WorldWideScience

Sample records for videodisc technology serve

  1. Videodisc technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, F.E. Jr.

    1981-03-01

    An overview of the technology of videodiscs is given. The emphasis is on systems that use reflection or transmission of laser light. Possible use of videodiscs for storage of bibliographic information is considered. 6 figures, 3 tables. (RWR)

  2. Artificial Intelligence Applications to Videodisc Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vries, John K.; Banks, Gordon; McLinden, Sean; Moossy, John; Brown, Melanie

    1985-01-01

    Much of medical information is visual in nature. Since it is not easy to describe pictorial information in linguistic terms, it has been difficult to store and retrieve this type of information. Coupling videodisc technology with artificial intelligence programming techniques may provide a means for solving this problem.

  3. A Survey of Videodisc Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-12-01

    manner. 1. EIDS Characteristics The best source for defining the capabilities of EIDS is the description of what the Army wanted to buy from one of the...significant preference for both role play and videodisc over text. When presented with a forced choise question as to which approach was the best in terms of...each. Considering the still frames only, the cost is only about $ .06 per work of art. To buy high quality slides (as used in art schools) of 1,645 73

  4. The development and evaluation of an interactive videodisc system to train radiation therapy technology students on the use of the linear accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this study was twofold. The first part was to describe the development and evaluation of an interactive videodisc system to train radiation therapy technology students how to treat malignancies using a Linear Accelerator. The second part of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of the interactive videodisc system as a simulation. The Gagne-Briggs instructional model was adapted to develop the interactive videodisc system. A model emerged as part of the project to conduct the formative evaluation of the prototype. A quasiexperimental research design was used to conduct the summative evaluation with two groups of first-year Radiation Therapy Technology students who entered the program in consecutive years. All testing and evaluation instruments were developed for the study with the exception of the clinical evaluation form. This latter form was already being used at the clinical sites. T-tests were used to analyze all data. A significant difference in cognitive achievement was evidenced between students exposed to the interactive videodisc system and students who were not exposed to the system. There was no significant difference found in clinical performance achievement and in attitude toward the clinical experience between both sets of participants. Instructor time was reduced by 1 and 1/2 hours for students on the interactive videodisc system. In conclusion, the interactive videodisc system was found to be more effective as an instructional method for cognitive achievement and as equally an effective method preparing students for clinical performance

  5. Teaching with Videodiscs [and] Teaching Fractions with Videodiscs [and] Mainstreaming Students with Learning Disabilities for Videodisc Math Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Alan M.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Presented is an introduction to laser videodisc technology, covering both hardware and courseware considerations and technological applications to special education. Described is the application of videodisc courseware to the teaching of fractions, and results of a successful program to teach fractions to eight mainstreamed students with learning…

  6. A comparison of student reactions to biology instruction by interactive videodisc or conventional laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, William H.

    This study was designed to learn if students perceived an interactive computer/videodisc learning system to represent a viable alternative to (or extension of) the conventional laboratory for learning biology skills and concepts normally taught under classroom laboratory conditions. Data were collected by questionnaire for introductory biology classes at a large midwestern university where students were randomly assigned to two interactive videodisc/computer lessons titled Respiration and Climate and Life or traditional laboratory investigation with the same titles and concepts. The interactive videodisc system consisted of a TRS-80 Model III microcomputer interfaced to a Pioneer laser-disc player and a color TV monitor. Students indicated an overall level satisfaction with this strategy very similar to that of conventional laboratory instruction. Students frequently remarked that videodisc instruction gave them more experimental and procedural options and more efficient use of instructional time than did the conventional laboratory mode. These two results are consistent with past CAI research. Students also had a strong perception that the images on the videodisc were not real and this factor was perceived as having both advantages and disadvantages. Students found the two approaches to be equivalent to conventional laboratory instruction in the areas of general interest, understanding of basic principles, help on examinations, and attitude toward science. The student-opinion data in this study do not suggest that interactive videodisc technology serve as a substitute to the wet laboratory experience, but that this medium may enrich the spectrum of educational experiences usually not possible in typical classroom settings.

  7. Enter the Videodisc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pribble, Ralph

    1985-01-01

    The uses for computer-controlled interactive video using a videodisc in training are discussed. Elements of the videodisc are examined: interactivity, soft skills training ability, effectiveness as a training agent, acceptance of videodisc by trainers, price, and cost-effectiveness. (CT)

  8. Using Interactive Videodisc To Teach Psychomotor Skills to Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renshaw, Sharon M.; Beadenkopf, F. Scott; Murray, Rodney

    1989-01-01

    An interactive videodisc program on the process of administering medications to clients will be demonstrated. Discussion will center on the strengths and limitations of interactive video for teaching psychomotor skills to healthcare professionals as well as design modifications that will facilitate this process. Interactive videodisc technology provides an exciting new medium for teaching psychomotor clinical skills to health care professionals. It is a particularly valuable approach for complex skills which involve visualization of motor activities and extensive client assessments.

  9. Interactive videodisc in maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zwingelstein, G.; Nguyen Van Nghi, B.

    1986-01-01

    After a recall of the videodisc characteristics, this paper presents its utilization by Electricite de France in the framework of training and maintenance. The SICMA (Interactive Communication System in Maintenance) developed and tested by Electricte de France is presented as also its utilization. It has been tested on the sites of Dampierre and Paluel in the cases of training and maintenance (deconnexion of drive rods of control elements); the conclusions of this experimentation are finally given. 4 refs [fr

  10. Satellite Demonstration: The Videodisc Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Propp, George; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Originally part of a symposium on educational media for the deaf, the paper describes a satellite demonstration of video disc materials. It is explained that a panel of deaf individuals in Washington, D.C. and another in Nebraska came into direct two-way communication for the first time, and video disc materials were broadcast via the satellite.…

  11. Which industries are served by online marketplaces for technology?

    OpenAIRE

    Dushnitsky, G; Klueter, T

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates a recent phenomenon in the market for technology: online marketplaces for technological inventions, which support the listing, search, and exchange of technological inventions by sellers and buyers. Focusing on three salient theoretical factors\\ud that affect markets for technology – search costs, ambiguity about the underlying knowledge and its applications, and expropriation concerns – our research systematically explores which industries are served by online marketp...

  12. Interactive videodisc training for power plant operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolan, R.; Nolan, J.; Campos, M.; Haukom, R.; Quentin, G.

    1990-01-01

    During the last several years, professionals in the personal computer and video fields have seen their two technologies coming together. This merging has created a new medium called multimedia. Multimedia provides the user with the interactivity of the personal computer and the realism of live-action television. It appears to be a perfect marriage for education, training and selling applications. As multimedia productions continue to be produced and tested with high marks, business and industry are becoming interested. The Interactive Videodisc Trainer (IVT) is a demonstration of how multimedia technology can be used by the electric power industry for operator training. Although the subject for this pilot program is the Claus sulfur recovery unit at the Cool Water Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle plant, similar courseware can be put to use for training at any type of power plant. The goal is to show many of the features and capabilities inherent in this powerful new training tool, so that utilities can begin to see how it could work for them

  13. Comparing interactive videodisc training effectiveness to traditional training methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenworthy, N.W.

    1987-01-01

    Videodisc skills training programs developed by Industrial Training Corporation are being used and evaluated by major industrial facilities. In one such study, interactive videodisc training programs were compared to videotape and instructor-based training to determine the effectiveness of videodisc in terms of performance, training time and trainee attitudes. Results showed that when initial training was done using the interactive videodisc system, trainee performance was superior to the performance of trainees using videotape, and approximately equal to the performance of those trained by an instructor. When each method was used in follow-up training, interactive videodisc was definitely the most effective. Results also indicate that training time can be reduced using interactive videodisc. Attitudes of both trainees and instructors toward the interactive videodisc training were positive

  14. Serving human needs. Nuclear technologies in the marketplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jihui; Burkart, Werner

    2001-01-01

    Many peaceful nuclear technologies today stand firmly established. They are being widely applied and accepted around the world in such fields as health care, food production, manufacturing, electricity generation, and environmental protection. Among the IAEA's 132 Member States, interest in constructively applying the tools of nuclear science and technology - especially outside the energy sector - remains high, although priorities, needs, and policies have changed over time. For the IAEA - whose specific mandate is to 'accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health, and prosperity' - the changing and challenging global picture has strengthened efforts to enhance the contribution of nuclear science and technologies in key fields of human development. A multi-faceted programme of technical cooperation serves as the main vehicle for the transfer of nuclear science and technology to developing countries. The programme's emphasis is on supporting projects that respond to the priority needs of each country, produce an economic or social impact, and reflect the distinct advantages of nuclear technology over other approaches

  15. Alyeska/SERVS technological innovations for oil spill response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hillman, S.O.

    1996-01-01

    An overview of technological innovations in spill response by Alyeska Pipeline Service Company/SERVS (ship escort response vessel system), was presented. The company has developed a number of spill response techniques which have needed new strategies and modified equipment for fulfillment of the Prince William Sound Tanker Oil Discharge Prevention and Contingency Plan. One of the strategies was the training of personnel to be ready to deploy massive quantities of equipment on short notice to potential spill sites over an 11,000 square mile water body with more than 3,200 miles of wilderness shoreline. Specific response equipment and decision-making tools have been developed in direct support of large scale programs. Along with oil slick tracking buoys and mini barges, SERVS has developed high capacity skimmers with recovery capacities approaching 2,000 to 3,000 barrels of liquid per hour and strategy boom-towing vessels which divert oil into a long U shaped containment boom. SERVS fishing vessel program, hatchery protection and remote response center equipment program, and wildlife treatment facilities were also described. 10 refs., 13 figs

  16. Simulations Using a Computer/Videodisc System: Instructional Design Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lisa R.

    Instructional design considerations involved in using level four videodisc systems when designing simulations are explored. Discussion of the hardware and software system characteristics notes that computer based training offers the features of text, graphics, color, animation, and highlighting techniques, while a videodisc player offers all of…

  17. An Interactive Videodisc Module for Forage Quality and Testing Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannaway, D. B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Announces the development of a videodisc module which provides access to the U.S. Department of Agriculture information network. Relates sources of information, module description, recommendations for use, and software specifications. Describes the equipment needed. (RT)

  18. Selected Conference Proceedings from the 1985 Videodisc, Optical Disk, and CD-ROM Conference and Exposition (Philadelphia, PA, December 10-12, 1985).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerva, John R.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Eight papers cover: optical storage technology; cross-cultural videodisc design; optical disk technology use at the Library of Congress Research Service and National Library of Medicine; Internal Revenue Service image storage and retrieval system; solving business problems with CD-ROM; a laser disk operating system; and an optical disk for…

  19. An interactive videodisc system for training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadwell, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Classification (DOE/OC), Brookhaven National Laboratory/Technical Support Organization (BNL/TSO) has prepared a level-three interactive-laserdisc program for the training of authorized classifiers in the Department of Energy. This training programs consists of six modules presented in several formats. The material is presented in a highly interactive manner with various tests to reinforce and evaluate the trainee's progress in learning the material. A lengthy qualification test is presented at the end of the educational material. The various instructional techniques of scenario presentation, ''talking heads'', graphics, textual material and combinations of the above are used to assure that the training material attracts the trainee's interests and motivates him to understand and use the material. The state-of-the-art interactive laser videodisc with its storage capacity, speed flexibility, and superior training capacity was the logical choice for the training of Authorized Classifiers in the Department of Energy

  20. Questioning Categories Used By Elementary Science Teachers during Moving and Still Frames of Videodisc Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Coralee S.; Barrow, Lloyd H.

    The purpose of the study reported in this paper was to examine the categories of teacher-asked questions while using moving and still frames of science videodisc instruction. Videotapes were made of 12 volunteer, Midwestern, urban, elementary teachers using videodisc instruction. Coding of the teacher-asked questioning categories was determined…

  1. The Use of an Interactive Videodisc and Associated Instructional Materials To Teach Selected Routine and Emergency Phrases in Signed English to the Deaf and Their Hearing Associates. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Cass; And Others

    This final report documents a project which developed and investigated the use of interactive videodisc technology to assist in the instruction of signing with deaf children and their associates (such as parents, teachers, peers). The project first identified words and phrases considered essential for interpersonal communications. A videodisc…

  2. Radiometric analysis of cooked meal served at PINSTECH (Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology) cafeteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anjum, M.I.; Khan, K.; Jabbar, A.; Akhter, P.; Dilband, M.; Rehman, M.

    2011-01-01

    The safety of the radiation workers is one of the most essential objectives of the radiation protection department of any nuclear installation. To meet this objective, continuous monitoring and analysis of different media is performed by Health Physics Division of Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH). To find radiological impact of composite food served at PINSTECH on its workers, cooked meal samples were collected from 2008 to 2010. The radiometric analysis of these samples was performed for naturally occurring radionuclide and fission fragments. On the basis of this analysis, only K-40 was found in considerable amount. Its activity ranges from 21.35 +- 2.4 Bqkg/sup -1/ to 117.29 +- 3.01 Bqkg/sup -1/ with cumulative average value of 76.15 +- 2.85 Bqkg/sup -1/. The meals taken by the PINSTECH workers during this period give 62.67 mu Sv as committed effective dose to them which results in estimated cancer risk factor of 1.25 x 10/sup -4/ which is very small as compared to the total risk of 5 x 10/sup -3/. This shows that the food served at PINSTECH cafeteria is radiologically safe for consumers. (author)

  3. A Study on Technology Architecture and Serving Approaches of Electronic Government System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chunnian; Huang, Yiyun; Pan, Qin

    As E-government becomes a very active research area, a lot of solutions to solve citizens' needs are being deployed. This paper provides technology architecture of E-government system and approaches of service in Public Administrations. The proposed electronic system addresses the basic E-government requirements of user friendliness, security, interoperability, transparency and effectiveness in the communication between small and medium sized public organizations and their citizens, businesses and other public organizations. The paper has provided several serving approaches of E-government, which includes SOA, web service, mobile E-government, public library and every has its own characteristics and application scenes. Still, there are a number of E-government issues for further research on organization structure change, including research methodology, data collection analysis, etc.

  4. "Spanish for Medical Professionals" an interactive videodisc program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shmarak, A D

    1991-01-01

    "Spanish for Medical Professionals" is an application authored using the IBM InfoWindow Presentation System (IWPS). It consists of a double-sided videodisc featuring four doctor/patient dialogues interrupted by comprehension quizzes, plus a large visual and audio data base for drill and practice of Spanish words and phrases in the following classifications: Medical History, Review of Systems, Anatomy Vocabulary, General Vocabulary and Pronunciation Guide. These five broad headings yield easy access to more than seventy sub-groups of material available for practice. The entire application stresses communication, not diagnostic skill or interview techniques. This is not a course in basic Spanish, but rather a needs-based language course designed to teach Spanish for a medical environment. Basic knowledge of Spanish is strongly recommended as a prerequisite.

  5. Development of a Microcomputer/Videodisc Aided Math Instructional Management System for Mildly Handicapped Children. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Alan M.

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of a project which developed, implemented, and evaluated the effectiveness of a microcomputer/videodisc math instructional management system for grades K-4. The system was designed to operate on an APPLE II microcomputer, videodisc player, and input-output devices. It included three…

  6. Section 7033 of the America COMPETES Act: Hispanic-Serving Institutions and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartrell, Sandra

    2009-01-01

    On March 1, 2009 from 2 pm to 5 pm at the Madison Hotel in Washington, DC, the National Science Foundation hosted a listening session, requesting input on Section 7033 of the America COMPETES (Creating Opportunities to Meaningfully Promote Excellence in Technology, Education, and Science) Act regarding Hispanic-serving institutions and science,…

  7. Skills and Knowledge Needed to Serve as Mobile Technology Consultants for Information Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potnis, Devendra; Regenstreif-Harms, Reynard; Deosthali, Kanchan; Cortez, Ed; Allard, Suzie

    2016-01-01

    Libraries often lack the in-house information technology (IT) expertise required to (1) implement mobile applications and related technologies (MAT); (2) attain maximum return on investment including patron satisfaction for using MAT; and (3) reduce reliance on expensive IT consultants. Based on secondary analysis of the experiences and advice…

  8. Strengthening the management of scientific and technological achievements and serving the work of uranium geology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tian Hua

    2009-01-01

    Through summarizing the experiences in the management of scientific and technological achievements uranium geology, combined with the scientific research and operation practices, the author tries to find some problems and puts forward suggestion for the management of scientific and technological achievements. (authors)

  9. Can solid-state laser technology serve usefully beyond fusion ignition facilities?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, S.A.; Powell, H.T.; Krupke, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    We have explored the major technical and conceptual issues relating to the suitability of a diode-pumped solid state laser as a driver for an inertial fusion energy power plant. While solid state lasers have long served as the workhorse of inertial confinement fusion physics studies, the deployment of a driver possessing adequate efficiency, reliability, and repetition rate for inertial fusion energy requires the implementation of several technical innovations discussed in this article

  10. Building a Roadmap for the Biomaterials Science and Technology to Serve Military Needs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kohn, Joachim; Kantor, Carole; Devore, David

    2005-01-01

    In order to develop a requirements document detailing the medical product needs of the military that could be enabled by biomaterials technologies, we conducted a planning conference on February 2-4...

  11. IAEA scientific forum to focus on nuclear technology's role in serving human needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    Science and technology's critical role in eradicating famine and disease - among the root causes of global instability - was addressed by some of the world's leading experts at an IAEA forum in Vienna, 18-19 September. The meeting underlined the contribution of nuclear science and technology to sustainable development and the betterment of human welfare and stressed the need for the world's wealthiest nations to give it more support

  12. Thinking of serving nursing abroad: how technology assists nurses on mission trips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Rachel M

    2015-06-01

    Advances in technology have assisted in the proliferation of short-term, faith-based international medical mission trips. Many of these mission trips include health care not only to local citizens but also building schools and churches and sharing the Gospel of Jesus Christ. Included in this article are my own personal experiences in short-term, faith-based medical missions. A step-by-step guide is offered to help prepare inexperienced mission participants gain insight into short-term mission trips. Advanced planning, fundraising, collaboration, and being open to change are key elements to successful participation in these life-changing missions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The World Center for Computing's Pilot Videodisc Project for French Language Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastmond, J. Nicholls, Jr.; Mosenthal, Richard

    1985-01-01

    Describes a pilot videodisc project for French language instruction. Unique features include (1) learner control of instruction by a mouse or touch-sensitive screen, (2) extensive cultural interaction, and (3) an elaborate lexicon of word meanings portrayed visually for selected key words. (Author/SED)

  14. The Validation of an Interactive Videodisc as an Alternative to Traditional Teaching Techniques: Auscultation of the Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branck, Charles E.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study of 87 veterinary medical students at Auburn University tests the effectiveness and student acceptance of interactive videodisc as an alternative to animal experimentation and other traditional teaching methods in analyzing canine cardiovascular sounds. Results of the questionnaire used are presented, and benefits of interactive video…

  15. WHAT DO INNOVATIVE SCHOLS DO WITH TECHNOLOGY?: ICT SERVING THE SCHOOL AND THE COMMUNITY IN THE AMARA BERRI SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Correa Gorospe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital technologies requires careful thinking that organizes and guides their integration into school activities. ICT (Information and Communication Technologies have a recognized potential but their actual impact has serious limitations. The analysis of good practices with ICT has been developed within the research project entitled “Analysis of educational policies regarding ICT in schools and their effects on pedagogical innovation in the Basque Country” and it has made us pay special attention to the use of digital technologies in the Colegio Amara Berri from San Sebastián, a school with a long and well-deserved reputation for innovation. We describe the activities in the department of Mass Media (Hedabideak, its different workshops and their organization, its tasks and projects, as well as the roles of teachers and students. Finally, we end up assessing the experience from a pedagogical point of view.

  16. Realizing the Potential of Information Resources: Information, Technology, and Services. Track 3: Serving Clients with Client/Server.

    Science.gov (United States)

    CAUSE, Boulder, CO.

    Eight papers are presented from the 1995 CAUSE conference track on client/server issues faced by managers of information technology at colleges and universities. The papers include: (1) "The Realities of Client/Server Development and Implementation" (Mary Ann Carr and Alan Hartwig), which examines Carnegie Mellon University's transition…

  17. The Lab of the Future: Using Technology to Teach Foreign Language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the role of technology in teaching foreign languages. Offers a brief history of language lab technologies, including computer use for drill-and-practice, text reconstruction, and simulations and games. Discusses tool programs, intelligent systems, video technology, satellite television, videodisc and interactive video, hypertext and…

  18. Aspects of the insertion of Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus into televised media: technologies of discourse serving hegemonic practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudio Márcio do Carmo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyses some aspects of the insertion of Igreja Universal do Reino de Deus (The Universal Church of the Kingdom of God into the media. It started with the television program Pare de Sofrer, broadcast daily by Rede Record.My presupposition is that this new preaching space helps to marketize the discourse due to its intersemiotic aspect. The interface between some conceptions of critical discourse analysis and marketing theories may explain some aspects of discourse technologies used to intensify institutional ideologies and guarantee a consistent argumentation capable of helping unleash a persuasive and hegemonic process for the religious institution.

  19. Revisiting Information Technology tools serving authorship and editorship: a case-guided tutorial to statistical analysis and plagiarism detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamidis, P D; Lithari, C; Konstantinidis, S T

    2010-12-01

    With the number of scientific papers published in journals, conference proceedings, and international literature ever increasing, authors and reviewers are not only facilitated with an abundance of information, but unfortunately continuously confronted with risks associated with the erroneous copy of another's material. In parallel, Information Communication Technology (ICT) tools provide to researchers novel and continuously more effective ways to analyze and present their work. Software tools regarding statistical analysis offer scientists the chance to validate their work and enhance the quality of published papers. Moreover, from the reviewers and the editor's perspective, it is now possible to ensure the (text-content) originality of a scientific article with automated software tools for plagiarism detection. In this paper, we provide a step-bystep demonstration of two categories of tools, namely, statistical analysis and plagiarism detection. The aim is not to come up with a specific tool recommendation, but rather to provide useful guidelines on the proper use and efficiency of either category of tools. In the context of this special issue, this paper offers a useful tutorial to specific problems concerned with scientific writing and review discourse. A specific neuroscience experimental case example is utilized to illustrate the young researcher's statistical analysis burden, while a test scenario is purpose-built using open access journal articles to exemplify the use and comparative outputs of seven plagiarism detection software pieces.

  20. Technology in the Classroom: Initiative or Response? New Directions in Curriculum Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damarin, Suzanne K.

    Within the last five years there has been a great deal of change in the role of technology in the schools. The advent of microcomputers has had an impact on instructional techniques as has the development of interactive graphics and animation, and other technologies such as videodisc and micronet. Teacher educators face the responsibility of…

  1. 3D technology of Sony Bloggie has no advantage in decision-making of tennis serve direction: A randomized placebo-controlled study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Sicong; Ritchie, Jason; Sáenz-Moncaleano, Camilo; Ward, Savanna K; Paulsen, Cody; Klein, Tyler; Gutierrez, Oscar; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2017-06-01

    This study aimed at exploring whether 3D technology enhances tennis decision-making under the conceptual framework of human performance model. A 3 (skill-level: varsity, club, recreational) × 3 (experimental condition: placebo, weak 3D [W3D], strong 3D [S3D]) between-participant design was used. Allocated to experimental conditions by a skill-level stratified randomization, 105 tennis players judged tennis serve direction from video scenarios and rated their perceptions of enjoyment, flow, and presence during task performance. Results showed that varsity players made more accurate decisions than less skilled ones. Additionally, applying 3D technology to typical video displays reduced tennis players' decision-making accuracy, although wearing the 3D glasses led to a placebo effect that shortened the decision-making reaction time. The unexpected negative effect of 3D technology on decision-making was possibly due to participants being more familiar to W3D than to S3D, and relatedly, a suboptimal task-technology match. Future directions for advancing this area of research are offered. Highlights 3D technology augments binocular depth cues to tradition video displays, and thus results in the attainment of more authentic visual representation. This process enhances task fidelity in researching perceptual-cognitive skills in sports. The paper clarified both conceptual and methodological difficulties in testing 3D technology in sports settings. Namely, the nomenclature of video footage (with/without 3D technology) and the possible placebo effect (arising from wearing glasses of 3D technology) merit researchers' attention. Participants varying in level of domain-specific expertise were randomized into viewing conditions using a placebo-controlled design. Measurement consisted of both participants' subjective experience (i.e., presence, flow, and enjoyment) and objective performance (i.e., accuracy and reaction time) in a decision-making task. Findings revealed that

  2. NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University and Research Education Program Promotes Climate Literacy by Engaging Students at Minority Serving Institutions in STEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, B.; Alston, E. J.; Chambers, L. H.; Bynum, A.; Montgomery, C.; Blue, S.; Kowalczak, C.; Leighton, A.; Bosman, L.

    2017-12-01

    NASA Earth Systems, Technology and Energy Education for Minority University Research & Education Program - MUREP (ESTEEM) activities enhance institutional capacity of minority serving institutions (MSIs) related to Earth System Science, Technology and energy education; in turn, increasing access of underrepresented groups to science careers and opportunities. ESTEEM is a competitive portfolio that has been providing funding to institutions across the United States for 10 years. Over that time 76 separate activities have been funded. Beginning in 2011 ESTEEM awards focused on MSIs and public-school districts with high under-represented enrollment. Today ESTEEM awards focus on American Indian/Alaska Native serving institutions (Tribal Colleges and Universities), the very communities most severely in need of ability to deal with climate adaptation and resiliency. ESTEEM engages a multi-faceted approach to address economic and cultural challenges facing MSI communities. PIs (Principal Investigators) receive support from a management team at NASA, and are supported by a larger network, the ESTEEM Cohort, which connects regularly through video calls, virtual video series and in-person meetings. The cohort acts as a collective unit to foster interconnectivity and knowledge sharing in both physical and virtual settings. ESTEEM partners with NASA's Digital Learning Network (DLNTM) in a unique non-traditional model to leverage technical expertise. DLN services over 10,000 participants each year through interactive web-based synchronous and asynchronous events. These events allow for cost effective (no travel) engagement of multiple, geographically dispersed audiences to share local experiences with one another. Events allow PIs to grow their networks, technical base, professional connections, and develop a sense of community, encouraging expansion into larger and broader interactions. Over 256 connections, beyond the 76 individual members, exist within the cohort. PIs report

  3. Technologies to better serve the millions of diabetic patients: a holistic, interactive and persuasive ICT model to facilitate self care, in extremely poor rural zones of Central America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Lombardo, Miguel; Jipsion, Armando; Vejarano, Rafael; Camargo, Ismael; Alvarez, Humberto; Mora, Elena Villalba; Ruíz, Ernestina Menasalva

    2012-04-01

    Health indicators express remarkable gaps between health systems at a world-wide level. Countries of the entire world are overflowed by the need of new strategies, methodologies and technologies to better serve the millions of patients, who demand better medical attention. The present archaic and ephemerally systematized systems widen the gap even more than the quality of medical services that should be provided for the millions of diabetic patients. It is therefore necessary to develop highly familiar environments with diabetic patients and their care needs. A Holistic, Interactive and Persuasive ICT model to facilitate self care of patients with diabetes (hIPAPD), is proposed as an innovative technological development in Panama to health optimized treatment for diabetic patients. Three health centers located in the District of Aguadulce, Province of Cocle, located on Panama's Pacific Coast, were selected to validate the model; the area presents extremely poor population, mostly with one daily meal, without any health insurance and with a high illiteracy rate. A series of experiences in the application and validation process are presented and analyzed in order to confirm the application, value and contribution of ICTs in health care in poor regions of Central America.

  4. Could a multimodal dictionary serve as a learning tool? An examination of the impact of technologically enhanced visual glosses on L2 text comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Sato

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the efficacy of a multimodal online bilingual dictionary based on cognitive linguistics in order to explore the advantages and limitations of explicit multimodal L2 vocabulary learning. Previous studies have examined the efficacy of the verbal and visual representation of words while reading L2 texts, concluding that it facilitates incidental word retention. This study explores other potentials of multimodal L2 vocabulary learning: explicit learning with a multimodal dictionary could enhance not only word retention, but also text comprehension; the dictionary could serve not only as a reference tool, but also as a learning tool; and technology-enhanced visual glosses could facilitate deeper text comprehension. To verify these claims, this study investigates the multimodal representations’ effects on Japanese students learning L2 locative prepositions by developing two online dictionaries, one with static pictures and one with animations. The findings show the advantage of such dictionaries in explicit learning; however, no significant differences are found between the two types of visual glosses, either in the vocabulary or in the listening tests. This study confirms the effectiveness of multimodal L2 materials, but also emphasizes the need for further research into making the technologically enhanced materials more effective.

  5. Computer Technology and Educational Equity. ERIC/CUE Urban Diversity Series, Number 91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Edmund W.; Armour-Thomas, Eleanor

    The impact of the technological revolution on education is examined in this monograph, which focuses primarily on computers. First, the history of the educational uses of a variety of media (film, radio, television, teaching machines, and videodisc systems) is traced and assessed. As instructional aids, it is said, the media economize teachers'…

  6. Libraries serving dialogue

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Odile

    2014-01-01

    This book based on experiences of libraries serving interreligious dialogue, presents themes like library tools serving dialogue between cultures, collections dialoguing, children and young adults dialoguing beyond borders, story telling as dialog, librarians serving interreligious dialogue.

  7. Utilizing Web 2.0 Technologies for Library Web Tutorials: An Examination of Instruction on Community College Libraries' Websites Serving Large Student Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blummer, Barbara; Kenton, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part of a series on Web 2.0 tools available from community college libraries' Websites. The first article appeared in an earlier volume of this journal and it illustrated the wide variety of Web 2.0 tools on community college libraries' Websites serving large student bodies (Blummer and Kenton 2014). The research found many of…

  8. A Helpful Serving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockower, David

    2006-01-01

    This article briefly describes how a fifth-grade class collaborated with a downtown diner for several months and then actually ran the restaurant for four hours. Through the Chatters Cafe, a local high school cafe that serves as a culinary arts training ground for high school students, fifth graders had the opportunity to prepare and serve dinner…

  9. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  10. Moving Toward an Anti-Deficit Perspective: African American Science, Technology, Engineering, Mathematics (STEM) Students at Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Melissa M.

    The increased demand for qualified STEM workers, necessitates addressing the bachelor's science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) degree achievement among African Americans and other underrepresented populations. Using inquiry derived from Harper's (2010) Anti-Deficit Achievement Framework, this study sought to explore the factors that contribute to the successful degree completion of African American STEM students within a large comprehensive university system. Coding of the twelve semi-structured interviews revealed six major themes: a) K-12/precollege educational experiences, b) motivation to complete a STEM degree, c) systems of social support, d) extracurricular activities and out-of-class experiences, e) addressing stereotyping and discrimination, and f) faculty behaviors and dispositions. All themes were intertwined at each phase of participants' academic careers, thereby, highlighting the complexity of this population's experience and what is needed to address their low STEM degree attainment. Findings indicated that this student population benefits from positive, sustained faculty-student interactions, holistic STEM success programming, and genuine networks of social support. Furthermore, Harper's framework can be modified to explore the motivation of African American STEM students as well as the African American student's relationship with disability support services.

  11. Drama is Served

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svømmekjær, Heidi Frank

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on how the theme of food is used for making social, gender, and other distinctions in the weekly Danish radio series The Hansen Family (The Danish Broadcasting Corporation, 1929-49) and in relation to other radio programmes from the 1930s and 1940s. These distinctions serve t...

  12. Predicting Volleyball Serve-Reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paulo, Ana; Zaal, Frank T J M; Fonseca, Sofia; Araujo, Duarte

    2016-01-01

    Serve and serve-reception performance have predicted success in volleyball. Given the impact of serve-reception on the game, we aimed at understanding what it is in the serve and receiver's actions that determines the selection of the type of pass used in serve-reception and its efficacy. Four

  13. Serving Bowl Selection Biases the Amount of Food Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kleef, Ellen; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Wansink, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how common serving bowls containing food for multiple persons influence serving behavior and consumption and whether they do so independently of satiation and food evaluation. Methods: In this between-subjects experiment, 68 participants were randomly assigned to either a group serving pasta from a large-sized bowl (6.9-L…

  14. ServAR: An augmented reality tool to guide the serving of food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollo, Megan E; Bucher, Tamara; Smith, Shamus P; Collins, Clare E

    2017-05-12

    Accurate estimation of food portion size is a difficult task. Visual cues are important mediators of portion size and therefore technology-based aids may assist consumers when serving and estimating food portions. The current study evaluated the usability and impact on estimation error of standard food servings of a novel augmented reality food serving aid, ServAR. Participants were randomised into one of three groups: 1) no information/aid (control); 2) verbal information on standard serving sizes; or 3) ServAR, an aid which overlayed virtual food servings over a plate using a tablet computer. Participants were asked to estimate the standard serving sizes of nine foods (broccoli, carrots, cauliflower, green beans, kidney beans, potato, pasta, rice, and sweetcorn) using validated food replicas. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests compared median served weights of each food to reference standard serving size weights. Percentage error was used to compare the estimation of serving size accuracy between the three groups. All participants also performed a usability test using the ServAR tool to guide the serving of one randomly selected food. Ninety adults (78.9% female; a mean (95%CI) age 25.8 (24.9-26.7) years; BMI 24.2 (23.2-25.2) kg/m 2 ) completed the study. The median servings were significantly different to the reference portions for five foods in the ServAR group, compared to eight foods in the information only group and seven foods for the control group. The cumulative proportion of total estimations per group within ±10%, ±25% and ±50% of the reference portion was greater for those using ServAR (30.7, 65.2 and 90.7%; respectively), compared to the information only group (19.6, 47.4 and 77.4%) and control group (10.0, 33.7 and 68.9%). Participants generally found the ServAR tool easy to use and agreed that it showed potential to support optimal portion size selection. However, some refinements to the ServAR tool are required to improve the user experience. Use of the

  15. Serving the world's poor, profitably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prahalad, C K; Hammond, Allen

    2002-09-01

    By stimulating commerce and development at the bottom of the economic pyramid, multi-nationals could radically improve the lives of billions of people and help create a more stable, less dangerous world. Achieving this goal does not require MNCs to spearhead global social-development initiatives for charitable purposes. They need only act in their own self-interest. How? The authors lay out the business case for entering the world's poorest markets. Fully 65% of the world's population earns less than $2,000 per year--that's 4 billion people. But despite the vastness of this market, it remains largely untapped. The reluctance to invest is easy to understand, but it is, by and large, based on outdated assumptions of the developing world. While individual incomes may be low, the aggregate buying power of poor communities is actually quite large, representing a substantial market in many countries for what some might consider luxury goods like satellite television and phone services. Prices, and margins, are often much higher in poor neighborhoods than in their middle-class counterparts. And new technologies are already steadily reducing the effects of corruption, illiteracy, inadequate infrastructure, and other such barriers. Because these markets are in the earliest stages of economic development, revenue growth for multi-nationals entering them can be extremely rapid. MNCs can also lower costs, not only through low-cost labor but by transferring operating efficiencies and innovations developed to serve their existing operations. Certainly, succeeding in such markets requires MNCs to think creatively. The biggest change, though, has to come from executives: Unless business leaders confront their own preconceptions--particularly about the value of high-volume, low-margin businesses--companies are unlikely to master the challenges or reap the rewards of these developing markets.

  16. NRPC ServCat priorities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of the Interior — This document lists the Natural Resource Program Center’s priority ServCat documents. It is recommended that these documents- which include annual narrative reports,...

  17. Food and drink serving contract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veselinović Janko

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Food and drink catering service is almost as old as the civilization itself. Even though this vocation is a part of the catering activity, Serbian law does not foresee this contract section as personalized. Key legal sources for this kind of contract are business customs. Food and drink serving contract is a mixed-type contract and its legal nature is very interesting due to its complexity. Specific for this contract is the fact that it is not an ordinary service, but also an activity which requires a degree of culinary skills, knowledge of customs of other nations, as well as other skills. The very category of a good professional in business economy / hospitality industry is very dynamic, as it needs to be evaluated according to all given circumstances, which may be rather unpredictable. By considering the legal nature, but also the rights and obligations of the contracting parties, we tried to point to the questions that require a special attention. Legal sources that indirectly refer to food and drink serving contracts were taken into account. Apart from the Law on Obligatory Relations, we also considered here the Law on Tourism also pointing to the comparative law and jurisprudence.

  18. Virtual Globes: Serving Science and Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Qureshi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Virtual Globes reached the mass market in 2005. They created multi-million dollar businesses in a very short time by providing novel ways to explore data geographically. We use the term “Virtual Globes” as the common denominator for technologies offering capabilities to annotate, edit and publish geographic information to a world-wide audience and to visualize information provided by the public and private sectors, as well as by citizens who volunteer new data. Unfortunately, but not surprising for a new trend or paradigm, overlapping terms such as “Virtual Globes”, “Digital Earth”, “Geospatial Web”, “Geoportal” or software specific terms are used heterogeneously. We analyze the terminologies and trends in scientific publications and ask whether these developments serve science and society. While usage can be answered quantitatively, the authors reason from the literature studied that these developments serve to educate the masses and may help to democratize geographic information by extending the producer base. We believe that we can contribute to a better distinction between software centered terms and the generic concept as such. The power of the visual, coupled with the potential of spatial analysis and modeling for public and private purposes raises new issues of reliability, standards, privacy and best practice. This is increasingly addressed in scientific literature but the required body of knowledge is still in its infancy.

  19. Preparation of Ready to Serve Grape Juice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mya Mya Than, Daw; Molly Ahad, Daw; Khin Khin Lay, Daw

    1997-10-01

    Studies were carried out at the Food Technology Research Department of Myanma Scientific and Technological Research Department to prepare ready to serve grape juice from ripe fruits of the red varieties of grapes. The sugar content of grapes varied from (10) to (14) % depending on the season. To get a maximum content of (16) % sugar in the juice, (2) to (6) % sugar was added. The yields of the seasonal grape juice varied from (62.5) to (72.2) % by weight. The tannin content was (0.36) % by volume in the fresh juice. It was decreased to (0.03) % by volume after the cold storage at (10)C for (10 to 15) days. The pH of the original fruit juice was (3.2). The best juice was obtain when the pH of the juice was(4.0). To obtain the higher yield of the juice, desirable bright colour and rapid clarification, (0.01) %. Pectinex enzyme was added. In this investigation grape juice was preserved with (0.1) % sodium benzoate. Storage studies, which also included microbiological aspects indicated that the pasteurized grape juice bottle can be stored at room temperature for minimum (6) months without any deterioration in quality

  20. Building the repositories to serve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lersch, D.

    1993-04-01

    The project to design and build the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory also includes the exciting opportunity to implement client/server information systems. Lab technologists were eager to take advantage of the cost savings inherent in the open systems and a distributed, client server environment and, at the same time, conscious of the need to provide secure repositories for sensitive data as well as a schedule sensitive acquisition strategy for mission critical software. During the first year of project activity, micro-based project management and business support systems were acquired and implemented to support a small study project of less than 400 people allocating contracts of less than $1 million. The transition to modern business systems capable of supporting more than 10,000 participants (world wide) who would be researching and developing the new technologies that would support the world's largest scientific instrument, a 42 Tevatron, superconducting, super collider became a mission critical event. This paper will present the SSC Laboratory's strategy to balance our commitment to open systems, structured query language (SQL) standards and our success with acquiring commercial off the shelf software (COTS) to support our immediate goals. Included will be an outline of the vital roles played by other labs (Livermore, CERN, Brookhaven, Fermi and others) and a discussion of future collaboration potentials to leverage the information activities of all Department of Energy (DOE) funded labs

  1. NASA Science Served Family Style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noel-Storr, Jacob; Mitchell, S.; Drobnes, E.

    2010-01-01

    Family oriented innovative programs extend the reach of many traditional out-of-school venues to involve the entire family in learning in comfortable and fun environments. Research shows that parental involvement is key to increasing student achievement outcomes, and family-oriented programs have a direct impact on student performance. Because families have the greatest influence on children's attitudes towards education and career choices, we have developed a Family Science program that provides families a venue where they can explore the importance of science and technology in our daily lives by engaging in learning activities that change their perception and understanding of science. NASA Family Science Night strives to change the way that students and their families participate in science, within the program and beyond. After three years of pilot implementation and assessment, our evaluation data shows that Family Science Night participants have positive change in their attitudes and involvement in science.  Even after a single session, families are more likely to engage in external science-related activities and are increasingly excited about science in their everyday lives.  As we enter our dissemination phase, NASA Family Science Night will be compiling and releasing initial evaluation results, and providing facilitator training and online support resources. Support for NASA Family Science Nights is provided in part through NASA ROSES grant NNH06ZDA001N.

  2. Building the repositories to serve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lersch, D.

    1994-01-01

    The project to design and build the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) Laboratory also includes the exciting opportunity to implement client/server information systems. Lab technologists were eager to take advantage of the cost savings inherent in the open systems and a distributed, client server environment and, at the same time, conscious of the need to provide secure repositories for sensitive data as well as a schedule sensitive acquisition strategy for mission critical software. During the first year of project activity, micro-based project management and business support systems were acquired and implemented to support a small study project of less than 400 people allocating contracts of less than $1 million. The transition to modern business systems capable of supporting more than 10,000 participants (world wide) who would be researching and developing the new technologies that would support the world's largest scientific instrument, a 42 Tevatron, superconducting, super collider became a mission critical event. This paper will present the SSC Laboratory's strategy to balance its commitment to open systems, structured query language (SQL) standards and its success with acquiring commercial off the shelf software to support immediate goals. Included will be an outline of the vital roles played by other labs (Livermore, CERN, Brookhaven, Fermi and others) and a discussion of future collaboration potentials to leverage the information activities of all Department of Energy funded labs

  3. Instructional technology: A tool or a panacea?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Howard; Deek, Fadi

    1996-03-01

    It is time to recognize that educational technology cannot be considered a panacea for educational reform. Technology, when properly used, can be a very effective tool for improving and enhancing instruction and learning experiences in the content areas. However, incorporation of electronic tools, such as computers and videodiscs, into classrooms must be accompanied by systemic change in the educational process. Successful utilization of technology depends on how we provide teachers with the necessary environment for training, tools for instruction, and technology evaluation skills. This paper examines some of the misuses of technology and then explores the appropriate use of technology in the context of current educational reform. The focus is on the integration of technology in the educational process that provides a learning environment allowing discovery and creativity through the use of computer visualizations. The teacher is seen as the essential element, requiring a solid foundation in the general applications of technology, and the ability to evaluate and select systems that are effective and efficient for specific applications.

  4. SERVING TIMES OF DISCONTINUOUS MATERIALS HANDLING MACHINES

    OpenAIRE

    PÉTER TELEK

    2014-01-01

    The performance of production systems highly depend on the effectiveness of the serving process, which consist of different materials handling operations depend on the applied machines. During the design process of serving systems there are key role of the characterisations of the handling equipment: they determine the applicability of the given machines. In my paper, I analyse the serving operations of discontinuous materials handling machines and define the time requirements of them. After ...

  5. Minority Serving Institutions Reporting System Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The database will be used to track SSA's contributions to Minority Serving Institutions such as Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU), Tribal Colleges...

  6. Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technology, on advances in such areas as aeronautics, electronics, physics, the space sciences, as well as computers and the attendant progress in medicine, robotics, and artificial intelligence. Describes educational resources for elementary and middle school students, including Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videotapes, books,…

  7. Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Jing

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The traditional answer card reading method using OMR (Optical Mark Reader, most commonly, OMR special card special use, less versatile, high cost, aiming at the existing problems proposed a method based on pattern recognition of the answer card identification method. Using the method based on Line Segment Detector to detect the tilt of the image, the existence of tilt image rotation correction, and eventually achieve positioning and detection of answers to the answer sheet .Pattern recognition technology for automatic reading, high accuracy, detect faster

  8. Depicted serving size: cereal packaging pictures exaggerate serving sizes and promote overserving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Aner; Niemann, Stina; Wansink, Brian

    2017-02-06

    Extensive work has focused on the effects of nutrition label information on consumer behavior on the one hand, and on the effects of packaging graphics on the other hand. However, little work has examined how serving suggestion depictions - graphics relating to serving size - influence the quantity consumers serve themselves. The current work examines the prevalence of exaggerated serving size depictions on product packaging (study 1) and its effects on food serving in the context of cereal (study 2). Study 1 was an observational field survey of cereal packaging. Study 2 was a mixed experimental cross-sectional design conducted at a U.S. university, with 51 student participants. Study 1 coded 158 US breakfast cereals and compared the serving sizes depicted on the front of the box with the suggested serving size stated on the nutrition facts panel. Study 2 measured the amount of cereal poured from exaggerated or accurate serving size depictions. Study 1 compared average servings via t-tests. Study 2 used a mixed model with cereal type as the repeated measure and a compound symmetry covariance matrix. Study 1 demonstrated that portion size depictions on the front of 158 cereal boxes were 65.84% larger (221 vs. 134 calories) than the recommended portions on nutrition facts panels of those cereals. Study 2 showed that boxes that depicted exaggerated serving sizes led people to pour 20% more cereal compared to pouring from modified boxes that depicted a single-size portion of cereal matching suggested serving size. This was 45% over the suggested serving size. Biases in depicted serving size depicted on cereal packaging are prevalent in the marketplace. Such biases may lead to overserving, which may consequently lead to overeating. Companies should depict the recommended serving sizes, or otherwise indicate that the depicted portion represents an exaggerated serving size.

  9. Depicted serving size: cereal packaging pictures exaggerate serving sizes and promote overserving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aner Tal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive work has focused on the effects of nutrition label information on consumer behavior on the one hand, and on the effects of packaging graphics on the other hand. However, little work has examined how serving suggestion depictions - graphics relating to serving size - influence the quantity consumers serve themselves. The current work examines the prevalence of exaggerated serving size depictions on product packaging (study 1 and its effects on food serving in the context of cereal (study 2. Methods Study 1 was an observational field survey of cereal packaging. Study 2 was a mixed experimental cross-sectional design conducted at a U.S. university, with 51 student participants. Study 1 coded 158 US breakfast cereals and compared the serving sizes depicted on the front of the box with the suggested serving size stated on the nutrition facts panel. Study 2 measured the amount of cereal poured from exaggerated or accurate serving size depictions. Study 1 compared average servings via t-tests. Study 2 used a mixed model with cereal type as the repeated measure and a compound symmetry covariance matrix. Results Study 1 demonstrated that portion size depictions on the front of 158 cereal boxes were 64.7% larger (221 vs. 134 calories than the recommended portions on nutrition facts panels of those cereals. Study 2 showed that boxes that depicted exaggerated serving sizes led people to pour 17.8% more cereal compared to pouring from modified boxes that depicted a single-size portion of cereal matching suggested serving size. This was 42% over the suggested serving size. Conclusions Biases in depicted serving size depicted on cereal packaging are prevalent in the marketplace. Such biases may lead to overserving, which may consequently lead to overeating. Companies should depict the recommended serving sizes, or otherwise indicate that the depicted portion represents an exaggerated serving size.

  10. A notational analysis of elite tennis serve and serve-return strategies on slow surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Eric; Leroy, David; Thouvarecq, Régis; Stein, Jean-François

    2009-03-01

    A notational analysis of singles events at the French Open Grand Slam tournament was undertaken in 2005 and 2006 to characterize the game patterns and strategies of serve and serve-return and to determine their influence on the point issue on a clay court surface. One hundred sixteen men's singles matches were video analyzed. The flat serve (57.6%), particularly down the "T" location (50.3%), allowed servers to win significantly more points than the topspin (24.1%) and slice serves (18.3%). When the topspin was the first serve strategy, servers kept a high percentage of points won from the serve (52.4%). This strategy was essentially used on the second serve (91.6%) by playing the "T" location in the deuce court and the wide zone in the advantage court. Returns to the central zone allowed receivers to win more points (73.3% on first serve and 65.9% on second serve) than plays to external locations. The results highlight the high impact of the first shots of all opponents on the rally. Even on clay, the slowest court surface, serves and serve-returns remain the strokes that most influence the match results in modern tennis games.

  11. Technology | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Frederick National Laboratory develops and applies advanced, next-generation technologies to solve basic and applied problems in the biomedical sciences, and serves as a national resource of shared high-tech facilities.

  12. Serving the Needs of the Latina Community for Health Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Yaros

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Latinos remain the largest US population with limited health literacy (Andrulis D.P. & Brach, 2007. Concerned with how local media can meet the information needs of underserved audiences, we interviewed Latinas who were pregnant or mothers of young children living in a Spanish speaking community, and surveyed 33 local health professionals. Findings are that Latina women’s most common source of health information was family and friends. They said they tune to Spanish television and radio programs, but gave low grades to news media for health information. Medical professionals agreed that Latinas generally get their health information through friends and family, and rated the media poorly in terms of serving Latinas’ needs. Since the data indicate that the local news media are not serving Latinas’ health information needs as much as they could, we offer recommendations to potentially exploit new technological affordances and suggest expansion of conventional definitions of health literacy.

  13. Serving the fuel cycle: preparing tomorrow's packagings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roland, V.

    2001-01-01

    The main fleet of transport packagings serving today the fuel cycle was born more than 20 years ago. Or was it they? The present paper will show that serving the fuel cycle by preparing tomorrow's logistics is actually an on-going process, rather than a rupture. We shall review the great packagings of the fuel cycle: In the front end, the major actors are the UF 4 , UF 6 , enriched UF 6 , UO 2 powders, fresh fuel packagings. In the back end of the fuel cycle, we find the dry transport casks of the TN-12, TN-17, TN-13, family and also the Excellox wet flasks. In the waste management, a whole fleet of containers, culminating in the TN Gemini, are available or being created. (author)

  14. Serving Diverse Knowledge Systems in Academia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F. Birdsall

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Libraries and academic disciplines are experiencing a major transformation to the digital era. A challenge for libraries is to adapt and coordinate their transformation with differing rates and types of changes in teaching, research, and scholarly communication among the disciplines they serve. This paper argues libraries need to acknowledge the diversity of knowledge systems and adopt a strategy that requires collaboration between libraries and multiple communities of knowing in the development and provision of heterogeneous services.

  15. Toss differences between the slice serve and the kick serve in tennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Carboch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pre-contact information of servers' motion is important for receiving players in tennis. Objective: The aim of this study is to examine whether serving players use the same ball toss for kick serve (KS and slice serve (SS at two different directions of serves, from the receiver's view. Methods: 10 male right-handed professional tennis players with an average ATP ranking of 533 were videotaped from the receiver's view using a high-speed video camera (200 Hz. Firstly, they served SS and then KS from deuce court. After reaching 3 successful SS and 3 KS to the correct location, the same procedure followed from the ad court. Kinematic analysis was used to obtain the point of ball release, vertical toss peak and racquet-ball contact. Results: Even though the release point was found nearly in the same location, the vertical toss peak of KS was horizontally to the right compared to SS and the point of racquet ball-contact of KS was even more to the right by approximately 30 cm from the receiver's view. Similar findings were obtained from deuce court and ad court. Conclusions: We found differences in the ball toss execution between KS and SS. The serve toss can provide useful information for receiving players. Serving players should use the same toss for each type of serve to hide their intention.

  16. Research brief : Serving Bowl Selection Biases the Amount of Food Served

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleef, van E.; Shimizu, M.; Wansink, B.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To determine how common serving bowls containing food for multiple persons influence serving behavior and consumption and whether they do so independently of satiation and food evaluation. Methods: In this between-subjects experiment, 68 participants were randomly assigned to either a

  17. Examination of neural systems sub-serving facebook "addiction".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turel, Ofir; He, Qinghua; Xue, Gui; Xiao, Lin; Bechara, Antoine

    2014-12-01

    Because addictive behaviors typically result from violated homeostasis of the impulsive (amygdala-striatal) and inhibitory (prefrontal cortex) brain systems, this study examined whether these systems sub-serve a specific case of technology-related addiction, namely Facebook "addiction." Using a go/no-go paradigm in functional MRI settings, the study examined how these brain systems in 20 Facebook users (M age = 20.3 yr., SD = 1.3, range = 18-23) who completed a Facebook addiction questionnaire, responded to Facebook and less potent (traffic sign) stimuli. The findings indicated that at least at the examined levels of addiction-like symptoms, technology-related "addictions" share some neural features with substance and gambling addictions, but more importantly they also differ from such addictions in their brain etiology and possibly pathogenesis, as related to abnormal functioning of the inhibitory-control brain system.

  18. Acquaintance molestation and youth-serving organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Kenneth V; Dietz, Park

    2014-10-01

    This article is based not only on the research literature but also on the extensive field experience of the authors in consulting with investigators, attorneys, and organizations on the prevention, investigation, prosecution, and civil litigation of molestation of children within or in connection with youth-serving organizations. Acquaintance molesters have often pursued careers or sought out paid or volunteer work with organizations through which they can meet children. To address the problem of such offenders, it is necessary for youth-serving organizations to recognize the diversity of sexual activity, the phenomena of "nice-guy" offenders and compliant child victims, and the grooming/seduction process, each of which is reviewed here. The four most important protection practices for organizations are screening; management, and supervision; response to suspicions, allegations, and complaints; and prevention and awareness programs. The authors recommend general approaches to each of these and describe the reasons many organizations resist implementing available preventive measures. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Serving to different locations: set-up, toss, and racket kinematics of the professional tennis serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Machar; Whiteside, David; Elliott, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    The serve, as the most important stroke in tennis, has attracted considerable biomechanical interest. Of its component parts, the swing has received disproportionate research attention and consequently, little is known regarding toss kinematics. Indeed, the age-old question of whether players serve to different parts of the court from the same toss remains unanswered. Six right-handed professionally ranked players hit first serves (FSs) and second serves (SSs) to three 2 x 1 m target areas reflecting the landing locations of T, body and wide serves, respectively, on the deuce court. A 22 camera, 250 Hz VICON MX motion analysis system captured racket, ball, foot, and h and kinematics. Repeated measures ANOVAs assessed within-player differences in foot, racket, and ball kinematics within the FS and SS as a function of landing location. The positions of the front foot, ball zenith, and ball impact were significantly different in the FS, while kinematics across all SS were consistent. Front foot position was closer to the centre mark in the T FS and players impacted the ball further left in the wide FS compared to the T FS. This study discusses the findings in the context of the development of the serve as well as potential implications for the return.

  20. Technology alliances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torgerson, D.F.; Boczar, P.G.; Kugler, G.

    1991-10-01

    In the field of nuclear technology, Canada and Korea developed a highly successful relationship that could serve as a model for other high-technology industries. This is particularly significant when one considers the complexity and technical depth required to design, build and operate a nuclear reactor. This paper will outline the overall framework for technology transfer and cooperation between Canada and Korea, and will focus on cooperation in nuclear R and D between the two countries

  1. Utilities' ''obligation to serve'' under deregulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    The utility no longer has protected status, and the traditional franchise concept is under attack. Exclusive rights once conveyed to the utilities are being denied and not just in the area of gas sales. Exclusive rights once conveyed to utilities will be denied in more areas. State by state, the utilities' franchise is being examined to see which, if any, of its provisions are necessary in a deregulated environment. Can the free market provide everything that's been provided for many years under monopolistic arrangements? Some of the most critical and difficult of these provisions concern the obligation to serve, which utilities, in most states, have assumed as part of their franchise agreement. Regulators, courts, utilities, marketers and others are busy sorting through these issues, but resolution could take years. The paper discusses deregulation, universal service fee, representation without taxation, suppliers and marketer restrictions

  2. Document recognition serving people with disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruchterman, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Document recognition advances have improved the lives of people with print disabilities, by providing accessible documents. This invited paper provides perspectives on the author's career progression from document recognition professional to social entrepreneur applying this technology to help people with disabilities. Starting with initial thoughts about optical character recognition in college, it continues with the creation of accurate omnifont character recognition that did not require training. It was difficult to make a reading machine for the blind in a commercial setting, which led to the creation of a nonprofit social enterprise to deliver these devices around the world. This network of people with disabilities scanning books drove the creation of Bookshare.org, an online library of scanned books. Looking forward, the needs for improved document recognition technology to further lower the barriers to reading are discussed. Document recognition professionals should be proud of the positive impact their work has had on some of society's most disadvantaged communities.

  3. Investigating Methods for Serving Visualizations of Vertical Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, J. T.; Cechini, M. F.; Lanjewar, K.; Rodriguez, J.; Boller, R. A.; Baynes, K.

    2017-12-01

    Several geospatial web servers, web service standards, and mapping clients exist for the visualization of two-dimensional raster and vector-based Earth science data products. However, data products with a vertical component (i.e., vertical profiles) do not have the same mature set of technologies and pose a greater technical challenge when it comes to visualizations. There are a variety of tools and proposed standards, but no obvious solution that can handle the variety of visualizations found with vertical profiles. An effort is being led by members of the NASA Global Imagery Browse Services (GIBS) team to gather a list of technologies relevant to existing vertical profile data products and user stories. The goal is to find a subset of technologies, standards, and tools that can be used to build publicly accessible web services that can handle the greatest number of use cases for the widest audience possible. This presentation will describe results of the investigation and offer directions for moving forward with building a system that is capable of effectively and efficiently serving visualizations of vertical profiles.

  4. Oxytocin promotes group-serving dishonesty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalvi, Shaul; De Dreu, Carsten K W

    2014-04-15

    To protect and promote the well-being of others, humans may bend the truth and behave unethically. Here we link such tendencies to oxytocin, a neuropeptide known to promote affiliation and cooperation with others. Using a simple coin-toss prediction task in which participants could dishonestly report their performance levels to benefit their group's outcome, we tested the prediction that oxytocin increases group-serving dishonesty. A double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment allowing individuals to lie privately and anonymously to benefit themselves and fellow group members showed that healthy males (n = 60) receiving intranasal oxytocin, rather than placebo, lied more to benefit their group, and did so faster, yet did not necessarily do so because they expected reciprocal dishonesty from fellow group members. Treatment effects emerged when lying had financial consequences and money could be gained; when losses were at stake, individuals in placebo and oxytocin conditions lied to similar degrees. In a control condition (n = 60) in which dishonesty only benefited participants themselves, but not fellow group members, oxytocin did not influence lying. Together, these findings fit a functional perspective on morality revealing dishonesty to be plastic and rooted in evolved neurobiological circuitries, and align with work showing that oxytocin shifts the decision-maker's focus from self to group interests. These findings highlight the role of bonding and cooperation in shaping dishonesty, providing insight into when and why collaboration turns into corruption.

  5. Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2013-01-01

    Researchers collect species occurrence data, records of an organism at a particular time in a particular place, as a primary or ancillary function of many biological field investigations. Presently, these data reside in numerous distributed systems and formats (including publications) and are consequently not being used to their full potential. As a step toward addressing this challenge, the Core Science Analytics and Synthesis (CSAS) program of the US Geological Survey (USGS) is developing Biodiversity Information Serving Our Nation (BISON), an integrated and permanent resource for biological occurrence data from the United States. BISON will leverage the accumulated human and infrastructural resources of the long-term USGS investment in research and information management and delivery. CSAS is also the U.S. Node of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF), an international, government-initiated and funded effort focused on making biodiversity data freely available for scientific research, conservation and sustainable development. CSAS, with its partners at Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), hosts a full mirror of the hundreds of millions of global records to which GBIF provides access. BISON has been initiated with the 110 million records GBIF makes available from the U.S. and is integrating millions more records from other sources each year.

  6. Serving Data to the GLAST Users Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The scientific community will access the public GLAST data through the website of the GLAST Science Support Center (GSSC). For most data products the GSSC website will link to the NASA High Energy Astrophysics Science Archive Research Center's (HEASARC) Browse interface, which will actually serve the data. For example, data from the GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) from a given burst will be packaged together and accessible through Browse. However, the photon and event data produced by the Large Area Telescope (LAT), GLAST's primary instrument, will be distributed through a custom GSSC interface. These data will be collected over the LAT's large field-of-view, usually while the LAT is scanning the sky, and thus photons from a particular direction cannot be attributed to a single 'observation' in the traditional sense. Users will request all photons detected from a region on the sky over a specified time and energy range. Through its website the GSSC will also provide long and short term science timelines, spacecraft position and attitude histories, exposure maps and other scientific data products. The different data products provided by the GSSC will be described

  7. A proposal: LEIR to serve biomedicine

    CERN Multimedia

    Antonella Del Rosso

    2012-01-01

    LEIR is the CERN facility that produces high-density ion beams for the LHC and for the SPS fixed target experiments. Since its operational schedule is not fully booked, LEIR could, in principle, be exploited even further. A brainstorming meeting recently took place at CERN to evaluate the possibility of modifying LEIR to serve the biomedical community. Discussions are in progress.   The Low Energy Ion Ring (LEIR). LEIR is a small synchrotron with a circumference of about 78 m. It currently receives particles from Linac 3 and prepares beams for the SPS and the LHC. “In order for LEIR to be able to provide ion beams with appropriate energies for studies of interest for biomedical applications, a new ejection system with new beam lines needs to be designed,” explains Christian Carli, from the Beams Department. “In addition, Linac 3 could be upgraded to include a second ion source and a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) optimized for ions of interest for bi...

  8. Effectively Serving AB 540 and Undocumented Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Person, Dawn; Gutierrez Keeton, Rebecca; Medina, Noemy; Gonzalez, Jacquelyn; Minero, Laura P.

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the experiences of undocumented students at a 4-year Hispanic Serving Institution. Barriers identified by these students included a lack of resources and minimal career opportunities after graduation. Faculty and staff perceived this historically underserved population as exhibiting high levels of optimism and…

  9. Offer versus Serve or Serve Only: Does Service Method Affect Elementary Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggans, Margaret Harbison; Lambert, Laurel; Chang, Yunhee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of the Offer versus Serve (OVS) provision in the National School Lunch Program would result in a significant difference in fruit and vegetable consumption by fourth and fifth grade elementary students, and in plate waste cost. Methods: Weighed and visual plate waste data…

  10. Preserving & Serving 150 years of KNMI data

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Vegte, J.; Som de Cerff, W. J.

    2012-04-01

    The Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) has over 150 years of knowledge and gathered information related to weather, Climate and Seismology. A huge part of this information is from numerical models, insitu sensor networks and remote sensing satellites. This digital collection is mostly internal only available and is a collection of non searchable , non standardized file formats, lacking documentation and has no references to scientific publications. With the Dutch funded KNMI Data Centre (KDC) project we aim to tackle al these issues. In the project a user driven development approach with SCRUM is chosen to get maximum user involvement in a relative short development timeframe. Building on open standards and proven opensource technology (which includes in-house developed software like ADAGUC WMS and Portal) should result in a solid first release in 2012-Q3. This presentation will focus on the aspects of developing the KDC relating to its technical challenges, the human factor and the development strategy to come to a future-proof centre that will preserve our data en make it usable for the community.

  11. Delivering Science, Mathematics and Vocational Coursework via Technology and Distance Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christine S.; Timpson, William M., Comps.

    1991-01-01

    Abstracts of 25 articles and documents provide examples of the delivery of science, math, and vocational education via such media as interactive television, communications satellites, videodiscs, and electronic mail. Studies of instructional effectiveness and design issues are also represented. (SK)

  12. 27 CFR 31.42 - Restaurants serving liquors with meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Restaurants serving... Part Certain Organizations, Agencies, and Persons § 31.42 Restaurants serving liquors with meals. Proprietors of restaurants and other persons who serve liquors with meals to paying customers, even if no...

  13. 28 CFR 522.14 - Inmates serving civil contempt commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inmates serving civil contempt... ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.14 Inmates serving civil contempt commitments. We treat inmates serving civil contempt commitments in...

  14. The economic performance of supply chain(s) served by the mega freight transport vehicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janic, M.

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with the economic performances of supply chain(s) served by different including the mega freight transport vehicles. These performances are considered as a dimension of the supply chain’s sustainability together with the infrastructural, technical/technological, operational,

  15. 75 FR 26947 - Office of Postsecondary Education: Overview Information: Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-13

    ... 503(b) was also amended to use the term ``distance education technologies'' in place of ``distance... Controlled Colleges and Universities Program; the Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-Serving Institutions... grant. Note 5: Applicants must provide, as an attachment to the application, the documentation that the...

  16. Development and Implementation of Targeted STEM Retention Strategies at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpi, Anthony; Ronan, Darcy M.; Falconer, Heather M.; Boyd, Heather H.; Lents, Nathan H.

    2013-01-01

    Retention rates of undergraduates at large urban universities serving minority populations have been problematic, especially among students in science and technology fields. John Jay College of Criminal Justice has designed a cohesive collegiate retention program according to the Tinto model of retention. This article details the strategies…

  17. Variations in serving sizes of Australian snack foods and confectionery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Wendy L; Kury, Alexandra; Wellard, Lyndal; Hughes, Clare; Dunford, Elizabeth; Chapman, Kathy

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the serving size and energy content per serving of Australian packaged snack foods and confectionery products. Nutrition Information Panel data for 23 sub-categories of packaged snack foods (n = 3481) were extracted from The George Institute for Global Health's 2013 branded food composition database. Variations in serving size and energy content per serving were examined. Energy contents per serving were compared to recommendations in the Australian Dietary Guidelines. Serving sizes varied within and between snack food categories. Mean energy content per serving varied from 320 kJ to 899 kJ. More energy per serving than the recommended 600 kJ was displayed by 22% (n = 539) of snack foods classified in the Australian Dietary Guidelines as discretionary foods. The recommendation for energy content per serving was exceeded in 60% (n = 635) of snack foods from the Five Food Groups. Only 37% (n = 377) of confectionery products displayed the industry-agreed serving size of 25 g. Energy content per serving of many packaged snack foods do not align with the Australian Dietary Guidelines and the industry agreed serving size has not been taken up widely within the confectionery category. Given the inconsistencies in serving sizes, featuring serving size in front-of-pack information may hinder the objective of a clear and simple nutrition message. Messaging to help consumers make healthier choices should consider the variation in serving sizes on packaged snack foods. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Self-Serving Bias or Simply Serving the Self? Evidence for a Dimensional Approach to Narcissism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamborski, Michael; Brown, Ryan P; Chowning, Karolyn

    2012-06-01

    Previous research has suggested that narcissism can be conceptualized as a multidimensional construct consisting of the related, but unique, dimensions of grandiosity and entitlement. The current studies examined the divergent associations of grandiosity and entitlement with respect to different types of self-serving strategies. In Study 1, we found that narcissistic grandiosity, but not entitlement, was positively associated with a self-enhancing strategy of unrealistic optimism. This association was not mediated by self-esteem. In Study 2, narcissistic entitlement, but not grandiosity, was predictive of unethical decision-making, an interpersonal self-promotional strategy that advances the self at the expense of others. Together, both studies support a model of narcissism consisting of a relatively intrapersonal dimension of grandiosity and a relatively interpersonal dimension of entitlement.

  19. Mass serving theory application to the analysis of maintenance system functioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljko Predrag Petrović

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes models and conditions for the application of the Mass Serving Theory in order to analyze relations between clients demanding the service and channels which provide the service as well as to design technological elements in the optimal regime for the given maintenance system. Based on the actual data collected and the statistical analysis of the expected intensity of combat vehicle arrivals and queuing at service for tehnical maintenance, the mathematical modeling of a real process of queuing was carried out and certain parameters quantified, in terms of determining the weaknesses of the existing models and the corrective actions needed. Introduction While solving many practical problems within the process of maintenance, the technological demands (TD for maintenance appear with the characteristics of stochasticity and stationarity. These properties provide the ability of the Mass Serving Theory (MST to be used, under certain conditions, for the dimensioning of technological elements (TE in the reporting maintenance system.The analysis of the mass serving system (MSS means the analysis of the input stream of clients, time and number of customers in a queue, time of serving and the output stream of clients as well. Mahtemathical models of the mass serving system applicable to maintenance processes There are many mathematical models developed in the MST to analyze the relationship between clients demanding the serving and channels that serve them. In the mathematical models of mass serving, the following parameters are commonly used as inputs: Input stream intensity,Serving intensity of the TE, Number of channels, i.e. TE; as outputs: Serving probability of TD,The average number of TD in a serving queue, and The average time of stay in the TD queue. In practice, during the system sizing, the number of channels is usually required, i.e. TE (n necessary to serve the TD, and in certain situations Input stream intensity and Serving

  20. The role of lower limbs during tennis serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossena, Filippo; Rossi, Carlo; LA Torre, Antonio; Bonato, Matteo

    2018-03-01

    Tennis serve is the most important shot in tennis. Lower limbs generate about 50% of the total force developed during the serve, but limited information is available about their role. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the role of lower limbs during first and second serve and its relationship between jump height and ball speed during tennis serve. Eight professional tennis players (age: 20±3 years; height 181±3 cm; height with racket: 283±5 cm; playing experience 13±3 years) were tested with counter movement jump (CMJ) and CMJ with free arm swing (CMJF). Moreover, jump height and serve speed during first and second serve were measured. No significant differences between the first and the second serve jump height were observed. Significant difference between the best CMJ and jump height during the first (37.29±4.94 vs. 12.42±3.28, P=0.0006; effect size [ES]: >2.0) and the second (37.29±4.94 vs. 13.04±2.46, P=0.0002; ES: >2.0) serve was noted. Significant difference between the best CMJF performance and the best jump height during the first (44.46±6.22 vs. 12.42±3.28, P=0.0006; ES: >2.0) and the second (44.46±5.82 vs. 13.04±2.46, P=0.0002; ES: >2.0) serves were detected. Slightly significant Spearman positive correlations between jump height and first (P=0.049; r=0.71) and second (P=0.047; r=0.71) serve speed was computed. Reaching higher impact point during tennis serve could allow to serve faster. On the other hand, because tennis serve is a complex coordinative movement of the entire kinetic chain, coaches should focus more coordinative skills of their athletes.

  1. Servant Leadership: How does NASA Serve the Interests of Humankind in Aerospace Exploration and the Role STEM Plays in it?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Felix A.

    2013-01-01

    This presentation provides a description of technology efforts illustrative of NASA Glenn Research Center Core competencies and which exemplifies how NASA serves the interest of humankind in aerospace exploration. Examples are provided as talking points to illustrate the role that career paths in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) plays in the aforementioned endeavor.

  2. 20 CFR 639.8 - How is the notice served?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is the notice served? 639.8 Section 639.8 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR WORKER ADJUSTMENT AND RETRAINING NOTIFICATION § 639.8 How is the notice served? Any reasonable method of delivery to the parties...

  3. The National Insurance Academy: Serving India's Insurance Professionals and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sane, Bhagyashree

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses how a special library can meet the needs of a specific industry. The author focuses on India's National Insurance Academy (NIA) Library, which serves the insurance industry of India and some neighboring countries. It is where the author serves as the chief librarian.

  4. Leader self-definition and leader self-serving behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rus, Diana; van Knippenberg, Daan; Wisse, Barbara

    The present research investigated the relationship between leader self-definition processes and leader self-serving behaviors. We hypothesized that self-definition as a leader interacts with social reference information (descriptive and injunctive) in predicting leader self-serving actions Six

  5. 40 CFR 791.34 - Serving of notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Serving of notice. 791.34 Section 791.34 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT... therewith may be served upon such party by mail addressed to such party or its attorney at its last known...

  6. 75 FR 32099 - Enterprise Duty To Serve Underserved Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-07

    ... 2590-AA27 Enterprise Duty To Serve Underserved Markets AGENCY: Federal Housing Finance Agency. ACTION... Recovery Act of 2008 (HERA) amended section 1335 of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and... Enterprises) to serve three specified underserved markets--manufactured housing, affordable housing...

  7. Applying Buddhist Practices to Advocacy: The Advocacy-Serving Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Jane; Klepper, Konja K.; Lambert, Serena; Nunez, Johnna; Williams, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Creating and retaining empathic connections with the most disenfranchised among us can take a toll on the wellness of counselor advocates. The Advocacy-Serving Model is introduced as a creative approach to strengthening the ability of advocates to serve through enhancing awareness, focusing actions, and connecting to community. The model…

  8. Portion and Serving Sizes of Commonly Consumed Foods

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    1992, provide a guiding tool for Americans to select appropriate portion sizes of foods from each food group for daily nutrient recommendations to be met. These serving sizes also serve as tools for use in controlling portion sizes as part of a weight loss and weight management programme, and as useful tools for dieticians ...

  9. On Their Own Terms: Two-Year Minority Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thai-Huy; Lundy-Wagner, Valerie; Castro Samayoa, Andrés; Gasman, Marybeth; Wilson, Audrey; Diggs, Desmond; Wolff, Melanie; Dávila, Carolina; Boland, William

    2015-01-01

    This report, published by the Center for Minority Serving Institutions in collaboration with CAPSEE, looks at the role of two-year Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) in improving postsecondary access and degree completion for disadvantaged students in the United States. In doing so, it aims to prepare the groundwork for research that considers…

  10. WHAT DO INNOVATIVE SCHOLS DO WITH TECHNOLOGY?: ICT SERVING THE SCHOOL AND THE COMMUNITY IN THE AMARA BERRI SCHOOL ¿QUÉ HACEN LAS ESCUELAS INNOVADORAS CON LA TECNOLOGÍA?: LAS TIC AL SERVICIO DE LA ESCUELA Y LA COMUNIDAD EN EL COLEGIO AMARA BERRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Correa Gorospe

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The use of digital technologies requires careful thinking that organizes and guides their integration into school activities. ICT (Information and Communication Technologies have a recognized potential but their actual impact has serious limitations. The analysis of good practices with ICT has been developed within the research project entitled “Analysis of educational policies regarding ICT in schools and their effects on pedagogical innovation in the Basque Country” and it has made us pay special attention to the use of digital technologies in the Colegio Amara Berri from San Sebastián, a school with a long and well-deserved reputation for innovation. We describe the activities in the department of Mass Media (Hedabideak, its different workshops and their organization, its tasks and projects, as well as the roles of teachers and students. Finally, we end up assessing the experience from a pedagogical point of view. La utilización de las tecnologías digitales exige una reflexión pedagógica que oriente y guíe su integración en las actividades escolares. Las TIC (Tecnologías de la Información y la Comunicación tienen reconocido todo su potencial pero son grandes también las limitaciones de su impacto. El análisis de buenas prácticas con TIC desarrollado dentro del proyecto de investigación titulado “Análisis de las políticas educativas de las TIC en los centros escolares y sus efectos sobre la innovación pedagógica en País Vasco”, nos ha llevado a observar con detenimiento la utilización de la tecnología digital en el Colegio Amara Berri de San Sebastián, un centro de reconocida tradición e influencia innovadora. Describimos las actividades del departamento de Medios de Comunicación (Hedabideak, los diferentes talleres y su organización, las tareas y proyectos que allí se realizan, así como los roles de maestros y alumnos. Por último, finalizamos valorando la experiencia desde un punto de vista pedagógico.

  11. Upper limb biomechanics during the volleyball serve and spike.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeser, Jonathan C; Fleisig, Glenn S; Bolt, Becky; Ruan, Mianfang

    2010-09-01

    The shoulder is the third-most commonly injured body part in volleyball, with the majority of shoulder problems resulting from chronic overuse. Significant kinetic differences exist among specific types of volleyball serves and spikes. Controlled laboratory study. Fourteen healthy female collegiate volleyball players performed 5 successful trials of 4 skills: 2 directional spikes, an off-speed roll shot, and the float serve. Volunteers who were competent in jump serves (n, 5) performed 5 trials of that skill. A 240-Hz 3-dimensional automatic digitizing system captured each trial. Multivariate analysis of variance and post hoc paired t tests were used to compare kinetic parameters for the shoulder and elbow across all the skills (except the jump serve). A similar statistical analysis was performed for upper extremity kinematics. Forces, torques, and angular velocities at the shoulder and elbow were lowest for the roll shot and second-lowest for the float serve. No differences were detected between the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Although there was an insufficient number of participants to statistically analyze the jump serve, the data for it appear similar to those of the cross-body and straight-ahead spikes. Shoulder abduction at the instant of ball contact was approximately 130° for all skills, which is substantially greater than that previously reported for female athletes performing tennis serves or baseball pitches. Because shoulder kinetics were greatest during spiking, the volleyball player with symptoms of shoulder overuse may wish to reduce the number of repetitions performed during practice. Limiting the number of jump serves may also reduce the athlete's risk of overuse-related shoulder dysfunction. Volleyball-specific overhead skills, such as the spike and serve, produce considerable upper extremity force and torque, which may contribute to the risk of shoulder injury.

  12. Mass serving theory application to the analysis of maintenance system functioning

    OpenAIRE

    Veljko Predrag Petrović; Veselin Lazar Mrdak; Branka Risto Luković

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes models and conditions for the application of the Mass Serving Theory in order to analyze relations between clients demanding the service and channels which provide the service as well as to design technological elements in the optimal regime for the given maintenance system. Based on the actual data collected and the statistical analysis of the expected intensity of combat vehicle arrivals and queuing at service for tehnical maintenance, the mathematical modeling of a rea...

  13. Environmental Finance Center Serving EPA's Region 8 States

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Rural Water Association, headquartered in Duncan Oklahoma, has been selected through a competitive grants process to establish a regional Environmental Finance Center (EFC) serving EPA Region 8 states.

  14. Consumer perceptions of fruit and vegetables serving sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, Christina M; Daly, Alison M; Binns, Colin W

    2009-05-01

    To assess consumer understanding of fruit and vegetable serving sizes. The Western Australian Health Department launched the Go for 2&5(R) campaign to promote fruit and vegetables in March 2002. The Health & Wellbeing Surveillance System surveyed 1108 adults, aged 16 years and over, between September and November 2002 about what constituted a serving of fruit and of vegetables, their usual daily fruit and vegetables intake, and their recall of the campaign. The study was undertaken as a part of a public health intervention - social marketing campaign in Western Australia, which had a population of 1 927 000 in 2002. Forty-two per cent of respondents knew that the fruit serving size was one piece and only 14.5 % reported the (1/2) cup vegetable serving size. The mean fruit intake was 1.8 (95 % CI 1.7, 1.8) servings/d and the mean vegetable intake was 2.8 (95 % CI 2.7, 3.0) servings/d. Vegetable intake was associated with being female (P = 0.006), increasing age (P < 0.0001), awareness of the campaign (P = 0.031) and knowledge of standard serving size (P = 0.006). Fruit consumption was associated with being female (P = 0.007). Fruit and vegetable intakes were not associated with educational attainment or household income. The Go for 2&5(R) campaign uses a prescriptive message to promote increased consumption of fruit and vegetables. Respondent's knowledge of the standard of serving sizes for fruit and vegetables suggests there is value in separating fruit and vegetable recommendations in messages to encourage increased consumption.

  15. Economic importance and growth rate of broiler chickens served ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weight gain were N307.13 and N87.50 /kg for the birds served 120 ml FPLE/litre of water compared to control (N208.17 and N96.52/kg), respectively. An average NP of N273.56 was made for the broiler chickens served 30-120 ml FPLE/l of water with reference to control (N208.17), which was a difference of N64.39 per bird.

  16. The Accounting Profession: Serving the Public Interest or Capital Interest?

    OpenAIRE

    Mary A Kaidonis

    2008-01-01

    As an integral facet of society, the accounting profession has a role in the State and thecorporate sector, and is also expected to serve the public interest. The capacity for theAustralian accounting profession to serve the public interest is considered in the context oflegislation and the accounting standard setting process. Specific reference is made to theCLERP Act 1999 and ASIC Act 2001. It is argued that the combined effect of these Acts is tolegislate bias so that accounting standards ...

  17. Accuracy of Diagnostic Mammography at Facilities Serving Vulnerable Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Walker, Rod; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Kerlikowske, Karla

    2011-01-01

    Background Breast cancer missed on diagnostic mammography may contribute to delayed diagnoses, while false-positive results may lead to unnecessary invasive procedures. Whether accuracy of diagnostic mammography at facilities serving vulnerable women differs from other facilities is unknown. Objective To compare the interpretive performance of diagnostic mammography at facilities serving vulnerable women to those serving non-vulnerable women. Design We examined 168,251 diagnostic mammograms performed at BCSC facilities from 1999–2005. We used hierarchical logistic regression to compare sensitivity, false positive rates, and cancer detection rates. Subjects Women ages 40–80 years undergoing diagnostic mammography to evaluate an abnormal screening mammogram or breast problem. Measures Facilities were assigned vulnerability indices according to the populations served based on the proportion of mammograms performed on women with lower educational attainment, racial/ethnic minority status, limited household income, or rural residences. Results Sensitivity of diagnostic mammography did not vary significantly across vulnerability indices adjusted for patient-level characteristics, but false-positive rates for diagnostic mammography examinations to evaluate a breast problem were higher at facilities serving vulnerable women defined as those with: lower educational attainment (odds ratio (OR) 1.39; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.08, 1.79); racial/ethnic minorities (OR 1.32; 95% CI 0.98, 1.76); limited income (OR 1.34; 95% CI 1.08, 1.66), and rural residence (OR 1.55; 95% CI 1.27, 1.88). Conclusions Diagnostic mammography to evaluate a breast problem at facilities serving vulnerable women has higher false positive rates than at facilities serving non-vulnerable women. This may reflect concerns that vulnerable populations may be less likely to follow-up after abnormal diagnostic mammography or concerns that such populations have higher cancer prevalence. PMID:20966780

  18. Influence of a Prolonged Tennis Match Play on Serve Biomechanics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Martin

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to quantify kinematic, kinetic and performance changes that occur in the serve throughout a prolonged tennis match play. Serves of eight male advanced tennis players were recorded with a motion capture system before, at mid-match, and after a 3-hour tennis match. Before and after each match, electromyographic data of 8 upper limb muscles obtained during isometric maximal voluntary contraction were compared to determine the presence of muscular fatigue. Vertical ground reaction forces, rating of perceived exertion, ball speed, and ball impact height were measured. Kinematic and upper limb kinetic variables were computed. The results show decrease in mean power frequency values for several upper limb muscles that is an indicator of local muscular fatigue. Decreases in serve ball speed, ball impact height, maximal angular velocities and an increase in rating of perceived exertion were also observed between the beginning and the end of the match. With fatigue, the majority of the upper limb joint kinetics decreases at the end of the match. No change in timing of maximal angular velocities was observed between the beginning and the end of the match. A prolonged tennis match play may induce fatigue in upper limb muscles, which decrease performance and cause changes in serve maximal angular velocities and joint kinetics. The consistency in timing of maximal angular velocities suggests that advanced tennis players are able to maintain the temporal pattern of their serve technique, in spite of the muscular fatigue development.

  19. Restaurant menus: calories, caloric density, and serving size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scourboutakos, Mary J; L'Abbé, Mary R

    2012-09-01

    The increasing trend toward eating out, rather than at home, along with concerns about the adverse nutritional profile of restaurant foods has prompted the introduction of calorie labeling. However, the calorie content in food from sit-down and fast-food restaurants has not been analyzed. The calorie content of restaurant foods was analyzed in order to better understand how factors that determine calorie content may potentially influence the effectiveness of calorie labeling. Nutritional information was collected from the websites of major (N=85) sit-down and fast-food restaurants across Canada in 2010. A total of 4178 side dishes, entrées, and individual items were analyzed in 2011. There was substantial variation in calories both within and across food categories. In all food categories, sit-down restaurants had higher calorie counts compared to fast-food restaurants (pcalories; however, serving size was more strongly correlated (r = 0.62) compared to caloric density (r = 0.29). On average, items that were higher in calories had a larger serving size compared to items that were lower in calories (pcalories per serving was seen when comparing various types of food, types of establishments, and the specific establishments that provided the foods. Compared to caloric density, serving size was shown to be a more important driver of calories per serving in restaurant foods. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Accounting Profession: Serving the Public Interest or Capital Interest?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary A Kaidonis

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available As an integral facet of society, the accounting profession has a role in the State and thecorporate sector, and is also expected to serve the public interest. The capacity for theAustralian accounting profession to serve the public interest is considered in the context oflegislation and the accounting standard setting process. Specific reference is made to theCLERP Act 1999 and ASIC Act 2001. It is argued that the combined effect of these Acts is tolegislate bias so that accounting standards privilege the specific needs of holders of capital,that is capital interest. The assumption that capital markets are surrogate for the publicinterest is contested. Accordingly, if the accounting profession follows national objectives tosupport capital markets, it may undermine its role in serving society.

  1. Uncapacitated facility location problem with self-serving demands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Monabbati

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In classical uncapacitated facility location problems (UFLP the goal is to satisfy requirements of some demand points by setting up some servers, among potential facility locations, such that the total cost including service costs and fixed costs are minimized. In this paper a generalization of UFLP is considered in which some demand points, called self-serving, could be served exclusively by a new server at that point. Numerical experiments show that near optimal solutions are achieved by the proposed method.

  2. Serving Those Who Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Labor unions provide job and training information to servicemen at separation centers and throughout the country. Through Project Transition, pre-apprenticeship training is given to servicemen who may be placed as apprentices after discharge. (MF)

  3. Serving the Society? Historical and Modern Interpretations of Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aamodt, Per Olaf; Hovdhaugen, Elisabeth; Bielfeldt, Uta

    2010-01-01

    One of the aims of the implementation of a two-tier degree system was that the new Bachelor's degree should serve two functions: as a basis for further studies (Master's level), and at the same time to qualify for the labour market. This twofold function may be present to a different degree in various countries, but was an explicit policy…

  4. Served versus actual nutrient intake of hospitalised patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To assess whether actual nutrient intake of hospitalised patients with tuberculosis differed from that served by the hospital and from that required according to current recommendations. Design: Descriptive, cross-sectional study. Setting: Brooklyn Chest Hospital in Brooklyn, Cape Town, Western Cape, South ...

  5. Serving online customers lessons for libraries from the business world

    CERN Document Server

    Barclay, Donald A

    2014-01-01

    To compete in the digital age, libraries must provide outstanding customer service to their virtual users. Serving Online Customers: Lessons for Libraries from the Business World is a practical guide to help libraries adopt and adapt the best practices of e-business for their own online operations.

  6. Portion and Serving Sizes of Commonly Consumed Foods, in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concept of portion size of foods consumed at a sitting and the serving sizes are important in efficient conduct of food consumption or dietary intake studies. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was adopted in Ibadan South-West and Ibadan North West local Government Areas of Oyo state and an ...

  7. Who Serves? The American All-Volunteer Force

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Lowther, Adam

    2012-01-01

    Who serves in the military? When the United States ended conscription and began to acquire its military personnel voluntarily, significant concerns were voiced. Would the military attract sufficient and appropriate personnel? Would the self-selected force reflect American society in terms...... force by the leadership of the Department of Defense....

  8. Intermediate obtained from photoionization, serving as precursor for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this article, we have introduced an intermediate benzyl carbocation (formed as a result of photoionization) which serves as precursor for the synthesis of Schiff's base. Lifetimes of many carbocations were determined from our laboratory. During the determination of the lifetimes, our endeavor was to obtain a carbocation ...

  9. Pedagogy for Equity: Teaching in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez, Anne-Marie; Ramalho, Elizabeth Murakami; Cuero, Kimberley K.

    2010-01-01

    Three female tenure-track faculty members at a Hispanic-Serving Institution explored how their cultural backgrounds inform their pedagogical approaches toward equity. They drew upon Mills's (1959) and Collins's (1993) frameworks to examine how their personal biographies, local social contexts, and broader systemic institutions affect their…

  10. Autonomy and Accountability in Schools Serving Disadvantaged Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Esther Dominique

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Increased school autonomy and accountability have been a common denominator of national reforms in otherwise heterogeneous governance systems in Europe and the USA. The paper argues that because schools serving disadvantaged communities (SSDCs) often have lower average performance, they are more often sanctioned or under closer scrutiny,…

  11. 7 CFR 1230.53 - Nominee's agreement to serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING... any relationship with the Council or a State association or any organization that has a contract with the Board and thereafter disclose, at any time while serving on the Board, any relationship with any...

  12. 7 CFR 1150.134 - Nominee's agreement to serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing... agreement to: (a) Serve on the Board if appointed; (b) Disclose any relationship with any organization that operates a qualified State or regional program or has a contractual relationship with the Board; and (c...

  13. Labor Market Returns for Graduates of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Toby J.; Flores, Stella M.; Ryan, Christopher J., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    Latinos have become the largest minority group in American postsecondary education, a majority of whom attend two- or four-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). However, little is known about labor market outcomes as result of attending these institutions. Using a unique student-level administrative database in Texas, and accounting for…

  14. 34 CFR 686.42 - Discharge of agreement to serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Discharge of agreement to serve. 686.42 Section 686.42 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE FOR COLLEGE AND HIGHER EDUCATION (TEACH...

  15. 34 CFR 686.12 - Agreement to serve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Agreement to serve. 686.12 Section 686.12 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION TEACHER EDUCATION ASSISTANCE FOR COLLEGE AND HIGHER EDUCATION (TEACH) GRANT PROGRAM...

  16. 77 FR 58299 - National Hispanic-Serving Institutions Week, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-19

    ... significant impact on our country's future. Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) have helped bring the dream... celebrate the critical role these colleges and universities play in American higher education. Across our... economic prosperity and foster American innovation for decades to come. Graduates of these institutions are...

  17. Serving the Public Interest in Several Ways: Theory and Empirics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J. Dur (Robert); M. van Lent (Max)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a model where people differ in their altruistic preferences and can serve the public interest in two ways: by making donations to charity and by taking a public service job and exerting effort on the job. Our theory predicts that people who are more altruistic are more likely

  18. Serving on Organizational Boards: What Nurses Need to Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stalter, Ann M; Arms, Deborah

    2016-02-26

    If you have ever thought about serving on a board or being actively involved in meetings aimed at making policy decisions, but are not sure you have the knowledge, skills or abilities to serve competently, this article is for you! In this article, the authors describe six competencies needed by nurses who are serving on boards and/or policy committees so as to contribute in a productive manner. These competencies include a professional commitment to serving on a governing board; knowledge about board types, bylaws, and job descriptions; an understanding of standard business protocols, board member roles, and voting processes; a willingness to use principles for managing and leading effective and efficient board meetings; an appreciation for the ethical and legal processes for conducting meetings; and the ability to employ strategies for maintaining control during intense/uncivil situations. They also discuss strategies for demonstrating these competencies and describe personal responsibilities of board members. The authors conclude that a knowledge of these rules and standards is essential in order for nurses to assume leadership roles that will enhance the health of today’s and tomorrow’s societies.

  19. Uncapacitated facility location problem with self-serving demands

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    satisfied by setting up a server there. We call these potential facility locations, demand- side. Note that a server established in a self-serving demand point, could only fulfill the requirements of this point. ...... methods of solving the uncapacitated plant location problem, Journal of Operations Management, 6(1), pp. 23–34.

  20. Guidelines for Serving Students with Special Health Care Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utah State Office of Education, Salt Lake City.

    This document provides guidance to parents, educators, and health care providers in serving Utah students with special health care needs. An introduction defines special health care needs, outlines legal responsibilities, and notes the importance of transagency collaboration. Guidelines are then offered for the identification and placement…

  1. Kinematic analysis of the wheelchair tennis serve: Implications for classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavedon, V; Zancanaro, C; Milanese, C

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the validity of the classification system used in Open-class wheelchair tennis by investigating the relationship between post-impact ball velocity in the serve (measured using a sports radar gun) and the severity of impairment. Shoulder and wrist angles at the instant of ball impact were also estimated from 2D motion analysis. Forty-three nationally ranked Italian Open-class wheelchair tennis players were assigned to four groups (A–D) according to descending level of activity limitation. Ten successful flat serves (WFSs) and 10 successful kick serves (WKSs) for each player were recorded. One-way ANOVA showed that the severity of impairment significantly (P value of post-impact ball velocity in WFS increased from group A to group D, i.e., with descending level of activity limitation. The results of this cross-sectional study indicate that the severity of impairment per se is associated with velocity of the wheelchair tennis serve, suggesting that the current classification is flawed in that it overlooks the impact of severity of impairment on players' performance.

  2. Competence in Serving Children: Credentials Protectionism and Public Policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koocher, Gerald P.

    Professional competency in psychologists wishing to treat children and families is an area of considerable concern and disagreement. Three types of practitioners comprise the bulk of the problem: clinical psychologists, who lack specific child-oriented training; developmental psychologists, who wish to serve children but lack traditional clinical…

  3. Building Capacity for Trauma Intervention across Child-Serving Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinitz, Susan; Stettler, Erin M.; Giammanco, Denise; Silverman, Marian; Briggs, Rahil D.; Loeb, Joanne

    2010-01-01

    Infants most vulnerable to trauma are often the least able to access interventions. Universal child-serving systems, such as primary pediatrics, early care and education, and the child welfare system, can offer a port of entry for millions of children annually for trauma-related supports and services. However, practitioners in these systems have…

  4. Educators as Serving Leaders in the Classroom and on Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Counterintuitively, the more one develops as a leader, the less of a leader one becomes. What do great leaders do? Great leaders are ambitious first and foremost for the cause, the mission, the work--not themselves. Educators as "serving leaders" sense that every action they take, together with every decision that they make, either…

  5. 16 CFR 500.26 - Representations of servings, uses, applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... net quantity (in terms of weight or mass, measure, or numerical count) of each such serving, use, or application: Provided, that such statement may be expressed in terms that differ from terms used in the... applications, if such amount is expressed in terms of standard units of weight or mass, measure, size, or count...

  6. Total Cost of Ownership and Cost-to-Serve

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachariassen, Frederik

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen reviewer den eksisterende litteratur vedrørende økonomistyringsværktøjerne Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) og Cost-to-Serve (CtS). Herefter kortlægges det, hvordan TCO og CtS bidrager til en identificering af direkte omkostninger såvel som indirekte omkostninger henholdsvis up-stream og down...

  7. Serving remote users in selected public university libraries in Kenya ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The provision of information services to support teaching, learning and research has long been a major objective of libraries in higher education. The students being served by these libraries, specifically in Kenya, may consist of on-campus and remote user groups. This study set out to explore the library section heads' ...

  8. Served versus actual nutrient intake of hospitalised patients with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nicky

    4 also illustrates that all male patients were consuming less than 67% of the beta- carotene and vitamin E recommended. For females, vitamin A, vitamin B12, vitamin C and vitamin K in both hospital food served and that consumed exceeded recommendations (Table III); beta- carotene, thiamin, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin B6, ...

  9. On the losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liger-Belair, Gérard; Bourget, Marielle; Villaume, Sandra; Jeandet, Philippe; Pron, Hervé; Polidori, Guillaume

    2010-08-11

    Pouring champagne into a glass is far from being consequenceless with regard to its dissolved CO(2) concentration. Measurements of losses of dissolved CO(2) during champagne serving were done from a bottled Champagne wine initially holding 11.4 +/- 0.1 g L(-1) of dissolved CO(2). Measurements were done at three champagne temperatures (i.e., 4, 12, and 18 degrees C) and for two different ways of serving (i.e., a champagne-like and a beer-like way of serving). The beer-like way of serving champagne was found to impact its concentration of dissolved CO(2) significantly less. Moreover, the higher the champagne temperature is, the higher its loss of dissolved CO(2) during the pouring process, which finally constitutes the first analytical proof that low temperatures prolong the drink's chill and helps it to retain its effervescence during the pouring process. The diffusion coefficient of CO(2) molecules in champagne and champagne viscosity (both strongly temperature-dependent) are suspected to be the two main parameters responsible for such differences. Besides, a recently developed dynamic-tracking technique using IR thermography was also used in order to visualize the cloud of gaseous CO(2) which flows down from champagne during the pouring process, thus visually confirming the strong influence of champagne temperature on its loss of dissolved CO(2).

  10. The New Millenium Program: Serving Earth and Space Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fuk K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has exciting plans for space science and Earth observations during the next decade. A broad range of advanced spacecraft and measurement technologies will be needed to support these plans within the existing budget and schedule constraints. Many of these technology needs are common to both NASA's Office of Earth Science (OES) and Office of Space Sciences (OSS). Even though some breakthrough technologies have been identified to address these needs, project managers have traditionally been reluctant to incorporate them into flight programs because their inherent development risk. To accelerate the infusion of new technologies into its OES and OSS missions, NASA established the New Millennium Program (NMP). This program analyzes the capability needs of these enterprises, identifies candidate technologies to address these needs, incorporates advanced technology suites into validation flights, validates them in the relevant space environment, and then proactively infuses the validated technologies into future missions to enhance their capabilities while reducing their life cycle cost. The NMP employs a cross-enterprise Science Working Group, the NASA Enterprise science and technology roadmaps to define the capabilities needed by future Earth and Space science missions. Additional input from the science community is gathered through open workshops and peer-reviewed NASA Research Announcement (NRAs) for advanced measurement concepts. Technology development inputs from the technology organizations within NASA, other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers (FFRDC's), U.S. industry, and academia are sought to identify breakthrough technologies that might address these needs. This approach significantly extends NASA's technology infrastructure. To complement other flight test programs that develop or validate of individual components, the NMP places its highest priority on system-level validations of technology suites in the relevant space

  11. How Can Marketing Academics Serve Marketing Practice? The New Marketing DNA as a Model for Marketing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, Paul; Hulbert, Bev

    2011-01-01

    This article seeks to address how marketing academics can best serve marketing practice through marketing education. It is contended that, where technology is driving marketing in practice, it is afforded significantly less attention in both theory and education. Thus, the marketing graduates being produced from universities are often lacking in…

  12. Green serves the dirtiest. On the interaction between black and green quotas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boehringer, Christoph [Oldenburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Economics; Rosendahl, Knut Einar [Statistics Norway Research Department, Oslo (Norway)

    2009-10-15

    Tradable black (CO2) and green (renewables) quotas gain in popularity and stringency within climate policies of many OECD countries. The overlapping regulation through both instruments, however, may have important adverse economic implications. Based on stylized theoretical analysis and substantiated with numerical model simulations for the German electricity market, we show that a green quota imposed on top of a black quota does not only induce substantial excess cost but serves the dirtiest power technologies as compared to a black quota regime only. (orig.)

  13. Strategic bidding for load serving entity in electricity markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlZahrani, Hashim A.

    The objective of this thesis is to study different options of load serving entities (LSEs) in electricity markets. Two models of pool-based electricity market have been studied. The difference between them is in the effect of transmission constraints. Transmission Constraints are neglected in the first model. Various bidding scenarios are presented in the first model to study the effect of retail, interruptible, and bidding prices on the profit of single LSE utilizing Monte Carlo simulation method. Genetic algorithm optimization tool is used to get the optimal bidding. In the second model, a new approach is presented to study the impact of transmission constraints (TCs) on the profit of LSE and its bidding strategy utilizing IEEE 30 bus system. Different pricing settlements then tested the effects of TCs to investigate the best pricing option. It has been shown that the first rejected bid settlement is the best selection for load serving entity.

  14. EMOTIONAL CONTAGION AND MOOD IN CROWD SERVING AS AUDIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beno Arnejcic

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The global world is gradually becoming a world of separated crowds despite the artificial wire and wireless connection through television and the Internet. Crowds remain a prevailing subject of research in different social studies, and the research of changes in the psychological structure of crowds and their characteristics is still of primary interest. The main focus of the research is on the interpretation of the results of the research paper about a special separated crowd called audience. It was observed how students, constituting the crowd, perceive a crowd on video. The observation was focused on the research of emotional contagion and mood in the crowd serving as audience. While watching a mass event on a big screen, the crowd serving as audience emotionally converges with someone else, in our case with public speakers.

  15. Do Cooperative Banks Really Serve Agricultural Sector in Poland?

    OpenAIRE

    Zawojska, Aldona; Siudek, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to assess the potential of cooperative banks for serving agricultural sector in Poland and to identify the areas with the most development potential. We discuss the transformation process in the cooperative banking system under market economy, and in particular investigate importance of cooperative banks for farms' financing on the basis of our survey of banks. Moreover, the role of cooperative banks in transmission of Government policy supporting farm sector in Poland...

  16. Calculating the optimum temperature for serving hot beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Fredericka; Diller, Kenneth R

    2008-08-01

    Hot beverages such as tea, hot chocolate, and coffee are frequently served at temperatures between 160 degrees F (71.1 degrees C) and 185 degrees F (85 degrees C). Brief exposures to liquids in this temperature range can cause significant scald burns. However, hot beverages must be served at a temperature that is high enough to provide a satisfactory sensation to the consumer. This paper presents an analysis to quantify hot beverage temperatures that balance limiting the potential scald burn hazard and maintaining an acceptable perception of adequate product warmth. A figure of merit that can be optimized is defined that quantifies and combines both the above effects as a function of the beverage temperature. An established mathematical model for simulating burns as a function of applied surface temperature and time of exposure is used to quantify the extent of thermal injury. Recent data from the literature defines the consumer preferred drinking temperature of coffee. A metric accommodates the thermal effects of both scald hazard and product taste to identify an optimal recommended serving temperature. The burn model shows the standard exponential dependence of injury level on temperature. The preferred drinking temperature of coffee is specified in the literature as 140+/-15 degrees F (60+/-8.3 degrees C) for a population of 300 subjects. A linear (with respect to temperature) figure of merit merged the two effects to identify an optimal drinking temperature of approximately 136 degrees F (57.8 degrees C). The analysis points to a reduction in the presently recommended serving temperature of coffee to achieve the combined result of reducing the scald burn hazard and improving customer satisfaction.

  17. ServPPIN: a review of scientific findings

    OpenAIRE

    Rubalcaba, Luis; Di Meglio, Gisela; Gallouj, Faïz; Pyka, Andreas; Windrum, Paul; Green, Lawrence; Sundbo, Jon; Weber, Matthias; Dachs, Bernhard

    2011-01-01

    ServPPIN is a research project which focuses on the role of public and private services on growth and welfare and the particular role of public-private innovation networks (PPIN). Public-private innovation networks are considered to be an organisational platform in which public and private services can perform complementarities and synergies in many ways. The project analyses public and private services, and their impact on growth and welfare. In particular it focuses on service innovation an...

  18. Upper extremity kinematics of flat serve in tennis | Bingul | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of the present study was to examine of the effects of upper body kinematics on the ball velocity at the impact phase of a tennis flat serve. 15 elite male tennis players were recruited to participate in this study (mean age 18.4±3.3 years, mean height 182.3±5.6cm, mean weight 72.2±7.9kg), of which five were from ...

  19. Operating a production pilot factory serving several scientific domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sfiligoi, I; Würthwein, F; Andrews, W; Dost, J M; MacNeill, I; McCrea, A; Sheripon, E; Murphy, C W

    2011-01-01

    Pilot infrastructures are becoming prominent players in the Grid environment. One of the major advantages is represented by the reduced effort required by the user communities (also known as Virtual Organizations or VOs) due to the outsourcing of the Grid interfacing services, i.e. the pilot factory, to Grid experts. One such pilot factory, based on the glideinWMS pilot infrastructure, is being operated by the Open Science Grid at University of California San Diego (UCSD). This pilot factory is serving multiple VOs from several scientific domains. Currently the three major clients are the analysis operations of the HEP experiment CMS, the community VO HCC, which serves mostly math, biology and computer science users, and the structural biology VO NEBioGrid. The UCSD glidein factory allows the served VOs to use Grid resources distributed over 150 sites in North and South America, in Europe, and in Asia. This paper presents the steps taken to create a production quality pilot factory, together with the challenges encountered along the road.

  20. Adaptive servoventilation in clinical practice: beyond SERVE-HF?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winfried Randerath

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive servoventilation (ASV has proven effective at suppressing breathing disturbances during sleep, improving quality of life and cardiac surrogate parameters. Since the publication of the SERVE-HF-trial, ASV became restricted. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical relevance of the SERVE-HF inclusion criteria in real life and estimate the portion of patients with these criteria with or without risk factors who are undergoing ASV treatment. We performed a retrospective study of all patients who were treated with ASV in a university-affiliated sleep laboratory. We reviewed the history of cardiovascular diseases, echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF and polysomnography. From 1998 to 2015, 293 patients received ASV, of which 255 (87.0% had cardiovascular diseases and 118 (40.3% had HF. Among those with HF, the LVEF was ≤45% in 47 patients (16.0%. Only 12 patients (4.1% had LVEF <30%. The SERVE-HF inclusion criteria were present in 28 (9.6% ASV recipients. Of these patients, 3 died within 30–58 months of therapy, all with systolic HF and a LVEF <30%. In this study, only a small minority of ASV patients fell in the risk group. The number of fatalities did not exceed the expected mortality in optimally treated systolic HF patients.

  1. Health technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicolas, Delphine; Dangleant, Caroline; Ganier, Aude; Kaczmarek, Delphine

    2008-01-01

    The CEA is an organization with a primarily technological focus, and one of the key areas in which it carries out research is Health Technology. This field of research was recognized and approved by the French Atomic Energy Committee on July 20, 2004. The expectations of both the public and health care professionals relate to demands for the highest standards of health care, at minimum risk. This implies a need to diagnose illness and disease as accurately and as at early a stage as possible, to target surgery precisely to deal only with damaged organs or tissues, to minimize the risk of side effects, allergies and hospital-acquired infections, to follow-up and, as far as possible, tailor the health delivery system to each individual's needs and his or her lifestyle. The health care sector is subject to rapid changes and embraces a vast range of scientific fields. It now requires technological developments that will serve to gather increasing quantities of useful information, analyze and integrate it to obtain a full understanding of highly complex processes and to be able to treat the human body as un-invasively as possible. All the technologies developed require assessment, especially in the hospital environment. (authors)

  2. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Nanette R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this summer's work was to attempt to enhance Technology Application Group (TAG) ability to measure the outcomes of its efforts to transfer NASA technology. By reviewing existing literature, by explaining the economic principles involved in evaluating the economic impact of technology transfer, and by investigating the LaRC processes our William & Mary team has been able to lead this important discussion. In reviewing the existing literature, we identified many of the metrics that are currently being used in the area of technology transfer. Learning about the LaRC technology transfer processes and the metrics currently used to track the transfer process enabled us to compare other R&D facilities to LaRC. We discuss and diagram impacts of technology transfer in the short run and the long run. Significantly, it serves as the basis for analysis and provides guidance in thinking about what the measurement objectives ought to be. By focusing on the SBIR Program, valuable information regarding the strengths and weaknesses of this LaRC program are to be gained. A survey was developed to ask probing questions regarding SBIR contractors' experience with the program. Specifically we are interested in finding out whether the SBIR Program is accomplishing its mission, if the SBIR companies are providing the needed innovations specified by NASA and to what extent those innovations have led to commercial success. We also developed a survey to ask COTR's, who are NASA employees acting as technical advisors to the SBIR contractors, the same type of questions, evaluating the successes and problems with the SBIR Program as they see it. This survey was developed to be implemented interactively on computer. It is our hope that the statistical and econometric studies that can be done on the data collected from all of these sources will provide insight regarding the direction to take in developing systematic evaluations of programs like the SBIR Program so that they can

  3. Minions: Empathetic Lessons From Small Yellow Creatures Serving the Despicable

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjerning, Halfdan; Vilsgaard, Dorte

    2015-01-01

    Reviews the film Minions (2015) directed by Kyle Balda and Pierre Coffin (2015). Minions are fictional computer-animated yellow pill-shaped creatures who speak their own language. They live to serve the most despicable master they can find. The film tells the evolutionary story of the minions and......, their facial expressions, their display of character strengths, and their need for a purpose in life, we identify reasons why we are able to understand the minions as we understand ourselves. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved)...

  4. Guidelines for public health practitioners serving as student preceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Karen A; Rainey Dye, Cheryl; Sherrill, Windsor Westbrook; Mayo, Rachel M

    2004-04-01

    Student fieldwork and service learning are valuable strategies for developing the skills of future public health professionals. Practitioners who serve as preceptors to students often receive little preparation for guiding and evaluating students. Findings from a review of fieldwork and service learning literature and a program evaluation of an undergraduate public health program at a large southern public university were used to construct guidelines for the practitioners supervising students in the field. These guidelines should aid practitioners in their role as preceptors of public health students. The guidelines address assessing student competencies, developing student competencies, writing learning objectives, evaluating students, maximizing the student precept or relationship, and managing problems.

  5. Palama Settlement: 100 years of serving a neighborhood's needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rath, P

    1995-11-01

    The founding of Palama Settlement brought to those who might not be able to afford it public health nurses for maternal care and nutrition, well-baby clinics, tuberculosis clinics, medical and dental clinics, and eventually major support of medical needs during and after the attack on Pearl Harbor. Palama Settlement celebrates its centennial year with many of its early functions assumed by state and private organizations, but it is prepared to enter the next 100 years of service to the community. Palama was founded by James Arthur Rath with the purpose of serving the community; many people today remember their childhood and Palama Settlement.

  6. Civilian social work: serving the military and veteran populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savitsky, Laura; Illingworth, Maria; DuLaney, Megan

    2009-10-01

    This article discusses social work practice areas for civilian social workers who provide services to military service members,veterans, and their families. These practice areas include education, child welfare, domestic violence, mental health, health care, substance abuse, and criminal justice. The authors examine the impact of the contemporary military lifestyle and current military operations on service members and their families in the context of these practice areas, with the goal of compelling civilian social workers to acknowledge their responsibility to competently serve military and veteran clients.

  7. Radiological analysis of lunch served at PINSTECH cafeteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, E.U.; Mubarak, M.A.; Faruq, M.U.; Aziz, A.; Perveen, N.; Orfi, S.D.

    1986-06-01

    Radiometric analysis of lunch served at PINSTECH cafeteria was carried out during the period from 1976 to 1984 by NaI (TI) scintillation detector, high resolution Ge(Li) detector gamma spectrometry system and low level beta counter. K-40 and Sr-90 were the most prominent radionuclides normally detected in all the lunch samples. Other radionuclides were below the measurement limits of our counting set up. Assuming 5 days a week and 50 weeks a year it can be safely stated that intake of K-40 and Sr-90 through LUNCH taken at PINSTECH cafeteria remains well below respective ALI's of these radionuclides. (author)

  8. Client/Server data serving for high performance computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Chris

    1994-01-01

    This paper will attempt to examine the industry requirements for shared network data storage and sustained high speed (10's to 100's to thousands of megabytes per second) network data serving via the NFS and FTP protocol suite. It will discuss the current structural and architectural impediments to achieving these sorts of data rates cost effectively today on many general purpose servers and will describe and architecture and resulting product family that addresses these problems. The sustained performance levels that were achieved in the lab will be shown as well as a discussion of early customer experiences utilizing both the HIPPI-IP and ATM OC3-IP network interfaces.

  9. Technologies for Cleaning Up Contaminated Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    This site provides information on characterization, monitoring, and remediation technologies as well as serves a forum for the hazardous waste remediation community through several technology information transfer initiatives and partnerships.

  10. How youth-serving organizations enable acquaintance molesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Patrick

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, some of the country's most prominent institutions have been ensnared in child sex abuse scandals. While each abuse incident features its own particular circumstances, institutions that have been the subject of these scandals have displayed similar patterns of organizational behavior that allowed molesting to occur and molesters to escape accountability. We can learn from those patterns to better understand and combat acquaintance molestation in youth-serving organizations. Although sex abuse is an inherent risk in youth work, American youth-serving organizations have responded to this risk largely on a case-by-case basis after abuse incidents have been revealed, rather than through proactive strategies to reduce the risk of abuse and to respond effectively to allegations. An examination of abuse scandals reveals common patterns of behavior among paid and volunteer staff in organizations that did not enact comprehensive, proactive strategies: Faith in the organiation blinded staff to the liklihood of abuse; organizations kept workers ignorant about the extent of the abuse problem; when abuse accusations arose, staff gave the benefit of the doubt to the adult; when abuse accusations were confirmed, staffers did not know how to respond; and not knowing how to resopnd, staff prioritized the protection of the organization. As a result, child molesters have been falsely exonerated or not held accountable, abused children have been disbelieved, and abuse has continued. These organizations inadvertently achieved the opposite of their missions: They enabled child molesters at the expense of children. © The Author(s) 2014.

  11. Renewable energy for federal facilities serving native Americans: preprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eiffert, P.; Sprunt Crawley, A.; Bartow, K.

    2000-01-01

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is targeting Federal facilities serving Native American populations for cost-effective renewable energy projects. These projects not only save energy and money, they also provide economic opportunities for the Native Americans who assist in producing, installing, operating, or maintaining the renewable energy systems obtained for the facilities. The systems include solar heating, solar electric (photovoltaic or PV), wind, biomass, and geothermal energy systems. In fiscal years 1998 and 1999, FEMP co-funded seven such projects, working with the Indian Health Service in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Bureau of Indian Affairs in the U.S. Department of the Interior, and their project partners. The new renewable energy systems are helping to save money that would otherwise be spent on conventional energy and reduce the greenhouse gases associated with burning fossil fuels

  12. Forestry serving urban societies in the north atlantic region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for the needs for urban societies, sound planning, design and management are required. An international conference was organised in Iceland in September 2009 in order to bring together researchers and practitioners from the region. The conference was part of the Icelandic chairmanship of the Nordic Council...... of Ministers and was organised in collaboration with the Nordic-Baltic Centre of Advanced Research on Forestry Serving Urbanised Societies (CARe-FOR-US), the European Forest Network, Icelandic Forest Research and the Icelandic Forestry Association. Over 120 delegates represented researchers, planners...... and managers of forests and other green areas, policy makers and students. This issue of TemaNord presents a selection of papers presented at the conference, covering topics such as planning for environmental services, urban forest strategies, public involvement, and urban woodland management....

  13. Unanswered prayers: religiosity and the god-serving bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggio, Heidi R; Uhalt, Joshua; Matthies, Brigitte K

    2014-01-01

    Two self-report experiments examined how religiosity affects attributions made for a target person's death. Online adults (Study 1, N = 427) and undergraduate students (Study 2, N = 326) read about Chris who had a heart attack, used religious or health behaviors, and lived or died. Participants made attributions to Chris and God (both studies), and reported their emotions (Study 2). Participants made more attributions to Chris when he lived than when he died, but only when he used health behaviors. The highly religious made more attributions to God, but not when Chris used religious behaviors and died (the God-serving bias); they reported the most positive emotions when Chris lived after using religious behaviors (the Hallelujah effect). Directions for future research in terms of implicit religious beliefs and normative evaluations of religion are discussed.

  14. Can gene fusions serve for fingerprints of radiogenic cancers?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Nori

    2016-01-01

    It has been recognized that malignancies in blood cells often bear specific chromosome translocations or gene fusions. In recent years, the presence of fusion genes became to be known also among solid cancers as driver mutations. However, representative solid cancers bearing specific gene fusions are limited to cancers of thyroid, prostate, and sarcomas among which only thyroid cancer risk is known to be related to radiation exposures. On the other hand, it is extremely rare to find recurrent reciprocal translocations among common cancers such as in the lung, stomach, breast, and colon, which form a major component of radiation risks. It is therefore unlikely that radiation increases the risk of cancer by inducing specific translocations (gene fusions) but more likely through induction of mutations (including deletions). Although gene fusions could play a role in radiation carcinogenesis, it does not seem good enough to serve for a radiation fingerprint. (author)

  15. Psychiatric disorder in women serving a prison sentence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maden, T; Swinton, M; Gunn, J

    1994-01-01

    The paper describes a case-note and interview study of a cross-sectional sample comprising 25% of all women serving a prison sentence in England and Wales. A 5% sample of the male sentenced prison population was used for comparison. Diagnoses were assigned on clinical grounds and an assessment was made of the treatment needs of all 'cases'. The prevalence of psychosis, around 2%, was similar in the two groups but women had higher rates of mental handicap (6% v. 2%), personality disorder (18% v. 10%), neurosis (18% v. 10%) and substance abuse (26% v. 12%). There is a need for closer links between the NHS and prison health services. Women's prisons lack a therapeutic community of the Grendon type, which may be of benefit to a substantial minority of inmates.

  16. One million served: Rhode Island`s recycling facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malloy, M.G.

    1997-11-01

    Rhode Island`s landfill and adjacent materials recovery facility (MRF) in Johnston, both owned by the quasi-public Rhode Island Resource Recovery Corp. (RIRRC, Johnston), serve the entire state. The $12-million recycling facility was built in 1989 next to the state`s sole landfill, the Central Landfill, which accepts only in-state trash. The MRF is operated for RIRRC by New England CRInc. (Hampton, N.H.), a unit of Waste Management, Inc. (WMI, Oak Brook, Ill.). It handles a wide variety of materials, from the usual newspaper, cardboard, and mixed containers to new streams such as wood waste, scrap metal, aseptic packaging (milk and juice boxes), and even textiles. State municipalities are in the process of adding many of these new recyclable streams into their curbside collection programs, all of which feed the facility.

  17. Study finds Chapel Hill, NC, soup kitchen serves nutritious meals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppich, Simone; Fernandez, Claudia Plaisted

    2004-08-01

    Soup kitchens attempt to improve the food security of low-income individuals, but the results of their efforts are rarely researched. We focused our study on the Inter-Faith Council Soup Kitchen (IFC) near the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill (UNC) in Chapel Hill, NC. The IFC uses no centralized nutrition planning and relies heavily on volunteer cooks, yet we found their meals to be highly nutrient-dense when averaged over a 1-month time frame and compared with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) and the Daily Reference Values (DRVs). In fact, the only nutrients needing improvement were vitamin D, folate, and calcium. The number of servings per meal was also substantially more than one third of the US Department of Agriculture Food Guide Pyramid recommendations, except for dairy at all meals, vegetables at breakfast, and fruit at dinner.

  18. Serve, Teach, and Lead: It’s All about Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Crippen, PhD

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Once a person assumes the mantle of teacher, one becomes a leader, first, in the classroom and then in the school (Crippen, 2005. With this position comes a delicate power and responsibility to the moral imperative. As such, this issue is critical as a component of teacher preparation programs. Goodlad (2004 sounds the alarm that our teacher preparation programs are remiss in responding to the need for moral literacy in our schools. The following paper will introduce the philosophy of servant-leadership, a moral way of serving, as defined by Robert K. Greenleaf (1970/1991 and will respond to Goodlad’s call with possibilities for preservice teachers that help them examine and define their role in contributing to the common good through servant-leadership.

  19. Missouri river navigation : data on commodity shipments for four states served by the Missouri river and two states served by both the Missouri and Mississippi rivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-15

    GAO determined: (1) the annual and total tonnage of commodity shipments for each state served by the Missouri River, and (2) the comparable tonnage of commodity shipments transported on the Mississippi River for states served by both the Missouri and...

  20. Science Serving the Nation: The Impact of Basic Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2012-01-01

    Impacts: The BES program supports basic research that underpins a broad range of energy technologies. Research in materials sciences and engineering leads to the development of materials that improve the efficiency, economy, environmental acceptability, and safety of energy generation, conversion, transmission, storage, and use. For example, advances in superconductivity have been introduced commercially in a number of demonstration projects around the country. Improvements in alloy design for high temperature applications are used in commercial furnaces and in green technologies such as lead-free solder. Research in chemistry has led to advances such as efficient combustion systems with reduced emissions of pollutants; new solar photoconversion processes; improved catalysts for the production of fuels and chemicals; and better separations and analytical methods for applications in energy processes, environmental remediation, and waste management. Research in geosciences results in advanced monitoring and measurement techniques for reservoir definition and an understanding of the fluid dynamics of complex fluids through porous and fractured subsurface rock. Research in the molecular and biochemical nature of photosynthesis aids the development of solar photo-energy conversion. The BES program also plays a major role in enabling the nanoscale revolution. The importance of nanoscience to future energy technologies is clearly reflected by the fact that all of the elementary steps of energy conversion (e.g., charge transfer, molecular rearrangement, and chemical reactions) take place on the nanoscale. The development of new nanoscale materials, as well as the methods to characterize, manipulate, and assemble them, create an entirely new paradigm for developing new and revolutionary energy technologies.

  1. Serving Culturally Diverse E-Learners in Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Bunt-Kokhuis, Sylvia; Weir, David

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight how future teaching in business schools will probably take place in an online (here called 24/7) classroom, where culturally diverse e-learners around the globe meet. Technologies such as iPhone, iPad and a variety of social media, to mention but a few, give management learners of any age easy…

  2. ArcGIS Framework for Scientific Data Analysis and Serving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Ju, W.; Zhang, J.

    2015-12-01

    ArcGIS is a platform for managing, visualizing, analyzing, and serving geospatial data. Scientific data as part of the geospatial data features multiple dimensions (X, Y, time, and depth) and large volume. Multidimensional mosaic dataset (MDMD), a newly enhanced data model in ArcGIS, models the multidimensional gridded data (e.g. raster or image) as a hypercube and enables ArcGIS's capabilities to handle the large volume and near-real time scientific data. Built on top of geodatabase, the MDMD stores the dimension values and the variables (2D arrays) in a geodatabase table which allows accessing a slice or slices of the hypercube through a simple query and supports animating changes along time or vertical dimension using ArcGIS desktop or web clients. Through raster types, MDMD can manage not only netCDF, GRIB, and HDF formats but also many other formats or satellite data. It is scalable and can handle large data volume. The parallel geo-processing engine makes the data ingestion fast and easily. Raster function, definition of a raster processing algorithm, is a very important component in ArcGIS platform for on-demand raster processing and analysis. The scientific data analytics is achieved through the MDMD and raster function templates which perform on-demand scientific computation with variables ingested in the MDMD. For example, aggregating monthly average from daily data; computing total rainfall of a year; calculating heat index for forecasting data, and identifying fishing habitat zones etc. Addtionally, MDMD with the associated raster function templates can be served through ArcGIS server as image services which provide a framework for on-demand server side computation and analysis, and the published services can be accessed by multiple clients such as ArcMap, ArcGIS Online, JavaScript, REST, WCS, and WMS. This presentation will focus on the MDMD model and raster processing templates. In addtion, MODIS land cover, NDFD weather service, and HYCOM ocean model

  3. Data archiving and serving system implementation in CLEP's GRAS Core System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Wei; Zeng, Xingguo; Zhang, Zhoubin; Geng, Liang; Li, Chunlai

    2017-04-01

    The Ground Research & Applications System(GRAS) is one of the five systems of China's Lunar Exploration Project(CLEP), it is responsible for data acquisition, processing, management and application, and it is also the operation control center during satellite in-orbit and payload operation management. Chang'E-1, Chang'E-2 and Chang'E-3 have collected abundant lunar exploration data. The aim of this work is to present the implementation of data archiving and Serving in CLEP's GRAS Core System software. This first approach provides a client side API and server side software allowing the creation of a simplified version of CLEPDB data archiving software, and implements all required elements to complete data archiving flow from data acquisition until its persistent storage technology. The client side includes all necessary components that run on devices that acquire or produce data, distributing and streaming to configure remote archiving servers. The server side comprises an archiving service that stores into PDS files all received data. The archiving solution aims at storing data coming for the Data Acquisition Subsystem, the Operation Management Subsystem, the Data Preprocessing Subsystem and the Scientific Application & Research Subsystem. The serving solution aims at serving data for the various business systems, scientific researchers and public users. The data-driven and component clustering methods was adopted in this system, the former is used to solve real-time data archiving and data persistence services; the latter is used to keep the continuous supporting ability of archive and service to new data from Chang'E Mission. Meanwhile, it can save software development cost as well.

  4. Assessing a Historically Hispanic Serving Institution Internationalization Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Iuspa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a qualitative study conducted at a Historically Hispanic Serving Institution (HHSI to further the understanding of its internationalization decision-making process. The study uses the Internationalization Cube model to review the institution’s internal processes and policies toward internationalization and assess how its international activities align with its internationalization efforts. The Internationalization Cube, an eight-cell model, permits the positioning of Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs based on the analysis of its three dimensions and respective subcategories: policy, support, and implementation. The International Dimension Index (IDI and the Item Relevancy Index (IRI were also used to determine the level of alignment between the HHSI position on the Internationalization Cube and its international activities. The study finds that the HHSI is on Position 6 on the Internationalization Cube (priority policy, one-sided support, and systematic/structure implementation, and exhibits all the international activities considered indicators of internationalization but attention is needed to foreign language, international students, study abroad, faculty movement and involvement in international projects. The study concludes that an association exists between the institution’s position on the Internationalization Cube and its international activities, and adjustments in the institution’s policy, support, and implementation dimensions will be required to advance its position on the Internationalization Cube making its internationalization process more sustainable. This study makes a contribution to addressing the need to assess an IHE by presenting a holistic organizational framework instead of a fragmented international activities organizational analysis.

  5. An empirical typology of private child and family serving agencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins-Camargo, Crystal; McBeath, Bowen; Wells, Rebecca; Bunger, Alicia

    2014-01-01

    Differences in how services are organized and delivered can contribute significantly to variation in outcomes experienced by children and families. However, few comparative studies identify the strengths and limitations of alternative delivery system configurations. The current study provides the first empirical typology of private agencies involved with the formal child welfare system. Data collected in 2011 from a national sample of private agencies were used to classify agencies into five distinct groups based on internal management capacity, service diversification, integration, and policy advocacy. Findings reveal considerable heterogeneity in the population of private child and family serving agencies. Cross-group comparisons suggest that differences in agencies’ strategic and structural characteristics correlated with agency directors’ perceptions of different pressures in their external environment. Future research can use this typology to better understand local service systems and the extent to which different agency strategies affect performance and other outcomes. Such information has implications for public agency contracting decisions and could inform system-level assessment and planning of services for children and families. PMID:24648603

  6. New family planning center serves 60,000 Nicaraguans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    In Nicaragua, the recently opened Regional Family Planning (FP) Center in the capital of Chontales Province provides a variety of FP services to the 60,000 citizens of Juigalpa. These services include counseling, laboratory exams, gynecologic exams, and voluntary sterilization. the Asociacion Pro Bienestar de la Familia Nicaraguense (PROFAMILIA) opened the center, since FP services have been neglected in this province as compared to access to these services in the large population centers of Managua and Leon. A recent contraceptive prevalence survey shows that contraceptive prevalence in urban areas of Nicaragua is 62%, while it is just between 13-15% in rural regions, like Chontales and Zelaya. The center will also run a community distribution program for Chontales. As of May 1993, it had 25 community distribution posts in the region, providing contraceptives and training volunteers. PROFAMILIA hopes to open another regional center in Chinandega in the western part of Nicaragua in 1993. It plans on opening a central clinic in Grenada, the third largest city, to serve 120,000 people from Grenada and the small communities surrounding Grenada.

  7. Serving Canada's exporters and their customers abroad since 1946

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benson, T.

    2000-01-01

    The Canadian Commercial Corporation (CCC) is a federal Crown corporation whose mandate is to facilitate trade between Canada and other nations, principally by partnering with Canadian suppliers in the sale of goods and services, and serving as a prime contractor and guarantor for sales by Canadian exporters to foreign buyers. CCC also acts as the purchasing agent contractor and manager for the U.S. Department of Defence of Canadian suppliers under a bilateral treaty. In essence, CCC participation constitutes a guarantee by the Canadian government that the Canadian supplier is capable, qualified, and that the contract terms will be met. The paper discusses the potential benefits of CCC participation in transactions for buyers, and for exporters, the intricacies of the progress payment program designed to provide working capital over and above normal cash flow, to share the risks amongst the parties to obtain pre-shipment financing for export sales, and to free up credit facilities. Eligibility criteria for the progress payment program, the process involved in becoming a participant, and associated costs to participants are also explained

  8. Internetworking technological foundations and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Meinel, Christoph

    2013-01-01

    This book is supposed to serve as a comprehensive and instructive guide through the new world of digital communication. On the physical layer optical and electrical cabling technology are described as well as wireless communication technologies. On the data link layer local area networks (LANs) are introduced together with the most popular LAN technologies such as Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI, and ATM as well as wireless LAN technologies including IEEE 802.x, Bluetooth, or ZigBee. A wide range of WAN technologies are covered including contemporary high speed technologies like PDH and SDH up to h

  9. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    candra pratama setiawan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The fast developments in information and communication technology have rapidly shaped and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the netgeneration, have started to implement the concept of hybrid library as a response of the technological advances. The trend of digital collections usage is getting increase, on the other hand, the number of library visitor is getting lower significantly. The condition make librarians afraid of being abandoned by its users, whereas libraries still have many physical collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of netgeneration has accomodated. The concept of library as place, and library marketing offer the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with the net-generation characteristics. In addition, libraries can create some events to promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  10. Serving severely mentally ill people in a major Canadian city.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, D A; Sladen-Dew, N; Russell, J S

    1994-01-01

    Over the past twenty years, GVMHS has been the single organization taking ultimate responsibility for the seriously mentally ill throughout the city. It uses central coordination coupled with community-based teams and partnership programs with other agencies to strike a useful balance between integration and flexibility. GVMHS's mission throughout that time has been to provide everyday community support, networking, case management, rehabilitation, and counseling services to as many seriously mentally ill persons with concomitant disabilities as possible. To carry out that mission, GVMHS has developed some innovative solutions for the problems of community support--problems such as psychiatric emergencies, crises, community demands for service outside the mandate, and workload management. GVMHS has also developed dual-diagnosis, multicultural, multiagency case coordination for the multiproblem client (Buckley and Bigelow, 1992), specialized family and child programs, and specialized geriatric programs. This has all been possible only because financial support is available on an ongoing basis at a level adequate to provide good, dependable services. GVMHS has been proven an effective service in a number of studies (Bigelow and Beiser, 1978; Beiser, Shore, Peters, and Tatum, 1985). It has also demonstrated good cost-efficiency (Bigelow and McFarland, 1989) and abundant innovation and adaptation to emerging challenges (Bigelow, McFarland, Russell, and Sladen-Dew, 1990). It has proven that dedicated, well-trained professionals working at the community level will work hard and smart and that an agency and its staff will stick to the mandate of serving people with serious mental illnesses and disabilities even under pressure to do otherwise. The intriguing thing is that this productivity is not driven by competition, incentives, or threat: none of these factors presses upon the Greater Vancouver Mental Health Services Society from without and none is built in. The

  11. Peak Operation of Cascaded Hydropower Plants Serving Multiple Provinces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianjian Shen

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bulk hydropower transmission via trans-provincial and trans-regional power networks in China provides great operational flexibility to dispatch power resources between multiple power grids. This is very beneficial to alleviate the tremendous peak load pressure of most provincial power grids. This study places the focus on peak operations of cascaded hydropower plants serving multiple provinces under a regional connected AC/DC network. The objective is to respond to peak loads of multiple provincial power grids simultaneously. A two-stage search method is developed for this problem. In the first stage, a load reconstruction strategy is proposed to combine multiple load curves of power grids into a total load curve. The purpose is to deal with different load features in load magnitudes, peaks and valleys. A mutative-scale optimization method is then used to determine the generation schedules of hydropower plants. In the second stage, an exterior point search method is established to allocate the generation among multiple receiving power grids. This method produces an initial solution using the load shedding algorithm, and further improves it by iteratively coordinating the generation among different power grids. The proposed method was implemented to the operations of cascaded hydropower plants on Xin-Fu River and another on Hongshui River. The optimization results in two cases satisfied the peak demands of receiving provincial power grids. Moreover, the maximum load difference between peak and valley decreased 12.67% and 11.32% in Shanghai Power Grid (SHPG and Zhejiang Power Grid (ZJPG, exceeding by 4.85% and 6.72% those of the current operational method, respectively. The advantage of the proposed method in alleviating peak-shaving pressure is demonstrated.

  12. Training in Geoethics: Shared Values in Serving Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peppoloni, S.; Di Capua, G.

    2014-12-01

    Geosciences have evident repercussions on society. Geoscientists possess knowledge and skills to investigate, manage and intervene on the Geosphere, and this implies ethical obligations. So, the adoption of ethical principles and standards is crucial if geoscientists want to best serve the public. Their ethical responsibility requires a more active role in interacting with society, by giving people valuable contexts that inform the need for sustainable development, and perspectives that reveal essential and delicate balances of natural systems that impact humanity. Geoethics consists of research and reflection on those values upon which to base appropriate behaviour and practices where human activities intersect the Geosphere, and should become an essential point of reference in geoscientists' curricula. Acting in this direction implies the awareness by the geological community of its ethical commitments and the necessity to train new generations of geoscientists that in the future will be able to transfer to society not only practical aspects of geological knowledge, but also a new way to understand our planet. The IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics (www.iapg.geoethics.org) was born to build a new awareness in the scientific community. It aims at joining forces of geoscientists all over the world, through creation of an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics through scientific publications and conferences. Its main goal is to give a new cultural framework of reference, in which to develop effective training tools, in order to sensitize young geoscientists on ethical and social issues related to their future work, starting from the definition of shared values within the scientific community. This work provides an overview on the IAPG goals, activities and ongoing initiatives.

  13. 77 FR 1942 - Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC) AGENCY: Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology... for appointment to Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC). SUMMARY: The... serving on the Homeland Security Science and Technology Advisory Committee (HSSTAC). The HSSTAC gives...

  14. The Strategies of Academic Library to Serve Net-Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandra Pratama Setiawan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The  fast  developments  in  information  and  communication  technology  have  rapidly  shaped  and created enormous changes in the way people live and use libraries. The generation who grow in this era is called net generation. Academic libraries, where the majority of the users are the net-generation,  have  started  to  implement  the  concept  of  hybrid  library  as  a  response  of  the technological  advances.  The  trend  of  digital  collections  usage  is  getting  increase,  on  the  other hand,  the  number  of  library  visitor  is  getting  lower  significantly.  The  condition  make  librarians afraid  of  being  abandoned  by  its  users,  whereas  libraries  still  have  many  physical  collections. This paper is written as a result of simple observation in some libraries where the needs of net-generation  has  accommodated.  The  concept  of library  as  place,  and  library  marketing  offer  the solutions to deal with the problem. Libraries can develop and provide some facilities that suitable with  the net-generation  characteristics.  In  addition,  libraries  can  create  some  events  to  promote their services even the collections to attract the users to visit library.

  15. Research reactors serving the radiotracer technique: An overlooked opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bode, P.

    2010-01-01

    The unique features of using radiotracers are not always fully explored at nuclear research reactor centers. The radiotracer method is a versatile and powerful tool in the study of a wide variety of applications in e.g. chemistry, biology, agriculture, medicine and (industrial) technology. The big advantage of radiotracers above e.g. stable isotope tracers, commonly applied in e.g. nutritional studies, is that radiotracers allow for non-invasive studies of both steady-state and dynamic systems, in equilibrium situations and for transport and exchange phenomena and thus provide information on the chemical and/or physical status of elements. The radiotracer method does not imply huge equipment investments but rather requires that the four interrelated aspects: experimental designs, data treatment including tracer kinetic analysis and data interpretation are careful considered. Radiotracer production with reactors often implies additional fundamental research to use smart nuclear reactions and chemical separations so as to obtain an almost no-carrier added tracer. Nuclear analytical groups, already equipped with gamma-ray spectrometers, can thus extend their research program. Using Ge-spectrometers, multi-labeling experiments are possible which allow for unique applications if different radionuclides exist for the same element, such as 65 Zn and 69m Zn or 64 Cu and 67 Cu. The developments in novel scintillation detectors, room-temperature semiconductor detectors (like CdZnTe) and position-sensitive detectors open the door for an entire new scope of radiotracer applications, such as SPECT. Once applied to in-vitro studies with cell cultures, the nuclear analytical group may position itself into the worlds of medical research, biochemistry and biotechnology. Radiotracers can be used to study the properties of drug-delivering compounds as used in e.g, cancer therapy. Radiotracers can be added as a label to solid particles, to liquids but may also be applied in the

  16. Variable-data Printing Serves - Niches Here, There & Everywhere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Ynostroza

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available A milestone focus on high-end digital color presses capable of variable-data imaging - a technology that was introduced ten years ago and is just now at the beginning of wider, more successful implementation in commercial printing-tends to overshadow some real achievements on other variable-data fronts. Those activities involve ink-jet and electrophotographic imaging for high-volume transactional printing, print-on-demand books and catalogs, wide-format proofing and imaging, label production, and printing of text and coding of printed packaging.The capabilities of digital production color presses intrigue commercial printers the most, especially new units referred to by manufacturers as "Series II" or "third-generation" systems. Besides having more press-like characteristics, from offset-caliber quality, image consistency, and high output rates to sturdy construction, reliability, and stock choice, the units seem to represent a way to produce printing that’s beyond the norm.Some users are producing hybrid printed products (offset printing a quantity of "shells" that are later personalized by digital presses, while others are utilizing clients’ "dynamic" databases to personalize marketing materials that drive response rates up to 15%, even 35%. Finally, digital color systems prompt the creation of high-margin Internet-based print providers offering easy-to-design and easy-toorder print materials. Printers may do well to adopt the high-value communications capability that digital imaging offers.

  17. Climate change and health research: has it served rural communities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Erica J

    2013-01-01

    If climate change is the 21st Century's biggest public health threat, research faces the major challenge of providing adequate evidence for vulnerable communities to adapt to the health effects of climate change. Available information about best practice in climate adaptation suggests it is inclusive of socio-economic disadvantage and local community factors such as access to health services. Since 1995, at least 19 164 papers have been published on climate change in the health sciences and social sciences. This body of literature has not yet been systematically examined for how well it serves rural communities. The ultimate aim of the study was to contribute to better understandings about what climate adaptation research has been done and is needed for rural communities. The two research questions were: 'What kinds of content define climate change research in disciplines that could potentially contribute to adaptation for health?' and 'How is content about rural and Aboriginal communities and best practice in adaptation related to this content?' A quantitative content analysis was performed using 'computational linguistics' Leximancer software. The analysis included 19 164 health and social sciences abstracts, batched by years, from 1 January 1995 to 31 July 2012. The relative frequency and co-occurrence of 52 concepts in these abstracts were mapped, as well as associations with positive or negative sentiment for selected concepts. Aboriginal' concepts tend to be relatively infrequent (3% and 5% overall likelihood of occurrence, respectively) and are more associated with socio-economic concepts in the social sciences than the health sciences. Multiple concepts in the health sciences literature are typically connected with 'disease' and ultimately 'science' storylines, with a 38% likelihood of paired co-occurrence of 'health' and 'disease' concepts alone. The social sciences appear more focused on the local and particular issues of community in climate change than

  18. Fusion technology programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finken, D.

    1984-04-01

    KfK participates to the Fusion Technology Programme of the European Community. Most of the work in progress addresses the Next European Torus (NET) and the long term technology aspects as defined in the 82/86 programme. A minor part serves to preparation of future contributions and to design studies on fusion concepts in a wider perspective. The Fusion Technology Programme of Euratom covers mainly aspects of nuclear engineering. Plasma engineering, heating, refueling and vacuum technology are at present part of the Physics Programme. In view of NET, integration of the different areas of work will be mandatory. KfK is therefore prepared to address technical aspects beyond the actual scope of the physics experiments. The technology tasks are reported project wise under title and code of the Euratom programme. Most of the projects described here are shared with other European fusion laboratories as indicated in the table annexed to this report. (orig./GG)

  19. NASA's MEaSUREs Program Serving the Earth Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Tsaoussi, L.; Olding, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. NASA has invested in the creation of consistent time series satellite data sets over decades, through both mission science team-based and measurement-based data product reprocessing and through solicitations for merged data products. The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program, carried out in the mid-1990's, resulted in the reprocessing of four long time-series datasets from existing archives. The Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN) Program, initiated in 2002, consisted of several projects that provided data products, information systems and services capabilities, and/or advanced data systems technologies, to address strategic needs in Earth science research, applications, and education. The Program named Making Earth System data records for Use in Research for Earth Science, or MEaSUREs has had two requests for proposals, the first in 2006 and the second in 2012. With this Program, the Earth Science Division has focused on generating datasets for particular Earth science research measurement needs, and refers to such datasets as Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). Climate Data Records (CDRs) are a particular case of ESDRs. An ESDR is defined as a unified and coherent set of observations of a given parameter of the Earth system, which is optimized to meet specific requirements in addressing science questions. Most of the MEaSUREs projects are five years long. They produce ESDRs using mature, peer-reviewed algorithms. The products are vetted by the user community in the respective scientific disciplines. They are made available publicly by the projects during their execution period. Before the projects end, the ESDRs are transferred to one of the NASA-assigned Distributed Active Archive Centers for longer-term archiving and distribution. Tens of millions of

  20. Exploring College Students' Identification with an Organizational Identity for Serving Latinx Students at a Hispanic Serving Institution (HSI) and an Emerging HSI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.; Dwyer, Brighid

    2018-01-01

    Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs; postsecondary institutions that enroll 25% or more Latinx students) are increasing in significance. But to what extent do students attending an HSI, or an emerging HSI (enrolls 15-24% Latinx students), identify with an organizational identity for serving Latinx students? There is a need to understand how…

  1. Laser Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauger, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Describes lasers and indicates that learning about laser technology and creating laser technology activities are among the teacher enhancement processes needed to strengthen technology education. (JOW)

  2. Improving Teachers' Teaching with Communication Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Ling

    2012-01-01

    With the growing needs to address the challenges that new teachers face and the popularity of social networking technology, this study explores how to increase the effectives of teaching through the use of such technology, and how the technology may serve to promote collaboration and open new resources of support in public education. In this…

  3. Technology transfer: the key to fusion commercialization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burnett, S.C.

    1981-01-01

    The paper brings to light some of the reasons why technology transfer is difficult in fusion, examines some of the impediments to the process, and finally looks at a successful example of technology transfer. The paper considers some subjective features of fusion - one might call them the sociology of fusion - that are none the less real and that serve as impediments to technology transfer

  4. Effect of Age Group on Technical-Tactical Performance Profile of the Serve in Men's Volleyball.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-de-Alcaraz, Antonio; Ortega, Enrique; Palao, José M

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the technical-tactical performance profile of the serve for various age groups and categories of competition in men's volleyball. The sample comprised 13,262 serves performed by 986 players in 299 sets observed in various categories of competition (U-14, U-16, U-19, national senior, and international senior). An observational design was used. The variables studied were category of competition, type of execution, and serve performance. The results showed that for higher age groups (senior categories), there were significantly fewer jump serves and poorer serve performance, regardless of players' maturity and training development. The use of the jump serves increased the serve risk while attempting to hinder the organization of the opponent attack. This paper discusses the serve evolution and the implications on the training process at the different age groups in men's volleyball. © The Author(s) 2016.

  5. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional Quality, Consumption, and Cost of Snacks Served in Afterschool Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, Robert G.; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6?pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks…

  6. 7 CFR 1980.334 - Appraisal of property serving as collateral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Appraisal of property serving as collateral. 1980.334 Section 1980.334 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) RURAL HOUSING... Appraisal of property serving as collateral. An appraisal of all property serving as security for the...

  7. 7 CFR 1980.444 - Appraisal of property serving as collateral.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 14 2010-01-01 2009-01-01 true Appraisal of property serving as collateral. 1980.444... Program § 1980.444 Appraisal of property serving as collateral. (a) Appraisal reports prepared by independent qualified fee appraisers will be required on all property that will serve as collateral. In the...

  8. Salty or sweet? Nutritional quality, consumption, and cost of snacks served in afterschool programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beets, Michael W; Weaver, Robert G; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S; Freedman, Darcy A

    2015-02-01

    Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6 pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks meet existing nutrition policies, whether children eat the snacks, and their cost. Direct observation of snacks served and consumed was collected in 20 ASPs serving over 1700 elementary age children. The number of days that snacks were served/week was evaluated for compliance with nutrition policies. Costs of snacks were collected via receipts. Programs served desserts and artificially flavored salty snacks on 2.7 and 2.1 days/week. Fruits and vegetables were served 0.6 and 0.1 days/week, respectively. Sugar-sweetened beverages were served 1.8 days/week. Of the children (N = 383) observed, 75% to 100% consumed the snack served, with 95% and 100% of served fruits/vegetables consumed. No ASP served fruit/vegetables daily, 18 served sugar-sweetened foods, 16 served artificially flavored snacks, and 14 served sugar-sweetened beverages. Desserts and salty snacks cost $0.27-$0.32/snack vs $0.38-$0.40/snack for vegetables/fruits. The quality of snacks failed to meet nutrition policies and consists of predominately high-sugar and artificially flavored options. Strategies to improve snack offerings in ASPs while addressing price barriers are required. © 2015, American School Health Association.

  9. Optical and wireless technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Manish; Singh, Ghanshyam; Minzioni, Paolo

    2018-01-01

    This book presents selected papers from 1st International Conference on Optical and Wireless Technologies, providing insights into the analytical, experimental, and developmental aspects of systems, techniques, and devices in these spheres. It explores the combined use of various optical and wireless technologies in next-generation networking applications, and discusses the latest developments in applications such as photonics, high-speed communication systems and networks, visible light communication, nanophotonics, and wireless and multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) systems. The book will serve as a valuable reference resource for academics and researchers across the globe.

  10. The toss of the professional and the competitive tennis player: serving from the ad-court

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Carboch

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We compared the serve toss of different types of serve when tennis players served from the ad-court. They used different spin on the ball and various ball placements in the opponent’s service box. Our aim was to compare the toss in different types of serve between a competitive (local tournament player and a professional player, from the point of view of the receiving player, when they served from the ad-court. One professional and one competitive tennis player (both right handed were observed while serving different types of serve to various locations of the opponent’s service box. We used a high-speed camera, which was placed opposite to the server in the position of a receiving player. The results showed that the players do not use the same toss for each type of serve. The professional player had a bigger range of racket-ball contact point on horizontal axis (32 cm of the various types of first serves, compared to the competitive player (only 24 cm. The toss of the kick serve had similar characteristics between both players (the racket-ball contact point was observed to be mostly to the right, from the view of receiver. Neither the professional nor the competitive player showed a stable profile of toss. In some cases, the receiving players could anticipate the type of the serve from the server’s toss.

  11. The Search for Security Technology Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Explains that although it is difficult to find money to pay for school security technology, there are places to look. For example, the Department of Education has a list serve that summarizes various funding opportunities. There is also a Federal Register list serve and a site put out by the Department of Justice. A sidebar presents three…

  12. Self-presentation on the Web: agencies serving abused and assaulted women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Susan B; Shi, Rui; Zhang, Jingwen; Xue, Jia

    2014-04-01

    We examined the content and usability of the Web sites of agencies serving women victims of violence. We entered the names of a systematic 10% sample of 3774 agencies listed in 2 national directories into a search engine. We took (in April 2012) and analyzed screenshots of the 261 resulting home pages and the readability of 193 home and first-level pages. Victims (94%) and donors (68%) were the primary intended audiences. About one half used social media and one third provided cues to action. Almost all (96.4%) of the Web pages were rated "fairly difficult" to "very confusing" to read, and 81.4% required more than a ninth-grade education to understand. The service and marketing functions were met fairly well by the agency home pages, but usability (particularly readability and offer of a mobile version) and efforts to increase user safety could be improved. Internet technologies are an essential platform for public health. They are particularly useful for reaching people with stigmatized health conditions because of the anonymity allowed. The one third of agencies that lack a Web site will not reach the substantial portion of the population that uses the Internet to find health information and other resources.

  13. High variation in manufacturer-declared serving size of packaged discretionary foods in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskelberg, Hila; Neal, Bruce; Dunford, Elizabeth; Flood, Victoria; Rangan, Anna; Thomas, Beth; Cleanthous, Xenia; Trevena, Helen; Zheng, Jazzmin Miaobing; Louie, Jimmy Chun Yu; Gill, Timothy; Wu, Jason H Y

    2016-05-28

    Despite the potential of declared serving size to encourage appropriate portion size consumption, most countries including Australia have not developed clear reference guidelines for serving size. The present study evaluated variability in manufacturer-declared serving size of discretionary food and beverage products in Australia, and how declared serving size compared with the 2013 Australian Dietary Guideline (ADG) standard serve (600 kJ). Serving sizes were obtained from the Nutrition Information Panel for 4466 packaged, discretionary products in 2013 at four large supermarkets in Sydney, Australia, and categorised into fifteen categories in line with the 2013 ADG. For unique products that were sold in multiple package sizes, the percentage difference between the minimum and the maximum serving size across different package sizes was calculated. A high variation in serving size was found within the majority of food and beverage categories - for example, among 347 non-alcoholic beverages (e.g. soft drinks), the median for serving size was 250 (interquartile range (IQR) 250, 355) ml (range 100-750 ml). Declared serving size for unique products that are available in multiple package sizes also showed high variation, particularly for chocolate-based confectionery, with median percentage difference between minimum and maximum serving size of 183 (IQR 150) %. Categories with a high proportion of products that exceeded the 600 kJ ADG standard serve included cakes and muffins, pastries and desserts (≥74 % for each). High variability in declared serving size may confound interpretation and understanding of consumers interested in standardising and controlling their portion selection. Future research is needed to assess if and how standardising declared serving size might affect consumer behaviour.

  14. Information Storage and Display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Christopher

    1981-01-01

    Reviews the state of information technologies involving teletext, viewdata, interactive graphics, videodisc, audio synthesis, and holography, and discusses the current understanding of access schemes and cognitive processing. Sixteen suggested readings and nine references are cited. (FM)

  15. Breaking the addiction to technology adoption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, Stirling; Mitton, Craig; Donaldson, Cam

    2014-04-01

    A major driver of cost growth in health care is the rapid increase in the utilisation of existing technology and not simply the adoption of new technology. Health economists and their health technology assessment colleagues have become obsessed by technology adoption questions and have largely ignored 'technology management' questions. Technology management would include the life-cycle assessment of technologies in use, to assess their real-world performance; and monitoring of technology indication creep. A rebalancing of focus might serve to encourage a more self-critical and learning culture amongst those involved in technology evaluation analysis. Further, health economists and health technology assessment analysts could make a more significant contribution to system efficiency through rebalancing their efforts away from technology adoption questions towards technology management issues. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. Variables that Predict Serve Efficacy in Elite Men's Volleyball with Different Quality of Opposition Sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Álvaro; Fernández-Echeverría, Carmen; González-Silva, Jara; Claver, Fernando; Moreno, M Perla

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the variables that predicted serve efficacy in elite men's volleyball, in sets with different quality of opposition. 3292 serve actions were analysed, of which 2254 were carried out in high quality of opposition sets and 1038 actions were in low quality of opposition sets, corresponding to a total of 24 matches played during the Men's European Volleyball Championships held in 2011. The independent variables considered in this study were the serve zone, serve type, serving player, serve direction, reception zone, receiving player and reception type; the dependent variable was serve efficacy and the situational variable was quality of opposition sets. The variables that acted as predictors in both high and low quality of opposition sets were the serving player, reception zone and reception type. The serve type variable only acted as a predictor in high quality of opposition sets, while the serve zone variable only acted as a predictor in low quality of opposition sets. These results may provide important guidance in men's volleyball training processes.

  17. Serving and Rendering Cluster-Based Ocean Model Output on a Geowall Using the Live Access Server

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C. W.; Hermann, A. J.; Dobbins, E. L.

    2004-12-01

    Scientists at NOAA's Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory are relying more and more on supercomputing platforms for their modeling efforts. Running ocean models on these large cluster machines poses problems in that domain sizes are increasing and tracking how the model dynamics are developing during a run requires high-bandwidth network time. In an effort to streamline this procedure both server and 3-D rending technology are utilized. Intermediate model results saved in netCDF file format can be served remotely to query model progress using the Live Access Server (LAS). In our implementation, a crontab script checks for model results and generates an XML data-file descriptor and adds the data set to the list of those available for LAS to serve up. On top of the default product choices (2-D plots, data listings, etc), the user can also chose one of two 3D file formats: either a VRML or a Vis5D file of the variable of interest. The LAS is built upon the Ferret data analysis package with the ability to re-grid variables defined on curvilinear coordinate grids and to serve up Vis5D files. An alternate back-end, written using the open-source Visualization Toolkit (VTK), can serve a VRML isosurface as well as current vector fields, keeping bandwidth low by utilizing topology-preserving polygon mesh decimation algorithms. Files served through our LAS system can be projected in passive stereo using a Geowall (www.geowall.org) by either Vis5D, or by ImmersaView. While ImmersaView offers the ability to animate through the VRML isosurfaces in collaboration with a remote researcher, Vis5D (an older-technology application) gives the user the ability to explore the data more thoroughly by allowing the scientist to change isosurfaces levels, or to probe the data using contour or vector slices. We will explore the possibility of using LAS as the server for the parallel, composite-rendering application ParaView.

  18. Remote desktop with HTML5 technology

    OpenAIRE

    Banič, Žiga

    2013-01-01

    In our thesis we implemented a remote desktop with the newest technology HTML5. The main reason we choose this technology is to access the system through many different computing platforms. Present web browsers take care for the right support of using before mentioned technology. With the new element canvas we can manipulate and display the remote computer. To manipulate the system we just add event listeners for mouse, keyboard and touch events on the element. Technology WebSockets served as...

  19. River Protection Project Technology and Innovation Roadmap.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, D. S. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Wooley, T. A. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States); Kelly, S. E. [Hanford Site (HNF), Richland, WA (United States)

    2017-08-14

    The Technology and Innovation Roadmap is a planning tool for WRPS management, DOE ORP, DOE EM, and others to understand the risks and technology gaps associated with the RPP mission. The roadmap identifies and prioritizes technical areas that require technology solutions and underscores where timely and appropriate technology development can have the greatest impact to reduce those risks and uncertainties. The roadmap also serves as a tool for determining allocation of resources.

  20. Taming Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branscomb, Lewis M.

    1971-01-01

    Reviews aspects of technology in our society: technology as a force for social change; reasons for the frustration and dissatisfaction with technology; how technology decentralizes power; the individual's influence; resolving conflicts in the ionized" society; regulation of technology; corporate responsibility; and the potential pitfalls for the…

  1. Assistive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Assistive Technology Assistive technology (AT) is any service or tool that helps ... be difficult or impossible. For older adults, such technology may be a walker to improve mobility or ...

  2. Sport Technology

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kirkbride, T

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Technology is transforming the games themselves and at times with dire consequences. Tony Kirkbride, Head: CSIR Technology Centre said there are a variety of sports technologies and there have been advances in material sciences and advances...

  3. Gaming Research for Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Aaron C.; Ernst, Jeremy

    2009-01-01

    This study assesses the use of gaming to teach Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) in public education. The intent of the investigation was to identify attitudes about gaming and its use in education, as well as the need to utilize gaming as a platform to serve as an integrator of STEM subject matter. Participants included…

  4. Rover Technologies

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop and mature rover technologies supporting robotic exploration including rover design, controlling rovers over time delay and for exploring . Technology...

  5. Nano technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, In Sik

    2002-03-01

    This book is introduction of nano technology, which describes what nano technology is, alpha and omega of nano technology, the future of Korean nano technology and human being's future and nano technology. The contents of this book are nano period is coming, a engine of creation, what is molecular engineering, a huge nano technology, technique on making small things, nano materials with exorbitant possibility, the key of nano world the most desirable nano technology in bio industry, nano development plan of government, the direction of development for nano technology and children of heart.

  6. Advanced technology meets mental health: how smartphones, textile electronics, and signal processing can serve mental health monitoring, diagnosis, and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, Gaetano; Lanatà, Antonio; Paradiso, Rita; Scilingo, Enzo Pasquale

    2014-01-01

    Mental disorders, characterized by impaired emotional and mood balance, are common in the West. Recent surveys have found that millions of people (age 18?65) have experienced some kind of mental disorder, such as psychotic disorder, major depression, bipolar disorder, panic disorder, social phobia, and somatoform disorder [1]. Specifically, in 2010, 164.8 million people in Europe were affected by such illnesses [1].

  7. Schools Serving as Centres for Dissemination of Alternative Energy Know-How and Technologies: Evidence from Southern Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalelo, Aklilu

    2008-01-01

    The school curricula are widely believed to be the best vehicle for generating public awareness of and action related to areas of energy concern. In an attempt to build the capacity of schools to address key environmental issues in Ethiopia, a pilot project had been designed in 2004. The principal aim of the project was to bring about positive…

  8. 77 FR 40332 - Request for Nominations for Members To Serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... States Geological Survey (USGS) Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC). Membership 1... Team Advisory Committee, Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction, NIST Smart Grid Advisory.... Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR) Addresses: Please submit nominations to Tina...

  9. 76 FR 39379 - Request for Nominations for Members To Serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-06

    ... States Geological Survey Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee. Membership 1. The Committee... Earthquake Hazards Reduction, NIST Smart Grid Advisory Committee, and Visiting Committee on Advanced.... Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR) Addresses: Please submit nominations to Tina...

  10. 75 FR 43933 - Request for nominations for members to serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-27

    ... States Geological Survey Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee. Membership 1. The Committee... Earthquake Hazards Reduction, NIST Smart Grid Advisory Committee, and Visiting Committee on Advanced.... Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction (ACEHR) ADDRESSES: Please submit nominations to Tina...

  11. 78 FR 67121 - Request for Nominations for Members To Serve on National Institute of Standards and Technology...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ...) Scientific Earthquake Studies Advisory Committee (SESAC). Membership 1. The Committee shall consist of not... Team Advisory Committee, Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards Reduction, NIST Smart Grid Advisory... workplace and seeks a broad-based and diverse Committee membership. Advisory Committee on Earthquake Hazards...

  12. Do children eat less at meals when allowed to serve themselves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savage, Jennifer S; Haisfield, Lisa; Fisher, Jennifer O; Marini, Michele; Birch, Leann L

    2012-07-01

    The effect of self-serving on young children's energy intake is not well understood. The objective was to examine individual differences in the effects of plated and self-served entrée portions on children's energy intake. Two within-subjects experiments were used to examine ad libitum intake at meals in 63 children aged 3-5 y when 400 g of a pasta entrée was either plated or available for children to self-serve. Child age, sex, BMI, and responsiveness to increasing portion size (defined as individual slope estimates relating ad libitum intake of the entrée across a range of entrée portions) were evaluated as predictors of self-served portions. Children's entrée and meal intakes did not differ between the self-served and plated conditions for the total sample or by child weight status. However, larger self-served entrée portions were associated with greater entrée and meal intakes. Children who served themselves larger entrée portions tended to be overweight and more responsive to portion size (ie, greater increases in entrée intake as plated portion size increased). Last, self-served portion predicted both entrée and meal intake over and above BMI z score and responsiveness to portion. Contrary to our hypothesis, relative to plated portions, allowing children to self-serve the entrée portion did not reduce energy intake. Children who were more responsive to portion-size effects were likely to self-serve and eat larger entrée portions. Self-serving is not a one-size-fits-all approach; some children may need guidance and rules to learn how to self-select appropriate portion sizes.

  13. Reference serving sizes for the Brazilian population: An analysis of processed food labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Kliemann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To compare serving sizes reported on processed food labels with reference serving sizes according to nutrition labeling legislation and the "Food Guide for the Brazilian Population". METHODS: This cross-sectional study analyzed the labels of 2,072 processed foods in a supermarket of Florianópolis, Santa Caratina, Brazil. The foods were classified according to the Brazilian food labeling legislation. Central tendency and variability values were calculated for the serving sizes and energy values reported on the labels, as well as the ratio between the reported and reference energy value. The Spearman correlation test was performed between the reference serving size and the reference energy density, and also between the reference serving size and energy density of each study food. RESULTS: Nutrition labeling and the Food Guide presented reference servings with different sizes and energy values. The serving sizes reported on the labels did not follow either of the references and presented heterogeneous values, with a maximum range of 55-240 g among ready and semi-ready pre-prepared dishes. The reported energy values were between 0.1 times smaller and 2.4 times larger than the reference values. The reference serving sizes presented a highly inverse correlation with the reference energy density (Spearman coefficient= 0.9 and a very low inverse correlation with the energy density of the foods analyzed (Spearman coefficient= 0.2. CONCLUSION: This study showed the need for standardizing reference serving size information for the Brazilian population as well as reviewing nutrition labeling legislation in order to standardize the serving sizes reported on labels and to update the reference energy density used to calculate serving sizes.

  14. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana, technology summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE's cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry's competitiveness in global environmental markets. WETO's environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of useable resources from waste. Environmental technology development and commercialization activities will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management. Since the site has no record of radioactive material use and no history of environmental contamination/remediation activities, DOE-EM can concentrate on performing developmental and demonstration activities without the demands of regulatory requirements and schedules. Thus, WETO will serve as a national resource for the development of new and innovative environmental technologies

  15. The Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO), Butte, Montana, technology summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-09-01

    This document has been prepared by the DOE Environmental Management (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) to highlight its research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation activities funded through the Western Environmental Technology Office (WETO) in Butte, Montana. Technologies and processes described have the potential to enhance DOE`s cleanup and waste management efforts, as well as improve US industry`s competitiveness in global environmental markets. WETO`s environmental technology research and testing activities focus on the recovery of useable resources from waste. Environmental technology development and commercialization activities will focus on mine cleanup, waste treatment, resource recovery, and water resource management. Since the site has no record of radioactive material use and no history of environmental contamination/remediation activities, DOE-EM can concentrate on performing developmental and demonstration activities without the demands of regulatory requirements and schedules. Thus, WETO will serve as a national resource for the development of new and innovative environmental technologies.

  16. School of Ice: An Advanced Professional Development Program for Geoscience Faculty at Minority-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, L. T.

    2017-12-01

    The School of Ice (SOI) program from the US Ice Drilling Program Office (IDPO) is designed for college faculty who teach at minority-serving institutions or historically black colleges and universities, but lessons learned transfer easily to any science course based on current research. The institute builds participants' background knowledge about ice core science and climate change while also providing experiences with activities and labs for transferring information to their students. After three years of highly successful workshops, our model has provided valuable lessons for creating powerful experiences for participants. This presentation will identify some of the key ideas including pairing researchers and educators as presenters; creating leadership teams capitalizing on partner strengths; building a science community willing to participate in education and outreach; and building participants' science content background knowledge and confidence while providing them with teaching models for transferring the knowledge to their students. Another important element is to demand teacher buy-in to ensure replication and dissemination. Also, IDPO's drilling technologies make it an ideal platform for intertwining engineering concepts and practices with science research to meet new science standards. In this session, we will share results of the institute evaluations including the impact on the educators as well as longitudinal analysis of data from interviews with past participants concerning continued impacts on their teaching, their courses and their students. Faculty who have attended this institute in the last three years have reported increases in their understanding of the content and how to teach it. They also report increased confidence in their ability to teach ice core science and climate change concepts. Elements of these successful workshops can inform both the development of college professional development and student courses, as well as the creation of

  17. Labor Market Supply in the Four Counties Served by the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Morgan V.

    A study examined the labor market supply in the four counties served by the Southern Ohio Diversification Initiative (SODI). Data were collected on the characteristics of the following groups: labor market entrants from the Joint Vocational Schools (JVSs) serving the four counties and Shawnee State University, area Job Training Partnership Act…

  18. The Mortality of Serving Africa Presidents: A Lesson for the Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DATONYE ALASIA

    ABSTRACT. Background: Although Africa has the worst mortality data in the world, the picture painted by the high mortality rate of serving Africa leaders in the last five years suggests reasons and causes far beyond poor socio-economic conditions. This study examined the causes and age at death of serving African leaders ...

  19. 77 FR 15812 - Notice of Funding Opportunity and Solicitation for Grant Applications for Serving Juvenile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... for Serving Juvenile Offenders in High-Poverty, High-Crime Communities Grants AGENCY: Employment and... funds authorized by the Workforce Investment Act to serve juvenile offenders, ages 14 and above, in high- poverty, high-crime communities. The purpose of these grants is to improve the long-term labor market...

  20. 76 FR 11285 - Notice of Funding Opportunity and Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Serving Juvenile...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... (SGA) for Serving Juvenile Offenders in High-Poverty, High-Crime Communities AGENCY: Employment and... authorized by the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 to serve juvenile offenders, ages 16 to 24, in high-poverty, high-crime communities. The purpose of these grants is to improve the long-term labor market...

  1. Latina Faculty in the Labyrinth: Constructing and Contesting Legitimacy in Hispanic Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Leslie D.; Murakami, Elizabeth; Nunez, Anne-Marie

    2013-01-01

    This article focuses on the presence and experiences of Latina academics in the U.S., especially those who serve in Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs). Following the theme of this special issue related to Women of Color Faculty's "Testimonios" and "Laberintos," the authors add to the notion of academia as a labyrinth…

  2. Latin@ Advocacy in the Hyphen: Faculty Identity and Commitment in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami-Ramalho, Elizabeth; Nunez, Anne-Marie; Cuero, Kimberley K.

    2010-01-01

    This study examines our experiences as female junior scholars with multicultural backgrounds teaching at the same Hispanic-serving institution. As education scholars with mixed-heritage families, we identify with the commitment to serving Latinos and the number of mixed-heritage people in the USA. The election of Barack Obama, whose racial…

  3. Institutional Agents at a Hispanic Serving Institution: Using Social Capital to Empower Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.; Ramirez, Jenesis J.

    2018-01-01

    As enrollment-driven postsecondary institutions, Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) must actively find ways to better "serve" their students. Guided by Stanton-Salazar's social capital framework, this study sought to understand how institutional agents use various forms of capital to develop structures that support and empower…

  4. Defined by Outcomes or Culture? Constructing an Organizational Identity for Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gina A.

    2017-01-01

    While Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs) enroll at least 25% Latinx students, the perennial question facing HSIs is, "What does it mean for postsecondary institutions to be Latinx-serving"--essentially an organizational identity question. Guided by the extant literature on organizational identity, culture, and institutionalism and…

  5. How internal and external supervisors influence employees' self-serving decisions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal, Melanie; Rink, Floor; Stoker, Janka

    2015-01-01

    The current investigation examined the effects of internal and external supervisors (i.e., formally installed institutions that hold employees accountable for their actions) on employees’ self-serving decisions. In two studies, it was found that internal supervisors reduced self-serving decisions

  6. 77 FR 68679 - Hispanic-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-16

    ...-Serving Agricultural Colleges and Universities (HSACU) AGENCIES: National Institute of Food and... Independence Avenue SW.; Washington, DC 20250-2299; Voice: 202-559-5088; Fax: 202-401-7752; Email: mlockhart...: PART 3434--HISPANIC-SERVING AGRICULTURAL COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES CERTIFICATION PROCESS 0 1. The...

  7. 2012 APPA Fellow Encourages Colleagues to Say Yes to Opportunities to Serve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler-Carter, Ruth E.

    2012-01-01

    It should be no surprise that the 2012 APPA Fellow is William (Bill) Elvey, P.E., FMP. He has served the association from the grassroots level up through its highest ranks and created a still-continuing legacy of excellence and engagement--his theme when serving as APPA President--that has led to new services, programs, and partnerships for the…

  8. 45 CFR 2552.81 - What type of children are eligible to be served?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... exceptional needs, or in circumstances that limit their academic, social, or emotional development, who are... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What type of children are eligible to be served... FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE FOSTER GRANDPARENT PROGRAM Children Served § 2552.81 What type of...

  9. 75 FR 64728 - Cooperative Operating Philosophy-Serving the Members of Farm Credit System Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-20

    ... Following Policy Statement: Cooperative Operating Philosophy--Serving the Member of Farm Credit System... System (System) institutions are required to operate.\\1\\ The FCA emphasizes cooperative principles by.... Policy on Implementing a Cooperative Operating Philosophy--Serving the Members The System, through its...

  10. Leader power and self-serving behavior : The moderating role of accountability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rus, Diana; van Knippenberg, Daan; Wisse, Barbara

    This study explored whether accountability influences the relationship between power and leader self-serving behavior. Across three studies, using both experimental manipulations and individual difference measures, we found that accountability mitigated the effects of power on leader self-serving

  11. The {open_quotes}obligation to serve{close_quotes} and a competitive electric industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colton, R.D. [Fisher, Sheehan and Colton (United States)

    1997-11-01

    This report presents an assessment of what the ``obligation to serve`` might look like in a competitive electric industry. Broadly, this research has three objectives: to define the ``duty to serve`` of a competitive electric industry; to identify those companies to whom that duty applies; and to explain how that duty protects residual classes.

  12. Are the Needs of Single Parents Serving in the Air Force Being Met?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha E. Blanchard

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The military has taken extraordinary steps in establishing programs to support not only the member serving but their families as well. This article will examine military policy as it impacts single parents serving in the Air Force, highlighting existing programs, and calling for more research on this valuable population.

  13. Information Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The first wave delivered a range of services to most areas of the world through a vast, carefully constructed global network. Cellular technology ...Information Technology and Services Alliance. Digital Planet 2002: The Global Information Economy. February 2002. Yegyazarian, Anush. Sales Taxes...Information Technology ABSTRACT: The information technology (IT) industry affects virtually every industry in the n economy. During the late 90

  14. The relationship between mother to child calories served and maternal perception of hunger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, S E; Janicke, D M

    2016-06-01

    Research has examined self-serving portions in adults and children and has shown that larger portion size is related to more calories consumed. The present study examines factors that may influence the portion sizes a mother serves her child at a mealtime. The present observational study included a community-based sample of 29 mother-child dyads. Dyads attended a 1-h session in which they shared a meal together. A buffet of food was provided and the mother was asked to serve her child and herself. The amount of food served and consumed by the child was recorded. Main independent variables of interest included maternal body mass index (BMI), child BMI Z-score, and maternal perception of personal and child hunger. The primary dependent variable was the total calories the mother served her child. Regression models and a moderated mediation were used to examine the relation between variables. Calories served to the child was positively associated with calories consumed by the child. Maternal perception of her own hunger was related to her perception of her child's hunger. Furthermore, maternal perception of child hunger explained the relationship between maternal perception of personal hunger and total calories served to the child, although only for obese mothers. Mothers may be serving their children larger portion sizes based on their personal weight and their perception of their child's hunger. To help children obtain or maintain a healthy weight, obesity prevention and intervention programmes should help mothers serve more appropriate serving sizes to their children. © 2015 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  15. Characterizing dinner meals served and consumed by low-income preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklas, Theresa A; O'Neil, Carol E; Stuff, Janice E; Hughes, Sheryl O; Liu, Yan

    2012-12-01

    A dinner meal is consumed by approximately 95% of preschool children, yet few studies have characterized the dinner meal within a broader environmental context. The primary goal of this study was to identify the average quantities of foods served and consumed at the dinner meal by preschool children. A secondary goal was to look at factors that influenced the total amounts of food and energy consumed among preschoolers at the dinner meal. Food intake at a family dinner meal was measured using digital photography in African-American and Hispanic-American preschool children (n = 231). Pictorial records were converted to gram and energy estimates of food served and consumed; grams were converted to kilocalories for each food using Nutrition Data System for Research (NDSR) nutritional software. Foods were categorized by groups/subgroups. Comparison of means and coefficient of variation was examined overall and by food groups for food grams (and energy) served, consumed, and wasted. The relationship of mother/child characteristics to amounts served and consumed were analyzed by regression and analysis of variance (ANOVA). Plate waste was high; 30% of the foods served to the child at the dinner meal were not consumed. The amounts of food and beverage served and consumed varied within and among the food groups studied. The proportion of children served a major food group at the dinner meal varied considerably: 44% fruit/juice, 97% vegetables, 99% grains, 97% meats, 74% dairy, 66% sweetened beverages, 92% fat and oils, and 40% sweets and sugars. The amount of food served was positively associated with the amount consumed (p < 0.0001). Energy density of the dinner meal was positively associated with energy intake consumed (p < 0.0001). Plate waste and variation in amounts served and consumed was substantial. The amount of food served was positively associated with the amount of food consumed by preschool children.

  16. Comparison of menus to actual foods and beverages served in North Carolina child-care centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin Neelon, Sara E; Copeland, Kristen A; Ball, Sarah C; Bradley, Lauren; Ward, Dianne S

    2010-12-01

    Menus from child-care centers are an important source of information for parents, researchers, and child-care regulators, but previous research suggests that menus do not accurately represent foods served. The purpose of this study was to compare menus with actual foods and beverages served to children in child-care centers. Menus were collected and a dietary observation was conducted to document all foods and beverages served to children during the course of 1 day in 84 child-care centers in North Carolina in the fall of 2005. Frequencies of foods and beverages on the menus vs those served were computed by eating occasion, food category, and individual foods and beverages. Of the 254 meals and snacks served, 131 (52%) meals and snacks matched entirely what was stated on the menu. Of the 820 individual foods and beverages served, 710 (86.6%) matched those listed on the menus. An additional 110 foods and beverages were served but not listed on the menus. Grains, juice, and vegetables were served less often than indicated on the menus, and milk, protein-rich foods, fruits, mixed dishes, and foods of low nutritional value were served more often than listed on the menus. Overall, just over half of all meals and snacks matched menus, and nearly 90% of individual foods and beverages served matched those stated on menus. Parents of children in child care and dietetics practitioners providing consultation to child-care centers can encourage not only provision of healthy foods and beverages, but also accurate menus in child care. Copyright © 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transferable site remediation technologies developed by U.S. DOE Office of Science and Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, T.D.

    1996-01-01

    To provide needed technologies for site remediation, the US Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Management, Office of Science and Technology (OST) is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater. The Technology Investment Decision model serves as a framework for technology management in OST. Seven technology maturation stages are used in the model. These stages run from basic research through implementation. The Innovative Technology Summary Reports (ITSRs) provide a technical synopsis of an individual technology that has been developed. An ITSR is prepared for each technology that is successfully demonstrated in the field. The information required to produce an ITSR is collected as the technology matures through the Technology Investment Decision Process. As of July 1996 there have been thirteen ITSRs completed. This paper describes those thirteen technologies

  18. Dehumanization: An Overview of Educational Technology's Critics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Geoff

    Almost since its inception, the word "dehumanization" has caused apprehension, especially as the words relate to educational technology. This paper is a brief analysis of educational technology's critics from the late 1950s through present time; it also serves as a study of how their rhetoric has affected the structure of elementary and…

  19. Welcome to Quantum Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thew, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Quantum information science and related technologies now involve thousands of researchers worldwide, cutting across physics, chemistry, engineering, bioscience, applied mathematics and computer science, extending from fundamental science to novel applications and industry. This situation defines the scope and mission of Quantum Science and Technology, a new IOP journal serving the interests of this multidisciplinary field by publishing research of the highest quality and impact.

  20. Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology publishes original papers in areas of Agriculture, Science, Technology, Biotechnology, Medicine and Architecture. It serves the scientific community in Africa. Vol 16, No 2 (2014). DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Open Access DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT Subscription or Fee Access ...

  1. Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Journal of Science and Technology (JUST) aims principally at publishing articles resulting from original research whether pure or applied in the various aspects of academic endeavour broadly classified as Science (Physical, Biological and Chemical), Humanities and Technology. It aims at serving the academic ...

  2. Electronic technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Su

    2010-07-01

    This book is composed of five chapters, which introduces electronic technology about understanding of electronic, electronic component, radio, electronic application, communication technology, semiconductor on its basic, free electron and hole, intrinsic semiconductor and semiconductor element, Diode such as PN junction diode, characteristic of junction diode, rectifier circuit and smoothing circuit, transistor on structure of transistor, characteristic of transistor and common emitter circuit, electronic application about electronic equipment, communication technology and education, robot technology and high electronic technology.

  3. Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) multibeam antenna technology verification experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Larko, Jeffrey M.; Lagin, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    The Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS) is a key to reaching NASA's goal of developing high-risk, advanced communications technology using multiple frequency bands to support the nation's future communication needs. Using the multiple, dynamic hopping spot beams, and advanced on board switching and processing systems, ACTS will open a new era in communications satellite technology. One of the key technologies to be validated as part of the ACTS program is the multibeam antenna with rapidly reconfigurable hopping and fixed spot beam to serve users equipped with small-aperature terminals within the coverage areas. The proposed antenna technology experiments are designed to evaluate in-orbit ACTS multibeam antenna performance (radiation pattern, gain, cross pol levels, etc.).

  4. A scalable new mechanism to store and serve the ATLAS detector description through a REST web API

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Until now, geometry information for the detector description of HEP experiments was only stored in online relational databases integrated into the experiments’ frameworks or described in files with text-based markup languages. In all cases, to build and store the detector description, a full software stack was needed. In this paper, we present a new and scalable mechanism to store the geometry data and to serve the detector description data through a web interface and a REST API. This new approach decouples the geometry information from the experiment’s framework. Moreover, it provides new functionalities to users, who can now search for specific volumes and get partial detector description, or filter geometry data based on custom criteria. We present two approaches to build a REST API to serve geometry data, based on two different technologies used in other fields and communities: the search engine ElasticSearch and the graph database Neo4j. We describe their characteristics and we compare them using rea...

  5. A scalable new mechanism to store and serve the ATLAS detector description through a REST web API

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Until now, geometry information for the detector description of HEP experiments was only stored in online relational databases integrated in the experiments’ frameworks or described in files with text-based markup languages. In all cases, to build and store the detector description, a full software stack was needed. In this paper we present a new and scalable mechanism to store the geometry data and to serve the detector description data through a REST web-based API. This new approach decouples the geometry information from the experiment’s framework. Moreover, it provides new functionalities to users, who can now search for specific volumes and get partial detector description, or filter geometry data based on custom criteria. We present two approaches to build a REST API to serve geometry data, based on two different technologies used in other fields and communities: the search engine ElasticSearch and the graph database Neo4j. We describe their characteristics and we compare them using real-world usage...

  6. 76 FR 20962 - Applications for New Awards; Native American-Serving Nontribal Institutions Part F Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ...). Native American. The term `Native American' means an individual who is of a tribe, people, or culture... Part F Program, the Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISI...

  7. Serving future transportation needs : succession planning for a state department of transportation organization, its people & mission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-01

    This project will examine the employment of people who accomplish the work of the Department of Transportation & Public Facilities : (AKDOT&PF) those who will serve the future transportation needs of Alaska. The study will focus primarily on prof...

  8. A Comparison of Serve Speed and Motor Coordination between Elite and Club Level Tennis Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Söğüt, Mustafa

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the serve speed and motor coordination of elite and club level junior tennis players aged 11-14 years. Participants (n=35) were assigned to one of the two groups according to their experience, weekly training volume and competition level. Serve speed was assessed with a sports radar gun. Motor coordination was evaluated by means of the Körperkoordinationstest für Kinder. The main results revealed that serve speed and motor coordination performance levels of the elite group were significantly higher than those of the club group. This study emphasized the importance of early participation and training intensity, which can play an important role in enhancement of serve speed and motor coordination.

  9. Methods of measuring the level of logistics serving in international business

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona BĂLĂŞESCU

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper raise the issue of logistics service of customers in international markets. The study aims optimizing logistics serving using the case of a company in Romania which has several foreign customers. The main objectives of the investigation are related to the measurement of logistic service level for the company’s foreign clients and to an evaluation of the present potential of the logistic serving strategy of this company. The instruments used for the analysis are the economic outputs, information from foreign customers and the theory about the level of logistic serving. The results of the analysis are used for making a proposal of a set of projects aiming the improvement of the serving quality of foreign customers.

  10. Les réserves extractivistes, état des lieux

    OpenAIRE

    Aubertin, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    La lutte des seringueiros a popularisé la notion de réserves extractivistes. Au départ calquée sur le modèle de la réserve indigène, la réserve extractiviste devait apporter une solution foncière aux conflits avec les patrons en garantissant, grâce à des expropriations menées par l’État, un droit d’usage collectif aux seringueiros et le maintien de leur outil de production, la forêt. L’histoire des réserves extractivistes est significative des modifications politiques enregistrées ces dix der...

  11. Testosterone reduces conscious detection of signals serving social correction - Implications for antisocial behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Honk, E.J. van; Schutter, D.J.L.G.

    2007-01-01

    Elevated levels of testosterone have repeatedly been associated with antisocial behavior, but the psychobiological mechanisms underlying this effect are unknown. However, testosterone is evidently capable of altering the processing of facial threat, and facial signals of fear and anger serve

  12. 76 FR 11195 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Census Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    ... technical expertise from the following disciplines: demography, economics, geography, psychology, statistics... required annual financial disclosure statements by those who serve as Special Government Employees... must have scientific and technical expertise in such areas as demography, economics, geography...

  13. Developing a digital photography-based method for dietary analysis in self-serve dining settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christoph, Mary J; Loman, Brett R; Ellison, Brenna

    2017-07-01

    Current population-based methods for assessing dietary intake, including food frequency questionnaires, food diaries, and 24-h dietary recall, are limited in their ability to objectively measure food intake. Digital photography has been identified as a promising addition to these techniques but has rarely been assessed in self-serve settings. We utilized digital photography to examine university students' food choices and consumption in a self-serve dining hall setting. Research assistants took pre- and post-photos of students' plates during lunch and dinner to assess selection (presence), servings, and consumption of MyPlate food groups. Four coders rated the same set of approximately 180 meals for inter-rater reliability analyses; approximately 50 additional meals were coded twice by each coder to assess intra-rater agreement. Inter-rater agreement on the selection, servings, and consumption of food groups was high at 93.5%; intra-rater agreement was similarly high with an average of 95.6% agreement. Coders achieved the highest rates of agreement in assessing if a food group was present on the plate (95-99% inter-rater agreement, depending on food group) and estimating the servings of food selected (81-98% inter-rater agreement). Estimating consumption, particularly for items such as beans and cheese that were often in mixed dishes, was more challenging (77-94% inter-rater agreement). Results suggest that the digital photography method presented is feasible for large studies in real-world environments and can provide an objective measure of food selection, servings, and consumption with a high degree of agreement between coders; however, to make accurate claims about the state of dietary intake in all-you-can-eat, self-serve settings, researchers will need to account for the possibility of diners taking multiple trips through the serving line. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Partnering with those we serve: using experiential learning activities to support community nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fries, Kathleen; Stewart, Julie G

    2012-01-01

    The concept of community is multidimensional and may include geographical boundaries and/or the shared interests of its members. Community nursing practice involves nurses, patients, and families who collaborate to address health issues and to promote positive health initiatives. Informed by community health theorists, experiential learning activities provide the structure to promote partnering in community nursing practice to achieve outcomes that benefit those who serve and those who are served.

  15. Does It Matter Whom an Agent Serves? Evidence from Recent Changes in Real Estate Agency Law.

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Christopher; Schrag, Joel

    2000-01-01

    Recent changes in real estate law hastened the shift from a seller's agency regime, in which real estate agents serve the interests of sellers, to a buyer's agency regime, in which agents serve the interests of buyers. Using data from the Atlanta real estate market, we show that the shift to buyer's agency led to a significant decline in real estate prices in the market for relatively expensive houses, while real estate prices did not significantly change in the market for relatively inexpens...

  16. Lower trunk kinematics and muscle activity during different types of tennis serves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chow John W

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To better understand the underlying mechanisms involved in trunk motion during a tennis serve, this study aimed to examine the (1 relative motion of the middle and lower trunk and (2 lower trunk muscle activity during three different types of tennis serves - flat, topspin, and slice. Methods Tennis serves performed by 11 advanced (AV and 8 advanced intermediate (AI male tennis players were videorecorded with markers placed on the back of the subject used to estimate the anatomical joint (AJ angles between the middle and lower trunk for four trunk motions (extension, left lateral flexion, and left and right twisting. Surface electromyographic (EMG techniques were used to monitor the left and right rectus abdominis (LRA and RRA, external oblique (LEO and REO, internal oblique (LIO and RIO, and erector spinae (LES and RES. The maximal AJ angles for different trunk motions during a serve and the average EMG levels for different muscles during different phases (ascending and descending windup, acceleration, and follow-through of a tennis serve were evaluated. Results The repeated measures Skill × Serve Type × Trunk Motion ANOVA for maximal AJ angle indicated no significant main effects for serve type or skill level. However, the AV group had significantly smaller extension (p = 0.018 and greater left lateral flexion (p = 0.038 angles than the AI group. The repeated measures Skill × Serve Type × Phase MANOVA revealed significant phase main effects in all muscles (p Conclusion Subjects in the AI group may be more susceptible to back injury than the AV group because of the significantly greater trunk hyperextension, and relatively large lumbar spinal loads are expected during the acceleration phase because of the hyperextension posture and profound front-back and bilateral co-activations in lower trunk muscles.

  17. Globalization & technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    Technology and globalization are interdependent processes. Globalization has a fundamental influence on the creation and diffusion of technology, which, in turn, affects the interdependence of firms and locations. This volume examines the international aspect of this interdependence at two levels...

  18. Living Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    This book is aimed at anyone who is interested in learning more about living technology, whether coming from business, the government, policy centers, academia, or anywhere else. Its purpose is to help people to learn what living technology is, what it might develop into, and how it might impact...... our lives. The phrase 'living technology' was coined to refer to technology that is alive as well as technology that is useful because it shares the fundamental properties of living systems. In particular, the invention of this phrase was called for to describe the trend of our technology becoming...... increasingly life-like or literally alive. Still, the phrase has different interpretations depending on how one views what life is. This book presents nineteen perspectives on living technology. Taken together, the interviews convey the collective wisdom on living technology's power and promise, as well as its...

  19. Different temporal bases for body and arm movements in volleyball serve reception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benerink, N H; Bootsma, R J; Zaal, F T J M

    2015-10-01

    In many sports, successfully intercepting a ball requires players to move both their body and their arms. Yet, studies of interception typically focus on one or the other. We performed an analysis of the moments of first foot and arm movements of elite-level volleyball players during serve reception. Video footage of five international matches of the Netherlands men's national volleyball team allowed the systematic coding and analysis of 347 different serve reception events. For each event, we identified the time of serve (TS) and time of contact (TC). Ball flight time (from TS to TC) varied between and within types of serve (power jump serves, n = 193, and jumping float serves, n = 154). Correlation analyses revealed that foot movement was initiated with respect to time from TS, while arm movement was initiated with respect to time until TC. These results suggest that whole-body and arm movements rely on different control processes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. WEAPONS COMPLEX OF RUSSIAN SERVING TATARS IN XV-XVII TH CENTURIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Б А Илюшин

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the issue of the offensive and defensive armament of the serving Tatars of the Moscow state in the XV-XVIIth centuries, its research degree in the national historiography, the opportunities and prospects of its enhanced studying. The serving Tatars were one of the categories of the Moscow state nobility, which is reflected, first of all, in written sources. The weapons complex of Russian serving Tatars included minimal armour. European sources do not mention armour and helms or shield. But noble Tatars could have costly armour of many types that were used in that epoch by peoples of Eastern Europe and Middle East - Russians, Persians, Turks. The basic weapons of the serving Tatars were bows and arrows. In the close combat they were using sabres, and (rarely spears. The fire weapon was not used by the serving Tatars (or they used it very rarely and it was not characteristic for their weapons complex, because it was ineffective in their tactics. The serving Tatars were light mobile horse archers that preferred battles of long-distance.

  1. Digital Dynamometer and Goniometer in Analyzing Isometric Capacities and Tennis Serving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Chia-Che

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study was to investigate relation between tennis serving techniques and shoulder joint muscles in various skilled players in Taiwan. The study used Micro FET3 (Digital Manual Muscle Dynamometer and Goniometer which appraised the isometric capacity of the shoulder joint and perimeter muscle. The research consists of 13 collegiate male tennis players; 6 players were in elite groups and the other 7 players were in general groups. The tennis players performed 30 servers testing the range to appraise serve technique reflect. The application of t-test and Linear Regression analyzed the serve technique reflect interrelated with the shoulder joint muscle. The muscle strength and the serve accuracy predominate interrelated place where middle trapezius, shoulder internal rotator, and shoulder external rotator of favor hands were obvious. The muscle strength and the serve speed predominated interrelated place where shoulder internal rotator and shoulder external rotator of favor hands were obvious. This study also discovered triceps of favor hands, shoulder extensor, shoulder abductor, triceps, and middle trapezius of non- favor hands muscle strength didn't have any outstanding reference with tennis league table. The research confirmed that the shoulder joint muscle discipline increased shoulder internal rotator, shoulder external rotator, and middle trapezius that help the serve technique reflect.

  2. Earthing Technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blok, Vincent

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we reflect on the conditions under which new technologies emerge in the Anthropocene and raise the question of how to conceptualize sustainable technologies therein. To this end, we explore an eco-centric approach to technology development, called biomimicry. We discuss opposing

  3. Technology Tiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    A technology tier is a level in a product system: final product, system, subsystem, component, or part. As a concept, it contrasts traditional “vertical” special technologies (for example, mechanics and electronics) and focuses “horizontal” feature technologies such as product characteristics...

  4. El aprendizaje en línea Online learning: Serving the needs of diverse students’ populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paquienséguy Françoise

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo reporta resultados de un proyecto de investigación que analiza el uso de las tecnologías de la Información y de la Comunicación (TIC en los cursos en línea universitarios en Francia y en México. El marco teórico del estudio se deriva de la perspectiva francófona sobre los usos sociales de las TIC. Desde este enfoque, la apropiación del usuario de las tecnologías y servicios en línea es crucial para entender su desempeño académico porque las TIC se consideran construcciones sociales con diferentes significados, dependiendo de sus usuarios y contextos de uso. Este documento presenta los resultados de 25 entrevistas semiestructuradas con estudiantes de dos universidades mexicanas: la UdG Virtual y la UABC. Los resultados sugieren que el aprendizaje en línea atiende una variedad de necesidades de los estudiantes, incluyendo ayudarles a comprender la lógica de uso de la computadora y software básico, como fue el caso de algunos estudiantes de nuevo ingreso en la UABC, hasta el reconocimiento y validación de habilidades profesionales en el caso de los estudiantes adultos de la UdG Virtual. En general, los discursos de los alumnos mostraron diferentes niveles de apropiación y diferentes formas de utilización de los programas en línea disponibles, pero para la mayoría de los estudiantes, el aprendizaje en línea significó una oportunidad para avanzar académicamente, lo que no hubiera sido posible de otra manera. This paper reports results from a research project that analyzes the use of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs in online higher education courses in France and Mexico. The francophone perspective on the development of the social uses of ICTs informs the theoretical approach. Within this view, the user’s appropriation of technologies and online services is crucial to understanding their academic performance, because ICTs are considered social constructions with different meanings according to

  5. Soulful Technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fausing, Bent

    2010-01-01

    or anthropomorphism is important for the branding of new technology. Technology is seen as creating a techno-transcendence towards a more qualified humanity which is in contact with fundamental human values like intuition, vision, and sensing; all the qualities that technology, industrialization, and rationalization......, - in short modernity - have taken away from human existence. What old technology has removed now comes back through new technology promoting a better humanity. The present article investigates how digital technology and affects are presented and combined, with examples from everyday imagery, e.g. TV......Samsung introduced in 2008 a mobile phone called "Soul" made with a human touch and including itself a "magic touch". Through the analysis of a Nokia mobile phone TV-commercials I want to examine the function and form of digital technology in everyday images. The mobile phone and its digital camera...

  6. Magnesium absorption from mineral water decreases with increasing quantities of magnesium per serving in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Eri; Tai, Hideyuki; Uozumi, Yoshinobu; Nakagawa, Koji; Matsui, Tohru

    2012-01-01

    It is hypothesized that magnesium (Mg) absorption from mineral water is affected by the concentration of Mg in the water, the consumption pattern, and the volume consumed per serving. The present study examined the effect of serving volume and consumption pattern of artificial mineral water (AMW) and Mg concentration on Mg absorption in rats. Magnesium in AMW was labeled with magnesium-25 as a tracer. Each group consisted of 6 or 7 rats. In experiment 1, the rats received 1 mL of AMW containing 200 mg Mg/L at 4 times, 400 mg Mg/L twice, or 800 mg Mg/L at 1 time. In experiment 2, the rats received 1 mL of AMW containing 200 mg Mg/L or 0.25 mL of AMW containing 800 mg Mg/L at 4 times or 1 mL of AMW containing 800 mg Mg/L at 1 time. The absorption of Mg decreased with increasing Mg concentrations in the same serving volume of AMW with different serving frequencies. When the AMW containing 800 mg Mg/L was portioned into 4 servings, Mg absorption increased to the level of absorption in the group exposed to AMW containing 200 mg Mg/L served at the same frequency. These results suggest that the Mg concentration and the volume of AMW do not affect Mg absorption per se, but Mg absorption from AMW decreases when the amount of Mg in each serving is increased. Thus, frequent consumption is preferable for mineral water rich in Mg when the total consumption of mineral water is the same. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Lumbar loading in the elite adolescent tennis serve: link to low back pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amity; Straker, Leon; O'Sullivan, Peter; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2013-08-01

    This study aimed to quantify and compare lumbar region kinetics in kick and flat serves performed by elite, adolescent male players with and without a history of low back pain (LBP). Lumbar region kinematics, as well as racquet velocity and the position of the ball at impact, was described to facilitate kinetic data interpretation. Twenty Tennis Australia adolescent male players participated; 7 had a history of disabling LBP and confirmed L4/L5 injury and 13 were age-, height-, mass-, and performance-matched controls. The VICON motion analysis system was used to record racquet, upper and lower limb, trunk, and lumbar movement during three "flat" and three "kick" serves. A customized mathematical model calculated lumbar region kinetics/kinematics, racquet velocity, and ball position at impact, and these are reported as if all players were right-handed. A series of 2 × 2 mixed-model ANOVA were used to compare between pain/no pain and kick/flat serves. There was no significant difference in racquet velocity or ball position at impact between pain groups or serve types. The players with LBP reported significantly greater (mean difference = 1.5 N · kg(-1)) peak left lateral force than the control group. The flat serve was associated with significantly greater flexion moments (mean difference = 2.7 N · kg(-1)) than the kick serve. The lumbar region undergoes substantial loading during both the kick and the flat tennis serves, including lateral flexion forces approximately eight times those experienced during running. Given that these left lateral flexion forces are significantly greater in players with a history of disabling LBP and occur simultaneous with peak vertical force and extension and right lateral rotations, this may be an important LBP mechanism in this population.

  8. Medicare's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program in Surgery May Disproportionately Affect Minority-serving Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Terry; Ryan, Andrew M; Gonzalez, Andrew A; Dimick, Justin B

    2015-06-01

    To project readmission penalties for hospitals performing cardiac surgery and examine how these penalties will affect minority-serving hospitals. The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program will potentially expand penalties for higher-than-predicted readmission rates to cardiac procedures in the near future. The impact of these penalties on minority-serving hospitals is unknown. We examined national Medicare beneficiaries undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in 2008 to 2010 (N = 255,250 patients, 1186 hospitals). Using hierarchical logistic regression, we calculated hospital observed-to-expected readmission ratios. Hospital penalties were projected according to the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program formula using only coronary artery bypass grafting readmissions with a 3% maximum penalty of total Medicare revenue. Hospitals were classified into quintiles according to proportion of black patients treated. Minority-serving hospitals were defined as hospitals in the top quintile whereas non-minority-serving hospitals were those in the bottom quintile. Projected readmission penalties were compared across quintiles. Forty-seven percent of hospitals (559 of 1186) were projected to be assessed a penalty. Twenty-eight percent of hospitals (330 of 1186) would be penalized less than 1% of total Medicare revenue whereas 5% of hospitals (55 of 1186) would receive the maximum 3% penalty. Minority-serving hospitals were almost twice as likely to be penalized than non-minority-serving hospitals (61% vs 32%) and were projected almost triple the reductions in reimbursement ($112 million vs $41 million). Minority-serving hospitals would disproportionately bear the burden of readmission penalties if expanded to include cardiac surgery. Given these hospitals' narrow profit margins, readmission penalties may have a profound impact on these hospitals' ability to care for disadvantaged patients.

  9. 77 FR 44582 - Applications To Serve as Accountability Agents in the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-30

    .... SUMMARY: The International Trade Administration's Office of Technology and Electronic Commerce (OTEC... CONTACT: Joshua Harris, Office of Technology and Electronic Commerce, International Trade Administration... electronic commerce, facilitate trade and economic growth, and strengthen consumer privacy protections. In...

  10. Using Terminal Services to Serve Geospatial Software and Data Resources of Corps Project Offices

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Graves, Mark

    2003-01-01

    Advances in geographic information systems (GIS) are causing the technology to no longer be considered a separate entity, but rather an integral component of the overall information technology infrastructure...

  11. Digital technology and journalism: implications for Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Pavlik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has brought sweeping changes to journalism  and the social institutions it serves. Journalism has historically played a central role in the U.S. and other democracies, serving as a primary source of news and information for citizens on matters of public importance. This paper examines the implications of these changes for democracy. It explores the question of whether a more interactive form of journalism will produce a more engaged and informed electorate.

  12. DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY AND JOURNALISM: implications for Democracy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John V. Pavlik

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology has brought sweeping changes to journalism  and the social institutions it serves. Journalism has historically played a central role in the U.S. and other democracies, serving as a primary source of news and information for citizens on matters of public importance. This paper examines the implications of these changes for democracy. It explores the question of whether a more interactive form of journalism will produce a more engaged and informed electorate.

  13. Physics of the Cosmos Program Annual Technology Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Bruce Thai; Cardiff, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    What's in this Report? What's New? This fifth Program Annual Technology Report (PATR) summarizes the Programs technology development activities for fiscal year (FY) 2015. The PATR serves four purposes.1. Summarize the technology gaps identified by the astrophysics community;2. Present the results of this years technology gap prioritization by the PCOS Technology Management Board (TMB);3. Report on newly funded PCOS Strategic Astrophysics Technology (SAT) projects; and4. Detail progress, current status, and activities planned for the coming year for all technologies supported by PCOS Supporting Research and Technology (SRT) funding in FY 2015. .

  14. Biomechanical Analysis of Abdominal Injury in Tennis Serves. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Tubez, Bénédicte Forthomme, Jean-Louis Croisier, Caroline Cordonnier, Olivier Brüls, Vincent Denoël, Gilles Berwart, Maurice Joris, Stéphanie Grosdent, Cédric Schwartz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of a professional tennis player who has suffered from a medical tear on the left rectus abdominis muscle after tennis serve. The goal of the study is to understand whether the injury could be explained by an inappropriate technique. For this purpose, we analyzed in three dimensions the kinematic and kinetic aspects of the serve. We also performed isokinetic tests of the player’s knees. We then compared the player to five other professional players as reference. We observed a possible deficit of energy transfer because of an important anterior pelvis tilt. Some compensation made by the player during the serve could be a possible higher abdominal contraction and a larger shoulder external rotation. These particularities could induce an abdominal overwork that could explain the first injury and may provoke further injuries.

  15. Technology '90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report

  16. Sensemaking technologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Øland

    Research scope: The scope of the project is to study technological implementation processes by using Weick's sensemaking concept (Weick, 1995). The purpose of using a social constructivist approach to investigate technological implementation processes is to find out how new technologies transform...... patterns of social action and interaction in organisations (Barley 1986; 1990, Orlikowski 2000). Current research in the field shows that new technologies affect organisational routines/structures/social relationships/power relations/dependencies and alter organisational roles (Barley 1986; 1990, Burkhardt......, Orlikowski 2000). Viewing the use of technology as a process of enactment opens up for investigating the social processes of interpreting new technology into the organisation (Orlikowski 2000). The scope of the PhD project will therefore be to gain a deeper understanding of how the enactment of new...

  17. Adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more valid cue to immunocompetence in human mate choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantala, Markus J; Coetzee, Vinet; Moore, Fhionna R; Skrinda, Ilona; Kecko, Sanita; Krama, Tatjana; Kivleniece, Inese; Krams, Indrikis

    2013-01-22

    According to the 'good genes' hypothesis, females choose males based on traits that indicate the male's genetic quality in terms of disease resistance. The 'immunocompetence handicap hypothesis' proposed that secondary sexual traits serve as indicators of male genetic quality, because they indicate that males can contend with the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. Masculinity is commonly assumed to serve as such a secondary sexual trait. Yet, women do not consistently prefer masculine looking men, nor is masculinity consistently related to health across studies. Here, we show that adiposity, but not masculinity, significantly mediates the relationship between a direct measure of immune response (hepatitis B antibody response) and attractiveness for both body and facial measurements. In addition, we show that circulating testosterone is more closely associated with adiposity than masculinity. These findings indicate that adiposity, compared with masculinity, serves as a more important cue to immunocompetence in female mate choice.

  18. [Intention to serve the same company for long years and job satisfaction in Japanese workers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Shinichiro

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relation between intention to serve the same company for long years and job satisfaction in Japanese workers. Four hundred eighteen Japanese workers completed a questionnaire to assess intention to serve for long years and job satisfaction. Job satisfaction was measured by two scales. One scale was consisted of the items which were deviced in the preliminary study concerning satisfaction with the company, and the other was consisted of the items based on the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. A factor analysis on the former scale yielded four factors: fosterage by company, order in company, company's name recognition, and expansibility of company. A factor analysis on the latter yielded four factors: contribution and activity, recognition and benefits, supervision, and discretion on job. The multiple regression analysis showed that "expansibility of company" was the most important predictor of intention to serve for long years.

  19. Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Weidian

    2013-09-27

    This project, “Building Surface Science Capacity to Serve the Automobile Industry in Southeastern Michigan” was carried out in two phases: (1) the 2009 – 2012 renovation of space in the new EMU Science Complex, which included the Surface Science Laboratory (SSL), a very vigorous research lab at EMU that carries on a variety of research projects to serve the auto and other industries in Michigan; and (2) the 2013 purchase of several pieces of equipment to further enhance the research capability of the SSL. The funding granted by the DoE was proposed to “renovate the space in the Science Complex to include SSL and purchase equipment for tribological and electrochemical impedance measurements in the lab, thus SSL will serve the auto and other industries in Michigan better.” We believe we have fully accomplished the mission.

  20. State Technologies Advancement Collaborative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David S. Terry

    2012-01-30

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), and Association of State Energy Research and Technology Transfer Institutions (ASERTTI) signed an intergovernmental agreement on November 14, 2002, that allowed states and territories and the Federal Government to better collaborate on energy research, development, demonstration and deployment (RDD&D) projects. The agreement established the State Technologies Advancement Collaborative (STAC) which allowed the states and DOE to move RDD&D forward using an innovative competitive project selection and funding process. A cooperative agreement between DOE and NASEO served as the contracting instrument for this innovative federal-state partnership obligating funds from DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Office of Fossil Energy to plan, fund, and implement RDD&D projects that were consistent with the common priorities of the states and DOE. DOE's Golden Field Office provided Federal oversight and guidance for the STAC cooperative agreement. The STAC program was built on the foundation of prior Federal-State efforts to collaborate on and engage in joint planning for RDD&D. Although STAC builds on existing, successful programs, it is important to note that it was not intended to replace other successful joint DOE/State initiatives such as the State Energy Program or EERE Special Projects. Overall the STAC process was used to fund, through three competitive solicitations, 35 successful multi-state research, development, deployment, and demonstration projects with an overall average non-federal cost share of 43%. Twenty-two states were awarded at least one prime contract, and organizations in all 50 states and some territories were involved as subcontractors in at least one STAC project. Projects were funded in seven program areas: (1) Building Technologies, (2) Industrial Technologies, (3) Transportation Technologies, (4) Distributed Energy

  1. Technological risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klinke, A.; Renn, O.

    1998-01-01

    The empirical part about the technological risks deals with different technologies: nuclear energy, early warning systems of nuclear weapons and NBC-weapons, and electromagnetic fields. The potential of damage, the contemporary management strategies and the relevant characteristics will be described for each technology: risks of nuclear energy; risks of early warning systems of nuclear weapons and NBC-weapons; risks of electromagnetic fields. (authors)

  2. Technological risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klinke, A.; Renn, O. [Center of Technology Assessment in Baden-Wuerttemberg, Stuttgart (Germany)

    1998-07-01

    The empirical part about the technological risks deals with different technologies: nuclear energy, early warning systems of nuclear weapons and NBC-weapons, and electromagnetic fields. The potential of damage, the contemporary management strategies and the relevant characteristics will be described for each technology: risks of nuclear energy; risks of early warning systems of nuclear weapons and NBC-weapons; risks of electromagnetic fields. (authors)

  3. Biomechanical analysis of abdominal injury in tennis serves. A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tubez, François; Forthomme, Bénédicte; Croisier, Jean-Louis; Cordonnier, Caroline; Brüls, Olivier; Denoël, Vincent; Berwart, Gilles; Joris, Maurice; Grosdent, Stéphanie; Schwartz, Cédric

    2015-06-01

    The serve is an important stroke in any high level tennis game. A well-mastered serve is a substantial advantage for players. However, because of its repeatability and its intensity, this stroke is potentially deleterious for upper limbs, lower limbs and trunk. The trunk is a vital link in the production and transfer of energy from the lower limbs to the upper limbs; therefore, kinematic disorder could be a potential source of risk for trunk injury in tennis. This research studies the case of a professional tennis player who has suffered from a medical tear on the left rectus abdominis muscle after tennis serve. The goal of the study is to understand whether the injury could be explained by an inappropriate technique. For this purpose, we analyzed in three dimensions the kinematic and kinetic aspects of the serve. We also performed isokinetic tests of the player's knees. We then compared the player to five other professional players as reference. We observed a possible deficit of energy transfer because of an important anterior pelvis tilt. Some compensation made by the player during the serve could be a possible higher abdominal contraction and a larger shoulder external rotation. These particularities could induce an abdominal overwork that could explain the first injury and may provoke further injuries. Key pointsIn the proximal-distal sequence, energy is transmitted from lower limbs to upper limps via trunk.The 3D analysis tool is an indispensable test for an objective evaluation of the kinematic in the tennis serve.Multiple evaluations techniques are useful for fuller comprehension of the kinematics and contribute to the awareness of the player's staff concerning pathologies and performance.

  4. Is the environment in kindergarten associated with the vegetables served and eaten? The BRA Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himberg-Sundet, Anne; Kristiansen, Anne Lene; Bjelland, Mona; Moser, Thomas; Holthe, Asle; Andersen, Lene F; Lien, Nanna

    2018-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the associations between the economic, political, sociocultural and physical environments in kindergartens, along with the frequency and variety of vegetables served, and the amount of vegetables eaten. The BRA Study collected data through two paper-based questionnaires answered by the kindergarten leader and pedagogical leader of each selected kindergarten, and a five-day vegetable diary from kindergartens ( n = 73) in Vestfold and Buskerud Counties, Norway. The questionnaires assessed environmental factors, and the frequency and variety of vegetables served. The non-parametric Mann-Whitney U and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to explore the associations between factors in the kindergarten environments and vegetables served and eaten. Kindergartens that included expenditures for food and beverages in the parental fees served a larger variety of vegetables ( p = 0.046). A higher frequency of served vegetables ( p = 0.014) and a larger amount ( p = 0.027) of vegetables eaten were found in kindergartens where parents paid a monthly fee of 251 NOK or more. Similarly, the amount of vegetables eaten was higher ( p = 0.017) in kindergartens where the employees paid a monthly fee to eat at work. Furthermore, a larger amount ( p = 0.046) of vegetables was eaten in kindergartens that had written guidelines for food and beverages that were offered. This study indicates that the economic environment in a kindergarten seems to be positively associated with the vegetables served and eaten there. This is of high relevance for public health policy as vegetable consumption is an important factor in reducing the risk of non-communicable diseases.

  5. Back pain in tennis players: a link with lumbar serve kinematics and range of motion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Amity; O'Sullivan, Peter; Straker, Leon; Elliott, Bruce; Reid, Machar

    2014-02-01

    This study compared regional lumbar (upper and lower), pelvis, trunk, and lower limb kinematics between elite male adolescent players with and without a history of low back pain (LBP) during the kick and flat serves as well as regional lumbar mobility and serving kinematics relative to the end of range. Seven players with a history of LBP and confirmed L4/L5 injury and 13 controls matched for age, height, mass, and performance underwent a three-dimensional motion analysis during serving trials and lumbar mobility assessments. Regional lumbar, pelvis, trunk, and lower limb kinematics were compared between pain/no pain and kick/flat serves using a series of 2 × 2 mixed-model ANOVA, with independent samples t-tests used to compare regional lumbar mobility between pain/no pain. The pain group had significantly reduced lower lumbar mobility in every plane of motion than the no pain group. The pain group demonstrated less right lower lumbar and pelvis/shoulder rotation, greater right pelvic tilt, earlier peak right knee extension velocity during the drive phase of the tennis serves, and greater lower lumbar and pelvis left rotation, upper lumbar left lateral flexion, and anterior pelvis tilt during the forward-swing phase. All players approached their lumbar end of range during the serve. The results of this investigation suggest that a multidimensional LBP management and prevention strategy is required, including the assessment of regional spinal mobility, the lower limb and upper limb and spinal kinematics, and the integrated work between clinicians and coaches to adapt adverse technique.

  6. Chemistry Technology

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Chemistry technology experts at NCATS engage in a variety of innovative translational research activities, including:Design of bioactive small molecules.Development...

  7. Intakes of calcium, vitamin D, and dairy servings and dental plaque in older Danish adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adegboye, Amanda Ra; Christensen, Lisa Bøge; Holm-Pedersen, Poul

    2013-01-01

    to the dentist, use of dental floss/tooth pick and salivary flow, among those with higher, but not lower, vitamin D intake. CONCLUSION: Intakes of calcium dairy-servings within-recommendations were inversely associated with plaque, among those with higher, but not lower, vitamin D intakes. Due to the cross...... as below vs. within-recommendations and dairy intake as =3 servings/ d. Dental plaque, defined as the percentage of tooth surfaces exhibiting plaque, was classified as =median value (9.5%). Analyses were stratified by lower and higher (>=6.8 mug/d) vitamin D intake. FINDINGS: Intakes of calcium (OR = 0...

  8. Handbook of hydraulic fluid technology

    CERN Document Server

    Totten, George E

    2011-01-01

    ""The Handbook of Hydraulic Fluid Technology"" serves as the foremost resource for designing hydraulic systems and for selecting hydraulic fluids used in engineering applications. Featuring new illustrations, data tables, as well as practical examples, this second edition is updated with essential information on the latest hydraulic fluids and testing methods. The detailed text facilitates unparalleled understanding of the total hydraulic system, including important hardware, fluid properties, and hydraulic lubricants. Written by worldwide experts, the book also offers a rigorous overview of h

  9. Positive technology: using interactive technologies to promote positive functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riva, Giuseppe; Baños, Rosa M; Botella, Cristina; Wiederhold, Brenda K; Gaggioli, Andrea

    2012-02-01

    It is generally assumed that technology assists individuals in improving the quality of their lives. However, the impact of new technologies and media on well-being and positive functioning is still somewhat controversial. In this paper, we contend that the quality of experience should become the guiding principle in the design and development of new technologies, as well as a primary metric for the evaluation of their applications. The emerging discipline of Positive Psychology provides a useful framework to address this challenge. Positive Psychology is the scientific study of optimal human functioning and flourishing. Instead of drawing on a "disease model" of human behavior, it focuses on factors that enable individuals and communities to thrive and build the best in life. In this paper, we propose the "Positive Technology" approach--the scientific and applied approach to the use of technology for improving the quality of our personal experience through its structuring, augmentation, and/or replacement--as a way of framing a suitable object of study in the field of cyberpsychology and human-computer interaction. Specifically, we suggest that it is possible to use technology to influence three specific features of our experience--affective quality, engagement/actualization, and connectedness--that serve to promote adaptive behaviors and positive functioning. In this framework, positive technologies are classified according to their effects on a specific feature of personal experience. Moreover, for each level, we have identified critical variables that can be manipulated to guide the design and development of positive technologies.

  10. CCTV networking and digital technology

    CERN Document Server

    Damjanovski, Vlado

    2005-01-01

    Closed circuit television (CCTV) is experiencing a leap in technology using digital techniques, networking and the Internet. The new edition of this high-level professional reference retains the particulars that made the first edition a success, including the details of CCD cameras, lenses, coaxial cables, fiber-optics, and system design, but it is expanded to cover all video compression techniques used in the ever increasing assortment of digital video recorders (DVRs) available on the market today. This new edition of the book CCTV demystifies DVR technology. It also serves to clarify the te

  11. Technology Catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-02-01

    The Department of Energy's Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) is responsible for remediating its contaminated sites and managing its waste inventory in a safe and efficient manner. EM's Office of Technology Development (OTD) supports applied research and demonstration efforts to develop and transfer innovative, cost-effective technologies to its site clean-up and waste management programs within EM's Office of Environmental Restoration and Office of Waste Management. The purpose of the Technology Catalogue is to provide performance data on OTD-developed technologies to scientists and engineers assessing and recommending technical solutions within the Department's clean-up and waste management programs, as well as to industry, other federal and state agencies, and the academic community. OTD's applied research and demonstration activities are conducted in programs referred to as Integrated Demonstrations (IDs) and Integrated Programs (IPs). The IDs test and evaluate.systems, consisting of coupled technologies, at specific sites to address generic problems, such as the sensing, treatment, and disposal of buried waste containers. The IPs support applied research activities in specific applications areas, such as in situ remediation, efficient separations processes, and site characterization. The Technology Catalogue is a means for communicating the status. of the development of these innovative technologies. The FY93 Technology Catalogue features technologies successfully demonstrated in the field through IDs and sufficiently mature to be used in the near-term. Technologies from the following IDs are featured in the FY93 Technology Catalogue: Buried Waste ID (Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho); Mixed Waste Landfill ID (Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico); Underground Storage Tank ID (Hanford, Washington); Volatile organic compound (VOC) Arid ID (Richland, Washington); and VOC Non-Arid ID (Savannah River Site, South Carolina)

  12. Thermally activated technologies: Technology Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this Technology Roadmap is to outline a set of actions for government and industry to develop thermally activated technologies for converting America’s wasted heat resources into a reservoir of pollution-free energy for electric power, heating, cooling, refrigeration, and humidity control. Fuel flexibility is important. The actions also cover thermally activated technologies that use fossil fuels, biomass, and ultimately hydrogen, along with waste heat.

  13. Technological Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  14. Maritime Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Herman

    1997-01-01

    Elementary introduction to the subject "Maritime Technology".The contents include drawings, sketches and references in English without any supplementary text.......Elementary introduction to the subject "Maritime Technology".The contents include drawings, sketches and references in English without any supplementary text....

  15. 77 FR 9703 - Notice of Funding Opportunity and Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Serving Young...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Solicitation for Grant Applications (SGA) for Serving Young Adult Ex-Offenders Through Training and Service... system from the age of 14 or above and have never been convicted as an adult under Federal or State Law... instruction and reflection that enrich the learning experience, teach civic responsibility, and encourage...

  16. 34 CFR 300.644 - Annual report of children served-criteria for counting children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annual report of children served-criteria for counting children. 300.644 Section 300.644 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... STATES FOR THE EDUCATION OF CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Monitoring, Enforcement, Confidentiality, and...

  17. Long-term sustainability of a worksite canteen intervention of serving more fruit and vegetables

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsen, Anne Vibeke; Lassen, Anne Dahl; Tetens, Inge

    2010-01-01

    . The method focused on providing ideas for increased F&V for lunch, making environmental changes in the canteens by giving access to tasteful and healthy food choices and reducing the availability of unhealthy options. Setting: Five Danish worksites serving from 50 to 500 meals a day: a military base...

  18. Principles of Peer Leadership: An Undergraduate Course for Students in Positions to Serve Fellow Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedel, Curtis R.; Kirland, Kelsey Church; Grimes, Matthew W.

    2016-01-01

    Principles of Peer Leadership is an undergraduate course developed through the collaboration of leadership educators with colleagues from residence life and fraternity/sorority life to provide instruction to undergraduate students serving in peer leadership positions across campus. The course comprises online and recitation components to connect…

  19. Supplemental Instruction and Academic Success and Retention in Science Courses at a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meling, Vanessa B.; Mundy, Marie-Anne; Kupczynski, Lori; Green, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    This study provides insight into the effectiveness of Supplemental Instruction (SI) at a Hispanic-serving institution (HSI), particularly with Hispanic students. The United States Department of Education (2010) defines an HSI as having a 25% or greater full-time, Hispanic student enrollment and 50% or more of all students are eligible for…

  20. Telephone-Administered Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Veterans Served by Community-Based Outpatient Clinics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohr, David C.; Carmody, Timothy; Erickson, Lauren; Jin, Ling; Leader, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Multiple trials have found telephone-administered cognitive behavioral therapy (T-CBT) to be effective for the treatment of depression. The aim of this study was to evaluate T-CBT for the treatment of depression among veterans served by community-based outpatient clinics (CBOCs) outside of major urban areas. Method: Eighty-five veterans…

  1. Early Head Start and Child Care Partnerships: Working Together To Serve Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buell, Martha J.; Hallam, Rena A.; Beck, Heidi L.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the growth of Early Head Start (EHS) programs, focusing on one EHS partnership with child care providers in Delaware to serve infants, toddlers, and their families. Includes discussion of partnership strategies that promote quality programming, ways the early care and education coordinator supports child development, strategies for…

  2. Assessing Diversity Awareness in University Business Students at a Hispanic Serving Liberal Arts Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiser, Angelina I. T.; Scobey, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Globalization and shifts in demographics are creating highly diverse workplaces, and managers must understand the importance of managing a diverse workforce. Students taking business management courses at a 4-year private Hispanic serving institution were asked to voluntarily participate in a study in which the researchers sought to explore the…

  3. Family Support in Nursing Homes Serving Residents with a Mental Health History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frahm, Kathryn; Gammonley, Denise; Zhang, Ning Jackie; Paek, Seung Chun

    2010-01-01

    Using 2003 nursing home data from the Minimum Data Set (MDS) database, this study investigated the role of family support among nursing homes serving residents with a mental health history. Exploratory factor analysis was used to create and test a conceptual model of family support using indicators located within the MDS database. Families were…

  4. The Purposes Outdoor Education Does, Could and Should Serve in Singapore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Susanna

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses the purposes that outdoor education does, could and should serve in Singapore. Gert Biesta's conceptualisation of three functions of education is adapted to frame deliberations on the purposes of outdoor education in Singapore's socio-political and educational milieu. The author suggests that outdoor education in Singapore…

  5. Training Staff Serving Clients with Intellectual Disabilities: A Meta-Analysis of Aspects Determining Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oorsouw, Wietske M. W. J.; Embregts, Petri J. C. M.; Bosman, Anna M. T.; Jahoda, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The last decades have seen increased emphasis on the quality of training for direct-care staff serving people with intellectual disabilities. Nevertheless, it is unclear what the key aspects of effective training are. Therefore, the aim of the present meta-analysis was to establish the ingredients (i.e., goals, format, and techniques) for staff…

  6. 78 FR 77354 - Procedural Rules To Permit Parties To File and Serve Documents Electronically

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-23

    ... FEDERAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH REVIEW COMMISSION 29 CFR Part 2700 Procedural Rules To Permit... Commission is amending its procedural rules to permit parties to file and serve documents electronically. The... intended recipients. The Commission is changing a few of its procedural rules through these interim rules...

  7. The Impact of Family Background on College Students' Chances of Serving as Student Union Cadres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinzhuo, Zhu; Junhua, Shi; Zhihui, Dong

    2015-01-01

    A survey and comparative analysis of the family backgrounds of the entire undergraduate student body of X University and the group of student union cadres shows: the proportion of college students who serve as student union cadres who come from cities and have families with high social status, high family income, and parents with high educational…

  8. The Relationships between Selection and Processing Food with Escherichia coli Contaminant on Food Stall Serving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tris Eryando

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Escherichia coli in food stalls surrounding the X Campuss in Depok, year 2012. The research conducted to examine food safety, which were served in surrounding the campus X in Depok. Escherichia coli (E. coli existence was used to indicate the quality of hygiene and sanitation of the food that was served. Using the cross sectional method, the research examined the persons who served the food to be sold in the food stalls in the campus. There were 173 food servers chosen as the respondents from 10 different food stalls around the university. The existence of E. coli examined in the microbiology laboratory in the Faculty of Public Health. Using the most probable number (MPN method found that 59.54% of the food served in the campus were contaminated E. coli. Factors affecting the existence of E. coli were the raw materials (vegetables treated and the length of cooking of the materials (rice/beens. The improper treatment such as washing with no running water or even unwashed vegetables had 5 times risk of the E. coli contamination. Cooking less than 15 minutes was also more risky than cooking more than 15 minutes. As a result, this is very important to find a method to improve knowledge and to increase practical skills in food safety. Furthermore, in this research area may give contribution to avoid E. coli contamination which will prevent unnecessary illness among students in the campus.

  9. Latina Faculty Transcending Barriers: Peer Mentoring in a Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Núñez, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors conducted a research metasynthesis of publications by a group of Latina tenure-track faculty participating in a peer mentoring group, the Research for the Educational Advancement of Latin@s (REAL) collaborative, housed in one Hispanic Serving Institution. Due to the small representation of Latinas in the academy, the…

  10. How to Guide: Aggregate under-served markets into buying pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2000-12-26

    This activity promotes new opportunities to increase energy security and lower energy costs for under-served markets. It involves market analysis and collaboration with community partners, as well as outreach activities to inform target markets and technical assistance for participants.

  11. Serving a variety of vegetables and fruit as a snack increased intake in preschool children123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meengs, Jennifer S; Birch, Leann L; Rolls, Barbara J

    2013-01-01

    Background: Although serving a greater variety of food increases intake, this effect has not been well studied as a strategy to encourage consumption of vegetables and fruit in preschool children. Objective: This study examined whether providing a variety of familiar vegetables or fruit to preschool children as a snack would lead to increased selection and intake. Design: In a crossover design, 61 children (aged 3–5 y) ate a snack in their childcare facility on 8 afternoons. At 4 snack times, the children were offered vegetables: either a single type (cucumber, sweet pepper, or tomato) or a variety of all 3 types. At 4 other snack times, the children were offered fruit (apple, peach, pineapple, or all 3 types). Uniform-sized pieces were served family style, and children selected and ate as much as they desired. Results: Offering a variety of vegetables or fruit increased the likelihood of selection (P snacks with variety and in 70% of snacks without variety. Serving a variety also increased consumption of both vegetables and fruit (P snack led to increased consumption of both food types in a childcare facility. Serving a variety of vegetables or fruit as a snack could help preschool children meet recommended intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01557218. PMID:23902783

  12. Different temporal bases for body and arm movements in volleyball serve reception

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benerink, N. H.; Bootsma, R. J.; Zaal, F. T. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    In many sports, successfully intercepting a ball requires players to move both their body and their arms. Yet, studies of interception typically focus on one or the other. We performed an analysis of the moments of first foot and arm movements of elite-level volleyball players during serve

  13. Influence of serving temperature on flavour perception and release of Bourbon Caturra coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Ida; Waehrens, Sandra S; Petersen, Mikael A; Münchow, Morten; Bredie, Wender L P

    2017-03-15

    The present study aimed to investigate coffee flavour perception and release as function of serving temperature to support standardisation in the specialty coffee branch. The coffee cultivar Bourbon Caturra was evaluated at six serving temperatures ranging from 31°C to 62°C. Coffee samples were analysed by dynamic headspace sampling gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and descriptive analyses using sip-and-spit tasting. The release of volatiles followed mostly the van't Hoff principle and was exuberated at temperatures above 40°C. Aliphatic ketones, alkylpyrazines, some furans and pyridines increased most notably at temperatures ⩾50°C. The changes in volatile release profiles could explain some of the sensory differences observed. The flavour notes of 'sour', 'tobacco' and 'sweet' were mostly associated with the coffees served at 31-44°C, whereas coffees served between 50°C and 62°C exhibited stronger 'overall intensity', 'roasted' flavour and 'bitter' notes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Psychiatric Primer for Programs Serving People with Developmental Disabilities. Monograph #101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Pozzo, Earlene; Bernstein, Gail S.

    Intended for personnel in programs serving persons with developmental disabilities, the booklet provides basic information about the major psychiatric disorders and their treatment. Five sections cover: the major disorders; medications--uses and problems; assessment; cooordination of services; and psychiatric emergencies. Major disorders such as…

  15. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Effects of Competitive State Anxiety on Serve Kinematics in Table Tennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ngo Vuong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Displays of anxiety in table tennis were assessed through subjective (a self-report questionnaire, physiological (heart-rate variability and kinematic variables. Using a within-group crossover design, 9 university-level table tennis players completed a series of serves under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Anxiety manipulation was achieved through the introduction of a national standard table tennis player, known to the participants, to receive serves in the high-anxiety condition, whilst serves were received by no opponent in the low-anxiety condition. Automated motion capture systems consisting of high-speed 3D motion cameras and analytical software (QUALISYS determined the subject’s movement kinematics: bat face angle (degrees and serve routine duration (s. Self-reported state anxiety (MRF-Likert and heart rate measurements were collected to examine changes between conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, bat face angles did not change significantly between anxiety conditions (F (1.8 = 2.791, p = 0.133 and movement times were faster in the high-anxiety condition. In light of these findings, research into other facets of movement behaviour must be analysed to gain further understanding of the effects of anxiety on performance, which remain unclear.

  16. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Effects of Competitive State Anxiety on Serve Kinematics in Table Tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Vuong; Richards, Hugh; Kondric, Miran

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Displays of anxiety in table tennis were assessed through subjective (a self-report questionnaire), physiological (heart-rate variability) and kinematic variables. Using a within-group crossover design, 9 university-level table tennis players completed a series of serves under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Anxiety manipulation was achieved through the introduction of a national standard table tennis player, known to the participants, to receive serves in the high-anxiety condition, whilst serves were received by no opponent in the low-anxiety condition. Automated motion capture systems consisting of high-speed 3D motion cameras and analytical software (QUALISYS) determined the subject’s movement kinematics: bat face angle (degrees) and serve routine duration (s). Self-reported state anxiety (MRF-Likert) and heart rate measurements were collected to examine changes between conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, bat face angles did not change significantly between anxiety conditions (F (1.8) = 2.791, p = 0.133) and movement times were faster in the high-anxiety condition. In light of these findings, research into other facets of movement behaviour must be analysed to gain further understanding of the effects of anxiety on performance, which remain unclear. PMID:28210341

  17. 20 CFR 662.210 - What other entities may serve as One-Stop partners?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... and the Responsibilities of Partners § 662.210 What other entities may serve as One-Stop partners? (a) WIA provides that other entities that carry out a human resource program, including Federal, State, or...) Additional partners may include: (1) TANF programs authorized under part A of title IV of the Social Security...

  18. Minority Serving Institutions: A Data-Driven Student Landscape in the Outcomes-Based Funding Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasman, Marybeth; Nguyen, Thai-Huy; Samayoa, Andrés Castro; Corral, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) emerged in response to a history of racial inequity and social injustice due to racial and ethnic minorities' lack of access to Predominately White Institutions (PWIs). Enrolling 20% of the nation's college students, MSIs are an integral part of U.S. higher education. The purpose of this paper is to highlight…

  19. Hispanic-Serving Institutions: Patterns, Predictions, and Implications for Informing Policy Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Vasti; Zerquera, Desiree

    2012-01-01

    This article seeks to identify and assess the readiness of "Potential" Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs)--institutions located within Latino communities projected to increase the number of Latino/a high school graduates. Institutions are described based on evaluation of institutional missions, planning documents, programs, and marketing…

  20. Minority-Serving Institutions and the Education of U.S. Underrepresented Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Ginelle; Stage, Frances K.

    2014-01-01

    Numbers of students of color enrolling in higher educational institutions is expected to increase across all racial groups. With continued increases in minority enrollments, minority-serving institutions have and will continue to play a major role in educating student of color. A large national data set was used to examine the numbers of…

  1. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, Niels; Super, Sabina; Verkooijen, Kirsten T.; Koelen, Maria A.

    2017-01-01

    Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on life skill

  2. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermens, N.J.; Super, Sabina; verkooijen, kirsten; Koelen, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on

  3. Widening Income Inequalities: Higher Education's Role in Serving Low Income Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Jon C.; Crosby, Pamela C.

    2015-01-01

    Many scholars argue that America is becoming a dangerously divided nation because of increasing inequality, especially in income distribution. This article examines the problem of widening income inequality with particular focus on the role that colleges and universities and their student affairs organizations play in serving low income students…

  4. The Challenge of Serving a Diverse Church: Being Christ for Others

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Rev. Gregory Boyle, S.J., was ordained a priest in 1984 and shortly afterward became the pastor of Dolores Mission parish, serving from 1986-1992. While at Dolores Mission, he developed numerous programs for at-risk youth in the community. In 2001 his various projects assisting youths in gangs were united under one banner: Homeboy Industries.…

  5. Quantitative Evaluation of HHFKA Nutrition Standards for School Lunch Servings and Patterns of Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echon, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to provide baseline data and characteristics of food served and consumed prior to the recently mandated nutrition standards as authorized by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). Methods: Over 600,000 school lunch menus with associated food production records from 61 elementary schools…

  6. Serving the Stranger in Our Midst-Accommodating Wiccan Religious Needs Within the US Air Force

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-09-17

    Force. Serving the Stranger in Our Midst is written to educate and assist in the formation of Chaplains’ thinking and response to Wicca practitioners in...the military. To do this I provide some historical information about witchcraft, facts about current practices in Wicca (witchcraft), then look at

  7. Serving Two Masters: Quality and Conflict in the Accreditation of Religious Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donahoo, Saran; Lee, Wynetta Y.

    2008-01-01

    Utilizing a voluntary review process, accreditation agencies judge the value of higher education institutions and programs. In doing so, the six regional associations and other accreditation agencies establish and maintain universal standards, which serve in the assessment of all their member institutions. Even so, the monitoring and quality…

  8. Team Collaboration: The Use of Behavior Principles for Serving Students with ASD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Amy L.; Stahmer, Aubyn C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and behavior analysts are key members of school-based teams that serve children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Behavior analysts approach assessment and intervention through the lens of applied behavior analysis (ABA). ABA-based interventions have been found effective for targeting skills across…

  9. Serving a variety of vegetables and fruit as a snack increased intake in preschool children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, Liane S; Meengs, Jennifer S; Birch, Leann L; Rolls, Barbara J

    2013-09-01

    Although serving a greater variety of food increases intake, this effect has not been well studied as a strategy to encourage consumption of vegetables and fruit in preschool children. This study examined whether providing a variety of familiar vegetables or fruit to preschool children as a snack would lead to increased selection and intake. In a crossover design, 61 children (aged 3-5 y) ate a snack in their childcare facility on 8 afternoons. At 4 snack times, the children were offered vegetables: either a single type (cucumber, sweet pepper, or tomato) or a variety of all 3 types. At 4 other snack times, the children were offered fruit (apple, peach, pineapple, or all 3 types). Uniform-sized pieces were served family style, and children selected and ate as much as they desired. Offering a variety of vegetables or fruit increased the likelihood of selection (P snacks with variety and in 70% of snacks without variety. Serving a variety also increased consumption of both vegetables and fruit (P snack led to increased consumption of both food types in a childcare facility. Serving a variety of vegetables or fruit as a snack could help preschool children meet recommended intakes. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01557218.

  10. Customer Satisfaction Perceptions of Dislocated Workers Served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, Dava Michelle

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the perceptions of satisfaction of dislocated workers served by WIN Job Centers in the Mississippi Corridor Consortium. Four WIN Job Centers participated in this study: Northeast Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Corinth, Northwest Mississippi Community College WIN Job Center in Oxford,…

  11. Beyond Accommodations: Perceptions of Students with Disabilities in a Hispanic Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Neelam

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed method study was to explore perceptions of students with disabilities in a predominantly Hispanic serving institution. Factors of transition from high school to college, campus involvement, engagement in student organizations and their perceptions of campus climate were investigated through both a survey with 104…

  12. Who Should Be Served? A Dilemma in the Field of Blindness and Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogrund, Rona L.

    2017-01-01

    As much as the field of visual impairment has advanced over the last half century and as growing populations of children and adults continue to be served by its practitioners, the issue of personnel shortages to meet the diverse needs of students and consumers seems to continue. More vision professionals are being trained than ever, but it seems…

  13. A Brief Examination of Institutional Advancement Activities at Hispanic Serving Institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulnix, Michael William; Bowden, Randall G.; Lopez, Esther Elena

    2002-01-01

    Examined what level of importance university presidents of Hispanic serving institutions place on institutional advancement. Found that they believe strongly in the importance of such activities but most believe their efforts in areas such as fund raising, marketing, and public relations are not very satisfactory. Also found that many do not…

  14. A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Effects of Competitive State Anxiety on Serve Kinematics in Table Tennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngo, Vuong; Richards, Hugh; Kondric, Miran

    2017-01-01

    Displays of anxiety in table tennis were assessed through subjective (a self-report questionnaire), physiological (heart-rate variability) and kinematic variables. Using a within-group crossover design, 9 university-level table tennis players completed a series of serves under low- and high-anxiety conditions. Anxiety manipulation was achieved through the introduction of a national standard table tennis player, known to the participants, to receive serves in the high-anxiety condition, whilst serves were received by no opponent in the low-anxiety condition. Automated motion capture systems consisting of high-speed 3D motion cameras and analytical software (QUALISYS) determined the subject's movement kinematics: bat face angle (degrees) and serve routine duration (s). Self-reported state anxiety (MRF-Likert) and heart rate measurements were collected to examine changes between conditions. Contrary to the hypothesis, bat face angles did not change significantly between anxiety conditions (F (1.8) = 2.791, p = 0.133) and movement times were faster in the high-anxiety condition. In light of these findings, research into other facets of movement behaviour must be analysed to gain further understanding of the effects of anxiety on performance, which remain unclear.

  15. Establishing Content Validity of the Quality Indicators for Classrooms Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearl, Cynthia E.; Vasquez, Eleazar, III.; Marino, Matthew T.; Wienke, Wilfred; Donehower, Claire; Gourwitz, Jillian; Rosenberg, Michael S.; Duerr, Sunny R.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide content validation for quality indicators included in an observation instrument developed to evaluate classrooms serving students with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A panel of 103 subject-matter experts consisting of a mixture of field personnel (n = 64; 59 classroom teachers, five school administrators)…

  16. How to Serve Content to PDA Users on-the-Go

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuddy, Colleen

    2006-01-01

    Fans of mobile devices are everywhere, and they are using their PDAs, smart phones, and mobile phones to access Web-based content. Chances are that they are trying to access your library's Web site or find library-based content for their devices. In this article, the author presents some tips on how to serve those who wants to grab some fast info…

  17. Serving Fish in School Meals: Perceptions of School Nutrition Professionals in Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Betty T.; Pickus, Hayley A.; Contesti, Amy; Dawson, Jo; Bersamin, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Fish and other seafood high in omega-3 fats are important components of a healthy diet. The purpose of this study was to explore perceptions regarding serving fish in school meals among nutrition professionals in Alaska. Methods: Interviews with 22 school nutrition professionals in Alaska were conducted to investigate the…

  18. Books, Books, Books--Let Us Read: A Library Serving Sheltered and Incarcerated Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Pam

    1994-01-01

    Describes the growth and development of a library program serving a shelter for abused and neglected children and youth and a juvenile detention center in Orange County (California). Program funding, materials preferred by teen users, library management, special events, and problems are discussed. Teen patrons and their use of the services are…

  19. Serving culturally diverse visitors to forests in California: a resource guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina S. Roberts; Deborah J. Chavez; Benjamin M. Lara; Emilyn A. Sheffield

    2009-01-01

    The national forests of California are experiencing an increase in new visitors yet, in some areas, a continued lack of ethnic diversity persists. In addition, changing demographics has led to a need for keeping up with trends while also being aware of constraints to visitor use. Knowing how to serve culturally diverse visitors in ways that are innovative and inclusive...

  20. Food Challenge: Serving Up 4-H to Non-Traditional Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Sara; Follmer-Reece, Holly E.; Kostina-Ritchey, Erin; Reyna, Roxanna

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a novel approach for introducing 4-H to non-traditional/diverse audiences using 4-H Food Challenge. Set in a low SES and minority-serving rural school, Food Challenge was presented during the school day to all 7th grade students, with almost half voluntarily participating in an after-school club component. Program design…

  1. Cutting Costs, Keeping Quality: Financing Strategies for Youth-Serving Organizations in a Difficult Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This research brief highlights three effective financing strategies that successful youth-serving organizations are using to maintain quality services despite difficult economic times. The brief provides examples of how organizations have implemented these strategies and offers tips to help leaders consider how best to adapt these strategies to…

  2. 75 FR 9516 - Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-03

    .... 804(2). The rules will not result in an annual effect on the economy of $100,000,000 or more; a major... supervision of a committed youth offender after the offender serves one year on supervision. Upon terminating supervision before the sentence expires, the Commission shall set aside the committed youth offender's...

  3. 77 FR 57035 - Notice of Commission's Implementation of Procedure of Serving Parties in an Electronic Format

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-17

    ... statute or regulation. Henceforth, that service will be made in an electronic format, rather than by mail... Commission's Implementation of Procedure of Serving Parties in an Electronic Format AGENCY: Federal... when required by statute or regulation. Henceforth, that service will be made in an electronic format...

  4. [Customer satisfaction study in two roman hospitals: comparison between "cook & serve" and "cook & chill"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perata, E; Ferrari, P; Tarsitani, G

    2005-01-01

    We studied patient's satisfaction rate for hospital dishes comparing "cook & chill" method with "cook & serve". As principal instrument we used a comparative questionnaire, anonymous and self-compiled, which is able to evaluate the differences of customer satisfaction's rate between the two methods.

  5. From Research to Practice: Strategies for Supporting School Readiness in Programs Serving Infants and Toddlers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Fostering healthy social and emotional development provides the foundation for school readiness in programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families. In this article, the author explores four key concepts that make the link between social and emotional development and early learning: 1) Cognitive and social-emotional development are…

  6. 78 FR 11998 - Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    ... require supervised release after serving their prison terms. We impose conditions of release for parolees... prison through the revocation process. Given the serious consequences that may follow from a violation of... tribal governments, or the private sector, to spend $100,000,000 or more in any one year, and it will not...

  7. 75 FR 28221 - Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Parole Commission 28 CFR Part 2 Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the United States and District of Columbia Codes... Administrative practice and procedure, Prisoners, Probation and parole. The Proposed Rule Accordingly, the U.S...

  8. 75 FR 51179 - Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 28 CFR Part 2 Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the United States and District of Columbia Codes AGENCY: United States... apply. List of Subjects in 28 CFR Part 2 Administrative practice and procedure, Prisoners, Probation and...

  9. The Relationship between Prisoners' Educational Motives and Previous Incarceration, Sentence Length, and Sentence Served

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Beate Buanes; Manger, Terje

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine Norwegian prisoners' educational motives, and how previous incarceration, sentence length, and sentence served influence such motives. Three motive categories emerged: future planning (Factor 1), social reasons and escapism (Factor 2), and competence building (Factor 3). Among prisoners who participated in…

  10. 75 FR 81457 - Paroling, Recommitting, and Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-28

    ... Supervising Federal Prisoners: Prisoners Serving Sentences Under the United States and District of Columbia...) organized crime offender; (3) national or unusual interest in the prisoner; and (4) long-term sentence. The prisoner could appeal a parole denial to the three national Board members in Washington, DC and some...

  11. The quality of water served in the Orotta National Referral Hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The objective of this study was to measure the quality of water served to the different sections of Orotta National Referral Hospital using WHO protocols. Methods: Water samples were collected from different sources in the National Referral Orotta Hospital compound according to the WHO guidelines and the ...

  12. Serving Alcohol at Home: What Do Most People Do? Findings from a 2001 Ontario Adult Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anglin, Lise; Giesbrecht, Norman; Ialomiteanu, Anca; Grand, Larry; Mann, Robert; McAllister, Janet

    2004-01-01

    In Ontario, some court cases have involved attempts to sue social hosts for damage caused by the behaviour of drunken guests. Such legal actions give rise to the question of risks and responsibilities accruing to social hosts who serve alcohol. Using a sample of 1395 male and female adult residents of Ontario, the authors present self-report…

  13. 77 FR 14805 - Request for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Advisory Committee on Immunization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-13

    ... programs. Federal employees will not be considered for membership. Members may be invited to serve for four-year terms. The next cycle of selection of candidates will begin in the fall of 2012, for selection of potential nominees to replace members whose terms will end on June 30, 2013. Selection of members is based...

  14. 78 FR 15370 - Request for Nominations of Candidates To Serve on the Advisory Committee on Immunization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-11

    ... immunization programs. Federal employees will not be considered for membership. Members may be invited to serve for four-year terms. The next cycle of selection of candidates will begin in the fall of 2013, for selection of potential nominees to replace members whose terms will end on June 30, 2014. Selection of...

  15. 76 FR 49771 - Request for Nominations of Candidates To Serve on the Advisory Committee on Immunization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... immunization programs. Federal employees will not be considered for membership. Members may be invited to serve for four-year terms. The next cycle of selection of candidates will begin in the Fall of 2011, for selection of potential nominees to replace members whose terms will end on June 30, 2012. Selection of...

  16. 28 CFR 522.15 - No good time credits for inmates serving only civil contempt commitments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... only civil contempt commitments. 522.15 Section 522.15 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INMATE ADMISSION, CLASSIFICATION, AND TRANSFER ADMISSION TO INSTITUTION Civil Contempt of Court Commitments § 522.15 No good time credits for inmates serving only civil contempt...

  17. Students Serving Christ: Understanding the Role of Student Subcultures on a College Campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magolda, Peter; Ebben, Kelsey

    2007-01-01

    This article uses the Students Serving Christ student organization to examine the role of student subcultures in higher education. Using subculture theories, this article examines the origins of student subcultures, explores how subcultures are formed and sustained, reveals what counts as normal within and among student subcultures, investigates…

  18. Beyond the Award Letter: Fund Management for Leaders of Small Youth-Serving Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gager, Jenifer; Marchand, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    This paper was created for executive directors, directors of finance and administration, and program managers of small youth-serving non-profit organizations. This guide supports and enhances the systems they use to manage grants and contracts. This guide is organized to use as a quick self-assessment of their fund management practices: (1) seven…

  19. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  20. Sensemaking technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Charlotte Øland

    Research objective: The object of the LOK research project is to gain a better understanding of the technological strategic processes in organisations by using the concept/metaphor of sensemaking. The project will investigate the technological strategies in organisations in order to gain a deeper...... understanding of the cognitive competencies and barriers towards implementing new technology in organisations. The research will therefore concentrate on researching the development process in the organisation's perception of the external environmental elements of customers, suppliers, competitors, internal...... and external technology and legislation and the internal environmental elements of structure, power relations and political arenas. All of these variables have influence on which/how technologies are implemented thus creating different outcomes all depending on the social dynamics that are triggered by changes...

  1. Issues of doing gender and doing technology - Music as an innovative theme for technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, A.; Zorn, I.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents the concept and results of the research project 'Engineer Your Sound!' (2008-2009). It aimed at exploring whether interdisciplinary, innovative teaching/learning settings in the fields of technology and digital media can be used to give pupils the opportunities to experiment and discover their technical potential, skills, interests and talents and if music technology could offer such an appealing context. The paper explains how technology and why gender need to be addressed when planning to raise young people's interest in technology but questions if interest in technology is mainly influenced by gender. The paper explores through ethnographic research how pupils' technological competencies and interests have developed during the course of a technology-related project. Results of the analysis explain how music technology can serve as a suitable theme with the potential to increase both males' and females' interest in technology.

  2. Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer for Assistive Technology Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leahy, James A.; Lane, Joseph P.

    2010-01-01

    Historically, the assistive technology (AT) industry is made up of small to medium size companies serving relatively small markets with products characterized as "niche" or "orphan" products. Presenting opportunities to AT companies that are created by outside sources is difficult. Presenting such opportunities to companies serving larger markets…

  3. The Healthy Meal Index: A tool for measuring the healthfulness of meals served to children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Nicole; Mandell, Cami; Ball, Sarah; Miller, Alison L; Lumeng, Julie; Peterson, Karen E

    2016-08-01

    Family meals have been associated with higher diet quality and reduced risk of obesity in children. Observational studies of the family meal have been employed with increasing frequency, yet there is currently no tool available for measuring the healthfulness of food served during the meal. Here we present the development and validation of the Healthy Meal Index (HMI), a novel tool for scoring the healthfulness of foods served to children during a meal, as well as sociodemographic predictors of meal scores. Parents of 233 children, aged 4-8 years, self-recorded three home dinners. A research assistant obtained a list of foods available during the meal (meal report) via phone call on the night of each video-recorded meal. This meal report was coded into component food groups. Subsequently, meals were scored based on the availability of more healthy "Adequacy foods" and the absence of "Moderation foods", (of which reduced consumption is recommended, according to pediatric dietary guidelines). Adjusted linear regression tested the association of sociodemographic characteristics with HMI scores. A validation study was conducted in a separate sample of 133 children with detailed meal data. In adjusted models, female children had higher HMI Moderation scores (p = 0.02), but did not differ in HMI Adequacy or Total scores. Parents with more education served meals with higher HMI Adequacy (p = 0.001) and Total scores (p = 0.001), though no significant difference was seen in HMI Moderation score (p = 0.21). The validation study demonstrated that the HMI was highly correlated with servings of foods and nutrients estimated from observations conducted by research staff. The HMI is a valuable tool for measuring the quality of meals served to children. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Energy and Nutrient Content of Food Served and Consumed by Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckinx, F; Allepaerts, S; Paquot, N; Reginster, J Y; de Cock, C; Petermans, J; Bruyère, O

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare energy and protein content of the served food with the actual intake from the food consumed by nursing home residents. This study also aimed to compare food intake and dietary allowances. This is a cross sectional study. This study was performed in nursing homes. Residents of these 2 nursing homes were eligible for the study if they agreed to participate and if they meet the selection criteria (to be older than 65 years and have a regular texture diet). Nutrient content of the served food and real food consumption was calculated for all meals during a 5-day period by precise weighting method. Difference between consumed and served dietary content was evaluated by the Chi² test. Seventy-four Belgian nursing home residents (75% of women, 85.8 ± 7.04 years on average) were included in this study. These subjects had a mean body mass index of 24.9 ± 4.83 kg/m². The mean energy content of the served food was 1783.3 ± 125.7 kcal per day. However, residents did not eat the whole of the meals and the actual energy content of the consumed food was significantly less (1552.4 ± 342.1 kcal per day; peating significantly more energy than the others (p=.04). Meals served in nursing homes are not entirely consumed by their residents. As expected, the energy consumed are lower in subjects considered as malnourished or at risk of malnutrition.

  5. What's for dinner? Types of food served at family dinner differ across parent and family characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne; MacLehose, Rich; Loth, Katie; Fulkerson, Jayne A; Eisenberg, Marla E; Berge, Jerica

    2014-01-01

    To examine the types of food served at family dinner in the homes of adolescents and correlations with parent and family sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors and meal-specific variables. A cross-sectional population-based survey completed by mail or telephone by parents participating in Project F-EAT (Families and Eating and Activity in Teens) in 2009-2010. Homes of families with adolescents in Minneapolis/St. Paul urban area, MN, USA. Participants included 1923 parents/guardians (90·8% female; 68·5% from ethnic/racial minorities) of adolescents who participated in EAT 2010. Less than a third (28%) of parents reported serving a green salad at family dinner on a regular basis, but 70% reported regularly serving vegetables (other than potatoes). About one-fifth (21%) of families had fast food at family dinners two or more times per week. Variables from within the sociodemographic domain (low educational attainment) psychosocial domain (high work-life stress, depressive symptoms, low family functioning) and meal-specific domain (low value of family meals, low enjoyment of cooking, low meal planning, high food purchasing barriers and fewer hours in food preparation) were associated with lower healthfulness of foods served at family dinners, in analyses adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics. There is a need for interventions to improve the healthfulness of food served at family meals. Interventions need to be suitable for parents with low levels of education; take parent and family psychosocial factors into account; promote more positive attitudes toward family meals; and provide skills to make it easier to plan and prepare healthful family meals.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Improved multi-band photometry from SERVS (Nyland+, 2017)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyland, K.; Lacy, M.; Sajina, A.; Pforr, J.; Farrah, D.; Wilson, G.; Surace, J.; Haussler, B.; Vaccari, M.; Jarvis, M.

    2017-07-01

    The Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS) sky footprint includes five well-studied astronomical deep fields with abundant multi-wavelength data spanning an area of ~18deg2 and a co-moving volume of ~0.8Gpc3. The five deep fields included in SERVS are the XMM-LSS field, Lockman Hole (LH), ELAIS-N1 (EN1), ELAIS-S1 (ES1), and Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). SERVS provides NIR, post-cryogenic imaging in the 3.6 and 4.5um Spitzer/IRAC bands to a depth of ~2uJy. IRAC dual-band source catalogs generated using traditional catalog extraction methods are described in Mauduit+ (2012PASP..124..714M). The Spitzer IRAC data are complemented by ground-based NIR observations from the VISTA Deep Extragalactic Observations (VIDEO; Jarvis+ 2013MNRAS.428.1281J) survey in the south in the Z, Y, J, H, and Ks bands and UKIRT Infrared Deep Sky Survey (UKIDSS; Lawrence+ 2007, see II/319) in the north in the J and K bands. SERVS also provides substantial overlap with infrared data from SWIRE (Lonsdale+ 2003PASP..115..897L) and the Herschel Multitiered Extragalactic Survey (HerMES; Oliver+ 2012, VIII/95). As shown in Figure 1, one square degree of the XMM-LSS field overlaps with ground-based optical data from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey Deep field 1 (CFHTLS-D1). The CFHTLS-D1 region is centered at RAJ2000=02:25:59, DEJ2000=-04:29:40 and includes imaging through the filter set u', g', r', i', and z'. Thus, in combination with the NIR data from SERVS and VIDEO that overlap with the CFHTLS-D1 region, multi-band imaging over a total of 12 bands is available. (2 data files).

  7. Inkjet technology for crystalline silicon photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüwe, David; Mager, Dario; Biro, Daniel; Korvink, Jan G

    2015-01-27

    The world's ever increasing demand for energy necessitates technologies that generate electricity from inexhaustible and easily accessible energy sources. Silicon photovoltaics is a technology that can harvest the energy of sunlight. Its great characteristics have fueled research and development activities in this exciting field for many years now. One of the most important activities in the solar cell community is the investigation of alternative fabrication and structuring technologies, ideally serving both of the two main goals: device optimization and reduction of fabrication costs. Inkjet technology is practically evaluated along the whole process chain. Research activities cover many processes, such as surface texturing, emitter formation, or metallization. Furthermore, the inkjet technology itself is manifold as well. It can be used to apply inks that serve as a functional structure, present in the final device, as mask for subsequent structuring steps, or even serve as a reactant source to activate chemical etch reactions. This article reviews investigations of inkjet-printing in the field of silicon photovoltaics. The focus is on the different inkjet processes for individual fabrication steps of a solar cell. A technological overview and suggestions about where future work will be focused on are also provided. The great variety of the investigated processes highlights the ability of the inkjet technology to find its way into many other areas of functional printing and printed electronics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Ergonomics technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, W. L.

    1977-01-01

    Major areas of research and development in ergonomics technology for space environments are discussed. Attention is given to possible applications of the technology developed by NASA in industrial settings. A group of mass spectrometers for gas analysis capable of fully automatic operation has been developed for atmosphere control on spacecraft; a version for industrial use has been constructed. Advances have been made in personal cooling technology, remote monitoring of medical information, and aerosol particle control. Experience gained by NASA during the design and development of portable life support units has recently been applied to improve breathing equipment used by fire fighters.

  9. Green technology meets ecotoxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Radošević

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available By applying concept and principles of green chemistry into different technological processes, green technologies are developed. The environmental and economic benefits of “green” approach is achieved through several directions, such as the use of renewable raw materials, creation of economic efficiency, the use of alternative reaction conditions, as well as the application of non-conventional solvents. From the point view of green chemistry, alternative solvents, in order to be a “green“ substitution to hazardous organic solvents, should be: non-volatile, non-flammable, stabile, synthesized by an environmentally friendly procedure, nontoxic and biodegradable. The toxic impact of all newly synthesized chemicals, such as alternative solvents, could be determined by methods and techniques of ecotoxicology. Ecotoxicology, an interdisciplinary scientific field, can serve as a way of monitoring the greenness of the processes. In vivo and in vitro experiments are used to study the effects of chemicals on different levels of organizations, from molecules to communities and ecosystem. The usage of in vitro methods is encouraged by a scientific community and regulatory agencies as an alternative to in vivo studies in order to reduce the number of laboratory animals used in the toxicological studies. Therefore, in this paper we gave a brief overview on the usage of animal cell cultures within the field of green chemistry and technology.

  10. For All Intents and Purposes: Twitter as a Foundational Technology for Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh, Spencer P.; Rosenberg, Joshua M.; Wolf, Leigh Graves

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is increasingly accepted as an important educational technology and has been shown to serve a range of purposes. In fact, this variety suggests that Twitter has the potential to serve as a foundational technology: one capable of supporting teachers' learning across multiple formal and informal contexts. To explore this possibility, we…

  11. Technology Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA produces innovative technologies and facilitates their creation in line with the Agency mission to create products such as the stormwater calculator, remote sensing, innovation clusters, and low-cost air sensors.

  12. Globalization & technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Narula, Rajneesh

    of innovation" understanding of learning. Narula and Smith reconcile an important paradox. On the one hand, locations and firms are increasingly interdependent through supranational organisations, regional integration, strategic alliances, and the flow of investments, technologies, ideas and people......Technology and globalization are interdependent processes. Globalization has a fundamental influence on the creation and diffusion of technology, which, in turn, affects the interdependence of firms and locations. This volume examines the international aspect of this interdependence at two levels....... The boundaries of firms and countries are increasingly porous and imprecise, because firms use alliances and outsourcing, and countries are rarely technologically self-sufficient. On the other hand, locations remain distinct and idiosyncratic, with innovation systems remaining largely nationally bound. Knowledge...

  13. Plasma technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drouet, M.G.

    1984-03-01

    IREQ was contracted by the Canadian Electrical Association to review plasma technology and assess the potential for application of this technology in Canada. A team of experts in the various aspects of this technology was assembled and each team member was asked to contribute to this report on the applications of plasma pertinent to his or her particular field of expertise. The following areas were examined in detail: iron, steel and strategic-metals production; surface treatment by spraying; welding and cutting; chemical processing; drying; and low-temperature treatment. A large market for the penetration of electricity has been identified. To build up confidence in the technology, support should be provided for selected R and D projects, plasma torch demonstrations at full power, and large-scale plasma process testing

  14. Exploration technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roennevik, H.C. [Saga Petroleum A/S, Forus (Norway)

    1996-12-31

    The paper evaluates exploration technology. Topics discussed are: Visions; the subsurface challenge; the creative tension; the exploration process; seismic; geology; organic geochemistry; seismic resolution; integration; drilling; value creation. 4 refs., 22 figs.

  15. Lasers technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The Laser Technology Program of IPEN is developed by the Center for Lasers and Applications (CLA) and is committed to the development of new lasers based on the research of new optical materials and new resonator technologies. Laser applications and research occur within several areas such as Nuclear, Medicine, Dentistry, Industry, Environment and Advanced Research. Additional goals of the Program are human resource development and innovation, in association with Brazilian Universities and commercial partners

  16. Cognitive technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Mello, Alan; Figueiredo, Fabrício; Figueiredo, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    This book focuses on the next generation optical networks as well as mobile communication technologies. The reader will find chapters on Cognitive Optical Network, 5G Cognitive Wireless, LTE, Data Analysis and Natural Language Processing. It also presents a comprehensive view of the enhancements and requirements foreseen for Machine Type Communication. Moreover, some data analysis techniques and Brazilian Portuguese natural language processing technologies are also described here. .

  17. Headmaster Technology Leadership in Malaysia Elementary Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai Yieng Wong

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Headmaster technology leadership increasingly important in education today. This leadership, providing various positive effects to the headmaster, teachers, students and schools. Therefore, headmaster need to master this leadership to take up the leadership role of technology in schools. Based on the Headmaster Technology Leadership Model by Chang (2003, a study based on interviews conducted on 6 headmasters serving in Johor, Malaysia. This study aims to review i the role of the headmaster in Johor as a technology leader in school ii the challenges faced by headmaster to serve as a technology leader. Analysis of the findings from interviews found the headmaster in Johor play a role as a technology leader in the school. However, the findings have found the effort in ICT development by the headmaster in schools is different based on the needs of the school. Therefore, there is no single fixed pattern headmaster role as a technology leader. In addition, the role of the headmaster as a technology leader is not comprehensive of the five dimensions as suggested by Chang (2003. Headmaster of Johor advised to make improvements to the school led to the transformation of technology-based education.

  18. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  19. Potassium (K+) gradients serve as a mobile energy source in plant vascular tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdanowicz, Pawel; Michard, Erwan; Sandmann, Michael; Rocha, Marcio; Corrêa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Ramírez-Aguilar, Santiago J; Gomez-Porras, Judith L; González, Wendy; Thibaud, Jean-Baptiste; van Dongen, Joost T; Dreyer, Ingo

    2011-01-11

    The essential mineral nutrient potassium (K(+)) is the most important inorganic cation for plants and is recognized as a limiting factor for crop yield and quality. Nonetheless, it is only partially understood how K(+) contributes to plant productivity. K(+) is used as a major active solute to maintain turgor and to drive irreversible and reversible changes in cell volume. K(+) also plays an important role in numerous metabolic processes, for example, by serving as an essential cofactor of enzymes. Here, we provide evidence for an additional, previously unrecognized role of K(+) in plant growth. By combining diverse experimental approaches with computational cell simulation, we show that K(+) circulating in the phloem serves as a decentralized energy storage that can be used to overcome local energy limitations. Posttranslational modification of the phloem-expressed Arabidopsis K(+) channel AKT2 taps this "potassium battery," which then efficiently assists the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase in energizing the transmembrane phloem (re)loading processes.

  20. Learning and knowledge-integration strategies of nurses and client care workers serving homeless persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirguis-Younger, Manal; McNeil, Ryan; Runnels, Vivien

    2009-06-01

    Health-care workers serving homeless persons often face difficulties in addressing the needs of this population due to the complexity of the health challenges and gaps in clinical knowledge. How can health-care workers enhance their ability to care for this population? The authors explore the learning and knowledge-integration strategies of nurses and client care workers employed by organizations targeting homeless persons in a Canadian city. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 8 health-care workers.The data were examined using narrative analysis and constant comparative analysis. Three strategies were identified: integrating past experiences into clinical practice, interacting with clients to identify care needs and boundaries, and engaging in interprofessional knowledge exchange. A better understanding of these strategies may help nursing programs and health-services organizations to equip health-care workers with the skills they need to serve homeless persons.

  1. A nutritional intervention to reduce the calorie content of meals served at psychiatric rehabilitation programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casagrande, Sarah Stark; Dalcin, Arlene; McCarron, Phyllis; Appel, Lawrence J; Gayles, Debra; Hayes, Jennifer; Daumit, Gail

    2011-12-01

    To assess the effectiveness of an intervention to reduce the calorie content of meals served at two psychiatric rehabilitation programs. Intervention staff assisted kitchen staff with ways to reduce calories and improve the nutritional quality of meals. Breakfast and lunch menus were collected before and after a 6-month intervention period. ESHA software was used to determine total energy and nutrient profiles of meals. Total energy of served meals significantly decreased by 28% at breakfast and 29% at lunch for site 1 (P breakfast for site 2 (P = 0.018). Total sugars significantly decreased at breakfast for both sites (P ≤ 0.001). In general, sodium levels were high before and after the intervention period. The nutrition intervention was effective in decreasing the total energy and altering the composition of macro-nutrients of meals. These results highlight an unappreciated opportunity to improve diet quality in patients attending psychiatric rehabilitation programs.

  2. Experimental measurements and theoretical simulations for neutron flux in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rana, Y.S.; Mishra, Abhishek; Singh, Tej

    2016-06-01

    Dhruva is a 100 MW th tank type research reactor with natural metallic uranium as fuel and heavy water as coolant, moderator and reflector. The reactor is utilized for production of a large variety of radioisotopes for fulfilling growing demands of various applications in industrial, agricultural and medicinal sectors, and neutron beam research in condensed matter physics. The core consists of two on-power tray rods for radioisotope production and fifteen experimental beam holes for neutron beam research. Recently, a self-serve facility has also been commissioned in one of the through tubes in the reactor for carrying out short term irradiations. To get accurate information about neutron flux spectrum, measurements have been carried out in self-serve facility of Dhruva reactor. The present report describes measurement method, analysis technique and results. Theoretical estimations for neutron flux were also carried out and a comparison between theoretical and experimental results is made. (author)

  3. Laughing at the Looking Glass: Does Humor Style Serve as an Interpersonal Signal?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virgil Zeigler-Hill

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The provision of information appears to be an important feature of humor. The present studies examined whether humor serves as an interpersonal signal such that an individual's style of humor is associated with how the individual is perceived by others. Method: We examined this issue across two studies. In Study 1, undergraduate participants (257 targets were rated more positively by their friends and family members (1194 perceivers when they possessed more benign humor styles. In Study 2, 1190 community participants rated the romantic desirability of targets ostensibly possessing different humor styles. Results: Across both studies, our results were consistent with the possibility that humor serves as a signal. More specifically, individuals with benign humor styles (affiliative and self-enhancing humor styles were evaluated more positively than those targets with injurious humor styles (aggressive and self-defeating humor styles. Conclusion: These findings are discussed in terms of the role that humor may play in interpersonal perception and relationships.

  4. Catering in a large hospital--does serving from a buffet system meet the patients' needs?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.F.; Nielsen, M.A.; Biltz, C.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: It has been suggested that serving from a buffet system may increase food intake. This observational study estimates the energy intake in a representative group of patients admitted to a hospital, where the food is served from a buffet system. MATERIAL: One hundred and sixteen...... random patients were screened according to the NRS-2002 system and the energy requirements were calculated. The type of food ordered for the patients and the energy intake were determined. RESULT: Eighty had an NRS score of 0-2, i.e. not at nutritional risk and 36 a score > or = 3, i.e. at nutritional...... risk. Among patients with NRS score > or = 3 only 50% were ordered the correct menu. Only 50% of the patients had an energy intake energy requirement more than 90% came from the main courses and very little from snacks. CONCLUSION...

  5. Partnerships Among Canadian Agencies Serving Women with Substance Abuse Issues and Their Children

    OpenAIRE

    Sword, Wendy; Niccols, Alison; Yousefi-Nooraie, Reza; Dobbins, Maureen; Lipman, Ellen; Smith, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Women with substance use issues and their children have unique needs that are best met through collaborative and coordinated service delivery offered by a variety of agencies. However, in Canada and elsewhere, services tend to be fragmented and fail to address children?s needs. This study aimed to describe the partnership patterns, activities, and qualities among Canadian agencies serving women with addictions and to determine predictors of partnerships. We found that a number of partnerships...

  6. Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc.: Conscious Capitalism by Serving ' Food with Integrity '

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Alan

    2014-01-01

    textabstractFounded by Steve Ells in 1993, Chipotle Mexican Grill quickly became one of the fastest growing restaurant chains in US history. People loved Chipotle because of the tasty and healthy food as well as its edgy, trendy, stylish brand image. Chipotle established itself as a successful company practicing “conscious capitalism” by serving “food with integrity” – its supply chain and corporate culture were closely integrated from the time that ingredients were farmed, raised, harvested,...

  7. Quality of Language and Literacy Instruction in Preschool Classrooms Serving At-Risk Pupils

    OpenAIRE

    Justice, Laura M.; Mashburn, Andrew; Hamre, Bridget; Pianta, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Policy-makers, administrators, researchers, and teachers are increasingly vested in ensuring the quality of preschool instruction, particularly in the areas of language and literacy. This research was conducted to characterize the quality of language and literacy instruction in 135 publicly-funded preschool classrooms serving at-risk pupils. As all teachers in these classrooms were implementing the same language and literacy curriculum, we also studied the interrelationships among procedural ...

  8. Effects of serving high-sugar cereals on children's breakfast-eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennifer L; Schwartz, Marlene B; Ustjanauskas, Amy; Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Brownell, Kelly D

    2011-01-01

    To test (1) whether children will consume low-sugar ready-to-eat (RTE) cereals and (2) the effects of serving high- versus low-sugar cereals on the consumption of cereal, refined sugar, fresh fruit, and milk. Using an experimental design, we randomly assigned children (n = 91) who were attending summer day camp to receive a breakfast that included either the choice of 1 of 3 high-sugar cereals (high-sugar condition) or low-sugar cereals (low-sugar condition), as well as low-fat milk, orange juice, bananas, strawberries, and sugar packets. Participants served themselves and completed a background questionnaire after eating. Researchers measured the amount and calories consumed of each food. In both conditions, children reported "liking" or "loving" the cereal they chose. Children in the low-sugar cereal condition consumed, on average, slightly more than 1 serving of cereal (35 g), whereas children in the high-sugar condition consumed significantly more (61 g) and almost twice the amount of refined sugar in total (24.4 vs 12.5 g). Milk and total calories consumed did not differ significantly between conditions, but children in the low-sugar condition were more likely to put fruit on their cereal (54% vs 8%) and consumed a greater portion of total calories from fresh fruit (20% vs 13%). Compared with serving low-sugar cereals, high-sugar cereals increase children's total sugar consumption and reduce the overall nutritional quality of their breakfast. Children will consume low-sugar cereals when offered, and they provide a superior breakfast option.

  9. Team collaboration: The use of behavior principles for serving students with ASD

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, AL; Stahmer, AC; Stahmer, AC; Stahmer, AC

    2014-01-01

    © American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Purpose: Speech-language pathologists (SLPs) and behavior analysts are key members of school-based teams that serve children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Behavior analysts approach assessment and intervention through the lens of applied behavior analysis (ABA). ABA-based interventions have been found effective for targeting skills across multiple domains for children with ASD. However, some SLPs may be unfamiliar with the breadth of ABA...

  10. Technology-transfer workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-08-01

    A workshop was held to generate a better understanding of the many diverse factors and steps involved in the technology transfer process. The introductory presentations reviewed relevant theories, addressed the importance of planning for the process, and presented possible organizational structures to help promote the process. Specific cases were used to expose the participants to a variety of situations that were relevant to EPRI. These sessions served as a common starting point for small group discussions that were eventually combined into a list of recommendations for future action by EPRI (and should be useful for others as well). Some of the key conclusions reached are: it is important to identify incentives; the process is more effective if it is personalized; planning cannot start too early; recipes can be developed for customizing to specific situations; and both transmitter and receptor must recognize and fulfill their roles

  11. Serving vegetables first: A strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbernd, S L; Reicks, M M; Mann, T L; Redden, J P; Mykerezi, E; Vickers, Z M

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable consumption in the United States is low despite the wealth of evidence that vegetables play an important role in reducing risk of various chronic diseases. Because eating patterns developed in childhood continue through adulthood, we need to form healthy eating habits in children. The objective of this study was to determine if offering vegetables before other meal components would increase the overall consumption of vegetables at school lunch. We served kindergarten through fifth-grade students a small portion (26-33 g) of a raw vegetable (red and yellow bell peppers) while they waited in line to receive the rest of their lunch meal. They then had the options to take more of the bell peppers, a different vegetable, or no vegetable from the lunch line. We measured the amount of each vegetable consumed by each child. Serving vegetables first greatly increased the number of students eating vegetables. On intervention days most of the vegetables consumed came from the vegetables-first portions. Total vegetable intake per student eating lunch was low because most students chose to not eat vegetables, but the intervention significantly increased this value. Serving vegetables first is a viable strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary schools. Long-term implementation of this strategy may have an important impact on healthy eating habits, vegetable consumption, and the health consequences of vegetable intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Sex offenders and sex crime recidivism: investigating the role of sentence length and time served.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budd, Kristen; Desmond, Scott A

    2014-12-01

    The relationship between criminal justice sanctions and sex crime recidivism remains largely unexplored. Therefore, using a sample of 8,461 previously incarcerated male sex offenders from 13 states in the United States, we focus on the sentence meted out for the sex crime conviction and the amount of time sex offenders served as a result of their conviction. Sex offenders were grouped into four categories: rapists, sexual assaulters, child molesters, and all sex offenders combined. Recidivism was operationalized as rearrest and reconviction. Findings suggest how recidivism is operationalized matters. When recidivism is measured as rearrest for another sex offense, sentence length and time served are unrelated to sex crime recidivism. On the other hand, when recidivism is operationalized as reconviction for another sex offense, sentence length is positively related to recidivism for rapists, sexual assaulters, child molesters, and all sex offenders combined, while time served is negatively related to recidivism for child molesters and all sex offenders combined. © The Author(s) 2013.

  13. Sleep extension improves serving accuracy: A study with college varsity tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Jennifer; Simon, Richard D

    2015-11-01

    This study investigated the effects of sleep extension on tennis serving accuracy, as well as daytime sleepiness in college varsity tennis players. Twelve (seven females and five males) healthy students on a college varsity tennis team maintained their habitual sleep-wake schedule for a one-week baseline period followed by a one-week sleep extension period. Participants were requested to sleep at least nine hours, including naps, during the sleep extension period. Serving accuracy was assessed when participants were sleep deprived (prior to the sleep extension period) and after the sleep extension period. Levels of daytime sleepiness were monitored via the Epworth Sleepiness Scale and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale, and caffeine consumption was recorded throughout the study. Participants slept significantly more in the second week--the sleep extension week--compared with the first week--the baseline week (8.85 vs. 7.14 h; psleep extension period, accuracy of the tennis serves improved significantly (35.7% vs. 41.8%; psleep of approximately 2h per night significantly increased athletic performance in college varsity tennis players. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Serve sizes and frequency of food consumption in Australian children aged 14 and 24 months.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauch, Chelsea; Magarey, Anthea; Byrne, Rebecca; Daniels, Lynne

    2017-02-01

    To describe the dietary intake of a sample of Australian children. Three days (1×24 hour recall, 2×24 hour records) of dietary intake data were collected from 409 and 363 mother-child dyads (resident in Brisbane and South Australia) at 14 (T2) and 24 (T3) months of age respectively as part of the NOURISH and SAIDI studies. Data presented include foods consumed by ≥10% of children, number of consumers and median serve size. Thirteen of 25 vegetables consumed by more than 10% of children at T2 were consumed by a lower proportion at T3 (9:1-5% less consumers; 4: 10-16% less). Eleven discretionary foods were consumed by greater than 10% of children at T2, and by T3, this number had almost doubled. Increased exposure to discretionary food and decreased exposure to vegetables is occurring in the transition toward family food, during a time of increasing independence and emerging neophobia. Implications for Public Health: The age-related decline in dietary quality is of concern, with potential concurrent impact on nutritional adequacy, development of food preferences and later eating patterns. Serve size data could be used to inform serve sizes for toddlers in future editions of the Australian Guide to Healthy Eating. © 2016 The Authors.

  15. Delineating the population served by a mobile crisis team: organizing diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeen, Janet; Pawlick, Julie; Rolfe, Steven; Cottee, Ian; Holmes, Melanie

    2004-01-01

    While mobile crisis teams have proliferated to address gaps in service for individuals with serious mental illness, research into their effectiveness is limited. This study identifies specific cohorts of individuals served by a single mobile crisis team so that appropriate program evaluation could be designed and conducted for each unique grouping. This retrospective study analyzes specific data from 4 sets of client records (n = 401) at 4 different time periods, using a qualitative, text-based approach. For the first 2 reviews (n = 69 and n = 40), only data related to referral source, sex, details of the reason for referral, and the mental status assessment were known to the researchers. The first 2 sets of records were used to identify the cohorts, the third set was used to confirm these cohorts, and the fourth set was used to determine the reliability of the classification tool. All individual cases for the mobile crisis team could be classified into one of the following categories: Symptoms Disturbing Others, Symptoms Disturbing Self, Information Seeking, For Your Information, and Other. After the third review, the cluster, Symptoms Disturbing Others, was subdivided into Symptoms Disturbing Others-General and Symptoms Disturbing Others-Suicide. This review was useful in identifying specific cohorts of individuals served by a single mobile crisis team. Clearly identifying who is served by a mobile crisis team is the first step in identifying practice guidelines and appropriate evaluation measures for each distinct group.

  16. [Adequacy of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools of northern Mexico].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Béjar-Lío, Graciela Ivette; Vázquez-Mendoza, Guillermo

    2010-01-01

    To assess the adequacy and variability of the diet served to Tarahumara children in indigenous boarding schools. Records of food and drinks served for meals, weighed daily, were obtained from Monday through Friday for 10 consecutive weeks in two selected boarding schools. Nutrient intake for Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays was calculated and analyzed for weeks 3, 5 and 7. The number of food items used per week ranged from 33 to 46. The most frequently utilized items were cooking oil, fortified corn tortilla, milk, onion, sugar and beans. Total energy served per day fluctuated between 1309 and 2919 Kcal; proteins comprised 10.5 to 21.2% (45 to 127 g/day), carbohydrates 40.7 to 61.9% (145 to 433 g/day), and lipids 22.5 to 48.1% (45 to 125 g/day) of the total. Daily micronutrient content ranges were: iron 15-33 mg, calcium 686-1795 mg, zinc 8-19 mg, vitamin A 118-756 mcg, vitamin B(9) 42-212 mcg, and vitamin B(12) 0.8-5 mcg. There was significant daily variability in the diet, which was hypercaloric due to the high lipid content, and yet insufficient in vitamins B(9), B(12) and A.

  17. Assessing the financial impacts of distributed energy on load serving entities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zeyu; Negash, Ahlmahz; Kirschen, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This article analyzes the financial impact of distributed energy resources (DERs) owned and operated by commercial customers on the load serving entities (LSEs). DERs reduce the customers' electricity bills and hence the revenues collected by their LSE. However, changes in customer demand profiles can potentially reduce the aggregated system demand profile, and therefore, reduce the LSE's costs in wholesale markets. Analysis of these financial impacts indicates that the LSE's lost revenue ultimately outweighs its reduced expenses. This is largely due to a significant reduction in revenue from demand charges. Dispatchable DERs, including energy storages and demand response, result in more financial losses for LSEs than photovoltaics. The financial losses LSEs face indicate that redesigning commercial customer tariffs is necessary in order for LSEs to accommodate customer owned DERs properly. Several suggestions on modifying commercial tariffs are presented. - Highlights: • We analyze the financial impacts on load serving entities of DERs owned by commercial customers. • Under the selected commercial tariff, load serving entities suffer economic losses. • Energy storages and demand response results in more financial losses for LSE than photovoltaics. • We provide some suggestions for tariff modifications.

  18. THE VARIABILITY OF THE SERVE TOSS IN TENNIS UNDER THE INFLUENCE OF ARTIFICIAL CROSSWIND

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro C. Mendes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This study was made to analyze the variability and stability of the serve toss in tennis, on the x (side-to-side, y (back-to-front and z (vertical axes, with 12 experienced players under the influence of crosswind (induced aerodynamic flow produced by an industrial ventilator. The players were analyzed individually after serving at maximum speed and accuracy to the intersection point of the centre line and service line ("T" point. The results allow us to conclude that the experienced players tend to stabilize the vertical dimension of the service (z axis. Additionally, this study confirms the invariability of the player height ratio: height of impact (1:1.5 in experienced players even when constrained by the "artificial crosswind." Given the above, the vertical dimension of the tennis serve is assumed as a constant feature, which is guaranteed in the remaining varying dimensions (y and x axes of the ball toss. Thus, the variability should be seen as part of the solution and not as something to be avoided by players and coaches

  19. Sleep restriction and serving accuracy in performance tennis players, and effects of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyner, L A; Horne, J A

    2013-08-15

    Athletes often lose sleep on the night before a competition. Whilst it is unlikely that sleep loss will impair sports mostly relying on strength and endurance, little is known about potential effects on sports involving psychomotor performance necessitating judgement and accuracy, rather than speed, as in tennis for example, and where caffeine is 'permitted'. Two studies were undertaken, on 5h sleep (33%) restriction versus normal sleep, on serving accuracy in semi-professional tennis players. Testing (14:00 h-16:00 h) comprised 40 serves into a (1.8 m×1.1 m) 'service box' diagonally, over the net. Study 1 (8 m; 8 f) was within-Ss, counterbalanced (normal versus sleep restriction). Study 2 (6m;6f -different Ss) comprised three conditions (Latin square), identical to Study 1, except for an extra sleep restriction condition with 80 mg caffeine vs placebo in a sugar-free drink, given (double blind), 30 min before testing. Both studies showed significant impairments to serving accuracy after sleep restriction. Caffeine at this dose had no beneficial effect. Study 1 also assessed gender differences, with women significantly poorer under all conditions, and non-significant indications that women were more impaired by sleep restriction (also seen in Study 2). We conclude that adequate sleep is essential for best performance of this type of skill in tennis players and that caffeine is no substitute for 'lost sleep'. 210. © 2013.

  20. The XMM-SERVS Survey: first results in the 5 deg^2 XMM-LSS region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Ting; Brandt, William; Luo, Bin; X-SERVS team

    2018-01-01

    We present an X-ray source catalog obtained with XMM-Newton in the XMM-LSS region as part of the X-SERVS survey (XMM-SERVS-LSS), which aims to expand the parameter space of current X-ray surveys with medium-deep X-ray observations in multiple large fields with superb multiwavelength coverage. Within the 5 deg$^2$ XMM-SERVS-LSS field, we combine the 1.3 Ms XMM observations allocated at XMM AO-15 with archival data, and identified 5218 X-ray sources of which 2400 are new sources. We reach $1.2\\times10^{-15}$ erg s$^{-1} cm$^{-1}$ for 50\\% of the area, which is comparable to the XMM-COSMOS survey but with 2.5 times more sources. We also present multiwavelength identifications, basic photometric properties, and spectroscopic redshifts obtained from the literature. These data, combined with the existing data from COSMOS, will enable a wide range of science on AGN evolution, including studying SMBH growth across the full range of cosmic environments and minimizing cosmic variance.

  1. Characterization of the human talent in health that serves people with chronic disease: construction of a survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Carreño-Moreno

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work, is provide conceptual elements that constitute an integrated vision of care conditions required by the human talent in health HTH that caters to people with chronic disease (CD and their families, and that are translated into a tool for gathering information of survey type that allow characterization. This research was conducted in three phases: 1 Review of the literature. 2 Structuring a proposed survey 3 Refinement of the final version of the survey. As results, based on the conceptual framework it was possible to reach a comprehensive vision that served as the basis for the development of a survey to identify the conditions of HTH to care for people with chronic illness and their families. This instrument, called GCPC-A-THS (in Spanish, contains 37 items distributed in 6 additional dimensions that include aspects of care such as: sociodemographic variables of HTH, caring ability, information and communication technologies (ICTs as a means of support to care, continuity, security and also includes some items related to the level of professional satisfaction. The work done made it possible to achieve a comprehensive view of the characteristics and conditions required by the HTH for care to people with chronic illness and their families.

  2. Comparative Analysis of Return of Serve Comparative Analysis of Return of Serve as Counter- as Counter-attack in Modern Tennis attack in Modern Tennis attack in Modern Tennis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petru Eugen MERGHEŞ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available High performance modern tennis is characterised by high dynamism, speed in thinking and action, precision and high technical and tactical skills. In this study, we used direct observation and statistical recording of nine matches during two competition years in the tennis players Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Andre Agassi. In these tennis players, we studied mainly the return of serve, one of the most important shots in tennis, together with serve, as first shots in a point. We have chosen the three tennis players because they are the best example of return of serve as shown by the matches recorded and interpreted. The study we have carried out shows that return of serve makes Agassi a winner in most matches. The high percentage in Federer’s serves makes his adversaries have a lower percentage in return of serve, which prevents them to win against his serve. High percentage in return of serve results in more points on the adversary’s serve and an opportunity to start the offensive point. After comparing the three tennis players mentioned above, we can see that the highest percentage of points won on return of serve belongs to Agassi, which ranks him among the best return of serve tennis players in the world. The tennis player with the highest percentage in return of service is the one who wins the match, which shows, once again, the importance of the return of serve. Return of serve can be a strong counter-attack weapon if used at its highest level.

  3. Exploring Healthcare Consumer Acceptance of Personal Health Information Management Technology through Personal Health Record Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan

    2013-01-01

    Healthcare technologies are evolving from a practitioner-centric model to a patient-centric model due to the increasing need for technology that directly serves healthcare consumers, including healthy people and patients. Personal health information management (PHIM) technology is one of the technologies designed to enhance an individual's ability…

  4. Technology cycles and technology revolutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganetto, Luigi; Scandizzo, Pasquale Lucio

    2010-09-15

    Technological cycles have been characterized as the basis of long and continuous periods economic growth through sustained changes in total factor productivity. While this hypothesis is in part consistent with several theories of growth, the sheer magnitude and length of the economic revolutions experienced by humankind seems to indicate surmise that more attention should be given to the origin of major technological and economic changes, with reference to one crucial question: role of production and use of energy in economic development.

  5. Contemplation as a Corrective to Technological Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steel, Sean

    2013-01-01

    This paper argues that noetic studies, contemplation, or "theoria" ought to take greater precedence in education than is currently the case. Our modern focus on and fascination with information technologies serves in many ways to thwart and to discourage the cultivation of noetic studies and the pursuit of wisdom in schools. The…

  6. Creativity, Technology, Art, and Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillander, Michelle

    2011-01-01

    Creativity serves an important role in culture, education, and the workforce as it "provides the impetus for any act, idea, or product that changes an existing domain or discipline into a new entity." In the 21st century, information technology is forming a powerful alliance with creative practices in the arts and design to establish new domains…

  7. Role of fracture mechanics in modern technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sih, G.C.

    1987-01-01

    The conference served as a forum not only for reviewing past concepts and technologies but it provided an opportunity for many of the designers, engineers and scientists to come forth with more advanced ideas so that fracture mechanics application can be broadened and employed more effectively to avoid unexpected failures that are annoying, costly and destructive of credibility of the engineering community in general

  8. Motion sensor technologies in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Bratitsis

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper attempts to raise a discussion regarding motion sensor technologies, mainly seen as peripherals of contemporary video game consoles, by examining their exploitation within educational context. An overview of the existing literature is presented, while attempting to categorize the educational approaches which involve motion sensor technologies, in two parts. The first one concerns the education of people with special needs. The utilization of motion sensor technologies, incorporated by game consoles, in the education of such people is examined. The second one refers to various educational approaches in regular education, under which not so many research approaches, but many teaching ideas can be found. The aim of the paper is to serve as a reference point for every individual/group, willing to explore the Sensor-Based Games Based Learning (SBGBL research area, by providing a complete and structured literature review.

  9. Evolution of intelligent transportation systems for mobility management and coordination serving California's rural frontier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    This report documents the evolution, development, and lessons learned while attempting to identify, modify, and deploy Intelligent Transportation System (ITS) and advanced technology tools to facilitate coordination of public transit and social (huma...

  10. Thermoeconomic Optimization of a Renewable Polygeneration System Serving a Small Isolated Community

    OpenAIRE

    Francesco Calise; Massimo Dentice d'Accadia; Antonio Piacentino; Maria Vicidomini

    2015-01-01

    During the last years, special attention has been paid to renewable polygeneration technologies, able of simultaneously producing thermal, cooling, electrical energy and desalinated water from seawater. This paper focuses on an innovative polygeneration system driven by renewable energy sources, including the following technologies: hybrid photovoltaic/thermal collectors, concentrating parabolic trough (CPVT), a biomass heater, a single-stage absorption chiller and a multiple-effect distillat...

  11. Persuasive Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book constitutes the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, PERSUASIVE 2010, held in Copenhagen Denmark in June 2010. The 25 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 80 submissions. In addition three keynote papers are included in this vol......This book constitutes the proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Persuasive Technology, PERSUASIVE 2010, held in Copenhagen Denmark in June 2010. The 25 papers presented were carefully reviewed and selected from 80 submissions. In addition three keynote papers are included...... in this volume. The topics covered are emotions and user experience, ambient persuasive systems, persuasive design, persuasion profiles, designing for health, psychology of persuasion, embodied and conversational agents, economic incentives, and future directions for persuasive technology....

  12. Seafood Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Børresen, Torger

    This presentation will fill the total picture of this conference between fisheries and aquaculture, blue biotech and bioconservation, by considering the optimal processing technology of marine resources from the raw material until the seafood reaches the plate of the consumer. The situation today...... must be performed such that total traceability and authenticity of the final products can be presented on demand. The most important aspects to be considered within seafood technology today are safety, healthy products and high eating quality. Safety can be divided into microbiological safety...... and not presenting any safety risk per se. Seafood is healthy due to the omega-3 fatty acids and the nutritional value of vitamins, peptides and proteins. The processing technology must however be performed such that these valuable features are not lost during production. The same applies to the eating quality. Any...

  13. Smart technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bruckner, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    The success of smart technology in the pursuit of the Gulf War has accentuated the awareness of how the Safeguards and Security disciplines are changing in response to new weaponry. Throughout the Department of Energy Integrated Complex (IC) Safeguards and Security efforts such as: Protection Programs Operations; Materials, Controls and Accountability; Information Security; Computer Security; Operational Security; Personnel Security, Safeguards and/or Security (S and S) surveys, and Inspections and Evaluations are undergoing a reassessment and refocusing. Some of this is in response to such things as the DOE initiated Freeze Report and the Drell Report. An important aspect is also technological, adjusting the way business is done in light of the weapons, tools and processes/procedures becoming available. This paper addresses the S and S issues with the promise of using smart technology to develop new approaches and equipment across the IC

  14. Variables that Predict Serve Efficacy in Elite Men’s Volleyball with Different Quality of Opposition Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valhondo, Álvaro; Fernández-Echeverría, Carmen; González-Silva, Jara; Claver, Fernando; Moreno, M. Perla

    2018-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to determine the variables that predicted serve efficacy in elite men’s volleyball, in sets with different quality of opposition. 3292 serve actions were analysed, of which 2254 were carried out in high quality of opposition sets and 1038 actions were in low quality of opposition sets, corresponding to a total of 24 matches played during the Men’s European Volleyball Championships held in 2011. The independent variables considered in this study were the serve zone, serve type, serving player, serve direction, reception zone, receiving player and reception type; the dependent variable was serve efficacy and the situational variable was quality of opposition sets. The variables that acted as predictors in both high and low quality of opposition sets were the serving player, reception zone and reception type. The serve type variable only acted as a predictor in high quality of opposition sets, while the serve zone variable only acted as a predictor in low quality of opposition sets. These results may provide important guidance in men’s volleyball training processes. PMID:29599869

  15. Technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuskiewicz, T.; Johnston, J.; Leavitt, W.; Zimmerman, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of NASA Technology Utilization programs for the period of 1 December 1971 through 31 May 1972 is presented. An abbreviated description of the overall Technology Utilization Applications Program is provided as a background for the specific applications examples. Subjects discussed are in the broad headings of: (1) cancer, (2) cardiovascular disease, (2) medical instrumentation, (4) urinary system disorders, (5) rehabilitation medicine, (6) air and water pollution, (7) housing and urban construction, (8) fire safety, (9) law enforcement and criminalistics, (10) transportation, and (11) mine safety.

  16. Architectural technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2005-01-01

    The booklet offers an overall introduction to the Institute of Architectural Technology and its projects and activities, and an invitation to the reader to contact the institute or the individual researcher for further information. The research, which takes place at the Institute of Architectural...... Technology at the Roayl Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, reflects a spread between strategic, goal-oriented pilot projects, commissioned by a ministry, a fund or a private company, and on the other hand projects which originate from strong personal interests and enthusiasm of individual...

  17. Variable Cycle Engine Technology Program Planning and Definition Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, J. S.; Stern, A. M.

    1978-01-01

    The variable stream control engine, VSCE-502B, was selected as the base engine, with the inverted flow engine concept selected as a backup. Critical component technologies were identified, and technology programs were formulated. Several engine configurations were defined on a preliminary basis to serve as demonstration vehicles for the various technologies. The different configurations present compromises in cost, technical risk, and technology return. Plans for possible variably cycle engine technology programs were formulated by synthesizing the technology requirements with the different demonstrator configurations.

  18. Progress and challenges associated with digitizing and serving up Hawaii's geothermal data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, D. M.; Lautze, N. C.; Abdullah, M.

    2012-12-01

    This presentation will report on the status of our effort to digitize and serve up Hawaii's geothermal information, an undertaking that commenced in 2011 and will continue through at least 2013. This work is part of national project that is funded by the Department of Energy and managed by the Arizona State Geology Survey (AZGS). The data submitted to AZGS is being entered into the National Geothermal Data System (see http://www.stategeothermaldata.org/overview). We are also planning to host the information locally. Main facets of this project are to: - digitize and generate metadata for non-published geothermal documents relevant to the State of Hawaii - digitize ~100 years of paper records relevant to well permitting and water resources development and serve up information on the ~4500 water wells in the state - digitize, organize, and serve up information on research and geothermal exploratory drilling conducted from the 1980s to the present. - work with AZGS and OneGeology to contribute a geologic map for Hawaii that integrates geologic and geothermal resource data. By December 2012, we anticipate that the majority of the digitization will be complete, the geologic map will be approved, and that over 1000 documents will be hosted online through the University of Hawaii's library system (in the "Geothermal Collection" within the "Scholar Space" repository, see http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/handle/10125/21320). Developing a 'user-friendly' web interface for the water well and drilling data will be a main task in the coming year. Challenges we have faced and anticipate include: 1) ensuring that no personally identifiable information (e.g. SSN, private telephone numbers, bank or credit account) is contained in the geothermal documents and well files; 2) Homeland Security regulations regarding release of information on critical infrastructure related to municipal water supply systems; 3) maintenance of the well database as future well data are developed with

  19. Infrared-faint radio sources in the SERVS deep fields. Pinpointing AGNs at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maini, A.; Prandoni, I.; Norris, R. P.; Spitler, L. R.; Mignano, A.; Lacy, M.; Morganti, R.

    2016-12-01

    Context. Infrared-faint radio sources (IFRS) represent an unexpected class of objects which are relatively bright at radio wavelength, but unusually faint at infrared (IR) and optical wavelengths. A recent and extensive campaign on the radio-brightest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≳ 10 mJy) has provided evidence that most of them (if not all) contain an active galactic nuclei (AGN). Still uncertain is the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs (S1.4 GHz≲ 1 mJy). Aims: The scope of this paper is to assess the nature of the radio-faintest IFRSs, testing their classification and improving the knowledge of their IR properties by making use of the most sensitive IR survey available so far: the Spitzer Extragalactic Representative Volume Survey (SERVS). We also explore how the criteria of IFRSs can be fine-tuned to pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at very high redshift (z > 4). Methods: We analysed a number of IFRS samples identified in SERVS fields, including a new sample (21 sources) extracted from the Lockman Hole. 3.6 and 4.5 μm IR counterparts of the 64 sources located in the SERVS fields were searched for and, when detected, their IR properties were studied. Results: We compared the radio/IR properties of the IR-detected IFRSs with those expected for a number of known classes of objects. We found that IR-detected IFRSs are mostly consistent with a mixture of high-redshift (z ≳ 3) radio-loud AGNs. The faintest ones (S1.4 GHz 100 μJy), however, could be also associated with nearer (z 2) dust-enshrouded star-burst galaxies. We also argue that, while IFRSs with radio-to-IR ratios >500 can very efficiently pinpoint radio-loud AGNs at redshift 2 < z < 4, lower radio-to-IR ratios ( 100-200) are expected for higher redshift radio-loud AGNs.

  20. Slim by design: serving healthy foods first in buffet lines improves overall meal selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; Hanks, Andrew S

    2013-01-01

    Each day, tens of millions of restaurant goers, conference attendees, college students, military personnel, and school children serve themselves at buffets--many being all-you-can-eat buffets. Knowing how the food order at a buffet triggers what a person selects could be useful in guiding diners to make healthier selections. The breakfast food selections of 124 health conference attendees were tallied at two separate seven-item buffet lines (which included cheesy eggs, potatoes, bacon, cinnamon rolls, low-fat granola, low-fat yogurt, and fruit). The food order between the two lines was reversed (least healthy to most healthy, and vise-versa). Participants were randomly assigned to choose their meal from one line or the other, and researchers recorded what participants selected. With buffet foods, the first ones seen are the ones most selected. Over 75% of diners selected the first food they saw, and the first three foods a person encountered in the buffet comprised 66% of all the foods they took. Serving the less healthy foods first led diners to take 31% more total food items (pselection of healthier foods was less common. Three words summarize these results: First foods most. What ends up on a buffet diner's plate is dramatically determined by the presentation order of food. Rearranging food order from healthiest to least healthy can nudge unknowing or even resistant diners toward a healthier meal, helping make them slim by design. Health-conscious diners, can proactively start at the healthier end of the line, and this same basic principle of "first foods most" may be relevant in other contexts - such as when serving or passing food at family dinners.

  1. A simple method for serving Web hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson Ewart R

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HealthCyberMap http://healthcybermap.semanticweb.org aims at mapping parts of health information cyberspace in novel ways to deliver a semantically superior user experience. This is achieved through "intelligent" categorisation and interactive hypermedia visualisation of health resources using metadata, clinical codes and GIS. HealthCyberMap is an ArcView 3.1 project. WebView, the Internet extension to ArcView, publishes HealthCyberMap ArcView Views as Web client-side imagemaps. The basic WebView set-up does not support any GIS database connection, and published Web maps become disconnected from the original project. A dedicated Internet map server would be the best way to serve HealthCyberMap database-driven interactive Web maps, but is an expensive and complex solution to acquire, run and maintain. This paper describes HealthCyberMap simple, low-cost method for "patching" WebView to serve hypermaps with dynamic database drill-down functionality on the Web. Results The proposed solution is currently used for publishing HealthCyberMap GIS-generated navigational information maps on the Web while maintaining their links with the underlying resource metadata base. Conclusion The authors believe their map serving approach as adopted in HealthCyberMap has been very successful, especially in cases when only map attribute data change without a corresponding effect on map appearance. It should be also possible to use the same solution to publish other interactive GIS-driven maps on the Web, e.g., maps of real world health problems.

  2. Technology Transfer: Marketing Tomorrow's Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tcheng, Erene

    1995-01-01

    The globalization of the economy and the end of the Cold War have triggered many changes in the traditional practices of U.S. industry. To effectively apply the resources available to the United States, the federal government has firmly advocated a policy of technology transfer between private industry and government labs, in this case the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NASA Administrator Daniel Goldin is a strong proponent of this policy and has organized technology transfer or commercialization programs at each of the NASA field centers. Here at Langley Research Center, the Technology Applications Group (TAG) is responsible for facilitating the transfer of Langley developed research and technology to U.S. industry. Entering the program, I had many objectives for my summer research with TAG. Certainly, I wanted to gain a more thorough understanding of the concept of technology transfer and Langley's implementation of a system to promote it to both the Langley community and the community at large. Also, I hoped to become more familiar with Langley's research capabilities and technology inventory available to the public. More specifically, I wanted to learn about the technology transfer process at Langley. Because my mentor is a member of Materials and Manufacturing marketing sector of the Technology Transfer Team, another overriding objective for my research was to take advantage of his work and experience in materials research to learn about the Advanced Materials Research agency wide and help market these developments to private industry. Through the various projects I have been assigned to work on in TAG, I have successfully satisfied the majority of these objectives. Work on the Problem Statement Process for TAG as well as the development of the Advanced Materials Research Brochure have provided me with the opportunity to learn about the technology transfer process from the outside looking in and the inside looking out. Because TAG covers

  3. [The clinical predictors of heteroaggressive behaviour of the women serving sentence in penitentiary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaklein, K N; Bardenshtein, L M; Demcheva, N K

    To identify clinical predictors of heteroaggressive behavior. Three hundreds and three women serving sentence in a penal colony were examined using clinical, neurologic and statistical methods. The main group consisted of 225 women with heteroaggressive behavior, the control group included 78 women without aggressive behavior. Differences between the main and control groups in the structure of mental disorders and key syndromes were revealed. The authors conclude that the states with elements of dysphoria, dysthymia, decompensation of personality disorders, which are defined in the various forms of mental pathology, are the most significant predictors of heteroaggressive behavior in women in the penal colony.

  4. Rethinking the core list of journals for libraries that serve schools and colleges of pharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Robert D; Cole, Sabrina W; Rogers, Hannah K; Bickett, Skye; Seeger, Christina; McDaniel, Jennifer A

    2014-10-01

    The Core List of Journals for Libraries that Serve Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy is a guide for developing and maintaining pharmacy-affiliated library collections. A work group was created to update the list and design a process for updating that will streamline future revisions. Work group members searched the National Library of Medicine catalog for an initial list of journals and then applied inclusion criteria to narrow the list. The work group finalized the fifth edition of the list with 225 diverse publications and produced a sustainable set of criteria for journal inclusion, providing a structured, objective process for future updates.

  5. Rethinking the Core List of Journals for Libraries that Serve Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, Robert D.; Rogers, Hannah K.; Bickett, Skye; Seeger, Christina; McDaniel, Jennifer A.

    2014-01-01

    The Core List of Journals for Libraries that Serve Schools and Colleges of Pharmacy is a guide for developing and maintaining pharmacy-affiliated library collections. A work group was created to update the list and design a process for updating that will streamline future revisions. Work group members searched the National Library of Medicine catalog for an initial list of journals and then applied inclusion criteria to narrow the list. The work group finalized the fifth edition of the list with 225 diverse publications and produced a sustainable set of criteria for journal inclusion, providing a structured, objective process for future updates. PMID:25349548

  6. Jane Kelsey, Serving Whose Interests? The Political Economy of Trade in Services Agreements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen Irish

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Serving Whose Interests is an examination of the General Agreement on Trade in Services [GATS] since its inception in 1995, with several case studies that discuss services trade in specific applications around the world. The scholarship i s extensive and detailed. Jane Kelsey, law professor at the University of Auckland, has criticized the pro-market services trade regime i n her role as a political activist. In this book, her goals are to make the technicalities of trade rules accessible and to show their effects on people and communities.

  7. Religion in the lives of older women serving life in prison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aday, Ronald H; Krabill, Jennifer J; Deaton-Owens, Dayron

    2014-01-01

    This exploratory qualitative study examined the roles of religiousness in the lives of 21 older women (mean age = 63) serving life sentences in one southern state. Based on survey and focus group methodology, several themes emerged as important focal points, including early religious experiences prior to incarceration, imprisonment and religious doubt, participation in formal and informal religious activities, and use of religion in coping with stressors such as interpersonal relationships, trauma, and health statuses. Irrespective of their religious upbringing, all participants agreed that religiosity/spirituality played a key role in their ability to cope with their prison experience as well as for maintaining hope and the opportunity for release.

  8. Blast Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-27

    Team Leader Risa Scherer Blast Mitigation Interior and Laboratory Team Leader Blast Technologies POC’s Government Point Of Contacts (POCs): To...to yield injury assessments at higher fidelities and with higher confidence UNCLASSIFIED UNCLASSIFIED Risa Scherer Blast Mitigation Interior and

  9. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boury, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper emphasizes in the specific areas of design, engineering and component production. This paper presents what Framatome has to offer in these areas and its export oriented philosophy. Then, a typical example of this technology transfer philosophy is the collaboration with the South Korean firm, Korea Heavy Industries Corporation (KHIC) for the supply of KNU 9 and KNU 10 power stations

  10. Technology Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Kimberly R.

    1995-01-01

    The development and application of new technologies in the United States has always been important to the economic well being of the country. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been an important source of these new technologies for almost four decades. Recently, increasing global competition has emphasized the importance of fully utilizing federally funded technologies. Today NASA must meet its mission goals while at the same time, conduct research and development that contributes to securing US economic growth. NASA technologies must be quickly and effectively transferred into commercial products. In order to accomplish this task, NASA has formulated a new way of doing business with the private sector. Emphasis is placed on forming mutually beneficial partnerships between NASA and US industry. New standards have been set in response to the process that increase effectiveness, efficiency, and timely customer response. This summer I have identified potential markets for two NASA inventions: including the Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Characterization of Flaws in Metallic Tubing and the Radiographic Moire. I have also worked to establish a cooperative program with TAG, private industry, and a university known as the TAG/Industry/Academia Program.

  11. Energy Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, William W.

    Reviewed are technological problems faced in energy production including locating, recovering, developing, storing, and distributing energy in clean, convenient, economical, and environmentally satisfactory manners. The energy resources of coal, oil, natural gas, hydroelectric power, nuclear energy, solar energy, geothermal energy, winds, tides,…

  12. (Environmental technology)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  13. Geospatial Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Philip A.; Ritz, John

    2004-01-01

    Geospatial technology refers to a system that is used to acquire, store, analyze, and output data in two or three dimensions. This data is referenced to the earth by some type of coordinate system, such as a map projection. Geospatial systems include thematic mapping, the Global Positioning System (GPS), remote sensing (RS), telemetry, and…

  14. Photovoltaic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagnall, Darren M.; Boreland, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaics is already a billion dollar industry. It is experiencing rapid growth as concerns over fuel supplies and carbon emissions mean that governments and individuals are increasingly prepared to ignore its current high costs. It will become truly mainstream when its costs are comparable to other energy sources. At the moment, it is around four times too expensive for competitive commercial production. Three generations of photovoltaics have been envisaged that will take solar power into the mainstream. Currently, photovoltaic production is 90% first-generation and is based on silicon wafers. These devices are reliable and durable, but half of the cost is the silicon wafer and efficiencies are limited to around 20%. A second generation of solar cells would use cheap semiconductor thin films deposited on low-cost substrates to produce devices of slightly lower efficiency. A number of thin-film device technologies account for around 5-6% of the current market. As second-generation technology reduces the cost of active material, the substrate will eventually be the cost limit and higher efficiency will be needed to maintain the cost-reduction trend. Third-generation devices will use new technologies to produce high-efficiency devices. Advances in nanotechnology, photonics, optical metamaterials, plasmonics and semiconducting polymer sciences offer the prospect of cost-competitive photovoltaics. It is reasonable to expect that cost reductions, a move to second-generation technologies and the implementation of new technologies and third-generation concepts can lead to fully cost-competitive solar energy in 10-15 years. (author)

  15. Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Journal of Agriculture, Science and Technology publishes original papers in areas of Agriculture, Science, Technology, Biotechnology, Medicine and Architecture. It serves the scientific community in Africa. Section Policies. Articles. Checked Open Submissions, Checked Indexed, Checked ...

  16. Special Article Personal Wearable Technologies in Education: Value or Villain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borthwick, Arlene C.; Anderson, Cindy L.; Finsness, Elizabeth S.; Foulger, Teresa S.

    2015-01-01

    Wearable personal learning technologies can gather data from the person wearing the device or from the surrounding environment and enable that data to be transferred to another device or shared via the cloud. Wearable technologies can serve as a valuable asset in the classroom enhancing differentiation of instruction and student engagement. They…

  17. U.S. Climate Change Technology Program: Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-09-01

    integrated heat pumps that serve space conditioning and water heating, and solid-state lighting technology are among some of the more promising...heating, and highly efficient geothermal heat pumps); improved hot water circulation systems; and solid state lighting technology and improved

  18. The Co-Dependent Relationship of Technology and Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surry, Daniel W.; Baker, Fredrick W., III

    2016-01-01

    Technology is one the defining features of humanity. It is ubiquitous in modern society and plays an important role in nearly everything that humans do. New technologies frequently spur our imagination, can evoke powerful emotions and often serve as the topic of heated debate. Many people are in awe of the power and potential of new technologies…

  19. Journal of Science and Technology (Ghana): Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The Journal of Science and Technology (JUST) aims principally at publishing articles resulting from original research whether pure or applied in the various aspects of academic endeavour broadly classified as Science (physical, biological and chemical), humanities and technology. It aims at serving the ...

  20. Energy technology sources, systems and frontier conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Ohta, Tokio

    1994-01-01

    This book provides a concise and technical overview of energy technology: the sources of energy, energy systems and frontier conversion. As well as serving as a basic reference book for professional scientists and students of energy, it is intended for scientists and policy makers in other disciplines (including practising engineers, biologists, physicists, economists and managers in energy related industries) who need an up-to-date and authoritative guide to the field of energy technology.Energy systems and their elemental technologies are introduced and evaluated from the view point

  1. Emerging technologies for the changing global market

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruit, Wendy; Schutzenhofer, Scott; Goldberg, Ben; Everhart, Kurt

    1993-01-01

    This project served to define an appropriate methodology for effective prioritization of technology efforts required to develop replacement technologies mandated by imposed and forecast legislation. The methodology used is a semi-quantative approach derived from quality function deployment techniques (QFD Matrix). This methodology aims to weight the full environmental, cost, safety, reliability, and programmatic implications of replacement technology development to allow appropriate identification of viable candidates and programmatic alternatives. The results will be implemented as a guideline for consideration for current NASA propulsion systems.

  2. The nine businesses of AEA Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovan, D.

    1990-01-01

    With the launch of AEA Technology last May, the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority took on fully its new role as a business-led high technology organisation. The new name has acted as a catalyst for the development of a new culture geared to meet commercial objectives. To reflect this change in direction further, a new corporate structure has been put into place. From now, AEA Technology is made up of nine businesses which will serve specific markets, nuclear and non-nuclear. (author)

  3. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  4. Pathways to Infidelity: The Roles of Self-Serving Bias and Betrayal Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warach, Benjamin; Josephs, Lawrence; Gorman, Bernard S

    2018-02-05

    This study employed a structural equation modeling (SEM) approach to examine the interrelationships between the self-serving bias and various known predictors of sexual infidelity. Specifically, we sought to generate a path model depicting how the following variables jointly predict sexual infidelity perpetration: (1) insecure attachment, (2) pathological narcissism, (3) sexual narcissism, (4) primary psychopathy, (5) self-serving attributions for retaliatory infidelity, and (6) sexual betrayal victimization. We developed a structural model describing various pathways to sexual infidelity perpetration based on these six variables. Three pathways to infidelity were discovered. In the first pathway, anxious and avoidant attachment predicted primary psychopathy, and self-justification for retaliatory infidelity mediated the relationship between primary psychopathy and infidelity perpetration. In the second pathway, anxious attachment predicted sexual narcissism, which predicted self-justification for retaliatory infidelity, which in turn predicted infidelity perpetration. In the third pathway, being a victim of sexual betrayal directly predicted sexual infidelity perpetration. In fact, suffering sexual betrayal was the best predictor of sexual infidelity perpetration. The clinical implications of these findings are discussed.

  5. Serving the Reich the struggle for the soul of physics under Hitler

    CERN Document Server

    Ball, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Serving the Reich tells the story of physics under Hitler. While some scientists tried to create an Aryan physics that excluded any 'Jewish ideas', many others made compromises and concessions as they continued to work under the Nazi regime. Among them were three world-renowned physicists: Max Planck, pioneer of quantum theory, regarded it as his moral duty to carry on under the regime. Peter Debye, a Dutch physicist, rose to run the Reich's most important research institute before leaving for the United States in 1940. Werner Heisenberg, discovered the Uncertainty Principle, and became the leading figure in Germany's race for the atomic bomb. After the war most scientists in Germany maintained they had been apolitical or even resisted the regime: Debye claimed that he had gone to America to escape Nazi interference in his research; Heisenberg and others argued that they had deliberately delayed production of the atomic bomb. Mixing history, science and biography, Serving the Reich is a gripping exploration o...

  6. A Systematic Review of Life Skill Development Through Sports Programs Serving Socially Vulnerable Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermens, Niels; Super, Sabina; Verkooijen, Kirsten T; Koelen, Maria A

    2017-12-01

    Despite the strong belief in sports programs as a setting in which socially vulnerable youth can develop life skills, no overview exists of life skill development in sports programs serving this youth group. Therefore, the present systematic review provides an overview of the evidence on life skill development in sports programs serving socially vulnerable youth and, insofar as it was investigated in the included studies, of the conditions conducive to life skill development in these sports programs. Potentially relevant studies published during 1990 to 2014 were identified by a search in 7 electronic databases. The search combined terms relating to (a) sport, (b) youth AND socially vulnerable, and (c) life skills. Eighteen of the 2,076 unique studies met the inclusion criteria. Each included study reported that at least 1 life skill improved in youth who participated in the studied sports program. Improvements in cognitive and social life skills were more frequently reported than were improvements in emotional life skills. Only a few of the included studies investigated the conditions in the studied sports programs that made these programs conducive to life skill development. Sports programs have the potential to make a difference in the life skill development of socially vulnerable youth. This conclusion needs to be treated with some caution, because the studies experienced many challenges in reducing the risk for bias. Several alternative research strategies are suggested for future studies in this field.

  7. Serving as a physician role model for a diverse population of medical learners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Scott M; Carrese, Joseph A

    2003-06-01

    Medical learners look to role models to better understand the values, attitudes, behaviors, and ethics of the medical profession. This study examined issues related to physicians serving as role models for diverse medical learners. Between September and November 2000, in-depth semi-structured 30-minute interviews were conducted with 29 highly regarded role models, as judged by medical house officers at two large teaching hospitals in Baltimore, Maryland. Interview transcripts were independently coded and compared for agreement. Content analysis identified several major categories of themes that were examined and conceptually organized. The informants identified issues that relate to role modeling for diverse medical learners. Subcategories under the domain of similarity facilitates role modeling included learners prefer role models similar to them, role modeling is easier when the learner resembles the teacher, and minority physicians may be better role models for minority learners. Under the domain role modeling when physician-teachers and learners are different were the subcategories extra effort may be necessary, success promotes and inspires confidence, and role modeling across diversity is an achievable objective that should be pursued. The final domain, approaches to differences between physician-teachers and learners, encompassed embrace diversity, act as a consultant and refer when necessary, and minimize and disregard all differences. The results of this study should draw attention to these issues and may serve as a stimulus for teaching physicians to consider a broader range of options for successful interactions with medical learners who are different from them.

  8. Serving California's Science and Governance Needs through Crisis-driven Collaborations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernacchi, L.

    2015-12-01

    Due to its magnitude, the ongoing drought in California (USA) serves as an experimental space for innovative resource management and will define responses to predicted widespread drought. Due to the magnitude of its effect on humans and natural ecosystems and the water resources on which they depend, governmental programs are granting support to scientifically-valid, locally-produced solutions to water scarcity. Concurrently, University of California Water (UC Water) Security and Sustainability Research Initiative is focused on strategic research to build the knowledge base for better water resources management. This paper examines how a team of transdisciplinary scientists are engaged in water governance and information, providing examples of actionable research successfully implemented by decision makers. From a sociology of science perspective, UC Water scientists were interviewed about their engagement practices with California water decision makers. Their "co-production of knowledge" relationships produce effective responses to climatic, landcover and population changes by expanding from singularly information-based, unidirectional communication to governance-relevant, co-constructed knowledge and wisdom. This is accomplished by serving on decision making organizational boards and developing information in a productive format. The perceived crisis of California's drought is an important impetus in cross-sector collaborations, and in combination with governance and institution parameters, defines the inquiry and decision space. We conclude by describing a process of clear problem-solution definition made possible through transparent communication, salient and credible information, and relevant tools and techniques for interpreting scientific findings.

  9. Multicultural Milky Way: Ethnoastronomy and Planetarium Shows for Under-served Arizonans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knierman, Karen

    2018-01-01

    The astronomy outreach initiative, Multicultural Milky Way, partners the School of Earth and Space Exploration (SESE) at Arizona State University (ASU) with under-served populations in Arizona in learning about our Milky Way and other galaxies. Arizona is home to many diverse populations with rich cultural histories such as Mayan, Navajo, and Apache. Linking astronomy practiced by one’s indigenous culture to that of Western astronomy may increase the interest in science. Through multicultural planetarium shows and associated hands-on activities, under-served students and families will learn how the Milky Way is represented in different cultures and about the science of galaxies. New planetarium shows using the Mesa Community College (MCC) Digital Planetarium and STARLAB portable planetarium explore how the Milky Way is interpreted in different cultures. STARLAB shows and associated new hands-on activities have been featured during school visits, teacher trainings, and Community Astronomy Nights around Arizona. For authentic assessment, evaluation techniques and procedures were developed.

  10. KNMI DataLab experiences in serving data-driven innovations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noteboom, Jan Willem; Sluiter, Raymond

    2016-04-01

    Climate change research and innovations in weather forecasting rely more and more on (Big) data. Besides increasing data from traditional sources (such as observation networks, radars and satellites), the use of open data, crowd sourced data and the Internet of Things (IoT) is emerging. To deploy these sources of data optimally in our services and products, KNMI has established a DataLab to serve data-driven innovations in collaboration with public and private sector partners. Big data management, data integration, data analytics including machine learning and data visualization techniques are playing an important role in the DataLab. Cross-domain data-driven innovations that arise from public-private collaborative projects and research programmes can be explored, experimented and/or piloted by the KNMI DataLab. Furthermore, advice can be requested on (Big) data techniques and data sources. In support of collaborative (Big) data science activities, scalable environments are offered with facilities for data integration, data analysis and visualization. In addition, Data Science expertise is provided directly or from a pool of internal and external experts. At the EGU conference, gained experiences and best practices are presented in operating the KNMI DataLab to serve data-driven innovations for weather and climate applications optimally.

  11. Technology Programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo

    2005-01-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  12. Technology Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batistoni, Paola; De Marco, Francesco; Pieroni, Leonardo (ed.)

    2005-07-01

    The technology activities carried out by the Euratom-ENEA Association in the framework of the European Fusion Development Agreement concern the Next Step (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor - ITER), the Long-Term Programme (breeder blanket, materials, International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility - IFMIF), Power Plant Conceptual Studies and Socio-Economic Studies. The Underlying Technology Programme was set up to complement the fusion activities as well to develop technologies with a wider range of interest. The Technology Programme mainly involves staff from the Frascati laboratories of the Fusion Technical and Scientific Unit and from the Brasimone laboratories of the Advanced Physics Technologies Unit. Other ENEA units also provide valuable contributions to the programme. ENEA is heavily engaged in component development/testing and in design and safety activities for the European Fusion Technology Programme. Although the work documented in the following covers a large range of topics that differ considerably because they concern the development of extremely complex systems, the high level of integration and coordination ensures the capability to cover the fusion system as a whole. In 2004 the most significant testing activities concerned the ITER primary beryllium-coated first wall. In the field of high-heat-flux components, an important achievement was the qualification of the process for depositing a copper liner on carbon fibre composite (CFC) hollow tiles. This new process, pre-brazed casting (PBC), allows the hot radial pressing (HRP) joining procedure to be used also for CFC-based armour monoblock divertor components. The PBC and HRP processes are candidates for the construction of the ITER divertor. In the materials field an important milestone was the commissioning of a new facility for chemical vapour infiltration/deposition, used for optimising silicon carbide composite (SiCf/SiC) components. Eight patents were deposited during 2004

  13. Technological Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Bivas

    The study of networks in the form of mathematical graph theory is one of the fundamental pillars of discrete mathematics. However, recent years have witnessed a substantial new movement in network research. The focus of the research is shifting away from the analysis of small graphs and the properties of individual vertices or edges to consideration of statistical properties of large scale networks. This new approach has been driven largely by the availability of technological networks like the Internet [12], World Wide Web network [2], etc. that allow us to gather and analyze data on a scale far larger than previously possible. At the same time, technological networks have evolved as a socio-technological system, as the concepts of social systems that are based on self-organization theory have become unified in technological networks [13]. In today’s society, we have a simple and universal access to great amounts of information and services. These information services are based upon the infrastructure of the Internet and the World Wide Web. The Internet is the system composed of ‘computers’ connected by cables or some other form of physical connections. Over this physical network, it is possible to exchange e-mails, transfer files, etc. On the other hand, the World Wide Web (commonly shortened to the Web) is a system of interlinked hypertext documents accessed via the Internet where nodes represent web pages and links represent hyperlinks between the pages. Peer-to-peer (P2P) networks [26] also have recently become a popular medium through which huge amounts of data can be shared. P2P file sharing systems, where files are searched and downloaded among peers without the help of central servers, have emerged as a major component of Internet traffic. An important advantage in P2P networks is that all clients provide resources, including bandwidth, storage space, and computing power. In this chapter, we discuss these technological networks in detail. The review

  14. Innovative Technology in Automotive Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, John

    2007-01-01

    Automotive Technology combines hands-on training along with a fully integrated, interactive, computerized multistationed facility. Our program is a competency based, true open-entry/open-exit program that utilizes flexible self-paced course outlines. It is designed around an industry partnership that promotes community and economic development,…

  15. Playful Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Stine Liv; Eriksson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the design of future services for children in Danish public libraries is discussed, in the light of new challenges and opportunities in relation to new media and technologies. The Danish government has over the last few years initiated and described a range of initiatives regarding...... the future of public libraries, especially in relation to children as a particular user group. This paper explores play culture, and takes a stance especially in the project ‘Families at play in the library’, but also in experiences from related projects. The focus is on families playing together...... in the library, the changing role of the librarians and the library space. We argue that intertwining traditional library services with new media forms and engaging play is the core challenge for future design in physical public libraries, but also that it is through new media and technology that new...

  16. Technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Illustrated by the example of the FRG's nuclear energy exports, it is shown that the nuclear technology transfer leads to new dimensions of intergovernmental relations, which hold within themselves on account of multiple state-to-state, scientific, industrial and - last but not least - personal contacts the chance of far-reaching friendships between countries and people. If the chance is taken, this can also be seen as an important contribution towards maintaining the peace. (orig.) [de

  17. Group technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rome, C.P.

    1976-01-01

    Group Technology has been conceptually applied to the manufacture of batch-lots of 554 machined electromechanical parts which now require 79 different types of metal-removal tools. The products have been grouped into 7 distinct families which require from 8 to 22 machines in each machine-cell. Throughput time can be significantly reduced and savings can be realized from tooling, direct-labor, and indirect-labor costs

  18. Army Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-02-01

    MUTT ) is a semi-autonomous robotic follower that lightens the load for Soldiers by decreasing the amount of equipment they need to carry when...dismounted in the toughest of terrains. The MUTT uses advanced, proven commercial technology that has been adapted for the rigors of the battlefield...With ultra-quiet electric motors, the MUTT gives Soldiers unmatched internal transportability options and expeditionary power that includes hands- free

  19. ADSL Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavko Šarić

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the ADSL (Asymmetric Digital SubscriberLine technology- the asymmetric digital telecommunicationtechnology. It is characterised by high-speed transmissionof data and simultaneous transmission of information regardingthe throughput capacity of the telephone network. Thisresults in better efficiency of transmission, and higher utilisationof the bandwidth. Due to its advantages, the use of ADSLtechnology is increasing daily, especially by ente1prises in Europeand worldwide.

  20. Nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report examines nuclear technology in Canada, with emphasis on Quebec, as a means of revitilizing industry. The historical, present day, and future states of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited are examined. Future research programs are discussed in greatest detail. These range from disposal of porcine wastes to new applications for electricity to nuclear medical techniques (to cite only a few examples). The executive summary is written in English. (23 fig., 16 tab.)

  1. Emerging technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  2. Technology Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilkington, Alan

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a bibliometric analysis (co-citation network analysis) of 10 journals in the management of technology (MOT) field. As well as introducing various bibliometric ideas, network analysis tools identify and explore the concepts covered by the field and their inter-relationships. Spe......This paper reports a bibliometric analysis (co-citation network analysis) of 10 journals in the management of technology (MOT) field. As well as introducing various bibliometric ideas, network analysis tools identify and explore the concepts covered by the field and their inter......-relationships. Specific results from different levels of analysis show the different dimensions of technology management: • Co-word terms identify themes • Journal co-citation network: linking to other disciplines • Co-citation network show concentrations of themes The analysis shows that MOT has a bridging role...... in integrating ideas from several distinct disciplines. This suggests that management and strategy are central to MOT which essentially relates to the firm rather than policy. Similarly we have a dual focus on capabilities, but can see subtle differences in how we view these ideas, either through an inwards...

  3. Cardiac expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein is increased in obesity and serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emil D Bartels

    Full Text Available Obesity causes lipid accumulation in the heart and may lead to lipotoxic heart disease. Traditionally, the size of the cardiac triglyceride pool is thought to reflect the balance between uptake and beta-oxidation of fatty acids. However, triglycerides can also be exported from cardiomyocytes via secretion of apolipoproteinB-containing (apoB lipoproteins. Lipoprotein formation depends on expression of microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP; the mouse expresses two isoforms of MTP, A and B. Since many aspects of the link between obesity-induced cardiac disease and cardiac lipid metabolism remain unknown, we investigated how cardiac lipoprotein synthesis affects cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes, insulin sensitivity, and function in obese mice. Heart-specific ablation of MTP-A in mice using Cre-loxP technology impaired upregulation of MTP expression in response to increased fatty acid availability during fasting and fat feeding. This resulted in cardiac triglyceride accumulation but unaffected cardiac insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Long-term fat-feeding of male C57Bl/6 mice increased cardiac triglycerides, induced cardiac expression of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and attenuated heart function. Abolishing cardiac triglyceride accumulation in fat-fed mice by overexpression of an apoB transgene in the heart prevented the induction of triglyceride metabolism-controlling genes and improved heart function. The results suggest that in obesity, the physiological increase of cardiac MTP expression serves to attenuate cardiac triglyceride accumulation albeit without major effects on cardiac insulin sensitivity. Nevertheless, the data suggest that genetically increased lipoprotein secretion prevents development of obesity-induced lipotoxic heart disease.

  4. Increasing Scientific Literacy at Minority Serving Institutions Nationwide through AMS Professional Development Diversity Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Nugnes, K. A.; Moses, M. N.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing students' earth science literacy, especially those at Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), is a primary goal of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Through the NSF-supported AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies Diversity workshops for Historically Black College and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, AMS has brought meteorology and oceanography courses to more students. These workshops trained and mentored faculty implementing AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies. Of the 145 institutions that have participated in the AMS Weather Studies Diversity Project, reaching over 13,000 students, it was the first meteorology course offered for more than two-thirds of the institutions. As a result of the AMS Ocean Studies Diversity Project, 75 institutions have offered the course to more than 3000 students. About 50 MSIs implemented both the Weather and Ocean courses, improving the Earth Science curriculum on their campuses. With the support of NSF and NASA, and a partnership with Second Nature, the organizing entity behind the American College and University President's Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), the newest professional development workshop, AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project will recruit MSI faculty members through the vast network of Second Nature's more than 670 signatories. These workshops will begin in early summer 2012. An innovative approach to studying climate science, AMS Climate Studies explores the fundamental science of Earth's climate system and addresses the societal impacts relevant to today's students and teachers. The course utilizes resources from respected organizations, such as the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA. In addition, faculty and students learn about basic climate modeling through the AMS Conceptual Energy Model. Following the flow of energy in a clear, simplified model from space to

  5. Slim by design: serving healthy foods first in buffet lines improves overall meal selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian Wansink

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Each day, tens of millions of restaurant goers, conference attendees, college students, military personnel, and school children serve themselves at buffets--many being all-you-can-eat buffets. Knowing how the food order at a buffet triggers what a person selects could be useful in guiding diners to make healthier selections. METHOD: The breakfast food selections of 124 health conference attendees were tallied at two separate seven-item buffet lines (which included cheesy eggs, potatoes, bacon, cinnamon rolls, low-fat granola, low-fat yogurt, and fruit. The food order between the two lines was reversed (least healthy to most healthy, and vise-versa. Participants were randomly assigned to choose their meal from one line or the other, and researchers recorded what participants selected. RESULTS: With buffet foods, the first ones seen are the ones most selected. Over 75% of diners selected the first food they saw, and the first three foods a person encountered in the buffet comprised 66% of all the foods they took. Serving the less healthy foods first led diners to take 31% more total food items (p<0.001. Indeed, diners in this line more frequently chose less healthy foods in combinations, such as cheesy eggs and bacon (r = 0.47; p<0.001 or cheesy eggs and fried potatoes (r= 0.37; p<0.001. This co-selection of healthier foods was less common. CONCLUSIONS: Three words summarize these results: First foods most. What ends up on a buffet diner's plate is dramatically determined by the presentation order of food. Rearranging food order from healthiest to least healthy can nudge unknowing or even resistant diners toward a healthier meal, helping make them slim by design. Health-conscious diners, can proactively start at the healthier end of the line, and this same basic principle of "first foods most" may be relevant in other contexts - such as when serving or passing food at family dinners.

  6. Can prior learning experience serve as a catalyst in the paradigm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This developmental programme in the fields of mathematics, science, technology and engineering education provides the teachers with an Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE) with 120 credits. This article outlines how prior learning experience helped to smooth the transition from traditional to OBE practice.

  7. 78 FR 67103 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Census Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-08

    ... December 9, 2013. ADDRESSES: Please submit nominations to Jeri Green, Chief, Office of External Engagement...: Jeri Green, Chief, Office of External Engagement, U.S. Census Bureau, Room 8H182, 4600 Silver Hill Road... and behavioral sciences, Information Technology and computing, marketing, communications, and other...

  8. 77 FR 1454 - Request for Nominations of Members To Serve on the Census Scientific Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-10

    ... February 9, 2012. ADDRESSES: Please submit nominations to Jeri Green, Chief, Office of External Engagement...: Jeri Green, Chief, Office of External Engagement, U.S. Census Bureau, Room 8H182, 4600 Silver Hill Road... and behavioral sciences, Information Technology and computing, marketing, communications, and other...

  9. Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and School Psychology: Preparing To Serve More Children with Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, Gary W.

    While the commitment to technology for neonatal and infant hearing screening in this country has come a long way and is evolving rapidly, the average age of 18-30 months, at which young children with auditory disabilities are identified, is still unacceptable. The promise of earlier detection, diagnosis, and habilitation of hearing loss is within…

  10. Serving culturally diverse learners in the 24/7 management classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Bunt-Kokhuis, S.G.M.; Weir, D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to highlight how future teaching in business schools will probably take place in an online (here called 24/7) classroom, where culturally diverse e-learners around the globe meet. Technologies such as iPhone, iPad and a variety of social media, to mention but a

  11. Immersive Virtual Reality in the Psychology Classroom: What Purpose Could it Serve?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coxon, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Virtual reality is by no means a new technology, yet it is increasingly being used, to different degrees, in education, training, rehabilitation, therapy, and home entertainment. Although the exact reasons for this shift are not the subject of this short opinion piece, it is possible to speculate that decreased costs, and increased performance, of…

  12. Serving the Cyberteen: Library Service for the 21st Century Adolescent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amey, Larry; Elliott, Stephen

    1997-01-01

    Arguing that today's youth yearns for initiation into adult society, this article examines visions of the future of adolescence in Western Society by contrasting the films "Star Trek" and "Blade Runner," and questions the role of information technology. Discusses library services for adolescents and the role of librarians as…

  13. 77 FR 8228 - Applications for New Awards; Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... (OER) means teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been... significantly increase efficiency in the use of time, staff, money, or other resources while improving student... innovative and sustainable uses of technology, modification of school schedules and teacher compensation...

  14. Student Success: A Descriptive Analysis of Hispanic Students and Engagement at a Midwest Hispanic-Serving Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercado, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn more about the Hispanic students attending Northeastern Illinois University, a four-year institution in Chicago, IL, and their student success. Little is known descriptively and statistically about this population at NEIU, which serves as a Hispanic-Serving Institution. In addition, little is known about…

  15. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING... Learn and Serve America programs? The Corporation will evaluate programs based on the following: (a) The...

  16. Research Productivity in Rehabilitation, Disability, and Allied Health Programs: A Focus Group Perspective on Minority-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aref, Fariborz; Manyibe, Edward O.; Washington, Andre L.; Johnson, Jean; Davis, Dytisha; Eugene-Cross, Kenyotta; Moore, Cayla A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The article outlines select individual and institutional factors that could contribute to rehabilitation, disability, and health research productivity among minority-serving institutions (MSIs; i.e., historically Black colleges/universities, Hispanic-serving institutions, and American Indian tribal colleges/universities). Method: We…

  17. Accessing On-Line Services with Synthetic Speech: America Online, CompuServe, and Internet Service Providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Crista L.; Leventhal, Jay D.

    1998-01-01

    This product evaluation reviews two of the most popular online Internet service providers, America Online and CompuServe, and describes their advantages and disadvantages for synthetic speech-users compared to services that offer Internet access only, such as Concentric or Netcome. It concludes that CompuServe is a better choice for individuals…

  18. 23 CFR 636.117 - What conflict of interest standards apply to individuals who serve as selection team members for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... § 636.117 What conflict of interest standards apply to individuals who serve as selection team members... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What conflict of interest standards apply to individuals who serve as selection team members for the owner? 636.117 Section 636.117 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY...

  19. 77 FR 17098 - Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications for Serving Adult and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration Notice of Availability of Funds and Solicitation for Grant Applications for Serving Adult and Youth Ex-Offenders Through Strategies Targeted to... award approximately eight grants to serve adult and youth ex-offenders pre- and post-release. Services...

  20. Leader power and leader self-serving behavior : The role of effective leadership beliefs and performance information

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rus, Diana; van Knippenberg, Daan; Wisse, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In this research we investigated the role played by leader power in determining leader self-serving behavior. Based on an integration of insights from research on the determinants of leader behavior and the power-approach theory, we hypothesized that with higher leader power leader self-serving