WorldWideScience

Sample records for video computer animation

  1. Flexible Animation Computer Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallcup, Scott S.

    1990-01-01

    FLEXAN (Flexible Animation), computer program animating structural dynamics on Evans and Sutherland PS300-series graphics workstation with VAX/VMS host computer. Typical application is animation of spacecraft undergoing structural stresses caused by thermal and vibrational effects. Displays distortions in shape of spacecraft. Program displays single natural mode of vibration, mode history, or any general deformation of flexible structure. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  2. Film/Video Animation: A Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, Steven P.

    Comprising approximately 475 items, this bibliography on film and video animation includes books and journal articles dating from 1917 to 1988. Both American and foreign sources are represented in the bibliography. (RS)

  3. Computer facial animation

    CERN Document Server

    Parke, Frederic I

    2008-01-01

    This comprehensive work provides the fundamentals of computer facial animation and brings into sharper focus techniques that are becoming mainstream in the industry. Over the past decade, since the publication of the first edition, there have been significant developments by academic research groups and in the film and games industries leading to the development of morphable face models, performance driven animation, as well as increasingly detailed lip-synchronization and hair modeling techniques. These topics are described in the context of existing facial animation principles. The second ed

  4. Computational Thinking in Constructionist Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weintrop, David; Holbert, Nathan; Horn, Michael S.; Wilensky, Uri

    2016-01-01

    Video games offer an exciting opportunity for learners to engage in computational thinking in informal contexts. This paper describes a genre of learning environments called constructionist video games that are especially well suited for developing learners' computational thinking skills. These games blend features of conventional video games with…

  5. Learning computer science by watching video games

    OpenAIRE

    Nagataki, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a teaching method that utilizes video games in computer science education. The primary characteristic of this approach is that it utilizes video games as observational materials. The underlying idea is that by observing the computational behavior of a wide variety of video games, learners will easily grasp the fundamental architecture, theory, and technology of computers. The results of a case study conducted indicate that the method enhances the motivation of students for...

  6. Understanding Motion Capture for Computer Animation

    CERN Document Server

    Menache, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    The power of today's motion capture technology has taken animated characters and special effects to amazing new levels of reality. And with the release of blockbusters like Avatar and Tin-Tin, audiences continually expect more from each new release. To live up to these expectations, film and game makers, particularly technical animators and directors, need to be at the forefront of motion capture technology. In this extensively updated edition of Understanding Motion Capture for Computer Animation and Video Games, an industry insider explains the latest research developments in digital design

  7. Video tracking in the extreme: video analysis for nocturnal underwater animal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patullo, B W; Jolley-Rogers, G; Macmillan, D L

    2007-11-01

    Computer analysis of video footage is one option for recording locomotor behavior for a range of neurophysiological and behavioral studies. This technique is reasonably well established and accepted, but its use for some behavioral analyses remains a challenge. For example, filming through water can lead to reflection, and filming nocturnal activity can reduce resolution and clarity of filmed images. The aim of this study was to develop a noninvasive method for recording nocturnal activity in aquatic decapods and test the accuracy of analysis by video tracking software. We selected crayfish, Cherax destructor, because they are often active at night, they live underwater, and data on their locomotion is important for answering biological and physiological questions such as how they explore and navigate. We constructed recording arenas and filmed animals in infrared light. Wethen compared human observer data and software-acquired values. In this article, we outline important apparatus and software issues to obtain reliable computer tracking.

  8. An investigation comparing traditional recitation instruction to computer tutorials which combine three-dimensional animation with varying levels of visual complexity, including digital video in teaching various chemistry topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, A. Palmer

    This study examines the effect of increasing the visual complexity used in computer assisted instruction in general chemistry. Traditional recitation instruction was used as a control for the experiment. One tutorial presented a chemistry topic using 3-D animation showing molecular activity and symbolic representation of the macroscopic view of a chemical phenomenon. A second tutorial presented the same topic but simultaneously presented students with a digital video movie showing the phenomena and 3-D animation showing the molecular view of the phenomena. This experimental set-up was used in two different experiments during the first semester of college level general chemistry course. The topics covered were the molecular effect of heating water through the solid-liquid phase change and the kinetic molecular theory used in explaining pressure changes. The subjects used in the experiment were 236 college students enrolled in a freshman chemistry course at a large university. The data indicated that the simultaneous presentation of digital video, showing the solid to liquid phase change of water, with a molecular animation, showing the molecular behavior during the phase change, had a significant effect on student particulate understanding when compared to traditional recitation. Although the effect of the KMT tutorial was not statistically significant, there was a positive effect on student particulate understanding. The use of computer tutorial also had a significant effect on student attitude toward their comprehension of the lesson.

  9. A Computational Framework for Vertical Video Editing

    OpenAIRE

    Gandhi, Vineet; Ronfard, Rémi

    2015-01-01

    International audience; Vertical video editing is the process of digitally editing the image within the frame as opposed to horizontal video editing, which arranges the shots along a timeline. Vertical editing can be a time-consuming and error-prone process when using manual key-framing and simple interpolation. In this paper, we present a general framework for automatically computing a variety of cinematically plausible shots from a single input video suitable to the special case of live per...

  10. Turning Video Resource Management into Cloud Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weili Kou

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Big data makes cloud computing more and more popular in various fields. Video resources are very useful and important to education, security monitoring, and so on. However, issues of their huge volumes, complex data types, inefficient processing performance, weak security, and long times for loading pose challenges in video resource management. The Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS is an open-source framework, which can provide cloud-based platforms and presents an opportunity for solving these problems. This paper presents video resource management architecture based on HDFS to provide a uniform framework and a five-layer model for standardizing the current various algorithms and applications. The architecture, basic model, and key algorithms are designed for turning video resources into a cloud computing environment. The design was tested by establishing a simulation system prototype.

  11. The complete guide to blender graphics computer modeling and animation

    CERN Document Server

    Blain, John M

    2014-01-01

    Smoothly Leads Users into the Subject of Computer Graphics through the Blender GUIBlender, the free and open source 3D computer modeling and animation program, allows users to create and animate models and figures in scenes, compile feature movies, and interact with the models and create video games. Reflecting the latest version of Blender, The Complete Guide to Blender Graphics: Computer Modeling & Animation, 2nd Edition helps beginners learn the basics of computer animation using this versatile graphics program. This edition incorporates many new features of Blender, including developments

  12. Selectively De-animating and Stabilizing Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-11

    welcoming me into their classes. I have learnt so much from them. My graduate life has been wonderful due to the great friends and lab mates I have...techniques for interactive control of video stabilization. The first step in current video stabilization methods is to track feature points that esti- mate ...Transactions on 18.11 (2012), pp. 1868–1879. [103] Gregory P. Sutton and Malcolm Burrows. “Biomechanics of jumping in the flea ”. In: J Exp Biol 214.5

  13. Computer animation algorithms and techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Parent, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Driven by the demands of research and the entertainment industry, the techniques of animation are pushed to render increasingly complex objects with ever-greater life-like appearance and motion. This rapid progression of knowledge and technique impacts professional developers, as well as students. Developers must maintain their understanding of conceptual foundations, while their animation tools become ever more complex and specialized. The second edition of Rick Parent's Computer Animation is an excellent resource for the designers who must meet this challenge. The first edition establ

  14. Techniques for animation of CFD results. [computational fluid dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horowitz, Jay; Hanson, Jeffery C.

    1992-01-01

    Video animation is becoming increasingly vital to the computational fluid dynamics researcher, not just for presentation, but for recording and comparing dynamic visualizations that are beyond the current capabilities of even the most powerful graphic workstation. To meet these needs, Lewis Research Center has recently established a facility to provide users with easy access to advanced video animation capabilities. However, producing animation that is both visually effective and scientifically accurate involves various technological and aesthetic considerations that must be understood both by the researcher and those supporting the visualization process. These considerations include: scan conversion, color conversion, and spatial ambiguities.

  15. Narrated Animated Solution Videos in a Mastery Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Noah; Gladding, Gary; Gutmann, Brianne; Stelzer, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Narrated animated solution videos were implemented in a clinical study that compared a mastery setting that employed repeated cycles of testing with instructional support to a group that had a single opportunity to experience the materials. The mastery setting students attempted sequential questions sets on a topic, with animated solutions between…

  16. Lengthening Temporalis Myoplasty: Virtual Animation-Assisted Technical Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aljudaibi, Nawaf; Bennis, Yasmine; Duquennoy-Martinot, Veronique; Labbé, Daniel; Guerreschi, Pierre

    2016-09-01

    Lengthening temporalis myoplasty is a well-established procedure for dynamic palliative reanimation of the lip in facial palsy sequelae. The particularity of this technique is that the entire temporal muscle is transferred from the coronoid process to the upper half of the lip without interposition of aponeurotic tissue. To date, no video describing the technique was available. This is the first video describing the entire procedure, from preoperative markings through postoperative rehabilitation. In the video presented herein, the authors craft virtual three-dimensional animations in addition to a live operation on a patient performed by Daniel Labbé, who first described this technique 20 years ago.

  17. Computational Design of Animated Mechanical Characters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coros, Stelian; Thomaszewski, Bernhard; DRZ Team Team

    2014-03-01

    A factor key to the appeal of modern CG movies and video-games is that the virtual worlds they portray place no bounds on what can be imagined. Rapid manufacturing devices hold the promise of bringing this type of freedom to our own world, by enabling the fabrication of physical objects whose appearance, deformation behaviors and motions can be precisely specified. In order to unleash the full potential of this technology however, computational design methods that create digital content suitable for fabrication need to be developed. In recent work, we presented a computational design system that allows casual users to create animated mechanical characters. Given an articulated character as input, the user designs the animated character by sketching motion curves indicating how they should move. For each motion curve, our framework creates an optimized mechanism that reproduces it as closely as possible. The resulting mechanisms are attached to the character and then connected to each other using gear trains, which are created in a semi-automated fashion. The mechanical assemblies generated with our system can be driven with a single input driver, such as a hand-operated crank or an electric motor, and they can be fabricated using rapid prototyping devices.

  18. A video-based system for hand-driven stop-motion animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoguang; Fu, Hongbo; Zheng, Hanlin; Liu, Ligang; Wang, Jue

    2013-01-01

    Stop-motion is a well-established animation technique but is often laborious and requires craft skills. A new video-based system can animate the vast majority of everyday objects in stop-motion style, more flexibly and intuitively. Animators can perform and capture motions continuously instead of breaking them into increments and shooting one still picture per increment. More important, the system permits direct hand manipulation without resorting to rigs, achieving more natural object control for beginners. The system's key component is two-phase keyframe-based capturing and processing, assisted by computer vision techniques. With this system, even amateurs can generate high-quality stop-motion animations.

  19. The Implementation of Blended Learning Using Android-Based Tutorial Video in Computer Programming Course II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huda, C.; Hudha, M. N.; Ain, N.; Nandiyanto, A. B. D.; Abdullah, A. G.; Widiaty, I.

    2018-01-01

    Computer programming course is theoretical. Sufficient practice is necessary to facilitate conceptual understanding and encouraging creativity in designing computer programs/animation. The development of tutorial video in an Android-based blended learning is needed for students’ guide. Using Android-based instructional material, students can independently learn anywhere and anytime. The tutorial video can facilitate students’ understanding about concepts, materials, and procedures of programming/animation making in detail. This study employed a Research and Development method adapting Thiagarajan’s 4D model. The developed Android-based instructional material and tutorial video were validated by experts in instructional media and experts in physics education. The expert validation results showed that the Android-based material was comprehensive and very feasible. The tutorial video was deemed feasible as it received average score of 92.9%. It was also revealed that students’ conceptual understanding, skills, and creativity in designing computer program/animation improved significantly.

  20. A Video Camera Road Sign System of the Early Warning from Collision with the Wild Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matuska Slavomir

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a camera road sign system of the early warning, which can help to avoid from vehicle collision with the wild animals. The system consists of camera modules placed down the particularly chosen route and the intelligent road signs. The camera module consists of the camera device and the computing unit. The video stream is captured from video camera using computing unit. Then the algorithms of object detection are deployed. Afterwards, the machine learning algorithms will be used to classify the moving objects. If the moving object is classified as animal and this animal can be dangerous for safety of the vehicle, warning will be displayed on the intelligent road sings.

  1. AniPaint: interactive painterly animation from video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donovan, Peter; Hertzmann, Aaron

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents an interactive system for creating painterly animation from video sequences. Previous approaches to painterly animation typically emphasize either purely automatic stroke synthesis or purely manual stroke key framing. Our system supports a spectrum of interaction between these two approaches which allows the user more direct control over stroke synthesis. We introduce an approach for controlling the results of painterly animation: keyframed Control Strokes can affect automatic stroke's placement, orientation, movement, and color. Furthermore, we introduce a new automatic synthesis algorithm that traces strokes through a video sequence in a greedy manner, but, instead of a vector field, uses an objective function to guide placement. This allows the method to capture fine details, respect region boundaries, and achieve greater temporal coherence than previous methods. All editing is performed with a WYSIWYG interface where the user can directly refine the animation. We demonstrate a variety of examples using both automatic and user-guided results, with a variety of styles and source videos.

  2. Viz-A-Vis: toward visualizing video through computer vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Mario; Summet, Jay; Stasko, John; Abowd, Gregory

    2008-01-01

    In the established procedural model of information visualization, the first operation is to transform raw data into data tables [1]. The transforms typically include abstractions that aggregate and segment relevant data and are usually defined by a human, user or programmer. The theme of this paper is that for video, data transforms should be supported by low level computer vision. High level reasoning still resides in the human analyst, while part of the low level perception is handled by the computer. To illustrate this approach, we present Viz-A-Vis, an overhead video capture and access system for activity analysis in natural settings over variable periods of time. Overhead video provides rich opportunities for long-term behavioral and occupancy analysis, but it poses considerable challenges. We present initial steps addressing two challenges. First, overhead video generates overwhelmingly large volumes of video impractical to analyze manually. Second, automatic video analysis remains an open problem for computer vision.

  3. Fannish masculinities in transition in anime music video fandom

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha Close

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Politically engaged scholarship often interrogates the experiences of groups without privilege. But in order for social change to happen, privileged identities must also be reworked. An analysis of anime fandom in the early 2000s shows that fan works, such as fan video and cosplay performances, concretize masculinities that are both transgressive and desperately seeking normative confirmation. By means of queer and masculinity theory, I argue that fandom is a uniquely generative space for reworking masculinity. This will only remain true, however, if it can hold onto its subversive practices in a time of increasing mainstream attention.

  4. Subject Anonymisation in Video Reporting. Is Animation an option?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2012-01-01

    This short-paper contribution questions the potential of a simple automated video-to-animation rotoscoping technique to provide subject anonymity and confidentiality to conform to ethical regulations whilst maintaining sufficient portraiture data to convey research outcome. This can be especially...... useful for presenting to young researchers whose limited experiences can restrict their ability to draw association between a treatment and subject profile when solely presented textually and/or verbally. The goal of the paper is to provoke discussions on the subject. It is speculated that given...

  5. [Animal experimentation, computer simulation and surgical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Alain

    2009-11-01

    We live in a digital world In medicine, computers are providing new tools for data collection, imaging, and treatment. During research and development of complex technologies and devices such as artificial hearts, computer simulation can provide more reliable information than experimentation on large animals. In these specific settings, animal experimentation should serve more to validate computer models of complex devices than to demonstrate their reliability.

  6. Animal computer interaction (ACI) & designing for animal interaction (AXD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann Judith; Turner, Jane; Farley, Helen

    2017-01-01

    This workshop invites researchers and practitioners from HCI and related fields who work in some capacity with animals and who recognise the sentient nature of their being. We call for those who want to better understand how to work with animals and learn from them. We are a small team looking...... to build an Australian chapter of the Animal Computer Interaction Community. The workshop will elicit discussion, forge new partnerships and head up a new group on the state of the art within this field in Australia, including comparative international studies. For more information see http://www.ozaci.org/...

  7. A computer vision for animal ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Ben G

    2017-11-07

    A central goal of animal ecology is to observe species in the natural world. The cost and challenge of data collection often limit the breadth and scope of ecological study. Ecologists often use image capture to bolster data collection in time and space. However, the ability to process these images remains a bottleneck. Computer vision can greatly increase the efficiency, repeatability and accuracy of image review. Computer vision uses image features, such as colour, shape and texture to infer image content. I provide a brief primer on ecological computer vision to outline its goals, tools and applications to animal ecology. I reviewed 187 existing applications of computer vision and divided articles into ecological description, counting and identity tasks. I discuss recommendations for enhancing the collaboration between ecologists and computer scientists and highlight areas for future growth of automated image analysis. © 2017 The Author. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2017 British Ecological Society.

  8. The effectiveness of animation video in teaching speaking to Junior high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurniati Kurniati

    2017-05-01

    There were many problems happened in the E n g l i s h l e a r n i n g p r o c e s s i n S M P N 1 S e ye g a n , s u c h a s ; (1 the students were afraid of expressing their ideas; (2 they were lack of vocabularies; (3 they were bored in studying English including in their learning speaking. Thus, this research was intended to find out the effectiveness of animation video in teaching speaking to seventh graders in SMP N 1 Seyegan-Sleman. It involved 32 students of 7A as experimental class and 7B as control class. It was experimental study to overcome students’ problem in learning English speaking skill and used pre-test and post-test as the instrument. The used design was quasi-experimental study. It was done with pre-test before treatments and post-test after having treatments. It was found that teaching speaking using animation video was effective. It can be seen from the result of the statistical computation using t- test. The t-test result of post-test in both of classes was 2.170 while t-table with the degree of freedom N-2 at 5% significance level was 1.999. It means that the result of the t-test was higher than ttable. Therefore, teaching speaking skill using animation video was considered effective. Based on this finding the researcher suggested to the teachers to use animation video in improving speaking skill especially for students in Junior High Schools.

  9. Narrated animated solution videos in a mastery setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noah Schroeder

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Narrated animated solution videos were implemented in a clinical study that compared a mastery setting that employed repeated cycles of testing with instructional support to a group that had a single opportunity to experience the materials. The mastery setting students attempted sequential questions sets on a topic, with animated solutions between each set, until mastery was achieved, combining formative assessment with worked examples. Students showed significant improvement from their first to second tries on similar sets of problems, attributable to the feedback and solutions they were given after the first try. These improvements were shown in two topics, superposition and electric potential. The single try group was given one version of the questions and solutions, and while they were not required to watch the solutions to move forward, they chose to. On a post-test including near and far transfer questions, no significant difference was seen between the mastery group and the single try group, but both significantly outperformed a control group that received no instructional support, indicating that students successfully transferred the skills from the solutions to the post-test.

  10. Designing effective animations for computer science instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grillmeyer, Oliver

    This study investigated the potential for animations of Scheme functions to help novice computer science students understand difficult programming concepts. These animations used an instructional framework inspired by theories of constructivism and knowledge integration. The framework had students make predictions, reflect, and specify examples to animate to promote autonomous learning and result in more integrated knowledge. The framework used animated pivotal cases to help integrate disconnected ideas and restructure students' incomplete ideas by illustrating weaknesses in their existing models. The animations scaffolded learners, making the thought processes of experts more visible by modeling complex and tacit information. The animation design was guided by prior research and a methodology of design and refinement. Analysis of pilot studies led to the development of four design concerns to aid animation designers: clearly illustrate the mapping between objects in animations with the actual objects they represent, show causal connections between elements, draw attention to the salient features of the modeled system, and create animations that reduce complexity. Refined animations based on these design concerns were compared to computer-based tools, text-based instruction, and simpler animations that do not embody the design concerns. Four studies comprised this dissertation work. Two sets of animated presentations of list creation functions were compared to control groups. No significant differences were found in support of animations. Three different animated models of traces of recursive functions ranging from concrete to abstract representations were compared. No differences in learning gains were found between the three models in test performance. Three models of animations of applicative operators were compared with students using the replacement modeler and the Scheme interpreter. Significant differences were found favoring animations that addressed

  11. Protection of Embossed Holograms by Computer Animation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Sobotka

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available Digital imaging in connection with computer animation is optimizing the counterfeiting security. All preparation work can be done outside the holographic lab and therefore an easier control process for the client is possible. The paper is dealing with a new holographic imaging process using computer animation and combining the results with the holographic stereoscopic technique. The paper is dealing with the holographic mastering and also with the construction of the holographic environment for special stereoscopic holographic imaging techniques. A prototype for producing monochromatic holographic stereograms was developed.

  12. R.I.P. Computer Animal Shelter

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Due to a brutal and unjustified attack on our facilities in front of the CERN Computer Centre, we had to close the CERN Animal Shelter on 5/1/2012 after only 9 months of operation (the shelter was inaugurated on 1/4/2011). With deep sadness we look back to the old days when everything was fine. R.I.P.   The Computer Mice shelter after the attack. More photographs available here.  All surviving mice have been returned to their owners, who have also been advised to "Stop --- Think --- Click" in order to securely browse the Internet and securely read e-mails. Users who have followed this recommendation in the past were less likely to have their computer infected or their computing account compromised. However, still too many users click on malicious web-links and put their computer and account at risk. Thank you all for your support during the last 9 months. The Computer Animal Shelter    

  13. Applying and evaluating computer-animated tutors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massaro, Dominic W.; Bosseler, Alexis; Stone, Patrick S.; Connors, Pamela

    2002-05-01

    We have developed computer-assisted speech and language tutors for deaf, hard of hearing, and autistic children. Our language-training program utilizes our computer-animated talking head, Baldi, as the conversational agent, who guides students through a variety of exercises designed to teach vocabulary and grammer, to improve speech articulation, and to develop linguistic and phonological awareness. Baldi is an accurate three-dimensional animated talking head appropriately aligned with either synthesized or natural speech. Baldi has a tongue and palate, which can be displayed by making his skin transparent. Two specific language-training programs have been evaluated to determine if they improve word learning and speech articulation. The results indicate that the programs are effective in teaching receptive and productive language. Advantages of utilizing a computer-animated agent as a language tutor are the popularity of computers and embodied conversational agents with autistic kids, the perpetual availability of the program, and individualized instruction. Students enjoy working with Baldi because he offers extreme patience, he doesn't become angry, tired, or bored, and he is in effect a perpetual teaching machine. The results indicate that the psychology and technology of Baldi holds great promise in language learning and speech therapy. [Work supported by NSF Grant Nos. CDA-9726363 and BCS-9905176 and Public Health Service Grant No. PHS R01 DC00236.

  14. Producing patient-avatar identification in animation video information on spinal anesthesia by different narrative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Høybye, Mette Terp; Vesterby, Martin; Jørgensen, Lene Bastrup

    2016-06-01

    Visual approaches to health information reduce complexity and may bridge challenges in health literacy. But the mechanisms and meanings of using animated video in communication with patients undergoing surgery are not well described. By comparing two versions of a two-dimensional animated video on spinal anesthesia, this study tested the patient-avatar identification within two different narrative models. To explore the perspectives of total hip arthroplasty, we employed qualitative methods of interviews and ethnographic observation. The animated presentation of the spinal anesthesia procedure was immediately recognized by all participants as reflecting their experience of the procedure independent of the narrative form. The avatar gender did not affect this identification. We found no preference for either narrative form. This study supports the potential of animation video in health informatics as a didactic model for qualifying patient behavior. Animation video creates a high degree of identification that may work to reduce pre-surgical anxiety. © The Author(s) 2014.

  15. Scientific Computing Using Consumer Video-Gaming Hardware Devices

    CERN Document Server

    Volkema, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Commodity video-gaming hardware (consoles, graphics cards, tablets, etc.) performance has been advancing at a rapid pace owing to strong consumer demand and stiff market competition. Gaming hardware devices are currently amongst the most powerful and cost-effective computational technologies available in quantity. In this article, we evaluate a sample of current generation video-gaming hardware devices for scientific computing and compare their performance with specialized supercomputing general purpose graphics processing units (GPGPUs). We use the OpenCL SHOC benchmark suite, which is a measure of the performance of compute hardware on various different scientific application kernels, and also a popular public distributed computing application, Einstein@Home in the field of gravitational physics for the purposes of this evaluation.

  16. What's New in Computers Video-On-Demand

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 1; Issue 6. What's New in Computers Video-On-Demand. M B Karthikeyan. Feature Article Volume 1 Issue 6 June 1996 pp 69-76. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/001/06/0069-0076 ...

  17. Using Computer and Video Technologies to Develop Interpersonal Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, J. Olin; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Two studies investigated ways in which computer and video technology can support expert human coaches in order to reduce instructor time and increase learner-centered environments; the goal was to train undergraduate students to facilitate others' interpersonal problem solving. Results indicate that the technology-supported methods can decrease…

  18. Validated computed cleansing score for video capsule endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Amir; Gizbar, Moshe; Bourke, Michael J; Ahlenstiel, Golo

    2016-07-01

    Diagnostic yield of video capsule endoscopy may be hampered by intestinal content or air bubbles. A major limitation in video capsule-related study is the lack of a validated objective score for bowel preparation quality. We aimed to design and validate a computed small bowel preparation score for research and clinical use. Two experienced physicians reached a consensus regarding bowel preparation quality based on known criteria used in previous studies and their confidence of an accurate medical interpretation of the procedure. A computed algorithm based on the pixels in the color bar was created and validated. Concordance between the gastroenterologists' agreement (gold standard) and the computed analysis was assessed. Of 85 videos studied, 44 (52%), 13 (15%) and 28 (33%) had adequate, borderline and inadequate bowel preparation, respectively, according to the gastroenterologists' agreement. Computer analysis restricted to adequate and inadequate cases yielded accurate classification of bowel preparation in 65/72 cases (90% agreement, sensitivity 95%, specificity 82%, total accuracy 90%, Kappa 0.79). When adding the borderline definition, the computer analysis correctly classified 71/85 of the cases, yielding an overall agreement of 84% (Kappa 0.72). Minute-by-minute analysis of 10 cases also yielded an agreement of 91.4%. The present study introduces a user-friendly computer analysis-based small bowel preparation score, which demonstrated excellent concordance with the physician's assessment. This score holds promise as a standardization tool in research and clinical practice of video capsule endoscopy. Further validation is warranted. © 2016 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  19. The Use of Animated Videos to Illustrate Oral Solid Dosage Form Manufacturing in a Pharmaceutics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellepeddi, Venkata Kashyap; Roberson, Charles

    2016-10-25

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of animated videos of oral solid dosage form manufacturing as visual instructional aids on pharmacy students' perception and learning. Design. Data were obtained using a validated, paper-based survey instrument designed to evaluate the effectiveness, appeal, and efficiency of the animated videos in a pharmaceutics course offered in spring 2014 and 2015. Basic demographic data were also collected and analyzed. Assessment data at the end of pharmaceutics course was collected for 2013 and compared with assessment data from 2014, and 2015. Assessment. Seventy-six percent of the respondents supported the idea of incorporating animated videos as instructional aids for teaching pharmaceutics. Students' performance on the formative assessment in 2014 and 2015 improved significantly compared to the performance of students in 2013 whose lectures did not include animated videos as instructional aids. Conclusions. Implementing animated videos of oral solid dosage form manufacturing as instructional aids resulted in improved student learning and favorable student perceptions about the instructional approach. Therefore, use of animated videos can be incorporated in pharmaceutics teaching to enhance visual learning.

  20. The Use of Animated Videos to Illustrate Oral Solid Dosage Form Manufacturing in a Pharmaceutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberson, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of animated videos of oral solid dosage form manufacturing as visual instructional aids on pharmacy students’ perception and learning. Design. Data were obtained using a validated, paper-based survey instrument designed to evaluate the effectiveness, appeal, and efficiency of the animated videos in a pharmaceutics course offered in spring 2014 and 2015. Basic demographic data were also collected and analyzed. Assessment data at the end of pharmaceutics course was collected for 2013 and compared with assessment data from 2014, and 2015. Assessment. Seventy-six percent of the respondents supported the idea of incorporating animated videos as instructional aids for teaching pharmaceutics. Students’ performance on the formative assessment in 2014 and 2015 improved significantly compared to the performance of students in 2013 whose lectures did not include animated videos as instructional aids. Conclusions. Implementing animated videos of oral solid dosage form manufacturing as instructional aids resulted in improved student learning and favorable student perceptions about the instructional approach. Therefore, use of animated videos can be incorporated in pharmaceutics teaching to enhance visual learning. PMID:27899837

  1. The use of animation video in teaching to enhance the imagination and visualization of student in engineering drawing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail M., E.; Mahazir I., Irwan; Othman, H.; Amiruddin M., H.; Ariffin, A.

    2017-05-01

    The rapid development of information technology today has given a new breath toward usage of computer in education. One of the increasingly popular nowadays is a multimedia technology that merges a variety of media such as text, graphics, animation, video and audio controlled by a computer. With this technology, a wide range of multimedia element can be developed to improve the quality of education. For that reason, this study aims to investigate the use of multimedia element based on animated video that was developed for Engineering Drawing subject according to the syllabus of Vocational College of Malaysia. The design for this study was a survey method using a quantitative approach and involved 30 respondents from Industrial Machining students. The instruments used in study is questionnaire with correlation coefficient value (0.83), calculated on Alpha-Cronbach. Data was collected and analyzed descriptive analyzed using SPSS. The study found that multimedia element for animation video was use significant have capable to increase imagination and visualization of student. The implications of this study provide information of use of multimedia element will student effect imagination and visualization. In general, these findings contribute to the formation of multimedia element of materials appropriate to enhance the quality of learning material for engineering drawing.

  2. Development and Assessment of a Chemistry-Based Computer Video Game as a Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, Kermin Joel

    2010-01-01

    The chemistry-based computer video game is a multidisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and computer graphics and technology fields developed to explore the use of video games as a possible learning tool. This innovative approach aims to integrate elements of commercial video game and authentic chemistry context environments into a learning…

  3. Low Cost Video Animation of People using a RGBD Sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Cathrine Juel; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Jensen, Troels Høg Peter

    2017-01-01

    were made to create seamless transitions, where new poses were found by moving pixels in the direction of the optical flow between the transitioning frames. The realism of the proposed animation was verified through a user study to have a higher rate of preference and perceived realism compared...

  4. Quantitative analysis of spider locomotion employing computer-automated video tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Bayley, M

    1993-01-01

    The locomotor activity of adult specimens of the wolf spider Pardosa amentata was measured in an open-field setup, using computer-automated colour object video tracking. The x,y coordinates of the animal in the digitized image of the test arena were recorded three times per second during four...... consecutive 12-h periods, alternating between white and red (lambda > 600 nm) illumination. Male spiders were significantly more locomotor active than female spiders under both lighting conditions. They walked, on average, twice the distance of females, employed higher velocities, and spent less time...

  5. "Primärerfahrung" with Living Animals in Contrast to Educational Videos: A Comparative Intervention Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingenberg, Konstantin

    2014-01-01

    "Primärerfahrung" (PE) describes direct contact with learning objects; in biological education with plants or animals in particular. Visualising these objects using videos, books, etc, can be classified as "Sekundärerfahrung" (SE) because the information is not presented in the "original" way. In this intervention…

  6. Animated educational video to prepare children for MRI without sedation: evaluation of the appeal and value

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeszak, Szofia [University of Nottingham, Radiological Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Man, Rachel; Love, Andrew [Nottingham Trent University, School of Art and Design, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Langmack, Gill; Wharrad, Heather [University of Nottingham, Health E-learning and Media group, School of Health Sciences, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); Dineen, Robert A. [University of Nottingham, Radiological Sciences, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom); University of Nottingham, Sir Peter Mansfield Imaging Centre, Queen' s Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2016-11-15

    MRI scans can be distressing for children and often require sedation. Educating children about what to expect reduces anxiety and increases likelihood of successful non-sedated MRI scans. Multimedia tools are a popular means of education. Animated video could provide a free, accessible method of preparing children for MRI scans. To evaluate a new animation video for preparing children for MRI, specifically for decreasing in-scanner motion and examination failure. We recruited 24 healthy children ages 5-11 years. Participants underwent pre- and post-viewing questionnaires and structured interviews. We then compared median Likert scale score changes between pre- and post-animation questions and analyzed the interview framework. Participants were filmed viewing the animation to calculate time spent looking at the screen to assess how well the video retained children's attention. There were significant improvements in median scores regarding what to expect, checking for metal and keeping still. There were no significant changes in other knowledge-based topics. There were significant improvements in median scores for anxiety-based topics. On average, children watched the screen for 98.9% of the 174-s animation. The animation improved knowledge, reduced anxiety, retained attention and was enjoyed by participants. It can be accessed freely via the Internet to help prepare children ages 5-11 for having an MRI scan. (orig.)

  7. Animated educational video to prepare children for MRI without sedation: evaluation of the appeal and value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeszak, Szofia; Man, Rachel; Love, Andrew; Langmack, Gill; Wharrad, Heather; Dineen, Robert A

    2016-11-01

    MRI scans can be distressing for children and often require sedation. Educating children about what to expect reduces anxiety and increases likelihood of successful non-sedated MRI scans. Multimedia tools are a popular means of education. Animated video could provide a free, accessible method of preparing children for MRI scans. To evaluate a new animation video for preparing children for MRI, specifically for decreasing in-scanner motion and examination failure. We recruited 24 healthy children ages 5-11 years. Participants underwent pre- and post-viewing questionnaires and structured interviews. We then compared median Likert scale score changes between pre- and post-animation questions and analyzed the interview framework. Participants were filmed viewing the animation to calculate time spent looking at the screen to assess how well the video retained children's attention. There were significant improvements in median scores regarding what to expect, checking for metal and keeping still. There were no significant changes in other knowledge-based topics. There were significant improvements in median scores for anxiety-based topics. On average, children watched the screen for 98.9% of the 174-s animation. The animation improved knowledge, reduced anxiety, retained attention and was enjoyed by participants. It can be accessed freely via the Internet to help prepare children ages 5-11 for having an MRI scan.

  8. X-38 research aircraft deorbit - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This is short 16-second computer animation clip showing the X-38 vehicle performing a deorbit engine burn, bringing the vehicle around 180 degrees and then jettisoning the solid rocket pack to reduce its re-entry weight.

  9. X-38 research aircraft landing - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    been some problems with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after air launch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This is a 21-second computer animation clip showing the X-38 vehicle under its main parachute gliding in for a Global Positioning System-guided landing on a dry desert lakebed.

  10. Using a Computer Animation to Teach High School Molecular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotbain, Yosi; Marbach-Ad, Gili; Stavy, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We present an active way to use a computer animation in secondary molecular genetics class. For this purpose we developed an activity booklet that helps students to work interactively with a computer animation which deals with abstract concepts and processes in molecular biology. The achievements of the experimental group were compared with those…

  11. Developing Educational Computer Animation Based on Human Personality Types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, Sajid; Ziatdinov, Rushan; Sozcu, Omer Faruk; Griffiths, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Computer animation in the past decade has become one of the most noticeable features of technology-based learning environments. By its definition, it refers to simulated motion pictures showing movement of drawn objects, and is often defined as the art in movement. Its educational application known as educational computer animation is considered…

  12. Galatea ¬â€?An Interactive Computer Graphics System For Movie And Video Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potel, Michael J.; MacKay, Steven A.; Sayre, Richard E.

    1983-03-01

    Extracting quantitative information from movie film and video recordings has always been a difficult process. The Galatea motion analysis system represents an application of some powerful interactive computer graphics capabilities to this problem. A minicomputer is interfaced to a stop-motion projector, a data tablet, and real-time display equipment. An analyst views a film and uses the data tablet to track a moving position of interest. Simultaneously, a moving point is displayed in an animated computer graphics image that is synchronized with the film as it runs. Using a projection CRT and a series of mirrors, this image is superimposed on the film image on a large front screen. Thus, the graphics point lies on top of the point of interest in the film and moves with it at cine rates. All previously entered points can be displayed simultaneously in this way, which is extremely useful in checking the accuracy of the entries and in avoiding omission and duplication of points. Furthermore, the moving points can be connected into moving stick figures, so that such representations can be transcribed directly from film. There are many other tools in the system for entering outlines, measuring time intervals, and the like. The system is equivalent to "dynamic tracing paper" because it is used as though it were tracing paper that can keep up with running movie film. We have applied this system to a variety of problems in cell biology, cardiology, biomechanics, and anatomy. We have also extended the system using photogrammetric techniques to support entry of three-dimensional moving points from two (or more) films taken simultaneously from different perspective views. We are also presently constructing a second, lower-cost, microcomputer-based system for motion analysis in video, using digital graphics and video mixing to achieve the graphics overlay for any composite video source image.

  13. The Relative Efficacy of Video and Text Tutorials in Online Computing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Guido

    2016-01-01

    This study tests the effects of tutorial format (i.e. video vs. text) on student attitudes and performance in online computing education. A one-factor within-subjects experiment was conducted in an undergraduate Computer Information Systems course. Subjects were randomly assigned to complete two Excel exercises online: one with a video tutorial…

  14. Computer-assisted animation of volumetric objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ten, Sergey V.; Savchenko, Andrei V.; Pasko, Alexander A.; Savchenko, Vladimir V.

    1996-03-01

    Generation of animation sequence of a deformed volumetric object on networked workstations is discussed. We use several deformation types: space mapping controlled by points linked to features of an object, deformation with an algebraic sum and metamorphosis. These deformations are directly applied to interpolated volume data with following polygonization of an isosurface for visualization.

  15. The effects of short interactive animation video information on preanesthetic anxiety, knowledge, and interview time: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakinuma, Akihito; Nagatani, Hirokazu; Otake, Hiroshi; Mizuno, Ju; Nakata, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    We designed an interactive animated video that provides a basic explanation-including the risks, benefits, and alternatives-of anesthetic procedures. We hypothesized that this video would improve patient understanding of anesthesia, reduce anxiety, and shorten the interview time. Two hundred eleven patients scheduled for cancer surgery under general anesthesia or combined general and epidural anesthesia, who were admitted at least 1 day before the surgery, were randomly assigned to the video group (n = 106) or the no-video group (n = 105). The patients in the video group were asked to watch a short interactive animation video in the ward. After watching the video, the patients were visited by an anesthesiologist who performed a preanesthetic interview and routine risk assessment. The patients in the no-video group were also visited by an anesthesiologist, but were not asked to watch the video. In both groups, the patients were asked to complete the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory and a 14-point scale of knowledge test before the anesthesiologist's visit and on the day of surgery. We also measured interview time. There was no demographic difference between the 2 groups. The interview time was 34.4% shorter (video group, 12.2 ± 5.3 minutes, vs. no-video group, 18.6 ± 6.4 minutes; 95% confidence interval [CI] for the percentage reduction in time: 32.7%- 44.3%), and knowledge of anesthesia was 11.6% better in the video group (score 12.5 ± 1.4 vs. no-video group score 11.2 ± 1.7; 95% CI for the percentage increase in knowledge: 8.5%-13.9%). However, there was no difference in preanesthetic anxiety between the 2 groups. Our short interactive animation video helped patients' understanding of anesthesia and reduced anesthesiologists' interview time.

  16. Text2Video: text-driven facial animation using MPEG-4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurainsky, J.; Eisert, P.

    2005-07-01

    We present a complete system for the automatic creation of talking head video sequences from text messages. Our system converts the text into MPEG-4 Facial Animation Parameters and synthetic voice. A user selected 3D character will perform lip movements synchronized to the speech data. The 3D models created from a single image vary from realistic people to cartoon characters. A voice selection for different languages and gender as well as a pitch shift component enables a personalization of the animation. The animation can be shown on different displays and devices ranging from 3GPP players on mobile phones to real-time 3D render engines. Therefore, our system can be used in mobile communication for the conversion of regular SMS messages to MMS animations.

  17. Soap opera video on handheld computers to reduce young urban women's HIV sex risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Rachel

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a soap opera video, A Story about Toni, Mike, and Valerie, designed to communicate HIV risk reduction themes. The study evaluated viewing the video and responding to audio computer assisted self-interview (ACASI) on a handheld computer. The sample was 76 predominately African American women, aged 18-29, in sexual relationships with men. Data were collected in urban neighborhoods in the northeastern United States. A pretest-posttest control group design with systematic assignment indicated statistically significant reduction in expectations to engage in unprotected sex in the experimental group. The handheld computer was found to be acceptable to view the near feature length video and complete ACASI. To date, no study has reported on use of video and ACASI on a handheld device to reduce HIV risk. The significance is the potential to stream health promotion videos to personal devices, such as cell phones.

  18. An Exploratory Study of Apache Middle School Students' Computer Animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokrocki, Mary; Buckpitt, Marcia

    The paper describes a participant observation study of a 3 week summer art program for Apache middle school students on the White Mountain Reservation. Computer art skills, specifically animation using a menu-driven computer paint program, were the focus of the investigation. Because it was in the context of a summer program, instruction was…

  19. The Use of Short, Animated, Patient-Centered Springboard Videos to Underscore the Clinical Relevance of Preclinical Medical Student Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Maya; Chen, Sharon F; Amieva, Manuel; Deitz, Jennifer; Jang, Heeju; Porwal, Aarti; Prober, Charles

    2017-07-01

    Medical students often struggle to appreciate the clinical relevance of material taught in the preclinical years. The authors believe videos could be effectively used to interweave a patient's illness script with foundational basic science concepts. In collaboration with four other U.S. medical schools, educators at the Stanford University School of Medicine created 36 short, animated, patient-centered springboard videos (third-person, narrated accounts of authentic patient cases conveying foundational pathophysiology) in 2014. The videos were used to introduce students to 36 content modules, created as part of a microbiology, immunology, and infectious diseases curriculum. The videos were created with input from faculty content experts and in some cases medical students, and were piloted using a flipped classroom pedagogical approach in January 2015-June 2016. Student feedback from course evaluations and focus groups was analyzed using a mixed-methods approach. On the course evaluations, the majority of students rated the patient-centered videos positively, and the majority of comments on the videos were positive, highlighting both enhanced engagement and enhanced learning and retention. Comments from focus groups mirrored the course evaluation comments and highlighted different usage patterns for the videos. The authors will continue to gather and analyze data from schools using the videos as part of their core preclinical curriculum, and will produce similar videos for use in other areas of undergraduate medical education. These videos could support students' review of content taught previously and be repurposed for use in continuing and graduate medical education, as well as patient education.

  20. Optimized static and video EEG rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) paradigm based on motion surprise computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khosla, Deepak; Huber, David J.; Bhattacharyya, Rajan

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we describe an algorithm and system for optimizing search and detection performance for "items of interest" (IOI) in large-sized images and videos that employ the Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) based EEG paradigm and surprise algorithms that incorporate motion processing to determine whether static or video RSVP is used. The system works by first computing a motion surprise map on image sub-regions (chips) of incoming sensor video data and then uses those surprise maps to label the chips as either "static" or "moving". This information tells the system whether to use a static or video RSVP presentation and decoding algorithm in order to optimize EEG based detection of IOI in each chip. Using this method, we are able to demonstrate classification of a series of image regions from video with an azimuth value of 1, indicating perfect classification, over a range of display frequencies and video speeds.

  1. Analyzing animal behavior via classifying each video frame using convolutional neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Ulrich; He, Ruo; Yang, Chung-Hui

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput analysis of animal behavior requires software to analyze videos. Such software analyzes each frame individually, detecting animals’ body parts. But the image analysis rarely attempts to recognize “behavioral states”—e.g., actions or facial expressions—directly from the image instead of using the detected body parts. Here, we show that convolutional neural networks (CNNs)—a machine learning approach that recently became the leading technique for object recognition, human pose estimation, and human action recognition—were able to recognize directly from images whether Drosophila were “on” (standing or walking) or “off” (not in physical contact with) egg-laying substrates for each frame of our videos. We used multiple nets and image transformations to optimize accuracy for our classification task, achieving a surprisingly low error rate of just 0.072%. Classifying one of our 8 h videos took less than 3 h using a fast GPU. The approach enabled uncovering a novel egg-laying-induced behavior modification in Drosophila. Furthermore, it should be readily applicable to other behavior analysis tasks. PMID:26394695

  2. Use of Short Animal-Themed Videos to Enhance Veterinary Students' Mood, Attention, and Understanding of Pharmacology Lectures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, Lori R; Hellyer, Pete; Clapp, Tod R; Suchman, Erica; McLean, Jennifer; Schoenfeld-Tacher, Regina

    2017-09-29

    Professional DVM training is inherently stressful and challenging for students. This study evaluated a simple intervention-short breaks during a veterinary pharmacology lecture course in the form of funny/cute animal videos (Mood Induction Procedures, or MIP)-to assess for potential impact on students' mood, interest in material, and perceived understanding of material. Ten YouTube video clips showing cats or dogs were selected to influence students' affective states. The videos were shown in a required pharmacology class offered during the fall semester of the second year of the DVM program at a large, land-grant institution in the Western US. The student cohort consisted of 133 students (20 males, 113 females). Twenty days of the course were randomly chosen for the study and ranged from weeks 2 to 13 of the semester. Sessions in which the videos were played were alternated with sessions in which no video was played, for a total of 10 video days and 10 control days. There were significant differences in all three post-class assessment measures between the experimental (video) days and the control days. Results suggest that showing short cute animal videos in the middle of class positively affected students' mood, interest in material, and self-reported understanding of material. While the results of this study are limited to one student cohort at one institution, the ease of implementation of the technique and relatively low stakes support incorporation of the MIP technique across a variety of basic and clinical science courses.

  3. From computer images to video presentation: Enhancing technology transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beam, Sherilee F.

    1994-01-01

    With NASA placing increased emphasis on transferring technology to outside industry, NASA researchers need to evaluate many aspects of their efforts in this regard. Often it may seem like too much self-promotion to many researchers. However, industry's use of video presentations in sales, advertising, public relations and training should be considered. Today, the most typical presentation at NASA is through the use of vu-graphs (overhead transparencies) which can be effective for text or static presentations. For full blown color and sound presentations, however, the best method is videotape. In fact, it is frequently more convenient due to its portability and the availability of viewing equipment. This talk describes techniques for creating a video presentation through the use of a combined researcher and video professional team.

  4. Examining human behavior in video games: The development of a computational model to measure aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamb, Richard; Annetta, Leonard; Hoston, Douglas; Shapiro, Marina; Matthews, Benjamin

    2017-04-24

    Video games with violent content have raised considerable concern in popular media and within academia. Recently, there has been considerable attention regarding the claim of the relationship between aggression and video game play. The authors of this study propose the use of a new class of tools developed via computational models to allow examination of the question of whether there is a relationship between violent video games and aggression. The purpose of this study is to computationally model and compare the General Aggression Model with the Diathesis Mode of Aggression related to the play of violent content in video games. A secondary purpose is to provide a method of measuring and examining individual aggression arising from video game play. Total participants examined for this study are N = 1065. This study occurs in three phases. Phase 1 is the development and quantification of the profile combination of traits via latent class profile analysis. Phase 2 is the training of the artificial neural network. Phase 3 is the comparison of each model as a computational model with and without the presence of video game violence. Results suggest that a combination of environmental factors and genetic predispositions trigger aggression related to video games.

  5. Micro-Computer Video Games and Spatial Visualization Acquisition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Bennie R.; Knirk, Frederick G.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the impact and effects of many hours of interaction with computerized video games on the acquisition and development of spatial visualization skills and their relationship to mathematical and scientific aptitude. Sex differences in spatial ability and learning of spatial visualization skills are discussed, and references are listed. (EAO)

  6. Practising Arithmetic Using Educational Video Games with an Interpersonal Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beserra, Vagner; Nussbaum, Miguel; Zeni, Ricardo; Rodriguez, Werner; Wurman, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Studies show the positive effects that video games can have on student performance and attitude towards learning. In the past few years, strategies have been generated to optimize the use of technological resources with the aim of facilitating widespread adoption of technology in the classroom. Given its low acquisition and maintenance costs, the…

  7. CATOS (Computer Aided Training/Observing System): Automating animal observation and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jinook; Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2017-02-01

    In animal behavioral biology, an automated observing/training system may be useful for several reasons: (a) continuous observation of animals for documentation of specific, irregular events, (b) long-term intensive training of animals in preparation for behavioral experiments, (c) elimination of potential cues and biases induced by humans during training and testing. Here, we describe an open-source-based system named CATOS (Computer Aided Training/Observing System) developed for such situations. There are several notable features in this system. CATOS is flexible and low cost because it is based on free open-source software libraries, common hardware parts, and open-system electronics based on Arduino. Automated video condensation is applied, leading to significantly reduced video data storage compared to the total active hours of the system. A data-viewing utility program helps a user browse recorded data quickly and more efficiently. With these features, CATOS has the potential to be applied to many different animal species in various environments such as laboratories, zoos, or even private homes. Also, an animal's free access to the device without constraint, and a gamified learning process, enhance the animal's welfare and enriches their environment. As a proof of concept, the system was built and tested with two different species. Initially, the system was tested for approximately 10 months with a domesticated cat. The cat was successfully and fully automatically trained to discriminate three different spoken words. Then, in order to test the system's adaptability to other species and hardware components, we used it to train a laboratory rat for 3 weeks.

  8. Virtually compliant: Immersive video gaming increases conformity to false computer judgments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weger, Ulrich W; Loughnan, Stephen; Sharma, Dinkar; Gonidis, Lazaros

    2015-08-01

    Real-life encounters with face-to-face contact are on the decline in a world in which many routine tasks are delegated to virtual characters-a development that bears both opportunities and risks. Interacting with such virtual-reality beings is particularly common during role-playing videogames, in which we incarnate into the virtual reality of an avatar. Video gaming is known to lead to the training and development of real-life skills and behaviors; hence, in the present study we sought to explore whether role-playing video gaming primes individuals' identification with a computer enough to increase computer-related social conformity. Following immersive video gaming, individuals were indeed more likely to give up their own best judgment and to follow the vote of computers, especially when the stimulus context was ambiguous. Implications for human-computer interactions and for our understanding of the formation of identity and self-concept are discussed.

  9. Effect of Computer-Based Video Games on Children: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Tsung-Yen; Chen, Wei-Fan

    2009-01-01

    This experimental study investigated whether computer-based video games facilitate children's cognitive learning. In comparison to traditional computer-assisted instruction (CAI), this study explored the impact of the varied types of instructional delivery strategies on children's learning achievement. One major research null hypothesis was…

  10. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shanis Barnard

    Full Text Available Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is

  11. Quick, Accurate, Smart: 3D Computer Vision Technology Helps Assessing Confined Animals' Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Shanis; Calderara, Simone; Pistocchi, Simone; Cucchiara, Rita; Podaliri-Vulpiani, Michele; Messori, Stefano; Ferri, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    Mankind directly controls the environment and lifestyles of several domestic species for purposes ranging from production and research to conservation and companionship. These environments and lifestyles may not offer these animals the best quality of life. Behaviour is a direct reflection of how the animal is coping with its environment. Behavioural indicators are thus among the preferred parameters to assess welfare. However, behavioural recording (usually from video) can be very time consuming and the accuracy and reliability of the output rely on the experience and background of the observers. The outburst of new video technology and computer image processing gives the basis for promising solutions. In this pilot study, we present a new prototype software able to automatically infer the behaviour of dogs housed in kennels from 3D visual data and through structured machine learning frameworks. Depth information acquired through 3D features, body part detection and training are the key elements that allow the machine to recognise postures, trajectories inside the kennel and patterns of movement that can be later labelled at convenience. The main innovation of the software is its ability to automatically cluster frequently observed temporal patterns of movement without any pre-set ethogram. Conversely, when common patterns are defined through training, a deviation from normal behaviour in time or between individuals could be assessed. The software accuracy in correctly detecting the dogs' behaviour was checked through a validation process. An automatic behaviour recognition system, independent from human subjectivity, could add scientific knowledge on animals' quality of life in confinement as well as saving time and resources. This 3D framework was designed to be invariant to the dog's shape and size and could be extended to farm, laboratory and zoo quadrupeds in artificial housing. The computer vision technique applied to this software is innovative in non

  12. The relationship between personality characteristics and parenting styles with video- computer plays’ dependency

    OpenAIRE

    Sharifi fard; Emel; Hamid Taher Neshat Doost; Mohammad Ali Mazaheri; Hooshang Talebi

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the relationship between personality characteristics and parenting styles with video computer games dependency among secondary students (males and females) in Ahvaz city. There were 872 participants from different educational regions of the city (four regions) which were selected via a multistage cluster method of sampling. The applied instruments included temperament-Character inventory (TCI-125), parenting styles Questionnaire (PSQ) and problematic video game p...

  13. Venus in motion: An animated video catalog of Pioneer Venus Orbiter Cloud Photopolarimeter images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limaye, Sanjay S.

    1992-01-01

    Images of Venus acquired by the Pioneer Venus Orbiter Cloud Photopolarimeter (OCPP) during the 1982 opportunity have been utilized to create a short video summary of the data. The raw roll by roll images were first navigated using the spacecraft attitude and orbit information along with the CPP instrument pointing information. The limb darkening introduced by the variation of solar illumination geometry and the viewing angle was then modelled and removed. The images were then projected to simulate a view obtained from a fixed perspective with the observer at 10 Venus radii away and located above a Venus latitude of 30 degrees south and a longitude 60 degrees west. A total of 156 images from the 1982 opportunity have been animated at different dwell rates.

  14. Video Editing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlecht, Leslie E.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This is a proposal for a general use system based, on the SGI IRIS workstation platform, for recording computer animation to videotape. In addition, this system would provide features for simple editing and enhancement. Described here are a list of requirements for the system, and a proposed configuration including the SGI VideoLab Integrator, VideoMedia VLAN animation controller and the Pioneer rewritable laserdisc recorder.

  15. Impact of computer animations in cognitive learning: differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altıparmak, Kemal

    2014-11-01

    In mathematic courses, construction of some concepts by the students in a meaningful way may be complicated. In such circumstances, to embody the concepts application of the required technologies may reinforce learning process. Onset of learning process over daily life events of the student's environment may lure their attention and may enable them to gain from the preliminary knowledge. Therefore, a good initiation may be realized in the course of meaningful learning. The underlying meaning of the abstract concepts by computer animations may be accomplished in class environments. That study is conducted searching out to discover the effects of animations over the learning process in mathematic courses. The study was performed over the 58 university freshman students selected randomly. Thirty-two students constituted the experiment group and 26 students constituted the control group. Computer animations-aided instruction model in constructive form were applied on the experiment group and non-computer-aided instruction model in constructive form were implemented on the control group. Student academic success via a test method developed by explored group with confidence rate .819 (Cronbach's alpha) revealed that data were evaluated by two-way variance analyses. The findings provided from the final test shows that the experiment group students were significantly higher according to the control group students in terms of academic success average scores. Computer animations were observed to be significant to assimilate the derivative concept in a discrete way over the students, to appeal their attention, animations of real life events observed to transform the abstract meanings in the events to a concrete manner. Students of whom the concrete stage is constructed meaningfully found to be tactful in reaching to semi-abstract and abstract stages.

  16. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xie, Tianwu; Zaidi, Habib

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal

  17. Using an Animated Cartoon Hero in Video Instruction to Improve Bathroom-Related Skills of a Student with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohtake, Yoshihisa; Takahashi, Ayaka; Watanabe, Kentaro

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of video hero modeling (VHM) for building four bathroom-related behaviors of an elementary-aged student with autism spectrum disorder. In the VHM intervention, the participant watched a video immediately before going to the bathroom he typically used. In the video, an animated face of a cartoon hero…

  18. Enhancing Communication of Climate Impacts Assessments: Examples of Local Stories, Animations and Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, M. F.; Grigholm, B. O.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive climate impacts assessments are important vehicles for conveying salient information to the public and policy makers. However, over the last few decades communication of this important information has been hampered for a number of reasons. Firstly, we have a rapidly changing social media landscape, where there are fewer opportunities for in-depth treatment of issues. To compete in this arena, climate information needs to be packaged in sound bites, and much of the nuance and complexity may be lost. Secondly, scientific literacy among the general U.S. population is not particularly high, which creates a barrier to understanding and limits the audiences that can be reached. Thirdly, climate science has been undermined by misinformation over many years often funded by fossil fuel interests. While this latter obstacle is clearly diminishing - largely in the face of evidence from the undeniable climate impacts that are already being seen by communities - there has been much confusion generated to date. Despite the fact that 97% of active climate scientists agree that the planet is warming as a result of human greenhouse gas emission, only 42% of the U.S. population agrees (Pew Research, 2013). In the face of these challenges, much of the work that the Union of Concerned Scientists does to translate climate impacts assessments has shifted to visuals, animations, and videos that people can relate to and connect with more readily. In this session we will share some of the general design features, discuss target audiences, and outline production limitations of several local stories involving videos and animations, as well as present some recent infographics. One example of this work are case studies that focus on sea level rise and involve a local personality who can speak to climate impacts at the community level. We understand the power of visual images and stories in creating messages that stick, and we use this in designing animations that explain the

  19. Computer-animated model of accommodation and presbyopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Daniel B

    2015-02-01

    To understand, demonstrate, and further research the mechanisms of accommodation and presbyopia. Private practice, Little Silver, New Jersey, USA. Experimental study. The CAMA 2.0 computer-animated model of accommodation and presbyopia was produced in collaboration with an experienced medical animator using Autodesk Maya animation software and Adobe After Effects. The computer-animated model demonstrates the configuration and synchronous movements of all accommodative elements. A new classification of the zonular apparatus based on structure and function is proposed. There are 3 divisions of zonular fibers; that is, anterior, crossing, and posterior. The crossing zonular fibers form a scaffolding to support the lens; the anterior and posterior zonular fibers work reciprocally to achieve focused vision. The model demonstrates the important support function of Weiger ligament. Dynamic movement of the ora serrata demonstrates that the forces of ciliary muscle contraction store energy for disaccommodation in the elastic choroid. The flow of aqueous and vitreous provides strong evidence for our understanding of the hydrodynamic interactions during the accommodative cycle. The interaction may result from the elastic stretch in the choroid transmitted to the vitreous rather than from vitreous pressue. The model supports the concept that presbyopia results from loss of elasticity and increasing ocular rigidity in both the lenticular and extralenticular structures. The computer-animated model demonstrates the structures of accommodation moving in synchrony and might enhance understanding of the mechanisms of accommodation and presbyopia. Dr. Goldberg is a consultant to Acevision, Inc., and Bausch & Lomb. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Computer and video game addiction-a comparison between game users and non-game users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, Aviv Malkiel

    2010-09-01

    Computer game addiction is excessive or compulsive use of computer and video games that may interfere with daily life. It is not clear whether video game playing meets diagnostic criteria for Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). First objective is to review the literature on computer and video game addiction over the topics of diagnosis, phenomenology, epidemiology, and treatment. Second objective is to describe a brain imaging study measuring dopamine release during computer game playing. Article search of 15 published articles between 2000 and 2009 in Medline and PubMed on computer and video game addiction. Nine abstinent "ecstasy" users and 8 control subjects were scanned at baseline and after performing on a motorbike riding computer game while imaging dopamine release in vivo with [123I] IBZM and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Psycho-physiological mechanisms underlying computer game addiction are mainly stress coping mechanisms, emotional reactions, sensitization, and reward. Computer game playing may lead to long-term changes in the reward circuitry that resemble the effects of substance dependence. The brain imaging study showed that healthy control subjects had reduced dopamine D2 receptor occupancy of 10.5% in the caudate after playing a motorbike riding computer game compared with baseline levels of binding consistent with increased release and binding to its receptors. Ex-chronic "ecstasy" users showed no change in levels of dopamine D2 receptor occupancy after playing this game. This evidence supports the notion that psycho-stimulant users have decreased sensitivity to natural reward. Computer game addicts or gamblers may show reduced dopamine response to stimuli associated with their addiction presumably due to sensitization.

  1. Learning Computational Models of Video Memorability from fMRI Brain Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Junwei; Chen, Changyuan; Shao, Ling; Hu, Xintao; Han, Jungong; Liu, Tianming

    2015-08-01

    Generally, various visual media are unequally memorable by the human brain. This paper looks into a new direction of modeling the memorability of video clips and automatically predicting how memorable they are by learning from brain functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). We propose a novel computational framework by integrating the power of low-level audiovisual features and brain activity decoding via fMRI. Initially, a user study experiment is performed to create a ground truth database for measuring video memorability and a set of effective low-level audiovisual features is examined in this database. Then, human subjects' brain fMRI data are obtained when they are watching the video clips. The fMRI-derived features that convey the brain activity of memorizing videos are extracted using a universal brain reference system. Finally, due to the fact that fMRI scanning is expensive and time-consuming, a computational model is learned on our benchmark dataset with the objective of maximizing the correlation between the low-level audiovisual features and the fMRI-derived features using joint subspace learning. The learned model can then automatically predict the memorability of videos without fMRI scans. Evaluations on publically available image and video databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  2. Students' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Incorporation of Demonstrations, Popular Media Videos, and Animations Concerning Chemical Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlosser, Sarah Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    Students often struggle with learning complex chemistry concepts. In today's society with the advances in multimedia technology, educators have a variety of tools available to help students learn these concepts. These tools include demonstrations, videos in the popular media, and animations; referred to collectively as multimethods. With the…

  3. The kids got game: Computer/video games, gender and learning outcomes in science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Janice Lyn

    In recent years educators have begun to explore how to purposively design computer/video games to support student learning. This interest in video games has arisen in part because educational video games appear to have the potential to improve student motivation and interest in technology, and engage students in learning through the use of a familiar medium (Squire, 2005; Shaffer, 2006; Gee, 2005). The purpose of this dissertation research is to specifically address the issue of student learning through the use of educational computer/video games. Using the Quest Atlantis computer game, this study involved a mixed model research strategy that allowed for both broad understandings of classroom practices and specific analysis of outcomes through the themes that emerged from the case studies of the gendered groups using the game. Specifically, this study examined how fifth-grade students learning about science concepts, such as water quality and ecosystems, unfolds over time as they participate in the Quest Atlantis computer game. Data sources included classroom observations and video, pre- and post-written assessments, pre- and post- student content interviews, student field notebooks, field reports and the field notes of the researcher. To make sense of how students learning unfolded, video was analyzed using a framework of interaction analysis and small group interactions (Jordan & Henderson, 1995; Webb, 1995). These coded units were then examined with respect to student artifacts and assessments and patterns of learning trajectories analyzed. The analysis revealed that overall, student learning outcomes improved from pre- to post-assessments for all students. While there were no observable gendered differences with respect to the test scores and content interviews, there were gendered differences with respect to game play. Implications for game design, use of external scaffolds, games as tools for learning and gendered findings are discussed.

  4. Playing Violent Video and Computer Games and Adolescent Self-Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Jeanne B.; Buchman, Debra D.

    1996-01-01

    Documents current adolescent electronic game-playing habits, exploring associations among preference for violent games, frequency and location of play, and self-concept. Identifies marked gender differences in game-playing habits and in scores on a self-perception profile. Finds that for girls, more time playing video or computer games is…

  5. Tech Writing, Meet "Tomb Raider": Video and Computer Games in the Technical Communication Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vie, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    This article examines the common genre of the usability study in technical communication courses and proposes the incorporation of computer and video games to ensure a rhetorical focus to this genre. As games are both entertaining and educational, their use in the technical communication classroom provides a new perspective on multimodal…

  6. New Media Resistance: Barriers to Implementation of Computer Video Games in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John W.

    2007-01-01

    Computer video games are an emerging instructional medium offering strong degrees of cognitive efficiencies for experiential learning, team building, and greater understanding of abstract concepts. As with other new media adopted for use by instructional technologists for pedagogical purposes, barriers to classroom implementation have manifested…

  7. Collaborative and Competitive Video Games for Teaching Computing in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Spencer; Chan, Samantha

    2017-01-01

    This study measures the success of using a collaborative and competitive video game, named Space Race, to teach computing to first year engineering students. Space Race is played by teams of four, each with their own tablet, collaborating to compete against the other teams in the class. The impact of the game on student learning was studied…

  8. Wireless live streaming video of laparoscopic surgery: a bandwidth analysis for handheld computers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandsas, Alex; McIntire, Katherine; George, Ivan M; Witzke, Wayne; Hoskins, James D; Park, Adrian

    2002-01-01

    Over the last six years, streaming media has emerged as a powerful tool for delivering multimedia content over networks. Concurrently, wireless technology has evolved, freeing users from desktop boundaries and wired infrastructures. At the University of Kentucky Medical Center, we have integrated these technologies to develop a system that can wirelessly transmit live surgery from the operating room to a handheld computer. This study establishes the feasibility of using our system to view surgeries and describes the effect of bandwidth on image quality. A live laparoscopic ventral hernia repair was transmitted to a single handheld computer using five encoding speeds at a constant frame rate, and the quality of the resulting streaming images was evaluated. No video images were rendered when video data were encoded at 28.8 kilobytes per second (Kbps), the slowest encoding bitrate studied. The highest quality images were rendered at encoding speeds greater than or equal to 150 Kbps. Of note, a 15 second transmission delay was experienced using all four encoding schemes that rendered video images. We believe that the wireless transmission of streaming video to handheld computers has tremendous potential to enhance surgical education. For medical students and residents, the ability to view live surgeries, lectures, courses and seminars on handheld computers means a larger number of learning opportunities. In addition, we envision that wireless enabled devices may be used to telemonitor surgical procedures. However, bandwidth availability and streaming delay are major issues that must be addressed before wireless telementoring becomes a reality.

  9. Using the CPU and GPU for real-time video enhancement on a mobile computer

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bachoo, AK

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available . In this paper, the current advances in mobile CPU and GPU hardware are used to implement video enhancement algorithms in a new way on a mobile computer. Both the CPU and GPU are used effectively to achieve realtime performance for complex image enhancement...

  10. Was that CT? Assessing Computational Thinking Patterns through Video-Based Prompts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Krista Sekeres

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate student understanding and application of computational thinking patterns to novel situations. Over 500 students, who had just designed and programmed a Frogger-style game using the AgentSheets platform, responded to a newly developed video-prompt survey instrument administered in the Fall 2010 semester.…

  11. How Patient Interactions with a Computer-Based Video Intervention Affect Decisions to Test for HIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronson, Ian David; Rajan, Sonali; Marsch, Lisa A.; Bania, Theodore C.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines predictors of HIV test acceptance among emergency department patients who received an educational video intervention designed to increase HIV testing. A total of 202 patients in the main treatment areas of a high-volume, urban hospital emergency department used inexpensive netbook computers to watch brief educational…

  12. Mutually Beneficial Foreign Language Learning: Creating Meaningful Interactions through Video-Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Fumie; Spring, Ryan; Mori, Chikako

    2016-01-01

    Providing learners of a foreign language with meaningful opportunities for interactions, specifically with native speakers, is especially challenging for instructors. One way to overcome this obstacle is through video-synchronous computer-mediated communication tools such as Skype software. This study reports quantitative and qualitative data from…

  13. Psychophysiological Assessment Of Fear Experience In Response To Sound During Computer Video Gameplay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garner, Tom Alexander; Grimshaw, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The potential value of a looping biometric feedback system as a key component of adaptive computer video games is significant. Psychophysiological measures are essential to the development of an automated emotion recognition program, capable of interpreting physiological data into models of affect...... is the primary affective stimuli....

  14. Teaching French Transformational Grammar by Means of Computer-Generated Video-Tapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Alfred; Thomas, Jean Jacques

    This paper describes a pilot program in an integrated media presentation of foreign languages and the production and usage of seven computer-generated video tapes which demonstrate various aspects of French syntax. This instructional set could form the basis for CAI lessons in which the student is presented images identical to those on the video…

  15. A Conceptual Review of Research on the Pathological Use of Computers, Video Games, and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Timothy; Gentile, Douglas A.; Bricolo, Francesco; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Gulamoydeen, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Preliminary research studies suggest that some people who use computer, video games, and the Internet heavily develop dysfunctional symptoms, often referred to in the popular press as an "addiction." Although several studies have measured various facets of this issue, there has been no common framework within which to view these studies. This…

  16. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Use Public Bus Transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda; O'Brien, Eileen

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach three young adults with moderate intellectual disabilities to push a "request to stop bus signal" and exit a city bus in response to target landmarks. A multiple probe design across three students and one bus route was used to evaluate effectiveness of…

  17. Computational prediction of disease microRNAs in domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buza, Teresia; Arick, Mark; Wang, Hui; Peterson, Daniel G

    2014-06-27

    The most important means of identifying diseases before symptoms appear is through the discovery of disease-associated biomarkers. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have become highly useful biomarkers of infectious, genetic and metabolic diseases in human but they have not been well studied in domestic animals. It is probable that many of the animal homologs of human disease-associated miRNAs may be involved in domestic animal diseases. Here we describe a computational biology study in which human disease miRNAs were utilized to predict orthologous miRNAs in cow, chicken, pig, horse, and dog. We identified 287 human disease-associated miRNAs which had at least one 100% identical animal homolog. The 287 miRNAs were associated with 359 human diseases referenced in 2,863 Pubmed articles. Multiple sequence analysis indicated that over 60% of known horse mature miRNAs found perfect matches in human disease-associated miRNAs, followed by dog (50%). As expected, chicken had the least number of perfect matches (5%). Phylogenetic analysis of miRNA precursors indicated that 85% of human disease pre-miRNAs were highly conserved in animals, showing less than 5% nucleotide substitution rates over evolutionary time. As an example we demonstrated conservation of human hsa-miR-143-3p which is associated with type 2 diabetes and targets AKT1 gene which is highly conserved in pig, horse and dog. Functional analysis of AKT1 gene using Gene Ontology (GO) showed that it is involved in glucose homeostasis, positive regulation of glucose import, positive regulation of glycogen biosynthetic process, glucose transport and response to food. This data provides the animal and veterinary research community with a resource to assist in generating hypothesis-driven research for discovering animal disease-related miRNA from their datasets and expedite development of prophylactic and disease-treatment strategies and also influence research efforts to identify novel disease models in large animals

  18. Computer Vision Tools for Finding Images and Video Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forsyth, D. A.

    1999-01-01

    Computer vision offers a variety of techniques for searching for pictures in large collections of images. Appearance methods compare images based on the overall content of the image using certain criteria. Finding methods concentrate on matching subparts of images, defined in a variety of ways, in hope of finding particular objects. These ideas…

  19. Computer-Based Video Instruction To Teach Persons with Moderate Intellectual Disabilities To Read Grocery Aisle Signs and Locate Items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Gast, David L.; Langone, John

    2002-01-01

    A study evaluated use of computer-based video instruction to teach generalized reading of grocery store aisle signs and the location of the corresponding grocery items to four students (ages 9-17) mental retardation. The computer-based video program was successful in teaching generalized reading of signs and the location of items. (Contains…

  20. Video-rate computational super-resolution and integral imaging at longwave-infrared wavelengths

    OpenAIRE

    Preciado, Miguel A.; Carles, Guillem; Harvey, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    We report the first computational super-resolved, multi-camera integral imaging at long-wave infrared (LWIR) wavelengths. A synchronized array of FLIR Lepton cameras was assembled, and computational super-resolution and integral-imaging reconstruction employed to generate video with light-field imaging capabilities, such as 3D imaging and recognition of partially obscured objects, while also providing a four-fold increase in effective pixel count. This approach to high-resolution imaging enab...

  1. Fast Integral Histogram Computations on GPU for Real-Time Video Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Poostchi, Mahdieh; Palaniappan, Kannappan; Li, Da; Becchi, Michela; Bunyak, Filiz; Seetharaman, Guna

    2017-01-01

    In many Multimedia content analytics frameworks feature likelihood maps represented as histograms play a critical role in the overall algorithm. Integral histograms provide an efficient computational framework for extracting multi-scale histogram-based regional descriptors in constant time which are considered as the principle building blocks of many video content analytics frameworks. We evaluate four different mappings of the integral histogram computation onto Graphics Processing Units (GP...

  2. A Realistic Coverage Model with Backup Set Computation for Wireless Video Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay S Ukani

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Video Sensor Network (WVSN are gaining increasing popularity due availability of low cost CMOS camera and miniaturization of hardware. For many applications it is difficult to have pre-engineered deployment of video camera sensors which leads to redundancy. Due to sectored coverage and random deployment, it becomes challenging to model video sensor coverage to identify redundancy and suppress redundant video transmission. Several efforts have been made to model coverage redundancy considering 2-dimensional coverage. Field of View (FoV of the camera sensor is in 3-dimensions, thus it is very difficult to model the coverage and identify overlap area for realistic camera. 3-dimensional coverage is largely an unexplored problem. In this paper, a realistic 3-dimensional pyramid camera coverage is assumed and backup set of nodes are computed. Backup set of a node is a set of video sensor nodes which collectively covers coverage area of the node under consideration. The approach presented in the paper identifies minimal sized set of backup nodes which can be used to adaptively duty cycle the video capture and transmission. The result shows that number of nodes required to remain active to cover the sensor field is reduced and in turn average energy consumption of the network also reduces.

  3. Video indexing using a high-performance and low-computation color-based opportunistic technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed; Karmouch, Ahmed

    2002-02-01

    Video information, image processing, and computer vision techniques are developing rapidly because of the availability of acquisition, processing, and editing tools that use current hardware and software systems. However, problems still remain in conveying this video data to the end users. Limiting factors are the resource capabilities in distributed architectures and the features of the users' terminals. The efficient use of image processing, video indexing, and analysis techniques can provide users with solutions or alternatives. We see the video stream as a sequence of correlated images containing in its structure temporal events such as camera editing effects and presents a new algorithm for achieving video segmentation, indexing, and key framing tasks. The algorithm is based on color histograms and uses a binary penetration technique. Although much has been done in this area, most work does not adequately consider the optimization of timing performance and processing storage. This is especially the case if the techniques are designed for use in run-time distributed environments. Our main contribution is to blend high performance and storage criteria with the need to achieve effective results. The algorithm exploits the temporal heuristic characteristic of the visual information within a video stream. It takes into consideration the issues of detecting false cuts and missing true cuts due to the movement of the camera, the optical flow of large objects, or both. We provide a discussion, together with results from experiments and from the implementation of our application, to show the merits of the new algorithm as compared to the existing one.

  4. Development and assessment of a chemistry-based computer video game as a learning tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Hernandez, Kermin Joel

    The chemistry-based computer video game is a multidisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and computer graphics and technology fields developed to explore the use of video games as a possible learning tool. This innovative approach aims to integrate elements of commercial video game and authentic chemistry context environments into a learning experience through gameplay. The project consists of three areas: development, assessment, and implementation. However, the foci of this study were the development and assessment of the computer video game including possible learning outcomes and game design elements. A chemistry-based game using a mixed genre of a single player first-person game embedded with action-adventure and puzzle components was developed to determine if students' level of understanding of chemistry concepts change after gameplay intervention. Three phases have been completed to assess students' understanding of chemistry concepts prior and after gameplay intervention. Two main assessment instruments (pre/post open-ended content survey and individual semi-structured interviews) were used to assess student understanding of concepts. In addition, game design elements were evaluated for future development phases. Preliminary analyses of the interview data suggest that students were able to understand most of the chemistry challenges presented in the game and the game served as a review for previously learned concepts as well as a way to apply such previous knowledge. To guarantee a better understanding of the chemistry concepts, additions such as debriefing and feedback about the content presented in the game seem to be needed. The use of visuals in the game to represent chemical processes, game genre, and game idea appear to be the game design elements that students like the most about the current computer video game.

  5. Can Computer Animations Affect College Biology Students' Conceptions about Diffusion and Osmosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Brecheisen, Dorothy M.; Hynek, Brian M.

    2001-01-01

    Investigates whether viewing computer animations representing the process of diffusion and osmosis affects students' conceptions. Discusses the difficulties of implementing computer animations in the classroom. (Contains 27 references.) (YDS)

  6. Analysing the doctor_patient_computer relationship: the use of video data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Pearce

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the utility of using digital video data in observational studies involving doctors' and patients' use of computers in the consultation. Previous observational studies have used either direct observations or analogue videotapes. We describe a method currently in use in a study examining how doctors, patients and computers interact in the consultation. The study is set in general practice as this is the most clinically computerised section of the Australian healthcare system. Computers are now used for clinical functions in 90% of doctors' surgeries. With this rapid rise of computerisation, concerns have been expressed as to how the computer will affect the doctor_patient relationship. To assess how doctors, patients and computers interact, we have chosen an observational technique, namely to make digital videotapes of actual consultations. This analysis is based on a theoretical framework derived from dramaturgical analysis. Data are gathered from general practitioners who are high-level users of computers, as defined by their use of progress notes, as well as prescribing and test ordering. The subsequent digital data is then transferred onto computer and analysed according to our conceptual framework, making use of video-tagging software.

  7. The Anime Revelation: How I Learned to Love Japanese Animation and Changed Our Teen Video Collection Forever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsall, Jane

    2004-01-01

    What is the appeal of anime? For one thing, the graphic storytelling is uniquely compelling and spans multiple genres. It tends to be targeted to different audiences: young children and families, males or females aged 10-18, or strictly adults for the mature genre called hentai. In America, almost all animation is produced for and watched by…

  8. Lipid Vesicle Shape Analysis from Populations Using Light Video Microscopy and Computer Vision

    OpenAIRE

    Jernej Zupanc; Barbara Drašler; Sabina Boljte; Veronika Kralj-Iglič; Aleš Iglič; Deniz Erdogmus; Damjana Drobne

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter). For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their ...

  9. Designing a Brain-Computer Interface controlled video-game using consumer grade EEG hardware

    OpenAIRE

    van Vliet, Marijn; Robben, Arne; Chumerin, Nikolay; Manyakov, Nikolay V.; Combaz, Adrien; Van Hulle, Marc

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes our first attempt to port a brain-computer interface (BCI), created in a research lab and running on expensive equipment, to consumer grade equipment, allowing one to reach a much broader audience and raise public awareness of this new technology. With the BCI, the user can perform a complicated task through mind control only: playing a tactical video-game. Reliable control is accomplished by adapting a Steady-State Visual Evoked Potential (SSVEP) classifier to be robust ...

  10. Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems1-3, logic circuits4-6 and robotics7-9. The molecule also naturally interfaces with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have previously been demonstrated10-13. Here we show that DNA origami14-16 can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other17-18 in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof-of-principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT, and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully employed the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets the cells of the animal. PMID:24705510

  11. Computer-aided pulmonary image analysis in small animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Ziyue; Mansoor, Awais; Mollura, Daniel J. [Center for Infectious Disease Imaging (CIDI), Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Bagci, Ulas, E-mail: ulasbagci@gmail.com [Center for Research in Computer Vision (CRCV), University of Central Florida (UCF), Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Kramer-Marek, Gabriela [The Institute of Cancer Research, London SW7 3RP (United Kingdom); Luna, Brian [Microfluidic Laboratory Automation, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697-2715 (United States); Kubler, Andre [Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Dey, Bappaditya; Jain, Sanjay [Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Foster, Brent [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California-Davis, Davis, California 95817 (United States); Papadakis, Georgios Z. [Radiology and Imaging Sciences, National Institutes of Health (NIH), Bethesda, Maryland 32892 (United States); Camp, Jeremy V. [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, University of Louisville, Louisville, Kentucky 40202 (United States); Jonsson, Colleen B. [National Institute for Mathematical and Biological Synthesis, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Bishai, William R. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Chevy Chase, Maryland 20815 and Center for Tuberculosis Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21231 (United States); Udupa, Jayaram K. [Medical Image Processing Group, Department of Radiology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: To develop an automated pulmonary image analysis framework for infectious lung diseases in small animal models. Methods: The authors describe a novel pathological lung and airway segmentation method for small animals. The proposed framework includes identification of abnormal imaging patterns pertaining to infectious lung diseases. First, the authors’ system estimates an expected lung volume by utilizing a regression function between total lung capacity and approximated rib cage volume. A significant difference between the expected lung volume and the initial lung segmentation indicates the presence of severe pathology, and invokes a machine learning based abnormal imaging pattern detection system next. The final stage of the proposed framework is the automatic extraction of airway tree for which new affinity relationships within the fuzzy connectedness image segmentation framework are proposed by combining Hessian and gray-scale morphological reconstruction filters. Results: 133 CT scans were collected from four different studies encompassing a wide spectrum of pulmonary abnormalities pertaining to two commonly used small animal models (ferret and rabbit). Sensitivity and specificity were greater than 90% for pathological lung segmentation (average dice similarity coefficient > 0.9). While qualitative visual assessments of airway tree extraction were performed by the participating expert radiologists, for quantitative evaluation the authors validated the proposed airway extraction method by using publicly available EXACT’09 data set. Conclusions: The authors developed a comprehensive computer-aided pulmonary image analysis framework for preclinical research applications. The proposed framework consists of automatic pathological lung segmentation and accurate airway tree extraction. The framework has high sensitivity and specificity; therefore, it can contribute advances in preclinical research in pulmonary diseases.

  12. Computation of Pump-Leak Flux Balance in Animal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor A. Vereninov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Many vital processes in animal cells depend on monovalent ion transport across the plasma membrane via specific pathways. Their operation is described by a set of nonlinear and transcendental equations that cannot be solved analytically. Previous computations had been optimized for certain cell types and included parameters whose experimental determination can be challenging. Methods: We have developed a simpler and a more universal computational approach by using fewer kinetic parameters derived from the data related to cell balanced state. A file is provided for calculating unidirectional Na+, K+, and Cl- fluxes via all major pathways (i.e. the Na/K pump, Na+, K+, Cl- channels, and NKCC, KC and NC cotransporters under a balanced state and during transient processes. Results: The data on the Na+, K+, and Cl- distribution and the pump flux of K+ (Rb+ are obtained on U937 cells before and after inhibiting the pump with ouabain. There was a good match between the results of calculations and the experimentally measured dynamics of ion redistribution caused by blocking the pump. Conclusion: The presented approach can serve as an effective tool for analyzing monovalent ion transport in the whole cell, determination of the rate coefficients for ion transfer via major pathways and studying their alteration under various conditions.

  13. Time-scheduled delivery of computer health animations: "Installing" healthy habits of computer use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sy-Chyi; Chern, Jin-Yuan

    2013-06-01

    The development of modern technology brings convenience to our lives but removes physical activity from our daily routines, thereby putting our lives at risk. Extended computer use may contribute to symptoms such as visual impairment and musculoskeletal disorders. To help reduce the risk of physical inactivity and promote healthier computer use, this study developed a time-scheduled delivery of health-related animations for users sitting in front of computers for prolonged periods. In addition, we examined the effects that the program had on the computer-related health behavior intentions and actions of participants. Two waves of questionnaires were implemented for data collection before and after intervention. The results showed that the animation program indeed had a positive effect on participants' healthy computer use actions in terms of breathtaking, body massages, and body stretches. It also helped to bridge the intention-action gap of the health behaviors. The development and evaluation were documented, and users' experiences/suggestions were discussed at the end.

  14. Self-motion perception: assessment by real-time computer-generated animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, D. E.; Phillips, J. O.

    2001-01-01

    We report a new procedure for assessing complex self-motion perception. In three experiments, subjects manipulated a 6 degree-of-freedom magnetic-field tracker which controlled the motion of a virtual avatar so that its motion corresponded to the subjects' perceived self-motion. The real-time animation created by this procedure was stored using a virtual video recorder for subsequent analysis. Combined real and illusory self-motion and vestibulo-ocular reflex eye movements were evoked by cross-coupled angular accelerations produced by roll and pitch head movements during passive yaw rotation in a chair. Contrary to previous reports, illusory self-motion did not correspond to expectations based on semicircular canal stimulation. Illusory pitch head-motion directions were as predicted for only 37% of trials; whereas, slow-phase eye movements were in the predicted direction for 98% of the trials. The real-time computer-generated animations procedure permits use of naive, untrained subjects who lack a vocabulary for reporting motion perception and is applicable to basic self-motion perception studies, evaluation of motion simulators, assessment of balance disorders and so on.

  15. The relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools, Kermanshah

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reshadat, S; Ghasemi, S R; Ahmadian, M; RajabiGilan, N

    2014-01-01

    .... This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools in Kermanshah...

  16. The relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools, Kermanshah.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshadat, S; Ghasemi, S R; Ahmadian, M; RajabiGilan, N

    2014-01-09

    Computer or video games are a popular recreational activity and playing them may constitute a large part of leisure time. This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools in Kermanshah, Islamic Republic of Iran, in 2012. Our total sample was 573 students and our tool was the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28) and social relationships questionnaires. Survey respondents reported spending an average of 71.07 (SD 72.1) min/day on computer or video games. There was a significant relationship between time spent playing games and general mental health (P playing and not playing computer or video games with social relationships and their subscales, including trans-local relationships (P time spent playing games (P < 0.02) and its dimensions, except for family relationships.

  17. What hinders teachers in using computer and video games in the classroom? Exploring factors inhibiting the uptake of computer and video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Young Kyun

    2008-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify factors inhibiting teachers' use of computer and video games in the classroom setting and to examine the degree to which teaching experience and gender affect attitudes toward using games. Six factors that hinder teachers' use of games in the classroom were discovered: Inflexibility of curriculum, Negative effects of gaming, Students' lack of readiness, Lack of supporting materials, Fixed class schedules, and Limited budgets. Lack of supporting material, Fixed class schedules, and Limited budgets were factors that female teachers believed to be more serious obstacles to game use in the classroom than male teachers did. Experienced teachers, more so than inexperienced teachers, believed that adopting games in teaching was hindered by Inflexibility of curriculum and Negative effects of gaming. On the other hand, inexperienced teachers, more so than experienced teachers, believed that adopting games in teaching is less hindered by Lack of supporting materials and Fixed class schedules.

  18. Self-Censorship Regulatory Structure: Can We Control Political of Hates, Violence & Sex in Children Computer & Video Games?

    OpenAIRE

    Zanuddin, Hasmah

    2008-01-01

    This article examines some of the extreme negative content available to teenagers and young children in the market. Extreme negative values such as political of hates, violence and sex in some of the children computer and video games were made possible due to several factors such as lacking in regulatory structure, week policy implementation, rampant of illegal and uncensored materials. Computer and video games have been the subject of frequent controversy and censorship, due to the depiction...

  19. Dive characteristics can predict foraging success in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus as validated by animal-borne video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth L. Volpov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dive characteristics and dive shape are often used to infer foraging success in pinnipeds. However, these inferences have not been directly validated in the field with video, and it remains unclear if this method can be applied to benthic foraging animals. This study assessed the ability of dive characteristics from time-depth recorders (TDR to predict attempted prey capture events (APC that were directly observed on animal-borne video in Australian fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus doriferus, n=11. The most parsimonious model predicting the probability of a dive with ≥1 APC on video included only descent rate as a predictor variable. The majority (94% of the 389 total APC were successful, and the majority of the dives (68% contained at least one successful APC. The best model predicting these successful dives included descent rate as a predictor. Comparisons of the TDR model predictions to video yielded a maximum accuracy of 77.5% in classifying dives as either APC or non-APC or 77.1% in classifying dives as successful verses unsuccessful. Foraging intensity, measured as either total APC per dive or total successful APC per dive, was best predicted by bottom duration and ascent rate. The accuracy in predicting total APC per dive varied based on the number of APC per dive with maximum accuracy occurring at 1 APC for both total (54% and only successful APC (52%. Results from this study linking verified foraging dives to dive characteristics potentially opens the door to decades of historical TDR datasets across several otariid species.

  20. Animation graphic interface for the space shuttle onboard computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wike, Jeffrey; Griffith, Paul

    1989-01-01

    Graphics interfaces designed to operate on space qualified hardware challenge software designers to display complex information under processing power and physical size constraints. Under contract to Johnson Space Center, MICROEXPERT Systems is currently constructing an intelligent interface for the LASER DOCKING SENSOR (LDS) flight experiment. Part of this interface is a graphic animation display for Rendezvous and Proximity Operations. The displays have been designed in consultation with Shuttle astronauts. The displays show multiple views of a satellite relative to the shuttle, coupled with numeric attitude information. The graphics are generated using position data received by the Shuttle Payload and General Support Computer (PGSC) from the Laser Docking Sensor. Some of the design considerations include crew member preferences in graphic data representation, single versus multiple window displays, mission tailoring of graphic displays, realistic 3D images versus generic icon representations of real objects, the physical relationship of the observers to the graphic display, how numeric or textual information should interface with graphic data, in what frame of reference objects should be portrayed, recognizing conditions of display information-overload, and screen format and placement consistency.

  1. 3D modeling method for computer animate based on modified weak structured light method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Hanwei; Pan, Ming; Zhang, Xiangwei

    2010-11-01

    A simple and affordable 3D scanner is designed in this paper. Three-dimensional digital models are playing an increasingly important role in many fields, such as computer animate, industrial design, artistic design and heritage conservation. For many complex shapes, optical measurement systems are indispensable to acquiring the 3D information. In the field of computer animate, such an optical measurement device is too expensive to be widely adopted, and on the other hand, the precision is not as critical a factor in that situation. In this paper, a new cheap 3D measurement system is implemented based on modified weak structured light, using only a video camera, a light source and a straight stick rotating on a fixed axis. For an ordinary weak structured light configuration, one or two reference planes are required, and the shadows on these planes must be tracked in the scanning process, which destroy the convenience of this method. In the modified system, reference planes are unnecessary, and size range of the scanned objects is expanded widely. A new calibration procedure is also realized for the proposed method, and points cloud is obtained by analyzing the shadow strips on the object. A two-stage ICP algorithm is used to merge the points cloud from different viewpoints to get a full description of the object, and after a series of operations, a NURBS surface model is generated in the end. A complex toy bear is used to verify the efficiency of the method, and errors range from 0.7783mm to 1.4326mm comparing with the ground truth measurement.

  2. Towards Realising Secure and Efficient Image and Video Processing Applications on Quantum Computers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah M. Iliyasu

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Exploiting the promise of security and efficiency that quantum computing offers, the basic foundations leading to commercial applications for quantum image processing are proposed. Two mathematical frameworks and algorithms to accomplish the watermarking of quantum images, authentication of ownership of already watermarked images and recovery of their unmarked versions on quantum computers are proposed. Encoding the images as 2n-sized normalised Flexible Representation of Quantum Images (FRQI states, with n-qubits and 1-qubit dedicated to capturing the respective information about the colour and position of every pixel in the image respectively, the proposed algorithms utilise the flexibility inherent to the FRQI representation, in order to confine the transformations on an image to any predetermined chromatic or spatial (or a combination of both content of the image as dictated by the watermark embedding, authentication or recovery circuits. Furthermore, by adopting an apt generalisation of the criteria required to realise physical quantum computing hardware, three standalone components that make up the framework to prepare, manipulate and recover the various contents required to represent and produce movies on quantum computers are also proposed. Each of the algorithms and the mathematical foundations for their execution were simulated using classical (i.e., conventional or non-quantum computing resources, and their results were analysed alongside other longstanding classical computing equivalents. The work presented here, combined together with the extensions suggested, provide the basic foundations towards effectuating secure and efficient classical-like image and video processing applications on the quantum-computing framework.

  3. Effects of the pyrethroid insecticide Cypermethrin on the locomotor activity of the wolf spider Pardosa amentata: quantitative analysis employing computer-automated video tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baatrup, E; Bayley, M

    1993-01-01

    Pardosa amentata was quantified in an open field setup, using computer-automated video tracking. Each spider was recorded for 24 hr prior to pesticide exposure. After topical application of 4.6 ng of Cypermethrin, the animal was recorded for a further 48 hr. Finally, after 9 days of recovery, the spider...... was tracked for 24 hr. Initially, Cypermethrin induced an almost instant paralysis of the hind legs and a lack of coordination in movement seen in the jagged and circular track appearance. This phase culminated in total quiescence, lasting approximately 12 hr in males and 24-48 hr in females. Following...

  4. Video Games, Gender, Diversity, and Learning as Cultural Practice: Implications for Equitable Learning and Computing Participation through Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Gabriela T.

    2017-01-01

    Games, play, and learning have a long and embedded history that outdates digital games by many years. However, video games, computing, and technology have significant and historically documented diversity issues, which privilege whites and males as content producers, computing and gaming experts, and STEM learners and employees. Many aspects of…

  5. Collaborative and Competitive Video Games for Teaching Computing in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Spencer; Chan, Samantha

    2017-08-01

    This study measures the success of using a collaborative and competitive video game, named Space Race, to teach computing to first year engineering students. Space Race is played by teams of four, each with their own tablet, collaborating to compete against the other teams in the class. The impact of the game on student learning was studied through measurements using 485 students, over one term. Surveys were used to gauge student reception of the game. Pre and post-tests, and in-course examinations were used to quantify student performance. The game was well received with at least 82% of the students that played it recommending it to others. In some cases, game participants outperformed non-participants on course exams. On the final course exam, all of the statistically significant ( pvideo game can be an effective tool for teaching computing in post-secondary education.

  6. Evaluation of an animated instructional video as a training tool for manual perineum support during vaginal delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Hadil Y; Vikanes, Åse; Anti, Marit; Hassan, Sahar; Ismail, Khaled M; Zimmo, Kaled; Zimmo, Mohammed; Fosse, Erik; Laine, Katariina

    2017-05-01

    To explore attitudes to an animation-based bimanual perineum-support technique (bPST) training video, and to investigate factors affecting the acceptability of the animation as a teaching modality. A quantitative study conducted between November 1, 2014, and January 1, 2015, included obstetricians and midwives of any age and experience from relevant Norwegian professional organizations, and obstetrics and gynecology experts selected by the authors. Participants completed an anonymous online-survey evaluating the accuracy and clarity of the animation, and assessing knowledge of bPST and clinical practice. Factor and reliability analyses were conducted and the survey results were stratified based on the profession of the participants. The online survey was completed by 124 participants. There were 6 (5.4%) participants who reported using bPST before the study and 102 (92%) who described themselves as willing to use it afterwards, a significant increase (Z=-9.42; Peffectiveness of bPST could potentially increase user satisfaction with the animation. © 2017 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  7. X-38 research aircraft atmospheric reentry - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume the flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This 30-second computer animation clip shows the X-38 vehicle experiencing frictional heating as it reenters the Earth's atmosphere and then gliding under its main parachute on its way to a Global Positioning System-guided landing.

  8. X-38 research aircraft launch from Space Station - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This is a short 16-second computer animation clip showing the X-38 vehicle being released from Pressurized Mating Adapter No. 3 and moving away from the International Space Station toward earth.

  9. X-38 research aircraft deorbit burn - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume the flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This is a short 21-second computer animation clip showing the X-38 vehicle returning to the atmosphere from orbit.

  10. Differences by Sex in Association of Mental Health With Video Gaming or Other Nonacademic Computer Use Among US Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Hogan H.; Sung, Jung Hye; Lee, Ji-Young; Lee, Jae Eun

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Although numerous studies have examined the association between playing video games and cognitive skills, aggression, and depression, few studies have examined how these associations differ by sex. The objective of our study was to determine differences by sex in association between video gaming or other nonacademic computer use and depressive symptoms, suicidal behavior, and being bullied among adolescents in the United States. Methods We used data from the 2015 Youth Risk Behav...

  11. Using Animation to Support the Teaching of Computer Game Development Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Mark John; Pountney, David C.; Baskett, M.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we examine the potential use of animation for supporting the teaching of some of the mathematical concepts that underlie computer games development activities, such as vector and matrix algebra. An experiment was conducted with a group of UK undergraduate computing students to compare the perceived usefulness of animated and static…

  12. Differences by Sex in Association of Mental Health With Video Gaming or Other Nonacademic Computer Use Among US Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hogan H; Sung, Jung Hye; Lee, Ji-Young; Lee, Jae Eun

    2017-11-22

    Although numerous studies have examined the association between playing video games and cognitive skills, aggression, and depression, few studies have examined how these associations differ by sex. The objective of our study was to determine differences by sex in association between video gaming or other nonacademic computer use and depressive symptoms, suicidal behavior, and being bullied among adolescents in the United States. We used data from the 2015 Youth Risk Behavior Survey on 15,624 US high school students. Rao-Scott χ2 tests, which were adjusted for the complex sampling design, were conducted to assess differences by sex in the association of mental health with video gaming or other nonacademic computer use. Approximately one-fifth (19.4%) of adolescents spent 5 or more hours daily on video gaming or other nonacademic computer use, and 17.9% did not spend any time in those activities. A greater percentage of female adolescents than male adolescents reported spending no time (22.1% and 14.0%, respectively) or 5 hours or more (21.3% and 17.5%, respectively) in gaming and other nonacademic computer use (P gaming or other nonacademic computer use differed by sex. Among female adolescents, prevalence of mental problems increased steadily in association with increased time spent, whereas the pattern for male adolescents followed a J-shaped curve, decreasing initially, increasing slowly, and then increasing rapidly beginning at 4 hours or more. Female adolescents were more likely to have all 3 mental health problems than male adolescents were. Spending no time or 5 hours or more daily on video gaming or other nonacademic computer use was associated with increased mental problems among both sexes. As suggested by the J-shaped relationship, 1 hour or less spent on video gaming or other nonacademic computer use may reduce depressive symptoms, suicidal behavior, and being bullied compared with no use or excessive use.

  13. Social interactions of juvenile brown boobies at sea as observed with animal-borne video cameras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Yoda

    Full Text Available While social interactions play a crucial role on the development of young individuals, those of highly mobile juvenile birds in inaccessible environments are difficult to observe. In this study, we deployed miniaturised video recorders on juvenile brown boobies Sula leucogaster, which had been hand-fed beginning a few days after hatching, to examine how social interactions between tagged juveniles and other birds affected their flight and foraging behaviour. Juveniles flew longer with congeners, especially with adult birds, than solitarily. In addition, approximately 40% of foraging occurred close to aggregations of congeners and other species. Young seabirds voluntarily followed other birds, which may directly enhance their foraging success and improve foraging and flying skills during their developmental stage, or both.

  14. Architectural Considerations for Highly Scalable Computing to Support On-demand Video Analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-19

    demand video intelligence ; intelligent video system; video analytics platform I. INTRODUCTION Video Analytics systems has been of tremendous interest...in various fields due to its utility [1]. A survey of Intelligent Video Systems and Analytics [2] highlights the importance of such systems in a...not, running each analytic pass in a separate process is an option. As can be surmised from values in Table I, this option has slight performance

  15. Test-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of general movements in healthy term-born infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Susanne Collier; Støen, Ragnhild; Sæther, Rannei; Jensenius, Alexander Refsum; Adde, Lars

    2015-10-01

    A computer-based video analysis has recently been presented for quantitative assessment of general movements (GMs). This method's test-retest reliability, however, has not yet been evaluated. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of GMs, and to explore the association between computer-based video analysis and the temporal organization of fidgety movements (FMs). Test-retest reliability study. 75 healthy, term-born infants were recorded twice the same day during the FMs period using a standardized video set-up. The computer-based movement variables "quantity of motion mean" (Qmean), "quantity of motion standard deviation" (QSD) and "centroid of motion standard deviation" (CSD) were analyzed, reflecting the amount of motion and the variability of the spatial center of motion of the infant, respectively. In addition, the association between the variable CSD and the temporal organization of FMs was explored. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC 1.1 and ICC 3.1) were calculated to assess test-retest reliability. The ICC values for the variables CSD, Qmean and QSD were 0.80, 0.80 and 0.86 for ICC (1.1), respectively; and 0.80, 0.86 and 0.90 for ICC (3.1), respectively. There were significantly lower CSD values in the recordings with continual FMs compared to the recordings with intermittent FMs (ptest-retest reliability of computer-based video analysis of GMs, and a significant association between our computer-based video analysis and the temporal organization of FMs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Chromogenic behaviors of the Humboldt squid (Dosidicus gigas) studied in situ with an animal-borne video package.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Hannah; Gilly, William; Bell, Lauren; Abernathy, Kyler; Marshall, Greg

    2015-01-15

    Dosidicus gigas (Humboldt or jumbo flying squid) is an economically and ecologically influential species, yet little is known about its natural behaviors because of difficulties in studying this active predator in its oceanic environment. By using an animal-borne video package, National Geographic's Crittercam, we were able to observe natural behaviors in free-swimming D. gigas in the Gulf of California with a focus on color-generating (chromogenic) behaviors. We documented two dynamic displays without artificial lighting at depths of up to 70 m. One dynamic pattern, termed 'flashing' is characterized by a global oscillation (2-4 Hz) of body color between white and red. Flashing was almost always observed when other squid were visible in the video frame, and this behavior presumably represents intraspecific signaling. Amplitude and frequency of flashing can be modulated, and the phase relationship with another squid can also be rapidly altered. Another dynamic display termed 'flickering' was observed whenever flashing was not occurring. This behavior is characterized by irregular wave-like activity in neighboring patches of chromatophores, and the resulting patterns mimic reflections of down-welled light in the water column, suggesting that this behavior may provide a dynamic type of camouflage. Rapid and global pauses in flickering, often before a flashing episode, indicate that flickering is under inhibitory neural control. Although flashing and flickering have not been described in other squid, functional similarities are evident with other species. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  17. Development of computational small animal models and their applications in preclinical imaging and therapy research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Tianwu [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Zaidi, Habib, E-mail: habib.zaidi@hcuge.ch [Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva 4 CH-1211 (Switzerland); Geneva Neuroscience Center, Geneva University, Geneva CH-1205 (Switzerland); Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen 9700 RB (Netherlands)

    2016-01-15

    The development of multimodality preclinical imaging techniques and the rapid growth of realistic computer simulation tools have promoted the construction and application of computational laboratory animal models in preclinical research. Since the early 1990s, over 120 realistic computational animal models have been reported in the literature and used as surrogates to characterize the anatomy of actual animals for the simulation of preclinical studies involving the use of bioluminescence tomography, fluorescence molecular tomography, positron emission tomography, single-photon emission computed tomography, microcomputed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and optical imaging. Other applications include electromagnetic field simulation, ionizing and nonionizing radiation dosimetry, and the development and evaluation of new methodologies for multimodality image coregistration, segmentation, and reconstruction of small animal images. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the history and fundamental technologies used for the development of computational small animal models with a particular focus on their application in preclinical imaging as well as nonionizing and ionizing radiation dosimetry calculations. An overview of the overall process involved in the design of these models, including the fundamental elements used for the construction of different types of computational models, the identification of original anatomical data, the simulation tools used for solving various computational problems, and the applications of computational animal models in preclinical research. The authors also analyze the characteristics of categories of computational models (stylized, voxel-based, and boundary representation) and discuss the technical challenges faced at the present time as well as research needs in the future.

  18. Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI) : An analysis, a perspective, and guidelines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, E.L.

    2016-01-01

    Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI)’s founding elements are discussed in relation to its overarching discipline Human-Computer Interaction (HCI). Its basic dimensions are identified: agent, computing machinery, and interaction, and their levels of processing: perceptual, cognitive, and affective.

  19. Lipid vesicle shape analysis from populations using light video microscopy and computer vision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jernej Zupanc

    Full Text Available We present a method for giant lipid vesicle shape analysis that combines manually guided large-scale video microscopy and computer vision algorithms to enable analyzing vesicle populations. The method retains the benefits of light microscopy and enables non-destructive analysis of vesicles from suspensions containing up to several thousands of lipid vesicles (1-50 µm in diameter. For each sample, image analysis was employed to extract data on vesicle quantity and size distributions of their projected diameters and isoperimetric quotients (measure of contour roundness. This process enables a comparison of samples from the same population over time, or the comparison of a treated population to a control. Although vesicles in suspensions are heterogeneous in sizes and shapes and have distinctively non-homogeneous distribution throughout the suspension, this method allows for the capture and analysis of repeatable vesicle samples that are representative of the population inspected.

  20. Animal crossing: New leaf and the diversity of horror in video games

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, AML; Björn, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the diverse ways horror can be conveyed in games by investigating how games that are not associated with the horror genre can produce unsettling or scary experiences. To conduct this exploration, this study uses interaction mapping, as outlined by Consalvo and Dutton (2006), to examine a game that has thoroughly pleasant and cutesy trappings: Animal Crossing: New Leaf (Nintendo 2013). The interactions were analysed according to three themes prevalent within literature on h...

  1. Prototype of a computer system for managing data and video colonoscopy exams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renato Bobsin Machado

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Develop a prototype using computer resources to optimize the management process of clinical information and video colonoscopy exams. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Through meetings with medical and computer experts, the following requirements were defined: management of information about medical professionals, patients and exams; video and image captured by video colonoscopes during the exam, and the availability of these videos and images on the Web for further analysis. The technologies used were Java, Flex, JBoss, Red5, JBoss SEAM, MySQL and Flamingo. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The prototype contributed to the area of colonocospy by providing resources to maintain the patients' history, tests and images from video colonoscopies. The web-based application allows greater flexibility to physicians and specialists. The resources for remote analysis of data and tests can help doctors and patients in the examination and diagnosis. CONCLUSION: The implemented prototype has contributed to improve colonoscopy-related processes. Future activities include the prototype deployment in the Service of Coloproctology and the utilization of this model to allow real-time monitoring of these exams and knowledge extraction from such structured database using artificial intelligence.OBJETIVO: Desenvolver um protótipo por meio de recursos computacionais para a otimização de processos de gerenciamento de informações clínicas e de exames de videocolonoscopia. MATERIAIS E MÉTODOS: Por meio de reuniões com especialistas médicos e computacionais, definiram-se os seguintes requisitos: gestão de informações sobre profissionais médicos, pacientes e exames complementares; aquisição dos vídeos e captura de imagens a partir do videocolonoscópio durante a realização desse exame, e a disponibilidade por meio da Web para análise posterior dessas imagens. As tecnologias aplicadas foram: Java, Flex, JBOSS, Red5, JBOSS SEAM, MySQL e Flamingo. RESULTADOS E

  2. Dry coupling for whole-body small-animal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chenghung; Li, Lei; Zhu, Liren; Xia, Jun; Li, Chiye; Chen, Wanyi; Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2017-04-01

    We have enhanced photoacoustic computed tomography with dry acoustic coupling that eliminates water immersion anxiety and wrinkling of the animal and facilitates incorporating complementary modalities and procedures. The dry acoustic coupler is made of a tubular elastic membrane enclosed by a closed transparent water tank. The tubular membrane ensures water-free contact with the animal, and the closed water tank allows pressurization for animal stabilization. The dry coupler was tested using a whole-body small-animal ring-shaped photoacoustic computed tomography system. Dry coupling was found to provide image quality comparable to that of conventional water coupling.

  3. ANIMATED COMPUTER GRAPHICS FOR THE STUDY OF MECHANICAL VIBRATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Crăifăleanu Andrei; ION George Cătălin

    2006-01-01

    The paper presents a computer code developed by the authors for the study of the small oscillations of a system of two pendulums, coupled one to each other, as well as to the fixed element, with linear springs and with linear viscous dampers. The code has an advanced Windows interface.

  4. A Computational Approach to the Quantification of Animal Camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    their visual backgrounds (Hanlon and Messenger 1996; Messenger 2001b) – a trait noted in Aristotle’s Historia Animalium (Aristotle 1910), and grossly...Computation in Neural Systems 14 (2):321-333 Aristotle (1910) Historia Animalium (trans: Thompson DAW). Clarendon Press, Oxford Arnold SE, Faruq S

  5. Color in Three-Dimensional Shaded Computer Graphics and Animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collery, Michael T.

    Directed primarily toward the person familiar with computer technology rather than the traditional art educator, this master's thesis addresses new approaches to color theory and its impact on electronic art media. Technical considerations related to color coming from electronic sources, i.e., radiant light, and differences between radiant and…

  6. Measured Self-Esteem and Locus of Control of Students Related to Video Game, Home Computer, and Television Viewing Involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, James D.

    This study was designed to investigate the influence of television on the lives of young people and the correlation between home computer programming, the playing of video games at home, and the playing of arcade games out of the home related to self-esteem and locus of control. Subjects were 405 students in grades 4 through 12 from 21 classrooms…

  7. Digital video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Don; Johnson, Mike

    2004-04-01

    The process of digital capture, editing, and archiving video has become an important aspect of documenting arthroscopic surgery. Recording the arthroscopic findings before and after surgery is an essential part of the patient's medical record. The hardware and software has become more reasonable to purchase, but the learning curve to master the software is steep. Digital video is captured at the time of arthroscopy to a hard disk, and written to a CD at the end of the operative procedure. The process of obtaining video of open procedures is more complex. Outside video of the procedure is recorded on digital tape with a digital video camera. The camera must be plugged into a computer to capture the video on the hard disk. Adobe Premiere software is used to edit the video and render the finished video to the hard drive. This finished video is burned onto a CD. We outline the choice of computer hardware and software for the manipulation of digital video. The techniques of backup and archiving the completed projects and files also are outlined. The uses of digital video for education and the formats that can be used in PowerPoint presentations are discussed.

  8. Register indicators of physical endurance of biological objects when running a treadmill and swimming with weights using computer video markerless tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Datsenko A.V.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: to study the use of video tracking to assess physical endurance and indicators of biological objects fatigue when running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. Material and methods. Physical endurance evaluated by test facilities for running on a treadmill and swimming with the load. As the object of the studies used laboratory rats. Results. For indicators of physical endurance biological objects isolated areas running track of treadmill and electrical stimulation site, when swimming on the total area of the container isolated subarea near the water surface. With video tracking performed computer timing of finding biological object in different zones of the treadmill and containers for swimming. On the basis of data on the time location rats in a given zone apparatus for running and swimming, obtained in the dynamics of the test of physical endurance, build a "fatigue curves", quantified changes in the indices of hard work, depending on the duration of its execution. Conclusion. Video tracking allows to define the execution of physical work to overflowing with loads of aerobic and mixed aerobic-anaerobic power, establish quantitative indicators of changes in the dynamics of biological objects operability testing with the construction of "fatigue curve" and objectively determine the times of occurrence in experimental animals exhaustion when fails to perform physical work.

  9. The challenge associated with the robust computation of meteor velocities from video and photographic records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egal, A.; Gural, P. S.; Vaubaillon, J.; Colas, F.; Thuillot, W.

    2017-09-01

    The CABERNET project was designed to push the limits for obtaining accurate measurements of meteoroids orbits from photographic and video meteor camera recordings. The discrepancy between the measured and theoretic orbits of these objects heavily depends on the semi-major axis determination, and thus on the reliability of the pre-atmospheric velocity computation. With a spatial resolution of 0.01° per pixel and a temporal resolution of up to 10 ms, CABERNET should be able to provide accurate measurements of velocities and trajectories of meteors. To achieve this, it is necessary to improve the precision of the data reduction processes, and especially the determination of the meteor's velocity. In this work, most of the steps of the velocity computation are thoroughly investigated in order to reduce the uncertainties and error contributions at each stage of the reduction process. The accuracy of the measurement of meteor centroids is established and results in a precision of 0.09 pixels for CABERNET, which corresponds to 3.24‧‧. Several methods to compute the velocity were investigated based on the trajectory determination algorithms described in Ceplecha (1987) and Borovicka (1990), as well as the multi-parameter fitting (MPF) method proposed by Gural (2012). In the case of the MPF, many optimization methods were implemented in order to find the most efficient and robust technique to solve the minimization problem. The entire data reduction process is assessed using simulated meteors, with different geometrical configurations and deceleration behaviors. It is shown that the multi-parameter fitting method proposed by Gural(2012)is the most accurate method to compute the pre-atmospheric velocity in all circumstances. Many techniques that assume constant velocity at the beginning of the path as derived from the trajectory determination using Ceplecha (1987) or Borovicka (1990) can lead to large errors for decelerating meteors. The MPF technique also allows one to

  10. ADAM: A computer program to simulate selective-breeding schemes for animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, L D; Sørensen, A C; Henryon, M

    2009-01-01

    ADAM is a computer program that models selective breeding schemes for animals using stochastic simulation. The program simulates a population of animals and traces the genetic changes in the population under different selective breeding scenarios. It caters to different population structures......, genetic models, selection strategies, and mating designs. ADAM can be used to evaluate breeding schemes and generate genetic data to test statistical tools...

  11. 3D Animation Essentials

    CERN Document Server

    Beane, Andy

    2012-01-01

    The essential fundamentals of 3D animation for aspiring 3D artists 3D is everywhere--video games, movie and television special effects, mobile devices, etc. Many aspiring artists and animators have grown up with 3D and computers, and naturally gravitate to this field as their area of interest. Bringing a blend of studio and classroom experience to offer you thorough coverage of the 3D animation industry, this must-have book shows you what it takes to create compelling and realistic 3D imagery. Serves as the first step to understanding the language of 3D and computer graphics (CG)Covers 3D anim

  12. Immersive video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moezzi, Saied; Katkere, Arun L.; Jain, Ramesh C.

    1996-03-01

    Interactive video and television viewers should have the power to control their viewing position. To make this a reality, we introduce the concept of Immersive Video, which employs computer vision and computer graphics technologies to provide remote users a sense of complete immersion when viewing an event. Immersive Video uses multiple videos of an event, captured from different perspectives, to generate a full 3D digital video of that event. That is accomplished by assimilating important information from each video stream into a comprehensive, dynamic, 3D model of the environment. Using this 3D digital video, interactive viewers can then move around the remote environment and observe the events taking place from any desired perspective. Our Immersive Video System currently provides interactive viewing and `walkthrus' of staged karate demonstrations, basketball games, dance performances, and typical campus scenes. In its full realization, Immersive Video will be a paradigm shift in visual communication which will revolutionize television and video media, and become an integral part of future telepresence and virtual reality systems.

  13. Applications of computer-graphics animation for motion-perception research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proffitt, D. R.; Kaiser, M. K.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of using computer animated stimuli in studying motion perception are presented and discussed. Most current programs of motion perception research could not be pursued without the use of computer graphics animation. Computer generated displays afford latitudes of freedom and control that are almost impossible to attain through conventional methods. There are, however, limitations to this presentational medium. At present, computer generated displays present simplified approximations of the dynamics in natural events. Very little is known about how the differences between natural events and computer simulations influence perceptual processing. In practice, the differences are assumed to be irrelevant to the questions under study, and that findings with computer generated stimuli will generalize to natural events.

  14. Computer-based alternatives to using animals in teaching physiology and pharmacology to undergraduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewhurst, David

    2004-06-01

    In the UK, the majority of animals used for undergraduate education are for laboratory practical classes (wet labs) in pharmacology and physiology. Computer simulations, which are now widely available at relatively low cost, can provide a dry lab experience that may fulfil some, but not all, of the objectives of the animal labs and may be particularly appropriate where the animal lab is costly to run or requires a high level of technical expertise. Broadly, the computer simulations fall into two categories, each having design features in line with achieving slightly different learning objectives. Most of the available evidence suggests that where computer simulations are used as alternatives, they can fulfil many of the learning objectives of wet labs, though clearly they are not effective in teaching animal handling, surgical/dissection and laboratory skills.

  15. Interactive Video in Training. Computers in Personnel--Making Management Profitable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Peter

    Interactive video is achieved by merging the two powerful technologies of microcomputing and video. Using television as the vehicle for display, text and diagrams, filmic images, and sound can be used separately or in combination to achieve a specific training task. An interactive program can check understanding, determine progress, and challenge…

  16. Relationships between Computer and Video Game Play and Creativity among Upper Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlen, Karla R.

    2009-01-01

    This study explored relationships between time spent playing video games in a typical week and general creativity, as measured by a common assessment. One hundred eighteen students in 4th and 5th grades answered questions about their video game play and completed the Torrance Tests of Creative Thinking (Torrance, Orlow, & Safter, 1990). While…

  17. Computer Security Awareness Guide for Department of Energy Laboratories, Government Agencies, and others for use with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL): Computer security short subjects videos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    Lonnie Moore, the Computer Security Manager, CSSM/CPPM at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Gale Warshawsky, the Coordinator for Computer Security Education & Awareness at LLNL, wanted to share topics such as computer ethics, software piracy, privacy issues, and protecting information in a format that would capture and hold an audience`s attention. Four Computer Security Short Subject videos were produced which ranged from 1-3 minutes each. These videos are very effective education and awareness tools that can be used to generate discussions about computer security concerns and good computing practices. Leaders may incorporate the Short Subjects into presentations. After talking about a subject area, one of the Short Subjects may be shown to highlight that subject matter. Another method for sharing them could be to show a Short Subject first and then lead a discussion about its topic. The cast of characters and a bit of information about their personalities in the LLNL Computer Security Short Subjects is included in this report.

  18. Creating a YouTube-Like Collaborative Environment in Mathematics: Integrating Animated Geogebra Constructions and Student-Generated Screencast Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Jill; Roulet, Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the integration of student-generated GeoGebra applets and Jing screencast videos to create a YouTube-like medium for sharing in mathematics. The value of combining dynamic mathematics software and screencast videos for facilitating communication and representations in a digital era is demonstrated herein. We share our…

  19. Early prediction of cerebral palsy by computer-based video analysis of general movements: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adde, Lars; Helbostad, Jorunn L; Jensenius, Alexander R; Taraldsen, Gunnar; Grunewaldt, Kristine H; Støen, Ragnhild

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the predictive value of a computer-based video analysis of the development of cerebral palsy (CP) in young infants. A prospective study of general movements used recordings from 30 high-risk infants (13 males, 17 females; mean gestational age 31wks, SD 6wks; range 23-42wks) between 10 and 15 weeks post term when fidgety movements should be present. Recordings were analysed using computer vision software. Movement variables, derived from differences between subsequent video frames, were used for quantitative analyses. CP status was reported at 5 years. Thirteen infants developed CP (eight hemiparetic, four quadriparetic, one dyskinetic; seven ambulatory, three non-ambulatory, and three unknown function), of whom one had fidgety movements. Variability of the centroid of motion had a sensitivity of 85% and a specificity of 71% in identifying CP. By combining this with variables reflecting the amount of motion, specificity increased to 88%. Nine out of 10 children with CP, and for whom information about functional level was available, were correctly predicted with regard to ambulatory and non-ambulatory function. Prediction of CP can be provided by computer-based video analysis in young infants. The method may serve as an objective and feasible tool for early prediction of CP in high-risk infants.

  20. Video Technology Transforms the Teaching of Art History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guernsey, Lisa

    1997-01-01

    An art history video created at the Columbia University (New York) Media Center for Art History takes the art student on a computer-animated video tour of Amiens Cathedral (France) designed to make architectural history come alive by illustrating the chronology of the building's construction. The Center was established to encourage faculty to…

  1. Pulmonary Artery Sealing With an Ultrasonic Energy Device in Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery Lobectomy: An Animal Survival Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, Eric; Khereba, Mohamed; Tahiri, Mehdi; Hegde, Pravachan; Thiffault, Vicky; Hadjeres, Rachid; Berdugo, Jérémie; Ferraro, Pasquale; Liberman, Moishe

    2016-10-01

    Pulmonary artery (PA) sealing in video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) lobectomy is typically accomplished using vascular endostaplers. Endostaplers may be associated with iatrogenic PA branch injury, especially in short, small PA branches. We evaluated PA branch sealing with the HARMONIC ACE +7 (ACE) shears (Ethicon, Cincinnati, OH) in VATS lobectomy in a canine survival model. Ten adult dogs underwent VATS lobectomy. Standard VATS lobectomy operative technique was used for the entire operation, except for PA branch sealing. The ACE was used for all PA branch sealing. Dogs were kept alive for 30 days. The 10 dogs underwent VATS right upper (n = 5) and right lower (n = 5) lobectomy. The ACE was used to seal 21 PA branches. No PA branch was divided with an endostapler. There were no intraoperative complications or conversions to thoracotomy. Mean in vivo PA diameter was 5.6 mm (range, 2 to 12 mm). One 10-mm PA branch had a partial seal failure immediately at the time of sealing. The device was reapplied on the stump, and the PA branch was successfully sealed. All dogs survived 30 days without hemothorax. Necropsy at 30 days did not reveal any signs of postoperative bleeding. Pathology of the sealed PA branches at 30 days revealed fibrosis, giant cell reaction, neovascularization, and thermal changes of the vessel wall. The use of the ACE for PA branch sealing in VATS lobectomy is safe and effective in an animal survival model. Human studies are needed to determine the clinical safety of ultrasonic PA branch sealing before widespread clinical use. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... video) Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (text version) Arabic Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance Chinese Translation of Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance French Translation of ...

  3. Hepatobiliary diseases in small animals: a comparison of ultrasonography and multidetector-row computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Borsetto, Antonella

    2011-01-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is an essential imaging tool for identifying abnormalities of the liver parenchyma, biliary tract and vascular system. US has replaced radiography as the initial imaging procedure in screening for liver disease in small animals. There are few reports of the use of conventional and helical computed tomography (CT) to assess canine or feline parenchymal and neoplastic liver disease and biliary disorders. In human medicine the development of multidetector- row helical comput...

  4. Prevalence of Addiction to the Internet, Computer Games, DVD, and Video and Its Relationship to Anxiety and Depression in a Sample of Iranian High School Students

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Amiri, Amin; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Khademalhosseini, Mitra; Khademalhosseini, Zeinab; Gholami, Zeinab; Sharifian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of addiction to the Internet, computer games, DVD, and video and its relationship to anxiety and depression in a sample of Iranian high school students...

  5. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  6. Cognitive Support for Learning Computer-Based Tasks Using Animated Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Ying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the influence of cognitive support for learning computer-based tasks using animated demonstration (AD) on instructional efficiency. Cognitive support included (1) segmentation and learner control introducing interactive devices that allow content sequencing through a navigational menu, and content pacing through stop and…

  7. The Effect of Using Computer Animations and Activities about Teaching Patterns in Primary Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, Mine; Bulut, Mehmet; Yuksel, Tugba

    2011-01-01

    In this study it is investigated that teaching of different pattern types by using computer animations and activities. The sample of this study was 28 eighth grade students in second semester of 2010-2011 educational years. They are at public school in Ankara. The one group pre-test post-test design was used for research methodology. Data were…

  8. Children's Interpretations of Computer-Animated Dinosaurs in Live Theatre: "Dinosaurus".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Jeanne M.

    To explore media theories of perceived reality regarding factuality, social, and physical realism, and "videocy" (or theatrical spectacle), 32 children in first, third, and fifth grades were individually interviewed after attending a production of "Dinosaurus" which included computer-animated dinosaurs. Contrary to beliefs that…

  9. Computer-Presented Video Prompting for Teaching Microwave Oven Use to Three Adults with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigafoos, Jeff; O'Reilly, Mark; Cannella, Helen; Upadhyaya, Megha; Edrisinha, Chaturi; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Hundley, Anna; Andrews, Alonzo; Garver, Carolyn; Young, David

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the use of a video prompting procedure for teaching three adults with developmental disabilities to make popcorn using a microwave oven. Training, using a 10-step task analysis, was conducted in the kitchen of the participant's vocational training program. During baseline, participants were instructed to make popcorn, but were given…

  10. Self-Motion Perception: Assessment by Real-Time Computer Generated Animations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Our overall goal is to develop materials and procedures for assessing vestibular contributions to spatial cognition. The specific objective of the research described in this paper is to evaluate computer-generated animations as potential tools for studying self-orientation and self-motion perception. Specific questions addressed in this study included the following. First, does a non- verbal perceptual reporting procedure using real-time animations improve assessment of spatial orientation? Are reports reliable? Second, do reports confirm expectations based on stimuli to vestibular apparatus? Third, can reliable reports be obtained when self-motion description vocabulary training is omitted?

  11. Application of computer virtual simulation technology in 3D animation production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Can

    2017-11-01

    In the continuous development of computer technology, the application system of virtual simulation technology has been further optimized and improved. It also has been widely used in various fields of social development, such as city construction, interior design, industrial simulation and tourism teaching etc. This paper mainly introduces the virtual simulation technology used in 3D animation. Based on analyzing the characteristics of virtual simulation technology, the application ways and means of this technology in 3D animation are researched. The purpose is to provide certain reference for the 3D effect promotion days after.

  12. Cross-Sectional Associations Between Violent Video and Computer Game Playing and Weapon Carrying in a National Cohort of Children

    OpenAIRE

    Ybarra, Michele L; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Korchmaros, Josephine D.; Reisner, Sari L.

    2014-01-01

    Data were collected from 9 to 18 year olds surveyed nationally in a three-wave longitudinal survey. The population-average (generalized estimating equation, GEE) odds of carrying a weapon to school in the last month were estimated as a function of past-year exposure to violent content in video, computer, and Internet games, as well as peer aggression and biological sex. The sample included youth who were at risk for both the exposure (i.e., game play) and the outcome (i.e., who attended publi...

  13. Video visual analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Höferlin, Markus Johannes

    2013-01-01

    The amount of video data recorded world-wide is tremendously growing and has already reached hardly manageable dimensions. It originates from a wide range of application areas, such as surveillance, sports analysis, scientific video analysis, surgery documentation, and entertainment, and its analysis represents one of the challenges in computer science. The vast amount of video data renders manual analysis by watching the video data impractical. However, automatic evaluation of video material...

  14. Computer animated relaxation therapy in children between 7 and 13 years with tension-type headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tornoe, Birte; Skov, Liselotte

    2012-01-01

    assisted by computer animated surface EMG provided from the trapezius muscles and with the physiotherapist as a participant observer. Outcome measures were (a) headache frequency and intensity, (b) pericranial tenderness, (c) tension patterns, and (d) evaluations assessed at baseline and at 3 months follow......This pilot study evaluated the effect of computer animated relaxation therapy in children between 7 and 13 years with tension-type headache and the children's experiences with the therapy. The therapy consisted of an uncontrolled nine-session course in modified progressive relaxation therapy...... up. Nine children, mean age 10.9 (SD 1.7) years, diagnosed with frequent episodic or chronic tension-type headache completed the course. The results showed a mean improvement of 45% for headache frequency at 3 months follow up versus baseline and a significant reduction in headache frequency for all...

  15. Computer- and robot-assisted stereotaxy for high-precision small animal brain exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramrath, Lukas; Vogt, Simon; Jensen, Winnie; Hofmann, Ulrich G; Schweikard, Achim

    2009-02-01

    This contribution introduces a computer- and robot-assisted framework for stereotactic neurosurgery on small animals. Two major elements of this framework are presented in detail: a robotic stereotactic assistant and the software framework for placement of probes into the brain. The latter integrates modules for registration, insertion control, and preoperative path planning. Two options for path planning are addressed: (a) atlas-based planning and (b) image-based planning based on computed tomography data. The framework is tested performing robot-assisted insertion of microelectrodes and acquisition of electrophysiological recordings in vivo. Concepts for data analysis pointing towards a mapping of position and neural structure to functional data are introduced. Results show that the presented framework allows precise small animal stereotaxy and therefore offers new options for brain research.

  16. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach Students with Intellectual Disabilities to Verbally Respond to Questions and Make Purchases in Fast Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Pridgen, Leslie S.; Cronin, Beth A.

    2005-01-01

    Computer-based video instruction (CBVI) was used to teach verbal responses to questions presented by cashiers and purchasing skills in fast food restaurants. A multiple probe design across participants was used to evaluate the effectiveness of CBVI. Instruction occurred through simulations of three fast food restaurants on the computer using video…

  17. Young Children’s Video/Computer Game Use: Relations with School Performance and Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Hastings, Erin C.; Karas, Tamara L.; Winsler, Adam; Way, Erin; Madigan, Amy; Tyler, Shannon

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the amount and content of children’s video game playing in relation with behavioral and academic outcomes. Relationships among playing context, child gender, and parental monitoring were explored. Data were obtained through parent report of child’s game play, behavior, and school performance. Results revealed that time spent playing games was related positively to aggression and negatively to school competence. Violent content was correlated positively and educational cont...

  18. The Use of Model Matching Video Analysis and Computational Simulation to Study the Ankle Sprain Injury Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Tik-Pui Fong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Lateral ankle sprains continue to be the most common injury sustained by athletes and create an annual healthcare burden of over $4 billion in the U.S. alone. Foot inversion is suspected in these cases, but the mechanism of injury remains unclear. While kinematics and kinetics data are crucial in understanding the injury mechanisms, ligament behaviour measures – such as ligament strains – are viewed as the potential causal factors of ankle sprains. This review article demonstrates a novel methodology that integrates model matching video analyses with computational simulations in order to investigate injury-producing events for a better understanding of such injury mechanisms. In particular, ankle joint kinematics from actual injury incidents were deduced by model matching video analyses and then input into a generic computational model based on rigid bone surfaces and deformable ligaments of the ankle so as to investigate the ligament strains that accompany these sprain injuries. These techniques may have the potential for guiding ankle sprain prevention strategies and targeted rehabilitation therapies.

  19. Use of three-dimensional computer graphic animation to illustrate cleft lip and palate surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutting, C; Oliker, A; Haring, J; Dayan, J; Smith, D

    2002-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) computer animation is not commonly used to illustrate surgical techniques. This article describes the surgery-specific processes that were required to produce animations to teach cleft lip and palate surgery. Three-dimensional models were created using CT scans of two Chinese children with unrepaired clefts (one unilateral and one bilateral). We programmed several custom software tools, including an incision tool, a forceps tool, and a fat tool. Three-dimensional animation was found to be particularly useful for illustrating surgical concepts. Positioning the virtual "camera" made it possible to view the anatomy from angles that are impossible to obtain with a real camera. Transparency allows the underlying anatomy to be seen during surgical repair while maintaining a view of the overlaying tissue relationships. Finally, the representation of motion allows modeling of anatomical mechanics that cannot be done with static illustrations. The animations presented in this article can be viewed on-line at http://www.smiletrain.org/programs/virtual_surgery2.htm. Sophisticated surgical procedures are clarified with the use of 3D animation software and customized software tools. The next step in the development of this technology is the creation of interactive simulators that recreate the experience of surgery in a safe, digital environment. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Effectiveness of a Video-Versus Text-Based Computer-Tailored Intervention for Obesity Prevention after One Year: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Long Cheung

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Computer-tailored programs may help to prevent overweight and obesity, which are worldwide public health problems. This study investigated (1 the 12-month effectiveness of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention on energy intake, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI, and (2 the role of educational level in intervention effects. A randomized controlled trial in The Netherlands was conducted, in which adults were allocated to a video-based condition, text-based condition, or control condition, with baseline, 6 months, and 12 months follow-up. Outcome variables were self-reported BMI, physical activity, and energy intake. Mixed-effects modelling was used to investigate intervention effects and potential interaction effects. Compared to the control group, the video intervention group was effective regarding energy intake after 6 months (least squares means (LSM difference = −205.40, p = 0.00 and 12 months (LSM difference = −128.14, p = 0.03. Only video intervention resulted in lower average daily energy intake after one year (d = 0.12. Educational role and BMI did not seem to interact with this effect. No intervention effects on BMI and physical activity were found. The video computer-tailored intervention was effective on energy intake after one year. This effect was not dependent on educational levels or BMI categories, suggesting that video tailoring can be effective for a broad range of risk groups and may be preferred over text tailoring.

  1. Gender, Lies and Video Games: the Truth about Females and Computing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klawe, Maria M. (Princeton University)

    2006-02-22

    This talk explores how girls and women differ from boys and men in their uses of and attitudes towards computers and computing. From playing computer games to pursuing computing careers, the participation of females tends to be very low compared to that of males. Why is this? Opinions range from girls wanting to avoid the math and/or the geek image of programming to girls having better things to do with their lives. We discuss research findings on this issue, as well as initiatives designed to increase the participation of females in computing.

  2. [Patella navigation in computer-assisted TKA : Intraoperative measurement of patellar kinematics. Video article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springorum, H-R; Baier, C; Craiovan, B; Maderbacher, G; Renkawitz, T; Grifka, J; Keshmiri, A

    2016-07-01

    Patellofemoral maltracking is a relevant problem after total knee arthroplasty (TKA). Patella navigation is a tool that allows real time monitoring of patella tracking. This video contribution demonstrates the technique of patellofemoral navigation and a possible consequence of intraoperative monitoring. A higher postoperative lateral tilt is addressed with a widening of the lateral retinaculum in a particular manner. In selected cases of patellofemoral problems, patella navigation is a helpful tool to evaluate patellofemoral tracking intraoperatively. Modifications of implant position and soft tissue measurements can then prevent postoperative patellofemoral maltracking.

  3. Virtually compliant: Immersive video gaming increases conformity to false computer judgments

    OpenAIRE

    Weger, Ulrich W.; Loughnan, Stephen; Sharma, Dinkar; Gonidis, Lazaros

    2015-01-01

    Real-life encounters with face-to-face contact are on the decline in a world in which many routine tasks are\\ud delegated to virtual characters—a development that bears both opportunities and risks. Interacting with such virtual-reality\\ud beings is particularly common during role-playing videogames, in which we incarnate into the virtual reality of\\ud an avatar. Video gaming is known to lead to the training and development of real-life skills and behaviors; hence, in the\\ud present study we ...

  4. Using a Computer Animation to Improve Students' Conceptual Understanding of a Can-Crushing Demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Michael J.; Phelps, Amy J.; Fienhold, Jason

    2000-11-01

    Students who received instruction including static chalkboard drawings and overhead transparencies to explain the behavior of gas particles in a can-crushing demonstration were given a demonstration-based quiz in which they were asked to predict what would happen when a similar can filled with water vapor was removed from the heat and sealed. They were also asked to explain their prediction in terms of the behavior of gas molecules. This paper reports some of the misconceptions that were identified from these students' explanations. As a result of these misconceptions, a computer animation depicting the chemical processes occurring in the can-crushing demonstration was created. Another set of students were instructed on the behavior of gas particles including the can-crushing demonstration and the computer animation and were given the same demonstration quiz. The responses from the two sets of students were then compared. The students who viewed the animation as part of their instruction on the particulate nature of gases were less likely to use explanations that relied solely on the application of mathematical relationships. These students were also more likely to report the importance of the condensation of water vapor and the pressure differential inside and outside the can in the can-crushing process.

  5. Real Time Eye Tracking and Hand Tracking Using Regular Video Cameras for Human Computer Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Expo (ICME 2010), July 2010, Singapore. (15% acceptance rate)  Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer...Computing, Dec. 2009. Las Vegas, NV  Shaun Canavan and Lijun Yin, Dynamic face appearance modeling and sight direction estimation based on local...Kaoning Hu, Shaun Canavan , and Lijun Yin, “Hand pointing estimation for human computer interaction based on two orthogonal views”, IEEE/IAPR

  6. Small-Animal Imaging Using Clinical Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Super-Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank P. DiFilippo

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the high cost of dedicated small-animal positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT, an acceptable alternative in many situations might be clinical PET/CT. However, spatial resolution and image quality are of concern. The utility of clinical PET/CT for small-animal research and image quality improvements from super-resolution (spatial subsampling were investigated. National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA NU 4 phantom and mouse data were acquired with a clinical PET/CT scanner, as both conventional static and stepped scans. Static scans were reconstructed with and without point spread function (PSF modeling. Stepped images were postprocessed with iterative deconvolution to produce super-resolution images. Image quality was markedly improved using the super-resolution technique, avoiding certain artifacts produced by PSF modeling. The 2 mm rod of the NU 4 phantom was visualized with high contrast, and the major structures of the mouse were well resolved. Although not a perfect substitute for a state-of-the-art small-animal PET/CT scanner, a clinical PET/CT scanner with super-resolution produces acceptable small-animal image quality for many preclinical research studies.

  7. Becoming a Child's Advocate for Toys--Instead of TV, Video Games, or Computers!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendleton, Marie

    2001-01-01

    Discusses problems with computer use by young children, including activation of neural pathways that hinder learning and a drop in emotional competence. Argues that instead of television and computer time, children need open-ended play time, concrete materials such as board games and building toys, and interaction with caring adults. (JPB)

  8. Tumor glucose metabolism imaged in vivo in small animals with whole-body photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatni, Muhammad Rameez; Xia, Jun; Sohn, Rebecca; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Zhang, Yu; Wang, Kun; Xia, Younan; Anastasio, Mark; Arbeit, Jeffrey; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-07-01

    With the increasing use of small animals for human disease studies, small-animal whole-body molecular imaging plays an important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose molecular information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image co-registration, the spatial resolution of the molecular imaging modality is not improved. Utilizing a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography system, we demonstrate, for the first time, that both anatomy and glucose uptake can be imaged in a single modality. Anatomy was imaged with the endogenous hemoglobin contrast, and glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose.

  9. Advances in Human-Computer Interaction: Graphics and Animation Components for Interface Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cipolla Ficarra, Francisco V.; Nicol, Emma; Cipolla-Ficarra, Miguel; Richardson, Lucy

    We present an analysis of communicability methodology in graphics and animation components for interface design, called CAN (Communicability, Acceptability and Novelty). This methodology has been under development between 2005 and 2010, obtaining excellent results in cultural heritage, education and microcomputing contexts. In studies where there is a bi-directional interrelation between ergonomics, usability, user-centered design, software quality and the human-computer interaction. We also present the heuristic results about iconography and layout design in blogs and websites of the following countries: Spain, Italy, Portugal and France.

  10. Young Children’s Video/Computer Game Use: Relations with School Performance and Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Erin C.; Karas, Tamara L.; Winsler, Adam; Way, Erin; Madigan, Amy; Tyler, Shannon

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the amount and content of children’s video game playing in relation with behavioral and academic outcomes. Relationships among playing context, child gender, and parental monitoring were explored. Data were obtained through parent report of child’s game play, behavior, and school performance. Results revealed that time spent playing games was related positively to aggression and negatively to school competence. Violent content was correlated positively and educational content negatively with attention problems. Educational games were related to good academic achievement. Results suggest violent games, and a large amount of game play, are related to troublesome behavioral and academic outcomes, but educational games may be related to positive outcomes. Neither gender nor parental monitoring emerged as significant moderators of these effects. PMID:19742374

  11. Young children's video/computer game use: relations with school performance and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Erin C; Karas, Tamara L; Winsler, Adam; Way, Erin; Madigan, Amy; Tyler, Shannon

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the amount and content of children's video game playing in relation with behavioral and academic outcomes. Relationships among playing context, child gender, and parental monitoring were explored. Data were obtained through parent report of child's game play, behavior, and school performance. Results revealed that time spent playing games was related positively to aggression and negatively to school competence. Violent content was correlated positively and educational content negatively with attention problems. Educational games were related to good academic achievement. Results suggest violent games, and a large amount of game play, are related to troublesome behavioral and academic outcomes, but educational games may be related to positive outcomes. Neither gender nor parental monitoring emerged as significant moderators of these effects.

  12. Application of A Computer Animation Technique to Assist the Teaching of Pre-Handwriting Skills to Children with Coordination Difficulties/Dyspraxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Muhammad Fakri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We have proposed a method to assist children with coordination difficulties or dyspraxia to improve their handwriting skills. We have chosen an animation technique called ‘Rotoscopy’, a method that normally been used in animation and film production and adapted it to Rotoscopy Prehandwriting Interface (RPI prototypes using the interactive whiteboard (IWB as interaction device. The motivation of this research is to discover how efficient if Rotoscopy is used beyond its normal purposes? Does it give benefits in terms of behavioural and motivational aspect rather than commercial and profit point of view? Implementation of RPI prototypes has taken place through series of workshops with a teacher and a group of children with handwriting difficulties at a special education school in Caerphilly, Cardiff, United Kingdom. In the workshops children were given pre-handwriting activities in two different environments. They have been trained to use RPI prototypes and IWB as well as using pen and paper. Their activities and action has been observed and recorded using video camera. Evaluation method is based-on video analysis of children’s pre-handwriting result and their reaction and motivation during the workshop. It was learnt that majority of children who used RPI prototypes and IWB have produced better results in terms of accuracy of the drawing as compared to results of pen and paper activities. Furthermore the children are more motivated to use the prototypes and IWB rather than using pen and paper. The study’s contribution includes offering a new way to improve children’s prehandwriting skills using computer animation technique and touch-based devices.

  13. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... search for current job openings visit HHS USAJobs Home > NEI YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia Animations Blindness Cataract ...

  14. Technology-Assisted Sheltered Instruction: Instructional Streaming Video in an EFL Multi-Purpose Computer Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yun-Hsuan; Chuang, Tsung-Yen

    2016-01-01

    Content-based instruction (CBI) has been widely adopted for decades. However, existing CBI models cannot always be effectively put into practice, especially for learners of lower English proficiency in English as a foreign language (EFL) context. This study examined an animation design course adopting CBI to promote reading abilities of English…

  15. Human Pose Estimation and Activity Recognition from Multi-View Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holte, Michael Boelstoft; Tran, Cuong; Trivedi, Mohan

    2012-01-01

    computer interaction (HCI), assisted living, gesture-based interactive games, intelligent driver assistance systems, movies, 3D TV and animation, physical therapy, autonomous mental development, smart environments, sport motion analysis, video surveillance, and video annotation. Next, we review and categorize recent...

  16. Validity and applicability of a video-based animated tool to assess mobility in elderly Latin American populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Ricardo Oliveira; Oliveira, Bruna Silva; Alvarado, Beatriz Eugenia; Curcio, Carmen Lucia; Rejeski, W Jack; Marsh, Anthony P; Ip, Edward H; Barnard, Ryan T; Guralnik, Jack M; Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria

    2014-10-01

    To assess the reliability and the validity of Portuguese- and Spanish-translated versions of the video-based short-form Mobility Assessment Tool in assessing self-reported mobility, and to provide evidence for the applicability of these videos in elderly Latin American populations as a complement to physical performance measures. The sample consisted of 300 elderly participants (150 from Brazil, 150 from Colombia) recruited at neighborhood social centers. Mobility was assessed with the Mobility Assessment Tool, and compared with the Short Physical Performance Battery score and self-reported functional limitations. Reliability was calculated using intraclass correlation coefficients. Multiple linear regression analyses were used to assess associations among mobility assessment tools and health, and sociodemographic variables. A significant gradient of increasing Mobility Assessment Tool score with better physical function was observed for both self-reported and objective measures, and in each city. Associations between self-reported mobility and health were strong, and significant. Mobility Assessment Tool scores were lower in women at both sites. Intraclass correlation coefficients of the Mobility Assessment Tool were 0.94 (95% confidence interval 0.90-0.97) in Brazil and 0.81 (95% confidence interval 0.66-0.91) in Colombia. Mobility Assessment Tool scores were lower in Manizales than in Natal after adjustment by Short Physical Performance Battery, self-rated health and sex. These results provide evidence for high reliability and good validity of the Mobility Assessment Tool in its Spanish and Portuguese versions used in Latin American populations. In addition, the Mobility Assessment Tool can detect mobility differences related to environmental features that cannot be captured by objective performance measures. © 2013 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  17. Desktop video conferencing

    OpenAIRE

    Potter, Ray; Roberts, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    This guide aims to provide an introduction to Desktop Video Conferencing. You may be familiar with video conferencing, where participants typically book a designated conference room and communicate with another group in a similar room on another site via a large screen display. Desktop video conferencing (DVC), as the name suggests, allows users to video conference from the comfort of their own office, workplace or home via a desktop/laptop Personal Computer. DVC provides live audio and visua...

  18. Computer-Based Graphical Displays for Enhancing Mental Animation and Improving Reasoning in Novice Learning of Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Danielle E.; Wu, Erin Chia-ling

    2006-01-01

    Our research suggests static and animated graphics can lead to more animated thinking and more correct problem solving in computer-based probability learning. Pilot software modules were developed for graduate online statistics courses and representation research. A study with novice graduate student statisticians compared problem solving in five…

  19. Teaching Animal Physiology: A 12-Year Experience Transitioning from a Classical to Interactive Approach with Continual Assessment and Computer Alternatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarevic, Sonja N.; Andric, Silvana A.; Kostic, Tatjana S.

    2017-01-01

    In response to the Bologna Declaration and contemporary trends in Animal Physiology education, the Animal Physiology course at the Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Serbia, has evolved over a 12-year period (2001-2012): from a classical two-semester course toward a one-semester course utilizing computer simulations of animal…

  20. A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED

    OpenAIRE

    Razieh Nilforooshan; Nicoletta Adamo-Villani; Hazar Dib

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents ongoing research aimed at investigating the efficacy of computer animations in improving college students’ learning of building sustainability concepts and practices. The use of animations in educational contexts is not new, however scientific evidence that supports their effectiveness as educational materials is still limited. This paper reports an experiment that explored the impact of an educational digital animation, called “LEED-ERS”, on college students’ learning of ...

  1. Learners' Use of Communication Strategies in Text-Based and Video-Based Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication Environments: Opportunities for Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Yu-Wan; Higgins, Steve

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the different learning opportunities enabled by text-based and video-based synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) from an interactionist perspective. Six Chinese-speaking learners of English and six English-speaking learners of Chinese were paired up as tandem (reciprocal) learning dyads. Each dyad participated…

  2. Computer-Based Video Instruction to Teach the Use of Augmentative and Alternative Communication Devices for Ordering at Fast-Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Cronin, Beth

    2006-01-01

    In the study reported on here, the authors used computer-based video instruction (CBVI) to teach 3 high school students with moderate or severe intellectual disabilities how to order in fast-food restaurants by using an augmentative, alternative communication device. The study employed a multiple probe design to institute CBVI as the only…

  3. Video Analysis of Projectile Motion Using Tablet Computers as Experimental Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, P.; Gröber, S.; Kuhn, J.; Müller, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tablet computers were used as experimental tools to record and analyse the motion of a ball thrown vertically from a moving skateboard. Special applications plotted the measurement data component by component, allowing a simple determination of initial conditions and "g" in order to explore the underlying laws of motion. This experiment…

  4. More Ideas for Monitoring Biological Experiments with the BBC Computer: Absorption Spectra, Yeast Growth, Enzyme Reactions and Animal Behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Openshaw, Peter

    1988-01-01

    Presented are five ideas for A-level biology experiments using a laboratory computer interface. Topics investigated include photosynthesis, yeast growth, animal movements, pulse rates, and oxygen consumption and production by organisms. Includes instructions specific to the BBC computer system. (CW)

  5. Analysis on laser plasma emission for characterization of colloids by video-based computer program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Kirana Yuniati; Lumbantoruan, Hendra Damos; Isnaeni

    2016-02-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a sensitive technique for characterization of colloids with small size and low concentration. There are two types of detection, optical and acoustic. Optical LIBD employs CCD camera to capture the plasma emission and uses the information to quantify the colloids. This technique requires sophisticated technology which is often pricey. In order to build a simple, home-made LIBD system, a dedicated computer program based on MATLAB™ for analyzing laser plasma emission was developed. The analysis was conducted by counting the number of plasma emissions (breakdowns) during a certain period of time. Breakdown probability provided information on colloid size and concentration. Validation experiment showed that the computer program performed well on analyzing the plasma emissions. Optical LIBD has A graphical user interface (GUI) was also developed to make the program more user-friendly.

  6. Health Videos: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/anatomyvideos.html.htm Health Videos To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. These animated videos show the anatomy of body parts and organ ...

  7. CT brush and CancerZap!: two video games for computed tomography dose minimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvare, Graham; Gordon, Richard

    2015-05-12

    X-ray dose from computed tomography (CT) scanners has become a significant public health concern. All CT scanners spray x-ray photons across a patient, including those using compressive sensing algorithms. New technologies make it possible to aim x-ray beams where they are most needed to form a diagnostic or screening image. We have designed a computer game, CT Brush, that takes advantage of this new flexibility. It uses a standard MART algorithm (Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique), but with a user defined dynamically selected subset of the rays. The image appears as the player moves the CT brush over an initially blank scene, with dose accumulating with every "mouse down" move. The goal is to find the "tumor" with as few moves (least dose) as possible. We have successfully implemented CT Brush in Java and made it available publicly, requesting crowdsourced feedback on improving the open source code. With this experience, we also outline a "shoot 'em up game" CancerZap! for photon limited CT. We anticipate that human computing games like these, analyzed by methods similar to those used to understand eye tracking, will lead to new object dependent CT algorithms that will require significantly less dose than object independent nonlinear and compressive sensing algorithms that depend on sprayed photons. Preliminary results suggest substantial dose reduction is achievable.

  8. MISCONCEPTION REMEDIATION OF ATOMIC ORBITAL, MOLECULAR ORBITAL, AND HIBRIDIZIATION CONCEPTS BY COMPUTER ASISSTED INSTRUCTION WITH ANIMATION AND SIMULATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Mursiti

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The research of Computer Asissted Instruction with animation and simulation was used to misconception remediation of atomic orbital, molecular orbital, and hibridiziation concepts. The applicated instruction model was focused on concept approach with macromedia flash player and power point programme. The subject of this research were the 2nd semestre students of Chemistry Department. The data were collected by using of true-false pre-test and post- test followed by the reason of its. The analysis reveals that the Computer Asissted Instruction with animation and simulation model increased the understanding of atomic orbital, molecular orbital, and hibridiziation concepts or remediation of concepts missconception, shown by the significant score gained between before and after the implementation of Computer Asissted Instruction with animation and simulation model. The instruction model developed the students's generic skills too.   Keywords: animation simulation,misconception remediation, orbital, hibridization

  9. Take-home video for adult literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yule, Valerie

    1996-01-01

    In the past, it has not been possible to "teach oneself to read" at home, because learners could not read the books to teach them. Videos and interactive compact discs have changed that situation and challenge current assumptions of the pedagogy of literacy. This article describes an experimental adult literacy project using video technology. The language used is English, but the basic concepts apply to any alphabetic or syllabic writing system. A half-hour cartoon video can help adults and adolescents with learning difficulties. Computer-animated cartoon graphics are attractive to look at, and simplify complex material in a clear, lively way. This video technique is also proving useful for distance learners, children, and learners of English as a second language. Methods and principles are to be extended using interactive compact discs.

  10. Felino : the philosophical practice of making an interspecies video game

    OpenAIRE

    Westerlaken, Michelle; Gualeni, Stefano; Philosophy of Computer Games Conference

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes the design process of an interspecies video game that has its foundations in the field of Animal-Computer Interaction (ACI), but is inspired by philosophical notions and approaches including Jos De Mul’s work on biohermeneutics (De Mul 2013), Pierce’s theory of semiotics (Pierce 1931-35), and the work of Helmuth Plessner in the field of philosophical anthropology (Plessner 2006). Our approach serves to better design playful artefacts (video games among them) that take the...

  11. Computer Animations as Astronomy Educational Tool: Immanuel Kant and the Island Universes Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijic, M.; Park, D.; Zumaeta, J.; Simonian, V.; Levitin, S.; Sullivan, A.; Kang, E. Y. E.; Longson, T.

    2008-11-01

    Development of astronomy is based on well defined, watershed moments when an individual or a group of individuals make a discovery or a measurement that expand, and sometimes dramatically improve our knowledge of the Universe. The purpose of the Scientific Visualization project at Cal State Los Angeles is to bring these moments to life with the use of computer animations, the medium of the 21st century that appeals to the generations which grew up in Internet age. Our first story describes Immanuel Kant's remarkable the Island Universes hypothesis. Using elementary principles of then new Newtonian mechanics, Kant made bold and ultimately correct interpretation of the Milky Way and the objects that we now call galaxies.

  12. Association of obesity with physical activity, television viewing, video /computer gaming among school children in Mangalore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is an increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide in children which can be attributed to changes in lifestyle such as sedentary habits, television (TV viewing, playing computer games, and consumption of snacks while watching television. The present study was done to find the association between obesity and TV viewing, computer game playing, sedentary lifestyle in children and also with a secondary objective to assess the association between blood pressure and TV/computer game viewing, sedentary lifestyle in children.Materials and methods: A cross sectional study was conducted at 4 high schools and Pre University Colleges (PUC’S in and around Mangalore during the study period of 4 days from 6 -12 august 2014. 509 students were enrolled. Information was gathered by asking the subjects to fill up a structured questionnaire. Nutritional status was assessed based on Body mass index (BMI and waist-hip ratio, waist-height ratio for all subjects. Blood pressure was measured for all the subjects.Results: It was found that among males 2.7% of students were obese and in females it was 2.3%. There was a significant association between blood pressure and consumption of snacks while watching TV and also between blood pressure and their habit of consumption / buying of snacks/ fast-food advertised in TV. A significant association was found between central obesity (Waist-hip ratio and Waist-height ratio and the number of hours of physical activity per week in schools.Conclusion: There is a need to develop preventive intervention like reducing snack consumption while watching TV and increasing the time dedicated to physical activity.

  13. Flip Video for Dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hutsko, Joe

    2010-01-01

    The full-color guide to shooting great video with the Flip Video camera. The inexpensive Flip Video camera is currently one of the hottest must-have gadgets. It's portable and connects easily to any computer to transfer video you shoot onto your PC or Mac. Although the Flip Video camera comes with a quick-start guide, it lacks a how-to manual, and this full-color book fills that void! Packed with full-color screen shots throughout, Flip Video For Dummies shows you how to shoot the best possible footage in a variety of situations. You'll learn how to transfer video to your computer and then edi

  14. Opto-numerical methods of data acquisition for computer graphics and animation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitnik, Robert; Kujawinska, Malgorzata

    2000-03-01

    The creation of virtual objects for CAD/CAM and animation systems on the base of data gathered by full-field optical measurement of 3D objects is presented. The absolute coordinates are obtained by combined fringe projection/photogrammetry based system with big measurement volume. The procedures for automatic calibration of the measurement volumes, base don sequential localization of a reference plane with markers are explained. To get information about true 3D object, clouds of points from numerous directions are gathered. The calibration procedure for determination of the parameters necessary for merging clouds of points is presented. The new and fully automatic procedure which process the cloud of measured points into triangular mesh accepted by CAD/CAM and multimedia systems is described. The adaptive process of reducing the number of triangles on the base of second derivative of local curvature of objects' surface is explained. The usefulness of the complete process of measurement and virtual object creation is proved by closing the reverse engineering sequence through producing the copy of an exemplary object. Also the virtual objects created are implemented into computer graphics and animation systems.

  15. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. © 2015 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  16. 3D animation of facial plastic surgery based on computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zonghua; Zhao, Yan

    2013-12-01

    More and more people, especial women, are getting desired to be more beautiful than ever. To some extent, it becomes true because the plastic surgery of face was capable in the early 20th and even earlier as doctors just dealing with war injures of face. However, the effect of post-operation is not always satisfying since no animation could be seen by the patients beforehand. In this paper, by combining plastic surgery of face and computer graphics, a novel method of simulated appearance of post-operation will be given to demonstrate the modified face from different viewpoints. The 3D human face data are obtained by using 3D fringe pattern imaging systems and CT imaging systems and then converted into STL (STereo Lithography) file format. STL file is made up of small 3D triangular primitives. The triangular mesh can be reconstructed by using hash function. Top triangular meshes in depth out of numbers of triangles must be picked up by ray-casting technique. Mesh deformation is based on the front triangular mesh in the process of simulation, which deforms interest area instead of control points. Experiments on face model show that the proposed 3D animation facial plastic surgery can effectively demonstrate the simulated appearance of post-operation.

  17. A new incision for unilateral cleft lip repair developed using animated simulation of repair on computer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahay A

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unilateral cleft lip repair continues to leave behind some amount of dissatisfaction, as a scope for further improvement is always felt. Most surgeons do not like to deviate from the standard Millard′s/ triangular techniques, or their minor modifications, as no one likes to experiment on the face for fear of unfavourable outcomes. The computer can be utilized as a useful tool in the analysis and planning of surgery and new methods can be developed and attempted subsequently with greater confidence. Aim: We decided to see if an improved lip repair could be developed with the use of computers. Materials and Methods: Analysis of previous lip repairs was done to determine where an improvement was required. Movement of tissues, by simulating an ideal repair, using image warping software, on digital images of cleft lip was studied in animation sequences. A repair which could reproduce these movements was planned. A new incision emerged, which had combined the principles of Millard′s and Randall / Tennyson repairs, with additional features. The new method was performed on 30 cases. Conclusions: The results were encouraging as the shortcomings of these methods were minimized, and the advantages maximized.

  18. A study of the effects of computer animation on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design - LEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razieh Nilforooshan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents ongoing research aimed at investigating the efficacy of computer animations in improving college students’ learning of building sustainability concepts and practices. The use of animations in educational contexts is not new, however scientific evidence that supports their effectiveness as educational materials is still limited. This paper reports an experiment that explored the impact of an educational digital animation, called “LEED-ERS”, on college students’ learning of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED rating system. Specifically, the animation focused on the LEED category of Sustainable Site. Results of a study with 68 students show that viewing the animation led to an increase in subjects’ declarative knowledge by 15%. Compared to traditional learning methods (e.g. reading assignments with static images, viewing the animation led to significantly higher declarative knowledge gains.

  19. Evaluation of a virtual pet visit system with live video streaming of patient images over the Internet in a companion animal intensive care unit in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robben, Joris H; Melsen, Diede N; Almalik, Osama; Roomer, Wendy; Endenburg, Nienke

    2016-05-01

    To evaluate the impact of a virtual pet visit system ("TelePet" System, TPS) on owners and staff of a companion animal ICU. Longitudinal interventional study (2010-2013). Companion animal ICU at a university veterinary medical teaching hospital. Pet owners, ICU technicians. The introduction of the TPS, with live video streaming of patient images over the Internet, in a companion animal ICU. Pet owners experienced TPS as a valuable extra service. Most TPS users (72.4%) experienced less anxiety and felt less need (40.4% of TPS users) to visit their hospitalized pet in person. Most users (83.5%) shared TPS access with their family. The introduction of the TPS did not improve overall owner satisfaction, except for the score on "quality of medical treatment." Seven of 26 indicators of owner satisfaction were awarded higher scores by TPS users than by TPS nonusers in the survey after the introduction of the system. However, the lack of randomization of owners might have influenced findings. The enthusiasm of the ICU technicians for the system was tempered by the negative feedback from a small number of owners. Nevertheless they recognized the value of the system for owners. The system was user friendly and ICU staff and TPS users experienced few technical problems. As veterinary healthcare is moving toward a more client-centered approach, a virtual pet visit system, such as TPS, is a relatively simple application that may improve the well-being of most owners during the hospitalization of their pet. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  20. Intelligent video surveillance systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dufour, Jean-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Belonging to the wider academic field of computer vision, video analytics has aroused a phenomenal surge of interest since the current millennium. Video analytics is intended to solve the problem of the incapability of exploiting video streams in real time for the purpose of detection or anticipation. It involves analyzing the videos using algorithms that detect and track objects of interest over time and that indicate the presence of events or suspect behavior involving these objects.The aims of this book are to highlight the operational attempts of video analytics, to identify possi

  1. Color spaces in digital video

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    Whether it`s photography, computer graphics, publishing, or video; each medium has a defined color space, or gamut, which defines the extent that a given set of RGB colors can be mixed. When converting from one medium to another, an image must go through some form of conversion which maps colors into the destination color space. The conversion process isn`t always straight forward, easy, or reversible. In video, two common analog composite color spaces are Y`tjv (used in PAL) and Y`IQ (used in NTSC). These two color spaces have been around since the beginning of color television, and are primarily used in video transmission. Another analog scheme used in broadcast studios is Y`, R`-Y`, B`-Y` (used in Betacam and Mll) which is a component format. Y`, R`-Y`,B`-Y` maintains the color information of RGB but in less space. From this, the digital component video specification, ITU-Rec. 601-4 (formerly CCIR Rec. 601) was based. The color space for Rec. 601 is symbolized as Y`CbCr. Digital video formats such as DV, Dl, Digital-S, etc., use Rec. 601 to define their color gamut. Digital composite video (for D2 tape) is digitized analog Y`UV and is seeing decreased use. Because so much information is contained in video, segments of any significant length usually require some form of data compression. All of the above mentioned analog video formats are a means of reducing the bandwidth of RGB video. Video bulk storage devices, such as digital disk recorders, usually store frames in Y`CbCr format, even if no other compression method is used. Computer graphics and computer animations originate in RGB format because RGB must be used to calculate lighting and shadows. But storage of long animations in RGB format is usually cost prohibitive and a 30 frame-per-second data rate of uncompressed RGB is beyond most computers. By taking advantage of certain aspects of the human visual system, true color 24-bit RGB video images can be compressed with minimal loss of visual information

  2. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for Veterinary Medicine is cited as the corporate author. Animation Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance (video) Animation of ... Basics FOIA No FEAR Act Site Map Nondiscrimination Website Policies U.S. Food and Drug Administration 10903 New ...

  3. Increased micronucleated cell frequency related to exposure to radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carbonari Karina

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well recognized that electromagnetic fields can affect the biological functions of living organisms at both cellular and molecular level. The potential damaging effects of electromagnetic fields and very low frequency and extremely low frequency radiation emitted by computer cathode ray tube video display monitors (VDMs has become a concern within the scientific community. We studied the effects of occupational exposure to VDMs in 10 males and 10 females occupationally exposed to VDMs and 20 unexposed control subjects matched for age and sex. Genetic damage was assessed by examining the frequency of micronuclei in exfoliated buccal cells and the frequency of other nuclear abnormalities such as binucleated and broken egg cells. Although there were no differences regarding binucleated cells between exposed and control individuals our analysis revealed a significantly higher frequency of micronuclei (p < 0.001 and broken egg cells (p < 0.05 in individuals exposed to VDMs as compared to unexposed. We also found that the differences between individuals exposed to VDMs were significantly related to the sex of the individuals and that there was an increase in skin, central nervous system and ocular disease in the exposed individuals. These preliminary results indicate that microcomputer workers exposed to VDMs are at risk of significant cytogenetic damage and should periodically undergo biological monitoring.

  4. Quantifying fish swimming behavior in response to acute exposure of aqueous copper using computer assisted video and digital image analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calfee, Robin D.; Puglis, Holly J.; Little, Edward E.; Brumbaugh, William G.; Mebane, Christopher A.

    2016-01-01

    Behavioral responses of aquatic organisms to environmental contaminants can be precursors of other effects such as survival, growth, or reproduction. However, these responses may be subtle, and measurement can be challenging. Using juvenile white sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) with copper exposures, this paper illustrates techniques used for quantifying behavioral responses using computer assisted video and digital image analysis. In previous studies severe impairments in swimming behavior were observed among early life stage white sturgeon during acute and chronic exposures to copper. Sturgeon behavior was rapidly impaired and to the extent that survival in the field would be jeopardized, as fish would be swept downstream, or readily captured by predators. The objectives of this investigation were to illustrate protocols to quantify swimming activity during a series of acute copper exposures to determine time to effect during early lifestage development, and to understand the significance of these responses relative to survival of these vulnerable early lifestage fish. With mortality being on a time continuum, determining when copper first affects swimming ability helps us to understand the implications for population level effects. The techniques used are readily adaptable to experimental designs with other organisms and stressors.

  5. Exploring the use of computer-mediated video communication in engineering projects in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer, Izak P.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Globally-expanding organisations that are trying to capitalise on distributed skills are increasingly using virtual project teams to shorten product development time and increase quality. These virtual teams, which are distributed across countries, cultures, and time zones, are required to use faster and better ways of interacting. Past research has shown that virtual teams that use computer-mediated communication (CMC instead of face-to-face communication are less cohesive because they struggle with mistrust, controlling behaviour , and communication breakdowns. This study aims to determine whether project practitioners in South Africa perceive virtual teams that use videoconferencing as suffering from the same CMC disadvantages described in past research in other environments; and if they do, what the possible causes could be. This paper reports on a survey of 106 project practitioners in South Africa. The results show that these project practitioners prefer face- to-face communication over CMC, and perceive virtual teams using videoconferencing to be less cohesive and to suffer from mistrust and communication breakdowns, but not from increased conflict and power struggles. The perceived shortcomings of videoconferencing might result from virtual teams that use this medium having less time to build interpersonal relationships.

  6. Education System Using Interactive 3D Computer Graphics (3D-CG) Animation and Scenario Language for Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Hiroshi; Shindo, Yoshiaki

    2006-01-01

    The 3D computer graphics (3D-CG) animation using a virtual actor's speaking is very effective as an educational medium. But it takes a long time to produce a 3D-CG animation. To reduce the cost of producing 3D-CG educational contents and improve the capability of the education system, we have developed a new education system using Virtual Actor.…

  7. Low-dose computed tomography to detect body-packing in an animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurer, M.H., E-mail: martin.maurer@charite.de [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Niehues, S.M.; Schnapauff, D.; Grieser, C.; Rothe, J.H. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Waldmueller, D. [Bildungs- und Wissenschaftszentrum der Bundesfinanzverwaltung, Berlin (Germany); Chopra, S.S. [Klinik fuer Allgemein-, Viszeral- und Transplantationschirurgie, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany); Hamm, B.; Denecke, T. [Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde, Charite - Universitaetsmedizin, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-05-15

    Objective: To assess the possible extent of dose reduction for low-dose computed tomography (CT) in the detection of body-packing (ingested drug packets) as an alternative to plain radiographs in an animal model. Materials and methods: Twelve packets containing cocaine (purity >80%) were introduced into the intestine of an experimental animal (crossbred pig), which was then repeatedly examined by abdominal CT with stepwise dose reduction (tube voltage, 80 kV; tube current, 10-350 mA). Three blinded readers independently evaluated the CT datasets starting with the lowest tube current and noted the numbers of packets detected at the different tube currents used. In addition, 1 experienced reader determined the number of packets detectable on plain abdominal radiographs and ultrasound. Results: The threshold for correct identification of all 12 drug packets was 100 mA for reader 1 and 125 mA for readers 2 and 3. Above these thresholds all 3 readers consistently identified all 12 packets. The effective dose of a low-dose CT scan with 125 mA (including scout view) was 1.0 mSv, which was below that of 2 conventional abdominal radiographs (1.2 mSv). The reader interpreting the conventional radiographs identified a total of 9 drug packets and detected 8 packets by abdominal ultrasound. Conclusions: Extensive dose reduction makes low-dose CT a valuable alternative imaging modality for the examination of suspected body-packers and might replace conventional abdominal radiographs as the first-line imaging modality.

  8. Interactive video algorithms and technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Hammoud, Riad

    2006-01-01

    This book covers both algorithms and technologies of interactive videos, so that businesses in IT and data managements, scientists and software engineers in video processing and computer vision, coaches and instructors that use video technology in teaching, and finally end-users will greatly benefit from it. This book contains excellent scientific contributions made by a number of pioneering scientists and experts from around the globe. It consists of five parts. The first part introduces the reader to interactive video and video summarization and presents effective methodologies for automatic abstraction of a single video sequence, a set of video sequences, and a combined audio-video sequence. In the second part, a list of advanced algorithms and methodologies for automatic and semi-automatic analysis and editing of audio-video documents are presented. The third part tackles a more challenging level of automatic video re-structuring, filtering of video stream by extracting of highlights, events, and meaningf...

  9. Small pulmonary nodule localization with cone beam computed tomography during video-assisted thoracic surgery: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouzé, Simon; de Latour, Bertrand; Flécher, Erwan; Guihaire, Julien; Castro, Miguel; Corre, Romain; Haigron, Pascal; Verhoye, Jean-Philippe

    2016-06-01

    To describe a non-invasive guidance procedure, using intraoperative cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) and augmented fluoroscopy to guide lung resection during video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS). Patients with solitary or multiple lung nodules between 5 and 20 mm in size were included. Under general anaesthesia, a moderate pneumothorax allowing the CBCT acquisition was first performed. Then a segmentation of the lesion was performed on a 3D reconstruction. A projection of this 3D reconstruction was then integrated into the digital workspace and automatically registered into the fluoroscopic images, creating an augmented fluoroscopy. The procedure was continued under classic video-thoracoscopic vision taking account of the augmented fluoroscopy to locate the targeted nodule. Eight patients were included (mean age 61 ± 11.7 years): 7 patients had an isolated lesion and 1 patient had two lesions (mean size 13.2 ± 5.1 mm). Their mean depth to the pleura was 21.4 ± 10.7 mm. Four patients underwent a wedge resection associated with lymph node resection. Two patients had an initial wedge resection followed by a complementary lobectomy associated with lymph node resection (primary lung tumour). One patient had a wedge resection in the upper lobe and a lobectomy of the inferior lobe associated with lymph node resection. One patient underwent a conversion and a bilobectomy due to vascular injury. The mean global operating time was 100.6 ± 36.7 min. All the nodules have been identified on the CBCT acquisitions. The segmentation of the lesion has been performed in all cases. We have been able to detect all the nodules and to successfully perform the resection in all cases owing to the augmented fluoroscopy. The mean fluoroscopic time was 134.2 ± 55.0 s. The mean imaging time, between the incision and the final nodule localization, was 11.8 ± 3.8 min. This paper is the first describing a clinical application of CBCT performed during thoracic surgery. Associated with

  10. Digital Audio/Video for Computer- and Web-Based Instruction for Training Rural Special Education Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludlow, Barbara L.; Foshay, John B.; Duff, Michael C.

    Video presentations of teaching episodes in home, school, and community settings and audio recordings of parents' and professionals' views can be important adjuncts to personnel preparation in special education. This paper describes instructional applications of digital media and outlines steps in producing audio and video segments. Digital audio…

  11. Comparison of perceptions of computer-animated left- and right-facing profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, N K; Evans, C A; Giddon, D B

    1999-06-01

    Although scientific publications differ in displaying left- or right-facing profiles, there are few systematic studies of the possible effects of directional biases and laterality on patients' and clinicians' perceptions of treatment need, outcomes, and satisfaction. As part of a research program to quantitate the physical bases of the perceived zone of acceptability and most-pleasing facial profiles, responses to computer-animated left- and right-facing soft-tissue profile images were compared and related to eye and hand preference. Standardized left-facing, soft-tissue profile images were captured in color and digitized. The right-facing profile was created by reversing the left profile image to display a mirror image. Using imaging and customized morphing software, retrusive and protrusive extremes were created, from which transitional frames were developed to display five features of the soft-tissue profile: upper lip, chin, bimaxillary position, lower face height, and mandible. One left- and one right-facing profile for a Class II division 1 female, and Class III male were randomly presented to 24 subjects who were asked to indicate: 1) acceptability by pressing a mouse button and releasing the button when the images were no longer acceptable; and 2) most-pleasing image by pressing the mouse button once. No differences were found between left- and right-profile images for zone of acceptability, midpoint of the zone of acceptability, or most pleasing; nor was there any relation to laterality measures. However, consistently higher intercorrelations among the features for the zone of acceptability were found for the left- than for the right-facing profiles for retrusive to protrusive and protrusive to retrusive excursions measured in millimeters (p < .001). The bimaxillary position accounted for most of the variance in judgments of acceptability with greater influence on the left than on the right profile. With the increasing use of computer-imaging in dental

  12. Computer Animation Complete All-in-One; Learn Motion Capture, Characteristic, Point-Based, and Maya Winning Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Parent, Rick

    2009-01-01

    A compilation of key chapters from the top MK computer animation books available today - in the areas of motion capture, facial features, solid spaces, fluids, gases, biology, point-based graphics, and Maya. The chapters provide CG Animators with an excellent sampling of essential techniques that every 3D artist needs to create stunning and versatile images. Animators will be able to master myriad modeling, rendering, and texturing procedures with advice from MK's best and brightest authors. Learn hundreds of tips, tricks, shortcuts and more - all within the covers of one complete, inspiring r

  13. Robust Adaptable Video Copy Detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Assent, Ira; Kremer, Hardy

    2009-01-01

    Video copy detection should be capable of identifying video copies subject to alterations e.g. in video contrast or frame rates. We propose a video copy detection scheme that allows for adaptable detection of videos that are altered temporally (e.g. frame rate change) and/or visually (e.g. change...... in contrast). Our query processing combines filtering and indexing structures for efficient multistep computation of video copies under this model. We show that our model successfully identifies altered video copies and does so more reliably than existing models....

  14. Computer technology and computer programming research and strategies

    CERN Document Server

    Antonakos, James L

    2011-01-01

    Covering a broad range of new topics in computer technology and programming, this volume discusses encryption techniques, SQL generation, Web 2.0 technologies, and visual sensor networks. It also examines reconfigurable computing, video streaming, animation techniques, and more. Readers will learn about an educational tool and game to help students learn computer programming. The book also explores a new medical technology paradigm centered on wireless technology and cloud computing designed to overcome the problems of increasing health technology costs.

  15. Prevalence of Addiction to the Internet, Computer Games, DVD, and Video and Its Relationship to Anxiety and Depression in a Sample of Iranian High School Students

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Amiri, Amin; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Khademalhosseini, Mitra; Khademalhosseini, Zeinab; Gholami, Zeinab; Sharifian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of addiction to the Internet, computer games, DVD, and video and its relationship to anxiety and depression in a sample of Iranian high school students. Methods: In this cross-sectional study 1020 high school students (males and females) were selected randomly from different areas of Shiraz city in southern Iran. They were interviewed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed (DSM-IV) crit...

  16. Consequences of fiducial marker error on three-dimensional computer animation of the temporomandibular joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leader, J. Ken, III; Boston, J. Robert; Rudy, Thomas E.; Greco, Carol M.; Zaki, Hussein S.

    2001-05-01

    Jaw motion has been used to diagnose jaw pain patients, and we have developed a 3D computer animation technique to study jaw motion. A customized dental clutch was worn during motion, and its consistent and rigid placement was a concern. The experimental protocol involved mandibular movements (vertical opening) and MR imaging. The clutch contained three motion markers used to collect kinematic data and four MR markers used as fiducial markers in the MR images. Fiducial marker misplacement was mimicked by analytically perturbing the position of the MR markers +/- 2, +/- 4, and +/- 6 degrees in the three anatomical planes. The percent difference between the original and perturbed MR marker position was calculated for kinematic parameters. The maximum difference across all perturbations for axial rotation, coronal rotation, sagittal rotation, axial translation, coronal translation, and sagittal translation were 176.85%, 191.84%, 0.64%, 9.76%, 80.75%, and 8.30%, respectively, for perturbing all MR markers, and 86.47%, 93.44%, 0.23%, 7.08%, 42.64%, and 13.64%, respectively, for perturbing one MR marker. The parameters representing movement in the sagittal plane, the dominant plane in vertical opening, were determined to be reasonably robust, while secondary movements in the axial and coronal planes were not considered robust.

  17. Computer assisted video analysis of swimming performance in a forced swim test: simultaneous assessment of duration of immobility and swimming style in mice selected for high and low swim-stress induced analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juszczak, Grzegorz R; Lisowski, Paweł; Sliwa, Adam T; Swiergiel, Artur H

    2008-10-20

    In behavioral pharmacology, two problems are encountered when quantifying animal behavior: 1) reproducibility of the results across laboratories, especially in the case of manual scoring of animal behavior; 2) presence of different behavioral idiosyncrasies, common in genetically different animals, that mask or mimic the effects of the experimental treatments. This study aimed to develop an automated method enabling simultaneous assessment of the duration of immobility in mice and the depth of body submersion during swimming by means of computer assisted video analysis system (EthoVision from Noldus). We tested and compared parameters of immobility based either on the speed of an object (animal) movement or based on the percentage change in the object's area between the consecutive video frames. We also examined the effects of an erosion-dilation filtering procedure on the results obtained with both parameters of immobility. Finally, we proposed an automated method enabling assessment of depth of body submersion that reflects swimming performance. It was found that both parameters of immobility were sensitive to the effect of an antidepressant, desipramine, and that they yielded similar results when applied to mice that are good swimmers. The speed parameter was, however, more sensitive and more reliable because it depended less on random noise of the video image. Also, it was established that applying the erosion-dilation filtering procedure increased the reliability of both parameters of immobility. In case of mice that were poor swimmers, the assessed duration of immobility differed depending on a chosen parameter, thus resulting in the presence or lack of differences between two lines of mice that differed in swimming performance. These results substantiate the need for assessing swimming performance when the duration of immobility in the FST is compared in lines that differ in their swimming "styles". Testing swimming performance can also be important in the

  18. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia Animations Blindness Cataract Convergence Insufficiency Diabetic Eye Disease Dilated Eye Exam Dry Eye For Kids Glaucoma ...

  19. Cross-sectional associations between violent video and computer game playing and weapon carrying in a national cohort of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L; Huesmann, L Rowell; Korchmaros, Josephine D; Reisner, Sari L

    2014-01-01

    Data were collected from 9 to 18 year olds surveyed nationally in a three-wave longitudinal survey. The population-average (generalized estimating equation, GEE) odds of carrying a weapon to school in the last month were estimated as a function of past-year exposure to violent content in video, computer, and Internet games, as well as peer aggression and biological sex. The sample included youth who were at risk for both the exposure (i.e., game play) and the outcome (i.e., who attended public or private school). 3,397 observations from 1,489 youth were included in analyses. 1.4% of youth reported carrying a weapon to school in the last month and 69% reported that at least some of the games they played depicted violence. After adjusting for other potentially influential characteristics (e.g., aggressive behavior), playing at least some violent games in the past year was associated with a fourfold increase in odds of also reporting carrying a weapon to school in the last month. Although youth who reported frequent and intense peer victimization in the past year were more likely to report carrying a weapon to school in the last month, this relation was explained by other influential characteristics. Consistent with the predictions of social-cognitive, observational learning theory, this study supports the hypothesis that carrying weapons to school is associated with violent game play. As one of the first studies of its kind, findings should be interpreted cautiously and need to be replicated. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cross-Sectional Associations Between Violent Video and Computer Game Playing and Weapon Carrying in a National Cohort of Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ybarra, Michele L.; Huesmann, L. Rowell; Korchmaros, Josephine D.; Reisner, Sari L.

    2015-01-01

    Data were collected from 9 to 18 year olds surveyed nationally in a three-wave longitudinal survey. The population-average (generalized estimating equation, GEE) odds of carrying a weapon to school in the last month were estimated as a function of past-year exposure to violent content in video, computer, and Internet games, as well as peer aggression and biological sex. The sample included youth who were at risk for both the exposure (i.e., game play) and the outcome (i.e., who attended public or private school). 3,397 observations from 1,489 youth were included in analyses. 1.4% of youth reported carrying a weapon to school in the last month and 69% reported that at least some of the games they played depicted violence. After adjusting for other potentially influential characteristics (e.g., aggressive behavior), playing at least some violent games in the past year was associated with a fourfold increase in odds of also reporting carrying a weapon to school in the last month. Although youth who reported frequent and intense peer victimization in the past year were more likely to report carrying a weapon to school in the last month, this relation was explained by other influential characteristics. Consistent with the predictions of social-cognitive, observational learning theory, this study supports the hypothesis that carrying weapons to school is associated with violent game play. As one of the first studies of its kind, findings should be interpreted cautiously and need to be replicated. PMID:24464267

  1. Short Paper and Poster Proceedings of the 22nd Annual Conference on Computer Animation and Social Agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijholt, Antinus; Egges, A.; van Welbergen, H.; Hondorp, G.H.W.

    2009-01-01

    These are the proceedings containing the short and poster papers of CASA 2009, the twenty second international conference on Computer Animation and Social Agents. CASA 2009 was organized in Amsterdam, the Netherlands from the 17th to the 19th of June 2009. CASA is organized under the auspices of the

  2. The Use of Interactive Computer Animations Based on POE as a Presentation Tool in Primary Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Ercan

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of using interactive computer animations based on predict-observe-explain (POE) as a presentation tool on primary school students' understanding of the static electricity concepts. A quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test control group design was utilized in this study. The experiment group consisted of 30…

  3. Effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music and Computer Animation on Senior Secondary School Students' Academic Achievement in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpoghol, T. V.; Ezeudu, F. O.; Adzape, J. N.; Otor, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music (LMM) and Computer Animation (LMC) on senior secondary school students' academic achievement in electrochemistry in Makurdi metropolis. Six research questions and six hypotheses guided the study. The design of the study was quasi experimental, specifically the pre-test,…

  4. Relative Effect of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music and Computer Animation on Senior Secondary School Students' Retention in Electrochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpoghol, T. V.; Ezeudu, F. O.; Adzape, J. N.; Otor, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of Lecture Method Supplemented with Music (LMM) and Computer Animation (LMC) on senior secondary school students' retention in electrochemistry in Makurdi metropolis. Three research questions and three hypotheses guided the study. The design of the study was quasi experimental, specifically the pre-test,…

  5. Effect of Jigsaw II, Reading-Writing-Presentation, and Computer Animations on the Teaching of "Light" Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Yasemin; Yildiz, Emre; Çaliklar, Seyma; Simsek, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the effect of Jigsaw II technique, reading-writing-presentation method, and computer animation on students' academic achievements, epistemological beliefs, attitudes towards science lesson, and the retention of knowledge in the "Light" unit covered in the 7th grade. The sample of the study consists…

  6. Effectiveness of Computer Animation Instructional Package on Academic Achievement of Senior Secondary School Agricultural Science Students in Animal Physiology in Minna, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.C. Falode

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study was carried out to determine the effectiveness of Computer Animation Instructional Package (CAIP on academic achievement of senior secondary school agricultural science students in animal physiology in Minna, Nigeria. Influence of gender was also examined. Quazi-experimental procedure of pretest, post-test, and non-randomized, non-equivalent design was adopted. Two research questions were raised while two null hypotheses were tested at 0.05 level of significance. The sample of the study was made up of 88 senior secondary school students selected from intact classes of two co-educational public schools within the study area. The two schools were randomly assigned to experimental and control groups. The experimental group which comprised 48 students (30 male and 18 female was taught through CAIP while their counterparts in the control group which comprised 40 students (26 male and 14 female was taught using lecture method. A 30-item animal physiology achievement test which was validated by experts and whose reliability coefficient of 0.85 was obtained was administered as pretest and post-test on both groups. Data gathered were analyzed using t-test statistics. Findings revealed that there was significant difference between the mean achievement scores of the two groups in favour of those taught with CAIP. Also, the package improved the achievement of both male and female students taught. It was therefore recommended among others that, computer animation instructional package should be adopted in secondary schools to complement lecture method of teaching in order to improve students' achievement in agricultural science.

  7. Parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo - bridging the gap to high-performance Bayesian computation in animal breeding and genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiao-Lin; Sun, Chuanyu; Beissinger, Timothy M; Rosa, Guilherme Jm; Weigel, Kent A; Gatti, Natalia de Leon; Gianola, Daniel

    2012-09-25

    Most Bayesian models for the analysis of complex traits are not analytically tractable and inferences are based on computationally intensive techniques. This is true of Bayesian models for genome-enabled selection, which uses whole-genome molecular data to predict the genetic merit of candidate animals for breeding purposes. In this regard, parallel computing can overcome the bottlenecks that can arise from series computing. Hence, a major goal of the present study is to bridge the gap to high-performance Bayesian computation in the context of animal breeding and genetics. Parallel Monte Carlo Markov chain algorithms and strategies are described in the context of animal breeding and genetics. Parallel Monte Carlo algorithms are introduced as a starting point including their applications to computing single-parameter and certain multiple-parameter models. Then, two basic approaches for parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo are described: one aims at parallelization within a single chain; the other is based on running multiple chains, yet some variants are discussed as well. Features and strategies of the parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo are illustrated using real data, including a large beef cattle dataset with 50K SNP genotypes. Parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithms are useful for computing complex Bayesian models, which does not only lead to a dramatic speedup in computing but can also be used to optimize model parameters in complex Bayesian models. Hence, we anticipate that use of parallel Markov chain Monte Carlo will have a profound impact on revolutionizing the computational tools for genomic selection programs.

  8. Digital Video Editing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Terry

    2004-01-01

    Monica Adams, head librarian at Robinson Secondary in Fairfax country, Virginia, states that librarians should have the technical knowledge to support projects related to digital video editing. The process of digital video editing and the cables, storage issues and the computer system with software is described.

  9. Smart Computing and Sensing Technologies for Animal Welfare: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Jukan, Admela; Masip-Bruin, Xavi; Amla, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Animals play a profoundly important and intricate role in our lives today. Dogs have been human companions for thousands of years, but they now work closely with us to assist the disabled, and in combat and search and rescue situations. Farm animals are a critical part of the global food supply chain, and there is increasing consumer interest in organically fed and humanely raised livestock, and how it impacts our health and environmental footprint. Wild animals are threatened with extinction...

  10. Computational strategies for alternative single-step Bayesian regression models with large numbers of genotyped and non-genotyped animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Rohan L; Cheng, Hao; Golden, Bruce L; Garrick, Dorian J

    2016-12-08

    Two types of models have been used for single-step genomic prediction and genome-wide association studies that include phenotypes from both genotyped animals and their non-genotyped relatives. The two types are breeding value models (BVM) that fit breeding values explicitly and marker effects models (MEM) that express the breeding values in terms of the effects of observed or imputed genotypes. MEM can accommodate a wider class of analyses, including variable selection or mixture model analyses. The order of the equations that need to be solved and the inverses required in their construction vary widely, and thus the computational effort required depends upon the size of the pedigree, the number of genotyped animals and the number of loci. We present computational strategies to avoid storing large, dense blocks of the MME that involve imputed genotypes. Furthermore, we present a hybrid model that fits a MEM for animals with observed genotypes and a BVM for those without genotypes. The hybrid model is computationally attractive for pedigree files containing millions of animals with a large proportion of those being genotyped. We demonstrate the practicality on both the original MEM and the hybrid model using real data with 6,179,960 animals in the pedigree with 4,934,101 phenotypes and 31,453 animals genotyped at 40,214 informative loci. To complete a single-trait analysis on a desk-top computer with four graphics cards required about 3 h using the hybrid model to obtain both preconditioned conjugate gradient solutions and 42,000 Markov chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) samples of breeding values, which allowed making inferences from posterior means, variances and covariances. The MCMC sampling required one quarter of the effort when the hybrid model was used compared to the published MEM. We present a hybrid model that fits a MEM for animals with genotypes and a BVM for those without genotypes. Its practicality and considerable reduction in computing effort was

  11. Multislice computed tomography perfusion imaging for visualization of acute pulmonary embolism: animal experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Spuentrup, Elmar; Mahnken, Andreas H.; Guenther, Rolf W. [University Hospital, RWTH Aachen, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Aachen (Germany); Klotz, Ernst; Ditt, Hendrik [Computed Tomography, Siemens Medical Solutions, Forchheim (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    The purpose of our animal study was to evaluate a new computed tomography (CT) subtraction technique for visualization of perfusion defects within the lung parenchyma in subsegmental pulmonary embolism (PE). Seven healthy pigs were entered into a prospective trial. Acute PE was artificially induced by fresh clot material prior to the CT scans. Within a single breath-hold, whole thorax CT scans were performed with a 16-slice multidetector-row CT scanner (SOMATOM Sensation 16; Siemens, Forchheim, Germany) before and after intravenous application of 80 ml of contrast medium with a flow rate of 4 ml/s, followed by a saline chaser. The scan parameters were 120 kV and 100 mAs{sub eff}, using a thin collimation of 16 x 0.75 mm and a table speed/rotation of 15-18 mm (pitch, 1.25-1.5; rotation time, 0.5 s). Axial source images were reconstructed with an effective slice thickness of 1 mm (overlap, 30%). A new automatic subtraction technique was used. After 3D segmentation of the lungs in the plain and contrast-enhanced series, threshold-based extraction of major airways and vascular structures in the contrast images was performed. This segmentation was repeated in the plain CT images segmenting the same number of vessels and airways as in the contrast images. Both scans were registered onto each other using nonrigid registration. After registration both image sets were filtered in a nonlinear fashion excluding segmented airways and vessels. After subtracting the plain CT data from the contrast data the resulting enhancement images were color-encoded and overlaid onto the contrast-enhanced CT angiography (CTA) images. This color-encoded combined display of parenchymal enhancement of the lungs was evaluated interactively on a workstation (Leonardo, Siemens) in axial, coronal and sagittal plane orientations. Axial contrast-enhanced CTA images were rated first, followed by an analysis of the combination images. Finally, CTA images were reread focusing on areas with perfusion

  12. High Resolution X-ray Computed Tomography: An Emerging Tool for Small Animal Cancer Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Paulus

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Dedicated high-resolution small animal imaging systems have recently emerged as important new tools for cancer research. These new imaging systems permit researchers to noninvasively screen animals for mutations or pathologies and to monitor disease progression and response to therapy. One imaging modality, X-ray microcomputed tomography (microCT shows promise as a cost-effective means for detecting and characterizing soft-tissue structures, skeletal abnormalities, and tumors in live animals. MicroCT systems provide highresolution images (typically 50 microns or less, rapid data acquisition (typically 5 to 30 minutes, excellent sensitivity to skeletal tissue and good sensitivity to soft tissue, particularly when contrast-enhancing media are employed. The development of microCT technology for small animal imaging is reviewed, and key considerations for designing small animal microCT imaging protocols are summarized. Recent studies on mouse prostate, lung and bone tumor models are overviewed.

  13. X-38 research aircraft mounted in Shuttle docked at Space Station - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    problems with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This 21-second computer animation clip shows the space shuttle approaching the Pressurized Mating Adapter No. 2 located on node 2 of the International Space Station. If you look closely you can just see the X-38 crew return vehicle in the shuttle cargo bay.

  14. X-38 research aircraft removal from Shuttle cargo bay - computer animation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    problems with the parafoil. Intermediate parafoil tests at the Army Yuma Proving Grounds in Arizona enabled the project to resolve these problems and resume flight research. In the drop tests, the X-38 vehicles have been autonomous after airlaunch from the B-52. After they deploy the parafoil, they have remained autonomous, but there is also a manual mode that allows control from the ground. The X-38 vehicles (designated V131 and V132) are each 24.5 feet long. The actual CRV to be flown in space is expected to be 30 feet long. This is a short 13-second computer animation clip showing the X-38 vehicle being removed from the shuttle cargo bay by the Space Station Remote Manipulator System robotic arm and then being attached to Pressurized Mating Adopter No. 3 located on the United States Habitation Module of the International Space Station.

  15. CASE, the computer-automated structure evaluation system, as an alternative to extensive animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkranz, H S; Klopman, G

    1988-12-01

    CASE, an artificial intelligence system with demonstrated ability to predict biological activity based on structural considerations, correctly predicts animal carcinogenicity. It can, therefore, play a pivotal role in classifying chemicals as carcinogens and prioritizing them for further testing. Additionally, CASE shows promise in the design of pharmacologically active agents by reducing the number of drugs that need to be synthesized and tested. For both of these applications, CASE provides a mechanism to conserve animal and other testing resources.

  16. Profiling animal toxicants by automatically mining public bioassay data: a big data approach for computational toxicology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Zhang

    Full Text Available In vitro bioassays have been developed and are currently being evaluated as potential alternatives to traditional animal toxicity models. Already, the progress of high throughput screening techniques has resulted in an enormous amount of publicly available bioassay data having been generated for a large collection of compounds. When a compound is tested using a collection of various bioassays, all the testing results can be considered as providing a unique bio-profile for this compound, which records the responses induced when the compound interacts with different cellular systems or biological targets. Profiling compounds of environmental or pharmaceutical interest using useful toxicity bioassay data is a promising method to study complex animal toxicity. In this study, we developed an automatic virtual profiling tool to evaluate potential animal toxicants. First, we automatically acquired all PubChem bioassay data for a set of 4,841 compounds with publicly available rat acute toxicity results. Next, we developed a scoring system to evaluate the relevance between these extracted bioassays and animal acute toxicity. Finally, the top ranked bioassays were selected to profile the compounds of interest. The resulting response profiles proved to be useful to prioritize untested compounds for their animal toxicity potentials and form a potential in vitro toxicity testing panel. The protocol developed in this study could be combined with structure-activity approaches and used to explore additional publicly available bioassay datasets for modeling a broader range of animal toxicities.

  17. Video-based rendering

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A

    2005-01-01

    Driven by consumer-market applications that enjoy steadily increasing economic importance, graphics hardware and rendering algorithms are a central focus of computer graphics research. Video-based rendering is an approach that aims to overcome the current bottleneck in the time-consuming modeling process and has applications in areas such as computer games, special effects, and interactive TV. This book offers an in-depth introduction to video-based rendering, a rapidly developing new interdisciplinary topic employing techniques from computer graphics, computer vision, and telecommunication en

  18. Television, computer, and video viewing; physical activity; and upper limb fracture risk in children: a population-based case control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Deqiong; Jones, Graeme

    2003-11-01

    The effect of physical activity on upper limb fractures was examined in this population-based case control study with 321 age- and gender-matched pairs. Sports participation increased fracture risk in boys and decreased risk in girls. Television viewing had a deleterious dose response association with wrist and forearm fractures while light physical activity was protective. The aim of this population-based case control study was to examine the association between television, computer, and video viewing; types and levels of physical activity; and upper limb fractures in children 9-16 years of age. A total of 321 fracture cases and 321 randomly selected individually matched controls were studied. Television, computer, and video viewing and types and levels of physical activity were determined by interview-administered questionnaire. Bone strength was assessed by DXA and metacarpal morphometry. In general, sports participation increased total upper limb fracture risk in boys and decreased risk in girls. Gender-specific risk estimates were significantly different for total, contact, noncontact, and high-risk sports participation as well as four individual sports (soccer, cricket, surfing, and swimming). In multivariate analysis, time spent television, computer, and video viewing in both sexes was positively associated with wrist and forearm fracture risk (OR 1.6/category, 95% CI: 1.1-2.2), whereas days involved in light physical activity participation decreased fracture risk (OR 0.8/category, 95% CI: 0.7-1.0). Sports participation increased hand (OR 1.5/sport, 95% CI: 1.1-2.0) and upper arm (OR 29.8/sport, 95% CI: 1.7-535) fracture risk in boys only and decreased wrist and forearm fracture risk in girls only (OR 0.5/sport, 95% CI: 0.3-0.9). Adjustment for bone density and metacarpal morphometry did not alter these associations. There is gender discordance with regard to sports participation and fracture risk in children, which may reflect different approaches to sport

  19. Multidetector-row computed tomography: technical basics and preliminary clinical applications in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bertolini, G.; Prokop, M.

    2011-01-01

    Multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT), a recent breakthrough in computed tomography (CT) technology, is increasingly available in veterinary practice. The main advantage of MDCT over previous CT generations is the ability to acquire thin-section data from a scan volume within a short scan

  20. The effectiveness of computer-generated 3D animations in inquiry chemistry laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theall, Rachel Morgan

    It has been shown that students need a molecular-level understanding of substances in order to comprehend chemistry. For solid structures, atomic-level understanding requires students to learn additional and different concepts than for other states of matter. To aid understanding, animations were created to model unit cell structures and depict the properties of unit cells. In order to determine if these animations are helpful to students, they were tested during a laboratory exercise in which students had previously been using model kits and images from textbooks to learn about solid structures. Students evaluated in this study were from two lecture sections of general chemistry, one that routinely used animations during lecture and one that used a more traditional lecture format that did not include animations or models. Twelve laboratory sections of these lectures, taught by six different instructors each teaching two sections, were chosen for participation. One section for each instructor was given the animations as an optional tool for completing the laboratory assignment, which consisted of questions about unit cells and crystal structures. The results of the study indicate that students who looked at the animations performed significantly better on the assignment. For the control group, students who routinely viewed multiple representations of chemistry in lecture performed significantly better on the lab assignment than students in the lecture section where chemistry concepts were only presented on the chalkboard and overhead projector. Students in the traditional lecture section also had significantly less appreciation for the model kits used in the laboratory than students in the other lecture section. Observations of students in the lab combined with statistical results led to the revision of the solid structures investigation. Additional animations were created and inserted into the module that covered areas where students indicated more help was needed

  1. Computer-based animations and static graphics as medical student aids in learning home safety assessment: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunuguntla, Renuka; Rodriguez, Osvaldo; Ruiz, Jorge G; Qadri, Syeda S; Mintzer, Michael J; Van Zuilen, Maria H; Roos, Bernard A

    2008-01-01

    Although animations may intuitively seem more effective than static graphics for teaching, there is no clear-cut evidence for the superiority of simple computer-based animations in medical education. We investigated whether simple animations are better than static graphics as an aid to medical students in learning home safety assessment, an important part of geriatric curriculum. We used two versions of an interactive online module, one that depicted common home safety issues in static graphics and the other in animations. We randomized first-year medical students who agreed to participate into two groups. After the module, students completed a cognitive burden scale and a standardized competency assessment test in which they had to identify the salient home safety issues and give recommendations based on the hazards. We also captured time spent on task. We found no significant differences between the groups in the cognitive burden level, competency assessment scores, and time spent on task. The much cheaper-to-produce static graphics were equally effective as simple animations in this medical education scenario.

  2. Animated Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Algava, Alisa

    1999-01-01

    A class of fourth-graders-turned-film-producers created an animated video about national parks. The experience helped students acquire academic skills and knowledge, use technology meaningfully, feel confident about themselves and their learning, value cooperation, understand the creative process, sustain a vision, and have fun in school. (MLH)

  3. Animated construction of line drawings

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    Revealing the sketching sequence of a line drawing can be visually intriguing and used for video-based storytelling. Typically this is enabled based on tedious recording of artists\\' drawing process. We demonstrate that it is often possible to estimate a reasonable drawing order from a static line drawing with clearly defined shape geometry, which looks plausible to a human viewer. We map the key principles of drawing order from drawing cognition to computational procedures in our framework. Our system produces plausible animated constructions of input line drawings, with no or little user intervention. We test our algorithm on a range of input sketches, with varying degree of complexity and structure, and evaluate the results via a user study. We also present applications to gesture drawing synthesis and drawing animation creation especially in the context of video scribing.

  4. Animated construction of line drawings

    KAUST Repository

    Fu, Hongbo

    2011-12-01

    Revealing the sketching sequence of a line drawing can be visually intriguing and used for video-based storytelling. Typically this is enabled based on tedious recording of artists\\' drawing process. We demonstrate that it is often possible to estimate a reasonable drawing order from a static line drawing with clearly defined shape geometry, which looks plausible to a human viewer. We map the key principles of drawing order from drawing cognition to computational procedures in our framework. Our system produces plausible animated constructions of input line drawings, with no or little user intervention. We test our algorithm on a range of input sketches, with varying degree of complexity and structure, and evaluate the results via a user study. We also present applications to gesture drawing synthesis and drawing animation creation especially in the context of video scribing. © 2011 ACM.

  5. Using virtual humans and computer animations to learn complex motor skills: a case study in karate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spanlang Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Learning motor skills is a complex task involving a lot of cognitive issues. One of the main issues consists in retrieving the relevant information from the learning environment. In a traditional learning situation, a teacher gives oral explanations and performs actions to provide the learner with visual examples. Using virtual reality (VR as a tool for learning motor tasks is promising. However, it raises questions about the type of information this kind of environments can offer. In this paper, we propose to analyze the impact of virtual humans on the perception of the learners. As a case study, we propose to apply this research problem to karate gestures. The results of this study show no significant difference on the after training performance of learners confronted to three different learning environments (traditional group, video and VR.

  6. Video microblogging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornoe, Nis; Barkhuus, Louise

    2010-01-01

    Microblogging is a recently popular phenomenon and with the increasing trend for video cameras to be built into mobile phones, a new type of microblogging has entered the arena of electronic communication: video microblogging. In this study we examine video microblogging, which is the broadcasting...... of short videos. A series of semi-structured interviews offers an understanding of why and how video microblogging is used and what the users post and broadcast....

  7. Gender differences in learning physical science concepts: Does computer animation help equalize them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacek, Laura Lee

    This dissertation details an experiment designed to identify gender differences in learning using three experimental treatments: animation, static graphics, and verbal instruction alone. Three learning presentations were used in testing of 332 university students. Statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA, binomial tests for differences of proportion, and descriptive statistics. Results showed that animation significantly improved women's long-term learning over static graphics (p = 0.067), but didn't significantly improve men's long-term learning over static graphics. In all cases, women's scores improved with animation over both other forms of instruction for long-term testing, indicating that future research should not abandon the study of animation as a tool that may promote gender equity in science. Short-term test differences were smaller, and not statistically significant. Variation present in short-term scores was related more to presentation topic than treatment. This research also details characteristics of each of the three presentations, to identify variables (e.g. level of abstraction in presentation) affecting score differences within treatments. Differences between men's and women's scores were non-standard between presentations, but these differences were not statistically significant (long-term p = 0.2961, short-term p = 0.2893). In future research, experiments might be better designed to test these presentational variables in isolation, possibly yielding more distinctive differences between presentational scores. Differences in confidence interval overlaps between presentations suggested that treatment superiority may be somewhat dependent on the design or topic of the learning presentation. Confidence intervals greatly overlap in all situations. This undercut, to some degree, the surety of conclusions indicating superiority of one treatment type over the others. However, confidence intervals for animation were smaller, overlapped nearly

  8. Accelerating video carving from unallocated space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalva, Hari; Parikh, Anish; Srinivasan, Avinash

    2013-03-01

    Video carving has become an essential tool in digital forensics. Video carving enables recovery of deleted video files from hard disks. Processing data to extract videos is a computationally intensive task. In this paper we present two methods to accelerate video carving: a method to accelerate fragment extraction, and a method to accelerate combining of these fragments into video segments. Simulation results show that complexity of video fragment extraction can be reduced by as much as 75% with minimal impact on the videos recovered.

  9. How usability is visible in video games

    OpenAIRE

    Saari, M

    2017-01-01

    Abstract As video games have become have become more popular and as popular as music and movies, the need for more video game developers have increased also. But even though there are more people developing video games, there still exists usability issues in video games like also in general computer software. The purpose of the thesis is to find out how usa...

  10. An Investigation of Human-Computer Interaction Approaches Beneficial to Weak Learners in Complex Animation Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Yu-Fang

    2016-01-01

    Animation is one of the useful contemporary educational technologies in teaching complex subjects. There is a growing interest in proper use of learner-technology interaction to promote learning quality for different groups of learner needs. The purpose of this study is to investigate if an interaction approach supports weak learners, who have…

  11. The Effects of Animations on Verbal Interaction in Computer Supported Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangin, M.; Dillenbourg, P.; Rebetez, Cyril; Betrancourt, Mireille; Molinari, Gaelle

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on the interaction patterns of learners studying in pairs who were provided with multimedia learning material. In a previous article, we reported that learning scores were higher for dyads of an "animations" condition than for dyads of a "static pictures" condition. Results also showed that offering a persistent display of one…

  12. Learning Anime Studio

    CERN Document Server

    Troftgruben, Chad

    2014-01-01

    Anime Studio is your complete animation program to help you create 2D movies, cartoons, anime, and cut out animations. You can create your own animated shorts and use Anime Studio to produce cartoon animations for film, video, or streaming over the Web, which can be enjoyed on YouTube, Vimeo, and other popular sites. Anime Studio is great for hobbyists and professionals alike, combining tools for both illustration and animation. With Anime Studio's easy-to-use interface, you will be creating an animated masterpiece in no time. This practical, step-by-step guide will provide you with a structur

  13. Computationally efficient video restoration for Nyquist sampled imaging sensors combining an affine-motion-based temporal Kalman filter and adaptive Wiener filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucci, Michael; Hardie, Russell C; Barnard, Kenneth J

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we present a computationally efficient video restoration algorithm to address both blur and noise for a Nyquist sampled imaging system. The proposed method utilizes a temporal Kalman filter followed by a correlation-model based spatial adaptive Wiener filter (AWF). The Kalman filter employs an affine background motion model and novel process-noise variance estimate. We also propose and demonstrate a new multidelay temporal Kalman filter designed to more robustly treat local motion. The AWF is a spatial operation that performs deconvolution and adapts to the spatially varying residual noise left in the Kalman filter stage. In image areas where the temporal Kalman filter is able to provide significant noise reduction, the AWF can be aggressive in its deconvolution. In other areas, where less noise reduction is achieved with the Kalman filter, the AWF balances the deconvolution with spatial noise reduction. In this way, the Kalman filter and AWF work together effectively, but without the computational burden of full joint spatiotemporal processing. We also propose a novel hybrid system that combines a temporal Kalman filter and BM3D processing. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed methods, we test the algorithms on both simulated imagery and video collected with a visible camera.

  14. Video demystified

    CERN Document Server

    Jack, Keith

    2004-01-01

    This international bestseller and essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide. This is by far the most informative analog and digital video reference available, includes the hottest new trends and cutting-edge developments in the field. Video Demystified, Fourth Edition is a "one stop" reference guide for the various digital video technologies. The fourth edition is completely updated with all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video (Video over DSL, Ethernet, etc.), as well as discussions of the latest standards throughout. The accompanying CD-ROM is updated to include a unique set of video test files in the newest formats. *This essential reference is the "bible" for digital video engineers and programmers worldwide *Contains all new chapters on MPEG-4, H.264, SDTV/HDTV, ATSC/DVB, and Streaming Video *Completely revised with all the latest and most up-to-date industry standards.

  15. A comparative study between xerographic, computer-assisted overlay generation and animated-superimposition methods in bite mark analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Meng Wei; Chong, Zhen Feng; Asif, Muhammad Khan; Rahmat, Rabiah A; Nambiar, Phrabhakaran

    2016-09-01

    This study was to compare the suitability and precision of xerographic and computer-assisted methods for bite mark investigations. Eleven subjects were asked to bite on their forearm and the bite marks were photographically recorded. Alginate impressions of the subjects' dentition were taken and their casts were made using dental stone. The overlays generated by xerographic method were obtained by photocopying the subjects' casts and the incisal edge outlines were then transferred on a transparent sheet. The bite mark images were imported into Adobe Photoshop® software and printed to life-size. The bite mark analyses using xerographically generated overlays were done by comparing an overlay to the corresponding printed bite mark images manually. In computer-assisted method, the subjects' casts were scanned into Adobe Photoshop®. The bite mark analyses using computer-assisted overlay generation were done by matching an overlay and the corresponding bite mark images digitally using Adobe Photoshop®. Another comparison method was superimposing the cast images with corresponding bite mark images employing the Adobe Photoshop® CS6 and GIF-Animator©. A score with a range of 0-3 was given during analysis to each precision-determining criterion and the score was increased with better matching. The Kruskal Wallis H test showed significant difference between the three sets of data (H=18.761, pbite mark analysis using the computer-assisted animated-superimposition method was the most accurate, followed by the computer-assisted overlay generation and lastly the xerographic method. The superior precision contributed by digital method is discernible despite the human skin being a poor recording medium of bite marks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Animated computer graphics models of space and earth sciences data generated via the massively parallel processor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treinish, Lloyd A.; Gough, Michael L.; Wildenhain, W. David

    1987-01-01

    The capability was developed of rapidly producing visual representations of large, complex, multi-dimensional space and earth sciences data sets via the implementation of computer graphics modeling techniques on the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP) by employing techniques recently developed for typically non-scientific applications. Such capabilities can provide a new and valuable tool for the understanding of complex scientific data, and a new application of parallel computing via the MPP. A prototype system with such capabilities was developed and integrated into the National Space Science Data Center's (NSSDC) Pilot Climate Data System (PCDS) data-independent environment for computer graphics data display to provide easy access to users. While developing these capabilities, several problems had to be solved independently of the actual use of the MPP, all of which are outlined.

  17. Teaching Animal Physiology: a 12-year experience transitioning from a classical to interactive approach with continual assessment and computer alternatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaisarevic, Sonja N; Andric, Silvana A; Kostic, Tatjana S

    2017-09-01

    In response to the Bologna Declaration and contemporary trends in Animal Physiology education, the Animal Physiology course at the Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Serbia, has evolved over a 12-yr period (2001-2012): from a classical two-semester course toward a one-semester course utilizing computer simulations of animal experiments, continual assessment, lectures, and an optional oral exam. This paper presents an overview of student achievement, the impact of reforms on learning outcomes, and lessons that we as educators learned during this process. The reforms had a positive impact on the percentage of students who completed the course within the same academic year. In addition, the percentage of students who completed the practical exam increased from 54% to >95% following the transition to a Bologna-based approach. However, average final grades declined from 8.0 to 6.8 over the same period. Students also appear reluctant to take the optional oral exam, and 82-91% of students were satisfied with the lower final grade obtained from only assessments and tests administered during the semester. In our endeavor to achieve learning outcomes set during the pre-Bologna period, while adopting contemporary teaching approaches, we sought to increase students' motivation to strive toward better performance, while ensuring that the increased quantity of students who complete the course is coupled with increased quality of education and a more in-depth understanding of animal physiology. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-01-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing…

  19. The Role of Visual Rhetoric in the Vegetarian Movement: “Meet Your Meat” Video of Animal Torture on the PETA Website

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desideria C. W. Murti

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Images have the power to create natural representation of reality, vividness in human memory and have rhetorical effect. However, visual rhetoric can create positive and negative feeling to persuade people. Negative feelings can be designed to make emotional reactions and spark action. Consequently, humans will consider ways to deal with the negative and discomfort feelings. In this paper, the writer analyzes the connection between visual rhetoric and emotional appeal by examining the controversial PETA video “Meet your Meat”. The writer will use the visual rhetoric, emotions, and cognitive dissonance theory to analyze the video and increase the understanding about the human emotions, especially disgust and guilt. Abstrak: Gambar memiliki kekuatan untuk menciptakan gambaran realitas yang alami, membuat kejelasan dalam ingatan manusia dan memiliki efek retoris. Namun, retorika visual dapat menciptakan perasaan positif dan negatif untuk membujuk orang. Perasaan negatif dapat dirancang untuk membuat reaksi emosional dan memicu tindakan. Akibatnya, manusia akan mempertimbangkan cara-cara untuk mengatasi perasaan-perasaan negatif dan ketidaknyamanan. Dalam tulisan ini, penulis akan menganalisis hubungan antara retorika visual dan daya tarik emosional dengan mengkaji video kontroversial PETA “Meet your Meat”. Penulis akan menggunakan teori retorika visual, emosi, dan disonansi kognitif untuk menganalisis video dan meningkatkan pemahaman tentang emosi manusia, terutama perasaan jijik dan rasa bersalah.

  20. Brains on video games

    OpenAIRE

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C. Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F.; Merzenich, Michael M.; Gentile, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games ‘damage the brain’ or ‘boost brain power’ do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affe...

  1. Android Video Streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    be processed by a nearby high -performance computing asset and returned to a squad of Soldiers with annotations indicating the location of friendly and...is to change the resolution, bitrate, and/or framerate of the video being transmitted to the client, reducing the bandwidth requirements of the...video. This solution is typically not viable because a progressive download is required to have a constant resolution, bitrate, and framerate because

  2. Creation and application of three-dimensional computer-graphic animations for introduction to radiological physics and technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Tomoyuki; Kojima, Haruna; Masu, Chisato; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Kojima, Hironori; Konokawa, Kiminori; Isobe, Tomonori; Sato, Eisuke; Murayama, Hideo; Maruyama, Koichi; Umeda, Tokuo

    2010-01-01

    Physics-related subjects are important in the educational fields of radiological physics and technology. However, conventional teaching tools, for example texts, equations, and two-dimensional figures, are not very effective in attracting the interest of students. Therefore, we have created several multimedia educational materials covering radiological physics and technology. Each educational presentation includes several segments of high-quality computer-graphic animations designed to attract students' interest. We used personal computers (PCs) and commercial software to create and compile these. Undergraduate and graduate students and teachers and related professionals contributed to the design and creation of the educational materials as part of student research. The educational materials can be displayed on a PC monitor and manipulated with popular free software. Opinion surveys conducted in undergraduate courses at Kitasato University support the effectiveness of our educational tools in helping students gain a better understanding of the subjects offered and in raising their interest.

  3. The garden of electromagnetic delights: Using computer animations to teach Maxwell's equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Kyle; Jones, Roger S.; Lauinger, Aaron

    1997-03-01

    The subject of electromagnetism is one of the most difficult and challenging for students of introductory physics to understand and for physics instructors to teach. The laws of electromagnetism involve abstract concepts of geometry, dimensionality, charge, current, field, flux, and potential, not to mention those of differential and integral calculus. These intangible concepts are especially difficult for students to visualize and apply and are also very demanding and frustrating for instructors to illustrate. We have developed a set of software simulation and animation programs to be used in lectures and lab/recitations for illustrating the concepts and methods behind Maxwell's equations and the calculation of fields and potentials from their sources. A metaphor involving color intensity is used to help students visualize how flux and other quantities vary with position and orientation and how sums and integrals are calculated in electromagnetism. Simulations and animations help to clarify mathematical operations and to articulate their time and space dependence. Combining different media and production techniques also has a natural attraction and appeal for students and allows our programs to be adapted for use on the Internet and for individual study. An informal evaluation of the programs has elicited a favorable endorsement from students.

  4. Investigation of Attenuation Correction for Small-Animal Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Hui Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative accuracy of SPECT is limited by photon attenuation and scatter effect when photons interact with atoms. In this study, we developed a new attenuation correction (AC method, CT-based mean attenuation correction (CTMAC method, and compared it with various methods that were often used currently to assess the AC phenomenon by using the small-animal SPECT/CT data that were acquired from various physical phantoms and a rat. The physical phantoms and an SD rat, which were injected with 99mTc, were scanned by a parallel-hole small-animal SPECT, and then they were imaged by the 80 kVp micro-CT. Scatter was estimated and corrected by the triple-energy window (TEW method. Absolute quantification was derived from a known activity point source scan. In the physical-phantom studies, we compared the images with original, scatter correction (SC only, and the scatter-corrected images with AC performed by using Chang’s method, CT-based attenuation correction (CTAC, CT-based iterative attenuation compensation during reconstruction (CTIACR, and the CTMAC. From the correction results, we find out that the errors of the previous six configurations are mostly quite similar. The CTMAC needs the shortest correction time while obtaining good AC results.

  5. MARTI: man-machine animation real-time interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christian M.; Dlay, Satnam S.

    1997-05-01

    The research introduces MARTI (man-machine animation real-time interface) for the realization of natural human-machine interfacing. The system uses simple vocal sound-tracks of human speakers to provide lip synchronization of computer graphical facial models. We present novel research in a number of engineering disciplines, which include speech recognition, facial modeling, and computer animation. This interdisciplinary research utilizes the latest, hybrid connectionist/hidden Markov model, speech recognition system to provide very accurate phone recognition and timing for speaker independent continuous speech, and expands on knowledge from the animation industry in the development of accurate facial models and automated animation. The research has many real-world applications which include the provision of a highly accurate and 'natural' man-machine interface to assist user interactions with computer systems and communication with one other using human idiosyncrasies; a complete special effects and animation toolbox providing automatic lip synchronization without the normal constraints of head-sets, joysticks, and skilled animators; compression of video data to well below standard telecommunication channel bandwidth for video communications and multi-media systems; assisting speech training and aids for the handicapped; and facilitating player interaction for 'video gaming' and 'virtual worlds.' MARTI has introduced a new level of realism to man-machine interfacing and special effect animation which has been previously unseen.

  6. Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Habits for TV, Video Games, and the Internet KidsHealth / For Parents / Healthy Habits for TV, Video ... negative effects that violent video games can have. Internet Safety Become computer literate. Learn how to block ...

  7. Development and evaluation of a computer-animated tutor for vocabulary and language learning in children with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosseler, Alexis; Massaro, Dominic W

    2003-12-01

    Using our theoretical framework of multimodal processing, we developed and evaluated a computer-animated tutor, Baldi, to teach vocabulary and grammar for children with autism. Baldi was implemented in a Language Wizard/Player, which allows easy creation and presentation of a language lesson involving the association of pictures and spoken words. The lesson plan includes both the identification of pictures and the production of spoken words. In Experiment 1, eight children were given initial assessment tests, tutorials, and reassessment tests 30 days following mastery of the vocabulary items. All of the students learned a significant number of new words and grammar. A second within-subject design with six children followed a multiple baseline design and documented that the program was responsible for the learning and generalization of new words. The research indicates that children with autism are capable of learning new language within an automated program centered around a computer-animated agent, multimedia, and active participation and can transfer and use the language in a natural, untrained environment.

  8. Prevalence of Addiction to the Internet, Computer Games, DVD, and Video and Its Relationship to Anxiety and Depression in a Sample of Iranian High School Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Jamshid; Amiri, Amin; Ghanizadeh, Ahmad; Khademalhosseini, Mitra; Khademalhosseini, Zeinab; Gholami, Zeinab; Sharifian, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the prevalence of addiction to the Internet, computer games, DVD, and video and its relationship to anxiety and depression in a sample of Iranian high school students. In this cross-sectional study 1020 high school students (males and females) were selected randomly from different areas of Shiraz city in southern Iran. They were interviewed according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4(th) ed (DSM-IV) criteria. About 50% of the students were females, 277 students (27.2%) were studying in the first year of high school, 242 (23.7%) were in the second year, and others in the third year. The prevalence of anxiety was significantly higher in females than in males (p video CD dependents (p addiction may cause depression and anxiety in high school students. It seems necessary to develop an Internet addiction prevention program for adolescents taking into account the psychological factors such as depression and Internet use habits.

  9. Instructional Effectiveness of Video Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, C. Douglas; And Others

    This volume is a blend of media research, cognitive science research, and tradecraft knowledge regarding video production techniques. The research covers: visual learning; verbal-auditory information; news broadcasts; the value of motion and animation in film and video; simulation (including realism and fidelity); the relationship of text and…

  10. Computer Animation with Adobe Flash Professional Cs6 in Newton’s Law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aji, S. D.; Hudha, M. N.; Huda, C.; Gufran, G.

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop computer-based physics learning media with Adobe Flash Professional CS6 on Newton’s Law of physics subject for senior high school (SMA / MA) class X. Type of research applied is Research and Development with ADDIE development model covering 5 stages: Analysis (Analysis), Design (Design), Development (Production), Implementation (Implementation) and Evaluation (Evaluation). The results of this study were tested toward media experts, media specialists, physics teachers, and students test results with media outcomes that are declared very feasible.

  11. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Luna, Brian; Dey, Bappaditya; Bishai, William R; Jonsson, Colleen B; Jain, Sanjay; Mollura, Daniel J

    2013-07-23

    Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast of the images, but there are still insufficient computational algorithms available for researchers to use when accurately quantifying imaging data from anatomical structures and functional biological processes. Since the development of such tools may potentially translate basic research into the clinic, this study focuses on the development of a quantitative and qualitative image analysis platform that provides a computational radiology perspective for pulmonary infections in small animal models. Specifically, we designed (a) a fast and robust automated and semi-automated image analysis platform and a quantification tool that can facilitate accurate diagnostic measurements of pulmonary lesions as well as volumetric measurements of anatomical structures, and incorporated (b) an image registration pipeline to our proposed framework for volumetric comparison of serial scans. This is an important investigational tool for small animal infectious disease models that can help advance researchers' understanding of infectious diseases. We tested the utility of our proposed methodology by using sequentially acquired CT and PET images of rabbit, ferret, and mouse models with respiratory infections of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB), H1N1 flu virus, and an aerosolized respiratory pathogen (necrotic TB) for a total of 92, 44, and 24 scans for the respective studies with half of the scans from CT and the other half from PET. Institutional Administrative Panel on Laboratory Animal Care approvals were

  12. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopy is Superior to Standard Computer Tomography of the Thorax for Selection of Patients With Spontaneous Pneumothorax for Bullectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julius P. Janssen

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Spontaneous pneumothorax (SP is a common disease of unknown cause often attributed to rupture of a subpleural bulla or bleb [in this study described as emphysema-like changes (ELC]. Treatment of SP varies from conservative (rest to aggressive (surgery. Patients with bullae >2 cm diameter, found either by chest roentgenogram or during thoracoscopy, are often treated surgically (bullectomy and pleurectomy, or abrasion. Thoracoscopy is frequently used as the method of choice to select patients for surgery. With the recent introduction of video-assisted thoracoscopy (VAT, it is now possible to combine a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure. However, to do this general anesthesia and a fully equipped operating theater are needed. Proper selection of patients for this costly and time-consuming procedure is necessary. We evaluated whether standard computed tomography (CT is appropriate for selection of patients with SP who are candidates for surgical intervention.

  13. Computer aided vertebral visualization and analysis: a methodology using the sand rat, a small animal model of disc degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanley Edward N

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study is to present an automated system that analyzes digitized x-ray images of small animal spines identifying the effects of disc degeneration. The age-related disc and spine degeneration that occurs in the sand rat (Psammomys obesus has previously been documented radiologically; selected representative radiographs with age-related changes were used here to develop computer-assisted vertebral visualization/analysis techniques. Techniques presented here have the potential to produce quantitative algorithms that create more accurate and informative measurements in a time efficient manner. Methods Signal and image processing techniques were applied to digitized spine x-ray images the spine was segmented, and orientation and curvature determined. The image was segmented based on orientation changes of the spine; edge detection was performed to define vertebral boundaries. Once vertebrae were identified, a number of measures were introduced and calculated to retrieve information on the vertebral separation/orientation and sclerosis. Results A method is described which produces computer-generated quantitative measurements of vertebrae and disc spaces. Six sand rat spine radiographs illustrate applications of this technique. Results showed that this method can successfully automate calculation and analysis of vertebral length, vertebral spacing, vertebral angle, and can score sclerosis. Techniques also provide quantitative means to explore the relation between age and vertebral shape. Conclusions This method provides a computationally efficient system to analyze spinal changes during aging. Techniques can be used to automate the quantitative processing of vertebral radiographic images and may be applicable to human and other animal radiologic models of the aging/degenerating spine.

  14. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Bob; Marcellino, Chris; Miller, Melissa; Maclean, Mary; Mostafa, Eman; Howell, Sue; Sakanari, Judy; Wolstenholme, Adrian; Kaplan, Ray

    2014-01-01

    A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic) parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi). We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3) of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf) of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and reproducibility, low

  15. Utilization of computer processed high definition video imaging for measuring motility of microscopic nematode stages on a quantitative scale: “The Worminator”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bob Storey

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A major hindrance to evaluating nematode populations for anthelmintic resistance, as well as for screening existing drugs, new compounds, or bioactive plant extracts for anthelmintic properties, is the lack of an efficient, objective, and reproducible in vitro assay that is adaptable to multiple life stages and parasite genera. To address this need we have developed the “Worminator” system, which objectively and quantitatively measures the motility of microscopic stages of parasitic nematodes. The system is built around the computer application “WormAssay”, developed at the Center for Discovery and Innovation in Parasitic Diseases at the University of California, San Francisco. WormAssay was designed to assess motility of macroscopic parasites for the purpose of high throughput screening of potential anthelmintic compounds, utilizing high definition video as an input to assess motion of adult stage (macroscopic parasites (e.g. Brugia malayi. We adapted this assay for use with microscopic parasites by modifying the software to support a full frame analysis mode that applies the motion algorithm to the entire video frame. Thus, the motility of all parasites in a given well are recorded and measured simultaneously. Assays performed on third-stage larvae (L3 of the bovine intestinal nematode Cooperia spp., as well as microfilariae (mf of the filarioid nematodes B. malayi and Dirofilaria immitis, yielded reproducible dose responses using the macrocyclic lactones ivermectin, doramectin, and moxidectin, as well as the nicotinic agonists, pyrantel, oxantel, morantel, and tribendimidine. This new computer based-assay is simple to use, requires minimal new investment in equipment, is robust across nematode genera and developmental stage, and does not require subjective scoring of motility by an observer. Thus, the “Worminator” provides a relatively low-cost platform for developing genera- and stage-specific assays with high efficiency and

  16. Robust Watermarking of Video Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Polyák

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past few years there has been an explosion in the use of digital video data. Many people have personal computers at home, and with the help of the Internet users can easily share video files on their computer. This makes possible the unauthorized use of digital media, and without adequate protection systems the authors and distributors have no means to prevent it.Digital watermarking techniques can help these systems to be more effective by embedding secret data right into the video stream. This makes minor changes in the frames of the video, but these changes are almost imperceptible to the human visual system. The embedded information can involve copyright data, access control etc. A robust watermark is resistant to various distortions of the video, so it cannot be removed without affecting the quality of the host medium. In this paper I propose a video watermarking scheme that fulfills the requirements of a robust watermark. 

  17. Gamifying Video Object Segmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spampinato, Concetto; Palazzo, Simone; Giordano, Daniela

    2017-10-01

    Video object segmentation can be considered as one of the most challenging computer vision problems. Indeed, so far, no existing solution is able to effectively deal with the peculiarities of real-world videos, especially in cases of articulated motion and object occlusions; limitations that appear more evident when we compare the performance of automated methods with the human one. However, manually segmenting objects in videos is largely impractical as it requires a lot of time and concentration. To address this problem, in this paper we propose an interactive video object segmentation method, which exploits, on one hand, the capability of humans to identify correctly objects in visual scenes, and on the other hand, the collective human brainpower to solve challenging and large-scale tasks. In particular, our method relies on a game with a purpose to collect human inputs on object locations, followed by an accurate segmentation phase achieved by optimizing an energy function encoding spatial and temporal constraints between object regions as well as human-provided location priors. Performance analysis carried out on complex video benchmarks, and exploiting data provided by over 60 users, demonstrated that our method shows a better trade-off between annotation times and segmentation accuracy than interactive video annotation and automated video object segmentation approaches.

  18. Computer vision-based diameter maps to study fluoroscopic recordings of small intestinal motility from conscious experimental animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, I; Pantrigo, J J; Montemayor, A S; López-Pérez, A E; Martín-Fontelles, M I; Brookes, S J H; Abalo, R

    2017-08-01

    When available, fluoroscopic recordings are a relatively cheap, non-invasive and technically straightforward way to study gastrointestinal motility. Spatiotemporal maps have been used to characterize motility of intestinal preparations in vitro, or in anesthetized animals in vivo. Here, a new automated computer-based method was used to construct spatiotemporal motility maps from fluoroscopic recordings obtained in conscious rats. Conscious, non-fasted, adult, male Wistar rats (n=8) received intragastric administration of barium contrast, and 1-2 hours later, when several loops of the small intestine were well-defined, a 2 minutes-fluoroscopic recording was obtained. Spatiotemporal diameter maps (Dmaps) were automatically calculated from the recordings. Three recordings were also manually analyzed for comparison. Frequency analysis was performed in order to calculate relevant motility parameters. In each conscious rat, a stable recording (17-20 seconds) was analyzed. The Dmaps manually and automatically obtained from the same recording were comparable, but the automated process was faster and provided higher resolution. Two frequencies of motor activity dominated; lower frequency contractions (15.2±0.9 cpm) had an amplitude approximately five times greater than higher frequency events (32.8±0.7 cpm). The automated method developed here needed little investigator input, provided high-resolution results with short computing times, and automatically compensated for breathing and other small movements, allowing recordings to be made without anesthesia. Although slow and/or infrequent events could not be detected in the short recording periods analyzed to date (17-20 seconds), this novel system enhances the analysis of in vivo motility in conscious animals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Video-Based Eye Tracking to Detect the Attention Shift: A Computer Classroom Context-Aware System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Yung-Lung; Lee, Jiann-Shu; Hsieh, Min-Chai

    2014-01-01

    Eye and head movements evoked in response to obvious visual attention shifts. However, there has been little progress on the causes of absent-mindedness so far. The paper proposes an attention awareness system that captures the conditions regarding the interaction of eye gaze and head pose under various attentional switching in computer classroom.…

  20. FMT-XCT: in vivo animal studies with hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale, Angelique; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Herzog, Eva; Cohrs, Christian; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-06-01

    The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360° imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.

  1. Anatomical and metabolic small-animal whole-body imaging using ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad; Maslov, Konstantin; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-03-01

    Due to the wide use of animals for human disease studies, small animal whole-body imaging plays an increasingly important role in biomedical research. Currently, none of the existing imaging modalities can provide both anatomical and glucose metabolic information, leading to higher costs of building dual-modality systems. Even with image coregistration, the spatial resolution of the metabolic imaging modality is not improved. We present a ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT) system that can provide both assessments in a single modality. Utilizing the novel design of confocal full-ring light delivery and ultrasound transducer array detection, RC-PACT provides full-view cross-sectional imaging with high spatial resolution. Scanning along the orthogonal direction provides three-dimensional imaging. While the mouse anatomy was imaged with endogenous hemoglobin contrast, the glucose metabolism was imaged with a near-infrared dye-labeled 2-deoxyglucose. Through mouse tumor models, we demonstrate that RC-PACT may be a paradigm shifting imaging method for preclinical research.

  2. Video games

    OpenAIRE

    Kolář, Vojtěch

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is based on a detailed analysis of various topics related to the question of whether video games can be art. In the first place it analyzes the current academic discussion on this subject and confronts different opinions of both supporters and objectors of the idea, that video games can be a full-fledged art form. The second point of this paper is to analyze the properties, that are inherent to video games, in order to find the reason, why cultural elite considers video games as i...

  3. Videos for Science Communication and Nature Interpretation: The TIB|AV-Portal as Resource.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Arraiza, Paloma; Plank, Margret; Löwe, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Scientific audiovisual media such as videos of research, interactive displays or computer animations has become an important part of scientific communication and education. Dynamic phenomena can be described better by audiovisual media than by words and pictures. For this reason, scientific videos help us to understand and discuss environmental phenomena more efficiently. Moreover, the creation of scientific videos is easier than ever, thanks to mobile devices and open source editing software. Video-clips, webinars or even the interactive part of a PICO are formats of scientific audiovisual media used in the Geosciences. This type of media translates the location-referenced Science Communication such as environmental interpretation into computed-based Science Communication. A new way of Science Communication is video abstracting. A video abstract is a three- to five-minute video statement that provides background information about a research paper. It also gives authors the opportunity to present their research activities to a wider audience. Since this kind of media have become an important part of scientific communication there is a need for reliable infrastructures which are capable of managing the digital assets researchers generate. Using the reference of the usecase of video abstracts this paper gives an overview over the activities by the German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) regarding publishing and linking audiovisual media in a scientifically sound way. The German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB) in cooperation with the Hasso Plattner Institute (HPI) developed a web-based portal (av.tib.eu) that optimises access to scientific videos in the fields of science and technology. Videos from the realms of science and technology can easily be uploaded onto the TIB|AV Portal. Within a short period of time the videos are assigned a digital object identifier (DOI). This enables them to be referenced, cited, and linked (e.g. to the

  4. Animation of Antimicrobial Resistance

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... complex. This video was designed to make the concept of antimicrobial resistance more real and understandable to ... audiences. We hope this animation will make the concept more understandable to non-scientists by showing how ...

  5. Animal Bites - Multiple Languages

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Animal Bites URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/animalbites.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  6. Computational fluid dynamics model of avian tracheal temperature control as a model for extant and extinct animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlova, N S; Arkali, F; Witzel, U; Perry, S F

    2013-10-01

    Respiratory evaporative cooling is an important mechanism of temperature control in bird. A computational simulation of the breathing cycle, heat and water loss in anatomical avian trachea/air sac model has not previously been conducted. We report a first attempt to simulate a breathing cycle in a three-dimensional model of avian trachea and air sacs (domestic fowl) using transient computational fluid dynamics. The airflow in the trachea of the model is evoked by changing the volume of the air sacs based on the measured tidal volume and inspiratory/expiratory times for the domestic fowl. We compare flow parameters and heat transfer results with in vivo data and with our previously reported results for a two-dimensional model. The total respiratory heat loss corresponds to about 13-19% of the starvation metabolic rate of domestic fowl. The present study can lend insight into a possible thermoregulatory function in species with long necks and/or a very long trachea, as found in swans and birds of paradise. Assuming the structure of the sauropod dinosaur respiratory system was close to avian, the simulation of the respiratory temperature control (using convective and evaporative cooling) in the extensively experimentally studied domestic fowl may also help in making simulations of respiratory heat control in these extinct animals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Feature Quantization and Pooling for Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    similar. 1.2 Context Video has become a very popular media for communication, entertainment , and science. Videos are widely used in educational...The same approach applied to action classification from YouTube videos of sport events shows that BoW approaches on real world data sets need further...dog videos, where the camera also tracks the people and animals . In Figure 4.38 we compare across action classes how well each segmentation

  8. Computer Animation Technology in Behavioral Sciences: A Sequential, Automatic, and High-Throughput Approach to Quantifying Personality in Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fangmeier, Melissa L; Noble, Daniel W A; O'Dea, Rose E; Usui, Takuji; Lagisz, Malgorzata; Hesselson, Daniel; Nakagawa, Shinichi

    2018-01-30

    An emergent field of animal personality necessitates a method for repeated high-throughput quantification of behavioral traits across contexts. In this study, we have developed an automated video stimulus approach to sequentially present different contexts relevant to five "personality" traits (exploration, boldness, neophobia, aggression, and sociability), successfully quantifying repeatable trait measurements in multiple individuals simultaneously. Although our method is designed to quantify personality traits in zebrafish, our approach can accommodate the quantification of other behaviors, and could be customized for other species. All digital materials and detailed protocols are publicly available online for researchers to freely use and modify.

  9. Review of the effectiveness of video media in instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, C. D.; Radtke, Paul H.; Stern, Hervey W.; Dickieson, Jan; McLachlan, J. C.

    1993-04-01

    Visual forms of instruction are increasingly used as a result of the widespread use of video technologies such as broadcasts, teleconferencing, tapes, videodiscs, and emerging multimedia combinations of computer and digital video technologies. The considerable amount of research that stretches back to early work with film, television, and static visual materials can be of benefit in developing these new forms of instruction. The objective is to present a review of the current research literature regarding the use of dynamic video media in instruction. Research on the following topics was reviewed: general reviews of the effectiveness, acceptance, and costs of several forms of educational television; teaching techniques used effectively with video media; combining visual and verbal information; the effects of motion, animation, and interactivity, the relationship between media perceptions and learning; the effect of various video production techniques on learning; and critical perspectives on learning from media. This review can be used as background material for future research or instructional development efforts concerned with learning from video-based media.

  10. A quick guide to video-tracking birds

    OpenAIRE

    Bluff, Lucas A; Rutz, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Video tracking is a powerful new tool for studying natural undisturbed behaviour in a wide range of birds, mammals and reptiles. Using integrated animal-borne video tags, video footage and positional data are recorded simultaneously from wild free-ranging animals. At the analysis stage, video scenes are linked to radio fixes, yielding an animal's eye view of resource use and social interactions along a known movement trajectory. Here, we provide a brief description of our basic equipment and ...

  11. Computer-based video digitizer analysis of surface extension in maize roots: kinetics of growth rate changes during gravitropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, H.; Hasenstein, K. H.; Evans, M. L.

    1991-01-01

    We used a video digitizer system to measure surface extension and curvature in gravistimulated primary roots of maize (Zea mays L.). Downward curvature began about 25 +/- 7 min after gravistimulation and resulted from a combination of enhanced growth along the upper surface and reduced growth along the lower surface relative to growth in vertically oriented controls. The roots curved at a rate of 1.4 +/- 0.5 degrees min-1 but the pattern of curvature varied somewhat. In about 35% of the samples the roots curved steadily downward and the rate of curvature slowed as the root neared 90 degrees. A final angle of about 90 degrees was reached 110 +/- 35 min after the start of gravistimulation. In about 65% of the samples there was a period of backward curvature (partial reversal of curvature) during the response. In some cases (about 15% of those showing a period of reverse bending) this period of backward curvature occurred before the root reached 90 degrees. Following transient backward curvature, downward curvature resumed and the root approached a final angle of about 90 degrees. In about 65% of the roots showing a period of reverse curvature, the roots curved steadily past the vertical, reaching maximum curvature about 205 +/- 65 min after gravistimulation. The direction of curvature then reversed back toward the vertical. After one or two oscillations about the vertical the roots obtained a vertical orientation and the distribution of growth within the root tip became the same as that prior to gravistimulation. The period of transient backward curvature coincided with and was evidently caused by enhancement of growth along the concave and inhibition of growth along the convex side of the curve, a pattern opposite to that prevailing in the earlier stages of downward curvature. There were periods during the gravitropic response when the normally unimodal growth-rate distribution within the elongation zone became bimodal with two peaks of rapid elongation separated by

  12. Animating functional anatomy for the web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, G D

    2000-04-15

    The instructor sometimes has a complex task in explaining the concepts of functional anatomy and embryology to health professional students. However, animations can easily illustrate functional anatomy, clinical procedures, or the developing embryo. Web animation increases the accessibility of this information and makes it much more useful for independent student learning. A modified version of the animation can also be used for patient education. This article defines animation, provides a brief history of animation, discusses the principles of animation, illustrates and evaluates some of the video-editing or movie-making computer software programs, and shows examples of two of the author's animations. These two animations are the inferior alveolar nerve block from the mandibular nerve anesthetics unit and normal temporomandibular joint (TMJ) function from the muscles of the mastication and the TMJ function unit. The software discussed are the industry leaders and have made the job of producing computer-based animations much easier. The programs are Adobe Premiere, Adobe After Effects, Apple QuickTime and Macromedia Flash .

  13. The impact of introducing computer-based alternatives to the use of animals in the teaching of physiology and pharmacology at Balkan universities - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojic, Zvezdana Z; Dewhurst, David G

    2009-11-01

    Balkan universities use a substantial number of small mammals and amphibians in the teaching of physiology and pharmacology. This project investigated whether making computer-based alternatives readily available, and combining this availability with a staff development workshop focusing on methods of integrating such resources into undergraduate curricula, would have any effect on animal use. Teachers from 20 Institutes (from five Balkan countries) participated in the workshop. They presented information about animal use in teaching in their universities, and agreed to introduce at least one computer-based alternative into their teaching in the following year. They were surveyed by questionnaire before, during, and one year after, attending the workshop, in order to estimate any changes in animal use. The results showed a significant (P < 0.01) reduction in animal use and a high level of implementation of the alternatives provided at the workshop. Teachers recognised the potential benefits of using computers to support their teaching. They lacked knowledge about what computer-based alternatives are available and how to find information about them, including published evidence of their educational effectiveness. In this pilot study, a combination of staff development and making alternatives readily available to teachers had a significant impact on animal use in the teaching of physiology and pharmacology. 2009 FRAME.

  14. Color Helmet Mounted Display System with Real Time Computer Generated and Video Imagery for In-Flight Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Kevin; Jacobsen, Robert; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and the US Army are developing the Rotorcraft Aircrew Systems Concepts Airborne Laboratory (RASCAL) using a Sikorsky UH-60 helicopter for the purpose of flight systems research. A primary use of the RASCAL is in-flight simulation for which the visual scene will use computer generated imagery and synthetic vision. This research is made possible in part to a full color wide field of view Helmet Mounted Display (HMD) system that provides high performance color imagery suitable for daytime operations in a flight-rated package. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of the HMD system. Emphasis is placed on the design specifications, testing, and integration into the aircraft of Kaiser Electronics' RASCAL HMD system that was designed and built under contract for NASA. The optical performance and design of the Helmet mounted display unit will be discussed as well as the unique capabilities provided by the system's Programmable Display Generator (PDG).

  15. Face Recognition and Tracking in Videos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnil Vitthal Tathe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in computer vision technology and availability of video capturing devices such as surveillance cameras has evoked new video processing applications. The research in video face recognition is mostly biased towards law enforcement applications. Applications involves human recognition based on face and iris, human computer interaction, behavior analysis, video surveillance etc. This paper presents face tracking framework that is capable of face detection using Haar features, recognition using Gabor feature extraction, matching using correlation score and tracking using Kalman filter. The method has good recognition rate for real-life videos and robust performance to changes due to illumination, environmental factors, scale, pose and orientations.

  16. Long-term video surveillance and automated analyses reveal arousal patterns in groups of hibernating bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, David T.S.; Cryan, Paul; Fricker, Paul D.; Dannemiller, Nicholas G.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding natural behaviours is essential to determining how animals deal with new threats (e.g. emerging diseases). However, natural behaviours of animals with cryptic lifestyles, like hibernating bats, are often poorly characterized. White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an unprecedented disease threatening multiple species of hibernating bats, and pathogen-induced changes to host behaviour may contribute to mortality. To better understand the behaviours of hibernating bats and how they might relate to WNS, we developed new ways of studying hibernation across entire seasons.We used thermal-imaging video surveillance cameras to observe little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus) and Indiana bats (M. sodalis) in two caves over multiple winters. We developed new, sharable software to test for autocorrelation and periodicity of arousal signals in recorded video.We processed 740 days (17,760 hr) of video at a rate of >1,000 hr of video imagery in less than 1 hr using a desktop computer with sufficient resolution to detect increases in arousals during midwinter in both species and clear signals of daily arousal periodicity in infected M. sodalis.Our unexpected finding of periodic synchronous group arousals in hibernating bats demonstrate the potential for video methods and suggest some bats may have innate behavioural strategies for coping with WNS. Surveillance video and accessible analysis software make it now practical to investigate long-term behaviours of hibernating bats and other hard-to-study animals.

  17. User aware video streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerofsky, Louis; Jagannath, Abhijith; Reznik, Yuriy

    2015-03-01

    We describe the design of a video streaming system using adaptation to viewing conditions to reduce the bitrate needed for delivery of video content. A visual model is used to determine sufficient resolution needed under various viewing conditions. Sensors on a mobile device estimate properties of the viewing conditions, particularly the distance to the viewer. We leverage the framework of existing adaptive bitrate streaming systems such as HLS, Smooth Streaming or MPEG-DASH. The client rate selection logic is modified to include a sufficient resolution computed using the visual model and the estimated viewing conditions. Our experiments demonstrate significant bitrate savings compare to conventional streaming methods which do not exploit viewing conditions.

  18. Contextual analysis of videos

    CERN Document Server

    Thida, Myo; Monekosso, Dorothy

    2013-01-01

    Video context analysis is an active and vibrant research area, which provides means for extracting, analyzing and understanding behavior of a single target and multiple targets. Over the last few decades, computer vision researchers have been working to improve the accuracy and robustness of algorithms to analyse the context of a video automatically. In general, the research work in this area can be categorized into three major topics: 1) counting number of people in the scene 2) tracking individuals in a crowd and 3) understanding behavior of a single target or multiple targets in the scene.

  19. Video observation of hand hygiene practices during routine companion animal appointments and the effect of a poster intervention on hand hygiene compliance

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, Maureen EC; Sargeant, Jan M.; Weese, J. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is considered one of the most important infection control measures in human healthcare settings, but there is little information available regarding hand hygiene frequency and technique used in veterinary clinics. The objectives of this study were to describe hand hygiene practices associated with routine appointments in companion animal clinics in Ontario, and the effectiveness of a poster campaign to improve hand hygiene compliance. Results Observation of hand hygien...

  20. Video Podcasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne Mette; Sørensen, Birgitte Holm

    2016-01-01

    This project’s aim was to support and facilitate master’s students’ preparation and collaboration by making video podcasts of short lectures available on YouTube prior to students’ first face-to-face seminar. The empirical material stems from group interviews, from statistical data created through...... YouTube analytics and from surveys answered by students after the seminar. The project sought to explore how video podcasts support learning and reflection online and how students use and reflect on the integration of online activities in the videos. Findings showed that students engaged actively...

  1. Segmentation of object-based video of gaze communication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghito, Shankar Manuel; Stegmann, Mikkel Bille; Forchhammer, Søren

    2005-01-01

    Aspects of video communication based on gaze interaction are considered. The overall idea is to use gaze interaction to control video, e.g. for video conferencing. Towards this goal, animation of a facial mask is demonstrated. The animation is based on images using Active Appearance Models (AAM...

  2. Preoperative computed tomography of the chest in lung cancer patients: the predictive value of calcified lymph nodes for the perioperative outcomes of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery lobectomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Lee, Youkyung; Wi, Jae Yeon [Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Hyeon-Jong; Sung, Yong Won [Seoul Metropolitan Government-Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    To determine the predictive value of identifying calcified lymph nodes (LNs) for the perioperative outcomes of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Fifty-six consecutive patients who underwent VATS lobectomy for lung cancer were included. We evaluated the number and location of calcified LNs on computed tomography (CT). We investigated clinical parameters, including percentage forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV{sub 1}%), surgery duration, chest tube indwelling duration, and length of hospital stay. We performed linear regression analysis and multiple comparisons of perioperative outcomes. Mean number of calcified LNs per patient was 0.9 (range, 0-6), mostly located in the hilar-interlobar zone (43.8 %). For surgery duration (mean, 5.0 h), FEV{sub 1}% and emphysema severity were independent predictors (P = 0.010 and 0.003, respectively). The number of calcified LNs was an independent predictor for chest tube indwelling duration (P = 0.030) and length of hospital stay (P = 0.046). Mean duration of chest tube indwelling and hospital stay was 8.8 days and 12.7 days in no calcified LN group; 9.2 and 13.2 in 1 calcified LN group; 12.8 and 19.7 in {>=}2 calcified LNs group, respectively. The presence of calcified LNs on CT can help predict more complicated perioperative course following VATS lobectomy. (orig.)

  3. Illustrating Geology With Customized Video in Introductory Geoscience Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magloughlin, J. F.

    2008-12-01

    For the past several years, I have been creating short videos for use in large-enrollment introductory physical geology classes. The motivation for this project included 1) lack of appropriate depth in existing videos, 2) engagement of non-science students, 3) student indifference to traditional textbooks, 4) a desire to share the visual splendor of geology through virtual field trips, and 5) a desire to meld photography, animation, narration, and videography in self-contained experiences. These (HD) videos are information-intensive but short, allowing a focus on relatively narrow topics from numerous subdisciplines, incorporation into lectures to help create variety while minimally interrupting flow and holding students' attention, and manageable file sizes. Nearly all involve one or more field locations, including sites throughout the western and central continental U.S., as well as Hawaii, Italy, New Zealand, and Scotland. The limited scope of the project and motivations mentioned preclude a comprehensive treatment of geology. Instead, videos address geologic processes, locations, features, and interactions with humans. The videos have been made available via DVD and on-line streaming. Such a project requires an array of video and audio equipment and software, a broad knowledge of geology, very good computing power, adequate time, creativity, a substantial travel budget, liability insurance, elucidation of the separation (or non-separation) between such a project and other responsibilities, and, preferably but not essentially, the support of one's supervisor or academic unit. Involving students in such projects entails risks, but involving necessary technical expertise is virtually unavoidable. In my own courses, some videos are used in class and/or made available on-line as simply another aspect of the educational experience. Student response has been overwhelmingly positive, particularly when expectations of students regarding the content of the videos is made

  4. Evaluation of Sisom: A computer-based animated tool to elicit symptoms and psychosocial concerns from children with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggott, Christina; Baird, Jennifer; Hinds, Pamela; Ruland, Cornelia M; Miaskowski, Christine

    2015-08-01

    In pediatric oncology, clear communication regarding symptom occurrence between clinicians and children is essential in order to provide safe and effective care. Mobile technology provides a means to enhance the standard clinician-patient interview, particularly among children, who are well versed in the use of technology. To help children identify and voice their concerns in the health care setting, researchers created Sisom, an animated computer tool for children and young people with serious and chronic illnesses. The purposes of this study of 100 dyads of patients 7-12 years of age and their parents were to: compare participants' reports of symptom occurrence using Sisom to a standard symptom checklist and determine the time requirements, ease of use, and perceived usefulness of the Sisom tool by children with cancer and their parents. Child and parent participants completed both Sisom and the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Symptoms on the two tools were compared and 20 items were similar to allow for comparisons. Children reported a significantly higher number of these 20 symptoms using Sisom as compared to the MSAS (i.e., 6.8 versus 4.9 symptoms, p elicit symptom reports from children for use in clinical care and research. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Effect of Animation in Multimedia Computer-Based Learning and Learning Style to the Learning Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad RUSLI

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a learning depends on four main elements, they are content, desired learning outcome, instructional method and the delivery media. The integration of those four elements can be manifested into a learning modul which is called multimedia learning or learning by using multimedia. In learning context by using computer-based multimedia, there are two main things that need to be noticed so that the learning process can run effectively: how the content is presented, and what the learner’s chosen way in accepting and processing the information into a meaningful knowledge. First it is related with the way to visualize the content and how people learn. The second one is related with the learning style of the learner. This research aims to investigate the effect of the type of visualization—static vs animated—on a multimedia computer-based learning, and learning styles—visual vs verbal, towards the students’ capability in applying the concepts, procedures, principles of Java programming. Visualization type act as independent variables, and learning styles of the students act as a moderator variable. Moreover, the instructional strategies followed the Component Display Theory of Merril, and the format of presentation of multimedia followed the Seven Principles of Multimedia Learning of Mayer and Moreno. Learning with the multimedia computer-based learning has been done in the classroom. The subject of this research was the student of STMIK-STIKOM Bali in odd semester 2016-2017 which followed the course of Java programming. The Design experiments used multivariate analysis of variance, MANOVA 2 x 2, with a large sample of 138 students in 4 classes. Based on the results of the analysis, it can be concluded that the animation in multimedia interactive learning gave a positive effect in improving students’ learning outcomes, particularly in the applying the concepts, procedures, and principles of Java programming. The

  6. Geotail Video News Release

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The Geotail mission, part of the International Solar Terrestrial Physics (ISTP) program, measures global energy flow and transformation in the magnetotail to increase understanding of fundamental magnetospheric processes. The satellite was launched on July 24, 1992 onboard a Delta II rocket. This video shows with animation the solar wind, and its effect on the Earth. The narrator explains that the Geotail spacecraft was designed and built by the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS), the Japanese Space Agency. The mission objectives are reviewed by one of the scientist in a live view. The video also shows an animation of the orbit, while the narrator explains the orbit and the reason for the small launch window.

  7. A Big Video Manifesto

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mcilvenny, Paul Bruce; Davidsen, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    For the last few years, we have witnessed a hype about the potential results and insights that quantitative big data can bring to the social sciences. The wonder of big data has moved into education, traffic planning, and disease control with a promise of making things better with big numbers...... and beautiful visualisations. However, we also need to ask what the tools of big data can do both for the Humanities and for more interpretative approaches and methods. Thus, we prefer to explore how the power of computation, new sensor technologies and massive storage can also help with video-based qualitative...... inquiry, such as video ethnography, ethnovideo, performance documentation, anthropology and multimodal interaction analysis. That is why we put forward, half-jokingly at first, a Big Video manifesto to spur innovation in the Digital Humanities....

  8. Brains on video games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavelier, Daphne; Green, C Shawn; Han, Doug Hyun; Renshaw, Perry F; Merzenich, Michael M; Gentile, Douglas A

    2011-11-18

    The popular press is replete with stories about the effects of video and computer games on the brain. Sensationalist headlines claiming that video games 'damage the brain' or 'boost brain power' do not do justice to the complexities and limitations of the studies involved, and create a confusing overall picture about the effects of gaming on the brain. Here, six experts in the field shed light on our current understanding of the positive and negative ways in which playing video games can affect cognition and behaviour, and explain how this knowledge can be harnessed for educational and rehabilitation purposes. As research in this area is still in its early days, the contributors of this Viewpoint also discuss several issues and challenges that should be addressed to move the field forward.

  9. Developing PCR Primers Using a New Computer Program for Detection of Multiple Animal-Derived Materials in Feed

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shinoda, Naoki; Kusama, Toyoko; Yoshida, Tomotaro; Sugiura, Tatsuki; Kadowaki, Koh-Ichi; Onodera, Takashi; Sugiura, Katsuaki

    2008-01-01

    To reduce the risk of the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent being recycled to cattle through animal feed, in October 2001 Japan introduced a feed ban prohibiting the use of animal proteins in feed...

  10. Use of a Proximity Sensor Switch for "Hands Free" Operation of Computer-Based Video Prompting by Young Adults with Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Alexandria N.; Mechling, Linda C.; Spencer, Galen P.

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effectiveness of a "hands free" approach for operating video prompts to complete multi-step tasks was measured. Students advanced the video prompts by using a motion (hand wave) over a proximity sensor switch. Three young adult females with a diagnosis of moderate intellectual disability participated in the study.…

  11. Fostering Primary School Students' Understanding of Cells and Other Related Concepts with Interactive Computer Animation Instruction Accompanied by Teacher and Student-Prepared Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Ercan; Ergin, Omer

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of instruction (application) including interactive computer animation accompanied by teacher and student-prepared concept maps on primary students' biology achievement during instruction, as well as revealing attitudes towards science as a school subject. A quasi-experimental…

  12. Effect of Computer Animation Technique on Students' Comprehension of the "Solar System and Beyond" Unit in the Science and Technology Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Gokhan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the effect of computer animation technique on academic achievement of students in the "Solar System and Beyond" unit lecture as part of the Science and Technology course of the seventh grade in primary education. The sample of the study consists of 60 students attending to the 7th grade of primary school…

  13. The Effects of Computer Simulation and Animation (CSA) on Students' Cognitive Processes: A Comparative Case Study in an Undergraduate Engineering Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, N.; Tajvidi, M.

    2018-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of the effects of computer simulation and animation (CSA) on students' cognitive processes in an undergraduate engineering course. The revised Bloom's taxonomy, which consists of six categories in the cognitive process domain, was employed in this study. Five of the six categories were investigated,…

  14. Deep video deblurring

    KAUST Repository

    Su, Shuochen

    2016-11-25

    Motion blur from camera shake is a major problem in videos captured by hand-held devices. Unlike single-image deblurring, video-based approaches can take advantage of the abundant information that exists across neighboring frames. As a result the best performing methods rely on aligning nearby frames. However, aligning images is a computationally expensive and fragile procedure, and methods that aggregate information must therefore be able to identify which regions have been accurately aligned and which have not, a task which requires high level scene understanding. In this work, we introduce a deep learning solution to video deblurring, where a CNN is trained end-to-end to learn how to accumulate information across frames. To train this network, we collected a dataset of real videos recorded with a high framerate camera, which we use to generate synthetic motion blur for supervision. We show that the features learned from this dataset extend to deblurring motion blur that arises due to camera shake in a wide range of videos, and compare the quality of results to a number of other baselines.

  15. A Multi-View Intelligent Editor for Digital Video Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Brad A.; Casares, Juan P.; Stevens, Scott; Dabbish, Laura; Yocum, Dan; Corbett, Albert

    Digital video is becoming increasingly ubiquitous. Most camcorders today are digital, and computers are being advertised based on their video editing capabilities. Many exciting research projects are investigating how to search, visualize, and summarize digital video, but there is little work on new ways to support the use of the video beyond just…

  16. Using Robot Animation to Promote Gestural Skills in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, W.-C.; Wong, M. K.-Y.; Cabibihan, J.-J.; Lam, C. K.-Y.; Chan, R. Y.-Y.; Qian, H.-H.

    2016-01-01

    School-aged children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) have delayed gestural development, in comparison with age-matched typically developing children. In this study, an intervention program taught children with low-functioning ASD gestural comprehension and production using video modelling (VM) by a computer-generated robot animation. Six to…

  17. Akademisk video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Dette kapitel har fokus på metodiske problemstillinger, der opstår i forhold til at bruge (digital) video i forbindelse med forskningskommunikation, ikke mindst online. Video har længe været benyttet i forskningen til dataindsamling og forskningskommunikation. Med digitaliseringen og internettet er...... der dog opstået nye muligheder og udfordringer i forhold til at formidle og distribuere forskningsresultater til forskellige målgrupper via video. Samtidig er klassiske metodologiske problematikker som forskerens positionering i forhold til det undersøgte stadig aktuelle. Både klassiske og nye...... problemstillinger diskuteres i kapitlet, som rammesætter diskussionen ud fra forskellige positioneringsmuligheder: formidler, historiefortæller, eller dialogist. Disse positioner relaterer sig til genrer inden for ’akademisk video’. Afslutningsvis præsenteres en metodisk værktøjskasse med redskaber til planlægning...

  18. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... World Videos. The workshops were run on December 4, 2016, in Cancun in Mexico. The two workshops together received 13 papers. Each paper was then reviewed by at least two expert reviewers in the field. In all, 11 papers were accepted to be presented at the workshops. The topics covered in the papers...

  19. The relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools, Kermanshah/Lien entre pratique des jeux vidéo sur ordinateur ou sur console, santé mentale et relations sociales chez des collégiens de Kermanshah

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    S Reshadat; S R Ghasemi; M Ahmadian; N RajabiGilan

    2013-01-01

    .... This cross-sectional study aimed to evaluate the relationship between playing computer or video games with mental health and social relationships among students in guidance schools in Kermanshah...

  20. Video observation of hand hygiene practices during routine companion animal appointments and the effect of a poster intervention on hand hygiene compliance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Hand hygiene is considered one of the most important infection control measures in human healthcare settings, but there is little information available regarding hand hygiene frequency and technique used in veterinary clinics. The objectives of this study were to describe hand hygiene practices associated with routine appointments in companion animal clinics in Ontario, and the effectiveness of a poster campaign to improve hand hygiene compliance. Results Observation of hand hygiene practices was performed in 51 clinics for approximately 3 weeks each using 2 small wireless surveillance cameras: one in an exam room, and one in the most likely location for hand hygiene to be performed outside the exam room following an appointment. Data from 38 clinics were included in the final analysis, including 449 individuals, 1139 appointments before and after the poster intervention, and 10894 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 14% (1473/10894), while before and after patient contact compliance was 3% (123/4377) and 26% (1145/4377), respectively. Soap and water was used for 87% (1182/1353) of observed hand hygiene attempts with a mean contact time of 4 s (median 2 s, range 1-49 s), while alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) was used for 7% (98/1353) of attempts with a mean contact time of 8 s (median 7 s, range 1-30 s). The presence of the posters had no significant effect on compliance, although some staff reported that they felt the posters did increase their personal awareness of the need to perform hand hygiene, and the posters had some effect on product contact times. Conclusions Overall hand hygiene compliance in veterinary clinics in this study was low, and contact time with hand hygiene products was frequently below current recommendations. Use of ABHR was low despite its advantages over hand washing and availability in the majority of clinics. The poster campaign had a limited effect on its own, but could still be used as a

  1. Video observation of hand hygiene practices during routine companion animal appointments and the effect of a poster intervention on hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Maureen E C; Sargeant, Jan M; Weese, J Scott

    2014-05-07

    Hand hygiene is considered one of the most important infection control measures in human healthcare settings, but there is little information available regarding hand hygiene frequency and technique used in veterinary clinics. The objectives of this study were to describe hand hygiene practices associated with routine appointments in companion animal clinics in Ontario, and the effectiveness of a poster campaign to improve hand hygiene compliance. Observation of hand hygiene practices was performed in 51 clinics for approximately 3 weeks each using 2 small wireless surveillance cameras: one in an exam room, and one in the most likely location for hand hygiene to be performed outside the exam room following an appointment. Data from 38 clinics were included in the final analysis, including 449 individuals, 1139 appointments before and after the poster intervention, and 10894 hand hygiene opportunities. Overall hand hygiene compliance was 14% (1473/10894), while before and after patient contact compliance was 3% (123/4377) and 26% (1145/4377), respectively. Soap and water was used for 87% (1182/1353) of observed hand hygiene attempts with a mean contact time of 4 s (median 2 s, range 1-49 s), while alcohol-based hand rub (ABHR) was used for 7% (98/1353) of attempts with a mean contact time of 8 s (median 7 s, range 1-30 s). The presence of the posters had no significant effect on compliance, although some staff reported that they felt the posters did increase their personal awareness of the need to perform hand hygiene, and the posters had some effect on product contact times. Overall hand hygiene compliance in veterinary clinics in this study was low, and contact time with hand hygiene products was frequently below current recommendations. Use of ABHR was low despite its advantages over hand washing and availability in the majority of clinics. The poster campaign had a limited effect on its own, but could still be used as a component of a multimodal hand

  2. JAABA: interactive machine learning for automatic annotation of animal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabra, Mayank; Robie, Alice A; Rivera-Alba, Marta; Branson, Steven; Branson, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    We present a machine learning-based system for automatically computing interpretable, quantitative measures of animal behavior. Through our interactive system, users encode their intuition about behavior by annotating a small set of video frames. These manual labels are converted into classifiers that can automatically annotate behaviors in screen-scale data sets. Our general-purpose system can create a variety of accurate individual and social behavior classifiers for different organisms, including mice and adult and larval Drosophila.

  3. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real W...

  4. Fast Aerial Video Stitching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The highly efficient and robust stitching of aerial video captured by unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs is a challenging problem in the field of robot vision. Existing commercial image stitching systems have seen success with offline stitching tasks, but they cannot guarantee high-speed performance when dealing with online aerial video sequences. In this paper, we present a novel system which has an unique ability to stitch high-frame rate aerial video at a speed of 150 frames per second (FPS. In addition, rather than using a high-speed vision platform such as FPGA or CUDA, our system is running on a normal personal computer. To achieve this, after the careful comparison of the existing invariant features, we choose the FAST corner and binary descriptor for efficient feature extraction and representation, and present a spatial and temporal coherent filter to fuse the UAV motion information into the feature matching. The proposed filter can remove the majority of feature correspondence outliers and significantly increase the speed of robust feature matching by up to 20 times. To achieve a balance between robustness and efficiency, a dynamic key frame-based stitching framework is used to reduce the accumulation errors. Extensive experiments on challenging UAV datasets demonstrate that our approach can break through the speed limitation and generate an accurate stitching image for aerial video stitching tasks.

  5. Interactive Video, The Next Step

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, L. R.; Wold-Brennon, R.; Cooper, S. K.; Brinkhuis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Video has the ingredients to reach us emotionally - with amazing images, enthusiastic interviews, music, and video game-like animations-- and it's emotion that motivates us to learn more about our new interest. However, watching video is usually passive. New web-based technology is expanding and enhancing the video experience, creating opportunities to use video with more direct interaction. This talk will look at an Educaton and Outreach team's experience producing video-centric curriculum using innovative interactive media tools from TED-Ed and FlixMaster. The Consortium for Ocean Leadership's Deep Earth Academy has partnered with the Center for Dark Energy Biosphere Investigations (C-DEBI) to send educators and a video producer aboard three deep sea research expeditions to the Juan de Fuca plate to install and service sub-seafloor observatories. This collaboration between teachers, students, scientists and media producers has proved a productive confluence, providing new ways of understanding both ground-breaking science and the process of science itself - by experimenting with new ways to use multimedia during ocean-going expeditions and developing curriculum and other projects post-cruise.

  6. Face recognition-based authentication and monitoring in video telecommunication systems

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Sc. (Computer Science) A video conference is an interactive meeting between two or more locations, facilitated by simultaneous two-way video and audio transmissions. People in a video conference, also known as participants, join these video conferences for business and recreational purposes. In a typical video conference, we should properly identify and authenticate every participant in the video conference, if information discussed during the video conference is confidential. This preve...

  7. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...... include: re-identification, consumer behavior analysis, utilizing pupillary response for task difficulty measurement, logo detection, saliency prediction, classification of facial expressions, face recognition, face verification, age estimation, super-resolution, pose estimation, and pain recognition...

  8. Video Analytics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    include: re-identification, consumer behavior analysis, utilizing pupillary response for task difficulty measurement, logo detection, saliency prediction, classification of facial expressions, face recognition, face verification, age estimation, super-resolution, pose estimation, and pain recognition......This book collects the papers presented at two workshops during the 23rd International Conference on Pattern Recognition (ICPR): the Third Workshop on Video Analytics for Audience Measurement (VAAM) and the Second International Workshop on Face and Facial Expression Recognition (FFER) from Real...

  9. Video in foreign language teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Hambrook

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Much of the attention paid to video in foreign language teaching is focused upon a relatively small amount of commercially produced and distributed material. This paper briefly describes the development of this material in the EFLIESL field; looks at some current issues and concerns, and considers future possibilities with particular reference to computer assisted interactive video. Heelwat van die aandag wat video geniet as hulpmiddel by tweedetaalonderrig is toegespits op 'n relatief klein hoeveelheid kommersieel vervaardigde en verspreide materiaal. Hierdie artikel beskryf kortliks die ontwikkeling van bogenoemde materiaal waar dit Engels as tweede of vreemde taal betref. Verder word daar aandag gegee aan huidige tendense en toekomstige moontlikhede word oorweeg, met spesifieke verwysing na rekenaarondersteunde interaktiewe video.

  10. Fine and Gross Motor Task Performance When Using Computer-Based Video Models by Students with Autism and Moderate Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechling, Linda C.; Swindle, Catherine O.

    2013-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of video modeling on the fine and gross motor task performance by three students with a diagnosis of moderate intellectual disability (Group 1) and by three students with a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (Group 2). Using a multiple probe design across three sets of tasks, the study examined the…

  11. The Impact of Animated Books on the Vocabulary and Language Development of Preschool-Aged Children in Two School Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broemmel, Amy D.; Moran, Mary Jane; Wooten, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    With the emergence of electronic media over the past two decades, young children have been found to have increased exposure to video games, computer-based activities, and electronic books (e-books). This study explores how exposure to animated ebooks impacts young children's literacy development. A stratified convenience sample (n = 24) was…

  12. Digital video technology - today and tomorrow: 11th office information technology conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liberman, J.

    1994-10-01

    Digital video is probably computing`s fastest moving technology today. Just three years ago, the zenith of digital video technology on the PC was the successful marriage of digital text and graphics with analog audio and video by means of expensive analog laser disc players and video overlay boards. The state of the art involves two different approaches to fully digital video on computers: hardware-assisted and software-only solutions.

  13. Video time encoding machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Aurel A; Pnevmatikakis, Eftychios A

    2011-03-01

    We investigate architectures for time encoding and time decoding of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation). The architecture for time encoding is akin to models of the early visual system. It consists of a bank of filters in cascade with single-input multi-output neural circuits. Neuron firing is based on either a threshold-and-fire or an integrate-and-fire spiking mechanism with feedback. We show that analog information is represented by the neural circuits as projections on a set of band-limited functions determined by the spike sequence. Under Nyquist-type and frame conditions, the encoded signal can be recovered from these projections with arbitrary precision. For the video time encoding machine architecture, we demonstrate that band-limited video streams of finite energy can be faithfully recovered from the spike trains and provide a stable algorithm for perfect recovery. The key condition for recovery calls for the number of neurons in the population to be above a threshold value.

  14. Public Education and Outreach Through Full-Dome Video Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, John

    2009-03-01

    My long-term goal is to enhance public understanding of complex systems that can be best demonstrated through richly detailed computer graphic animation displayed with full-dome video technology. My current focus is on health science advances that focus on regenerative medicine, which helps the body heal itself. Such topics facilitate science learning and health literacy. My team develops multi-media presentations that bring the scientific and medical advances to the public through immersive high-definition video animation. Implicit in treating the topics of regenerative medicine will be the need to address stem cell biology. The topics are clarified and presented from a platform of facts and balanced ethical consideration. The production process includes communicating scientific information about the excitement and importance of stem cell research. Principles of function are emphasized over specific facts or terminology by focusing on a limited, but fundamental set of concepts. To achieve this, visually rich, biologically accurate 3D computer graphic environments are created to illustrate the cells, tissues and organs of interest. A suite of films are produced, and evaluated in pre- post-surveys assessing attitudes, knowledge and learning. Each film uses engaging interactive demonstrations to illustrate biological functions, the things that go wrong due to disease and disability, and the remedy provided by regenerative medicine. While the images are rich and detailed, the language is accessible and appropriate to the audience. The digital, high-definition video is also re-edited for presentation in other ``flat screen'' formats, increasing our distribution potential. Show content is also presented in an interactive web space (www.sepa.duq.edu) with complementing teacher resource guides and student workbooks and companion video games.

  15. Three-dimensional computer graphic animations for studying social approach behaviour in medaka fish: Effects of systematic manipulation of morphological and motion cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayasu, Tomohiro; Yasugi, Masaki; Shiraishi, Soma; Uchida, Seiichi; Watanabe, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    We studied social approach behaviour in medaka fish using three-dimensional computer graphic (3DCG) animations based on the morphological features and motion characteristics obtained from real fish. This is the first study which used 3DCG animations and examined the relative effects of morphological and motion cues on social approach behaviour in medaka. Various visual stimuli, e.g., lack of motion, lack of colour, alternation in shape, lack of locomotion, lack of body motion, and normal virtual fish in which all four features (colour, shape, locomotion, and body motion) were reconstructed, were created and presented to fish using a computer display. Medaka fish presented with normal virtual fish spent a long time in proximity to the display, whereas time spent near the display was decreased in other groups when compared with normal virtual medaka group. The results suggested that the naturalness of visual cues contributes to the induction of social approach behaviour. Differential effects between body motion and locomotion were also detected. 3DCG animations can be a useful tool to study the mechanisms of visual processing and social behaviour in medaka.

  16. Three-dimensional computer graphic animations for studying social approach behaviour in medaka fish: Effects of systematic manipulation of morphological and motion cues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiro Nakayasu

    Full Text Available We studied social approach behaviour in medaka fish using three-dimensional computer graphic (3DCG animations based on the morphological features and motion characteristics obtained from real fish. This is the first study which used 3DCG animations and examined the relative effects of morphological and motion cues on social approach behaviour in medaka. Various visual stimuli, e.g., lack of motion, lack of colour, alternation in shape, lack of locomotion, lack of body motion, and normal virtual fish in which all four features (colour, shape, locomotion, and body motion were reconstructed, were created and presented to fish using a computer display. Medaka fish presented with normal virtual fish spent a long time in proximity to the display, whereas time spent near the display was decreased in other groups when compared with normal virtual medaka group. The results suggested that the naturalness of visual cues contributes to the induction of social approach behaviour. Differential effects between body motion and locomotion were also detected. 3DCG animations can be a useful tool to study the mechanisms of visual processing and social behaviour in medaka.

  17. Assessing Higher Order Thinking in Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, John

    2007-01-01

    Computer video games have become highly interesting to educators and researchers since their sophistication has improved considerably over the last decade. Studies indicate simple video games touting educational benefits are common in classrooms. However, a need for identifying truly useful games for educational purposes exists. This article…

  18. Video Field Studies with your Cell Phone

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buur, Jacob; Fraser, Euan

    2010-01-01

    is monumental, that equipment is difficult to handle etc. This tutorial presents a lightweight entry into video field studies, using cheap devices like cell phones and portable webcams for informal shooting and simple computer handling for editing. E.g. how far can you get with an iPhone or a video capable i...

  19. Internet-based dissemination of educational video presentations: a primer in video podcasting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corl, Frank M; Johnson, Pamela T; Rowell, Melissa R; Fishman, Elliot K

    2008-07-01

    Video "podcasting" is an Internet-based publication and syndication technology that is defined as the process of capturing, editing, distributing, and downloading audio, video, and general multimedia productions. The expanded capacity for visual components allows radiologists to view still and animated media. These image-viewing characteristics and the ease of widespread delivery are well suited for radiologic education. This article presents detailed information about how to generate and distribute a video podcast using a Macintosh platform.

  20. Using animated computer-generated text and graphics to depict the risks and benefits of medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tait, Alan R; Voepel-Lewis, Terri; Brennan-Martinez, Colleen; McGonegal, Maureen; Levine, Robert

    2012-11-01

    Conventional print materials for presenting risks and benefits of treatment are often difficult to understand. This study was undertaken to evaluate and compare subjects' understanding and perceptions of risks and benefits presented using animated computerized text and graphics. Adult subjects were randomized to receive identical risk/benefit information regarding taking statins that was presented on an iPad (Apple Corp, Cupertino, Calif) in 1 of 4 different animated formats: text/numbers, pie chart, bar graph, and pictograph. Subjects completed a questionnaire regarding their preferences and perceptions of the message delivery together with their understanding of the information. Health literacy, numeracy, and need for cognition were measured using validated instruments. There were no differences in subject understanding based on the different formats. However, significantly more subjects preferred graphs (82.5%) compared with text (17.5%, Pcomputer-animated depictions of risks and benefits offer an effective means to describe medical risk/benefit statistics. That understanding and satisfaction were significantly better when the format matched the individual's preference for message delivery is important and reinforces the value of "tailoring" information to the individual's needs and preferences. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Animal models for bone and joint disease. Assessment of bone mass, structure and strength in rat and mouse models - focus on micro-computed tomography study -].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masako

    2011-02-01

    In the assessment of quality of bone in animal models, it is required to know the differences in bone mineral density, bone structure and strength from the human bones. "Guidelines for Assessment of Bone Microstructure in Rodents Using Micro-Computed Tomography" has been published (2010 JBMR). For a good use of micro-CT for animal studies, the important items are explained in this article, (1) Imaging acquisition : sample preparation and positioning, X-ray scan conditions, voxel size/image resolution, region of interest (2) Image processing : filtration, segmentation (3) Terminology and algorithm of trabecular (bone volume fraction, trabecular number/thickness/separation, structure model index, connectivity, degree of anisotropy) and cortical (cross-sectional area, cortical thickness) bone morphometry.

  2. A prototype to automate the video subsystem routing for the video distribution subsystem of Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, Jessie M. Bethly

    1993-12-01

    The Video Distribution Subsystem (VDS) for Space Station Freedom provides onboard video communications. The VDS includes three major functions: external video switching; internal video switching; and sync and control generation. The Video Subsystem Routing (VSR) is a part of the VDS Manager Computer Software Configuration Item (VSM/CSCI). The VSM/CSCI is the software which controls and monitors the VDS equipment. VSR activates, terminates, and modifies video services in response to Tier-1 commands to connect video sources to video destinations. VSR selects connection paths based on availability of resources and updates the video routing lookup tables. This project involves investigating the current methodology to automate the Video Subsystem Routing and developing and testing a prototype as 'proof of concept' for designers.

  3. Digital video for the desktop

    CERN Document Server

    Pender, Ken

    1999-01-01

    Practical introduction to creating and editing high quality video on the desktop. Using examples from a variety of video applications, benefit from a professional's experience, step-by-step, through a series of workshops demonstrating a wide variety of techniques. These include producing short films, multimedia and internet presentations, animated graphics and special effects.The opportunities for the independent videomaker have never been greater - make sure you bring your understanding fully up to date with this invaluable guide.No prior knowledge of the technology is assumed, with explanati

  4. The Structural Communication Methodology as a Means of Teaching George Orwell's "Animal Farm": Paper and Computer-Based Instruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romiszowski, Alex; Abrahamson, Andrew

    1994-01-01

    Provides brief history of Structural Communication (SC) methodology and discusses its use for teaching eighth-grade literature. Examines strengths and weaknesses of SC in print and hypermedia formats, and discusses the computer-based implementation of this participatory method of instruction. (JKP)

  5. Utilizing Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaize, L.

    Almost from its birth, the computer and video gaming industry has done an admirable job of communicating the vision and attempting to convey the experience of traveling through space to millions of gamers from all cultures and demographics. This paper will propose several approaches the 100 Year Starship Study can take to use the power of interactive media to stir interest in the Starship and related projects among a global population. It will examine successful gaming franchises from the past that are relevant to the mission and consider ways in which the Starship Study could cooperate with game development studios to bring the Starship vision to those franchises and thereby to the public. The paper will examine ways in which video games can be used to crowd-source research aspects for the Study, and how video games are already considering many of the same topics that will be examined by this Study. Finally, the paper will propose some mechanisms by which the 100 Year Starship Study can establish very close ties with the gaming industry and foster cooperation in pursuit of the Study's goals.

  6. Digital Video: Get with It!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Several years after the first audiovisual Macintosh computer appeared, most educators are still oblivious of this technology. Almost every other economic sector (including the porn industry) makes abundant use of digital and streaming video. Desktop movie production is so easy that primary grade students can do it. Tips are provided. (MLH)

  7. Video Games and Civic Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins-Gough, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    According to a national telephone survey by the Pew Internet Project, 99 percent of boys and 94 percent of girls ages 12-17 play computer, Web, portable, or console games; and 50 percent play such games daily. The survey report, Teens, Video Games, and Civics, examines the extent and nature of teens' game playing and sheds some light on the…

  8. A computational pipeline for quantification of pulmonary infections in small animal models using serial PET-CT imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Bagci, Ulas; Foster, Brent; Miller-Jaster, Kirsten; Luna, Brian; Dey, Bappaditya; William R Bishai; Jonsson, Colleen B.; Jain, Sanjay; Mollura, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are the second leading cause of death worldwide. In order to better understand and treat them, an accurate evaluation using multi-modal imaging techniques for anatomical and functional characterizations is needed. For non-invasive imaging techniques such as computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and positron emission tomography (PET), there have been many engineering improvements that have significantly enhanced the resolution and contrast o...

  9. Evaluation of Video Quality in Wireless Multimedia Sensor Networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mustafa Shakir; Obaid Ur Rehman; Zeeshan Abbas; Abdullah Masood; Wajeeha Shahid

    2016-01-01

    .... Scenarios involving multimedia transmissions with characteristics of video quality control and evaluation must be computed on the basis of Quality of Experience which relies on user's perception...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview In autumn the main focus was to process and handle CRAFT data and to perform the Summer08 MC production. The operational aspects were well covered by regular Computing Shifts, experts on duty and Computing Run Coordination. At the Computing Resource Board (CRB) in October a model to account for service work at Tier 2s was approved. The computing resources for 2009 were reviewed for presentation at the C-RRB. The quarterly resource monitoring is continuing. Facilities/Infrastructure operations Operations during CRAFT data taking ran fine. This proved to be a very valuable experience for T0 workflows and operations. The transfers of custodial data to most T1s went smoothly. A first round of reprocessing started at the Tier-1 centers end of November; it will take about two weeks. The Computing Shifts procedure was tested full scale during this period and proved to be very efficient: 30 Computing Shifts Persons (CSP) and 10 Computing Resources Coordinators (CRC). The shift program for the shut down w...

  11. Tech Tips: Using Video Management/ Analysis Technology in Qualitative Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Spiers

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents tips on how to use video in qualitative research. The author states that, though there many complex and powerful computer programs for working with video, the work done in qualitative research does not require those programs. For this work, simple editing software is sufficient. Also presented is an easy and efficient method of transcribing video clips.

  12. 36 CFR 1194.24 - Video and multimedia products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Video and multimedia products... Video and multimedia products. (a) All analog television displays 13 inches and larger, and computer... training and informational video and multimedia productions which support the agency's mission, regardless...

  13. Tech Tips: Using Video Management/ Analysis Technology in Qualitative Research

    OpenAIRE

    J.A. Spiers

    2004-01-01

    This article presents tips on how to use video in qualitative research. The author states that, though there many complex and powerful computer programs for working with video, the work done in qualitative research does not require those programs. For this work, simple editing software is sufficient. Also presented is an easy and efficient method of transcribing video clips.

  14. Composing with Images: A Study of High School Video Producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Brian

    At Bell High School (Los Angeles, California), students have been using video cameras, computers and editing machines to create videos in a variety of forms and on a variety of topics; in this setting, video is the textual medium of expression. A study was conducted using participant-observation and interviewing over the course of one school year…

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Overview During the past three months activities were focused on data operations, testing and re-enforcing shift and operational procedures for data production and transfer, MC production and on user support. Planning of the computing resources in view of the new LHC calendar in ongoing. Two new task forces were created for supporting the integration work: Site Commissioning, which develops tools helping distributed sites to monitor job and data workflows, and Analysis Support, collecting the user experience and feedback during analysis activities and developing tools to increase efficiency. The development plan for DMWM for 2009/2011 was developed at the beginning of the year, based on the requirements from the Physics, Computing and Offline groups (see Offline section). The Computing management meeting at FermiLab on February 19th and 20th was an excellent opportunity discussing the impact and for addressing issues and solutions to the main challenges facing CMS computing. The lack of manpower is particul...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction CMS distributed computing system performed well during the 2011 start-up. The events in 2011 have more pile-up and are more complex than last year; this results in longer reconstruction times and harder events to simulate. Significant increases in computing capacity were delivered in April for all computing tiers, and the utilisation and load is close to the planning predictions. All computing centre tiers performed their expected functionalities. Heavy-Ion Programme The CMS Heavy-Ion Programme had a very strong showing at the Quark Matter conference. A large number of analyses were shown. The dedicated heavy-ion reconstruction facility at the Vanderbilt Tier-2 is still involved in some commissioning activities, but is available for processing and analysis. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Facility and Infrastructure operations have been active with operations and several important deployment tasks. Facilities participated in the testing and deployment of WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request...

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    The Computing Project is preparing for a busy year where the primary emphasis of the project moves towards steady operations. Following the very successful completion of Computing Software and Analysis challenge, CSA06, last fall, we have reorganized and established four groups in computing area: Commissioning, User Support, Facility/Infrastructure Operations and Data Operations. These groups work closely together with groups from the Offline Project in planning for data processing and operations. Monte Carlo production has continued since CSA06, with about 30M events produced each month to be used for HLT studies and physics validation. Monte Carlo production will continue throughout the year in the preparation of large samples for physics and detector studies ramping to 50 M events/month for CSA07. Commissioning of the full CMS computing system is a major goal for 2007. Site monitoring is an important commissioning component and work is ongoing to devise CMS specific tests to be included in Service Availa...

  18. TAV-IR: a visible and near-IR radiometric analysis code which operates with an off-the-shelf computer animation package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Andrew C.; Mischel, Dennis P.

    1994-06-01

    This paper describes a new image generation software code for creating radiometrically accurate images in the visible and near-infrared wavelength band. It was developed to evaluate pilot vision through aircraft windscreens and was written to operate in conjunction with an off- the-shelf computer animation software package. This capability allows the user to take advantage of the geometric modeling and motion generation capabilities inherent within the computer animation software for scene and scenario generation while using the new image generation codes for sensor modeling. The code, called TAV-IR, uses spectral reflectance and transmittance data as a function of incidence angle to describe surface material properties and spectral illumination data to model light sources. Once the operator selects the wavelength band of interest, the spectral sampling rate and the image size, the code produces an `image cube' consisting of floating point radiometric values for each pixel and each wavelength bin modeled. This image cube is then post-processed for sensor modeling purposes and image display. The code also reads an output file from a thin-film optical coating analysis package so that the reflective and transmissive properties of coated windscreens can be modeled. An interactive image inspection and display tool with a graphical user interface was also developed. This interactive tool, called SPEC, allows image pan and zoom and permits the operator to select pixels in the scene and view the spectral data contained in the selected pixels.

  19. Influence of Respiratory Gating, Image Filtering, and Animal Positioning on High-Resolution Electrocardiography-Gated Murine Cardiac Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac parameters obtained from single-photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT images can be affected by respiratory motion, image filtering, and animal positioning. We investigated the influence of these factors on ultra-high-resolution murine myocardial perfusion SPECT. Five mice were injected with 99m technetium (99mTc-tetrofosmin, and each was scanned in supine and prone positions in a U-SPECT-II scanner with respiratory and electrocardiographic (ECG gating. ECG-gated SPECT images were created without applying respiratory motion correction or with two different respiratory motion correction strategies. The images were filtered with a range of three-dimensional gaussian kernels, after which end-diastolic volumes (EDVs, end-systolic volumes (ESVs, and left ventricular ejection fractions were calculated. No significant differences in the measured cardiac parameters were detected when any strategy to reduce or correct for respiratory motion was applied, whereas big differences (> 5% in EDV and ESV were found with regard to different positioning of animals. A linear relationship (p < .001 was found between the EDV or ESV and the kernel size of the gaussian filter. In short, respiratory gating did not significantly affect the cardiac parameters of mice obtained with ultra-high-resolution SPECT, whereas the position of the animals and the image filters should be the same in a comparative study with multiple scans to avoid systematic differences in measured cardiac parameters.

  20. Towards the use of video games for learning: a survey about video games preferences of Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Bouciguez, María José; Santos, Graciela; Abásolo Guerrero, María José

    2014-01-01

    Video games are now a widespread cultural practice, especially among young people, making them an ideal medium for the design of learning processes. In order to design educational technologies that provide teaching support we must first understand the practices developed by the young with computers and especially with video games. The aim of the present study is therefore to learn about the experience and expectations about video games among students, particularly engineering students. The re...

  1. 13 point video tape quality guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaunt, R.

    1997-05-01

    Until high definition television (ATV) arrives, in the U.S. we must still contend with the National Television Systems Committee (NTSC) video standard (or PAL or SECAM-depending on your country). NTSC, a 40-year old standard designed for transmission of color video camera images over a small bandwidth, is not well suited for the sharp, full-color images that todays computers are capable of producing. PAL and SECAM also suffers from many of NTSC`s problems, but to varying degrees. Video professionals, when working with computer graphic (CG) images, use two monitors: a computer monitor for producing CGs and an NTSC monitor to view how a CG will look on video. More often than not, the NTSC image will differ significantly from the CG image, and outputting it to NTSC as an artist works enables the him or her to see the images as others will see it. Below are thirteen guidelines designed to increase the quality of computer graphics recorded onto video tape. Viewing your work in NTSC and attempting to follow the below tips will enable you to create higher quality videos. No video is perfect, so don`t expect to abide by every guideline every time.

  2. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... NEI YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration ... Retinopathy of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: ...

  3. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia ...

  4. NEI You Tube Videos: Amblyopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... YouTube Videos > NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia NEI YouTube Videos YouTube Videos Home Age-Related Macular Degeneration Amblyopia ... of Prematurity Science Spanish Videos Webinars NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia Embedded video for NEI YouTube Videos: Amblyopia ...

  5. Robust Shot Boundary Detection from Video Using Dynamic Texture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Taile

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Video boundary detection belongs to a basis subject in computer vision. It is more important to video analysis and video understanding. The existing video boundary detection methods always are effective to certain types of video data. These methods have relatively low generalization ability. We present a novel shot boundary detection algorithm based on video dynamic texture. Firstly, the two adjacent frames are read from a given video. We normalize the two frames to get the same size frame. Secondly, we divide these frames into some sub-domain on the same standard. The following thing is to calculate the average gradient direction of sub-domain and form dynamic texture. Finally, the dynamic texture of adjacent frames is compared. We have done some experiments in different types of video data. These experimental results show that our method has high generalization ability. To different type of videos, our algorithm can achieve higher average precision and average recall relative to some algorithms.

  6. Mining Crowdsourced First Impressions in Online Social Video

    OpenAIRE

    Biel, Joan-Isaac; Gatica-Perez, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    While multimedia and social computing research have used crowdsourcing techniques to annotate objects, actions, and scenes in social video sites like YouTube, little work has ad- dressed the crowdsourcing of personal and social traits in online social video or social media content in general. In this paper, we address the problems of (1) crowdsourcing the annotation of first impressions of video bloggers (vloggers) personal and social traits in conversational YouTube videos, and (2) mining th...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing activity had ramped down after the completion of the reprocessing of the 2012 data and parked data, but is increasing with new simulation samples for analysis and upgrade studies. Much of the Computing effort is currently involved in activities to improve the computing system in preparation for 2015. Operations Office Since the beginning of 2013, the Computing Operations team successfully re-processed the 2012 data in record time, not only by using opportunistic resources like the San Diego Supercomputer Center which was accessible, to re-process the primary datasets HTMHT and MultiJet in Run2012D much earlier than planned. The Heavy-Ion data-taking period was successfully concluded in February collecting almost 500 T. Figure 3: Number of events per month (data) In LS1, our emphasis is to increase efficiency and flexibility of the infrastructure and operation. Computing Operations is working on separating disk and tape at the Tier-1 sites and the full implementation of the xrootd federation ...

  8. Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series This series of five videos was designed ... Activity Role of Body Weight in Osteoarthritis Educational Videos for Patients Rheumatoid Arthritis Educational Video Series Psoriatic ...

  9. Animated pedagogical agents: How the presence and nonverbal communication of a virtual instructor affect perceptions and learning outcomes in a computer-based environment about basic physics concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frechette, M. Casey

    One important but under-researched area of instructional technology concerns the effects of animated pedagogical agents (APAs), or lifelike characters designed to enhance learning in computer-based environments. This research sought to broaden what is currently known about APAs' instructional value by investigating the effects of agents' visual presence and nonverbal communication. A theoretical framework based on APA literature published in the past decade guided the design of the study. This framework sets forth that APAs impact learning through their presence and communication. The communication displayed by an APA involves two distinct kinds of nonverbal cues: cognitive (hand and arm gestures) and affective (facial expressions). It was predicted that the presence of an agent would enhance learning and that nonverbal communication would amplify these effects. The research utilized a between-subjects experimental design. Participants were randomly assigned to treatment conditions in a controlled lab setting, and group means were compared with a MANCOVA. Participants received (1) a non-animated agent, (2) an agent with hand and arm gestures, (3) an agent with facial expressions, or (4) a fully animated agent. The agent appeared in a virtual learning environment focused on Kepler's laws of planetary motion. A control group did not receive the visual presence of an agent. Two effects were studied: participants' perceptions and their learning outcomes. Perceptions were measured with an attitudinal survey with five subscales. Learning outcomes were measured with an open-ended recall test, a multiple choice comprehension test, and an open-ended transfer test. Learners presented with an agent with affective nonverbal communication comprehended less than learners exposed to a non-animated agent. No significant differences were observed when a group exposed to a fully animated agent was compared to a group with a non-animated agent. Adding both nonverbal communication

  10. Do-It-Yourself Whiteboard-Style Physics Video Lectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douglas, Scott Samuel; Aiken, John Mark; Greco, Edwin; Schatz, Michael; Lin, Shih-Yin

    2017-01-01

    Video lectures are increasingly being used in physics instruction. For example, video lectures can be used to "flip" the classroom, i.e., to deliver, via the Internet, content that is traditionally transmitted by in-class lectures (e.g., presenting concepts, working examples, etc.), thereby freeing up classroom time for more interactive instruction. To date, most video lectures are live lecture recordings or screencasts. The hand-animated "whiteboard" video is an alternative to these more common styles and affords unique creative opportunities such as stop-motion animation or visual "demonstrations" of phenomena that would be difficult to demo in a classroom. In the spring of 2013, a series of whiteboard-style videos were produced to provide video lecture content for Georgia Tech introductory physics instruction, including flipped courses and a MOOC. This set of videos (which also includes screencasts and live recordings) can be found on the "Your World is Your Lab" YouTube channel. In this article, we describe this method of video production, which is suitable for an instructor working solo or in collaboration with students; we explore students' engagement with these videos in a separate work. A prominent example of whiteboard animation is the "Minute Physics" video series by Henry Reich, whose considerable popularity and accessible, cartoony style were the original inspiration for our own video lectures.

  11. 61214++++','DOAJ-ART-EN'); return false;" href="+++++https://jual.nipissingu.ca/wp-content/uploads/sites/25/2014/06/v61214.m4v">61214++++">Jailed - Video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron CULBERT

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available As the public education system in Northern Ontario continues to take a downward spiral, a plethora of secondary school students are being placed in an alternative educational environment. Juxtaposing the two educational settings reveals very similar methods and characteristics of educating our youth as opposed to using a truly alternative approach to education. This video reviews the relationship between public education and alternative education in a remote Northern Ontario setting. It is my belief that the traditional methods of teaching are not appropriate in educating at risk students in alternative schools. Paper and pencil worksheets do not motivate these students to learn and succeed. Alternative education should emphasize experiential learning, a just in time curriculum based on every unique individual and the students true passion for everyday life. Cameron Culbert was born on February 3rd, 1977 in North Bay, Ontario. His teenage years were split between attending public school and his willed curriculum on the ski hill. Culbert spent 10 years (1996-2002 & 2006-2010 competing for Canada as an alpine ski racer. His passion for teaching and coaching began as an athlete and has now transferred into the classroom and the community. As a graduate of Nipissing University (BA, BEd, MEd. Camerons research interests are alternative education, physical education and technology in the classroom. Currently Cameron is an active educator and coach in Northern Ontario.

  12. Fast compressed domain motion detection in H.264 video streams for video surveillance applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szczerba, Krzysztof; Forchhammer, Søren; Støttrup-Andersen, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    numbers of video streams on a single server. The focus of the work is on using the information in coded video streams to reduce the computational complexity and memory requirements, which translates into reduced hardware requirements and costs. The devised algorithm detects and segments activity based...

  13. Video Analytics for Business Intelligence

    CERN Document Server

    Porikli, Fatih; Xiang, Tao; Gong, Shaogang

    2012-01-01

    Closed Circuit TeleVision (CCTV) cameras have been increasingly deployed pervasively in public spaces including retail centres and shopping malls. Intelligent video analytics aims to automatically analyze content of massive amount of public space video data and has been one of the most active areas of computer vision research in the last two decades. Current focus of video analytics research has been largely on detecting alarm events and abnormal behaviours for public safety and security applications. However, increasingly CCTV installations have also been exploited for gathering and analyzing business intelligence information, in order to enhance marketing and operational efficiency. For example, in retail environments, surveillance cameras can be utilised to collect statistical information about shopping behaviour and preference for marketing (e.g., how many people entered a shop; how many females/males or which age groups of people showed interests to a particular product; how long did they stay in the sho...

  14. Video Design Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Rachel Charlotte; Christensen, Kasper Skov; Iversen, Ole Sejer

    We introduce Video Design Games to train educators in teaching design. The Video Design Game is a workshop format consisting of three rounds in which participants observe, reflect and generalize based on video snippets from their own practice. The paper reports on a Video Design Game workshop...

  15. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion An activity that is still in progress is computing for the heavy-ion program. The heavy-ion events are collected without zero suppression, so the event size is much large at roughly 11 MB per event of RAW. The central collisions are more complex and...

  16. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann P. McBride Edited by M-C. Sawley with contributions from: P. Kreuzer D. Bonacorsi S. Belforte F. Wuerthwein L. Bauerdick K. Lassila-Perini M-C. Sawley

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the comput...

  17. Characterization of social video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrowski, Jeffrey R.; Sarhan, Nabil J.

    2009-01-01

    The popularity of social media has grown dramatically over the World Wide Web. In this paper, we analyze the video popularity distribution of well-known social video websites (YouTube, Google Video, and the AOL Truveo Video Search engine) and characterize their workload. We identify trends in the categories, lengths, and formats of those videos, as well as characterize the evolution of those videos over time. We further provide an extensive analysis and comparison of video content amongst the main regions of the world.

  18. Using Multimedia in Large-Scale Computer-Based Testing Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, R. E.; Goodman, M.; Hessinger, J.; Kahn, H.; Ligget, J.; Marshall, G.; Zack, J.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the use of multimedia in large-scale computer-based testing programs to measure problem solving and related cognitive constructs more effectively. Considers the incorporation of dynamic stimuli such as audio, video, and animation, and gives examples in history, physical education, and the sciences. (Author/LRW)

  19. Computer-assisted instruction before colonoscopy is as effective as nurse counselling, a clinical pilot trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuijzen, G.; Klemt-Kropp, M.; Noomen, C.; Esch, A.A.J. van; Tjwa, E.T.; Drenth, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIMS: Better patient education prior to colonoscopy improves adherence to instructions for bowel preparation and leads to cleaner colons. We reasoned that computer assisted instruction (CAI) using video and 3 D animations followed by nurse contact maximizes the effectiveness of

  20. Add Audio and Video to Your Site

    CERN Document Server

    MacDonald, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    Nothing spices up websites like cool sound effects (think ker-thunk as visitors press a button) or embedded videos. Think you need a programmer to add sizzle to your site? Think again. This hands-on guide gives you the techniques you need to add video, music, animated GIFs, and sound effects to your site. This Mini Missing Manual is excerpted from Creating a Web Site: The Missing Manual.

  1. Video Games as Equipment for Living

    OpenAIRE

    Soetaert, Ronald; Bourgonjon, Jeroen; Rutten, Kris

    2011-01-01

    In their article "Video Games as Equipment for Living" Ronald Soetaert, Jeroen Bourgonjon, and Kris Rutten postulate that with the emergence of new media there is need of a re-evaluation of all modes of communication and the ways in which literacy is conceptualized. Drawing on the concept of multi-literacy they suggest a rhetorical/ anthropological meta-perspective to describe human beings as symbol using animals and focus on particular symbol systems: narrative, drama, and video games. Speci...

  2. Crowdfunding Japanese Commercial Animation: Collective Financing Experiences in Anime

    OpenAIRE

    Loriguillo López, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    This paper offers an exploration of the incipient development of crowdfunding anime projects for short and medium-length films. Japanese commercial animation is characterised by the support of a strong production industry that primarily targets local audiences through cross-media projects, developed in synergy with other cultural sectors (such as the publishing industry, record labels or video game developers). The growing acceptance of anime in markets around the world has str...

  3. An economic evaluation of a video- and text-based computer-tailored intervention for smoking cessation: a cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Nicola E; Smit, Eline S; Schulz, Daniela N; de Vries, Hein; Bolman, Catherine; Muris, Jean W M; Evers, Silvia M A A

    2014-01-01

    Although evidence exists for the effectiveness of web-based smoking cessation interventions, information about the cost-effectiveness of these interventions is limited. The study investigated the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of two web-based computer-tailored (CT) smoking cessation interventions (video- vs. text-based CT) compared to a control condition that received general text-based advice. In a randomized controlled trial, respondents were allocated to the video-based condition (N = 670), the text-based condition (N = 708) or the control condition (N = 721). Societal costs, smoking status, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; EQ-5D-3L) were assessed at baseline, six-and twelve-month follow-up. The incremental costs per abstinent respondent and per QALYs gained were calculated. To account for uncertainty, bootstrapping techniques and sensitivity analyses were carried out. No significant differences were found in the three conditions regarding demographics, baseline values of outcomes and societal costs over the three months prior to baseline. Analyses using prolonged abstinence as outcome measure indicated that from a willingness to pay of €1,500, the video-based intervention was likely to be the most cost-effective treatment, whereas from a willingness to pay of €50,400, the text-based intervention was likely to be the most cost-effective. With regard to cost-utilities, when quality of life was used as outcome measure, the control condition had the highest probability of being the most preferable treatment. Sensitivity analyses yielded comparable results. The video-based CT smoking cessation intervention was the most cost-effective treatment for smoking abstinence after twelve months, varying the willingness to pay per abstinent respondent from €0 up to €80,000. With regard to cost-utility, the control condition seemed to be the most preferable treatment. Probably, more time will be required to assess changes in quality of life

  4. An Economic Evaluation of a Video- and Text-Based Computer-Tailored Intervention for Smoking Cessation: A Cost-Effectiveness and Cost-Utility Analysis of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanczyk, Nicola E.; Smit, Eline S.; Schulz, Daniela N.; de Vries, Hein; Bolman, Catherine; Muris, Jean W. M.; Evers, Silvia M. A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although evidence exists for the effectiveness of web-based smoking cessation interventions, information about the cost-effectiveness of these interventions is limited. Objective The study investigated the cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of two web-based computer-tailored (CT) smoking cessation interventions (video- vs. text-based CT) compared to a control condition that received general text-based advice. Methods In a randomized controlled trial, respondents were allocated to the video-based condition (N = 670), the text-based condition (N = 708) or the control condition (N = 721). Societal costs, smoking status, and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs; EQ-5D-3L) were assessed at baseline, six-and twelve-month follow-up. The incremental costs per abstinent respondent and per QALYs gained were calculated. To account for uncertainty, bootstrapping techniques and sensitivity analyses were carried out. Results No significant differences were found in the three conditions regarding demographics, baseline values of outcomes and societal costs over the three months prior to baseline. Analyses using prolonged abstinence as outcome measure indicated that from a willingness to pay of €1,500, the video-based intervention was likely to be the most cost-effective treatment, whereas from a willingness to pay of €50,400, the text-based intervention was likely to be the most cost-effective. With regard to cost-utilities, when quality of life was used as outcome measure, the control condition had the highest probability of being the most preferable treatment. Sensitivity analyses yielded comparable results. Conclusion The video-based CT smoking cessation intervention was the most cost-effective treatment for smoking abstinence after twelve months, varying the willingness to pay per abstinent respondent from €0 up to €80,000. With regard to cost-utility, the control condition seemed to be the most preferable treatment. Probably, more time will be

  5. Exchanging digital video of laryngeal examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crump, John M; Deutsch, Thomas

    2004-03-01

    Laryngeal examinations, especially stroboscopic examinations, are increasingly recorded using digital video formats on computer media, rather than using analog formats on videotape. It would be useful to share these examinations with other medical professionals in formats that would facilitate reliable and high-quality playback on a personal computer by the recipients. Unfortunately, a personal computer is not well designed for reliable presentation of artifact-free video. It is particularly important that laryngeal video play without artifacts of motion or color because these are often the characteristics of greatest clinical interest. With proper tools and procedures, and with reasonable compromises in image resolution and the duration of the examination, digital video of laryngeal examinations can be reliably exchanged. However, the tools, procedures, and formats for recording, converting to another digital format ("transcoding"), communicating, copying, and playing digital video with a personal computer are not familiar to most medical professionals. Some understanding of digital video and the tools available is required of those wanting to exchange digital video. Best results are achieved by recording to a digital format best suited for recording (such as MJPEG or DV),judiciously selecting a segment of the recording for sharing, and converting to a format suited to distribution (such as MPEG1 or MPEG2) using a medium suited to the situation (such as e-mail attachment, CD-ROM, a "clip" within a Microsoft PowerPoint presentation, or DVD-Video). If digital video is sent to a colleague, some guidance on playing files and using a PC media player is helpful.

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. McBride

    It has been a very active year for the computing project with strong contributions from members of the global community. The project has focused on site preparation and Monte Carlo production. The operations group has begun processing data from P5 as part of the global data commissioning. Improvements in transfer rates and site availability have been seen as computing sites across the globe prepare for large scale production and analysis as part of CSA07. Preparations for the upcoming Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 are progressing. Ian Fisk and Neil Geddes have been appointed as coordinators for the challenge. CSA07 will include production tests of the Tier-0 production system, reprocessing at the Tier-1 sites and Monte Carlo production at the Tier-2 sites. At the same time there will be a large analysis exercise at the Tier-2 centres. Pre-production simulation of the Monte Carlo events for the challenge is beginning. Scale tests of the Tier-0 will begin in mid-July and the challenge it...

  7. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Computing continued with a high level of activity over the winter in preparation for conferences and the start of the 2012 run. 2012 brings new challenges with a new energy, more complex events, and the need to make the best use of the available time before the Long Shutdown. We expect to be resource constrained on all tiers of the computing system in 2012 and are working to ensure the high-priority goals of CMS are not impacted. Heavy ions After a successful 2011 heavy-ion run, the programme is moving to analysis. During the run, the CAF resources were well used for prompt analysis. Since then in 2012 on average 200 job slots have been used continuously at Vanderbilt for analysis workflows. Operations Office As of 2012, the Computing Project emphasis has moved from commissioning to operation of the various systems. This is reflected in the new organisation structure where the Facilities and Data Operations tasks have been merged into a common Operations Office, which now covers everything ...

  8. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction It has been a very active quarter in Computing with interesting progress in all areas. The activity level at the computing facilities, driven by both organised processing from data operations and user analysis, has been steadily increasing. The large-scale production of simulated events that has been progressing throughout the fall is wrapping-up and reprocessing with pile-up will continue. A large reprocessing of all the proton-proton data has just been released and another will follow shortly. The number of analysis jobs by users each day, that was already hitting the computing model expectations at the time of ICHEP, is now 33% higher. We are expecting a busy holiday break to ensure samples are ready in time for the winter conferences. Heavy Ion The Tier 0 infrastructure was able to repack and promptly reconstruct heavy-ion collision data. Two copies were made of the data at CERN using a large CASTOR disk pool, and the core physics sample was replicated ...

  9. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction More than seventy CMS collaborators attended the Computing and Offline Workshop in San Diego, California, April 20-24th to discuss the state of readiness of software and computing for collisions. Focus and priority were given to preparations for data taking and providing room for ample dialog between groups involved in Commissioning, Data Operations, Analysis and MC Production. Throughout the workshop, aspects of software, operating procedures and issues addressing all parts of the computing model were discussed. Plans for the CMS participation in STEP’09, the combined scale testing for all four experiments due in June 2009, were refined. The article in CMS Times by Frank Wuerthwein gave a good recap of the highly collaborative atmosphere of the workshop. Many thanks to UCSD and to the organizers for taking care of this workshop, which resulted in a long list of action items and was definitely a success. A considerable amount of effort and care is invested in the estimate of the co...

  10. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CCRC’08 challenges and CSA08 During the February campaign of the Common Computing readiness challenges (CCRC’08), the CMS computing team had achieved very good results. The link between the detector site and the Tier0 was tested by gradually increasing the number of parallel transfer streams well beyond the target. Tests covered the global robustness at the Tier0, processing a massive number of very large files and with a high writing speed to tapes.  Other tests covered the links between the different Tiers of the distributed infrastructure and the pre-staging and reprocessing capacity of the Tier1’s: response time, data transfer rate and success rate for Tape to Buffer staging of files kept exclusively on Tape were measured. In all cases, coordination with the sites was efficient and no serious problem was found. These successful preparations prepared the ground for the second phase of the CCRC’08 campaign, in May. The Computing Software and Analysis challen...

  11. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The first data taking period of November produced a first scientific paper, and this is a very satisfactory step for Computing. It also gave the invaluable opportunity to learn and debrief from this first, intense period, and make the necessary adaptations. The alarm procedures between different groups (DAQ, Physics, T0 processing, Alignment/calibration, T1 and T2 communications) have been reinforced. A major effort has also been invested into remodeling and optimizing operator tasks in all activities in Computing, in parallel with the recruitment of new Cat A operators. The teams are being completed and by mid year the new tasks will have been assigned. CRB (Computing Resource Board) The Board met twice since last CMS week. In December it reviewed the experience of the November data-taking period and could measure the positive improvements made for the site readiness. It also reviewed the policy under which Tier-2 are associated with Physics Groups. Such associations are decided twice per ye...

  12. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction During the past six months, Computing participated in the STEP09 exercise, had a major involvement in the October exercise and has been working with CMS sites on improving open issues relevant for data taking. At the same time operations for MC production, real data reconstruction and re-reconstructions and data transfers at large scales were performed. STEP09 was successfully conducted in June as a joint exercise with ATLAS and the other experiments. It gave good indication about the readiness of the WLCG infrastructure with the two major LHC experiments stressing the reading, writing and processing of physics data. The October Exercise, in contrast, was conducted as an all-CMS exercise, where Physics, Computing and Offline worked on a common plan to exercise all steps to efficiently access and analyze data. As one of the major results, the CMS Tier-2s demonstrated to be fully capable for performing data analysis. In recent weeks, efforts were devoted to CMS Computing readiness. All th...

  13. Multimedia in the Counselor Education Classroom: Transforming Learning with Video Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltimore, Michael L.

    This document addresses video production as it relates to counselor education. Groundwork for infusing video production technology is covered, including the video production process, equipment, computer technology that assists in production, video editing, and final production. In addition, three important formats will be discussed. First is the…

  14. Video Salient Object Detection via Fully Convolutional Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguan; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling

    This paper proposes a deep learning model to efficiently detect salient regions in videos. It addresses two important issues: 1) deep video saliency model training with the absence of sufficiently large and pixel-wise annotated video data and 2) fast video saliency training and detection. The proposed deep video saliency network consists of two modules, for capturing the spatial and temporal saliency information, respectively. The dynamic saliency model, explicitly incorporating saliency estimates from the static saliency model, directly produces spatiotemporal saliency inference without time-consuming optical flow computation. We further propose a novel data augmentation technique that simulates video training data from existing annotated image data sets, which enables our network to learn diverse saliency information and prevents overfitting with the limited number of training videos. Leveraging our synthetic video data (150K video sequences) and real videos, our deep video saliency model successfully learns both spatial and temporal saliency cues, thus producing accurate spatiotemporal saliency estimate. We advance the state-of-the-art on the densely annotated video segmentation data set (MAE of .06) and the Freiburg-Berkeley Motion Segmentation data set (MAE of .07), and do so with much improved speed (2 fps with all steps).This paper proposes a deep learning model to efficiently detect salient regions in videos. It addresses two important issues: 1) deep video saliency model training with the absence of sufficiently large and pixel-wise annotated video data and 2) fast video saliency training and detection. The proposed deep video saliency network consists of two modules, for capturing the spatial and temporal saliency information, respectively. The dynamic saliency model, explicitly incorporating saliency estimates from the static saliency model, directly produces spatiotemporal saliency inference without time-consuming optical flow computation. We further

  15. Automated Video Quality Assessment for Deep-Sea Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirenne, B.; Hoeberechts, M.; Kalmbach, A.; Sadhu, T.; Branzan Albu, A.; Glotin, H.; Jeffries, M. A.; Bui, A. O. V.

    2015-12-01

    Video provides a rich source of data for geophysical analysis, often supplying detailed information about the environment when other instruments may not. This is especially true of deep-sea environments, where direct visual observations cannot be made. As computer vision techniques improve and volumes of video data increase, automated video analysis is emerging as a practical alternative to labor-intensive manual analysis. Automated techniques can be much more sensitive to video quality than their manual counterparts, so performing quality assessment before doing full analysis is critical to producing valid results.Ocean Networks Canada (ONC), an initiative of the University of Victoria, operates cabled ocean observatories that supply continuous power and Internet connectivity to a broad suite of subsea instruments from the coast to the deep sea, including video and still cameras. This network of ocean observatories has produced almost 20,000 hours of video (about 38 hours are recorded each day) and an additional 8,000 hours of logs from remotely operated vehicle (ROV) dives. We begin by surveying some ways in which deep-sea video poses challenges for automated analysis, including: 1. Non-uniform lighting: Single, directional, light sources produce uneven luminance distributions and shadows; remotely operated lighting equipment are also susceptible to technical failures. 2. Particulate noise: Turbidity and marine snow are often present in underwater video; particles in the water column can have sharper focus and higher contrast than the objects of interest due to their proximity to the light source and can also influence the camera's autofocus and auto white-balance routines. 3. Color distortion (low contrast): The rate of absorption of light in water varies by wavelength, and is higher overall than in air, altering apparent colors and lowering the contrast of objects at a distance.We also describe measures under development at ONC for detecting and mitigating

  16. Lung cancer screening and video-assisted thoracic surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, René Horsleben; Hansen, Henrik Jessen; Dirksen, Asger

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report the impact of computed tomography (CT) screening on the use of Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) in a randomized screening trial.......The objective of this study is to report the impact of computed tomography (CT) screening on the use of Video-Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) in a randomized screening trial....

  17. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2013-01-01

    Computing operation has been lower as the Run 1 samples are completing and smaller samples for upgrades and preparations are ramping up. Much of the computing activity is focusing on preparations for Run 2 and improvements in data access and flexibility of using resources. Operations Office Data processing was slow in the second half of 2013 with only the legacy re-reconstruction pass of 2011 data being processed at the sites.   Figure 1: MC production and processing was more in demand with a peak of over 750 Million GEN-SIM events in a single month.   Figure 2: The transfer system worked reliably and efficiently and transferred on average close to 520 TB per week with peaks at close to 1.2 PB.   Figure 3: The volume of data moved between CMS sites in the last six months   The tape utilisation was a focus for the operation teams with frequent deletion campaigns from deprecated 7 TeV MC GEN-SIM samples to INVALID datasets, which could be cleaned up...

  18. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

      Introduction Computing activity has been running at a sustained, high rate as we collect data at high luminosity, process simulation, and begin to process the parked data. The system is functional, though a number of improvements are planned during LS1. Many of the changes will impact users, we hope only in positive ways. We are trying to improve the distributed analysis tools as well as the ability to access more data samples more transparently.  Operations Office Figure 2: Number of events per month, for 2012 Since the June CMS Week, Computing Operations teams successfully completed data re-reconstruction passes and finished the CMSSW_53X MC campaign with over three billion events available in AOD format. Recorded data was successfully processed in parallel, exceeding 1.2 billion raw physics events per month for the first time in October 2012 due to the increase in data-parking rate. In parallel, large efforts were dedicated to WMAgent development and integrati...

  19. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Just two months after the “LHC First Physics” event of 30th March, the analysis of the O(200) million 7 TeV collision events in CMS accumulated during the first 60 days is well under way. The consistency of the CMS computing model has been confirmed during these first weeks of data taking. This model is based on a hierarchy of use-cases deployed between the different tiers and, in particular, the distribution of RECO data to T1s, who then serve data on request to T2s, along a topology known as “fat tree”. Indeed, during this period this model was further extended by almost full “mesh” commissioning, meaning that RECO data were shipped to T2s whenever possible, enabling additional physics analyses compared with the “fat tree” model. Computing activities at the CMS Analysis Facility (CAF) have been marked by a good time response for a load almost evenly shared between ALCA (Alignment and Calibration tasks - highest p...

  20. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Matthias Kasemann

    Overview The main focus during the summer was to handle data coming from the detector and to perform Monte Carlo production. The lessons learned during the CCRC and CSA08 challenges in May were addressed by dedicated PADA campaigns lead by the Integration team. Big improvements were achieved in the stability and reliability of the CMS Tier1 and Tier2 centres by regular and systematic follow-up of faults and errors with the help of the Savannah bug tracking system. In preparation for data taking the roles of a Computing Run Coordinator and regular computing shifts monitoring the services and infrastructure as well as interfacing to the data operations tasks are being defined. The shift plan until the end of 2008 is being put together. User support worked on documentation and organized several training sessions. The ECoM task force delivered the report on “Use Cases for Start-up of pp Data-Taking” with recommendations and a set of tests to be performed for trigger rates much higher than the ...

  1. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    Introduction A large fraction of the effort was focused during the last period into the preparation and monitoring of the February tests of Common VO Computing Readiness Challenge 08. CCRC08 is being run by the WLCG collaboration in two phases, between the centres and all experiments. The February test is dedicated to functionality tests, while the May challenge will consist of running at all centres and with full workflows. For this first period, a number of functionality checks of the computing power, data repositories and archives as well as network links are planned. This will help assess the reliability of the systems under a variety of loads, and identifying possible bottlenecks. Many tests are scheduled together with other VOs, allowing the full scale stress test. The data rates (writing, accessing and transfer¬ring) are being checked under a variety of loads and operating conditions, as well as the reliability and transfer rates of the links between Tier-0 and Tier-1s. In addition, the capa...

  2. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    Contributions from I. Fisk

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The start of the 2012 run has been busy for Computing. We have reconstructed, archived, and served a larger sample of new data than in 2011, and we are in the process of producing an even larger new sample of simulations at 8 TeV. The running conditions and system performance are largely what was anticipated in the plan, thanks to the hard work and preparation of many people. Heavy ions Heavy Ions has been actively analysing data and preparing for conferences.  Operations Office Figure 6: Transfers from all sites in the last 90 days For ICHEP and the Upgrade efforts, we needed to produce and process record amounts of MC samples while supporting the very successful data-taking. This was a large burden, especially on the team members. Nevertheless the last three months were very successful and the total output was phenomenal, thanks to our dedicated site admins who keep the sites operational and the computing project members who spend countless hours nursing the...

  3. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. MacBride

    The Computing Software and Analysis Challenge CSA07 has been the main focus of the Computing Project for the past few months. Activities began over the summer with the preparation of the Monte Carlo data sets for the challenge and tests of the new production system at the Tier-0 at CERN. The pre-challenge Monte Carlo production was done in several steps: physics generation, detector simulation, digitization, conversion to RAW format and the samples were run through the High Level Trigger (HLT). The data was then merged into three "Soups": Chowder (ALPGEN), Stew (Filtered Pythia) and Gumbo (Pythia). The challenge officially started when the first Chowder events were reconstructed on the Tier-0 on October 3rd. The data operations teams were very busy during the the challenge period. The MC production teams continued with signal production and processing while the Tier-0 and Tier-1 teams worked on splitting the Soups into Primary Data Sets (PDS), reconstruction and skimming. The storage sys...

  4. Computed tomography guided percutaneous injection of a mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue in rabbit lungs: evaluation of localization ability for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Kwang Nam; Lee, Kyung Won; Kim, Tae Jung; Song, Yong Sub; Kim, Dong Il

    2014-01-01

    Preoperative localization is necessary prior to video assisted thoracoscopic surgery for the detection of small or deeply located lung nodules. We compared the localization ability of a mixture of lipiodol and methylene blue (MLM) (0.6 mL, 1:5) to methylene blue (0.5 mL) in rabbit lungs. CT-guided percutaneous injections were performed in 21 subjects with MLM and methylene blue. We measured the extent of staining on freshly excised lung and evaluated the subjective localization ability with 4 point scales at 6 and 24 hr after injections. For MLM, radio-opacity was evaluated on the fluoroscopy. We considered score 2 (acceptable) or 3 (excellent) as appropriate for localization. The staining extent of MLM was significantly smaller than methylene blue (0.6 vs 1.0 cm, Pmethylene blue (2.8 vs 2.2, P=0.010). Excellent staining was achieved in 17 subjects (81%) with MLM and 8 (38%) with methylene blue (P=0.011). An acceptable or excellent radio-opacity of MLM was found in 13 subjects (62%). An appropriate localization rate of MLM was 100% with the use of the directly visible ability and radio-opacity of MLM. MLM provides a superior pulmonary localization ability over methylene blue.

  5. Model-based video segmentation for vision-augmented interactive games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lurng-Kuo

    2000-04-01

    This paper presents an architecture and algorithms for model based video object segmentation and its applications to vision augmented interactive game. We are especially interested in real time low cost vision based applications that can be implemented in software in a PC. We use different models for background and a player object. The object segmentation algorithm is performed in two different levels: pixel level and object level. At pixel level, the segmentation algorithm is formulated as a maximizing a posteriori probability (MAP) problem. The statistical likelihood of each pixel is calculated and used in the MAP problem. Object level segmentation is used to improve segmentation quality by utilizing the information about the spatial and temporal extent of the object. The concept of an active region, which is defined based on motion histogram and trajectory prediction, is introduced to indicate the possibility of a video object region for both background and foreground modeling. It also reduces the overall computation complexity. In contrast with other applications, the proposed video object segmentation system is able to create background and foreground models on the fly even without introductory background frames. Furthermore, we apply different rate of self-tuning on the scene model so that the system can adapt to the environment when there is a scene change. We applied the proposed video object segmentation algorithms to several prototype virtual interactive games. In our prototype vision augmented interactive games, a player can immerse himself/herself inside a game and can virtually interact with other animated characters in a real time manner without being constrained by helmets, gloves, special sensing devices, or background environment. The potential applications of the proposed algorithms including human computer gesture interface and object based video coding such as MPEG-4 video coding.

  6. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    I. Fisk

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The Computing Team successfully completed the storage, initial processing, and distribution for analysis of proton-proton data in 2011. There are still a variety of activities ongoing to support winter conference activities and preparations for 2012. Heavy ions The heavy-ion run for 2011 started in early November and has already demonstrated good machine performance and success of some of the more advanced workflows planned for 2011. Data collection will continue until early December. Facilities and Infrastructure Operations Operational and deployment support for WMAgent and WorkQueue+Request Manager components, routinely used in production by Data Operations, are provided. The GlideInWMS and components installation are now deployed at CERN, which is added to the GlideInWMS factory placed in the US. There has been new operational collaboration between the CERN team and the UCSD GlideIn factory operators, covering each others time zones by monitoring/debugging pilot jobs sent from the facto...

  7. Video-task assessment of learning and memory in Macaques (Macaca mulatta) - Effects of stimulus movement on performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, David A.; Hopkins, William D.; Rumbaugh, Duane M.

    1989-01-01

    Effects of stimulus movement on learning, transfer, matching, and short-term memory performance were assessed with 2 monkeys using a video-task paradigm in which the animals responded to computer-generated images by manipulating a joystick. Performance on tests of learning set, transfer index, matching to sample, and delayed matching to sample in the video-task paradigm was comparable to that obtained in previous investigations using the Wisconsin General Testing Apparatus. Additionally, learning, transfer, and matching were reliably and significantly better when the stimuli or discriminanda moved than when the stimuli were stationary. External manipulations such as stimulus movement may increase attention to the demands of a task, which in turn should increase the efficiency of learning. These findings have implications for the investigation of learning in other populations, as well as for the application of the video-task paradigm to comparative study.

  8. Learning to Segment Moving Objects in Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Fragkiadaki, Katerina; Arbelaez, Pablo; Felsen, Panna; Malik, Jitendra

    2014-01-01

    We segment moving objects in videos by ranking spatio-temporal segment proposals according to "moving objectness": how likely they are to contain a moving object. In each video frame, we compute segment proposals using multiple figure-ground segmentations on per frame motion boundaries. We rank them with a Moving Objectness Detector trained on image and motion fields to detect moving objects and discard over/under segmentations or background parts of the scene. We extend the top ranked segmen...

  9. Digital Video Stabilization with Inertial Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Freeman, William John

    2013-01-01

    As computing power becomes more and more available, robotic systems are moving away from active sensors for environmental awareness and transitioning into passive vision sensors.  With the advent of teleoperation and real-time video tracking of dynamic environments, the need to stabilize video onboard mobile robots has become more prevalent. This thesis presents a digital stabilization method that incorporates inertial fusion with a Kalman filter.  The camera motion is derived visually by tra...

  10. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... support group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ... group for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ...

  11. Video Games and Citizenship

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bourgonjon, Jeroen; Soetaert, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    ... by exploring a particular aspect of digitization that affects young people, namely video games. They explore the new social spaces which emerge in video game culture and how these spaces relate to community building and citizenship...

  12. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos Podcasts ...

  13. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For ... Doctor Find a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos ...

  14. Digital Video in Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølunde, Lisbeth

    2012-01-01

    questions of our media literacy pertaining to authoring multimodal texts (visual, verbal, audial, etc.) in research practice and the status of multimodal texts in academia. The implications of academic video extend to wider issues of how researchers harness opportunities to author different types of texts......Is video becoming “the new black” in academia, if so, what are the challenges? The integration of video in research methodology (for collection, analysis) is well-known, but the use of “academic video” for dissemination is relatively new (Eriksson and Sørensen). The focus of this paper is academic...... video, or short video essays produced for the explicit purpose of communicating research processes, topics, and research-based knowledge (see the journal of academic videos: www.audiovisualthinking.org). Video is increasingly used in popular showcases for video online, such as YouTube and Vimeo, as well...

  15. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Back Support Groups Is a support group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo ... Support Groups Back Is a support group for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library ...

  16. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork ... for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ...

  17. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ... Family Caregivers Glossary Menu In this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ...

  18. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ... Family Caregivers Glossary Menu In this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For ...

  19. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media ... a Provider Meet the Team Blog Articles & Stories News Provider Directory Donate Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars ...

  20. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer ... me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork ...

  1. Video Screen Capture Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunbar, Laura

    2014-01-01

    This article is an introduction to video screen capture. Basic information of two software programs, QuickTime for Mac and BlueBerry Flashback Express for PC, are also discussed. Practical applications for video screen capture are given.

  2. Videos, Podcasts and Livechats

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Resources Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For Policymakers For Family Caregivers Glossary ... this section Links Videos Podcasts Webinars For the Media For Clinicians For Policymakers For Family Caregivers Glossary ...

  3. Three-dimensional representations of complex carbohydrates and polysaccharides--SweetUnityMol: a video game-based computer graphic software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Serge; Tubiana, Thibault; Imberty, Anne; Baaden, Marc

    2015-05-01

    A molecular visualization program tailored to deal with the range of 3D structures of complex carbohydrates and polysaccharides, either alone or in their interactions with other biomacromolecules, has been developed using advanced technologies elaborated by the video games industry. All the specific structural features displayed by the simplest to the most complex carbohydrate molecules have been considered and can be depicted. This concerns the monosaccharide identification and classification, conformations, location in single or multiple branched chains, depiction of secondary structural elements and the essential constituting elements in very complex structures. Particular attention was given to cope with the accepted nomenclature and pictorial representation used in glycoscience. This achievement provides a continuum between the most popular ways to depict the primary structures of complex carbohydrates to visualizing their 3D structures while giving the users many options to select the most appropriate modes of representations including new features such as those provided by the use of textures to depict some molecular properties. These developments are incorporated in a stand-alone viewer capable of displaying molecular structures, biomacromolecule surfaces and complex interactions of biomacromolecules, with powerful, artistic and illustrative rendering methods. They result in an open source software compatible with multiple platforms, i.e., Windows, MacOS and Linux operating systems, web pages, and producing publication-quality figures. The algorithms and visualization enhancements are demonstrated using a variety of carbohydrate molecules, from glycan determinants to glycoproteins and complex protein-carbohydrate interactions, as well as very complex mega-oligosaccharides and bacterial polysaccharides and multi-stranded polysaccharide architectures. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e

  4. COMPUTING

    CERN Multimedia

    M. Kasemann

    CMS relies on a well functioning, distributed computing infrastructure. The Site Availability Monitoring (SAM) and the Job Robot submission have been very instrumental for site commissioning in order to increase availability of more sites such that they are available to participate in CSA07 and are ready to be used for analysis. The commissioning process has been further developed, including "lessons learned" documentation via the CMS twiki. Recently the visualization, presentation and summarizing of SAM tests for sites has been redesigned, it is now developed by the central ARDA project of WLCG. Work to test the new gLite Workload Management System was performed; a 4 times increase in throughput with respect to LCG Resource Broker is observed. CMS has designed and launched a new-generation traffic load generator called "LoadTest" to commission and to keep exercised all data transfer routes in the CMS PhE-DEx topology. Since mid-February, a transfer volume of about 12 P...

  5. Transmission of compressed video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasch, H. L.

    1990-09-01

    An overview of video coding is presented. The aim is not to give a technical summary of possible coding techniques, but to address subjects related to video compression in general and to the transmission of compressed video in more detail. Bit rate reduction is in general possible by removing redundant information; removing information the eye does not use anyway; and reducing the quality of the video. The codecs which are used for reducing the bit rate, can be divided into two groups: Constant Bit rate Codecs (CBC's), which keep the bit rate constant, but vary the video quality; and Variable Bit rate Codecs (VBC's), which keep the video quality constant by varying the bit rate. VBC's can be in general reach a higher video quality than CBC's using less bandwidth, but need a transmission system that allows the bandwidth of a connection to fluctuate in time. The current and the next generation of the PSTN does not allow this; ATM might. There are several factors which influence the quality of video: the bit error rate of the transmission channel, slip rate, packet loss rate/packet insertion rate, end-to-end delay, phase shift between voice and video, and bit rate. Based on the bit rate of the coded video, the following classification of coded video can be made: High Definition Television (HDTV); Broadcast Quality Television (BQTV); video conferencing; and video telephony. The properties of these classes are given. The video conferencing and video telephony equipment available now and in the next few years can be divided into three categories: conforming to 1984 CCITT standard for video conferencing; conforming to 1988 CCITT standard; and conforming to no standard.

  6. Making good physics videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-05-01

    Online videos are an increasingly important way technology is contributing to the improvement of physics teaching. Students and teachers have begun to rely on online videos to provide them with content knowledge and instructional strategies. Online audiences are expecting greater production value, and departments are sometimes requesting educators to post video pre-labs or to flip our classrooms. In this article, I share my advice on creating engaging physics videos.

  7. Physics for Animation Artists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, David; Garcia, Alejandro L.

    2011-11-01

    Animation has become enormously popular in feature films, television, and video games. Art departments and film schools at universities as well as animation programs at high schools have expanded in recent years to meet the growing demands for animation artists. Professional animators identify the technological facet as the most rapidly advancing (and now indispensable) component of their industry. Art students are keenly aware of these trends and understand that their future careers require them to have a broader exposure to science than in the past. Unfortunately, at present there is little overlap between art and science in the typical high school or college curriculum. This article describes our experience in bridging this gap at San Jose State University, with the hope that readers will find ideas that can be used in their own schools.

  8. 47 CFR 79.3 - Video description of video programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Video description of video programming. 79.3... CLOSED CAPTIONING AND VIDEO DESCRIPTION OF VIDEO PROGRAMMING § 79.3 Video description of video programming. (a) Definitions. For purposes of this section the following definitions shall apply: (1...

  9. Video Self-Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buggey, Tom; Ogle, Lindsey

    2012-01-01

    Video self-modeling (VSM) first appeared on the psychology and education stage in the early 1970s. The practical applications of VSM were limited by lack of access to tools for editing video, which is necessary for almost all self-modeling videos. Thus, VSM remained in the research domain until the advent of camcorders and VCR/DVD players and,…

  10. Tracing Sequential Video Production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Otrel-Cass, Kathrin; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin

    2015-01-01

    With an interest in learning that is set in collaborative situations, the data session presents excerpts from video data produced by two of fifteen students from a class of 5th semester techno-anthropology course. Students used video cameras to capture the time they spent working with a scientist...... video, nature of the interactional space, and material and spatial semiotics....

  11. Developing a Promotional Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epley, Hannah K.

    2014-01-01

    There is a need for Extension professionals to show clientele the benefits of their program. This article shares how promotional videos are one way of reaching audiences online. An example is given on how a promotional video has been used and developed using iMovie software. Tips are offered for how professionals can create a promotional video and…

  12. Towards User Experience-Driven Adaptive Uplink Video Transmission for Automotive Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Lottermann, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The focus of this thesis is to enable user experience-driven uplink video streaming from mobile video sources with limited computational capacity and to apply these to resource-constraint automotive environments. The first part investigates perceptual quality-aware encoding of videos, the second part proposes camera context-based estimators of temporal and spatial activities for videos captured by a front-facing camera of a vehicle, and the last part studies the upstreaming of videos from a m...

  13. Pediatric Audiometry: The Relative Success of Toy and Video Reinforcers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doggett, Sheryl; Gans, Donald P.; Stein, Ramona

    2000-01-01

    An operate conditional technique was used to determine the relative success of toys and video shows as reinforcers for testing the hearing of 28 younger (30-month-old) and 28 older (45-month old) children. Animated toys and video shows for children were equally effective as reinforcers for both age groups. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  14. Semi-Supervised Image-to-Video Adaptation for Video Action Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jianguang; Han, Yahong; Tang, Jinhui; Hu, Qinghua; Jiang, Jianmin

    2017-04-01

    Human action recognition has been well explored in applications of computer vision. Many successful action recognition methods have shown that action knowledge can be effectively learned from motion videos or still images. For the same action, the appropriate action knowledge learned from different types of media, e.g., videos or images, may be related. However, less effort has been made to improve the performance of action recognition in videos by adapting the action knowledge conveyed from images to videos. Most of the existing video action recognition methods suffer from the problem of lacking sufficient labeled training videos. In such cases, over-fitting would be a potential problem and the performance of action recognition is restrained. In this paper, we propose an adaptation method to enhance action recognition in videos by adapting knowledge from images. The adapted knowledge is utilized to learn the correlated action semantics by exploring the common components of both labeled videos and images. Meanwhile, we extend the adaptation method to a semi-supervised framework which can leverage both labeled and unlabeled videos. Thus, the over-fitting can be alleviated and the performance of action recognition is improved. Experiments on public benchmark datasets and real-world datasets show that our method outperforms several other state-of-the-art action recognition methods.

  15. Modeling 3D Unknown object by Range Finder and Video Camera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    real world); proprioceptive and exteroceptive sensors allowing the recreating of the 3D geometric database of an environment (virtual world). The virtual world is projected onto a video display terminal (VDT). Computer-generated and video ...

  16. Marketing Strategy Implementation Process in the Creative Industry of Video Games

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maryangela Drumond de Abreu Negrão; Ana Maria Machado Toaldo

    2013-01-01

    ... in a qualitative study conducted in the creative industry of video game development. The research, a case study applied to four video and computer game companies was based on the Sashittal and Jassawalla (2001...

  17. Perceptually-Inspired Computing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Lin

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Human sensory systems allow individuals to see, hear, touch, and interact with the surrounding physical environment. Understanding human perception and its limit enables us to better exploit the psychophysics of human perceptual systems to design more efficient, adaptive algorithms and develop perceptually-inspired computational models. In this talk, I will survey some of recent efforts on perceptually-inspired computing with applications to crowd simulation and multimodal interaction. In particular, I will present data-driven personality modeling based on the results of user studies, example-guided physics-based sound synthesis using auditory perception, as well as perceptually-inspired simplification for multimodal interaction. These perceptually guided principles can be used to accelerating multi-modal interaction and visual computing, thereby creating more natural human-computer interaction and providing more immersive experiences. I will also present their use in interactive applications for entertainment, such as video games, computer animation, and shared social experience. I will conclude by discussing possible future research directions.

  18. Advanced video coding systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wen

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and accessible text/reference presents an overview of the state of the art in video coding technology. Specifically, the book introduces the tools of the AVS2 standard, describing how AVS2 can help to achieve a significant improvement in coding efficiency for future video networks and applications by incorporating smarter coding tools such as scene video coding. Topics and features: introduces the basic concepts in video coding, and presents a short history of video coding technology and standards; reviews the coding framework, main coding tools, and syntax structure of AV

  19. VBR video traffic models

    CERN Document Server

    Tanwir, Savera

    2014-01-01

    There has been a phenomenal growth in video applications over the past few years. An accurate traffic model of Variable Bit Rate (VBR) video is necessary for performance evaluation of a network design and for generating synthetic traffic that can be used for benchmarking a network. A large number of models for VBR video traffic have been proposed in the literature for different types of video in the past 20 years. Here, the authors have classified and surveyed these models and have also evaluated the models for H.264 AVC and MVC encoded video and discussed their findings.

  20. Influence of Distal Resistance and Proximal Stiffness on Hemodynamics and RV Afterload in Progression and Treatments of Pulmonary Hypertension: A Computational Study with Validation Using Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenbi Su

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We develop a simple computational model based on measurements from a hypoxic neonatal calf model of pulmonary hypertension (PH to investigate the interplay between vascular and ventricular measures in the setting of progressive PH. Model parameters were obtained directly from in vivo and ex vivo measurements of neonatal calves. Seventeen sets of model-predicted impedance and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP show good agreement with the animal measurements, thereby validating the model. Next, we considered a predictive model in which three parameters, PVR, elastic modulus (EM, and arterial thickness, were varied singly from one simulation to the next to study their individual roles in PH progression. Finally, we used the model to predict the individual impacts of clinical (vasodilatory and theoretical (compliance increasing PH treatments on improving pulmonary hemodynamics. Our model (1 displayed excellent patient-specific agreement with measured global pulmonary parameters; (2 quantified relationships between PVR and mean pressure and PVS and pulse pressure, as well as studiying the right ventricular (RV afterload, which could be measured as a hydraulic load calculated from spectral analysis of pulmonary artery pressure and flow waves; (3 qualitatively confirmed the derangement of vascular wall shear stress in progressive PH; and (4 established that decreasing proximal vascular stiffness through a theoretical treatment of reversing proximal vascular remodeling could decrease RV afterload.

  1. Student Evaluation of Online Pharmaceutical Compounding Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanna L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To describe pharmacy students’ views on the effectiveness of an expansion of the compounding laboratory website at the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Methods. Originally, there were 39 videos and three animations available. In 2011, an additional 59 videos and two animations were added. Concurrently, all of the interactive questions were updated to fully integrate with the expanded video library. Students were surveyed about the expanded video library regarding accessibility, functionality, and usefulness, and how using the library impacted their learning of compounding. Surveys were analyzed with descriptive statistics. Means and SDs were calculated for the rating scale questions; independent t tests and Wilcoxon nonparametric tests were used to find differences between professional classes and campuses. Analytical results were evaluated with a one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), z test, and a homogeneity of variance (Levene’s) test. Results. The response rate to the survey was 85%. Compounding videos were used by 386/391 students. Thirty-four percent of students used the videos an average of 30 minutes or less per week; 56% used the videos 1–2 hours per week. Approximately 80% of students were satisfied with the functionality and accessibility of the videos. All students, regardless of professional year or campus affiliation, put their confidence/competence at about 70% of the rating scale. Conclusions. As no standardized compounding curriculum was found in US schools of pharmacy and students reported being satisfied with the website, it could be an accessible, functional, and useful resource for pharmaceutical compounding in schools of pharmacy. PMID:27073283

  2. Managed Video as a Service for a Video Surveillance Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Benta

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for security systems hasresulted in rapid development of video surveillance and videosurveillance has turned into a major area of interest andmanagement challenge. Personal experience in specializedcompanies helped me to adapt demands of users of videosecurity systems to system performance. It is known thatpeople wish to obtain maximum profit with minimum effort,but security is not neglected. Surveillance systems and videomonitoring should provide only necessary information and torecord only when there is activity. Via IP video surveillanceservices provides more safety in this sector, being able torecord information on servers located in other locations thanthe IP cameras. Also, these systems allow real timemonitoring of goods or activities that take place in supervisedperimeters. View live and recording can be done via theInternet from any computer, using a web browser. Access tothe surveillance system is granted after a user and passwordauthentication.

  3. Childhood Violence Prevention Education Using Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Leonard; Beckerman, Adela

    2004-01-01

    This article describes a project that incorporated interactive technology to teach violence prevention knowledge and skills to second grade students. The educational video games presented lessons consisting of animated characters in a story, accompanied by a number of exercises. The research issue was whether students would develop an appreciation…

  4. Monitoring Motion of Pigs in Thermal Videos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gronskyte, Ruta; Kulahci, Murat; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new approach for monitoring animal movement in thermal videos. The method distinguishes movements as walking in the expected direction from walking in the opposite direction, stopping or lying down. The method utilizes blob detection combined with opti-cal ow to segment the pigs...

  5. Animating the Discussion about Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratner, A.

    2016-12-01

    Abstract concepts such as climate change are extremely difficult for both students and adults to grasp. Given that many of these concepts involve issues at global scales or at a microscopic level, photos and video are simply insufficient much of the time. Through an innovative partnership between The Marine Mammal Center, a marine mammal hospital and education facility, and the California College of the Arts Animation Department, we have been able to provide animation students real-world experience in producing scientific animations, and the Center has been able to create an animated video highlighting the science of climate change and effects on marine mammals. Using the science direct from our veterinary and research teams, along with scientifically tested communication strategies related to climate change from the National Network of Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation and Frameworks Institute, this video enables us to teach students and adults of all ages these complex scientific concepts in a fun, engaging, and easily understandable way. Utilizing the skill set and expertise of the College professor as director (currently a lead animator at Pixar Animation), this video provided animation students critical experience in the animation field, exposure and engagement in a critical environmental issue, and an understanding of the opportunities available within the field of animation for educational and scientific purposes. This presentation will highlight the opportunities to utilize animation for educational purposes and provide resources surrounding climate change that could be beneficial to educators at their own organizations.

  6. Educational Video Recording and Editing for The Hand Surgeon

    OpenAIRE

    Rehim, Shady A.; Chung, Kevin C.

    2015-01-01

    Digital video recordings are increasingly used across various medical and surgical disciplines including hand surgery for documentation of patient care, resident education, scientific presentations and publications. In recent years, the introduction of sophisticated computer hardware and software technology has simplified the process of digital video production and improved means of disseminating large digital data files. However, the creation of high quality surgical video footage requires b...

  7. Video tonal stabilization via color states smoothing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yinting; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xiang; Song, Mingli; Bu, Jiajun; Tan, Ping

    2014-11-01

    We address the problem of removing video color tone jitter that is common in amateur videos recorded with hand-held devices. To achieve this, we introduce color state to represent the exposure and white balance state of a frame. The color state of each frame can be computed by accumulating the color transformations of neighboring frame pairs. Then, the tonal changes of the video can be represented by a time-varying trajectory in color state space. To remove the tone jitter, we smooth the original color state trajectory by solving an L1 optimization problem with PCA dimensionality reduction. In addition, we propose a novel selective strategy to remove small tone jitter while retaining extreme exposure and white balance changes to avoid serious artifacts. Quantitative evaluation and visual comparison with previous work demonstrate the effectiveness of our tonal stabilization method. This system can also be used as a preprocessing tool for other video editing methods.

  8. Temporal Segmentation of MPEG Video Streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janko Calic

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Many algorithms for temporal video partitioning rely on the analysis of uncompressed video features. Since the information relevant to the partitioning process can be extracted directly from the MPEG compressed stream, higher efficiency can be achieved utilizing information from the MPEG compressed domain. This paper introduces a real-time algorithm for scene change detection that analyses the statistics of the macroblock features extracted directly from the MPEG stream. A method for extraction of the continuous frame difference that transforms the 3D video stream into a 1D curve is presented. This transform is then further employed to extract temporal units within the analysed video sequence. Results of computer simulations are reported.

  9. Defocus cue and saliency preserving video compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Meera Thapar; Chaudhury, Santanu; Lall, Brejesh

    2016-11-01

    There are monocular depth cues present in images or videos that aid in depth perception in two-dimensional images or videos. Our objective is to preserve the defocus depth cue present in the videos along with the salient regions during compression application. A method is provided for opportunistic bit allocation during the video compression using visual saliency information comprising both the image features, such as color and contrast, and the defocus-based depth cue. The method is divided into two steps: saliency computation followed by compression. A nonlinear method is used to combine pure and defocus saliency maps to form the final saliency map. Then quantization values are assigned on the basis of these saliency values over a frame. The experimental results show that the proposed scheme yields good results over standard H.264 compression as well as pure and defocus saliency methods.

  10. Animal research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsson, I.A.S.; Sandøe, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This article presents the ethical issues in animal research using a combined approach of ethical theory and analysis of scientific findings with bearing on the ethical analysis. The article opens with a general discussion of the moral acceptability of animal use in research. The use of animals...... in research is analyzed from the viewpoint of three distinct ethical approaches: contractarianism, utilitarianism, and animal rights view. On a contractarian view, research on animals is only an ethical issue to the extent that other humans as parties to the social contract care about how research animals...... are faring. From the utilitarian perspective, the use of sentient animals in research that may harm them is an ethical issue, but harm done to animals can be balanced by benefit generated for humans and other animals. The animal rights view, when thoroughgoing, is abolitionist as regards the use of animals...

  11. Understanding Video Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heide Smith, Jonas; Tosca, Susana Pajares; Egenfeldt-Nielsen, Simon

    From Pong to PlayStation 3 and beyond, Understanding Video Games is the first general introduction to the exciting new field of video game studies. This textbook traces the history of video games, introduces the major theories used to analyze games such as ludology and narratology, reviews...... the economics of the game industry, examines the aesthetics of game design, surveys the broad range of game genres, explores player culture, and addresses the major debates surrounding the medium, from educational benefits to the effects of violence. Throughout the book, the authors ask readers to consider...... larger questions about the medium: * What defines a video game? * Who plays games? * Why do we play games? * How do games affect the player? Extensively illustrated, Understanding Video Games is an indispensable and comprehensive resource for those interested in the ways video games are reshaping...

  12. Collaborative Video Sketching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Birgitte; Gundersen, Peter Bukovica; Hautopp, Heidi

    2017-01-01

    This paper introduces to what we define as a collaborative video sketching process. This process links various sketching techniques with digital storytelling approaches and creative reflection processes in video productions. Traditionally, sketching has been used by designers across various...... forms and through empirical examples, we present and discuss the video recording of sketching sessions, as well as development of video sketches by rethinking, redoing and editing the recorded sessions. The empirical data is based on workshop sessions with researchers and students from universities...... and university colleges and primary and secondary school teachers. As researchers, we have had different roles in these action research case studies where various video sketching techniques were applied.The analysis illustrates that video sketching can take many forms, and two common features are important...

  13. Reflections on academic video

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thommy Eriksson

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As academics we study, research and teach audiovisual media, yet rarely disseminate and mediate through it. Today, developments in production technologies have enabled academic researchers to create videos and mediate audiovisually. In academia it is taken for granted that everyone can write a text. Is it now time to assume that everyone can make a video essay? Using the online journal of academic videos Audiovisual Thinking and the videos published in it as a case study, this article seeks to reflect on the emergence and legacy of academic audiovisual dissemination. Anchoring academic video and audiovisual dissemination of knowledge in two critical traditions, documentary theory and semiotics, we will argue that academic video is in fact already present in a variety of academic disciplines, and that academic audiovisual essays are bringing trends and developments that have long been part of academic discourse to their logical conclusion.

  14. MR360: Mixed Reality Rendering for 360° Panoramic Videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Taehyun; Petikam, Lohit; Allen, Benjamin; Chalmers, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel immersive system called MR360 that provides interactive mixed reality (MR) experiences using a conventional low dynamic range (LDR) 360° panoramic video (360-video) shown in head mounted displays (HMDs). MR360 seamlessly composites 3D virtual objects into a live 360-video using the input panoramic video as the lighting source to illuminate the virtual objects. Image based lighting (IBL) is perceptually optimized to provide fast and believable results using the LDR 360-video as the lighting source. Regions of most salient lights in the input panoramic video are detected to optimize the number of lights used to cast perceptible shadows. Then, the areas of the detected lights adjust the penumbra of the shadow to provide realistic soft shadows. Finally, our real-time differential rendering synthesizes illumination of the virtual 3D objects into the 360-video. MR360 provides the illusion of interacting with objects in a video, which are actually 3D virtual objects seamlessly composited into the background of the 360-video. MR360 was implemented in a commercial game engine and tested using various 360-videos. Since our MR360 pipeline does not require any pre-computation, it can synthesize an interactive MR scene using a live 360-video stream while providing realistic high performance rendering suitable for HMDs.

  15. Video Salient Object Detection via Fully Convolutional Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenguan; Shen, Jianbing; Shao, Ling

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a deep learning model to efficiently detect salient regions in videos. It addresses two important issues: (1) deep video saliency model training with the absence of sufficiently large and pixel-wise annotated video data, and (2) fast video saliency training and detection. The proposed deep video saliency network consists of two modules, for capturing the spatial and temporal saliency information, respectively. The dynamic saliency model, explicitly incorporating saliency estimates from the static saliency model, directly produces spatiotemporal saliency inference without time-consuming optical flow computation. We further propose a novel data augmentation technique that simulates video training data from existing annotated image datasets, which enables our network to learn diverse saliency information and prevents overfitting with the limited number of training videos. Leveraging our synthetic video data (150K video sequences) and real videos, our deep video saliency model successfully learns both spatial and temporal saliency cues, thus producing accurate spatiotemporal saliency estimate. We advance the state-of-the-art on the DAVIS dataset (MAE of .06) and the FBMS dataset (MAE of .07), and do so with much improved speed (2fps with all steps).

  16. American animation VS. Japanese Animation

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Stian; Johnsen, Frank

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is a comparative study between American animation and Japanese animation. We take a look into differences, taking into account the culture, history, production- and the animation techniques employed. The main theoretical questions that are answered in this study are: - How has each side of animation influenced the culture surrounding it, and vice versa? -Why can Japanese animation studios presumably produce more than twice the amount that an American animation studio p...

  17. Summarization of Surveillance Video Sequences Using Face Quality Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.; Rahmati, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    Constant working surveillance cameras in public places, such as airports and banks, produce huge amount of video data. Faces in such videos can be extracted in real time. However, most of these detected faces are either redundant or useless. Redundant information adds computational costs to facial...

  18. Selection of keyframes for video colourization using steerable filtering

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Somdyuti Paul

    2017-09-08

    Sep 8, 2017 ... Abstract. The appropriate selection of distinctive keyframes to represent the salient contents of a video is a critical task in video ... Steerable filtering; dominant orientation; keyframe selection; adaptive thresholding. 1. Introduction ..... the XX Brazilian Symposium on Computer Graphics and. Image Processing ...

  19. Expressing Youth Voice through Video Games and Coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Crystle

    2017-01-01

    A growing body of research focuses on the impact of video games and coding on learning. The research often elevates learning the technical skills associated with video games and coding or the importance of problem solving and computational thinking, which are, of course, necessary and relevant. However, the literature less often explores how young…

  20. High-Speed Video Analysis in a Conceptual Physics Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbien, Dwain M.

    2011-01-01

    The use of probe ware and computers has become quite common in introductory physics classrooms. Video analysis is also becoming more popular and is available to a wide range of students through commercially available and/or free software. Video analysis allows for the study of motions that cannot be easily measured in the traditional lab setting…

  1. Jeff FROST, video artist for U2, visits CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Video artist Jeff Frost came to CERN last April to produce video art for the U2 band's 2015 tour Innocence and Experience. He spent a week and visited in The Globe, the ATLAS, CMS experiments and ALICE caverns, Idea Square, the COMPASS experiment, the AD, the Aegis experiment, n-ToF, LEIR, ISOLDE, SM18, the Computing Centre.

  2. Video-based lectures: An emerging paradigm for teaching human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Video-based teaching material is a rich and powerful medium being used in computer assisted learning. This paper aimed to assess the learning outcomes and student nurses' acceptance and satisfaction with the video-based lectures versus the traditional method of teaching human anatomy and physiology courses.

  3. Exploring the influence of instant messaging and video conferencing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some results showed that the use of both instant messaging and video conferencing in projects is moderate and both improve the quality of communication in virtual teams, however in different ways. Keywords: Project communication, computer-mediated communication, instant messaging, video conferencing, virtual teams ...

  4. Building 3D Event Logs for Video Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dang, T.K.; Worring, M.; Bui, T.D.

    2015-01-01

    In scene investigation, creating a video log captured using a handheld camera is more convenient and more complete than taking photos and notes. By introducing video analysis and computer vision techniques, it is possible to build a spatio-temporal representation of the investigation. Such a

  5. The effects of video games on laparoscopic simulator skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalink, Maarten B; Goris, Jetse; Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-07-01

    Recently, there has been a growth in studies supporting the hypothesis that video games have positive effects on basic laparoscopic skills. This review discusses all studies directly related to these effects. A search in the PubMed and EMBASE databases was performed using synonymous terms for video games and laparoscopy. All available articles concerning video games and their effects on skills on any laparoscopic simulator (box trainer, virtual reality, and animal models) were selected. Video game experience has been related to higher baseline laparoscopic skills in different studies. There is currently, however, no standardized method to assess video game experience, making it difficult to compare these studies. Several controlled experiments have, nevertheless, shown that video games cannot only be used to improve laparoscopic basic skills in surgical novices, but are also used as a temporary warming-up before laparoscopic surgery. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Sound for digital video

    CERN Document Server

    Holman, Tomlinson

    2013-01-01

    Achieve professional quality sound on a limited budget! Harness all new, Hollywood style audio techniques to bring your independent film and video productions to the next level.In Sound for Digital Video, Second Edition industry experts Tomlinson Holman and Arthur Baum give you the tools and knowledge to apply recent advances in audio capture, video recording, editing workflow, and mixing to your own film or video with stunning results. This fresh edition is chockfull of techniques, tricks, and workflow secrets that you can apply to your own projects from preproduction

  7. Green Power Partnership Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Green Power Partnership develops videos on a regular basis that explore a variety of topics including, Green Power partnership, green power purchasing, Renewable energy certificates, among others.

  8. Comparison of video poster presentation technique with other presentation techniques in congresses

    OpenAIRE

    Bozdağ, Ali; Eren Bozdag, Kübra; Soyder, Aykut; Aksu, Murat

    2014-01-01

    AbstractBackgroundThe presentation techniques in scientific congresses have advantages and disadvantages over each other. A special presentation technique which involves the advantageous aspects of all the presentation techniques was planned to be constituted.DescriptionIn this technique called as video poster, videos, video animations and/or numerous pictures are displayed by means of a digital frame placed on the poster. Video poster was firstly introduced in Turkey, and then in other count...

  9. REAL TIME SPEED ESTIMATION FROM MONOCULAR VIDEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. S. Temiz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, detailed studies have been performed for developing a real time system to be used for surveillance of the traffic flow by using monocular video cameras to find speeds of the vehicles for secure travelling are presented. We assume that the studied road segment is planar and straight, the camera is tilted downward a bridge and the length of one line segment in the image is known. In order to estimate the speed of a moving vehicle from a video camera, rectification of video images is performed to eliminate the perspective effects and then the interest region namely the ROI is determined for tracking the vehicles. Velocity vectors of a sufficient number of reference points are identified on the image of the vehicle from each video frame. For this purpose sufficient number of points from the vehicle is selected, and these points must be accurately tracked on at least two successive video frames. In the second step, by using the displacement vectors of the tracked points and passed time, the velocity vectors of those points are computed. Computed velocity vectors are defined in the video image coordinate system and displacement vectors are measured by the means of pixel units. Then the magnitudes of the computed vectors in the image space are transformed to the object space to find the absolute values of these magnitudes. The accuracy of the estimated speed is approximately ±1 – 2 km/h. In order to solve the real time speed estimation problem, the authors have written a software system in C++ programming language. This software system has been used for all of the computations and test applications.

  10. Player behavioural modelling for video games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Lankveld, G.; Spronck, P.H.M.; Bakkes, S.C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Player behavioural modelling has grown from a means to improve the playing strength of computer programs that play classic games (e.g., chess), to a means for impacting the player experience and satisfaction in video games, as well as in cross-domain applications such as interactive storytelling. In

  11. Effect Through Broadcasting System Access Point For Video Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Marlina

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Most universities are already implementing wired and wireless network that is used to access integrated information systems and the Internet. At present it is important to do research on the influence of the broadcasting system through the access point for video transmitter learning in the university area. At every university computer network through the access point must also use the cable in its implementation. These networks require cables that will connect and transmit data from one computer to another computer. While wireless networks of computers connected through radio waves. This research will be a test or assessment of how the influence of the network using the WLAN access point for video broadcasting means learning from the server to the client. Instructional video broadcasting from the server to the client via the access point will be used for video broadcasting means of learning. This study aims to understand how to build a wireless network by using an access point. It also builds a computer server as instructional videos supporting software that can be used for video server that will be emitted by broadcasting via the access point and establish a system of transmitting video from the server to the client via the access point.

  12. Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... clinical problems. CT is less sensitive to patient movement than MRI. CT can be performed if you ... Images related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Videos related to Children's (Pediatric) CT (Computed Tomography) Sponsored ...

  13. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer Support Program Community Connections Overview ... group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork Peer Support Program ...

  14. Reviews in instructional video

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meij, Hans

    2017-01-01

    This study investigates the effectiveness of a video tutorial for software training whose construction was based on a combination of insights from multimedia learning and Demonstration-Based Training. In the videos, a model of task performance was enhanced with instructional features that were

  15. AudioMove Video

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Live drawing video experimenting with low tech techniques in the field of sketching and visual sense making. In collaboration with Rune Wehner and Teater Katapult.......Live drawing video experimenting with low tech techniques in the field of sketching and visual sense making. In collaboration with Rune Wehner and Teater Katapult....

  16. Making Good Physics Videos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, James

    2017-01-01

    Online videos are an increasingly important way technology is contributing to the improvement of physics teaching. Students and teachers have begun to rely on online videos to provide them with content knowledge and instructional strategies. Online audiences are expecting greater production value, and departments are sometimes requesting educators…

  17. SECRETS OF SONG VIDEO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernyshov Alexander V.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the origins of the song videos as TV and Internet-genre. In addition, it considers problems of screen images creation depending on the musical form and the text of a songs in connection with relevant principles of accent and phraseological video editing and filming techniques as well as with additional frames and sound elements.

  18. Acoustic Neuroma Educational Video

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... support group for me? Find a Group Upcoming Events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support ANetwork Peer ... group for me? Find a group Back Upcoming events Video Library Photo Gallery One-on-One Support Back ANetwork ...

  19. Personal Digital Video Stories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørngreen, Rikke; Henningsen, Birgitte Sølbeck; Louw, Arnt Vestergaard

    2016-01-01

    agenda focusing on video productions in combination with digital storytelling, followed by a presentation of the digital storytelling features. The paper concludes with a suggestion to initiate research in what is identified as Personal Digital Video (PDV) Stories within longitudinal settings, while...

  20. The Video Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provenzo, Eugene F., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Video games are neither neutral nor harmless but represent very specific social and symbolic constructs. Research on the social content of today's video games reveals that sex bias and gender stereotyping are widely evident throughout the Nintendo games. Violence and aggression also pervade the great majority of the games. (MLF)