantly higher α angles than did the control group, and hockey players had a significant correlation between increased age and increased α angles, while the control group did not. In the ice hockey group, 75% had an α angle of ≥55°, while in the skier group, 42% had an α angle of ≥55° (P Hockey players were 4.5 times more likely to have an α angle commonly associated with cam impingement than skiers. Midget players had the highest risk of increased α angles. Even at young ages, ice hockey players have a greater prevalence of α angles associated with cam FAI than do skier-matched controls. Properties inherent to ice hockey likely enhance the development of a bony overgrowth on the femoral neck, leading to cam FAI.

  3. Quantitative evaluation of statistical errors in small-angle X-ray scattering measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlak, Steffen M.; Bruetzel, Linda K.; Lipfert, Jan (LMU)

    2017-03-29

    A new model is proposed for the measurement errors incurred in typical small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) experiments, which takes into account the setup geometry and physics of the measurement process. The model accurately captures the experimentally determined errors from a large range of synchrotron and in-house anode-based measurements. Its most general formulation gives for the variance of the buffer-subtracted SAXS intensity σ2(q) = [I(q) + const.]/(kq), whereI(q) is the scattering intensity as a function of the momentum transferq;kand const. are fitting parameters that are characteristic of the experimental setup. The model gives a concrete procedure for calculating realistic measurement errors for simulated SAXS profiles. In addition, the results provide guidelines for optimizing SAXS measurements, which are in line with established procedures for SAXS experiments, and enable a quantitative evaluation of measurement errors.

  4. Precision measurements of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2017-01-01

    The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) angle $\\gamma$ is still the least known angle of the Unitarity Triangle, and is the only one that can be accessed exclusively through tree-level $B$-meson decays. Its precise determination is of crucial importance to identify possible effects beyond the Standard Model in global CKM fits. Powerful constraints on $\\gamma$ are obtained from the analysis of $B^{\\pm} \\to D^{0} K^{\\pm}$ decays, where the $D^{0}$ meson is reconstructed in the $K^+K^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states; the latest results using the Run-1 (2011 and 2012) and Run-2 (2015 and 2016) LHCb datasets are presented. The measurement of $B^{\\pm} \\to D^{*0}K^{\\pm}$ decays using a novel partial reconstruction method is also presented, where both $D^{*0} \\to D^0\\pi^0$ and $D^{*0} \\to D^0\\gamma$ decays are considered. These world’s best results contribute to the ultimate goal of reaching degree-level precision on $\\gamma$, via the exploitation of all possible decay modes and techniques.&a...

  5. Measurement of the pseudoscalar mixing angle and $\\eta^{\\prime}$ gluonium content with KLOE detector

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, S; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocchetta, S; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Murtas, F; Müller, S; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Xu, G; al, et

    2007-01-01

    We have measured the ratio $R_{\\phi}=BR(\\phi \\to \\eta^{\\prime} \\gamma)/BR(\\phi \\to \\eta \\gamma)$ by looking for the radiative decays $\\phi \\to \\eta^{\\prime} \\gamma$ and $\\phi \\to \\eta \\gamma$ in the final states $\\pi^+\\pi^-$ 7 $\\gamma$'s and 7 $\\gamma$'s respectively, in a sample of $\\sim 1.3\\cdot 10^{9}$ $\\phi$ mesons produced at the Frascati $\\phi$-factory. We obtain $R_{\\phi}=(4.77\\pm0.09_{stat}\\pm0.19_{sys})\\cdot 10^{-3}$ from which we derive $BR(\\phi \\to \\eta^{\\prime} \\gamma)=(6.20\\pm0.11_{stat}\\pm0.25_{sys})\\cdot 10^{-5}$. In the hypothesis of no gluonium content we extract the pseudoscalar mixing angle in the quark-flavor basis $\\phi_P=(41.4\\pm0.3_{stat}\\pm0.7_{sys}\\pm0.6_{th})^{\\circ}$. Combining the value of $R_{\\phi}$ with other constraints, we estimate the gluonium fractional content of $\\eta^{\\prime}$ meson as $Z^2 = 0.14\\pm0.04$ and the mixing angle $\\phi_P = (39.7\\pm0.7)^{\\circ}$.

  6. Human soleus sarcomere lengths measured using in vivo microendoscopy at two ankle flexion angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuefeng; Delp, Scott L

    2016-12-08

    The forces generated by the soleus muscle play an important role in standing and locomotion. The lengths of the sarcomeres of the soleus affect its force-generating capacity, yet it is unknown how sarcomere lengths in the soleus change as a function of ankle flexion angle. In this study, we used microendoscopy to measure resting sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion and 20° dorsiflexion in 7 healthy individuals. Mean sarcomere lengths at 10° plantarflexion were 2.84±0.09µm (mean±S.E.M.), near the optimal length for sarcomere force generation. Sarcomere lengths were 3.43±0.09µm at 20° dorsiflexion, indicating that they were longer than optimal length when the ankle was in dorsiflexion and the muscle was inactive. Our results indicate a smaller sarcomere length difference between two ankle flexion angles compared to estimates from musculoskeletal models and suggest why these models frequently underestimate the force-generating capacity of the soleus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The angle of insonation for Doppler measurements of left and right ventricular output in newborns and infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karin Sprenkelder

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: The angle of insonation can be an important determinant of Doppler-derived cardiac output measurements. It is known anatomically that there is a larger insonation angle for the left vs. right ventricular outflow area, but variability and calculated angles have not been described. The aim of this study was to describe the anatomical position of the left and right outflow areas and determine the geometric angle of insonation in newborn and infants. Methods: Magnetic resonance images of infants ≤ 2 years of age were explored. For each outflow, the position was determined relative to an anatomical reference point. To obtain the angle of insonation, the angle between the outflow and the hypothetical position of the ultrasound probe beam was calculated. Results: Forty-five patients were included with a median age of 71 days old. Anatomically, the left outflow is directed almost vertically upwards in sagittal images with a 40º angle to the right in coronal images. The right outflow is directed 53º upwards in sagittal images with a slight angle to the left on axial images. The median (range angle of insonation for the left ventricular outflow area using the apical or subcostal view was 40° (22-51 and 28° (7-47 respectively, and 23° (2-40 for the right ventricular outflow area using the parasternal view. Conclusions: The median geometric angle of insonation of the left outflow was larger than the right. The variation within the group was large, but in each individual case the angle for left was larger than for right.

  8. [Measurement of viscoelastic corneal parameters (corneal hysteresis) in patients with primary open angle glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, B; Hager, A; Kutschan, A; Wiegand, W

    2008-10-01

    The ocular response analyzer (ORA) uses an air-pressure-triggered, dynamic, bi-directional corneal applanation method to measure biomechanical parameters of the cornea. Corneal hysteresis (CH) is defined as the difference in intraocular pressure recorded during inward and outward applanation. CH is therefore an indicator for the viscoelastic properties of the cornea. CH was recorded in non-glaucoma patients (80 eyes) as well as in patients with primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, 82 eyes). The correlation between CH and central corneal thickness (CCT) was analyzed. Mean CH was 10.6+/-2.2 mmHg in the non-glaucoma group and 9.3+/-2.2 mmHg in patients with POAG (pcorneal parameters with a significant decrease in corneal hysteresis. A positive correlation between CH and CCT, which was seen in the non-glaucoma group could not be detected in the POAG group.

  9. On measurement of acoustic pulse arrival angles using a vertical array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, D. V.

    2017-11-01

    We consider a recently developed method to analyze the angular structure of pulsed acoustic fields in an underwater sound channel. The method is based on the Husimi transform that allows us to approximately link a wave field with the corresponding ray arrivals. The advantage of the method lies in the possibility of its practical realization by a vertical hydrophone array crossing only a small part of the oceanic depth. The main aim of the present work is to find the optimal parameter values of the array that ensure good angular accuracy and sufficient reliability of the algorithm to calculate the arrival angles. Broadband pulses with central frequencies of 80 and 240 Hz are considered. It is shown that an array with a length of several hundred meters allows measuring the angular spectrum with an accuracy of up to 1 degree. The angular resolution is lowered with an increase of the sound wavelength due to the fundamental limitations imposed by the uncertainty relation.

  10. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home. PMID:26583101

  11. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourcou, Quentin; Fleury, Anthony; Diot, Bruno; Franco, Céline; Vuillerme, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS). Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home.

  12. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Mourcou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM. Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balance. Its clinical evaluation is commonly based on the assessment of the joint position sense (JPS. Both ROM and JPS measurements require estimating angles through goniometer, scoliometer, laser-pointer, and bubble or digital inclinometer. With the arrival of Smartphones, these costly clinical tools tend to be replaced. Beyond evaluation, maintaining and/or improving joint functional and proprioceptive abilities by training with physical therapy is important for long-term management. This review aims to report Smartphone applications used for measuring and improving functional and proprioceptive abilities. It identifies that Smartphone applications are reliable for clinical measurements and are mainly used to assess ROM and JPS. However, there is lack of studies on Smartphone applications which can be used in an autonomous way to provide physical therapy exercises at home.

  13. A measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from studies of $DK\\pi$ Dalitz plots

    CERN Document Server

    Craik, Daniel; Kreps, Michal

    Various measurements of quantities relating to $B^0_{(s)} \\to D K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp$ decays are reported from analyses building towards a measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$. The first observation of the decay $B^0_s \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^-\\pi^+$ is reported. Based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $1.0 \\,{\\rm fb}^{-1}$ of $pp$ collision data recorded by the LHCb detector, the branching fraction relative to that of the topologically similar decay $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-$ is measured to be $$ \\frac{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0_s \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^-\\pi^+\\right)}{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-\\right)} = 1.18 \\pm 0.05\\,\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.12\\,\\text{(syst.)} \\, . $$ In addition, the relative branching fraction of the decay $B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^+\\pi^-$ is measured to be $$ \\frac{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 K^+\\pi^-\\right)}{ {\\cal B}\\left(B^0 \\to \\bar{D}^0 \\pi^+\\pi^-\\right)} = 0.106 \\pm 0.007\\,\\text{(stat.)} \\pm 0.008\\,\\text{(syst.)} \\, . $$ The resonant substructures of $B^0_s \\to \\...

  14. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tognetti, Alessandro; Lorussi, Federico; Carbonaro, Nicola; de Rossi, Danilo

    2015-11-11

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities). The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1:96 and 0:96, respectively). In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints.

  15. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Tognetti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion analysis. Our sensory fusion method is based on a Kalman filter technique and combines the outputs of textile electrogoniometers and accelerometers without making any assumptions regarding the initial accelerometer position and orientation. We used our technique to measure the flexion-extension angle of the knee in different motion tasks (monopodalic flexions and walking at different velocities. The estimation technique was benchmarked against a commercial measurement system based on inertial measurement units and performed reliably for all of the various tasks (mean and standard deviation of the root mean square error of 1:96 and 0:96, respectively. In addition, the method showed a notable improvement in angular estimation compared to the estimation derived by the textile goniometer and accelerometer considered separately. In future work, we will extend this method to more complex and multi-degree of freedom joints.

  16. The effect of internal fixation lamp on anterior chamber angle width measured by anterior segment optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamine, Sakari; Sakai, Hiroshi; Arakaki, Yoshikuni; Yonahara, Michiko; Kaiya, Tadayoshi

    2018-01-01

    To study the effect of the internal fixation lamp on anterior chamber width measured by anterior segment optical coherence tomography. In a prospective cross sectional observational study, consecutive 22 right eyes of 22 patients (4 men and 18 women) with suspected primary angle closure underwent swept source domain anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT), (CASIA SS-1000, Tomey, Nagoya, Japan). Anterior chamber parameters of angle opening distance (AOD), trabecular-iris angle (TIA), angle recess area (ARA) at 500 or 750 µm from scleral spur and pupil diameter were measured by AS-OCT in a three-dimensional mode in 4 quadrants (superior, inferior, temporal and nasal) in dark room setting both with and without internal fixation lamp. Anterior segment parameters of AOD 500 in superior, inferior and temporal quadrants, AOD 750 at superior and nasal, TIA 500 at superior, and inferior and TIA 750 at superior and nasal, and ARA 500 or 750 at superior and inferior with internal fixation lamp were greater and the pupil diameter was significantly (all P angle wider. When using AS-OCT with usual setting with internal fixation lamp on with eyes in which the anterior chamber angle is narrow but open, it is recommended that the internal fixation lamp be turned off to ensure a clear indication as to whether the angle is open or closed in the dark.

  17. Expressing Cobb Angle as Linear Measurement in Scoliosis and Its Significance: A Clinical and Geometrical Analysis of Scoliosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puthezhath, Kishore

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate an objective clinical and geometric relationship between Cobb angle and the difference between the lengths of convex and concave sides (convexo-concave vertebral difference) of the structural curve in scoliosis. Is it possible to express Cobb angle in such a way that it could be visualized as a length, especially while planning for surgical correction of scoliosis? Thirty consecutive patients below the age of 19 years with a scoliosis of Cobb angle more than 10 degrees were included in the study. Convexo-concave vertebral difference of the structural curve was measured. Its relationship with the measure of Cobb angle was studied. Author obtained a significant linear correlation between the convexo-concave vertebral differences and the Cobb angle. Using the formula Y=2d.Sin (X/2) the convexo-concave vertebral difference could be predicted. The difference thus obtained gives a quantitative measure of the maximum length of correction possible in the structural curve. It is possible to express the Cobb angle as a function of linear measurement. The author proposes that this would aid the surgeons to accurately and predictably achieve the desired scoliosis correction.

  18. Expanding Model Independent Approaches for Measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ at LHCb

    CERN Multimedia

    Prouve, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Model independent approaches to measuring the CKM angle $\\gamma$ in $B\\rightarrow DK$ decays at LHCb are explored. In particular, we consider the case where the $D$ meson decays into a final state with four hadrons. Using four-body final states such as $\\pi^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, $K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ and $K^+ K^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ in addition to traditional 2 and 3 body states and has the potential to significantly improve to the overall constraint on $\\gamma$. There is a significant systematic uncertainty associated with modelling the complex phase of the $D$ decay amplitude across the five-dimensional phase space of the four body decay. It is therefore important to replace these model-dependent quantities with model-independent parameters as input for the $\\gamma$ measurement. These model independent parameters have been measured using quantum-correlated $\\psi(3770) \\rightarrow D^0 \\overline{D^0}$ decays collected by the CLEO-c experiment, and, for $D\\rightarrow K^+ \\pi^- \\pi^+ \\pi^-$, with $D^0-\\overline{D^0...

  19. Nasolabial fold angle measurement using anterior segment optical coherence tomography in normal subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Marcus C C; Aung, Han T; Aung, Tin; Looi, Audrey L G

    2009-01-01

    The human nasolabial fold angle (NFA) has been measured using MRI and photogrammetry and has been shown to decrease with age. The authors aimed to evaluate a novel method using optical coherence tomography to measure the NFA. In this cross-sectional observational series, the authors used anterior segment optical coherence tomography (ASOCT) to image the NFA of both cheeks of 126 subjects aged 21 to 79 years. A dental vinylpolysiloxane custom-designed mould was used as a chin rest. The mean of 3 scans on each side was calculated and analysis of variance, multiple comparisons, and multiple linear regression were carried out using SPSS 11.0. Sixty-one subject (48.4%) were men and 65 (51.6%) were women. Mean age was 50.6 +/- 16.8 years (range, 21-79 years). The ASOCT successfully imaged the NFA in all subjects. Mean right and left NFA were 144.4 degrees +/- 17.1 degrees and 145.4 degrees +/- 17.7 degrees. The NFA were dissimilar between the 6 age categories by decade (p NFA, accounting for 55% of NFA variation. Every year accounted for a decrease of 0.78 degrees (p NFA of 5.4 degrees (p = 0.007) and 4.0 degrees (p = 0.06) in the right and left cheeks, respectively. The NFA decreases with age and increases with male sex and can be measured with ASOCT accurately and easily.

  20. Depth-encoded dual beam phase-resolved Doppler OCT for Doppler-angle-independent flow velocity measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jie; Cheng, Wei; Cao, Zhaoyuan; Chen, Xinjian; Mo, Jianhua

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved Doppler optical coherence tomography (PR-D-OCT) is a functional OCT imaging technique that can provide high-speed and high-resolution depth-resolved measurement on flow in biological materials. However, a common problem with conventional PR-D-OCT is that this technique often measures the flow motion projected onto the OCT beam path. In other words, it needs the projection angle to extract the absolute velocity from PR-D-OCT measurement. In this paper, we proposed a novel dual-beam PR-D-OCT method to measure absolute flow velocity without separate measurement on the projection angle. Two parallel light beams are created in sample arm and focused into the sample at two different incident angles. The images produced by these two beams are encoded to different depths in single B-scan. Then the Doppler signals picked up by the two beams together with the incident angle difference can be used to calculate the absolute velocity. We validated our approach in vitro on an artificial flow phantom with our home-built 1060 nm swept source OCT. Experimental results demonstrated that our method can provide an accurate measurement of absolute flow velocity with independency on the projection angle.

  1. Dispersion measurement on chirped mirrors at arbitrary incidence angle and polarization state (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Mate; Somoskoi, Tamas; Seres, Imre; Borzsonyi, Adam; Sipos, Aron; Osvay, Károly

    2017-05-01

    The optical elements of femtosecond high peak power lasers have to fulfill more and more strict requirements in order to support pulses with high intensity and broad spectrum. In most cases chirped pulse amplification scheme is used to generate high peak power ultrashort laser pulses, where a very precise control of spectral intensity and spectral phase is required in reaching transform-limited temporal shape at the output. In the case of few cycle regime, the conventional bulk glass, prism-, grating- and their combination based compressors are not sufficient anymore, due to undesirable nonlinear effects in their material and proneness to optical damages. The chirped mirrors are also commonly used to complete the compression after a beam transport system just before the target. Moreover, the manufacturing technology requires quality checks right after production and over the lifetime of the mirror as well, since undesired deposition on the surface can lead alteration from the designed value over a large part of the aperture. For the high harmonic generation, polarization gating technology is used to generate single attosecond pulses [1]. In this case the pulse to be compressed has various polarization state falling to the chirped mirrors. For this reason, it is crucial to measure the dispersion of the mirrors for the different polarization states. In this presentation we demonstrate a simple technique to measure the dispersion of arbitrary mirror at angles of incidence from 0 to 55 degree, even for a 12" optics. A large aperture 4" mirror has been scanned over with micrometer accuracy and the dispersion property through the surface has been investigated with a stable interference fringes in that robust geometry. We used Spectrally Resolved Interferometry, which is based on a Michaelson interferometer and a combined visible and infrared spectrometer. Tungsten halogen lamp with 10 mW coupled optical power was used as a white-light source so with the selected

  2. An angle-dependent estimation of CT x-ray spectrum from rotational transmission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuan; Ramirez-Giraldo, Juan Carlos; Gauthier, Daniel J; Stierstorfer, Karl; Samei, Ehsan

    2014-06-01

    Computed tomography (CT) performance as well as dose and image quality is directly affected by the x-ray spectrum. However, the current assessment approaches of the CT x-ray spectrum require costly measurement equipment and complicated operational procedures, and are often limited to the spectrum corresponding to the center of rotation. In order to address these limitations, the authors propose an angle-dependent estimation technique, where the incident spectra across a wide range of angular trajectories can be estimated accurately with only a single phantom and a single axial scan in the absence of the knowledge of the bowtie filter. The proposed technique uses a uniform cylindrical phantom, made of ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene and positioned in an off-centered geometry. The projection data acquired with an axial scan have a twofold purpose. First, they serve as a reflection of the transmission measurements across different angular trajectories. Second, they are used to reconstruct the cross sectional image of the phantom, which is then utilized to compute the intersection length of each transmission measurement. With each CT detector element recording a range of transmission measurements for a single angular trajectory, the spectrum is estimated for that trajectory. A data conditioning procedure is used to combine information from hundreds of collected transmission measurements to accelerate the estimation speed, to reduce noise, and to improve estimation stability. The proposed spectral estimation technique was validated experimentally using a clinical scanner (Somatom Definition Flash, Siemens Healthcare, Germany) with spectra provided by the manufacturer serving as the comparison standard. Results obtained with the proposed technique were compared against those obtained from a second conventional transmission measurement technique with two materials (i.e., Cu and Al). After validation, the proposed technique was applied to measure spectra from the

  3. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from a combination of $B\\to DK$ analyses

    CERN Document Server

    The LHCb Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    A combination is made of tree-level measurements of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from $B \\to DK$ decays at LHCb. The results are obtained from time-integrated analyses of $B^{+}\\to D K^+$, $B^0\\to D K^{*0}$ and $B^+ \\to D K^+\\pi^+\\pi^-$ decays, where the $D$ meson decays into $K^+K^-$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $K^+K^-\\pi^0$, $K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp\\pi^0$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^0$, $K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp$, $K^0_S K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp$, $K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $K^0_S K^+K^-$, $K^\\pm\\pi^\\mp \\pi^+\\pi^-$ and $\\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states. In addition, results obtained from a time-dependent analysis of $B_s^0 \\to D_s^\\mp K^\\pm$ decays are included. The combination gives a best fit value of $\\gamma = 70.9^\\circ$ and confidence intervals are set using a frequentist procedure: $\\gamma \\in [62.4,78.0]^\\circ$ at 68$\\%$ CL and $\\gamma \\in [51.0,85.0]^\\circ$ at 95$\\%$ CL, where all values are modulo $180^\\circ$. Using the best fit value and the 68$\\%$ CL interval, $\\gamma$ is measured to be \\begin{align*} \\gamma = (70.9\\,^{+7.1}_{-8.5})^\\circ\\,, \\end{align*} where the q...

  4. Stability test of the silicon Fiber Bragg Grating embroidered on textile for joint angle measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apiwattanadej, Thanit; Chun, Byung Jae; Lee, Hyub; Li, King Ho Holden; Kim, Young-Jin

    2017-06-01

    Recently, Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors are being used for motion tracking applications. However, the sensitivity, linearity and stability of the systems have not been fully studied. Herein, an embroidered optical Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) on a stretchable supportive textile for elbow movement measurement was developed. The sensing principle of this system is based on the alteration of Bragg wavelength due to strain from the elbow movements. The relationship between elbow movements and reflected Bragg wavelength was found to be linear. The dynamic range of FBG sensor on elbow support is between 0 and 120 degree. Finally, the stability of the FBG sensor on the supportive textile was tested during the exercise and the cleaning process with water. The sensitivity of FBG sensors for joint angle measurement and the effect of the movement and cleaning process to signals from FBG sensors after using in the real activity will be the basis knowledge for design and actual implementation of future optical fiber based wearable devices.

  5. New method for improving angle measurement precision of laser collimation system under complex background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaofeng; Chen, He; Tan, Lilong; Zhang, Zhili; Cai, Wei

    2014-09-01

    We have proposed a new method for improving angle measurement precision based on the principle of CCD laser collimation in this paper. First, through the control of the laser's state, on or off, by the Digital Signal Processor (DSP), the collimation light and the background light can be sampled, individually. Second, with the comparison between the sampled value of the background light intensity and the threshold value which has been set in the DSP previously, the DSP can automatically control Complex Programmable Logic Device (CPLD) to adjust the light integral time of CCD to adapt to different environment background and the changeable scanning driver of CCD is realized. Last, by the digital wave filtering the impact of the background light on the collimation light can be removed. With the comprehensive application of the controlling technology of automatically changeable scanning driving, collimation light on or off, A/D conversion and adaptive filtering, the integration time of the collimation system can automatically adjust to the proper value according to the change of the environment and the impact of the background light on the collimation system can be well removed. The simulation results show that the new method can achieve the self-adaptable control with the change of the environment and can improve the measurement precision of the laser collimation system under the complex environment.

  6. Measurement of CKM-angle γ with Charmed B0 Meson Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baak, Max Arjen [Univ. of Amsterdam (Netherlands)

    2007-02-05

    This thesis reports measurements of the time-dependent CP asymmetries in fully reconstructed B0 → (D (*)∓π± and B0 → D ρ± ) decays in approximately 232 million Y(4S) → B$\\bar{B}$ events, collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center in California, as published in Ref. [14]. The phenomenon of CP violation allows one to distinguish between matter and antimatter, and, as such, is one of the essential ingredients needed to explain the apparent abundance of matter over antimatter in the universe. The Standard Model describes the observed elementary particles in terms of three generations of quarks and leptons, as well as the weak, electromagnetic, and strong interactions between them. In the Standard Model, CP violation is incorporated in the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix, which describes the weak interactions between the quarks. The weak interactions between quarks are described by coupling constants that are functions of three real parameters and one irreducible complex phase. The magnitude of all CP violating effects in the Standard Model is related to this complex phase. The measurement of the CP violating phase of the CKM matrix is an important part of the present scientific program in particle physics. Violation of the CP symmetry manifests itself as a non-zero area of the Unitarity Triangle. The Unitarity Triangle needs to be overconstrained by experimental measurements in order to demonstrate that the CKM mechanism is the correct explanation of this phenomenon. No stringent measurement of the CKM-angle γ is yet available.

  7. Measurement of small-angle antiproton-proton and proton-proton elastic scattering at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amos, N.; Block, M.M.; Bobbink, G.J.; Botje, M.A.J.; Favart, D.; Leroy, C.; Linde, F.; Lipnik, P.; Matheys, J-P.; Miller, D.

    1985-01-01

    Antiproton-proton and proton-proton small-angle elastic scattering was measured for centre-of-mass energies at the CERN Intersectung Storage Rings. In addition, proton-proton elastic scattering was measured at . Using the optical theorem, total cross sections are obtained with an accuracy of about

  8. Finding the Speed of a Bicycle in Circular Motion by Measuring the Lean Angle of the Bicycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Abu, Yuval; Wolfson, Ira; Yizhaq, Hezi

    2018-01-01

    We suggest an activity for measuring the speed of a bicycle going in circular motion by measuring the bicycle's lean angle. In this activity students will be able to feel the strength that is being activated on their bodies while they are moving in circular motion. They will also understand that it is impossible to ride in a circle without the…

  9. Quantitative diffusion and swelling kinetic measurements using large-angle interferometric refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, John E; Chen, Hao; Brauer, Chris; Clayton, McGregor; Chen, Weijian; Barnes, Jack A; Loock, Hans-Peter

    2015-12-07

    The uptake and release of sorbates into films and coatings is typically accompanied by changes of the films' refractive index and thickness. We provide a comprehensive model to calculate the concentration of the sorbate from the average refractive index and the film thickness, and validate the model experimentally. The mass fraction of the analyte partitioned into a film is described quantitatively by the Lorentz-Lorenz equation and the Clausius-Mosotti equation. To validate the model, the uptake kinetics of water and other solvents into SU-8 films (d = 40-45 μm) were explored. Large-angle interferometric refractometry measurements can be used to characterize films that are between 15 μm to 150 μm thick and, Fourier analysis, is used to determine independently the thickness, the average refractive index and the refractive index at the film-substrate interface at one-second time intervals. From these values the mass fraction of water in SU-8 was calculated. The kinetics were best described by two independent uptake processes having different rates. Each process followed one-dimensional Fickian diffusion kinetics with diffusion coefficients for water into SU-8 photoresist film of 5.67 × 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1) and 61.2 × 10(-9) cm(2) s(-1).

  10. Updated Measurement of the CKM Angle alpha Using B0->rho+rho- Decays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aubert, B

    2006-09-26

    The authors present results from an analysis of B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} using 316 fb{sup -1} of {Upsilon}(4S) {yields} B{bar B} decays observed with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at SLAC. They measure the B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -} branching fraction, longitudinal polarization fraction f{sub L}, and the CP-violating parameters S{sub long} and C{sub long}: {Beta}(B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{sup +}{rho}{sup -}) = (23.5 {+-} 2.2(stat) {+-} 4.1(syst)) x 10{sup -6}, f{sub L} = 0.977 {+-} 0.024(stat){sub -0.013}{sup +0.015}(syst), S{sub long} = -0.19 {+-} 0.21(stat){sub -0.07}{sup +0.05}(syst), C{sub long} = -0.07 {+-} 0.15(stat) {+-} 0.06(syst). Using an isospin analysis of B {yields} {rho}{rho} decays they determine the angle {alpha} of the unitarity triangle. One of the two solutions, {alpha} [74,117]{sup o} at 68% CL, is compatible with the standard model. All results presented here are preliminary.

  11. Measurement of the running of the QED coupling in small-angle Bhabha scattering at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Abbiendi, G.; Akesson, P.F.; Alexander, G.; Anagnostou, G.; Anderson, K.J.; Asai, S.; Axen, D.; Bailey, I.; Barberio, E.; Barillari, T.; Barlow, R.J.; Batley, R.J.; Bechtle, P.; Behnke, T.; Bell, Kenneth Watson; Bell, P.J.; Bella, G.; Bellerive, A.; Benelli, G.; Bethke, S.; Biebel, O.; Boeriu, O.; Bock, P.; Boutemeur, M.; Braibant, S.; Brown, Robert M.; Burckhart, H.J.; Campana, S.; Capiluppi, P.; Carnegie, R.K.; Carter, A.A.; Carter, J.R.; Chang, C.Y.; Charlton, D.G.; Ciocca, C.; Csilling, A.; Cuffiani, M.; Dado, S.; Dallavalle, G.M.; De Roeck, A.; De Wolf, E.A.; Desch, K.; Dienes, B.; Dubbert, J.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Duerdoth, I.P.; Etzion, E.; Fabbri, F.; Ferrari, P.; Fiedler, F.; Fleck, I.; Ford, M.; Frey, A.; Gagnon, P.; Gary, John William; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Giacomelli, G.; Giacomelli, P.; Giacomelli, R.; Giunta, Marina; Goldberg, J.; Gross, E.; Grunhaus, J.; Gruwe, M.; Gunther, P.O.; Gupta, A.; Hajdu, C.; Hamann, M.; Hanson, G.G.; Harel, A.; Hauschild, M.; Hawkes, C.M.; Hawkings, R.; Hemingway, R.J.; Herten, G.; Heuer, R.D.; Hill, J.C.; Horvath, D.; Igo-Kemenes, P.; Ishii, K.; Jeremie, H.; Jovanovic, P.; Junk, T.R.; Kanzaki, J.; Karlen, D.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawamoto, T.; Keeler, R.K.; Kellogg, R.G.; Kennedy, B.W.; Kluth, S.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Komamiya, S.; Kramer, T.; Krieger, P.; von Krogh, J.; Kuhl, T.; Kupper, M.; Lafferty, G.D.; Landsman, H.; Lanske, D.; Lellouch, D.; Lettso, J.; Levinson, L.; Lillich, J.; Lloyd, S.L.; Loebinger, F.K.; Lu, J.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, J.; Mader, W.; Marcellini, S.; Martin, A.J.; Mashimo, T.; Mattig, Peter; McKenna, J.; McPherson, R.A.; Meijers, F.; Menges, W.; Merritt, F.S.; Mes, H.; Meyer, Niels T.; Michelini, A.; Mihara, S.; Mikenberg, G.; Miller, D.J.; Mohr, W.; Mori, T.; Mutter, A.; Nagai, K.; Nakamura, I.; Nanjo, H.; Neal, H.A.; Nisius, R.; ONeale, S.W.; Oh, A.; Oreglia, M.J.; Orito, S.; Pahl, C.; Pasztor, G.; Pater, J.R.; Pilcher, J.E.; Pinfold, J.; Plane, David E.; Pooth, O.; Przybycien, M.; Quadt, A.; Rabbertz, K.; Rembser, C.; Renkel, P.; Roney, J.M.; Runge, K.; Sachs, K.; Saeki, T.; Sarkisyan, E.K.G.; Schaile, A.D.; Schaile, O.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieck, J.; Schorner-Sadenius, T.; Schroder, Matthias; Schumacher, M.; Seuster, R.; Shears, T.G.; Shen, B.C.; Sherwood, P.; Skuja, A.; Smith, A.M.; Sobie, R.; Soldner-Rembold, S.; Spano, F.; Stahl, A.; Strom, David M.; Strohmer, R.; Tarem, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Teuscher, R.; Thomson, M.A.; Torrence, E.; Toya, D.; Tran, P.; Trigger, I.; Trocsanyi, Z.; Tsur, E.; Turner-Watson, M.F.; Ueda, I.; Ujvari, B.; Vollmer, C.F.; Vannerem, P.; Vertesi, R.; Verzocchi, M.; Voss, H.; Vossebeld, J.; Ward, C.P.; Ward, D.R.; Watkins, P.M.; Watson, A.T.; Watson, N.K.; Wells, P.S.; Wengler, T.; Wermes, N.; Wilson, G.W.; Wilson, J.A.; Wolf, G.; Wyatt, T.R.; Yamashita, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2006-01-01

    Using the OPAL detector at LEP, the running of the effective QED coupling alpha(t) is measured for space-like momentum transfer through its effect on the angular spectrum of small-angle Bhabha scattering. In an almost ideal QED framework, with very favourable experimental conditions, we obtain: Delta alpha(-6.07GeV^2) - Delta alpha(-1.81GeV^2) = (440 pm 58 pm 43 pm 30) X 10^-5, where the first error is statistical, the second is the experimental systematic and the third is the theoretical uncertainty. This is the strongest direct evidence ever presented that the running of alpha is consistent with Standard Model expectations. The null hypothesis that alpha remains constant within the above interval of -t is excluded with a significance above 5sigma. Similarly, our results are inconsistent at the level of 3sigma with the hypothesis that only leptonic loops contribute to the running, and therefore provide the first clear experimental evidence that hadronic loops also contribute.

  12. Indirect Measurement of the Vertex and Angles of the Unitarity Triangle

    CERN Document Server

    Mele, S

    1999-01-01

    The precise measurements of the $B^0_d$ oscillation frequency and the limit on the $B^0_s$ one as well as the determination of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element $|\\mathrm{V_{ub}}|$ impro ve the constraints on the other elements of this matrix. A fit to the experimental data and the theory calculations leads to the determination of the vertex of the unitarity triangle as: \\begin{ displaymath} \\rho =0.160 ^{+0.094} _{-0.070}\\,\\,\\,\\,\\, \\eta =0.381 ^{+0.061} _{-0.058}. \\end{displaymath} The values of its angles, in their customary definition in terms of sines for $\\alpha$ a nd $\\beta$, are found to be: \\begin{displaymath} \\sin{2\\alpha} =0.06 ^{+0.35} _{-0.42} \\,\\,\\,\\,\\, \\sin{2\\beta} =0.75 \\pm 0.09 \\,\\,\\,\\,\\, \\gamma =67 ^{+11} _{-12}\\,^\\circ. \\end{displaymath} Ind irect information on non-perturbative QCD parameters, on the presence of a CP violating complex phase in the CKM matrix and on the $B^0_s$ oscillation frequency are also extracted.

  13. Does flexible tunnel drilling affect the femoral tunnel angle measurement after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Bart; Hofbauer, Marcus; Atte, Akere; van Dijk, C Niek; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the mean difference in femoral tunnel angle (FTA) as measured on knee radiographs between rigid and flexible tunnel drilling after anatomic anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty consecutive patients that underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a flexible reamer were included in this study. The control group was comprised of 50 patients all of who underwent primary anatomic ACL reconstruction with a single femoral tunnel drilled with a rigid reamer. All femoral tunnels were drilled through a medial portal to ensure anatomic tunnel placement. The FTA was determined from post-operative anterior-to-posterior (AP) radiographs by two independent observers. A 5° difference between the two mean FTA was considered clinically significant. The average FTA, when drilled with a rigid reamer, was 42.0° ± 7.2°. Drilling with a flexible reamer resulted in a mean FTA of 44.7° ± 7.0°. The mean difference of 2.7° was not statistically significant. The intraclass correlation coefficient for inter-tester reliability was 0.895. The FTA can be reliably determined from post-operative AP radiographs and provides a useful and reproducible metric for characterizing femoral tunnel position after both rigid and flexible femoral tunnel drilling. This has implications for post-operative evaluation and preoperative treatment planning for ACL revision surgery. IV.

  14. Understanding properties of engineered catalyst supports using contact angle measurements and X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amama, Placidus B; Islam, Ahmad E; Saber, Sammy M; Huffman, Daniel R; Maruyama, Benji

    2016-02-07

    There is significant interest in broadening the type of catalyst substrates that support the growth of high-quality carbon nanotube (CNT) carpets. In this study, ion beam bombardment has been utilized to modify catalyst substrates for CNT carpet growth. Using a combination of contact angle measurements (CAMs) and X-ray reflectivity (XRR) for the first time, new correlations between the physicochemical properties of pristine and engineered catalyst substrates and CNT growth behavior have been established. The engineered surfaces obtained after exposure to different degrees of ion beam damage have distinct physicochemical properties (porosity, layer thickness, and acid-base properties). The CAM data were analyzed using the van Oss-Chaudhury-Good model, enabling the determination of the acid-base properties of the substrate surfaces. For the XRR data, a Fourier analysis of the interference patterns enabled extraction of layer thickness, while the atomic density and interfacial roughness were extracted by analyzing the amplitude of the interference oscillations. The dramatic transformation of the substrate from "inactive" to "active" is attributed to a combined effect of substrate porosity or damage depth and Lewis basicity. The results reveal that the efficiency of catalyst substrates can be further improved by increasing the substrate basicity, if the minimum surface porosity is established. This study advances the use of a non-thermochemical approach for catalyst substrate engineering, as well as demonstrates the combined utility of CAM and XRR as a powerful, nondestructive, and reliable tool for rational catalyst design.

  15. Exploiting the Rotational Dynamics of Asymmetric Top Molecules to make Angle Resolved, Molecular Frame Ion Yield and High Harmonic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhija, Varun; Ren, Xiaoming; Tross, Jan; Mondal, Sudipta; Le, Anh-Thu; Trallero, Carlos; Kumarappan, Vinod; JRM HHG-Alignment Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    We extract the angle-dependent ionization rate of ethylene in an intense femtosecond laser pulse from the rotational revivals of the yield of the singly-charged molecular ion. By fitting the measured delay-dependent ion yield to the molecular axis distribution calculated using a rigid rotor code for asymmetric top molecules, we show that the dependence of the ionization rate on two Euler angles can be on obtained. Additionally we explore the possibility of extracting molecular frame information from similar pump-probe measurements of high harmonic generation. Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy.

  16. Effect of various facial angles and measurements on the ideal position of the nasal tip in the Asian patient population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Ji Yun; Park, Jun Hee; Javidnia, Hedyeh; Sykes, Jonathan M

    2013-01-01

    Successful surgical correction of nasal tip position requires preoperative analysis. Perceived adequate nasal tip position depends on its relationship with other facial features. Nasal tip position can be affected by the subnasal contour, proportion of facial height, and relative facial size and shape. The relation of these factors to the nasolabial angle may not be as important as previously believed. To investigate and compare the factors affecting the ideal location of the tip of the nose in Asian patients using standard photographic measurements. We analyzed measurements of profile photographs and compared different factors that affect nasal tip location, including the nasofrontal, nasolabial, nasomental, and Legan angles and the ratios of the dorsal height to tip projection, the radix height to tip projection, the glabella to subnasale, and the subnasale to mentum. One hundred men, 100 women, 20 to 40 years old, seen for rhinoplasty at the Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Chosun University College of Medicine. Contribution of different facial measurements to the ideal nasal tip position. Nasolabial and nasomental angles exerted a statistically significant effect on ideal nasal tip position, whereas the Legane angle, the ratio of midface to lower face, and the ratio of nasal length to lower face did not show significant effects on nasal tip position. The nasolabial and nasomental angles have important effects on ideal nasal tip position and should be considered together during preoperative evaluation of the location of the nasal tip. Concurrent genioplasty should optimize rhinoplasty outcomes in appropriately selected patients. NA.

  17. Some remarks on the solid surface tension determination from contact angle measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zdziennicka, Anna; Szymczyk, Katarzyna; Krawczyk, Joanna; Jańczuk, Bronisław, E-mail: bronislaw.janczuk@poczta.umcs.lublin.pl

    2017-05-31

    Graphical abstract: Surface tension of PE, nylon 6 and quartz from different approaches to the interface tension. - Highlights: • New values of water and formamide surface tension components were established. • Quartz surface tension depends on its crystal face. • Usefulness of different approaches for solid surface tension determination was tested. - Abstract: The measurements of water, formamide and diiodomethane contact angle (θ) on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), polyethylene (PE), polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA), nylon 6, quartz and silica were performed. Based on the θ values of these liquids obtained on PTFE, the Lifshitz-van der Waals and acid-base and/or dispersion and polar components of their surface tension (ST) were determined. In turn, the θ values for water, formamide and diiodomethane on PMMA were applied to calculate the electron-acceptor and electron-donor parameters of the Lewis acid-base component of the formamide ST. For this calculation the same values of the electron-acceptor and electron-donor parameters for water ST were used. Taking into account the values of components and parameters of water, formamide and diiodomethane ST obtained by us, van Oss et al. and from the water(formamide)-n-alkane and water-diiodomethane interface tension, the components and parameters of studied solids ST were calculated. To this end different approaches to the interface tension were considered. The obtained values were compared with those in the literature. It was concluded that for determination of solid ST components and parameters, those of water, formamide and diiodomethane ST obtained from the θ measurements on the model solids should be used.

  18. Reliability and criterion validity of measurements using a smart phone-based measurement tool for the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during single-leg lifting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Sung-Hoon; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Jeon, In-Cheol; Hwang, Ui-Jae; Weon, Jong-Hyuck

    2018-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine the intra-rater test-retest reliability of a smart phone-based measurement tool (SBMT) and a three-dimensional (3D) motion analysis system for measuring the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during single-leg lifting (SLL) and the criterion validity of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis measurement using SBMT compared with a 3D motion analysis system (3DMAS). Seventeen healthy volunteers performed SLL with their dominant leg without bending the knee until they reached a target placed 20 cm above the table. This study used a 3DMAS, considered the gold standard, to measure the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis to assess the criterion validity of the SBMT measurement. Intra-rater test-retest reliability was determined using the SBMT and 3DMAS using intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) [3,1] values. The criterion validity of the SBMT was assessed with ICC [3,1] values. Both the 3DMAS (ICC = 0.77) and SBMT (ICC = 0.83) showed excellent intra-rater test-retest reliability in the measurement of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis during SLL in a supine position. Moreover, the SBMT showed an excellent correlation with the 3DMAS (ICC = 0.99). Measurement of the transverse rotation angle of the pelvis using the SBMT showed excellent reliability and criterion validity compared with the 3DMAS.

  19. A Wireless Swing Angle Measurement Scheme Using Attitude Heading Reference System Sensing Units Based on Microelectromechanical Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingtuan Gao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Feasible real-time swing angle measurement is significant to improve the efficiency and safety of industrial crane systems. This paper presents a wireless microelectromechanical system (MEMS-based swing angle measurement system. The system consists of two attitude heading reference system (AHRS sensing units with a wireless communication function, which are mounted on the hook (or payload and the jib (or base of the crane, respectively. With a combination of a three-axis accelerometer, a three-axis gyroscope and a three-axis magnetometer, the standard extended Kalman filter (EKF is used to estimate the desired orientation of the payload and the base. Wireless ZigBee communication is employed to transmit the orientation of the payload to the sensing unit mounted on the base, which measures the orientation of the base. Because several physical parameters from the payload to the base can be acquired from the original crane control system, the swing angles of the payload can be calculated based on the two measured orientation parameters together with the known physical parameters. Experiments were performed to show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed swing angle measurement system.

  20. Improved accuracy of capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement with angular-to-linear displacement conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinran; Zhu, Fan; Wang, Chao; Shi, Jian; Qi, Xue; Yu, Yang; Yuan, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement (CSMAM) method that uses an angular-to-linear displacement conversion to achieve high accuracy. The principal and secondary error components of CSMAMs are modeled and analyzed to reveal their impacts on the measurement accuracy. The theoretical accuracies of six types of commonly used CSMAMs are analyzed to determine the optimum configuration of capacitive sensors for 1D and 2D micro-angle measurements. An angular-to-linear displacement conversion method with a linear motional stage and a hemisphere decoupler is used to eliminate the principal error of CSMAM. Experimental results indicate that the optimized CSMAM can achieve accuracies of 0.157 arc sec and 0.052 arc sec in the ranges of ±900 arc sec and ±300 arc sec, respectively, in the case that the effective length of the rotation arm is 100 mm and the linear displacement measurement accuracy of the capacitive sensor is 2 nm. These results can be used as a reference to further improve CSMAM designs and achieve high accuracy in a large measurement range, for use in a wide range of precision engineering applications including angle metrology, micro- and nano-radian angle generators, beam steering mechanisms, and high-performance precision stages.

  1. Accuracy of a Custom Physical Activity and Knee Angle Measurement Sensor System for Patients with Neuromuscular Disorders and Gait Abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Feldhege

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Long-term assessment of ambulatory behavior and joint motion are valuable tools for the evaluation of therapy effectiveness in patients with neuromuscular disorders and gait abnormalities. Even though there are several tools available to quantify ambulatory behavior in a home environment, reliable measurement of joint motion is still limited to laboratory tests. The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel inertial sensor system for ambulatory behavior and joint motion measurement in the everyday environment. An algorithm for behavior classification, step detection, and knee angle calculation was developed. The validation protocol consisted of simulated daily activities in a laboratory environment. The tests were performed with ten healthy subjects and eleven patients with multiple sclerosis. Activity classification showed comparable performance to commercially available activPAL sensors. Step detection with our sensor system was more accurate. The calculated flexion-extension angle of the knee joint showed a root mean square error of less than 5° compared with results obtained using an electro-mechanical goniometer. This new system combines ambulatory behavior assessment and knee angle measurement for long-term measurement periods in a home environment. The wearable sensor system demonstrated high validity for behavior classification and knee joint angle measurement in a laboratory setting.

  2. Improved accuracy of capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement with angular-to-linear displacement conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xinran; Zhu, Fan; Wang, Chao; Shi, Jian; Qi, Xue; Yu, Yang; Yuan, Feng; Tan, Jiubin

    2017-11-01

    This paper presents a capacitive sensor-based micro-angle measurement (CSMAM) method that uses an angular-to-linear displacement conversion to achieve high accuracy. The principal and secondary error components of CSMAMs are modeled and analyzed to reveal their impacts on the measurement accuracy. The theoretical accuracies of six types of commonly used CSMAMs are analyzed to determine the optimum configuration of capacitive sensors for 1D and 2D micro-angle measurements. An angular-to-linear displacement conversion method with a linear motional stage and a hemisphere decoupler is used to eliminate the principal error of CSMAM. Experimental results indicate that the optimized CSMAM can achieve accuracies of 0.157 arc sec and 0.052 arc sec in the ranges of ±900 arc sec and ±300 arc sec, respectively, in the case that the effective length of the rotation arm is 100 mm and the linear displacement measurement accuracy of the capacitive sensor is 2 nm. These results can be used as a reference to further improve CSMAM designs and achieve high accuracy in a large measurement range, for use in a wide range of precision engineering applications including angle metrology, micro- and nano-radian angle generators, beam steering mechanisms, and high-performance precision stages.

  3. Study of a additive device which measures the angled walls of injection mold components on a three axis CNC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pralea Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to demonstrate an efficient on machine measurement system. During this study the authors will develop a measurement device, in order to accurately analyze the dimensional precision of the angled vertical walls used to center active cavities inside an injection mold, on a three axis CNC. The designed device will work in strong connection with a touch trigger probe. The final results will show an improved accuracy of the measurement system.

  4. Measurement of the adsorption at solid-liquid interfaces from the pressure dependence of contact angles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, C A; Wu, Jiyu; Keshavarz, A

    2008-01-10

    Earlier studies have indicated that in an isothermal three-phase system, the liquid-phase pressure at the three-phase line, xL3, may be viewed as the independent variable of the contact angle, theta, and that adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is the mechanism relating them. When the liquid-vapor interface is axi-symmetric, we show that theta can be predicted as a function of xL3 and that by measuring theta(xL3), the amount adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface can be determined. We consider water in differently sized borosilicate glass cylinders. For progressively larger cylinders, xL3 increases with cylinder radius, but when a particularly sized cylinder is rotated about it longitudinal axis, xL3 is decreased. The observed value of theta in each case is found to be in close agreement with that predicted. A Gibbs model of the interphase is used, and the Gibbs adsorption at the solid-liquid interface is found to be negative. As xL3 increases above its value at wetting, the amount adsorbed at the solid-liquid interface becomes progressively more negative. Negative adsorption is shown to mean that the concentration of the fluid component is greater in the bulk liquid than in the interphase and that the difference in concentration increases as xL3 is increased. The data is used to investigate the hypothesis that the curvature of the three-phase line affects theta through line tension, but we find no relation between line tension and theta. There is an apparent relation between the curvature of the liquid-vapor interface, CLV and theta, but this is shown to be because CLV affects xL3.

  5. Small Angle Shubnikov-de Haas Measurements in Silicon MOSFET's : The Effect of Strong In-Plane Magnetic Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vitkalov, S.A.; Zheng, H.; Sarachik, M.P.; Klapwijk, T.M.

    2000-01-01

    Measurements in magnetic fields applied at small angles relative to the electron plane in silicon MOSFETs indicate a factor of two increase of the frequency of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations at H>H_{sat}. This signals the onset of full spin polarization above H_{sat}, the parallel field above which

  6. First approach to automatic measurement of frontal plane projection angle during single leg landing based on depth video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bailon, Carlos; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Banos Legran, Oresti

    2016-01-01

    Knee alignment measurements are one of the most extended indicators of knee complex injuries such as anterior cruciate ligament injury and patellofemoral pain syndrome. The Frontal Plane Projection Angle (FPPA) is widely used as a 2D estimation of knee alignment. However, traditional procedures to

  7. Measurements of CKM angles beta/phi_1 and alpha/phi_2 at the BABAR and Belle experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Lazzaro, A.

    2009-01-01

    We report measurements of the CKM angles beta/phi_1 and alpha/phi_2 done by the BABAR and Belle experiments. Both experiments have collected large data samples, corresponding to a total of more than 1 billion of BBbar pairs, at the e^+e^- asymmetric-energy colliders PEP-II (SLAC) and KEK-B (KEK), respectively.

  8. A comparison of hallux valgus angles assessed with computerised plantar pressure measurements, clinical examination and radiography in patients with diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, D.M.; Sanders, A.P.; Guldemond, N.A.; Hermus, J.; Walenkamp, G.H.; Van Rhijn, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Hallux valgus deformity is a common musculoskeletal foot disorder with a prevalence of 3.5% in adolescents to 35.7% in adults aged over 65 years. Radiographic measurements of hallux valgus angles (HVA) are considered to be the most reproducible and accurate assessment of HVA. However, in

  9. "Angle to Be Corrected" in Preoperative Evaluation for Hallux Valgus Surgery: Analysis of a New Angular Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Cristian; Wagner, Pablo; Vela, Omar; Fischman, Daniel; Cavada, Gabriel; Wagner, Emilio

    2016-02-01

    The most common methods for assessing severity of hallux valgus deformity and the effects of an operative procedure are the angular measurements in weightbearing radiographs, specifically the hallux valgus angle and intermetatarsal angle (IMA). Our objective was to analyze the interobserver variability in hallux valgus patients of a new angle called the "angle to be corrected" (ATC), and to compare its capacity to differentiate between different deformities against IMA. We included 28 symptomatic hallux valgus patients with 48 weightbearing foot x-rays. Three trained observers measured the 1 to 2 IMA and the ATC. We then identified retrospectively 45 hallux valgus patients, which were divided into 3 operative technique groups having used the ATC as reference, and analyzed the capacity of the IMA to differentiate between them. The IMA average value was 13.6 degrees, and there was a significant difference between observer 3 and observer 1 (P = .001). The average value for the ATC was 8.9 degrees, and there was no difference between observers. Both angles showed a high intraclass correlation. Regarding the capacity to differentiate between operative technique groups, the ATC was different between the 3 operative technique groups analyzed, but the IMA showed differences only between 2. The ATC was at least as reliable as the intermetatarsal angle for hallux valgus angular measurements, showing a high intraclass correlation with no interobserver difference. It can be suggested that the ATC was better than the IMA to stratify hallux valgus patients when deciding between different operative treatments. Level III, comparative study. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Automatic measurement of touch and release angles of the fetlock joint for lameness detection in dairy cattle using vision techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluk, A; Bahr, C; Poursaberi, A; Maertens, W; van Nuffel, A; Berckmans, D

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes a synchronized measurement system combining image and pressure data to automatically record the angle of the metacarpus and metatarsus bones of the cow with respect to a vertical line, which is useful for lameness detection in dairy cattle. A camera system was developed to record the posture and movement of the cow and the timing and position of hoof placement and release were recorded using a pressure sensitive mat. Experiments with the automatic system were performed continuously on a farm in Ghent (Belgium) for 5 wk in September and October 2009. In total, 2,219 measurements were performed on 75 individual lactating Holstein cows. As a reference for the analysis of the calculated variables, the locomotion of the cows was visually scored from recorded videos by a trained observer into 3 classes of lameness [53.5% were scored with gait score (GS)1, 33.3% were scored with GS2, and 9.3% were scored with GS3]. The contact data of the pressure mat and the camera images recorded by the system were synchronized and combined to measure different angles of the legs of the cows, together with the range of motion of the leg. Significant differences were found between the different gait scores in the release angles of the front hooves, in the range of motion of the front hooves, and in the touch angles of the hind hooves. The contact data of the pressure mat and the camera images recorded by the system were synchronized and combined to measure different angles of the legs of the cows, together with the range of motion of the leg. With respect to the classification of lameness, the range of motion of the front hooves (42.1 and 42.8%) and the release angle of the front hooves (41.7 and 42.0%) were important variables. In 83.3% of the cows, a change in GS led to an increase in within-cow variance for the range of motion or the release angle of the front hooves. In 76.2% of the cows, an increase in GS led to a decrease in range of motion or an increase in

  11. A globally stable autopilot with wave filter using only yaw angle measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trygve Lauvdal

    1996-04-01

    Full Text Available A stable minimum phase transfer function from rudder angle to yaw angle is used to design a globally stable adaptive ship autopilot. First-order wave disturbances in yaw are filtered by applying a notch filter. Integral action is introduced by using a reference model technique. Global stability is proven for the total system which include the yaw rate observer, the parameter update law, the feedback controller, the notch filter and the integral part of the controller. The simulation results showed that the performance is excellent, even with no a priori knowledge of the ship parameters.

  12. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xian-Zhao; Xu, Xi-Ming; Wang, Fei; Li, Ming; Wang, Zi-Min

    2015-09-05

    A quantitative and accurate measurement of the range of hip joint flexion (RHF) is necessarily required in the evaluation of disordered or artificial hip joint function. This study aimed to assess a novel method to measure RHF more accurately and objectively. Lateral radiographs were taken of 31 supine men with hip joints extended or flexed. Relevant angles were measured directly from the radiographs. The change in the sacrofemoral angle (SFA) (the angle formed between the axis of the femur and the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1) from hip joint extension to hip joint flexion, was proposed as the RHF. The validity of this method was assessed via concomitant measurements of changes in the femur-horizontal angle (between the axis of the femur and the horizontal line) and the sacrum-horizontal angle (SHA) (between the line tangent to the upper endplate of S1 and the horizontal line), the difference of which should equal the change in the SFA. The mean change in the SFA was 112.5 ± 7.4°, and was independent of participant age, height, weight, or body mass index. The mean changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs were 123.0 ± 6.4° and 11.4 ± 3.0°, respectively. This confirmed that the change of SFA between hip joint extension and hip joint flexion was equal to the difference between the changes in the femur-horizontal and SHAs. Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  13. Reliability and concurrent validity of knee angle measurement: smart phone app versus universal goniometer used by experienced and novice clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milanese, Steven; Gordon, Susan; Buettner, Petra; Flavell, Carol; Ruston, Sally; Coe, Damien; O'Sullivan, William; McCormack, Steven

    2014-12-01

    The use of goniometers to measure joint angles is a key part of musculoskeletal practice. Recently smartphone goniometry applications have become available to clinicians. This study examined the intra- and inter-measurer reliability of novice and experienced clinicians and the concurrent validity of assessing knee range of motion using a smartphone application (the Knee Goniometer App (Ockendon(©))) (KGA) and a standard universal goniometer (UG). Three clinicians, each with over seven years' experience as musculoskeletal physiotherapists and three final year physiotherapy students, measured 18 different knee joint angles three times, using both the universal goniometer and the smartphone goniometric application. The universal goniometer and the smartphone goniometric application were reliable in repeated measures of knee flexion angles (average Concordance Correlation Coefficient (CCC) > 0.98) with both experienced clinicians and final year physiotherapy students (average CCCs > 0.96). There were no significant differences in reliability between the experienced and the novice practitioners for either device. Agreement between the universal goniometer and smartphone goniometric application measurements was also high for all examiners with average CCCs all above 0.96. The Standard Error of Measurement ranged between 1.56° (0.52-2.66) for the UG and 0.62° (0.29-1.27) for the KGA. The universal goniometer and the smartphone goniometric application were reliable in repeated measures of knee flexion angles. Smaller error of measurement values for the smartphone goniometric application might indicate superiority for assessment where clinical situations demand greater precision of knee range of motion. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Reliability analysis of Cobb angle measurements of congenital scoliosis using X-ray and 3D-CT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauchi, Ryoji; Tsuji, Taichi; Cahill, Patrick J; Flynn, John M; Flynn, John M; Glotzbecker, Michael; El-Hawary, Ron; Heflin, John A; Imagama, Shiro; Joshi, Ajeya P; Nohara, Ayato; Ramirez, Norman; Roye, David P; Saito, Toshiki; Sawyer, Jeffrey R; Smith, John T; Kawakami, Noriaki

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic decisions for congenital scoliosis rely on Cobb angle measurements on consecutive radiographs. There have been no studies documenting the variability of measuring the Cobb angle using 3D-CT images in children with congenital scoliosis. The purpose of this study was to compare the reliability and measurement errors using X-ray images and those utilizing 3D-CT images. The X-ray and 3D-CT images of 20 patients diagnosed with congenital scoliosis were used to assess the reliability of the digital 3D-CT images for the measurement of the Cobb angle. Thirteen observers performed the measurements, and each image was analyzed by each observer twice with a minimum interval of 1 week between measurements. The analysis of intraobserver variation was expressed as the mean absolute difference (MAD) and standard deviation (SD) between measurements and the intraclass correlation coefficient (IaCC) of the measurements. In addition, the interobserver variation was expressed as the MAD and interclass correlation coefficient (IeCC). The average MAD and SD was 4.5° and 3.2° by the X-ray method and 3.7° and 2.6° by the 3D-CT method. The intraobserver and interobserver intraclass ICCs were excellent in both methods (X-ray: IaCC 0.835-0.994 IeCC 0.847, 3D-CT: IaCC 0.819-0.996 IeCC 0.893). There was no significant MAD difference between X-ray and 3D-CT images in measuring each type of congenital scoliosis by each observer. Results of Cobb angle measurements in patients with congenital scoliosis using X-ray images in the frontal plane could be reproduced with almost the same measurement variance (3°-4° measurement error) using 3D-CT images. This suggests that X-ray images are clinically useful for assessing any type of congenital scoliosis about measuring the Cobb angle alone. However, since 3D-CT can provide more detailed images of the anterior and posterior components of malformed vertebrae, the volume of information that can be obtained by evaluating them has

  15. Method for measuring tri-axial lumbar motion angles using wearable sheet stretch sensors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Body movements, such as trunk flexion and rotation, are risk factors for low back pain in occupational settings, especially in healthcare workers. Wearable motion capture systems are potentially useful to monitor lower back movement in healthcare workers to help avoid the risk factors. In this study, we propose a novel system using sheet stretch sensors and investigate the system validity for estimating lower back movement.Six volunteers (female:male = 1:1, mean age: 24.8 ± 4.0 years, height 166.7 ± 5.6 cm, weight 56.3 ± 7.6 kg participated in test protocols that involved executing seven types of movements. The movements were three uniaxial trunk movements (i.e., trunk flexion-extension, trunk side-bending, and trunk rotation and four multiaxial trunk movements (i.e., flexion + rotation, flexion + side-bending, side-bending + rotation, and moving around the cranial-caudal axis. Each trial lasted for approximately 30 s. Four stretch sensors were attached to each participant's lower back. The lumbar motion angles were estimated using simple linear regression analysis based on the stretch sensor outputs and compared with those obtained by the optical motion capture system.The estimated lumbar motion angles showed a good correlation with the actual angles, with correlation values of r = 0.68 (SD = 0.35, r = 0.60 (SD = 0.19, and r = 0.72 (SD = 0.18 for the flexion-extension, side bending, and rotation movements, respectively (all P < 0.05. The estimation errors in all three directions were less than 3°.The stretch sensors mounted on the back provided reasonable estimates of the lumbar motion angles. The novel motion capture system provided three directional angles without capture space limits. The wearable system possessed great potential to monitor the lower back movement in healthcare workers and helping prevent low back pain.

  16. Automated 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck junction using MR imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Ying; Fripp, Jurgen; Chandra, Shekhar S.; Walker, Duncan; Crozier, Stuart; Engstrom, Craig

    2015-10-01

    To develop an automated approach for 3D quantitative assessment and measurement of alpha angles from the femoral head-neck (FHN) junction using bone models derived from magnetic resonance (MR) images of the hip joint. Bilateral MR images of the hip joints were acquired from 30 male volunteers (healthy active individuals and high-performance athletes, aged 18-49 years) using a water-excited 3D dual echo steady state (DESS) sequence. In a subset of these subjects (18 water-polo players), additional True Fast Imaging with Steady-state Precession (TrueFISP) images were acquired from the right hip joint. For both MR image sets, an active shape model based algorithm was used to generate automated 3D bone reconstructions of the proximal femur. Subsequently, a local coordinate system of the femur was constructed to compute a 2D shape map to project femoral head sphericity for calculation of alpha angles around the FHN junction. To evaluate automated alpha angle measures, manual analyses were performed on anterosuperior and anterior radial MR slices from the FHN junction that were automatically reformatted using the constructed coordinate system. High intra- and inter-rater reliability (intra-class correlation coefficients  >  0.95) was found for manual alpha angle measurements from the auto-extracted anterosuperior and anterior radial slices. Strong correlations were observed between manual and automatic measures of alpha angles for anterosuperior (r  =  0.84) and anterior (r  =  0.92) FHN positions. For matched DESS and TrueFISP images, there were no significant differences between automated alpha angle measures obtained from the upper anterior quadrant of the FHN junction (two-way repeated measures ANOVA, F  measures around the FHN junction circumference with very good reliability and reproducibility. This work has the potential to improve analyses of cam-type lesions of the FHN junction for large-scale morphometric and clinical MR

  17. Contact Angle Goniometer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description:The FTA32 goniometer provides video-based contact angle and surface tension measurement. Contact angles are measured by fitting a mathematical expression...

  18. Angle of insertion and confirmation of angles measured after in vitro implantation during laminar vertebral stabilization in vertebral columns obtained from canine cadavers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knell, Sebastian C; Kircher, Patrick; Dennler, Matthias; Montavon, Pierre M; Voss, Katja; Hurter, Karin

    2011-12-01

    To determine angles of insertion for laminar vertebral fixation of L1 and L2 by use of a locking plate in dogs and to confirm screw placement by use of computed tomography (CT). Vertebral specimens harvested from 8 canine cadavers. The point of insertion and minimum and maximum insertion angles for laminar and facet screws for laminar vertebral stabilization were determined by use of CT. A precontoured locking plate was then placed by use of 1 locking screw in the lamina of each lumbar vertebra and 1 nonlocking screw in the facet joint. The position and angle of the screws were examined by use of CT, and penetration into the vertebral canal was recorded. Mean ± SD insertion angles for L1 and L2 were 18 ± 4° and 21 ± 5° toward the vertebral canal and 11 ± 4.4° and 10 ± 3° in a dorsal direction, respectively. Insertion angles for the facet joint were between 24 ± 4° ventrally and 12 ± 2° dorsally. Insertion of the screw did not penetrate the vertebral canal for 23 of 24 (96%) screws. For 23 of 24 inserted screws, the previously determined angle was maintained and purchase of bone and cortices was satisfactory. Placement of laminar and facet screws in canine vertebrae was possible and can be performed safely if angles of insertion determined pre-operatively via CT are maintained.

  19. Synthetic aperture double exposure digital holographic interferometry for wide angle measurement and monitoring of mechanical displacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kujawinska, M.; Makowski, P.; Finke, G.; Zak, J.; Józwik, M.; Kozacki, T.

    2015-08-01

    A novel approach for wide angle registration and display of double exposure digital holograms of 3D objects under static or step-wise load is presented. The registration setup concept combines digital Fourier holography with synthetic aperture (SA) technique, which is equivalent to usage of a wide angle, spherically curved detector. The coherent object wavefields extracted from a pair of acquisitions collected in the synthetic aperture double exposure digital holographic interferometry scheme (SA DEDH) are utilized as the input for two different scenarios of investigation, which include (i) numerical determination of 2D phase difference fringes representing deformation of an object and (ii) physical displaying of a 3D image resulting from interference of two object (slightly different) wavefronts registered at the SA double exposure hologram. The capture and display processes are analyzed and implemented. The applicability of both numerical and experimental approach to SA DEDH for testing engineering objects is discussed.

  20. Exploring the Binary Nature of STF 2128 Using Separation and Position Angle Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minarik, Holly; Helm, Victoria; Asquith, Ezra; Hoffman, Andrew; Fielding, Alec; Gaytan, Humberto; Marvier, Kevin; Warneke, Walter; Howell, James; Rowe, David; Freed, Rachel; Genet, Russell

    2018-01-01

    A team of nine students from Cuesta College studied double star STF 2128 (WDS 17033+5935) using ten CCD images obtained at the Sierra Remote Observatories. Calculations of these ten observations yielded an average separation of 12.203" and an average position angle of 42.957°. By comparing these values with past observations from the Washington Double Star Catalogue, we concluded that STF 2128 is likely a true binary system.

  1. High angle phase modulated low coherence interferometry for path length resolved Doppler measurements of multiply scattered light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; Van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2008-02-01

    We describe an improved method for coherence domain path length resolved measurements of multiply scattered photons in turbid media. An electro-optic phase modulator sinusoidally modulates the phase in the reference arm of a low coherence fiber optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer, at a high phase modulation angle. For dynamic turbid media this results in Doppler broadened phase modulation interference peaks at the modulation frequency and its multiples. The signal to noise ratio is increased by almost one order or magnitude for large modulation angles and the shape of the spectral peaks resulting from the interference of Doppler shifted sample waves and reference light is not changed. The path length dependent Doppler broadening is compared with the theoretical predictions in the single scattered and diffusive regimes. The experimentally measured optical path lengths are validated with the Monte Carlo technique.

  2. Joint angle measurement: a comparative study of the reliability of goniometry and wire tracing for the hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, B; Bruton, A; Goddard, J R

    1997-11-01

    To compare the inter- and intra-rater reliability of goniometry and wire tracing in the assessment of finger joint angles: metacarpo-phalangeal (MCPJ), proximal (PIPJ) and distal interphalangeal joints (DIPJ). Twenty occupational therapists and 20 physiotherapists with a range of clinical experience were recruited from nine different centres. Using a masked goniometer and wire tracing they carried out repeated assessments of the MCPJ, PIPJ and DIPJ of a normal subject fixed in two different positions. The two assessment methods did not produce comparable angle measurements. Goniometry showed greater inter- and intra-rater reliability than wire tracing. Regardless of the assessment tool, the repeatability coefficient indicated that DIPJ measurement was less reliable than the other joints. Clinical and specialist experience did not affect reliability. Although both goniometry and wire tracing show limitations as reliable assessment tools, it is recommended that where possible goniometry should be used.

  3. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viezzer, E., E-mail: eleonora.viezzer@ipp.mpg.de, E-mail: eviezzer@us.es [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Department of Atomic, Molecular, and Nuclear Physics, University of Seville, Avda. Reina Mercedes, 41012 Seville (Spain); Dux, R.; Dunne, M. G. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasma Physics, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line D{sub α}. The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  4. Determining Metacarpophalangeal Flexion Angle Tolerance for Reliable Volumetric Joint Space Measurements by High-resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tom, Stephanie; Frayne, Mark; Manske, Sarah L; Burghardt, Andrew J; Stok, Kathryn S; Boyd, Steven K; Barnabe, Cheryl

    2016-10-01

    The position-dependence of a method to measure the joint space of metacarpophalangeal (MCP) joints using high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) was studied. Cadaveric MCP were imaged at 7 flexion angles between 0 and 30 degrees. The variability in reproducibility for mean, minimum, and maximum joint space widths and volume measurements was calculated for increasing degrees of flexion. Root mean square coefficient of variance values were spaces. Values for minimum joint space width were optimized under 10 degrees of flexion. MCP joint space measurements should be acquired at < 10 degrees of flexion in longitudinal studies.

  5. A new beam emission polarimetry diagnostic for measuring the magnetic field line angle at the plasma edge of ASDEX Upgrade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viezzer, E; Dux, R; Dunne, M G

    2016-11-01

    A new edge beam emission polarimetry diagnostic dedicated to the measurement of the magnetic field line angle has been installed on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. The new diagnostic relies on the motional Stark effect and is based on the simultaneous measurement of the polarization direction of the linearly polarized π (parallel to the electric field) and σ (perpendicular to the electric field) lines of the Balmer line Dα. The technical properties of the system are described. The calibration procedures are discussed and first measurements are presented.

  6. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the Drell-Yan process in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; Sirunyan, Albert M; Tumasyan, Armen; Adam, Wolfgang; Bergauer, Thomas; Dragicevic, Marko; Erö, Janos; Fabjan, Christian; Friedl, Markus; Fruehwirth, Rudolf; Ghete, Vasile Mihai; Hammer, Josef; Haensel, Stephan; Hoch, Michael; Hörmann, Natascha; Hrubec, Josef; Jeitler, Manfred; Kiesenhofer, Wolfgang; Krammer, Manfred; Liko, Dietrich; Mikulec, Ivan; Pernicka, Manfred; Rahbaran, Babak; Rohringer, Herbert; Schöfbeck, Robert; Strauss, Josef; Taurok, Anton; Teischinger, Florian; Trauner, Christine; Wagner, Philipp; Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Walzel, Gerhard; Widl, Edmund; Wulz, Claudia-Elisabeth; Mossolov, Vladimir; Shumeiko, Nikolai; Suarez Gonzalez, Juan; Bansal, Sunil; Benucci, Leonardo; De Wolf, Eddi A; Janssen, Xavier; Luyckx, Sten; Maes, Thomas; Mucibello, Luca; Ochesanu, Silvia; Roland, Benoit; Rougny, Romain; Selvaggi, Michele; Van Haevermaet, Hans; Van Mechelen, Pierre; Van Remortel, Nick; Blekman, Freya; Blyweert, Stijn; D'Hondt, Jorgen; Gonzalez Suarez, Rebeca; Kalogeropoulos, Alexis; Maes, Michael; Olbrechts, Annik; Van Doninck, Walter; Van Mulders, Petra; Van Onsem, Gerrit Patrick; Villella, Ilaria; Charaf, Otman; Clerbaux, Barbara; De Lentdecker, Gilles; Dero, Vincent; Gay, Arnaud; Hammad, Gregory Habib; Hreus, Tomas; Marage, Pierre Edouard; Raval, Amita; Thomas, Laurent; Vander Marcken, Gil; Vander Velde, Catherine; Vanlaer, Pascal; Adler, Volker; Cimmino, Anna; Costantini, Silvia; Grunewald, Martin; Klein, Benjamin; Lellouch, Jérémie; Marinov, Andrey; Mccartin, Joseph; Ryckbosch, Dirk; Thyssen, Filip; Tytgat, Michael; Vanelderen, Lukas; Verwilligen, Piet; Walsh, Sinead; Zaganidis, Nicolas; Basegmez, Suzan; Bruno, Giacomo; Caudron, Julien; Ceard, Ludivine; Cortina Gil, Eduardo; De Favereau De Jeneret, Jerome; Delaere, Christophe; Favart, Denis; Forthomme, Laurent; Giammanco, Andrea; Grégoire, Ghislain; Hollar, Jonathan; Lemaitre, Vincent; Liao, Junhui; Militaru, Otilia; Nuttens, Claude; Ovyn, Severine; Pagano, Davide; Pin, Arnaud; Piotrzkowski, Krzysztof; Schul, Nicolas; Beliy, Nikita; Caebergs, Thierry; Daubie, Evelyne; Alves, Gilvan; Brito, Lucas; De Jesus Damiao, Dilson; Pol, Maria Elena; Henrique Gomes E Souza, Moacyr; Aldá Júnior, Walter Luiz; Carvalho, Wagner; Da Costa, Eliza Melo; De Oliveira Martins, Carley; Fonseca De Souza, Sandro; Matos Figueiredo, Diego; Mundim, Luiz; Nogima, Helio; Oguri, Vitor; Prado Da Silva, Wanda Lucia; Santoro, Alberto; Silva Do Amaral, Sheila Mara; Sznajder, Andre; Souza Dos Anjos, Tiago; Bernardes, Cesar Augusto; De Almeida Dias, Flavia; Tomei, Thiago; De Moraes Gregores, Eduardo; Lagana, Caio; Da Cunha Marinho, Franciole; Mercadante, Pedro G; Novaes, Sergio F; Padula, Sandra; Darmenov, Nikolay; Genchev, Vladimir; Iaydjiev, Plamen; Piperov, Stefan; Rodozov, Mircho; Stoykova, Stefka; Sultanov, Georgi; Tcholakov, Vanio; Trayanov, Rumen; Vutova, Mariana; Dimitrov, Anton; Hadjiiska, Roumyana; Karadzhinova, Aneliya; Kozhuharov, Venelin; Litov, Leander; Mateev, Matey; Pavlov, Borislav; Petkov, Peicho; Bian, Jian-Guo; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng; Jiang, Chun-Hua; Liang, Dong; Liang, Song; Meng, Xiangwei; Tao, Junquan; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jian; Wang, Xianyou; Wang, Zheng; Xiao, Hong; Xu, Ming; Zang, Jingjing; Zhang, Zhen; Ban, Yong; Guo, Shuang; Guo, Yifei; Li, Wenbo; Mao, Yajun; Qian, Si-Jin; Teng, Haiyun; Zhu, Bo; Zou, Wei; Cabrera, Andrés; Gomez Moreno, Bernardo; Ocampo Rios, Alberto Andres; Osorio Oliveros, Andres Felipe; Sanabria, Juan Carlos; Godinovic, Nikola; Lelas, Damir; Lelas, Karlo; Plestina, Roko; Polic, Dunja; Puljak, Ivica; Antunovic, Zeljko; Dzelalija, Mile; Kovac, Marko; Brigljevic, Vuko; Duric, Senka; Kadija, Kreso; Luetic, Jelena; Morovic, Srecko; Attikis, Alexandros; Galanti, Mario; Mousa, Jehad; Nicolaou, Charalambos; Ptochos, Fotios; Razis, Panos A; Finger, Miroslav; Finger Jr, Michael; Assran, Yasser; Ellithi Kamel, Ali; Khalil, Shaaban; Mahmoud, Mohammed; Radi, Amr; Hektor, Andi; Kadastik, Mario; Müntel, Mait; Raidal, Martti; Rebane, Liis; Tiko, Andres; Azzolini, Virginia; Eerola, Paula; Fedi, Giacomo; Voutilainen, Mikko; Czellar, Sandor; Härkönen, Jaakko; Heikkinen, Mika Aatos; Karimäki, Veikko; Kinnunen, Ritva; Kortelainen, Matti J; Lampén, Tapio; Lassila-Perini, Kati; Lehti, Sami; Lindén, Tomas; Luukka, Panja-Riina; Mäenpää, Teppo; Tuominen, Eija; Tuominiemi, Jorma; Tuovinen, Esa; Ungaro, Donatella; Wendland, Lauri; Banzuzi, Kukka; Karjalainen, Ahti; Korpela, Arja; Tuuva, Tuure; Sillou, Daniel; Besancon, Marc; Choudhury, Somnath; Dejardin, Marc; Denegri, Daniel; Fabbro, Bernard; Faure, Jean-Louis; Ferri, Federico; Ganjour, Serguei; Givernaud, Alain; Gras, Philippe; Hamel de Monchenault, Gautier; Jarry, Patrick; Locci, Elizabeth; Malcles, Julie; Marionneau, Matthieu; Millischer, Laurent; Rander, John; Rosowsky, André; Shreyber, Irina; Titov, Maksym; Baffioni, Stephanie; Beaudette, Florian; Benhabib, Lamia; Bianchini, Lorenzo; Bluj, Michal; Broutin, Clementine; Busson, Philippe; Charlot, Claude; Dahms, Torsten; Dobrzynski, Ludwik; Elgammal, Sherif; Granier de Cassagnac, Raphael; Haguenauer, Maurice; Miné, Philippe; Mironov, Camelia; Ochando, Christophe; Paganini, Pascal; Sabes, David; Salerno, Roberto; Sirois, Yves; Thiebaux, Christophe; Veelken, Christian; Zabi, Alexandre; Agram, Jean-Laurent; Andrea, Jeremy; Bloch, Daniel; Bodin, David; Brom, Jean-Marie; Cardaci, Marco; Chabert, Eric Christian; Collard, Caroline; Conte, Eric; Drouhin, Frédéric; Ferro, Cristina; Fontaine, Jean-Charles; Gelé, Denis; Goerlach, Ulrich; Greder, Sebastien; Juillot, Pierre; Karim, Mehdi; Le Bihan, Anne-Catherine; Mikami, Yoshinari; Van Hove, Pierre; Fassi, Farida; Mercier, Damien; Baty, Clement; Beauceron, Stephanie; Beaupere, Nicolas; Bedjidian, Marc; Bondu, Olivier; Boudoul, Gaelle; Boumediene, Djamel; Brun, Hugues; Chasserat, Julien; Chierici, Roberto; Contardo, Didier; Depasse, Pierre; El Mamouni, Houmani; Fay, Jean; Gascon, Susan; Ille, Bernard; Kurca, Tibor; Le Grand, Thomas; Lethuillier, Morgan; Mirabito, Laurent; Perries, Stephane; Sordini, Viola; Tosi, Silvano; Tschudi, Yohann; Verdier, Patrice; Viret, Sébastien; Lomidze, David; Anagnostou, Georgios; Beranek, Sarah; Edelhoff, Matthias; Feld, Lutz; Heracleous, Natalie; Hindrichs, Otto; Jussen, Ruediger; Klein, Katja; Merz, Jennifer; Mohr, Niklas; Ostapchuk, Andrey; Perieanu, Adrian; Raupach, Frank; Sammet, Jan; Schael, Stefan; Sprenger, Daniel; Weber, Hendrik; Weber, Martin; Wittmer, Bruno; Zhukov, Valery; Ata, Metin; Dietz-Laursonn, Erik; Erdmann, Martin; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heidemann, Carsten; Hinzmann, Andreas; Hoepfner, Kerstin; Klimkovich, Tatsiana; Klingebiel, Dennis; Kreuzer, Peter; Lanske, Dankfried; Lingemann, Joschka; Magass, Carsten; Merschmeyer, Markus; Meyer, Arnd; Papacz, Paul; Pieta, Holger; Reithler, Hans; Schmitz, Stefan Antonius; Sonnenschein, Lars; Steggemann, Jan; Teyssier, Daniel; Bontenackels, Michael; Cherepanov, Vladimir; Davids, Martina; Flügge, Günter; Geenen, Heiko; Giffels, Manuel; Haj Ahmad, Wael; Hoehle, Felix; Kargoll, Bastian; Kress, Thomas; Kuessel, Yvonne; Linn, Alexander; Nowack, Andreas; Perchalla, Lars; Pooth, Oliver; Rennefeld, Jörg; Sauerland, Philip; Stahl, Achim; Tornier, Daiske; Zoeller, Marc Henning; Aldaya Martin, Maria; Behrenhoff, Wolf; Behrens, Ulf; Bergholz, Matthias; Bethani, Agni; Borras, Kerstin; Cakir, Altan; Campbell, Alan; Castro, Elena; Dammann, Dirk; Eckerlin, Guenter; Eckstein, Doris; Flossdorf, Alexander; Flucke, Gero; Geiser, Achim; Hauk, Johannes; Jung, Hannes; Kasemann, Matthias; Katsas, Panagiotis; Kleinwort, Claus; Kluge, Hannelies; Knutsson, Albert; Krämer, Mira; Krücker, Dirk; Kuznetsova, Ekaterina; Lange, Wolfgang; Lohmann, Wolfgang; Lutz, Benjamin; Mankel, Rainer; Marienfeld, Markus; Melzer-Pellmann, Isabell-Alissandra; Meyer, Andreas Bernhard; Mnich, Joachim; Mussgiller, Andreas; Olzem, Jan; Petrukhin, Alexey; Pitzl, Daniel; Raspereza, Alexei; Rosin, Michele; Schmidt, Ringo; Schoerner-Sadenius, Thomas; Sen, Niladri; Spiridonov, Alexander; Stein, Matthias; Tomaszewska, Justyna; Walsh, Roberval; Wissing, Christoph; Autermann, Christian; Blobel, Volker; Bobrovskyi, Sergei; Draeger, Jula; Enderle, Holger; Gebbert, Ulla; Görner, Martin; Hermanns, Thomas; Kaschube, Kolja; Kaussen, Gordon; Kirschenmann, Henning; Klanner, Robert; Lange, Jörn; Mura, Benedikt; Naumann-Emme, Sebastian; Nowak, Friederike; Pietsch, Niklas; Sander, Christian; Schettler, Hannes; Schleper, Peter; Schlieckau, Eike; Schröder, Matthias; Schum, Torben; Stadie, Hartmut; Steinbrück, Georg; Thomsen, Jan; Barth, Christian; Bauer, Julia; Berger, Joram; Buege, Volker; Chwalek, Thorsten; De Boer, Wim; Dierlamm, Alexander; Dirkes, Guido; Feindt, Michael; Gruschke, Jasmin; Guthoff, Moritz; Hackstein, Christoph; Hartmann, Frank; Heinrich, Michael; Held, Hauke; Hoffmann, Karl-Heinz; Honc, Simon; Katkov, Igor; Komaragiri, Jyothsna Rani; Kuhr, Thomas; Martschei, Daniel; Mueller, Steffen; Müller, Thomas; Niegel, Martin; Oberst, Oliver; Oehler, Andreas; Ott, Jochen; Peiffer, Thomas; Quast, Gunter; Rabbertz, Klaus; Ratnikov, Fedor; Ratnikova, Natalia; Renz, Manuel; Röcker, Steffen; Saout, Christophe; Scheurer, Armin; Schieferdecker, Philipp; Schilling, Frank-Peter; Schmanau, Mike; Schott, Gregory; Simonis, Hans-Jürgen; Stober, Fred-Markus Helmut; Troendle, Daniel; Wagner-Kuhr, Jeannine; Weiler, Thomas; Zeise, Manuel; Ziebarth, Eva Barbara; Daskalakis, Georgios; Geralis, Theodoros; Kesisoglou, Stilianos; Kyriakis, Aristotelis; Loukas, Demetrios; Manolakos, Ioannis; Markou, Athanasios; Markou, Christos; Mavrommatis, Charalampos; Ntomari, Eleni; Petrakou, Eleni; Gouskos, Loukas; Mertzimekis, Theodoros; Panagiotou, Apostolos; Saoulidou, Niki; Stiliaris, Efstathios; Evangelou, Ioannis; Foudas, Costas; Kokkas, Panagiotis; Manthos, Nikolaos; Papadopoulos, Ioannis; Patras, Vaios; Triantis, Frixos A; Aranyi, Attila; Bencze, Gyorgy; Boldizsar, Laszlo; Hajdu, Csaba; Hidas, Pàl; Horvath, Dezso; Kapusi, Anita; Krajczar, Krisztian; Sikler, Ferenc; Veres, Gabor Istvan; Vesztergombi, Gyorgy; Beni, Noemi; Molnar, Jozsef; Palinkas, Jozsef; Szillasi, Zoltan; Veszpremi, Viktor; Karancsi, János; Raics, Peter; Trocsanyi, Zoltan Laszlo; Ujvari, Balazs; Beri, Suman Bala; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Dhingra, Nitish; Gupta, Ruchi; Jindal, Monika; Kaur, Manjit; Kohli, Jatinder Mohan; Mehta, Manuk Zubin; Nishu, Nishu; Saini, Lovedeep Kaur; Sharma, Archana; Singh, Anil; Singh, Jasbir; Singh, Supreet Pal; Ahuja, Sudha; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Gupta, Pooja; Kumar, Ashok; Kumar, Arun; Malhotra, Shivali; Naimuddin, Md; Ranjan, Kirti; Shivpuri, Ram Krishen; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bhattacharya, Satyaki; Dutta, Suchandra; Gomber, Bhawna; Jain, Sandhya; Jain, Shilpi; Khurana, Raman; Sarkar, Subir; Choudhury, Rajani Kant; Dutta, Dipanwita; Kailas, Swaminathan; Kumar, Vineet; Mehta, Pourus; Mohanty, Ajit Kumar; Pant, Lalit Mohan; Shukla, Prashant; Aziz, Tariq; Guchait, Monoranjan; Gurtu, Atul; Maity, Manas; Majumder, Devdatta; Majumder, Gobinda; Mazumdar, Kajari; Mohanty, Gagan Bihari; Parida, Bibhuti; Saha, Anirban; Sudhakar, Katta; Wickramage, Nadeesha; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Dugad, Shashikant; Mondal, Naba Kumar; Arfaei, Hessamaddin; Bakhshiansohi, Hamed; Etesami, Seyed Mohsen; Fahim, Ali; Hashemi, Majid; Hesari, Hoda; Jafari, Abideh; Khakzad, Mohsen; Mohammadi, Abdollah; Mohammadi Najafabadi, Mojtaba; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, Saeid; Safarzadeh, Batool; Zeinali, Maryam; Abbrescia, Marcello; Barbone, Lucia; Calabria, Cesare; Colaleo, Anna; Creanza, Donato; De Filippis, Nicola; De Palma, Mauro; Fiore, Luigi; Iaselli, Giuseppe; Lusito, Letizia; Maggi, Giorgio; Maggi, Marcello; Manna, Norman; Marangelli, Bartolomeo; My, Salvatore; Nuzzo, Salvatore; Pacifico, Nicola; Pierro, Giuseppe Antonio; Pompili, Alexis; Pugliese, Gabriella; Romano, Francesco; Roselli, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Giovanna; Silvestris, Lucia; Trentadue, Raffaello; Tupputi, Salvatore; Zito, Giuseppe; Abbiendi, Giovanni; Benvenuti, Alberto; Bonacorsi, Daniele; Braibant-Giacomelli, Sylvie; Brigliadori, Luca; Capiluppi, Paolo; Castro, Andrea; Cavallo, Francesca Romana; Cuffiani, Marco; Dallavalle, Gaetano-Marco; Fabbri, Fabrizio; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fasanella, Daniele; Giacomelli, Paolo; Giunta, Marina; Grandi, Claudio; Marcellini, Stefano; Masetti, Gianni; Meneghelli, Marco; Montanari, Alessandro; Navarria, Francesco; Odorici, Fabrizio; Perrotta, Andrea; Primavera, Federica; Rossi, Antonio; Rovelli, Tiziano; Siroli, Gianni; Travaglini, Riccardo; Albergo, Sebastiano; Cappello, Gigi; Chiorboli, Massimiliano; Costa, Salvatore; Potenza, Renato; Tricomi, Alessia; Tuve, Cristina; Barbagli, Giuseppe; Ciulli, Vitaliano; Civinini, Carlo; D'Alessandro, Raffaello; Focardi, Ettore; Frosali, Simone; Gallo, Elisabetta; Gonzi, Sandro; Meschini, Marco; Paoletti, Simone; Sguazzoni, Giacomo; Tropiano, Antonio; Benussi, Luigi; Bianco, Stefano; Colafranceschi, Stefano; Fabbri, Franco; Piccolo, Davide; Fabbricatore, Pasquale; Musenich, Riccardo; Benaglia, Andrea; De Guio, Federico; Di Matteo, Leonardo; Gennai, Simone; Ghezzi, Alessio; Malvezzi, Sandra; Martelli, Arabella; Massironi, Andrea; Menasce, Dario; Moroni, Luigi; Paganoni, Marco; Pedrini, Daniele; Ragazzi, Stefano; Redaelli, Nicola; Sala, Silvano; Tabarelli de Fatis, Tommaso; Buontempo, Salvatore; Carrillo Montoya, Camilo Andres; Cavallo, Nicola; De Cosa, Annapaola; Dogangun, Oktay; Fabozzi, Francesco; Iorio, Alberto Orso Maria; Lista, Luca; Merola, Mario; Paolucci, Pierluigi; Azzi, Patrizia; Bacchetta, Nicola; Bellan, Paolo; Bisello, Dario; Branca, Antonio; Carlin, Roberto; Checchia, Paolo; Dorigo, Tommaso; Dosselli, Umberto; Fanzago, Federica; Gasparini, Fabrizio; Gasparini, Ugo; Gozzelino, Andrea; Lacaprara, Stefano; Lazzizzera, Ignazio; Margoni, Martino; Mazzucato, Mirco; Meneguzzo, Anna Teresa; Nespolo, Massimo; Perrozzi, Luca; Pozzobon, Nicola; Ronchese, Paolo; Simonetto, Franco; Torassa, Ezio; Tosi, Mia; Vanini, Sara; Zotto, Pierluigi; Zumerle, Gianni; Baesso, Paolo; Berzano, Umberto; Ratti, Sergio P; Riccardi, Cristina; Torre, Paola; Vitulo, Paolo; Viviani, Claudio; Biasini, Maurizio; Bilei, Gian Mario; Caponeri, Benedetta; Fanò, Livio; Lariccia, Paolo; Lucaroni, Andrea; Mantovani, Giancarlo; Menichelli, Mauro; Nappi, Aniello; Romeo, Francesco; Santocchia, Attilio; Taroni, Silvia; Valdata, Marisa; Azzurri, Paolo; Bagliesi, Giuseppe; Bernardini, Jacopo; Boccali, Tommaso; Broccolo, Giuseppe; Castaldi, Rino; D'Agnolo, Raffaele Tito; Dell'Orso, Roberto; Fiori, Francesco; Foà, Lorenzo; Giassi, Alessandro; Kraan, Aafke; Ligabue, Franco; Lomtadze, Teimuraz; Martini, Luca; Messineo, Alberto; Palla, Fabrizio; Palmonari, Francesco; Segneri, Gabriele; Serban, Alin Titus; Spagnolo, Paolo; Tenchini, Roberto; Tonelli, Guido; Venturi, Andrea; Verdini, Piero Giorgio; Barone, Luciano; Cavallari, Francesca; Del Re, Daniele; Di Marco, Emanuele; Diemoz, Marcella; Franci, Daniele; Grassi, Marco; Longo, Egidio; Meridiani, Paolo; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Organtini, Giovanni; Pandolfi, Francesco; Paramatti, Riccardo; Rahatlou, Shahram; Sigamani, Michael; Amapane, Nicola; Arcidiacono, Roberta; Argiro, Stefano; Arneodo, Michele; Biino, Cristina; Botta, Cristina; Cartiglia, Nicolo; Castello, Roberto; Costa, Marco; Demaria, Natale; Graziano, Alberto; Mariotti, Chiara; Maselli, Silvia; Migliore, Ernesto; Monaco, Vincenzo; Musich, Marco; Obertino, Maria Margherita; Pastrone, Nadia; Pelliccioni, Mario; Potenza, Alberto; Romero, Alessandra; Ruspa, Marta; Sacchi, Roberto; Sola, Valentina; Solano, Ada; Staiano, Amedeo; Vilela Pereira, Antonio; Belforte, Stefano; Cossutti, Fabio; Della Ricca, Giuseppe; Gobbo, Benigno; Marone, Matteo; Montanino, Damiana; Penzo, Aldo; Heo, Seong Gu; Nam, Soon-Kwon; Chang, Sunghyun; Chung, Jin Hyuk; Kim, Dong Hee; Kim, Gui Nyun; Kim, Ji Eun; Kong, Dae Jung; Park, Hyangkyu; Ro, Sang-Ryul; Son, Dong-Chul; Son, Taejin; Kim, Jae Yool; Kim, Zero Jaeho; Song, Sanghyeon; Jo, Hyun Yong; Choi, Suyong; Gyun, Dooyeon; Hong, Byung-Sik; Jo, Mihee; Kim, Hyunchul; Kim, Tae Jeong; Lee, Kyong Sei; Moon, Dong Ho; Park, Sung Keun; Seo, Eunsung; Sim, Kwang Souk; Choi, Minkyoo; Kang, Seokon; Kim, Hyunyong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Park, Chawon; Park, Inkyu; Park, Sangnam; Ryu, Geonmo; Cho, Yongjin; Choi, Young-Il; Choi, Young Kyu; Goh, Junghwan; Kim, Min Suk; Lee, Byounghoon; Lee, Jongseok; Lee, Sungeun; Seo, Hyunkwan; Yu, Intae; Bilinskas, Mykolas Jurgis; Grigelionis, Ignas; Janulis, Mindaugas; Martisiute, Dalia; Petrov, Pavel; Polujanskas, Mindaugas; Sabonis, Tomas; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Heredia-de La Cruz, Ivan; Lopez-Fernandez, Ricardo; Magaña Villalba, Ricardo; Martínez-Ortega, Jorge; Sánchez-Hernández, Alberto; Villasenor-Cendejas, Luis Manuel; Carrillo Moreno, Salvador; Vazquez Valencia, Fabiola; Salazar Ibarguen, Humberto Antonio; Casimiro Linares, Edgar; Morelos Pineda, Antonio; Reyes-Santos, Marco A; Krofcheck, David; Tam, Jason; Butler, Philip H; Doesburg, Robert; Silverwood, Hamish; Ahmad, Muhammad; Ahmed, Ijaz; Asghar, Muhammad Irfan; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Khalid, Shoaib; Khan, Wajid Ali; Khurshid, Taimoor; Qazi, Shamona; Shah, Mehar Ali; Shoaib, Muhammad; Brona, Grzegorz; Cwiok, Mikolaj; Dominik, Wojciech; Doroba, Krzysztof; Kalinowski, Artur; Konecki, Marcin; Krolikowski, Jan; Frueboes, Tomasz; Gokieli, Ryszard; Górski, Maciej; Kazana, Malgorzata; Nawrocki, Krzysztof; Romanowska-Rybinska, Katarzyna; Szleper, Michal; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zalewski, Piotr; Almeida, Nuno; Bargassa, Pedrame; David Tinoco Mendes, Andre; Faccioli, Pietro; Ferreira Parracho, Pedro Guilherme; Gallinaro, Michele; Musella, Pasquale; Nayak, Aruna; Pela, Joao; Ribeiro, Pedro Quinaz; Seixas, Joao; Varela, Joao; Afanasiev, Serguei; Belotelov, Ivan; Bunin, Pavel; Gavrilenko, Mikhail; Golutvin, Igor; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Kozlov, Guennady; Lanev, Alexander; Moisenz, Petr; Palichik, Vladimir; Perelygin, Victor; Shmatov, Sergey; Smirnov, Vitaly; Volodko, Anton; Zarubin, Anatoli; Golovtsov, Victor; Ivanov, Yury; Kim, Victor; Levchenko, Petr; Murzin, Victor; Oreshkin, Vadim; Smirnov, Igor; Sulimov, Valentin; Uvarov, Lev; Vavilov, Sergey; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Andrey; Andreev, Yuri; Dermenev, Alexander; Gninenko, Sergei; Golubev, Nikolai; Kirsanov, Mikhail; Krasnikov, Nikolai; Matveev, Viktor; Pashenkov, Anatoli; Toropin, Alexander; Troitsky, Sergey; Epshteyn, Vladimir; Erofeeva, Maria; Gavrilov, Vladimir; Kaftanov, Vitali; Kossov, Mikhail; Krokhotin, Andrey; Lychkovskaya, Natalia; Popov, Vladimir; Safronov, Grigory; Semenov, Sergey; Stolin, Viatcheslav; Vlasov, Evgueni; Zhokin, Alexander; Belyaev, Andrey; Boos, Edouard; Dubinin, Mikhail; Dudko, Lev; Ershov, Alexander; Gribushin, Andrey; Kodolova, Olga; Lokhtin, Igor; Markina, Anastasia; Obraztsov, Stepan; Perfilov, Maxim; Petrushanko, Sergey; Sarycheva, Ludmila; Savrin, Viktor; Snigirev, Alexander; Andreev, Vladimir; Azarkin, Maksim; Dremin, Igor; Kirakosyan, Martin; Leonidov, Andrey; Mesyats, Gennady; Rusakov, Sergey V; Vinogradov, Alexey; Azhgirey, Igor; Bayshev, Igor; Bitioukov, Sergei; Grishin, Viatcheslav; Kachanov, Vassili; Konstantinov, Dmitri; Korablev, Andrey; Krychkine, Victor; Petrov, Vladimir; Ryutin, Roman; Sobol, Andrei; Tourtchanovitch, Leonid; Troshin, Sergey; Tyurin, Nikolay; Uzunian, Andrey; Volkov, Alexey; Adzic, Petar; Djordjevic, Milos; Ekmedzic, Marko; Krpic, Dragomir; Milosevic, Jovan; Aguilar-Benitez, Manuel; Alcaraz Maestre, Juan; Arce, Pedro; Battilana, Carlo; Calvo, Enrique; Cerrada, Marcos; Chamizo Llatas, Maria; Colino, Nicanor; De La Cruz, Begona; Delgado Peris, Antonio; Diez Pardos, Carmen; Domínguez Vázquez, Daniel; Fernandez Bedoya, Cristina; Fernández Ramos, Juan Pablo; Ferrando, Antonio; Flix, Jose; Fouz, Maria Cruz; Garcia-Abia, Pablo; Gonzalez Lopez, Oscar; Goy Lopez, Silvia; Hernandez, Jose M; Josa, Maria Isabel; Merino, Gonzalo; Puerta Pelayo, Jesus; Redondo, Ignacio; Romero, Luciano; Santaolalla, Javier; Soares, Mara Senghi; Willmott, Carlos; Albajar, Carmen; Codispoti, Giuseppe; de Trocóniz, Jorge F; Cuevas, Javier; Fernandez Menendez, Javier; Folgueras, Santiago; Gonzalez Caballero, Isidro; Lloret Iglesias, Lara; Vizan Garcia, Jesus Manuel; Brochero Cifuentes, Javier Andres; Cabrillo, Iban Jose; Calderon, Alicia; Chuang, Shan-Huei; Duarte Campderros, Jordi; Felcini, Marta; Fernandez, Marcos; Gomez, Gervasio; Gonzalez Sanchez, Javier; Jorda, Clara; Lobelle Pardo, Patricia; Lopez Virto, Amparo; Marco, Jesus; Marco, Rafael; Martinez Rivero, Celso; Matorras, Francisco; Munoz Sanchez, Francisca Javiela; Piedra Gomez, Jonatan; Rodrigo, Teresa; Rodríguez-Marrero, Ana Yaiza; Ruiz-Jimeno, Alberto; Scodellaro, Luca; Sobron Sanudo, Mar; Vila, Ivan; Vilar Cortabitarte, Rocio; Abbaneo, Duccio; Auffray, Etiennette; Auzinger, Georg; Baillon, Paul; Ball, Austin; Barney, David; Bell, Alan James; Benedetti, Daniele; Bernet, Colin; Bialas, Wojciech; Bloch, Philippe; Bocci, Andrea; Bolognesi, Sara; Bona, Marcella; Breuker, Horst; Bunkowski, Karol; Camporesi, Tiziano; Cerminara, Gianluca; Christiansen, Tim; Coarasa Perez, Jose Antonio; Curé, Benoît; D'Enterria, David; De Roeck, Albert; Di Guida, Salvatore; Dupont-Sagorin, Niels; Elliott-Peisert, Anna; Frisch, Benjamin; Funk, Wolfgang; Gaddi, Andrea; Georgiou, Georgios; Gerwig, Hubert; Gigi, Dominique; Gill, Karl; Giordano, Domenico; Glege, Frank; Gomez-Reino Garrido, Robert; Gouzevitch, Maxime; Govoni, Pietro; Gowdy, Stephen; Guida, Roberto; Guiducci, Luigi; Hansen, Magnus; Hartl, Christian; Harvey, John; Hegeman, Jeroen; Hegner, Benedikt; Hoffmann, Hans Falk; Innocente, Vincenzo; Janot, Patrick; Kaadze, Ketino; Karavakis, Edward; Lecoq, Paul; Lenzi, Piergiulio; Lourenco, Carlos; Maki, Tuula; Malberti, Martina; Malgeri, Luca; Mannelli, Marcello; Masetti, Lorenzo; Maurisset, Aurelie; Mavromanolakis, Georgios; Meijers, Frans; Mersi, Stefano; Meschi, Emilio; Moser, Roland; Mozer, Matthias Ulrich; Mulders, Martijn; Nesvold, Erik; Nguyen, Matthew; Orimoto, Toyoko; Orsini, Luciano; Palencia Cortezon, Enrique; Perez, Emmanuelle; Petrilli, Achille; Pfeiffer, Andreas; Pierini, Maurizio; Pimiä, Martti; Piparo, Danilo; Polese, Giovanni; Quertenmont, Loic; Racz, Attila; Reece, William; Rodrigues Antunes, Joao; Rolandi, Gigi; Rommerskirchen, Tanja; Rovelli, Chiara; Rovere, Marco; Sakulin, Hannes; Schäfer, Christoph; Schwick, Christoph; Segoni, Ilaria; Sharma, Archana; Siegrist, Patrice; Silva, Pedro; Simon, Michal; Sphicas, Paraskevas; Spiga, Daniele; Spiropulu, Maria; Stoye, Markus; Tsirou, Andromachi; Vichoudis, Paschalis; Wöhri, Hermine Katharina; Worm, Steven; Zeuner, Wolfram Dietrich; Bertl, Willi; Deiters, Konrad; Erdmann, Wolfram; Gabathuler, Kurt; Horisberger, Roland; Ingram, Quentin; Kaestli, Hans-Christian; König, Stefan; Kotlinski, Danek; Langenegger, Urs; Meier, Frank; Renker, Dieter; Rohe, Tilman; Sibille, Jennifer; Bäni, Lukas; Bortignon, Pierluigi; Caminada, Lea; Casal, Bruno; Chanon, Nicolas; Chen, Zhiling; Cittolin, Sergio; Dissertori, Günther; Dittmar, Michael; Eugster, Jürg; Freudenreich, Klaus; Grab, Christoph; Hintz, Wieland; Lecomte, Pierre; Lustermann, Werner; Marchica, Carmelo; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, Pablo; Milenovic, Predrag; Moortgat, Filip; Nägeli, Christoph; Nef, Pascal; Nessi-Tedaldi, Francesca; Pape, Luc; Pauss, Felicitas; Punz, Thomas; Rizzi, Andrea; Ronga, Frederic Jean; Rossini, Marco; Sala, Leonardo; Sanchez, Ann - Karin; Sawley, Marie-Christine; Starodumov, Andrei; Stieger, Benjamin; Takahashi, Maiko; Tauscher, Ludwig; Thea, Alessandro; Theofilatos, Konstantinos; Treille, Daniel; Urscheler, Christina; Wallny, Rainer; Weber, Matthias; Wehrli, Lukas; Weng, Joanna; Aguilo, Ernest; Amsler, Claude; Chiochia, Vincenzo; De Visscher, Simon; Favaro, Carlotta; Ivova Rikova, Mirena; Jaeger, Andreas; Millan Mejias, Barbara; Otiougova, Polina; Robmann, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander; Snoek, Hella; Chang, Yuan-Hann; Chen, Kuan-Hsin; Kuo, Chia-Ming; Li, Syue-Wei; Lin, Willis; Liu, Zong-Kai; Lu, Yun-Ju; Mekterovic, Darko; Volpe, Roberta; Yu, Shin-Shan; Bartalini, Paolo; Chang, Paoti; Chang, You-Hao; Chang, Yu-Wei; Chao, Yuan; Chen, Kai-Feng; Dietz, Charles; Grundler, Ulysses; Hou, George Wei-Shu; Hsiung, Yee; Kao, Kai-Yi; Lei, Yeong-Jyi; Lu, Rong-Shyang; Shiu, Jing-Ge; Tzeng, Yeng-Ming; Wan, Xia; Wang, Minzu; Adiguzel, Aytul; Bakirci, Mustafa Numan; Cerci, Salim; Dozen, Candan; Dumanoglu, Isa; Eskut, Eda; Girgis, Semiray; Gokbulut, Gul; Hos, Ilknur; Kangal, Evrim Ersin; Kayis Topaksu, Aysel; Onengut, Gulsen; Ozdemir, Kadri; Ozturk, Sertac; Polatoz, Ayse; Sogut, Kenan; Sunar Cerci, Deniz; Tali, Bayram; Topakli, Huseyin; Uzun, Dilber; Vergili, Latife Nukhet; Vergili, Mehmet; Akin, Ilina Vasileva; Aliev, Takhmasib; Bilin, Bugra; Bilmis, Selcuk; Deniz, Muhammed; Gamsizkan, Halil; Guler, Ali Murat; Ocalan, Kadir; Ozpineci, Altug; Serin, Meltem; Sever, Ramazan; Surat, Ugur Emrah; Yalvac, Metin; Yildirim, Eda; Zeyrek, Mehmet; Deliomeroglu, Mehmet; Gülmez, Erhan; Isildak, Bora; Kaya, Mithat; Kaya, Ozlem; Özbek, Melih; Ozkorucuklu, Suat; Sonmez, Nasuf; Levchuk, Leonid; Bostock, Francis; Brooke, James John; Cheng, Teh Lee; Clement, Emyr; Cussans, David; Frazier, Robert; Goldstein, Joel; Grimes, Mark; Heath, Greg P; Heath, Helen F; Kreczko, Lukasz; Metson, Simon; Newbold, Dave M; Nirunpong, Kachanon; Poll, Anthony; Senkin, Sergey; Smith, Vincent J; Basso, Lorenzo; Bell, Ken W; Belyaev, Alexander; Brew, Christopher; Brown, Robert M; Camanzi, Barbara; Cockerill, David JA; Coughlan, John A; Harder, Kristian; Harper, Sam; Jackson, James; Kennedy, Bruce W; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Petyt, David; Radburn-Smith, Benjamin Charles; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire; Tomalin, Ian R; Womersley, William John; Bainbridge, Robert; Ball, Gordon; Ballin, Jamie; Beuselinck, Raymond; Buchmuller, Oliver; Colling, David; Cripps, Nicholas; Cutajar, Michael; Davies, Gavin; Della Negra, Michel; Ferguson, William; Fulcher, Jonathan; Futyan, David; Gilbert, Andrew; Guneratne Bryer, Arlo; Hall, Geoffrey; Hatherell, Zoe; Hays, Jonathan; Iles, Gregory; Jarvis, Martyn; Karapostoli, Georgia; Lyons, Louis; Magnan, Anne-Marie; Marrouche, Jad; Mathias, Bryn; Nandi, Robin; Nash, Jordan; Nikitenko, Alexander; Papageorgiou, Anastasios; Pesaresi, Mark; Petridis, Konstantinos; Pioppi, Michele; Raymond, David Mark; Rogerson, Samuel; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Rose, Andrew; Ryan, Matthew John; Seez, Christopher; Sharp, Peter; 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Bonato, Alessio; Eskew, Christopher; Fehling, David; Giurgiu, Gavril; Gritsan, Andrei; Grizzard, Kevin; Guo, Zijin; Hu, Guofan; Maksimovic, Petar; Rappoccio, Salvatore; Swartz, Morris; Tran, Nhan Viet; Whitbeck, Andrew; Baringer, Philip; Bean, Alice; Benelli, Gabriele; Grachov, Oleg; Kenny Iii, Raymond Patrick; Murray, Michael; Noonan, Daniel; Sanders, Stephen; Stringer, Robert; Wood, Jeffrey Scott; Zhukova, Victoria; Barfuss, Anne-Fleur; Bolton, Tim; Chakaberia, Irakli; Ivanov, Andrew; Khalil, Sadia; Makouski, Mikhail; Maravin, Yurii; Shrestha, Shruti; Svintradze, Irakli; Gronberg, Jeffrey; Lange, David; Wright, Douglas; Baden, Drew; Boutemeur, Madjid; Eno, Sarah Catherine; Ferencek, Dinko; Gomez, Jaime; Hadley, Nicholas John; Kellogg, Richard G; Kirn, Malina; Lu, Ying; Mignerey, Alice; Rossato, Kenneth; Rumerio, Paolo; Santanastasio, Francesco; Skuja, Andris; Temple, Jeffrey; Tonjes, Marguerite; Tonwar, Suresh C; Twedt, Elizabeth; Alver, Burak; Bauer, Gerry; Bendavid, Joshua; Busza, Wit; 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Stone, Robert; Thomas, Scott; Cerizza, Giordano; Hollingsworth, Matthew; Spanier, Stefan; Yang, Zong-Chang; York, Andrew; Eusebi, Ricardo; Flanagan, Will; Gilmore, Jason; Gurrola, Alfredo; Kamon, Teruki; Khotilovich, Vadim; Montalvo, Roy; Osipenkov, Ilya; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Perloff, Alexx; Roe, Jeffrey; Safonov, Alexei; Sengupta, Sinjini; Suarez, Indara; Tatarinov, Aysen; Toback, David; Akchurin, Nural; Bardak, Cemile; Damgov, Jordan; Dudero, Phillip Russell; Jeong, Chiyoung; Kovitanggoon, Kittikul; Lee, Sung Won; Libeiro, Terence; Mane, Poonam; Roh, Youn; Sill, Alan; Volobouev, Igor; Wigmans, Richard; Yazgan, Efe; Appelt, Eric; Brownson, Eric; Engh, Daniel; Florez, Carlos; Gabella, William; Issah, Michael; Johns, Willard; Johnston, Cody; Kurt, Pelin; Maguire, Charles; Melo, Andrew; Sheldon, Paul; Snook, Benjamin; Tuo, Shengquan; Velkovska, Julia; Arenton, Michael Wayne; Balazs, Michael; Boutle, Sarah; Cox, Bradley; Francis, Brian; Goadhouse, Stephen; Goodell, Joseph; Hirosky, Robert; Ledovskoy, Alexander; Lin, Chuanzhe; Neu, Christopher; Wood, John; Yohay, Rachel; Gollapinni, Sowjanya; Harr, Robert; Karchin, Paul Edmund; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, Chamath; Lamichhane, Pramod; Mattson, Mark; Milstène, Caroline; Sakharov, Alexandre; Anderson, Michael; Bachtis, Michail; Belknap, Donald; Bellinger, James Nugent; Carlsmith, Duncan; Cepeda, Maria; Dasu, Sridhara; Efron, Jonathan; Friis, Evan; Gray, Lindsey; Grogg, Kira Suzanne; Grothe, Monika; Hall-Wilton, Richard; Herndon, Matthew; Hervé, Alain; Klabbers, Pamela; Klukas, Jeffrey; Lanaro, Armando; Lazaridis, Christos; Leonard, Jessica; Loveless, Richard; Mohapatra, Ajit; Ojalvo, Isabel; Parker, William; Ross, Ian; Savin, Alexander; Smith, Wesley H; Swanson, Joshua; Weinberg, Marc

    2011-01-01

    A multivariate likelihood method to measure electroweak couplings with the Drell-Yan process at the LHC is presented. The process is described by the dilepton rapidity, invariant mass, and decay angle distributions. The decay angle ambiguity due to the unknown assignment of the scattered constituent quark and antiquark to the two protons in a collision is resolved statistically using correlations between the observables. The method is applied to a sample of dimuon events from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 inverse femtobarns. From the dominant u-ubar, d-dbar to gamma*/Z to opposite sign dimuons process, the effective weak mixing angle parameter is measured to be sin^2(theta[eff]) = 0.2287 +/- 0.0020 (stat.) +/- 0.0025 (syst.). This result is consistent with measurements from other processes, as expected within the standard model.

  7. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the Drell-Yan process in proton-proton collisions at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chatrchyan, S. [Yerevan Physics Institute (Armenia); et al.,

    2011-12-01

    A multivariate likelihood method to measure electroweak couplings with the Drell-Yan process at the LHC is presented. The process is described by the dilepton rapidity, invariant mass, and decay angle distributions. The decay angle ambiguity due to the unknown assignment of the scattered constituent quark and antiquark to the two protons in a collision is resolved statistically using correlations between the observables. The method is applied to a sample of dimuon events from proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.1 inverse femtobarns. From the dominant u-ubar, d-dbar to gamma*/Z to opposite sign dimuons process, the effective weak mixing angle parameter is measured to be sin^2(theta[eff]) = 0.2287 +/- 0.0020 (stat.) +/- 0.0025 (syst.). This result is consistent with measurements from other processes, as expected within the standard model.

  8. Comparison of radiographic measurements of the patellar tendon-tibial plateau angle with anatomical measurements in dogs. Validity of the common tangent and tibial plateau methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismuth, C; Ferrand, F X; Millet, M; Labrunie, A; Marin, B; Pillard, P; Deroy, C; Fau, D; Carozzo, C; Cachon, T; Viguier, E

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the validity of the common tangent and conventional tibial plateau angle methods for measuring the patellar tendon angle (PTA) in dogs. Radiographs of cadaveric stifles (n = 20) placed at 135° in true lateral position were obtained to measure the PTA with both methods. A Kirschner wire was inserted perpendicularly to the patellar tendon at its insertion on the tibia and the stifle was dissected. Two Kirschner wires were then used to identify the anatomical landmarks of the tibial plateau. A digital image was obtained of the proximal tibia in true lateral position. Six blinded observers measured each PTA digitally while the anatomical PTA was determined by an independent blinded observer from the angle between the line representing the tibial plateau and the Kirschner wire representing the perpendicular to the patellar tendon. The agreement between the methods was determined statistically from an intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The global ICC for the common tangent method (0.44) and for the conventional method (0.4) indicated that their overall validity is poor. The measurements obtained by common tangentmethod and conventional method were respectively below and above the anatomical measurements. The reproducibility of the PTA measurements based on images of the dissected stifles was very good. Both the common tangent and conventional methods show poor concordance with the anatomical measurement of PTA. Further studies are needed to determine if errors in measurements affect the clinical outcome.

  9. Evaluation of the Norberg angle threshold: a comparison of Norberg angle and distraction index as measures of coxofemoral degenerative joint disease susceptibility in seven breeds of dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culp, William T N; Kapatkin, Amy S; Gregor, Thomas P; Powers, Michelle Y; McKelvie, Pamela J; Smith, Gail K

    2006-07-01

    To evaluate the thresholds of 2 radiographic methods used to determine coxofemoral joint laxity in 7 breeds of dogs. Three hundred and fifty clinically normal dogs. Retrospective study. Hip radiographs from 7 breeds of dogs were randomly selected from a database. None of the dogs had radiographic evidence of degenerative joint disease (DJD). Distraction index (DI) and Norberg angle (NA) were measured on these radiographs and compared with DI and NA thresholds for diagnosing DJD susceptibility derived from the literature and from evaluated Borzois. Dogs with a NA or =105 degrees and a DI of >0.32 were considered false-negatives. Mean age of all dogs was 22.9 months. Mean NA for all dogs was 99.37 degrees, and mean DI for all dogs was 0.44. Borzoi mean DI of was significantly less than the mean DI of the other 6 breeds. The highest (most hip laxity) Borzoi DI was 0.32, and the lowest (most hip laxity) Borzoi NA was 99 degrees. False-positive and false-negative diagnoses were identified in 6 of the 7 breeds. Using the NA threshold of 105 degrees (literature established threshold of susceptibility to DJD) resulted in a high percentage of false-negative and false-positive diagnoses. Breeds like the Labrador Retriever and Rottweiler would have large numbers of hip dysplasia susceptible dogs remain in the breeding population based on this NA threshold. False-positive diagnoses were common in breeds like the Australian Shepherd, Borzoi, and German Shepherd effectively eliminating hip dysplasia nonsusceptible dogs from the breeding population. The NA was not an accurate predictor of DJD susceptibility in these 7 breeds of dogs when using a NA threshold of 105 degrees.

  10. Wettability of supercritical carbon dioxide/water/quartz systems: simultaneous measurement of contact angle and interfacial tension at reservoir conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraji, Soheil; Goual, Lamia; Piri, Mohammad; Plancher, Henry

    2013-06-11

    Injection of carbon dioxide in deep saline aquifers is considered as a method of carbon sequestration. The efficiency of this process is dependent on the fluid-fluid and rock-fluid interactions inside the porous media. For instance, the final storage capacity and total amount of capillary-trapped CO2 inside an aquifer are affected by the interfacial tension between the fluids and the contact angle between the fluids and the rock mineral surface. A thorough study of these parameters and their variations with temperature and pressure will provide a better understanding of the carbon sequestration process and thus improve predictions of the sequestration efficiency. In this study, the controversial concept of wettability alteration of quartz surfaces in the presence of supercritical carbon dioxide (sc-CO2) was investigated. A novel apparatus for measuring interfacial tension and contact angle at high temperatures and pressures based on Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis with no-Apex (ADSA-NA) method was developed and validated with a simple system. Densities, interfacial tensions, and dynamic contact angles of CO2/water/quartz systems were determined for a wide range of pressures and temperatures relevant to geological sequestration of CO2 in the subcritical and supercritical states. Image analysis was performed with ADSA-NA method that allows the determination of both interfacial tensions and contact angles with high accuracy. The results show that supercritical CO2 alters the wettability of quartz surface toward less water-wet conditions compared to subcritical CO2. Also we observed an increase in the water advancing contact angles with increasing temperature indicating less water-wet quartz surfaces at higher temperatures.

  11. Assessment of difficult laryngoscopy by electronically measured maxillo-pharyngeal angle on lateral cervical radiograph: A prospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta Kumkum

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Difficult airway continued to be a major cause of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Successful airway management depends on direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Difficult laryngoscopy is a resultant of incomplete structural arrangements during the process of head positioning. Through clinical history,examination of the patients along with craniofacial indices alerts the anesthetist for difficult laryngoscopy. But it does not predict all causes of difficult laryngoscopy during pre-anesthetic evaluation. The maxillo-pharyngeal angle, an upper airway anatomical balance, was proposed for better understanding the pathophysiology of difficult laryngoscopy. In our study we have assess difficult laryngoscopy by electronically measuring maxillo-pharyngeal angles on a lateral cervical radiograph. This angle is normally greater than 100 o . Less than 90 o angle suggests either impossible or difficult direct laryngoscopy when all known craniofacial indices were within the normal range. Cervical radiographic assessment is a simple, economical, and non-invasive predictive method for difficult laryngoscopy. It should be used routinely along with other indices as pre-anesthetic airway assessment criteria to predict the difficult laryngoscopy. Context: Difficulties with airway management continue to be a major cause of anesthesia-related morbidity, mortality, and litigation. Pre-operative assessment of difficult laryngoscopy by the simple and non-invasive radiological method can help to prevent them. Aims: To assess the difficult laryngoscopy pre operatively by a simple and non invasive radiological method by electronically measuring maxillo-pharyngeal angle on a lateral cervical radiograph and it′s correlation with Cormack and Lehane grading. Settings and Design: This is a controlled, nonrandomized, prospective, cohort observation study. Patients and Methods: The 157 adult consented patients of ASA grade I to III of either sex

  12. Assessment of difficult laryngoscopy by electronically measured maxillo-pharyngeal angle on lateral cervical radiograph: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kumkum; Gupta, Prashant K

    2010-09-01

    Difficult airway continued to be a major cause of anesthesia-related morbidity and mortality. Successful airway management depends on direct laryngoscopy and tracheal intubation. Difficult laryngoscopy is a resultant of incomplete structural arrangements during the process of head positioning. Through clinical history, examination of the patients along with craniofacial indices alerts the anesthetist for difficult laryngoscopy. But it does not predict all causes of difficult laryngoscopy during pre-anesthetic evaluation. The maxillo-pharyngeal angle, an upper airway anatomical balance, was proposed for better understanding the pathophysiology of difficult laryngoscopy. In our study we have assess difficult laryngoscopy by electronically measuring maxillo-pharyngeal angles on a lateral cervical radiograph. This angle is normally greater than 100°. Less than 90° angle suggests either impossible or difficult direct laryngoscopy when all known craniofacial indices were within the normal range. Cervical radiographic assessment is a simple, economical, and non-invasive predictive method for difficult laryngoscopy. It should be used routinely along with other indices as pre-anesthetic airway assessment criteria to predict the difficult laryngoscopy. Difficulties with airway management continue to be a major cause of anesthesia-related morbidity, mortality, and litigation. Pre-operative assessment of difficult laryngoscopy by the simple and non-invasive radiological method can help to prevent them. To assess the difficult laryngoscopy pre operatively by a simple and non invasive radiological method by electronically measuring maxillo-pharyngeal angle on a lateral cervical radiograph and it's correlation with Cormack and Lehane grading. This is a controlled, nonrandomized, prospective, cohort observation study. The 157 adult consented patients of ASA grade I to III of either sex, scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia with endo-tracheal intubation, were

  13. Wettability Investigation of UV/O3 and Acid Functionalized MWCNT and MWCNT/PMMA Nanocomposites by Contact Angle Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seil Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion state of individual MWCNT in the polymer matrix influences the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of the resulting composite. One method of obtaining a good dispersion state of MWCNT in a polymer matrix is to functionalize the surface of MWCNT using various treatments to enhance the surface energy and increase the dispersibility of MWCNT. In this study, wettability and surface energy of UV/O3 and acid-treated multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and its polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA polymer nanocomposites were measured using contact angle analysis in various solvent media. Contact angle analysis was based on ethylene glycol-water-glycerol probe liquid set and data was further fitted into geometric mean (Fowkes, van Oss-Chaudhury-Good (GvOC, and Chang-Qing-Chen (CQC models to determine both nonpolar and acid base surface energy components. Analysis was conducted on MWCNT thin films subjected to different levels of UV/O3 and acid treatments as well as their resulting MWCNT/PMMA nanocomposites. Contact angle analysis of thin films and nanocomposites revealed that the total surface energy of all samples was well fitted with each other. In addition, CQC model was able to determine the surface nature and polarity of MWCNT and its nanocomposites. Results indicated that the wettability changes in the thin film and its nanocomposites are due to the change in surface chemistry. Finally, electrical properties of nanocomposites were measured to investigate the effect of surface functionality (acid or basic on the MWCNT surfaces.

  14. Hypersonic boundary-layer transition measurements at Mach 10 on a large seven-degree cone at angle of attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraru, Ciprian G.

    The ability to predict the onset of boundary-layer transition is critical for hypersonic flight vehicles. The development of prediction methods depends on a thorough comprehension of the mechanisms that cause transition. In order to improve the understanding of hypersonic boundary-layer transition, tests were conducted on a large 7° half-angle cone at Mach 10 in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Wind Tunnel 9. Twenty-four runs were performed at varying unit Reynolds numbers and angles of attack for sharp and blunt nosetip configurations. Heat-transfer measurements were used to determine the start of transition on the cone. Increasing the unit Reynolds number caused a forward movement of transition on the sharp cone at zero angle of attack. Increasing nosetip radius delayed transition up to a radius of 12.7 mm. Larger nose radii caused the start of transition to move forward. At angles of attack up to 10°, transition was leeside forward for nose radii up to 12.7 mm and windside forward for nose radii of 25.4 mm and 50.8 mm. Second-mode instability waves were measured on the sharp cone and cones with small nose radii. At zero angle of attack, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone were in earlier stages of development as the unit Reynolds number was decreased. The same trend was observed as the nosetip radius was increased. No second-mode waves were apparent for the cones with large nosetip radii. As the angle of attack was increased, waves at a particular streamwise location on the sharp cone moved to earlier stages of growth on the windward ray and later stages of growth on the leeward ray. RMS amplitudes of second-mode waves were computed. Comparison between maximum second-mode amplitudes and edge Mach numbers showed good correlation for various nosetip radii and unit Reynolds numbers. Using the e N method, initial amplitudes were estimated and compared to freestream noise in the second-mode frequency band. Correlations indicate

  15. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Q. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Modern Physics, Lanzhou (China); Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Xu, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Taeschner, A. [Universitaet Muenster, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Muenster (Germany); Klehr, F.; Wuestner, P. [Elektronik und Analytik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, Zentralinstitut fuer Engineering, Juelich (Germany); Ritman, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich, Institut fuer Kernphysik, Juelich (Germany); Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, Bochum (Germany)

    2014-10-15

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to 90 {sup circle} are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment. (orig.)

  16. A recoil detector for the measurement of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at angles close to 90°

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Q.; Bechstedt, U.; Gillitzer, A.; Grzonka, D.; Khoukaz, A.; Klehr, F.; Lehrach, A.; Prasuhn, D.; Ritman, J.; Sefzick, T.; Stockmanns, T.; Täschner, A.; Wuestner, P.; Xu, H.

    2014-10-01

    The design and construction of a recoil detector for the measurement of recoil protons of antiproton-proton elastic scattering at scattering angles close to are described. The performance of the recoil detector has been tested in the laboratory with radioactive sources and at COSY with proton beams by measuring proton-proton elastic scattering. The results of laboratory tests and commissioning with beam are presented. Excellent energy resolution and proper working performance of the recoil detector validate the conceptual design of the KOALA experiment at HESR to provide the cross section data needed to achieve a precise luminosity determination at the PANDA experiment.

  17. Contact Angles of Water-repellent Porous Media Inferred by Tensiometer- TDR Probe Measurement Under Controlled Wetting and Drying Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subedi, Shaphal; Komatsu, Ken; Komatsu, Toshiko

    2013-01-01

    The time dependency of water repellency (WR) in hydrophobic porous media plays a crucial role for water infiltration processes after rainfall and for the long-term performance of capillary barrier systems. The contact angle (CA) of hydrophobic media normally decreases with continuous contact...... with water, eventually allowing water imbibition. However, the effect of the reduction in CA with soil-water contact time on the water retention function of hydrophobic media is not yet fully understood. In this study, water retention characteristics were measured using a hanging water column apparatus...... equipped with a mini-time domain reflectometry (TDR) coil probe under controlled wetting and drying in a water-repellent volcanic ash soil (VAS) and in sands coated with different hydrophobic agents. The contact angle (CA–SWRC) under imbibition was evaluated based on the inflection points on the water...

  18. Lorentz angle measurements as part of the sensor R\\&D for the CMS Tracker upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Nurnberg, Andreas Matthias

    2012-01-01

    $200 m^2$ silicon strip tracker was designed to withstand the radiation of 10 years of LHC operation. The foreseen high luminosity upgrade of the LHC imposes even higher demands on the radiation tolerance and thus requires the construction of a new tracking detector. To determine the properties of different silicon materials and production processes, a campaign has been started by the CMS Tracker Collaboration to identify the most promising candidate material for the new CMS tracker. The silicon sensors of the CMS tracker are operated in a 3.8 T magnetic field. Charges created by traversing ionizing particles inside the active sensor volume are deflected by the Lorentz force. The Lorentz angle, under which the charge drifts through the sensor, is strongly dependent on the mobility, which in turn depends on the electric field and may depend on the radiation damage created by the particles produced by the LHC. Studying this is ...

  19. Kinetic equilibrium reconstruction of KSTAR plasmas including internal pitch angle profile measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanzheng; Sabbagh, Steven; Park, Youngseok; Ahn, Jaeheon; Ko, Jinseok

    2017-10-01

    High fidelity kinetic equilibrium reconstructions are an essential requirement for accurate stability and disruption prediction analyses to support continuous operation of high beta KSTAR tokamak plasmas. The present work significantly expands our past magnetics-only equilibrium reconstruction capability. The present kinetic equilibrium reconstructions include Thomson scattering (TS) data, charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) data, and allowance for fast particle pressure in addition to external magnetics and shaping field current data, and inclusion of vacuum vessel and passive plate currents following a ``partial kinetic'' approach used successfully in other devices. In addition, up to 25 channels of Motional Stark Effect (MSE) data are used to constrain the local magnetic field pitch angle to produce reliable evaluation of the safety factor profile. The ramifications of the inclusion of the kinetic profiles and MSE data are examined in the context of plasma stability evaluation, and parameters and analysis used for disruption event characterization and forecasting (DECAF). Supported by US DOE Grant DE-SC0016614.

  20. Compensation method for the influence of angle of view on animal temperature measurement using thermal imaging camera combined with depth image.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Leizi; Dong, Daming; Zhao, Xiande; Han, Pengcheng

    2016-12-01

    In the study, we proposed an animal surface temperature measurement method based on Kinect sensor and infrared thermal imager to facilitate the screening of animals with febrile diseases. Due to random motion and small surface temperature variation of animals, the influence of the angle of view on temperature measurement is significant. The method proposed in the present study could compensate the temperature measurement error caused by the angle of view. Firstly, we analyzed the relationship between measured temperature and angle of view and established the mathematical model for compensating the influence of the angle of view with the correlation coefficient above 0.99. Secondly, the fusion method of depth and infrared thermal images was established for synchronous image capture with Kinect sensor and infrared thermal imager and the angle of view of each pixel was calculated. According to experimental results, without compensation treatment, the temperature image measured in the angle of view of 74° to 76° showed the difference of more than 2°C compared with that measured in the angle of view of 0°. However, after compensation treatment, the temperature difference range was only 0.03-1.2°C. This method is applicable for real-time compensation of errors caused by the angle of view during the temperature measurement process with the infrared thermal imager. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu Fan; Tan Jiubin; Cui Jiwen [Center of Ultra-precision Optoelectronic Instrument Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2013-06-15

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of {+-}0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of {+-}1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  2. Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation of measuring small angle deviations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Fan; Tan, Jiubin; Cui, Jiwen

    2013-06-01

    Beam splitting target reflector based compensation for the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation is proposed in this article to improve the measurement accuracy and stability of small angle deviations. A beam splitting target reflector is used to replace the plane mirror in laser autocollimation to generate a reference beam when returning the measurement beam. The reference beam and measurement beam have the same angular drift, but have different sensitivities to the rotation angle of the reflector due to the unique characteristics of the reflector. Thus, the angular drift of laser beam in laser autocollimation can be compensated in real time by using the drift of reference beam. Experimental results indicate that an output stability of 0.085 arc sec in 2 h can be achieved after compensation. And a measurement accuracy of ±0.032 arc sec can be obtained over the range of ±1190 arc sec with an effective resolution of 0.006 arc sec. It is confirmed that the compensation method for the angular drift of laser beam is necessary for improving the measurement accuracy and stability in laser autocollimation.

  3. The Measurement of Palpebral Fissure Height Using the Intersection Angle (the Réal Angle) Between the Meeting Points of the Upper Eyelid and the Edge of the Cornea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hun Joo; Kim, Soo Shin

    2017-06-01

    We evaluated a new palpebral fissure height measurement to evaluate medial, lateral, and overall ptosis. We photographed 250 Koreans (44 males, 206 females) and evaluated their Réal 1 angle (angle between the meeting points of the upper eyelid and the corneal edge), Réal 2 angle (angle between the meeting point of the upper eyelid, medial corneal edge and a vertical line through the center of the pupil), Réal 3 angle (angle between the meeting point of the upper eyelid, lateral corneal edge and a vertical line through the center of the pupil), and Réal 4 angle (Réal 2-Réal 3). Angles were compared between sexes and age groups. We then evaluated the Réal angles of 13 Korean actresses. Mean age was 31.85 ± 14.60 years; Réal 1 was 129.01° ± 14.23°, Réal 2 was 68.20° ± 7.49°, Réal 3 was 60.80° ± 9.65°. There was no significant difference between the sexes in Réal 1, Réal 2, and Réal 3 angles. Réal 1 increased with age, and Réal 4 decreased with age. All Réal angles were significantly different between age groups. The actresses' mean age was 30.66 ± 8.01 years; Réal 1 was 102.84° ± 10.16°, Réal 2 was 57.87° ± 6.10°, and Réal 3 was 44.97° ± 8.74°. This simple measurement of palpebral fissure height using Réal angles consistently evaluated the amount of medial, lateral, and general ptosis. For average Korean eyes, the lateral portion of the upper eyelid is slightly higher than the medial portion; however, this lateral portion droops with age. Korean actresses have vertically higher eyes than average Korean women. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266 .

  4. Using a photochemical model for the validation of NO2 satellite measurements at different solar zenith angles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Bracher

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography aboard the recently launched Environmental Satellite (ENVISAT of ESA is measuring solar radiance upwelling from the atmosphere and the extraterrestrial irradiance. Appropriate inversion of the ultraviolet and visible radiance measurements, observed from the atmospheric limb, yields profiles of nitrogen dioxide, NO2, in the stratosphere (SCIAMACHY-IUP NO2 profiles V1. In order to assess their accuracy, the resulting NO2 profiles have been compared with those retrieved from the space borne occultation instruments Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE, data version v19 and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment II (SAGE II, data version 6.2. As the HALOE and SAGE II measurements are performed during local sunrise or sunset and because NO2 has a significant diurnal variability, the NO2 profiles derived from HALOE and SAGE II have been transformed to those predicted for the solar zenith angles of the SCIAMACHY measurement by using a 1-dimensional photochemical model. The model used to facilitate the comparison of the NO2 profiles from the different satellite sensors is described and a sensitivity ananlysis provided. Comparisons between NO2 profiles from SCIAMACHY and those from HALOE NO2 but transformed to the SCIAMACHY solar zenith angle, for collocations from July to October 2002, show good agreement (within +/-12% between the altitude range from 22 to 33km. The results from the comparison of all collocated NO2 profiles from SCIAMACHY and those from SAGE II transformed to the SCIAMACHY solar zenith angle show a systematic negative bias of 10 to 35% between 20km to 38km with a small standard deviation between 5 to 14%. These results agree with those of Newchurch and Ayoub (2004, implying that above 20km NO2 profiles from SAGE II sunset are probably somewhat high.

  5. The reliability and validity of three non-radiological measures of thoracic kyphosis and their relations to the standing radiological Cobb angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greendale, G A; Nili, N S; Huang, M-H; Seeger, L; Karlamangla, A S

    2011-06-01

    Hyperkyphosis is implicated in a mounting list of negative outcomes, including higher mortality. Hyperkyphosis research is hindered due to difficulties inherent in its measurement. By showing that three clinical measures of kyphosis are suitable for use in large scale, longitudinal, hyperkyphosis studies, we will facilitate much needed research in this field. The objective of this study is to describe the reliability of three non-radiological kyphosis measures (Debrunner kyphosis angle, flexicurve kyphosis index, and flexicurve kyphosis angle) and their validity compared to the Cobb angle and to approximate a Cobb angle from non-radiological kyphosis measures. We analyzed data from 113 participants aged ≥ 60 years with kyphosis angle ≥ 40°. Cobb angle was measured on a standing lateral thoracolumbar radiograph using bounds at T4 and T12. Non-radiological measures of kyphosis were made three times by a single rater and a 4th time by a blinded second rater. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities for non-radiological assessments were high (intra-class correlations of 0.96 to 0.98) and did not differ from each other. Pearson correlations, estimating validity, ranged from 0.62 to 0.69 and did not differ. The Debrunner angle was close to the Cobb angle, with scaling factor of 1.067 and an offset of 5°. The Flexicurve kyphosis angle had to be scaled by 1.53 to obtain the equivalent Cobb angle. The scaling factor for the Flexicurve kyphosis index to Cobb angle was 315, with an offset of 5°. Compared to the measured Cobb angle, Cobb angles predicted using the non-radiological measures had similar magnitude errors (standard deviations of the differences ranging between 10.24 and 11.26). Each non-radiological measurement had similar reliability and validity. Low cost, ease of use, and robustness to variations in spine contour argue for the Flexicurve in longitudinal kyphosis assessments. The approximate conversion factors provided will permit translation of non

  6. Accuracy of CT image in measuring the mandible for implant : Effect of mandibular position and gantry angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soon Chul; Choi, Hang Moon; Park, Rae Jeong; Lee, Sam Sun; Park, Tae Won; You, Dong Soo [Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Radiology and Dental Research Institute, College of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-02-15

    We used five adult dog mandibles embedded in resin block and six different cross-sectional planes for each mandible were chosen. According to the angle of mandibular occlusal plane to vertical plane (mandibular angle) and gantry angle of CT machine, we classified 4 experimental groups and 1 control group. The control group images were taken at the mandivylar angle 0 (group 1); 30 and 0 (group 2);15 and 15 (group 3); 30 and 30 (group 4), respectively. Using the reformatted cross-sectional images, the distance from the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest and the distance from the mandibular canal to the buccal cortex and to the lingual cortex was measured and compared. The obtained results were as follows: 1. The distance from the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest of group 1 and 2 was larger than control group, but the distance of group 3 and 4 was smaller. The distance from the mandibular canal to the buccal cortex and to the lingual cortex of all experimental groups was smaller than control group. 2. The distance from the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest showed the largest difference from control group in all experimental groups, especially in group 2 and 4 (p<0.05). 3. In the distance from the mandibular canal to the alveolar crest, the number of deviation value under 1 mm was 20 in group 3 and was 11 in group 2 and 4, respectively. 4. The deviation value of the distance from the mandibular canal to the buccal cortex and to the lingual cortex was under 1 mm in most cases.

  7. A PRECISION MEASUREMENT OF THE NEUTRINO MIXING ANGLE THETA (SUB 13) USING REACTOR ANTINEUTRINOS AT DAYA BAY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KETTELL, S.; ET AL.

    2006-10-16

    This document describes the design of the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment. Recent discoveries in neutrino physics have shown that the Standard Model of particle physics is incomplete. The observation of neutrino oscillations has unequivocally demonstrated that the masses of neutrinos are nonzero. The smallness of the neutrino masses (<2 eV) and the two surprisingly large mixing angles measured have thus far provided important clues and constraints to extensions of the Standard Model. The third mixing angle, {delta}{sub 13}, is small and has not yet been determined; the current experimental bound is sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} < 0.17 at 90% confidence level (from Chooz) for {Delta}m{sub 31}{sup 2} = 2.5 x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}. It is important to measure this angle to provide further insight on how to extend the Standard Model. A precision measurement of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} using nuclear reactors has been recommended by the 2004 APS Multi-divisional Study on the Future of Neutrino Physics as well as a recent Neutrino Scientific Assessment Group (NUSAG) report. We propose to perform a precision measurement of this mixing angle by searching for the disappearance of electron antineutrinos from the nuclear reactor complex in Daya Bay, China. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will be vital in resolving the neutrino-mass hierarchy and future measurements of CP violation in the lepton sector because this technique cleanly separates {theta}{sub 13} from CP violation and effects of neutrino propagation in the earth. A reactor-based determination of sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} will provide important, complementary information to that from long-baseline, accelerator-based experiments. The goal of the Daya Bay experiment is to reach a sensitivity of 0.01 or better in sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub 13} at 90% confidence level.

  8. Estimation of the Surface Properties of Styrene-Acrylonitrile Random Copolymers from Contact Angle Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adão; Saramago; Fernandes

    1999-09-01

    The surface free energy per unit area of a solid, gamma(S), is a fundamental property of materials and determines their surface and interfacial behavior in processes like wetting and adhesion. In this study the gamma(S) of a series of styrene-acrylonitrile random copolymers is evaluated. Three different approaches are used to determine the components in which the surface free energy can be decomposed. Using the geometric and the harmonic mean approach, the dispersive, gamma(d), and polar, gamma(p), components of the solid surface free energy were determined and compared to the Lifshitz-van der Waals, gamma(LW), and acid-base, gamma(AB), components using the approach developed by C. J. van Oss et al. (1987, Adv. Colloid Interface Sci. 28, 35). The acid-base approach was also used to evaluate the work of adhesion of the test liquids: water, glycerol, and thiodiglycol. It was found that the contact angles of these liquids follow closely the predictions of Cassie equation. The evaluation of the surface free energy components on one hand and the relative magnitude of the work of adhesion components on the other hand, suggest that below 50% of acrylonitrile the polystyrene repeating units are preferentially at the surface. Above 50% of acrylonitrile the segregation of the low-energy homopolymer at the surface decreases. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Reliable measurement of 3D foot bone angles based on the frame-of-reference derived from a sole of the foot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Lee, Dong Yeon; Park, Jinah

    2016-03-01

    Clinical management of foot pathology requires accurate and robust measurement of the anatomical angles. In order to measure a 3D angle, recent approaches have adopted a landmark-based local coordinate system to establish bone angles used in orthopedics. These measurement methods mainly assess the relative angle between bones using a representative axis derived from the morphological feature of the bone and therefore, the results can be affected by bone deformities. In this study, we propose a method of deriving a global frame-of-reference to acquire consistent direction of the foot by extracting the undersurface of the foot from the CT image data. The two lowest positions of the foot skin are identified from the surface to define the base plane, and the direction from the hallux to the fourth toe is defined together to construct the global coordinate system. We performed the experiment on 10 volumes of foot CT images of healthy subjects to verify that the proposed method provides reliable measurements. We measured 3D angles for talus-calcaneus and talus-navicular using facing articular surfaces of paired bones. The angle was reported in 3 projection angles based on both coordinate systems defined by proposed global frame-of-reference and by CT image planes (saggital, frontal, and transverse). The result shows that the quantified angle using the proposed method considerably reduced the standard deviation (SD) against the angle using the conventional projection planes, and it was also comparable with the measured angles obtained from local coordinate systems of the bones. Since our method is independent from any individual local shape of a bone, unlike the measurement method using the local coordinate system, it is suitable for inter-subject comparison studies.

  10. Selected CPV Results from LHCb Run 1 and Prospects for CKM $\\gamma $ Angle Measurements in Run 2

    CERN Document Server

    Oblakowska-Mucha, Agniezka

    2016-01-01

    The LHCb detector is a single-arm forward spectrometer that collects data at the LHC, designed for studies of flavour physics with high precision. In this review, a few selected results regarding CP violation are discussed with particular emphasis on the CKM angle measurements. This sum- mary covers results based on the data collected by the LHCb detector during 2011 and 2012 proton–proton LHC runs at the centre-of-mass ener- gies of 7 and 8 TeV, respectively. Some remarks on prospects for analyses foreseen in the ongoing LHC Run 2 are also presented

  11. The effect of pronation and inclination on the measurement of the hallucal distal metatarsal articular set angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakmak, Gökhan; Kanatlı, Ulunay; Kılınç, Barış; Yetkin, Haluk

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we tried to evaluate the effect of pronation and the inclination of the first metatarsal on the measurement of distal metatarsal articular angle (DMAA) in 10 cadaver first metatarsals. Ten cadaver first metatarsals were fixed to a device. This device can change the inclination and pronation angles of the metatarsal. 15-30-45 degrees of inclination and 0-10-20 degrees of pronation were applied to the metatarsals. After applying radio-opaque putty to the medial and lateral articular edges and metatarsal dorsal diaphyseal ridge, the X-ray and digital images were taken at different degrees of inclination and pronation. A graphics software did the measurement of DMAA. The statistical analysis was done by paired sample t-test. The inclination had no effect on DMAA (p>0.1). The pronation of the first metatarsal was found to have a positive effect on DMAA (pDMAA was found to also increase. We found no difference between the measurements of the X-ray and the digital images. According to the current data, the measurement of DMAA is not suitable for making clinical and surgical decisions. The inclination of the first metatarsal can change, depending on the height of the medial longitudinal arch. By doing this study, we are trying to simulate the pes cavus and pes planus deformity on the radiologic measurement of pronation of the hallux. According to our results, inclination has no effect on the measurement of DMAA. However, the measurement of DMAA is expected to be dependent on the rotational deformity of the hallux.

  12. A simple method to measure critical angles for high-sensitivity differential refractometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilio, S C

    2012-01-16

    A total internal reflection-based differencial refractometer, capable of measuring the real and imaginary parts of the complex refractive index in real time, is presented. The device takes advantage of the phase difference acquired by s- and p-polarized light to generate an easily detectable minimum at the reflected profile. The method allows to sensitively measuring transparent and turbid liquid samples.

  13. Indoor measurement of angle resolved light absorption by antireflective glass in solar panels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amdemeskel, Mekbib Wubishet; Benatto, Gisele Alves dos Reis; Riedel, Nicholas

    2017-01-01

    measurements with trackers. The experimental results showed optical responses that are stable and suitable for indoor characterization of solar cells. We find the characteristic optical response of six different antireflective glasses, and based on such measurements, we perform PVsyst simulations and present...

  14. Measurement Over Large Solid Angle of Low Energy Cosmic Ray Muon Flux

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiner, H. F., III; Schwitters, R. F.

    2015-12-01

    Recent advancements in portable muon detectors have made cosmic ray imaging practical for many diverse applications. Working muon attenuation detectors have been built at the University of Texas and are already successfully being used to image tunnels, structures, and Mayan pyramids. Most previous studies have focused on energy measurements of the cosmic ray spectrum from of 1 GeV or higher. We have performed an accurate measurement of the ultra-low energy (muon spectrum down to the acceptance level of our detector, around one hundred MeV. Measurements include angular dependence, with acceptance approaching horizontal. Measurements were made underwater using a custom enclosure in Lake Travis, Austin, TX. This measurement will allow more accurate predictions and simulations of attenuation for small (muon tomography.

  15. Frontomaxillary Facial Angle Measurement in Screening for Trisomy 18 at 11 + 0 to 13 + 6 Weeks of Pregnancy: A Double-Centre Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartosz Czuba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of prenatal screening for trisomy 18 with the use of the frontomaxillary facial angle (FMF angle measurement. Material and Methods. The study involved 1751 singleton pregnancies at 11–13 + 6 weeks, examined between 2007 and 2011. Serum PAPP-A and free beta-hCG levels were assessed, and crown-rump length, nuchal translucency, and FMF angle were measured in all patients. 1350 fetuses with known follow-up were included in the final analysis. Results. Highly significant (P<0.01 negative correlation between the CRL and the FMF angle was found. There were 30 fetuses with trisomy 18. FMF angle was highly significantly larger (P<0.0001 in fetuses with trisomy 18 as compared to chromosomally normal fetuses. Two models of first trimester screening were compared: Model 1 based on maternal age, NT, and first trimester biochemistry test (DR 80–85% and FPR 0.3–0.6%, and Model 2 = Model 1 + FMF angle measurement (DR 87.3–93.3% and FPR 0.8–1.3%. Conclusions. The use of FMF angle measurement increases the effectiveness of the screening for trisomy 18. Introduction of the FMF angle as an independent marker for fetal trisomy 18 risk requires further prospective research in large populations.

  16. Measurement of the DA$\\Phi$NE luminosity with the KLOE detector using large angle Bhabha scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosino, F; Antonelli, M; Bacci, C; Beltrame, P; Bencivenni, G; Bertolucci, Sergio; Bini, C; Bloise, C; Bocci, V; Bossi, F; Bowring, D; Branchini, P; Caloi, R; Campana, P; Capon, G; Capussela, T; Ceradini, F; Chi, S; Chiefari, G; Ciambrone, P; Conetti, S; De Lucia, E; De Santis, A; De Simone, P; De Zorzi, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Denig, A; Di Domenico, A; Di Donato, C; Di Falco, S; Di Micco, B; Doria, A; Dreucci, M; Felici, G; Ferrari, A; Ferrer, M L; Finocchiaro, G; Fiore, S; Forti, C; Franzini, P; Gatti, C; Gauzzi, P; Giovannella, S; Gorini, E; Graziani, E; Incagli, M; Kluge, W; Kulikov, V; Lacava, F; Lanfranchi, G; Lee-Franzini, J; Leone, D; Martini, M; Massarotti, P; Mei, W; Meola, S; Miscetti, S; Moulson, M; Müller, S; Murtas, F; Napolitano, M; Nguyen, F; Palutan, M; Pasqualucci, E; Passeri, A; Patera, V; Perfetto, F; Pontecorvo, L; Primavera, M; Santangelo, P; Santovetti, E; Saracino, G; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Scuri, F; Sfiligoi, I; Spadaro, T; Testa, M; Tortora, L; Valente, P; Valeriani, B; Venanzoni, G; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, A; Versaci, R; Xu, G

    2006-01-01

    We describe the method of measuring the integrated luminosity of the $e^+e^-$ collider DA$\\Phi$NE, the Frascati $\\phi-$factory. The measurement is done with the KLOE detector selecting large angle Bhabha scattering events and normalizing them to the effective cross section. The $e^+e^- \\to e^+e^-(\\gamma)$ cross section is calculated using different event generators which account for the $O(\\alpha)$ radiative initial and final state corrections, and the $\\phi$ resonance contribution. The accuracy of the measurement is 0.6%, where 0.3% comes from systematic errors related to the event counting and 0.5% from theoretical evaluations of the cross section.

  17. A warning system for travelling ionospheric disturbances using skywave Doppler frequency and angle-of-arrival measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belehaki, Anna; Reinisch, Bodo; Galkin, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs) constitute a threat for operational systems using groundbased HF and trans-ionospheric VHF-UHF radiowave propagation. TIDs can impose disturbances with amplitudes of up to 20% of the ambient electron density, and a Doppler frequency shifts of the order of 0.5 Hz on HF signals. Therefore their identification and tracking is important for the reliable operation of critical systems using the ionosphere as an essential part or for systems for which the ionosphere is fundamentally a nuisance. The Net-TIDE project has developed a warning system for real-time identification of TIDs using skywave Doppler frequency and angle-of-arrival measurements. Data are collected from network-coordinated HF sounding between pairs of European DPS4D and processed in real-time for the calculation of the angles-of-arrival and Doppler frequencies of ionospherically reflected high-frequency (HF) radio signals. The outcome is provided in real-time to the users to characterise TID activity over Europe based on the measured signal parameters. Complementary methodologies based on the analysis of vertical sounding parameters are currently exploited as verification means to improve the confidence level of the warnings. The resulting map of TID activity is updated every 5 minutes to enable the end-users enabling them to put into action specific mitigation techniques to protect their systems.

  18. X-ray diffraction study with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement of polymorphic crystallization of triacylglycerols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Satoru [Hiroshima Univ., Faculty of Applied Biological Science, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    Polymorphism of triacylglycerols (TAGs) is an important phenomenon which influences the physical chemical properties of fats employed in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics etc. In particular, precise analysis of kinetic properties of polymorphic crystallization is closely related to technical control of fat crystallization in confectionery and food industry. In the melt-mediated crystallization, which is one of the typical methods of crystallizing the more stable form for industrial use, the more stable form is induced by rapidly melting the less stable forms. Recently, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy using a synchrotron radiation source has been used in study of dynamic processes of polymorphic transformations of many TAGs. This approach has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the kinetics of processes occurring during the polymorphic crystallization and transformations of TAGs at the molecular level. In the present study, polymorphic crystallization of TAG has been examined with the time-resolved X-ray diffraction method with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement using synchrotron radiation. The main result is as follows: the melt mediation gave rise to the formation of a liquid crystalline structure having long spacing values of 5.1 nm and 4.6 nm in SOS (sn-1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol). Consequently, the use of the time-resolved X-ray diffraction method with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement using synchrotron radiation unveiled quite newer aspects of the polymorphic crystallization of the triacylglycerols from neat liquid, which were not detectable in conventional XRD techniques. (author)

  19. A precision control method for plasma electron density and Faraday rotation angle measurement on HL-2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Wu, Tongyu; Ding, Baogang; Li, Yonggao; Zhou, Yan; Yin, Zejie

    2017-07-01

    The precision of plasma electron density and Faraday rotation angle measurement is a key indicator for far-infrared laser interferometer/polarimeter plasma diagnosis. To improve the precision, a new multi-channel high signal-to-noise ratio HCOOH interferometer/polarimeter has been developed on the HL-2A tokamak. It has a higher level requirement for phase demodulation precision. This paper introduces an improved real-time fast Fourier transform algorithm based on the field programmable gate array, which significantly improves the precision. We also apply a real-time error monitoring module (REMM) and a stable error inhibiting module (SEIM) for precision control to deal with the weak signal. We test the interferometer/polarimeter system with this improved precision control method in plasma discharge experiments and simulation experiments. The experimental results confirm that the plasma electron density precision is better than 1/3600 fringe and the Faraday rotation angle measurement precision is better than 1/900 fringe, while the temporal resolution is 80 ns. This performance can fully meet the requirements of HL-2A.

  20. Accuracy of linear measurement using cone-beam computed tomography at different reconstruction angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikneshan, Nikneshan; Aval, Shadi Hamidi [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bakhshalian, Neema [Dept. of Advanced Periodontology, School of Dentistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles (United States); Shahab, Shahriyar [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Shahed University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Korea, Republic of); Mohammadpour, Mahdis [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Qazvin University of Medical Sciences, Qazvin (Iran, Islamic Republic of); SarikhanI, Soodeh [Dept. of Dental and Maxillofacial Radiology, School of Dentistry, Golestan University of Medical Sciences, Golestan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    This study was performed to evaluate the effect of changing the orientation of a reconstructed image on the accuracy of linear measurements using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Forty-two titanium pins were inserted in seven dry sheep mandibles. The length of these pins was measured using a digital caliper with readability of 0.01 mm. Mandibles were radiographed using a CBCT device. When the CBCT images were reconstructed, the orientation of slices was adjusted to parallel (i.e., 0 degrees), +10 degrees, +12 degrees, -12 degrees, and -10 degrees with respect to the occlusal plane. The length of the pins was measured by three radiologists, and the accuracy of these measurements was reported using descriptive statistics and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA); p<0.05 was considered statistically significant. The differences in radiographic measurements ranged from -0.64 to +0.06 at the orientation of -12 degrees, -0.66 to -0.11 at -10 degrees, -0.51 to +0.19 at 0 degrees, -0.64 to +0.08 at +10 degrees, and -0.64 to +0.1 at +12 degrees. The mean absolute values of the errors were greater at negative orientations than at the parallel position or at positive orientations. The observers underestimated most of the variables by 0.5-0.1 mm (83.6%). In the second set of observations, the reproducibility at all orientations was greater than 0.9. Changing the slice orientation in the range of -12 degrees to +12 degrees reduced the accuracy of linear measurements obtained using CBCT. However, the error value was smaller than 0.5 mm and was, therefore, clinically acceptable.

  1. Goniometer Measurements of Oral Labial Angle and Evaluation of Oral Motor Reflexes in Preterm Infants: Comparison to Findings in Term Infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ince, Deniz Anuk; Tugcu, Ali Ulas; Ecevit, Ayşe; Ciyiltepe, Muzeyyen; Kurt, Abdullah; Abbasoğlu, Aslıhan; Tekindal, Mustafa Agah; Tarcan, Aylin

    2015-10-01

    To date, no study has evaluated changes in oral labial angle as preterm infants mature. The main purpose of this study was to document goniometer measurements of the labial angle of the mouth in preterm infants, to assess changes with development, to compare to findings in healthy term infants, and also evaluate oral motor reflexes in these groups. Seventy-eight preterm infants and 45 healthy term infants were recruited for the prospective study. Labial angle was assessed via goniometer, and oral motor reflexes and the volume of milk ingested were evaluated. There was significant difference between term and preterm infants' labial angles (P Goniometer measurements of the oral labial angle may reveal oral motor performance in preterm infants and may be relevant for feeding skills assessment in this group of infants. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Pitch angle distribution of trapped energetic protons and helium isotope nuclei measured along the Resurs-01 No. 4 LEO satellite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Leonov

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available The NINA detector on board the Resurs-01 No. 4 satellite (835 km, 98° inclination is equipped with particle trackers based on silicon strip detectors. From the energy deposited in each of its silicon layers the mass, the momentum direction and energy of incident particles have been determined. The resolutions in mass and energy allow identification of H and He isotopes over the 10-50 MeV/n energy range. The angular resolution is about 2.5°. We present the direct measurements of proton and helium isotopes pitch angle distributions derived from Resurs-01 No.4/NINA observations and their variations as functions of (B, L coordinates and energy. The measurements of trapped helium isotopes spectrum are also presented.

  3. Time-Resolving Study of Stress-Induced Transformations of Isotactic Polypropylene through Wide Angle X-ray Scattering Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Finizia Auriemma

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The development of a highly oriented fiber morphology by effect of tensile deformation of stereodefective isotactic polypropylene (iPP samples, starting from the unoriented γ form, is studied by following the transformation in real time during stretching through wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS measurements. In the stretching process, after yielding, the initial γ form transforms into the mesomorphic form of iPP through mechanical melting and re-crystallization. The analysis of the scattering invariant measured in the WAXS region highlights that the size of the mesomorphic domains included in the well oriented fiber morphology obtained at high deformations increases through a process which involves the coalescence of the small fragments formed by effect of tensile stress during lamellar destruction with the domain of higher dimensions.

  4. Mobile Phone-Based Joint Angle Measurement for Functional Assessment and Rehabilitation of Proprioception

    OpenAIRE

    Quentin Mourcou; Anthony Fleury; Bruno Diot; Céline Franco; Nicolas Vuillerme

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of joint functional and proprioceptive abilities is essential for balance, posture, and motor control rehabilitation. Joint functional ability refers to the capacity of movement of the joint. It may be evaluated thereby measuring the joint range of motion (ROM). Proprioception can be defined as the perception of the position and of the movement of various body parts in space. Its role is essential in sensorimotor control for movement acuity, joint stability, coordination, and balan...

  5. Unbalance Identification of Speed-Variant Rotary Machinery without Phase Angle Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Cong Yue; Xingmin Ren; Yongfeng Yang; Wangqun Deng

    2015-01-01

    As rotary mechanical structure becomes more complicated, difficulty arises in receiving prime correction mass and optimum balancing plane efficiently. An innovative modal balancing process for estimating the residual unbalance from different equilibrium plane of complex flexible rotor system is presented. The method is based on a numerical approach with modal ratio among measurement points (MRMP) coefficient and triple phase method (TPM). The veracity of calculation result is verified by an a...

  6. Wearable Goniometer and Accelerometer Sensory Fusion for Knee Joint Angle Measurement in Daily Life

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Tognetti; Federico Lorussi; Nicola Carbonaro; Danilo De Rossi

    2015-01-01

    Human motion analysis is crucial for a wide range of applications and disciplines. The development and validation of low cost and unobtrusive sensing systems for ambulatory motion detection is still an open issue. Inertial measurement systems and e-textile sensors are emerging as potential technologies for daily life situations. We developed and conducted a preliminary evaluation of an innovative sensing concept that combines e-textiles and tri-axial accelerometers for ambulatory human motion...

  7. Brewster angle reflection measurements of Hg density and laser deflection (Schlieren) measurements of Hg density gradients in an ultra-high pressure arc lamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kane, J; Kato, M; Lawler, J E

    2009-05-01

    A Brewster angle reflection measurement is used to determine the Hg vapor density at the arc tube wall of an ultra-high pressure lamp. The density measurement in combination with the wall temperature yields a pressure of 201 ± 11 bar. This lamp pressure in combination with an arc core temperature measurement yields an arc core Hg vapor density of 1.78 × 1020 cm-3, which agrees with the density from resonance collisional line broadening measurements of the 1014 nm Hg line. These density results are combined with Abel inverted laser deflection or schlieren measurements to determine a density/temperature map of the Hg vapor in the lamp. The laser deflection technique is sensitive in the arc core and mantle, unlike emission techniques which are sensitive only in the arc core.

  8. The quadriceps angle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miles, James Edward; Frederiksen, Jane V.; Jensen, Bente Rona

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effect of measurement technique and limb positioning on quadriceps (Q) angle measurement, intra- and interobserver reliability, potential sources of error, and the effect of Q angle variation. STUDY DESIGN: Cadaveric radiographic study and computer modeling. ANIMALS......: Pelvic limbs from red foxes (Vulpes vulpes). METHODS: Q angles were measured on hip dysplasia (HD) and whole limb (WL) view radiographs of each limb between the acetabular rim, mid-point (Q1: patellar center, Q2: femoral trochlea), and tibial tuberosity. Errors of 0.5-2.0 mm at measurement landmarks...... alone and in combination were modeled to identify the effect on Q angle. The effect of measured Q angles on the medial force exerted on the patella (F(MEDIAL) ) was calculated. RESULTS: The HD position yielded significantly (P angles than the WL position. No significant difference...

  9. Measurement of the Neutrino Mixing Angle θ_{23} in NOvA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, P; Aliaga, L; Ambrose, D; Anfimov, N; Antoshkin, A; Arrieta-Diaz, E; Augsten, K; Aurisano, A; Backhouse, C; Baird, M; Bambah, B A; Bays, K; Behera, B; Bending, S; Bernstein, R; Bhatnagar, V; Bhuyan, B; Bian, J; Blackburn, T; Bolshakova, A; Bromberg, C; Brown, J; Brunetti, G; Buchanan, N; Butkevich, A; Bychkov, V; Campbell, M; Catano-Mur, E; Childress, S; Choudhary, B C; Chowdhury, B; Coan, T E; Coelho, J A B; Colo, M; Cooper, J; Corwin, L; Cremonesi, L; Cronin-Hennessy, D; Davies, G S; Davies, J P; Derwent, P F; Desai, S; Dharmapalan, R; Ding, P; Djurcic, Z; Dukes, E C; Duyang, H; Edayath, S; Ehrlich, R; Feldman, G J; Frank, M J; Gabrielyan, M; Gallagher, H R; Germani, S; Ghosh, T; Giri, A; Gomes, R A; Goodman, M C; Grichine, V; Group, R; Grover, D; Guo, B; Habig, A; Hartnell, J; Hatcher, R; Hatzikoutelis, A; Heller, K; Himmel, A; Holin, A; Hylen, J; Jediny, F; Judah, M; Kafka, G K; Kalra, D; Kasahara, S M S; Kasetti, S; Keloth, R; Kolupaeva, L; Kotelnikov, S; Kourbanis, I; Kreymer, A; Kumar, A; Kurbanov, S; Lang, K; Lee, W M; Lin, S; Liu, J; Lokajicek, M; Lozier, J; Luchuk, S; Maan, K; Magill, S; Mann, W A; Marshak, M L; Matera, K; Matveev, V; Méndez, D P; Messier, M D; Meyer, H; Miao, T; Miller, W H; Mishra, S R; Mohanta, R; Moren, A; Mualem, L; Muether, M; Mufson, S; Murphy, R; Musser, J; Nelson, J K; Nichol, R; Niner, E; Norman, A; Nosek, T; Oksuzian, Y; Olshevskiy, A; Olson, T; Paley, J; Pandey, P; Patterson, R B; Pawloski, G; Pershey, D; Petrova, O; Petti, R; Phan-Budd, S; Plunkett, R K; Poling, R; Potukuchi, B; Principato, C; Psihas, F; Radovic, A; Rameika, R A; Rebel, B; Reed, B; Rocco, D; Rojas, P; Ryabov, V; Sachdev, K; Sail, P; Samoylov, O; Sanchez, M C; Schroeter, R; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J; Shanahan, P; Sheshukov, A; Singh, J; Singh, J; Singh, P; Singh, V; Smolik, J; Solomey, N; Song, E; Sousa, A; Soustruznik, K; Strait, M; Suter, L; Talaga, R L; Tamsett, M C; Tas, P; Thayyullathil, R B; Thomas, J; Tian, X; Tognini, S C; Tripathi, J; Tsaris, A; Urheim, J; Vahle, P; Vasel, J; Vinton, L; Vold, A; Vrba, T; Wang, B; Wetstein, M; Whittington, D; Wojcicki, S G; Wolcott, J; Yadav, N; Yang, S; Zalesak, J; Zamorano, B; Zwaska, R

    2017-04-14

    This Letter reports new results on muon neutrino disappearance from NOvA, using a 14 kton detector equivalent exposure of 6.05×10^{20} protons on target from the NuMI beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The measurement probes the muon-tau symmetry hypothesis that requires maximal θ_{23} mixing (θ_{23}=π/4). Assuming the normal mass hierarchy, we find Δm_{32}^{2}=(2.67±0.11)×10^{-3}  eV^{2} and sin^{2}θ_{23} at the two statistically degenerate values 0.404_{-0.022}^{+0.030} and 0.624_{-0.030}^{+0.022}, both at the 68% confidence level. Our data disfavor the maximal mixing scenario with 2.6σ significance.

  10. Measurement of the Neutrino Mixing Angle θ23 in NOvA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamson, P.; Aliaga, L.; Ambrose, D.; Anfimov, N.; Antoshkin, A.; Arrieta-Diaz, E.; Augsten, K.; Aurisano, A.; Backhouse, C.; Baird, M.; Bambah, B. A.; Bays, K.; Behera, B.; Bending, S.; Bernstein, R.; Bhatnagar, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bian, J.; Blackburn, T.; Bolshakova, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brown, J.; Brunetti, G.; Buchanan, N.; Butkevich, A.; Bychkov, V.; Campbell, M.; Catano-Mur, E.; Childress, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Chowdhury, B.; Coan, T. E.; Coelho, J. A. B.; Colo, M.; Cooper, J.; Corwin, L.; Cremonesi, L.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Davies, G. S.; Davies, J. P.; Derwent, P. F.; Desai, S.; Dharmapalan, R.; Ding, P.; Djurcic, Z.; Dukes, E. C.; Duyang, H.; Edayath, S.; Ehrlich, R.; Feldman, G. J.; Frank, M. J.; Gabrielyan, M.; Gallagher, H. R.; Germani, S.; Ghosh, T.; Giri, A.; Gomes, R. A.; Goodman, M. C.; Grichine, V.; Group, R.; Grover, D.; Guo, B.; Habig, A.; Hartnell, J.; Hatcher, R.; Hatzikoutelis, A.; Heller, K.; Himmel, A.; Holin, A.; Hylen, J.; Jediny, F.; Judah, M.; Kafka, G. K.; Kalra, D.; Kasahara, S. M. S.; Kasetti, S.; Keloth, R.; Kolupaeva, L.; Kotelnikov, S.; Kourbanis, I.; Kreymer, A.; Kumar, A.; Kurbanov, S.; Lang, K.; Lee, W. M.; Lin, S.; Liu, J.; Lokajicek, M.; Lozier, J.; Luchuk, S.; Maan, K.; Magill, S.; Mann, W. A.; Marshak, M. L.; Matera, K.; Matveev, V.; Méndez, D. P.; Messier, M. D.; Meyer, H.; Miao, T.; Miller, W. H.; Mishra, S. R.; Mohanta, R.; Moren, A.; Mualem, L.; Muether, M.; Mufson, S.; Murphy, R.; Musser, J.; Nelson, J. K.; Nichol, R.; Niner, E.; Norman, A.; Nosek, T.; Oksuzian, Y.; Olshevskiy, A.; Olson, T.; Paley, J.; Pandey, P.; Patterson, R. B.; Pawloski, G.; Pershey, D.; Petrova, O.; Petti, R.; Phan-Budd, S.; Plunkett, R. K.; Poling, R.; Potukuchi, B.; Principato, C.; Psihas, F.; Radovic, A.; Rameika, R. A.; Rebel, B.; Reed, B.; Rocco, D.; Rojas, P.; Ryabov, V.; Sachdev, K.; Sail, P.; Samoylov, O.; Sanchez, M. C.; Schroeter, R.; Sepulveda-Quiroz, J.; Shanahan, P.; Sheshukov, A.; Singh, J.; Singh, J.; Singh, P.; Singh, V.; Smolik, J.; Solomey, N.; Song, E.; Sousa, A.; Soustruznik, K.; Strait, M.; Suter, L.; Talaga, R. L.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tas, P.; Thayyullathil, R. B.; Thomas, J.; Tian, X.; Tognini, S. C.; Tripathi, J.; Tsaris, A.; Urheim, J.; Vahle, P.; Vasel, J.; Vinton, L.; Vold, A.; Vrba, T.; Wang, B.; Wetstein, M.; Whittington, D.; Wojcicki, S. G.; Wolcott, J.; Yadav, N.; Yang, S.; Zalesak, J.; Zamorano, B.; Zwaska, R.; NOvA Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    This Letter reports new results on muon neutrino disappearance from NOvA, using a 14 kton detector equivalent exposure of 6.05 ×1 020 protons on target from the NuMI beam at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. The measurement probes the muon-tau symmetry hypothesis that requires maximal θ23 mixing (θ23=π /4 ). Assuming the normal mass hierarchy, we find Δ m322 =(2.67 ±0.11 )×10-3 eV2 and sin2θ23 at the two statistically degenerate values 0.40 4-0.022+0.030 and 0.62 4-0.030+0.022, both at the 68% confidence level. Our data disfavor the maximal mixing scenario with 2.6 σ significance.

  11. Collected charge and Lorentz angle measurement on non-irradiated ATLAS silicon micro-strip sensors for the HL-LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yildirim, Eda

    2017-02-15

    In this thesis, the collected charge and the Lorentz angle on non-irradiated and the irradiated miniature of the current test silicon micro-strip sensors (ATLAS12) of the future ATLAS inner tracker are measured. The samples are irradiated up to 5 x 10{sup 15} 1 MeV n{sub eq}/cm{sup 2} and some of them also measured after short-term annealing (80 min at 60 C). The measurements are performed at the DESY II test beam, which provides the advantage of tracking to suppress noise hits. The collected charge is measured at various bias voltages for each sample. The results are compared with the measurements performed using a Sr{sup 90} radioactive source. It is shown that the measurements with beam and radioactive source are consistent with each other, and the advantage of tracking at the beam measurements provides the measurement of collected charge on highly irradiated sensors at lower bias voltages. The Lorentz angle is measured for each sample at different magnetic field strengths between 0 T and 1 T, the results are extrapolated to 2 T, which is the magnetic field in the inner tracker of the ATLAS detector. Most of the measurements are performed at -500 V bias voltage, which is the planned operation bias voltage of the future strip tracker. Some samples are also measured at different bias voltages to observe the effect of bias voltage on the Lorentz angle. The signal reconstruction of the strip sensors are performed using the lowest possible signal-to-noise thresholds. For non-irradiated samples, the measured Lorentz angle agrees with the prediction of the BFK model. On the irradiated samples, the results suggest that the Lorentz angle decreases with increasing bias voltage due to the increasing electric field in the sensor. The Lorentz angle decreases with increasing irradiation level; however, if the sample is under-depleted, the effect of electric field dominates and the Lorentz angle increases. Once the irradiation level becomes too high, hence the collected charge

  12. OCT-measured plaque free wall angle is indicative for plaque burden: overcoming the main limitation of OCT?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, Ayla; Gnanadesigan, Muthukaruppan; Zahnd, Guillaume; van Ditzhuijzen, Nienke S; Schuurbiers, Johan C H; van Soest, Gijs; Regar, Evelyn; Wentzel, Jolanda J

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the plaque free wall (PFW) measured by optical coherence tomography (OCT) and the plaque burden (PB) measured by intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). We hypothesize that measurement of the PFW could help to estimate the PB, thereby overcoming the limited ability of OCT to visualize the external elastic membrane in the presence of plaque. This could enable selection of the optimal stent-landing zone by OCT, which is traditionally defined by IVUS as a region with a PB OCT and IVUS) were measured in 18 matched IVUS and OCT pullbacks acquired in the same coronary artery. We determined the relationship between OCT measured PFW (PFWOCT) and IVUS PB (PBIVUS) by non-linear regression analysis. An ROC-curve analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off value of PFW angle for the detection of PB < 40 %. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were calculated. There is a significant correlation between PFWOCT and PBIVUS (r(2) = 0.59). The optimal cut-off value of the PFWOCT for the prediction of a PBIVUS < 40 % is ≥220° with a PPV of 78 % and an NPV of 84 %. This study shows that PFWOCT can be considered as a surrogate marker for PBIVUS, which is currently a common criterion to select an optimal stent-landing zone.

  13. The MOLLER Experiment: An Ultra-Precise Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle Using M{\\o}ller Scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Benesch, J; Carlini, R D; Chen, J-P; Chudakov, E; Covrig, S; Dalton, M M; Deur, A; Gaskell, D; Gavalya, A; Gomez, J; Higinbotham, D W; Keppel, C; Meekins, D; Michaels, R; Moffit, B; Roblin, Y; Suleiman, R; Wines, R; Wojtsekhowski, B; Cates, G; Crabb, D; Day, D; Gnanvo, K; Keller, D; Liyanage, N; Nelyubin, V V; Nguyen, H; Norum, B; Paschke, K; Sulkosky, V; Zhang, J; Zheng, X; Birchall, J; Blunden, P; Gericke, M T W; Falk, W R; Lee, L; Mammei, J; Page, S A; van Oers, W T H; Dehmelt, K; Deshpande, A; Feege, N; Hemmick, T K; Kumar, K S; Kutz, T; Miskimen, R; Ramsey-Musolf, M J; Riordan, S; Taylor, N Hirlinger; Bessuille, J; Ihloff, E; Kelsey, J; Kowalski, S; Silwal, R; De Cataldo, G; De Leo, R; Di Bari, D; Lagamba, L; Bellini, E NappiV; Mammoliti, F; Noto, F; Sperduto, M L; Sutera, C M; Cole, P; Forest, T A; Khandekar, M; McNulty, D; Aulenbacher, K; Baunack, S; Maas, F; Tioukine, V; Gilman, R; Myers, K; Ransome, R; Tadepalli, A; Beniniwattha, R; Holmes, R; Souder, P; Armstrong, D S; Averett, T D; Deconinck, W; Duvall, W; Lee, A; Pitt, M L; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; Fassi, L El; De Persio, F; Meddi, F; Urciuoli, G M; Cisbani, E; Fanelli, C; Garibaldi, F; Johnston, K; Simicevic, N; Wells, S; King, P M; Roche, J; Arrington, J; Reimer, P E; Franklin, G; Quinn, B; Ahmidouch, A; Danagoulian, S; Glamazdin, O; Pomatsalyuk, R; Mammei, R; Martin, J W; Holmstrom, T; Erler, J; Kolomensky, Yu G; Napolitano, J; Aniol, K A; Ramsay, W D; Korkmaz, E; Spayde, D T; Benmokhtar, F; Del Dotto, A; Perrino, R; Barkanova, S; Aleksejevs, A; Singh, J

    2014-01-01

    The physics case and an experimental overview of the MOLLER (Measurement Of a Lepton Lepton Electroweak Reaction) experiment at the 12 GeV upgraded Jefferson Lab are presented. A highlight of the Fundamental Symmetries subfield of the 2007 NSAC Long Range Plan was the SLAC E158 measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry $A_{PV}$ in polarized electron-electron (M{\\o}ller) scattering. The proposed MOLLER experiment will improve on this result by a factor of five, yielding the most precise measurement of the weak mixing angle at low or high energy anticipated over the next decade. This new result would be sensitive to the interference of the electromagnetic amplitude with new neutral current amplitudes as weak as $\\sim 10^{-3}\\cdot G_F$ from as yet undiscovered dynamics beyond the Standard Model. The resulting discovery reach is unmatched by any proposed experiment measuring a flavor- and CP-conserving process over the next decade, and yields a unique window to new physics at MeV and multi-TeV scales, complem...

  14. Assessment of critical dimension small-angle x-ray scattering measurement approaches for FinFET fabrication process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Settens, Charles; Cordes, Aaron; Bunday, Benjamin; Bello, Abner; Kamineni, Vimal; Paul, Abhijeet; Fronheiser, Jody; Matyi, Richard

    2014-10-01

    We have used synchrotron-based critical dimension small-angle x-ray scattering (CD-SAXS) to monitor the impact of hydrogen annealing on the structural characteristics of silicon FinFET structures fabricated using self-aligned double patterning on both bulk silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates. H2 annealing under different conditions of temperature and gas pressure allowed us to vary the sidewall roughness and observe the response in the two metrology approaches. In the case of the simpler bulk Si FinFET structures, the CD-SAXS measurements of the critical dimensions are in substantive agreement with the top-down critical dimension scanning electron microscopy metrology. Corresponding characterizations on SOI-based FinFET structures showed less agreement, which is attributed to the more complex structural model required for SOI FinFET CD-SAXS modeling. Because sidewall roughness is an important factor in the performance characteristics of Si FinFETs, we have compared the results of roughness measurements using both critical dimension atomic force microscopy (CD-AFM) and CD-SAXS. The measurements yield similar estimates of sidewall roughness, although the CD-AFM values were typically larger than those generated by CD-SAXS. The reasons for these differences will be discussed.

  15. Variable temperature system using vortex tube cooling and fiber optic temperature measurement for low temperature magic angle spinning NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Rachel W.; Zilm, Kurt W.

    2004-06-01

    We describe the construction and operation of a variable temperature (VT) system for a high field fast magic angle spinning (MAS) probe. The probe is used in NMR investigations of biological macromolecules, where stable setting and continuous measurement of the temperature over periods of several days are required in order to prevent sample overheating and degradation. The VT system described is used at and below room temperature. A vortex tube is used to provide cooling in the temperature range of -20 to 20 °C, while a liquid nitrogen-cooled heat exchanger is used below -20 °C. Using this arrangement, the lowest temperature that is practically achievable is -140 °C. Measurement of the air temperature near the spinning rotor is accomplished using a fiber optic thermometer that utilizes the temperature dependence of the absorption edge of GaAs. The absorption edge of GaAs also has a magnetic field dependence that we have measured and corrected for. This dependence was calibrated at several field strengths using the well-known temperature dependence of the 1H chemical shift difference of the protons in methanol.

  16. A retrospective study of canine hip dysplasia in 116 military working dogs. Part I: Angle measurements and orthopedic foundation for animals (OFA) grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfield, C M; Bartels, J E; Hudson, J A; Wright, J C; Hathcock, J T; Montgomery, R D

    1996-01-01

    The progression of hip dysplasia was investigated in 116 military working dogs. Serial pelvic radiographs were graded for degree of dysplasia and degenerative joint disease (DJD). Norberg angles, angles of inclination, and joint space widths were measured. There was a significant correlation between the Norberg angle and the degree of dysplasia (p less than 0.0001). Angles of inclination and joint space width measurements did not demonstrate a correlation to canine hip dysplasia. Dysplastic dogs had a significant estimated risk for development of DJD compared to normal dogs (p less than 0.0001; odds ratio of 70.2). Dogs with normal hip conformation at 24 months of age or older did not develop moderate nor severe DJD.

  17. Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bandyopadhyay, J

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available -1 Polymer Volume 52, Issue 12, 26 May 2011, Pages 2628?2642 Determination of structural changes of dispersed clay platelets in a polymer blend during solid-state rheological property measurement by small-angle X-ray scattering ? Jayita Bandyopadhyaya... frequency and temperature sweep tests. Graphical abstract Keywords ? Blend composites; ? Small-angle X-ray scattering; ? Solid-state rheology ...

  18. Tests of the electroweak standard model and measurement of the weak mixing angle with the ATLAS detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goebel, M.

    2011-09-15

    In this thesis the global Standard Model (SM) fit to the electroweak precision observables is revisted with respect to newest experimental results. Various consistency checks are performed showing no significant deviation from the SM. The Higgs boson mass is estimated by the electroweak fit to be M{sub H}=94{sub -24}{sup +30} GeV without any information from direct Higgs searches at LEP, Tevatron, and the LHC and the result is M{sub H}=125{sub -10}{sup +8} GeV when including the direct Higgs mass constraints. The strong coupling constant is extracted at fourth perturbative order as {alpha}{sub s}(M{sub Z}{sup 2})=0.1194{+-}0.0028(exp){+-}0.0001 (theo). From the fit including the direct Higgs constraints the effective weak mixing angle is determined indirectly to be sin{sup 2} {theta}{sup l}{sub eff}=0.23147{sub -0.00010}{sup +0.00012}. For the W mass the value of M{sub W}=80.360{sub -0.011}{sup +0.012} GeV is obtained indirectly from the fit including the direct Higgs constraints. The electroweak precision data is also exploited to constrain new physics models by using the concept of oblique parameters. In this thesis the following models are investigated: models with a sequential fourth fermion generation, the inert-Higgs doublet model, the littlest Higgs model with T-parity conservation, and models with large extra dimensions. In contrast to the SM, in these models heavy Higgs bosons are in agreement with the electroweak precision data. The forward-backward asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass is measured for pp{yields} Z/{gamma}{sup *}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -} events collected with the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The data taken in 2010 at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}(s)=7 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 37.4 pb{sup -1} is analyzed. The measured forward-backward asymmetry is in agreement with the SM expectation. From the measured forward-backward asymmetry the effective weak mixing angle is extracted as sin{sup 2} {theta}{sup l

  19. Dolphin biosonar signals measured at extreme off-axis angles: insights to sound propagation in the head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Whitlow W L; Branstetter, Brian; Moore, Patrick W; Finneran, James J

    2012-08-01

    Biosonar signals radiated along the beam axis of an Atlantic bottlenose dolphin resemble short transient oscillations. As the azimuth of the measuring hydrophones in the horizontal plane progressively increases with respect to the beam axis the signals become progressively distorted. At approximately ±45°, the signals begin to divide into two components with the time difference between the components increasing with increasing angles. At ±90° or normal to the longitudinal axis of the animal, the time difference between the two pulses measured by the hydrophone on the right side of the dolphin's head is, on average, ∼11.9 μs larger than the time differences observed by the hydrophone on the left side of the dolphin's head. The center frequency of the first pulse is generally lower, by 33-47 kHz, than the center frequency of the second pulse. When considering the relative locations of the two phonic lips, the data suggest that the signals are being produced by one of the phonic lips and the second pulse resulting from a reflection within the head of the animal. The generation of biosonar signals is a complex process and the propagation pathways through the dolphin's head are not well understood.

  20. Measuring the off-axis angle and the rotational movements of phonating sperm whales using a single hydrophone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laplanche, Christophe; Adam, Olivier; Lopatka, Maciej; Motsch, Jean-François

    2006-06-01

    The common use of the bent-horn model of the sperm whale sound generator describes sperm whale clicks as the pulse series {p0, p1, p2, p3,...}. Clicks, however, deviate from this standard when recorded using off-axis hydrophones. The existence of additional pulses within the {p0, p1, p2, p3, ...} series can be explained still using the bent-horn model. Multiple reflections on the whale's frontal and distal sacs of the p0 pulse lead to additional sets of pulses detectable using a farfield, off-axis hydrophone. The travel times of some of these additional pulses depend on the whale's orientation. The authors propose a method to estimate the off-axis angle of sperm whale clicks. They also propose a method to determine the nature of the movement (if it is pitch, yaw, or roll) of phonating sperm whales. The application of both methods requires the measurement of the travel time differences between pulses composing a sperm whale click. They lead, using a simple apparatus consisting of a single hydrophone at an unknown depth, to new measurements of the underwater movements of sperm whales. Using these methods shows that sperm whales would methodically scan seawater while searching for prey, by making periodic pitch and yaw movements in sync with their acoustic activity.

  1. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ from a combination of $B^{\\pm} \\to Dh^{\\pm}$ analyses

    CERN Document Server

    INSPIRE-00258707; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-01-01

    A combination of three LHCb measurements of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ is presented. The decays $B^\\pm\\to DK^\\pm$ and $B^\\pm\\to D\\pi^\\pm$ are used, where $D$ denotes an admixture of $D^0$ and $\\overline{D^0}$ mesons, decaying into $K^+K^-$, $\\pi^+\\pi^-$, $K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp$, $K^\\pm \\pi^\\mp \\pi^\\pm \\pi^\\mp$, $K_S\\pi^+\\pi^-$, or $K_S K^+K^-$ final states. All measurements use a dataset corresponding to 1.0 fb$^{-1}$ of data. Combining results from $B^\\pm\\to DK^\\pm$ decays alone a best-fit value of $\\gamma = 72.0^\\circ$ is found, and confidence intervals are set \\begin{align*} \\gamma \\in [56.4,86.7]^\\circ \\quad &{\\rm at\\ 68\\%\\,CL}\\,,\\\\ \\gamma \\in [42.6,99.6]^\\circ \\quad &{\\rm at\\ 95\\%\\,CL}\\,. \\end{align*} The best-fit value of $\\gamma$ found from a combination of results from $B^\\pm\\to D\\pi^\\pm$ decays alone, is $\\gamma = 18.9^\\circ$, and the confidence intervals \\begin{align*} \\gamma \\in [7.4,99.2]^\\circ \\quad \\cup \\quad [167.9,176.4]^\\circ \\quad &{\\rm at\\ 68\\%\\,CL}\\, \\end{align*} are set, without constrai...

  2. Reproducibility of hand-held ankle dynamometry to measure altered ankle moment-angle characteristics in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benard, M.R.; Jaspers, R.T.; Huijing, P.A.J.B.M.; Becher, J.G.S.J.S.; Harlaar, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: In children with spastic cerebral palsy, the range of motion of the ankle joint is often limited. Measurement of range of motion may be hampered by a non-rigid foot deformity. We constructed a hand-held instrument which allows measurements of static ankle angle and moment in children

  3. Anisotropic pitch angle distribution of ~100 keV microburst electrons in the loss cone: measurements from STSAT-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Lee

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Electron microburst energy spectra in the range of 170 keV to 360 keV have been measured using two solid-state detectors onboard the low-altitude (680 km, polar-orbiting Korean STSAT-1 (Science and Technology SATellite-1. Applying a unique capability of the spacecraft attitude control system, microburst energy spectra have been accurately resolved into two components: perpendicular to and parallel to the geomagnetic field direction. The former measures trapped electrons and the latter those electrons with pitch angles in the loss cone and precipitating into atmosphere. It is found that the perpendicular component energy spectra are harder than the parallel component and the loss cone is not completely filled by the electrons in the energy range of 170 keV to 360 keV. These results have been modeled assuming a wave-particle cyclotron resonance mechanism, where higher energy electrons travelling within a magnetic flux tube interact with whistler mode waves at higher latitudes (lower altitudes. Our results suggest that because higher energy (relativistic microbursts do not fill the loss cone completely, only a small portion of electrons is able to reach low altitude (~100 km atmosphere. Thus assuming that low energy microbursts and relativistic microbursts are created by cyclotron resonance with chorus elements (but at different locations, the low energy portion of the microburst spectrum will dominate at low altitudes. This explains why relativistic microbursts have not been observed by balloon experiments, which typically float at altitudes of ~30 km and measure only X-ray flux produced by collisions between neutral atmospheric particles and precipitating electrons.

  4. Recent developments and ASAXS measurements at the ultra small angle X-ray scattering instrument of HASYLAB

    CERN Document Server

    Krosigk, G V; Gehrke, R; Kranold, R

    2001-01-01

    The wiggler beamline BW4 at the synchrotron radiation facility HASYLAB (DESY) is mainly designed for Ultra Small Angle X-ray Scattering (USAXS) and usually operated with detector-sample distances up to 13 m and at photon energies between 4 and 16 keV. With a new optical design the largest observable correlation distances have now been increased up to 9x10 sup 3 A. A grazing incidence set-up [P. Mueller-Buschbaum et al., Europhys. Lett. 42 (5) (1998) 517], vapor chamber, furnace, tensile testing machine and other instruments make the USAXS beamline attractive for a variety of scattering experiments [A. Endres et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 11 (1997) 68; A. Karl et al., J. Macromolecular Sci.-Phys. B 38 (5 and 6) (1999) 901; S. Minko et al., J. Macromolecular Sci., Phys. B 38 (5 and 6) (1999) 913]. A fully evacuated beampath allows high quality measurements with very low background signal. A photodiode mounted in the primary beam stop registers the primary beam flux simultaneously to the data acquisition and thus p...

  5. Chemical shift MR imaging in the lumbar vertebra: the effect of field strength, scanner vendors and flip angles in repeatability of signal intensity index measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zebin; Li, Jian; Li, Chengqi; Zhang, Yuyang; She, Dejun; Cao, Dairong

    2016-11-25

    To evaluate the reproducibility of signal intensity index (SII) measurements with MRI systems from different vendors and with different field strengths, and to test the effectiveness of flip angle. Thirty-two healthy volunteers (mean age 35.3 ± 9.3 years) were enrolled in this ethics committee-approved study. Chemical shift MR imaging was performed on 1.5- and 3.0-T MR systems from three vendors. Two independent observers measured SII values in five lumbar segments. Inter- and intraobserver agreement was assessed using the interclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Differences of mean SII values between different field strengths and MR vendors as well as flip angles were compared by using repeated-measures analysis of variance. Differences of mean SII values between different flip angles were also compared by using paired-sample t test. Inter- and intra-observer correlation coefficients showed good agreement (all ICC > 0.75) when measuring SII values at different MR systems (ICCs ranging from 0.896 to 0.983) and flip angles (ICCs ranging from 0.824 to 0.983). There were no significant differences in mean SII values measured by different MR vendors with different field strengths (all p > 0.05 ranging from 0.337 to 0.824). The differences in the mean SII between the four different flip angles were statistically significant (all p measurement using chemical shift MR imaging may be comparable between different MR systems. Also high flip angles showed better stability to quantitate lumbar fat content.

  6. Effects of infrared camera angle and distance on measurement and reproducibility of thermographically determined temperatures of the distolateral aspects of the forelimbs in horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westermann, Simone; Buchner, Heinz H F; Schramel, Johannes P; Tichy, Alexander; Stanek, Christian

    2013-02-01

    To assess effects of camera angle and distance on measurement and reproducibility of thermographically determined temperatures of the distolateral aspect of the forelimbs in horses. Evaluation study. 10 adult horses. Thermographic images of both forelimbs were obtained at 3 times during the day (replicates 1, 2, and 3); maximum surface temperature over 1 region (distolateral aspect of the third metacarpal bone and metacarpophalangeal joint) was measured. Standard images were obtained every 5 minutes for 1 hour with the camera positioned at an angle of 90° and a distance of 1.0 m from the forelimb; additional images were obtained at changed (± 20°) angles or at a 1.5-m distance. At the end of each replicate, 4 sets of additional images were obtained at 2-minute intervals to assess short-term reproducibility. Mean ± SD temperature difference between left and right forelimbs was 0.32° ± 0.27°C (0.58° ± 0.49°F) in standard images. Temperatures measured via standard images were highly correlated with those measured with the camera positioned at changed angles or distance. Mean ± SD differences between temperatures measured via standard images and those measured from changed angles or distance were considered small (≤ 0.22° ± 0.18°C [0.40° ± 0.32°F] for all comparisons). The degree of short-term reproducibility was high. Thermographically determined temperatures were unaffected by 20° changes in camera angle or a 0.5-m increase in camera distance from the forelimb. Minor temperature differences between left and right forelimbs were detected in the study and should be considered during diagnostic investigations.

  7. To what degree is digital imaging reliable? Validation of femoral neck shaft angle measurement in the era of picture archiving and communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J D; Eardley, W; Odak, S; Jennings, A

    2011-01-01

    Objectives This study investigates the reliability of femoral neck shaft angle (NSA) measurements made with the software and images available in routine clinical practice. Methods Using the Centricity Enterprise™ (GE Healthcare Pty Ltd Piscataway, NJ) picture archiving and communication system (PACS), the NSA of the proximal femur was measured from anteroposterior radiographs of adult hips. 3 independent observers, using a standardised technique, performed a total of 120 measurements. Results The Pearson's correlation coefficient for the intraobserver agreement was 0.98 (psystems that can display angle measurements to one-tenth of a degree caution must be exercised to ensure that reliability of these measurements is not overestimated. We found that in the context of measuring the NSA of the proximal femur the reliability of the measurement, even under the best conditions, is only ±6° for different observers. PMID:21159801

  8. Measuring the Earth’s magnetic field dip angle using a smartphone-aided setup: a simple experiment for introductory physics laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabasi, Sameer; Al-Taani, Hussein

    2017-03-01

    Measurement of the Earth’s magnetic field dip angle is a widely used experiment in most introductory physics laboratories. In this paper we propose a smartphone-aided setup that takes advantage of the smartphone’s magnetometer sensor to measure the Earth’s magnetic field dip angle. This set-up will help students visualize the vector nature of the Earth’s magnetic field, especially high school and first year college students who are not quite experienced with vectors. This set-up is affordable and easy to use and could be easily produced by any high school or college physics instructor.

  9. Diagnosis of a case of Dandy-Walker malformation aided by measurement of the brainstem-vermis angle at 14 weeks gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Mishina, Miyuki; Hasegawa, Junichi; Matsuoka, Ryu; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Pooh, Ritsuko K

    2015-05-01

    Reported is a fetal Dandy-Walker malformation that was strongly suspected in the first trimester through measurement of the brainstem-vermis (B-V) angle, which was found to be 119° on transvaginal ultrasound examination at 14 weeks and 2 days gestation. Definitive diagnosis of the Dandy-Walker malformation was made by magnetic resonance imaging following stillbirth. Ultrasound measurement of the B-V angle may be a useful index for prenatal diagnosis of Dandy-Walker anomalies during early pregnancy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  10. Microphysical properties of snowfall in the Swiss Alps as measured with a Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praz, Christophe; Roulet, Yves-Alain; Berne, Alexis

    2017-04-01

    In solid precipitation, snowfall rate can be estimated from weather radar using relationships between solid hydrometeors microstructure (size, shape, mass) and their scattering properties. These relationships are difficult to estimate and remain largely uncertain, mainly due to the rich variety of shapes, sizes and properties that snowflakes and ice crystals can adopt in the atmosphere. It is therefore essential to document the microstructural properties of individual falling snowflakes in order to better characterize the microphysics of snowfall as well as to improve its quantitative estimation. In this study, we utilized a new supervised classification method applied on pictures recorded with a Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) in order to classify observed particles into 6 distinct hydrometeor classes (columnar crystals, planar crystals, combination of columnar and planar crystals, aggregates, graupels and small particles) and estimate their degree of riming on a continuous scale ranging from zero (no riming) to one (graupel). The classification is performed on more than 8 months of MASC data collected in the Swiss Alps. The outcome is in turn used to investigate important microstructural properties of falling snowflakes (particle size, aspect ratio, orientation, fallspeed) and refine the relationships between them (e.g. shape-size, fallspeed-size) as a function of the hydrometeor type and degree of riming. In addition, collocated measurements from a two-dimensional video disdrometer (2DVD) are used to evaluate the accuracy and the uncertainties associated with the MASC fallspeed retrieval system. The two instruments were both located in a Double-Fence Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) during the measurement campaign in a configuration aimed to minimize the influence of wind and ambient turbulence on snowflakes fall velocity.

  11. Multichannel spin polarimeter for energy- and angle-dispersive photoemission measurements; Vielkanal-Spinpolarimeter fuer energie- und winkeldispersive Photoemissionsmessungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolbe, Michaela

    2011-09-09

    Spin polarization measurements of free electrons remain challenging since their first realization by Mott. The relevant quantity of a spin polarimeter is its figure of merit, FoM=S{sup 2}I/I{sub 0}, with the asymmetry function S and the ratio between scattered and primary intensity I/I{sub 0}. State-of-the-art devices are based on single-channel scattering (spin-orbit or exchange interaction) which is characterized by FoM {approx_equal}10{sup -4}. On the other hand, modern hemispherical analyzers feature an efficient multichannel detection of spin-integral intensity with more than 10{sup 4} data points simultaneously. In comparison between spin-resolved and spin-integral electron spectroscopy we are thus faced with a difference in counting efficiency by 8 orders of magnitude. The present work concentrates on the development and investigation of a novel technique for increasing the efficiency in spin-resolved electron spectroscopy by multichannel detection. The spin detector was integrated in a {mu}-metal shielded UHV-chamber and mounted behind a conventional hemispherical analyzer. The electrostatic lens system's geometry was determined by electron-optical simulations. The basic concept is the k {sub parallel} -conserving elastic scattering of the (0,0)-beam on a W(100) scattering crystal under 45 impact angle. It could be demonstrated that app. 960 data points (15 energy and 64 angular points) could be displayed simultaneously on a delayline detector in an energy interval of {approx_equal}3 eV. This leads to a two-dimensional figure of merit of FoM{sub 2D}=1.7. Compared to conventional spin detectors, the new type is thus characterized by a gain in efficiency of 4 orders of magnitude. The operational reliability of the new spin polarimeter could be proven by measurements with a Fe/MgO(100) and O p(1 x 1)/Fe(100)-sample, where results from the literature were reproduced with strongly decreased measuring time. Due to the high intensity it becomes possible, to

  12. Correction for a measurement artifact of the Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP at high black carbon mass concentration levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.-P. Hyvärinen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP is a widely-used instrument for aerosol black carbon (BC measurements. In this paper, we show correction methods for an artifact found to affect the instrument accuracy in environments characterized by high black carbon concentrations. The artifact occurs after a filter spot change – as BC mass is accumulated on a fresh filter spot, the attenuation of the light (raw signal is weaker than anticipated. This causes a sudden decrease, followed by a gradual increase in measured BC concentration. The artifact is present in the data when the BC concentration exceeds ~3 μg m−3 at the typical MAAP flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 or 1 m3 h−1. The artifact is caused by erroneous dark counts in the photodetector measuring the transmitted light, in combination with an instrument internal averaging procedure of the photodetector raw signals. It was found that, in addition to the erroneous temporal response of the data, concentrations higher than 9 μg m−3 (at the flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 are underestimated by the MAAP. The underestimation increases with increasing BC accumulation rate. At a flow rate of 16.7 L min−1 and concentration of about 24 μg m−3 (BC accumulation rate ~0.4 μg min−1, the underestimation is about 30%. There are two ways of overcoming the MAAP artifact. One method is by logging the raw signal of the 165° photomultiplier measuring the reflected light from the filter spot. As this signal is not affected by the artifact, it can be converted to approximately correct absorption and BC values. However, as the typical print formats of the MAAP do not give the reflected signal as an output, a semi-empirical correction method was developed based on laboratory experiments to correct for the results in the post-processing phase. The correction function was applied to three MAAP datasets from

  13. Measurement of colour flow with the jet pull angle in $t\\bar{t}$ events using the ATLAS detector at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Aad, Georges; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; Άlvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier; Bilokon, Halina; Bindi, Marcello; Binet, Sebastien; Bingul, Ahmet; Bini, Cesare; Biondi, Silvia; Black, Curtis; Black, James; Black, Kevin; Blackburn, Daniel; Blair, Robert; Blanchard, Jean-Baptiste; Blanco, Jacobo Ezequiel; Blazek, Tomas; Bloch, Ingo; Blocker, Craig; Blum, Walter; Blumenschein, Ulrike; Bobbink, Gerjan; Bobrovnikov, Victor; Bocchetta, Simona Serena; Bocci, Andrea; Bock, Christopher; Boehler, Michael; Bogaerts, Joannes Andreas; Bogavac, Danijela; Bogdanchikov, Alexander; Bohm, Christian; Boisvert, Veronique; Bold, Tomasz; Boldea, Venera; Boldyrev, Alexey; Bomben, Marco; Bona, Marcella; Boonekamp, Maarten; Borisov, Anatoly; Borissov, Guennadi; Borroni, Sara; Bortfeldt, Jonathan; Bortolotto, Valerio; Bos, Kors; Boscherini, Davide; Bosman, Martine; Boudreau, Joseph; Bouffard, Julian; Bouhova-Thacker, Evelina Vassileva; Boumediene, Djamel Eddine; Bourdarios, Claire; Bousson, Nicolas; Boveia, Antonio; Boyd, James; Boyko, Igor; Bozic, Ivan; Bracinik, Juraj; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Gerhard; Brandt, Oleg; Bratzler, Uwe; Brau, Benjamin; Brau, James; Braun, Helmut; Brazzale, Simone Federico; Breaden Madden, William Dmitri; Brendlinger, Kurt; Brennan, Amelia Jean; Brenner, Lydia; Brenner, Richard; Bressler, Shikma; Bristow, Kieran; Bristow, Timothy Michael; Britton, Dave; Britzger, Daniel; Brochu, Frederic; Brock, Ian; Brock, Raymond; Bronner, Johanna; Brooijmans, Gustaaf; Brooks, Timothy; Brooks, William; Brosamer, Jacquelyn; Brost, Elizabeth; Brown, Jonathan; Bruckman de Renstrom, Pawel; Bruncko, Dusan; Bruneliere, Renaud; Bruni, Alessia; Bruni, Graziano; Bruschi, Marco; Bruscino, Nello; Bryngemark, Lene; Buanes, Trygve; Buat, Quentin; Buchholz, Peter; Buckley, Andrew; Buda, Stelian Ioan; Budagov, Ioulian; Buehrer, Felix; Bugge, Lars; Bugge, Magnar Kopangen; Bulekov, Oleg; Bullock, Daniel; Burckhart, Helfried; Burdin, Sergey; Burghgrave, Blake; Burke, Stephen; Burmeister, Ingo; Busato, Emmanuel; Büscher, Daniel; Büscher, Volker; Bussey, Peter; Butler, John; Butt, Aatif Imtiaz; Buttar, Craig; Butterworth, Jonathan; Butti, Pierfrancesco; Buttinger, William; Buzatu, Adrian; Buzykaev, Aleksey; Cabrera Urbán, Susana; Caforio, Davide; Cairo, Valentina; Cakir, Orhan; Calace, Noemi; Calafiura, Paolo; Calandri, Alessandro; Calderini, Giovanni; Calfayan, Philippe; Caloba, Luiz; Calvet, David; Calvet, Samuel; Camacho Toro, Reina; Camarda, Stefano; Camarri, Paolo; Cameron, David; Caminal Armadans, Roger; Campana, Simone; Campanelli, Mario; Campoverde, Angel; Canale, Vincenzo; Canepa, Anadi; Cano Bret, Marc; Cantero, Josu; Cantrill, Robert; Cao, Tingting; Capeans Garrido, Maria Del Mar; Caprini, Irinel; Caprini, Mihai; Capua, Marcella; Caputo, Regina; Cardarelli, Roberto; Cardillo, Fabio; Carli, Tancredi; Carlino, Gianpaolo; Carminati, Leonardo; Caron, Sascha; Carquin, Edson; Carrillo-Montoya, German D; Carter, Janet; Carvalho, João; Casadei, Diego; Casado, Maria Pilar; Casolino, Mirkoantonio; Castaneda-Miranda, Elizabeth; Castelli, Angelantonio; Castillo Gimenez, Victoria; Castro, Nuno Filipe; Catastini, Pierluigi; Catinaccio, Andrea; Catmore, James; Cattai, Ariella; Caudron, Julien; Cavaliere, Viviana; Cavalli, Donatella; Cavalli-Sforza, Matteo; Cavasinni, Vincenzo; Ceradini, Filippo; Cerio, Benjamin; Cerny, Karel; Santiago Cerqueira, Augusto; Cerri, Alessandro; Cerrito, Lucio; Cerutti, Fabio; Cerv, Matevz; Cervelli, Alberto; Cetin, Serkant Ali; Chafaq, Aziz; Chakraborty, Dhiman; Chalupkova, Ina; Chang, Philip; Chapman, John Derek; Charlton, Dave; Chau, Chav Chhiv; Chavez Barajas, Carlos Alberto; Cheatham, Susan; Chegwidden, Andrew; Chekanov, Sergei; Chekulaev, Sergey; Chelkov, Gueorgui; Chelstowska, Magda Anna; Chen, Chunhui; Chen, Hucheng; Chen, Karen; Chen, Liming; Chen, Shenjian; Chen, Xin; Chen, Ye; Cheng, Hok Chuen; Cheng, Yangyang; Cheplakov, Alexander; Cheremushkina, Evgenia; Cherkaoui El Moursli, Rajaa; Chernyatin, Valeriy; Cheu, Elliott; Chevalier, Laurent; Chiarella, Vitaliano; Chiarelli, Giorgio; Childers, John Taylor; Chiodini, Gabriele; Chisholm, Andrew; Chislett, Rebecca Thalatta; Chitan, Adrian; Chizhov, Mihail; Choi, Kyungeon; Chouridou, Sofia; Chow, Bonnie Kar Bo; Christodoulou, Valentinos; Chromek-Burckhart, Doris; Chudoba, Jiri; Chuinard, Annabelle Julia; Chwastowski, Janusz; Chytka, Ladislav; Ciapetti, Guido; Ciftci, Abbas Kenan; Cinca, Diane; Cindro, Vladimir; Cioara, Irina Antonela; Ciocio, Alessandra; Citron, Zvi Hirsh; Ciubancan, Mihai; Clark, Allan G; Clark, Brian Lee; Clark, Philip James; Clarke, Robert; Cleland, Bill; Clement, Christophe; Coadou, Yann; Cobal, Marina; Coccaro, Andrea; Cochran, James H; Coffey, Laurel; Cogan, Joshua Godfrey; Colasurdo, Luca; Cole, Brian; Cole, Stephen; Colijn, Auke-Pieter; Collot, Johann; Colombo, Tommaso; Compostella, Gabriele; Conde Muiño, Patricia; Coniavitis, Elias; Connell, Simon Henry; Connelly, Ian; Consonni, Sofia Maria; Consorti, Valerio; Constantinescu, Serban; Conta, Claudio; Conti, Geraldine; Conventi, Francesco; Cooke, Mark; Cooper, Ben; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda; Cornelissen, Thijs; Corradi, Massimo; Corriveau, Francois; Corso-Radu, Alina; Cortes-Gonzalez, Arely; Cortiana, Giorgio; Costa, Giuseppe; Costa, María José; Costanzo, Davide; Côté, David; Cottin, Giovanna; Cowan, Glen; Cox, Brian; Cranmer, Kyle; Cree, Graham; Crépé-Renaudin, Sabine; Crescioli, Francesco; Cribbs, Wayne Allen; Crispin Ortuzar, Mireia; Cristinziani, Markus; Croft, Vince; Crosetti, Giovanni; Cuhadar Donszelmann, Tulay; Cummings, Jane; Curatolo, Maria; Cuthbert, Cameron; Czirr, Hendrik; Czodrowski, Patrick; D'Auria, Saverio; D'Onofrio, Monica; Da Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, Mario Jose; Da Via, Cinzia; Dabrowski, Wladyslaw; Dafinca, Alexandru; Dai, Tiesheng; Dale, Orjan; Dallaire, Frederick; Dallapiccola, Carlo; Dam, Mogens; Dandoy, Jeffrey Rogers; Dang, Nguyen Phuong; Daniells, Andrew Christopher; Danninger, Matthias; Dano Hoffmann, Maria; Dao, Valerio; Darbo, Giovanni; Darmora, Smita; Dassoulas, James; Dattagupta, Aparajita; Davey, Will; David, Claire; Davidek, Tomas; Davies, Eleanor; Davies, Merlin; Davison, Peter; Davygora, Yuriy; Dawe, Edmund; Dawson, Ian; Daya-Ishmukhametova, Rozmin; De, Kaushik; de Asmundis, Riccardo; De Castro, Stefano; De Cecco, Sandro; De Groot, Nicolo; de Jong, Paul; De la Torre, Hector; De Lorenzi, Francesco; De Nooij, Lucie; De Pedis, Daniele; De Salvo, Alessandro; De Sanctis, Umberto; De Santo, Antonella; De Vivie De Regie, Jean-Baptiste; Dearnaley, William James; Debbe, Ramiro; Debenedetti, Chiara; Dedovich, Dmitri; Deigaard, Ingrid; Del Peso, Jose; Del Prete, Tarcisio; Delgove, David; Deliot, Frederic; Delitzsch, Chris Malena; Deliyergiyev, Maksym; Dell'Acqua, Andrea; Dell'Asta, Lidia; Dell'Orso, Mauro; Della Pietra, Massimo; della Volpe, Domenico; Delmastro, Marco; Delsart, Pierre-Antoine; Deluca, Carolina; DeMarco, David; Demers, Sarah; Demichev, Mikhail; Demilly, Aurelien; Denisov, Sergey; Derendarz, Dominik; Derkaoui, Jamal Eddine; Derue, Frederic; Dervan, Paul; Desch, Klaus Kurt; Deterre, Cecile; Deviveiros, Pier-Olivier; Dewhurst, Alastair; Dhaliwal, Saminder; Di Ciaccio, Anna; Di Ciaccio, Lucia; Di Domenico, Antonio; Di Donato, Camilla; Di Girolamo, Alessandro; Di Girolamo, Beniamino; Di Mattia, Alessandro; Di Micco, Biagio; Di Nardo, Roberto; Di Simone, Andrea; Di Sipio, Riccardo; Di Valentino, David; Diaconu, Cristinel; Diamond, Miriam; Dias, Flavia; Diaz, Marco Aurelio; Diehl, Edward; Dietrich, Janet; Diglio, Sara; Dimitrievska, Aleksandra; Dingfelder, Jochen; Dita, Petre; Dita, Sanda; Dittus, Fridolin; Djama, Fares; Djobava, Tamar; Djuvsland, Julia Isabell; Barros do Vale, Maria Aline; Dobos, Daniel; Dobre, Monica; Doglioni, Caterina; Dohmae, Takeshi; Dolejsi, Jiri; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dolgoshein, Boris; Donadelli, Marisilvia; Donati, Simone; Dondero, Paolo; Donini, Julien; Dopke, Jens; Doria, Alessandra; Dova, Maria-Teresa; Doyle, Tony; Drechsler, Eric; Dris, Manolis; Dubreuil, Emmanuelle; Duchovni, Ehud; Duckeck, Guenter; Ducu, Otilia Anamaria; Duda, Dominik; Dudarev, Alexey; Duflot, Laurent; Duguid, Liam; Dührssen, Michael; Dunford, Monica; Duran Yildiz, Hatice; Düren, Michael; Durglishvili, Archil; Duschinger, Dirk; Dyndal, Mateusz; Eckardt, Christoph; Ecker, Katharina Maria; Edgar, Ryan Christopher; Edson, William; Edwards, Nicholas Charles; Ehrenfeld, Wolfgang; Eifert, Till; Eigen, Gerald; Einsweiler, Kevin; Ekelof, Tord; El Kacimi, Mohamed; Ellert, Mattias; Elles, Sabine; Ellinghaus, Frank; Elliot, Alison; Ellis, Nicolas; Elmsheuser, Johannes; Elsing, Markus; Emeliyanov, Dmitry; Enari, Yuji; Endner, Oliver Chris; Endo, Masaki; Erdmann, Johannes; Ereditato, Antonio; Ernis, Gunar; Ernst, Jesse; Ernst, Michael; Errede, Steven; Ertel, Eugen; Escalier, Marc; Esch, Hendrik; Escobar, Carlos; Esposito, Bellisario; Etienvre, Anne-Isabelle; Etzion, Erez; Evans, Hal; Ezhilov, Alexey; Fabbri, Laura; Facini, Gabriel; Fakhrutdinov, Rinat; Falciano, Speranza; Falla, Rebecca Jane; Faltova, Jana; Fang, Yaquan; Fanti, Marcello; Farbin, Amir; Farilla, Addolorata; Farooque, Trisha; Farrell, Steven; Farrington, Sinead; Farthouat, Philippe; Fassi, Farida; Fassnacht, Patrick; Fassouliotis, Dimitrios; Faucci Giannelli, Michele; Favareto, Andrea; Fayard, Louis; Federic, Pavol; Fedin, Oleg; Fedorko, Wojciech; Feigl, Simon; Feligioni, Lorenzo; Feng, Cunfeng; Feng, Eric; Feng, Haolu; Fenyuk, Alexander; Feremenga, Last; Fernandez Martinez, Patricia; Fernandez Perez, Sonia; Ferrando, James; Ferrari, Arnaud; Ferrari, Pamela; Ferrari, Roberto; Ferreira de Lima, Danilo Enoque; Ferrer, Antonio; Ferrere, Didier; Ferretti, Claudio; Ferretto Parodi, Andrea; Fiascaris, Maria; Fiedler, Frank; Filipčič, Andrej; Filipuzzi, Marco; Filthaut, Frank; Fincke-Keeler, Margret; Finelli, Kevin Daniel; Fiolhais, Miguel; Fiorini, Luca; Firan, Ana; Fischer, Adam; Fischer, Cora; Fischer, Julia; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fitzgerald, Eric Andrew; Flaschel, Nils; Fleck, Ivor; Fleischmann, Philipp; Fleischmann, Sebastian; Fletcher, Gareth Thomas; Fletcher, Gregory; Fletcher, Rob Roy MacGregor; Flick, Tobias; Floderus, Anders; Flores Castillo, Luis; Flowerdew, Michael; Formica, Andrea; Forti, Alessandra; Fournier, Daniel; Fox, Harald; Fracchia, Silvia; Francavilla, Paolo; Franchini, Matteo; Francis, David; Franconi, Laura; Franklin, Melissa; Frate, Meghan; Fraternali, Marco; Freeborn, David; French, Sky; Friedrich, Felix; Froidevaux, Daniel; Frost, James; Fukunaga, Chikara; Fullana Torregrosa, Esteban; Fulsom, Bryan Gregory; Fusayasu, Takahiro; Fuster, Juan; Gabaldon, Carolina; Gabizon, Ofir; Gabrielli, Alessandro; Gabrielli, Andrea; Gach, Grzegorz; Gadatsch, Stefan; Gadomski, Szymon; Gagliardi, Guido; Gagnon, Pauline; Galea, Cristina; Galhardo, Bruno; Gallas, Elizabeth; Gallop, Bruce; Gallus, Petr; Galster, Gorm Aske Gram Krohn; Gan, KK; Gao, Jun; Gao, Yanyan; Gao, Yongsheng; Garay Walls, Francisca; Garberson, Ford; García, Carmen; García Navarro, José Enrique; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Gardner, Robert; Garelli, Nicoletta; Garonne, Vincent; Gatti, Claudio; Gaudiello, Andrea; Gaudio, Gabriella; Gaur, Bakul; Gauthier, Lea; Gauzzi, Paolo; Gavrilenko, Igor; Gay, Colin; Gaycken, Goetz; Gazis, Evangelos; Ge, Peng; Gecse, Zoltan; Gee, Norman; Geerts, Daniël Alphonsus Adrianus; Geich-Gimbel, Christoph; Geisler, Manuel Patrice; Gemme, Claudia; Genest, Marie-Hélène; Gentile, Simonetta; George, Matthias; George, Simon; Gerbaudo, Davide; Gershon, Avi; Ghasemi, Sara; Ghazlane, Hamid; Giacobbe, Benedetto; Giagu, Stefano; Giangiobbe, Vincent; Giannetti, Paola; Gibbard, Bruce; Gibson, Stephen; Gilchriese, Murdock; Gillam, Thomas; Gillberg, Dag; Gilles, Geoffrey; Gingrich, Douglas; Giokaris, Nikos; Giordani, MarioPaolo; Giorgi, Filippo Maria; Giorgi, Francesco Michelangelo; Giraud, Pierre-Francois; Giromini, Paolo; Giugni, Danilo; Giuliani, Claudia; Giulini, Maddalena; Gjelsten, Børge Kile; Gkaitatzis, Stamatios; Gkialas, Ioannis; Gkougkousis, Evangelos Leonidas; Gladilin, Leonid; Glasman, Claudia; Glatzer, Julian; Glaysher, Paul; Glazov, Alexandre; Goblirsch-Kolb, Maximilian; Goddard, Jack Robert; Godlewski, Jan; Goldfarb, Steven; Golling, Tobias; Golubkov, Dmitry; Gomes, Agostinho; Gonçalo, Ricardo; Goncalves Pinto Firmino Da Costa, Joao; Gonella, Laura; González de la Hoz, Santiago; Gonzalez Parra, Garoe; Gonzalez-Sevilla, Sergio; Goossens, Luc; Gorbounov, Petr Andreevich; Gordon, Howard; Gorelov, Igor; Gorini, Benedetto; Gorini, Edoardo; Gorišek, Andrej; Gornicki, Edward; Goshaw, Alfred; Gössling, Claus; Gostkin, Mikhail Ivanovitch; Goujdami, Driss; Goussiou, Anna; Govender, Nicolin; Gozani, Eitan; Grabas, Herve Marie Xavier; Graber, Lars; Grabowska-Bold, Iwona; Grafström, Per; Grahn, Karl-Johan; Gramling, Johanna; Gramstad, Eirik; Grancagnolo, Sergio; Grassi, Valerio; Gratchev, Vadim; Gray, Heather; Graziani, Enrico; Greenwood, Zeno Dixon; Gregersen, Kristian; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Grenier, Philippe; Griffiths, Justin; Grillo, Alexander; Grimm, Kathryn; Grinstein, Sebastian; Gris, Philippe Luc Yves; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohs, Johannes Philipp; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gross, Eilam; Grosse-Knetter, Joern; Grossi, Giulio Cornelio; Grout, Zara Jane; Guan, Liang; Guenther, Jaroslav; Guescini, Francesco; Guest, Daniel; Gueta, Orel; Guido, Elisa; Guillemin, Thibault; Guindon, Stefan; Gul, Umar; Gumpert, Christian; Guo, Jun; Guo, Yicheng; Gupta, Shaun; Gustavino, Giuliano; Gutierrez, Phillip; Gutierrez Ortiz, Nicolas Gilberto; Gutschow, Christian; Guyot, Claude; Gwenlan, Claire; Gwilliam, Carl; Haas, Andy; Haber, Carl; Hadavand, Haleh Khani; Haddad, Nacim; Haefner, Petra; Hageböck, Stephan; Hajduk, Zbigniew; Hakobyan, Hrachya; Haleem, Mahsana; Haley, Joseph; Hall, David; Halladjian, Garabed; Hallewell, Gregory David; Hamacher, Klaus; Hamal, Petr; Hamano, Kenji; Hamer, Matthias; Hamilton, Andrew; Hamity, Guillermo Nicolas; Hamnett, Phillip George; Han, Liang; Hanagaki, Kazunori; Hanawa, Keita; Hance, Michael; Hanke, Paul; Hanna, Remie; Hansen, Jørgen Beck; Hansen, Jorn Dines; Hansen, Maike Christina; Hansen, Peter Henrik; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hard, Andrew; Harenberg, Torsten; Hariri, Faten; Harkusha, Siarhei; Harrington, Robert; Harrison, Paul Fraser; Hartjes, Fred; Hasegawa, Makoto; Hasegawa, Satoshi; Hasegawa, Yoji; Hasib, A; Hassani, Samira; Haug, Sigve; Hauser, Reiner; Hauswald, Lorenz; Havranek, Miroslav; Hawkes, Christopher; Hawkings, Richard John; Hawkins, Anthony David; Hayashi, Takayasu; Hayden, Daniel; Hays, Chris; Hays, Jonathan Michael; Hayward, Helen; Haywood, Stephen; Head, Simon; Heck, Tobias; Hedberg, Vincent; Heelan, Louise; Heim, Sarah; Heim, Timon; Heinemann, Beate; Heinrich, Lukas; Hejbal, Jiri; Helary, Louis; Hellman, Sten; Hellmich, Dennis; Helsens, Clement; Henderson, James; Henderson, Robert; Heng, Yang; Hengler, Christopher; Henrichs, Anna; Henriques Correia, Ana Maria; Henrot-Versille, Sophie; Herbert, Geoffrey Henry; Hernández Jiménez, Yesenia; Herrberg-Schubert, Ruth; Herten, Gregor; Hertenberger, Ralf; Hervas, Luis; Hesketh, Gavin Grant; Hessey, Nigel; Hetherly, Jeffrey Wayne; Hickling, Robert; Higón-Rodriguez, Emilio; Hill, Ewan; Hill, John; Hiller, Karl Heinz; Hillier, Stephen; Hinchliffe, Ian; Hines, Elizabeth; Hinman, Rachel Reisner; Hirose, Minoru; Hirschbuehl, Dominic; Hobbs, John; Hod, Noam; Hodgkinson, Mark; Hodgson, Paul; Hoecker, Andreas; Hoeferkamp, Martin; Hoenig, Friedrich; Hohlfeld, Marc; Hohn, David; Holmes, Tova Ray; Homann, Michael; Hong, Tae Min; Hooft van Huysduynen, Loek; Hopkins, Walter; Horii, Yasuyuki; Horton, Arthur James; Hostachy, Jean-Yves; Hou, Suen; Hoummada, Abdeslam; Howard, Jacob; Howarth, James; Hrabovsky, Miroslav; Hristova, Ivana; Hrivnac, Julius; Hryn'ova, Tetiana; Hrynevich, Aliaksei; Hsu, Catherine; Hsu, Pai-hsien Jennifer; Hsu, Shih-Chieh; Hu, Diedi; Hu, Qipeng; Hu, Xueye; Huang, Yanping; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hubaut, Fabrice; Huegging, Fabian; Huffman, Todd Brian; Hughes, Emlyn; Hughes, Gareth; Huhtinen, Mika; Hülsing, Tobias Alexander; Huseynov, Nazim; Huston, Joey; Huth, John; Iacobucci, Giuseppe; Iakovidis, Georgios; Ibragimov, Iskander; Iconomidou-Fayard, Lydia; Ideal, Emma; Idrissi, Zineb; Iengo, Paolo; Igonkina, Olga; Iizawa, Tomoya; Ikegami, Yoichi; Ikematsu, Katsumasa; Ikeno, Masahiro; Ilchenko, Iurii; Iliadis, Dimitrios; Ilic, Nikolina; Ince, Tayfun; Introzzi, Gianluca; Ioannou, Pavlos; Iodice, Mauro; Iordanidou, Kalliopi; Ippolito, Valerio; Irles Quiles, Adrian; Isaksson, Charlie; Ishino, Masaya; Ishitsuka, Masaki; Ishmukhametov, Renat; Issever, Cigdem; Istin, Serhat; Iturbe Ponce, Julia Mariana; Iuppa, Roberto; Ivarsson, Jenny; Iwanski, Wieslaw; Iwasaki, Hiroyuki; Izen, Joseph; Izzo, Vincenzo; Jabbar, Samina; Jackson, Brett; Jackson, Matthew; Jackson, Paul; Jaekel, Martin; Jain, Vivek; Jakobs, Karl; Jakobsen, Sune; Jakoubek, Tomas; Jakubek, Jan; Jamin, David Olivier; Jana, Dilip; Jansen, Eric; Jansky, Roland; Janssen, Jens; Janus, Michel; Jarlskog, Göran; Javadov, Namig; Javůrek, Tomáš; Jeanty, Laura; Jejelava, Juansher; Jeng, Geng-yuan; Jennens, David; Jenni, Peter; Jentzsch, Jennifer; Jeske, Carl; Jézéquel, Stéphane; Ji, Haoshuang; Jia, Jiangyong; Jiang, Yi; Jiggins, Stephen; Jimenez Pena, Javier; Jin, Shan; Jinaru, Adam; Jinnouchi, Osamu; Joergensen, Morten Dam; Johansson, Per; Johns, Kenneth; Jon-And, Kerstin; Jones, Graham; Jones, Roger; Jones, Tim; Jongmanns, Jan; Jorge, Pedro; Joshi, Kiran Daniel; Jovicevic, Jelena; Ju, Xiangyang; Jung, Christian; Jussel, Patrick; Juste Rozas, Aurelio; Kaci, Mohammed; Kaczmarska, Anna; Kado, Marumi; Kagan, Harris; Kagan, Michael; Kahn, Sebastien Jonathan; Kajomovitz, Enrique; Kalderon, Charles William; Kama, Sami; Kamenshchikov, Andrey; Kanaya, Naoko; Kaneti, Steven; Kantserov, Vadim; Kanzaki, Junichi; Kaplan, Benjamin; Kaplan, Laser Seymour; Kapliy, Anton; Kar, Deepak; Karakostas, Konstantinos; Karamaoun, Andrew; Karastathis, Nikolaos; Kareem, Mohammad Jawad; Karentzos, Efstathios; Karnevskiy, Mikhail; Karpov, Sergey; Karpova, Zoya; Karthik, Krishnaiyengar; Kartvelishvili, Vakhtang; Karyukhin, Andrey; Kashif, Lashkar; Kass, Richard; Kastanas, Alex; Kataoka, Yousuke; Katre, Akshay; Katzy, Judith; Kawagoe, Kiyotomo; Kawamoto, Tatsuo; Kawamura, Gen; Kazama, Shingo; Kazanin, Vassili; Keeler, Richard; Kehoe, Robert; Keller, John; Kempster, Jacob Julian; Keoshkerian, Houry; Kepka, Oldrich; Kerševan, Borut Paul; Kersten, Susanne; Keyes, Robert; Khalil-zada, Farkhad; Khandanyan, Hovhannes; Khanov, Alexander; Kharlamov, Alexey; Khoo, Teng Jian; Khovanskiy, Valery; Khramov, Evgeniy; Khubua, Jemal; Kim, Hee Yeun; Kim, Hyeon Jin; Kim, Shinhong; Kim, Young-Kee; Kimura, Naoki; Kind, Oliver Maria; King, Barry; King, Matthew; King, Samuel Burton; Kirk, Julie; Kiryunin, Andrey; Kishimoto, Tomoe; Kisielewska, Danuta; Kiss, Florian; Kiuchi, Kenji; Kivernyk, Oleh; Kladiva, Eduard; Klein, Matthew Henry; Klein, Max; Klein, Uta; Kleinknecht, Konrad; Klimek, Pawel; Klimentov, Alexei; Klingenberg, Reiner; Klinger, Joel Alexander; Klioutchnikova, Tatiana; Kluge, Eike-Erik; Kluit, Peter; Kluth, Stefan; Knapik, Joanna; Kneringer, Emmerich; Knoops, Edith; Knue, Andrea; Kobayashi, Aine; Kobayashi, Dai; Kobayashi, Tomio; Kobel, Michael; Kocian, Martin; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Koffeman, Els; Kogan, Lucy Anne; Kohlmann, Simon; Kohout, Zdenek; Kohriki, Takashi; Koi, Tatsumi; Kolanoski, Hermann; Koletsou, Iro; Komar, Aston; Komori, Yuto; Kondo, Takahiko; Kondrashova, Nataliia; Köneke, Karsten; König, Adriaan; Kono, Takanori; Konoplich, Rostislav; Konstantinidis, Nikolaos; Kopeliansky, Revital; Koperny, Stefan; Köpke, Lutz; Kopp, Anna Katharina; Korcyl, Krzysztof; Kordas, Kostantinos; Korn, Andreas; Korol, Aleksandr; Korolkov, Ilya; Korolkova, Elena; Kortner, Oliver; Kortner, Sandra; Kosek, Tomas; Kostyukhin, Vadim; Kotov, Vladislav; Kotwal, Ashutosh; Kourkoumeli-Charalampidi, Athina; Kourkoumelis, Christine; Kouskoura, Vasiliki; Koutsman, Alex; Kowalewski, Robert Victor; Kowalski, Tadeusz; Kozanecki, Witold; Kozhin, Anatoly; Kramarenko, Viktor; Kramberger, Gregor; Krasnopevtsev, Dimitriy; Krasny, Mieczyslaw Witold; Krasznahorkay, Attila; Kraus, Jana; Kravchenko, Anton; Kreiss, Sven; Kretz, Moritz; Kretzschmar, Jan; Kreutzfeldt, Kristof; Krieger, Peter; Krizka, Karol; Kroeninger, Kevin; Kroha, Hubert; Kroll, Joe; Kroseberg, Juergen; Krstic, Jelena; Kruchonak, Uladzimir; Krüger, Hans; Krumnack, Nils; Kruse, Amanda; Kruse, Mark; Kruskal, Michael; Kubota, Takashi; Kucuk, Hilal; Kuday, Sinan; Kuehn, Susanne; Kugel, Andreas; Kuger, Fabian; Kuhl, Andrew; Kuhl, Thorsten; Kukhtin, Victor; Kulchitsky, Yuri; Kuleshov, Sergey; Kuna, Marine; Kunigo, Takuto; Kupco, Alexander; Kurashige, Hisaya; Kurochkin, Yurii; Kus, Vlastimil; Kuwertz, Emma Sian; Kuze, Masahiro; Kvita, Jiri; Kwan, Tony; Kyriazopoulos, Dimitrios; La Rosa, Alessandro; La Rosa Navarro, Jose Luis; La Rotonda, Laura; Lacasta, Carlos; Lacava, Francesco; Lacey, James; Lacker, Heiko; Lacour, Didier; Lacuesta, Vicente Ramón; Ladygin, Evgueni; Lafaye, Remi; Laforge, Bertrand; Lagouri, Theodota; Lai, Stanley; Lambourne, Luke; Lammers, Sabine; Lampen, Caleb; Lampl, Walter; Lançon, Eric; Landgraf, Ulrich; Landon, Murrough; Lang, Valerie Susanne; Lange, J örn Christian; Lankford, Andrew; Lanni, Francesco; Lantzsch, Kerstin; Lanza, Agostino; Laplace, Sandrine; Lapoire, Cecile; Laporte, Jean-Francois; Lari, Tommaso; Lasagni Manghi, Federico; Lassnig, Mario; Laurelli, Paolo; Lavrijsen, Wim; Law, Alexander; Laycock, Paul; Lazovich, Tomo; Le Dortz, Olivier; Le Guirriec, Emmanuel; Le Menedeu, Eve; LeBlanc, Matthew Edgar; LeCompte, Thomas; Ledroit-Guillon, Fabienne Agnes Marie; Lee, Claire Alexandra; Lee, Shih-Chang; Lee, Lawrence; Lefebvre, Guillaume; Lefebvre, Michel; Legger, Federica; Leggett, Charles; Lehan, Allan; Lehmann Miotto, Giovanna; Lei, Xiaowen; Leight, William Axel; Leisos, Antonios; Leister, Andrew Gerard; Leite, Marco Aurelio Lisboa; Leitner, Rupert; Lellouch, Daniel; Lemmer, Boris; Leney, Katharine; Lenz, Tatjana; Lenzi, Bruno; Leone, Robert; Leone, Sandra; Leonidopoulos, Christos; Leontsinis, Stefanos; Leroy, Claude; Lester, Christopher; Levchenko, Mikhail; Levêque, Jessica; Levin, Daniel; Levinson, Lorne; Levy, Mark; Lewis, Adrian; Leyko, Agnieszka; Leyton, Michael; Li, Bing; Li, Haifeng; Li, Ho Ling; Li, Lei; Li, Liang; Li, Shu; Li, Yichen; Liang, Zhijun; Liao, Hongbo; Liberti, Barbara; Liblong, Aaron; Lichard, Peter; Lie, Ki; Liebal, Jessica; Liebig, Wolfgang; Limbach, Christian; Limosani, Antonio; Lin, Simon; Lin, Tai-Hua; Linde, Frank; Lindquist, Brian Edward; Linnemann, James; Lipeles, Elliot; Lipniacka, Anna; Lisovyi, Mykhailo; Liss, Tony; Lissauer, David; Lister, Alison; Litke, Alan; Liu, Bo; Liu, Dong; Liu, Hao; Liu, Jian; Liu, Jianbei; Liu, Kun; Liu, Lulu; Liu, Miaoyuan; Liu, Minghui; Liu, Yanwen; Livan, Michele; Lleres, Annick; Llorente Merino, Javier; Lloyd, Stephen; Lo Sterzo, Francesco; Lobodzinska, Ewelina; Loch, Peter; Lockman, William; Loebinger, Fred; Loevschall-Jensen, Ask Emil; Loginov, Andrey; Lohse, Thomas; Lohwasser, Kristin; Lokajicek, Milos; Long, Brian Alexander; Long, Jonathan David; Long, Robin Eamonn; Looper, Kristina Anne; Lopes, Lourenco; Lopez Mateos, David; Lopez Paredes, Brais; Lopez Paz, Ivan; Lorenz, Jeanette; Lorenzo Martinez, Narei; Losada, Marta; Loscutoff, Peter; Lösel, Philipp Jonathan; Lou, XinChou; Lounis, Abdenour; Love, Jeremy; Love, Peter; Lu, Nan; Lubatti, Henry; Luci, Claudio; Lucotte, Arnaud; Luehring, Frederick; Lukas, Wolfgang; Luminari, Lamberto; Lundberg, Olof; Lund-Jensen, Bengt; Lynn, David; Lysak, Roman; Lytken, Else; Ma, Hong; Ma, Lian Liang; Maccarrone, Giovanni; Macchiolo, Anna; Macdonald, Calum Michael; Machado Miguens, Joana; Macina, Daniela; Madaffari, Daniele; Madar, Romain; Maddocks, Harvey Jonathan; Mader, Wolfgang; Madsen, Alexander; Maeland, Steffen; Maeno, Tadashi; Maevskiy, Artem; Magradze, Erekle; Mahboubi, Kambiz; Mahlstedt, Joern; Maiani, Camilla; Maidantchik, Carmen; Maier, Andreas Alexander; Maier, Thomas; Maio, Amélia; Majewski, Stephanie; Makida, Yasuhiro; Makovec, Nikola; Malaescu, Bogdan; Malecki, Pawel; Maleev, Victor; Malek, Fairouz; Mallik, Usha; Malon, David; Malone, Caitlin; Maltezos, Stavros; Malyshev, Vladimir; Malyukov, Sergei; Mamuzic, Judita; Mancini, Giada; Mandelli, Beatrice; Mandelli, Luciano; Mandić, Igor; Mandrysch, Rocco; Maneira, José; Manfredini, Alessandro; Manhaes de Andrade Filho, Luciano; Manjarres Ramos, Joany; Mann, Alexander; Manning, Peter; Manousakis-Katsikakis, Arkadios; Mansoulie, Bruno; Mantifel, Rodger; Mantoani, Matteo; Mapelli, Livio; March, Luis; Marchiori, Giovanni; Marcisovsky, Michal; Marino, Christopher; Marjanovic, Marija; Marley, Daniel; Marroquim, Fernando; Marsden, Stephen Philip; Marshall, Zach; Marti, Lukas Fritz; Marti-Garcia, Salvador; Martin, Brian Thomas; Martin, Tim; Martin, Victoria Jane; Martin dit Latour, Bertrand; Martinez, Mario; Martin-Haugh, Stewart; Martoiu, Victor Sorin; Martyniuk, Alex; Marx, Marilyn; Marzano, Francesco; Marzin, Antoine; Masetti, Lucia; Mashimo, Tetsuro; Mashinistov, Ruslan; Masik, Jiri; Maslennikov, Alexey; Massa, Ignazio; Massa, Lorenzo; Massol, Nicolas; Mastrandrea, Paolo; Mastroberardino, Anna; Masubuchi, Tatsuya; Mättig, Peter; Mattmann, Johannes; Maurer, Julien; Maxfield, Stephen; Maximov, Dmitriy; Mazini, Rachid; Mazza, Simone Michele; Mazzaferro, Luca; Mc Goldrick, Garrin; Mc Kee, Shawn Patrick; McCarn, Allison; McCarthy, Robert; McCarthy, Tom; McCubbin, Norman; McFarlane, Kenneth; Mcfayden, Josh; Mchedlidze, Gvantsa; McMahon, Steve; McPherson, Robert; Medinnis, Michael; Meehan, Samuel; Mehlhase, Sascha; Mehta, Andrew; Meier, Karlheinz; Meineck, Christian; Meirose, Bernhard; Mellado Garcia, Bruce Rafael; Meloni, Federico; Mengarelli, Alberto; Menke, Sven; Meoni, Evelin; Mercurio, Kevin Michael; Mergelmeyer, Sebastian; Mermod, Philippe; Merola, Leonardo; Meroni, Chiara; Merritt, Frank; Messina, Andrea; Metcalfe, Jessica; Mete, Alaettin Serhan; Meyer, Carsten; Meyer, Christopher; Meyer, Jean-Pierre; Meyer, Jochen; Middleton, Robin; Miglioranzi, Silvia; Mijović, Liza; Mikenberg, Giora; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mikuž, Marko; Milesi, Marco; Milic, Adriana; Miller, David; Mills, Corrinne; Milov, Alexander; Milstead, David; Minaenko, Andrey; Minami, Yuto; Minashvili, Irakli; Mincer, Allen; Mindur, Bartosz; Mineev, Mikhail; Ming, Yao; Mir, Lluisa-Maria; Mitani, Takashi; Mitrevski, Jovan; Mitsou, Vasiliki A; Miucci, Antonio; Miyagawa, Paul; Mjörnmark, Jan-Ulf; Moa, Torbjoern; Mochizuki, Kazuya; Mohapatra, Soumya; Mohr, Wolfgang; Molander, Simon; Moles-Valls, Regina; Mönig, Klaus; Monini, Caterina; Monk, James; Monnier, Emmanuel; Montejo Berlingen, Javier; Monticelli, Fernando; Monzani, Simone; Moore, Roger; Morange, Nicolas; Moreno, Deywis; Moreno Llácer, María; Morettini, Paolo; Morgenstern, Marcus; Mori, Daniel; Morii, Masahiro; Morinaga, Masahiro; Morisbak, Vanja; Moritz, Sebastian; Morley, Anthony Keith; Mornacchi, Giuseppe; Morris, John; Mortensen, Simon Stark; Morton, Alexander; Morvaj, Ljiljana; Mosidze, Maia; Moss, Josh; Motohashi, Kazuki; Mount, Richard; Mountricha, Eleni; Mouraviev, Sergei; Moyse, Edward; Muanza, Steve; Mudd, Richard; Mueller, Felix; Mueller, James; Mueller, Ralph Soeren Peter; Mueller, Thibaut; Muenstermann, Daniel; Mullen, Paul; Mullier, Geoffrey; Murillo Quijada, Javier Alberto; Murray, Bill; Musheghyan, Haykuhi; Musto, Elisa; Myagkov, Alexey; Myska, Miroslav; Nachman, Benjamin Philip; Nackenhorst, Olaf; Nadal, Jordi; Nagai, Koichi; Nagai, Ryo; Nagai, Yoshikazu; Nagano, Kunihiro; Nagarkar, Advait; Nagasaka, Yasushi; Nagata, Kazuki; Nagel, Martin; Nagy, Elemer; Nairz, Armin Michael; Nakahama, Yu; Nakamura, Koji; Nakamura, Tomoaki; Nakano, Itsuo; Namasivayam, Harisankar; Naranjo Garcia, Roger Felipe; Narayan, Rohin; Naumann, Thomas; Navarro, Gabriela; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer; Nechaeva, Polina; Neep, Thomas James; Nef, Pascal Daniel; Negri, Andrea; Negrini, Matteo; Nektarijevic, Snezana; Nellist, Clara; Nelson, Andrew; Nemecek, Stanislav; Nemethy, Peter; Nepomuceno, Andre Asevedo; Nessi, Marzio; Neubauer, Mark; Neumann, Manuel; Neves, Ricardo; Nevski, Pavel; Newman, Paul; Nguyen, Duong Hai; Nickerson, Richard; Nicolaidou, Rosy; Nicquevert, Bertrand; Nielsen, Jason; Nikiforou, Nikiforos; Nikiforov, Andriy; Nikolaenko, Vladimir; Nikolic-Audit, Irena; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Nilsen, Jon Kerr; Nilsson, Paul; Ninomiya, Yoichi; Nisati, Aleandro; Nisius, Richard; Nobe, Takuya; Nomachi, Masaharu; Nomidis, Ioannis; Nooney, Tamsin; Norberg, Scarlet; Nordberg, Markus; Novgorodova, Olga; Nowak, Sebastian; Nozaki, Mitsuaki; Nozka, Libor; Ntekas, Konstantinos; Nunes Hanninger, Guilherme; Nunnemann, Thomas; Nurse, Emily; Nuti, Francesco; O'Brien, Brendan Joseph; O'grady, Fionnbarr; O'Neil, Dugan; O'Shea, Val; Oakham, Gerald; Oberlack, Horst; Obermann, Theresa; Ocariz, Jose; Ochi, Atsuhiko; Ochoa, Ines; Ochoa-Ricoux, Juan Pedro; Oda, Susumu; Odaka, Shigeru; Ogren, Harold; Oh, Alexander; Oh, Seog; Ohm, Christian; Ohman, Henrik; Oide, Hideyuki; Okamura, Wataru; Okawa, Hideki; Okumura, Yasuyuki; Okuyama, Toyonobu; Olariu, Albert; Olivares Pino, Sebastian Andres; Oliveira Damazio, Denis; Oliver Garcia, Elena; Olszewski, Andrzej; Olszowska, Jolanta; Onofre, António; Onyisi, Peter; Oram, Christopher; Oreglia, Mark; Oren, Yona; Orestano, Domizia; Orlando, Nicola; Oropeza Barrera, Cristina; Orr, Robert; Osculati, Bianca; Ospanov, Rustem; Otero y Garzon, Gustavo; Otono, Hidetoshi; Ouchrif, Mohamed; Ouellette, Eric; Ould-Saada, Farid; Ouraou, Ahmimed; Oussoren, Koen Pieter; Ouyang, Qun; Ovcharova, Ana; Owen, Mark; Owen, Rhys Edward; Ozcan, Veysi Erkcan; Ozturk, Nurcan; Pachal, Katherine; Pacheco Pages, Andres; Padilla Aranda, Cristobal; Pagáčová, Martina; Pagan Griso, Simone; Paganis, Efstathios; Paige, Frank; Pais, Preema; Pajchel, Katarina; Palacino, Gabriel; Palestini, Sandro; Palka, Marek; Pallin, Dominique; Palma, Alberto; Pan, Yibin; Panagiotopoulou, Evgenia; Pandini, Carlo Enrico; Panduro Vazquez, William; Pani, Priscilla; Panitkin, Sergey; Pantea, Dan; Paolozzi, Lorenzo; Papadopoulou, Theodora; Papageorgiou, Konstantinos; Paramonov, Alexander; Paredes Hernandez, Daniela; Parker, Michael Andrew; Parker, Kerry Ann; Parodi, Fabrizio; Parsons, John; Parzefall, Ulrich; Pasqualucci, Enrico; Passaggio, Stefano; Pastore, Fernanda; Pastore, Francesca; Pásztor, Gabriella; Pataraia, Sophio; Patel, Nikhul; Pater, Joleen; Pauly, Thilo; Pearce, James; Pearson, Benjamin; Pedersen, Lars Egholm; Pedersen, Maiken; Pedraza Lopez, Sebastian; Pedro, Rute; Peleganchuk, Sergey; Pelikan, Daniel; Penc, Ondrej; Peng, Cong; Peng, Haiping; Penning, Bjoern; Penwell, John; Perepelitsa, Dennis; Perez Codina, Estel; Pérez García-Estañ, María Teresa; Perini, Laura; Pernegger, Heinz; Perrella, Sabrina; Peschke, Richard; Peshekhonov, Vladimir; Peters, Krisztian; Peters, Yvonne; Petersen, Brian; Petersen, Troels; Petit, Elisabeth; Petridis, Andreas; Petridou, Chariclia; Petroff, Pierre; Petrolo, Emilio; Petrucci, Fabrizio; Pettersson, Nora Emilia; Pezoa, Raquel; Phillips, Peter William; Piacquadio, Giacinto; Pianori, Elisabetta; Picazio, Attilio; Piccaro, Elisa; Piccinini, Maurizio; Pickering, Mark Andrew; Piegaia, Ricardo; Pignotti, David; Pilcher, James; Pilkington, Andrew; Pina, João Antonio; Pinamonti, Michele; Pinfold, James; Pingel, Almut; Pinto, Belmiro; Pires, Sylvestre; Pirumov, Hayk; Pitt, Michael; Pizio, Caterina; Plazak, Lukas; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Pleskot, Vojtech; Plotnikova, Elena; Plucinski, Pawel; Pluth, Daniel; Poettgen, Ruth; Poggioli, Luc; Pohl, David-leon; Polesello, Giacomo; Poley, Anne-luise; Policicchio, Antonio; Polifka, Richard; Polini, Alessandro; Pollard, Christopher Samuel; Polychronakos, Venetios; Pommès, Kathy; Pontecorvo, Ludovico; Pope, Bernard; Popeneciu, Gabriel Alexandru; Popovic, Dragan; Poppleton, Alan; Pospisil, Stanislav; Potamianos, Karolos; Potrap, Igor; Potter, Christina; Potter, Christopher; Poulard, Gilbert; Poveda, Joaquin; Pozdnyakov, Valery; Pralavorio, Pascal; Pranko, Aliaksandr; Prasad, Srivas; Prell, Soeren; Price, Darren; Price, Lawrence; Primavera, Margherita; Prince, Sebastien; Proissl, Manuel; Prokofiev, Kirill; Prokoshin, Fedor; Protopapadaki, Eftychia-sofia; Protopopescu, Serban; Proudfoot, James; Przybycien, Mariusz; Ptacek, Elizabeth; Puddu, Daniele; Pueschel, Elisa; Puldon, David; Purohit, Milind; Puzo, Patrick; Qian, Jianming; Qin, Gang; Qin, Yang; Quadt, Arnulf; Quarrie, David; Quayle, William; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Quilty, Donnchadha; Raddum, Silje; Radeka, Veljko; Radescu, Voica; Radhakrishnan, Sooraj Krishnan; Radloff, Peter; Rados, Pere; Ragusa, Francesco; Rahal, Ghita; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Rammensee, Michael; Rangel-Smith, Camila; Rauscher, Felix; Rave, Stefan; Ravenscroft, Thomas; Raymond, Michel; Read, Alexander Lincoln; Readioff, Nathan Peter; Rebuzzi, Daniela; Redelbach, Andreas; Redlinger, George; Reece, Ryan; Reeves, Kendall; Rehnisch, Laura; Reisin, Hernan; Relich, Matthew; Rembser, Christoph; Ren, Huan; Renaud, Adrien; Rescigno, Marco; Resconi, Silvia; Rezanova, Olga; Reznicek, Pavel; Rezvani, Reyhaneh; Richter, Robert; Richter, Stefan; Richter-Was, Elzbieta; Ricken, Oliver; Ridel, Melissa; Rieck, Patrick; Riegel, Christian Johann; Rieger, Julia; Rijssenbeek, Michael; Rimoldi, Adele; Rinaldi, Lorenzo; Ristić, Branislav; Ritsch, Elmar; Riu, Imma; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rizvi, Eram; Robertson, Steven; Robichaud-Veronneau, Andree; Robinson, Dave; Robinson, James; Robson, Aidan; Roda, Chiara; Roe, Shaun; Røhne, Ole; Rolli, Simona; Romaniouk, Anatoli; Romano, Marino; Romano Saez, Silvestre Marino; Romero Adam, Elena; Rompotis, Nikolaos; Ronzani, Manfredi; Roos, Lydia; Ros, Eduardo; Rosati, Stefano; Rosbach, Kilian; Rose, Peyton; Rosendahl, Peter Lundgaard; Rosenthal, Oliver; Rossetti, Valerio; Rossi, Elvira; Rossi, Leonardo Paolo; Rosten, Rachel; Rotaru, Marina; Roth, Itamar; Rothberg, Joseph; Rousseau, David; Royon, Christophe; Rozanov, Alexandre; Rozen, Yoram; Ruan, Xifeng; Rubbo, Francesco; Rubinskiy, Igor; Rud, Viacheslav; Rudolph, Christian; Rudolph, Matthew Scott; Rühr, Frederik; Ruiz-Martinez, Aranzazu; Rurikova, Zuzana; Rusakovich, Nikolai; Ruschke, Alexander; Russell, Heather; Rutherfoord, John; Ruthmann, Nils; Ryabov, Yury; Rybar, Martin; Rybkin, Grigori; Ryder, Nick; Saavedra, Aldo; Sabato, Gabriele; Sacerdoti, Sabrina; Saddique, Asif; Sadrozinski, Hartmut; Sadykov, Renat; Safai Tehrani, Francesco; Saimpert, Matthias; Saito, Tomoyuki; Sakamoto, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Yuki; Salamanna, Giuseppe; Salamon, Andrea; Saleem, Muhammad; Salek, David; Sales De Bruin, Pedro Henrique; Salihagic, Denis; Salnikov, Andrei; Salt, José; Salvatore, Daniela; Salvatore, Pasquale Fabrizio; Salvucci, Antonio; Salzburger, Andreas; Sampsonidis, Dimitrios; Sanchez, Arturo; Sánchez, Javier; Sanchez Martinez, Victoria; Sandaker, Heidi; Sandbach, Ruth Laura; Sander, Heinz Georg; Sanders, Michiel; Sandhoff, Marisa; Sandoval, Carlos; Sandstroem, Rikard; Sankey, Dave; Sannino, Mario; Sansoni, Andrea; Santoni, Claudio; Santonico, Rinaldo; Santos, Helena; Santoyo Castillo, Itzebelt; Sapp, Kevin; Sapronov, Andrey; Saraiva, João; Sarrazin, Bjorn; Sasaki, Osamu; Sasaki, Yuichi; Sato, Koji; Sauvage, Gilles; Sauvan, Emmanuel; Savage, Graham; Savard, Pierre; Sawyer, Craig; Sawyer, Lee; Saxon, James; Sbarra, Carla; Sbrizzi, Antonio; Scanlon, Tim; Scannicchio, Diana; Scarcella, Mark; Scarfone, Valerio; Schaarschmidt, Jana; Schacht, Peter; Schaefer, Douglas; Schaefer, Ralph; Schaeffer, Jan; Schaepe, Steffen; Schaetzel, Sebastian; Schäfer, Uli; Schaffer, Arthur; Schaile, Dorothee; Schamberger, R Dean; Scharf, Veit; Schegelsky, Valery; Scheirich, Daniel; Schernau, Michael; Schiavi, Carlo; Schillo, Christian; Schioppa, Marco; Schlenker, Stefan; Schmidt, Evelyn; Schmieden, Kristof; Schmitt, Christian; Schmitt, Sebastian; Schmitt, Stefan; Schneider, Basil; Schnellbach, Yan Jie; Schnoor, Ulrike; Schoeffel, Laurent; Schoening, Andre; Schoenrock, Bradley Daniel; Schopf, Elisabeth; Schorlemmer, Andre Lukas; Schott, Matthias; Schouten, Doug; Schovancova, Jaroslava; Schramm, Steven; Schreyer, Manuel; Schroeder, Christian; Schuh, Natascha; Schultens, Martin Johannes; Schultz-Coulon, Hans-Christian; Schulz, Holger; Schumacher, Markus; Schumm, Bruce; Schune, Philippe; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwartz, Matthew; Schwartzman, Ariel; Schwarz, Thomas Andrew; Schwegler, Philipp; Schweiger, Hansdieter; Schwemling, Philippe; Schwienhorst, Reinhard; Schwindling, Jerome; Schwindt, Thomas; Sciacca, Gianfranco; Scifo, Estelle; Sciolla, Gabriella; Scuri, Fabrizio; Scutti, Federico; Searcy, Jacob; Sedov, George; Sedykh, Evgeny; Seema, Pienpen; Seidel, Sally; Seiden, Abraham; Seifert, Frank; Seixas, José; Sekhniaidze, Givi; Sekhon, Karishma; Sekula, Stephen; Seliverstov, Dmitry; Semprini-Cesari, Nicola; Serfon, Cedric; Serin, Laurent; Serkin, Leonid; Serre, Thomas; Sessa, Marco; Seuster, Rolf; Severini, Horst; Sfiligoj, Tina; Sforza, Federico; Sfyrla, Anna; Shabalina, Elizaveta; Shamim, Mansoora; Shan, Lianyou; Shang, Ruo-yu; Shank, James; Shapiro, Marjorie; Shatalov, Pavel; Shaw, Kate; Shaw, Savanna Marie; Shcherbakova, Anna; Shehu, Ciwake Yusufu; Sherwood, Peter; Shi, Liaoshan; Shimizu, Shima; Shimmin, Chase Owen; Shimojima, Makoto; Shiyakova, Mariya; Shmeleva, Alevtina; Shoaleh Saadi, Diane; Shochet, Mel; Shojaii, Seyedruhollah; Shrestha, Suyog; Shulga, Evgeny; Shupe, Michael; Shushkevich, Stanislav; Sicho, Petr; Sidebo, Per Edvin; Sidiropoulou, Ourania; Sidorov, Dmitri; Sidoti, Antonio; Siegert, Frank; Sijacki, Djordje; Silva, José; Silver, Yiftah; Silverstein, Samuel; Simak, Vladislav; Simard, Olivier; Simic, Ljiljana; Simion, Stefan; Simioni, Eduard; Simmons, Brinick; Simon, Dorian; Simoniello, Rosa; Sinervo, Pekka; Sinev, Nikolai; Sioli, Maximiliano; Siragusa, Giovanni; Sisakyan, Alexei; Sivoklokov, Serguei; Sjölin, Jörgen; Sjursen, Therese; Skinner, Malcolm Bruce; Skottowe, Hugh Philip; Skubic, Patrick; Slater, Mark; Slavicek, Tomas; Slawinska, Magdalena; Sliwa, Krzysztof; Smakhtin, Vladimir; Smart, Ben; Smestad, Lillian; Smirnov, Sergei; Smirnov, Yury; Smirnova, Lidia; Smirnova, Oxana; Smith, Matthew; Smith, Russell; Smizanska, Maria; Smolek, Karel; Snesarev, Andrei; Snidero, Giacomo; Snyder, Scott; Sobie, Randall; Socher, Felix; Soffer, Abner; Soh, Dart-yin; Solans, Carlos; Solar, Michael; Solc, Jaroslav; Soldatov, Evgeny; Soldevila, Urmila; Solodkov, Alexander; Soloshenko, Alexei; Solovyanov, Oleg; Solovyev, Victor; Sommer, Philip; Song, Hong Ye; Soni, Nitesh; Sood, Alexander; Sopczak, Andre; Sopko, Bruno; Sopko, Vit; Sorin, Veronica; Sosa, David; Sosebee, Mark; Sotiropoulou, Calliope Louisa; Soualah, Rachik; Soukharev, Andrey; South, David; Sowden, Benjamin; Spagnolo, Stefania; Spalla, Margherita; Spanò, Francesco; Spearman, William Robert; Sperlich, Dennis; Spettel, Fabian; Spighi, Roberto; Spigo, Giancarlo; Spiller, Laurence Anthony; Spousta, Martin; Spreitzer, Teresa; St Denis, Richard Dante; Staerz, Steffen; Stahlman, Jonathan; Stamen, Rainer; Stamm, Soren; Stanecka, Ewa; Stanescu, Cristian; Stanescu-Bellu, Madalina; Stanitzki, Marcel Michael; Stapnes, Steinar; Starchenko, Evgeny; Stark, Jan; Staroba, Pavel; Starovoitov, Pavel; Staszewski, Rafal; Stavina, Pavel; Steinberg, Peter; Stelzer, Bernd; Stelzer, Harald Joerg; Stelzer-Chilton, Oliver; Stenzel, Hasko; Stewart, Graeme; Stillings, Jan Andre; Stockton, Mark; Stoebe, Michael; Stoicea, Gabriel; Stolte, Philipp; Stonjek, Stefan; Stradling, Alden; Straessner, Arno; Stramaglia, Maria Elena; Strandberg, Jonas; Strandberg, Sara; Strandlie, Are; Strauss, Emanuel; Strauss, Michael; Strizenec, Pavol; Ströhmer, Raimund; Strom, David; Stroynowski, Ryszard; Strubig, Antonia; Stucci, Stefania Antonia; Stugu, Bjarne; Styles, Nicholas Adam; Su, Dong; Su, Jun; Subramaniam, Rajivalochan; Succurro, Antonella; Sugaya, Yorihito; Suhr, Chad; Suk, Michal; Sulin, Vladimir; Sultansoy, Saleh; Sumida, Toshi; Sun, Siyuan; Sun, Xiaohu; Sundermann, Jan Erik; Suruliz, Kerim; Susinno, Giancarlo; Sutton, Mark; Suzuki, Shota; Svatos, Michal; Swedish, Stephen; Swiatlowski, Maximilian; Sykora, Ivan; Sykora, Tomas; Ta, Duc; Taccini, Cecilia; Tackmann, Kerstin; Taenzer, Joe; Taffard, Anyes; Tafirout, Reda; Taiblum, Nimrod; Takai, Helio; Takashima, Ryuichi; Takeda, Hiroshi; Takeshita, Tohru; Takubo, Yosuke; Talby, Mossadek; Talyshev, Alexey; Tam, Jason; Tan, Kong Guan; Tanaka, Junichi; Tanaka, Reisaburo; Tanaka, Shuji; Tannenwald, Benjamin Bordy; Tannoury, Nancy; Tapprogge, Stefan; Tarem, Shlomit; Tarrade, Fabien; Tartarelli, Giuseppe Francesco; Tas, Petr; Tasevsky, Marek; Tashiro, Takuya; Tassi, Enrico; Tavares Delgado, Ademar; Tayalati, Yahya; Taylor, Frank; Taylor, Geoffrey; Taylor, Wendy; Teischinger, Florian Alfred; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, Matilde; Teixeira-Dias, Pedro; Temming, Kim Katrin; Ten Kate, Herman; Teng, Ping-Kun; Teoh, Jia Jian; Tepel, Fabian-Phillipp; Terada, Susumu; Terashi, Koji; Terron, Juan; Terzo, Stefano; Testa, Marianna; Teuscher, Richard; Theveneaux-Pelzer, Timothée; Thomas, Juergen; Thomas-Wilsker, Joshuha; Thompson, Emily; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Ray; Thompson, Stan; Thomsen, Lotte Ansgaard; Thomson, Evelyn; Thomson, Mark; Thun, Rudolf; Tibbetts, Mark James; Ticse Torres, Royer Edson; Tikhomirov, Vladimir; Tikhonov, Yury; Timoshenko, Sergey; Tiouchichine, Elodie; Tipton, Paul; Tisserant, Sylvain; Todome, Kazuki; Todorov, Theodore; Todorova-Nova, Sharka; Tojo, Junji; Tokár, Stanislav; Tokushuku, Katsuo; Tollefson, Kirsten; Tolley, Emma; Tomlinson, Lee; Tomoto, Makoto; Tompkins, Lauren; Toms, Konstantin; Torrence, Eric; Torres, Heberth; Torró Pastor, Emma; Toth, Jozsef; Touchard, Francois; Tovey, Daniel; Trefzger, Thomas; Tremblet, Louis; Tricoli, Alessandro; Trigger, Isabel Marian; Trincaz-Duvoid, Sophie; Tripiana, Martin; Trischuk, William; Trocmé, Benjamin; Troncon, Clara; Trottier-McDonald, Michel; Trovatelli, Monica; True, Patrick; Truong, Loan; Trzebinski, Maciej; Trzupek, Adam; Tsarouchas, Charilaos; Tseng, Jeffrey; Tsiareshka, Pavel; Tsionou, Dimitra; Tsipolitis, Georgios; Tsirintanis, Nikolaos; Tsiskaridze, Shota; Tsiskaridze, Vakhtang; Tskhadadze, Edisher; Tsukerman, Ilya; Tsulaia, Vakhtang; Tsuno, Soshi; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tudorache, Alexandra; Tudorache, Valentina; Tuna, Alexander Naip; Tupputi, Salvatore; Turchikhin, Semen; Turecek, Daniel; Turra, Ruggero; Turvey, Andrew John; Tuts, Michael; Tykhonov, Andrii; Tylmad, Maja; Tyndel, Mike; Ueda, Ikuo; Ueno, Ryuichi; Ughetto, Michael; Ugland, Maren; Uhlenbrock, Mathias; Ukegawa, Fumihiko; Unal, Guillaume; Undrus, Alexander; Unel, Gokhan; Ungaro, Francesca; Unno, Yoshinobu; Unverdorben, Christopher; Urban, Jozef; Urquijo, Phillip; Urrejola, Pedro; Usai, Giulio; Usanova, Anna; Vacavant, Laurent; Vacek, Vaclav; Vachon, Brigitte; Valderanis, Chrysostomos; Valencic, Nika; Valentinetti, Sara; Valero, Alberto; Valery, Loic; Valkar, Stefan; Valladolid Gallego, Eva; Vallecorsa, Sofia; Valls Ferrer, Juan Antonio; Van Den Wollenberg, Wouter; Van Der Deijl, Pieter; van der Geer, Rogier; van der Graaf, Harry; Van Der Leeuw, Robin; van Eldik, Niels; van Gemmeren, Peter; Van Nieuwkoop, Jacobus; van Vulpen, Ivo; van Woerden, Marius Cornelis; Vanadia, Marco; Vandelli, Wainer; Vanguri, Rami; Vaniachine, Alexandre; Vannucci, Francois; Vardanyan, Gagik; Vari, Riccardo; Varnes, Erich; Varol, Tulin; Varouchas, Dimitris; Vartapetian, Armen; Varvell, Kevin; Vazeille, Francois; Vazquez Schroeder, Tamara; Veatch, Jason; Veloce, Laurelle Maria; Veloso, Filipe; Velz, Thomas; Veneziano, Stefano; Ventura, Andrea; Ventura, Daniel; Venturi, Manuela; Venturi, Nicola; Venturini, Alessio; Vercesi, Valerio; Verducci, Monica; Verkerke, Wouter; Vermeulen, Jos; Vest, Anja; Vetterli, Michel; Viazlo, Oleksandr; Vichou, Irene; Vickey, Trevor; Vickey Boeriu, Oana Elena; Viehhauser, Georg; Viel, Simon; Vigne, Ralph; Villa, Mauro; Villaplana Perez, Miguel; Vilucchi, Elisabetta; Vincter, Manuella; Vinogradov, Vladimir; Vivarelli, Iacopo; Vives Vaque, Francesc; Vlachos, Sotirios; Vladoiu, Dan; Vlasak, Michal; Vogel, Marcelo; Vokac, Petr; Volpi, Guido; Volpi, Matteo; von der Schmitt, Hans; von Radziewski, Holger; von Toerne, Eckhard; Vorobel, Vit; Vorobev, Konstantin; Vos, Marcel; Voss, Rudiger; Vossebeld, Joost; Vranjes, Nenad; Vranjes Milosavljevic, Marija; Vrba, Vaclav; Vreeswijk, Marcel; Vuillermet, Raphael; Vukotic, Ilija; Vykydal, Zdenek; Wagner, Peter; Wagner, Wolfgang; Wahlberg, Hernan; Wahrmund, Sebastian; Wakabayashi, Jun; Walder, James; Walker, Rodney; Walkowiak, Wolfgang; Wang, Chao; Wang, Fuquan; Wang, Haichen; Wang, Hulin; Wang, Jike; Wang, Jin; Wang, Kuhan; Wang, Rui; Wang, Song-Ming; Wang, Tan; Wang, Xiaoxiao; Wanotayaroj, Chaowaroj; Warburton, Andreas; Ward, Patricia; Wardrope, David Robert; Warsinsky, Markus; Washbrook, Andrew; Wasicki, Christoph; Watkins, Peter; Watson, Alan; Watson, Ian; Watson, Miriam; Watts, Gordon; Watts, Stephen; Waugh, Ben; Webb, Samuel; Weber, Michele; Weber, Stefan Wolf; Webster, Jordan S; Weidberg, Anthony; Weinert, Benjamin; Weingarten, Jens; Weiser, Christian; Weits, Hartger; Wells, Phillippa; Wenaus, Torre; Wengler, Thorsten; Wenig, Siegfried; Wermes, Norbert; Werner, Matthias; Werner, Per; Wessels, Martin; Wetter, Jeffrey; Whalen, Kathleen; Wharton, Andrew Mark; White, Andrew; White, Martin; White, Ryan; White, Sebastian; Whiteson, Daniel; Wickens, Fred; Wiedenmann, Werner; Wielers, Monika; Wienemann, Peter; Wiglesworth, Craig; Wiik-Fuchs, Liv Antje Mari; Wildauer, Andreas; Wilkens, Henric George; Williams, Hugh; Williams, Sarah; Willis, Christopher; Willocq, Stephane; Wilson, Alan; Wilson, John; Wingerter-Seez, Isabelle; Winklmeier, Frank; Winter, Benedict Tobias; Wittgen, Matthias; Wittkowski, Josephine; Wollstadt, Simon Jakob; Wolter, Marcin Wladyslaw; Wolters, Helmut; Wosiek, Barbara; Wotschack, Jorg; Woudstra, Martin; Wozniak, Krzysztof; Wu, Mengqing; Wu, Miles; Wu, Sau Lan; Wu, Xin; Wu, Yusheng; Wyatt, Terry Richard; Wynne, Benjamin; Xella, Stefania; Xu, Da; Xu, Lailin; Yabsley, Bruce; Yacoob, Sahal; Yakabe, Ryota; Yamada, Miho; Yamaguchi, Yohei; Yamamoto, Akira; Yamamoto, Shimpei; Yamanaka, Takashi; Yamauchi, Katsuya; Yamazaki, Yuji; Yan, Zhen; Yang, Haijun; Yang, Hongtao; Yang, Yi; Yao, Weiming; Yasu, Yoshiji; Yatsenko, Elena; Yau Wong, Kaven Henry; Ye, Jingbo; Ye, Shuwei; Yeletskikh, Ivan; Yen, Andy L; Yildirim, Eda; Yorita, Kohei; Yoshida, Rikutaro; Yoshihara, Keisuke; Young, Charles; Young, Christopher John; Youssef, Saul; Yu, David Ren-Hwa; Yu, Jaehoon; Yu, Jiaming; Yu, Jie; Yuan, Li; Yuen, Stephanie P; Yurkewicz, Adam; Yusuff, Imran; Zabinski, Bartlomiej; Zaidan, Remi; Zaitsev, Alexander; Zalieckas, Justas; Zaman, Aungshuman; Zambito, Stefano; Zanello, Lucia; Zanzi, Daniele; Zeitnitz, Christian; Zeman, Martin; Zemla, Andrzej; Zengel, Keith; Zenin, Oleg; Ženiš, Tibor; Zerwas, Dirk; Zhang, Dongliang; Zhang, Fangzhou; Zhang, Huijun; Zhang, Jinlong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Ruiqi; Zhang, Xueyao; Zhang, Zhiqing; Zhao, Xiandong; Zhao, Yongke; Zhao, Zhengguo; Zhemchugov, Alexey; Zhong, Jiahang; Zhou, Bing; Zhou, Chen; Zhou, Lei; Zhou, Li; Zhou, Ning; Zhu, Cheng Guang; Zhu, Hongbo; Zhu, Junjie; Zhu, Yingchun; Zhuang, Xuai; Zhukov, Konstantin; Zibell, Andre; Zieminska, Daria; Zimine, Nikolai; Zimmermann, Christoph; Zimmermann, Stephanie; Zinonos, Zinonas; Zinser, Markus; Ziolkowski, Michael; Živković, Lidija; Zobernig, Georg; Zoccoli, Antonio; zur Nedden, Martin; Zurzolo, Giovanni; Zwalinski, Lukasz

    2015-09-24

    The distribution and orientation of energy inside jets is predicted to be an experimental handle on colour connections between the hard--scatter quarks and gluons initiating the jets.  This Letter presents a measurement of the distribution of one such variable, the jet pull angle. The pull angle is measured for jets produced in $t\\bar{t}$ events with one $W$ boson decaying leptonically and the other decaying to jets using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data recorded with the ATLAS detector at a centre--of--mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the LHC. The jet pull angle distribution is corrected for detector resolution and acceptance effects and is compared to various models.

  14. Measurement of colour flow with the jet pull angle in tt¯ events using the ATLAS detector at s=8 TeV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The distribution and orientation of energy inside jets is predicted to be an experimental handle on colour connections between the hard-scatter quarks and gluons initiating the jets. This Letter presents a measurement of the distribution of one such variable, the jet pull angle. The pull angle is measured for jets produced in tt¯ events with one W boson decaying leptonically and the other decaying to jets using 20.3 fb−1 of data recorded with the ATLAS detector at a centre-of-mass energy of s=8 TeV at the LHC. The jet pull angle distribution is corrected for detector resolution and acceptance effects and is compared to various models.

  15. Measuring the {chi}{sub 1} torsion angle in protein by CH-CH cross-correlated relaxation: A new resolution-optimised experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlomagno, Teresa [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)], E-mail: taco@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de; Bermel, Wolfgang [Bruker Biospin GmbH (Germany); Griesinger, Christian [Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Department of NMR-based Structural Biology (Germany)], E-mail: cigr@nmr.mpibpc.mpg.de

    2003-10-15

    Here we introduce an experiment with high sensitivity and resolution for the measurement of CH-CH dipolar-dipolar cross-correlated relaxation rates (CCRR) in protein side-chains. The new methodology aims to the determination of structural and dynamical parameters around the torsion angle {chi}{sub 1} by measuring C{sub {alpha}}H{sub {alpha}}-C{sub {beta}}H{sub {beta}} cross-correlated relaxation rates. The method is validated on the protein ubiquitin: the {chi}{sub 1} angles determined from the CCRR data are compared with the {chi}{sub 1} angles of a previously determined NMR structure. The agreement between the two data sets is excellent for most residues. The few discrepancies that were found between the CCR-derived {chi}{sub 1} angles and the angles of the previously determined NMR structure could be explained by taking internal motion into account. The new methodology represents a very powerful tool to determine both structure and dynamics of protein side-chains in only one experiment.

  16. Ultra-Precision Measurement and Control of Angle Motion in Piezo-Based Platforms Using Strain Gauge Sensors and a Robust Composite Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Gang Wu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The measurement and control strategy of a piezo-based platform by using strain gauge sensors (SGS and a robust composite controller is investigated in this paper. First, the experimental setup is constructed by using a piezo-based platform, SGS sensors, an AD5435 platform and two voltage amplifiers. Then, the measurement strategy to measure the tip/tilt angles accurately in the order of sub-μrad is presented. A comprehensive composite control strategy design to enhance the tracking accuracy with a novel driving principle is also proposed. Finally, an experiment is presented to validate the measurement and control strategy. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed measurement and control strategy provides accurate angle motion with a root mean square (RMS error of 0.21 μrad, which is approximately equal to the noise level.

  17. Scaling of misorientation angle distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, D.A.; Chrzan, D.C.; Liu, Q.

    1998-01-01

    The measurement of misorientation angle distributions following different amounts of deformation in cold-rolled aluminum and nickel and compressed stainless steel is reported. The sealing of the dislocation cell boundary misorientation angle distributions is studied. Surprisingly, the distributions...

  18. A path-following driver-vehicle model with neuromuscular dynamics, including measured and simulated responses to a step in steering angle overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, David J.

    2012-04-01

    An existing driver-vehicle model with neuromuscular dynamics is improved in the areas of cognitive delay, intrinsic muscle dynamics and alpha-gamma co-activation. The model is used to investigate the influence of steering torque feedback and neuromuscular dynamics on the vehicle response to lateral force disturbances. When steering torque feedback is present, it is found that the longitudinal position of the lateral disturbance has a significant influence on whether the driver's reflex response reinforces or attenuates the effect of the disturbance. The response to angle and torque overlay inputs to the steering system is also investigated. The presence of the steering torque feedback reduced the disturbing effect of torque overlay and angle overlay inputs. Reflex action reduced the disturbing effect of a torque overlay input, but increased the disturbing effect of an angle overlay input. Experiments on a driving simulator showed that measured handwheel angle response to an angle overlay input was consistent with the response predicted by the model with reflex action. However, there was significant intra- and inter-subject variability. The results highlight the significance of a driver's neuromuscular dynamics in determining the vehicle response to disturbances.

  19. The Achilles tendon resting angle as an indirect measure of Achilles tendon length following rupture, repair, and rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Carmont

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The ATRA increases following injury, is reduced by surgery, and then increases again during initial rehabilitation. The angle also correlates with patient-reported symptoms early in the rehabilitation phase and with heel-rise height after 1 year. The ATRA might be considered a simple and effective means to evaluate Achilles tendon function 1 year after the rupture.

  20. The Use of Bending Angle Retrieved By GPS Radio Occultation Technique For The Measurement of The Atmospheric Water Vapour Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespe, F.; Benedetto, C.; Pacione, R.

    In the last decade the use of GPS radio occultation technique (GPS RO) has been deeply and widely investigated for retrieving physical and chemical Earth atmospheric parameters. The technique proved to be particularly precise in retrieving temperature profiles with an high vertical resolution (air) in 2 unknown (hydrostatic pressure and temperature). The system cannot be solved for lower troposphere because the water vapour pressu re is not negligible. So we are forced to include some other information such as the humidity computed by the models (ECMWF or NEP) or adding another observable in the system as the zenith troposphere delays estimated by the GPS ground stations. In this work we will investigate the possibility to retrieve humidity using only the bending angles achieved by the GPS RO. In particular, the humidity profiles are extracted differentiating the true bending angle profiles, retrieved by the GPS RO, with the dry ones, obtained by fitting and extrapolating the outer layers bending angles in a dry atmosphere model (exponential or Hopfield). The bending angles will be retrieved by CHAMP and SAC-C GPS RO data. Then the humidity profiles obtained with the proposed technique will be compared and validated with those retrieved with radio-sounding balloons over two sites at different latitudes: Brindisi (Italy) and Singapore (Japan).

  1. Measurement of the effective weak mixing angle in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events

    CERN Document Server

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; Acharya, Bannanje Sripath; Adams, Mark Raymond; Adams, Todd; Agnew, James P; Alexeev, Guennadi D; Alkhazov, Georgiy D; Alton, Andrew K; Askew, Andrew Warren; Atkins, Scott; Augsten, Kamil; Avila, Carlos A; Badaud, Frederique; Bagby, Linda F; Baldin, Boris; Bandurin, Dmitry V; Banerjee, Sunanda; Barberis, Emanuela; Baringer, Philip S; Bartlett, JFrederick; Bassler, Ursula Rita; Bazterra, Victor; Bean, Alice L; Begalli, Marcia; Bellantoni, Leo; Beri, Suman B; Bernardi, Gregorio; Bernhard, Ralf Patrick; Bertram, Iain A; Besancon, Marc; Beuselinck, Raymond; Bhat, Pushpalatha C; Bhatia, Sudeep; Bhatnagar, Vipin; Blazey, Gerald Charles; Blessing, Susan K; Bloom, Kenneth A; Boehnlein, Amber S; Boline, Daniel Dooley; Boos, Edward E; Borissov, Guennadi; Borysova, Maryna; Brandt, Andrew; Brandt, Oleg; Brock, Raymond L; Bross, Alan D; Brown, Duncan Paul; Bu, Xue-Bing; Buehler, Marc; Buescher, Volker; Bunichev, Viacheslav Yevgenyevich; Burdin, Sergey; Buszello, Claus Peter; Camacho-Perez, Enrique; Casey, Brendan Cameron Kieran; Castilla-Valdez, Heriberto; Caughron, Seth Aaron; Chakrabarti, Subhendu; Chan, Kwok Ming Leo; Chandra, Avdhesh; Chapon, Emilien; Chen, Guo; Cho, Sung-Woong; Choi, Suyong; Choudhary, Brajesh C; Cihangir, Selcuk; Claes, Daniel R; Clutter, Justace Randall; Cooke, Michael P; Cooper, William Edward; Corcoran, Marjorie D; Couderc, Fabrice; Cousinou, Marie-Claude; Cutts, David; Das, Amitabha; Davies, Gavin John; de Jong, Sijbrand Jan; De La Cruz-Burelo, Eduard; Deliot, Frederic; Demina, Regina; Denisov, Dmitri S; Denisov, Sergei P; Desai, Satish Vijay; Deterre, Cecile; DeVaughan, Kayle Otis; Diehl, HThomas; Diesburg, Michael; Ding, Pengfei; Dominguez, DAaron M; Dubey, Abhinav Kumar; Dudko, Lev V; Duperrin, Arnaud; Dutt, Suneel; Eads, Michael T; Edmunds, Daniel L; Ellison, John A; Elvira, VDaniel; Enari, Yuji; Evans, Harold G; Evdokimov, Valeri N; Faure, Alexandre; Feng, Lei; Ferbel, Thomas; Fiedler, Frank; Filthaut, Frank; Fisher, Wade Cameron; Fisk, HEugene; Fortner, Michael R; Fox, Harald; Fuess, Stuart C; Garbincius, Peter H; Garcia-Bellido, Aran; Garcia-Gonzalez, Jose Andres; Gavrilov, Vladimir B; Geng, Weigang; Gerber, Cecilia Elena; Gershtein, Yuri S; Ginther, George E; Gogota, Olga; Golovanov, Georgy Anatolievich; Grannis, Paul D; Greder, Sebastien; Greenlee, Herbert B; Grenier, Gerald Jean; Gris, Phillipe Luc; Grivaz, Jean-Francois; Grohsjean, Alexander; Gruenendahl, Stefan; Gruenewald, Martin Werner; Guillemin, Thibault; Gutierrez, Gaston R; Gutierrez, Phillip; Haley, Joseph Glenn Biddle; Han, Liang; Harder, Kristian; Harel, Amnon; Hauptman, John Michael; Hays, Jonathan M; Head, Tim; Hebbeker, Thomas; Hedin, David R; Hegab, Hatim; Heinson, Ann; Heintz, Ulrich; Hensel, Carsten; Heredia-De La Cruz, Ivan; Herner, Kenneth Richard; Hesketh, Gavin G; Hildreth, Michael D; Hirosky, Robert James; Hoang, Trang; Hobbs, John D; Hoeneisen, Bruce; Hogan, Julie; Hohlfeld, Mark; Holzbauer, Jenny Lyn; Howley, Ian James; Hubacek, Zdenek; Hynek, Vlastislav; Iashvili, Ia; Ilchenko, Yuriy; Illingworth, Robert A; Ito, Albert S; Jabeen, Shabnam; Jaffre, Michel J; Jayasinghe, Ayesh; Jeong, Min-Soo; Jesik, Richard L; Jiang, Peng; Johns, Kenneth Arthur; Johnson, Emily; Johnson, Marvin E; Jonckheere, Alan M; Jonsson, Per Martin; Joshi, Jyoti; Jung, Andreas Werner; Juste, Aurelio; Kajfasz, Eric; Karmanov, Dmitriy Y; Katsanos, Ioannis; Kaur, Manbir; Kehoe, Robert Leo Patrick; Kermiche, Smain; Khalatyan, Norayr; Khanov, Alexander; Kharchilava, Avto; Kharzheev, Yuri N; Kiselevich, Ivan Lvovich; Kohli, Jatinder M; Kozelov, Alexander V; Kraus, James Alexander; Kumar, Ashish; Kupco, Alexander; Kurca, Tibor; Kuzmin, Valentin Alexandrovich; Lammers, Sabine Wedam; Lebrun, Patrice; Lee, Hyeon-Seung; Lee, Seh-Wook; Lee, William M; Lei, Xiaowen; Lellouch, Jeremie; Li, Dikai; Li, Hengne; Li, Liang; Li, Qi-Zhong; Lim, Jeong Ku; Lincoln, Donald W; Linnemann, James Thomas; Lipaev, Vladimir V; Lipton, Ronald J; Liu, Huanzhao; Liu, Yanwen; Lobodenko, Alexandre; Lokajicek, Milos; Lopes de Sa, Rafael; Luna-Garcia, Rene; Lyon, Adam Leonard; Maciel, Arthur KA; Madar, Romain; Magana-Villalba, Ricardo; Malik, Sudhir; Malyshev, Vladimir L; Mansour, Jason; Martinez-Ortega, Jorge; McCarthy, Robert L; Mcgivern, Carrie Lynne; Meijer, Melvin M; Melnitchouk, Alexander S; Menezes, Diego D; Mercadante, Pedro Galli; Merkin, Mikhail M; Meyer, Arnd; Meyer, Jorg Manfred; Miconi, Florian; Mondal, Naba K; Mulhearn, Michael James; Nagy, Elemer; Narain, Meenakshi; Nayyar, Ruchika; Neal, Homer A; Negret, Juan Pablo; Neustroev, Petr V; Nguyen, Huong Thi; Nunnemann, Thomas P; Hernandez Orduna, Jose de Jesus; Osman, Nicolas Ahmed; Osta, Jyotsna; Pal, Arnab; Parashar, Neeti; Parihar, Vivek; Park, Sung Keun; Partridge, Richard A; Parua, Nirmalya; Patwa, Abid; Penning, Bjoern; Perfilov, Maxim Anatolyevich; Peters, Reinhild Yvonne Fatima; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrillo, Gianluca; Petroff, Pierre; Pleier, Marc-Andre; Podstavkov, Vladimir M; Popov, Alexey V; Prewitt, Michelle; Price, Darren; Prokopenko, Nikolay N; Qian, Jianming; Quadt, Arnulf; Quinn, Breese; Ratoff, Peter N; Razumov, Ivan A; Ripp-Baudot, Isabelle; Rizatdinova, Flera; Rominsky, Mandy Kathleen; Ross, Anthony; Royon, Christophe; Rubinov, Paul Michael; Ruchti, Randal C; Sajot, Gerard; Sanchez-Hernandez, Alberto; Sanders, Michiel P; Santos, Angelo Souza; Savage, David G; Savitskyi, Mykola; Sawyer, HLee; Scanlon, Timothy P; Schamberger, RDean; Scheglov, Yury A; Schellman, Heidi M; Schwanenberger, Christian; Schwienhorst, Reinhard H; Sekaric, Jadranka; Severini, Horst; Shabalina, Elizaveta K; Shary, Viacheslav V; Shaw, Savanna; Shchukin, Andrey A; Simak, Vladislav J; Skubic, Patrick Louis; Slattery, Paul F; Smirnov, Dmitri V; Snow, Gregory R; Snow, Joel Mark; Snyder, Scott Stuart; Soldner-Rembold, Stefan; Sonnenschein, Lars; Soustruznik, Karel; Stark, Jan; Stoyanova, Dina A; Strauss, Michael G; Suter, Louise; Svoisky, Peter V; Titov, Maxim; Tokmenin, Valeriy V; Tsai, Yun-Tse; Tsybychev, Dmitri; Tuchming, Boris; Tully, Christopher George T; Uvarov, Lev; Uvarov, Sergey L; Uzunyan, Sergey A; Van Kooten, Richard J; van Leeuwen, Willem M; Varelas, Nikos; Varnes, Erich W; Vasilyev, Igor A; Verkheev, Alexander Yurievich; Vertogradov, Leonid S; Verzocchi, Marco; Vesterinen, Mika; Vilanova, Didier; Vokac, Petr; Wahl, Horst D; Wang, Michael HLS; Warchol, Jadwiga; Watts, Gordon Thomas; Wayne, Mitchell R; Weichert, Jonas; Welty-Rieger, Leah Christine; Williams, Mark Richard James; Wilson, Graham Wallace; Wobisch, Markus; Wood, Darien Robert; Wyatt, Terence R; Xie, Yunhe; Yamada, Ryuji; Yang, Siqi; Yasuda, Takahiro; Yatsunenko, Yuriy A; Ye, Wanyu; Ye, Zhenyu; Yin, Hang; Yip, Kin; Youn, Sungwoo; Yu, Jiaming; Zennamo, Joseph; Zhao, Tianqi Gilbert; Zhou, Bing; Zhu, Junjie; Zielinski, Marek; Zieminska, Daria; Zivkovic, Lidija

    2015-07-22

    We present a measurement of the fundamental parameter of the standard model, the weak mixing angle, in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+}e^{-}$ events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, using data corresponding to 9.7 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The effective weak mixing angle is extracted from the forward-backward charge asymmetry as a function of the invariant mass around the Z boson pole. The measured value of $\\sin^2\\theta_{\\text{eff}}^{\\text{$\\ell$}}=0.23146 \\pm 0.00047$ is the most precise measurement from light quark interactions to date, with a precision close to the best LEP and SLD results.

  2. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose K.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-05

    The optical constants n and k can be used to model infrared spectra, including refraction, absorption, reflectance, and emissivity, but obtaining reliable values for solid materials (pure or otherwise) presents a challenge: In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, homogeneous materials, free of defects. That is, materials where the Fresnel equations are operant since there is no light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain a pure macroscopic (crystalline) material, it may be possible to press the material into a (uniform, void-free) disk. We have recently been able to do this with ammonium sulfate powder and then measured the n & k values via two independent methods: 1) Ellipsometry - which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) Single angle specular reflectance with an FT spectrometer using a specular reflectance device within an FT instrument which measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence over a wide wavelength range. The quality of the derived n & k values was tested by generating the reflectance spectra of the pellet and comparing to the calculated to measured reflectance spectra of the pure material which has been previously published. The comparison to literature values showed good accuracy and good agreement, indicating promise to measure other materials by such methods.

  3. Development of a straightness measurement and compensation system with multiple right-angle reflectors and a lead zirconate titanate-based compensation stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chien-Hung; Chen, Jui-Hung; Teng, Yun-Feng

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents a real-time straightness measurement and compensation system with an optical straightness measurement system and a single-axis flexure-hinge type lead zirconate titanate (PZT)-based compensation stage. The optical straightness measurement system consists of a He-Ne laser, a quadrant photodiode detector, and five right-angle reflectors. Multiple laser beam reflections between the right-angle reflectors increase the sensitivity of the straightness measurement by a factor of 6. The right-angle reflectors can be moved by the flexure-hinge type PZT-based compensation stage that is actuated by a PZT actuator to ensure that the laser beam is always projected onto the center of the quadrant detector. These two systems are integrated and fixed on a scanning stage. The resolution of the straightness measurement system is 0.1 microm. Using the real-time straightness compensation system, the straightness error of the scanning stage is fed back to the control system. The compensated straightness error of the scanning stage system was reduced from 6.5 microm to less than 1 microm.

  4. Measurements of anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter using two Scheimpflug imaging devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Domínguez-Vicent

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To compare the ocular anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, as measured with two different Scheimpflug imaging devices. Methods: This transversal study included 80 right eyes from 80 subjects aged from 20 to 40 years. Their spherical equivalents ranged from -4.25 to +1.00 diopters (D. Each eye's anterior chamber depth, white-to-white distance, anterior chamber angle, and pupil diameter, were measured for far vision using both the Galilei G4 (double Scheimpflug camera and the Pentacam HR (single Scheimpflug camera systems. Results: Mean anterior chamber depths were calculated as 3.12 ± 0.23 mm and 3.19 ± 0.24 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. The mean white-to-white distance measured was 11.84 ± 0.31 mm and 11.90 ± 0.43 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Mean pupil diameters were measured as 3.22 ± 0.58 mm and 3.22 ± 0.52 mm when measured with the Galilei G4 and the Pentacam HR, respectively. Finally, the mean anterior chamber angle was 34.30 ± 2.86 degrees when it was measured with the Galilei G4, and 39.26 ± 2.85 degrees when measured with the Pentacam HR. A comparative analysis revealed that the Galilei G4 yielded a significantly lower (P0.05 for both devices were obtained for the white-to-white distance measurements. Conclusion: The Galilei G4 and Pentacam HR Scheimpflug systems cannot be used interchangeably because they produce significant measurement differences.

  5. Photoelectric angle converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzharenko, Volodymyr A.; Kulakov, Pavlo I.

    2001-06-01

    The photo-electric angle transmitter of rotation is offered, at which the output voltage is linear function of entering magnitude. In a transmitter the linear phototransducer is used on the basis of pair photo diode -- operating amplifier, which output voltage is linear function of the area of an illuminated photosensitive stratum, and modulator of a light stream of the special shape, which ensures a linear dependence of this area from an angle of rotation. The transmitter has good frequent properties and can be used for dynamic measurements of an angular velocity and angle of rotation, in systems of exact drives and systems of autocontrol.

  6. Angle performance on optima MDxt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, Jonathan; Kamenitsa, Dennis [Axcelis Technologies, Inc., 108 Cherry Hill Dr, Beverly, MA 01915 (United States)

    2012-11-06

    Angle control on medium current implanters is important due to the high angle-sensitivity of typical medium current implants, such as halo implants. On the Optima MDxt, beam-to-wafer angles are controlled in both the horizontal and vertical directions. In the horizontal direction, the beam angle is measured through six narrow slits, and any angle adjustment is made by electrostatically steering the beam, while cross-wafer beam parallelism is adjusted by changing the focus of the electrostatic parallelizing lens (P-lens). In the vertical direction, the beam angle is measured through a high aspect ratio mask, and any angle adjustment is made by slightly tilting the wafer platen prior to implant. A variety of tests were run to measure the accuracy and repeatability of Optima MDxt's angle control. SIMS profiles of a high energy, channeling sensitive condition show both the cross-wafer angle uniformity, along with the small-angle resolution of the system. Angle repeatability was quantified by running a channeling sensitive implant as a regular monitor over a seven month period and measuring the sheet resistance-to-angle sensitivity. Even though crystal cut error was not controlled for in this case, when attributing all Rs variation to angle changes, the overall angle repeatability was measured as 0.16 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}). A separate angle repeatability test involved running a series of V-curves tests over a four month period using low crystal cut wafers selected from the same boule. The results of this test showed the angle repeatability to be <0.1 Degree-Sign (1{sigma}).

  7. Dynamic Deformation Measurements of an Aeroelastic Semispan Model. [conducted in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, Sharon S.; Burner, Alpheus W.; Edwards, John W.; Schuster, David M.

    2001-01-01

    The techniques used to acquire, reduce, and analyze dynamic deformation measurements of an aeroelastic semispan wind tunnel model are presented. Single-camera, single-view video photogrammetry (also referred to as videogrammetric model deformation, or VMD) was used to determine dynamic aeroelastic deformation of the semispan 'Models for Aeroelastic Validation Research Involving Computation' (MAVRIC) model in the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel at the NASA Langley Research Center. Dynamic deformation was determined from optical retroreflective tape targets at five semispan locations located on the wing from the root to the tip. Digitized video images from a charge coupled device (CCD) camera were recorded and processed to automatically determine target image plane locations that were then corrected for sensor, lens, and frame grabber spatial errors. Videogrammetric dynamic data were acquired at a 60-Hz rate for time records of up to 6 seconds during portions of this flutter/Limit Cycle Oscillation (LCO) test at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 0.96. Spectral analysis of the deformation data is used to identify dominant frequencies in the wing motion. The dynamic data will be used to separate aerodynamic and structural effects and to provide time history deflection data for Computational Aeroelasticity code evaluation and validation.

  8. [Imaging measurement and clinical significance of the angle between the axis of pedicle and the plane of lamina in lower cervical vertebra].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zhenghao; Zhou, Jinghua; Wang, Weiguo

    2017-11-28

    To explore the imaging measurement and clinical significance of the angle between the axis of pedicle and the plane of lamina in lower cervical vertebra.
 Methods: Three dimensional reconstruction of CT scan was performed in 30 patients with cervical deformity, and the angle between the axis of pedicle and the plane of lamina was measured with the specific reconstructed CT image of C3-C7.
 Results: 1) The left and right transverse angle of C3-C7 between the axis of pedicle and the ipsilateral plane of lamina were 98.3°±6.3°, 98.0°±5.1°, 97.5°±6.9°, 95.1°±5.0°, 85.8°±5.4° and 96.7°±8.2°, 98.7°±7.1°, 97.8°±3.6°, 93.2°±6.2°, 86.8°±5.7°, respectively, which showed a gradual decreasing trend. Meanwhile the angle of C3-C6 was more than 90 degrees and C7 was less than 90 degrees. In addition to C6 with C3 and C7 with other segments, the rest of the differences between the sections was not statistically significant (all P>0.05). 2) The left and right transverse angle of C3-C7 between the axis of pedicle and the pedicle of vertebral arch of lamina were 0.2°±4.5°, 1.2°±7.2°, -0.8°±6.8°, -3.3°±5.4°, -14.7°±4.0° and -1.6°±5.4°, 1.9°±4.6°, -0.5°±6.0°, -4.6°±5.3°, -13.7°±3.4°, respectively, which showed a first increasing and then reducing trend. Meanwhile the angle of C4 was maximum angle. In addition to C6 with C3, C6 with C4, and C7 with other segments, the differences between the sections was not statistically significant (all P>0.05). 3) The left and right sagittal angle of C3-C7 between the axis of pedicle and the ipsilateral plane of lamina were 77.7°±7.6°, 77.0°±7.1°, 85.3°±8.4°, 94.1°±2.2°, 94.9°±3.8° and 78.5°±7.1°, 76.2°±6.2°, 86.4°±6.4°, 94.0°±2.7°, 95.6°±3.8°, respectively, which showed a gradual increasing trend. The angle of C3-C4 was less than 90 degrees. C5 showed large variation and C6-C7 was more than 90 degrees. In addition to C3 with C4 and C6 with C7, the

  9. The Semiotic and Conceptual Genesis of Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguay, Denis; Venant, Fabienne

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we try to understand how students at the end of primary school conceive of angle: Is an angle a magnitude for them or a geometric figure, and how do they manage to coordinate the two aspects in their understanding of the concepts of angle and of angle measurement? With the aim of better grasping the way "angle" is…

  10. Bioimpedance spectroscopy measurements of phase angle and height for age are predictive of outcome in children following surgery for congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, L V; Meyer, R; Johnson, M; Newell, C; Johnstone, C; Magee, A; Sykes, K; Wootton, S A; Pappachan, J V

    2017-06-28

    Children with congenital heart disease (CHD) are often growth restricted (low weight- and/or height-for-age) which may increase risk of poor post operative resilience. Bioelectrical impedance spectroscopy (BIS) has been used to determine body composition in different clinical settings and has been shown to mark differences in nutritional state and clinical outcome. In disease conditions were fluid is not normally distributed it is proposed that raw impedance values and BIS derived phase-angle may serve as prognostic indicators of clinical outcome. We sought to describe the relationship between nutritional status, phase-angle and post-operative outcomes in children with congenital heart disease. Single centre prospective cohort study. Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU), Southampton Children's Hospital. 122 children with CHD following cardiac surgery (March 2015-April 2016). Outcome variables included growth, mechanical-ventilation, PICU length of stay (PICU-LOS) and phase-angle at 50 Hz. BIS measurements were taken before and on the day of surgery (day 0), day 2 post-operatively and on discharge from hospital. Pre-operative moderate malnutrition defined as height-for-age-z-score (HAZ) ≤-2 was observed in 28.5% of infants and 20.6% of children. Regression analysis was used to investigate the relationship between phase-angle, HAZ and clinical outcomes. Moderate-malnutrition (HAZ ≤-2) was associated with an increased PICU-LOS (odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence interval: 1.8; 1.1-2.7, p = 0.008) whilst a low phase-angle (≤2.7° on day 2 was associated with longer PICU-LOS (OR 7.8; 2.7-22.45, p angle ≤2.7° on day 2 were associated with longer PICU-LOS (p = 0.001 and p = 0.04 respectively) and together explained 81.7% of the variability in PICU-LOS. Moderate malnutrition (HAZ ≤-2) in infants and children undergoing cardiac surgery is associated with longer PICU-LOS. Post-operative measures of BIS phase angle may further improve our ability to

  11. Constraints on the Z-Z' mixing angle from data measured for the process e + e - → W + W - at the LEP2 collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreev, Vas. V.; Pankov, A. A.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis of effects induced by new neutral gauge Z' bosons was performed on the basis of data from the OPAL, DELPHI, ALEPH, and L3 experiments devoted to measuring differential cross sections for the process of the annihilation production of pairs of charged gauge W ± bosons at the LEP2 collider. By using these experimental data, constraints on the Z'-boson mass and on the angle of Z-Z' mixing were obtained for a number of extended gauge models.

  12. Cam deformity and the omega angle, a novel quantitative measurement of femoral head-neck morphology: a 3D CT gender analysis in asymptomatic subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mascarenhas, Vasco V.; Gaspar, Augusto [Hospital da Luz, MSK imaging Unit (UIME), Imaging Center, Lisbon (Portugal); Rego, Paulo [Hospital da Luz, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Lisbon (Portugal); Dantas, Pedro [Hospital CUF Descobertas, Lisbon (Portugal); Soldado, Francisco [Universitat de Barcelona, Hospital Sant Joan de Deu, Barcelona (Spain); Consciencia, Jose G. [NOVA Medical School, Lisbon (Portugal)

    2017-05-15

    Our objectives were to use 3D computed tomography (CT) to define head-neck morphologic gender-specific and normative parameters in asymptomatic individuals and use the omega angle (Ω ) to provide quantification data on the location and radial extension of a cam deformity. We prospectively included 350 individuals and evaluated 188 asymptomatic hips that underwent semiautomated CT analysis. Different thresholds of alpha angle (α ) were considered in order to analyze cam morphology and determine Ω . We calculated overall and gender-specific parameters for imaging signs of cam morphology (Ω and circumferential α ). The 95 % reference interval limits were beyond abnormal thresholds found in the literature for cam morphology. Specifically, α at 3/1 oclock were 46.9 /60.8 overall, 51.8 /65.4 for men and 45.7 /55.3 for women. Cam prevalence, magnitude, location, and epicenter were significantly gender different. Increasing α correlated with higher Ω , meaning that higher angles correspond to larger cam deformities. Hip morphometry measurements in this cohort of asymptomatic individuals extended beyond current thresholds used for the clinical diagnosis of cam deformity, and α was found to vary both by gender and measurement location. These results suggest that α measurement is insufficient for the diagnosis of cam deformity. Enhanced morphometric evaluation, including 3D imaging and Ω , may enable a more accurate diagnosis. (orig.)

  13. The measurement of CKM-angle $alpha$ using decays of $B^0_d \\ r ightarrow pi^+ pi^- pi^0$

    CERN Document Server

    Jacholkowska, A

    2000-01-01

    The preliminary study of the decay Bo->3pi to extract the CKM--angle alpha is presented. The theoretical background to the extraction of alpha using the decay Bo->3pi and its advantages over using the decay Bo->2pi are outlined. Studies of the selection of the decays Bo->3pi will be presented. In particular, the use of a discriminant variable to suppress background w ill be described. In addition,studies of the extraction of alpha are presented and the possible sensitivity after 1 and 5 years of LHC running are given.

  14. Load-relaxation properties of the human trunk in response to prolonged flexion: measuring and modeling the effect of flexion angle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nima Toosizadeh

    Full Text Available Experimental studies suggest that prolonged trunk flexion reduces passive support of the spine. To understand alterations of the synergy between active and passive tissues following such loadings, several studies have assessed the time-dependent behavior of passive tissues including those within spinal motion segments and muscles. Yet, there remain limitations regarding load-relaxation of the lumbar spine in response to flexion exposures and the influence of different flexion angles. Ten healthy participants were exposed for 16 min to each of five magnitudes of lumbar flexion specified relative to individual flexion-relaxation angles (i.e., 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100%, during which lumbar flexion angle and trunk moment were recorded. Outcome measures were initial trunk moment, moment drop, parameters of four viscoelastic models (i.e., Standard Linear Solid model, the Prony Series, Schapery's Theory, and the Modified Superposition Method, and changes in neutral zone and viscoelastic state following exposure. There were significant effects of flexion angle on initial moment, moment drop, changes in normalized neutral zone, and some parameters of the Standard Linear Solid model. Initial moment, moment drop, and changes in normalized neutral zone increased exponentially with flexion angle. Kelvin-solid models produced better predictions of temporal behaviors. Observed responses to trunk flexion suggest nonlinearity in viscoelastic properties, and which likely reflected viscoelastic behaviors of spinal (lumbar motion segments. Flexion-induced changes in viscous properties and neutral zone imply an increase in internal loads and perhaps increased risk of low back disorders. Kelvin-solid models, especially the Prony Series model appeared to be more effective at modeling load-relaxation of the trunk.

  15. Load-relaxation properties of the human trunk in response to prolonged flexion: measuring and modeling the effect of flexion angle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toosizadeh, Nima; Nussbaum, Maury A; Bazrgari, Babak; Madigan, Michael L

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies suggest that prolonged trunk flexion reduces passive support of the spine. To understand alterations of the synergy between active and passive tissues following such loadings, several studies have assessed the time-dependent behavior of passive tissues including those within spinal motion segments and muscles. Yet, there remain limitations regarding load-relaxation of the lumbar spine in response to flexion exposures and the influence of different flexion angles. Ten healthy participants were exposed for 16 min to each of five magnitudes of lumbar flexion specified relative to individual flexion-relaxation angles (i.e., 30, 40, 60, 80, and 100%), during which lumbar flexion angle and trunk moment were recorded. Outcome measures were initial trunk moment, moment drop, parameters of four viscoelastic models (i.e., Standard Linear Solid model, the Prony Series, Schapery's Theory, and the Modified Superposition Method), and changes in neutral zone and viscoelastic state following exposure. There were significant effects of flexion angle on initial moment, moment drop, changes in normalized neutral zone, and some parameters of the Standard Linear Solid model. Initial moment, moment drop, and changes in normalized neutral zone increased exponentially with flexion angle. Kelvin-solid models produced better predictions of temporal behaviors. Observed responses to trunk flexion suggest nonlinearity in viscoelastic properties, and which likely reflected viscoelastic behaviors of spinal (lumbar) motion segments. Flexion-induced changes in viscous properties and neutral zone imply an increase in internal loads and perhaps increased risk of low back disorders. Kelvin-solid models, especially the Prony Series model appeared to be more effective at modeling load-relaxation of the trunk.

  16. The lateral angle revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Jeannie; Lynnerup, Niels; Hoppa, R.D.

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the results of a validation study of a previously published method of sex determination from the temporal bone. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the lateral angle method for the internal acoustic canal for accurately determining the sex of human skeletal remains using...... measurements taken from computed tomography (CT) scans. Previous reports have observed that the lateral angle size in females is significantly larger than in males. The method was applied to an independent series of 77 postmortem CT scans (42 males, 35 females) to validate its accuracy and reliability....... The mean lateral angle of the internal acoustic canal was found to be larger in females (46.5°) than in males (43.4°). However, the difference was not statistically significant and the sex differences reported in previous studies were not substantiated. In light of the observed results, the lateral angle...

  17. Surface characterization of poly(L-lactic acid)-methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymers by static and dynamic contact angle measurements, FTIR, and ATR-FTIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mert, O; Doganci, E; Erbil, H Y; Demir, A S

    2008-02-05

    The surface composition and surface free energy properties of two types of amphiphilic and semicrystalline diblock copolymers consisting of poly(L-lactic acid) coupled to (methoxy poly(ethylene glycol) (PLLA-MePEG) having differing block lengths of PEG were investigated by using static and dynamic contact angle measurements, transmission Fourier infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) and compared with results obtained from PLLA and MePEG homopolymers. The contact angle results were evaluated by using the van Oss-Good method (acid-base method), and it was determined that the Lewis base surface tension coefficient (gamma-) of the copolymers increased with an increase of the PEG molar content at the copolymer surface. This result is in good agreement with the transmission FTIR and ATR-FTIR results but not proportional to them, indicating that the surfaces of the copolymers are highly mobile and that the molecular rearrangement takes place upon contact with a polar liquid drop. The dynamic contact angle measurements showed that the strong acid-base interaction between the oxygen atoms in the copolymer backbone of the relatively more hydrophilic PEG segments with the Lewis acidic groups of the polar and hydrogen-bonding water molecules enabled the surface molecules to restructure (conformational change) at the contact area, so that the PEG segments moved upward, whereas the apolar methyl pendant groups of PLLA segments buried downward.

  18. Applicability of the two-angle differential method to response measurement of neutron-sensitive devices at the RCNP high-energy neutron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masuda, Akihiko, E-mail: aki-masuda@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Matsumoto, Tetsuro [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Iwamoto, Yosuke [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hagiwara, Masayuki [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Satoh, Daiki; Sato, Tatsuhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Iwase, Hiroshi [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Yashima, Hiroshi [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, 2-1010 Asashiro-nishi, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nakane, Yoshihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), 2-4 Shirakata, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nishiyama, Jun [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Shima, Tatsushi; Tamii, Atsushi; Hatanaka, Kichiji [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, 10-1 Mihogaoka, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Harano, Hideki [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Cyclotron and Radioisotope Center (CYRIC), Tohoku University, 6-3 Aramaki, Aoba, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8578 (Japan)

    2017-03-21

    Quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields induced by {sup 7}Li(p,n) reactions are used for the response evaluation of neutron-sensitive devices. The quasi-monoenergetic high-energy field consists of high-energy monoenergetic peak neutrons and unwanted continuum neutrons down to the low-energy region. A two-angle differential method has been developed to compensate for the effect of the continuum neutrons in the response measurements. In this study, the two-angle differential method was demonstrated for Bonner sphere detectors, which are typical examples of moderator-based neutron-sensitive detectors, to investigate the method's applicability and its dependence on detector characteristics. Experiments were performed under 96–387 MeV quasi-monoenergetic high-energy neutron fields at the Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University. The measurement results for large high-density polyethylene (HDPE) sphere detectors agreed well with Monte Carlo calculations, which verified the adequacy of the two-angle differential method. By contrast, discrepancies were observed in the results for small HDPE sphere detectors and metal-induced sphere detectors. The former indicated that detectors that are particularly sensitive to low-energy neutrons may be affected by penetrating neutrons owing to the geometrical features of the RCNP facility. The latter discrepancy could be consistently explained by a problem in the evaluated cross-section data for the metals used in the calculation. Through those discussions, the adequacy of the two-angle differential method was experimentally verified, and practical suggestions were made pertaining to this method.

  19. Measurement of carbon condensation using small-angle x-ray scattering during detonation of the high explosive hexanitrostilbene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagge-Hansen, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lauderbach, L. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hodgin, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bastea, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Fried, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); van Buuren, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hansen, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benterou, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); May, C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Graber, T. [Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States); Jensen, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ilavsky, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Willey, T. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-24

    The dynamics of carboncondensation in detonating high explosives remains controversial. Detonation model validation requires data for processes occurring at nanometer length scales on time scales ranging from nanoseconds to microseconds. A new detonation endstation has been commissioned to acquire and provide time-resolved small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) from detonating explosives. Hexanitrostilbene (HNS) was selected as the first to investigate due to its ease of initiation using exploding foils and flyers, vacuum compatibility, high thermal stability, and stoichiometric carbon abundance that produces high carbon condensate yields. The SAXS data during detonation, collected with 300 ns time resolution, provide unprecedented signal fidelity over a broad q-range. This fidelity permits the first analysis of both the Guinier and Porod/power-law regions of the scattering profile during detonation, which contains information about the size and morphology of the resultant carbon condensate nanoparticles. To bolster confidence in these data, the scattering angle and intensity were additionally cross-referenced with a separate, highly calibrated SAXS beamline. The data show that HNS produces carbon particles with a radius of gyration of 2.7 nm in less than 400 ns after the detonation front has passed, and this size and morphology are constant over the next several microseconds. These data directly contradict previous pioneering work on RDX/TNT mixtures and TATB, where observations indicate significant particle growth (50% or more) continues over several microseconds. As a result, the power-law slope is about –3, which is consistent with a complex disordered, irregular, or folded sp2 sub-arrangement within a relatively monodisperse structure possessing radius of gyration of 2.7 nm after the detonation of HNS.

  20. Spin-orbit angle measurements for six southern transiting planets: New insights into the dynamical origins of hot Jupiters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Triaud, A. H. M. J; Collier Cameron, A; Queloz, D; Anderson, D. R; Gillon, M; Hebb, L; Hellier, C; Loeillet, B; Maxted, P. F. L; Mayor, M; Pepe, F; Pollacco, D; Ségransan, D; Smalley, B; Udry, S; West, R. G; Wheatley, P. J

    2010-01-01

    .... Our goal is to measure the degree of alignment between planetary orbits and stellar spin axes, to search for potential correlations with eccentricity or other planetary parameters and to measure long...

  1. Measurement of the Effective Weak Mixing Angle in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^* \\rightarrow \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2017-10-11

    We present a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle parameter $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell}$, in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^* \\rightarrow \\mu^+\\mu^-$ events at a center of mass energy of 1.96 TeV, collected by the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider and corresponding to 8.6 fb$^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity. The measured value of $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell}[\\mu\\mu]=0.23016 \\pm 0.00064$ is further combined with the result from the D0 measurement in $p\\bar{p}\\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{*}\\rightarrow e^{+} e^{-}$ events, resulting in $\\sin^2\\theta_\\text{eff}^{\\ell} [\\text{comb.}]=0.23095 \\pm 0.00040$. This combined result is the most precise measurement from a single experiment at a hadron collider and is the most precise determination using the coupling of the $Z/\\gamma^*$ to light quarks.

  2. The influence of biosurfactant adsorption on the physicochemical behaviour of carbon steel surfaces using contact angle measurements and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shubina, V., E-mail: varvara.shubina2014@gmail.com [LUNAM Université, IFSTTAR, MAST, SMC, F-44340 Bouguenais (France); Gaillet, L. [LUNAM Université, IFSTTAR, MAST, SMC, F-44340 Bouguenais (France); Ababou-Girard, S. [Institut de Physique de Rennes, Département Matériaux et Nanosciences, UMR 6251 CNRS, Université Rennes 1, 35000 Rennes-Cedex (France); Gaudefroy, V. [LUNAM Université, IFSTTAR, MAST, SMC, F-44340 Bouguenais (France); Chaussadent, T.; Farças, F. [Université Paris-Est, IFSTTAR, MAST, CPDM, F-77447 Marne-la-Vallée (France); Meylheuc, T. [INRA, UMR1319 Micalis, F-78352 Jouy-en-Josas (France); AgroParisTech, UMR Micalis, F-78352 Jouy-en-Josas (France); Dagbert, C. [2 Chemin de la Grand’côte, 36270 Éguzon-Chantôme (France); Creus, J. [LaSIE, UMR7356, Université de La Rochelle, Pôle Sciences et Technologie, Bâtiment Marie Curie, Avenue Michel Crépeau, 17000 La Rochelle (France)

    2015-10-01

    Highlights: • Surface modifications to carbon steel surfaces due to the adsorption of a biosurfactant derived from Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria cells were investigated using contact angle measurements (CAM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). • CAM allowed to establish an increase of electron-donating properties of steel surface due to the biosurfactant adsorption. • XPS demonstrated that biosurfactant molecules change the stoichiometry of mixted-oxide layer and the new outer layer mostly composed of magnetite. • Thickness and density of adsorbed biosurfactants layers were highlighted using a semiquantitative approach for 3 different concentrations of biomolecules. - Abstract: We investigated modifications to carbon steel surfaces due to the adsorption of a biosurfactant derived from Pseudomonas fluorescens bacteria cells using contact angle measurements (CAM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). After conditioning carbon steel in solutions with three different concentrations of biosurfactant molecules: 0.05, 0.3 and 1 g L{sup −1}, the average thickness of the biosurfactant layer on the carbon steel specimens was 7.9 ± 0.3, 12.1 ± 0.5 and 16.4 ± 0.7 Å, respectively. The biosurfactants changed the composition of both the Fe{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} mixed-oxide layer and the outer layer, mostly composed of Fe{sup 3+} associated with magnetite. Contact angle measurements indicate decreased hydrophobic properties after the carbon steel was modified by biosurfactant. It was shown that the carbon steel surface free energy depends on the biosurfactant concentration, due to an acquisition of strong electron-donating properties.

  3. Expected accuracy in a measurement of the CKM angle alpha using a Dalitz plot analysis of B0 ---> rho pi decays in the BTeV project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shestermanov, K.E.; Vasiliev, A.N; /Serpukhov, IHEP; Butler, J.; Derevschikov, A.A.; Kasper, P.; Kiselev, V.V.; Kravtsov, V.I.; Kubota, Y.; Kutschke, R.; Matulenko, Y.A.; Minaev, N.G.; /Serpukhov, IHEP /Fermilab /Minnesota U. /Syracuse U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-12-01

    A precise measurement of the angle {alpha} in the CKM triangle is very important for a complete test of Standard Model. A theoretically clean method to extract {alpha} is provided by B{sup 0} {yields} {rho}{pi} decays. Monte Carlo simulations to obtain the BTeV reconstruction efficiency and to estimate the signal to background ratio for these decays were performed. Finally the time-dependent Dalitz plot analysis, using the isospin amplitude formalism for tre and penguin contributions, was carried out. It was shown that in one year of data taking BTeV could achieve an accuracy on {alpha} better than 5{sup o}.

  4. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G.; Craig, Jamie E.; Burdon, Kathryn P.; Kearns, Lisa S.; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W.; Mackey, David A.; Trounce, Ian A.

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function. PMID:26496696

  5. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Bergen, Nicole J; Crowston, Jonathan G; Craig, Jamie E; Burdon, Kathryn P; Kearns, Lisa S; Sharma, Shiwani; Hewitt, Alex W; Mackey, David A; Trounce, Ian A

    2015-01-01

    Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower). Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  6. Measurement of Systemic Mitochondrial Function in Advanced Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma and Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole J Van Bergen

    Full Text Available Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs. Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to complex-I mutations in the mitochondrial genome. This study directly compares the degree of OXPHOS impairment in POAG and LHON patients, testing the hypothesis that the milder clinical disease in POAG is due to a milder complex-I impairment. To assess overall mitochondrial capacity, cells can be forced to produce ATP primarily from mitochondrial OXPHOS by switching the media carbon source to galactose. Under these conditions POAG lymphoblasts grew 1.47 times slower than controls, whilst LHON lymphoblasts demonstrated a greater degree of growth impairment (2.35 times slower. Complex-I enzyme specific activity was reduced by 18% in POAG lymphoblasts and by 29% in LHON lymphoblasts. We also assessed complex-I ATP synthesis, which was 19% decreased in POAG patients and 17% decreased in LHON patients. This study demonstrates both POAG and LHON lymphoblasts have impaired complex-I, and in the majority of aspects the functional defects in POAG were milder than LHON, which could reflect the milder disease development of POAG. This new evidence places POAG in the spectrum of mitochondrial optic neuropathies and raises the possibility for new therapeutic targets aimed at improving mitochondrial function.

  7. Cheap non-toxic non-corrosive method of glass cleaning evaluated by contact angle, AFM, and SEM-EDX measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Tania; Naughton, Daragh

    2017-05-01

    Glass surface cleaning is the very first step in advanced coating deposition and it also finds use in conserving museum objects. However, most of the wet chemical methods of glass cleaning use toxic and corrosive chemicals like concentrated sulfuric acid (H 2 SO 4 ), piranha (a mixture of concentrated sulfuric acid and 30% hydrogen peroxide), and hydrogen fluoride (HF). On the other hand, most of the dry cleaning techniques like UV-ozone, plasma, and laser treatment require costly instruments. In this report, five eco-friendly wet chemical methods of glass cleaning were evaluated in terms of contact angle (measured by optical tensiometer), nano-scale surface roughness (measured by atomic force microscopy or AFM), and elemental composition (measured by energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy or SEM-EDX). These glass cleaning methods are devoid of harsh chemicals and costly equipment, hence can be applied in situ in close proximity with plantation such as greenhouse or upon subtle objects such as museum artifacts. Out of these five methods, three methods are based on the chemical principle of chelation. It was found that the citric acid cleaning method gave the greatest change in contact angle within the hydrophilic regime (14.25° for new glass) indicating effective cleansing and the least surface roughness (0.178 nm for new glass) indicating no corrosive effect. One of the glass sample showed unique features which were traced backed to the history of the glass usage.

  8. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SESANS) measurements of needle-like crystallites of gelator compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumou, P.C.J.J.; Brizard, A.M.A.; Van Esch, J.H.; De Schepper, I.M.; Bouwman, W.G.

    2010-01-01

    From dibenzoyl cystine, a low molecular weight gelator, we have prepared needle shaped crystals at relatively high concentrations. For the first time SESANS measurements are performed on objects with this geometry. From the measurements the average diameter can be seen directly. From a more careful

  9. Measurement of the infrared optical constants for spectral modeling: n and k values for (NH4)2SO4 via single-angle reflectance and ellipsometric methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blake, Thomas A.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Myers, Tanya L.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Tiwald, Thomas E.

    2017-05-01

    The complex index of refraction, ñ = n + ik, has two components, n(ν) and k(ν), both a function of frequency, ν. The constant n is the real component, and k is the complex component, proportional to the absorption. In combination with other parameters, n and k can be used to model infrared spectra. However, obtaining reliable n/k values for solid materials is often difficult. In the past, the best results for n and k have been obtained from bulk, polished homogeneous materials free of defects; i.e. materials where the Fresnel equations are valid and there is no appreciable light scattering. Since it is often not possible to obtain such pure macroscopic samples, the alternative is to press the powder form of the material into a uniform disk. Recently, we have pressed such pellets from ammonium sulfate powder, and have measured the pellets' n and k values via two independent methods: 1) ellipsometry, which measures the changes in amplitude and phase of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength and angle of incidence, and 2) single-angle reflectance using a specular reflectance device within a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. This technique measures the change in amplitude of light reflected from the material of interest as a function of wavelength over a wide spectral domain. The optical constants are determined from the single-angle measurements using the Kramers-Kronig relationship, whereas an oscillator model is used to analyze the ellipsometric measurements. The n(ν) and k(ν) values determined by the two methods were compared to previous values determined from single crystal samples from which transmittance and reflectance measurements were made and converted to n(ν) and k(ν) using a simple dispersion model. [Toon et al., Journal of Geophysical Research, 81, 5733-5748, (1976)]. Comparison with the literature values shows good agreement, indicating that these are promising techniques to measure the optical constants

  10. Radiological Assessment of the Sacrofemoral Angle: A Novel Method to Measure the Range of Hip Joint Flexion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian-Zhao Wei

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: Using the SFA, to evaluate RHF could prevent compromised measurements due to the movements of pelvis and lumbar spine during hip flexion, and is, therefore, a more accurate and objective method with reasonable reliability and validity.

  11. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SESANS) measurements of needle-like crystallites of gelator compounds

    OpenAIRE

    Coumou, P. C. J. J.; Brizard, A.M.A.; van Esch, J. H; Schepper, I.M. de; Bouwman, W.G.

    2010-01-01

    From dibenzoyl cystine, a low molecular weight gelator, we have prepared needle shaped crystals at relatively high concentrations. For the first time SESANS measurements are performed on objects with this geometry. From the measurements the average diameter can be seen directly. From a more careful analysis the width distribution is determined. The gel phase itself prepared at lower concentrations did not show any signal, in contrast to what one observes with conventional SANS. This shows the...

  12. Spin-echo small-angle neutron scattering (SESANS) measurements of needle-like crystallites of gelator compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coumou, Pieter-Jan C. J. J.; Brizard, Aurelie M. A.; van Esch, Jan H.; de Schepper, Ignatz M.; Bouwman, Wim G.

    2010-11-01

    From dibenzoyl cystine, a low molecular weight gelator, we have prepared needle shaped crystals at relatively high concentrations. For the first time SESANS measurements are performed on objects with this geometry. From the measurements the average diameter can be seen directly. From a more careful analysis the width distribution is determined. The gel phase itself prepared at lower concentrations did not show any signal, in contrast to what one observes with conventional SANS. This shows the complementarity of SESANS and SANS.

  13. Measurement of the weak mixing angle with the forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan events at 8 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    We present a measurement of the effective weak mixing angle using the forward-backward asymmetry of Drell-Yan ($ee$ and $\\mu\\mu$) events in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=8~\\mathrm{TeV}$ at CMS. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of $18.8~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ and $19.6~\\mathrm{fb}^{-1}$ for muon and electron channels, respectively. The sample consists of 8.2 million dimuon and 4.9 million dielectron events. With new analysis techniques and a larger dataset, the statistical and systematic uncertainties are significantly reduced compared to our previous measurement. The extracted value of the effective weak mixing angle from the combined $ee$ and $\\mu\\mu$ data samples is $ \\sin^2\\theta^{\\text{lept}}_{\\text{eff}}=0.23101\\pm 0.00036(\\text{stat})\\pm 0.00018(\\text{syst})\\pm 0.00016(\\text{theory})\\pm 0.00030(\\text{pdf})$ or $ \\sin^2\\theta^{\\text{lept}}_{\\text{eff}}=0.23101\\pm0.00052$.

  14. Demonstration of two-laser Polarimeter-Interferometer (PIer) scheme for simultaneous measurements of Faraday rotation angle and electron density on HL-2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. G.; Zhou, Y.; Deng, Z. C.; Li, Y.; Wang, H. X.; Yuan, B. S.; Yi, J.; Yin, Z. J.; Ji, X. Q.; Wu, T. Y.; Chen, W. J.; Chen, W.; Yu, L. M.; Zhang, Y. P.; Li, L. C.; Shi, Z. B.; Liu, Yi.; Yan, L. W.; Yang, Q. W.; Ding, X. T.; Xu, M.; Duan, X. R.

    2017-11-01

    A novel two-laser Polarimeter-Interferometer (PIer) diagnostic scheme, in which Faraday rotation angle (αF) and electron density (ne) can be simultaneously measured by taking advantage of two lasers and two detectors for each channel, has been successfully demonstrated on HL-2A tokamak through upgrading one channel of existing monofunctional Faraday-effect polarimeter. In comparison with the conventional three-laser PIer diagnostic, two-laser PIer generates only one intermediate frequency (IF), avoiding the overlap of IF frequency bands, so as to increase the time resolution and decrease the phase noise of system. The single channel two-laser PIer was firstly put into operation in 2016 HL-2A experimental campaign, and both Faraday rotation angle and electron density phase have been measured with a fast time resolution of 1.0 μs and a phase resolution of 0.1o and 1.0o, respectively. This work is valuable for next step far-infrared (FIR) laser PIer construction on HL-2M tokamak, as well as the future International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).

  15. High angle phase modulated low coherence interferometry for path length resolved Doppler measurements of multiply scattered light

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varghese, Babu; Rajan, Vinayakrishnan; van Leeuwen, Ton; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2008-01-01

    We describe an improved method for coherence domain path length resolved measurements of multiply scattered photons in turbid media. An electro-optic phase modulator sinusoidally modulates the phase in the reference arm of a low coherence fiber optic Mach–Zehnder interferometer, at a high phase

  16. Reproducibility of thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements with three-dimensional, variable flip angle (SPACE) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihai, Georgeta; Varghese, Juliet; Lu, Bo; Zhu, Hong; Simonetti, Orlando P; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the reproducibility and repeatability of high-resolution, isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements, and determine the implications they have on the number of subjects necessary for future clinical trials. Using a T1-weighted three-dimensional MRI SPACE sequence, we evaluated the interobserver, intraobserver, and scan-rescan variability of isotropic thoracic and abdominal aortic wall measurements in 15 cardiovascular diseased patients and 6 normal volunteers. Main outcome analyses were intracorrelation coefficient (ICC), mean relative error (mRE), and sample size calculation at 80% power to be used to compare placebo group and treatment group means in future two-arm randomized clinical trials. Excellent reliability, ICC > 0.8 (P measures: lumen area (LA), outer wall area (OWA), wall area (VWA), total wall volume (TWV), and percentage wall volume (%WV). Sample size calculation revealed slightly different sample size per treatment arm for thoracic and abdominal aorta segments (maximum number of subjects: 352 subjects for thoracic segment versus 421 subjects for abdominal segment for LA at 5% difference, and minimum of 3 thoracic versus 4 abdominal subjects needed for %WV evaluation at 25% difference). Our study demonstrates the reproducibility and repeatability of SPACE aortic plaque measurements, and gives insight into the number of subjects needed for the design of therapeutic studies in aortic atherosclerosis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Development and reliability of the Achilles Tendon Length Measure and comparison with the Achilles Tendon Resting Angle on patients with an Achilles tendon rupture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maria Swennergren; Barfod, Kristoffer Weisskirchner; Kristensen, Morten Tange

    2017-12-01

    There is a need for a valid, reliable, and easily applicable clinical measure of the length of the Achilles tendon (AT) after rupture. This study examines the reliability of a new ruler based measurement, the Achilles Tendon Length Measure (ATLM) in comparison with the goniometer-based Achilles Tendon Resting Angle (ATRA). Measurements were performed by two independent physiotherapists eight weeks after AT rupture on 28 patients treated non-operatively. The mean (SD) injured ATLM was 56.5 (2.3)cm, ICC2.1 0.91(CI [0.72-0.97]), SEM 0.7cm (SEM% 1.2), MDC 1.9cm (MDC% 3.4). Corresponding data for the injured ATRA was mean 64.4° (3.9°), ICC2.1 0.84 (CI [0.68-0-92]), SEM 1.5° (SEM% 2.4), MDC 4.3° (MDC% 6.6). Both ATLM and ATRA showed excellent inter-rater reliability with low measurement error. Both measurements seem easy to use in clinical practice and potentially providing an indirect measure of the length of the AT after rupture. Copyright © 2016 European Foot and Ankle Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Measurement of the forward-backward asymmetry in $Z/\\gamma^{\\ast} \\rightarrow \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ decays and determination of the effective weak mixing angle

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adinolfi, Marco; Affolder, Anthony; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Anderson, Jonathan; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bien, Alexander; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frédéric; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Brook, Nicholas; Buchanan, Emma; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chiapolini, Nicola; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coombes, Matthew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Déléage, Nicolas; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Di Ruscio, Francesco; Dijkstra, Hans; Donleavy, Stephanie; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dossett, David; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Dupertuis, Frederic; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Färber, Christian; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fohl, Klaus; Fol, Philip; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gauld, Rhorry; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Göbel, Carla; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Greening, Edward; Gregson, Sam; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gui, Bin; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heijne, Veerle; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Hynds, Daniel; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; Jing, Fanfan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kochebina, Olga; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krocker, Georg; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Lefèvre, Regis; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Liles, Myfanwy; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen, Thi-Dung; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pilař, Tomas; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Rauschmayr, Nathalie; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; Reid, Matthew; dos Reis, Alberto; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vincente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovsky, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Rouvinet, Julien; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Sail, Paul; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Edmund; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Teklishyn, Maksym; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Todd, Jacob; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Torr, Nicholas; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Vecchi, Stefania; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Volyanskyy, Dmytro; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wandernoth, Sebastian; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The forward-backward charge asymmetry for the process $q\\bar{q} \\rightarrow Z/\\gamma^{\\ast} \\rightarrow \\mu^{+}\\mu^{-}$ is measured as a function of the invariant mass of the dimuon system. Measurements are performed using proton proton collision data collected with the LHCb detector at $\\sqrt {s} = 7$ and 8 TeV, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 1 fb$^{-1}$ and 2 fb$^{-1}$ respectively. Within the Standard Model the results constrain the effective electroweak mixing angle to be $\\text{sin} ^2\\theta ^\\text{eff} _W = 0.23142 \\pm 0.00073 \\pm 0.00052 \\pm 0.00056$, where the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third theoretical. This result is in agreement with the current world average, and is one of the most precise determinations at hadron colliders to date.

  19. Single-Shot Measurement of Temporally-Dependent Polarization State of Femtosecond Pulses by Angle-Multiplexed Spectral-Spatial Interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Wei; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that temporally-dependent polarization states of ultrashort laser pulses can be reconstructed in a single shot by use of an angle-multiplexed spatial-spectral interferometry. This is achieved by introducing two orthogonally polarized reference pulses and interfering them with an arbitrarily polarized ultrafast pulse under measurement. A unique calibration procedure is developed for this technique which facilitates the subsequent polarization state measurements. The accuracy of several reconstructed polarization states is verified by comparison with that obtained from an analytic model that predicts the polarization state on the basis of its method of production. Laser pulses with mJ-level energies were characterized via this technique, including a time-dependent polarization state that can be used for polarization-gating of high-harmonic generation for production of attosecond pulses.

  20. The Critical Angle Can Override the Brewster Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehle, Peter H.

    2009-01-01

    As a culminating activity in their study of optics, my students investigate polarized light and the Brewster angle. In this exercise they encounter a situation in which it is impossible to measure the Brewster angle for light reflecting from a particular surface. This paper describes the activity and explains the students' observations.

  1. The G0 experiment: Apparatus for parity-violating electron scattering measurements at forward and backward angles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Androic, D. [Department of Physics, University of Zagreb, Zagreb HR-41001 (Croatia); Armstrong, D.S. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Arvieux, J. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, F-91406 ORSAY-Cedex (France); Asaturyan, R. [Yerevan Physics Institute, Alikhanian Brothers 2, Yerevan 375036 (Armenia); Averett, T.D.; Bailey, S.L. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States); Batigne, G. [LPSC, Universite Joseph Fourier Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Institut Polytechnique de Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Beck, D.H., E-mail: dhbeck@illinois.edu [Loomis Laboratory of Physics, University of Illinois, 1110 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Beise, E.J. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20472 (United States); Benesch, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Benmokhtar, F. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20472 (United States); Bimbot, L. [Institut de Physique Nucleaire d' Orsay, F-91406 ORSAY-Cedex (France); Birchall, J. [Department of Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2 (Canada); Biselli, A. [Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Bosted, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Breuer, H. [Department of Physics, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20472 (United States); Brindza, P. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, 12000 Jefferson Avenue, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Capuano, C.L. [Department of Physics, College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA 23187 (United States)

    2011-08-01

    In the G0 experiment, performed at Jefferson Lab, the parity-violating elastic scattering of electrons from protons and quasi-elastic scattering from deuterons is measured in order to determine the neutral weak currents of the nucleon. Asymmetries as small as 1 part-per-million in the scattering of a polarized electron beam are determined using a dedicated apparatus. It consists of specialized beam monitoring and control systems, a cryogenic hydrogen (or deuterium) target, and a superconducting, toroidal magnetic spectrometer equipped with plastic scintillation and aerogel Cherenkov detectors, as well as fast readout electronics for the measurement of individual events. The overall design and performance of this experimental system is discussed.

  2. Tropospheric scintillation prediction models for a high elevation angle based on measured data from a tropical region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Nadirah Binti; Islam, Md. Rafiqul; J. S., Mandeep; Dao, Hassan; Bashir, Saad Osman

    2013-12-01

    The recent rapid evolution of new satellite services, including VSAT for internet access, LAN interconnection and multimedia applications, has triggered an increasing demand for bandwidth usage by satellite communications. However, these systems are susceptible to propagation effects that become significant as the frequency increases. Scintillation is the rapid signal fluctuation of the amplitude and phase of a radio wave, which is significant in tropical climates. This paper presents the analysis of the tropospheric scintillation data for satellite to Earth links at the Ku-band. Twelve months of data (January-December 2011) were collected and analyzed to evaluate the effect of tropospheric scintillation. Statistics were then further analyzed to inspect the seasonal, worst-month, diurnal and rain-induced scintillation effects. By employing the measured scintillation data, a modification of the Karasawa model for scintillation fades and enhancements is proposed based on data measured in Malaysia.

  3. The G0 Experiment: Apparatus for Parity-Violating Electron Scattering Measurements at Forward and Backward Angles

    CERN Document Server

    Androic, D; Arvieux, J; Asaturyan, R; Averett, T D; Bailey, S L; Batigne, G; Beck, D H; Beise, E J; Benesch, J; Benmokhtar, F; Bimbot, L; Birchall, J; Biselli, A; Bosted, P; Breuer, H; Brindza, P; Capuano, C L; Carlini, R D; Carr, R; Chant, N; Chao, Y -C; Clark, R; Coppens, A; Covrig, S D; Cowley, A; Dale, D; Davis, C A; Ellis, C; Falk, W R; Fenker, H; Finn, J M; Forest, T; Franklin, G; Frascaria, R; Furget, C; Gaskell, D; Gericke, M T W; Grames, J; Griffioen, K A; Grimm, K; Guillard, G; Guillon, B; Guler, H; Gustafsson, K; Hannelius, L; Hansknecht, J; Hasty, R D; Allen, A M Hawthorne; Horn, T; Ito, T M; Johnston, K; Jones, M; Kammel, P; Kazimi, R; King, P M; Kolarkar, A; Korkmaz, E; Korsch, W; Kox, S; Kuhn, J; Lachniet, J; Laszewski, R; Lee, L; Lenoble, J; Liatard, E; Liu, J; Lung, A; MacLachlan, G A; Mammei, J; Marchand, D; Martin, J W; Mack, D J; McFarlane, K W; McKee, D W; McKeown, R D; Merchez, F; Mihovilovic, M; Micherdzinska, A; Mkrtchyan, H; Moffit, B; Morlet, M; Muether, M; Musson, J; Nakahara, K; Neveling, R; Niccolai, S; Nilsson, D; Ong, S; Page, S A; Papavassiliou, V; Pate, S F; Phillips, S K; Pillot, P; Pitt, M L; Poelker, M; Porcelli, T A; Quemener, G; Quinn, B P; Ramsay, W D; Rauf, A W; Real, J -S; Ries, T; Roos, J Roche P; Rutledge, G A; Schaub, J; Secrest, J; Seva, T; Simicevic, N; Smith, G R; Spayde, D T; Stepanyan, S; Stutzman, M; Suleiman, R; Tadevosyan, V; Tieulent, R; van de Wiele, J; van Oers, W T H; Versteegen, M; Voutier, E; Vulcan, W F; Wells, S P; Warren, G; Williamson, S E; Woo, R J; Wood, S A; Yan, C; Yun, J; Zeps, V

    2011-01-01

    In the G0 experiment, performed at Jefferson Lab, the parity-violating elastic scattering of electrons from protons and quasi-elastic scattering from deuterons is measured in order to determine the neutral weak currents of the nucleon. Asymmetries as small as 1 part per million in the scattering of a polarized electron beam are determined using a dedicated apparatus. It consists of specialized beam-monitoring and control systems, a cryogenic hydrogen (or deuterium) target, and a superconducting, toroidal magnetic spectrometer equipped with plastic scintillation and aerogel Cerenkov detectors, as well as fast readout electronics for the measurement of individual events. The overall design and performance of this experimental system is discussed.

  4. Determining the Optimum Tilt Angle and Orientation for Solar Energy Collection Based on Measured Solar Radiance Data

    OpenAIRE

    Danny H. W. Li; Tony N. T. Lam

    2007-01-01

    A prior requirement to the design of any solar-based conversion systems is the knowledge of optimum orientation and tilt surface at which peak solar energy can be collected. In many parts of the world, however, the solar radiation data for the surfaces of interest are not always available. This paper presents a numerical approach to calculate the solar radiation on sloped planes by integrating the measured sky radiance distributions. The annual total solar yield at different sloped surfaces ...

  5. Measurements on small angle elastic scattering from p p and anti-p p collisions at the ISR

    CERN Document Server

    Shukla, Shekhar

    1986-01-01

    Experiment R211 was performed at the Intersecting Storage rings (ISR) of the European Center for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva, Switzerland. The aim was to measure, for pp and anti-p(p) scattering at high energy, the three quantities: (1) the total nuclear cross section, σ/sub n/, (2) the nuclear slope parameter, b, that describes the dependence of the differential elastic cross section on the 4- momentum transfer, t, for small absolute value of t, and (3) the ratio, rho, of the real to the imaginary part of the forward nuclear elastic scattering amplitude. These quantities were deduced from differential elastic scattering cross sections measured in the near forward direction. The measurements were made for pp scattering at √s = 30.5 GeV, 52.8 GeV and 62.5 GeV. The total cross section for both pp and anti-p(p) scattering is seen to rise in the range √s = 30.5 GeV to √s = 62.5 GeV. The rise is consistent with an asymptotic increase of σ/sub n/ as In2(s/s0), the highest rate allowed by the Froissart b...

  6. Heterodyne Interferometer Angle Metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Inseob; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Goullioud, Renaud

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution angle measurement instrument has been developed that is based on a heterodyne interferometer. The common-path heterodyne interferometer metrology is used to measure displacements of a reflective target surface. In the interferometer setup, an optical mask is used to sample the measurement laser beam reflecting back from a target surface. Angular rotations, around two orthogonal axes in a plane perpendicular to the measurement- beam propagation direction, are determined simultaneously from the relative displacement measurement of the target surface. The device is used in a tracking telescope system where pitch and yaw measurements of a flat mirror were simultaneously performed with a sensitivity of 0.1 nrad, per second, and a measuring range of 0.15 mrad at a working distance of an order of a meter. The nonlinearity of the device is also measured less than one percent over the measurement range.

  7. Frozen lattice and absorptive model for high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy: A comparison study in terms of integrated intensity and atomic column position measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, M; Lobato, I; Van Aert, S

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, both the frozen lattice (FL) and the absorptive potential (AP) approximation models are compared in terms of the integrated intensity and the precision with which atomic columns can be located from an image acquired using high angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). The comparison is made for atoms of Cu, Ag, and Au. The integrated intensity is computed for both an isolated atomic column and an atomic column inside an FCC structure. The precision has been computed using the so-called Cramér-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB), which provides a theoretical lower bound on the variance with which parameters can be estimated. It is shown that the AP model results into accurate measurements for the integrated intensity only for small detector ranges under relatively low angles and for small thicknesses. In terms of the attainable precision, both methods show similar results indicating picometer range precision under realistic experimental conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. SU-F-T-84: Measurement and Monte-Carlo Simulation of Electron Phase Spaces Using a Wide Angle Magnetic Electron Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englbrecht, F; Lindner, F; Bin, J; Wislsperger, A; Reiner, M; Kamp, F; Belka, C; Dedes, G; Schreiber, J; Parodi, K [LMU Munich, Munich, Bavaria (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To measure and simulate well-defined electron spectra using a linear accelerator and a permanent-magnetic wide-angle spectrometer to test the performance of a novel reconstruction algorithm for retrieval of unknown electron-sources, in view of application to diagnostics of laser-driven particle acceleration. Methods: Six electron energies (6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21 MeV, 40cm × 40cm field-size) delivered by a Siemens Oncor linear accelerator were recorded using a permanent-magnetic wide-angle electron spectrometer (150mT) with a one dimensional slit (0.2mm × 5cm). Two dimensional maps representing beam-energy and entrance-position along the slit were measured using different scintillating screens, read by an online CMOS detector of high resolution (0.048mm × 0.048mm pixels) and large field of view (5cm × 10cm). Measured energy-slit position maps were compared to forward FLUKA simulations of electron transport through the spectrometer, starting from IAEA phase-spaces of the accelerator. The latter ones were validated against measured depth-dose and lateral profiles in water. Agreement of forward simulation and measurement was quantified in terms of position and shape of the signal distribution on the detector. Results: Measured depth-dose distributions and lateral profiles in the water phantom showed good agreement with forward simulations of IAEA phase-spaces, thus supporting usage of this simulation source in the study. Measured energy-slit position maps and those obtained by forward Monte-Carlo simulations showed satisfactory agreement in shape and position. Conclusion: Well-defined electron beams of known energy and shape will provide an ideal scenario to study the performance of a novel reconstruction algorithm using measured and simulated signal. Future work will increase the stability and convergence of the reconstruction-algorithm for unknown electron sources, towards final application to the electrons which drive the interaction of TW-class laser

  9. Direct wide-angle measurement of a photonic band structure in a three-dimensional photonic crystal using infrared Fourier imaging spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lifeng; Lopez-Garcia, Martin; Taverne, Mike P C; Zheng, Xu; Ho, Ying-Lung D; Rarity, John

    2017-04-15

    We propose a method to directly visualize the photonic band-structure of micrometer-sized photonic crystals using wide-angle spectroscopy. By extending Fourier imaging spectroscopy sensitivity into the infrared range, we have obtained accurate measurements of the band structures along the high-symmetry directions (X-W-K-L-U) of polymeric three-dimensional, rod-connected diamond photonic crystals. Our implementation also allows us to record single-wavelength reflectance far-field patterns showing very good agreement with simulations of the same designs. This technique is suitable for the characterization of photonic structures working in the infrared and, in particular, to obtain band-structure information of complete photonic band gap materials.

  10. Observation of $\\bar{B}^0_{(s)}\\rightarrow J/\\psi f_1(1285)$ decays and measurement of the $f_1(1285)$ mixing angle

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, R; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves Jr, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M -O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Cheung, S -F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Hafkenscheid, T W; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J -P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Martynov, A; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M -N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M -H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-01-01

    Decays of $\\bar{B}^0_(s)$ and $\\bar{B}^0$ mesons into $J/\\psi \\pi^+\\pi^-\\pi^+\\pi^-$ final states, produced in $pp$ collisions at the LHC, are investigated using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb$^{-1}$ collected with the LHCb detector. $\\bar{B}^0_{(s)}\\to J/\\psi f_1(1285)$ decays are seen for the first time, and the branching fractions are measured. Using these rates, the $f_1(1285)$ mixing angle between strange and non-strange components of its wave function in the $q\\overline{q}$ structure model is determined to be $\\pm(24.0^{\\,+3.1\\,+0.6}_{\\,-2.6\\,-0.8})^{\\circ}$. Implications on the possible tetraquark nature of the $f_1(1285)$ are discussed.

  11. Complex refractive index measurements for BaF 2 and CaF 2 via single-angle infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelly-Gorham, Molly Rose K.; DeVetter, Brent M.; Brauer, Carolyn S.; Cannon, Bret D.; Burton, Sarah D.; Bliss, Mary; Johnson, Timothy J.; Myers, Tanya L.

    2017-10-01

    We have re-investigated the optical constants n and k for the homologous series of inorganic salts barium fluoride (BaF2) and calcium fluoride (CaF2) using a single-angle near-normal incidence reflectance device in combination with a calibrated Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer. Our results are in good qualitative agreement with most previous works. However, certain features of the previously published data near the reststrahlen band exhibit distinct differences in spectral characteristics. Notably, our measurements of BaF2 do not include a spectral feature in the ~250 cm-1 reststrahlen band that was previously published. Additionally, CaF2 exhibits a distinct wavelength shift relative to the model derived from previously published data. We confirmed our results with recently published works that use significantly more modern instrumentation and data reduction techniques

  12. Bulk and surface electronic structure of GaN measured using angle resolved photoemission, soft x-ray emission and soft x-ray absorption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.; Dhesi, S.S.; Duda, L.C.; Stagarescu, C.B.; Singh, R.; Moustakas, T.D. [Boston Univ., MA (United States); Guo, J.H.; Nordgren, J. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Physics

    1997-12-31

    The electronic structure of thin film wurtzite GaN has been studied using a combination of angle resolved photoemission, soft x-ray absorption and soft x-ray emission spectroscopies. The authors have measured the bulk valence and conduction band partial density of states by recording Ga L and N K- x-ray emission and absorption spectra. They compare the x-ray spectra to a recent ab initio calculation and find good overall agreement. The x-ray emission spectra reveal that the top of the valence band is dominated by N 2p states, while the x-ray absorption spectra show the bottom of the conduction band as a mixture of Ga 4s and N 2p states, again in good agreement with theory. However, due to strong dipole selection rules the authors can also identify weak hybridization between Ga 4s- and N 2p-states in the valence band. Furthermore, a component to the N K-emission appears at approximately 19.5 eV below the valence band maximum and can be identified as due to hybridization between N 2p and Ga 3d states. They report preliminary results of a study of the full dispersion of the bulk valence band states along high symmetry directions of the bulk Brillouin zone as measured using angle resolved photoemission. Finally, they tentatively identify a non-dispersive state at the top of the valence band in parts of the Brillouin zone as a surface state.

  13. Measurement of the CKM angle γ using B 0 → DK *0 with D → K S 0 π + π - decays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Déléage, N.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Färber, C.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Göbel, C.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lefèvre, R.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovskiy, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-08-01

    A model-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay B 0 → D( K S 0 π + π -) K ∗ 0 is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb-1, recorded at √{s}=7 and 8 TeV by the LHCb experiment. The CP violation observables x ± and y ±, sensitive to the CKM angle γ, are measured to be {x}-=-0.15± 0.14± 0.03± 0.01, {y}-=0.25± 0.15± 0.06± 0.01, {x}+=0.05± 0.24± 0.04± 0.01, {y}+=-{0.65}_{-0.23}^{+0.24}± 0.08± 0.01, where the first uncertainties are statistical, the second systematic and the third arise from the uncertainty on the D → K S 0 π + π - amplitude model. These are the most precise measurements of these observables. They correspond to γ = (80 - 22 + 21 ) ° and {r}_{B^0}=0.39± 0.13 , where {r}_{B^0} is the magnitude of the ratio of the suppressed and favoured B 0 → DK + π - decay amplitudes, in a Kπ mass region of ±50 MeV around the K *(892)0 mass and for an absolute value of the cosine of the K *0 decay angle larger than 0.4. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  14. Soot measurements by two angle scattering and extinction in an N 2 -diluted ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flame from 2 to 5 atm

    KAUST Repository

    Amin, Hafiz M.F.

    2016-06-27

    The soot formed in an N-diluted ethylene/air counterflow diffusion flame at elevated pressure was investigated using two angle light scattering/extinction technique. To provide a well-controlled pressurized environment for the flame, a novel pressure vessel was built with the required optical access. The soot parameters were measured along the centerline of the counterflow flame. These properties included soot volume fraction (f ), primary particle diameter (d ), population averaged radius of gyration (R ) and number density of primary particles (n ). The Rayleigh-Debye-Gans theory for Fractal Aggregates (RDG-FA) was used to retrieve these properties from scattering and extinction measurements. Soot volume fraction was measured via light extinction from 2 to 5atm while maintaining the same global strain rate at all pressures. Scattered light from soot particles was measured at 45° and 135° and primary particle diameter was calculated using scattering/extinction ratio and the radius of gyration was determined from the dissymmetry ratio. Soot volume fraction, primary particle diameter and radius of gyration all increased with pressure while the number density of primary particles decreased with increasing pressure.

  15. New insights into nucleation. Pressure trace measurements and the first small angle X-ray scattering experiments in a supersonic laval nozzle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, D.

    2007-07-01

    Homogeneous nucleation rates of the n-alcohols and the n-alkanes have been determined by combining information from two sets of supersonic Laval nozzle expansion experiments under identical conditions. The nucleation rates J=N/{delta}t{sub Jmax} for the n-alcohols are in the range of 1.10{sup 17}measurements were conducted for the n-alkanes to determine the condensible partial pressure, temperature, supersaturation, characteristic time, and the expansion rate corresponding to the maximum nucleation rate. Characteristic times in the range of 13{<=}{delta}t{sub Jmax}/{mu}s{<=}34 were found. In the second set of experiments, the first flow rate resolved Small Angle X-ray Scattering experiments are conducted to determine the particle number density for both substance classes. Particle number densities in the range of 1.10{sup 12}

  16. Influence of LASIK on scanning laser polarimetric measurement of the retinal nerve fibre layer with fixed angle and customised corneal polarisation compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holló, G; Katsanos, A; Kóthy, P; Kerek, A; Süveges, I

    2003-01-01

    Background/aim: Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFLT), as measured with scanning laser polarimetry using the fixed angle corneal polarisation compensator (SLP-F), has been found to be reduced after uncomplicated laser assisted in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) compared to the pre-LASIK measurement. Since this virtual RNFLT thinning is attributed to the corneal changes induced by the LASIK, the authors investigated whether customised corneal polarisation compensation (SLP-C), which compensates for the actual corneal polarisation during each measurement, can avoid the LASIK induced, virtual changes of the polarimetric RNFLT values. Methods: Scanning laser polarimetry using both the SLP-F and SLP-C methods (GDx-Access, software version 5.0) was performed on 15 consecutive healthy subjects with no eye disease who underwent LASIK for ametropia correction. The SLP measurements were performed before the surgery, then on day 1 and day 6 after LASIK. Thickness data from images of one randomly selected eye per subject were analysed using the ANOVA and Scheffe multiple comparison tests. Results: Superior maximum, inferior maximum, normalised superior area, and normalised inferior area (SLP parameters representing the RNFLT at the superior and inferior poles of the optic nerve head) remained unchanged with SLP-C (ANOVA, p>0.05) but decreased (superior maximum, normalised superior area, Scheffe test, p0.05) after LASIK. Superior to nasal ratio, symmetry of the superior and inferior RNFLT as well as the parameter showing the probability of having glaucoma (called “the number”) remained unchanged with both types of corneal compensation (ANOVA, p>0.05). With SLP-C the parameter ellipse average thickness increased after LASIK (Scheffe test, p = 0.021). No parameter value altered between day 1 and day 6 after LASIK, for either method. Conclusion: The results suggest that the LASIK induced decrease of the polarimetric RNFLT, which is consistently detected with polarimeters

  17. Left ventricular volume measurements with free breathing respiratory self-gated 3-dimensional golden angle radial whole-heart cine imaging - Feasibility and reproducibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holst, Karen; Ugander, Martin; Sigfridsson, Andreas

    2017-11-01

    To develop and evaluate a free breathing respiratory self-gated isotropic resolution technique for left ventricular (LV) volume measurements. A 3D radial trajectory with double golden-angle ordering was used for free-running data acquisition during free breathing in 9 healthy volunteers. A respiratory self-gating signal was extracted from the center of k-space and used with the electrocardiogram to bin all data into 3 respiratory and 25 cardiac phases. 3D image volumes were reconstructed and the LV endocardial border was segmented. LV volume measurements and reproducibility from 3D free breathing cine were compared to conventional 2D breath-held cine. No difference was found between 3D free breathing cine and 2D breath-held cine with regards to LV ejection fraction, stroke volume, end-systolic volume and end-diastolic volume (Pcine and 2D breath-held cine (Pcine and conventional 2D breath-held cine showed similar values and test-retest repeatability for LV volumes in healthy volunteers. 3D free breathing cine enabled retrospective sorting and arbitrary angulation of isotropic data, and could correctly measure LV volumes during free breathing acquisition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A Search for New Physics at the TeV Scale Via a Precise Measurement of the Weak Mixing Angle in Moller Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emam, W.

    2004-11-01

    This dissertation reports on a precise measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in electron-electron (Moeller) scattering at a four-momentum transfer Q{sup 2} = 0.03 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The observed parity-violating asymmetry is A{sub PV} = -128 {+-} 14 (stat.) {+-} 12 (syst.) x 10{sup -9}. This is the most precise asymmetry ever measured in a parity-violating electron scattering. In the context of the Standard Model, the A{sub PV} result determines the weak mixing angle, which is one of the fundamental parameters of the model. The result is sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W}{sup eff} = 0.2403 {+-} 0.0014, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation at the current level of precision. The comparison between this measurement of the weak mixing angle at low Q{sup 2} and at the Z{sup 0} pole establishes the running of sin{sup 2} {theta}{sub W} with 6.5{sigma} significance. In addition, they report on the first observation of a transverse asymmetry in electron-electron scattering. The observed asymmetry is A{sub T}{sup Moeller} = 2.7 x 10{sup -6}, which is consistent with the theoretical predictions. They also provide a new measurement of the transverse asymmetry in ep scattering A{sub T}{sup ep} = 2 x 10{sup -6}. The consistency of the result with the theoretical prediction provides new limits on the TeV scale physics. A limit of 0.9 TeV was set on the mass of the extra Z' boson in the SO(10) Model. A limit of 14 TeV and 6 TeV was set on the compositeness scales {Lambda}{sub ee}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub ee}{sup -}, respectively. Finally a limit of 0.2 TeV was set on ratio of the doubly-charged Higgs mass to the ee{Delta} coupling g{sub ee{Delta}}{sup 2}/m{sub {delta}}{sup 2}.

  19. Cross-Correlated Relaxation of Dipolar Coupling and Chemical-Shift Anisotropy in Magic-Angle Spinning R1ρ NMR Measurements: Application to Protein Backbone Dynamics Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurauskas, Vilius; Weber, Emmanuelle; Hessel, Audrey; Ayala, Isabel; Marion, Dominique; Schanda, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transverse relaxation rate measurements in MAS solid-state NMR provide information about molecular motions occurring on nanoseconds-to-milliseconds (ns-ms) time scales. The measurement of heteronuclear (13C, 15N) relaxation rate constants in the presence of a spin-lock radio-frequency field (R1ρ relaxation) provides access to such motions, and an increasing number of studies involving R1ρ relaxation in proteins has been reported. However, two factors that influence the observed relaxation rate constants have so far been neglected, namely (i) the role of CSA/dipolar cross-correlated relaxation (CCR), and (ii) the impact of fast proton spin flips (i.e. proton spin diffusion and relaxation). We show that CSA/D CCR in R1ρ experiments is measurable, and that this cross-correlated relaxation rate constant depends on ns-ms motions, and can thus itself provide insight into dynamics. We find that proton spin-diffusion attenuates this cross-correlated relaxation, due to its decoupling effect on the doublet components. For measurements of dynamics, the use of R1ρ rate constants has practical advantages over the use of CCR rates, and the present manuscript reveals factors that have so far been disregarded and which are important for accurate measurements and interpretation. PMID:27500976

  20. Measurement of the CKM angle $\\gamma$ using $B^0 \\rightarrow D K^{*0}$ with $D \\rightarrow K^0_S \\pi^+ \\pi^-$ decays

    CERN Document Server

    Aaij, Roel; Adeva, Bernardo; Adinolfi, Marco; Ajaltouni, Ziad; Akar, Simon; Albrecht, Johannes; Alessio, Federico; Alexander, Michael; Ali, Suvayu; Alkhazov, Georgy; Alvarez Cartelle, Paula; Alves Jr, Antonio Augusto; Amato, Sandra; Amerio, Silvia; Amhis, Yasmine; An, Liupan; Anderlini, Lucio; Andreassi, Guido; Andreotti, Mirco; Andrews, Jason; Appleby, Robert; Aquines Gutierrez, Osvaldo; Archilli, Flavio; d'Argent, Philippe; Artamonov, Alexander; Artuso, Marina; Aslanides, Elie; Auriemma, Giulio; Baalouch, Marouen; Bachmann, Sebastian; Back, John; Badalov, Alexey; Baesso, Clarissa; Baldini, Wander; Barlow, Roger; Barschel, Colin; Barsuk, Sergey; Barter, William; Batozskaya, Varvara; Battista, Vincenzo; Bay, Aurelio; Beaucourt, Leo; Beddow, John; Bedeschi, Franco; Bediaga, Ignacio; Bel, Lennaert; Bellee, Violaine; Belloli, Nicoletta; Belyaev, Ivan; Ben-Haim, Eli; Bencivenni, Giovanni; Benson, Sean; Benton, Jack; Berezhnoy, Alexander; Bernet, Roland; Bertolin, Alessandro; Bettler, Marc-Olivier; van Beuzekom, Martinus; Bifani, Simone; Billoir, Pierre; Bird, Thomas; Birnkraut, Alex; Bitadze, Alexander; Bizzeti, Andrea; Blake, Thomas; Blanc, Frederic; Blouw, Johan; Blusk, Steven; Bocci, Valerio; Bondar, Alexander; Bondar, Nikolay; Bonivento, Walter; Borghi, Silvia; Borsato, Martino; Boubdir, Meriem; Bowcock, Themistocles; Bowen, Espen Eie; Bozzi, Concezio; Braun, Svende; Britsch, Markward; Britton, Thomas; Brodzicka, Jolanta; Buchanan, Emma; Burr, Christopher; Bursche, Albert; Buytaert, Jan; Cadeddu, Sandro; Calabrese, Roberto; Calvi, Marta; Calvo Gomez, Miriam; Campana, Pierluigi; Campora Perez, Daniel; Capriotti, Lorenzo; Carbone, Angelo; Carboni, Giovanni; Cardinale, Roberta; Cardini, Alessandro; Carniti, Paolo; Carson, Laurence; Carvalho Akiba, Kazuyoshi; Casse, Gianluigi; Cassina, Lorenzo; Castillo Garcia, Lucia; Cattaneo, Marco; Cauet, Christophe; Cavallero, Giovanni; Cenci, Riccardo; Charles, Matthew; Charpentier, Philippe; Chefdeville, Maximilien; Chen, Shanzhen; Cheung, Shu-Faye; Chobanova, Veronika; Chrzaszcz, Marcin; Cid Vidal, Xabier; Ciezarek, Gregory; Clarke, Peter; Clemencic, Marco; Cliff, Harry; Closier, Joel; Coco, Victor; Cogan, Julien; Cogneras, Eric; Cogoni, Violetta; Cojocariu, Lucian; Collazuol, Gianmaria; Collins, Paula; Comerma-Montells, Albert; Contu, Andrea; Cook, Andrew; Coquereau, Samuel; Corti, Gloria; Corvo, Marco; Couturier, Benjamin; Cowan, Greig; Craik, Daniel Charles; Crocombe, Andrew; Cruz Torres, Melissa Maria; Cunliffe, Samuel; Currie, Robert; D'Ambrosio, Carmelo; Dall'Occo, Elena; Dalseno, Jeremy; David, Pieter; Davis, Adam; De Aguiar Francisco, Oscar; De Bruyn, Kristof; De Capua, Stefano; De Cian, Michel; De Miranda, Jussara; De Paula, Leandro; De Simone, Patrizia; Dean, Cameron Thomas; Decamp, Daniel; Deckenhoff, Mirko; Del Buono, Luigi; Demmer, Moritz; Derkach, Denis; Deschamps, Olivier; Dettori, Francesco; Dey, Biplab; Di Canto, Angelo; Dijkstra, Hans; Dordei, Francesca; Dorigo, Mirco; Dosil Suárez, Alvaro; Dovbnya, Anatoliy; Dreimanis, Karlis; Dufour, Laurent; Dujany, Giulio; Durante, Paolo; Dzhelyadin, Rustem; Dziurda, Agnieszka; Dzyuba, Alexey; Déléage, Nicolas; Easo, Sajan; Egede, Ulrik; Egorychev, Victor; Eidelman, Semen; Eisenhardt, Stephan; Eitschberger, Ulrich; Ekelhof, Robert; Eklund, Lars; El Rifai, Ibrahim; Elsasser, Christian; Ely, Scott; Esen, Sevda; Evans, Hannah Mary; Evans, Timothy; Falabella, Antonio; Farley, Nathanael; Farry, Stephen; Fay, Robert; Ferguson, Dianne; Fernandez Albor, Victor; Ferrari, Fabio; Ferreira Rodrigues, Fernando; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Filippov, Sergey; Fiore, Marco; Fiorini, Massimiliano; Firlej, Miroslaw; Fitzpatrick, Conor; Fiutowski, Tomasz; Fleuret, Frederic; Fohl, Klaus; Fontana, Marianna; Fontanelli, Flavio; Forshaw, Dean Charles; Forty, Roger; Frank, Markus; Frei, Christoph; Frosini, Maddalena; Fu, Jinlin; Furfaro, Emiliano; Färber, Christian; Gallas Torreira, Abraham; Galli, Domenico; Gallorini, Stefano; Gambetta, Silvia; Gandelman, Miriam; Gandini, Paolo; Gao, Yuanning; García Pardiñas, Julián; Garra Tico, Jordi; Garrido, Lluis; Garsed, Philip John; Gascon, David; Gaspar, Clara; Gavardi, Laura; Gazzoni, Giulio; Gerick, David; Gersabeck, Evelina; Gersabeck, Marco; Gershon, Timothy; Ghez, Philippe; Gianì, Sebastiana; Gibson, Valerie; Girard, Olivier Göran; Giubega, Lavinia-Helena; Gligorov, V.V.; Golubkov, Dmitry; Golutvin, Andrey; Gomes, Alvaro; Gotti, Claudio; Grabalosa Gándara, Marc; Graciani Diaz, Ricardo; Granado Cardoso, Luis Alberto; Graugés, Eugeni; Graverini, Elena; Graziani, Giacomo; Grecu, Alexandru; Griffith, Peter; Grillo, Lucia; Grünberg, Oliver; Gushchin, Evgeny; Guz, Yury; Gys, Thierry; Göbel, Carla; Hadavizadeh, Thomas; Hadjivasiliou, Christos; Haefeli, Guido; Haen, Christophe; Haines, Susan; Hall, Samuel; Hamilton, Brian; Han, Xiaoxue; Hansmann-Menzemer, Stephanie; Harnew, Neville; Harnew, Samuel; Harrison, Jonathan; He, Jibo; Head, Timothy; Heister, Arno; Hennessy, Karol; Henrard, Pierre; Henry, Louis; Hernando Morata, Jose Angel; van Herwijnen, Eric; Heß, Miriam; Hicheur, Adlène; Hill, Donal; Hoballah, Mostafa; Hombach, Christoph; Hulsbergen, Wouter; Humair, Thibaud; Hussain, Nazim; Hutchcroft, David; Idzik, Marek; Ilten, Philip; Jacobsson, Richard; Jaeger, Andreas; Jalocha, Pawel; Jans, Eddy; Jawahery, Abolhassan; John, Malcolm; Johnson, Daniel; Jones, Christopher; Joram, Christian; Jost, Beat; Jurik, Nathan; Kandybei, Sergii; Kanso, Walaa; Karacson, Matthias; Karbach, Moritz; Karodia, Sarah; Kecke, Matthieu; Kelsey, Matthew; Kenyon, Ian; Kenzie, Matthew; Ketel, Tjeerd; Khairullin, Egor; Khanji, Basem; Khurewathanakul, Chitsanu; Kirn, Thomas; Klaver, Suzanne; Klimaszewski, Konrad; Kolpin, Michael; Komarov, Ilya; Koopman, Rose; Koppenburg, Patrick; Kozeiha, Mohamad; Kravchuk, Leonid; Kreplin, Katharina; Kreps, Michal; Krokovny, Pavel; Kruse, Florian; Krzemien, Wojciech; Kucewicz, Wojciech; Kucharczyk, Marcin; Kudryavtsev, Vasily; Kuonen, Axel Kevin; Kurek, Krzysztof; Kvaratskheliya, Tengiz; Lacarrere, Daniel; Lafferty, George; Lai, Adriano; Lambert, Dean; Lanfranchi, Gaia; Langenbruch, Christoph; Langhans, Benedikt; Latham, Thomas; Lazzeroni, Cristina; Le Gac, Renaud; van Leerdam, Jeroen; Lees, Jean-Pierre; Leflat, Alexander; Lefrançois, Jacques; Lefèvre, Regis; Lemos Cid, Edgar; Leroy, Olivier; Lesiak, Tadeusz; Leverington, Blake; Li, Yiming; Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Lindner, Rolf; Linn, Christian; Lionetto, Federica; Liu, Bo; Liu, Xuesong; Loh, David; Longstaff, Iain; Lopes, Jose; Lucchesi, Donatella; Lucio Martinez, Miriam; Luo, Haofei; Lupato, Anna; Luppi, Eleonora; Lupton, Oliver; Lusiani, Alberto; Lyu, Xiao-Rui; Machefert, Frederic; Maciuc, Florin; Maev, Oleg; Maguire, Kevin; Malde, Sneha; Malinin, Alexander; Manca, Giulia; Mancinelli, Giampiero; Manning, Peter Michael; Mapelli, Alessandro; Maratas, Jan; Marchand, Jean François; Marconi, Umberto; Marin Benito, Carla; Marino, Pietro; Marks, Jörg; Martellotti, Giuseppe; Martin, Morgan; Martinelli, Maurizio; Martinez Santos, Diego; Martinez Vidal, Fernando; Martins Tostes, Danielle; Massacrier, Laure Marie; Massafferri, André; Matev, Rosen; Mathad, Abhijit; Mathe, Zoltan; Matteuzzi, Clara; Mauri, Andrea; Maurin, Brice; Mazurov, Alexander; McCann, Michael; McCarthy, James; McNab, Andrew; McNulty, Ronan; Meadows, Brian; Meier, Frank; Meissner, Marco; Melnychuk, Dmytro; Merk, Marcel; Michielin, Emanuele; Milanes, Diego Alejandro; Minard, Marie-Noelle; Mitzel, Dominik Stefan; Molina Rodriguez, Josue; Monroy, Ignacio Alberto; Monteil, Stephane; Morandin, Mauro; Morawski, Piotr; Mordà, Alessandro; Morello, Michael Joseph; Moron, Jakub; Morris, Adam Benjamin; Mountain, Raymond; Muheim, Franz; Mussini, Manuel; Muster, Bastien; Müller, Dominik; Müller, Janine; Müller, Katharina; Müller, Vanessa; Naik, Paras; Nakada, Tatsuya; Nandakumar, Raja; Nandi, Anita; Nasteva, Irina; Needham, Matthew; Neri, Nicola; Neubert, Sebastian; Neufeld, Niko; Neuner, Max; Nguyen, Anh Duc; Nguyen-Mau, Chung; Niess, Valentin; Nieswand, Simon; Niet, Ramon; Nikitin, Nikolay; Nikodem, Thomas; Novoselov, Alexey; O'Hanlon, Daniel Patrick; Oblakowska-Mucha, Agnieszka; Obraztsov, Vladimir; Ogilvy, Stephen; Okhrimenko, Oleksandr; Oldeman, Rudolf; Onderwater, Gerco; Osorio Rodrigues, Bruno; Otalora Goicochea, Juan Martin; Otto, Adam; Owen, Patrick; Oyanguren, Maria Aranzazu; Palano, Antimo; Palombo, Fernando; Palutan, Matteo; Panman, Jacob; Papanestis, Antonios; Pappagallo, Marco; Pappalardo, Luciano; Pappenheimer, Cheryl; Parker, William; Parkes, Christopher; Passaleva, Giovanni; Patel, Girish; Patel, Mitesh; Patrignani, Claudia; Pearce, Alex; Pellegrino, Antonio; Penso, Gianni; Pepe Altarelli, Monica; Perazzini, Stefano; Perret, Pascal; Pescatore, Luca; Petridis, Konstantinos; Petrolini, Alessandro; Petruzzo, Marco; Picatoste Olloqui, Eduardo; Pietrzyk, Boleslaw; Pinci, Davide; Pistone, Alessandro; Piucci, Alessio; Playfer, Stephen; Plo Casasus, Maximo; Poikela, Tuomas; Polci, Francesco; Poluektov, Anton; Polyakov, Ivan; Polycarpo, Erica; Popov, Alexander; Popov, Dmitry; Popovici, Bogdan; Potterat, Cédric; Price, Eugenia; Price, Joseph David; Prisciandaro, Jessica; Pritchard, Adrian; Prouve, Claire; Pugatch, Valery; Puig Navarro, Albert; Punzi, Giovanni; Qian, Wenbin; Quagliani, Renato; Rachwal, Bartolomiej; Rademacker, Jonas; Rama, Matteo; Ramos Pernas, Miguel; Rangel, Murilo; Raniuk, Iurii; Raven, Gerhard; Redi, Federico; Reichert, Stefanie; dos Reis, Alberto; Renaudin, Victor; Ricciardi, Stefania; Richards, Sophie; Rihl, Mariana; Rinnert, Kurt; Rives Molina, Vicente; Robbe, Patrick; Rodrigues, Ana Barbara; Rodrigues, Eduardo; Rodriguez Lopez, Jairo Alexis; Rodriguez Perez, Pablo; Rogozhnikov, Alexey; Roiser, Stefan; Romanovskiy, Vladimir; Romero Vidal, Antonio; Ronayne, John William; Rotondo, Marcello; Ruf, Thomas; Ruiz Valls, Pablo; Saborido Silva, Juan Jose; Sagidova, Naylya; Saitta, Biagio; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Sanchez Mayordomo, Carlos; Sanmartin Sedes, Brais; Santacesaria, Roberta; Santamarina Rios, Cibran; Santimaria, Marco; Santovetti, Emanuele; Sarti, Alessio; Satriano, Celestina; Satta, Alessia; Saunders, Daniel Martin; Savrina, Darya; Schael, Stefan; Schiller, Manuel; Schindler, Heinrich; Schlupp, Maximilian; Schmelling, Michael; Schmelzer, Timon; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schneider, Olivier; Schopper, Andreas; Schubiger, Maxime; Schune, Marie Helene; Schwemmer, Rainer; Sciascia, Barbara; Sciubba, Adalberto; Semennikov, Alexander; Sergi, Antonino; Serra, Nicola; Serrano, Justine; Sestini, Lorenzo; Seyfert, Paul; Shapkin, Mikhail; Shapoval, Illya; Shcheglov, Yury; Shears, Tara; Shekhtman, Lev; Shevchenko, Vladimir; Shires, Alexander; Siddi, Benedetto Gianluca; Silva Coutinho, Rafael; Silva de Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo; Simi, Gabriele; Sirendi, Marek; Skidmore, Nicola; Skwarnicki, Tomasz; Smith, Eluned; Smith, Iwan Thomas; Smith, Jackson; Smith, Mark; Snoek, Hella; Sokoloff, Michael; Soler, Paul; Soomro, Fatima; Souza, Daniel; Souza De Paula, Bruno; Spaan, Bernhard; Spradlin, Patrick; Sridharan, Srikanth; Stagni, Federico; Stahl, Marian; Stahl, Sascha; Stefkova, Slavorima; Steinkamp, Olaf; Stenyakin, Oleg; Stevenson, Scott; Stoica, Sabin; Stone, Sheldon; Storaci, Barbara; Stracka, Simone; Straticiuc, Mihai; Straumann, Ulrich; Sun, Liang; Sutcliffe, William; Swientek, Krzysztof; Swientek, Stefan; Syropoulos, Vasileios; Szczekowski, Marek; Szumlak, Tomasz; T'Jampens, Stephane; Tayduganov, Andrey; Tekampe, Tobias; Tellarini, Giulia; Teubert, Frederic; Thomas, Christopher; Thomas, Eric; van Tilburg, Jeroen; Tisserand, Vincent; Tobin, Mark; Tolk, Siim; Tomassetti, Luca; Tonelli, Diego; Topp-Joergensen, Stig; Tournefier, Edwige; Tourneur, Stephane; Trabelsi, Karim; Tran, Minh Tâm; Tresch, Marco; Trisovic, Ana; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei; Tsopelas, Panagiotis; Tuning, Niels; Ukleja, Artur; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey; Uwer, Ulrich; Vacca, Claudia; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Valat, Sebastien; Valenti, Giovanni; Vallier, Alexis; Vazquez Gomez, Ricardo; Vazquez Regueiro, Pablo; Vecchi, Stefania; van Veghel, Maarten; Velthuis, Jaap; Veltri, Michele; Veneziano, Giovanni; Vesterinen, Mika; Viaud, Benoit; Vieira, Daniel; Vieites Diaz, Maria; Vilasis-Cardona, Xavier; Volkov, Vladimir; Vollhardt, Achim; Voong, David; Vorobyev, Alexey; Vorobyev, Vitaly; Voß, Christian; de Vries, Jacco; Vázquez Sierra, Carlos; Waldi, Roland; Wallace, Charlotte; Wallace, Ronan; Walsh, John; Wang, Jianchun; Ward, David; Watson, Nigel; Websdale, David; Weiden, Andreas; Whitehead, Mark; Wicht, Jean; Wilkinson, Guy; Wilkinson, Michael; Williams, Mark Richard James; Williams, Matthew; Williams, Mike; Williams, Timothy; Wilson, Fergus; Wimberley, Jack; Wishahi, Julian; Wislicki, Wojciech; Witek, Mariusz; Wormser, Guy; Wotton, Stephen; Wraight, Kenneth; Wright, Simon; Wyllie, Kenneth; Xie, Yuehong; Xu, Zhirui; Yang, Zhenwei; Yin, Hang; Yu, Jiesheng; Yuan, Xuhao; Yushchenko, Oleg; Zangoli, Maria; Zavertyaev, Mikhail; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Yanxi; Zhelezov, Alexey; Zheng, Yangheng; Zhokhov, Anatoly; Zhong, Liang; Zhukov, Valery; Zucchelli, Stefano

    2016-08-24

    A model-dependent amplitude analysis of the decay $B^0\\rightarrow D(K^0_S\\pi^+\\pi^-) K^{*0}$ is performed using proton-proton collision data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0fb$^{-1}$, recorded at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ and $8 TeV$ by the LHCb experiment. The CP violation observables $x_{\\pm}$ and $y_{\\pm}$, sensitive to the CKM angle $\\gamma$, are measured to be \\begin{eqnarray*} x_- &=& -0.15 \\pm 0.14 \\pm 0.03 \\pm 0.01, \\\\y_- &=& 0.25 \\pm 0.15 \\pm 0.06 \\pm 0.01, \\\\x_+ &=& 0.05 \\pm 0.24 \\pm 0.04 \\pm 0.01, \\\\y_+ &=& -0.65^{+0.24}_{-0.23} \\pm 0.08 \\pm 0.01, \\end{eqnarray*} where the first uncertainties are statistical, the second systematic and the third arise from the uncertainty on the $D\\rightarrow K^0_S \\pi^+\\pi^-$ amplitude model. These are the most precise measurements of these observables. They correspond to $\\gamma=(80^{+21}_{-22})^{\\circ}$ and $r_{B^0}=0.39\\pm0.13$, where $r_{B^0}$ is the magnitude of the ratio of the suppressed and favoured $B^0\\rightarrow D K^+ \\...

  1. Measuring the molecular dimensions of wine tannins: comparison of small-angle X-ray scattering, gel-permeation chromatography and mean degree of polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Jacqui M; Kirby, Nigel; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Kassara, Stella; Smith, Paul A

    2014-07-23

    The molecular size of wine tannins can influence astringency, and yet it has been unclear as to whether the standard methods for determining average tannin molecular weight (MW), including gel-permeation chromatography (GPC) and depolymerization reactions, are actually related to the size of the tannin in wine-like conditions. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) was therefore used to determine the molecular sizes and corresponding MWs of wine tannin samples from 3 and 7 year old Cabernet Sauvignon wine in a variety of wine-like matrixes: 5-15% and 100% ethanol; 0-200 mM NaCl and pH 3.0-4.0, and compared to those measured using the standard methods. The SAXS results indicated that the tannin samples from the older wine were larger than those of the younger wine and that wine composition did not greatly impact on tannin molecular size. The average tannin MWs as determined by GPC correlated strongly with the SAXS results, suggesting that this method does give a good indication of tannin molecular size in wine-like conditions. The MW as determined from the depolymerization reactions did not correlate as strongly with the SAXS results. To our knowledge, SAXS measurements have not previously been attempted for wine tannins.

  2. Corneal biomechanical characteristics measured by the CorVis Scheimpflug technology in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma and normal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Wang, Dajiang; Wu, Ying; Meng, Xiaoli; Chen, Bing; Ge, Mei; Huang, Yifei

    2016-08-01

    To evaluate the biomechanical properties of the cornea using Corneal Visualization Scheimpflug Technology (CorVis ST, Oculus) in eyes with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) and normal control eyes. A comparative cross-sectional study that included 42 patients with POAG and 60 normal control subjects matched for intraocular pressure (IOP) and central corneal thickness (CCT). IOP was measured with a Goldmann applanation tonometer (GAT). Corneal tomography and biomechanical parameters were measured with Pentacam (Oculus) and CorVis ST, respectively. Corneal biomechanical properties were compared between groups, and the associations between corneal biomechanical parameters and ocular characteristics were evaluated. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were used to establish a cut-off value for the biomechanical parameters. The following parameters of the CorVis ST showed a significant difference between eyes with POAG and normal eyes: first applanation velocity (Vin ), second applanation time (A-time2 ), peak distance (PD) and deformation amplitude (DA). In the univariate analysis, DA was negatively correlated with IOP in both groups. For all biomechanical parameters, the areas under the ROC curve were corneal biomechanical properties. Eyes with POAG exhibit a faster Vin , longer A-time2 , lower DA and longer PD than do IOP- and CCT-matched normal control eyes. The biomechanical parameters of the CorVis ST cannot readily be used for diagnosis of POAG in the individual patient. © 2015 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Relationship between intrapartum transperineal ultrasound measurement of angle of progression and head-perineum distance with correlation to conventional clinical parameters of labor progress and time to delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Ying Tze Viola; Ng, Vivian Kwun Sin; Yung, Wai Kuen; Lo, Tsz Kin; Leung, Wing Cheong; Lau, Wai Lam

    2015-08-01

    To assess whether angle of progression (AOP) and head-perineum distance (HPD) measured by intrapartum transperineal ultrasound (ITU) correlate with clinical fetal head station (station); and whether AOP versus HPD varies during uterine contraction and relaxation. In a subset of primiparous women, whether these ITU parameters correlate with time to normal spontaneous delivery (TD). We evaluated prospectively 100 primiparous and multiparous women at term in active labor. Transabdominal and transperineal ultrasound (sagittal and transverse plane) were used to measure fetal head position and ITU parameters, respectively. Digitally palpated station and cervical dilatation were also noted. The results were compared using regression and correlation coefficients. Station was moderately correlated with AOP (r = 0.579) and HPD (r = -0.497). AOP was highly correlated with HPD during uterine contraction (r = -0.703) and relaxation (r = -0.647). In the subgroup of primiparous women, natural log of TD has the highest correlation with HPD and AOP during uterine contraction (r = 0.742), making prediction of TD similar to that of using cervical dilatation. ITU parameters were moderately correlated with station. There was constant high correlation between AOP and HPD. Prediction of TD in primiparous women using ITU parameters was similar to that of using cervical dilatation.

  4. [Proposal for a radiologic classification of disorders of the pelvi-rectal angle based on measurement of the posterior rectal inclination. Value of dynamic digitalized rectography].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costalat, G; Garrigues, J M; Lopez, P; Lamarque, J L; Vernhet, J

    1991-10-01

    The difficulties for evaluation of the perineal descent have always been linked to the choice of references and mostly with the incertitude of the measurement of length on the radiographic film. This present study was carried out to evaluate the perineal descent on the choice of an angular measurement: the posterior rectal inclination. The dynamic digitalized rectography was used to investigate the pelvic floor status of 134 women: 115 patients complaining of idiopathic constipation, and 19 healthy volunteers. Results have shown 3 populations with an increasing graduation of perineal impairment and led to propose a radiologic classification of pelvic floor impairment: stage I, or solid perineum, stage II, or descending perineum and stage III or descended perineum. This study has brought up that the first sign of a pelvic floor abnormality may be increased descent during straining, only later followed by perineal descent at rest. The relationship linking abnormal perineal descent and excessive opening of the ano-rectal angle suggested logically that fecal incontinence may be the end complication of the Descending Perineum Syndrom.

  5. Simulation of e-{gamma}-n targets by FLUKA and measurement of neutron flux at various angles for accelerator based neutron source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patil, B.J., E-mail: bjp@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Chavan, S.T.; Pethe, S.N.; Krishnan, R. [SAMEER, IIT Powai Campus, Mumbai 400 076 (India); Bhoraskar, V.N. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Dhole, S.D., E-mail: sanjay@physics.unipune.ernet.i [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India)

    2010-10-15

    A 6 MeV Race track Microtron (an electron accelerator) based pulsed neutron source has been designed specifically for the elemental analysis of short lived activation products where the low neutron flux requirement is desirable. The bremsstrahlung radiation emitted by impinging 6 MeV electron on the e-{gamma} primary target, was made to fall on the {gamma}-n secondary target to produce neutrons. The optimisation of bremsstrahlung and neutron producing target along with their spectra were estimated using FLUKA code. The measurement of neutron flux was carried out by activation of vanadium and the measured fluxes were 1.1878 x 10{sup 5}, 0.9403 x 10{sup 5}, 0.7428 x 10{sup 5}, 0.6274 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5659 x 10{sup 5}, 0.5210 x 10{sup 5} n/cm{sup 2}/s at 0{sup o}, 30{sup o}, 60{sup o}, 90{sup o}, 115{sup o}, 140{sup o} respectively. The results indicate that the neutron flux was found to be decreased as increase in the angle and in good agreement with the FLUKA simulation.

  6. Parity Violation in elastic electron scattering : A first measurment of the parity-violating Asymmetry at Q2 = 0.631 GeV/c2 at Backward Angle.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Stephanie L. [College of William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA (United States)

    2007-05-01

    The goal of Experiment E04-115 (the G0 backward angle measurement) at Jefferson Lab is to investigate the contributions of strange quarks to the fundamental properties of the nucleon. The experiment measures parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen and quasielastic electron scattering off deuterium at backward angles at Q2 = 0.631 (GeV/c)2 and Q2 = 0.232 (GeV/c)2. The backward angle measurement represents the second phase of the G0 experiment. The first phase, Experiment E00-006 (the G0 forward angle experiment), measured parity-violating asymmetries in elastic electron scattering off hydrogen at forward angles over a Q2 range of 0.1-1.0 (GeV/c)2. The experiments used a polarized electron beam and unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium liquid targets. From these measurements, along with the electromagnetic form factors, one can extract the contribution of the strange quark to the proton's charge and magnetization distributions. This thesis represents a fi

  7. Small Angle Neutron Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) probes structural details at the nanometer scale in a non-destructive way. This article gives an introduction to scientists who have no prior small-angle scattering knowledge, but who seek a technique that allows elucidating structural information in challenging situations that thwart approaches by other methods. SANS is applicable to a wide variety of materials including metals and alloys, ceramics, concrete, glasses, polymers, composites and biological materials. Isotope and magnetic interactions provide unique methods for labeling and contrast variation to highlight specific structural features of interest. In situ studies of a material s responses to temperature, pressure, shear, magnetic and electric fields, etc., are feasible as a result of the high penetrating power of neutrons. SANS provides statistical information on significant structural features averaged over the probed sample volume, and one can use SANS to quantify with high precision the structural details that are observed, for example, in electron microscopy. Neutron scattering is non-destructive; there is no need to cut specimens into thin sections, and neutrons penetrate deeply, providing information on the bulk material, free from surface effects. The basic principles of a SANS experiment are fairly simple, but the measurement, analysis and interpretation of small angle scattering data involves theoretical concepts that are unique to the technique and that are not widely known. This article includes a concise description of the basics, as well as practical know-how that is essential for a successful SANS experiment.

  8. ROC surface assessment of the ANB angle and Wits appraisal's diagnostic performance with a statistically derived 'gold standard': does normalizing measurements have any merit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellens, Hans L L; BeGole, Ellen A; Kuijpers-Jagtman, Annemarie M

    2017-08-01

    To assess the ANB angle's and Wits appraisal's diagnostic performance using an extended vers