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Sample records for vickers microhardness measurements

  1. Determination of Vickers microhardness on porous silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Masis, M. [Department of Physics, Wright State University, Dayton OH 45435 (United States); Ramirez-Porras, A. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales (CICIMA) and Escuela de Fisica, Universidad de Costa Rica, San Pedro de Montes de Oca 2060 (Costa Rica)], E-mail: aramirez@fisica.ucr.ac.cr

    2008-02-29

    The Vickers microhardness values of two different sets of porous silicon layers were determined at applied load of 98 mN. The sets consisted of Boron-doped substrates anodized at diverse current densities for two different amounts of hydrofluoric acid (HF) in the etching solution. We found that the microhardness of the samples with lower content of HF at the anodization process showed higher values, whereas the Vickers parameter diminishes consistently for higher current densities. A possible explanation of this behavior is proposed.

  2. The relationship between vickers microhardness and compressive strength of functional surface geopolymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaer, Ekaputri, Januari Jaya; Fansuri, Hamzah; Abdullah, Mustafa Al Bakri

    2017-09-01

    An experimental study to investigate the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength of geopolymers made from metakaolin has been conducted. Samples were prepared by using metakaolin activated with a sodium silicate solution at a different ratio of Si to Al and Na to Al and cured at 70oC for one hour. The resulting geopolymers were stored in an open air for 28 days before conducting any measurement. Bulk density and apparent porosity of the samples were measured by using Archimedes's method. Vickers microhardness measurements were performed on a polished surface of geopolymers with a load ranging from 0.3 - 1.0 kg. The topographic of indented samples were examined by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Compressive strength of the resulting geopolymers was measured on the cylindrical samples with a ratio of height to the diameter was 2:1. The results showed that the molar ratios of geopolymers compositions play important roles in the magnitude of bulk density, porosity, Vickers's microhardness as well as the compressive strength. The porosity reduced exponentially the magnitude of the strength of geopolymers. It was found that the relationship between Vickers microhardness and compressive strength was linear. At the request of all authors and with the approval of the proceedings editor, article 020188 titled, "The relationship between vickers microhardness and compressive strength of functional surface geopolymers," is being retracted from the public record due to the fact that it is a duplication of article 020170 published in the same volume.

  3. The characterization of Vicker`s microhardness indentations and pile-up profiles as a strain-hardening microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, C. Jr. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Engineering Technology; Odette, G.R.; Lucas, G.E.; Schroeter, B.; Klinginsmith, D. [California Univ., Santa Barbara, CA (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering; Yamamoto, T. [Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan)

    1998-04-01

    Microhardness measurements have long been used to examine strength properties and changes in strength properties in metals, for example, as induced by irradiation. Microhardness affords a relatively simple test that can be applied to very small volumes of material. Microhardness is nominally related to the flow stress of the material at a fixed level of plastic strain. Further, the geometry of the pile-up of material around the indentation is related to the strain-hardening behavior of a material; steeper pile-ups correspond to smaller strain-hardening rates. In this study the relationship between pile-up profiles and strain hardening is examined using both experimental and analytical methods. Vickers microhardness tests have been performed on a variety of metal alloys including low alloy, high Cr and austenitic stainless steels. The pile-up topology around the indentations has been quantified using confocal microscopy techniques. In addition, the indentation and pile-up geometry has been simulated using finite element method techniques. These results have been used to develop an improved quantification of the relationship between the pile-up geometry and the strain-hardening constitutive behavior of the test material.

  4. DETERMINATION OF VICKERS MICROHARDNESS IN β-Ga2O3 SINGLE CRYSTALS GROWN FROM THEIR OWN MELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Guzilova

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The results of microhardness measurements of β-Ga2O3 single crystals for (001 crystallographic face are reported. The crystals were grown by the free crystallization with the "Garnet-2M" equipment. Microhardness values ​​ were determined by the Vickers method at varying loads. A four-sided diamond pyramid was used as an indenter. The average value of gallium oxide microhardness was equal to 8.91 GPa. We have carried out comparison of the values ​​obtained with the microhardness for the other wide bandgap semiconductors - epitaxial GaN layers grown on 6H-SiC and GaP layers grown on GaP:S. The findings are usable for machining process development of β-Ga2O3 single crystal substrates. In particular, silicon carbide and electrocorundum may be recommended for β-Ga2O3 machine processing.

  5. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  6. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, Tahereh-Sadat; Erfan, Mohammad; Behroozibakhsh, Marjan; Fatemi, Mostafa; Masaeli, Reza; Rezaei, Yashar; Bagheri, Hossein; Erfan, Yasaman

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm). Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length) were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan) was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm) surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness. PMID:26889359

  7. Evaluation of Polymerization Efficacy in Composite Resins via FT-IR Spectroscopy and Vickers Microhardness Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahereh-Sadat Jafarzadeh

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Polymerization efficacy affects the properties and performance of composite resin restorations.The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of polymerization of two micro-hybrid, two nano-hybrid and one nano-filled ormocer-based composite resins, cured by two different light-curing systems, using Fourier transformation infrared (FT-IR spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness testing at two different depths (top surface, 2 mm. Materials and methods. For FT-IR spectrometry, five cylindrical specimens (5mm in diameter × 2 mm in length were prepared from each composite resin using Teflon molds and polymerized for 20 seconds. Then, 70-μm wafers were sectioned at the top surface and at2mm from the top surface. The degree of conversion for each sample was calculated using FT-IR spectroscopy. For Vickers micro-hardness testing, three cylindrical specimens were prepared from each composite resin and polymerized for 20 seconds. The Vickers microhardness test (Shimadzu, Type M, Japan was performed at the top and bottom (depth=2 mm surfaces of each specimen. Three-way ANOVA with independent variables and Tukey tests were performed at 95% significance level. Results. No significant differences were detected in degree of conversion and microhardness between LED and QTH light-curing units except for the ormocer-based specimen, CeramX, which exhibited significantly higher DC by LED. All the composite resins showed a significantly higher degree of conversion at the surface. Microhardness was not significantly affected by depth, except for Herculite XRV Ultra and CeramX, which showed higher values at the surface. Conclusion. Composite resins containing nano-particles generally exhibited more variations in degree of conversion and microhardness.

  8. Vickers microhardness comparison of 4 composite resins with different types of filler.

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    René García-Contreras

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Composite resins are the material of choice to restore minimal invasive cavities; conversely, it is important to explore the mechanical properties of commercially available dental materials. Objective: To compare the Vickers microhardness (VHN of four available commercial composite resins using standardized samples and methods. Methodology: Composite cylinders were manufactured in a Teflon mould. We used the follow composite resins (n=4/gp: Microhybrid resins [Feeling Lux (Viarden and Amelogen Plus (Ultradent], Hybrid resin [Te-Econom Plus (Ivoclar] and Nanohybrid resin [Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE]. All samples were incubated in distilled water at 37ºC for five days. The test was carried out with microhardness indenter at 10 N, and a dwelling time of 10 s for 9 indentations across the specimens resulting in a total of 36 indentations for each group. Data were subjected to Kolmogorov-Smirnov normality test and ANOVA (post-hoc Tukey test. Results: The VHN mean values ranged from harder to softer as follows: Filtek Z350 (71.96±6.44 (p Amelogen Plus (59.90±4.40 (p Feeling lux (53.52±5.72> Te-Econom Plus (53.26±5.19. Conclusion: According to our results, the microhardness of the evaluated conventional composite resins can withstand the masticatory forces; however nanohybrid composite resins showed better Vickers microhardness and therefore are a more clinically suitable option for minimal invasion treatments.

  9. A new approach to the estimation of surface free energy based on Vickers microhardness data

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    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A relation between surface free energy (σMHV and Meyer’s lines cut-values has been established using Vickers microhardness (MHV method and empirical physical laws. This relation allows the calculation of σMHV only from MHV data. The parameters required are Meyer’s lines cut-values and the mean value of diagonal length of the impression at different loads applied (drealmean. Our study of 12 samples of ultra high molecular weight polyethylene (PE-UHMW showed that the new approach is applicable when the slope value of Meyer’s lines equals 2 (i.e. n = 2. A γ-60Co source was used for the irradiation of 11 samples (one of the samples investigated is un-irradiated at room temperature in air. Doses of 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 200, 500, 1000 and 1500 kGy were applied. The values of σMHV obtained are in a good agreement with the literature. The dependence of σMHV on the dose applied strictly corresponds to the radiation effects theory. MHV was measured at seven different loads – 0.0123, 0.0245, 0.049, 0.098, 0.196, 0.392, 0.785 N at a loading time of 30 s.

  10. Effect of Preoperative Occlusal Matrices on the Vickers Microhardness of Composite Disks Polymerized with QTH and LED Lamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-Oyagüe, Raquel; Milward, Paul J; Martín-Cerrato, Alicia; Lynch, Christopher D

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the reliability of the preoperative occlusal matrix technique in terms of the surface Vickers microhardness (VMH) of the underlying composite restorative material. Two hundred microhybrid composite cylinders were built up and light-cured in a single-layer step, forming two experimental groups (N = 100) according to their heights (1.5 mm/2 mm). Each group was divided into five subgroups (N = 20) depending on the matrix thickness (no matrix/0.5 mm/1 mm/2 mm/3 mm). Half the specimens per subgroup (N = 10) were randomly polymerized with a quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) light-curing unit (LCU). The remaining half were cured using a light-emitting diode lamp. The top and bottom samples' sides were tested for VMH at 1 hour and 24 hours post-curing using a universal VMH machine. A multiple analysis of variance with repeated measurements for the "surface" factor and the Student-Newman-Keuls test were run (α = 0.05). Bottom/top microhardness ratios were compared with the empirically accepted limit (0.8). Surface topography was analyzed under a scanning electron microscope. The thinnest matrices provided the significantly best VMH values. LCU, disc height, and time also contributed to VMH. At 24 hours, 2-mm high discs polymerized with QTH resulted in inadequate microhardness ratios when 1-mm thick to 3-mm thick matrices were used. The thinnest matrices are the most recommendable ones. The esthetics and occlusal reproducibility achieved with customized occlusal matrices fabricated before cavity preparation have been widely demonstrated. However, their effect on the physical properties of the restorations deserves further investigation. Although more studies are necessary, the thinnest matrices seem to be the most suitable to preserve the composite surface VMH and the curing depth. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Carsten P.

    Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope......Calibrated atomic force microscope measurements of vickers hardness indentations and tip production and characterisation for scanning tunelling microscope...

  12. Prediction of the Vickers Microhardness and Ultimate Tensile Strength of AA5754 H111 Friction Stir Welding Butt Joints Using Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Luigi Alberto Ciro; Serio, Livia Maria; Facchini, Francesco; Mummolo, Giovanni; Ludovico, Antonio Domenico

    2016-11-10

    A simulation model was developed for the monitoring, controlling and optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. This approach, using the FSW technique, allows identifying the correlation between the process parameters (input variable) and the mechanical properties (output responses) of the welded AA5754 H111 aluminum plates. The optimization of technological parameters is a basic requirement for increasing the seam quality, since it promotes a stable and defect-free process. Both the tool rotation and the travel speed, the position of the samples extracted from the weld bead and the thermal data, detected with thermographic techniques for on-line control of the joints, were varied to build the experimental plans. The quality of joints was evaluated through destructive and non-destructive tests (visual tests, macro graphic analysis, tensile tests, indentation Vickers hardness tests and t thermographic controls). The simulation model was based on the adoption of the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) characterized by back-propagation learning algorithm with different types of architecture, which were able to predict with good reliability the FSW process parameters for the welding of the AA5754 H111 aluminum plates in Butt-Joint configuration.

  13. Prediction of the Vickers Microhardness and Ultimate Tensile Strength of AA5754 H111 Friction Stir Welding Butt Joints Using Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Alberto Ciro De Filippis

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A simulation model was developed for the monitoring, controlling and optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW process. This approach, using the FSW technique, allows identifying the correlation between the process parameters (input variable and the mechanical properties (output responses of the welded AA5754 H111 aluminum plates. The optimization of technological parameters is a basic requirement for increasing the seam quality, since it promotes a stable and defect-free process. Both the tool rotation and the travel speed, the position of the samples extracted from the weld bead and the thermal data, detected with thermographic techniques for on-line control of the joints, were varied to build the experimental plans. The quality of joints was evaluated through destructive and non-destructive tests (visual tests, macro graphic analysis, tensile tests, indentation Vickers hardness tests and t thermographic controls. The simulation model was based on the adoption of the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs characterized by back-propagation learning algorithm with different types of architecture, which were able to predict with good reliability the FSW process parameters for the welding of the AA5754 H111 aluminum plates in Butt-Joint configuration.

  14. Prediction of the Vickers Microhardness and Ultimate Tensile Strength of AA5754 H111 Friction Stir Welding Butt Joints Using Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Filippis, Luigi Alberto Ciro; Serio, Livia Maria; Facchini, Francesco; Mummolo, Giovanni; Ludovico, Antonio Domenico

    2016-01-01

    A simulation model was developed for the monitoring, controlling and optimization of the Friction Stir Welding (FSW) process. This approach, using the FSW technique, allows identifying the correlation between the process parameters (input variable) and the mechanical properties (output responses) of the welded AA5754 H111 aluminum plates. The optimization of technological parameters is a basic requirement for increasing the seam quality, since it promotes a stable and defect-free process. Both the tool rotation and the travel speed, the position of the samples extracted from the weld bead and the thermal data, detected with thermographic techniques for on-line control of the joints, were varied to build the experimental plans. The quality of joints was evaluated through destructive and non-destructive tests (visual tests, macro graphic analysis, tensile tests, indentation Vickers hardness tests and t thermographic controls). The simulation model was based on the adoption of the Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) characterized by back-propagation learning algorithm with different types of architecture, which were able to predict with good reliability the FSW process parameters for the welding of the AA5754 H111 aluminum plates in Butt-Joint configuration. PMID:28774035

  15. Morphological, thermal and annealed microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of annealing temperature on the microhardness of IPNs were studied using the Vickers method. SEM indicates the homogeneous morphological features for IPN. The role of gelatin, AN and crosslinker on the developed hard biopolymer has been described with the help of DSC thermograms and microhardness ...

  16. Microhardness of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins polymerized through 7.5-mm-thick endocrowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregor, Ladislav; Bouillaguet, Serge; Onisor, Ioana; Ardu, Stefano; Krejci, Ivo; Rocca, Giovanni Tommaso

    2014-10-01

    The complete polymerization of luting resins through thick indirect restorations is still questioned. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the degree of polymerization of light- and dual-polymerizable luting resins under thick indirect composite resin and ceramic endocrowns by means of Vickers microhardness measurements. The Vickers microhardness measurements of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin and a dual-polymerizable luting cement directly polymerized in a natural tooth mold for 40 seconds with a high-power light-emitting diode lamp (control) were compared with measurements after indirect irradiation through 7.5-mm-thick composite resin and ceramic endocrowns for 3 × 90 seconds. A test-to-control microhardness values ratio of 0.80 at a depth of 0.5 mm below the surface was assumed as the criterion for adequate conversion. For the Vickers microhardness measurements of a dual-polymerizable luting cement, no differences (P>.05) were found between Vickers microhardness control values and values reported after polymerization through composite resin and ceramic endocrowns. For The Vickers microhardness measurements (±SD) of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin, control values were significantly (Pmicrohardness measurements of a light-polymerizable microhybrid composite resin polymerized through the endocrowns were approximately 10% to 12% lower than those of the control values. Two-way ANOVA showed the influence of the luting material on the Vickers microhardness values (Pmaterial was not significant (P>.05). Under the conditions of this in vitro study, Vickers microhardness values of the dual-polymerizable resin cement and the light-polymerizable restorative composite resin irradiated for 3 × 90 seconds with a high irradiance light-emitting diode lamp through 7.5-mm-thick endocrowns reached at least 80% of the control Vickers microhardness values, which means that both materials can be adequately polymerized when they are used for

  17. Effect of Boronizing on Microhardness and Wear Resistance of Steel AISI 1050 and Chilled Cast Iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calik, Adnan; Simsek, Mithat; Karakas, Mustafa Serdar; Ucar, Nazim

    2014-05-01

    Steel AISI 1050 (steel 50) and chilled cast iron are studied after 5-h solid-phase boronizing from a powder environment at 900 °C. The surfaces of the boronized specimens are studied by x-ray and electron microscopic analyses and their Vickers microhardness is measured. The wear resistance is determined by the pin-on-disc method.

  18. Macro- and microhardness of IN-713C nickel superalloy constituents

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    F. Binczyk

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The results of investigations of the effect of modification and cooling rate on the macrohardness of castings and microhardness of phase constituents in IN-713C nickel superalloy were described. As an inoculant, cobalt aluminate CoAl2O4 in composition with aluminium powder and colloidal silica was used. Changes in the cooling rate were obtained using a cast stepped test piece with steps of 6, 11 and 17 mm thickness. Macrohardness of the cast test piece steps was measured by Brinell technique, while Vickers method was used to measure the microhardness of γ and γ’ phases present in the alloy matrix, as well as the hardness of eutectic carbide precipitates.A significant effect of the cooling rate and modification treatment on the results of the measurements was stated, and difficulties in performing correctly the microhardness measurements due to the precipitates dimensions, especially after the modification treatment, were highlighted.

  19. Comparative evaluation of the microhardness of 4 dental sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevilacqua, L; Sossi, A; Cadenaro, M; Di Lenarda, R

    2007-12-01

    Aim of this study was the evaluation of the microhardness of 4 dental sealants polymerised with two different curing units. Twenty samples (5 x 5x 2 mm) were prepared with 4 different sealants; 10 samples for each group were polymerised with a plasma curing unit (Apollo 95 E DMD) and 10 with a halogen curing light (Heliolux DLX Vivadent ETS, Schaan, Liechtenstein). For each section 6 Vickers microhardness measurements were performed (VMHT 30A, Leica Wien, Austria), 3 on the surface exposed to the light and 3 on the opposite surface. After the baseline assessment all samples were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C for 30, 60, 90, 180 and 360 days, and then analysed again with the microhardness indenter and observed under steromicroscope 10X (Leica DM2500 Wien, Austria). Data were then statistically analysed. The hybrid composite Tetric flow (group IV) showed the higher microhardness values compared to the other tested materials (group I, II, III); surfaces exposed to curing light showed higher microhardness values than opposite surfaces. Moreover, a significant microhardness reduction was observed after 30 days; values remained unmodified after 60, 90, 180 and 360 days. Data were then statistically analysed with Anova test for repeated measures, with a global significance level of 0.05. Because of the good mechanical properties of dental sealants they represent the first choice materials in pits and fissures sealing.

  20. Effects of chlorhexidine and sodium hypochlorite on the microhardness of root canal dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luciane Dias; Carvalho, Cláudio Antonio Talge; Nunes, Willian; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Camargo, Carlos Henrique Ribeiro; Jorge, Antonio Olavo Cardoso

    2007-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of endodontic irrigants on the microhardness of root canal dentin. Thirty extracted single-rooted human teeth were used. The crowns were sectioned at the cementoenamel junction. Each root was transversely sectioned into cervical, middle, and apical segments, resulting in 90 specimens. The 3 sections of each root were separately mounted in an individual silicon device with acrylic resin. The specimens were randomly divided into the following 3 groups (n = 30), according to the irrigant solution used: (1) group 1, control (saline solution); (2) group 2, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate solution; and (3) group 3, 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). After 15 minutes of irrigation, dentin microhardness was measured on each section at 500 microm and 1000 microm from the pulp-dentin interface with a Vickers diamond microhardness tester in Vickers hardness number (VHN). Data obtained were analyzed using analysis of variance and the Tukey test (5%). Specimens irrigated with 2% chlorhexidine (group 2) or 1% NaOCl (group 3) presented lower values of dentin microhardness, with significant difference in relation to the control group (P chlorhexidine and NaOCl solutions significantly reduced the microhardness of root canal dentin at 500 microm and 1000 microm from the pulp-dentin interface.

  1. Effect of chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil solvents on the microhardness of human root dentin.

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    Sedigheh Khedmat

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil solvents on the microhardness of human root dentin.Sixty-eight single-rooted single-canal extracted human premolar teeth were used. Tooth crowns were separated from the roots at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ. Roots were buccolingually sectioned into mesial and distal halves. Specimens were randomly divided into 5 groups, with 20 teeth in each solvent group and 4 teeth in each control group. Primary microhardness of specimens was measured using Vickers microhardness tester. Specimens were exposed to solvents for 15 minutes and were subjected to microhardness testing again. Data were recorded and analyzed using repeated measure ANOVA.No significant difference was found in dentin microhardness before and after exposure to solvents in any of the orange oil, eucalyptol, chloroform or saline groups (P=0.727. None of the experimental groups showed any significant difference in terms of dentin microhardness reduction (P=0.99 and had no significant difference with the negative control group.This study showed that chloroform, eucalyptol and orange oil as gutta percha solvents did not decrease the microhardness of root dentin. Thus, none of the mentioned solvents has any superiority over the others in terms of affecting dentin properties.

  2. Effect of organic acids in dental biofilm on microhardness of a silorane-based composite

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    Sedighe Sadat Hashemikamangar

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study evaluated the effect of lactic acid and acetic acid on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite compared to two methacrylate-based composite resins. Materials and Methods Thirty disc-shaped specimens each were fabricated of Filtek P90, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z350XT. After measuring of Vickers microhardness, they were randomly divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10 and immersed in lactic acid, acetic acid or distilled water. Microhardness was measured after 48 hr and 7 day of immersion. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05. The surfaces of two additional specimens were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM before and after immersion. Results All groups showed a reduction in microhardness after 7 day of immersion (p < 0.001. At baseline and 7 day, the microhardness of Z250 was the greatest, followed by Z350 and P90 (p < 0.001. At 48 hr, the microhardness values of Z250 and Z350 were greater than P90 (p < 0.001 for both, but those of Z250 and Z350 were not significantly different (p = 0.095. Also, the effect of storage media on microhardness was not significant at baseline, but significant at 48 hr and after 7 day (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively. Lactic acid had the greatest effect. Conclusions The microhardness of composites decreased after 7 day of immersion. The microhardness of P90 was lower than that of other composites. Lactic acid caused a greater reduction in microhardness compared to other solutions.

  3. Effect of organic acids in dental biofilm on microhardness of a silorane-based composite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemikamangar, Sedighe Sadat; Pourhashemi, Seyed Jalal; Talebi, Mohammad; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Kharazifard, Mohammad Javad

    2015-08-01

    This study evaluated the effect of lactic acid and acetic acid on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite compared to two methacrylate-based composite resins. Thirty disc-shaped specimens each were fabricated of Filtek P90, Filtek Z250 and Filtek Z350XT. After measuring of Vickers microhardness, they were randomly divided into 3 subgroups (n = 10) and immersed in lactic acid, acetic acid or distilled water. Microhardness was measured after 48 hr and 7 day of immersion. Data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA (p < 0.05). The surfaces of two additional specimens were evaluated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) before and after immersion. All groups showed a reduction in microhardness after 7 day of immersion (p < 0.001). At baseline and 7 day, the microhardness of Z250 was the greatest, followed by Z350 and P90 (p < 0.001). At 48 hr, the microhardness values of Z250 and Z350 were greater than P90 (p < 0.001 for both), but those of Z250 and Z350 were not significantly different (p = 0.095). Also, the effect of storage media on microhardness was not significant at baseline, but significant at 48 hr and after 7 day (p = 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). Lactic acid had the greatest effect. The microhardness of composites decreased after 7 day of immersion. The microhardness of P90 was lower than that of other composites. Lactic acid caused a greater reduction in microhardness compared to other solutions.

  4. Study of microhardness and electrical properties of proton irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Polyethersulfone (PES) films were irradiated with 3 MeV proton beams in the fluence range 1013–1015 ions/cm2. The radiation induced changes in microhardness was investigated by a Vickers' microhardness tester in the load range 100–1000 mN and electrical properties in the frequency range 100 Hz–1 MHz by an LCR ...

  5. Photoplastic effect in polycarbonate using microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vickers microhardness indentation technique has been employed to detect the photoplastic effect in the transparent polycarbonate specimens in darkness and under mercury illumination. For low applied loads, the hardening of specimens under illumination confirms the positive photoplastic effect that causes ...

  6. Microhardness characteristics values of root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wahyuniwati Wahyuniwati

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the characteristics of the microhardness impairment root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA. Samples mandibular premolar teeth with one root canal, each divided into 4 groups: EDTA solution, EDTA gel, EDTA cream and negative control; and each group consisted of 6 samples. The teeth were decoronated  at cementoenamel junction (CEJ,  prepared by the crown down pressureless technique, cut along  longitudinal direction, and  each sample was attached  to selfcured acrylic and then soaked in distilled water. Samples were taken early microhardness measurement by means of Digital Vickers Microhardness Tester. The sample is then applied to the appropriate group of materials EDTA for 5 minutes, except for the negative control group, soaked in saline solution for 5 menit, then performed the final measurement of microhardness of dentin. The results of measurements taken from  the average value of measurements made at 3 points, coronal, middle and apical. Data were collected and analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s Post Hoc test. The results showed there are differences in dentin microhardness decrease significantly in all treatment groups compared to the negative control group (p 0.05 which means there is no difference in microhardness reduction in dentin significantly among the test group.

  7. Effect of polymerization cycles on flexural strengths and microhardness of different denture base materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, Hasan; Gundogdu, Mustafa; Alkurt, Murat; Yesil Duymus, Zeynep

    2017-03-31

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of different polymerization cycles on the flexural strengths and microhardness of two denture base materials (Meliodent and Paladent). Heat-polymerized acrylic resin specimens (65.0 mm long×10.0 mm wide×2.5 mm in height) were prepared using different short and long polymerization cycles. After the specimens had been polymerized, they were stored in distilled water at 37±1°C for 24 h. Flexural strength test was performed at a cross-head speed of 5 mm/min and Vickers microhardness was measured. Data were analyzed with a 1-way analysis of variance followed by Tukey test, and Student t-test (α=0.05). The flexural strengths and microhardness were significantly different between Meliodent and Paladent (pmicrohardness (p<0.05). Polymerization with G cycle may be suggested for Meliodent and H cycle may be suggested for Paladent.

  8. MICROHARDNESS OF BULK-FILL COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelić, Katarina; Matić, Sanja; Marović, Danijela; Klarić, Eva; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to determine microhardness of high- and low-viscosity bulk-fill composite resins and compare it with conventional composite materials. Four materials of high-viscosity were tested, including three bulk-fills: QuiXfi l (QF), x-tra fi l (XTF) and Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (TEBCF), while nanohybrid composite GrandioSO (GSO) served as control. The other four were low-viscosity composites, three bulk-fill materials: Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR), Venus Bulk Fill (VBF) and x-tra base (XB), and conventional control material X-Flow (XF). Composite samples (n=5) were polymerized for 20 s with Bluephase G2 curing unit. Vickers hardness was used to determine microhardness of each material at the surface, and at 2-mm and 4-mm depth. GSO on average recorded significantly higher microhardness values than bulk-fill materials (pcomposite XF revealed similar microhardness values as SDR, but significantly lower than XB (pmaterials was lower than microhardness of the conventional composite material (GSO). Surface microhardness of low-viscosity materials was generally even lower. The microhardness of all tested materials at 4 mm was not different from their surface values. However, additional capping layer was a necessity for low-viscosity bulk-fill materials due to their low microhardness.

  9. Roughness and microhardness of composites after different bleaching techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Andreia; Paula, Anabela; Ramalho, Amílcar; Esteves, Miguel; Ferreira, Manuel Marques; Carrilho, Eunice

    2015-12-18

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the roughness and microhardness of SonicFill™ (Kerr), and compare it with Filtek™ Supreme XTE (3M ESPE) after 2 bleaching regimens. Sixty cylindrical specimens (10 × 2 mm) of each of the 2 composites were prepared and divided into 6 groups (n = 20): groups 1, 2: no treatment; groups 3, 4: 10% carbamide peroxide (CP); and groups 5, 6: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP) plus LED. After treatments, specimens were thermocycled (500 cycles, 5 °C/55 °C, dwell time 30 minutes). A mechanical roughness tester was employed to measure the surface roughness parameters and the Vickers test to measure microhardness. One-way ANOVA, Tukey and Bonferroni methods with a significance level of 5% were used for the statistical analysis. For SonicFill™, there was no statistically significant difference in microhardness between the control group (no. 1) and the bleached groups (nos. 3, 5), but there was difference between CP and HP treatments; for Filtek™ Supreme XTE, there was no significant difference in microhardness among all groups. There was no significant difference in average roughness (Ra) and the root mean square of the roughness (Rq) among all groups. The mean roughness depth (Rz) parameter showed no statistically significant differences among all groups for SonicFill™, but in Filtek™ Supreme XTE, there was a significant increase between control and bleaching treatments; roughness skewness (Rsk) showed no statistically significant differences among all groups for SonicFill™ and Filtek™ Supreme XTE, except for nos. 2 and 4, where the Rsk increased with CP. The microhardness of Filtek™ Supreme XTE is less affected by bleaching than that of SonicFill™. Both bleaching treatments affect Rz in Filtek™ Supreme XTE in contrast to SonicFill™, but only the CP treatment affects the Rsk of Filtek™ Supreme XTE, with no significant effect of SonicFill™.

  10. Effect of calcium hydroxide pastes and vehicles on root canal dentin microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María G Pacios

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium hydroxide pastes used in the endodontic therapy may produce changes in the physical properties of the dentin. Objective: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of calcium hydroxide pastes and their vehicles on microhardness of root canal dentin. Materials and Methods: Sixty maxillary anterior teeth were used. The crowns of the teeth were removed at the cemento-enamel junction. Canals were instrumented, horizontally sectioned into 2 segments, embedded in acrylic resin, and polished. A total of 120 specimens were randomly divided into 12 groups. Specimens stayed in contact with the vehicles or the pastes prepared with the calcium hydroxide powder and the same vehicles. The vehicles are: Distilled water, chlorhexidine, carticaine in the anesthetic solution, propylene glycol, monochlorophenol and monochlorophenol - propylene glycol. The references Vickers microhardness were obtained prior the application of the medicaments. Samples were then exposed to the medicaments for 3, 7, and 14 days, and microhardness measured again. The results were statistically analyzed by one-way ANOVA, Tukey test, and regression. Results: All vehicles and pastes, except distilled water, significantly decreased the microhardness of the root dentin; however, calcium hydroxide + camphorated monochlorophenol - propylene glycol and camphorated monochlorophenol - propylene glycol showed the highest decrease. Conclusion: Vehicles contribute to calcium hydroxide reduction of root canal dentin microhardness as constituent of endodontic pastes.

  11. Effect of different bleaching strategies on microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahari, Mahmoud; Savadi Oskoee, Siavash; Mohammadi, Narmin; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel; Godrati, Mostafa; Savadi Oskoee, Ayda

    2016-01-01

    Background. Dentists' awareness of the effects of bleaching agents on the surface and mechanical properties of restorative materials is of utmost importance. Therefore, this in vitro study was undertaken to investigate the effects of different bleaching strategies on the microhardness of a silorane-based composite resin. Methods. Eighty samples of a silorane-based composite resin (measuring 4 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness) were prepared within acrylic molds. The samples were polished and randomly assigned to 4 groups (n=20). Group 1 (controls) were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks. The samples in group 2 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide for two weeks two hours daily. The samples in group 3 were bleached with 35% hydrogen peroxide twice 5 days apart for 30 minutes each time. The samples in group 4 underwent a bleaching procedure with light-activated 35% hydrogen peroxide under LED light once for 40 minutes. Then the microhardness of the samples was determined using Vickers method. Data were analyzed with one-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (P microhardness compared to the control group (P microhardness between groups 2 and 4 (P = 0.001) and between groups 3 and 4 (Pmicrohardness between groups 2 and 3 (P > 0.05). Conclusion. Bleaching agents decreased microhardness of silorane-based composite resin restorations, the magnitude of which depending on the bleaching strategy used.

  12. Effect of nano-hydroxyapatite toothpaste on microhardness ofartificial carious lesions created on extracted teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Ebadifar

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many types of toothpastes contain substances that can remineralize initial enamel caries. This study aimed to assess the effect of nano-hydroxyapatite (NHA on microhardness of artificially created carious lesions. Methods. In this in vitro study, NHA was prepared using sol-gel technique and added to the toothpaste with 7% concentration. A total of 80 extracted sound teeth were collected. The crowns were polished using 500-grit abrasive paper. The specimens were randomly coded from 1 to 80. Number 1 to 40 were assigned to group A and numbers 41 to 80 to group B. The microhardness was measured using HVS-1000 Vickers microhardness tester. The specimens were demineralized using 37% phosphoric acid for 3 minutes in order to create artificial carious lesions and then were rinsed with water, air-sprayed for 3 minutes and dried. Microhardness was measured again. Next, the specimens were brushed for 15 days, twice daily, for 15 seconds. After 15 days, microhardness was measured again. Toothpaste A contained NHA and fluoride and toothpaste B contained fluoride alone. Data were analyzed using SPSS 16, with one-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test and ANOVA at a significance level of P<0.05. Results. The microhardness of specimens significantly decreased following acid exposure (P<0.01 but increased again in both groups after exposure to toothpastes. The increase in microhardness was significantly greater in group A (P<0.01. Conclusion. The toothpaste containing NHA was more effective than the toothpaste without NHA for the purpose of remineralization.

  13. The effects of humidity and serum on the surface microhardness and morphology of five retrograde filling materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, J S; Rhim, E M; Huh, S Y; Ahn, S J; Kim, D S; Kim, S Y; Park, S H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the surface morphology and surface hardness of five materials 24 h after filling, in conditions of 100% humidity, and fetal bovine serum. The five materials were ProRoot Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA), Super-EBA, Intermediate Restorative Materials (IRM), Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE), and Amalgam. The microhardness of these materials was evaluated by Vickers microhardness test, and their morphologies were compared by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). To evaluate the microhardness, the mixed five materials were measured with Vickers microhardness test. Differences between the experimental groups were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Duncan's multiple comparison tests. All analyses were performed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). For the microstructural morphological evaluation, the cross cut and root-end cavity prepared surfaces followed by retrograde filling with five different materials were observed under a Scanning Electron Microscope (Steroscan 440; Leica, Cambridge, England) at ×500. To summarize, Super EBA was less influenced by storage medium than the other materials, especially MTA. However, further long-term studies considering other factors, such as biocompatibility (i.e. cellular toxicity) and retention, are needed to be collaborated with these findings in the clinical context. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Influence of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of bleaching agents on the microhardness of nanoparticle resin composite. Methods: Twenty-eight cylindrical test specimens (8x1mm of FiltekTM Supreme XT resin (3M/ESPE were prepared and divided into 5 groups. The initial Vickers microhardness was measured (load of 50 grams force for 30 seconds on the top surface of the test specimens. The groupswere treated and divided as follows: G1 – artificial saliva (21 days - control; G2 - 7% hydrogen peroxide gel applied for 4h/day, for 14 days; G3 - 10% carbamide peroxide for 4h/day, for 14 days: G4 – 35% hydrogen peroxide gel applied in three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions; G5 - 35% carbamide peroxide, three sessions of 30 minutes each, with an interval of one week (21 days between the sessions. The top surfaces of the test specimens received treatment and were submitted to the Vickers microhardness test. Results: The results obtained were submitted to the Analysis of Variance at a fixed criterion, at a level of significance of p=0.05. No significant differences were observed among the treatments tested (p=0.42 when compared with G1. Significant differences (Tukey test were found when the initial microhardness values were compared with the values after experimental treatments (p<0.01. Conclusion: The application of bleaching agents did not alter the microhardness of resin composites. Therefore, there is no need to change restorations after bleaching.

  15. [Influence of Coca-Cola on early erosion and surface microhardness of human enamel: an in situ study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, M; Zhang, Q; Gao, X J

    2016-06-01

    Assessed the effect of single dose attack of Coca-Cola on early erosion and surface microhardness of permanent human enamel, in order to provide diet instructions on minimum amount and frequency of carbonated beverage consumption. Eighty enamel slabs were prepared out of 10 extracted human mandibular third molars, and distributed into 8 groups with randomized block design(n=10). Ten generally healthy volunteers with normal saliva secretion wore acrylic palatal appliances containing 2 enamel slabs, with formation of a salivary pellicle 2 h ahead. The volunteers were instructed to drink 100 ml fresh Coca-Cola within 20 s. And then the alterations of the enamel slabs were measured using a Vicker's microhardness tester at 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 20 and 30 min after the consumption of Coca-Cola. For each volunteer, the experiment was carried out in four days, 2 samples were examined each time. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon tests(α =0.05). Significant decreases in surface microhardness(SMH)were observed in each time point(PCoca-Cola could lead to significant decrease of enamel microhardness and initiate erosion of enamel surface. Enamel surface microhardness decreased to the lowest points at 2-8 min, and began to recover after 10 min. The enamel surface microhardness could not fully recovered to the baseline level in 30 min if no intervention was performed.

  16. In Vitro Comparative Study of Two Different Bleaching Agents on Micro-hardness Dental Enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish; Ali Abidi, Syed Yawar; Meo, Ashraf Ali

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of home-use bleaching agent containing 16% Carbamide Peroxide (CP) and in-office bleaching agent containing 38% Hydrogen Peroxide (HP) on enamel micro-hardness. An in vitroexperimental study. Department of Operative Dentistry and Science of Dental Materials at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences and Material Engineering Department of NED University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from July to December 2014. Atotal of 90 enamel slabs from 45 sound human 3rd molar were randomly divided into 3 groups. Each group contained 30 specimens (n=30). Group 1 was kept in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator during the whole experiment. However, Groups 2 and 3 were treated with power whitening gel and tooth whitening pen respectively. After bleaching session, specimens were thoroughly rinsed with deionized water again for 10 seconds and then stored in artificial saliva at 37°C in incubator. Artificial saliva was changed after every 2 days. The Vickers hardness tester (Wolpert 402 MVD, Germany) was adjusted to a load of 0.1 kg (100 gm) and dwell time of 5 seconds. Three Vickers were performed on each specimen using a hardness tester according to the ISO 6507-3:1998 specification. Micro-hardness measurements were performed before and after bleaching at day 1, 7 and 14. In the control group, the baseline micro-hardness was 181.1 ±9.3 which was reduced after the storage on day 1, 7 and 14 (p = 0.104). In Group 2, baseline micro-hardness was 180.4 ±10.1 which was reduced to 179.79 ±10.0 units after day 1. Whereas, on day 7 and 14, the values of micro-hardness were 179.8 ±10 and 179.7 ±10.29, respectively (p=0.091). Furthermore, the baseline micro-hardness in Group 3 was 174.0 ±22.9 units which was reduced to 173 ±23 on day 1, 170 ±30 on day 7 and 173 ±23 on day 14 (p = 0.256). The statistically insignificant difference was found among micro-hardness values of different bleaching

  17. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhashini, Bhattacharya, Soumalya; Shashikala, H. D.; Udayashankar, N. K.

    2014-04-01

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi2O+yNa2O+80B2O3 (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li2O and Na2O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO4/2)- into (BO3/2)-. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  18. Microhardness studies on nonlinear optical L-alanine single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    alanine single crystals by slow evaporation technique over a load range of 10–50 g on selected broad (2 0 3) plane. Vickers (Hv) and Knoop (Hk) microhardness for the above loads were found to be in the range of 60–71 kg/mm2 and 35–47 ...

  19. Effect of a third-generation LED LCU on microhardness of tooth-colored restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonulol, Nihan; Ozer, Sezin; Tunc, Emine Sen

    2016-09-01

    To assess the effects of different modes of a third-generation light-curing unit (LCU) (VALO) on the microhardness of restorative materials. A microhybrid composite resin (Filtek(™) Z550), a giomer (Beautifil II), a compomer (Dyract eXtra) and a RMGIC (Photac(™) Fil) were used in the study. Three different modes of VALO were tested and a second-generation LCU (Elipar S10) was used as a control. The microhardness (VHN) was measured using a Vickers Hardness tester. Data were analyzed using two-way anova and post hoc Tukey's test (P 0.05). Of the different curing protocols tested, the VALO LCU in Mode 3 resulted in the lowest VHN values at both top and bottom surfaces (P materials. © 2015 BSPD, IAPD and John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Microstructures and Microhardness Properties of CMSX-4® Additively Fabricated Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy (SLE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Amrita; Holenarasipura Raghu, Shashank; Das, Suman

    2017-10-01

    Epitaxial CMSX-4® deposition is achieved on CMSX-4® substrates through the scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) process. A thorough analysis is performed using various advanced material characterization techniques, namely high-resolution optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Vickers microhardness measurements, to characterize and compare the quality of the SLE-fabricated CMSX-4® deposits to the CMSX-4® substrates. The results show that the CMSX-4® deposits have smaller primary dendritic arm spacing, finer γ/γ' size, weaker elemental segregation, and higher microhardness compared to the investment cast CMSX-4® substrates. The results presented here demonstrate that CMSX-4® is an attractive material for laser-based AM processing and, therefore, can be used in the fabrication of gas turbine hot-section components through AM processing.

  1. Influence of enzymatic maceration on the microstructure and microhardness of compact bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Ling; Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2010-02-01

    The cleaning of fresh bones to remove their soft tissues while maintaining their structural integrity is a basic and essential part of bone studies. The primary issue is how the cleaning process influences bone microstructures and mechanical properties. We cleaned fresh lamb femurs using enzymatic maceration in comparison with water maceration at room temperature. The microstructures of these compact bones were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their porosities were quantified using image processing software. The bone microhardness was measured using a Vickers indentation tester for studying the mechanical properties. The results show that enzymatic maceration of compact bone resulted in a significant microhardness reduction in comparison with water maceration. However, enzymatic maceration did not cause any significant change of porosity in bone structures.

  2. Influence of enzymatic maceration on the microstructure and microhardness of compact bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Ling [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4811 (Australia); Venkatesan, Sudharshan; Kalyanasundaram, Shankar; Qin Qinghua, E-mail: ling.yin@jcu.edu.a [Department of Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-02-15

    The cleaning of fresh bones to remove their soft tissues while maintaining their structural integrity is a basic and essential part of bone studies. The primary issue is how the cleaning process influences bone microstructures and mechanical properties. We cleaned fresh lamb femurs using enzymatic maceration in comparison with water maceration at room temperature. The microstructures of these compact bones were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and their porosities were quantified using image processing software. The bone microhardness was measured using a Vickers indentation tester for studying the mechanical properties. The results show that enzymatic maceration of compact bone resulted in a significant microhardness reduction in comparison with water maceration. However, enzymatic maceration did not cause any significant change of porosity in bone structures.

  3. Micro-Hardness Measurement of Proton Irradiated Type 316 Stainless Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Yun Soo; Hwang, Seong Sik; Kim, Hong Pyo; Lee, Han Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) has been recognized to be a potentially critical phenomenon for core internals in pressurized water reactors over decades. Though the IASCC mechanism is not fully understood because of its complexity, it is widely accepted that IASCC can be affected by the water environment and the irradiation-induced material properties. The compositional change at grain boundary, especially the depletion of Cr, radiation induced segregation, and/or localized deformation due to irradiation can considerably contribute to IASCC. In the present study, microscopic examination of the type 316 stainless steel (SS) was firstly done, and then the micro-hardness test was preformed to find out the changes of its mechanical properties due to a proton irradiation.

  4. Effect of Diode Laser Irradiation Combined with Topical Fluoride on Enamel Microhardness of Primary Teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Lotfian, Malihe

    2015-02-01

    Laser irradiation has been suggested as an adjunct to traditional caries prevention methods. But little is known about the cariostatic effect of diode laser and most studies available are on permanent teeth.The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of diode laser irradiation combined with topical fluoride on enamel surface microhardness. Forty-five primary teeth were used in this in vitro study. The teeth were sectioned to produce 90 slabs. The baseline Vickers microhardness number of each enamel surface was determined. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 5% NaF varnish, group 2: NaF varnish+ diode laser at 5 W power and group 3: NaF varnish+ diode laser at 7 W power. Then, the final microhardness number of each surface was again determined. The data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance. In all 3 groups, microhardness number increased significantly after surface treatment (P0.05). The combined application of diode laser and topical fluoride varnish on enamel surface did not show any significant additional effect on enamel resistance to caries.

  5. Microhardness evaluations of CAD/CAM ceramics irradiated with CO2or Nd:YAP laser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gamal, Ahmed; Rocca, Jean Paul; Fornaini, Carlo; Medioni, Etienne; Brulat-Bouchard, Nathalie

    2017-03-31

    The aim of this study was to measure the microhardness values of irradiated computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) ceramics surfaces before and after thermal treatment. Sixty CAD/CAM ceramic discs were prepared and grouped by material, i.e. lithium disilicate ceramic (Emax CAD) and zirconia ceramic (Emax ZirCAD). Laser irradiation at the material surface was performed with a carbon dioxide laser at 5 Watt (W) or 10 W power in continuous mode (CW mode), or with a neodymium:yttrium aluminum perovskite (Nd:YAP) laser at 10 W on graphite and non-graphite surfaces. Vickers hardness was tested at 0.3 kg f for lithium disilicate and 1 kg f for zirconia. Emax CAD irradiated with CO 2 at 5 W increased microhardness by 6.32 GPa whereas Emax ZirCAD irradiated with Nd:YAP decreased microhardness by 17.46 GPa. CO 2 laser effectively increases the microhardness of lithium disilicate ceramics (Emax CAD).

  6. Effect of Diode Laser Irradiation Combined with Topical Fluoride on Enamel Microhardness of Primary Teeth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Bahrololoomi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Laser irradiation has been suggested as an adjunct to traditional caries prevention methods. But little is known about the cariostatic effect of diode laser and most studies available are on permanent teeth.The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of diode laser irradiation combined with topical fluoride on enamel surface microhardness.Forty-five primary teeth were used in this in vitro study. The teeth were sectioned to produce 90 slabs. The baseline Vickers microhardness number of each enamel surface was determined. The samples were randomly divided into 3 groups. Group 1: 5% NaF varnish, group 2: NaF varnish+ diode laser at 5 W power and group 3: NaF varnish+ diode laser at 7 W power. Then, the final microhardness number of each surface was again determined. The data were statistically analyzed by repeated measures ANOVA at 0.05 level of significance.In all 3 groups, microhardness number increased significantly after surface treatment (P0.05.The combined application of diode laser and topical fluoride varnish on enamel surface did not show any significant additional effect on enamel resistance to caries.

  7. Microhardness and Penetration of Artificial White Spot Lesions Treated with Resin or Colloidal Silica Infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandava, Jyothi; Reddy, Y Shilpa; Kantheti, Sirisha; Chalasani, Uma; Ravi, Ravi Chandra; Borugadda, Roopesh; Konagala, Ravi Kumar

    2017-04-01

    Infiltration of early enamel lesions by materials having remineralizing capacity seems to improve aesthetics and arrests caries progression. To evaluate and compare the surface microhardness and penetration depth of a low viscosity resin and colloidal silica nanoparticle infiltrates into artificially created white spot lesions. Forty extracted human central incisors were embedded in acrylic resin blocks exposing the labial surfaces of the crowns. The specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution for 96 hours to create white spot lesions on labial surfaces. The samples were then divided into two groups (n=20 each), where in Group 1-resin infiltration (ICON DMG, Hamburg, Germany) and Group 2-colloidal silica infiltration (Arrow Fine chemicals, Rajkot, Gujarat, India) was done. Samples were subjected to vicker's microhardness testing at baseline, after demineralization and after treatment with resin or colloidal silica infiltrates. Then, the crowns were sectioned longitudinally and penetration depth of the infiltrants was measured using confocal laser scanning microscope and compared the readings to lesion depth. All the collected data was subjected to statistical analysis using t-test. Resin infiltration group showed significantly greater increase in microhardness compared to colloidal silica infiltration (p=0.001). The percentage of penetration of the resin group was 67.14% and that of colloidal silica group was 54.53% indicating significant difference between the two. Resin infiltrates performed better in regaining the baseline microhardness and penetrating deep into the porous white spot lesions, when compared to colloidal silica infiltrates.

  8. Design of Vickers Hardness Loading Controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sihai Zhao

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally Vickers testing needs manual works, as a result, it will induce low precision and automatization. So this paper design a new type of loading controlling system, it is based on single chip computer 89S52, used PZT as the force generator in micro Vickers hardness testing. It primarily includes the designing of hardware, software of collecting data and PZT signals by AD667. This article has given the sketch of electrical circuit and controlling software, it also offers the experiment data. The experiments have showed that using this system can exactly control the loading results, and the average tolerance is less than 0.43 %.

  9. Cathodoluminescence study of vickers indentations in magnesium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vickers diamond pyramid indentations made in single crystal of magnesium oxide (MgO) were examined in an environmental scanning electron microscope interfaced with an AVS-2000 spectrophotometer for luminescence. Three distinct zones around the indentations were identified to exhibit cathodoluminescence, which ...

  10. Filler Content, Surface Microhardness, and Rheological Properties of Various Flowable Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jager, S; Balthazard, R; Dahoun, A; Mortier, E

    The objectives of this study were to determine the filler content, the surface microhardness (at baseline and after immersion in water for 2 years), and the rheological properties of various flowable resin composites. Three flowable resin composites (Grandioso Heavy Flow [GHF], Grandio Flow [GRF], Filtek Supreme XTE Flow [XTE]), one pit and fissure sealant resin composite (ClinPro [CLI]), and three experimental flowable resin composites with the same matrix and a variable filler content (EXPA, EXPB, EXPC) were tested. The filler content was determined by calcination. The Vickers surface microhardness was determined after polymerization and then after immersion in distilled water at 37°C for 7, 60, 180, 360, and 720 days. The rheological measurements were performed using a dynamic shear rheometer. The determined filler contents differed from the manufacturers' data for all the materials. The materials with the highest filler content presented the highest microhardness, but filler content did not appear to be the only influencing parameter. With respect to the values recorded after photopolymerization, the values were maintained or increased after 720 days compared with the initial microhardness values, except for GHF. For the values measured after immersion for 7 days, an increase in microhardness was observed for all the materials over time. All the materials were non-Newtonian, with shear-thinning behavior. At all the shear speeds, GRF presented a lower viscosity to GHF and XTE. GRF presented a low viscosity before photopolymerization, associated with high filler content, thereby providing a good compromise between spreadability and mechanical properties after photopolymerization.

  11. Gradient microstructure and microhardness in a nitrided 18CrNiMo7-6 gear steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, R.; Wu, G. L.; Zhang, X.

    2017-01-01

    A commercial gear steel (18CrNiMo7-6) containing a tempered martensite structure was nitrided using a pressurized gas nitriding process under a pressure of 5 atm at 530 °C for 5 hours. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the nitrided sample were characterized by Vickers hardness...... measurements, X-ray diffraction, and backscatter electron imaging in a scanning electron microscope. A micro-hardness gradient was identified over a distance of 500 μm with hardness values of 900 HV at the top surface and 300 HV in the core. This micro-hardness gradient corresponds to a gradient...... in the microstructure that changes from a nitride compound layer at the top surface (∼ 20 μm thick) to a diffusion zone with a decreasing nitrogen concentration and precipitate density with distance from the surface, finally reaching the core matrix layer with a recovered martensite structure....

  12. Gradient microstructure and microhardness in a nitrided 18CrNiMo7-6 gear steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, R.; Wu, G. L.; Zhang, X.; Fu, W. T.; Huang, X.

    2017-07-01

    A commercial gear steel (18CrNiMo7-6) containing a tempered martensite structure was nitrided using a pressurized gas nitriding process under a pressure of 5 atm at 530 °C for 5 hours. The mechanical properties and microstructure of the nitrided sample were characterized by Vickers hardness measurements, X-ray diffraction, and backscatter electron imaging in a scanning electron microscope. A micro-hardness gradient was identified over a distance of 500 μm with hardness values of 900 HV at the top surface and 300 HV in the core. This micro-hardness gradient corresponds to a gradient in the microstructure that changes from a nitride compound layer at the top surface (∼ 20 μm thick) to a diffusion zone with a decreasing nitrogen concentration and precipitate density with distance from the surface, finally reaching the core matrix layer with a recovered martensite structure.

  13. Push-Out Bond Strength and Surface Microhardness of Calcium Silicate-Based Biomaterials: An in vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Abdul; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2017-01-01

    This was an in vitro evaluation of push-out bond strength and surface microhardness of calcium silicate-based biomaterials in coronal and apical root dentin. Ninety sections (2 mm thick) of coronal and apical root dentin were obtained from roots of 60 extracted teeth; the canals were enlarged to a standardized cavity diameter of 1.3 mm. Sections were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 15 per group), and cavities were filled with Biodentine™, BioAggregate, or ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), according to the manufacturers' instructions. Push-out bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine under a compressive load at a speed of 1 mm/min. Samples were analyzed under a light microscope to determine the nature of bond failure. Ten samples (2 mm thick) were prepared for all the materials, and Vickers microhardness was determined using a digital hardness tester. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests at a significance level of p microhardness and BioAggregate (68.79 HV) showed the lowest hardness. Biodentine and ProRoot MTA showed higher bond strength and microhardness compared to BioAggregate. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Enderami, Seyede Anese; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide- amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.

  15. The effect of human blood on the setting and surface micro-hardness of calcium silicate cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Minju; Yue, Wonyoung; Kim, Soyeon; Kim, Wooksung; Kim, Yaelim; Kim, Jeong-Woong; Kim, Euiseong

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the effects of human blood on the setting and microhardness of calcium silicate cements. Three types of silicate-based cements were used: ProRoot MTA (PMTA), OrthoMTA (OMTA), and RetroMTA (RMTA). Mixed cement was placed into polyethylene molds with lengths of 2 and 4 mm. After storage for 4 days under three different storage conditions, i.e., saline, saline after 5 min of human blood, and human blood, the polyethylene molds were removed. With the specimens set, the surface microhardness was measured using a Vickers microhardness tester, crystalline structure was analyzed with X-ray diffraction (XRD), and the surface characteristics were examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). All specimens of 4 mm in length were set with all materials, and the blood groups exhibited lower microhardnesses than did the saline groups (p blood, the numbers of specimens that set were significantly different across the materials (p blood group exhibited reduced microhardness. XRD showed changes of crystalline structure in the PMTA and OMTA blood group, whereas RMTA did not. SEM analysis revealed more rounded and homogeneous structures and demonstrated a clear lack of acicular or needle-like crystals in the PMTA and OMTA blood groups, while RMTA did not reveal substantial differences between the saline- and blood-stored groups. Blood contamination detrimentally affected the surface microhardnesses of all materials; furthermore, among the 2-mm specimens, blood contamination interfered with normal setting. Therefore, RMTA might be a more suitable choice when blood contamination is unavoidable due to limited depth. Clinical relevance RetroMTA might be a more suitable choice in situations in which blood contamination is unavoidable.

  16. Acidic pH weakens the microhardness and microstructure of three tricalcium silicate materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z; Ma, J; Shen, Y; Haapasalo, M

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the microhardness and microstructural features of three tricalcium silicate materials: mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), Endosequence Root Repair Material Putty (ERRM Putty) and Endosequence Root Repair Material Paste (ERRM Paste), after exposure to a range of acidic environments in comparison with intermediate restorative material (IRM). Endosequence Root Repair Material Putty (Brasseler, Savannah, GA, USA), ERRM Paste (Brasseler, Savannah, GA, USA), MTA (ProRoot; Dentsply Tulsa Dental, Johnson City, TN, USA) and IRM (Dentsply Caulk, Milford, DE, USA) were set in cylindrical rubber moulds as four groups containing twenty specimens each. Fifteen specimens per each material were randomly distributed into three groups (n = 5) to be exposed to butyric acid buffered at three different pH levels (5.4, 6.4 and 7.4) for 7 days. The remaining five specimens were exposed to distilled water as a control group. The surface microhardness after exposure either to acid or to water was measured after 7-days at 37 °C. The morphology of the internal microstructure was observed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Two-way univariate analysis of variance (anova) was applied to evaluate the Vickers microhardness value (VHN). The microhardness values of the materials were significantly higher in the neutral environment of butyric acid at pH 7.4 compared to those in the acidic condition of pH 5.4 for all groups (P microhardness values than IRM at all pH levels (P microhardness values than those values obtained in the presence of butyric acid buffered to all pH levels (P microhardness values of ERRM Putty, ERRM Paste and MTA were reduced in an acidic environment, which resulted in these materials having more porous and less crystalline microstructures. MTA seems the most suitable material for application to an area of inflammation where a low pH value may exist. © 2014 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Wear Potential of Dental Ceramics and its Relationship with Microhardness and Coefficient of Friction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freddo, Rafael Augusto; Kapczinski, Myriam Pereira; Kinast, Eder Julio; de Souza Junior, Oswaldo Baptista; Rivaldo, Elken Gomes; da Fontoura Frasca, Luis Carlos

    2016-10-01

    To evaluate, by means of pin-on-disk testing, the wear potential of different dental ceramic systems as it relates to friction parameters, surface finish, and microhardness. Three groups of different ceramic systems (Noritake EX3, Eris, Empress II) with 20 disks each (10 glazed, 10 polished) were used. Vickers microhardness (Hv) was determined with a 200-g load for 30 seconds. Friction coefficients (μ) were determined by pin-on-disk testing (5 N load, 600 seconds, and 120 rpm). Wear patterns were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, with the significance level set at α = 0.05. The coefficients of friction were as follows: Noritake EX3 0.28 ± 0.12 (polished), 0.33 ± 0.08 (glazed); Empress II 0.38 ± 0.08 (polished), 0.45 ± 0.05 (glazed); Eris 0.49 ± 0.05 (polished), 0.49 ± 0.06 (glazed). Microhardness measurements were as follows: Noritake EX3 530.7 ± 8.7 (polished), 525.9 ± 6.2 (glazed); Empress II 534.1 ± 8 (polished), 534.7 ± 4.5 (glazed); Eris, 511.7 ± 6.5 (polished), 519.5 ± 4.1 (glazed). The polished and glazed Noritake EX3 and polished and glazed Eris specimens showed statistically different friction coefficients. SEM image analysis revealed more surface changes, such as small cracks and grains peeling off, in glazed ceramics. Wear potential may be related to the coefficient of friction in Noritake ceramics, which had a lower coefficient than Eris ceramics. Within-group analysis showed no differences in polished or glazed specimens. The differences observed were not associated with microhardness. © 2015 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  18. Surface microhardness of three thicknesses of mineral trioxide aggregate in different setting conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Jafargholizadeh, Leila; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Raoof, Maryam

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to compare the surface microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) samples having different thicknesses and exposed to human blood from one side and with or without a moist cotton pellet on the other side. Ninety cylindrical molds with three heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm were fabricated. In group 1 (dry condition), molds with heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm (10 molds of each) were filled with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental), and the upper surface of the material was not exposed to any additional moisture. In groups 2 and 3, a distilled water- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS)-moistened cotton pellet was placed on the upper side of MTA, respectively. The lower side of the molds in all the groups was in contact with human blood-wetted foams. After 4 day, the Vickers microhardness of the upper surface of MTA was measured. In the dry condition, the 4 and 6 mm-thick MTA samples showed significantly lower microhardness than the 2 mm-thick samples (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively). However, when a distilled water- or PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed over the MTA, no significant difference was found between the surface microhardness of samples having the abovementioned three thicknesses of the material (p = 0.210 and p = 0.112, respectively). It could be concluded that a moist cotton pellet must be placed over the 4 to 6 mm-thick MTA for better hydration of the material. However, this might not be necessary when 2 mm-thick MTA is used.

  19. Effect of two different tooth bleaching techniques on microhardness of giomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimyai, Soodabeh; Bahari, Mahmoud; Naser-Alavi, Fereshteh; Behboodi, Soodabeh

    2017-02-01

    Tooth bleaching is a safe and conservative treatment modality to improve the esthetic appearance of discolored teeth. One of the problems with the use of bleaching agents is their possible effect on surface microhardness of resin-based materials. The present study was carried out to evaluate the effect of in-office and at-home bleaching on surface microhardness of giomer. Seventy-five disk-shaped giomer samples (Beautifil II) were prepared and cured with a light-curing unit. The samples were randomly assigned to three groups (n=25). In group 1 (control), the samples were stored in distilled water for 14 days. The samples in groups 2 and 3 underwent a bleaching procedure with 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) (8 hours daily) and 45% CP (30 minutes daily), respectively, for 14 days. Finally, the microhardness of samples was measured with Vickers hardness tester using a 100-g force for 20 seconds. One-way ANOVA was used to compare the mean microhardness values among the study groups, followed by post hoc Tukey test for two-by-two comparison of the groups. Statistical significance was set at Pmicrohardness values among the study groups (Pmicrohardness in the bleached groups was significantly less than that in the control group (Pmicrohardness in the 45% CP group was significantly less than that in the 15% CP group (Pmicrohardness of giomer. The unfavorable effect of in-office bleaching (45% CP) was greater than that of at-home bleaching (15% CP). Key words:Dental restorations, hardness, tooth bleaching.

  20. Marginal leakage and microhardness evaluation of low-shrinkage resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshmand, Tabassom; Tabari, Negin; Keshvad, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to compare the marginal leakage and microhardness of low-shrinkage resin-based dental restorative materials containing ormocer- and silorane-based composites to that of conventional methacrylate-based systems. A total of 50 noncarious extracted human teeth were collected after debridement and standard Class V cavities were prepared. Teeth were randomly assigned to five groups (n = 10) and restored with 5 types of resin-based restorative material composites: hybrid, microhybrid, nanohybrid, ormocer-based, and silorane-based. After thermocycling, all teeth were placed in a silver nitrate solution, sectioned longitudinally in a buccolingual direction, and observed under a stereomicroscope to determine the degree of dye penetration. Data were analyzed using a non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis test (P microhardness test, five specimens were made for each restorative material, using Teflon molds with disk-shaped specimen wells. Specimens were photocured and placed in distilled water (at 37°C) for 24 hours. Vickers Hardness Number (VHN) measurements were performed using a microhardness tester. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferroni post hoc tests. In terms of microhardness, there was no statistically significant difference among the resin-based restorative materials (P > 0.05). The degree of microleakage at the gingival margins was lowest for the silorane composite, followed by microhybrid and nanohybrid. The silorane composite was significantly lower than that of the ormocer and hybrid composites (P material could provide a marginal seal comparable to that provided by microhybrid or nanohybrid resin composites.

  1. Surface microhardness of three thicknesses of mineral trioxide aggregate in different setting conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives This study aimed to compare the surface microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA samples having different thicknesses and exposed to human blood from one side and with or without a moist cotton pellet on the other side. Materials and Methods Ninety cylindrical molds with three heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm were fabricated. In group 1 (dry condition, molds with heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm (10 molds of each were filled with ProRoot MTA (Dentsply Tulsa Dental, and the upper surface of the material was not exposed to any additional moisture. In groups 2 and 3, a distilled water- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed on the upper side of MTA, respectively. The lower side of the molds in all the groups was in contact with human blood-wetted foams. After 4 day, the Vickers microhardness of the upper surface of MTA was measured. Results In the dry condition, the 4 and 6 mm-thick MTA samples showed significantly lower microhardness than the 2 mm-thick samples (p = 0.003 and p = 0.001, respectively. However, when a distilled water- or PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed over the MTA, no significant difference was found between the surface microhardness of samples having the abovementioned three thicknesses of the material (p = 0.210 and p = 0.112, respectively. Conclusions It could be concluded that a moist cotton pellet must be placed over the 4 to 6 mm-thick MTA for better hydration of the material. However, this might not be necessary when 2 mm-thick MTA is used.

  2. Effects of 15% Carbamide Peroxide and 40% Hydrogen Peroxide on the Microhardness and Color Change of Composite Resins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamangar, Sedighe Sadat Hashemi; Kiakojoori, Kiana; Mirzaii, Mansoore; Fard, Mohammad Javad Kharazi

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the effects of 40% hydrogen peroxide and 15% carbamide peroxide on microhardness and color change of a silorane-based composite resin in comparison with two methacrylate-based composites. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four disc-shaped specimens (A3 shade) were fabricated of Filtek P90 (P90), Filtek Z350XT Enamel (Z350) and Filtek Z250 (Z250) (3MESPE) (n=18). The samples of each composite were randomly divided into three subgroups of 6. The control subgroups were immersed in distilled water; the test groups were exposed to Opalescence Boost (OB) once; and Opalescence PF (OP) (Ultradent) for two weeks. Vickers microhardness testing and a spectrophotometric analysis of the color of samples were performed before and after each intervention. Results: The baseline microhardness of P90 was significantly lower than that of the other two composites (P=0.001), but no difference was found between Z250 and Z350 in this respect (P=0.293). Bleaching treatments significantly decreased the microhardness of Z250 and Z350 (P 0.05). No significant difference was detected between the two types of bleaching (P>0.05). After bleaching with OB, ΔE value was measured to be 3.12(1.97), 3.31(1.84) and 3.7(2.11) for P90, Z250 and Z350, respectively. These values were 5.98(2.42), 4.66(2.85) and 4.90(2.78) after bleaching with OP with no significant difference. Conclusion: Bleaching decreased the microhardness of methacrylate-based but not silorane-based composites. Although no significant differences were found in ΔE of composites, ΔE of all groups did not remain in the clinically acceptable range after bleaching except for P90 after bleaching with 40% H2O2 (ΔE < 3.3). PMID:24910696

  3. Synthesis and studies on microhardness of alkali zinc borate glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subhashini,, E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Bhattacharya, Soumalya, E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Shashikala, H. D., E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com; Udayashankar, N. K., E-mail: subhashini.p.p@gmail.com [Department of Physics, National Institute of Technology Karnataka, Surathkal-575025 (India)

    2014-04-24

    The mixed alkali effect on zinc borate glasses have been reported. The glass systems of nominal composition 10Zn+xLi{sub 2}O+yNa{sub 2}O+80B{sub 2}O{sub 3} (x = y = 0, 5, 10, 15 mol%) were prepared using standard melt quenching method. The structural, physical and mechanical properties of the samples have been studied using X-ray diffraction(XRD), density measurement and Vickers hardness measurement, respectively. A consistent increase in the density was observed, which explains the role of the modifiers (Li{sub 2}O and Na{sub 2}O) in the network modification of borate structure. The molar volume is decreasing linearly with the alkali concentration, which is attributed to the conversion of tetrahedral boron (BO{sub 4/2}){sup −} into (BO{sub 3/2}){sup −}. The microhardness studies reveals the anisotropy nature of the material. It further confirms that the samples belong to hard glass category.

  4. Microhardness and Young's modulus of high burn-up UO{sub 2} fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappia, F. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Technische Universität München, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Pizzocri, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, 20156, Milano (Italy); Marchetti, M. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Université Montpellier 2, Institut d’Electronique du Sud UMR CNRS 5214, 34095, Montpellier (France); Schubert, A.; Van Uffelen, P. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Luzzi, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Department of Energy, Nuclear Engineering Division, 20156, Milano (Italy); Papaioannou, D. [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany); Macián-Juan, R. [Technische Universität München, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Department of Nuclear Engineering, D-85748, Garching bei München (Germany); Rondinella, V.V., E-mail: Vincenzo.RONDINELLA@ec.europa.eu [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements, P.O. Box 2340, 76125, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2016-10-15

    Vickers microhardness (HV{sub 0.1}) and Young's modulus (E) measurements of LWR UO{sub 2} fuel at burn-up ≥60 GWd/tHM are presented. Their ratio HV{sub 0.1}/E was found constant in the range 60–110 GWd/tHM. From the ratio and the microhardness values vs porosity, the Young's modulus dependence on porosity was derived and extended to the full radial profile, including the high burn-up structure (HBS). The dependence is well represented by a linear correlation. The data were compared to fuel performance codes correlations. A burn-up dependent factor was introduced in the Young's modulus expression. The modifications extend the experimental validation range of the TRANSURANUS correlation from un-irradiated to irradiated UO{sub 2} and up to 20% porosity. First simulations of LWR fuel rod irradiations were performed in order to illustrate the impact on fuel performance. In the specific cases selected, the simulations suggest a limited effect of the Young's modulus decrease due to burn-up on integral fuel performance. - Highlights: • Vickers microhardness and Young's modulus data of high burnup fuels are presented. • The data are compared to fuel performance codes' correlations. • A burn-up dependent factor is introduced for the Young's modulus of irradiated fuel. • The modification extends ranges of experimental validation of the code correlation. • The new burn-up dependent factor has limited effect on integral fuel performance.

  5. Degradation Potential of Bulk Versus Incrementally Applied and Indirect Composites: Color, Microhardness, and Surface Deterioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gezawi, M; Kaisarly, D; Al-Saleh, H; ArRejaie, A; Al-Harbi, F; Kunzelmann, K H

    This study investigated the color stability and microhardness of five composites exposed to four beverages with different pH values. Composite discs were produced (n=10); Filtek Z250 (3M ESPE) and Filtek P90 (3M ESPE) were applied in two layers (2 mm, 20 seconds), and Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill (TetricBF, Ivoclar Vivadent) and SonicFill (Kerr) were applied in bulk (4 mm) and then light cured (40 seconds, Ortholux-LED, 1600 mW/cm2). Indirect composite Sinfony (3M ESPE) was applied in two layers (2 mm) and cured (Visio system, 3M ESPE). The specimens were polished and tested for color stability; ΔE was calculated using spectrophotometer readings. Vickers microhardness (50 g, dwell time=45 seconds) was assessed on the top and bottom surfaces at baseline, 40 days of storage, subsequent repolishing, and 60 days of immersion in distilled water (pH=7.0), Coca-Cola (pH=2.3), orange juice (pH=3.75), or anise (pH=8.5) using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The materials had similar ΔE values (40 days, p>0.05), but TetricBF had a significantly greater ΔE than P90 or SF (40 days). The ΔE was less for P90 and TetricBF than for Z250, SonicFill, and Sinfony (60 days). Repolishing and further immersion significantly affected the ΔE (p<0.05) except for P90. All composites had significantly different top vs bottom baseline microhardnesses. This was insignificant for the Z250/water, P90/orange juice (40 days), and Sinfony groups (40 and 60 days). Immersion produced variable time-dependent deterioration of microhardness in all groups. Multivariate repeated measures analysis of variance with post hoc Bonferroni tests were used to compare the results. ΔE and microhardness changes were significantly inversely correlated at 40 days, but this relationship was insignificant at 60 days (Pearson test). SEM showed degradation (40 days) that worsened (60 days). Bulk-fill composites differ regarding color-stability and top-to-bottom microhardness changes compared with those of other

  6. Interconnection between microstructure and microhardness of directionally solidified binary Al-6wt.%Cu and multicomponent Al-6wt.%Cu-8wt.%Si alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Angela J; Kikuchi, Rafael H; Barros, André S; Costa, Thiago A; Dias, Marcelino; Moreira, Antonio L; Silva, Adrina P; Rocha, Otávio L

    2016-05-31

    An experimental study has been carried out to evaluate the microstructural and microhardness evolution on the directionally solidified binary Al-Cu and multicomponent Al-Cu-Si alloys and the influence of Si alloying. For this purpose specimens of Al-6wt.%Cu and Al-6wt.%Cu-8wt.%Si alloys were prepared and directionally solidified under transient conditions of heat extraction. A water-cooled horizontal directional solidification device was applied. A comprehensive characterization is performed including experimental dendrite tip growth rates (VL) and cooling rates (TR) by measuring Vickers microhardness (HV), optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy with microanalysis performed by energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM-EDS). The results show, for both studied alloys, the increasing of TR and VL reduced the primary dendrite arm spacing (l1) increasing the microhardness. Furthermore, the incorporation of Si in Al-6wt.%Cu alloy to form the Al-6wt.%Cu-8wt.%Si alloy influenced significantly the microstructure and consequently the microhardness but did not affect the primary dendritic growth law. An analysis on the formation of the columnar to equiaxed transition (CET) is also performed and the results show that the occurrence of CET is not sharp, i.e., the CET in both cases occurs in a zone rather than in a parallel plane to the chill wall, where both columnar and equiaxed grains are be able to exist.

  7. Radiopacity and microhardness changes and effect of X-ray operating voltage in resin-based materials before and after the expiration date

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tirapelli Camila

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This study observed alteration in the radiopacity and microhardness of expired resin-based materials compared to non-expired materials and the operating characteristics of the X-ray source used. Five 2 mm-thick cured specimens were prepared for each material: composite resins (P60®, Z100®, and a compomer (Dyract AP®. Radiopacity of the specimens was evaluated comparing the density of the resin-based material to an equivalent (mm density of a 99.5% pure aluminum step wedge using a transmission densitometer. Surface microhardness measurements were carried out using a calibrated Vickers indenter on three different points of the same surface. ANOVA and Tukey tests (pre-set alpha = 0.05 revealed that expired materials showed no significant change in radiopacity. One material (Filtek P60 demonstrated lower radiopacity with lower KVp. Change in microhardness wa s statistically significant for Z100: for this material, the microhardness after expiration was significantly lower than before the expiration date.

  8. An in vitro comparison of fluorescence-aided caries excavation and conventional excavation by microhardness testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Guangyun; Zhu, Laikuan; Xu, Xiaohui; Kunzelmann, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to compare fluorescence-aided caries excavation with conventional excavation based on the Martens and Vickers hardness of dentin at the cavity floor after caries removal. In total, 20 extracted human teeth with dentin caries were bisected through the lesion center into two halves, which were assigned to either the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group or the conventional excavation group. After the treatment, embedding, mounting, and polishing, a line of indentations from the dental pulp across the sound dentin to the cavity floor was made on each sample. The data were compared with Student's t and Mann-Whitney U tests. The calculated Vickers hardness of the sound dentin was 57 ± 10 kg/mm(2) in the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group and 59 ± 8 kg/mm(2) in the conventional excavation group, which is consistent with the previous studies. The absolute and relative Martens hardness measurements of the cavity floor were 224 ± 93 N/mm(2) and 46 ± 17%, respectively, in the fluorescence-aided caries excavation group and 412 ± 75 N/mm(2) and 81 ± 14%, respectively, in the conventional excavation group. Based on either the Martens or Vickers hardness, both the absolute and relative microhardness measurements of the cavity floor after fluorescence-aided caries excavation were significantly lower than the values obtained by conventional excavation. Fluorescence-aided caries excavation showed the tissue-preserving property and was more conservative than the conventional excavation in this in vitro study.

  9. Kinetics and statistical analysis of precipitation in a Cu-0,49Co-0,44Ti alloy, by microcalorimetry and microhardness measurements; Analisis cinetico y estadistico de la precipitacion en una aleacion de Cu-0,49Co-0,44Ti, mediante microcalorimetria y medidas de microdureza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donoso, E.; Diaz, G.

    2009-07-01

    Starting with a solid solution of Cu-o,49Co-0,44Ti tempered from 1173 K, the kinetics of precipitation of atoms of cobalt and titanium was studied by means of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). the analysis of the calorimetric curves show the presence of an exo thermal reaction that is attributed to the formation of particles of CoTi in the copper matrix. The energy of activation was estimated by means of a modified method of Kissinger. The kinetic parameters were estimated with the use of the formalism of Johnson-Mehl-Avrami. On the other hand, a statistical analysis of the process of precipitation was performed by measuring the microhardness. Vickers, employing a Weibull probability distribution function. Using minimum square method the Weibull parameters were estimated. The goodness of fit was analyzed by using the Chi square test with a coincidence level of 95 percent. Increasing the aging time, for the sam annealing temperature, the Weibull modulus increase too, which may be attributed to precipitation of CoTi phase. (Author) 27 refs.

  10. Effect of Four Bleaching Regimens on Color Changes and Microhardness of Dental Nanofilled Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Costa, Simone Xavier; Becker, Anne Buss; de Souza Rastelli, Alessandra Nara; Monteiro Loffredo, Leonor de Castro; de Andrade, Marcelo Ferrarezi; Bagnato, Vanderlei Salvador

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to compare the color changes and microhardness of a nanocomposite after four bleaching regimens. Materials. Twenty-five specimens (n = 25) were made with a nanocomposite resin (Filtek Supreme XT). The specimens were divided into five groups equally (n = 5): bleaching groups and control group, as follows: G1: artificial saliva at 37°C; (control) G2: hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 7%; G3: hydrogen peroxide (HP) at 35%; G4: carbamide peroxide (CP) at 10%; G5: carbamide peroxide (CP) 35%. Color measurements were made with spectrophotometer using CIELAB color scale. The Vickers hardness (VHN) measurements were performed at the top surface. The data were analyzed with two-way Analysis of Variance. Results. ΔE and VHN mean values into the groups were not statistically different, however, the VHN mean values before and after storage and bleaching showed statistically significant differences. Conclusion. Nanocomposite samples showed no significant alteration (color and microhardness) after bleaching. Thus, no replacement of restorations is required after bleaching. PMID:20339576

  11. The Micro-hardness of Heat Treated Carbon Steel

    OpenAIRE

    Petrík, Jozef

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the submitted work is to study the influence of applied loads ranging from 0.09807 N to 0.9807 N on measured values of micro-hardness of heat treated carbon steel. The influence of applied load on measured value of micro-hardness was evaluated by Meyer’s index n, PSR method and by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA). The influence of the load on the measured value of micro-hardness is statistically significant and the relationship between applied load and micro-hardness manifests the mode...

  12. Influence of Scanning Speed on the Microhardness Property of Additive Manufactured Titanium Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Mahamood

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ti6Al4V is an important aerospace alloy, and it is challenging processing this material through traditional manufacturing processes. Laser metal deposition, an additive manufacturing process offers lots of advantages for processing aerospace materials, the ability to increase buy-to-fly ratio by at least 80% amongst other things. An improved property is achievable through laser metal deposition. The Ti6Al4V powder of particle size 150-200 μm was deposited using a 4.0 kW Rofin Sinar Nd: YAG laser on 72x72x5 mm Ti6Al4V substrate. The powder was delivered using argon gas as a shield. The scanning speed was varied between 0.01 and 0.12 m/sec. The microstructures of the deposited layers were studied by optical microscope and the microhardness was also measured using the Vickers hardness tester. The properties of the deposited tracks were compared to that of the substrate. The microhardness was found to increase with increase in scanning speed.

  13. Evaluation of Surface Microhardness Following Chemical and Microwave Disinfection of Commercially Available Acrylic Resin Denture Teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Nitasha; Daniel, Smitha; Benjamin, Sushant; Varghese, Vinaya Susan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Denture disinfection is an indispensable procedure for preventing cross contamination and the maintenance of a healthy oral mucosa in patients rehabilitated with removable dental prosthesis. Nevertheless, they are known to cause changes in the physical and mechanical properties of denture base resins and acrylic resin denture teeth following immersion of a denture in a suitable chemical disinfectant solution or by undergoing microwave irradiation. One such mechanical property indicator for artificial tooth materials is hardness. Aim To assess the surface hardness of acrylic resin teeth of three different commercial brands (Ivoclar, Newace, Acryrock) following chemical (2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite) and microwave disinfections. Materials and Methods Ten specimens of each of the three commercial brands were made for control and each simulated disinfection type and stored in distilled water at room temperature for 24 hours. After water storage, specimens were immersed in 2% glutaraldehyde and 1% sodium hypochlorite (one and three cycles) at room temperature for 10 minutes. Irradiation with microwave (one and three cycles) was done in domestic microwave for three minutes with the specimens immersed in 150 ml of distilled water. The specimens were stored in distilled water at room temperature for seven days after each disinfection cycle. Vickers hardness measurements were made using a hardness indenter under a load of 50 g force for 10 seconds. Data was subjected to repeated measure two-way ANOVA test and Tukey’s test. Results There were statistically significant differences for the variables disinfection, tooth, and cycle (pdisinfectant interaction, pdisinfectant interaction). The mean surface hardness following one microwave disinfection cycle was lower than control, glutaraldehyde and sodium hypochlorite. Comparison among cycles revealed that microhardness was significantly decreased for three cycles of microwave disinfection. Conclusion

  14. Influence of heavy ion implantation on the microhardness of lif

    CERN Document Server

    Abu-Alazm, S M

    2003-01-01

    The paper presented microhardness measurements for pure lithium fluoride (LiF) implanted with Ar, Kr and Xe at doses ranged from 10 sup 9 up to 10 sup 1 2 ion/cm sup 2. Measurements were also performed for the microhardness after irradiation by electron and gamma rays. The data exhibited a large increase of microhardness of LiF using heavy ions in comparison with the unimplanted and irradiated samples with electrons and gamma rays. The influence of annealing the samples on the microhardness is also studied. The obtained results were interpreted according to the formation of F-centers in LiF.

  15. Measurement of local strain-induced martensitic phase transformation by micro-hardness; Bisho kodo wo mochiita kyokusho hizumi yuki martensite hentai tokusei no sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shibutani, Y.; Taniyama, A.; Tomita, Y.; Adachi, T. [Kobe University, Kobe (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-08-15

    By the duplex effect produced by two kinds of phases of austenite and martensite, the transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel is improved in ductility and fracture toughness. The strain-induced martensitic phase transformation could be associated with the strain localization behavior. Accordingly, the measurement of the amount of local transformation is necessary in order to construct a more physical evolution model in the constitutive equation. In this study, a new measurement system using a micro-hardness tester is proposed to obtain a volume fraction map of the martensitic phase expanding in the neighbor of strain localization. Then the system is applied to investigate the inhomogenous transformation behavior around the notch root of SUS 304 stainless steel bar under uniaxial tension. 27 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  16. Conventional and high intensity halogen light effects on water sorption and microhardness of orthodontic adhesives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uysal, Tancan; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan; Sener, Yagmur; Botsali, Murat Selim; Demir, Abdullah

    2008-01-01

    To test the null hypothesis that when the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there is no difference between the microhardness and water sorption values regardless of the curing light sources. Samples were divided into six groups according to the combination of three orthodontic adhesives (Kurasper F, Light-Bond, Transbond XT) and two light intensities (quartz tungsten halogen [QTH] and high intensity quartz tungsten halogen [HQTH]). One half of each of the 40 samples of three adhesive pastes was polymerized for 20 seconds by a QTH light source, and the other half was polymerized for 10 seconds by a HQTH light source. Water sorption was determined and Vickers hardness was established with three measurements per sample at the top, center, and bottom. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with multiple comparisons (Tukey-HSD). Statistically significant differences were found among all adhesives for water sorption and hardness values cured with QTH and HQTH. The HQTH curing unit resulted in higher values than did the QTH. The highest water sorption values were observed for Kurasper F cured with HQTH and the lowest value was observed for Transbond XT cured with QTH. For microhardness Light-Bond cured with HQTH produced the highest values, and Transbond XT cured with QTH produced the lowest. When the equivalent total light energy is irradiated to three orthodontic adhesive resins, there are significant differences between the microhardness and water sorption values cured with the QTH and HQTH light source. The null hypothesis is rejected.

  17. Push-Out Bond Strength and Surface Microhardness of Calcium Silicate-Based Biomaterials: An in vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Abdul; AlShwaimi, Emad

    2017-01-01

    Objective This was an in vitro evaluation of push-out bond strength and surface microhardness of calcium silicate-based biomaterials in coronal and apical root dentin. Materials and Methods Ninety sections (2 mm thick) of coronal and apical root dentin were obtained from roots of 60 extracted teeth; the canals were enlarged to a standardized cavity diameter of 1.3 mm. Sections were randomly divided into 6 groups (n = 15 per group), and cavities were filled with Biodentine™, BioAggregate, or ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), according to the manufacturers' instructions. Push-out bond strength values were measured using a universal testing machine under a compressive load at a speed of 1 mm/min. Samples were analyzed under a light microscope to determine the nature of bond failure. Ten samples (2 mm thick) were prepared for all the materials, and Vickers microhardness was determined using a digital hardness tester. Data were analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison tests at a significance level of p Biodentine (42.02; 39.35 MPa) and ProRoot MTA (21.86; 34.13 MPa) showed significantly higher bond strengths than BioAggregate (6.63; 10.09 MPa) in coronal and apical root dentin, respectively (p Biodentine also differed significantly from ProRoot MTA in coronal dentin. Bond failure was predominantly adhesive in Biodentine and ProRoot MTA, while BioAggregate showed predominantly mixed failure. ProRoot MTA (158.52 HV) showed significantly higher microhardness and BioAggregate (68.79 HV) showed the lowest hardness. Conclusion Biodentine and ProRoot MTA showed higher bond strength and microhardness compared to BioAggregate. PMID:27852076

  18. Microhardness of esthetic restorative materials at different depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palma-Dibb Regina Guenka

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to analyze the microhardness of two resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer; Fuji II LC; two polyacid-modified composite resins (Freedom; F2000 and a hybrid composite resin (Prodigy, at different depths from the upper surface. Six hemi-cylinders (3 mm height; 3 mm radius per tested material were obtained. Vickers Hardness was determined using a micro-indentation tester. For each hemi-cylinder, three indentations were taken at one of the following depths: 0.4, 1.0, 2.0 and 2.6 mm. For each material, microhardness average was calculated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey test Fuji II LC and Vitremer showed no statistically significant difference among hardness means recorded at the four analyzed depths. The hybrid and the polyacid-modified composite resins showed significant decrease microhardness with increasing depth. It may be concluded that for the RMGIC, microhardness was not affected at depths up to 2.6 mm. On the other hand, both hybrid and PMCRs should de better placed in increments not thicker than 2 mm to achieve optimal hardness throughout the restoration.

  19. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An In Vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghazaleh Ahmadi Zenouz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion.Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10 of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPP-ACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027. The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (P<0.001.Conclusion: All the remineralizing agents were effective for rehardening the enamel after microabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential.Keywords: Casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate nanocomplex; Enamel Microabrasion; Hardness; Sodium Fluoride

  20. Effect of Fluoride, Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Casein Phosphopeptide–Amorphous Calcium Phosphate Fluoride on Enamel Surface Microhardness After Microabrasion: An in Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi Zenouz, Ghazaleh; Ezoji, Fariba; Khafri, Soraya

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the effect of applying casein phosphopeptide– amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) paste, casein phosphopeptide–amorphous calcium phosphate fluoride (CPP-ACPF) paste and sodium fluoride gel on surface microhardness of enamel after microabrasion. Materials and Methods: Thirty freshly extracted human premolars were selected. All samples were subjected to hardness indentations made with the Vickers hardness machine and the average value was recorded as the initial surface microhardness. The specimens were then randomly divided into three groups (n=10) of CPP-ACPF, fluoride and CPPACP. The teeth were micro-abraded with Opalustre. Microhardness test was performed to assess the post-abrasion hardness. Three remineralization modalities were performed on samples of each group. The enamel surface microhardness measurements were performed. To compare the difference between groups, the rehardening and softening values were defined. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test at a significance level of 5% were used for statistical analysis. Results: The mean microhardness value (MMV) had a significant decrease after microabrasion from baseline. The MMV had a significant increase after remineralization in all groups. The MMV of CPP-ACPF group was significantly more than that of fluoride group (P=0.027). The rehardening value of fluoride group was significantly more than that of other groups (Pmicroabrasion. The CPP-ACP and CPP-ACPF pastes are effective, but to a lesser extent than neutral sodium fluoride gel in remineralizing enamel surface. Incorporation of fluoride to CPP-ACP formulation does not provide any additional remineralizing potential. PMID:27252753

  1. Effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP and fluoride on the microhardness of enamel treated with a bleaching agent: ex vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mügem Aslı Gürel Ekici

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to compare the effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF; pH 3.5 on the microhardness of enamel treated with a bleaching agent. Materials and Method: Enamel slices (n=32; 2×4 mm were obtained from 8 mandibular permanent molar teeth. Specimens were embedded into acrylic resin blocks with the enamel surfaces facing upwards. Vickers microhardness (VHN values of the specimens were recorded at baseline. The specimens were randomly divided into 4 experimental groups, and the experimental designation was as follows: Group 1: no treatment (control, Group 2: 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP, Group 3: HP + CPP-ACP, Group 4: HP + APF application. After treatments, VHN values were measured and recorded again. Specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 °C for 1 week. After 1 week second application was done and VHN of the specimens was registered once more. Data were statistically analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey post hoc tests. Values obtained at baseline, and first and second applications were compared using paired samples t-test (α=0.05. Results: In inter-group comparisons, no statistically significant difference in the enamel microhardness values was found between the baseline, and first and second applications (p>0.05. In intra-group comparisons, again, no statistically significant difference in the enamel microhardness values was found between the baseline, and first and second applications (p>0.05. Conclusion: According to the limitations of this study it can be concluded that neither the HP application nor the CPP-ACP or APF application after HP had any significant effect on the enamel microhardness.

  2. In vitro Evaluation of the Efficacy of 2% Carbonic Acid and 2% Acetic Acid on Retrieval of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate and their Effect on Microhardness of Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sathish; Kamble, Aradhana B; Gupta, Pooja; Satpute, Archana; Chaudhari, Salil; Ladhe, Pushpak

    2016-07-01

    In this in vitro study, the efficacy of 2% carbonic acid and 2% acetic acid on the surface, microhardness of white mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) and dentin after 1 day of setting and 21 days of setting of MTA is measured. Tooth molds were made using 60 single-rooted premolars by slicing them to 4 mm in the mid-root region. White MTA (Angelus) was mixed and packed in the molds. Three experimental groups were formed and exposed to 2% carbonic acid, 2% acetic acid, and saline for 10 minutes on 1 and 21 days of setting respectively. Vickers hardness test of white MTA and dentin was done before and after exposure. Data were subjected to analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc tests. The results show that 2% acetic acid was significantly effective in reducing the microhardness of white MTA compared to 2% carbonic acid and saline on exposure for 10 minutes. The results of the present study indicate that 2% acetic acid has maximum efficacy in reducing the surface microhardness of partial and completely set MTA, followed by 2% carbonic acid. The following study will help find an adjunct for retrieval of MTA, which was found difficult with the existing methods.

  3. Comparative evaluation of Nano-Hydroxyapatite preparation and Calcium Sucrose Phosphate on microhardness of deciduous teeth after iron drop exposure - An in-vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Rathi, Nilesh; Baid, Rutika; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare the microhardness of deciduous teeth treated with nano-hydroxyapatite and calcium sucrose phosphate after iron drop exposure. Material and Methods Twenty healthy anterior deciduous teeth were collected and stored in 0.9% saline solution at room temperature. All the teeth were immersed in artificial saliva in an incubator shaker at 37? for an hour and then subjected to Vickers microhardness test at 100g load for 5 seconds. The teeth were then immersed in iron...

  4. Comparative evaluation of Nano-Hydroxyapatite preparation and Calcium Sucrose Phosphate on microhardness of deciduous teeth after iron drop exposure - An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathi, Nilesh; Baid, Rutika; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate and compare the microhardness of deciduous teeth treated with nano-hydroxyapatite and calcium sucrose phosphate after iron drop exposure. Twenty healthy anterior deciduous teeth were collected and stored in 0.9% saline solution at room temperature. All the teeth were immersed in artificial saliva in an incubator shaker at 37° for an hour and then subjected to Vickers microhardness test at 100g load for 5 seconds. The teeth were then immersed in iron drop for 5 minutes, twice daily, rinsed with distilled water and kept in artificial saliva. This procedure was repeated for 7 days and teeth were subjected to microhardness testing. Further, the teeth were divided in two groups, each group containing 10 teeth. In group I, nanohydroxyapatite preparation and in group II, calcium sucrose phosphate were applied for 10 minutes, twice daily for 7 days and subjected again to microhardness testing again. Vickers microhardness analysis revealed that iron drop exposure to teeth caused significant decrease in microhardness (pcalcium sucrose phosphate in Group II showed significantly increased enamel microhardness (200.89) than that after iron drop exposure. Statistical difference was seen between the two groups, with nanohydroxyapatite preparation showing increased microhardness than calcium sucrose phosphate. Nanohydroxyapatite preparation and calcium sucrose phosphate have remineralizing effect over teeth affected by acid challenge of iron drops, nanohydroxyapatite preparation showing better results than calcium sucrose phosphate. Key words:Iron drops, Nanohydroxyapaptite, calcium sucrose phosphate, anticay.

  5. The effects of Exposure Times and Light Curing Sources on Surface Micro-Hardness of a Resin Modified Glass Ionomer

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    Iman Parisay

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The aim of this study was to evaluate the influenceof different light curing systems and curing times on the micro-hardness of aresin modified glass ionomer. Methods: Forty two samples of ResinModified Glass Ionomer (RMGI were prepared using stainless steel cylindrical mold(8 × 2 mm and randomly divided into six groups of seven. Three groups werecured with a Quartz Tungsten Halogen (QTH light cure unit and the other threegroups were polymerized with LED unit for 20, 30 and 40 seconds. All sampleswere stored in distilled water for 24 hours. The micro-hardness was measured onthe top and bottom surfaces of the samples by Vickers hardness tester. Datawere analyzed by two–way ANOVA and Tukey’s post-hoc tests. Results: Two-wayANOVA showed that QTH light-cure unit had higher percentage in depth of curethan LED light-curing unit in both surfaces; whereas, the application time hasno significant effect on it. There was no interaction between two variables. Inboth light-curing groups, the values of top and bottom surfaces micro-hardnesswere increased as the application time increased, but there was not anystatistically significant difference among these groups except for 40-second groupof LED light-curing unit which was significantly higher than 20-second and30-second groups (P

  6. Acid and microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate and mineral trioxide aggregate-like materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolhari, Behnam; Nekoofar, Mohammad Hossein; Sharifian, Mohammadreza; Ghabrai, Sholeh; Meraji, Naghmeh; Dummer, Paul M H

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the surface microhardness of BioAggregate, ProRoot MTA, and CEM Cement when exposed to an acidic environment or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) as a synthetic tissue fluid. Ninety cylindrical molds made of polymethyl methacrylate with an internal diameter of 6 mm and height of 4 mm (according to ASTM E384 standard for microhardness tests) were fabricated and filled with BioAggregate (n = 30), tooth-colored ProRoot MTA (n = 30), or CEM Cement (n = 30). Each group was then divided into 3 subgroups of 10 specimens consisting of those exposed to distilled water, exposed to PBS (pH = 7.4), or exposed to butyric acid (pH = 5.4). After 1 week the Vickers surface microhardness test was performed. Statistical analysis included 2-way analysis of variance, followed by post hoc Dunnett T3 in cases with lack of homoscedasticity and Tukey honestly significant difference in cases with homoscedasticity. The indentations obtained from the CEM Cement specimens exposed to an acidic pH were not readable because of incomplete setting. There was a significant difference between the microhardness of the materials regardless of the environmental conditions (P microhardness values (P microhardness values when exposed to PBS (P microhardness values when exposed to butyric acid (P microhardness of BioAggregate, ProRoot MTA, and CEM Cement was reduced significantly by exposure to butyric acid and increased significantly by exposure to PBS. In all environmental conditions, MTA had significantly higher microhardness values. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. All rights reserved.

  7. The Effects of Remineralization via Fluoride Versus Low-Level Laser IR810 and Fluoride Agents on the Mineralization and Microhardness of Bovine Dental Enamel

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    Edith Lara-Carrillo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess the mineralization and microhardness of bovine dental enamel surfaces treated with fluoride, tri-calcium phosphate, and infrared (IR 810 laser irradiation. The study used 210 bovine incisors, which were divided into six groups (n = 35 in each: Group A: Untreated (control, Group B: Fluoride (Durapath-Colgate, Group C: Fluoride+Tri-calcium phosphate (Clin-Pro White-3 M, Group D: Laser IR 810 (Quantum, Group E: Fluoride+laser, and Group F: Fluoride+tri-calcium phosphate+laser. Mineralization was measured via UV-Vis spectroscopy for phosphorus and via atomic absorption spectroscopy for calcium upon demineralization and remineralization with proven agents. Microhardness (SMH was measured after enamel remineralization. Mineral loss data showed differences between the groups before and after the mineralizing agents were placed (p < 0.05. Fluoride presented the highest remineralization tendency for both calcium and phosphate, with a Vickers microhardness of 329.8 HV0.1/11 (p < 0.05. It was observed that, if remineralization solution contained fewer minerals, the microhardness surface values were higher (r = −0.268 and −0.208; p < 0.05. This study shows that fluoride has a remineralizing effect compared with calcium triphosphate and laser IR810. This in vitro study imitated the application of different remineralizing agents and showed which one was the most efficient for treating non-cavitated injuries. This can prevent the progression of lesions in patients with white spot lesions.

  8. Effect of CPP-ACP paste with and without CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and bracket shear bond strength

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    Nasrin Farhadian

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Many patients seeking orthodontic treatment already have incipient enamel lesions and should be placed under preventive treatments. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste and CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Methods: Eighty caries-free human premolars were subjected to a demineralization challenge using Streptococcus mutans. After demineralization, the samples were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups: Group 1 (control, the brackets were bonded without any surface treatment; Group 2, the enamel surfaces were treated with CPP-ACP paste for 4 minutes before bonding; Group 3, the teeth were irradiated with CO2 laser beams at a wavelength of 10.6 µm for 20 seconds. The samples in Groups 4 and 5 were treated with CO2 laser either before or through CPP-ACP application. SEM photomicrographs of a tooth from each group were taken to observe the enamel surface. The brackets were bonded to the buccal enamel using a conventional method. Shear bond strength of brackets and ARI scores were measured. Vickers microhardness was measured on the non-bonded enamel surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test at the p< 0.05 level. Results: The mean shear bond strength and microhardness of the laser group were higher than those in the control group and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05. All groups showed a higher percentage of ARI score 4. Conclusion: CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm significantly increased demineralized enamel microhardness and enhanced bonding to demineralized enamel.

  9. Effect of CPP-ACP paste with and without CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and bracket shear bond strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadian, Nasrin; Rezaei-Soufi, Loghman; Jamalian, Seyed Farzad; Farhadian, Maryam; Tamasoki, Shahrzad; Malekshoar, Milad; Javanshir, Bahareh

    2017-01-01

    Many patients seeking orthodontic treatment already have incipient enamel lesions and should be placed under preventive treatments. The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP paste and CO2 laser irradiation on demineralized enamel microhardness and shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets. Eighty caries-free human premolars were subjected to a demineralization challenge using Streptococcus mutans. After demineralization, the samples were randomly divided into five equal experimental groups: Group 1 (control), the brackets were bonded without any surface treatment; Group 2, the enamel surfaces were treated with CPP-ACP paste for 4 minutes before bonding; Group 3, the teeth were irradiated with CO2 laser beams at a wavelength of 10.6 µm for 20 seconds. The samples in Groups 4 and 5 were treated with CO2 laser either before or through CPP-ACP application. SEM photomicrographs of a tooth from each group were taken to observe the enamel surface. The brackets were bonded to the buccal enamel using a conventional method. Shear bond strength of brackets and ARI scores were measured. Vickers microhardness was measured on the non-bonded enamel surface. Data were analyzed with ANOVA and Tukey test at the p< 0.05 level. The mean shear bond strength and microhardness of the laser group were higher than those in the control group and this difference was statistically significant (p< 0.05). All groups showed a higher percentage of ARI score 4. CO2 laser at a wavelength of 10.6 µm significantly increased demineralized enamel microhardness and enhanced bonding to demineralized enamel.

  10. Effect of titanium dioxide nanoparticle addition into orthodontic adhesive resin on enamel microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, A.; Krisnawati; Purwanegara, M. K.

    2017-08-01

    White spots are an early sign of enamel demineralization, which may lead to development of dental caries. Enamel demineralization can be determined by examining the microhardness number of the enamel. Addition of antibacterial agents such as TiO2 nanoparticles into the orthodontic adhesive (TiO2 nanocomposite) is expected to prevent enamel demineralization. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of TiO2 nanocomposites in maintaining enamel microhardness around orthodontic brackets. The bracket was bonded to the premolar using Transbond XT (group 1), 1% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 2), and 2% TiO2 nanocomposites (group 3). Group 4 was the control group, and it was not given any treatment prior to the microhardness test. The samples of groups 1, 2, and 3 were soaked in BHI solution containing Streptococcus mutans, and then stored in an incubator at 37°C for 30 days. Demineralizations were determined on cross-sectioned tooth 100μm and 200μm cervical to the bracket by the Vickers microhardness test. The microhardness values were significantly different between every group, with the highest value obtained for control group, followed by the 2% TiO2 nanocomposite group, 1% TiO2 nanocomposite group, and then the Transbond XT group. The results of this study reveal that 2% TiO2 nanocomposites have the ability to maintain enamel microhardness around the orthodontic bracket.

  11. The Micro-hardness of Heat Treated Carbon Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef PETRÍK

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the submitted work is to study the influence of applied loads ranging from 0.09807 N to 0.9807 N on measured values of micro-hardness of heat treated carbon steel. The influence of applied load on measured value of micro-hardness was evaluated by Meyer’s index n, PSR method and by Analysis of Variance (ANOVA. The influence of the load on the measured value of micro-hardness is statistically significant and the relationship between applied load and micro-hardness manifests the moderate reverse ISE. As far as the relationship between measured hardness and load independent “true hardness”, the best fit was obtained between HV0.05 and “true hardness” calculated using index a2.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5755/j01.ms.20.1.4017

  12. Effect of pre-heating on the viscosity and microhardness of a resin composite.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lucey, S

    2010-04-01

    The effect of pre-heating resin composite on pre-cured viscosity and post-cured surface hardness was evaluated. Groups of uncured specimens were heated to 60 degrees C and compared with control groups (24 degrees C) with respect to viscosity and surface hardness. Mean (SD) viscosities of the pre-heated specimens (n = 15) were in the range of 285 (13)-377 (11) (Pa) compared with 642 (35)-800 (23) (Pa) at ambient temperature. There was a statistically significant difference between the two groups (P < 0.001). Mean (SD) Vickers microhardness (VHN) of the pre-heated group (n = 15) was 68.6 (2.3) for the top surface and 68.7 (1.8) for the bottom surface measured at 24 h post curing (specimen thickness = 1.5 mm). The corresponding values for the room temperature group were 60.6 (1.4) and 59.0 (3.5). There was a statistically significant difference between corresponding measurements taken at the top and bottom for the pre-heated and room temperature groups (P < 0.001). There was no significant difference between top and bottom measurements within each group. Pre-heating resin composite reduces its pre-cured viscosity and enhances its subsequent surface hardness. These effects may translate as easier placement together with an increased degree of polymerization and depth-of-cure.

  13. Concurrent Effects of Bleaching Materials and the Size of Root Canal Preparation on Cervical Dentin Microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazemipoor, Maryam; Azad, Shaghayegh; Farahat, Farnaz

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concurrent effect of root canal preparation size and intra coronal bleaching on dentin microhardness. Seventy-two intact anterior teeth were root canal treated and randomly divided into two groups (n=36) according to the size of coronal root canal preparation. The coronal portions of the canals were then enlarged with #2 and 4 Peeso reamers, respectively. Following root canal obturation, teeth were assigned into three groups (n=12) to be treated with bleaching agents containing 35% hydrogen peroxide (HP), sodium perborate (SP) and distilled water as control group. The teeth were stored at 37(º)C and 100% humidity for 7 days. Dentinal blocks with 3 mm thickness were obtained from the cervical region and Vickers microhardness number (VHN) were measured for outer and inner dentin in each tooth sample. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD tests. In the outer dentin, the mean VHN in the HP and control groups showed statistically significant differences (P=0.047). The mean VHN of inner dentin for the large preparation size was statistically higher in comparison to the small preparation size (P=0.042). There was a statistically significant difference in the mean VHN of inner dentin with small preparation size between HP and SP groups (P=0.029) and HP and control groups (P=0.021). Intra coronal bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide, affects the inner and outer dentin significantly. Excessive removal of cervical dentin, following root canal preparation, alongside the adverse effect of bleaching materials on dentin could result in the tooth fracture.

  14. Surface microhardness of a resin composite exposed to a "first-generation" LED curing lamp, in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, Pauraic; Ray, Noel J; Lynch, Christopher D; Burke, Francis M; Hannigan, Ailish

    2004-12-01

    This investigation determined the minimum exposure times consistent with optimised surface microhardness parameters for a commercial resin composite cured using a "first-generation" light-emitting diode activation lamp. Disk specimens were exposed and surface microhardness numbers measured at the top and bottom surfaces for elapsed times of 1 hour and 24 hours. Bottom/top microhardness number ratios were also calculated. Most microhardness data increased significantly over the elapsed time interval but microhardness ratios (bottom/top) were dependent on exposure time only. A minimum exposure of 40 secs is appropriate to optimise microhardness parameters for the combination of resin composite and lamp investigated.

  15. Different-Oxides Nanoceramics Microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Vladimir

    2014-11-01

    With help of the method of the spark plasma sintering (SPS), the fine-grained (of micron approximately) ceramics based on various alumina nanopowders had created. A comparison of microhardness of ceramic samples obtained from 11 alumina nanopowders and 2 their composites was held. Microhardness of the ceramics obtained both by SPS, and by the traditional method (at successive pressing and sintering) is compared. The dependence of ceramics microhardness on the phase composition of the initial nanopowder and the average size of its particles was investigated. Besides alumina nanopowders (Al2O3), there were compared microhardness of ceramics from other 10 nanopowders of oxides (SiO2, ZnO, Fe3O4, Gd2O3, CuO, WO3, TiO2, Y2O3, ZrO2, MgO) obtained both by SPS, and by the traditional method. It is obtained that the microhardness of the ceramics created on the method of the spark plasma sintering, is significantly higher than a microhardness of the ceramics obtained by the traditional method; at the SPS method the average size of grain in ceramics decreases (to 1 micron and less).

  16. Application of ANFIS for modeling of microhardness of high strength low alloy (HSLA steels in continuous cooling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gholamreza Khalaj

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some results of the research connected with the development of new approach based on the Adaptive Network-based Fuzzy Inference Systems (ANFIS of predicting the Vickers microhardness of the phase constituents occurring in five steel samples after continuous cooling. The independent variables in the model are chemical compositions, initial austenite grain size and cooling rate over the temperature range of the occurrence of phase transformations. To construct these models, 114 different experimental data were gathered from the literature. The data used in the ANFIS model is arranged in a format of twelve input parameters that cover the chemical compositions, initial austenite grain size and cooling rate, and output parameter which is Vickers microhardness. In this model, the training and testing results in the ANFIS systems have shown strong potential for prediction of effects of chemical compositions and heat treatments on hardness of microalloyed steels.

  17. Effect of EDTA, sodium hypochlorite, and chlorhexidine gluconate with or without surface modifiers on dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslantas, Eda E; Buzoglu, Hatice Dogan; Altundasar, Emre; Serper, Ahmet

    2014-06-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of root canal irrigants on the microhardness of root canal dentin in the presence and absence of surface-modifying agents. Forty-eight root halves were prepared by longitudinal splitting of the distal roots of 24 freshly extracted mandibular human third molars and embedded in autopolymerizing acrylic resin, leaving the dentin surface exposed. After polishing, the microhardness values of the untreated dentin surfaces were recorded by using Vickers tester at the mid-root level. The root halves were randomly assigned to 6 groups composed of 8 samples each and treated for 5 minutes with one of the following irrigants: 17% EDTA, REDTA, 2% chlorhexidine gluconate (CHX), 2% CHX with surface modifiers (CHX-Plus), 6% NaOCl, or 6% NaOCl with surface modifiers (Chlor-XTRA). After surface treatment, dentin microhardness values were recorded at close proximity to the initial indentation areas. Experimental data were statistically analyzed by using the t test and one-way analysis of variance, followed by Tukey honestly significant difference test at α = 0.05. EDTA, REDTA, NaOCl, and Chlor-XTRA significantly decreased the microhardness of root dentin compared with intact controls (P < .05). The addition of surface modifiers to the irrigants did not affect the microhardness of the samples. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Vickers Hardness Measurements of the M855 Cartridge Case Base

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    EMT B MACHAK PICATINNY ARSENAL NJ 07806-5000 5 COMMANDER US ARMY TACOM ARDEC AMSRD AAR AEP E D CARLUCCI K LAUGHLIN S...R COATES T EHLERS L MAGNESS B SCHUSTER AMSRD ARL WM TD T BJERKE T WEERASOORIYA AMSRD ARL WM TE B RINGERS 18 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK.

  19. Effects of the bleaching procedures on enamel micro-hardness: Plasma Arc and diode laser comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nematianaraki, Saeid; Fekrazad, Reza; Naghibi, Nasim; Kalhori, Katayoun Am; Junior, Aldo Brugnera

    2015-10-02

    One of the major side effects of vital bleaching is the reduction of enamel micro-hardness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of two different bleaching systems, Plasma Arc and GaAlAs laser, on the enamel micro-hardness. 15 freshly extracted human third molars were sectioned to prepare 30 enamel blocks (5×5 mm). These samples were then randomly divided into 2 groups of 15 each (n=15): a plasma arc bleaching group (: 350-700 nm) + 35% Hydrogen Peroxide whitening gel and a laser bleaching group (GaAlAs laser, λ: 810 nm, P: 10 W, CW, Special Tip) + 35% Hydrogen Peroxide whitening gel. Samples were subjected to the Vickers micro-hardness test (VHN) at a load of 50 g for 15s before and after treatment. Data were statistically analyzed by a Mann-Whitney test (p≤0.05). In the GaAlAs laser group, the enamel micro-hardness was 618.2 before and was reduced to 544.6 after bleaching procedures. In the plasma arc group, the enamel micro-hardness was 644.8 before and 498.9 after bleaching. Although both techniques significantly reduced VHN, plasma arc bleaching resulted in a 22.62% reduction in VHN for enamel micro-hardness, whereas an 11.89% reduction in VHN was observed for laser bleaching; this difference is statistically significant (pplasma arc. Therefore GaAlAs laser bleaching has fewer harmful effects than plasma arc in respect to enamel micro-hardness reduction.

  20. Microhardness of heat cure acrylic resin after treatment with disinfectants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Faiza; Rehman, Abdur; Abbas, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of disinfectants and distilled water on the micro-hardness of heat cure acrylic resins. The case-control study was conducted at Dr. Ishrat-ul-Ebad Khan Institute of Oral Health Sciences, Dow University of Health Sciences, and Nadirshaw Edulji Dinshaw University of Engineering and Technology, Karachi, from April to October 2011. Specimens were fabricated from heat cure acrylic resin material and they were divided into four equal groups. Group 1 was evaluated at baseline and was taken as the control group. Group 2 was immersed in distilled water for 20 minutes, Group 3 in1% sodium hypochlorite for 20 minutes, and Group 4 in 2% alkaline gluteraldehyde for 10 minutes. All specimens were polished, stored in distilled water for 24 hours prior to experiment. All the specimens were immersed twice daily for a total of 60 days after which they were tested for Vickers micro-hardness test. Statistical analysis was conducted with one-way analysis of variance and Tukey post hoc test (a=0.05). There were 72 specimens divided into four groups of 18(25%) each. Statistically significant differences were found among all groups (pacrylic resins. Group 4 showed the most reduction in the hardness value which was followed by Group 3. The hardness of heat cure acrylic resin was affected by disinfectants.

  1. The Influence of Indenter Rotation Angle on The Quality of Vicker Tester Calibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Petrík

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The object of submitted work is to analyze the influence of the rotation of the indenter (diamond pyramid and test force on the result of Vickers hardness tester calibration using uncertainty analysis, Measurement systems analysis (MSA, analysis of variance (ANOVA and Z-score. The rotation anmgle of indenter affects the values of hardness, repeatability rrel, maximal error Erel and relative expanded uncertainty Urel. The significance of the angle of indenter on the hardness and observed parameters of calibration no such as it of test force, but not negligible.

  2. Effects of incorporation of nano-fluorapatite particles on microhardness, fluoride releasing properties, and biocompatibility of a conventional glass ionomer cement (GIC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshaverinia, Maryam; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Sameni, Abdi; Moshaverinia, Alireza; Ansari, Sahar

    2016-01-01

    Present study evaluated effects of addition of Nanoparticles fluorapatite (Nano-FA) on microhardness and fluoride release of a Glass Ionomer Cement (GIC, Fuji IX GP Fast). Forty-eight specimens prepared, divided equally into 4 groups (2 with Nano-FA); after 24 h and one week Vickers microhardness (HV) was measured. Nano-FA specimens were made from addition of nano-FA to Fuji IX powder (glass powder/Nano-FA ratio=20:1 wt/wt, 3.6:1 P/L ratio). At 24 h, mean (95% CI) HV for GIC and Nano-FA GIC were 40.59 (39.51-41.66) and 46.89 (45.95-47.82) kg/mm 2 , and at one week 44.98 (44.23-45.72), 53.29 (52.58-53.99) kg/mm 2 , respectively. Findings indicated higher HV in Nano-FA specimens (F=221.088, p0.05). MTT assay exhibited no inhibition of cell proliferation or reduction in metabolic activity in experimental [84.0 (3.3)] or control groups [85.1 (4.7)] with no difference between groups (p>0.05). New nano-FA GIC was biocompatible and showed improved surface hardness. Future clinical trials can verify the usefulness of Nano-FA GIC.

  3. Comparative evaluation of Nano-Hydroxyapatite preparation and Calcium Sucrose Phosphate on microhardness of deciduous teeth after iron drop exposure - An in-vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baid, Rutika; Baliga, Sudhindra; Thosar, Nilima

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate and compare the microhardness of deciduous teeth treated with nano-hydroxyapatite and calcium sucrose phosphate after iron drop exposure. Material and Methods Twenty healthy anterior deciduous teeth were collected and stored in 0.9% saline solution at room temperature. All the teeth were immersed in artificial saliva in an incubator shaker at 37° for an hour and then subjected to Vickers microhardness test at 100g load for 5 seconds. The teeth were then immersed in iron drop for 5 minutes, twice daily, rinsed with distilled water and kept in artificial saliva. This procedure was repeated for 7 days and teeth were subjected to microhardness testing. Further, the teeth were divided in two groups, each group containing 10 teeth. In group I, nanohydroxyapatite preparation and in group II, calcium sucrose phosphate were applied for 10 minutes, twice daily for 7 days and subjected again to microhardness testing again. Results Vickers microhardness analysis revealed that iron drop exposure to teeth caused significant decrease in microhardness (pmicrohardness (206.90) than that after iron drop exposure. Similarly, application of calcium sucrose phosphate in Group II showed significantly increased enamel microhardness (200.89) than that after iron drop exposure. Statistical difference was seen between the two groups, with nanohydroxyapatite preparation showing increased microhardness than calcium sucrose phosphate. Conclusions Nanohydroxyapatite preparation and calcium sucrose phosphate have remineralizing effect over teeth affected by acid challenge of iron drops, nanohydroxyapatite preparation showing better results than calcium sucrose phosphate. Key words:Iron drops, Nanohydroxyapaptite, calcium sucrose phosphate, anticay. PMID:28469827

  4. Effect of Ceramic Barriers of Different Thicknesses on Microhardness of Light-Cured Resin Cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    do Nascimento, Yasmin Alves; de Oliveira Correia, Ayla Macyelle; Lima, Darlon Martins; Griza, Sandro; Takeshita, Wilton Mitsunari; Melo de Mendonça, Adriano Augusto

    This study evaluated the microhardness of two resin cements and a low-viscosity resin composite when light-cured under different ceramic thicknesses. A total of 20 samples (10.0 × 1.0 mm) of each material were polymerized by means of a LED light source with an intensity of 1,100 mW/cm(2) for 20 seconds. For each experimental group, different ceramic thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1.0 mm, and 1.5 mm) were applied to each sample. For the control group, the samples were polymerized without the presence of ceramics. Each material was then stored in dry vials that inhibited the passage of light for a period of 24 hours. After that time, each sample underwent Vickers hardness test (HMV, Shimadzu: 25 g/10 seconds). The data were collected and analyzed using analysis of variance and Tukey test (P microhardness values and standard deviations of 44.42 ± 4.9, 44.25 ± 2.4, and 31.71 ± 2.4, respectively. The lowest microhardness value (24.13) was found when the greatest ceramic thickness (1.5 mm) was used on the Allcem Veneer cement (P microhardness of resin-based materials was affected when the 1.5-mm-thick ceramic material was interposed during photoactivation.

  5. Impact of Polishing Systems on the Surface Roughness and Microhardness of Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfawaz, Yasser

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this article is to evaluate the influence of finishing and polishing techniques on the surface roughness and microhardness of two composite resins with two different types of polishing systems. A total of 30 disk-shaped specimens of nanocomposite Filtek™ Z350 and Ceram-X® were prepared. They were divided into three groups. The control group (n = 10) received no finishing and polishing. The remaining specimens were divided into two groups, and they received polishing and finishing either with PoGo or Sof-Lex system. After the polishing procedures, average surface roughness (Ra) was assessed with a surface profilometer. The microhardness was determined using a Vickers hardness test. The data were tabulated and analyzed. The smoothest surfaces were noticed with the control group (Mylar strips) in both composite materials tested. The PoGo one-step polishing system showed significantly better surface roughness compared with the Sof-Lex polishing system. The microhardness did not show any significant variations after finishing and polishing. It can be concluded that the use of PoGo® one-step polishing system resulted in smoother surface with both composite materials studied compared with the Sof-Lex system. The finishing and polishing system had little influence on the surface microhardness. The finishing procedure and polishing system can affect the physical properties and performance of resin composites.

  6. Effect of different concentrations of fluoride varnish on enamel surface microhardness: An in vitro randomized controlled study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Subramaniam

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dental caries occurs as a result of demineralization-remineralization phases occurring alternately at the tooth surface. Fluoride varnishes have a caries-inhibiting effect on teeth through remineralization. The resulting enamel is resistant to acid dissolution. Aim: The aim of this study is to assess enamel surface microhardness (SMH following varnish application with different fluoride concentrations. Materials and Methods: Ninety freshly extracted, caries-free premolar teeth were used. Teeth were sectioned to obtain enamel blocks from the buccal surface of crown. The blocks were serially polished and flattened, embedded in acrylic blocks and smoothened to achieve a flat surface. The samples were divided into three groups, namely, A, B, and C consisting of 30 enamel blocks each. In Group A, Fluor Protector® varnish and in Group B, Bi-Fluorid 10® varnish was applied. Group C served as controls. All samples were subjected to a demineralization-remineralization cycle for 7 days. The SMH of enamel was measured. Data obtained was subjected to statistical analysis using the Student's t-test and one-way ANOVA. Results: The mean values of enamel SMH of Groups A and B were 496.99 ± 4.81 and 449.47 ± 7.37 Vickers Hardness Number, respectively. Conclusion: Fluor Protector varnish showed significantly higher enamel SMH than that of the other two groups (P < 0.05.

  7. Effect of microstructure and microhardness on the wear resistance of zirconia-alumina, zirconia-yttria and zirconia-ceria coatings manufactured by atmospheric plasma spraying; fecto de la microestructura y de la microdureza sobre la resistencia al desgaste de recubrimientos elaborados por proyeccion termica por plasma atmosferico a partir de circona-alumina, circona-itria y circona-ceria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giovanni Gonzalez, A.; Ageorges, H.; Rojas, O.; Lopez, E.; Milena Hurtado, F.; Vargas, F.

    2015-10-01

    The effect of the structure and microhardness on the wear resistance of zirconia-alumina (ATZ), zirconia-yttria (YSZ) and zirconia-ceria (CSZ) coatings manufactured by atmospheric plasma spraying was studied. The microstructure and the fracture on the cross section of the coatings were analyzed using Scanning Electron Microscopy, the phases were identified using X-Ray Diffraction, the microhardness was measured by Vickers indentation and the wear resistance was evaluated by ball on disc test. The results showed that zirconia-alumina coating exhibits the best performance in the wear test. This behavior is closely related to their microstructure and higher microhardness, despite of its significant quantity of the monoclinic zirconia phase, which has lower mechanical properties than tetragonal zirconia phase. Tetragonal zirconia phase was predominant in the zirconia-yttria and zirconia-ceria coatings and despite this behavior; they did not have a good performance in the wear tests. This low wear resistance was mainly influenced by the columnar structure within their lamellae, which caused a greater detachment of particles in the contact surface during the ball-disc tests, increasing its wear. (Author)

  8. Microhardness, Structure, and Morphology of Primary Enamel after Phosphoric Acid, Self-Etching Adhesive, and Er:YAG Laser Etching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Carmen Zoila Alcantara-Galeana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Phosphoric acid is the traditional etching agent; self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser are alternative methods. Knowledge of deciduous enamel etching is required. Aim. To evaluate primary enamel microhardness, structure, and morphology after phosphoric acid, self-etching, and Er:YAG laser etching. Design. Seventy primary incisors were assigned to five groups (n=14: I (control, II (35% phosphoric acid, III (self-etching adhesive, IV (Er:YAG laser at 15 J/cm2, and V (Er:YAG laser at 19.1 J/cm2. Microhardness was evaluated by Vickers indentation. Chemical composition was analyzed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and morphological changes by scanning electron microscopy. One-way ANOVA, Kruskal–Wallis, Mann–Whitney U, and Pearson bivariate correlation were employed (α=0.05. Results. Vickers microhardness showed differences and no correlation with Ca/P ratio. Group II showed differences in carbon, oxygen, and phosphorus atomic percent and group V in Ca/P ratio. Morphological changes included exposed prisms, fractures, craters, and fusion. Conclusions. Enamel treated with phosphoric acid showed different chemical characterization among groups. Self-etching and Er:YAG laser irradiation at 19.1 J/cm2 showed similar microhardness and chemical characterization. Er:YAG laser irradiation at 15 J/cm2 maintained microhardness as untreated enamel. Er:YAG laser irradiation at 19.1 J/cm2 enhanced mineral content. Morphological retentive changes were specific to each type of etching protocol.

  9. Effects of applying anchovy (Stolephorus insularis) substrates on the microhardness of tooth enamel in Sprague-Dawley rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrik, Y. C.; Puspitawati, R.; Gunawan, H. A.

    2017-08-01

    Anchovies (Stolephorus insularis) contain high levels of fluor in the form of CaF2. The aim of this study is to analyze changes in tooth enamel microhardness after application of anchovy substrates by feeding or as a topical fluoridation material. An in vivo study of the lower left incisors of nine Sprague-Dawley rats was conducted. The sample was comprised of baseline and treatment groups, including feeding application, topical application, negative control feeding, and negative control topical groups. The treatment groups were given 5% anchovy substrates through feeding and topical applications. After treatment, tooth samples were extracted from each of the rats for examination, and statistical analyses were performed after determining hardness numbers for enamel surfaces using Vickers microhardness tester. Vickers hardness numbers (VHNs) for anchovy substrate application and consumption by feeding (440.3 ± 24.72) were higher than for the negative control (315.80 ± 17.51). VHNs for the topical application group were higher than for the negative control (347.28 ± 28.56) and for the feeding group. The use of anchovy as a fluoridation material in form of topical application is potentially an effective method for increasing the microhardness of the tooth enamel surface

  10. Effect of different EGTA concentrations on dentin microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cruz-Filho Antonio Miranda da

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of 1%, 3% and 5% EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis-(b-amino-ethyl ether N,N,N,N-tetra-acetic acid on the microhardness of root dentin of the cervical third of human teeth was studied. Five newly extracted maxillary incisors were sectioned transversely at the cementoenamel junction, and the crowns were discarded. The roots were embedded in blocks of high-speed polymerized acrylic resin and cut transversely into 1-mm sections. The second section of the cervical third of the root of each tooth was sectioned and divided into four parts. Each part was placed on an acrylic disc that was used as a base for microhardness measurement. Fifty microliters of 1% EGTA, 3% EGTA, or 5% EGTA were applied to the dentin surface. Deionized and distilled water was used as control. Dentin microhardness was then measured with a load of 50 g for 15 s. Statistical analysis showed that the three concentrations of the chelating solution EGTA significantly reduced dentin microhardness when compared with water (ANOVA, p<0.01, and that there was a statistically significant difference among the three solutions (Tukey test, p<0.05.

  11. Microhardness assessment of different commercial brands of resin composites with different degrees of translucence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taciana Emília de Almeida Anfe

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Owing to improvements in its mechanical properties and to the availability of shade and translucence resources, resin composite has become one of the most widely used restorative materials in present day Dentistry. The aim of this study was to assess the relation between the surface hardness of seven different commercial brands of resin composites (Charisma, Fill Magic, Master Fill, Natural Look, Opallis, Tetric Ceram, and Z250 and the different degrees of translucence (translucid, enamel and dentin. Vickers microhardness testing revealed significant differences among the groups. Z250 was the commercial brand that showed the best performance in the hardness test. When comparing the three groups assessed within the same brand, only Master Fill and Fill Magic presented statistically significant differences among all of the different translucencies. Natural Look was the only one that showed no significant difference among any of the three groups. Charisma, Opallis, Tetric Ceram and Z250 showed significant differences among some of the tested groups. Based on the results found in this study, it was not possible to establish a relation between translucence and the microhardness of the resin composites assessed. Depending on the material assessed, however, translucence variation did affect the microhardness values of the resin composites.

  12. Microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of VCp/Fe surface composites fabricated in situ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Fangxia; Hojamberdiev, Mirabbos; Xu, Yunhua; Zhong, Lisheng; Zhao, Nana; Li, Yaping; Huang, Xing

    2013-09-01

    The vanadium carbide particles (VCp)/Fe surface composites were in situ fabricated by a technique combining infiltration casting with subsequent heat treatment. The effects of different heat treatment times on the phase evolution, microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of the composite were studied by means of X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Vickers hardness tester and wear resistance testing instrument, respectively. The results show that only graphite, α-Fe and V8C7 phases dominate in the composite after being heat treated at 1164 °C for 3 h. The amount of V8C7 decreases gradually from the top surface of the composite to the matrix mainly composed of gray cast iron. The average microhardness of the VCp/Fe surface composites varies according to the different reaction zones as follows: 505 HV0.1 (vanadium plate), 1096 HV0.1 (composite region), and 235 HV0.1 (iron matrix). The microhardness of the composite region is four times higher than that of the iron matrix and two times higher than that of the vanadium plate. This is attributed to the formation of vanadium carbide (V2C and V8C7) crystallites as reinforcement phases within the iron matrix. The VCp/Fe surface composites exhibit a good wear resistance under two-body abrasive wear test.

  13. Comparative study on BIS thiourea cadmium acetate crystals using HRXRD, etching, microhardness, UV-visible and dielectric characterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganesh, V. [Department of Physics, Ganapathy Engineering College, Warangal-506005 (India); Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal-506009 (India); Snehalatha Reddy, Ch. [Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal-506009 (India); Shakir, Mohd. [Crystal Growth Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India) and Materials Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110 025 (India); Wahab, M.A. [Crystal Growth Lab, Department of Physics, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi-110025 (India); Bhagavannarayana, G. [Materials Characterization Division, National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi-110 025 (India); Kishan Rao, K., E-mail: kishankotte@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal-506009 (India)

    2011-01-15

    <1 1 1> oriented bis thiourea cadmium acetate (BTCA) crystal of diameter 15 mm and length 45 mm was grown for the first time by the unidirectional Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) method. The conventional and SR method grown BTCA crystals were characterized by using high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD), chemical etching, Vickers microhardness, UV-vis, dielectric studies and differential scanning calorimetry. The HRXRD analysis indicates that the crystalline perfection of SR method grown crystal is good without having any low angle internal structural grain boundaries. The transmittance of SR method grown BTCA is 14% higher than that of conventional grown crystal. The dielectric constant was higher and the dielectric loss was less in SR method grown crystal. The crystals grown by SR method possess less dislocation density and higher microhardness.

  14. Evaluation of Surface Roughness Characteristics Using Atomic Force Microscopy and Inspection of Microhardness Following Resin Infiltration with Icon(®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurdogan, Elif Beril; Ozdemir-Ozenen, Didem; Sandalli, Nuket

    2017-05-06

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the surface roughness via atomic force microscopy (AFM) as well as to evaluate the microhardness values of Icon(®) in comparison with sound and demineralized enamel in a large subject group. Enamel samples were prepared from sound bovine incisors and randomly allocated into either AFM (n = 60) or microhardness (n = 60) groups. The AFM group was divided into control (n = 30) and Icon(®) (n = 30) subgroups. The microhardness group was also divided into three subgroups: control (n = 20), demineralization (n = 20) and Icon(®) (n = 20) groups. The demineralization and Icon(®) subgroups were subjected to a demineralizing solution (pH: 4, 2 hours). Following the formation of shallow white spot lesions and application of the infiltrant, each sample was examined according to its parameter. AFM images suggested that Icon(®) had a significantly rougher surface than the control group. When the AFM results were evaluated numerically, it was evident that the Icon(®) group possessed statistically higher Sa, Sq, mean height, and maximum deviation values compared to the control group. The mean Vickers hardness values of all groups were determined to be significantly different from one another. Hardness values in the demineralization group were determined to be significantly lower than the control and Icon(®) groups. No statistically significant difference was observed between mean Vickers hardness values for the contol and Icon(®) groups. The present in vitro study shows that more studies are required to improve the surface quality of this infiltrant material. The present in vitro study shows that the resin infiltration technique results in increased microhardness of demineralized enamel. However, it was observed that the infiltrant material creates a significantly rougher surface compared to healthy, untreated enamel. (J Esthet Restor Dent 29:201-208, 2017). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Effects of Different Percentages of Microhydroxyapatite on Microhardness of Resin-modified Glass-ionomer and Zirconomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Shoale, Soodabe; Kowkabi, Mahsa

    2017-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) is the main mineral component of the tooth structure, which exhibits considerable biological behavior and its incorporation might improve microhardness of dental materials. Microhardness of restorative materials, like glass-ionomer, is critical for the clinical longevity of restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of two glass-ionomers types by incorporating different percentages of microhydroxyapatite. In this study, 80 disc-shaped experimental specimens (6 mm in diameter, 2 mm in height) were prepared in 8 groups, including resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI, GC, Gold Label, Japan), zirconia-reinforced glass-ionomer (Zirconomer, Shofu, Kyoto, Japan), and their mixture with 0, 5, 15 and 25 wt% of microhydroxyapatite (Sigma-Aldrich, Germany). All the specimens were stored in deionized water at 37ºC for 24 hours. Then Vickers microhardness test was carried out on the both sides of specimens and data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and paired t-test (Pglass-ionomer, Zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer, Microhydroxyapatite.

  16. Evaluation of superficial microhardness in dental enamel with different eruptive ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Geller Palti

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the superficial microhardness of enamel in teeth at different posteruptive ages (before eruption in the oral cavity, 2-3 years after eruption, 4-10 years after eruption and more than 10 years after eruption. The study sample was composed of 134 specimens of human enamel. One fragment of each tooth was obtained from the flattest central portion of the crown to produce specimens with 3 x 3 mm. The enamel blocks were minimally flattened out and polished in order to obtain a flat surface parallel to the base, which is fundamental for microhardness testing. Microhardness was measured with a microhardness tester and a Knoop diamond indenter, under a static load of 25 g applied for 5 seconds. Comparison between the superficial microhardness obtained for the different groups was performed by analysis of Student's t test. The results demonstrated that superficial microhardness values have a tendency to increase over the years, with statistically significant difference only between unerupted enamel and that with more than 10 years after eruption. According to the present conditions and methodology, it was concluded that there were differences between the superficial micro-hardness of specimens at different eruptive ages, revealing an increasing mineralization. However, this difference was significant only between unerupted specimens and those with more than 10 years after eruption.

  17. Correlation between surface roughness and microhardness of experimental composites with varying filler concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchow, Eliseu Aldrighi; Correa, Marcos Brito; Ogliari, Fabricio Aulo; Piva, Evandro; Zanchi, Cesar Henrique

    2012-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of the surface roughness on the surface microhardness of experimental composites with varying filler concentration. Experimental resin composites were formulated by mixing Bis-GMA and TEGDMA in a 50/50% weight ratio and CQ/EDAB were added to make the material photosensitive. Silanized glass particles were incorporated in the resin blend in two concentrations: C50 with 50% and C75 with 75% in weight ratio. The surface roughness and the surface microhardness measurements were determined after every three finishing procedures with #280-, #600- and #1200-grit wet sandpapers, respectively. The data were analyzed statistically by Two Way ANOVA and Tukey's test, and comparisons were conducted using the Spearman's correlation test (p > 0.05). The surface roughness and surface microhardness were negatively associated (r = - 0.68) and the finishing procedures of both composites resulted in harder and smoother surfaces than the initial ones. Additionally, in a smooth circumstance, the higher content of fillers has not resulted in a composite with better microhardness and smoothness. Finishing procedures decreased the surface roughness and consequently improved the surface microhardness of the composites evaluated. Finishing and polishing procedures are effectives in reducing the surface roughness amplitude of composite materials and in improving their surface microhardness. Thus a microhardness test and any hardness evaluation must be conducted only after a properly finished and polished surface is achieved.

  18. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on microhardness of acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Baptista, Gabriella Trunckle; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Dekon, Stéfan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the microhardness of acrylic resins denture base. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated: Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone. Each brand of acrylic resin was divided into four groups (n = 7) according to the disinfection method (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine and 1% hypochlorite). Samples were disinfected during 60 days. Before and after disinfection, samples were thermal cycled between 5-55 °C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles. The microhardness was measured using a microhardener, at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2). The microhardness values of all groups reduced over time. QC-20 acrylic resin exhibited the lowest microhardness values. At B and T1 periods, the acrylic resins exhibited statistically greater microhardness values when compared to D and T2 periods. It can be concluded that the microhardness values of the acrylic resins denture base were affected by the thermal cycling and disinfection procedures. However, all microhardness values obtained herein are within acceptable clinical limits for the acrylic resins.

  19. Dentine microhardness after different methods for detection and removal of carious dentine tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Brandão Mollica

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods for identifying carious dentinal tissue aiming to avoid removal of healthy dentinal tissue. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to test different methods for the detection of carious dentinal tissue regarding the amount of carious tissue removed and the remaining dentin microhardness after caries removal. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The dentin surfaces of 20 bovine teeth were exposed and half of the surface was protected with nail polish. Cariogenic challenge was performed by immersion in a demineralizing solution for 14 days. After transverse cross-section of the crown, the specimens were divided into four groups (n=10, according to the method used to identify and remove the carious tissue: "Papacárie", Caries-detector dye, DIAGNOdent and Tactile method. After caries removal, the cross-sectional surface was included in acrylic resin and polished. In a microhardness tester, the removed dentin thickness and the Vickers microhardness of the following regions were evaluated: remaining dentin after caries removal and superficial and deep healthy dentin. RESULTS: ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05 were performed, except for DIAGNOdent, which did not detect the presence of caries. Results for removed dentin thickness were: "Papacárie" (424.7±105.0; a, Caries-detector dye (370.5±78.3; ab, Tactile method (322.8±51.5; bc. Results for the remaining dentin microhardness were: "Papacárie" (42.2±10.5; bc, Caries-detector dye (44.6±11.8; abc, Tactile method (24.3±9.0; d. CONCLUSIONS: DIAGNOdent did not detect the presence of carious tissue; Tactile method and "Papacárie" resulted in the least and the most dentinal thickness removal, respectively; Tactile method differed significantly from "Papacárie" and Caries-detector dye in terms of the remaining dentin microhardness, and Tactile method was the one which presented the lowest microhardness values.

  20. Remineralizing amorphous calcium phosphate based composite resins: the influence of inert fillers on monomer conversion, polymerization shrinkage, and microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marović, Danijela; Šariri, Kristina; Demoli, Nazif; Ristić, Mira; Hiller, Karl-Anton; Škrtić, Drago; Rosentritt, Martin; Schmalz, Gottfried; Tarle, Zrinka

    2016-01-01

    Aim To determine if the addition of inert fillers to a bioactive dental restorative composite material affects its degree of conversion (DC), polymerization shrinkage (PS), and microhardness (HV). Methods Three amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP)-based composite resins: without added fillers (0-ACP), with 10% of barium-glass fillers (Ba-ACP), and with 10% of silica fillers (Si-ACP), as well as commercial control (Ceram•X, Dentsply DeTrey) were tested in laboratory conditions. The amount of ACP (40%) and the composition of the resin mixture (based on ethoxylated bisphenol A dimethacrylate) was the same for all ACP materials. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to determine the DC (n = 40), 20 min and 72 h after polymerization. Linear PS and Vickers microhardness (n = 40) were also evaluated. The results were analyzed by paired samples t test, ANOVA, and one-way repeated measures ANOVA with Student-Newman-Keuls or Tukey’s post-hoc test (P = 0.05). Results The addition of barium fillers significantly increased the DC (20 min) (75.84 ± 0.62%) in comparison to 0-ACP (73.92 ± 3.08%), but the addition of silica fillers lowered the DC (71.00 ± 0.57%). Ceram•X had the lowest DC (54.93 ± 1.00%) and linear PS (1.01 ± 0.24%) but the highest HV (20.73 ± 2.09). PS was significantly reduced (P < 0.010) in both Ba-ACP (1.13 ± 0.25%) and Si-ACP (1.17 ± 0.19%) compared to 0-ACP (1.43 ± 0.21%). HV was significantly higher in Si-ACP (12.82 ± 1.30) than in 0-ACP (10.54 ± 0.86) and Ba-ACP (10.75 ± 0.62) (P < 0.010). Conclusion Incorporation of inert fillers to bioactive remineralizing composites enhanced their physical-mechanical performance in laboratory conditions. Both added fillers reduced the PS while maintaining high levels of the DC. Silica fillers additionally moderately improved the HV of ACP composites. PMID:27815937

  1. Effect of two contemporary root canal sealers on root canal dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khallaf, Maram E

    2017-01-01

    Successful root canal treatment depends on proper cleaning, disinfecting and shaping of the root canal space. Pulpless teeth have lower dentin microhardness value compared to that of vital teeth. A material which can cause change in dentin composition may affect the microhardness. Thus the aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the effect of two root canal sealers on dentin microhardness. Forty two single rooted teeth were selected and divided into 3 equal groups; Apexit, iRootSP and control groups (n=14) Each group was then divided into 2 subgroups according to the post evaluation period; 1 week and 2 months (n=7). Root canal procedure was done in the experimental groups and obturation was made using either; Apexit, iRootSP or left unprepared and unobturated in the control group. Roots were sectioned transversely into cervical, middle and apical segments. The three sections of each root were mounted in a plastic chuck with acrylic resin. The coronal dentin surfaces of the root segments werepolished. Microhardness of each section was measured at 500 µm and 1000 µm from the canal lumen. Four way-ANOVA revealed that different tested sealer materials, canal third, measuring distance from the pulp and time as independent variables had statistically non significant effect on mean microhardness values (VHN) at p≤0.001. Among iRootSP groups there was a statistically significant difference between iRoot SP at coronal root portion (87.79±17.83) and iRoot SP at apical root portion (76.26±9.33) groups where (p=0.01). IRoot SP at coronal canal third had higher statistically significant mean microhardness value (87.79±17.83) compared to Apexit at coronal third (73.61±13.47) where (p=0.01). Root canal sealers do not affect dentin microhardness. Key words:Root canal, dentin, sealers, microhardness, bioceramic.

  2. Effect of resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun-Ha; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon; Park, Jeong-Kil

    2015-05-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the resin thickness on the microhardness and optical properties of bulk-fill resin composites. Four bulk-fill (Venus Bulk Fill, Heraeus Kulzer; SDR, Dentsply Caulk; Tetric N-Ceram Bulk Fill, Ivoclar vivadent; SonicFill, Kerr) and two regular resin composites (Charisma flow, Heraeus Kulzer; Tetric N-Ceram, Ivoclar vivadent) were used. Sixty acrylic cylindrical molds were prepared for each thickness (2, 3 and 4 mm). The molds were divided into six groups for resin composites. The microhardness was measured on the top and bottom surfaces, and the colors were measured using Commission Internationale d'Eclairage (CIE) L (*) a (*) b (*) system. Color differences according to the thickness and translucency parameters and the correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter were analyzed. The microhardness and color differences were analyzed by ANOVA and Scheffe's post hoc test, and a student t-test, respectively. The level of significance was set to α = 0.05. The microhardness decreased with increasing resin thickness. The bulk-fill resin composites showed a bottom/top hardness ratio of almost 80% or more in 4 mm thick specimens. The highest translucency parameter was observed in Venus Bulk Fill. All resin composites used in this study except for Venus Bulk Fill showed linear correlations between the microhardness and translucency parameter according to the thickness. Within the limitations of this study, the bulk-fill resin composites used in this study can be placed and cured properly in the 4 mm bulk.

  3. Comparative efficiency of plasma and halogen light sources on composite micro-hardness in different curing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietschi, D; Marret, N; Krejci, I

    2003-09-01

    Recent developments have led to the introduction of high power curing lights, which are claimed to greatly reduce the total curing time. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a plasma-curing device (Apollo 95 E) and a halogen device (Heliolux DLX), in different curing conditions. Vicker's micro-hardness values were performed on 1 and 2 mm thick composite discs cured in a natural tooth mold by direct irradiation or indirect irradiation through composite material (2 or 4 mm) and dental tissues (1 mm enamel or 2 mm enamel-dentin). Measures were, respectively, performed after a 1, 3, 6 s (SC, step curing mode) or 18 s (3xSC) exposure to the plasma light, and a 5, 10, 20 or 40 s exposure to the halogen light. With the PAC light used, a 3 s irradiation in the direct curing condition was necessary to reach hardness values similar to those obtained after a 40 s exposure to the halogen light. Using the indirect curing condition, hardness values reached after an 18 s exposure (3xSC mode) with the plasma light were either equivalent or inferior to those obtained with 40 s halogen irradiation. Direct polymerization with the plasma light used requires longer exposure times than those initially proposed by the manufacturer. The effectiveness of plasma generated light was lowered by composite or natural tissues, and therefore requires an important increase in the irradiation time when applied to indirect polymerization. The practical advantage of this polymerization method is less than expected, when compared to traditional halogen curing.

  4. Microhardness and morphological changes induced by Nd: Yag laser on dental enamel: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Bedini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was a scanning electron microscopy (SEM evaluation of the hardness and morphological changes of enamel irradiated by neodymium: yttrium aluminium garnet (Nd:YAG laser with different energy levels. Twenty-eight human teeth samples were divided into 4 groups: control, where enamel surface was not lased, and 3 test treated with 3 different levels of energy power 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 Watt, respectively. In each group, 5 samples underwent Vickers microhardness test and 2 samples were processed for SEM. No significant differences between treated and non treated samples were found by micro-hardness test. However, by SEM, test samples showed a rougher enamel surface than control. Specifically, the 0.6 Watt treated samples showed vertical scratches and glass-like areas, while in the other 2 groups enamel surface was covered by craters and cracks. These findings suggest that enamel should be lased at a low energy level to preserve its integrity and reduce demineralization, and thus for dental caries prevention purposes; while high energy level creates a retentive surface suitable for sealant or composite anchorage.

  5. Microhardness of demineralized enamel following home bleaching and laser-assisted in office bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarzadeh, Majid; Ahrari, Farzaneh; Akbari, Majid; Hamzei, Haniye

    2015-07-01

    There is little data regarding the effect of tooth whitening on microhardness of white spot lesions. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of home-bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching on microhardness of demineralized enamel. Forty bovine incisors were selected and immersed in a demineralizing solution for 12 weeks to induce white spot lesions. Enamel blocks were prepared and randomly assigned to two groups of 20 each. The first group underwent home bleaching with 15% carbamide peroxide which was applied for 8 hours a day over a period of 15 days. In the second group, in-office bleaching was performed by 40% hydrogen peroxide and powered by irradiation from an 810 nm gallium-aluminum-arsenide (GaAlAs) diode laser (CW, 2W). This process was performed for 3 sessions every seven days, in 15 days. The specimens were stored in Fusayama Meyer artificial saliva during the experiment. Surface microhardness was assessed before and after the bleaching therapies in both groups. Microhardness decreased significantly following both home bleaching and laser-assisted in-office bleaching (phome bleaching or laser-assisted in-office bleaching can result in a significant reduction in microhardness of white spot lesions. Therefore, it is suggested to take protective measures on bleached demineralized enamel. Key words:White spot lesion, bleaching, laser, microhardness, demineralized enamel, home bleaching, in-office bleaching.

  6. Surface microhardness of different thicknesses of a premixed bioceramic material with or without the application of a moist cotton pellet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noushin Shokouhinejad

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was conducted to assess the effect of thickness and hydration condition on the surface microhardness of Endosequence Root Repair Material putty (ERRM; Brasseler USA, Savannah, GA, a premixed bioceramic material. Materials and Methods: Polymethyl methacrylate cylindrical molds with an internal diameter of 4 mm and three heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm were fabricated. In Group 1 (dry condition, the molds with heights of 2, 4, and 6 mm (10 molds of each were filled with ERRM. In Groups 2 and 3 (wet condition, a distilled water- or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS-moistened cotton pellet was placed directly on the upper surface of ERRM, respectively. The lower surface of ERRM was in contact with floral foams soaked with human blood. After 4 days, Vickers microhardness of the upper surface of ERRM was tested. The data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance. Significance level was set at P 0.05. Conclusion: Based on the results of this study, it could be concluded that placing a moistened cotton pellet on ERRM putty up to 6 mm thick might be unnecessary to improve its surface microhardness and hydration characteristics.

  7. Comparison of the microhardness and morphology of five different retrograde filling materials in aqueous and dry conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhim, E M; Huh, S Y; Ahn, S J; Abbott, P V; Kim, E C; Park, S H

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to compare the effect of dry and aqueous conditions on the surface morphology and surface hardness of five materials 24 h after being used as fillings without initial setting time in dry condition. The five materials were ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), super EBA, intermediate restorative materials (IRM), zinc oxide eugenol (ZOE), and amalgam. To evaluate microhardness, the five materials were submitted to the Vickers microhardness (VHN) test. We used a scanning electron microscope (Steroscan 440, Leica Cambridge, England) to observe the microstructural morphology of the five different materials. The VHN of MTA soaked in water showed five times lower than that of MTA soaked in dry condition. On the other hand, super EBA was less influenced by the medium of storage compared with the other materials. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) images showed the similar results with microhardness tests. The surface of MTA soaked in water appeared to be unstable compared with that of dry condition while super EBA showed similarly smooth surface in both conditions (aqueous and dry). In conclusion, the physical property of MTA is reduced after storage in water; however, super EBA is less influenced by aqueous condition. © Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liza George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T Prasanth; Charlie, K M; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent.

  10. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Liza; Baby, Allu; Dhanapal, T. Prasanth; Charlie, K. M.; Joseph, Asha; Varghese, Anjum Anna

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agent, Group 3 - fluoride containing bleaching agent, and Group 4 - fluoride free bleaching agent followed by anticay application. The samples were subjected to indentation to test the microhardness using Vicker's hardness analyzer. Conclusion: Enamel microhardness significantly increased in samples where anticay was used after the application of bleaching agent. PMID:26604568

  11. Effect of welding process on microstructure, microhardness and composition chemistry of stainless steel coatings applied by welding; Efeito do processo de soldagem na microestrutura, microdureza e composicao quimica de revestimentos de aco inoxidavel aplicados por soldagem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melo, R.H.F. de; Maciel, T.M., E-mail: raphael.engmec@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Mecanica; Costa, J.; Santa, R.A.C. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Cuite, PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Quimica

    2012-07-01

    This study evaluates the influence of welding parameters on the chemical composition of weld overlays of the AWS E 308-L T1 applied by the FCAW and SAW process, as well as their influence on the microstructure and microhardness of the weld overlays. The characterization of chemical composition was performed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Analysis), the microstructure was investigated by optical microscopy and Vickers microhardness. The contents of Cr, Ni, Mn, Mo, Nb and Si varied as a function of welding parameters, the microstructure and microhardness varied as a function of heat input and chemical composition. The resulting microstructure showed an austenitic matrix with lacy ferrite and ferrite FA, with an average hardness of 191.6 HV for the FCAW process and 210 HV for the SAW process. (author)

  12. Effects of Treatment with Various Remineralizing Agents on the Microhardness of Demineralized Enamel Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehzadeh Esfahani, Kiana; Mazaheri, Romina; Pishevar, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Remineralization of incipient caries is one of the goals in dental health care. The present study aimed at comparing the effects of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate complex (CPP-ACP), Remin Pro(®), and 5% sodium fluoride varnish on remineralization of enamel lesions. Materials and methods. In this in vitro study, 60 enamel samples were randomly allocated to six groups of 10. After four days of immersion in demineralizing solution, microhardness of all samples was measured. Afterward, groups 1-3 underwent one-time treatment with fluoride varnish, CPP-ACP, and Remin Pro(®), respectively. Microhardness of groups 4-6 was measured not only after one-month treatment with the above-mentioned materials (for eight hours a day), but also after re-exposing to the demineralizing solution. The results were analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), repeated measures ANOVA, and Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) test. Results . None of the regimens could increase microhardness in groups 1-3. However, one-month treatment regimens in groups 4-6 caused a significant increase in microhardness. The greatest microhardness was detected in the group treated with CPP-ACP (P = 0.001). In addition, although microhardness reduced following re-demineralization in all three groups, the mean reduction was minimum in the CPP-ACP-treated group (P microhardness, the remineralization potential of CPP-ACP was significantly higher than that of Remin Pro(®) and sodium fluoride varnish.

  13. Influence of pulse electrodeposition parameters on microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    forced by SiO2 nanoparticles was processed by electro- deposition method and effects of electrodeposition parameters such as average current density, pulse frequency and duty cycle on microhardness and grain size of nanocomposite coating were investigated. There were insufficient reports about effect of current density ...

  14. Influence of pulse electrodeposition parameters on microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 5. Influence of ... size rose. The optimum value for pulse frequency was about 25 Hz. Results showed that microhardness of nanocomposite coatings which were produced by pulse current method was higher than that of produced by direct currentmethod.

  15. Influence of post-cure time on the microhardness of self-adhesive resin cements inside the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baena, E; Fuentes, M V; Garrido, M A; Rodríguez, J; Ceballos, L

    2012-01-01

    To compare the microhardness of several dual-cure, self-adhesive resin cements used to lute fiber posts at 24 hours and seven days after cementation. Bovine incisors were selected to lute 15 fiber posts that were 12 mm long (FRC Postec Plus size 3, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Five resin cements were tested: Multilink Automix (Ivoclar-Vivadent), without light-curing, and the self-adhesive resin cements Maxcem Elite (Kerr), RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE), G-Cem (GC), and Smartcem 2 (Dentsply), which were light-cured for 40 seconds (LED Bluephase, Ivoclar-Vivadent). Each root was embedded in chemically cured acrylic resin and stored at 37°C for 24 hours. The roots were transversally sectioned into nine specimens that were each 1 mm thick, with three specimens corresponding to each root third. Indentations (100g, 30 seconds) were performed on each section in the resin cement, at 24 hours and seven days after cementation, using a Vickers digital microdurometer (Buehler). Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, Student-Newman-Keuls test, and paired t-test (pcement evaluated, the root third, and their interactions on microhardness values at 24 hours and seven days after post cementation. RelyX Unicem and G-Cem exhibited the highest microhardness values, whereas Multilink Automix presented the lowest. All resin cements suffered a decrease in microhardness according to root canal depth, with the exception of G-Cem and Multilink Automix at 24 hours and Smartcem 2 after seven days. After seven days, the evaluated resin cements showed a significant increase in microhardness values, with the exception of Maxcem Elite and Smartcem 2 at the coronal third. Microhardness of the self-adhesive resin cements when used to lute fiber posts was material-dependent and higher values were obtained in the coronal third, revealing their sensitivity to light irradiation. More information regarding the polymerization reaction of these cements is warranted. According to the current results

  16. Influence of the final temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro César Garcia Oliveira

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to evaluate the influence of the temperature of investment healting on the tensile strength and Vickers hardness of CP Ti and Ti-6Al-4V alloy casting. Were obtained for the tensile strength test dumbbell rods that were invested in the Rematitan Plus investment and casting in the Discovery machine cast. Thirty specimens were obtained, fiftten to the CP Titanium and fifteen to the Ti-6Al-4V alloy, five samples to each an of the three temperatures of investment: 430ºC (control group, 480ºC and 530ºC. The tensile test was measured by means of a universal testing machine, MTS model 810, at a strain of 1.0 mm/min. After the tensile strenght test the specimens were secctioned, embedded and polished to hardness measurements, using a Vickers tester, Micromet 2100. The means values to tensile tests to the temperatures 430ºC, 480 and 530: CP Ti (486.1 - 501.16 - 498.14 -mean 495.30 MPa and Ti-6Al-4V alloy (961.33 - 958.26 - 1005.80 - mean 975.13 MPa while for the Vickers hardness the values were (198.06, 197.85, 202.58 - mean 199.50 and (352.95, 339.36, 344.76 - mean 345.69, respectively. The values were submitted to Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Tukey,s Test that indicate differences significant only between the materials, but not between the temperature, for both the materias. It was conclued that increase of the temperature of investment its not chance the tensile strength and the Vickers hardness of the CP Titanium and Ti-6Al-4V alloy.

  17. Removable partial or complete dentures exposed to beverages and mouthwashes: evaluation of microhardness and roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Alves Feitosa

    Full Text Available AbstractPurposeTo evaluate microhardness and roughness of denture base polymethylmethacrylate resinn exposed to acid beverages and mouthwashes.Material and methodRectangular samples (n=80 were prepared from poly (methyl methacrylate (PMMA. They were divided into 8 groups and had the initial microhardness and Knoop roughness measured. Samples of each group were immersed for 10 min into a test solution (coffee, lemon juice, chlorhexidine gluconate, red wine, cola-based soft drink, vinegar or antiseptic with and without alcohol and after stored in artificial saliva for 23 h and 50 min, completing a period of 24 h. This procedure was performed for 14 consecutive days and after this period the microhardness and surface roughness measurements were made again. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA non parametric, Kruskal-Walis and the Dunn´s test for microhardness and the t-Student and ANOVA for roughness.ResultFor microhardness there were found statistically significant differences among the chlorhexidine gluconate solution, antiseptic without alcohol and cola-based soft drink. For roughness was observed that the mean values between the initial period and after immersion in the test products differed statistically in all groups, without difference among groups.ConclusionThe microhardness of poly(methyl methacrylate was affected by continue exposition to chlorhexidine gluconate, antiseptic without alcohol and cola-based soft drink. The roughness of poly(methyl methacrylate is negatively influenced by the exposure to all tested products. It may be concluded that both, microhardness and roughness, were affected by the treatments.

  18. On the Invariance of Hardness at Vickers Indentation of Pre-Stressed Materials

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    Per-Lennart Larsson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The influence from residual surface stresses on global indentation properties, i.e., hardness and size of the contact area, have been studied quite frequently in recent years. A fundamental assumption when evaluating such tests is that the material hardness is independent of any residual stresses. This assumption has been verified in the case of cone indentation of classical Mises elastoplastic materials. However, a detailed investigation of this feature in the case of three-dimensional indentation, i.e., Vickers and Berkovic indentation, has not been presented previously. It is therefore the aim of the present study to remedy this shortcoming using finite element methods. The numerical results pertinent to Vickers indentation clearly show that the material hardness is independent of residual (or applied stresses (also in case of three-dimensional indentation problems. The limitations of the validity of hardness invariance are also discussed in some detail.

  19. Degree of conversion and microhardness of dental composite resin materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marovic, D.; Panduric, V.; Tarle, Z.; Ristic, M.; Sariri, K.; Demoli, N.; Klaric, E.; Jankovic, B.; Prskalo, K.

    2013-07-01

    Dental composite resins (CRs) are commonly used materials for the replacement of hard dental tissues. Degree of conversion (DC) of CR measures the amount of the un-polymerized monomers in CR, which can cause adverse biological reactions and weakening of the mechanical properties. In the past, studies have determined the positive correlation of DC values determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and microhardness (MH) values. The aim of this study was to establish whether MH can replace FTIR for the determination of DC of contemporary CR.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of the Effect of EDTA, EDTAC, NaOCl and MTAD on Microhardness of Human Dentin - An In-vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluru, Rama S; Kumar, N Deepak; Ahmed, Shafie; Sathish, Emanuel Solomon; Jayaprakash, Thumu; Garlapati, Roopadevi; Sowmya, Butti; Reddy, K Narasimha

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of human dentin by using four irrigating solutions. Materials and Methodos: A total of 40 extracted mandibular premolars were selected and sectioned horizontally in the middle third of the root. Forty specimens of 4 mm thickness were embedded in acrylic resin and polished. Four test groups, each group containing ten specimens were immersed in respective irrigating solution and subjected to vicker's microhardness test at T0, T2 and T5min. The data obtained were analyzed using the one way ANOVA followed by Tukey HSD method with ap=0.05 as the level for statistical significance. Suggested that there was no statistically significant difference in mean values between four experimental irrigating solutions. Mixture of Tetracycline isomer i.e. Doxycycline, Citric acid and a Detergent (Tween 80) MTAD not altered the microhardness of root canal dentin significantly and seems to be an appropriate irrigating solution, because of its harmless effect on the microhardness of the root canal dentin.

  1. Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Tantalum Carbide Ceramic Layer: A Vickers Indentation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ke; Xu, Yunhua; Zhao, Nana; Zhong, Lisheng; Shang, Zhao; Shen, Liuliu; Wang, Juan

    2016-07-01

    A tantalum carbide (TaC) ceramic layer was produced on gray cast iron matrix by in situ technique comprising a casting process and a subsequent heat treatment at 1135 °C for 45 min. Indentation fracture toughness in TaC ceramic layer was determined by the Vickers indentation test for various loads. A Niihara approach was chosen to assess the fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer under condition of the Palmqvist mode in the experiment. The results reveal that K IC evaluation of TaC ceramic layer by the Vickers indentation method strongly depends on the selection of crack system and K IC equations. The critical indentation load for Vickers crack initiation in TaC ceramic layer lies between 1 and 2 N and the cracks show typical intergranular fracture characteristics. Indentation fracture toughness calculated by the indentation method is independent of the indentation load on the specimen. The fracture toughness of TaC ceramic layer is 6.63 ± 0.34 MPa m1/2, and the toughening mechanism is mainly crack deflection.

  2. Effect of different disinfectants on the microhardness and roughness of acrylic resins for ocular prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Amália; Goiato, Marcelo C; dos Santos, Daniela M; Haddad, Marcela F; Pesqueira, Aldiéris A; Bannwart, Lisiane C

    2013-03-01

    Ocular prosthesis materials should have specific properties for their indication and durability; therefore, it is important to investigate their physical behaviour when affected by several disinfectants. This study evaluated the influence of different disinfecting solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of acrylic resins for ocular prosthesis. Fifty samples simulating ocular prostheses were fabricated with N1 resin and colourless resin and divided (n = 10) according to the disinfectant used: neutral soap, Opti-free, Efferdent, 1% hypochlorite (HYC) and 4% chlorhexidine (CHX). Samples were stored in saline solution at 37°C and disinfected during 120 days. Both microhardness and roughness were investigated before, after 60 days and 120 days of disinfection and storage. Microhardness was measured using a microhardner and the roughness with a roughness device. N1 resin showed lower microhardness when compared with colourless resin (p acrylic resins were observed after both periods of disinfection and storage (p disinfection/storage periods affected the microhardness and roughness values of the samples. © 2012 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Effect of alcoholic beverages on surface roughness and microhardness of dental composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DA Silva, Marcos Aurélio Bomfim; Vitti, Rafael Pino; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Silva-Júnior, José Ginaldo da; Tonholo, Josealdo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microhardness and surface roughness of composite resins immersed in alcoholic beverages. Three composite resins were used: Durafill (Heraeus Kulzer), Z250 (3M-ESPE) and Z350 XT (3M-ESPE). The inital surface roughness and microhardness were measured. The samples were divided into four groups (n=30): G1-artificial saliva; G2-beer; G3-vodka; G4-whisky. The samples were immersed in the beverages 3× a day for 15 min and 30 days. The surface roughness and microhardness assays were repeated after immersion period. The data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey-HSD test (palcoholic beverages. The effect of these beverages on dental composites is depended upon the chemical composition, immersion time, alcohol content and pH of solutions.

  4. Effect of dry cryogenic treatment on Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory nickel-titanium alloy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vinothkumar, Thilla Sekar; Kandaswamy, Deivanayagam; Prabhakaran, Gopalakrishnan; Rajadurai, Arunachalam

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the role of dry cryogenic treatment (CT) temperature and time on the Vickers hardness and wear resistance of new martensitic shape memory (SM) nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloy...

  5. In-vitro study investigating influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized human enamel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febrian, K.; Triaminingsih, S.; Indrani, DJ

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of toothpaste containing green tea extract on the microhardness of demineralized enamel. Human tooth, which was demineralised in citric acid solution, had a toothpaste containing green tea extract of concentration of 5, 10 or 15% application. Microhardness measurement was carried out on each enamel surface of the teeth for initial, after the demineralization and after application of the tooth pastes. It showed that there was significant decrease between enamel microhardness of the teeth at the initial condition and after demineralization. After application of the toothpaste containing green tea extract of each concentration the microhardnss increased significantly. However, there the microhardness was insignificant between the applications of each green tea concentration.

  6. Modelo predictivo del espesor de la capa de óxido y microdureza en aluminio Al3003-B14 y Al6063-T6 anodizado usando análisis multifactorial Oxide film thickness and microhardness prediction model of Al3003-B14 and Al6063-T6 anodized aluminum using multifactorial analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Eladio Vergara Guillén

    2011-08-01

    ], electrolyte concentration [1,2M; 2M], current density [1Amp/dm²; 3Amp/dm²], aluminum [Al3003, Al6063], and as a noise parameter, the plastic deformation [0%, 10%, 20%, 30%]. A combined fractional design 2(7-2 was proposed, based on which a total of 48 tests were performed using sulfuric acid electrolytic solutions. The measurement of microhardness was performed using a Vickers indenter loaded at 400g, and the thickness of the oxide layer was captured using electron microscopy. Variance analysis (ANOVA was applied to the results in order to determine the significant factors and the robustness of the effects. Results of microhardness [HV] [85,74-308,87]; and the oxide layer thickness [µm] [12,82 – 94,69] were determined. Finally, the equations for the prediction models are shown for each response as a function of the significant factors, these equations will allow the selection of the microhardness and thickness of oxide layer to fulfill the requirements of a particular product using an appropriate selection of process parameters.

  7. Comparison of the effects of two whitening toothpastes on microhardness of the enamel and a microhybride composite resin: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamverdi, Z; Kasraie, Sh; Rezaei-Soufi, L; Jebeli, S

    2010-01-01

    Whitening toothpastes which have been accepted in populations may affect properties of enamel and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of human enamel and Z250 microhybrid composite resin after brushing with two whitening toothpastes. In this experimental study of enamel specimens, forty five freshly extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into three groups of control enamel (ClE), Crest enamel (CtE) and Aquafresh enamel (AfE). For composite resin specimens, forty five cylindrical-shaped specimens of light-cured Z250 composite were prepared and divided into three groups of control composite (ClC), Crest composite (CtC) and Aquafresh composite (AfC). The control groups were brushed without toothpaste. Crest and Aquafresh group specimens were brushed with Crest and Aquafresh whitening toothpastes, respectively. Vickers microhardness test was performed for all groups. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests. Microhardness values of ClE, CtE, AfE, ClC, CtC and AfC groups were 332.99 ± 26.59, 313.99 ± 20.56, 323.57 ± 27.96, 137.1 ± 3.16, 122.95 ± 3.27 and 130.36 ± 4.8, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed no significant differences among three enamel groups but there was significant difference among composite groups (pwhitening toothpastes did not affect enamel hardness but reduced the microhardness value of Z-250 composite resin. However, Crest whitening toothpaste decreased the microhardness more than Aquafresh.

  8. Comparison of the Effects of Two Whitening Toothpastes on Microhardness of the Enamel and a Microhybride Composite Resin: An in Vitro Study

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    Z. Khamverdi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Whitening toothpastes which have been accepted in populations may affect properties of enamel and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of human enamel and Z250 microhybrid composite resin after brushing with two whitening toothpastes.Materials and Methods: In this experimental study of enamel specimens, forty five freshly extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into three groups of control enamel (ClE, Crest enamel (CtE and Aquafresh enamel (AfE. For composite resin specimens, forty five cylindrical-shaped specimens of light-cured Z250 composite were prepared and divided into three groups of control composite (ClC, Crest composite (CtC and Aquafresh composite (AfC. The control groups were brushed without toothpaste. Crest and Aquafresh group specimens were brushed with Crest and Aquafresh whitening toothpastes, respectively. Vickers microhardness test wasperformed for all groups. Data were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey tests.Results: Microhardness values of ClE, CtE, AfE, ClC, CtC and AfC groups were 332.99 ± 26.59, 313.99 ± 20.56, 323.57 ± 27.96, 137.1 ± 3.16, 122.95 ± 3.27 and 130.36 ± 4.8, respectively. One-way ANOVA showed no significant differences among three enamel groups but there was significant difference among composite groups(p<0.01.Conclusion: Crest and Aquafresh whitening toothpastes did not affect enamel hardness but reduced the microhardness value of Z-250 composite resin. However, Crest whitening toothpaste decreased the microhardness more than Aquafresh.

  9. Changes in Vickers hardness during the decomposition of bone: Possibilities for forensic anthropology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walden, Steven J; Evans, Sam L; Mulville, Jacqui

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine how the Vickers hardness (HV) of bone varies during soft tissue putrefaction. This has possible forensic applications, notably for determining the postmortem interval. Experimental porcine bone samples were decomposed in surface and burial deposition scenarios over a period of 6 months. Although the Vickers hardness varied widely, it was found that when transverse axial hardness was subtracted from longitudinal axial hardness, the difference showed correlations with three distinct phases of soft tissue putrefaction. The ratio of transverse axial hardness to longitudinal axial hardness showed a similar correlation. A difference of 10 or greater in HV with soft tissue present and signs of minimal decomposition, was associated with a decomposition period of 250 cumulative cooling degree days or less. A difference of 10 (+/- standard error of mean at a 95% confidence interval) or greater in HV associated with marked decomposition indicated a decomposition period of 1450 cumulative cooling degree days or more. A difference of -7 to +8 (+/- standard error of mean at a 95% confidence interval) was thus associated with 250 to 1450 cumulative cooling degree days' decomposition. The ratio of transverse axial HV to longitudinal HV, ranging from 2.42 to 1.54, is a more reliable indicator in this context and is preferable to using negative integers These differences may have potential as an indicator of postmortem interval and thus the time of body deposition in the forensic context. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of 10% carbamide peroxide, carbopol and/or glycerin on enamel and dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of 10% carbamide peroxide, carbopol and glycerin and their associations on microhardness over time on enamel and dentin. Eight treatment agents were evaluated: a commercial bleaching agent containing 10% carbamide peroxide (Opalescence 10% Ultradent), 10% carbamide peroxide, carbopol, glycerin, 10% carbamide peroxide + carbopol, 10% carbamide peroxide + glycerin, carbopol + glycerin and 10% carbamide peroxide + carbopol + glycerin. Three hundred and twenty human dental fragments, 80 sound enamel fragments (SE), 80 demineralized enamel fragments (DE), 80 sound dentin fragments (SD) and 80 demineralized dentin (DD) fragments, were exposed to the treatment agents (n=10). These agents were applied onto the surface of the fragments eight hours a day for 42 days. After eight hours, they were washed from the dental fragment surfaces after five back-and-forth movements with a soft bristle toothbrush under distilled and deionized running water. During the remaining time (16 hours per day), the fragments were kept in individual vials in artificial saliva. After the 42-day treatment period, the specimens were kept individually in artificial saliva for 14 days. Knoop microhardness measurements were performed at baseline, after eight hours, and 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days, and 7 and 14 days post-treatment (corresponding to 49 and 56 days after the initial treatment agent applications). The non-parametric Kruskal-Wallis analysis showed significant differences among the agents at each time interval, except at baseline for sound and demineralized enamel and dentin. For SE, SD and DD, there was a decrease in microhardness values during treatment with all agents. There was a tendency towards lower microhardness values after treatment with carbopol and its associations for sound tissues. DD showed low microhardness values during and after treatment with CP and its associations. For DE, there was an increase in microhardness values during treatment

  11. Flexural strength and microhardness of anterior composites after accelerated aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pala, Kanşad; Tekçe, Neslihan; Tuncer, Safa; Demirci, Mustafa; Öznurhan, Fatih; Serim, Merve

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the flexural strength and microhardness of three different anterior composites after 10 000 thermocycles. The mechanical properties of a nano-fill composite (Filtek Ultimate Universal Restorative (FUR) (Enamel)), a nano-hybrid composite (Clearfil Majesty ES2 (ES2) (Enamel)), and a micro-hybrid composite (G Aenial Anterior (GAA)) were investigated in this study. For the microhardness test, 8-mm diameter and 2-mm thickness composite discs were used (n = 10), and for the flexural strength test, 25x2x2 mm bar-shaped specimens were prepared (n = 13). The specimens were tested at 24 h and after 10 000 thermocycles. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and the post-hoc Tukey test (p microhardness values of the materials (p microhardness than ES2 and GAA. However, the flexural strength of three composites was statistically similar at 24 h (p > .05). Pearson correlation analysis revealed that there was a negative relationship between the mean hardness and flexural strength values (correlation coefficient = -0.367, p = .043). After 10 000 thermocycles, microhardness values of each material and flexural strength of ES2 and GAA decreased significantly according to 24 h. The nano-fill composite FUR displayed significantly higher microhardness values. However, each resin composite was statistically similar for flexural strength values. Ten thousand thermocycles significantly affected microhardness and flexural strength. Key words:Flexural strength, microhardness, anterior composites.

  12. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoroushi, Maryam; Shirban, Farinaz; Kaveh, Sara; Doustfateme, Samaneh

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm) were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12): Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control); Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP) gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG), amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP) and hydroxyapatite (HA), respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching.

  13. Hydrolytic degradation of composite resins: effects on the microhardness

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    Martos Josué

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the microhardness of two laboratory-processed composites (Artglass; belleGlass and two direct placement composites (Filtek Z250; Alert, after aging in distilled water. Twenty cylinders (8 mm diameter; 2 mm height per tested material were prepared and stored in 10 ml of distilled water. Five Knoop hardness measurements were made on the surface of the specimens with a Miniload Hardness Tester under a load of 50 g for 30 s at 10 min, 24 h, 30 and 90 days. Statistical analysis was perfomed using two-way ANOVA, followed by a SNK multiple comparison test (p < 0.05. The analysis showed statistically significant difference among hardness means recorded at the different aging time and the tested materials. It may be concluded that all materials presented hydrolytic degradation due to aging in aqueous environment.

  14. Mapping residual stress fields from Vickers hardness indents using Raman microprobe spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sparks, R.G.; Enloe, W.S.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Micro-Raman spectroscopy is used to map the residual stress fields in the vicinity of Vickers hardness indents. Both 514.5 and 488.0 nm, light is used to excite the effect and the resulting shifted and broadened Raman peaks are analyzed using computer deconvolution. Half-wave plates are used to vary the orientation of the incident later light`s polarization state with respect to crystal orientation. The Raman scattered light is then analyzed for polarization dependences which are indicative of the various components of the Raman scattering tensor. Such studies can yield valuable information about the orientation of stress components in a well known stress field. The results can then be applied to the determination of stress components in machined semiconductor materials.

  15. Vickers Hardness of Composite Resins Cured with LED and QTH Units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaghemand H

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Statement of Problem: One of the factors affecting the degree of polymerization of light-cured composites is the type of light-curing unit used. In addition, physicomechanical properties of the composite resins depend on the degree of conversion and polymerization. Objectives: Since the type of initiator in new composite resins is not explained by manufacturers, this study is an attempt to compare the depth of hardening, with two LED and QTH light-curing units. Materials and Methods: Fifteen samples prepared from Gradia Direct and Filtek Z250, both of which being universal, were cured with QTH (Astralis 7 and LED (Bluephase C8 light-curing units. All the samples were molded in polyester resin and cut from the middle by a disk. The hardness of the cut area was evaluated at 0, 0.5, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3, 3.5 and 4-mm depth intervals and also at the same interval as the width of the sample, with Vickers hardness machine, while the samples were placed in a darkroom. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA, two-way ANOVA, t-test and post Hoc Tukey’s tests in SPSS, version 16. Results: Filtek Z250 was harder than Gradia Direct at all the depth with both light-curing units. The hardness of Filtek Z250 sample cured with Astralis 7 was higher than that cured with LED, but with Gradia Direct the LED unit resulted in higher hardness. Curing depth was not significantly different between the groups (p = 0.109. Conclusions: Vickers hardness number for both composites used in this study is in an acceptable range for clinical implications. The composites’ composition is important to be considered for selection of light unit. Based on the findings of the present study, LED did not present more curing depth compared with QTH.

  16. [Influence of different ultrasonic irrigation solutions after root canal preparation with ProTaper by machine on micro-hardness of root canal dentin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jiang-li; Zhang, Yan; Zhen, Lei

    2015-08-01

    To develope the influence of different ultrasonic irrigations after root canal preparation with nickel titanium ProTaper on micro-hardness of root canal dentin. Sixty of maxillary anterior teeth with single-canal were collected and randomly divided into 6 groups. Group A was control group, group B was prepared to F3 with nickel titanium ProTaper by machine, group C was ultrasonic irrigated with 3% hydrogen peroxide solution for 1 minute after preparation, group D was ultrasonic irrigated with koutai mouthwash for 1 minute after preparation, group E was ultrasonic irrigated with 17% EDTA solution for 1 minute after preparation, group F was ultrasonic irrigated with distilled water for 1 minute after preparation. The roots were then sectioned horizontally into 3 parts, split longitudinally into halves and examined under a micro Vickers hardness test machine. The data was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and t test with SPSS 17.0 software package. The micro-hardness of group A was (52.66 ± 1.64) HV,(52.08 ± 1.53) HV and (51.47 ± 2.53) HV. There was no significant difference in all parts of the root canal in group A (P>0.05). The micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal was lower than that of the cervical and middle of root canal in the other groups (Phardness of group E was (44.65 ± 1.33) HV and(42.55 ± 1.12) HV, and there were statistical significances between group E and the other groups (Phardness of group E was (37.82 ± 1.60) HV, and group C was (44.14±1.73) HV, both of the comparative differences with other groups were statistically significant (P0.05). Root canal preparation to F3 with nickel titanium ProTaper by machine can make the micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal decrease. Ultrasonic irrigation with 17% EDTA solution for 1 minute can make the micro-hardness of the root canal decrease ultrasonic irrigation with. Ultrasonic irrigation with 3% hydrogen peroxide can make the micro-hardness of the apical third of root canal decrease

  17. Evaluation of the flexural strength and microhardness of provisional crown and bridge materials fabricated by different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digholkar, Shruti; Madhav, V N V; Palaskar, Jayant

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the flexural strength and microhardness of provisional restorative materials fabricated utilizing rapid prototyping (RP), Computer Assisted Designing and Computer Assisted Milling (CAD-CAM) and conventional method. Twenty specimens of dimensions 25 mm × 2 mm × 2 mm (ADA-ANSI specification #27) were fabricated each using: (1) Three dimensional (3D) printed light-cured micro-hybrid filled composite by RP resin group, (2) a milled polymethyl methacrylate (CH) using CAD-CAM (CC resin group), and (3) a conventionally fabricated heat activated polymerized CH resin group. Flexural strength and microhardness were measured and values obtained were evaluated. The measured mean flexural strength values (MegaPascals) were 79.54 (RP resin group), 104.20 (CC resin group), and 95.58 (CH resin group). The measured mean microhardness values (Knoop hardness number) were 32.77 (RP resin group), 25.33 (CC resin group), and 27.36 (CH resin group). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) test shows that there is statistically significant difference in the flexural strength values of the three groups (P microhardness values of the three groups was statistically significant according to ANOVA as well as the intergroup comparison done using the Tukey's HSD (post hoc) test (P microhardness.

  18. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Syafira

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces that were embedded in epoxy resin. Furthermore specimens were randomly divided into 4 groups, which were control (distilled water, theobromine 100 mg/L (T100, theobromine 500 mg/L (T500 and theobromine 1000 mg/L (T1000. Specimens were immersed for 15 minutes and microhardness test was performed using Knoop microhardness tester. Results: Increasing enamel microhardness was observed after treatment with four different theobromine concentrations. The highest icreased of enamel microhardness was shown in T1000 group and difference compared to other groups were statistically significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: theobromine is a potential dental caries prevention material due to its effect in improving the microhardness of tooth enamel.

  19. Effects of a carbamide peroxide agent and desensitizing dentifrices on enamel microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Rogério; Basting, Roberta Tarkany; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Rodrigues, Antonio Luiz; Serra, Mônica Campos

    2003-02-01

    To evaluate the in vitro microhardness of enamel treated with a 10% carbamide peroxide agent and two desensitizing dentifrices at different bleaching times. A 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent was evaluated (Rembrandt 10%) (REM). A placebo agent was used as a control group (PLA). The bleaching and the placebo agents were applied to human enamel dental fragments for 8 hours per day, followed by immersion for 5 minutes in a slurry solution of desensitizing dentifrices: Sensodyne (S) or Sensodyne Fluor (SF). During the remaining time, the enamel fragments were individually stored in 13.5 ml of artificial saliva. Knoop microhardness measurements were performed at baseline, 8 hours, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42 days of treatment and at 7 and 14 days of a post-treatment period. Analysis of variance and Tukey's test showed no differences in enamel microhardness for REM + SF (P=0.069) and PLA + SF (P=0.93) within each time interval. The dental fragments treated with REM + S and PLA + S showed an increase in microhardness values within each time interval (P<0.0001). There were significant differences among the treatment agents from the 28th to the 56th day. The use of 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching and a desensitizing dentifrice significantly increased the enamel microhardness values during the bleaching treatment and after 14 days after the completion of the treatment. After the post-treatment period, the enamel fragments treated with a placebo agent and with a 10% carbamide peroxide agent and with a desensitizing fluoride dentifrice maintained the baseline values.

  20. Influence of light curing and sample thickness on microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio HB Aguiar

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Flávio HB Aguiar1, Kelly RM Andrade1, Débora AN Leite Lima1, Gláucia MB Ambrosano2, José R Lovadino11Department of Restorative Dentistry; 2Department of Social Dentistry/Statistics, Piracicaba Dental School, State University of Campinas, SP, BrazilAbstract: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of light-curing units and different sample thicknesses on the microhardness of a composite resin. Composite resin specimens were randomly prepared and assigned to nine experimental groups (n = 5: considering three light-curing units (conventional quartz tungsten halogen [QTH]: 550 mW/cm2 – 20 s; high irradiance QTH: 1160 mW/cm2 – 10 s; and light-emitting diode [LED]: 360 mW/cm2 – 40 s and three sample thicknesses (0.5 mm, 1 mm, and 2 mm. All samples were polymerized with the light tip 8 mm away from the specimen. Knoop microhardness was then measured on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. The top surfaces, with some exceptions, were almost similar; however, in relation to the bottom surfaces, statistical differences were found between curing units and thicknesses. In all experimental groups, the 0.5-mm-thick increments showed microhardness values statistically higher than those observed for 1- and -2-mm increments. The conventional and LED units showed higher hardness mean values and were statistically different from the high irradiance unit. In all experimental groups, microhardness mean values obtained for the top surface were higher than those observed for the bottom surface. In conclusion, higher levels of irradiance or thinner increments would help improve hybrid composite resin polymerization.Keywords: photo-polymerization, light-curing distance, light-curing units, composite resin, composite thickness, microhardness

  1. A comparison of microhardness of indirect composite restorative materials Estudo comparativo da microdureza de materiais resinosos indiretos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Baptista Miranda

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10 as follows: G1 - Artglass; G2 - Sinfony; G3 - Solidex; G4 - Targis. Microhardness was determined by the Vickers indentation technique with a load of 300g for 10 seconds. Four indentations were made on each sample, determining the mean microhardness values for each specimen. Descriptive statistics data for the experimental conditions were: G1 - Artglass (mean ±standard deviation: 55.26 ± 1.15HVN; median: 52.6; G2 - Sinfony (31.22 ± 0.65HVN; 31.30; G3 - Solidex (52.25 ± 1.55HVN; 52.60; G4 - Targis (72.14 ± 2.82HVN; 73.30. An exploratory data analysis was performed to determine the most appropriate statistical test through: (I Levene's for homogeneity of variances; (II ANOVA on ranks (Kruskal-Wallis; (III Dunn's multiple comparison test (0.05. Targis presented the highest microhardness values while Sinfony presented the lowest. Artglass and Solidex were found as intermediate materials. These results indicate that distinct mechanical properties may be observed at specific materials. The composition of each material as well as variations on polymerization methods are possibly responsibles for the difference found in microhardness. Therefore, indirect composite resin materials that guarantee both good esthetics and adequate mechanical properties may be considered as substitutes of natural teeth.O objetivo deste estudo foi comparar a microdureza de 4 resinas compostas indiretas. Quarenta amostras cilíndricas foram obtidas com o auxílio de uma matriz de teflon, seguindo-se as recomendações dos fabricantes. Foram obtidas 10 amostras para cada material testado, contituindo-se 4 grupos (n=10 como se segue: G1-Artglass; G2-Sinfony; G3-Solidex; G4-Targis. A

  2. Comparison of the effect of ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid, chlorhexidine, etidronic acid and propolis as an irrigant on the microhardness of root dentin: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumita A Bhagwat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This in vitro study was carried out to compare of the effect of 17% ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA, 2% chlorhexidine (CHX, 18% etidronic acid (HEBP, and 4% propolis as an irrigant on the microhardness of root dentin. Materials and Methods: The sample size for the study was 100. Each specimen consisted of a longitudinally sectioned half of a root of a single-rooted tooth which was embedded in acrylic resin. The prepared specimens were divided randomly into five groups of twenty specimens each. Each group was treated with the irrigants to be tested. Group I was the control - the specimens were treated with distilled water. The specimens in Group II were treated with sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl followed by EDTA. Specimens in Group III were treated with NaOCl followed by CHX. Specimens in Group IV were treated with NaOCl followed by HEBP, and specimens in Group V were treated with NaOCl followed by propolis. Following this, all the specimens were placed on the Vickers hardness tester and three readings were taken for each specimen. An average reading was obtained for each group. The results were tabulated and statistically analyzed to determine which of the irrigant solutions had the least effect on the microhardness of root dentin. Results: Eighteen percent HEBP had the least effect on the root dentin microhardness, followed by 4% propolis and 2% CHX. Seventeen percent EDTA showed maximum effect on the microhardness of the dentin. Conclusion: Under the limitations of this study, 18% HEBP and 4% propolis show promise for use as irrigants because of less detrimental effect on the hardness of root dentin. More studies are needed on demineralization depth and the sealability of resin sealers in the radicular dentin after the use of propolis and HEBP.

  3. Evaluation of Vickers hardness of different types of acrylic denture base resins with and without glass fibre reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Ana Paula; Cecchin, Doglas; Soares, Rodrigo Gonçalves; Botelho, André Luís; Takahashi, Jessica Mie Ferreira Koyama; Mazzetto, Marcelo Oliveira; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the Vickers hardness of different acrylic resins for denture bases with and without the addition of glass fibres. It has been suggested that different polymerisation methods, as well as the addition of glass fibre (FV) might improve the hardness of acrylic. Five types of acrylic resin were tested: Vipi Wave (VW), microwave polymerisation; Vipi Flash (VF), auto-polymerisation; Lucitone (LT), QC20 (QC) and Vipi Cril (VC), conventional heat-polymerisation, all with or without glass fibre reinforcement (GFR) and distributed into 10 groups (n = 12). Specimens were then submitted to Vickers hardness testing with a 25-g load for 30 s. All data were submitted to anova and Tukey's HSD test. A significant statistical difference was observed with regard to the polymerisation method and the GFR (p hardness values, and VF and LT presented the lowest. In the presence of GFR, VC resin still presented the highest Vickers hardness values, and VF and QC presented the lowest. The acrylic resin VC and VW presented higher hardness values than VF and QC resins. Moreover, GFR increased the Vickers hardness of resins VW, VC and LT. © 2010 The Gerodontology Society and John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  4. Effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Daniel Pinto; Teixeira, Erica Cappelletto Nogueira; Ferraz, Caio Cezar Randi; Teixeira, Fabricio B

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents associated or unassociated with chlorhexidine gel on dentin microhardness. Sixty human maxillary incisor crowns were divided into six groups, and bleaching agents were sealed into the pulp chambers as follows: sodium perborate + water (SPW), sodium perborate + 2% chlorhexidine gel (SP + CHX), sodium perborate + 30% hydrogen peroxide solution (SP + HP), 37% carbamide peroxide gel (CP), 37% carbamide peroxide gel + 2% chlorhexidine gel (CP+CHX), and water (W). After the bleaching procedure, microhardness testing was carried out on the dentin surface at three different levels: inner, middle, and outer dentin. The greatest reduction in microhardness was observed for the SP + HP group. No differences were observed between the SPW and SP + CHX group. The 2% chlorhexidine gel did not adversely affect dentin microhardness when associated with the tested bleaching agents. CHX might be considered as an antimicrobial vehicle during intracoronal bleaching.

  5. Evaluation by Vickers indentation of fracture toughness of a phosphate biodegradable glass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clément, J; Torres, P; Gil, F J; Planell, J A; Terradas, R; Martinez, S

    1999-07-01

    Indentation tests are commonly used for the evaluation of fracture toughness of brittle materials, particularly glasses and ceramics, because this technique requires only a small polished area on the specimen surface from which a large number of data points can be generated rapidly. However, a wide variety of equations for the calculation of fracture toughness of ceramic materials by means of Vickers indentation are available. Such equations are obtained phenomenologically and their parameters adjusted in such a way that the KIC values obtained are in good agreement with those obtained by conventional methods. This is the reason why it is necessary to check which type of equation reproduces more accurately the results obtained by means of conventional methods for the material which is going to be investigated. In the present work seven different fracture toughness equations widely used in glass and ceramic studies are considered and the results are compared with those obtained by conventional methods, such as single-edge notch beam (SENB) specimens tested in three-point bending. The role played by the applied indentation load is considered. Copyright 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers

  6. Theobromine Effects on Enamel Surface Microhardness: In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Grace Syafira; Rina Permatasari; Nina Wardani

    2013-01-01

    Dental caries is still a dental health problem in Indonesia. Fluoride, one of the dental caries prevention material, but its safety and the danger of fluorosis is still debated. Theobromine is an alkaloid compound contained in cocoa beans. Theobromine is believed to increase enamel microhardness with mineral changes in the enamel superficial layer. Objectives: To determine the influence of theobromine on the enamel surface microhardness. Methods: This study used 40 premolar tooth crown pieces...

  7. Correlation between the beam profile from a curing light and the microhardness of four resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Richard B T; Labrie, Daniel; Rueggeberg, Frederick A; Sullivan, Braden; Kostylev, Ivan; Fahey, John

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the effect of localized irradiance and spectral distribution inhomogeneities of one LED-based dental light-curing unit (LCU) on the corresponding microhardness values at the top, and bottom surfaces of four dental resin-based composites (RBCs), which contained either camphorquinone (CQ) alone or a combination of CQ and monoacylphosphine oxide (TPO) as photoinitiators. Localized irradiance beam profiles from a polywave LED-based LCU were recorded five times using a laser beam analyzer, without and with either a 400 nm or 460 nm narrow bandpass filter placed in front of the camera lens. Five specimens of each of the four RBCs (two containing CQ/TPO and two containing CQ-only) were exposed for 5-, 10-, or 30-s with the light guide directly on the top surface of the RBC. After 24 h, Knoop microhardness values were measured at 45 locations across the top and bottom surfaces of each specimen. Microhardness readings for each RBC surface and exposure time were correlated with localized patterns of the LCU beam profile, measured using the 400 nm and 460 nm bandpass filters. Spearman rank correlation was used to avoid relying on an assumption of a bivariate normal distribution for the KHN and irradiance. The local irradiance and spectral emission values were not uniformly distributed across the light tip. There was a strong significant positive correlation with the irradiance beam profile values from the LCU taken through bandpass filters and the microhardness maps of the RBC surfaces exposed for 5 and 10 s. The strength of this correlation decreased with increasing exposure time for the RBCs containing CQ only, and increased for the RBCs containing both CQ and TPO. Localized beam and spectral distributions across the tip end of the light guide strongly correlated with corresponding areas of microhardness in both the top and bottom surfaces among four RBCs with different photoinitiator contents. Significance: A light-curing unit with a highly inhomogeneous

  8. Tooth enamel surface micro-hardness with dual species Streptococcus biofilm after exposure to Java turmeric (Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb.) extract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isjwara, F. R. G.; Hasanah, S. N.; Utami, Sri; Suniarti, D. F.

    2017-08-01

    Streptococcus biofilm on tooth surfaces can decrease mouth environment pH, thus causing enamel demineralization that can lead to dental caries. Java Turmeric extract has excellent antibacterial effects and can maintain S. mutans biofilm pH at neutral levels for 4 hours. To analyze the effect of Java Turmeric extract on tooth enamel micro-hardness, the Java Turmeric extract was added on enamel tooth samples with Streptococcus dual species biofilm (S. sanguinis and S. mutans). The micro-hardness of enamel was measured by Knoop Hardness Tester. Results showed that Curcuma xanthorrhiza Roxb. could not maintain tooth enamel surface micro-hardness. It is concluded that Java Turmeric extract ethanol could not inhibit the hardness of enamel with Streptococcus dual species biofilm.

  9. Effect of the microhardness difference between base metal and bionic coupling unit on wear resistance of gray cast iron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Zuobo; Zhou, Hong; Chang, Fang; Zhang, Peng; Cong, Dalong; Meng, Chao; Wang, Chuanwei; Ren, Luquan

    2015-12-01

    In order to improve the wear resistance of gray cast iron guide rail, the samples with different microhardness difference between bionic coupling units and base metal were manufactured by laser surface remelting. Wear behavior of gray cast iron with bionic coupling units has been studied under dry sliding condition at room temperature using a homemade liner reciprocating wear testing machine. The wear resistance was evaluated by means of weight loss measurement and wear morphology. The results indicated that when the microhardness difference is 561 HV0.2, the wear resistance of sample is the best.

  10. A new technique to make transparent teeth without decalcifying: description of the methodology and micro-hardness assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malentacca, Augusto; Lajolo, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Diaphanisation and other in vitro endodontic models (i.e., plastic blocks, micro-CT reconstruction, computerised models) do not recreate real root canal working conditions: a more realistic endodontic model is essential for testing endodontic devices and teaching purposes. The aim of this study was to describe a new technique to construct transparent teeth without decalcifying and evaluate the micro-hardness of so treated teeth. Thirty freshly extracted teeth were randomly divided into three groups as follows: 10 non-treated teeth (4 molars, 3 premolars, 3 incisors; control group - G1), 10 teeth were diaphanised (4 molars, 4 premolars, 2 incisors - G2) and 10 teeth were treated with the new proposed technique (2 molars, 6 premolars, 2 incisors - G3). Vickers hardness tester (MHT-4 and AxioVision microscope, Carl Zeiss, 37030 Gottingen, Germany - load=50 g, dwell time=20s, slope=5, 50× magnification) was used to determine microhardness (Vickers Hardness Number - VHN). Statistical analysis was performed using the Intercooled Stata 8.0 software (Stata Corporation, College Station, TX, USA). Only groups 1 and 3 could be tested for hardness because diaphanised teeth were too tender and elastic. Differences in enamel VHN were observed between G1 (mean 304.29; DS=10.44; range 283-321) and G3 (mean 318.51; DS=14.36; range 295.5-339.2) - (p<0.05); differences in dentine VHN were observed between G1 (mean 74.73; DS=6.62; range 63.9-88.1) and G3 (mean 64.54; DS=5.55; range 51.2-72.3) - (p<0.05). G3 teeth presented a slightly lower VHN compared to G1, probably due to some little structural differences among groups, and were dramatically harder than the diaphanised teeth. The described technique, thus, can be considered ideal for testing endodontic instruments and for teaching purposes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  11. Investigation on Porosity and Microhardness of 316L Stainless Steel Fabricated by Selective Laser Melting

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    Shahir Mohd Yusuf

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the porosity and microhardness of 316L stainless steel samples fabricated by selective laser melting (SLM. The porosity content was measured using the Archimedes method and the advanced X-ray computed tomography (XCT scan. High densification level (≥99% with a low average porosity content (~0.82% were obtained from the Archimedes method. The highest porosity content in the XCT-scanned sample was ~0.61. However, the pores in the SLM samples for both cases (optical microscopy and XCT were not uniformly distributed. The higher average microhardness values in the SLM samples compared to the wrought manufactured counterpart are attributed to the fine microstructures from the localised melting and rapid solidification rate of the SLM process.

  12. Microhardness studies on nonlinear optical L-alanine single crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Meyer's index number () calculated from v shows that the material belongs to the soft material category. Using Wooster's empirical relation, the elastic stiffness constant (11) was calculated from Vickers hardness values. Young's modulus was calculated using Knoop hardness values. Hardness anisotropy has been ...

  13. Effect of chemical and microwave disinfection on the surface microhardness of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasconcelos, Ligia Regina; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Sinhoreti, Mário Alexandre Coelho

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of simulated disinfections (2% glutaraldehyde, 1% sodium hypochlorite, and microwave energy) on the surface hardness of Trilux, Biocler, Biotone, New Ace, and Magister commercial artificial teeth. Specimens (n = 10) were made with the teeth included individually in circular blocks of acrylic resin, leaving the labial surface exposed. Cycles of simulated chemical disinfection were accomplished with the specimens immersed in the solutions at room temperature for 10 minutes, followed by tap water washing for 30 seconds and storage in distilled water at room temperature for 7 days until the next disinfection. Simulated disinfection by microwave energy was carried out in a domestic oven with 1300 W at a potency of 50% for 3 minutes with the specimens individually immersed in 150 ml of distilled water. Control (no disinfection) and the experimental groups (first and third disinfection cycles) were submitted to Knoop hardness measurements with indentations at the center of the labial tooth surface. Data were submitted to repeated measure two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Biocler, Magister, and Trilux showed lower surface microhardness when submitted to microwave. Lower microhardness for Biotone was promoted by hypochlorite, while no significant difference was shown for New Ace. The third disinfection cycle significantly decreased the tooth surface hardness only for microwave. Different disinfection methods promoted different effects on the microhardness of different types of artificial teeth. Surface microhardness of the teeth was less affected by the simulated chemical disinfections when compared to microwaved specimens. © 2013 by the American College of Prosthodontists.

  14. Evaluation of Surface Microhardness and Abrasion Resistance of Two Dental Glass Ionomer Cement Materials after Radiant Heat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Dionysopoulos

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a radiant heat treatment using a dental LED unit on the surface microhardness and abrasion resistance after toothbrushing simulation of two conventional GIC materials. Two conventional GIC materials were studied in this investigation: Ketac Fil Plus Aplicap and IonoStar Molar. Twenty disk-shaped specimens (n=10 were prepared of each GIC (7 mm × 2 mm using cylindrical Teflon molds. Group 1 specimens were left in the mold to set without any treatment, while in Group 2 after placement in the mold the specimens were irradiated for 60 sec at the top surface using a LED light-curing unit. Toothbrushing simulation was carried out using a commercial electric toothbrush which was fixed in a constructed device that allowed the heads of the brushes to be aligned parallel to the surface of the specimens and to control the pressure, with the following parameters: load of the toothbrush standardized at 250 g, medium hardness toothbrush head, and rotation sense changing every 30 sec. The toothbrush abrasion test mechanism, based on a 1.25-Hz frequency for 10,000 cycles, was equivalent to 800 days (~2 years of brushing. Surface hardness, surface roughness, and surface loss after abrasive procedure were evaluated using Vickers method and Vertical Scanning Interferometry. Data were statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s post hoc test (a=0.05. The radiant heat treatment increased the surface microhardness and decreased surface roughness and surface loss after abrasive procedures of both the tested GIC materials but to different extent. Between the tested GIC materials there were significant differences in their tested properties (p<0.05.

  15. Effect of different curing modes on the degree of conversion and the microhardness of different composite restorations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reem Ali Ajaj

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aims to evaluate the effects of different curing units and modes on the degree of conversion (DC and microhardness (MH of two different resin composites [ESTELITE ∑ QUICK (EQ, and Z350 XT (Z3]. Materials and Methods: One hundred (100 discs of each tested material were made and divided into two subgroups (n = 50 according to the discs′ dimensions: 5 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness, and 2 mm diameter × 2 mm thickness. Each subgroup was further subdivided into the following five classes (n = 10: I cured with halogen light curing-unit; II cured with light-emitting diode (LED unit; III cured with argon laser; IV cured with halogen light-curing unit for 5 s, 10 s rest followed by 20 s curing; and V cured with halogen light-curing unit for 10 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing. The first subgroup was tested for MH using the Vickers Microhardness tester and the second subgroup was tested for DC using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR. Data were statistically analyzed using two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc test P < 0.05. Results: Specimens in class IV showed the highest mean DC and MH, followed by class III, then class II. Class I showed significantly lower mean values for both DC and MH. On the other hand, Z3 showed statistically significantly higher mean DC and MH than EQ. Conclusion: Although the two tested composites did not perform similarly under the test conditions, curing with halogen unit for 5 s, then 10 s rest, followed by 10 s curing improved the DC and the MH of both the tested materials.

  16. Light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness and microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egilmez, Ferhan; Ergun, Gulfem; Kaya, Bekir M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to compare microhardness of resin cements under different thicknesses of zirconia and the light transmittance of zirconia as a function of thickness. Study design: A total of 126 disc-shaped specimens (2 mm in height and 5 mm in diameter) were prepared from dual-cured resin cements (RelyX Unicem, Panavia F and Clearfil SA cement). Photoactivation was performed by using quartz tungsten halogen and light emitting diode light curing units under different thicknesses of zirconia. Then the specimens (n=7/per group) were stored in dry conditions in total dark at 37°C for 24 h. The Vicker’s hardness test was performed on the resin cement layer with a microhardness tester. Statistical significance was determined using multifactorial analysis of variance (ANOVA) (alpha=.05). Light transmittance of different thicknesses of zirconia (0.3, 0.5 and 0.8 mm) was measured using a hand-held radiometer (Demetron, Kerr). Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA test (alpha=.05). Results: ANOVA revealed that resin cement and light curing unit had significant effects on microhardness (p zirconia thickness resulted in lower transmittance. There was no correlation between the amount of light transmitted and microhardness of dual-cured resin cements (r = 0.073, p = 0.295). Conclusion: Although different zirconia thicknesses might result in insufficient light transmission, dual-cured resin cements under zirconia restorations could have adequate microhardness. Key words:Zirconia, microhardness, light transmittance, resin cement. PMID:23385497

  17. Microhardness of Ni-Cr alloys under different casting conditions Microdureza de ligas de Ni-Cr fundidas sob diferentes condições

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Roberto de Oliveira Bauer

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the microhardness of Ni-Cr alloys used in fixed prosthodontics after casting under different conditions. The casting conditions were: (1-flame/air torch flame made of a gas/oxygen mixture and centrifugal casting machine in a non-controlled casting environment; (2-induction/argon electromagnetic induction in an environment controlled with argon; (3-induction/vacuum electromagnetic induction in a vacuum environment; (4-induction/air electromagnetic induction in a non-controlled casting environment. The 3 alloys used were Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti, Ni-Cr-Mo-Be, and Ni-Cr-Mo-Nb. Four castings with 5 cylindrical, 15 mm-long specimens (diameter: 1.6 mm in each casting ring were prepared. After casting, the specimens were embedded in resin and polished for Vickers microhardness (VH measurements in a Shimadzu HMV-2 (1,000 g for 10 s. A total of 5 indentations were done for each ring, one in each specimen. The data was subjected to two-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple comparison tests (alpha = 0.05. The VH values of Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti (422 ± 7.8 were statistically higher (p 0.05 and lower than the values obtained in the conditions induction/air and flame/air torch (p 0.05. The microhardness of the alloys is influenced by their composition and casting method. The hardness of the Ni-Cr alloys was higher when they were cast with the induction/air and flame/air torch methods.Este estudo avaliou a microdureza de ligas de Ni-Cr usadas em prótese fixa fundidas sob diferentes condições. As condições de fundição foram: (1-maçarico chama composta por uma mistura de gás/oxigênio e centrífuga sem o controle do ambiente de fundição; (2-indução/argônio indução eletromagnética com o ambiente controlado com argônio; (3-indução/vácuo indução eletromagnética com o ambiente sob vácuo; (4-indução/ar indução eletromagnética sem o controle da atmosfera. Foram utilizadas três ligas: Ni-Cr-Mo-Ti, Ni-Cr-Mo-Be e Ni-Cr-Mo-Nb. Foram realizadas 4

  18. Microhardness of different resin cement shades inside the root canal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vignolo, Valeria; Fuentes, Maria-Victoria; Garrido, Miguel-Angel; Rodríguez, Jesús; Ceballos, Laura

    2012-09-01

    To compare microhardness along the root canal post space of two resin cements in different shades and a dual-cure resin core material. Root canals of 21 bovine incisors were prepared for post space. Translucent posts (X∘Post, Dentsply DeTrey) were luted using one the following resin luting agent: Calibra (Dentsply DeTrey) in Translucent, Medium and Opaque shades, RelyX Unicem (3M ESPE) in Translucent, A2 and A3 shades and the dual-cure resin core material Core∘X flow. All materials were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and were all photopolymerized (Bluephase LED unit, Ivoclar Vivadent, 40s). After 24 hours, roots were transversally cut into 9 slices 1 mm thick from the coronal to apical extremes, three corresponding to each root third. Then, VHNs were recorded (100gf, 30 s) on the resin luting materials along the adhesive interface in all sections. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and SNK tests (α=0.05). A significant influence on microhardness of resin luting material in their respective shades (pmicrohardness values and Calibra the lowest, regardless of the shade selected. All resin luting materials tested exhibited a significantly higher microhardness in the cervical third. Microhardness of resin luting agents tested inside the canal is dependent on material brand and resin cement shade seems to be a less relevant factor. Microhardness decreased along the root canal, regardless of the shade selected.

  19. Effect of three nanobiomaterials on microhardness of bleached enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Khoroushi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of incorporating three different nanobiomaterials into bleaching material on microhardness of bleached enamel. Materials and Methods The crowns of 24 extracted sound human molars were sectioned. Sixty enamel specimens (2 × 3 × 4 mm were selected and divided into five groups (n = 12: Group 1 received no bleaching procedure (control; Group 2 underwent bleaching with a 40% hydrogen peroxide (HP gel; Groups 3, 4, and 5 were bleached with a 40% HP gel modified by incorporation of bioactive glass (BAG, amorphous calcium phosphate (ACP and hydroxyapatite (HA, respectively. The enamel microhardness was evaluated. The differences in Knoop microhardness data of each group were analyzed by one-way ANOVA, followed by post hoc Tukey tests. Results Significant differences were observed between the study groups. The enamel microhardness changes in Groups 1, 3, 4, and 5 were significantly lower than that of Group 2 (p < 0.001. Conclusions Within the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that incorporation of each one of the three tested biomaterials as remineralizing agents might be effective in decreasing enamel microhardness changes subsequent to in-office bleaching.

  20. Effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Emi Razera BALDASSO

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the effect of final irrigation protocols on microhardness reduction and erosion of root canal dentin. Sixty root canals from mandibular incisors were instrumented and randomly divided into six groups (n = 10 according to the irrigant used: QMiX, 17% EDTA, 10% citric acid (CA, 1% peracetic acid (PA, 2.5% NaOCl (solution control, and distilled water (negative control. The chelating solutions were used to irrigate the canal followed by 2.5% NaOCl as a final flush. After the irrigation protocols, all specimens were rinsed with 10 mL of distilled water to remove any residue of the chemical solutions. Before and after the final irrigation protocols, dentin microhardness was measured with a Knoop indenter. Three indentations were made at 100 µm and 500 µm from the root canal lumen. Afterwards, the specimens were prepared for scanning electron microscopic analysis and the amount of dentin erosion was examined. Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to analyze the results with a significance level set at 5%. At 100 µm, all protocols significantly reduced dentin microhardness (p < .05, while at 500 µm, this effect was detected only in the EDTA and QMiX groups (p < .05. CA was the irrigant that caused more extensive erosion in dentinal tubules, followed by PA and EDTA. QMiX opened dentinal tubules, but did not cause dentin erosion. Results suggest that QMiX and 17% EDTA reduced dentin microhardness at a greater depth. Additionally, QMiX did not cause dentin erosion.

  1. The effect of three whitening oral rinses on enamel micro-hardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potgieter, E; Osman, Y; Grobler, S R

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect on human enamel micro-hardness of three over-the-counter whitening oral rinses available in South Africa. Enamel fragments were gathered into three groups of 15 each. One group was exposed to Colgate Plax Whitening Blancheur, the second group to White Glo 2 in 1 and the third to Plus White, in each case for periods recommended by the respective manufacturers. Surface micro-hardness of all groups was measured before and after a 14 day treatment period. pH levels of the oral rinses were also determined with a combination pH electrode. Pre- and post- treatment data were analysed by the Wilcoxon Signed Rank Sum Test. According to the micro-hardness values no significant (p > 0.05) enamel damage was found as a result of treatment. However, it was observed that Colgate Pax and White Glo decreased the enamel hardness, an early sign of enamel damage, while Plus White showed a small increase in hardness. The three whitening oral rinses on the South African market do not damage the tooth enamel significantly when used as recommended by the manufacturers. However, extending the contact period and increasing the frequency of application might lead to damage of enamel.

  2. A comparison of microhardness of indirect composite restorative materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clóvis; Bottino, Marco Cícero

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10) as foll......The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10...

  3. A comparison of microhardness of indirect composite restorative materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miranda, Carolina Baptista; Pagani, Clóvis; Bottino, Marco Cícero

    2003-01-01

    test through: (I) Levene's for homogeneity of variances; (II) ANOVA on ranks (Kruskal-Wallis); (III) Dunn's multiple comparison test (0.05). Targis presented the highest microhardness values while Sinfony presented the lowest. Artglass and Solidex were found as intermediate materials. These results......The purpose of this study was to compare the microhardness of four indirect composite resins. Forty cylindrical samples were prepared according to the manufacturer’s recommendations using a Teflon mold. Ten specimens were produced from each tested material, constituting four groups (n=10...

  4. The effect of light curing units, curing time, and veneering materials on resin cement microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurcan Ozakar Ilday

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: Light-curing units, curing time, and veneering materials are important factors for achieving adequate dual cure resin composite microhardness. High-intensity light and longer curing times resulted in the highest microhardness values.

  5. Microhardness and roughness of enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide and brushed with different toothpastes: an in situ study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carolina França de Medeiros; Manfroi, Fernanda Borguetti; Spohr, Ana Maria

    2014-07-01

    This in situ study evaluated the roughness and microhardness of enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide (PC10) and brushed with different toothpastes. Two groups of volunteers received PC10 and placebo agents for 21 days in two phases in a crossover 2 × 3 study. Fragments of human enamel were distributed among intraoral removable appliances (IRA). Nine fragments, divided into three triplets, were used in each IRA, and these were brushed with toothpastes R (Colgate), W (Colgate Total 12 Whiteness Gel) or BS (Colgate Whitening Oxygen Bubbles Fluoride). Treatments agents were applied for 8 h overnight. After brushing, the volunteers used the IRA for about 16 h/day. After a washout period, new IRAs were distributed and the volunteers were crossed over to the alternate agent for 21 days. Roughness and microhardness were measured before and after each phase. According to the paired Student's t-test, roughness of enamel increased and microhardness decreased (P toothpaste factor was significant (P = 0.037) for roughness. Enamel microhardness and surface roughness are altered when PC10 bleaching is associated with tooth brushing using toothpastes BS, R, and W.

  6. Cathode material and pulsed plasma treatment influence on the microstructure and microhardness of high-chromium cast iron surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Юлія Геннадіївна Чабак

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents an analysis of the cathode material and the pulse plasma treatment mode influence on the surface microstructure and microhardness of high chrome (15% Cr cast iron. The methods of metallographic analysis and microhardness measurements were used. It has been shown that pulsed plasma treatment at 4 kV voltage with the use of the electro-axial thermal accelerator results in surface modification with high microhardness 950-1050 HV50, and in the formation of the coating due to the transfer of the electrodes material. The specific features of using different cathode materials have been systematized. It has been found that graphite electrodes are not recommended to be used due to their low strength and fracture under plasma pulses. In case of using tungsten cathode a coating of small thickness (20-30 microns and having cracks has been formed on the specimen surface. The most expedient is to apply the electrodes with low melting point (such as killed St.3, which provides a high-quality state of treated surface and formation the protective crack-free coating of 80-100 microns thick. It has been found that as a result of the plasma pulsed treatment the enrichment of coating with carbon is likely to occur that results in microhardness increase. The prospects of this technology as well as its shortcomings have been described

  7. Effect of bleaching on microhardness of esthetic restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malkondu, Özlem; Yurdagüven, Haktan; Say, Esra Can; Kazazoğlu, Ender; Soyman, Mübin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a high-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching system (Opalescence PF) and a hydrogen peroxide–containing over-the-counter bleaching system (Treswhite Supreme) on the microhardness of two nanocomposites (Filtek Supreme XT and Premise) and leucite-reinforced glass ceramic (Empress Esthetic), glass ceramic (Empress 2 layering), and feldspathic porcelain (Matchmaker MC). A total of 100 specimens, 20 of each kind of the restorative materials, 2 mm in thickness and 10 mm in diameter, were fabricated. Then the specimens were polished with SiC paper and 1 μm alumina polishing paste. After polishing, porcelain specimens were glazed in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions. Each type of restorative material was then randomly divided into two groups (n=10), and the specimens were treated with either Opalescence PF or Treswhite Supreme. The microhardness of the specimens before bleaching (baseline) and after bleaching was determined using a digital microhardness tester. Data were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney U-test and the Wilcoxon test. Opalescence PF significantly influenced the hardness of all the restorative materials. Statistically significant decreases with respect to before bleaching were found for Premise (p=0.005), Empress Esthetic (p=0.003), Empress 2 layering (p=0.005), and Matchmaker-MC (p=0.003), whereas a statistically significant increase was observed in Filtek Supreme XT (p=0.028). The difference in the microhardness values between before and after bleaching using Treswhite Supreme was statistically significant only for Premise (p=0.022). High-concentration carbamide peroxide–containing home bleaching may affect the microhardness of restorative materials.

  8. Microhardness of glass ionomer cements indicated for the ART technique according to surface protection treatment and storage time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Keiko Shintome

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the microhardness of 5 glass ionomer cements (GIC - Vidrion R (V, SS White, Fuji IX (F, GC Corp., Magic Glass ART (MG, Vigodent, Maxxion R (MR, FGM and ChemFlex (CF, Dentsply - in the presence or absence of a surface protection treatment, and after different storage periods. For each GIC, 36 test specimens were made, divided into 3 groups according to the surface protection treatment applied - no protection, varnish or nail varnish. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 7 and 30 days and the microhardness tests were performed at these times. The data obtained were submitted to the ANOVA for repeated measures and Tukey tests (α = 5%. The results revealed that the mean microhardness values of the GICs were, in decreasing order, as follows: F > CF = MR > MG > V; that surface protection was significant for MR, at 24 h, without protection (64.2 ± 3.6a, protected with GIC varnish (59.6 ± 3.4b and protected with nail varnish (62.7 ± 2.8ab; for F, at 7 days, without protection (97.8 ± 3.7ab, protected with varnish (95.9 ± 3.2b and protected with nail varnish (100.8 ± 3.4a; and at 30 days, for F, without protection (98.8 ± 2.6b, protected with varnish (103.3 ± 4.4a and protected with nail varnish (101 ± 4.1ab and, for V, without protection (46 ± 1.3b, protected with varnish (49.6 ± 1.7ab and protected with nail varnish (51.1 ± 2.6a. The increase in storage time produced an increase in microhardness. It was concluded that the different GICs, surface protection treatments and storage times could alter the microhardness values.

  9. The effect of microwave/laboratory light source postcuring technique and wet-aging on microhardness of composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farahnaz Sharafeddin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although composite restorations are really valuable for esthetic zones, they have shown less longevity rather than amalgam restorations. Since it may be related to the method used for curing the composite, postcuring could increase the degree of conversion and result in more long-lasting composite restorations. This study was planned to evaluate the effect of two different postcuring techniques on microhardness of indirect composite resin after wet-aging and comparing them with the direct type. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 99 composite disk-shaped (6.5 × 2.5 mm specimens of composite (Gradia GC, Japan were prepared in split mold. The indirect composite specimens were postcured by laboratory light source (Labolite LV-III GC Corp, Japan or microwave unit (MC 2002 JR, LG, Korea. Then, the aging procedure was done for 24 h, 30 and 180 days in distilled water. The Vicker′s Hardness test (VHN on surface of specmens was measured by Wolpert microhardness tester and the data were analyzed by the two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA and Tukey′s post hoc tests. (P ≤ 0.05. Results: The statistical analysis revealed that surface microhardness of postcured composite by microwave and laboratory light source was more than that of direct composite ( P = 0.0001 and postcuring by microwave was more effective than postcuring by laboratory light source ( P = 0.004. The 30 days stored composite demonstrated significant decrease of VHN compared with the 24-h stored samples ( P = 0.0001, with a more significant VHN decrease after 180 days of aging ( P = 0.045. Conclusion: Postcuring increased the surface microhardness and aging reduced the surface microhardness of indirect composite.

  10. Indentation-induced microhardness and dielectric studies of flux-grown gadolinium aluminate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, K.K.; Kotru, P.N. [Department of Physics, University of Jammu, Jammu (India); Tandon, R.P. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Wanklyn, B.M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1998-06-22

    Results of microhardness measurements and dielectric studies carried out on flux-grown GdAlO{sub 3} single crystals are presented. Load independent values of hardness are estimated for (110) and (001) planes by applying the law of Hays and Kendall. The values of fracture toughness and brittleness index are calculated for median cracks at higher loads. Hardness anisotropy for both the crystal planes considered is reported. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and conductivity are found to be dependent on temperature as well as frequency of the applied a.c. field. The anomalous behaviour of dielectric constant against temperature suggests some transition taking place at 170 deg. C. (author)

  11. Systematic hardness measurements on single crystals and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Vickers and knoop hardness measurements were carried out on CsBr and CsI single crystals. Polycrystalline blanks of CsCl, CsBr and CsI were prepared by melting and characterized by X-ray diffraction. Vickers hardness measurements were carried out on these blanks. The hardness values were correlated with the lattice ...

  12. In vivo Dentin Microhardness beneath a Calcium-Phosphate Cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, E.; Wagner, W.C.; Navarro, M.F.L.; Dickens, S.H.; Peters, M.C.

    2010-01-01

    A minimally invasive caries-removal technique preserves potentially repairable, caries-affected dentin. Mineral-releasing cements may promote remineralization of soft residual dentin. This study evaluated the in vivo remineralization capacity of resin-based calcium-phosphate cement (Ca-PO4) used for indirect pulp-capping. Permanent carious and sound teeth indicated for extraction were excavated and restored either with or without the Ca-PO4 base (control), followed by adhesive restoration. Study teeth were extracted after 3 months, followed by sectioning and in vitro microhardness analysis of the cavity floor to 115-µm depth. Caries-affected dentin that received acid conditioning prior to Ca-PO4 basing showed significantly increased Knoop hardness near the cavity floor. The non-etched group presented results similar to those of the non-treated group. Acid etching prior to cement application increased microhardness of residual dentin near the interface after 3 months in situ. PMID:20511564

  13. Chemical removal of necrotic periodontal ligament on delayed replanted teeth by sodium hypochlorite: morphological analysis and microhardness indentation test of cementum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J; Qin, M; Zhao, Y-M; Huang, M-W; Ji, A-P

    2016-04-01

    To compare the efficacy of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) used at different concentrations and working times for removing necrotic periodontal ligament (PDL) from delayed replanted teeth and to observe the effects of NaOCl on surface structure and microhardness of cementum. A total of 88 healthy premolars with a single root extracted for orthodontic purposes were selected and kept dry at room temperature for 1 h. The teeth were divided into 11 groups: group 1 (control): roots were untreated; group 2: necrotic PDL was removed with gauze; groups 3-11: teeth were immersed in NaOCl at different concentrations (1, 2.5 and 5.25%) and for different working times (5, 10 and 15 min). The specimens in each group were inspected separately for cementum integrity and the presence of PDL remnants by histomorphometric analysis, confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Another 14 healthy premolars with roots divided into two pieces were selected for Vickers microhardness indentation tests before and after NaOCl treatment. The data were analysed statistically using Wilcoxon signed-rank test of two-related samples (P = 0.05). In teeth treated with 1% NaOCl for 15 min or 5.25% NaOCl for 5 min, the cementum remained morphologically intact without cracks, and PDL remnants were absent. In the 1% NaOCl for 15 min group, the microstructure of cementum was arranged more regularly, as observed ×8000 magnification by SEM. Teeth in each of the other groups displayed cementum damage and/or the presence of PDL remnants. Microhardness tests revealed that treatment with 1% NaOCl for 15 min or 5.25% NaOCl for 5 min significantly decreased microhardness of root cementum (P < 0.05). Use of either 1% NaOCl for 15 min or 5.25% NaOCl for 5 min was effective at removing necrotic PDL from the delayed replanted teeth whilst having a minimal influence on cementum integrity. However, 1% NaOCl for 15 min was less damaging to cementum. © 2015 International Endodontic

  14. Microstructure and microhardness evolution of melt-spun Al-Si-Cu alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Emad M.; Ebrahim, M. R.

    2014-04-01

    Al-11 wt.% Si-11 wt.% Cu (11.29 at.% Si-5.1 at.% Cu) melt was rapidly solidified into ribbons and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and microhardness technique. The Rietveld X-ray diffraction analysis was applied successfully to analyze the microstructure and phase precipitations. The high cooling rate obtained in rapid solidification has a significant influence on the microstructure and microhardness of this alloy. On the basis of the Al peaks shift measured in the XRD scans, a solid solubility extension value of 3.95 at.% Si and 3.54 at.% Cu in α-Al were determined. No XRD peaks of the Si phase have been detected. XRD peaks of the intermetallic Al2Cu phase have been observed clearly with estimated content of 12.6 wt.%. During prolonged annealing process at 350°C/25 h, XRD peaks of the Si phase clearly appeared with estimated content of 8.6 wt.% and, moreover, the Al2Cu phase content increased to 16 wt.%. The estimated crystallite size and micro-strain % of α-Al are 30 nm and 0.056, respectively. The melt-spun wheel side ribbon represents ultra-fine microstructure with particles size less than 1μm and exhibits enhancement of hardness to 241 HV. Hardness has further increased to 291 HV during heat treatment (150°C/12 h). Rapid solidification exhibited a great influence on microstructure and microhardness of the Al-Si-Cu alloy.

  15. Effect of a novel commercial potassium-oxalate containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of resin composite restorative materials with different monomer compositions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabulut, Barış; Can-Karabulut, Deniz C; Güleç, Serkan; Doğan, Cem M

    2016-12-01

    The effects of mouthrinses on dental resin composites have been investigated extensively. However, there is little information available regarding the effects of 'newly developed mouthrinse' formulations on the microhardness of different monomer based composite systems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a novel potassium-oxalate containing desensitizing mouthrinse on the microhardness of different monomer based composite materials. A hundred and twenty specimens (6mm in diameter and 2mm in height) were prepared for composite resin groups (methacrylate based, DX-511 monomer based and silorane monomer based) and for storage solution groups (artificial saliva and potassium oxalate-containing tooth-desensitizing mouthrinse). After allowing post-polimerization the baseline Knoop microhardness measurements for all specimens were recorded. The specimens were stored in 20 mL mouthwash and artificial saliva for 12 hours at 37ºC. The post-immersion microhardness values of all specimens were also recorded. Data were subjected to ANOVA/Scheffe's test at a significance level of 0.05. The intra group (pre and post immersion values) comparison of the mean microhardness values of the specimens was done using Wilcoxon signed rank test. The microhardness of the silorane based composite was not affected significantly (p>0.05). The hardness values of the DX-511 monomer based composite and the methacrylate based composite exhibited a slight but not significant microhardness change compared to the baseline values (p>0.05). Studies reported that the effect of mouthrinses on microhardness changes of composite resins may be material dependent, and the hardness change susceptibility of a restorative material may be attributed to its resin matrix or filler type. However, dental monomers as well as the oral care products have an ever-evolving technology and future studies should consider newer products. Potassium oxalate containing mouthrinses, especially

  16. Growth, spectral, thermal, laser damage threshold, microhardness, dielectric, linear and nonlinear optical properties of an organic single crystal: L-phenylalanine DL-mandelic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayaprakash, P. [PG & Research Department of Physics, Arignar Anna Govt. Arts College, Cheyyar 604 407, Tamil Nadu (India); Peer Mohamed, M. [PG & Research Department of Physics, Arignar Anna Govt. Arts College, Cheyyar 604 407, Tamil Nadu (India); Department of Physics, C. Abdul Hakeem College, Melvisharam 632 509, Tamil Nadu (India); Krishnan, P. [Department of Physics, St. Joseph’s College of Engineering, Chennai 600 119, Tamil Nadu (India); Nageshwari, M.; Mani, G. [PG & Research Department of Physics, Arignar Anna Govt. Arts College, Cheyyar 604 407, Tamil Nadu (India); Lydia Caroline, M., E-mail: lydiacaroline2006@yahoo.co.in [PG & Research Department of Physics, Arignar Anna Govt. Arts College, Cheyyar 604 407, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2016-12-15

    Single crystals of L-phenylalanine dl-mandelic acid [C{sub 9}H{sub 11}NO{sub 2}. C{sub 8}H{sub 8}O{sub 3}], have been grown by the slow evaporation technique at room temperature using aqueous solution. The single crystal XRD study confirms monoclinic system for the grown crystal. The functional groups present in the grown crystal have been identified by FTIR and FT-Raman analyses. The optical absorption studies show that the crystal is transparent in the visible region with a lower cut-off wavelength of 257 nm and the optical band gap energy E{sub g} is determined to be 4.62 eV. The Kurtz powder second harmonic generation was confirmed using Nd:YAG laser with fundamental wavelength of 1064 nm. Further, the thermal studies confirmed no weight loss up to 150°C for the as-grown crystal. The photoluminescence spectrum exhibited three peaks (414 nm, 519 nm, 568 nm) due to the donation of protons from carboxylic acid to amino group. Laser damage threshold value was found to be 4.98 GW/cm{sup 2}. The Vickers microhardness test was carried out on the grown crystals and there by Vickers hardness number (H{sub v}), work hardening coefficient (n), yield strength (σ{sub y}), stiffness constant C{sub 11} were evaluated. The dielectric behavior of the crystal has been determined in the frequency range 50 Hz–5 MHz at various temperatures.

  17. Standard hardness conversion tables for metals relationship among brinell hardness, vickers hardness, rockwell hardness, superficial hardness, knoop hardness, and scleroscope hardness

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 Conversion Table 1 presents data in the Rockwell C hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.2 Conversion Table 2 presents data in the Rockwell B hardness range on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, Knoop hardness, and Scleroscope hardness of non-austenitic steels including carbon, alloy, and tool steels in the as-forged, annealed, normalized, and quenched and tempered conditions provided that they are homogeneous. 1.3 Conversion Table 3 presents data on the relationship among Brinell hardness, Vickers hardness, Rockwell hardness, Rockwell superficial hardness, and Knoop hardness of nickel and high-nickel alloys (nickel content o...

  18. The effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the microhardness of four types of direct resin-based restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlQahtani, M Q

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study was undertaken to evaluate the effect of a 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent on the microhardness of four types of direct resin-based restorative materials. Thirty disk-shaped specimens (10.0 mm diameter × 2.0 mm depth) of each material, including a microhybrid resin composite (Z250), a nanofilled resin composite (Z350), a silorane-based low-shrink resin composite (P90), and a hybrid resin composite (Valux Plus), were fabricated and then polished with medium, fine, and superfine polishing discs. After being polished, specimens were cleaned with distilled water for 2 min in an ultrasonic bath to remove any surface debris and then stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 hours. Specimens from each material were divided into three groups (n=10). One group was selected as a control group (nontreated with bleaching agent). The other two groups were treated with bleaching agent for 14 days (group A) and for 14 days followed by immersion in artificial saliva for 14 days (group B). The top surfaces of the specimens in the different groups were also subjected to the Vickers hardness test with a load of 300 g and 15-second dwell time. Data were analyzed with a one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's HSD test (α = 0.05). There was a general reduction of Vickers hardness numbers (VHN) values of treated groups compared with the control group for each material used, but this reduction was minimal, with no significant difference between groups in Z250, whereas the other three materials (Z350, P90, and Valux Plus) showed a significant reduction of VHN of treated groups compared with the control group. Conversely, the findings showed no significant difference between treated groups A and B in all materials used except P90. A 10% carbamide peroxide bleaching agent had an adverse effect on the microhardness of nanofilled, silorane-based low-shrink, and hybrid types of resin-based composite materials compared with the microhybrid type.

  19. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Lei, E-mail: penglei@ustc.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Ge, Hongen [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China); Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Dai, Yong [Laboratory for Nuclear Materials, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Huang, Qunying [Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Ye, Minyou [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230027 (China)

    2016-01-15

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  20. Microstructure and microhardness of CLAM steel irradiated up to 20.8 dpa in STIP-V

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Lei; Ge, Hongen; Dai, Yong; Huang, Qunying; Ye, Minyou

    2016-01-01

    Specimens of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel were irradiated in the fifth experiment of SINQ target irradiation program (STIP-V) up to 20.8 dpa/1564 appm He. Microhardness measurements and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations have been performed to investigate irradiation induced hardening effects. The results of CLAM steel specimens show similar trend in microhardness and microstructure changes with irradiation dose, compared to F82H/Optimax-A steels irradiated in STIP-I/II. Defects and helium bubbles were observed in all specimens, even at a very low dose of 5.4 dpa. For defects and bubbles, the mean size and number density increased with increasing irradiation dose to 13 dpa, and then the mean size increased and number density decreased with the increasing irradiation dose to 20.8 dpa.

  1. Effect of light curing methods on microleakage and microhardness of different resin sealants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duangthip, Duangporn; Ballungpattama, Suda; Sitthisettapong, Thanya

    2011-07-01

    This study's purpose was to evaluate the effect of light curing methods on the microleakage and microhardness of sealants. The Elipar Free Light 2 light emitting diode (LED) with 10- and 20-second curing times, and the Elipar 2500 halogen light with a 20-second curing time were compared. Four different sealants were used: (1) Delton Clear; (2) Delton Opaque; (3) UltraSeal XT Clear; and (4) UltraSeal XT Opaque. Specimens were fabricated in a silicone mold (2-mm thick) and cured. Knoop hardness was measured at the bottom and top surfaces. For the microleakage evaluation, 120 human molars were divided into 12 groups and sealed with the sealants and curing methods, as stated previously. The teeth were thermocycled and immersed in 2% methylene blue for 24 hours. Each tooth was sectioned and examined for dye penetration. There were no statistically significant differences in the microleakage of sealants polymerized by either the halogen or LED curing methods. The microhardness of sealants varied according to the type of material and curing method. A 10-second polymerization time with light emitting diodes was not sufficient to cure the 2-mm-thick opaque or high filler loaded sealants. Decreasing the curing time, however, had no effect on the microleakage of the sealants.

  2. Microhardness tests of stainless steel 52100 implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide

    CERN Document Server

    Mardanian, M; Taheri, Z

    2003-01-01

    In this research work, samples of stainless steel 52100 disks were implanted with nitrogen and carbon dioxide ions at the energy of 90 keV. Microhardness measurement were performed to determine the hardness of the surface. The N-2 sup + implanted steels at the doses of 1x10 sup 1 8 ions cm sup sub 2 gave the highest hardness of 49.70%, while for the CO sub 2 sup + ions implantation, the hardness of 17% and 5% were obtained at the doses of 3x10 sup 1 8 and 1x10 sup 1 9 ions cm sup - 2, respectively. To support the interpretation of our microhardness results the implanted surface were analyzed by the use of XRD method. Our results indicated that the hardness of the N sub 2 sup + implanted samples are due to formation of beta-Cr N phase in the surface layer, while in the CO sub 2 + implanted samples no observation of carbon as graphite or carbide was made. In addition, the absence of any hump in the XRD spectrum indicating that carbon is not in the amorphous phase either.

  3. Effect of sodium hypochlorite contamination on microhardness of dental core build-up materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegehaupt, Florian Just; Betschart, Jasmin; Attin, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    This study aimed to determine the influence of sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) contamination on the microhardness of build-up composites. Fifty-two samples, from each of three build-up materials (LuxaCore Dual, MultiCore flow and Rebilda DC) were prepared. Half of the samples from each material were stored in physiologic saline (baseline control) while the other halves were stored in NaOCl. After 1 h, the samples were rinsed with tap water, cut axially and measured for Knoop hardness at different depth levels. The results were analysed by ANOVA and unpaired t-tests (pmicrohardness were observed for LuxaCore Dual up to 0.2 mm, Rebilda DC up to 0.3 mm, and for MultiCore flow up to 0.4 mm under the surface level. Contact with sodium hypochlorite on build-up materials causes reduction of the microhardness. The softening is not only limited on the surface, but can also be found in deeper layers of build-up materials.

  4. Influence of different brazing and welding methods on tensile strength and microhardness of orthodontic stainless steel wire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bock, Jens Johannes; Fraenzel, Wolfgang; Bailly, Jacqueline; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf; Fuhrmann, Robert Andreas Werner

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mechanical strength and microhardness of joints made by conventional brazing and tungsten inert gas (TIG) and laser welding. A standardized end-to-end joint configuration of the orthodontic wire material in spring hard quality was used. The joints were made using five different methods: brazing (soldering > 450 degrees C) with universal silver solder, two TIG, and two laser welders. Laser parameters and welding conditions were used according to the manufacturers' guidance. The tensile strengths were measured with a universal testing machine (Zwick 005). The microhardness measurements were carried out with a hardness tester (Zwick 3202). Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni's post hoc correction (P TIG or laser welding were found. The highest means were observed for TIG welding (699-754 MPa). Laser welding showed a significantly lower mean tensile strength (369-520 MPa) compared with TIG welding. Significant differences (P welded area. The mean microhardness differed significantly between brazing (1.99 GPa), TIG (2.22-2.39 GPa) and laser welding (2.21-2.68 GPa). For orthodontic purposes, laser and TIG welding are solder-free alternatives to joining metal. TIG welding with a lower investment cost is comparable with laser welding. However, while expensive, the laser technique is a sophisticated and simple method.

  5. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Menezes de MENDONÇA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. Objectives: To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein, used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin, after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Material and Methods: Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10 according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal and R (resin- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5 were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Results: Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231. Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (p<0.001 and the Tukey test revealed that microhardness was significantly lower when crowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007. Conclusion: The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the

  6. Topography, microhardness, and precision of fit on ready-made zirconia abutment before/after sintering process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Taro; Milleding, Percy; Wennerberg, Ann

    2007-09-01

    Sintering porcelain on a ceramic abutment may change the microstructure and result in aging processes that influence the mechanical properties, internal strain, and the three-dimensional form of the abutment, thus causing a possible misfit between the abutment and the fixture. The aim was to investigate topography, microhardness, and precision of fit on yttrium-stabilized zirconia (Y-TZP) abutments before/after the sintering process. Ten Y-TZP abutment samples were ground to a shape used in the clinical situation and divided at random into two groups: before/after sintering. After the surface roughness was measured on all abutments, the abutments were connected to fixture replicas, embedded in resin, and cut in the longitudinal axis. Both sides of the cut samples were measured with respect to microhardness and minimum distance between fixture and abutment surface. t-Test, one-way analysis of variance, and Bonferroni multiple comparisons were used to investigate statistical significant differences. The surface roughness (S(a) and S(dr)) after sintering was significantly higher than before sintering. The total average values of microhardness after sintering were statistically lower than before sintering with a difference of 2%. The total distance between abutment/fixture before/after sintering demonstrated no statistically significant difference. Contact between abutment/fixture was most common at the top area of the fixture. A slight decrease of microhardness and contamination of porcelain particles immediately below the veneered part were found on the Y-TZP abutment after sintering. The sintering process did not affect the precision of fit.

  7. Micro-hardness and mineral loss of enamel lesions after infiltration with various resins: influence of infiltrant composition and application frequency in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, S; Schwendicke, F; Seddig, S; Müller, W-D; Dörfer, C; Meyer-Lueckel, H

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the influence of infiltrant composition and application frequency on micro-hardness and lesion progression after resin infiltration of artificial enamel lesions. In each of 100 bovine enamel samples, three artificial caries lesions were created (pH=4.95, 50 days). After etching two of the lesions (37% phosphoric acid) specimens were randomly allocated to five infiltrants (four experimental infiltrants with different monomer and solvent compositions and penetration coefficients, and one commercial infiltrant [Icon, DMG]). Lesions were then infiltrated and light-cured, and infiltration repeated afterwards for one of the lesions. Infiltrated samples were cut into halves, with one half being demineralised for further 50 days. Micro-hardness (VHN) and integrated mineral loss (ΔZ) were evaluated at baseline and after second demineralisation. Repeated measures ANOVA and paired t-tests were used to analyse influence of material composition and application frequency on micro-hardness and lesion progression (integrated mineral loss difference ΔΔZ). Resin infiltration significantly increased micro-hardness and reduced lesion progression compared to untreated artificial lesions (phardness nor lesion progression were significantly influenced by material composition (p>0.05, ANOVA). In contrast, twice application resulted in significantly increased micro-hardness and demineralisation resistance of infiltrated lesions (phardness and demineralisation resistance of enamel lesions; these effects are significantly enhanced if resins are applied twice. Experimental resins did not outperform the commercial infiltrant. This in vitro study demonstrated that resin infiltration significantly increases both micro-hardness and demineralisation resistance of enamel caries lesions. Twice application of the infiltrant seems to increase these effects. In contrast, the composition of the infiltrant had no significant influence on investigated

  8. Surface microhardness of enamel after different home bleaching procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zantner, Catharina; Beheim-Schwarzbach, Nils; Neumann, Konrad; Kielbassa, Andrej M

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of different home bleaching procedures on surface microhardness of human enamel. Among eight groups 192 incisors were distributed. The facial surface of each incisor was polished and baseline hardness of enamel (m0; Knoop) was assessed with a load of 1N for 30s. Subsequently, the enamel was treated for 14 days with the bleaching agent: groups 1, 2 and 4 Viva Style Paint on, 8% carbamide peroxide (CP) 1x20min, 2x20min and 2x5min; group 3 Colgate Simply White, 5.9% hydrogen peroxide (HP), 2x30min; group 5 Viva Style 10% CP 1x1h; group 6 Blend-a-med White Strips, 5.9% HP 2x30min; group 7 Odol-med3 Beauty-Kur, sodium chlorite 2x10min; group 8 control, running water 1x1h. Hardness was reassessed after the last bleaching treatment (m1) and after 6 weeks storage in artificial saliva (m2). Changes in microhardness were as follows (m0-m1): (1) -2.3 (+/-20.3); (2) -8.9 (+/-27.2); (3) 63.4 (+/-56.3); (4) 9.6 (+/-30.1); (5) 12.8 (+/-62.6); (6) 92.2 (+/-50.2); (7) 158.4 (+/-59.7); (8) 10.6 (+/-38.5). Statistical analysis showed that hardness values were significantly (p< or =0.0005; Wilcoxon test) reduced in groups 3, 6, and 7 (m1) and in group 7 (m2). Both type of bleaching agent and concentration have a significant influence on the microhardness of enamel. The most critical bleaching agent seems to be the one containing sodium chlorite in combination with citric acid.

  9. Effect of energy density and delay time on the degree of conversion and Knoop microhardness of a dual resin cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Maria do Carmo A J; Giorgi, Maria Cecília C; Lima, Débora A N L; Marchi, Giselle M; Ambrosano, Gláucia M; Paulillo, Luiz A M S; Aguiar, Flávio H B

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the influence of the photo-curing delay time and energy density on the degree of conversion and the Knoop microhardness of a resin cement. Seventy-eight samples were assigned to 13 groups (n = 6), one of which received no light curing (control). The samples were made of a dual-cured resin cement (RelyX ARC) with the aid of a Teflon matrix, submitted to one of the following energy densities (J/cm²): 7, 14, 20, and 28. Delay times were immediate (0), 1 min, or 2 min. After 24 h, the degree of conversion and microhardness were measured at three segments: cervical, medium, and apical. Data were submitted to three-way anova and Tukey's and Dunnett's tests, the latest of which was used to compare the control to the experimental groups. No interaction was observed between delay time and energy density regarding the degree of conversion. The cervical segment showed the highest values, while the apical showed the lowest. Microhardness values concerning the cervical segment in all groups were statistically different from that obtained for the control. A high-irradiance light-curing unit allows for a reduced irradiation exposure time with a short delay time, aimed at tooth restorations using a dual-cured resin cement. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Safety of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma for tooth bleaching evaluated in terms of microhardness and mineral content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, S. H.; Hong, J. W.; Lee, H. J.; Jeon, Y. C.; Kim, G. C.

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of bleaching with nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma and 15% hydrogen peroxide (HP) or 15% carbamide peroxide (CP). Sixty human enamel and dentin slabs were randomly assigned to six groups as follows: Group 1 was a control group and did not receive any treatment; Group 2 was exposed only to plasma, as a negative control; Group 3 was treated with 15% HP; Group 4 was treated with 15% HP plus plasma; Group 5 was treated with 15% CP alone; and Group 6 was treated with 15% CP plus plasma during 30 min bleaching treatments. A microhardness measurement was conducted according to a microhardness tester. The amount of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), chloride (Cl), sodium (Na), magnesium (Mg), and zinc (Zn) in the enamel and dentin was quantified with an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). The data were analyzed by using the Student’s t test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), complemented by Tukey’s test. The statistical analysis did not show any significant differences in microhardness values and six mineral contents in all groups (p  >  0.05). Therefore, we believe that the application of nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasma is a safe energy source for tooth bleaching.

  11. Effect of a broad-spectrum LED curing light on the Knoop microhardness of four posterior resin based composites at 2, 4 and 6-mm depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALShaafi, Maan M; Haenel, Thomas; Sullivan, Braden; Labrie, Daniel; Alqahtani, Mohammed Q; Price, Richard B

    2016-02-01

    To measure the Knoop microhardness at the bottom of four posterior resin-based composites (RBCs): Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill (Ivoclar Vivadent), SureFil SDR flow (DENTSPLY), SonicFill (Kerr), and x-tra fil (Voco). The RBCs were expressed into metal rings that were 2, 4, or 6-mm thick with a 4-mm internal diameter at 30°C. The uncured specimens were covered by a Mylar strip and a Bluephase 20i (Ivoclar Vivadent) polywave(®) LED light-curing unit was used in high power setting for 20s. The specimens were then removed and placed immediately on a Knoop microhardness-testing device and the microhardness was measured at 9 points across top and bottom surfaces of each specimen. Five specimens were made for each condition. As expected, for each RBC there was no significant difference in the microhardness values at the top of the 2, 4 and 6-mm thick specimens. SureFil SDR Flow was the softest resin, but was the only resin that had no significant difference between the KHN values at the bottom of the 2 and 4-mm (Mixed Model ANOVA pmaterial and, in accordance with manufacturer's instructions, this RBC should be overlaid with a conventional resin. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Microhardness Characteristics Value of Root canal Dentin After application With Different Types of EDTA

    OpenAIRE

    drg. Ph.D, Nurhayati NatsirSp.KG

    2016-01-01

    The Result Show there arae differences in dentin microhardness decrease significantly in all treatment group EDTA solution, Amountingto 13 667kg/mm2. This study aim to determine the charactheristics of the microhardness impairment root canal dentin after application with different types of EDTA.

  13. Comparative evaluation of two different remineralizing agents on the microhardness of bleached enamel surface: Results of an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunpriya Kaur

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Both GC Tooth Mousse (Recaldent and Toothmin Tooth cream (Abbott Healthcare Pvt.Ltd increase the microhardness of bleached enamel. Toothmin tooth cream is a better agent for increasing microhardness, although difference is not significant.

  14. Impact of hydrogen peroxide activated by lighting-emitting diode/laser system on enamel color and microhardness: An in situ design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Barbara Araujo Loiola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hydrogen peroxide (HP at lower concentration can provide less alteration on enamel surface and when combined with laser therapy, could decrease tooth sensitivity. This in situ study evaluated the influence of 15% and 35% HP gel activated by lighting-emitting diode (LED/laser light for in-office tooth bleaching. Materials and Methods: Forty-four bovine enamel slabs were polished and subjected to surface microhardness (load of 25 g for 5 s. The specimens were placed in intraoral palatal devices of 11 volunteers (n = 11. Sample was randomly distributed into four groups according to the bleaching protocol: 15% HP, 15% HP activated by LED/laser, 35% HP, and 35% HP activated by LED/laser. The experimental phase comprised 15 days and bleaching protocols were performed on the 2 nd and 9 th days. Surface microhardness (KHN and color changes were measured and data were analyzed by ANOVA (α = 0.05. Results: There were no significant differences in microhardness values neither in color alteration of enamel treated with 15% HP and 35% HP activated or not by LED/laser system (P > 0.05. Conclusions: Both concentrations of HP (15 or 35%, regardless of activated by an LED/laser light, did not affect the surface microhardness and had the same effectiveness in enamel bleaching.

  15. Repeated exposure of acidic beverages on esthetic restorative materials: An in-vitro surface microhardness study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Arun M; Sunny, Steffy M; Rai, Kavita; Hegde, Amitha M

    2016-07-01

    A manifold increase in the consumption of aerated beverages has witnessed a twin increase in tooth wear and raised demand for esthetic restorative materials. This study aimed to evaluate the surface microhardness changes of esthetic restorative materials following treatment with aerated beverages in an in-vitro situation. The initial surface microhardness of the restorative materials GC Fuji II LC, GC Fuji IX, Nano Glass ionomer, Resin and Nano composite was recorded. These materials were studied under 3 groups that included those exposed to the acidic beverages daily, weekly once in a month and those that had no exposures at all. The final surface microhardness of the materials was recorded following experimentation and was subjected to statistical comparisons. The restorative materials were compared for their surface microhardness changes following respective treatments using the T-test and One-way ANOVA analysis. Inter-comparisons between the groups showed statistical significance (pmaterials revealed surface microhardness loss; the maximum reduction noticed with the Nano glass ionomer cement tested (pmicrohardness of restorative materials markedly reduced upon repeated exposures with acidic beverages; the product with phosphoric acid producing the maximum surface microhardness loss. Restorative materials, acidic beverages, surface microhardness, resin composites, glass ionomers.

  16. Laser Surface Modification of Ti6Al4V-Cu for Improved Microhardness and Wear Resistance Properties

    OpenAIRE

    Erinosho, Mutiu Folorunsho; Akinlabi, Esther Titilayo; Pityana, Sisa; Owolabi, Gbadebo

    2017-01-01

    To modify the properties of Ti6Al4V alloy, Cu has been added to host an antimicrobial effect in the revised alloy for marine application. The Laser Metal Deposition (LMD) process on the Ti6Al4V alloy and Cu was been investigated for surface modification in order to combat the problem of biofouling in the marine industry. The investigations focused on the microstructural observations, micro-hardness measurements and dry sliding wear in the presence of 3 and 5 weight percents of Cu. The microst...

  17. Effects of coronal substrates and water storage on the microhardness of a resin cement used for luting ceramic crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Luana Menezes de; Pegoraro, Luiz Fernando; Lanza, Marcos Daniel Septímio; Pegoraro, Thiago Amadei; Carvalho, Ricardo Marins de

    2014-01-01

    Composite resin and metallic posts are the materials most employed for reconstruction of teeth presenting partial or total destruction of crowns. Resin-based cements have been widely used for cementation of ceramic crowns. The success of cementation depends on the achievement of adequate cement curing. To evaluate the microhardness of Variolink® II (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein), used for cementing ceramic crowns onto three different coronal substrate preparations (dentin, metal, and composite resin), after 7 days and 3 months of water storage. The evaluation was performed along the cement line in the cervical, medium and occlusal thirds on the buccal and lingual aspects, and on the occlusal surface. Thirty molars were distributed in three groups (N=10) according to the type of coronal substrate: Group D- the prepared surfaces were kept in dentin; Groups M (metal) and R (resin)- the crowns were sectioned at the level of the cementoenamel junction and restored with metallic cast posts or resin build-up cores, respectively. The crowns were fabricated in ceramic IPS e.max® Press (Ivoclar Vivadent, Schaan, Liechtenstein) and luted with Variolink II. After 7 days of water storage, 5 specimens of each group were sectioned in buccolingual direction for microhardness measurements. The other specimens (N=5) were kept stored in deionized water at 37ºC for three months, followed by sectioning and microhardness measurements. Data were first analyzed by three-way ANOVA that did not reveal significant differences between thirds and occlusal surface (p=0.231). Two-way ANOVA showed significant effect of substrates (pcrowns were cemented on resin cores and tested after 7 days of water storage (p=0.007). The type of material employed for coronal reconstruction of preparations for prosthetic purposes may influence the cement properties.

  18. Effect of a multi-layer infection control barrier on the micro-hardness of a composite resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    HWANG, In-Nam; HONG, Sung-Ok; LEE, Bin-Na; HWANG, Yun-Chan; OH, Won-Mann; CHANG, Hoon-Sang

    2012-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of multiple layers of an infection control barrier on the micro-hardness of a composite resin. Material and Methods One, two, four, and eight layers of an infection control barrier were used to cover the light guides of a high-power light emitting diode (LED) light curing unit (LCU) and a low-power halogen LCU. The composite specimens were photopolymerized with the LCUs and the barriers, and the micro-hardness of the upper and lower surfaces was measured (n=10). The hardness ratio was calculated by dividing the bottom surface hardness of the experimental groups by the irradiated surface hardness of the control groups. The data was analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results The micro-hardness of the composite specimens photopolymerized with the LED LCU decreased significantly in the four- and eight-layer groups of the upper surface and in the two-, four-, and eight-layer groups of the lower surface. The hardness ratio of the composite specimens was hardness of the composite specimens photopolymerized with the halogen LCU decreased significantly in the eight-layer group of the upper surface and in the two-, four-, and eight-layer groups of the lower surface. However, the hardness ratios of all the composite specimens photopolymerized with barriers were hardness of the composite resin. However, when using an infection control barrier on the low-power LCUs, attention should be paid so as not to sacrifice the polymerization efficiency. PMID:23138746

  19. Influence of investment, disinfection, and storage on the microhardness of ocular resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Gennari-Filho, Humberto; Zavanelli, Adriana Cristina; Dekon, Stefan Fiuza de Carvalho; Mancuso, Daniela Nardi

    2009-01-01

    The longevity of an ocular prosthesis is directly related to the resistance to erosion of its material. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of chemical disinfection and the method of investment on the microhardness of ocular prosthesis acrylic resin. Thirty-two test specimen investments were obtained in two silicones. A segment was cut in each test specimen, and each specimen was fixed in an acrylic disk. The specimens were then polished and submitted to the first microhardness test before immersion in distilled water and incubation for 2 months. During this 2-month period, the specimens were immersed in a water bath at 37 degrees C and were disinfected daily; half were disinfected with neutral soap and the other half were disinfected with 4% chlorhexidine gluconate. After the storage phase and disinfection, a second microhardness test was performed. The surface microhardness values for the acrylic resins were submitted to ANOVA, followed by the Tukey test. The disinfection and the period of storage did not statistically influence the surface microhardness of the acrylic resin, independent of the method of investment of the specimens (Zetalabor or Vipi Sil). The investment of specimens with Zetalabor silicone presented a greater surface hardness, independent of the type of disinfection and the period of storage. Based on these results, we suggest that the microhardness of the resin evaluated was not influenced by the method of disinfection or the time of storage used and was affected only by the investment material.

  20. Use of microhardness as a simple means of estimating relative wear resistance of carbide thermal spray coatings: Part 2. wear resistance of cemented carbide coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factor, Michael; Roman, Itzhak

    2002-12-01

    A selection of WC-Co and Cr3C2-25%NiCr coatings produced by plasma spray and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) deposition techniques were subjected to various wear tests designed to simulate abrasion, cavitation, sliding, and particle erosion type wear mechanisms. All of the coatings were at least 200 µm thick and were deposited onto stainless steel substrates. In Part 1 of this contribution, the microstructures of the coatings were characterized and their mechanical properties were assessed using microindentation procedures. In this second part of the article, the behavior of the coatings when subjected to the various wear tests is reported and the utility of microhardness testing as an indication of relative wear resistance is discussed. It is shown that correctly performed, appropriate microhardness measurements are a good indication of abrasion resistance and sliding wear resistance, and also correlate well with cavitation resistance in Cr3C2-NiCr. The measurements were less useful for predicting erosion resistance for both Cr3C2-NiCr and WC-Co, however, and for abrasion resistance when WC-Co was ground against SiC. Here the contribution of micromechanisms involving fracturing and brittle failure is greater than that indicated by the coating microhardness, which is essentially a measurement of resistance to plastic deformation under equilibrium conditions.

  1. Radiation therapy alters microhardness and microstructure of enamel and dentin of permanent human teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Ligia Maria Napolitano; Palma-Dibb, Regina Guenka; Paula-Silva, Francisco Wanderley Garcia; Oliveira, Harley Francisco de; Nelson-Filho, Paulo; Silva, Léa Assed Bezerra da; Queiroz, Alexandra Mussolino de

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the effects of ionizing radiation on the mechanical and micro-morphological properties of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. Enamel and dentin microhardness (n=12 hemi-sections) was evaluated at three depths (superficial, middle and deep) prior to (control) and after every 10Gy radiation dose up to a cumulative dose of 60Gy by means of longitudinal microhardness. Data were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test at a significance level of 5%. Enamel and dentin morphology was assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for semi-quantitative analysis (n=8 hemi-sections). Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn's or Fisher exact tests at a significance level of 5%. The application of ionizing radiation did not change the overall enamel microhardness, although an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. The micro-morphological analysis of enamel revealed that irradiation did not influence rod structure but interprismatic structure became more evident. Dentin microhardness decreased after 10, 20, 30, 50 and 60Gy cumulative doses (pmorphological analysis revealed fissures in the dentin structure, obliterated dentinal tubules and fragmentation of collagen fibers after 30 and 60Gy cumulative doses. Although ionizing radiation did not affect the enamel microhardness of permanent teeth as a whole, an increase in superficial enamel microhardness was observed. Dentin microhardness decreased after almost all radiation doses compared with the control, with the greatest reduction of microhardness in the middle depth region. The morphological alterations on enamel and dentin structures increased with the increase of the radiation dose, with a more evident interprismatic portion, presence of fissures and obliterated dentinal tubules, and progressive fragmentation of the collagen fibers. This study shows that irradiation affects microhardness and micro-morphology of enamel and dentin of permanent teeth. The

  2. Microhardness and In Vitro Corrosion of Heat-Treated Mg–Y–Ag Biodegradable Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlček, Marián; Lukáč, František; Kudrnová, Hana; Smola, Bohumil; Stulíková, Ivana; Luczak, Monika; Szakács, Gábor; Hort, Norbert; Willumeit-Römer, Regine

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium alloys are promising candidates for biodegradable medical implants which reduce the necessity of second surgery to remove the implants. Yttrium in solid solution is an attractive alloying element because it improves mechanical properties and exhibits suitable corrosion properties. Silver was shown to have an antibacterial effect and can also enhance the mechanical properties of magnesium alloys. Measurements of microhardness and electrical resistivity were used to study the response of Mg–4Y and Mg–4Y–1Ag alloys to isochronal or isothermal heat treatments. Hardening response and electrical resistivity annealing curves in these alloys were compared in order to investigate the effect of silver addition. Procedures for solid solution annealing and artificial aging of the Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy were developed. The corrosion rate of the as-cast and heat-treated Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy was measured by the mass loss method. It was found out that solid solution heat treatment, as well artificial aging to peak hardness, lead to substantial improvement in the corrosion properties of the Mg–4Y–1Ag alloy. PMID:28772414

  3. Residual stress, micro-hardness and tensile properties of ANSI 304 stainless steel thick sheet by fiber laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Lu, J.Z., E-mail: blueesky2005@163.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Luo, K.Y., E-mail: luokaiyu2012@gmail.com [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Feng, A.X. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); College of Mechanical Engineering, Wenzhou University, Wenzhou 325035 (China); Dai, F.Z.; Zhong, J.S.; Luo, M. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); Zhang, Y.K. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Xuefu Road 301, Jingkou District, Zhenjiang 212013 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-01-20

    A fiber laser was chosen to weld the ANSI 304 stainless steel (ANSI 304 SS) sheets with a thickness of 5 mm. The effects of laser power, defocusing distance and welding speed on the weld appearances were investigated by the orthogonal test and the analyses on the appearances and properties of laser welds. Residual stress, micro-hardness and tensile properties of ANSI 304 SS welds were measured, and the cross section and surface morphologies were characterized by optical microscope (OM) compared with the two conventional laser (CO{sub 2}, Nd:YAG) welding methods. Results showed that ANSI 304 SS welds with good quality can be obtained if the appropriate fiber laser welding parameters were chosen. Tensile residual stresses of the fiber laser weld with the appropriate welding parameters were the lowest and micro-hardness and tensile properties were the highest among the three laser welding methods. In addition, the crystal solidification process induced by the fiber laser welding was schematically illustrated and systematically revealed.

  4. Effect of different denture cleansers on surface roughness and microhardness of artificial denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuzugullu, Bulem; Acar, Ozlem; Cetinsahin, Cem; Celik, Cigdem

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the effects of different denture cleansers on the surface roughness and microhardness of various types of posterior denture teeth. 168 artificial tooth specimens were divided into the following four subgroups (n=42): SR Orthotyp PE (polymethylmethacrylate); SR Orthosit PE (Isosit); SR Postaris DCL (double cross-linked); and SR Phonares II (nanohybrid composite). The specimens were further divided according to the type of the denture cleanser (Corega Tabs (sodium perborate), sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl), and distilled water (control) (n=14)) and immersed in the cleanser to simulate a 180-day immersion period, after which the surface roughness and microhardness were tested. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test, Conover's nonparametric multiple comparison test, and Spearman's rank correlation analysis (P<.05). A comparison among the denture cleanser groups showed that NaOCl caused significantly higher roughness values on SR Orthotyp PE specimens when compared with the other artificial teeth (P<.001). Furthermore, Corega Tabs resulted in higher microhardness values in SR Orthotyp PE specimens than distilled water and NaOCl (P<.005). The microhardness values decreased significantly from distilled water, NaOCl, to Corega Tabs for SR Orthosit PE specimens (P<.001). SR Postaris DLC specimens showed increased microhardness when immersed in distilled water or NaOCl when compared with immersion in Corega Tabs (P<.003). No correlation was found between surface roughness and microhardness (r=0.104, P=.178). NaOCl and Corega Tabs affected the surface roughness and microhardness of all artificial denture teeth except for the new generation nanohybrid composite teeth.

  5. Effect of Lithium Disilicate Veneers of Different Thickness on the Degree of Conversion and Microhardness of a Light-Curing and a Dual-Curing Cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scotti, Nicola; Comba, Allegra; Cadenaro, Milena; Fontanive, Luca; Breschi, Lorenzo; Monaco, Carlo; Scotti, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Various materials and systems for bonding lithium disilicate to the tooth substrate are available to clinicians, who can adapt the materials to each clinical situation to maximize the performance of indirect esthetic restorations. This study aimed to evaluate the degree of conversion (DC) and the microhardness (MH) of a dual-curing and a light-curing cement under lithium disilicate discs of different thicknesses. A total of 48 lithium disilicate (IPS e.max CAD, Ivoclar Vivadent) samples were prepared and divided into three groups (n = 16) according to the thickness (group A was 0.6 mm; group B was 1.0 mm; group C was 1.5 mm). Each group was further divided into two subgroups (n = 8) according to the resin cement employed, NX3 (Kerr) or Choice 2 (Bisco). A standardized quantity of cement was placed on the sample, and DC was evaluated with an attenuated total reflectance Fourier transformed infrared spectrophotometer (Nicolet IS10, Thermo Scientific). Twenty-four hours after DC was established, Vickers test was performed on the cement with a microindentometer (Leica Microsystems). Results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance test and significance set at P < .05. Statistical analysis showed cement type had a significant influence (P = .005) on DC. MH results were influenced by thicknesses only between 0.6 and 1.5 mm when light-cured cement was employed. The light-curing and the dual-curing cements reached comparable DCs between 0.6 and 1.5 mm. However, the light-curing resin showed a higher DC and MH.

  6. Comparative evaluation of sorption, solubility and microhardness of heat cure polymethylmethacrylate denture base resin & flexible denture base resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Jay; Bulbule, Nilesh; Kulkarni, Shilpa; Shah, Riddhi; Kakade, Dilip

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare sorption, solubility and microhardness of heat cure polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) denture base resin and flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) denture base resin. Sorption, solubility and microhardness were assessed to determine compliance with ADA Specification no. 12. RESULTs were assessed using statistical and observational analyses. All materials satisfied ADA requirements for sorption, solubility and microhardness. Heat cure PMMA showed more sorption, solubility and microhardness than flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon). Flexible (thermoplastic polyamide nylon) resin absorbs less water, is less soluble and is more flexible than PMMA.

  7. Evaluating the importance of the convex hull in solving the Euclidean version of the traveling salesperson problem: reply to Lee and Vickers (2000).

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, J N; Ormerod, T C

    2000-10-01

    Lee and Vickers (2000) suggest that the results of MacGregor and Ormerod (1996), showing that the response uncertainty to traveling salesperson problems (TSPs) increases with increasing numbers of nonboundary points, may have resulted as an artifact of constraints imposed in the construction of stimuli. The fact that similar patterns of results have been obtained for our "constrained" stimuli, for a stimulus constructed under different constraints, for 13 randomly generated stimuli, and for random and patterned 48-point problems provides empirical evidence that the results are not artifactual. Lee and Vickers further suggest that, even if not artifactual, the results are in principle limited to arrays of fewer than 50 points and that, beyond this, the total number of points and number of nonboundary points are "diagnostically equivalent." This claim seems to us incorrect, since arrays of any size can be constructed that will permit experimental tests of whether problem difficulty is influenced by the number of nonboundary points, or the total number of points, or both. We present a reanalysis of our original data using hierarchical regression analysis which indicates that both factors may influence problem complexity.

  8. Structure and Microhardness of Cu-Ta Joints Produced by Explosive Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliutina, Iu. N.; Mali, V. I.; Bataev, I. A.; Bataev, A. A.; Esikov, M. A.; Smirnov, A. I.; Skorokhod, K. A.

    2013-01-01

    The structure and microhardness of Cu-Ta joints produced by explosive welding were studied. It was found that, during explosive welding, an intermediate layer 20⋯40 μm thick with a finely dispersed heterophase structure, formed between the welded copper and tantalum plates. The structure of the layer was studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Microvolumes with tantalum particles distributed in a copper matrix and microvolumes of copper particles in a tantalum matrix were detected. The tantalum particles in copper have a size of 5⋯500 nm, with a predominance of 5⋯50 nm particles. A mechanism for the formation of the finely dispersed heterophase structure in explosive welding is proposed. The microhardness of interlayers with the heterophase structure reaches 280 HV, which far exceeds the microhardness of copper (~130 HV) and tantalum (~160 HV). Many twins of deformation origin were found in the structure of the copper plate. The effect of heating temperature in the range from 100 to 900°C on the microhardness of copper, tantalum, and the Cu-Ta welded joint was studied. Upon heating to 900°C, the microhardness of the intermediate layer decreases from 280 to 150 HV. The reduction in the strength properties of the weld material is mainly due to structural transformations in copper. PMID:24453818

  9. Effect of preheating on microhardness and viscosity of 4 resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayub, Karen V; Santos, Gildo C; Rizkalla, Amin S; Bohay, Richard; Pegoraro, Luis Fernando; Rubo, José H; Santos, M Jacinta M C

    2014-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the effect of temperature on the microhardness and viscosity of 4 resin composite materials. To investigate microhardness, samples of each of the 4 composite materials, prepared by standard insertion of resin into prefabricated moulds, were divided into 2 groups (n = 10 per group). On the first group, the resin composite materials were inserted into the moulds at room temperature and cured. On the second group, the resin composite materials were pre-heated in a heating device, inserted into the moulds and immediately cured. Microhardness after curing (both immediately and after 24 hours of storage) was determined (using a 300 g load applied for 10 seconds) and averaged for 5 randomly selected points on the top and bottom surfaces of each sample. To investigate viscosity, 0.5 g samples of room temperature or preheated resin composite (n = 15 per group) were placed under a 454 g load for 45 seconds before light-curing (40 seconds). After curing, each sample was photographed and the surface area calculated. Data were analyzed by t tests or one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Preheating the resin composites increased the microhardness and decreased the viscosity of the samples. Filtek Supreme Ultra resin composite had the highest mean microhardness, and Vit-l-escence resin composite had the lowest viscosity. The effects of preheating resin composites may allow easier placement of restorations and greater monomer conversion.

  10. Evaluation of CO2 laser irradiation effect on enamel microhardness after incipient caries creation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loghman Rezaei-Soufi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The important mission in modern science of caries prevention is identification and providing the necessary actions for caries prevention to patients with an elevated risk of caries. The aim of this study was evaluation of CO2 laser irradiation effect on enamel microhardness after incipient caries creation. Material and methods: In this in vitro-experimental study, for evaluation of enamel microhardness 30 teeth after disinfection process were divided randomly into three groups A, B, C [n=10]: A] Control [normal saline] B] Immersed in cariogenic solution for 1 month C] Immersed in cariogenic solution for 1 month + CO2 laser [10.6µm, 10Hz, 0.5W, 20s, beam diameter 0.2 mm]. Data analyzing was used by 16 SPSS software. Parametric one-way ANOVA and Tukey were used for surface microhardness at 0.05% significance level. Results: According to one-way ANOVA parametric test, there was a significant difference between three groups [p=0.047]. In the following, results of Tukey test showed that there was a significant statistical difference between the microhardness of control and other groups [P=0.038]. On the other hand, there wasn’t statistical difference between A, C and B, C group means [P>0.05]. Conclusion: These study findings showed that CO2 laser irradiation on enamel surface with incipient caries had no significant effect on surface microhardness enhancement.

  11. Effects of bone graft materials on the microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Erick Y; Svec, Timothy; Whitten, Brian; Sedgley, Christine M

    2012-05-01

    Large through-and-through lesions have been reported to heal faster and better when filled with bone graft material at the time of an apicoectomy. It is unknown what effect these have on retrograde filling materials such as white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA). In this study, the null hypothesis was tested that the presence of bone graft materials does not affect the microhardness of WMTA. Freshly mixed WMTA was condensed into acrylic cylinders and preincubated aerobically at 37°C for 1 hour. Cylinders were immersed in simulated body fluid in close proximity to graft materials: xenograft (Bio-Oss, n = 60), freeze-dried bone allograft (MinerOss, n = 60), demineralized freeze-dried bone allograft (OraGraft, n = 40), and allograft (Puros, n = 60). Knoop microhardness of half the samples in each group was evaluated after 2 weeks of incubation and the remainder at 4 weeks. The values for each group were then compared with 2-way analysis of variance and Bonferroni post hoc tests. WMTA microhardness values for Bio-Oss, MinerOss, and Puros groups were lower than those for OraGraft and control groups regardless of incubation period (P Microhardness values were higher at 4 weeks compared with 2 weeks for MinerOss (P materials appear to have a differential effect on the microhardness of WMTA. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Microhardness and sealing ability of materials used for root canal perforations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, Carlos H R; Fonseca, Manuela B; Carvalho, Alessandra S; Camargo, Samira E; Cardoso, Flavia G; Valera, Marcia C

    2012-01-01

    Root perforations may lead to a loss of integrity in the root and periodontium, violations of the biologic periodontal distance, and injuries to periodontal tissue. This study sought to analyze the effect of root canal biomechanical preparation on the microhardness and the marginal sealing ability of different materials used to treat root perforations. Standard root perforations were performed in 96 bovine incisors. The teeth were divided into four groups (n = 24), based on the material used to treat those teeth: Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) (Group 1), MTA protected with cyanoacrylate (Group 2), MTA protected with glass ionomer (GI) cement (Group 3), and castor oil bean (COB) cement (Group 4). After root perforations were closed, the root canals were prepared biomechanically and teeth were sectioned longitudinally. Microleakage and microhardness of sealed perforations were assessed; microleakage data were submitted to analysis of variance (ANOVA) testing, while microhardness data were submitted to Dunnet and Tukey tests (p microhardness values compared to COB. It was concluded that the chemical and mechanical agents used during root canal preparation did not affect the sealing procedures. Administering surface protection to MTA did not improve microhardness or sealing.

  13. Influencing Factors on the Interface Microhardness of Lightweight Aggregate Concrete Consisting of Glazed Hollow Bead

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Ma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Lightweight aggregate concrete consisting of glazed hollow bead (GHB as lightweight aggregate is studied for the influence of nanosilica (NS content, prewetting time for GHB, water-cement ratio, and curing humidity, on the interface structure between GHB and cement paste. This research analyzed the influences of various factors on the interface zone structure by measuring microhardness (HV and hydration degree of cement paste (HD nearby the interface zone (1 mm between GHB and cement paste at different periods of aging. Due to the sampling limitation, the interface zone in this test is within 1 mm away from the surface of lightweight aggregate. The HD of cement paste was determined through chemically combined water (CCW test. The results were expected to reflect the influence of various factors on the interface zone structure. Results showed that the rational control of the four factors studied could fully mobilize the water absorption and desorption properties of GHB to improve the characteristics of the interfacial transition zone.

  14. Microhardness and microstructure of Ferritic-Martensitic ODS steel tube fabricated by a pilger process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Chun; Jin, Hyun Ju; Noh, Sang Hoon; Kang, Suk Hoon; Choi, Byoung Kwon; Kim, Ki Baik; Kim, Ga Eon; Kim, Tae Kyu [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are attractive for the structural materials of the future generation nuclear systems owing to excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of FM steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. This study investigates microhardness and microstructure of FM ODS steel tube fabricated by a pilger process. For this, 10Cr-1Mo FM ODS steel tube was prepared by mechanical alloying (MA), hot extrusion, pilgering and heat treatment (HT). Hardness measurement was carried out for mother tube, pilgering and HT to evaluate the effects of tube fabrication process on the mechanical property. The microstructures were observed using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The FM ODS steel tube after pilgering indicated high hardness value by the high density dislocation due to cold rolling. Heat treatment tube at 1150 .deg. for 1hr followed by a furnace cooling showed the very large ferrite grains and coarse carbides, leading to the softening of the strength for the FM ODS steel tube. It is believed that these results will be helpful in the development of FM ODS steel tube.

  15. Microhardness and tribological wear of the steels remelted with an electric arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Adamiak

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available This study presents results of a research on the surface strengthening of the C15, C45 and C90U steels by application of concentrated heat stream with the GTAW methodology. Utilizing the GTAW methodology remelting of the surface layer of the sampled steels was performed by a welding head moving at a speed ranging from 200 mm/min to 800 mm/min and the current intensity of the electric arcranging from 50A to 300A. Measurements of hardness, frictional coefficient and intensity of tribological wear were performed in theremelted surface layer. Correlation between the intensity of the electric arc versus microhardness and tribological wear resistance under conditions of dry-friction was established. Following the treatment an increase in hardness as well as increase in the tribological wear resistance could be observed in steel samples. The best results were achieved during remelting of the surface layer with electric arc at 100A intensity and the speed of the welding head in relation to treated sample of 200 mm/min.

  16. Microhardness evaluation alloys Hf-Si-B; Avaliacao de microdureza de ligas Hf-Si-B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gigolotti, Joao Carlos Janio; Costa, Eliane Fernandes Brasil [Centro Universitario de Volta Redonda (UNIFOA), Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil); Nunes, Carlos Angelo; Rocha, Elisa Gombio; Coelho, Gilberto Carvalho, E-mail: carlosjanio@uol.com.br, E-mail: eliane-costabrasi@hotmail.com, E-mail: cnunes@demar.eel.usp.br, E-mail: elisarocha@alunos.eel.usp.br, E-mail: coelho@demar.eel.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    The technological advance has generated increasing demand for materials that can be used under high temperature, what includes intermetallic MR-Si-B (MR = refractory metal) alloys with multiphase structures, that can also be applied in oxide environments. Thus, this work had for objective the micro hardness study of the Hf-Si-B system alloys, heat treated at 1600 deg C, in the Hf rich region. Hf-Si-B alloys had been produced with blades of Hf (min. 99.8%), Si (min. 99.998%) and B (min. 99.5%), in the voltaic arc furnace and heat treated at 1600 deg C under argon atmosphere. The relationship of the phases had been previously identified by X-ray diffraction and contrast in backscattered electron imaging mode. The alloys had their hardness analyzed by method Vickers (micro hardness) with load of 0.05 kgf and 0.2 kgf and application time of 20 s. The results, obtained from the arithmetic mean of measurements for each alloy on the heterogeneous region, showed a mean hardness of 11.08 GPA, with small coefficient of variation of 3.8%. The borides HfB2 (19.34 GPa) e HfB - 11.76 GPa, showed the hardness higher than the silicides Hf2Si (8.57 GPa), Hf5Si3 (9.63 GPa), Hf3Si2 (11.66 GPa), Hf5Si4 (10.00 GPa), HfSi (10.02 GPa) e HfSi2 (8.61 GPa). (author)

  17. Evaluation of Chlorine Dioxide Irrigation Solution on the Microhardness and Surface Roughness of Root Canal Dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballal, Nidambur Vasudev; Khandewal, Deepika; Karthikeyan, Saravana; Somayaji, Krishnaraj; Foschi, Federico

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of chlorine dioxide and various other more common irrigation solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of root canal dentin. Fifty human maxillary central incisors were sectioned longitudinally and treated for 1 minute with 5 ml of the following aqueous solutions (v/v%): Group 1: 13.8% chlorine dioxide, Group 2: 17% ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA). Group 3: 7% maleic acid, Group 4: 2.5% sodium hypochlorite (5 ml/min), Group 5: Saline (control). Specimens were subjected to microhardness and surface roughness testing. Chlorine dioxide and sodium hypochlorite reduced the microhardness more than other test agents. The highest surface roughness was produced with maleic acid. Chlorine dioxide should be used cautiously during chemomechanical preparation of the root canal system in order to prevent untoward damage to the teeth.

  18. In vitro effect of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser exposure on morphology, hydroxyapatite composition and microhardness properties of human dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Retna Apsari

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was employed as a source of ablation. The fundamental wavelength of the laser is 1064 nm, with pulse duration of 8 nanosecond operates with uniphase mode of TEM00. In the following experiments, dentin samples (without caries and plaque are exposed to pulse laser with Q-switching effect at various energy dose. Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of laser ablation on dentin samples using Q-switched Nd:YAG laser exposure. Methods: The laser was operated in repetitive mode with frequency of 10 Hz. The energy dose of the laser was ranging from 13.9 J/cm2, 21.2 J/cm2 and 41.7 J/cm2. The target material comprised of human dentin. The laser was exposed in one mode with Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. Energy delivered to the target through free beam technique. The exposed human dentin was examined by using x-ray diffraction (XRD and fluoresence scanning electron microscopy for energy dispersive (FESEM-EDAX. Microhardness of human dentin were examined by using microhardness vickers test (MVT. Results: The result obtained showed that the composition of hydroxyapatite of the dentin after exposed by Q-switched Nd:YAG laser are 75.02% to 78.21%, with microhardness of 38.7 kgf/mm2 to 86.6 kgf/mm2. This indicated that exposed pulsed Nd:YAG laser on the human dentin attributed to the phototermal effect. The power density created by the Q-switched Nd:YAG laser enables the heat to produce optical breakdown (melting and hole associated with plasma formation and shock wave propagation, from energy dose of 21.2 J/cm2. From XRD analysis showed that the exposure of Nd:YAG laser did not involve in changing the crystal structure of the dentin, but due to photoablation effect. Conclusion: In conclusion, the application of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser as contactless drills in dentistry should be regarded as an alternative to the classical mechanical technique to improve the quality of the dentin treatment.Latar belakang

  19. Effect of artificial aging on the roughness and microhardness of sealed composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catelan, Anderson; Briso, André L F; Sundfeld, Renato H; Dos Santos, Paulo H

    2010-10-01

      The application of surface sealant could improve the surface quality and success of composite restorations; however, it is important to assess the behavior of this material when subjected to aging procedures.   To evaluate the effect of artificial aging on the surface roughness and microhardness of sealed microhybrids and nanofilled composites.   One hundred disc-shaped specimens were made for each composite. After 24 hours, all samples were polished and surface sealant was applied to 50 specimens of each composite. Surface roughness (Ra) was determined with a profilometer and Knoop microhardness was assessed with a 50-g load for 15 seconds. Ten specimens of each group were aged during 252 hours in a UV-accelerated aging chamber or immersed for 28 days in cola soft drink, orange juice, red wine staining solutions, or distilled water. Data were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and Fischer's test (α=0.05).   Artificial aging decreased microhardness values for all materials, with the exceptions of Vit-l-escence (Ultradent Products Inc., South Jordan UT, USA) and Supreme XT (3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA) sealed composites; surface roughness values were not altered. Water storage had less effect on microhardness, compared with the other aging processes. The sealed materials presented lower roughness and microhardness values, when compared with unsealed composites.   Aging methods decreased the microhardness values of a number of composites, with the exception of some sealed composites, but did not alter the surface roughness of the materials. The long-term maintenance of the surface quality of materials is fundamental to improving the longevity of esthetic restorations. In this manner, the use of surface sealants could be an important step in the restorative procedure using resin-based materials. © 2010, COPYRIGHT THE AUTHORS. JOURNAL COMPILATION © 2010, WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  20. Effect of Cutting Parameters on Microhardness in 2 mm Slot Milling Hardened Tool Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bissacco, Giuliano; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard; De Chiffre, Leonardo

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental study on the dependency of surface integrity on cutting parameters in slot milling of hardened tool steel. A series of 2 mm slot milling tests have been performed with different cutting parameters. Microhardness was chosen for evaluation of subsurface integrity....... The process was found to be sensitive to cutting parameters. An increase of feed per tooth or depth of cut produced a reduction of the microhardness of the slot surface. An optimal combination of machining parameters was found to be 80-110 m/min in cutting speed, 0.005 mm in feed per tooth and 0.1 mm in axial...... depth of cut....

  1. Harmful Effect of Beer on Bovine Enamel Microhardness - In Vitro Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Esper, Maria Ângela Lacerda Rangel; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Melo, Renata Marques; Bresciani, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of beers on the bovine enamel microhardness. Fifty rectangular (1 x 3 x 1 mm-height x width x thickness) enamel specimens were obtained from permanent bovine incisors, and divided into five groups (n = 10) according to the treatment employed: Saliva, Coke, Brahma, Heineken, and Budweiser. Microhardness (Knoop) were obtained before; after 5, 30 and 60 min of immersion in each solution. The data were analyzed using repeated two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s test (pHeineken, showed low values after 60 minutes. Beers tested have low potential to cause enamel erosion when compared to Coke.

  2. Harmful Effect of Beer on Bovine Enamel Microhardness – In Vitro Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanatta, Rayssa Ferreira; Esper, Maria Ângela Lacerda Rangel; Valera, Marcia Carneiro; Melo, Renata Marques; Bresciani, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of beers on the bovine enamel microhardness. Fifty rectangular (1 x 3 x 1 mm–height x width x thickness) enamel specimens were obtained from permanent bovine incisors, and divided into five groups (n = 10) according to the treatment employed: Saliva, Coke, Brahma, Heineken, and Budweiser. Microhardness (Knoop) were obtained before; after 5, 30 and 60 min of immersion in each solution. The data were analyzed using repeated two-way ANOVA and Tukey´s test (pHeineken, showed low values after 60 minutes. Beers tested have low potential to cause enamel erosion when compared to Coke. PMID:27760132

  3. Microhardness changes gradient of the duplex stainless steel (DSS surface layer after dry turning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Krolczyk

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the gradient of microhardness changes as a function of the distance from the material surface after turning with a wedge provided with a coating with a ceramic intermediate layer. The investigation comprised the influence of cutting speed on surface integrity microhardness in dry machining. The tested material was duplex stainless steel (DSS with two-phase, ferritic-austenitic structure. The tests have been performed under production conditions during machining of parts for electric motors and deep-well pumps.

  4. Effect of operating conditions on thin layers of titanium posed on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... important: a compact structure and good mechanical properties. The reaction between thin films and substrates is studied by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The measurements of microhardness were performed with the Vickers method. Keywords: Diffusion, reaction, carbides, microhardness ...

  5. Effect of a post-polymerization treatments on the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of reline and acrylic denture base resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Seiko Seo

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the effect of water-bath and microwave post-polymerization treatments on the flexural strength and Vickers hardness of four autopolymerizing reline resins (Duraliner II-D, Kooliner-K, Tokuso Rebase Fast-TR and Ufi Gel Hard C-UGH and one heat-polymerized acrylic resin (Lucitone 550-L, processed using two polymerization cycles (short cycle - 90 minutes at 73ºC and 100ºC for 30 minutes; and long cycle - 9 hours at 71ºC. For each material, thirty specimens (64 x 10 x 3.3 mm were made and divided into 3 groups (n=10. Specimens were tested after: processing (control group; water-bath at 55ºC for 10 minutes (reline materials or 60 minutes (L; and microwave irradiation. Flexural strength tests were performed at a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min using a three-point bending device with a span of 50 mm. The flexural strengths values were calculated in MPa. One fragment of each specimen was submitted to Vickers hardness test. Data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's HSD test (alpha=0.05. L microwaved specimens (short cycle exhibited significantly higher flexural strength means than its respective control group (p<0.05. Water-bath promoted a significant increase (p<0.05 in flexural strength of K and L (long cycle. The hardness of the tested materials was not influenced by the post-polymerization treatments. Post-polymerization treatments could be used to improve the flexural strength of some materials tested.

  6. Microstructural, Micro-hardness and Sensitization Evaluation in HAZ of Type 316L Stainless Steel Joint with Narrow Gap Welds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Faisal Shafiqul; Jang, Changheui [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Shi Chull [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    From Micro-hardness measurement HAZ zone was found approximately 1-1.5 mm in NGW and DL-EPR test confirmed that 316L NGW HAZ was not susceptible to sensitization as DOS <1% according to sensitization criteria based on reference. In nuclear power plants 316L stainless steels are commonly used material for their metallurgical stability, high corrosion resistance, and good creep and ductility properties at elevated temperatures. Welding zone considered as the weakest and failure initiation source of the components. For safety and economy of nuclear power plants accurate and dependable structural integrity assessment of main components like pressure vessels and piping are need as it joined by different welding process. In similar and dissimilar metal weld it has been observed that weld microstructure cause the variation of mechanical properties through the thickness direction. In the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) relative to the fusion line face a unique thermal experience during welding.

  7. On the interpretation of the indentation size effect (ISE) through gradient theory for Vickers and Berkovich indenters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kampouris, Asterios K.; Konstantinidis, Avraam A.

    2016-12-01

    The so-called indentation size effect (ISE) observed mainly in nanoindentation measurements with prismatic tips, is theoretically modeled in this article with the use of gradient theory. It is shown that the ISE, i.e. the dependence of the calculated hardness value on the indentation depth, is rather an artifact of the geometry of the tip used, than a phenomenon related to the material tested. The model predictions are compared with nanoindentation measurements of Al specimens.

  8. Effect of accelerated aging on the microhardness and color stability of flexible resins for dentures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resins have been widely used due to their acceptable esthetics and desirable characteristics such as easy handling, good thermal conductivity, low permeability to oral fluids and color stability. Flexible resins were introduced on the market as an alternative to the use of conventional acrylic resins in the construction of complete and partial removable dentures. Although these resins present advantages in terms of esthetics and comfort, studies assessing chromatic and microhardness alterations of these materials are still scarce in the related literature. The aim of this study was to evaluate the chromatic and microhardness alterations of two commercial brands of flexible resins in comparison to the conventional resin Triplex when submitted to accelerated aging. The resins were manipulated according to manufacturers' instructions and inserted into a silicone matrix to obtain 21 specimens divided into 3 groups: Triplex, Ppflex and Valplast. Triplex presented the highest microhardness value (p < 0.05 for all the aging periods, which was significantly different from that of the other resins, followed by the values of Valplast and Ppflex. Comparison between the flexible resins (Ppflex and Valplast revealed a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards color. The flexible resin Ppflex and the conventional resin Triplex presented no statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 as regards aging. The accelerated aging significantly increased the microhardness values of the resins, with the highest values being observed for Triplex. Valplast presented the greatest chromatic alteration after accelerated aging.

  9. Microhardness of resin composite materials light-cured through fiber reinforced composite.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, W.M.M.; Ray, N.J.; Creugers, N.H.J.; Kreulen, C.M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare polymerization efficiency of resin composite basing materials when light-cured through resin composite and fiber reinforced composite (FRC) by testing microhardness. METHODS: Simulated indirect restorations were prepared by application of resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) or FRC

  10. Microstructure and microhardness of AA1050/TiC surface composite ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A tool made of HCHCr steel, oil hardened to 62 HRC, having a cylindrical profile was used in this study. The microstructure and microhardness of the fabricated AMC were analysed. Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) micrographs revealed a uniform distribution of TiC particles which were well-bonded to the matrix alloy.

  11. Impact of chemical agents for surface treatments on microhardness and flexural strength of root dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Marcheto MARCELINO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the cross-sectional Knoop microhardness and flexural strength of root dentin exposed to different surface treatments with chemical agents after biomechanical preparation. Root canals from human canines were biomechanically treated and divided into eight groups (n=10 to receive one of the following dentin treatments: I. Deionized water (control; II. 5.25% Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl; III. NaOCl + 10% Sodium ascorbate (SA; IV. SA; V. 2% Chlorhexidine gel (CHX; VI. 37% Phosphoric acid gel (PA + CHX; VII. PA; and VIII. PA + NaOCl. The roots were sectioned to obtain specimens that were evaluated for cross-sectional Knoop microhardness and flexural strength using a three-point bending test. ANOVA and Tukey’s test were performed. The microhardness in the control group was significantly higher (p 0.05 to each other. Regarding flexural strength, PA+NaOCl provided statistical higher values than PA+CHX and CHX. However, there was no significant difference between the control group and those groups subjected to surface treatment (p > 0.05. Dentin microhardness was reduced after exposure to NaOCl, CHX, PA, SA and their associations and the flexural strength of radicular dentin was not affected by the chemical agents.

  12. Effect of traditional and alternative intracoronal bleaching agents on microhardness of human dentine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chng, H K; Yap, A U J; Wattanapayungkul, P; Sim, C P C

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of traditional and alternative bleaching agents on microhardness of human dentine when used intracoronally. Thirty-six premolars were divided into six groups and bleaching agents were sealed into the pulp chambers as follows: group 1--distilled water (control), group 2--30% hydrogen peroxide solution, group 3--sodium perborate mixed with distilled water, group 4--sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide solution, group 5--35% carbamide peroxide gel, group 6--35% hydrogen peroxide gel. Access cavities were sealed and the teeth were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C. After 7 days, each tooth was sectioned at the cemento-enamel junction level and microhardness testing was carried out on dentine. The results showed that treatment with 35% hydrogen peroxide gel, 30% hydrogen peroxide solution and 35% carbamide peroxide gel reduced the microhardness of outer dentine to a small extent while treatment with sodium perborate mixed with water and sodium perborate mixed with 30% hydrogen peroxide solution did not significantly alter the microhardness of dentine. Copyright 2004 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Microhardness and Roughness of Infiltrated White Spot Lesions Submitted to Different Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neres, É Y; Moda, M D; Chiba, E K; Briso, Alf; Pessan, J P; Fagundes, T C

    A white spot lesion is the first clinical sign of a caries lesion and represents mineral loss from the enamel subsurface. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microhardness and surface roughness of white spot lesions after application of a resin infiltrant and subjection to different challenges. Caries-like lesions were induced in bovine enamel discs (n=50), and the specimens were randomly divided into five study groups (n=10): demineralized enamel (negative control, G1), infiltrated enamel (G2), infiltrated enamel submitted to brushing (G3), infiltrated enamel submitted to pH cycling (G4), and infiltrated enamel submitted to artificial aging (G5). Half of each enamel surface was used as its own positive control. Roughness data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test followed by the Dunn test. Results from microhardness were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance, followed by the Tukey test for multiple comparisons. The level of significance was set at 5%. Microhardness and roughness values obtained from the test side of the specimens were significantly lower compared with the sound enamel for all groups. Microhardness values obtained for G2, G3, and G5 were not significantly different. Values found for G1 were significantly lower compared with those for G2, G3, and G5. The lowest microhardness values were observed for G4, which was significantly different from the other groups. Surface roughness was not significantly different between G2 and G3. The resin infiltrant presented superiority over the unprotected white spot lesions, as they were more resistant to mechanical and aging challenges. However, resin infiltration was not able to reestablish the properties of sound enamel and was not resistant to a new cariogenic challenge.

  14. The effect of Curcuma domestica Val - Tamarindus indica L mixed solution (“kunyit asam” on microhardness and roughnessof human tooth enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andi Pratiwi Iljas

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays,peoples tendto seekan alternative treatment from traditional plants because it is side effects relatively less than synthetic drugs. One of the famous traditional medicinedrinks in Indonesia is “kunyit asam”. People was make it with mixed both Curcuma domestica Val and Tamarindus indica L. Beside it has many advantages for health such as increasing stamina, it also has a good taste, so many people consumed it. However, the acid content in this drink maycause enamel erosion. Therefore the aim of this present study is to determine thein vitro effect of “kunyit asam” solution towards microhardness and roughness of human enamel tooth. The pH of solutionwas measure using a digital pH meter, while the calcium content measure using the Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy (AAS. This study used 40 permanent maxillary first incisor that has been extracted from the patient who came to dental polyclinic of hospitals in Polewali Mandar regency, West Sulawesi Province during February 2015-April 2015 period. The roots of the teeth were removed at the cementoenamel junction. Tooth crowns placed on blocks orthoplast with labial surface facing up. Samples were randomly divided into 2 groups equally andimmersed in aquadest solution pH 7.0 (negative control (Group I or “kunyit asam” solution pH 3.0 (Group II for 14, 28, 42 and 56 minutes respectively. An Universal Hardness Tester (Affri® Universal Hardness Tester, Japan was used to measure enamel surface microhardness, while to measure enamel surface roughness wasused a Roughness Tester (Surftest 301 Mitutoyo, Japan. Both measure were done before and after immersed in solution. Data were statistically analyzed using Levene, paired-t one-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA and Least Significance Different (LSD tests. The results of present study showed that there was no significant difference (p>0.05 microhardness but significant differences (p<0.05 for the roughness of tooth enamelbefore and

  15. INFLUENCE OF DIE ANGLES ON THE MICROHARDNESS OF ALUMINUM ALLOY PROCESSED BY EQUAL CHANNEL ANGULAR PRESSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali A Aljubouri

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available   The die geometry has a massive effect on the plastic deformation behavior during pressing of material processed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP method; subsequently the properties of the processed material are strongly dependent on it. Two categories of designed and manufactured dies are used for equal channel angular pressing, a 1200 sharp angle and a 900 round –cornered (200 dies, that produce strain per pass through both dies of ~0.7 and ~1.05   respectively. The microhardness developed in Al-Si alloy during ECAP using route BC. The microhardness increased by a factor of >1.5, after only 1 pressing. Subsequently, the hardness increases slightly up to 8 pressings through the 1200 sharp angle die, while it is increased by a factor of ~2.6 after 5 passes by using the 900 round cornered die, comparing with that for the cast workpiece.

  16. The effect of using propylene glycol as a vehicle on the microhardness of mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem Milani, Amin; Banifatemeh, Alireza; Rahimi, Saeed; Jafarabadi, Mohammad Asghari

    2015-01-01

    While it has been proven that the handling properties of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) are improved upon mixing it with propylene glycol (PG), this study sought to evaluate how PG affects the microhardness of MTA in terms of setting quality. MTA was mixed with different proportions of distilled water (DW) and PG to prepare 5 groups (n = 30). The DW/PG percent proportions used in Groups 1-5 were 100/0, 80/20, 50/50, 20/80, and 0/100, respectively. The mixed MTA was condensed into acrylic molds. Half of the samples of each group were evaluated on Day 4, the other half on Day 28. The results indicated that PG reduces the microhardness of MTA, thus adversely affecting its setting process. Group 2 (80% DW/20% PG) best improved the handling of MTA without a significant reduction in setting quality.

  17. Bond strength, microhardness, and core/veneer interface quality of an all-ceramic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahmy, Nadia Z

    2010-02-01

    This study was designed to evaluate three veneering materials for an all-ceramic alumina system in terms of bond strength, microhardness, and core/veneer interface quality. Fifteen In-Ceram cores were constructed for this study, forming three groups of five specimens each divided by the veneering ceramic disc fired on the occlusal surface of the alumina core: Vitadur N, Vitadur Alpha, or VM7. The specimens underwent shear bond and microhardness testing. Gross examination of debonded discs by SEM and EDAX analysis was conducted. Data for shear bond strength (SBS) and microhardness were presented as means and standard deviation (SD) values. One-way ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test were used for pairwise comparison between the means when ANOVA test was significant. VM7 showed the highest shear bond value and lowest microhardness values of the three tested veneering materials. No statistically significant difference was evident between the SBSs of Vitadur N and Vitadur Alpha to the alumina cores. Vitadur Alpha showed statistically the highest mean VHN, followed by Vitadur N, while VM7 showed statistically the lowest mean values of VHN. In-Ceram core/Vitadur N disc debondings appeared to be interfacial by complete delaminations, leaving a shiny visible and quite distinct area, whereas there appeared to be perfect adhesion between the core and VM7 veneering material. VM7 appeared to possess ultra-fine texture with intimate contact to the core, forming what seemed like a transition zone where the ceramic and core appeared to blend for a distance. VM7's finer particle size has improved the core/veneer bond strength and decreased micohardness values. This new veneering material will probably enhance the performance and esthetics of the In-Ceram system.

  18. In vitro evaluation of surface roughness and microhardness of restorative materials submitted to erosive challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briso, A L F; Caruzo, L P; Guedes, A P A; Catelan, A; dos Santos, P H

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different acidic solutions on the microhardness and surface roughness of restorative materials. The 120 specimens of restorative materials (Fuji II LC, Vitremer, Supreme XT, and Supreme XT + Biscover LV) were randomly divided into three groups according to the immersion media: hydrochloric acid, soft drink, or distilled water. Over a period of five weeks, the groups were immersed in the solutions, which were changed weekly. Data were tested using analysis of variance and the Fisher protected least significant difference test (pmaterials showed the highest surface roughness values (Fuji II LC: 0.111 ± 0.014 μm before and 0.139 ± 0.016 μm after immersion; Vitremer: 0.177 ± 0.012 μm before and 0.084 ± 0.012 μm after immersion), whereas the lowest values were found for the resin sealed with Biscover LV before (0.047 ± 0.011 μm) and after exposure in distilled water (0.043 ± 0.007 μm), soft drink (0.040 ± 0.005 μm), and hydrochloric acid (0.045 ± 0.005 μm). The Supreme XT showed the highest microhardness values before (44.96 ± 2.51 KHN) and after the aging process (41.26 ± 1.22 KHN in water, 35.96 ± 0.81 KHN in soft drink, and 34.74 ± 0.97 KHN in HCl), with significant differences from the other materials (pmicrohardness values were found for glass ionomer materials. The solutions used in this study decreased the microhardness of all studied materials, whereas the sealed surface suffered minor changes in microhardness and surface roughness after exposure to acidic solutions.

  19. Effect of different light-curing devices and aging procedures on composite knoop microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Regina Voltarelli

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of light-curing devices (Halogen/HAL, Light Emitting Diodes/LED, Argon Laser/LAS and Plasma Arc/PAC and aging procedures (Mechanical Cycling/MC, Thermal Cycling/TC, Storage/S, MC+TC and MC+TC+S on the micro-hardness of bottom/B and top/T surfaces of 2-mm-high composite resin cylinders. The Knoop microhardness test (25 g, 20 s on both B and T was performed before and after each aging procedure. For B and T, before aging procedures, PAC showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared with HAL. In the T, after TC, PAC and LAS had also showed reduced polymerization effectiveness when compared to HAL and LED. For all light-curing devices, MC+TC+S and S affected the Knoop microhardness values. In the B, no difference could be observed among the aging procedures for PAC. From all light-curing units, PAC may have rendered composites of reduced quality and the storage aging procedures were the most harmful to the polymer hardness.

  20. Effect of naturally acidic agents on microhardness and surface micromorphology of restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengtrakool, Chanothai; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Kedjarune-Leggat, Ureporn

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the titratable acidity and erosive potential of acidic agents on the microhardness and surface micromorphology of four restorative materials. Forty-seven discs of each restorative material; metal-reinforced glass ionomer cement (Ketac-S), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Fuji II LC), resin composite (Filtek Z250) and amalgam (Valiant-Ph.D.), 12 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in thickness, were divided into four groups (5 discs/group). Specimens were then immersed for 7 days into four storage media; deionized water (control), citrate buffer solution, green mango juice and pineapple juice. Microhardness testing before and after immersions was performed. Micromorphological changes were evaluated under a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Statistical significance among each group was analyzed using two-way repeated ANOVA and Tukey's tests. The Fuji II LC and the Ketac-S showed the highest reduction in microhardness (Pmaterials selected should be considered. In terms of materials evaluated, amalgam and resin composite are the most suitable for restorations.

  1. Microstructure, microhardness and dry friction behavior of cold-sprayed tin bronze coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xueping; Zhang, Ga; Li, Wen-Ya; Dembinski, Lucas; Gao, Yang; Liao, Hanlin; Coddet, Christian

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, two types of tin bronze coatings (Cu-6 wt.% Sn and Cu-8 wt.% Sn) were prepared by cold spray process. The as-sprayed coatings were subjected to a vacuum heat treatment at 600 °C for 3 h. The coating microstructure, microhardness and tribological performance were characterized. The effects of the tin content and the vacuum heat treatment on the microstructure, microhardness and tribological behavior of the coatings were investigated. It is found that the as-sprayed CuSn6 (As6) and CuSn8 (As8) coatings exhibit practically an identical porosity. Meanwhile, As8 presents a higher microhardness than As6. In addition, the increase of the tin content in the powder feedstock leads to a lower wear rate. After a heat treatment, coating porosities are significantly reduced. However, the coating hardness is significantly decreased and the coating presents a much decreased wear resistance. For the as-sprayed coatings, such factors as ploughing and particle delamination could determine the sliding process. The heat treatment results in a distinct modification of the tribological behavior. For the annealed coatings, the adhesion, between the coating and the counterpart, could play a dominant role in the sliding process.

  2. Effect of hydrogen peroxide and sodium perborate on the microhardness of human enamel and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewinstein, I; Hirschfeld, Z; Stabholz, A; Rotstein, I

    1994-02-01

    The effect of 30% hydrogen peroxide and a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at different temperatures and time intervals on the microhardness of human enamel and dentin was examined. Intact extracted human teeth were sectioned, embedded in acrylic resin, polished, and divided into four test groups related to surface treatment. The groups were 30% hydrogen peroxide at 37 degrees C, 30% hydrogen peroxide at 50 degrees C in an illuminated chamber, a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at 37 degrees C, and a paste of sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide at 50 degrees C in an illuminated chamber. Teeth treated with distilled water at either 37 degrees C or 50 degrees C served as controls. The results indicated that treatment with 30% hydrogen peroxide reduced the microhardness of both enamel and dentin. This reduction was statistically significant after 5-min treatment for the dentin and after 15-min treatment for the enamel (p sodium perborate mixed with hydrogen peroxide did not alter the microhardness of either the enamel or dentin at the tested temperatures and time intervals. It is therefore suggested that the use of high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide for bleaching purposes should be limited. Sodium perborate appears to be a less damaging bleaching agent.

  3. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, José Augusto; Oliveira, Glauco Paulo Felício; Amaral, Cristiane Mariote

    2007-01-01

    Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleaching agents with and without carbopol as a thickener agent. Bovine dental slabs with 3 x 3 x 3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, and randomly divided into 4 groups according to the experimental treatment: G1: 2% carbopol; G2: 10% carbamide peroxide with carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: 10% carbamide peroxide with poloxamer. Bleaching was performed daily for 4 weeks, immersed in artificial saliva. Enamel microhardness values were obtained before the treatment (T0) and 7 (T1), 14 (T2), 21 (T3), 28 (T4), and 42 (T5) days after the beginning of the treatment. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed statistically significant differences only for the factor Time (F = 5.48; p thickener agents caused no alterations on the enamel microhardness.

  4. Effects of acids used in the microabrasion technique: Microhardness and confocal microscopy analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Núbia-Inocencya-Pavesi; Lima, Débora-Alves-Nunes-Leite; Ambrosano, Gláucia-Maria-Bovi; da Silva, Wander-José; Aguiar, Flávio-Henrique-Baggio; Lovadino, José-Roberto

    2015-10-01

    This study evaluated the effects of the acids used in the microabrasion on enamel. Seventy enamel/dentine blocks (25 mm2) of bovine incisors were divided into 7 groups (n=10). Experimental groups were treated by active/passive application of 35% H3PO4 (E1/E2) or 6.6% HCl (E3/E4). Control groups were treated by microabrasion with H3PO4+pumice (C5), HCl+silica (C6), or no treatment (C7). The superficial (SMH) and cross-sectional (CSMH; depths of 10, 25, 50, and 75 µm) microhardness of enamel were analyzed. Morphology was evaluated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM). Data were analyzed by analysis of variance (Proc Mixed), Tukey, and Dunnet tests (α=5%). Active application (E1 and E3) resulted in higher microhardness than passive application (E2 and E4), with no difference between acids. For most groups, the CSMH decreased as the depth increased. All experimental groups and negative controls (C5 and C6) showed significantly reduced CSMH values compared to the control. A significantly higher mean CSMH result was obtained with the active application of H3PO4 (E1) compared to HCl (E3). Passive application did not result in CSMH differences between acids. CLSM revealed the conditioning pattern for each group. Although the acids displayed an erosive action, use of microabrasive mixture led to less damage to the enamel layers. Enamel microabrasion, enamel microhardness, confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  5. Efficacy of Four Remineralizing Agents on Primary Teeth: In Vitro Evaluation Using Microhardness Testing and Quantitative Light-induced Fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Gayathri; George, Sageena; Anandaraj, S; John, Sheen Ann; Mathew, V; Shanavas, Nikil M

    2017-05-15

    This study's purpose was to evaluate the remineralization of primary enamel using GC Tooth Mousse, Clinpro Tooth Crème, SHY-NM, and Pronamel by employing microhardness testing and quantitative light-induced fluorescence (QLF) values. An in vitro study was performed with 100 intact primary anterior teeth. After specimen preparation, they were subjected to baseline microhardness and QLF testing. The specimens were immersed in demineralizing solution, subjected again to microhardness and QLF testing, and divided randomly into five groups of 20 teeth: group one-control group (artificial saliva); group two-GC Tooth Mousse; group three-ClinPro tooth crème; group four-SHY-NM; and group five-Pronamel. The pastes were respectively applied for the specific group specimens for 15 consecutive days. The samples were subjected to microhardness and QLF testing. The results were analyzed using analysis of variance testing. A post-hoc comparison was done using a paired t test. There were mean increases in microhardness and QLF values with all remineralizing agents. Group two showed a statistically significant increase (Pmicrohardness and QLF values. Group four showed a significant increase only in microhardness values. (Pmaterials for remineralizing incipient lesions in primary teeth.

  6. Effects of bleaching with carbamide peroxide gels on microhardness of restoration materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Inger; Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Pimenta, Luiz André Freire; Ambrosano, Gláucia

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this in vitro study was to quantitatively assess the effects of bleaching with 10 and 15% carbamide peroxide (CP) on restoration materials by performing superficial microhardness analysis. Acrylic cylindrical containers (4 x 2 mm) were filled with the following restoration products: Charisma (Heraues Kulzer, Vila Santa Catarina, São Paulo, Brazil), Durafill VS (Heraeus Kulzer), Vitremer (3M, Sumaré, São Paulo, Brazil), Dyract (Dentsply, Petrópolis, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil), and Permite C (SDI, São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil). Sixty samples were prepared of each restoration material. Twenty samples received bleaching treatment with 10% CP, 20 samples received bleaching treatment with 15% CP, and 20 samples were kept submerged in artificial saliva, which was replaced daily. The treatment consisted of immersion of the specimens in 1 cm3 of CP at 10 and 15% for 6 hours per day during 3 weeks, whereupon the test specimens were washed, dried, and kept immersed in artificial saliva for 18 hours. Then the test and control specimens were analyzed using a microhardness gauge. The Knoop Hardness Number (KHN) was taken for each test and control specimen at five different locations by applying a 25 g force for 20 seconds. The values obtained were transformed into KHNs and the mean was calculated. The data were submitted to statistical analysis by analysis of variance and Tukey test, p standard deviations were as follows: Charisma: CP 10% 38.52/4.08, CP 15% 34.31/6.13, saliva 37.36/4.48; Durafill VS: CP 10% 18.65/1.65, CP 15% 19.38/2.23, saliva 18.27/1.43; Dyract AP: CP 10% 30.26/2.81, CP 15% 28.64/5.44, saliva 33.88/3.46; Vitremer: CP 10% 28.15/3.04, CP 15% 17.40/3.11, saliva 40.93/4.18; and Permite C: CP 10% 183.50/27.09, CP 15% 159.45/5.78, saliva 215.80/26.15. A decrease in microhardness was observed for the materials Dyract AP, Vitremer, and Permite C after treatment with CP at 10 and 15%, whereas no effect on either of the two composites (Charisma and

  7. Growth, Microhardness And Photoconducting Studies On The Organometallic Complex Crystal Of TMTM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajarajan, K.; Ramesh, V.; Kumar, K. Sendil

    2011-07-01

    Bulk size (21×15×5 mm3) single crystal of Tetra thiourea mercury (II) tetra thiocyanato manganate (II); Hg(N2H4CS)4Mn(SCN)4 (TMTM) has been grown for the first time from an aqueous solution using slow solvent evaporation technique and presented. The color of the crystal is so impressive due to Mn ions incorporated in the resulting compound. The grown crystal is subjected to both microhardness and photoconducting studies and the results are discussed.

  8. Diamond Tool Specific Wear Rate Assessment in Granite Machining by Means of Knoop Micro-Hardness and Process Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goktan, R. M.; Gunes Yılmaz, N.

    2017-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the potential usability of Knoop micro-hardness, both as a single parameter and in combination with operational parameters, for sawblade specific wear rate (SWR) assessment in the machining of ornamental granites. The sawing tests were performed on different commercially available granite varieties by using a fully instrumented side-cutting machine. During the sawing tests, two fundamental productivity parameters, namely the workpiece feed rate and cutting depth, were varied at different levels. The good correspondence observed between the measured Knoop hardness and SWR values for different operational conditions indicates that it has the potential to be used as a rock material property that can be employed in preliminary wear estimations of diamond sawblades. Also, a multiple regression model directed to SWR prediction was developed which takes into account the Knoop hardness, cutting depth and workpiece feed rate. The relative contribution of each independent variable in the prediction of SWR was determined by using test statistics. The prediction accuracy of the established model was checked against new observations. The strong prediction performance of the model suggests that its framework may be applied to other granites and operational conditions for quantifying or differentiating the relative wear performance of diamond sawblades.

  9. Microstructure, microhardness, and biocompatibility characteristics of yttrium hydroxyapatite doped with fluoride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toker, S M; Tezcaner, A; Evis, Z

    2011-02-01

    The current study focused on doping of hydroxyapatite (HA) with constant yttrium (Y(3+) ) and varying fluoride (F(-) ) compositions to investigate its microstructure, microhardness, and biocompatibility. HA was synthesized by precipitation method and sintered at 1100°C for 1 h. Y(3+) and F(-) ion dopings resulted in changes in densities. In x-ray diffraction analysis, no secondary phase formation was observed. Lattice parameters decreased upon ion substitutions. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results showed that ion addition resulted in smaller grains. In Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy analysis, F(-) ion substitution was confirmed. HA doped with 2.5% Y(3+) and 1% F(-) exhibited the highest microhardness. Y(3+) and F(-) ions improved Saos-2 cell proliferation on discs in Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium (MTT) assay. In SEM analysis, cells attached and proliferated on all disc surfaces. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay showed that cell differentiation on the discs was improved by doping HA with an optimum F(-) amount. Dissolution tests revealed that structural stability of HA was improved with F(-) ion incorporation. The dissolution behavior of fluoridated samples exhibited a parallel pattern with the cell proliferation and differentiation behavior on these samples. Overall, this work shows that fluoride and yttrium cosubstitution into HA HA2.5Y1F was the most promising material for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Irradiation effects on microhardness of fluoridated and non-fluoridated bovine dentin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kielbassa, A.M.; Beetz, I.; Hellwig, E. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Univ. Clinic of Dentistry, Dept. of Operative Dentistry and Periodontology, Freiburg (Germany); Schendera, A. [Albert-Ludwigs-Univ., Univ. Clinic of Radiotherapy, Freiburg (Germany)

    1997-10-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of irradiation on microhardness of dentin. Dentin blocks from the cervical region of bovine incisors were treated as follows: 1) no irradiation; 2) irradiation of specimens up to 60 Gy (2Gy/day, 5 days/week); 3) no irradiation, but fluoridation of specimens for 5 min/d; 4) irradiation of specimens and daily fluoridation. Knoop hardness number (KHN) of the control specimens was 62.63{+-}14.75 (mean{+-}SD). This was significantly different from the irradiated dentin samples (8.74{+-}2.59 KHN). Hardness of the fluoridated dentin specimens was 11.19{+-}1.95 KHN in the non-irradiated group and 10.03{+-}2.75 KHN in the irradiated groups, respectively. Within the limitations of an in vitro study, it is concluded that dentin is severely affected by irradiation. This could be an explanation for the frequently observed side-effects of irradiation like loss of enamel, gap formation at the amelodentinal junction, and caries of the cervical region. Fluoridation with acidic gels decereases microhardness of dentin surface, and does not prevent softening due to radiation, when saliva is absent. (au). 23 refs.

  11. In vitro cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes in human dental enamel-microhardness evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Melina Mayumi; Rodrigues, José Augusto; Marchi, Giselle Maria; Ambrosano, Gláucia Maria Bovi

    2005-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate, in vitro, the cariostatic effect of whitening toothpastes. Ninety-five dental fragments were obtained from nonerupted third molars. The fragments were embedded in polystyrene resin and sequentially polished with abrasive papers (400-, 600-, and 1,000-grit) and diamond pastes of 6, 3, and 1 microm. The fragments were assigned in five groups according to toothpaste treatment: G1 = Rembrandt Plus with Peroxide; G2 = Crest Dual Action Whitening; G3 = Aquafresh Whitening Triple Protection; and the control groups: G4 = Sensodyne Original (without fluoride); G5 = Sensodyne Sodium Bicarbonated (with fluoride). The initial enamel microhardness evaluations were done. For 2 weeks the fragments were submitted daily to a de-remineralization cycle followed by a 10-minute toothpaste slurry. After that, the final microhardness tests were done. The percentage of mineral loss of enamel was determined for statistical analysis. Analysis of variance and the Tukey test were applied. The results did not show statistically significant differences in mineral loss among groups G1, G2, G3, and G5, which statistically differ from G4 (toothpaste without fluoride). G4 showed the highest mineral loss (P whitening toothpastes evaluated showed a cariostatic effect similar to regular, nonwhitening toothpaste.

  12. Knoop microhardness and FT-Raman evaluation of composite resins: influence of opacity and photoactivation source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Gustavo Barrotte Albino

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of conversion by Knoop microhardness (KHN and FT-Raman spectroscopy (FTIR of one nanofilled (Filtek Supreme-3M-ESPE [FS] and one microhybrid composite (Charisma-Heraeus-Kulzer [CH], each with different opacities, namely enamel, dentin, and translucent, which were photo-activated by a quartz-tungsten-halogen lamp (QTH and a light-emitting diode (LED. Resin was bulk inserted into a disc-shaped mold that was 2.0 mm thick and 4 mm in diameter, obtaining 10 samples per group. KHN and FTIR values were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests (α = 0.05. Nanofilled resin activated by a LED presented higher microhardness values than samples activated by a QTH for dentin opacity (p < 0.05. The microhybrid resin showed no differences in KHN or FTIR values with different activation sources or opacity. The nanofilled dentin and enamel resins showed lower FTIR values than the translucent resin. The KHN values of the translucent resins were not influenced by the light source.

  13. Analysis of enamel microhardness at various hard tissue states and depth of the microfissures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Yarova

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice are often diagnosed precervical lesions: wedge-shaped defects and cracks. Long phases of the confrontation of the body as a damaging influence in the formation of thicker tissue sections of higher salinity, density and sustainability occur prior to the integrity of the enamel. Micro-hardness is one of the important characteristics of the micro-mechanical strength of the tooth-related physical and chemical changes that occur in the enamel as a result of external and internal influences. The purpose of the study was to identify possible differences in the micro-hardness of enamel, depending on the depth of fissures and pathology of hard tissues of the teeth. We investigated the longitudinal sections of 27 teeth (18 - intact, 5 - with wedge-shaped defect, 4 - with cervical caries of both jaws removed for clinical indications in patients aged 25-54 years, who were diagnosed three types of fractures (SB Ivanov, 1984. Hardness was determined in the outer, middle, inner layers of enamel in three topographical locations: in the cusp tip (cutting edge of the tooth equator and neck as in previously described technique (S. Remizov, 1965. The obtained results showed decrease in strength with micro-cracks enamel, compared with apparently intact ones, on the average 10% more in the incisal areas (tuber, less - in the equatorial zone. In intact teeth with micro-cracks and having a wedge-shaped defect the indices differed significantly depending on the depth of the defects of the cutting edge (tuber and the equator: they were the smallest in the deep type III micro-cracks (p <0.05. The opposite picture was observed in samples with cervical caries. Thus, the statistically significant difference in terms of the micro-hardness of the enamel, depending on the depth of defects has been identified only in the area of cutting edge (tuber: in samples with deep micro-cracks of enamel type III they were the highest (P = 0.017. The greatest values of

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JOHN V. VICKERS in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South Pacific Ocean from 1992-08-16 to 1992-10-21 (NODC Accession 0115003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115003 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JOHN V. VICKERS in the Bering Sea, North Pacific Ocean and South...

  15. Effect of the Temperature in the Mechanical Properties of Austenite, Ferrite and Sigma Phases of Duplex Stainless Steels Using Hardness, Microhardness and Nanoindentation Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorka Argandoña

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to study the hardness of the ferrite, austenite and sigma phases of a UNS S32760 superduplex stainless steel submitted to different thermal treatments, thus leading to different percentages of the mentioned phases. A comparative study has been performed in order to evaluate the resulting mechanical properties of these phases by using hardness, microhardness and nanoindentation techniques. In addition, optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD have been also used to identify their presence and distribution. Finally, the experimental results have shown that the resulting hardness values were increased as a function of a longer heat treatment duration which it is associated to the formation of a higher percentage of the sigma phase. However, nanoindentation hardness measurements of this sigma phase showed lower values than expected, being a combination of two main factors, namely the complexity of the sigma phase structure as well as the surface finish (roughness.

  16. Surface nanostructure and improved microhardness of 40CrNiMo7 steel induced by high current pulsed electron beam treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huihui; Hao, Shengzhi

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, surface modification of 40CrNiMo7 steel was investigated with high current pulsed electron beam (HCPEB) treatment. The scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD), electron probe micro analysis (EPMA), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that a composite microstructure of mainly refined austenite and a little martensite was produced in the surface modified layer of depth ∼7 μm. The average size of small cells on modified surface was decreased to ∼120 nm after 25 HCPEB pulses. XRD analysis indicates a preferred orientation of austenite (2 2 0) crystal plane, and TEM results show the broken and dissolved cementite in the surface modified layer. After HCPEB treatment, all the samples exhibited a remarkable improvement in surface microhardness measurement, up to ∼1000 HK for 15 HCPEB pulses, as tripled of the initial 40CrNiMo7 steel.

  17. Shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Nasiłowska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article presents shot-peening effect on the structure, microhardness, and compressive stresses of the austenitic steel 1.4539. The research shows strengthening of the top layer and the formation of compressive stresses in the subsurface layers of the shot-peening elements.[b]Keyword[/b]: austenitic steel 1.4539, residual stresses, Waisman-Phillips’a method

  18. Microhardness of composite materials with different organic phases in deep class II cavities: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tchorz, J P; Doll, R; Wolkewitz, M; Hellwig, E; Hannig, C

    2011-01-01

    This study compared the microhardness of three composite resins with different organic matrices in deep class II cavities. A total of 36 extracted molars were randomly assigned to six groups and standardized class II cavities were prepared. The cavity design comprised three steps in a mesiodistal direction with an increasing depth (2, 4, and 6 mm). Twelve cavities each were restored using Filtek Supreme (FS), Quixfil (QF), and Filtek Silorane (SI). The materials were applied in incremental layers of 2 mm and cured either with Halogen Translux Energy (HTE) (n=18) or LED Bluephase C8 (LED) (n=18). Subsequently, the specimens were cross-sectioned, and microhardness was determined in various depths and at two different distances from the matrix. QF yielded the highest KHN microhardness values (92.67 ± 12.77), followed by FS (65.53 ± 19.52) and SI (57.67 ± 8.33). Composites cured with LED achieved higher KHN values. All materials showed the highest microhardness values within the superficial increments and at a distance of 1000 μm from the matrix.

  19. Differences between micro-hardness affected dentin after mechanical or chemo-mechanical infected dentin disposal (laboratory experiment)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihsani, V.; Nursasongko, B.; Djauharie, N.

    2017-08-01

    The concept of conserving healthy tooth structures during cavity preparation has gained popularity with chemo-mechanical caries removal. This study compared three methods of caries removal using: a chemo-mechanical caries removal papain gel; Papacarie® (these contain natural ingredients, mainly papain enzyme); and mechanical preparation with a bur rotary instrument. The purpose of this study was to compare affected dentin micro-hardness after removal of infected dentin with mechanical and chemo-mechanical techniques. Twenty-seven permanent molar teeth were randomly divided into three groups receiving removal of infected dentin. These were: Group 1: chemo-mechanical technique using papain gel; Group 2: chemo-mechanical technique using Papacarie® Group 3: mechanical technique using a bur rotary instrument. Each group was tested using Knoop Micro-hardness tester, and the data were submitted to one way ANOVA and Post-hoc Tukey test. There is a significant difference between Groups 1 and 3, and Groups 2 and 3, p = 0.000. However, there is no significant difference between Groups 1 and 2, p = 1.000. Affected dentin micro-hardness after removal of infected dentin with a bur rotary tool is higher than after use of the papain gel or Papacarie®. Affected dentin micro-hardness after removal of infected dentin with Papacarie® and papain gel give almost the same result.

  20. Enhancement of the wear resistance and microhardness of aluminum alloy by Nd:YaG laser treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Haitham T; Kadhim, Abdulhadi; Al-Amiery, Ahmed A; Kadhum, Abdul Amir H; Mohamad, Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Influence of laser treatment on mechanical properties, wear resistance, and Vickers hardness of aluminum alloy was studied. The specimens were treated by using Nd:YaG laser of energy 780 mj, wavelength 512 nm, and duration time 8 ns. The wear behavior of the specimens was studied for all specimens before and after treatment by Nd:YaG laser and the dry wear experiments were carried out by sing pinon-disc technique. The specimens were machined as a disk with diameter of 25 mm and circular groove in depth of 3 mm. All specimens were conducted by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis (EDS), optical microscopy, and Vickers hardness. The results showed that the dry wear rate was decreased after laser hardening and increased Vickers hardness values by ratio of 2.4:1. The results showed that the values of wear rate for samples having circular grooves are less than samples without grooves after laser treatment.

  1. The simulation of the temperature effects on the microhardness of anodic alumina oxide layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gombár

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the mechanical properties of the layer deposited by anodic oxidation of aluminum on the material EN AW-1050 H24, in the contribution was investigated the microhardness of the deposited layer as a function of the physic-chemical factors affecting in the process of anodic oxidation at the constant anodic current density J = 3 A.dm-2 in electrolyte formed by sulfuric acid and oxalic acid, with the emphasis on the influence of electrolyte temperature in the range – 1,78 °C to 45,78 °C. The model of the studied dependence was compiled based on mathematical and statistical analysis of matrix from experimental obtained data from composite rotation plan of experiment with five independent variable factors (amount of sulfuric acid in the electrolyte, the amount of oxalic acid in the electrolyte, electrolyte, anodizing time and applied voltage.

  2. The Influence of Duration of Mechanical Activation of Titanium Powder on its Morphology, Microstructure, and Microhardness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ditenberg, I. A.; Korchagin, M. A.; Pinzhin, Yu. P.; Melnikov, V. V.; Tyumentsev, A. N.; Grinyaev, K. V.; Smirnov, I. V.; Radishevskii, V. L.; Tsverova, A. S.; Sukhanov, I. I.

    2017-10-01

    Using the methods of X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning and transmission electron microscopy, an investigation of the influence of duration of mechanical activation on morphology and structure of titanium powder is performed. In the course of processing the following stages of material transformation are revealed: fragmentation of the initial powder, conglomeration, and ovalization of the conglomerates. It is found that when the duration of mechanical activation increases, the characteristic size of coherent scattering regions is significantly decreased, which is accompanied by an increase in the value of microdistortions and intensive fragmentation of the crystal lattice inside powder particles followed by the formation of highly defective nanostructured states. The transformation of microstructure is accompanied by a considerable increase in microhardness.

  3. Structural, Microhardness, Photoconductivity, and Dielectric Properties of Tris(thiourea Cadmium Sulphate Single Crystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Arthi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Semiorganic nonlinear optical tris(thiourea cadmium sulphate (TTCS single crystals were grown by slow evaporation method. The crystal system, cell parameter of the grown crystal, was identified by powder X-ray diffraction study. The self-focusing Z-scan technique has been employed to observe the third-order nonlinear optical property of the grown crystal. The mechanical property of the grown crystal was examined by using Vicker’s microhardness test. Chemical etching studies were made on the TTCS crystal using water as an etchant. The dark current and photocurrent properties of the crystal were estimated by using photoconductivity study. The dielectric constant of grown crystal was studied in different temperature by varying applied frequencies.

  4. The effect of different light-curing units on tensile strength and microhardness of a composite resin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Batista Franco

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of different light-curing units on the tensile bond strength and microhardness of a composite resin (Filtek Z250 - 3M/ESPE. Conventional halogen (Curing Light 2500 - 3M/ESPE; CL and two blue light emitting diode curing units (Ultraled - Dabi/Atlante; UL; Ultrablue IS - DMC; UB3 and UB6 were selected for this study. Different light intensities (670, 130, 300, and 600 mW/cm², respectively and different curing times (20s, 40s and 60s were evaluated. Knoop microhardness test was performed in the area corresponding to the fractured region of the specimen. A total of 12 groups (n=10 were established and the specimens were prepared using a stainless steel mold composed by two similar parts that contained a cone-shaped hole with two diameters (8.0 mm and 5.0 mm and thickness of 1.0 mm. Next, the specimens were loaded in tensile strength until fracture in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min and a 50 kg load cell. For the microhardness test, the same matrix was used to fabricate the specimens (12 groups; n=5. Microhardness was determined on the surfaces that were not exposed to the light source, using a Shimadzu HMV-2 Microhardness Tester at a static load of 50 g for 30 seconds. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p<0.05. Regarding the individual performance of the light-curing units, there was similarity in tensile strength with 20-s and 40-s exposure times and higher tensile strength when a 60-s light-activation time was used. Regarding microhardness, the halogen lamp had higher results when compared to the LED units. For all light-curing units, the variation of light-exposure time did not affect composite microhardness. However, lower irradiances needed longer light-activation times to produce similar effect as that obtained with high-irradiance light-curing sources.

  5. Comparative evaluation of the effect of topical fluorides on the microhardness of various restorative materials: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gill N

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Topical fluorides can recharge the fluoride content of exhausted glass ionomer cements, converting them into fluoride reservoirs. However, the high reactivity of fluoride agents used in topical fluorides may result in the deterioration of surface properties of these restorations. Aim: To evaluate and compare the effect of topical fluorides on the microhardness of conventional glass ionomer cements (Fuji II,GC Corporation,Tokyo, Japan and Ketac Fil Plus,3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany, high viscosity conventional glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany and Fuji IX GP, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan, and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer, 3M ESPE, St.Paul, MN, USA and Fuji II LC, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one pellets were made of each material and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 h. These were then randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 7 pellets each. One subgroup was treated by 4 min application of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF gel, other subgroup with 2% sodium fluoride (NaF gel, and the third subgroup was used as control. Thereafter, all the pellets were subjected to microhardness testing (load = 100 g for 15 s. Results: APF gel of 1.23% produced a statistically significant decrease in microhardness (P<0.05 of all the restorative materials as compared with restorative materials used as control. The decrease in the microhardness was more pronounced in conventional glass ionomer cements and least pronounced in resin-modified glass ionomer cements. No statistically significant difference (P > 0.05 in microhardness was found after NaF treatment in all the restorative materials tested as compared with control subgroups. Conclusion: The use of 1.23% APF gel may be detrimental to the long-term durability of glass ionomer restorations.

  6. Contactless measurement of electrical conductivity for bulk nanostructured silver prepared by high-pressure torsion: A study of the dissipation process of giant strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mito, Masaki; Shibayama, Keisuke; Deguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuruta, Kazuki; Tajiri, Takayuki; Edalati, Kaveh; Horita, Zenji

    2017-09-01

    We measured the electrical conductivity of bulk nanostructured silver prepared by high-pressure torsion (HPT) in a contactless manner by observing the AC magnetic susceptibility resulting from the eddy current, so that we could quantitatively analyze the dissipation process of the residual strain with sufficient time resolution as a function of temperature T and initial shear strain γ. The HPT process was performed at room temperature under a pressure of 6 GPa for revolutions N = 0-5, and we targeted a wide range of residual shear strains. The contactless measurement without electrode preparation enabled us to investigate both the fast and slow dissipation processes of the residual strain with sufficient time resolution, so that a systematic study of these processes became possible. The changes in the electrical conductivity as a function of N at room temperature were indeed consistent with changes in the Vickers microhardness; furthermore, they were also related to changes in structural parameters such as the preferred orientation, the interplanar distance, and the crystallite size. The dissipation process at N = 1, corresponding to γ ≈ 30, was the largest and the fastest. For N = 5, corresponding to γ ≈ 140, we considered the effects of grain boundaries, as well as those of dislocations. The strain dissipation was quite slow below T = 290 K. According to the analytical results, it became successful to conduct the quantitative evaluation of the strain dissipation at arbitrary temperatures: For instance, the relaxation times at T = 280 and 260 K were estimated to be 3.6 and 37 days, respectively.

  7. Effects of Electron Beam Welding on Microstructure, Microhardness, and Electrical Conductivity of Cu-Cr-Zr Alloy Plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanigalpula, P. K. C.; Chatterjee, Arya; Pratihar, D. K.; Jha, M. N.; Derose, J.

    2015-12-01

    In this study, the effects of electron beam welding on the microstructure, microhardness, and electrical conductivity of precipitation-hardened Cu-0.804%Cr-0.063%Zr (wt.%) alloy plates were investigated. Experiments were carried out following a central composite design of experiments. Five welding schedules yielding the higher hardness were chosen and then were subjected to standard metallographic and various microscopy techniques to reveal the type, morphology, and distribution of the precipitates and to obtain the sub-structural information from the weld zone. X-ray diffraction studies revealed predominant formation of intermetallic phases in the welded zones of some of the samples, which could have resulted in higher hardness and better electrical conductivity compared to those of other ones. Microhardness values in the fusion zone and heat-affected zone were found to be less than that of the parent material. The mechanism of damage in Cu-Cr-Zr plates due to welding was also explained.

  8. Experimental study and effect of particulate interference on the microhardness, wear and microstructural properties of ternary doped coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fayomi, O. S. I., E-mail: ojosundayfayomi3@gmail.com [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Covenant University, P.M.B. 1023, Canaanland, Ota (Nigeria); Popoola, A. P. I. [Department of Chemical, Metallurgical & Materials Engineering, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Joseph, O. O.; Inegbenebor, A. O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Covenant University, P.M.B. 1023, Canaanland, Ota (Nigeria); Olukanni, D. O. [Department of Civil Engineering, Covenant University, P.M.B. 1023, Ota, Ogun State (Nigeria)

    2016-07-25

    This paper studies effects of the composite particle infringement of ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} on zinc rich ternary based coating. The corrosion-degradation property in 3.5% NaCl was investigatedusing polarization technique. The structural characteristics of the multilayer produce coatings were evaluated by scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS). The mechanical response of the coated samples was studied using a diamond base Dura –Scan) micro-hardness tester and a MTR-300 dry abrasive wear tester. The combined effect of the coatings gave highly-improved performance on microhardness, corrosion and wear damage. This also implies that protection of wind-energy structures in marine environments can be achieved by composite strengthening capacity.

  9. The Influence of Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE) and Glass Ionomer (GI) Base Materials on the Microhardness of Various Composite and GI Restorative Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Itskovich, Roee; Lewinstein, Israel; Zilberman, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Re-examining the well accepted concept that Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol bases (ZOE) have a negative effect on composite restoration materials microhardness, in light of the advancement in composite materials and newer publications...

  10. Effect of different beverages on the color stability and microhardness of CAD/CAM hybrid versus feldspathic ceramic blocks: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalia A. Saba

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: Coffee may adversely affect color and microhardness of En and Vm which may consequently compromise esthetics. Different immersion media; with different polarity, may affect hardness of PICN and feldspathic CAD/CAM blocks differently.

  11. Order and Domain Strengthening in Highly Pure and Commercial Cu2NiZn

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wegen, G.J.L. van der; Bronsveld, P.M.; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    1981-01-01

    Vickers microhardness measurements are performed on the ordering alloy Cu2NiZn to determine the dependence of the strength upon the quench temperature and the antiphase domain size. The influence of impurities on the strength is investigated by performing the measurements on a highly pure and on a

  12. Comparative evaluation of the effect of topical fluorides on the microhardness of various restorative materials: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, N C; Pathak, A

    2010-01-01

    Topical fluorides can recharge the fluoride content of exhausted glass ionomer cements, converting them into fluoride reservoirs. However, the high reactivity of fluoride agents used in topical fluorides may result in the deterioration of surface properties of these restorations. To evaluate and compare the effect of topical fluorides on the microhardness of conventional glass ionomer cements (Fuji II,GC Corporation,Tokyo, Japan and Ketac Fil Plus,3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), high viscosity conventional glass ionomer cements (Ketac Molar Easymix, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany and Fuji IX GP, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan), and resin-modified glass ionomer cements (Vitremer, 3M ESPE, St.Paul, MN, USA and Fuji II LC, GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). Twenty-one pellets were made of each material and stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 h. These were then randomly divided into 3 subgroups of 7 pellets each. One subgroup was treated by 4 min application of 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) gel, other subgroup with 2% sodium fluoride (NaF) gel, and the third subgroup was used as control. Thereafter, all the pellets were subjected to microhardness testing (load = 100 g for 15 s). APF gel of 1.23% produced a statistically significant decrease in microhardness (P 0.05) in microhardness was found after NaF treatment in all the restorative materials tested as compared with control subgroups. The use of 1.23% APF gel may be detrimental to the long-term durability of glass ionomer restorations.

  13. Microstructure and Microhardness of Laser Metal Deposition Shaping K465/Stellite-6 Laminated Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiguo Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available K465 superalloy with high titanium and aluminum contents was easy to crack during laser metal deposition. In this study, the crack-free sample of K465/Stellite-6 laminated material was formed by laser metal deposition shaping to control the cracking behaviour in laser metal deposition of K465 superalloy. The microstructure differences between the K465 superalloy with cracking and the laminated material were discussed. The microstructure and intermetallic phases were analyzed through scanning electron microscope (SEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS and X-ray diffraction (XRD. The results showed that the microstructure of K465/Stellite-6 laminated material samples consisted of continuous dendrites with a similar structure size in different alloy deposition layers, and the second dendrite arm spacing was finer compared with laser metal deposition shaping K465. The intermetallic phases in the different alloy deposition layers varied, and the volume fraction of carbides in K465 deposition layer of the laminated material was higher than only K465 deposition under the fluid flow effect. In addition, the composition and microhardness distribution of laminated materials variation occurred along the deposition direction.

  14. Microhardness and Stress Analysis of Laser-Cladded AISI 420 Martensitic Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, Mohammad K.; Edrisy, Afsaneh; Urbanic, Jill; Pineault, James

    2017-03-01

    Laser cladding is a surface treatment process which is starting to be employed as a novel additive manufacturing. Rapid cooling during the non-equilibrium solidification process generates non-equilibrium microstructures and significant amounts of internal residual stresses. This paper investigates the laser cladding of 420 martensitic stainless steel of two single beads produced by different process parameters (e.g., laser power, laser speed, and powder feed rate). Metallographic sample preparation from the cross section revealed three distinct zones: the bead zone, the dilution zone, and the heat-affected zone (HAZ). The tensile residual stresses were in the range of 310-486 MPa on the surface and the upper part of the bead zone. The compressive stresses were in the range of 420-1000 MPa for the rest of the bead zone and the dilution zone. The HAZ also showed tensile residual stresses in the range of 140-320 MPa for both samples. The post-cladding heat treatment performed at 565 °C for an hour had significantly reduced the tensile stresses at the surface and in the subsurface and homogenized the compressive stress throughout the bead and dilution zones. The microstructures, residual stresses, and microhardness profiles were correlated for better understanding of the laser-cladding process.

  15. Effect of artificial aging on the surface roughness and microhardness of resin-based materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M Jacinta M C; Rêgo, Heleine Maria Chagas; Mukhopadhyay, Anuradha; El Najjar, Mai; Santos, Gildo C

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to verify the effects of aging on the surface roughness (Ra) and microhardness (Knoop hardness number [KHN]) of resin-based restorative materials protected with a surface sealer. Disc specimens of 2 resin-modified glass ionomers (RMGIs) and 1 composite resin (CR) were fabricated in a metal mold. Specimens of each material were divided into 1 group that was covered with surface sealer and 1 group that was not. Both groups of each material were then subdivided according to whether they were stored (aged) in cola or distilled water. Surface roughness and KHN values were obtained from each specimen before and after storage. After aging of the specimens, significantly higher Ra values were observed in the 2 RMGIs when they were not covered with a surface sealer, while the CR was not affected. The KHN values varied by materials and storage conditions (with and without a surface sealer). All the groups with a surface sealer exhibited increased Ra values after aging.

  16. An Investigation of TIG welding parameters on microhardness and microstructure of heat affected zone of HSLA steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musa, M. H. A.; Maleque, M. A.; Ali, M. Y.

    2018-01-01

    Nowadays a wide variety of metal joining methods are used in fabrication industries. In this study, the effect of various welding parameters of the TIG welding process on microhardness, depth, and microstructure of the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of L450 HSLA steel and optimizing these process parameters following Taguchi experimental design was investigated. The microhardness tended to increase significantly with the increase of welding speed from 1.0 to 2.5 mm/s whereas the width of HAZ decreased. The current and arc voltage was found to be less significant in relative comparison. Microstructures of the welded samples were also studied to analyze the changes in the microstructure of the material in terms of ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and martensite formations. Welding speed was found to be the most significant factors leading to changes in microhardness and metallurgical properties. The increase of welding heat input caused an increase in width (depth) of HAZ and the growth of prior austenite grains and then enlarged the grain size of coarse grain heat affected zone (CGHAZ). However, the amount of martensite in the HAZ decreased accompanied by an opposite change of paint. It was observed that the hardness properties and the microstructural feature of HAZ area was strongly affected by the welding parameters.

  17. Analysis of the shelf life of chitosan stored in different types of packaging, using colorimetry and dentin microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cruz-Filho, Antonio Miranda; Bordin, Angelo Rafael de Vito; Souza-Flamini, Luis Eduardo; Guedes, Débora Fernandes da Costa; Saquy, Paulo César; Silva, Ricardo Gariba; Pécora, Jesus Djalma

    2017-05-01

    Chitosan has been widely investigated and used. However, the literature does not refer to the shelf life of this solution. This study evaluated, through the colorimetric titration technique and an analysis of dentin micro-hardness, the shelf life of 0.2% chitosan solution. Thirty human canines were sectioned, and specimens were obtained from the second and third slices, from cemento-enamel junction to the apex. A 0.2% chitosan solution was prepared and distributed in 3 identical glass bottles (v1, v2, and v3) and 3 plastic bottles (p1, p2, and p3). At 0, 7, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days, the specimens were immersed in each solution for 5 minutes (n = 3 each). The chelating effect of the solution was assessed by micro-hardness and colorimetric analysis of the dentin specimens. 17% EDTA and distilled water were used as controls. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison (α = 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among the solutions with respect to the study time (p = 0.113) and micro-hardness/time interaction (p = 0.329). Chitosan solutions and EDTA reduced the micro-hardness in a similar manner and differed significantly from the control group (p < 0.001). Chitosan solutions chelated calcium ions throughout the entire experiment. Regardless of the storage form, chitosan demonstrates a chelating property for a minimum period of 6 months.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of a home bleaching agent on surface characteristics of indirect esthetic restorative materials--part II microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabi, Kianoosh; Rasaeipour, Sasan; Ghodsi, Safoura; Khaledi, Amir Ali Reza; Vojdani, Mahroo

    2014-07-01

    The exponential usage of esthetic restorative materials is beholden to society needs and desires. Interaction between the bleaching agents and the esthetic restorative materials is of critical importance. This in vitro study has been conducted to evaluate the effect of a home bleaching agent, carbamide peroxide (CP) 38%, on the microhardness of the fiber reinforced composite (FRC), overglazed, autoglazed, or polished porcelain specimens. For overglazed, autoglazed, polished ceramics and also FRC cylindrical specimens (n = 20 per group) were prepared. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 48 hours prior to testing. Six samples from each group were selected randomly as negative controls which were stored in distilled water at 37°C that was changed daily. CP 38% was applied on the test specimens for 15 minutes, twice a day for 14 days. By using Knoop-microhardness tester microhardness testing for baseline, control and test specimens was conducted. Data were statistically analyzed using paired t-test, Mann-Whitney test, and Kruskal-Wallis test. Home bleaching significantly decreased the surface microhardness of all the test samples (p microhard-ness after bleaching process (p materials is unavoidable. Therefore protecting these restorations from bleaching agents and reglazing or at least polishing the restorations after bleaching is recommended.

  19. Effects of gamma irradiation on microhardness and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy of bovine bone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Derly Augusto; Pereira, Daisa L.; Gomes, Gabriela V.; Sugahara, Vanessa M.L.; Mathor, Monica B.; Zezell, Denise Maria, E-mail: zezell@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro para Lasers e Aplicacoes

    2017-07-01

    The skeletal systems with the structural arrangement of the bone are very important for load distribution, mechanical resistance and vital organs protection. The bone structure is multiphase and composed of organic, inorganic (mineral) compounds and water. Gamma radiation is an ionizing radiation that comes from gamma radiation sources or X-ray generator is commonly used in health establishments such as radio diagnostic exams, radiotherapy and sterilization of allograft. The characterization of the irradiated bone tissue can be is an important tool to study of the components that are affected and how much each dose of ionizing radiation can alter its mechanical properties. This information will be very important in in vitro and ex vivo studies where sterilization of the bone material is necessary and may still be useful in understanding the effects on the bone tissue of patients undergoing short-term radiotherapy. For this, 110 samples of bovine femur diaphysis were randomized into 11 groups: G1 untreated (control); G2 to G11 were submitted to gamma irradiation ({sup 60}Co Gammacel). Samples were polished before irradiation and submitted to a Knoop Microhardness Test to determine the hardness of bovine bone and Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to biochemical characterization. Spectra were collected in the mid-infrared range in Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) sampling mode associated whit PCA multivariate technique to evaluate the molecular changes in bone matrix. It was observed that hardness was not altered by gamma irradiation and FTIR spectroscopy associated with PCA is a good method to analyze the changes in bone tissue submitted to ionizing radiation. (author)

  20. Grain-Structure Development in Heavily Cold-Rolled Alpha-Titanium (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    obtain an additional insight into microstructure evolution and material flow, the Vicker’s microhardness was measured using a load of 500 g for 10 s. At...inside pages STINFO COPY © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT...Signature// SHELDON L. SEMIATIN DANIEL J. EVANS, Chief Metals Branch Metals Branch Structural Materials Division Structural Materials Division

  1. Microwave-assisted brazing of alumina ceramics for electron tube ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The brazed joints were characterizedby X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, Vickers microhardness evaluation, brazing strength measurement and helium leak test. X-ray diffraction analysis confirmed the formationof Ti-based compounds at the substrate-filler alloy interfaces of ...

  2. Metallurgical and mechanical characterization of mild steel-mild ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, mild steel–mild steel (MS-MS) joints fabricated through microwave hybrid heating (MHH) have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electron probe micro analyser (EPMA), Vicker's microhardness measurement and tensile strength. The XRD spectrum of the ...

  3. Examining the microhardness evolution and thermal stability of an Al–Mg–Sc alloy processed by high-pressure torsion at a high temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Henrique R. Pereira

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available An Al–3% Mg–0.2% Sc alloy was solution treated and processed through 10 turns of high-pressure torsion (HPT at 450 K. Afterwards, the HPT-processed alloy was annealed for 1 h at temperatures ranging from 423 to 773 K and its mechanical properties and microstructural evolution were examined using microhardness measurements and electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD analysis. The results demonstrate that HPT processing at an elevated temperature leads to a more uniform microhardness distribution and to an early saturation in the hardness values in the Al alloy compared with high-pressure torsion at room temperature. In addition, detailed EBSD analysis conducted on the HPT-processed samples immediately after annealing revealed that the Al–Mg–Sc alloy subjected to HPT processing at 450 K exhibits superior thermal stability by comparison with the same material subjected to HPT at 300 K. Keywords: Aluminium alloys, Hall–Petch relationship, Hardness, High-pressure torsion, Severe plastic deformation, Thermal stability

  4. The Influence of Zinc Oxide Eugenol (ZOE) and Glass Ionomer (GI) Base Materials on the Microhardness of Various Composite and GI Restorative Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itskovich, Roee; Lewinstein, Israel; Zilberman, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Re-examining the well accepted concept that Zinc-Oxide-Eugenol bases (ZOE) have a negative effect on composite restoration materials microhardness, in light of the advancement in composite materials and newer publications. Five modern composite restoration materials were used, including hybrid (Xtra-fill and Z250), micro-fill hybrid (G-aenial and Gradia-direct) and methacrylate-free restorative material (Silorane- oxirane). Two base materials were used IRM (ZOE-base) and Fuji-IX (GI-base). Samples were made using a designed mold, in which composite discs were cured on top and in close relation to base materials. Micro-hardness testing was performed using a DMH-2 microhardness tester utilizing the Knoop method. Statistic analysis demonstrated significantly better microhardness of three composite materials when IRM was used as base in comparison to control (G-aenial, Gradia direct and Filtek silorane), and no differences in two materials (Filtek universal Z250 and Voco Xtra-fil). Fuji-IX bases showed a significant positive effect on the microhardness of four composite materials, and a negative effect on one material (Voco Xtra-fill). In comparison with other tested restoration materials, both Voco Xtra-fill and Fuji-IX showed higher microhardness results (Pcomposite restorations. The results of this study together with the results published recently showed that the concept of not using ZOE or GI bases under composite must be reconsidered. Fuji IX showed microhardness results similar to the best composite material and therefore it can be used as a restorative material.

  5. Evaluation of microhardness of residual dentin in primary molars following caries removal with conventional and chemomechanical techniques: An In vitro Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Shihab Anwar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many patients consider removal of caries to be a very unpleasant experience. Removal of caries with conventional drill is considered traumatic mainly due to fear and anxiety of children and their parents. Minimally invasive dentistry adopts a philosophy that integrates prevention, remineralization, and minimal intervention for the placement and replacement of restorations, thus reaching the treatment objective using the least invasive surgical approach, with the removal of the minimal amount of healthy tissues. Chemomechanical caries removal (CMCR is a method for minimally invasive, gentle dentin caries removal based on biological principles which is an effective alternative to the traditional method. The present study was done to compare the microhardness of sound dentin before and after carious removal using a chemomechanical method and a conventional method. Materials and Methods: The present in vitro study was done on 28 proximal surfaces of fourteen extracted primary molars (with active caries on one proximal surface and sound side as control. The study was done to assess the Knoop microhardness of remaining dentinal surface after caries removal using a slow speed conventional bur and a chemomechanical method (Carie-Care™. Results and Conclusion: The rotary instrument group showed a consistent microhardness value with not much difference according to depth. The chemomechanical group showed a lesser microhardness value closer to the cavity floor than away from it. The microhardness values at all depths were significantly different for each treatment group with an increased value seen in the rotary group. The mean microhardness values of residual dentin in treated side were found to be insignificant when compared among each interval in each group. The microhardness of sound dentin had high significant difference from that of residual dentin in both the rotary group and the chemomechanical group.

  6. The gradient crystalline structure and microhardness in the treated layer of TC17 via high energy shot peening

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Huimin [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Yingang, E-mail: lygsuper1987@163.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Miaoquan, E-mail: honeymli@nwpu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liu, Hongjie [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The gradient nanocrystalline structure was induced in treated layer of TC17. • The thickness of nanograin layer with an average grain size of 10.5 nm was 20 μm. • The composition of the treated layer of TC17 was discussed. • The gradient variation of the microhardness was obtained in treated layer of TC17. - Abstract: The gradient nanocrystalline structure from the topmost surface to the matrix of a bulk coarse-grained TC17 was attained by using high energy shot peening treatment at an air pressure of 0.35 MPa and a processing duration of 30 min. The thickness from the topmost surface with a grain size of about 10.5 nm to the matrix with a micrometer structure was about 120 μm, and the thickness in the nanocrystalline layer was about 20 μm. The microscopic and nanocrystalline structure characteristic in the treated layer were investigated via X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The nanograins layer, the nanometer-thick laminated structure layer, the refined grains layer and the low-strain matrix layer occurred in sequence from the topmost surface to the matrix, and therefore the gradient nanocrystalline structure in the treated layer was produced by using high energy shot peening. TEM investigation confirmed that the dislocation activity with very high stacking fault energy induced by surface severe plastic deformation mainly controlled the grain refinement. The microhardness (HV{sub 0.02}) from the topmost surface to the matrix gradually increased by 43% from 440 to 629 and the gradient variation of the microhardness with the depths from the topmost surface to the matrix of treated TC17 was obtained.

  7. Analysis of the shelf life of chitosan stored in different types of packaging, using colorimetry and dentin microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Miranda da Cruz-Filho

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Chitosan has been widely investigated and used. However, the literature does not refer to the shelf life of this solution. This study evaluated, through the colorimetric titration technique and an analysis of dentin micro-hardness, the shelf life of 0.2% chitosan solution. Materials and Methods Thirty human canines were sectioned, and specimens were obtained from the second and third slices, from cemento-enamel junction to the apex. A 0.2% chitosan solution was prepared and distributed in 3 identical glass bottles (v1, v2, and v3 and 3 plastic bottles (p1, p2, and p3. At 0, 7, 15, 30, 45, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 days, the specimens were immersed in each solution for 5 minutes (n = 3 each. The chelating effect of the solution was assessed by micro-hardness and colorimetric analysis of the dentin specimens. 17% EDTA and distilled water were used as controls. Data were analyzed statistically by two-way and Tukey-Kramer multiple comparison (α = 0.05. Results There was no statistically significant difference among the solutions with respect to the study time (p = 0.113 and micro-hardness/time interaction (p = 0.329. Chitosan solutions and EDTA reduced the micro-hardness in a similar manner and differed significantly from the control group (p < 0.001. Chitosan solutions chelated calcium ions throughout the entire experiment. Conclusions Regardless of the storage form, chitosan demonstrates a chelating property for a minimum period of 6 months.

  8. Laser surface modification of Ti6Al4V-Cu for improved microhardness and wear resistance properties

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Erinosho, MF

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available sample was etched for 10 -15 seconds, cleaned with ethanol, rinsed under running water and dried off prior to Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and optical microscopic (OM) observations. The SEM was conducted on the samples using the TESCAN...Laser Surface Modification of Ti6Al4V-Cu for Improved Microhardness and Wear Resistance Properties The microstructures of the selected Ti6Al4V-3Cu and Ti6Al4V-5Cu alloys observed by SEM and Optical microscope (OM) are presented Figure 5. The SEM...

  9. Effect of probe sonication and sodium hexametaphosphate on the microhardness and wear behavior of electrodeposited Ni–SiC composite coating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aruna, S.T., E-mail: aruna_reddy@nal.res.in; Anandan, C.; Grips, V.K. William

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Sodium hexametaphosphate (SHMP) explored as dispersant for SiC in Ni-bath. • SHMP and probe sonication (PS) enhances SiC incorporation in Ni matrix. • SHMP and PS enhances wear resistance and microhardness of Ni–SiC. - Abstract: Electrodeposited Ni–SiC composite coating is the most widely used engineering coating. Ni–SiC coating is bestowed with higher wear resistance and microhardness compared to plain nickel. In this study, the feasibility of using sodium hexametaphosphate as a dispersant in the electrodeposition of Ni–SiC composite coating has been investigated. The effect of sodium hexametaphosphate and probe sonication on the microhardness, microstructure and wear resistance of the electrodeposited Ni–SiC composite coating has been studied. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis of the coatings showed the absence of Na and P elements from sodium hexametaphosphate in the bath. Ni–SiC coating deposited using probe sonication followed by the addition of sodium hexametaphosphate exhibited microhardness as high as 680 HK. The microstructure of the coatings varied with probe sonication and SHMP addition and Ni–SiC–PS–SHMP coating possessed lowest roughness. This study has revealed that a synergistic combination of probe sonication of the electrolyte bath containing particles followed by sodium hexametaphosphate addition enhances the co-deposition of finer SiC particles and thereby enhances the coating properties like microhardness and wear resistance.

  10. Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance of remelted TiG2 and Ti6Al4V by a high power diode laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amaya-Vazquez, M.R. [Laboratorio de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Cadiz, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Sanchez-Amaya, J.M., E-mail: josemaria.sanchez@uca.es [Titania, Ensayos y Proyectos Industriales S.L., Ctra Sanlucar A-2001 Km 7,5, Parque Tecnologico TecnoBahia-Edif. RETSE Nave 4, 11500 El Puerto de Santa Maria, Cadiz (Spain); Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, CASEM, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510-Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain); Boukha, Z.; Botana, F.J. [Laboratorio de Corrosion y Proteccion, Universidad de Cadiz, Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e Ingenieria Metalurgica y Quimica Inorganica, Avda. Republica Saharaui s/n, 11510 Puerto Real, Cadiz (Spain)

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Laser remelting of TiG2 and Ti6Al4V is performed with argon shielded diode laser. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructure, microhardness and corrosion of remelted samples are deeply analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Microstructural changes of laser remelted TiG2 lead to microhardness increase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Remelted Ti6Al4V presents microhardness increase and corrosion improvement. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Martensite depth in remelted Ti6Al4V is linearly proportional to laser fluence. - Abstract: The high strength, low density and superior corrosion resistance allow titanium alloys to be widely employed in different industrial applications. The properties of these alloys can be modulated by different heat treatments, including laser processing. In the present paper, laser remelting treatments, performed with a high power diode laser, were applied to samples of two titanium alloys (TiG2 and Ti6Al4V). The influence of the applied laser fluence on microstructure, microhardness and corrosion resistance is investigated. Results show that laser remelting treatments with appropriate fluences provoke microstructural changes leading to microhardness increase and corrosion resistance improvement.

  11. Microstructure and microhardness characterization of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2}-SiC coatings produced by the plasma transferred arc method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islak, Serkan [Kastamonu Univ. (Turkey). Cide Rifat Ilgaz Vocational High School; Eski, Oezkan [Kastamonu Univ. (Turkey). Kastamonu Vocational High School; Buytoz, Soner [Firat Univ., Elazig (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Karagoez, Muzaffer [Bartin Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering; Stokes, Joseph [Dublin City Univ. (Ireland). School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate the coatings made of Cr{sub 3}C{sub 2} and SiC powder manufactured on AISI 304 stainless steel applied by the plasma transferred arc (PTA) welding process. SiC content in the produced coated layer was varied between 0-100 wt. % and the effect of SiC concentration on the microstructure and hardness of the coating was measured experimentally. SEM analyses revealed that the composite coatings had a homogeneous, nonporous, and crack-free microstructure. Dendrites and interdendrite eutectics formed on the coating layer, subject to the temperature gradient and the solidification ratio. There was a significant increase in the hardness of coating layers with the effect of the {gamma}-(Fe,Ni), Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3}, Cr{sub 23}C{sub 6}, Fe{sub 5}C{sub 2}, Cr{sub 3}Si, CrSi{sub 2}, Fe{sub 0.64}Ni{sub 0.36}, CFe{sub 15.1}, C-(Fe,Cr)-Si phases formed in the microstructure. In comparison to the substrate, the microhardness of the coatings produced by PTA were 2.5-3.5 times harder. (orig.)

  12. Microstructural evolution and microhardness of a selective-laser-melted Ti–6Al–4V alloy after post heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, S.Q.; Lu, Y.J.; Gan, Y.L.; Huang, T.T. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemical and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China); Zhao, C.Q. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemical and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China); College Materials Science and Engineering, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou (China); Lin, J.J.; Guo, S. [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemical and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China); Lin, J.X., E-mail: franklin@fjirsm.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials Chemical and Physics, Fujian Institute of Research on the Structure of Matter, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fuzhou (China)

    2016-07-05

    Microstructure and hardness of a powder-bed-type selective laser melted Ti–6Al–4V alloy after post heat treatments at from 300 °C to 1020 °C were systematically investigated by using optical microscope (OM), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and Vickers hardness (HV) tester. Long columnar original β grains together with the inside dominated parallel acicular martensite in the side view, and chessboard pattern in the top view, were found in the as-received specimen. The subtransus heat treatment does not enable modification of the morphology of the original columnar β grain, only leading to the acicular α′ martensite decomposition into the α platelet and whether surrounded β phase or transformed α′ phase depending on the heating temperature; while the supertransus heat treatment would thoroughly break up the original long columnar β grain, leaving only big original equiaxial β grain filled with the new forming weave-type acicular α′ martensite like the supertransus heat treated wrought specimen. Vickers hardness evolution strictly follows the trend of the microstructural change as the heating temperature increasing, and the double peak phenomenon of the Hardness–Temperature plot should be attributed to substructural refinement effect at around 500 °C, martensitic refinement effect at around 1000 °C, and softening effect resulting from the completely decomposition of the martensite at around 875 °C. - Highlights: • Heat treatment affects microstructure and hardness of the SLM Ti–6Al–4V alloy. • The as-received alloy is of columnar β grains with the inside acicular martensites. • The as-received martensites decompose into α and β/β{sub t} plates during heating. • Double peak phenomenon appears in the Microhardness–Temperature plot.

  13. Microstructure, microhardness, phase analysis and chemical composition of laser remelted FeB-Fe2B surface layers produced on Vanadis-6 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartkowska, Aneta; Swadźba, Radosław; Popławski, Mikołaj; Bartkowski, Dariusz

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the study results of the diffusion boronized layer and their laser modification. Diffusion boronized processes were carried out on Vanadis-6 steel at 900 °C for 5 h. Boronized layers were characterized by dual-phase microstructure consisting of iron borides having a microhardness in the range from 1800 to 1400 HV. The laser heat treatment was carried out using CO2 laser after diffusion boronizing process. The research goals of this paper was analysis of microstructure, microhardness as well as phase and chemical composition of boronized layers after laser modification. Microstructure of boronized layer after laser modification consisted of remelted zone, heat affected zone and substrate. Remelted zone was characterized by microstructure consisted of boron-martensite eutectic. In this zone, the phases of borides and carbides were detected. Boronized layers after laser modification were characterized by the mild gradient of microhardness from surface to the substrate.

  14. Influence of Post-Weld Heat Treatment on the Microstructure, Microhardness, and Toughness of a Weld Metal for Hot Bend

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Lin Han

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a weld metal in K65 pipeline steel pipe has been processed through self-designed post-weld heat treatments including reheating and tempering associated with hot bending. The microstructures and the corresponding toughness and microhardness of the weld metal subjected to the post-weld heat treatments have been investigated. Results show that with the increase in reheating temperature, austenite grain size increases and the main microstructures transition from fine polygonal ferrite (PF to granular bainitic ferrite (GB. The density of the high angle boundary decreases at higher reheating temperature, leading to a loss of impact toughness. Lots of martensite/austenite (M/A constituents are observed after reheating, and to a large extent transform into cementite after further tempering. At high reheating temperatures, the increased hardenability promotes the formation of large quantities of M/A constituents. After tempering, the cementite particles become denser and coarser, which considerably deteriorates the impact toughness. Additionally, microhardness has a good linear relation with the mean equivalent diameter of ferrite grain with a low boundary tolerance angle (2°−8°, which shows that the hardness is controlled by low misorientation grain boundaries for the weld metal.

  15. Effect of Post Heat Treatment on the Microstructure and Microhardness of Friction Stir Processed NiAl Bronze (NAB Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuting Lv

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available NiAl bronze (NAB alloy is prepared by using friction stir processing (FSP technique at a tool rotation rate of 1200 rpm and a traverse speed of 150 mm/min. A post heat treatment is performed at the temperature of 675 °C. The effect of heat treatment on the microstructure and microhardness is studied. The results show that the microstructure of the FSP NAB alloy consists of high density dislocations, retained β phase (β′ phase and recrystallized grains. When annealed at 675 °C, discontinuous static recrystallization (DSRX takes place. The content of β′ phase gradually decreases and fine κ phase is precipitated. After annealing for 2 h, both the microhardness of the FSP sample in the stir zone (SZ and the difference in hardness between the SZ and base metal decrease due to the reduction of the dislocation density and β′ phase, accompanying recrystallized grain coarsening. With further increasing of the annealing time to 4 h, the aforementioned difference in hardness nearly disappears.

  16. Influence of high sintering pressure on the microhardness and wear resistance of diamond powder and silicon carbide-based composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osipov Oleksandr Sergueevitch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The work reported on here involved the development of several samples of "diamond-SiC" composite produced under sintering pressures of up to 9.0 GPa at temperatures of up to 1973 7K. The average size of the diamond micropowder crystals used was 40/28 µm. The sintering process was carried out in a 2500-ton hydraulic press equipped with an anvil-type high-pressure device having a toroidal work surface and a central concavity diameter of 20 mm. The microhardness and wear resistance of the samples were found to be dependent on the sintering pressure. The experimental results indicated that the maximum microhardness and minimum wear resistance coefficients of each compact were attained when the pressure applied during sintering exceeded 6.5 GPa. Based on the established values of pressure, this study served to identify the types of devices applicable for the manufacture of composite material inserts for a variety of rock drilling applications.

  17. Effect of Multipath Laser Shock Processing on Microhardness, Surface Roughness, and Wear Resistance of 2024-T3 Al Alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulhadi Kadhim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser shock processing (LSP is an innovative surface treatment technique with high peak power, short pulse, and cold hardening for strengthening metal materials. LSP is based on the application of a high intensity pulsed laser beam (I>1 GW/cm2;  t<50 ns at the interface between the metallic target and the surrounding medium (a transparent confining material, normally water forcing a sudden vaporization of the metallic surface into a high temperature and density plasma that immediately develops inducing a shock wave propagating into the material. The shock wave induces plastic deformation and a residual stress distribution in the target material. In this paper we study the increase of microhardness and surface roughness with the increase of laser pulse energy in 2024-T3 Al alloy. The influence of the thickness of the confining layer (water on microhardness and surface roughness is also studied. In addition, the effect of LSP treatment with best conditions on wear behaviors of the alloy was investigated.

  18. Effect of Boron on Microstructure and Microhardness Properties of Mo-Si-B Based Coatings Produced Via TIG Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islak S.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, Mo-Si-B based coatings were produced using tungsten inert gas (TIG process on the medium carbon steel because the physical, chemical, and mechanical properties of these alloys are particularly favourable for high-temperature structural applications. It is aimed to investigate of microstructure and microhardness properties of Mo-Si-B based coatings. Optical microscopy (OM, X-ray diffraction (XRD and scanning electron microscopy (SEM were used to characterize the microstructures of Mo-Si-B based coatings. The XRD results showed that microstructure of Mo–Si–B coating consists of α-Mo, α-Fe, Mo2B, Mo3Si and Mo5SiB2 phases. It was reported that the grains in the microstructure were finer with increasing amounts of boron which caused to occur phase precipitations in the grain boundary. Besides, the average microhardness of coatings changed between 735 HV0.3 and 1140 HV0.3 depending on boron content.

  19. Microstructure and Microhardness of Ti6Al4V Alloy Treated by GTAW SiC Alloying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bochnowski

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the change of the structure and microhardness of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy after remelting and remelting with SiC alloing by electric arc welding (GTAW method was studied. The current intensity equal 100 A and fixed scan speed rate equal 0,2 m/min has been used to remelting surface of the alloy. Change of structure were investigated by optical and scanning electron microscopy. Microhardness test showed, that the remelting of the surface does not change the hardness of the alloy. Treated by GTAW SiC alloying leads to the formation of hard (570 HV0, 1 surface layer with a thickness of 2 mm. The resulting surface layer is characterized by diverse morphology alloyed zone. The fracture of alloy after conventional heat treatment, similarly to fracture after remelting with GTAW is characterized by extremely fine dimples of plastic deformation. In the alloyed specimens the intergranular and crystalline fracture was identified.

  20. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Science.gov (United States)

    RAMOS, Marcelo Barbosa; PEGORARO, Thiago Amadei; PEGORARO, Luiz Fernando; CARVALHO, Ricardo Marins

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-ESPE and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray) used for cementing fiber-reinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron) under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. Material and methods Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a) no light activation; b) light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c) light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds) for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. Results Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. Conclusions The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent. PMID:23138743

  1. Effects of curing protocol and storage time on the micro-hardness of resin cements used to lute fiber-reinforced resin posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Barbosa Ramos

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To determine the micro-hardness profile of two dual cure resin cements (RelyX - U100®, 3M-eSPe and Panavia F 2.0®, Kuraray used for cementing fiberreinforced resin posts (Fibrekor® - Jeneric Pentron under three different curing protocols and two water storage times. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty 16mm long bovine incisor roots were endodontically treated and prepared for cementation of the Fibrekor posts. The cements were mixed as instructed, dispensed in the canal, the posts were seated and the curing performed as follows: a no light activation; b light-activation immediately after seating the post, and; c light-activation delayed 5 minutes after seating the post. The teeth were stored in water and retrieved for analysis after 7 days and 3 months. The roots were longitudinally sectioned and the microhardness was determined at the cervical, middle and apical regions along the cement line. The data was analyzed by the three-way ANOVA test (curing mode, storage time and thirds for each cement. The Tukey test was used for the post-hoc analysis. RESULTS: Light-activation resulted in a significant increase in the microhardness. This was more evident for the cervical region and for the Panavia cement. Storage in water for 3 months caused a reduction of the micro-hardness for both cements. The U100 cement showed less variation in the micro-hardness regardless of the curing protocol and storage time. CONCLUSIONS: The micro-hardness of the cements was affected by the curing and storage variables and were material-dependent.

  2. X-Ray Microanalytic Concentration Measurements in Unsectioned Specimens: a Technique and its Application to Zinc, Manganese, and Iron Enriched Mechanical Structures of Organisms from Three Phyla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, Robert M. S.

    A method for measuring concentrations of minor elements in microscopic volumes of heterogeneous, unsectioned biological specimens using an ion microprobe is developed. The element quantity is obtained from PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and the total quantity of material is derived from STIM (Scanning Transmission Ion Microscopy) energy loss measurements. Sources of error, including changes in x-ray production cross section with proton energy and absorption of induced x-rays, are discussed and a method of calculating the total measurement uncertainty, typically about 25% here, is developed. The measurement accuracy is shown to be improved for symmetric specimens, and a method of using the bremsstrahlung background to correct for x-ray attenuation within irregular specimens is developed. Methods for measuring local concentrations in internal features are also discussed. With this technique, scorpions were found to contain cuticular accumulations of one or more heavy metals (manganese up to 5% of dry weight, iron up to 8%, zinc up to 24%) in the chelicera, pedipalp denticles, tarsal claws, and stingers; different region soften contained different metals. The stingers are argued to be of particular interest because they are not homologous to legs. Similar accumulations were found in spiders, some other chelicerates and crustaceans. Previous reports of manganese and zinc accumulations in insect and worm mouth parts were augmented with local concentration measurements and with the detection of other enrichment features (such as 6% iron in the paragnaths of the worm Nereis vexillosa). Zinc accumulations (up to only 0.1%) were also found in the tips of the teeth of a hagfish, Myxine + glutinosa. X-ray images of several of these features are presented. It is argued that the extreme magnitude of some concentration values suggests that some metals are incorporated in unusual biominerals rather than organically bound. Results of x-ray diffractometry and Vickers

  3. Intra-oral remineralization of enamel with a MFP/DCPD and MFP/silica dentifrice using surface microhardness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y P; Din, C S; Miller, S; Nathoo, S A; Gaffar, A

    1995-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to ascertain the effect of dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (DCPD) abrasive in a dentifrice on the remineralizaton of enamel using a surface microhardness technique. The method of assessing enamel remineralization via surface microhardness (SMH) was validated in a randomized, crossover, double-blind, intra-oral remineralization study conducted with 12 healthy adults. Enamel demineralization was achieved in vitro by covering bovine enamel blocks with exogenous oral bacteria, S. Mutans 1600 Ingbritt, containing glucan which was then exposed to sucrose. In the intra-oral treatment phase, subjects were fitted with oral maxillary palatal retainers, each holding four demineralized enamel blocks. Subjects brushed their teeth for 30 seconds with a test dentifrice, swished for an additional 60 seconds, rinsed with water and then retained the blocks intra-orally for 4 hours. Percent mineral recovery for each enamel block was calculated as the ratio of the changes in enamel microhardness due to treatment (remin) and sucrose challenge (demin). Treatments included DCPD-based dentifrices containing 0, 250 and 1000 ppm fluoride (F) from sodium monofluorophosphate (MFP). Using SMH, respective mean percent mineral recoveries of 5.7, 18.7 and 41.4% were obtained. All ADA criteria for model validation were fulfilled. This same model was then used to compare the remineralization effects of a silica placebo, DCPD placebo, 1000 ppm F MFP/silica and 1000 ppm F MFP/DCPD dentifrice. Mean percent mineral recoveries of -0.9, 24.1, 30.2 and 55.7% were obtained, respectively. The MFP/DCPD dentifrice was superior to MFP/silica (<0.01) with use of the MFP/DCPD dentifrice when compared to MFP/silica or the silica placebo. These results indicate that more active calcium and a higher degree of saturation (DS(EN)) with respect to enamel exists for an extended period of time after use of a MFP/DCPD dentifrice. Since an elevation in DS(EN) is considered a major parameter

  4. Effect of heat treatments on the microhardness and tensile strength of Al–0.25 wt.% Zr alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Çadırlı, Emin [Niğde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Niğde (Turkey); Tecer, Hicran [Coreal Aluminyum Kablo A.Ş., Free Zone of Kayseri, Kayseri (Turkey); Şahin, Mevlüt [Niğde University, Vocational School of Technical Sciences, Niğde (Turkey); Yılmaz, Elif [Erciyes University, Kayseri Vocational High School, Kayseri (Turkey); Kırındı, Talip [Kırıkkale University, Faculty of Education, Department of Elementary Education, Kırıkkale (Turkey); Gündüz, Mehmet, E-mail: gunduz@erciyes.edu.tr [Erciyes University, Faculty of Sciences, Department of Physics, Kayseri (Turkey)

    2015-05-25

    Highlights: • The HV increases with increasing aging T up to 425 °C at a constant h (100 h). • The HV increases with increasing h up to 120 h at a constant T (400 °C). • Peak values of HV depend on the aging T and h are 370 MPa and 410 MPa respectively. • σ values reached a peak value (130 MPa) with increasing h up to 120 h at a constant T. • More fine dimples were found on the fracture surface of short time aged samples. - Abstract: In the present work, the effect of heat treatments on the microhardness and tensile properties of the Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy have been investigated. The Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy was melted in a vacuum furnace, and the molten alloy was poured into crucibles held in a hot filing furnace. Then, the samples were directionally solidified from bottom to top and aged isothermally and isochronally in a muffle furnace. Aging was performed in two ways: using a wide range of temperatures (350–600 °C) with a constant aging time (100 h) and a wide range of aging times (3–240 h) with a constant temperature (400 °C). The dependence of the microhardness (HV) and ultimate tensile strength (σ{sub UTS}) on the aging temperatures and aging times was determined. According to the experimental results, the HV and σ{sub UTS} values of the aged samples increase at a certain aging temperature and aging time values, reaching peak values at specific temperatures and aging times. The microhardness and ultimate tensile strength decreased with further increase of aging temperatures and aging times. The microscopic fracture surfaces of the aged samples under different aging conditions were observed using scanning electron microscopy. Fractographic analysis of the tensile fracture surfaces shows that the type of fracture changed significantly from ductile to brittle depending on the aging times. Transmission electron microscopy was also used to characterize the precipitation processes in an Al–0.25 Zr (wt.%) alloy aged at 400 °C for 120 h.

  5. Influence of light-exposure methods and depths of cavity on the microhardness of dual-cured core build-up resin composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    YOSHIDA, Keiichi; MENG, Xiangfeng

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the Knoop hardness number (KHN) of dual-cured core build-up resin composites (DCBRCs) at 6 depths of cavity after 3 post-irradiation times by 4 light-exposure methods. Material and Methods Five specimens each of DCBRCs (Clearfil DC Core Plus [DCP] and Unifil Core EM [UCE]) were filled in acrylic resin blocks with a semi-cylindrical cavity and light-cured using an LED light unit (power density: 1,000 mW/cm2)at the top surface by irradiation for 20 seconds (20 s), 40 seconds (40 s), bonding agent plus 20 seconds (B+20 s), or 40 seconds plus light irradiation of both sides of each acrylic resin block for 40 seconds each (120 s). KHN was measured at depths of 0.5, 2.0, 4.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 10.0 mm at 0.5 hours, 24 hours, and 7 days post-irradiation. Statistical analysis was performed using repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's compromise post-hoc test with a significance level of p0.05). In DCP, and not UCE, at 24 hours and 7 days post-irradiation, the B+20 s method showed significantly higher KHN at all depths of cavity, except the depth of 0.5 mm (p<0.05). Conclusion KHN depends on the light-exposure method, use of bonding agent, depth of cavity, post-irradiation time, and material brand. Based on the microhardness behavior, DCBRCs are preferably prepared by the effective exposure method, when used for a greater depth of cavity. PMID:24626248

  6. Influence of N{sub 2} partial pressure on structural and microhardness properties of TiN/ZrN multilayers deposited by Ar/N{sub 2} vacuum arc discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naddaf, M., E-mail: ascientific24@aec.org.sy [Department of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria (AECS), P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Abdallah, B. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); Ahmad, M. [IBA Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic); A-Kharroub, M. [Department of Physics, Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, P.O. Box 6091, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2016-08-15

    The influence of N{sub 2} partial pressure on structural, mechanical and wetting properties of multilayered TiN/ZrN thin films deposited on silicon substrates by vacuum arc discharge of (N{sub 2} + Ar) gas mixtures is investigated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results show that the average texturing coefficient of (1 1 1) orientation and the grain size of both TiN and ZrN individual layers increase with increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure. The Rutherford back scattering (RBS) measurements and analysis reveal that incorporation of the nitrogen in the film increases with increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure and both TiN and ZrN individual layers have a nitrogen over-stoichiometry for N{sub 2} partial pressure ⩾50%. The change in the film micro-hardness is correlated to the changes in crystallographic texture, grain size, stoichiometry and the residual stress in the film as a function of the N{sub 2} partial pressure. In particular, stoichiometry of ZrN and TiN individual is found to play the vital role in determining the multilayer hardness. The multilayer film deposited at N{sub 2} partial pressure of 25% has the best stoichiometric ratio of both TiN and ZrN layers and the highest micro-hardness of about 32 GPa. In addition, water contact angle (WCA) measurements and analysis show a decrease in the work of adhesion on increasing the N{sub 2} partial pressure.

  7. Microhardness evaluation around composite restorations using fluoride-containing adhesive systems Avaliação da microdureza ao redor de restaurações de compósito confeccionadas com sistemas adesivos contendo fluoretos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Silami de Magalhães

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microhardness of dental enamel around composite restorations bonded with fluoride-containing adhesive systems (FCAS, after thermo- and pH-cycling protocols. Standardized cylindrical cavities were prepared on enamel surfaces of 175 dental fragments, which were randomly assigned into seven experimental groups (n=25. Four groups used FCAS: Optibond Solo (OS; Prime&Bond 2.1 (PB; Syntac Sprint (SS and Tenure Quick (TC. Other groups consisted of "Sandwich" technique restoration (STR (glass ionomer liner + hydrophobic adhesive resin /restorative composite or used Single Bond with (SB or without (SBWC cycling protocols. Adhesive systems were applied according to manufacturers' instructions and cavities were restored with a microfilled composite (Durafill VS. After finishing and polishing, all groups were submitted to 1,000 thermal cycles (5 ºC and 55 ºC and to demineralization (pH 4.3 and remineralization (pH 7.0 cycling protocols, except for SBWC group. The Knoop microhardness of enamel surfaces were measured around restorations. Indentations were recorded at 150, 300 and 450-mm from the cavity wall. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Duncan's Test (a=0.05%. Means ± SD of enamel microhardness for the groups were (Kg/mm²: SBWC: 314.50 ± 55.93ª ; SB: 256.78 ± 62.66b; STR: 253.90 ± 83.6b; TQ: 243.93 ± 68.3b; OS: 227.97 ± 67.1c; PB: 213.30 ± 91.3d; SS: 208.73 ± 86.6d. Means ± SD of microhardness for the distances 150, 300, 450mm from the cavity wall were, respectively: 234.46 ± 77.81ª; 240.24 ± 85.12ª; 262.06 ± 79.46b. SBWC group, which was not submitted to thermo- and pH-cycling protocols, showed the highest enamel microhardness mean value and the FCAS resulted in lower microhardness values. At 450 mm from the cavity wall, the enamel microhardness increased significantly.O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a microdureza do esmalte dental ao redor de restaurações em compósito que

  8. Systematic hardness measurements on CsClxBr(1–x) and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Vickers hardness measurements have been made on polycrystalline blanks of CsClxBr(1–x) and single crystals of NH4ClxBr(1–x). The composition dependence of hardness is highly nonlinear in both systems and follows an empirical model that includes a lattice contribution and a disorder contribution.

  9. Characterization and analyses on micro-hardness, residual stress and microstructure in laser cladding coating of 316L stainless steel subjected to massive LSP treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, K.Y.; Jing, X.; Sheng, J. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Sun, G.F. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing, 211189 (China); Yan, Z. [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China); Lu, J.Z., E-mail: jzlu@ujs.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering, Jiangsu University, Zhenjiang, 212013 (China)

    2016-07-15

    The effects of massive laser shock peening (LSP) treatment on micro-hardness, residual stress and microstructure in four different zones of laser cladding coating was investigated. Furthermore, micro-hardness curves and residual stress distributions with and without massive LSP treatment were presented and compared, and typical microstructure in different zones of both coatings were characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and cross-sectional optical microscope (OM) observations. Results and analyses showed that massive LSP treatment had an important influence on micro-hardness and residual stress of the cladding coating. Special attempt was made to the effects of massive LSP treatment on microstructure in three zones of the cladding coating. In addition, the underlying mechanism of massive LSP treatment on microstructure and mechanical properties of the cladding coating was revealed clearly. - Highlights: • Micro-hardness and residual stress curves of both coatings were presented and compared. • Typical microstructure in different zones of both coatings were characterized and analyzed. • LSP causes increased micro-activities, and induces plastic deformation layer in three zones. • Underlying mechanism of LSP on mechanical properties of cladding coating was revealed.

  10. Laser metal deposition of Ti6Al4V: A study on the effect of laser power on microstructure and microhardness

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mahamood, RM

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of laser power on the resulting microstructure and microhardness of laser metal deposited Ti6Al4V powder on Ti6Al4V substrate has been investigated. The tracks were deposited using 99.6 % pure Ti6Al4V powder of particle size ranging...

  11. Microstructure/Oxidation/Microhardness Correlations in Gamma-Based and Tau-Based Al-Ti-Cr Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Michael P.; Smialek, J. L.; Humphrey, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    The relationships between alloy microstructure and air oxidation kinetics and alloy microstructure and microhardness in the Al-Ti-Cr system for exposures at 800 C and 1000 C were investigated. The relevant phases were identified as tau (Ll2), gamma (LIO), r-Al2Ti, TiCrAl (laves), and Cr2AI. Protective alumina formation was associated with tau, Al-rich TiCrAl, and gamma/TiCrAl mixtures. Brittleness was associated with the TiCrAl phase and tau decomposition to A12Ti + Cr2AI. It was concluded that two-phase gamma + TiCrAl alloys offer the greatest potential for oxidation resistance and room temperature ductility in the Al-Ti-Cr system.

  12. Grain size and microhardness evolution during annealing of a magnesium alloy processed by high-pressure torsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Raquel C. Malheiros

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available High-pressure torsion (HPT was used to impose severe plastic deformation on a magnesium alloy AZ31. The material was processed for 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 5 and 7 turns at room temperature under a pressure of 6.0 GPa. Samples were annealed for 1800 s at temperatures of 373 K, 423 K, 473 K, 573 K and 673 K. Microhardness tests and metallography were used to determine the evolution of strength and grain size as a function of the annealing temperature. The results show that recrystallization takes place at temperatures higher than 423 K. The annealing behavior is independent of the number of turns in HPT.

  13. The influence of the phosphorous content and heat treatment on the nano-micro-structure, thickness and micro-hardness of electroless Ni-P coatings on steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czagány, M.; Baumli, P.; Kaptay, G.

    2017-11-01

    Electroless Ni-P coatings were obtained on steel substrates using different bath compositions, which lead to different phosphorous contents of the coatings. In this paper the effect of the P-content in the Ni-P coatings was experimentally studied on the thickness of the coating, on its nano-micro-structure and on its micro-hardness. The as-received samples were nano-crystalline (mostly amorphous according to XRD) and their micro-hardness was found to decrease with increasing the P-content. Upon annealing at 400 °C a new Ni3P phase was formed and the nano-cystalline Ni-rich grains coarsened to micro-grains. In this annealed state the micro-hardness was found to increase with increasing the P-content. A complex model was built to explain the experimental results. It was supposed that the as-received Ni-P coating contains almost pure Ni nano-grains surrounded by segregated P atoms; as the grain grows, its surface is covered more and more by the P atoms. When the grain is fully covered by the P atoms, further grain growth is inhibited and the coating can grow further only due to nucleation of a new grain. Thus, the size of the grains was found inversely proportional to the P-content of the Ni-P alloy. The need for a larger number of nucleation events with decreasing grain size explains why the coating has a smaller thickness for smaller grain size, i.e. higher P-content. The inverse Hall-Petch rule was found for the grain size dependence of micro-hardness of the as deposited samples due to the grain boundary sliding of relatively hard Ni-rich nano-crystals along the soft P atoms (higher P-content lead to lower micro-hardness through smaller grain size). After annealing the micro-hardness was found to increase with the volumetric phase fraction of the harder Ni3P phase within a relatively soft Ni matrix, i.e. it was found to increase with the P-content of the Ni-P coating. The extrapolated value for the micro-hardness of the Ni3P phase is found about 757 ± 20 HV0.01.

  14. Degree of conversion and microhardness of TPO-containing resin-based composites cured by polywave and monowave LED units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Ario; Miletic, Vesna; Swift, Michael D; Bradley, Mark

    2012-07-01

    To determine the degree of conversion (DC) and Knoop microhardness (KHN) of resin-based composites (RBCs) containing trimethylbenzoyl-diphenylphosphine oxide (TPO) cured by polywave or monowave LED light-curing units (LCUs). Three groups (each n = 5) of Tetric EvoCeram (Ivoclar Vivadent), Vit-l-escence (Ultradent) and Herculite XRV Ultra (Kerr) were prepared in Teflon moulds (5mm in diameter and 2mm thick) and cured with polywave Bluephase(®) G2 (Ivoclar Vivadent), polywave Valo (Ultradent) or monowave Bluephase(®) (Ivoclar Vivadent; control) resulting in 9 groups. DC and KHN were determined using micro-Raman spectroscopy and Knoop microhardness, respectively. High-performance liquid chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy were used to confirm the presence or absence of TPO in the three uncured materials. Data were statistically analysed using two-way and one-way ANOVA and DC and KHN were correlated using Pearson's correlation (α = 0.05). TPO was confirmed in Tetric EvoCeram and Vit-l-escence but not in Herculite XRV Ultra. All three LCUs produced comparable KHN for Tetric EvoCeram and Herculite XRV Ultra (p > 0.05). Both polywave LCUs resulted in significantly higher KHN for Vit-l-escence and higher DC in Tetric EvoCeram and Vit-l-escence than the monowave Bluephase(®) (p TPO-containing RBCs, but not in Herculite XRV Ultra. DC and KHN were linearly correlated in all three RBCs. Vit-l-escence showed the highest DC and KHN of the three materials tested. The use of polywave LEDs significantly improves both the DC and KHN of materials which contain TPO. This should be taken into account when curing bleached shades of RBCs even if the manufacturers do not indicate the presence of TPO in their materials. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of irradiation time on subsurface degree of conversion and microhardness of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarle, Z; Attin, T; Marovic, D; Andermatt, L; Ristic, M; Tauböck, T T

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the influence of irradiation time on degree of conversion (DC) and microhardness of high-viscosity bulk-fill resin composites in depths up to 6 mm. Four bulk-fill materials (Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill--TECBF; x-tra fil--XF; QuixFil--QF; SonicFill-SF) and one conventional nano-hybrid resin composite (Tetric EvoCeram--TEC) were irradiated for 10, 20, or 30 s at 1,170 mW/cm(2). DC and Knoop microhardness (KHN) were recorded after 24-h dark storage at five depths: 0.1, 2, 4, 5, and 6 mm. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Bonferroni's post-hoc test (α = 0.05). With increasing bulk thickness, DC and KHN significantly decreased for TEC. TECBF and SF showed a significant decrease in DC and KHN at 4-mm depth after 10-s irradiation, but no decrease in DC after 30-s irradiation (p > 0.05). XF and QF demonstrated no significant DC decrease at depths up to 6 mm after irradiation of at least 20 s. At 4-mm depth, all materials tested achieved at least 80 % of their maximum DC value, irrespective of irradiation time. However, at the same depth (4 mm), only XF and QF irradiated for 30 s achieved at least 80 % of their maximum KHN value. Regarding DC, the tested bulk-fill resin composites can be safely used up to at least 4-mm incremental thickness. However, with respect to hardness, only XF and QF achieved acceptable results at 4-mm depth with 30 s of irradiation. Minimum irradiation times stated by the manufacturers cannot be recommended for placement of high-viscosity bulk-fill materials in 4-mm increments.

  16. Comparative evaluation of microhardness and morphology of permanent tooth enamel surface after laser irradiation and fluoride treatment - An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Puneet; Goswami, Mridula; Dhillon, Jatinder Kaur; Rehman, Ferah; Thakkar, Deepti; Bharti, Kusum

    2016-10-01

    Background and aims: The aim of the study was to evaluate and compare the surface microhardness and surface morphology of permanent tooth enamel after Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and Fluoride application. Materials and methods: One hundred and twenty premolars extracted for orthodontic purpose were used in the study and randomly divided into 6 groups. Group A was not subjected to any treatment. Group B was subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation. Group C was subjected to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation followed by application of 2% NaF gel for 4 minutes. Group D was subjected to laser irradiation and 1.23% APF gel for 4 minutes. Group E was subjected to 2% NaF gel pretreatment technique followed by laser irradiation. Group F was subjected to 1.23% APF gel pretreatment technique followed by laser irradiation. All the test groups were subjected to microhardness testing and scanning electron microscope evaluation at 500 X and 1500 X. Results: All the treated groups showed an increase in microhardness value in comparison to the control group. The highest increase in microhardness was seen in Group F. Increase in microhardness values of Group B and Group D was not statistically significant as compared to Group A. Scanning Electron Micrographs showed few craters and fine porosities for Group A. These craters and porosities increased in size and often showed glass like appearance after laser irradiation. Conclusions: It can be suggested by means of present study that Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation alone or in combination with fluoride gel is an effective tool to provide resistance against the caries. Significantly higher resistance (p< 0.05) was seen when APF gel was used prior to Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation and this combination can act as an efficient tool for prevention against dental caries.

  17. Caries resistance of lased human root surface with 10.6 μm CO2 laser-thermal, morphological, and microhardness analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza-Zaroni, W. C.; Freitas, A. C. P.; Hanashiro, F. S.; Steiner-Oliveira, C.; Nobre-Dos-Santos, M.; Youssef, M. N.

    2010-02-01

    Although the cariostatic effects of CO2 laser on enamel have been shown, its effects on root surface demineralization remains uncertain. The objectives of this in vitro research was to establish safe parameters for a pulsed 10.6 μm CO2 laser and to evaluate its effect on morphological features of the root surface, as well as on the reduction of root demineralization. Ninety-five human root surfaces were randomly divided into five groups: G1-No treatment (control); G2—2.5 J/cm2; G3—4.0 J/cm2; G4—5.0 J/cm2; and G5—6.0 J/cm2. Intrapulpal temperature was evaluated during root surface irradiation by a thermocouple and morphological changes were evaluated by SEM. After the surface treatment, the specimens were submitted to a 7-day pH-cycling model. Subsequently, the cross-sectional Knoop microhardness values were measured. For all irradiated groups, intrapulpal temperature changes were less than 1.5°C. Scanning electron microscopy images indicated that fluences as low as 4.0 J/cm2 were sufficient to induce morphological changes in the root surface. Additionally, for fluences reaching or exceeding 4.0 J/cm2, laser-induced inhibitory effects on root surface demineralization were observed. It was concluded that laser energy density in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 J/cm2 could be applied to a dental root to reduce demineralization of this surface without compromising pulp vitality.

  18. Evaluation of the effect of home bleaching agents on surface microhardness of different glass-ionomer cements containing hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Kowkabi, Mahsa; Shoale, Soodabe

    2017-09-01

    Home bleaching agents may exert some negative effects on surface hardness of restorative materials such as glass-ionomer cements (GICs). Since some studies have shown that some components such as hydroxyapatite (HA), as a bioactive glass, can improve the mechanical properties of dental materials, the effect of bleaching agents on surface hardness of GICs containing hydroxyapatite is questionable. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of home bleaching agents on the surface hardness of two different commercially available GICs containing hydroxyapatite. 80 disk-shaped specimens were made from two different GICs, including resin modified glass-ionomer and Zirconomer. Each material was divided into four groups (n=10): 1. control, 2. 20 %wt. hydroxyapatite-containing, 3. bleached and 4. bleached 20 %wt. hydroxyapatite-containing. Group 1 and 2 specimens were stored in distilled water for 2 weeks while group 3 and 4 specimens were treated with 15% carbamide peroxide in that period. Surface hardness was tested with Vickers surface hardness tester. Data were analyzed with 3-way ANOVA and mean comparison done by post hoc Tukey tests (pGlass-ionomer cement, surface hardness, Zirconia-reinforced glass ionomer, hydroxyapatite.

  19. Correlation between tensile property and micro-hardness in reduced activation ferritic/martensitic steel irradiated at 573 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, M.; Tanigawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura, Naga-gun, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Stoller, R. [ORNL - Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Materials Science and Technology Div., AK TN (United States)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Radiation hardening and embrittlement due to high-energy neutron radiation around 623 K are the important issues on reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic (RAF/M) steels. It is expected that the improvement of radiation hardening might be one of effective ways to control the mechanical properties of RAF/M after irradiation. It has been reported that the weld joint has less hardening than the base metal from the tensile test results of TIG weldments irradiated in HFIR. This report indicated that radiation hardening can be reduced by the optimization of heat treatment condition for F82H. The purposes of this study are to establish the condition of heat treatment for minimum of radiation hardening in F82H steel using Neutron/Ion-irradiation and to examine a correlation between tensile property and micro-hardness before/after irradiation. The materials used in this study were F82H IEA heat and F82H heat treatment variants. Neutron irradiation was performed in High Flux Isotope Reactor up to 9 dpa at 573 K. The hardness test was 8{approx}10 points for each SS-J3 tensile specimen. Tensile test was carried out at room temperature in Hot Cell Facility. For the ion irradiation experiment, the F82H steel and variants were cut to small coupon type specimens. The ion-beam irradiation experiment was carried out at the TIARA facility of JAEA. These specimens were irradiated at 543 and 633 K by 10.5 MeV Fe{sup 3+} ions. The irradiation was performed to 3.3-33 dpa at the depth of 0.6 {mu}m. The irradiated specimens were indentation-tested using an ultra micro-indentation testing system. The irradiated specimens were made into thin films, with a focused ion beam processing instrument. The microstructural examination was carried out using a transmission electron microscope. For the results of tensile test and hardness test of F82H and F82H heat treatment variants neutron-irradiated at 573 K, all specimens caused radiation hardening. The radiation

  20. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liza George; Allu Baby; T Dhanapal; K Charlie; Asha Joseph; Anjum Varghese

    2015-01-01

      Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent...

  1. Comparison of the Effects of Two Whitening Toothpastes on Microhardness of the Enamel and a Microhybride Composite Resin: An in Vitro Study

    OpenAIRE

    Z. Khamverdi; Sh. Kasraie; L. Rezaei-Soufi; S. Jebeli

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Whitening toothpastes which have been accepted in populations may affect properties of enamel and restorative materials. The aim of this study was to compare the microhardness of human enamel and Z250 microhybrid composite resin after brushing with two whitening toothpastes. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study of enamel specimens, forty five freshly extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into three groups of control enamel (ClE), Crest enamel (CtE) and ...

  2. Systematic hardness measurements on mixed and doped crystals of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Efforts are made to improve the hardness of rubidium halide crystals by (i) solid solution harden- ing and (ii) impurity hardening. Systematic microhardness measurements have been made on rubidium halide mixed crystals (RbBr–RbI and KI–RbI) and rubidium halide crystals doped with Sr2+ ions. The composition.

  3. Systematic hardness measurements on mixed and doped crystals of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Efforts are made to improve the hardness of rubidium halide crystals by. solid solution hardening and; impurity hardening. Systematic microhardness measurements have been made on rubidium halide mixed crystals (RbBr–RbI and KI–RbI) and rubidium halide crystals doped with Sr2+ ions. The composition dependence ...

  4. Microhardness and Strain Field Characterization of Self-Reacting Friction Stir and Plug Welds of Dissimilar Aluminum Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Karla Renee

    2011-01-01

    Friction stir welding (FSW) is a solid state welding process with potential advantages for aerospace and automotive industries dealing with light alloys. Self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW) is one variation of the FSW process being developed at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for use in the fabrication of propellant tanks. Friction plug welding is used to seal the exit hole that remains in a circumferential SR-FSW. This work reports on material properties and strain patterns developed in a SR-FSW with a friction plug weld. Specifically, this study examines the behavior of a SR-FSW formed between an AA 2014-T6 plate on the advancing side and an AA 2219-T87 plate on the retreating side and a SR-FSW (AA 2014-T6 to AA 2219-T87) with a 2219-T87 plug weld. This study presents the results of a characterization of the micro-hardness, joint strength, and strain field characterization of SR-FSW and FPW joints tested at room temperature and cryogenic temperatures.

  5. Effects of new formulas of bleaching gel and fluoride application on enamel microhardness: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Juliana B; Mazur, Rui Fernando

    2007-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the new formulas of bleaching products and the effect of subsequent applications of fluoride on the hardness of enamel during and after tooth bleaching. The crowns of 60 extracted intact human molars were sectioned longitudinally; the buccal part was embedded in acrylic resin, the occlusal part was ground flat, exposing enamel and dentin, and then polished. Baseline Knoop microhardness (KHN) of enamel was determined. The specimens were then randomly divided into six groups of 10 specimens, and each group was assigned to a specific 10% carbamide peroxide (CP) bleaching agent. A: Opalescence, B: Opalescence PF (3% potassium nitrate and 0.11% fluoride), C: Nite White Excel 3 (ACP), D: Opalescence + F (acidulated phosphate fluoride 1.23%), E: Opalescence PF + F, F: Nite White Excel 3 + F. The teeth were bleached for eight hours; after each procedure, the specimens were stored in artificial saliva at 37 degrees C. Immediately after day 21 of bleaching, the specimens in groups D, E and F received fluoride 1.23% for five minutes. KHN tests w ere performedbefore (baseline = control), during (14, 21) and two weeks (35 days) after the bleaching procedure and were statistically compared using ANOVA/Tukey's t-test (alpha formulas, the enamel was restored to a value similar to baseline.

  6. Evaluation of primary tooth enamel surface morphology and microhardness after Nd:YAG laser irradiation and APF gel treatment--an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banda, Naveen Reddy; Vanaja Reddy, G; Shashikiran, N D

    2011-01-01

    Laser irradiation and fluoride has been used as a preventive tool to combat dental caries in permanent teeth, but little has been done for primary teeth which are more prone to caries. The purpose of this study was to evaluate microhardness alterations in the primary tooth enamel after Nd-YAG laser irradiation alone and combined with topical fluoride treatment either before or after Nd-YAG laser irradiation. Ten primary molars were sectioned and assigned randomly to: control group, Nd-YAG laser irradiation, Nd-YAG lasing before APF and APF followed by Nd-YAG lasing. The groups were evaluated for microhardness. Surface morphological changes were observed using SEM. Statistical comparisons were performed. The control group's SEM showed a relatively smooth enamel surface and lasing group had fine cracks and porosities. In the lasing + fluoride group a homogenous confluent surface was seen. In the fluoride + lasing group an irregular contour with marked crack propagation was noted. There was a significant increase in the microhardness of the treatment groups. Nd-YAG laser irradiation and combined APF treatment of the primary tooth enamel gave morphologically hardened enamel surface which can be a protective barrier against a cariogenic attack.

  7. Investigation of micro-structure and micro-hardness properties of 304L stainless steel treated in a hot cathode arc discharge plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malik, Hitendra K., E-mail: hkmalik@physics.iitd.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Singh, Omveer [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Dahiya, Raj P. [Centre for Energy Studies, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi – 110016 (India); Deenbandhu Chhotu Ram University of Science and Technology, Murthal–131039 (India)

    2015-08-28

    We have established a hot cathode arc discharge plasma system, where different stainless steel samples can be treated by monitoring the plasma parameters and nitriding parameters independently. In the present work, a mixture of 70% N{sub 2} and 30% H{sub 2} gases was fed into the plasma chamber and the treatment time and substrate temperature were optimized for treating 304L Stainless Steel samples. Various physical techniques such as x-ray diffraction, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and micro-vickers hardness tester were employed to determine the structural, surface composition and surface hardness of the treated samples.

  8. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Zuccolotti, Bruna Carolina Rossatti; Moreno, Amalia; Vechiato Filho, Aljomar José; Paulini, Marcela Borghi; Santos, Daniela Micheline Dos

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil). The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5-55°C, for 2000 cycles). Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (P titanium dioxide. Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling) showed higher hardness values.

  9. Effect of 457 nm Diode-Pumped Solid State Laser on the Polymerization Composite Resins: Microhardness, Cross-Link Density, and Polymerization Shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Sung-Ae; Park, Jeong-Kil; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Ko, Ching-Chang; Jeong, Chang-Mo

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: The purpose of the present study was to test the usefulness of 457 nm diode-pumped solid state (DPSS) laser as a light source to cure composite resins. Materials and methods: Five different composite resins were light cured using three different light-curing units (LCUs): a DPSS 457 nm laser (LAS), a light-emitting diode (LED), and quartz-tungsten-halogen (QTH) units. The light intensity of LAS was 560 mW/cm2, whereas LED and QTH LCUs was ∼900 mW/cm2. The degree of polymerization was tested by evaluating microhardness, cross-link density, and polymerization shrinkage. Results: Before water immersion, the microhardness of laser-treated specimens ranged from 40.8 to 84.7 HV and from 31.7 to 79.0 HV on the top and bottom surfaces, respectively, and these values were 3.3–23.2% and 2.9–31.1% lower than the highest microhardness obtained using LED or QTH LCUs. Also, laser-treated specimens had lower top and bottom microhardnesses than the other LCUs treated specimens by 2.4–19.4% and 1.4–27.8%, respectively. After ethanol immersion for 24 h, the microhardness of laser-treated specimens ranged from 20.3 to 63.2 HV on top and bottom surfaces, but from 24.9 to 71.5 HV when specimens were cured using the other LCUs. Polymerization shrinkage was 9.8–14.7 μm for laser-treated specimens, and these were significantly similar or lower (10.2–16.0 μm) than those obtained using the other LCUs. Conclusions: The results may suggest that the 457 nm DPSS laser can be used as a light source for light-curing dental resin composites. PMID:25549163

  10. Effect of the irradiance distribution from light curing units on the local micro-hardness of the surface of dental resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haenel, Thomas; Hausnerová, Berenika; Steinhaus, Johannes; Price, Richard B T; Sullivan, Braden; Moeginger, Bernhard

    2015-02-01

    An inhomogeneous irradiance distribution from a light-curing unit (LCU) can locally cause inhomogeneous curing with locally inadequately cured and/or over-cured areas causing e.g. monomer elution or internal shrinkage stresses, and thus reduce the lifetime of dental resin based composite (RBC) restorations. The aim of the study is to determine both the irradiance distribution of two light curing units (LCUs) and its influence on the local mechanical properties of a RBC. Specimens of Arabesk TOP OA2 were irradiated for 5, 20, and 80s using a Bluephase® 20i LCU in the Low mode (666mW/cm(2)), in the Turbo mode (2222mW/cm(2)) and a Celalux® 2 (1264mW/cm(2)). The degree of conversion (DC) was determined with an ATR-FTIR. The Knoop micro-hardness (average of five specimens) was measured on the specimen surface after 24h of dark and dry storage at room temperature. The irradiance distribution affected the hardness distribution across the surface of the specimens. The hardness distribution corresponded well to the inhomogeneous irradiance distributions of the LCU. The highest reaction rates occurred after approximately 2s light exposure. A DC of 40% was reached after 3.6 or 5.7s, depending on the LCU. The inhomogeneous hardness distribution was still evident after 80s of light exposure. The irradiance distribution from a LCU is reflected in the hardness distribution across the surface. Irradiance level of the LCU and light exposure time do not affect the pattern of the hardness distribution--only the hardness level. In areas of low irradiation this may result in inadequate resin polymerization, poor physical properties, and hence premature failure of the restorations as they are usually much smaller than the investigated specimens. It has to be stressed that inhomogeneous does not necessarily mean poor if in all areas of the restoration enough light intensity is introduced to achieve a high degree of cure. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by

  11. Effect of nanoscale particles incorporation on microhardness of polymers for oral prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Coelho Goiato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the influence of the incorporation of pigments on surface hardness of four acrylic resins subjected to thermocycling and analyze their elemental composition using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one discs of each resin were fabricated, whereas seven had no additive, seven had 3% of nanoscale pigments and last seven had 10% of them. The percentage was obtained by measuring the total weight of each resin disc. Besides, seven discs composed by only nanoscale pigments were also fabricated, totalizing 91 discs. The pigment was weighed by using an analytical balance (BEL Analytical Equipment, SP, Brazil. The surface hardness was measured through a hardness tester machine before and after thermocycling (5-55°C, for 2000 cycles. Data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey′s test (P < 0.05. The chemical composition of the discs composed only by nanoscale pigments was analyzed with EDS test. Results: Hardness of all resins decreased after thermocycling. The lowest values were observed on the discs with 3% of nanoscale pigments and discs fabricated only with them. EDS showed the presence of titanium dioxide. Conclusion: Discs with 7% of pigments (after thermocycling showed higher hardness values.

  12. Metallurgical and mechanical characterization of mild steel-mild ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    in dimensions made on the weld zone, but larger in dimensions made on the base metal. This clearly indicates that the weld zone has a higher hardness as compared to base metal. Micro. (a). (b). Figure 5. (a) Vicker's microhardness indentation shown by white circle, (b) Vickers microhardness value at various zones.

  13. Effect of different tetra pack juices on microhardness of direct tooth colored-restorative materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nazish; Abidi, Syed Yawar Ali; Qazi, Fazal-Ur-Rehaman; Jat, Shahbaz Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    To examine the effect of apple and orange juices on the surface hardness of direct tooth-colored restorative materials. The materials included resin-modified glass ionomer cement (Vitremer 3M™ ESPE™ Core buildup restorative) and composite resin (Filtek™ 3M™ ESPE™ Z350). A total of 45 disks of each restorative material were prepared. The disks were divided into groups of 15, which were immersed for 7 days in deionized water (G1/G4, control group), apple juice (G2/G5), or orange juice (G3/G6). The pH of the apple juice was approximately 4.8 and the pH of the orange juice was approximately 4.9. Surface hardness tests were performed before immersion and at various times following immersion. Statistical analysis included two-way ANOVA with repeated measurement and Tukey's test. Exposure to juices significantly reduced the hardness of both materials (p material. The ionomer cement experienced a greater reduction than the composite resin (p = 0.000). There was no significant difference in the effect of apple and orange juices. Juice box-type fruit juices reduced the hardness of direct tooth-colored restorative materials. Material selection should be considered when planning restorations in patients who have experienced tooth surface loss. In terms of the materials evaluated in this study, the composite material provides greater durability under acidic conditions.

  14. Microdureza de resina composta fotopolimerizável: a cor da matriz experimental pode alterar os resultados dos testes? Microhardness of photopolymerized composite resin: can the color of the experimental matrix change the results of the tests?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Míriam Lacalle TURBINO

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available O grau de polimerização das resinas compostas, avaliado principalmente pela microdureza vem sendo estudado relacionado com inúmeros fatores. Algumas pesquisas in vitro fazem uso de matrizes como base para a confecção de corpos-de-prova e não dentes naturais. Para as resinas fotopolimerizáveis, a intensidade de luz que atinge o material exerce influência direta no seu grau de polimerização. A cor e/ou transparência dessas matrizes não deveriam induzir a diferenças nos resultados finais de microdureza. Com essa preocupação, este trabalho teve por objetivo avaliar o efeito de duas matrizes de polipropileno utilizadas para testes com resina composta. Uma delas era branca e outra preta. A resina foi inserida e polimerizada em incremento único de 3 mm e em 3 incrementos de 1 mm cada e sua dureza medida a 3 mm de profundidade. Analisando os resultados pode-se concluir que houve diferença estatisticamente significante entre as duas cores, sendo que a microdureza foi menor com a matriz preta. A técnica de inserção e polimerização em incremento único induziu a menor grau de polimerização que a técnica incremental em ambas as matrizes (p The polymerizing degree of composite resins, mainly evaluated through their microhardness, has been studied in relation to many factors. Some in vitro researches use matrices as basis for manufacturing test specimens instead of, natural teeth. For photopolymerized resins, the light intensity that reaches the material directly influences its polymerization degree. The color, as well as the transparency of the resins, should not induce differences on the final microhardness results. With this awareness in mind, this work had the aim of evaluating the effect of two polypropylene resins used in tests of composite resins. One of them was white and the other was black. The resin was applied and polymerized in a single portion of 3 mm, and in 3 increments of 1 mm each, and the hardness index was measured

  15. Influence of light curing source on microhardness of composite resins of different shades Influência da fonte de luz polimerizadora na microdureza da resina composta de diferentes cores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Fraga Briso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The evolution of light curing units can be noticed by the different systems recently introduced. The technology of LED units promises longer lifetime, without heating and with production of specific light for activation of camphorquinone. However, further studies are still required to check the real curing effectiveness of these units. PURPOSE: This study evaluated the microhardness of 4 shades (B-0.5, B-1, B-2 and B-3 of composite resin Filtek Z-250 (3M ESPE after light curing with 4 light sources, being one halogen (Ultralux - Dabi Atlante and three LED (Ultraled - Dabi Atlante, Ultrablue - DMC and Elipar Freelight - 3M ESPE. METHODS: 192 specimens were distributed into 16 groups, and materials were inserted in a single increment in cylindrical templates measuring 4mm x 4mm and light cured as recommended by the manufacturer. Then, they were submitted to microhardness test on the top and bottom aspects of the cylinders. RESULTS: The hardness values achieved were submitted to analysis of variance and to Tukey test at 5% confidence level. It was observed that microhardness of specimens varied according to the shade of the material and light sources employed. The LED appliance emitting greater light intensity provided the highest hardness values with shade B-0.5, allowing the best curing. On the other hand, appliances with low light intensity were the least effective. It was also observed that the bottom of specimens was more sensitive to changes in shade. CONCLUSION: Light intensity of LED light curing units is fundamental for their good functioning, especially when applied in resins with darker shades.INTRODUCTION: A evolução dos aparelhos fotopolimerizadores pode ser notada nos diferentes sistemas introduzidos recentemente no mercado. A tecnologia apresentada pelos aparelhos LED promete maior tempo de vida útil, não gerar aquecimento e produzir luz específica para a ativação da canforoquinona. No entanto, ainda são necess

  16. The refinement of the surface layer of HS 7425 high speed tool steel by laser and electric arc plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bochnowski

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper present two different techniques: laser remelting surface and plasma remelting surface of the high speed steel HS 7425. Thestructure of the remelted layers were examined by means of SEM – microscopy. Measurement of microhardness in remelting zone usingVickers method. The remelting zone consist of dendritic cells and columnar crystals. Increase of hardness was observed in remelted zonein comparison to the substrate of the steel. The hardness in the remelted zone increases with the increasing cooling rate.

  17. Opacificación y endurecimiento de vidriados cerámicos mediante scheelita

    OpenAIRE

    Vicent, J. B.; Galbo, J.; Badenes, J. A.; Monrós, G.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of addition of scheelite, obtained by both ceramic and coprecipation route, on the opacity and strength of ceramic glazes are discussed and compared with the scheelite obtained by in situ devitrification from a4dition of WO3. Mohs hardness, Vickers microhardness, gloss and whitness measurements of resulting glazes are associated with the obtained microstrucure of glass-ceramic composite.

    En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados obte...

  18. An Analysis of the Microstructure, Macrostructure and Microhardness of Nicr-Ir Joints Produced by Laser Welding with and without Preheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Różowicz S.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses some of the basic problems involved in laser welding of dissimilar materials with significant differences in melting points. It focuses on the micro and macrostructure of laser welded NiCr-Ir microjoints used in central spark plug electrodes. The joints were produced by welding with and without preheat using an Nd,YAG laser. The structure and composition of the welded joints were analyzed by means of a light microscope (LM and a scanning electron microscope (SEM equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray (EDX spectrometer. The microhardness of the weld area was also studied.

  19. Efeito das técnicas de inserção e ativação da resina composta sobre a microinfiltração e microdureza Effect of techniques of composite resin insertion and polymerization on microleakage and microhardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Mariote Amaral

    2002-09-01

    system (3M. After thermocycling, the samples were immersed in 2% methylene blue dye solution for 4 hours. Half of the samples were embedded in polystyrene resin, and Knoop microhardness was measured. The Kruskal-Wallis test did not reveal statistical differences (p > 0.05 between the polymerization and insertion techniques as to microleakage. Regarding microhardness, the two-way ANOVA and the Tukey test did not reveal statistical differences between the restorative techniques (p > 0.05, but progressive polymerization (G5 and G6 was associated with smaller Knoop microhardness values (p < 0.05: G = 144.11; G2 = 143.89; G3 = 141.14; G4 = 142.79; G5 = 132.15; G6 = 131.67. It was concluded that the evaluated polymerization and insertion techniques did not affect marginal microleakage, but a decrease in microhardness occurred when progressive polymerization was carried out.

  20. Microstructure and temperature dependence of the microhardness of W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Savoini, B., E-mail: begona.savoini@uc3m.es; Martínez, J.; Muñoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.

    2013-11-15

    W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt.%) alloys have been produced by mechanical alloying and subsequent hot isostatic pressing. Electron microscopy observations revealed that these alloys exhibit a submicron grain structure with a dispersion of La oxide nanoparticles. Large V or Ti pools with martensitic characteristics are found segregated in the interstices between the W particles of the respective alloys. Microhardness tests were carried out over the temperature range 300–1073 K in vacuum. The microhardness–temperature curve for W–4V–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} exhibited the expected decreasing trend with increasing temperature although the microhardness stayed constant between ∼473 and 773 K. The W–4Ti–1La{sub 2}O{sub 3} presented quite different temperature dependence with an anomalous microhardness increase for temperatures above ∼473 K.

  1. Halogen lamp and LED activation of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative material. In vitro microhardness after long-term storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassoni, A; Macarini, P; Leonetti, E S; Shibli, J A; Rodrigues, J A

    2011-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the activation of resin-modified glass ionomer restorative material (RMGI, Vitremer-3M-ESPE, A3) by halogen lamp (QTH) or light-emitting diode (LED) by Knoop microhardness (KHN) in two storage conditions: 24 hrs and 6 months and in two depths (0 and 2 mm). The specimens were randomly divided into 3 experimental groups (n = 10) according to activation form and evaluated in depth after 24 h and after 6 months of storage. Activation was performed with QTH for 40s (700 mW/cm) and for 40 or 20 s with LED (1,200 mW/cm2). After 24 hrs and 6 months of storage at 37 degrees C in relative humidity in light-proof container, the Knoop microhardness test was performed. Statistics Data were analysed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey post-tests (p LED higher than the ones activated by QTH. Light-activation with LED positively influenced the KHN for RMGI evaluated after 6 months.

  2. Effect of activation modes on the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardness of dual-cured self-adhesive resin cements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ah-Rang; Jeon, Yong-Chan; Jeong, Chang-Mo; Yun, Mi-Jung; Choi, Jae Won; Kwon, Yong Hoon; Huh, Jung-Bo

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the compressive strength, diametral tensile strength and microhardnss of several selfadhesive resin cements (Rely-X U200, Clearfill SA Luting, G-CEM LinkAce, Maxcem Elite, PermaCem 2.0, and Zirconite) using different activation modes (self-cured, light-cured) and testing time (immediately, 24 h, thermocycling). Specimens were prepared for the compressive strength (Ø 4×6 mm) and diametral tensile strength and microhardness (Ø 6×3 mm) according to ISO standards. The strength after 24 h was higher than immediately after. In addition, G-CEM showed the highest values. In terms of the activation modes, Rely-X U200, PermaCem 2.0 had higher values in the light-curing than the self-curing. In conclusion, all cements demonstrated clinically available strength values and revealed differences in strength according to their composition, testing time and activation mode. Furthermore, correlation was found between the microhardness (degree of conversion) and mechanical strengths of the cements tested.

  3. Effect of Tool Rotation Speed on Microstructure and Microhardness of Friction-Stir-Processed Cold-Sprayed SiCp/Al5056 Composite Coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chunjie; Li, Wenya; Zhang, Zhihan; Planche, Marie-pierre; Liao, Hanlin; Montavon, Ghislain

    2016-10-01

    SiC-particle-reinforced Al5056-matrix composite coatings were deposited onto Al2024 substrates by cold spraying using a powder mixture having 15 vol.% SiC. To investigate the effects of friction stir processing (FSP) parameters on the microstructure and microhardness of the as-sprayed coating, the as-sprayed composite coating was then subjected to FSP using a stir tool having a threaded pin with rotation speed of 600 rpm and 1400 rpm. Results showed that the coatings presented Al and SiC phases before and after FSP treatment, and no other diffraction peaks were detected. Fine grains were produced in the Al5056 matrix due to severe plastic deformation during FSP, and the refined SiC particles exhibited a homogeneous distribution in the FSPed coating. In addition, an evident reduction of porosity (from 0.36% to 0.08% at 600 rpm or 0.09% at 1400 rpm) occurred, and a dramatic size reduction of the reinforcement from 12.5 µm to 6.5 µm at 600 rpm or 7.0 µm at 1400 rpm was achieved. Nevertheless, the microhardness profile presented general softening and a decrease from 143.9 HV to about 110 HV.

  4. Effect of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes on the mechanical properties of Gd-123 superconducting phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anas, M.; Ebrahim, Shaker; Eldeen, I. G.; Awad, R.; Abou-Aly, A. I.

    2017-10-01

    The influence of single wall carbon nanotubes SWCNTs and multi wall carbon nanotubes MWCNTs on Vickers microhardness of Gd-123 superconducting phase is studied. Samples of type (SWCNTs)x and (MWCNTs)xGdBa2Cu3O7-δ, composite where, 0.0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1 wt.%, are prepared by solid-state reaction technique. The samples are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM). Moreover the samples are examined by measuring electrical resistivity and Vickers microhardness. The obtained results showed an enhancement in the phase formation and grains connectivity up to 0.06 and 0.08 wt.% for SWCNTs and MWCNTs added samples, respectively. Likewise the superconducting transition temperature Tc was improved at a low content of CNTs but it suppressed for higher concentrations. In addition, the analysis of Vickers microhardness measurements suggests that the most suitable model that describes the behavior of our sample is proportional specimen resistance PSR model.

  5. Measuring $\

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Jessica Sarah [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2011-01-01

    The MINOS Experiment consists of two steel-scintillator calorimeters, sampling the long baseline NuMI muon neutrino beam. It was designed to make a precise measurement of the ‘atmospheric’ neutrino mixing parameters, Δm2 atm. and sin2 (2 atm.). The Near Detector measures the initial spectrum of the neutrino beam 1km from the production target, and the Far Detector, at a distance of 735 km, measures the impact of oscillations in the neutrino energy spectrum. Work performed to validate the quality of the data collected by the Near Detector is presented as part of this thesis. This thesis primarily details the results of a vμ disappearance analysis, and presents a new sophisticated fitting software framework, which employs a maximum likelihood method to extract the best fit oscillation parameters. The software is entirely decoupled from the extrapolation procedure between the detectors, and is capable of fitting multiple event samples (defined by the selections applied) in parallel, and any combination of energy dependent and independent sources of systematic error. Two techniques to improve the sensitivity of the oscillation measurement were also developed. The inclusion of information on the energy resolution of the neutrino events results in a significant improvement in the allowed region for the oscillation parameters. The degree to which sin2 (2θ )= 1.0 could be disfavoured with the exposure of the current dataset if the true mixing angle was non-maximal, was also investigated, with an improved neutrino energy reconstruction for very low energy events. The best fit oscillation parameters, obtained by the fitting software and incorporating resolution information were: | Δm2| = 2.32+0.12 -0.08×10-3 eV2 and sin2 (2θ ) > 0.90(90% C.L.). The analysis provides the current world best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass

  6. Thermal treatment of the amorphous base alloy Fe 2605SA1, analysis of its defects and microhardness; Tratamiento termico de la aleacion amorfa base Fe 2605SA1, analisis de sus defectos y microdureza

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Contreras V, J.A.; Cabral P, A.; Garcia Santibanez S, F.; Ramirez, J.; Lopez M, J.; Villaverde L, A.; Montoya E, A.; Merino, F.J. [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico. El Cerillo Piedras Blancas, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2007-07-01

    By means of the use of the positron lifetime technique those characteristics of the present crystalline defects in an amorphous base alloy Fe (SA1) are determined, when this is subjected to thermal treatments from 293 K until 808 K. Also, some results about the microhardness and electric resistivity are presented. (Author)

  7. Microhardness and lattice parameter calibrations of the oxygen solid solutions of unalloyed alpha-titanium and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedemann, K. E.; Shenoy, R. N.; Unnam, J.

    1987-01-01

    Standards were prepared for calibrating microanalyses of dissolved oxygen in unalloyed alpha-Ti and Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo. Foils of both of these materials were homogenized for 120 hours in vacuum at 871 C following short exposures to the ambient atmosphere at 854 C that had partially oxidized the foils. The variation of Knoop microhardness with oxygen content was calibrated for both materials using 15-g and 5-g indentor loads. The unit-cell lattice parameters were calibrated for the unalloyed alpha-Ti. Example analyses demonstrate the usefulness of these calibrations and support an explanation of an anomaly in the lattice parameter variation. The results of the calibrations have been tabulated and summarized using predictive equations.

  8. Micromechanical Property Measurements of Glass and Glass-Ceramic Substrates for Magnetic Thin-Film Rigid Disks for Gigabit Recording

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhushan, Bharat; Chyung, Kenneth; Miller, Roger A.

    Chemically-strengthened glass and glass-ceramics are beginning to be used as substrate materials for magnetic thin-film rigid disks because of their superior rigidity, dent resistance, smoothness and high maximum use temperature with respect to commonly used Ni-P coated aluminum-magnesium (Al-Mg) substrates. Elastic-plastic deformation behavior, hardness and Young's modulus of elasticity of various glass and glass-ceramic substrates were measured using a depth-sensing nanoindenter. The damage mechanisms were studied during microscratching using a scratching option in the nanoindenter and during Vickers indentations at relatively high loads using a microindenter. Based on the length of the cracks produced during Vickers indentation, fracture toughness was obtained. Hardness, Young's modulus, scratch resistance and fracture toughness of glass-ceramics are found to be a function of composition, phases and grain size. The mechanical properties of glass-ceramics are superior to those of chemically-strengthened glasses.

  9. Evaluation and comparison of the microhardness of enamel after bleaching with fluoride free and fluoride containing carbamide peroxide bleaching agents and post bleaching anticay application: An in vitro study

    OpenAIRE

    Liza George; Allu Baby; T Prasanth Dhanapal; K M Charlie; Asha Joseph; Anjum Anna Varghese

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate and compare the microhardness of enamel after the application of anticay on bleached enamel with fluoride containing and fluoride free bleaching agent. Materials and Methods: Twenty freshly extracted teeth decoronated and divided mesiodistally into two halves were randomly divided into five groups with 10 samples in each group. The enamel surface was treated as follows: Group 1 - no treatment, Group 2 - fluoride free bleaching agen...

  10. Effect of gamma sterilization on microhardness of the cortical bone tissue of bovine femur in presence of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine free radical scavenger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allaveisi, Farzaneh; Hashemi, Bijan; Mortazavi, Seyed Mohammad Javad

    2014-05-01

    Gamma sterilization is usually used to minimize the risk of infection transmission through bone allografts. However, it is believed that gamma irradiation affects the mechanical properties of allografts and free radical scavengers can be used to alleviate the radiation-induced degradation of these properties. The aim of this study was to investigate the radioprotective effects of N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine (NAC) free radical scavenger on the material properties of sterilized bovine cortical bone at microstructure level. Forty-two cortical tissue specimens were excised from three bovine femurs and irradiated to 35 and 70 kGy gamma rays in the presence of 5, 50, and 100 mM concentrations of NAC. The localized variations in microhardness were evaluated via indentation in the radial and longitudinal directions to examine different regions of the microstructures of the specimens, including the osteonal and interstitial tissues. A significant increase was observed in the hardness of osteonal, interstitial, and longitudinal combined microstructures exposed to 35 and 70 kGy radiations (P ionizing radiation and can be used to improve the material properties of sterilized allografts. Copyright © 2013 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Microhardness with depth sensing indentation. Instruments methods and applications; Mesure de durete submicronique instrumentee. Methode et applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poissonnet, S

    1999-07-01

    The study of applied surface layer or modified layers lead to the development of depth sensing indentation instruments in which measurements of penetration depth replaces optical measurements of surface impressions and sub-micron hardness may be determined. Indentation curves, depth-load, of elastoplastic materials give informations about plasticity and elasticity. After a description of the micro-indentation techniques we show few applications. Irradiation effects are measured in different materials like hafnium diboride, stainless steel or kapton. Hardness in oxide formed on metal study give informations. All these examples show that the nano-indentation is a powerful mean in the physical studies of materials because of a good statistic may be obtained and we have access to thin samples and to small phases. (author)

  12. The effect of curing intensity on mechanical properties of different bulk-fill composite resins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alkhudhairy FI

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fahad I Alkhudhairy Restorative Dental Sciences Department, College of Dentistry, King Saud University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of two curing light intensities on the mechanical properties (Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength of bulk-fill resin-based composites (RBCs.Materials and methods: Four commercially available bulk-fill RBCs (Tetric® N-Ceram, SonicFill™, Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR™ Posterior Flowable Material, and Filtek™ Posterior Restorative were used in this study. A total of 72 cylindrical specimens of each RBC (n=288 were prepared and subjected to Vickers microhardness, compressive strength, and diametral tensile strength tests at high (1200 mW/cm2 and low (650 mW/cm2 curing light intensities (each n=12. Results were evaluated using independent and paired sample t-tests, one-way analysis of variance, and Tukey’s post hoc test. All tests were performed at a significance level of P<0.05.Results: The highest mean microhardness was observed for SonicFill (58.3 Vickers hardness number [VHN] cured using high-intensity light. Although having the least mean microhardness values, a significant difference was observed between SDR cured using high-intensity light and that cured using low-intensity light (P<0.05. In the total sample, the highest mean compressive strength was obtained for SonicFill (262.6 MPa, followed by SDR (253.2 MPa, both cured using high-intensity light, and the least was measured for Tetric N-Ceram cured using low-intensity light (214.3 MPa. At high and low curing light intensities, diametral tensile strength for all RBCs except SonicFill was significant (P<0.001.Conclusion: A higher curing light intensity (1200 mW/cm2 had a positive influence on the compressive and tensile strength of the four bulk-fill RBCs and microhardness of two materials tested compared with lower curing light intensity

  13. Investigation of physical and mechanical properties of (BaSnO3)x(Bi,Pb)-2223 composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habanjar, K.; Barakat, M. M. E.; Awad, R.

    2017-07-01

    The effect of BaSnO3 nanoparticles addition on the structural and mechanical properties of (Bi,Pb)-2223 superconducting phase by means of X-rays diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), electrical resistance and Vickers microhardness measurement was studied. BaSnO3 nanomaterial and (BaSnO3)x(Bi,Pb)-2223 superconducting samples were prepared using co-precipitation method and standard solid-state reaction techniques, respectively. From XRD data, the addition of BaSnO3 into (Bi,Pb)-2223 phase does not affect the tetragonal structure and the lattice parameters. SEM images indicate that the microstructure of (Bi,Pb)-2223 was enhanced by adding BaSnO3 nanoparticles by filling its pores and voids. The superconducting transition temperature Tc as well as the critical transport current density Jc, estimated from electrical resistivity measurements, are increased up to x = 0.5 wt%, then decreased with further increase in x. Vickers microhardness measurements Hv were carried out at room temperature as a function of applied. The experimental Hv results were analysed in view of Meyer’s law, Hays and Kendall (HK) approach, elastic/plastic deformation (EPD) and proportional specimen resistance (PSR). All samples exhibit normal indentation size effect (ISE), in addition to that, the analysis shows that the Hays and Kendall model is the most suitable one to describe the load independent microhardness for (BaSnO3)x(Bi,Pb)-2223 superconducting samples.

  14. The influence of the arc plasma treatment on the structure and microhardness C120U carbon tool steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Bochnowski

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available paper. They are compared with the properties obtained after conventional hardening. The GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding method was used. The remelted zone consists of dendritic cells and columnar crystals. Inside the columnar crystals dependent to current arc plasma intensity the martensite or lower bainite was observed. The cooling rate of the remelted zone is similar to the cooling rate obtained in the classical heat treatment. The maximum hardness 650 HV0,1 was measured in material after treatment with a smaller current intensity of arc plasma – 60A. Increases of the current intensity of arc plasma from 60 A to 110 A (for fixed speed rate of source lead to increases the depth of the remelted zone from 1,2 to 3,1 mm. Thickness of the heat affected zone in the all specimens was similar (1,9 to 2,1 mm.

  15. Effect of thickener agents on dental enamel microhardness submitted to at-home bleaching Efeito de agentes espessantes na microdureza do esmalte submetido ao clareamento dental caseiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Augusto Rodrigues

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Dental bleaching occurs due to an oxidation reaction between the bleaching agents and the macromolecules of pigments in the teeth. This reaction is unspecific and the peroxides can also affect the dental matrix causing mineral loss. On the other hand, recent studies have suggested that the thickener agent carbopol can also cause mineral loss. Thus, the objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro the effect of at-home dental bleaching on dental enamel microhardness after the use of bleaching agents with and without carbopol as a thickener agent. Bovine dental slabs with 3 x 3 x 3 mm were obtained, sequentially polished, and randomly divided into 4 groups according to the experimental treatment: G1: 2% carbopol; G2: 10% carbamide peroxide with carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: 10% carbamide peroxide with poloxamer. Bleaching was performed daily for 4 weeks, immersed in artificial saliva. Enamel microhardness values were obtained before the treatment (T0 and 7 (T1, 14 (T2, 21 (T3, 28 (T4, and 42 (T5 days after the beginning of the treatment. ANOVA and Tukey's test revealed statistically significant differences only for the factor Time (F = 5.48; p O clareamento dental ocorre devido a uma reação de oxidação entre o agente clareador e as macromoléculas de pigmentos presentes nos dentes. Esta reação é inespecífica e o peróxido pode agir na matriz dental causando perdas de mineral. Por outro lado, estudos recentes sugerem que o agente espessante carbopol também pode causar perda mineral. Assim, o objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar in vitro o efeito do clareamento caseiro sobre a microdureza do esmalte após o uso de agentes clareadores com e sem carbopol como espessante. Fragmentos de esmalte bovino de 3 x 3 x 3 mm foram obtidos, polidos seqüencialmente e aleatoriamente divididos em 4 grupos de acordo com o tratamento experimental: G1: carbopol a 2%; G2: peróxido de carbamida a 10% com carbopol; G3: carbowax; G4: peróxido de carbamida a

  16. Measuring Radiation Damage from Heavy Energetic Ions in Aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostin, M., PI-MSU; Ronningen, R., PI-MSU; Ahle, L., PI-LLNL; Gabriel, T., Scientific Investigation and Development; Mansur, L., PI-ORNL; Leonard, K., ORNL; Mokhov, N., FNAL; Niita, K., RIST, Japan

    2009-02-21

    An intense beam of 122 MeV/u (9.3 GeV) 76Ge ions was stopped in aluminum samples at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL, MSU. Attempts were made at ORNL to measure changes in material properties by measuring changes in electrical resistivity and microhardness, and by transmission electron microscopy characterization, for defect density caused by radiation damage, as a function of depth and integrated ion flux. These measurements are relevant for estimating damage to components at a rare isotope beam facility.

  17. The Role of Si and Cu Alloying Elements on the Dendritic Growth and Microhardness in Horizontally Solidified Binary and Multicomponent Aluminum-Based Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araújo, Eugênio C.; Barros, André S.; Kikuchi, Rafael H.; Silva, Adrina P.; Gonçalves, Fernando A.; Moreira, Antonio L.; Rocha, Otávio L.

    2017-03-01

    Horizontal directional solidification (HDS) experiments were carried out with Al-3wtpctCu, Al-3wtpctSi, and Al- 3wtpctCu-5.5wtpctSi alloys in order to analyze the interrelation between the secondary dendrite arm spacing ( λ 2) and microhardness (HV). A water-cooled horizontal directional solidification device was applied. Microstructural characterization has been carried out using traditional techniques of metallography, optical, and SEM microscopy. The ThermoCalc software was used to generate the phase equilibrium diagrams as a function of Cu and Si for the analyzed alloys. The effects of Si and Cu elements on the λ 2 and HV evolution of the hypoeutectic binary Al-Cu and Al-Si alloys have been analyzed as well as the addition of Si in the formation of ternary Al-Cu-Si alloy. The secondary dendrite arm spacing was correlated with local solidification thermal parameters such as growth rate ( V L), cooling rate ( T R), and local solidification time ( t SL). This has allowed to observe that power experimental functions given by λ 2 = Constant ( V L)-2/3, λ 2 = Constant ( T R)-1/3 and λ 2 = Constant ( t SL)1/3 may represent growth laws of λ 2 with corresponding thermal parameters for investigated alloys. Hall-Petch equations have also been used to characterize the dependence of HV with λ 2. A comparative analysis is performed between λ 2 experimental values obtained in this study for Al-3wtpctCu-5.5wtpctSi alloy and the only theoretical model from the literature that has been proposed to predict the λ 2 growth in multicomponent alloys. Comparisons with literature results for upward directional solidification were also performed.

  18. Glassceramics from Industrial Waste Prepared in a Microwave Furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milota Kováčová

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the study of glassceramics from nickel leaching residue used as a heavy metal carrier (Cd, Pb preparedby microwave vitrification. The Vicker`s microhardness, chemical durability and magnetic susceptibility of vitrified waste was tested.The glassceramics containing 40-50 % of nickel leaching residue with a high microhardness and very good chemical durability wasobtained in a short time of heating (45 minutes.

  19. Dietary boron does not affect tooth strength, micro-hardness, and density, but affects tooth mineral composition and alveolar bone mineral density in rabbits fed a high-energy diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakki, Sema S; SiddikMalkoc; Dundar, Niyazi; Kayis, Seyit Ali; Hakki, Erdogan E; Hamurcu, Mehmet; Baspinar, Nuri; Basoglu, Abdullah; Nielsen, Forrest H; Götz, Werner

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary boron (B) affects the strength, density and mineral composition of teeth and mineral density of alveolar bone in rabbits with apparent obesity induced by a high-energy diet. Sixty female, 8-month-old, New Zealand rabbits were randomly assigned for 7 months into five groups as follows: (1) control 1, fed alfalfa hay only (5.91 MJ/kg and 57.5 mg B/kg); (2) control 2, high energy diet (11.76 MJ and 3.88 mg B/kg); (3) B10, high energy diet + 10 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (4) B30, high energy diet + 30 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h; (5) B50, high energy diet + 50 mg B gavage/kg body weight/96 h. Maxillary incisor teeth of the rabbits were evaluated for compression strength, mineral composition, and micro-hardness. Enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp tissue were examined histologically. Mineral densities of the incisor teeth and surrounding alveolar bone were determined by using micro-CT. When compared to controls, the different boron treatments did not significantly affect compression strength, and micro-hardness of the teeth, although the B content of teeth increased in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to control 1, B50 teeth had decreased phosphorus (P) concentrations. Histological examination revealed that teeth structure (shape and thickness of the enamel, dentin, cementum and pulp) was similar in the B-treated and control rabbits. Micro CT evaluation revealed greater alveolar bone mineral density in B10 and B30 groups than in controls. Alveolar bone density of the B50 group was not different than the controls. Although the B treatments did not affect teeth structure, strength, mineral density and micro-hardness, increasing B intake altered the mineral composition of teeth, and, in moderate amounts, had beneficial effects on surrounding alveolar bone.

  20. Evaluation of photo-activation appliances used in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thales Ribeiro de Magalhães Filho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Verify the Vickers microhardness promoted by three photo-activation appliances: one Halogen Light Ultralux (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and two Light Emitting Diodes. One with a larger diode (Ultraled, Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and the other with seven smaller diodes (Ultraled xp, Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil in composites with different matrixes. Methods: Three test specimens were made for each resinous materials using silicone molds measuring 4 X 8 X 30 mm. Polymerization was performedin three stages and on the two surfaces. After having been submitted to careful polishing with sequential abrasive papers and diamond paste, the Vickers microhardness of the test specimens was determined. Afterwards these values were submitted to statistical analysis by the ANOVA table and Student’s-t test. Results: The microhardness values obtained in the hybrid composite were as follows: 51.63 kg/mm2 +- 3.27; 52.22 kg/mm2 +- 3.3; 38.08 kg/mm2 +-0.31 and in the ormocer, 41.87 kg/mm2 +- 2.36; 41.5 kg/mm2 +- 1.2; 33.63 kg/mm2 +- 1.2, by the Ultralux (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, Ultraled xp (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil appliances, respectively. Conclusion: The Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil and Ultraled xp (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil appliances promoted microhardness values that were similar between them and higher than the values produced by Ultraled (Dabi-Atlante, Ribeirão Preto, Brazil in the composites. It was verified that the intensity of the photo-activator appliances is directly related to the microhardness they produce in the composites.

  1. Comparison of mechanical properties of glass-bonded sodalite and borosilicate glass high-level waste forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Holleran, T. P.; DiSanto, T.; Johnson, S. G.; Goff, K. M.

    2000-05-09

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a glass-bonded sodalite waste form to immobilize the salt waste stream from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel. The waste form consists of 75 vol.% crystalline sodalite and 25 vol.% glass. Microindentation fracture toughness measurements were performed on this material and borosilicate glass from the Defense Waste Processing Facility using a Vickers indenter. Palmqvist cracking was confined for the glass-bonded sodalite waste form, while median-radial cracking occurred in the borosilicate glass. The elastic modulus was measured by an acoustic technique. Fracture toughness, microhardness, and elastic modulus values are reported for both waste forms.

  2. Morphological, thermal and annealed microhardness ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Department of Chemistry, Government Autonomous Science College, Jabalpur 482 001, India. MS received 12 November 2004; revised 13 June 2005. Abstract. The present paper reports the preparation of full IPNs of gelatin and polyacrylonitrile.

  3. Effects of gamma irradiation and post-irradiation annealing on carbon/epoxy UDC properties deduced by methods of local loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekulic, Danijela; Stevanovic, M. M.

    2011-05-01

    Hardness and Young's modulus of the matrix and fibers in carbon/epoxy gamma irradiated and annealed composites were investigated using nanoindentation technique. The Vickers microhardness of the tested composites after irradiation and annealing was studied, as well. Gamma irradiation to various doses (5-27 MGy) of UDC plates, were followed by thermal treatments of irradiated coupons at 180 and 250 °C, in vacuum. The measured changes of nano and micro properties were correlated to glass transition temperatures, as well as the delamination toughness changes, determined earlier on the same material. The established irradiation and annealing effects on nanoindentation properties and Vickers mocrohardness were analyzed as a function of the matrix plasticity change. An attempt was made to assess the contribution of chain scission mechanism and the change in plasticity mechanism on the property changes from irradiation and subsequent thermal treatments.

  4. Effect of the welding process on the microstructure and microhardness of API 5L X80 steel welded joint used for oil transportation pipeline; Efeito do processo de soldagem sobre a microestrutura e a microdureza de juntas soldadas de aco API 5L X80 usado em tubulacoes para transporte de petroleo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alves, R.T.P.; Albuquerque, S.F. [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil); Maciel, T.M.; Almeida, D.M.; Santos, M.A.

    2008-07-01

    This study had as objective to evaluate the microstructure and microhardness of API 5L X80 steel welded joints, used for pipelines to transport oil and gas, using the Shield Metal Arc Welding process with pre- heating temperature of 200 deg C and 400 deg C and the AWS E8010G electrode as filler metal. For this, besides the microhardness of the welded joint, the weld metals percentiles of micro-constituents and of columnar and regenerated grains and the medium size and extension of the heat affected zone were evaluated. The percentage of acicular ferrite in weld metal ranged from 13% to 33% which generated values of microhardness from 114 HV to 309 HV. (author)

  5. Influence of Size on the Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of an AISI 304L Stainless Steel—A Comparison between Bulk and Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J. Baldenebro-Lopez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the mechanical properties and microstructural features of an AISI 304L stainless steel in two presentations, bulk and fibers, were systematically studied in order to establish the relationship among microstructure, mechanical properties, manufacturing process and effect on sample size. The microstructure was analyzed by XRD, SEM and TEM techniques. The strength, Young’s modulus and elongation of the samples were determined by tensile tests, while the hardness was measured by Vickers microhardness and nanoindentation tests. The materials have been observed to possess different mechanical and microstructural properties, which are compared and discussed.

  6. In-situ Investigation of Lead-free Solder Alloy Formation Using a Hot-plate Microscope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, René; Tang, Peter Torben; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    2007-01-01

    This work presents the advantages of using a hot-plate microscope for investigation of new (high-temperature) lead- free solders as in-situ analysis tool and preparation equipment. A description of the equipment and the preparation method is given and some examples are outlined. The formation...... of small AuSn-based, homogeneous and un-oxidized solder spheres will be demonstrated. Moreover the possibility of using this equipment as a sample preparation method to further investigation is shown. As example the equipment was used to produce samples for Vickers microhardness measurement of important...

  7. DEVELOPMENT BY COMPUTATIONAL SIMULATION AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS OF AN EQUAL CHANNEL ANGULAR PRESSING DIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillip Springer

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Critical geometric parameters of an Equal Channel Angular Pressing (ECAP die suitable to plate processing were optimized by making use of the DEFORM™ software. Following the simulation a die was manufactured and employed in the processing of 7 mm thick Al AA 1050 plates. Software output included the pressing forces and the equivalent deformation distribution within the plates, after one and four ECAP passes. Calculated pressing forces against the punch displacement were compared with the actual forces, whilst the deformation distribution is validated by Vickers microhardness measurements. From tensile tests and microstructural observation of the processed plates the die performance was found quite satisfactory.

  8. Chemomechanical phenomena in the grinding of coal. Final report, February 1, 1976--May 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macmillan, N.H.

    1977-08-01

    Vickers microhardness, drilling rate, grinding rate and zeta-potential measurements have been made on coals of various rank in both aqueous and organic environments in order to determine whether: (a) chemomechanical (Rebinder) effects exist in coal; and (b) any such effects as do exist can be used to improve the comminution of coal. The results reveal the mechanical behavior of coal to be remarkably environment-insensitive as compared to inorganic non-metals. As a result, it is concluded that chemomechanical phenomena offer little prospect of reducing the cost of comminuting coal.

  9. Depth of cure of resin composites: is the ISO 4049 method suitable for bulk fill materials?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flury, Simon; Hayoz, Stefanie; Peutzfeldt, Anne; Hüsler, Jürg; Lussi, Adrian

    2012-05-01

    To evaluate if depth of cure D(ISO) determined by the ISO 4049 method is accurately reflected with bulk fill materials when compared to depth of cure D(new) determined by Vickers microhardness profiles. D(ISO) was determined according to "ISO 4049; Depth of cure" and resin composite specimens (n=6 per group) were prepared of two control materials (Filtek Supreme Plus, Filtek Silorane) and four bulk fill materials (Surefil SDR, Venus Bulk Fill, Quixfil, Tetric EvoCeram Bulk Fill) and light-cured for either 10s or 20s. For D(new), a mold was filled with one of the six resin composites and light-cured for either 10 s or 20 s (n=22 per group). The mold was placed under a microhardness indentation device and hardness measurements (Vickers hardness, VHN) were made at defined distances, beginning at the resin composite that had been closest to the light-curing unit (i.e. at the "top") and proceeding toward the uncured resin composite (i.e. toward the "bottom"). On the basis of the VHN measurements, Vickers hardness profiles were generated for each group. D(ISO) varied between 1.76 and 6.49 mm with the bulk fill materials showing the highest D(ISO). D(new) varied between 0.2 and 4.0 mm. D(new) was smaller than D(ISO) for all resin composites except Filtek Silorane. For bulk fill materials the ISO 4049 method overestimated depth of cure compared to depth of cure determined by Vickers hardness profiles. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Dental Materials. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On the mechanical properties of selenite glass nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Arun Kr.; Kundu, Ranadip; Roy, Debasish; Bhattacharya, Sanjib

    2016-05-01

    In this paper the room temperature micro-hardness of selenite glass-nanocomposites has been measured using a Vickers and Knoop micro hardness tester where the applied load varies from 0.01N to 0.98 N. A significant indentation size effect was observed for each sample at relatively low indentation test loads. The classical Meyer's law and the proportional specimen resistance model were used to analyze the micro-hardness behavior. It was found that the selenite glass-nanocomposite becomes harder with increasing CuI composition and the work hardening coefficient and mechanical properties like Young modulus, E, were also calculated. Our results open the way for the preparation, application and investigation of significant mechanical properties of new type of glass-nanocomposites.

  11. Synthesis, crystal growth and studies on non-linear optical property of new chalcones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarojini, B. K.; Narayana, B.; Ashalatha, B. V.; Indira, J.; Lobo, K. G.

    2006-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal growth and non-linear optical (NLO) property of new chalcone derivatives are reported. 4-Propyloxy and 4-butoxy benzaldehydes were made to under go Claisen-Schmidt condensation with 4-methoxy, 4-nitro and 4-phenoxy acetophenones to form corresponding chalcones. The newly synthesized compounds were characterized by analytical and spectral data. The Second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency of these compounds was measured by powder technique using Nd:YAG laser. Among tested compounds three chalcones showed NLO property. The chalcone 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(4-propyloxy phenyl)-2-propen-1-one exhibited SHG conversion efficiency 2.7 times that of urea. The bulk crystal of 1-(4-methoxyphenyl)-3-(4-butoxyphenyl)-2-propen-1-one (crystal size 65×28×15 mm 3) was grown by slow-evaporation technique from acetone. Microhardness of the crystal was tested by Vicker's microhardness method.

  12. Mechanical properties of the (BaSnO3)x/Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ superconductor phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, A.; Malaeb, W.; Rekaby, M.; Awad, R.

    2017-10-01

    In this study, we carried out the Vickers microhardness for Cu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ , (Cu0.5Tl0.5)-1223 superconducting phase added with BaSnO3 nanoparticles. BaSnO3 nanoparticles were prepared by the co-precipitation technique, while the superconductor samples of type (BaSnO3)xCu0.5Tl0.5Ba2Ca2Cu3O10-δ , with 0.00 ≤ x ≤ 1.00 wt.%, were prepared by the conventional solid-state reaction method. Vickers microhardness (Hv) was measured at room temperature and was computed by taking the average of three hits at different locations on the specimen surface. The measurements were performed as a function of the applied load (F = 0.98-9.80 N) and the dwell time (t = 10-59 s). The Hv values were found to be strongly dependent on both the BaSnO3 content and the dwell time. Furthermore, the load independent Vickers microhardness was analyzed using Meyer’s law and different models such as the Hays-Kendall approach (HK), the elastic/plastic deformation model (EPD), the proportional specimen resistance model (PSR) and the modified proportional specimen resistance model (MPSR). The PSR model is found to be the most adequate model in explaining the load independent microhardness for the (BaSnO3)x/(Cu0.5Tl0.5)-1223 superconductor phase. Some important mechanical parameters such as Young’s modulus (E), yield strength (Y), fracture toughness (K) and brittleness index (B) were calculated as a function of x. It was found that the addition of proper concentrations of BaSnO3 nanoparticles enhanced the mechanical properties of the prepared samples. The time-dependent microhardness was investigated according to indentation creep experiments showing that the operative creep mechanisms in the studied samples were diffusion creeps at low loads followed by grain boundary sliding as well as dislocation creeps for higher loads.

  13. Measurement of the magnetic properties of P9 and T22 steel taken from service in power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, J.W., E-mail: John.Wilson@manchester.ac.uk [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Karimian, N. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Liu, J. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Yin, W. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Davis, C.L. [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Peyton, A.J. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-01

    With the UK's aging power generation network, life-extension of steel plant components is a critical issue. However, in order to evaluate the likelihood of component failure, techniques must be developed to properly assess the level of degradation in power station steels. Electromagnetic inspection has the potential to quantify the level of degradation through in-situ measurements at elevated temperatures. This paper reports the results of tests carried out on thermally treated P9 and T22 steel samples with different microstructural states using major and minor B–H loop measurements and magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements. The results show that by careful selection of minor loop parameters, specific to the material under inspection and the material change under consideration, correlations can established between EM properties and material properties such as Vickers hardness. These results will be used as a basis for the further development of a fully field deployable device. - Highlights: • T22 and P9 steel samples thermally treated to create different microstructures. • Major and minor BH loop and Barkhausen noise signals measured. • Permeability curves derived from three different types of minor loop. • Minor loop Barkhausen noise shows loop amplitude required to overcome pinning sites. • Correlations established between EM signal features and Vickers hardness.

  14. The Quality of Welded Connections Elements from the Steel 30HGS and Titanium Alloy Ti6Al4V

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Łapiński

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of that work was the evaluation of the quality of welded connections elements (welds from the 30HGS steel and titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. The metallographic, factographic tests were used, and measurements of microhardness with the Vickers method. In the head weld of the 30HGS steel there were non-metallic partial division and bubbles observed. The average microhardness in the head connection was 320 HV0.1. There was no significant increase/decrease observed of microhardness in the head influence zone of the weld. There was a good condition of head connections observed, in accordance with the standard EN12517 and EN25817. In the head weld of Ti6Al4V titanium alloy there were single, occasional non-metallic interjections and bubbles observed. There were no cracks both on the weld, and on the border of the heat influence zone. The value of microhardness in head connection was in the range 300÷445 HV0.1. Reveal a very good condition of the head connections in accordance with the standard EN12517 and EN25817. The factographic tests prove the correctness of welded connections done and then heat treatment in case of steel and titanium alloy.

  15. Blue Thermomechanical Treatment Optimizes Fatigue Resistance and Flexibility of the Reciproc Files.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Deus, Gustavo; Silva, Emmanuel João Nogueira Leal; Vieira, Victor Talarico Leal; Belladonna, Felipe Gonçalves; Elias, Carlos Nelson; Plotino, Gianluca; Grande, Nicola Maria

    2017-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of Blue thermal treatment on the bending resistance and cyclic fatigue of conventional M-Wire Reciproc files (VDW, Munich, Germany). The roughness pattern and the microhardness of the files were also assessed. Flexibility of standard Reciproc R25 files and the corresponding Blue prototypes was determined by 45° bending tests according to the ISO 3630-1 specification. Instruments were also subjected to cyclic fatigue resistance, measuring the time to fracture in an artificial stainless steel canal with a 60° angle and a 5-mm radius of curvature. The fracture surface of all fragments was examined with a scanning electron microscope. The roughness of the working parts was quantified by using a profilometer, and the microhardness test was performed using the Vickers hardness tester. Results were statistically analyzed using the Student t test with a level of significance set at P Reciproc Blue instruments presented a significantly longer cyclic fatigue life and significantly lower bending resistance than the original Reciproc instrument (P Reciproc Blue and the original Reciproc instruments (P > .05), whereas Reciproc Blue revealed significantly lower microhardness than the original Reciproc instrument (P Reciproc Blue nickel-titanium showed improved all-around performance when compared with conventional M-Wire superelastic nickel-titanium, demonstrating improved flexibility and fatigue resistance, and reduced microhardness while maintaining similar characteristics of the surface. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Wear resistance of experimental titanium alloys for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Adriana Cláudia Lapria; Rodrigues, Renata Cristina Silveira; Claro, Ana Paula Rosifini Alves; da Gloria Chiarello de Mattos, Maria; Ribeiro, Ricardo Faria

    2011-11-01

    The present study evaluated microstructure, microhardness and wear resistance of experimental titanium alloys containing zirconium and tantalum. Alloys were melted in arc melting furnace according to the following compositions: Ti-5Zr, Ti-5Ta and Ti-5Ta-5Zr (%wt). Hemispheres and disks were obtained from wax patterns that were invested and cast by plasma. Microstructures were evaluated using optical microscopy and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and also Vickers microhardness was measured. Hemispherical samples and disks were used for 2-body wear tests, performed by repeated grinding of the samples. Wear resistance was assessed as height loss after 40,000 cycles. The data were compared using ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test. Ti-5Zr presented a Widmanstätten structure and the identified phases were α and α' while Ti-5Ta and Ti-5Ta-5Zr presented α, β, α' and α" phases, but the former presented a lamellar structure, and the other, acicular. The microhardness of Ti-5Zr was significantly greater than other materials and cp Ti presented wear resistance significantly lower than experimental alloys. It was concluded that wear resistance was improved when adding Ta and Zr to titanium and Zr increased microhardness of Ti-5Zr alloy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. In vitro assessment of the composition and microhardness of hard tissues of oral cavity submitted to gamma irradiation; Avaliacao in vitro da composicao e microdureza dos tecidos duros da cavidade bucal submetidos a irradiacao gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes, Wilber Edison Bernaola

    2017-11-01

    Clinical Radiotherapy is extremely important for the treatment of malignant lesions of the head and neck region, however, exposure to ionizing radiation can lead to systemic or local complications during and after radiation treatment. Among these immediate local complications are the oral cavity xerostomia and the consequent oral mucositis. Regarding late complications produced by radiation, tooth decay of radiation and osteoradionecrosis are included, which are considered dose-dependent lesions, with high incidence in recent decades and difficult to manage, although these appear after completion of treatment and under the influence of local factors. The methodology proposed in this study consists in evaluating the effect of gamma radiation after irradiation of the samples, using the dose used in patients suffering with head and neck cancer. The samples were obtained from human enamel and root dentin; and swine mandibular bone, which were previously polished, and then submitted to the analysis of the initial surface microhardness of all groups. Subsequently, the samples were irradiated in a dose rate of 4 Gy per day, completing a total dose of 72 Gy. Finally, the samples were submitted to surface microhardness analysis after irradiation, which presented statistically significant results from the Student t, ANOVA and Tukey statistical tests referred to the difference of the mean of the initial and final values of each study group with a significant value of p = 0.00 (<0.05). Regarding the morphological analysis in scanning electron microscopy (SEM), the deleterious effect of gamma irradiation was evidenced as structural cracks, breaks and superficial fractures of the analyzed tissues and the biochemical analysis by Attenuated Total Reflection technique using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR - FTIR) showed degradation of inorganic components and denaturation of organic compounds; whereby, the effect of gamma irradiation on the hard tissues of the oral

  18. Microdureza de resina composta: efeito de aparelhos e tempos de polimerização em diferentes profundidades Microhardness of composite resins: effect of photocuring units and polymerization periods in different depths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Aily SANTOS

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available As propriedades das resinas compostas têm sido estudadas com freqüência, bem como os fatores que podem influenciar seu grau de polimerização. Diante da evolução desses materiais e da necessidade de buscarmos melhora do seu comportamento na cavidade bucal, objetivamos, por meio deste estudo avaliar a eficácia de dois aparelhos fotopolimerizadores do tipo pistola (de alta intensidade de luz, comparando com a de um aparelho a cabo (de baixa intensidade de luz, com tempos de exposição de 20 e de 40 segundos e em profundidades de 1 a 4 milímetros. Os testes avaliaram o grau de polimerização da resina por meio de testes de microdureza Knoop. Os resultados mostraram haver diferença estatisticamente significante entre os tempos, sendo que com 40 segundos a dureza foi maior que com 20 segundos para as 4 diferentes profundidades. Para o fator aparelhos, os dois aparelhos tipo pistola se comportaram superiores ao do tipo cabo Fibralux (Dabi Atlante, e entre eles, o XL 1500 (3M promoveu dureza maior que o Optilight II (Gnatus no tempo de polimerização de 40 segundos. As profundidades de 1, 2, 3 e 4 milímetros mostraram estatisticamente diferença entre si tendo sido encontrada maior dureza para as menores profundidades (p The properties of composite resins have been frequently studied, as well as the factors that might influence the polymerization degree. Considering the evolution of composites and the need to improve their clinical performance, this study intends to evaluate the efficacy of two high-intensity and one low-intensity photocuring units, as a function of exposure time (20 and 40seconds and composite depth (from 1 to 4 millimeters. Composite properties were evaluated via Knoop Microhardness Test. Statistical analysis (1 way ANOVA, p < 0.05 of the obtained results showed that there was statistically significant difference regarding the time factor. The 40-seconds polymerization time showed the best results, for the four depths

  19. Metallurgical characterization of orthodontic brackets produced by Metal Injection Molding (MIM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinelis, Spiros; Annousaki, Olga; Makou, Margarita; Eliades, Theodore

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the bonding base surface morphology, alloy type, microstructure, and hardness of four types of orthodontic brackets produced by Metal Injection Molding technology (Discovery, Extremo, Freedom, and Topic). The bonding base morphology of the brackets was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Brackets from each manufacturer were embedded in epoxy resin, and after metallographic grinding, polishing and coating were analyzed by x-ray energy-dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) microanalysis to assess their elemental composition. Then, the brackets were subjected to metallographic etching to reveal their metallurgical structure. The same specimen surfaces were repolished and used for Vickers microhardness measurements. The results were statistically analyzed with one-way analysis of variance and Student-Newman-Keuls multiple comparison test at the 0.05 level of significance. The findings of SEM observations showed a great variability in the base morphology design among the brackets tested. The x-ray EDS analysis demonstrated that each bracket was manufactured from different ferrous or Co-based alloys. Metallographic analysis showed the presence of a large grain size for the Discovery, Freedom, and Topic brackets and a much finer grain size for the Extremo bracket. Vickers hardness showed great variations among the brackets (Topic: 287 +/- 16, Freedom: 248 +/- 13, Discovery: 214 +/- 12, and Extremo: 154 +/- 9). The results of this study showed that there are significant differences in the base morphology, composition, microstructure, and microhardness among the brackets tested, which may anticipate significant clinical implications.

  20. Effect of yttrium doping on structural and electrical properties of Bi2Sr1.9Ca0.1−xYxCu2O7+δ (Bi-2202) cuprate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boudjadja, Y.; Amira, A.; Saoudel, A.; Mahamdioua, N.; Varilci, A.; Terzioglu, C.; Polat Altintas, S.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we report on the effect of Y3+ doping on structural, mechanical and electrical properties of Bi-2202 phase. Samples of Bi2Sr1.9Ca0.1−xYxCu2O7+δ with x=0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.10 are elaborated in air by conventional solid state reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) combined with EDS spectroscopy, density, Vickers microhardness and resistivity measurements. A good correlation between the variations of the bulk density and the Vickers microhardness with doping is obtained. The SEM photograph shows that the samples are composed of grains with a flat shape that characterizes the Bi-based cuprates. Quantitative EDS analysis confirms the reduction of Ca content and the increase of Y content when x is increased. The variation of resistivity with temperature shows that only samples with x=0, 0.025 and 0.05 present an onset transition to the superconducting state. The higher onset transition temperature is obtained for x=0.025 and is about 93.62K. The transition is wide and is realized in two steps confirming then the presence of the low Tc Bi-2201 phase in the samples. For x=0.075 and 0.10, a transition to a semiconducting state is seen at low temperatures. Some physical parameters are extracted from these curves and discussed. (Author)

  1. Timing for composite resin placement on mineral trioxide aggregate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, Masaki; Tsujimoto, Yasuhisa; Ookubo, Atsushi; Shiraishi, Takanobu; Watanabe, Ikuya; Yamada, Shizuka; Hayashi, Yoshihiko

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the proper time to restore composite resin over mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA). Thirty-five samples of MTA blocks were divided into 7 groups with 3 different times (10 minutes, 1 day, and 7 days) selected for restoring the composite resin over MTA with and without bonding resin, and a control group was included for comparison. After 21 days, the distances between MTA and the composite resin or between MTA and the bonding agent on sectioned planes along the long axis were measured using a scanning electron microscope (×2,000 magnification). The hardness of the MTA near the composite resin was presented as the Vickers microhardness. There were no gaps at the interface in the 10-minute groups, the 1-day group with a bonding agent, and the 7-day group with a bonding agent. The groups without a bonding agent at 1 and 7 days presented a separation or gap at the interface. The value of the Vickers microhardness in the 1-day groups was significantly decreased compared with those of the other groups regardless of the presence or absence of a bonding agent. These findings suggest that composite resin with a bonding agent over MTA can be restored almost immediately after MTA mixing during a single visit. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of surface physical properties of acrylic resins for provisional prosthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Paulo Hilgenberg

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Acrylic resins used for provisional prostheses should have satisfactory superficial characteristics in order to ensure gingival health and low bacterial attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the superficial roughness and contact angle after two types of polishing and the Vickers hardness of three acrylic resins (Duralay - G1, Dencrilay - G2, and Dencor - G3, all shade 66, indicated for provisional fixed prostheses. Five 20 x 3 ± 1 mm diameter discoid specimens were obtained for each group. One side of the specimens was subjected to standard polishing (pumice and whiting slurry, and the opposite side was polished with special tips. The mean roughness and contact angles of the materials were measured. The specimens were subjected to the Vickers microhardness test, which indicated that standard polishing produced a surface roughness equivalent to that of the special tips. The contact angles obtained with the standard polishing were equivalent to those observed in the special tips group. The microhardness of G1 and G3 resins showed statistical differences.

  3. Algunas experiencias en el incremento de la microdureza y el espesor de capas de carburos cromadas por difusión // Some experiences in the increment of the microhardness and the thickness of layers of carbides chromed by diffusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. González Ruiz

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available En el trabajo se realiza una valoración, a partir de análisis metalográficos, del efecto de la rugosidad superficial presente en lasmuestras tratadas y de la adición de boro a la mezcla saturante sobre el espesor y la microdureza en las capas cromadas base aceroAISI 1055, obtenidas utilizando como materia prima mineral de cromo refractario cubano. También se aborda el efecto deltratamiento post cromado (temple + revenido bajo sobre la microdureza en las zonas de transición y ferrítica en probetas cromadasbase acero 1055.Palabras claves: Intensi f icación, cromado di fusivo, termodi fusión, deposición.______________________________________________________________________AbstractIn this work an appraisement of the effects of surface rugosity present in samples to treat and the addition of boron to themaster alloy on the depth and microhardness in chromium diffusion layers base steel AISI 1055 obtained from Cubanrefractaries ores was realized with the help of metalografic analysis. Finally the results from post chromized heat treatment(hardening + low tempering on the transition and ferritic zones was offered.Key words: Intensi fy, di f fusive chromed, thermodi f fusion, deposi t ion.

  4. Effect of light-emitting diode and halogen light curing on the micro-hardness of dental composite and resin-modified glass ionomer cement: An in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bhalla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims : This in vitro study was conducted to evaluate and compare the micro-hardness of composite resin and resin-modified glass ionomer cement using light-emitting diode (LED and halogen curing and also to inter-compare the effect of LED and halogen curing. Materials and Methods : The study sample comprised of 4 stainless steel plates with a thickness of 2 mm. For these stainless steel plates, holes were made to a diameter of 3 mm. The samples were divided into 4 groups of 8 each and labeled as group I, group II, group III, group IV, thus making provision for the two different modes of light exposure. In each group, the hole was restored with its respective restorative material and cured with light-curing unit according to manufacturer instructions. The results were statistically analyzed using Mann-Whitney test. Results and conclusion: It was concluded that the curing efficacy of the LED lamp was comparable to that of conventional halogen lamp, even with a 50% reduction in cure time, and resin composite (Filtek Z-250 presented the highest hardness values, whereas complete hardening of resin-modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC (Vitremer was observed because of its self-curing system even after the removal of light source.

  5. Microhardness, Friction and Wear of SiC and Si3N4 Materials as a Function of Load, Temperature and Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    are possible by mixing the starting powder with a polymeric binder and shaping by conventional plastic forming methods, finally burning out the binder...Zeiss -. Epignost II microscope fitted with a Leitz long working distance objective lens and a screw micrometer measuring- eyepiece . For heating, the

  6. Effect of antibacterial agents on the surface hardness of a conventional glass-ionomer cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    TÜZÜNER, Tamer; ULUSU, Tezer

    2012-01-01

    In atraumatic restorative treatment (ART), caries removal with hand excavation instruments is not as efficient as that with rotary burs in eliminating bacteria under the glass ionomer cements (GICs). Thus, different antibacterial agents have been used in recent studies to enhance the antibacterial properties of the GICs, without jeopardizing their basic physical properties. Objective The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of antibacterial agents on the surface hardness of a conventional GIC (Fuji IX) using Vickers microhardness [Vickers hardness number (VHN)] test. Material and Methods Cetrimide (CT), cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) and chlorhexidine (CHX) were added to the powder and benzalkonium chloride (BC) was added to the liquid of Fuji IX in concentrations of 1% and 2%, and served as the experimental groups. A control group containing no additive was also prepared. After the completion of setting reaction, VHN measurements were recorded at 1, 7, 15, 30, 60, and 90 days after storage in 37ºC distilled water. A one-way ANOVA was performed followed by a Dunnett t test and Tamhane T2 tests and also repeated measurements ANOVA was used for multiple comparisons in 95% confidence interval. Results VHN results showed significant differences between the control and the experimental groups at all time periods (phardness of set cements. Conclusions Despite the decreased microhardness values in all experimental groups compared to the controls after 7 up to 90 days, incorporating certain antibacterial agents into Fuji IX GIC showed tolerable microhardness alterations within the limitations of this in vitro study. PMID:22437677

  7. Study of the mechanisms involved in the laser superficial hardening process of metallic alloys; Estudo dos mecanismos envolvidos no processo de endurecimento superficial a laser de ligas metalicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Edmara Marques Rodrigues da

    2001-07-01

    The laser superficial hardening process of a ferrous alloy (gray cast iron) and of an aluminum-silicon alloy was investigated in this work. These metallic alloys are used in the automobile industry for manufacturing cylinders and pistons, respectively. By application of individual pulses and single tracks, the involved mechanisms during the processing were studied. Variables such as energy density, power density, temporal width, beam diameter on the sample surface, atmosphere of the processing region, overlapping and scanning velocity. The hardened surface was characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, dispersive energy microanalysis, X-ray mapping, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of roughness and Vickers microhardness. Depending on the processing parameters, it is possible to obtain different microstructures. The affected area of gray cast iron, can be hardened by remelting or transformation hardening (total or partial) if the reached temperature is higher or not that of melting temperature. Laser treatment originated new structures such as retained austenite, martensite and, occasionally, eutectic of cellular dendritic structure. Aluminum-silicon alloy does not have phase transformation in solid state, it can be hardened only by remelting. The increase of hardness is a function of the precipitation hardening process, which makes the silicon particles smaller and more disperse in the matrix. Maximal values of microhardness (700-1000 HV) were reached with the laser treatment in gray cast iron samples. The initial microhardness is of 242 HV. For aluminum-silicon alloy, the laser remelting increases the initial microhardness of 128 HV to the range of 160-320 HV. The found results give a new perspective for using the CLA/IPEN's laser in the heat treatment area. Besides providing a higher absorptivity to the materials, compared with the CO{sub 2} laser, and optical fiber access, the superficial hardening with Nd:YAG laser, depending on the

  8. Measurement of the magnetic properties of P9 and T22 steel taken from service in power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, J. W.; Karimian, N.; Liu, J.; Yin, W.; Davis, C. L.; Peyton, A. J.

    2014-06-01

    With the UK's aging power generation network, life-extension of steel plant components is a critical issue. However, in order to evaluate the likelihood of component failure, techniques must be developed to properly assess the level of degradation in power station steels. Electromagnetic inspection has the potential to quantify the level of degradation through in-situ measurements at elevated temperatures. This paper reports the results of tests carried out on thermally treated P9 and T22 steel samples with different microstructural states using major and minor B-H loop measurements and magnetic Barkhausen noise measurements. The results show that by careful selection of minor loop parameters, specific to the material under inspection and the material change under consideration, correlations can established between EM properties and material properties such as Vickers hardness. These results will be used as a basis for the further development of a fully field deployable device.

  9. Interaction between staining and degradation of a composite resin in contact with colored foods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debora Soares-Geraldo

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Composite resins might be susceptible to degradation and staining when in contact with some foods and drinks. This study evaluated color alteration and changes in microhardness of a microhybrid composite after immersion in different colored foods and determined whether there was a correlation between these two variables. Eighty composite disks were randomly divided into 8 experimental groups (n = 10: kept dry; deionized water; orange juice; passion fruit juice; grape juice; ketchup; mustard and soy sauce. The disks were individually immersed in their respective test substance at 37 ºC, for a period of 28 days. Superficial analysis of the disk specimens was performed by taking microhardness measurements (Vickers, 50 g load for 45 seconds and color alterations were determined with a spectrophotometer (CINTRA 10- using a CIEL*a*b* system, 400-700 nm wavelength, illuminant d65 and standard observer of 2º at the following times: baseline (before immersion, 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days. Results were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05. Both variables were also submitted to Pearson's correlation test (p < 0.05. The passion fruit group underwent the greatest microhardness change, while the mustard group suffered the greatest color alteration. Significant positive correlation was found between the two variables for the groups deionized water, grape juice, soy sauce and ketchup. Not all color alteration could be associated with surface degradation.

  10. Effect of thermal tempering on microstructure and mechanical properties of Mg-AZ31/Al-6061 diffusion bonding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jafarian, Mojtaba [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rizi, Mohsen Saboktakin, E-mail: M.saboktakin@Pa.iut.ac.ir [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jafarian, Morteza [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Honarmand, Mehrdad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Tiran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Javadinejad, Hamid Reza; Ghaheri, Ali [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Bahramipour, Mohammad Taghi [Materials Engineering Department, Hakim Sabzevari University, Sabzevar, 397 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimian, Marzieh [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 8415683111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Industrial Engineering, Lenjan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of the types thermal tempering of aluminum alloy on microstructure and mechanical properties of AZ31-O Mg and Al 6061-T6 diffusion bonding. Using Optical Microscope (OM) and Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) equipped with EDS analysis and line scan the interfaces of joints were evaluated. The XRD analysis was carried out to characterize phase constitution near the interface zone. The mechanical properties of joints were measured using Vickers micro-hardness and shear strength. According to the results in bonding of AZ31-Mg/Al-6061-O, in less plastic deformation in magnesium alloy, diffusion rate of most magnesium atoms occurred to aluminum alloy and formation of diffusion zone with minimum micro-hardness (140 HV) and maximum shear strength (32 MPa) compared to Al 6061-T6/Mg-AZ31 bonding. Evaluation of fracture surfaces indicates an occurrence of failure from the brittle intermetallic phases. - Highlights: • Diffusion bonding AZ31 to Al-6061withoutany interlayer was successful. • Thermal tempered aluminum alloy plays a vital role in the mechanical properties of joint. • Less thickness of reaction layers and micro-hardness in bonding annealed Al- 6061 layers to AZ31 was achieved. • Fracture surfaces indicated that the onset of fracture from intermetallic compounds resulted in fracture of the cleavage.

  11. Effect of light curing tip distance and resin shade on microhardness of a hybrid resin composite Efeito da distância da ponta do aparelho de fotoativação e da cor na microdureza superficial de um compósito híbrido

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio Henrique Baggio Aguiar

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Resin composite shades and resin composite polymerization performed with a distanced light tip are factors that can affect polymerization effectiveness. Thisin vitro study aimed to evaluate the influence of curing tip distance and resin shade on the microhardness of a hybrid resin composite (Z250 - 3M ESPE. Forty-five resin composite specimens were randomly prepared and divided into nine experimental groups (n = 5: three curing tip distances (2 mm, 4 mm, and 8 mm and three resin shades (A1, A3.5, and C2. All samples were polymerized with a continuous output at 550 mW/cm². After 24 hours, Knoop microhardness measurements were obtained on the top and bottom surfaces of the sample, with a load of 25 grams for 10 seconds. Five indentations were performed on each surface of each sample. Results showed that bottom surface samples light-cured at 2 mm and 4 mm presented significantly higher hardness values than samples light-cured at 8 mm. The resin shade A1 presented higher hardness values and was statistically different from C2. The resin shade A3.5 did not present statistical differences from A1 and C2. For the top surface, there were no statistical differences among the curing tip distances. For all experimental conditions, the top surface showed higher hardness values than the bottom surface. It was concluded that light curing tip distance and resin shade are important factors to be considered for obtaining adequate polymerization.A cor do compósito e a polimerização realizada com a ponta do aparelho de fotoativação distante da superfície do compósito são fatores que podem afetar a efetividade de polimerização. Assim, o objetivo deste estudo in vitro foi avaliar a influência desses fatores na microdureza superficial de um compósito híbrido (Z250 - 3M ESPE. Quarenta e cinco espécimes de compósito foram aleatoriamente preparados de acordo com os nove grupos experimentais (n = 5: três distâncias de fotoativação (2 mm, 4 mm e 8 mm e

  12. Microhardness Testing of Aluminum Alloy Welds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohanon, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    A weld is made when two pieces of metal are united or fused together using heat or pressure, and sometimes both. There are several different types of welds, each having their own unique properties and microstructure. Strength is a property normally used in deciding which kind of weld is suitable for a certain metal or joint. Depending on the weld process used and the heat required for that process, the weld and the heat-affected zone undergo microstructural changes resulting in stronger or weaker areas. The heat-affected zone (HAZ) is the region that has experienced enough heat to cause solid-state microstructural changes, but not enough to melt the material. This area is located between the parent material and the weld, with the grain structure growing as it progresses respectively. The optimal weld would have a short HAZ and a small fluctuation in strength from parent metal to weld. To determine the strength of the weld and decide whether it is suitable for the specific joint certain properties are looked at, among these are ultimate tensile strength, 0.2% offset yield strength and hardness. Ultimate tensile strength gives the maximum load the metal can stand while the offset yield strength gives the amount of stress the metal can take before it is 0.2% longer than it was originally. Both of these are good tests, but they both require breaking or deforming the sample in some way. Hardness testing, however, provides an objective evaluation of weld strengths, and also the difference or variation in strength across the weld and HAZ which is difficult to do with tensile testing. Hardness is the resistance to permanent or plastic deformation and can be taken at any desired point on the specimen. With hardness testing, it is possible to test from parent metal to weld and see the difference in strength as you progress from parent material to weld. Hardness around grain boundaries and flaws in the material will show how these affect the strength of the metal while still retaining the sample. This makes hardness testing a good test for identifying grain size and microstructure.

  13. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems engineering at Vickers Shipbuilding and Engineering Limited (VSEL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    A project, jointly funded by VSEL and CJB Developments Limited, is aimed at the development of complete power generation systems based on PEM fuel cell technology. Potential markets for such systems are seen as being very broadly based, ranging from military land and marine systems through to commercial on-site power generation and transport. From the outset the project was applications driven, the intent being to identify market requirements, in terms of system specifications and to use these to produce development targets. The two companies have based their work on the Ballard PEM stack and have focused their efforts on the development of supporting systems. This benefits all three companies as it allows Ballard to obtain applications information on which to base future research and VSEL/CJBD are able to capitalise on the advanced development of the Ballard stack. Current work is focused on the production of a 20 kW, methanol fuelled, power generation system demonstrator, although work is also in hand to address a wider range of fuels including natural gas. The demonstrator, when complete, will be used to indicate the potential benefits of such systems and to act as a design aid for the applications phase of the project. Preliminary work on this next phase is already in hand, with studies to assess both systems and fuel cell stack design requirements for specific applications and to generate concept designs. Work to date has concentrated on the development of a methanol reformer, suitable for integration into a fuel cell system and on extensive testing and evaluation of the Ballard fuel cell stacks. This testing has covered a wide range of operating parameters, including different fuel and oxidant combinations. The effect of contaminants on the performance and life of the fuel cells is also under evaluation. PEM fuel cells still require a great deal of further development if they are to gain widespread commercial acceptance. A recent study conducted by VSEL in conjunction with the UK Department of Energy has addressed the fuel cell cost and performance requirements in order to both focus future research and to aid understanding of the time-scale to reach full commercialisation.

  14. Influence of polymerization time and depth of cure of resin composites determined by Vickers hardness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Lombardini

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: Among the materials tested, the nanofilled and the nanohybrid resin composites were rather insensible to thickness variations. Miicrohybrid composites, instead, had features different from one another.

  15. Investigation on crystalline perfection, mechanical, piezoelectric and ferroelectric properties of L-tartaric acid single crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murugan, G. Senthil, E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com; Ramasamy, P., E-mail: nanosen@gmail.com [Centre for Crystal Growth, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam, Tamilnadu - 603110 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Polar organic nonlinear optical material, L-tartaric acid single crystals have been grown from slow evaporation solution growth technique. Single crystal X-ray diffraction study indicates that the grown crystal crystallized in monoclinic system with space group P2{sub 1}. Crystalline perfection of the crystal has been evaluated by high resolution X-ray diffraction technique and it reveals that the crystal quality is good and free from structural grain boundaries. Mechanical stability of the crystal has been analyzed by Vickers microhardness measurement and it exhibits reverse indentation size effect. Piezoelectric d{sub 33} co-efficient for the crystal has been examined and its value is 47 pC/N. The ferroelectric behaviour of the crystal was analyzed by polarization-electric field hysteresis loop measurement.

  16. Long-term microstructural stability of oxide-dispersion strengthened Eurofer steel annealed at 800 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zilnyk, K.D. [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena – USP, 12600-970 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Sandim, H.R.Z., E-mail: hsandim@demar.eel.usp.br [Escola de Engenharia de Lorena – USP, 12600-970 Lorena, SP (Brazil); Bolmaro, R.E. [Instituto de Física Rosario, CONICET-UNR, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Lindau, R.; Möslang, A. [Karlsruher Institut für Technologie, KIT, IAM-AWP, D-72061 Karlsruhe (Germany); Kostka, A.; Raabe, D. [Max-Planck Institut für Eisenforschung, MPI-E, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany)

    2014-05-01

    Oxide-dispersion strengthened ferritic martensitic steels such as ODS-Eurofer grade are good candidates for structural applications in future fusion power reactors. Long-term annealing treatments in vacuum were carried out in cold-rolled samples (80% reduction in thickness) from 1 h up to 4320 h (6 months) at 800 °C, i.e. the maximum temperature in the ferritic phase field, to follow its softening behavior. The microstructural stability of this steel was mapped using several characterization techniques including scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, electron backscatter diffraction, Vickers microhardness testing, X-ray diffraction texture measurements, low-temperature electrical resistivity, and magnetic coercive field measurements. ODS-Eurofer steel displays good microstructural stability. Discontinuous recrystallization occurs at the early stages of annealing resulting in a low volume fraction of recrystallized grains. Extended recovery is the predominant softening mechanism at this temperature for longer times.

  17. The hardness of synthetic products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts (in Romanian

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Ogrean

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The Hardness of Synthetic Products Obtained from Cooled and Crystallized Basaltic Melts. Hardness is one of the main properties of the products obtained from cooled and crystallized basaltic melts under a controlled thermal regime. It influences the abrasion tear resistance of the resulted material. The microhardness measurements on the samples (bricks, boards, gutters, armour plates, tubes indicated Vickers hardness value between 757–926 for the materials obtained from Şanovita basalts (Timiş district and between 539–958 respectively, in case of the Racoş basalts (Braşov district. There is a certain variation of the hardness within the same sample, in various measurement points, within the theoretical limits of the hardnesses of the pyroxenes and that of the spinels.

  18. Micro and nanohardness testing of laser welds

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestová, H.; Čtvrtlík, Radim; Chmelíčková, H.; Tomáštík, J.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 3 (2014), s. 247-253 ISSN 1454-9069 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010517 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Vickers microhardness * depth sensing indentation * laser welding Subject RIV: JP - Industrial Processing Impact factor: 1.658, year: 2014

  19. Evaluation of WC-9Co-4Cr laser surface alloyed coatings on stainless steel

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Obadele, A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available spectrometer (EDS), while the phase changed were observed using x-ray diffraction (XRD). The surface hardness was determined using the Vickers microhardness tester. The decomposition of WC-9Co-4Cr into W2C, C and W is as a result of low heat of formation of WC...

  20. Densification and mechanical properties of mullite–SiC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Nanosize SiC (average size 180 nm) surface was first provided with a mullite precursor coating which was characterized by the X-ray analysis and TEM. ... load of 500 g. This value gradually decreased with an increase in SiC content. Keywords. Mullite–SiC nanocomposites; sol–gel; microstructure; Vicker's microhardness.

  1. Mechanical characterization of microwave sintered zinc oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    II, Echo Ultrasound, USA). A 15 MHz transducer was used for this purpose. For each sintering condition, at least three to five samples were used to obtain the average data. The hardness data was obtained for the load range. (0⋅1–20 N) using a microhardness tester fitted with a. Vicker's square pyramidal indenter. Similarly ...

  2. Application of ANFIS for analytical modeling of tensile strength of functionally graded steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Nazari

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, the tensile strength of ferritic and austenitic functionally graded steels produced by electroslag remelting has been modeled. To produce functionally graded steels, two slices of plain carbon steel and austenitic stainless steels were spot welded and used as electroslag remelting electrode. Functionally graded steel containing graded layers of ferrite and austenite may be fabricated via diffusion of alloying elements during remelting stage. Vickers microhardness profile of the specimen has been obtained experimentally and modeled with adaptive network-based fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS. To build the model for graded ferritic and austenitic steels, training, testing and validation using respectively 174 and 120 experimental data were conducted. According to the input parameters, in the ANFIS model, the Vickers microhardness of each layer was predicted. A good fit equation which correlates the Vickers microhardness of each layer to its corresponding chemical composition was achieved by the optimized network for both ferritic and austenitic graded steels. Afterwards; the Vickers microhardness of each layer in functionally graded steels was related to the yield stress of the corresponding layer and by assuming Holloman relation for stress-strain curve of each layer, they were acquired. Finally, by applying the rule of mixtures, tensile strength of functionally graded steels configuration was found through a numerical method. The obtained results from the proposed model are in good agreement with those acquired from the experiments.

  3. Measures for Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Sune Lehman; A.D., Jackson; Lautrup, B.E.

    2006-01-01

    Are some ways of measuring scientific quality better than others? Sune Lehmann, Andrew D. Jackson and Benny E. Lautrup analyse the reliability of commonly used methods for comparing citation records.......Are some ways of measuring scientific quality better than others? Sune Lehmann, Andrew D. Jackson and Benny E. Lautrup analyse the reliability of commonly used methods for comparing citation records....

  4. Change in magnetic properties of a cold rolled and thermally aged Fe-Cu alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, D. G.; Ryu, K. S.; Kobayashi, S.; Takahashi, S.; Cheong, Y. M.

    2010-05-01

    The variation in magnetic properties of a Fe-1%Cu model alloy due to a cold rolling and a thermal aging has been evaluated to simulate the radiation damage of reactor pressure vessel of nuclear power plant. The thermal aging was conducted at 500 °C with different aging times in series. The hysteresis loops, magnetic Barkhausen noise (BN) and Vickers microhardness were measured for prestrained, strained, and thermal aged samples. The coercivity increased by a plastic strain and decreased by thermal aging, The BN decreased in the prestrained and strained samples but large changes were observed in the strained sample. These results were interpreted in terms of the domain wall motion signified by a change in the mean free path associated with microinternal stress and copper rich precipitates.

  5. The effect of different photoactivation sources on a nanocomposite resin: LED, halogen and argon laser application - doi: 10.4025/actascitechnol.v35i3.16238

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Bassi Denis

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the effects of different light sources on the monomer conversion (DC% and Vickers microhardness number (VHN of a nanocomposite resin. Three different depths were measured in this study (1, 2 and 3 mm, and photoactivation methods including a halogen lamp, a LED and an argon ion laser were used. In contrast to other studies, the conditions for each photoactivation source such as the exposure time and the same power density were considered and kept the same. It was also shown that increasing the depth lowered the VHN. At each of the depths, it was observed that the three light sources behaved similarly. The correlation between the VHN and DC% is shown. However, only a weak correlation was observed, which implies that a higher DC% value does not necessarily indicate a higher VHN.  

  6. INFLUENCE OF ABNORMAL AUSTENITE GRAIN GRAIN GROWTH IN QUENCHED ABNT 5135 STEEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila de Brito Ferreira

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Grain size in the steels is a relevant aspect in quenching and tempering heat treatments. It is known that high austenitizing temperature and long time provide an increase in austenitic grain sizes. Likewise, after hardening of low alloy steel, the microstructure consists of martensite and a volume fraction of retained austenite. This paper evaluates the influence of austenite grain size on the volume fraction of retained austenite measured by metallographic analyses and X-ray diffraction. The Mi and Mf temperatures were calculated using an empirical equation and experimentally determined by differential thermal analysis. The mechanical behavior of the steel was evaluated by Vickers microhardness testing. Differently from other results published in the literature that steel hardenability increases with the austenite grain size, it was observed that the increase in austenite grain promotes greater volume fraction of retained austenite after water quenching.

  7. Crystal Growth and Characterization of a New NLO Material: p-Toluidine p-Toluenesulfonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Suresh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of p-Toluidine p-Toluenesulfonate (PTPT, an organic nonlinear optical (NLO material, have been grown by slow evaporation method at room temperature using ethanol as solvent. The crystal system was confirmed from the single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis. The functional groups were identified using FTIR spectroscopy. UV-Vis-NIR spectrum showed that the UV cut-off wavelength of PTPT occurs at 295 nm and it has insignificant absorption in the wavelength region of 532–800 nm. The SHG efficiency of PTPT was measured by employing Kurtz and Perry powder technique using a Q-switched mode locked Nd: YAG laser emitting 1064 nm for the first time and it was found to be 52% of standard KDP. Thermal and mechanical properties of PTPT were examined by TG/DTA and Vickers microhardness test, respectively.

  8. Historical and Metallurgical Characterization of a "Falchion" Sword Manufactured in Caino (Brescia, Italy) in the Early 17th Century A.D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonelli, G.; Faccoli, M.; Gotti, R.; Roberti, R.; Cornacchia, G.

    2016-08-01

    A historical and metallurgical characterization of a "falchion" sword manufactured in Caino (Brescia, northern Italy) and dating from the early 17th century was performed to understand the manufacture methods of a Renaissance sword. At first, a set of size measurements was carried out to look for the existence of constant and/or recurring macroscopic sizes, which would indicate a standardized production, or of any type of proportionality between different parts of a sword, which would prove an intentional design activity. Light optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, quantometer analyses, and Vickers microhardness tests were then employed to analyze the microstructure and obtain the mechanical properties. All the metallurgical work is supported by an accurate study on the chemical composition of both metal-matrix and nonmetallic inclusions, which allowed for rebuilding and evaluating the efficiency of the whole production process.

  9. Physicochemical properties of dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate– p-nitrophenol: A nonlinear optical crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathika, A. [Department of Physics, Noorul Islam Centre for Higher Education, Noorul Islam University, Kumaracoil 629 180 (India); Prasad, L. Guru [Departemnt of Science & Humanities, M. Kumarasamy College of Engineering, Karur (India); Raman, R. Ganapathi, E-mail: ganapathiraman83@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Noorul Islam Centre for Higher Education, Noorul Islam University, Kumaracoil 629 180 (India)

    2016-03-15

    Single crystals of Dimethylammonium p-nitrophenolate–p-nitrophenol have been grown from aqueous solution by slow evaporation solution growth technique. Unit cell parameters of the grown crystal were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis and the synthesized compound is crystallized in monoclinic system. Various functional groups and their vibrational frequencies were recognized from the FT-IR and FT-Raman spectrum. Thermal stability of the crystal was examined by recording the TGA/DTA curve. The grown crystal has wider transparency nature in the visible region and the lower cut-off wavelength is found at 465 nm. Mechanical property of the crystal was studied by analyzing the Vicker's microhardness measurements. The fluorescence emission from the crystal is observed at 350 nm which arise due to the presence of aromatic ring. Relative SHG conversion efficiency of the grown crystal is about 0.59 times that of KDP.

  10. Growth of ninhydrin single crystal and its characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma Devi, T.; Lawrence, N.; Ramesh Babu, R.; Ramamurthi, K.; Bhagavannarayana, G.

    2009-01-01

    A novel organic nonlinear optical crystal ninhydrin having good optical quality was grown by solution technique using aqua solution. The quality of the crystal was also examined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction study. Solubility studies were made at different temperatures. Functional groups present in the grown material were identified from the vibrational frequencies of recorded FTIR spectrum. Transmittance of the crystal was recorded using the UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer. From the thermal analysis it was observed that the material exhibits single sharp melting point. The fluorescence spectrum of ninhydrin was recorded. The Vicker's microhardness values were measured for the grown crystal. Second harmonic generation conversion efficiency estimated using Kurtz and Perry method is about five times that of KDP.

  11. Aging Thermal Treatment in the Inconel 725 Brazed Incorporating Tungsten Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Hdz-García

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fractures in blade sections of Inconel 725 were impregnated with tungsten nanoparticles and jointed by the brazing process. In order to evaluate their effect over the microstructure, aging thermal treatments at 750°C for 2, 6, 10, and 14 h were done. BNi-9 was selected as brazing filler metal and was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray fluorescence. Before brazing, the fractures were impregnated with a mixture of tungsten NPs in ethanol. Measurements of Vickers microhardness showed an increase in the melting zone of samples with aging thermal treatment for 14 h, which is attributed to the precipitation of the γ′ phase with a typical size of ca. 100 nm. Likewise, the tungsten NPs modified the size and morphology of Cr-Ni eutectics into finer and uniformly distributed microstructures.

  12. Physical properties and hydration behavior of a fast-setting bioceramic endodontic material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Ya-Juan; Du, Tian-Feng; Li, Hong-Bo; Shen, Ya; Mobuchon, Christophe; Hieawy, Ahmed; Wang, Zhe-Jun; Yang, Yan; Ma, Jingzhi; Haapasalo, Markus

    2016-02-20

    To investigate the physical properties and the hydration behaviour of the fast-setting bioceramic iRoot FS Fast Set Root Repair Material (iRoot FS) and three other endodontic cements. iRoot FS, Endosequence Root Repair Material Putty (ERRM Putty), gray and white mineral trioxide aggregate (G-MTA & W-MTA), and intermediate restorative material (IRM) were evaluated. The setting time was measured using ANSI/ADA standards. Microhardness was evaluated using the Vickers indentation test. Compressive strength and porosity were investigated at 7 and 28 days. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) was employed for the hydration test. iRoot FS had the shortest setting time of the four bioceramic cements (p bioceramic cements (p bioceramic groups compared to those at 7 days (p bioceramic cements (p bioceramic cements tested. The mechanical properties of iRoot FS, G-MTA and W-MTA were relatively similar.

  13. Wear Assessment of Fe-TiC/ZrC Hardfacing Produced from Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Corujeira-Gallo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The direct conversion of oxides into carbides during plasma transferred arc welding is a promising processing route to produce wear resistant overlays at low cost. In the present study, Fe-TiC and Fe-ZrC composite overlays were produced by carbothermic reduction of TiO2 and ZrO2 during plasma transferred arc deposition. The overlays were characterised by optical microscopy, electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The microstructure consisted of small TiC and ZrC evenly dispersed in a pearlitic matrix. The Vickers microhardness was measured and low-stress abrasion tests were conducted. The results showed increased hardness and promising wear resistance under low-stress abrasion conditions.

  14. Comparative effects of indium/ytterbium doping on, mechanical and gas-sensitivity-related morphological, properties of sprayed ZnO compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boukhachem, A.; Fridjine, S.; Amlouk, A. [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Boubaker, K., E-mail: mmbb11112000@yahoo.f [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Bouhafs, M. [Unite de Recherche MA2I, Ecole Nationale d' Ingenieurs de Tunis B.P. 37, Le Belvedere, 1002 Tunis (Tunisia); Amlouk, M. [Unite de physique des dispositifs a semi-conducteurs, Faculte des sciences de Tunis, Universite de Tunis El Manar, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia)

    2010-07-09

    In this study, conducting and transparent indium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been deposited on glass substrates by the micro-spray technique. First, zinc oxide layers were obtained by spaying a solution of propanol and zinc acetate in acidified medium. Alternatively, some of the obtained films were doped with indium (In) at the molar rates of: 1%, 2% and 3%. In addition to the classical structural investigated using XRD, AFM and SEM techniques, microhardness Vickers (Hv) measurements have been carried out along with comparative morphological prospecting. The specific gases sensitivity-related surface morphology of the doped ZnO compounds was favorably different from that of the non-doped ones, and showed a thin overlay structure. Results were compared to those recorded for similar ytterbium-doped material.

  15. Production and characterization of a Fe-Ni alloy by aqueous coloidal processing and solid state reaction; Producao e caracterizacao de uma liga Fe-Ni obtida por processamento coloidal aquoso e reacao de estado solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vieira Junior, Luiz Eloi; Rodrigues Neto, Joao Batista; Klein, AloIsio Nelmo; Hotza, Dachamir, E-mail: eloi_junior@hotmail.com, E-mail: jbrn.ufsc@gmail.com, E-mail: a.n.klein@ufsc.br, E-mail: d.hotza@ufsc.br [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (UFSC), Florianopolis, (Brazil); Moreno, Rodrigo, E-mail: rmoreno@icv.csic.es [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio (ICV/CSIC), Madri (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    Colloidal processing is a widely used technique to produce ceramic components. Several papers have been published in the last decade presenting the possibility to obtain aqueous concentrate stable suspension of metallic particles from their pH control and using dispersants. This paper aims to study the production of a steel with austenitic microstructure using elemental iron (Fe) and nickel (Ni) powders via colloidal route. For this, Zeta potential measurements were performed between pH 2 and 12 to Fe30Ni wt% composition. Aqueous suspensions reached solids concentrations of up to 45% v/v and processed by slip casting. The compacts were characterized by density (Archimedes), differential thermal analysis (DTA) and dilatometry. After sintering at 900°C to 1100°C/1h, the sintered bodies presented a microstructure with of annealing twins, porosity less than 10 %v/v approximate Vickers microhardness of 160 HV. (author)

  16. Microstructural Characterization Of Laser Heat Treated AISI 4140 Steel With Improved Fatigue Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh M.C.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The influence of surface heat treatment using laser radiation on the fatigue strength and corresponding microstructural evolution of AISI 4140 alloy steel was investigated in this research. The AISI 4140 alloy steel was radiated by a diode laser to give surface temperatures in the range between 600 and 800°C, and subsequently underwent vibration peening. The fatigue behavior of surface-treated specimens was examined using a giga-cycle ultrasonic fatigue test, and it was compared with that of non-treated and only-peened specimens. Fatigue fractured surfaces and microstructural evolution with respect to the laser treatment temperatures were investigated using an optical microscope. Hardness distribution was measured using Vickers micro-hardness. Higher laser temperature resulted in higher fatigue strength, attributed to the phase transformation.

  17. Estudio cinético de las reacciones de recocido en aleaciones de Cu-Ni-Fe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donoso, Eduardo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal aging of a Cu-45Ni-4Fe, Cu-34Ni-11Fe and Cu-33Ni-22Fe alloys tempered from 1173 K have been studied from Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC and microhardness measurements. The analysis of DSC curves, from room temperature to 950 K, shows the presence of one exothermic reaction associated to the formation of FeNi3 phase nucleating from a modulate structure, and one endothermic peak attributed to dissolution of this phase. Kinetic parameters were obtained using the usual Avrami-Erofeev equation, modified Kissinger method and integrated kinetic functions. Microhardness measurements confirmed the formation and dissolution of the FeNi3 phase.Mediante Calorimetría Diferencial de Barrido (DSC y medidas de microdureza Vickers se ha estudiado el comportamiento durante el recocido de las aleaciones Cu-45Ni-4Fe, Cu-34Ni-11Fe y Cu-33Ni-22Fe templadas desde 1173 K. El análisis de las curvas DSC, desde temperatura ambiente hasta los 950 K, muestran la presencia de una reacción exotérmica asociada a la formación de la fase FeNi3 que nuclea a partir de una estructura modulada, y una reacción endotérmica que correspondería a la disolución de esta fase. Los parámetros cinéticos se calcularon a partir de la ecuación usual de Avrami-Erofeev, Kissinger modificado y funciones cinéticas integradas. Medidas de microdureza Vickers corroboraron la formación y disolución de fase FeNi3.

  18. Comparative effect of different polymerization techniques on residual monomer and hardness properties of PMMA-based denture resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Elif Aydogan; Durkan, Rukiye; Koroglu, Ayşegul; Bagis, Bora

    2014-12-30

    The aim of this study was to compare the residual monomer and microhardness of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA)-based denture resins processed by using autoclave and conventional water bath techniques. To determine the amount of residual methyl methacrylate (MMA) monomer, disk-shaped specimens (n=5) were prepared from 3 different acrylic resins (Meliodent, Paladent and Qc-20). Control groups were polymerized in water bath for 30 minutes at 100°C. The study groups were prepared in an autoclave device for 60°C/30 min followed 130°C/10 min and the other group for 60°C/30 min followed by 130°C/20 min. According to standard calibration curves, ultraviolet spectrophotometry at 230 nm was used to determine the residual monomer. For the Vickers hardness measurements, disk-shaped specimens (n=5) were prepared for each test group. Hardness measurements were performed with a Vickers hardness tester under a 4.91-N press load for a 30 seconds, after immersion in distilled water at 37ºC for 48 hours. The data were analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD test (phardness for all resin groups (p0.05). The autoclave polymerization technique exhibited significantly lower residual monomer content and greater hardness than conventional heat polymerization.

  19. Evaluation of surface roughness and hardness of different glass ionomer cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Oya; Arisu, Hacer Deniz; Yikilgan, Ihsan; Arslan, Seda; Gullu, Abdulkadir

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate surface roughness and hardness of a nanofiller GIC, a resin-modified GIC, three conventional GICs, and a silver-reinforced GIC. Methods: For each material, 11 spcecimens were prepared and then stored in distilled water at 37 °C for 24 h. The surface roughness of 5 specimens was measured using a surface profilometer before polishing and after polishing with coarse, medium, fine, superfine aluminum oxide abrasive Sof-Lex discs respectively. The hardness of the upper surfaces of the remaining 6 specimens was measured with a Vickers microhardness measuring instrument. Results: All tested GICs showed lower surface roughness values after the polishing procedure. Surface finish of nanofiller GIC was smoother than the other tested GICs after polishing. This was followed by resin-modified GIC, Fuji II LC; then silver-reinforced GIC, Argion Molar, conventional GICs, Aqua Ionofil Plus, Fuji IX, and Ionofil Molar, respectively. The result of the hardness test indicated that the microhardness value of silver-reinforced GIC was greater than that of the other GICs. When the hardness values of all tested GICs were compared, the differences between materials (except Aqua Ionofil Plus with Ionofil Molar and Ketac N100 with Fuji II LC (P>.05)) were found statistically significant (P<.05). Conclusions: According to the results of this study, it can be concluded that the differences in the composition of GICs may affect their surface roughness and hardness. PMID:22229011

  20. Effect of yttrium doping on structural and electrical properties of Bi2Sr1.9Ca0.1−xYxCu2O7+δ (Bi-2202 cuprate ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazid Boudjadja

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we report on the effect of Y3+ doping on structural, mechanical and electrical properties of Bi-2202 phase. Samples of Bi2Sr1.9Ca0.1−xYxCu2O7+δ with x = 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075 and 0.10 are elaborated in air by conventional solid state reaction and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electronic microscopy (SEM combined with EDS spectroscopy, density, Vickers microhardness and resistivity measurements. A good correlation between the variations of the bulk density and the Vickers microhardness with doping is obtained. The SEM photograph shows that the samples are composed of grains with a flat shape that characterizes the Bi-based cuprates. Quantitative EDS analysis confirms the reduction of Ca content and the increase of Y content when x is increased. The variation of resistivity with temperature shows that only samples with x = 0, 0.025 and 0.05 present an onset transition to the superconducting state. The higher onset transition temperature is obtained for x = 0.025 and is about 93.62 K. The transition is wide and is realized in two steps confirming then the presence of the low Tc Bi-2201 phase in the samples. For x = 0.075 and 0.10, a transition to a semiconducting state is seen at low temperatures. Some physical parameters are extracted from these curves and discussed.

  1. Characterisation of Y-PSZ and PR-doped Y-PSZ obtained by unconventional methods for sofc applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badenes, J. A.

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of method of preparation, including the traditional ceramic method and several sol-gel methods have been studied on the molar composition (ZrO20.92(Y2O30.04 and (ZrO20.82(Y2O30.04(Pr2O30.05 praseodymium doped samples. Powder fired at 500ºC was sieved at 60 μm, uniaxialy pressed and fired at 1.600ºC for 2h. The resulting compacts were characterised by XRD, SEM-EDX, density measurements, toughness strength and Vickers microhardness. The results indicate that colloidal samples stabilises tetragonal zirconia polymorph showing the best densification and electrical conductivity behaviour, praseodymium addition stabilises cubic zirconia improving the microhardness and densification of the material.

    Se ha estudiado el efecto del método de preparación, incluyendo el método cerámico tradicional y varios métodos sol-gel, sobre las composiciones (ZrO20.92(Y2O30.04 y (ZrO20.82(Y2O30.04(Pr2O30.05. Los polvos calcinados a 500ºC se tamizaron a 60 μm, se prensaron uniaxialmente y se sinterizaron a 1600ºC durante 2h. Los compactos resultantes se caracterizaron mediante XRD, SEM-EDX, medidas de densidad, tenacidad y microdureza Vickers. Los resultados indican que en las muestras coloidales se estabiliza el polimorfo tetragonal de la circona mostrando la mejor densificación y el mejor comportamiento en conductividad eléctrica. Las adiciones de praseodimio estabilizan la circona cúbica mejorando la microdureza y densificación del material.

  2. Measurement Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jun Hui; Kim, Hyeong Cheol

    2001-08-15

    This book deals with conception of measurement such as measuring and test, instrument for measurement, and types and methods of measuring, general things for precision measurement like indicator, gauge standard and Abbe's principle, measuring instrument such as vernier calipers, micrometer calipers, each gage, an optical instrument, and 3D instrument, choice and using of measuring instrument on length measurement, angle measurement, and side measurement, application and calculation for measuring using trigonometrical function, sin law, and the Pythagorean Theorem.

  3. Opacificación y endurecimiento de vidriados cerámicos mediante scheelita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicent, J. B.

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The effect of addition of scheelite, obtained by both ceramic and coprecipation route, on the opacity and strength of ceramic glazes are discussed and compared with the scheelite obtained by in situ devitrification from a4dition of WO3. Mohs hardness, Vickers microhardness, gloss and whitness measurements of resulting glazes are associated with the obtained microstrucure of glass-ceramic composite.

    En esta comunicación se presentan los resultados obtenidos en la utilización de scheelita obtenida por diferentes procedimientos (ruta cerámica y precipitación química en la opacificación y endurecimiento de vidriados cerámicos comparándose los resultados con los obtenidos por coprecipitación in situ de Scheelita por adición de WO3 al molino. Los estudios de dureza al rayado, microdureza Vickers así como de índice de blancura y brillo de los materiales obtenidos se asocian al tipo de microestructura obtenido en material compuesto vidrio-cerámica.

  4. Physical properites of O- and N-containing V-Cr-Ti alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J.H.; Kupperman, D.; Park, E.T.; Dragel, G. [Argonne National Laboratory, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Incorporation of O in the surface of V-Ti-Cr alloys has been investigated in controlled environments at 550-750{degrees}C, and test were performed to determine the physical properties of V-Cr-Ti-O solid solutions. The amount of O in the alloys has been determined by weight change measurements. Microhardness was used to determine O depth profiles of the alloys. X-ray diffraction indicated a phase transformation from body-centered cubic (bcc) to tetragonal in the lattice that was highly stressed because of O incorporation. Back-scattered-electron images and electron-energy-dispersive spectra revealed Cr depletion near alloy grain boundaries. Elastic modulus and Vickers hardness increased in O-enriched V-Cr-Ti alloys. Hardening of the alloys results from O atoms on face-centered interstitial sites in the bcc sublattice and the formation of homogeneous oxide or nitride phases via internal oxidation or nitridation. The O,N-enriched surface region exhibited the extraordinarily high Vickers hardness of {approx}18 GPa (1800 kg/mm{sup 2}), a value that is typical of oxides nitrides, or carbides, or that is obtainable by ion-beam irradiation of metals.

  5. Perbandingan kekerasan mikro dentin mahkota setelah aplikasi berbagai bahan bleaching intrakoronal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apriko Merza

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Comparing microhardness of dentine crown after application of various intracoronal bleaching agents. The aim of this study is to compare microhardness of dentine crown after treatment with intracoronal bleaching agents. The method of this study was an experimental laboratory. Thirty two extracted human mandibular first premolars without caries, sectioned at 2 mm below Cemento-Enamel Junction were divided into four groups and bleaching agents were sealed into the pulp chambers as follows: group A – 45% carbamide peroxide, group B – 35% hydrogen peroxide, group C – sodium perborate mixed aquadest and group D – aquadest. Access cavities were sealed and then stored in aquadest at 37 °C. Bleaching procedures were performed on days 0, 7, 14 and 21. After 28 days, the teeth were sectioned longitudinally, and planted on acrylyc. Microhardness of dentine crown was measured by vickers microhardness tester. One Way ANOVA and LSD were used to evaluate the effect of intracoronal bleaching agents on microhardness of dentine crown. The results showed that average values of microhardness of dentine crown on group A was 45,04 VHN, group B was 45,42 VHN, group C was 55,22 VHN and group D was 55,63 VHN. In clonclusion, there was si gnificantly different microhardness of dentine crown between group 45% carbamide peroxide and 35% hidrogen peroxide with sodium perborate mixed aquadest, but between group 45% carbamide peroxide with 35% hidrogen peroxide there was no significant difference. ABSTRAK Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui perbandingan kekerasan mikro dentin mahkota setelah aplikasi berbagai bahan bleaching intrakoronal. Jenis penelitian ini merupakan penelitian eksperimental laboratoris. Sebanyak 32 gigi premolar pertama mandibula tanpa karies, telah diekstraksi, dipotong 2 mm di bawah cemento-enamel junction dibagi dalam 4 kelompok dan bahan bleaching dimasukkan ke dalam kamar pulpa, yaitu kelompok A – 45% karbamid peroksida, kelompok B -35

  6. Measure for measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Peter

    2012-06-01

    The present system of measures for length, weight and capacity (volume) originates from scientific ideas expressed during the French Revolution in 1789. The history of a compatible unit of length, however, turns out to be less of a scientific but rather of a political character. Here reports to the Philosophical Magazine made in the first quarter of the nineteenth century are used to trace the cultural split between meters and inches, and between kilograms and pounds, that can be experienced in many parts of the world.

  7. The effect of different fluoride application methods on the remineralization of initial carious lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byeon, Seon Mi; Lee, Min Ho; Bae, Tae Sung

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of single and combined applications of fluoride on the amount of fluoride release, and the remineralization and physical properties of enamel. Each of four fluoride varnish and gel products (Fluor Protector, FP, Ivoclar Vivadent; Tooth Mousse Plus, TM, GC; 60 Second Gel, A, Germiphene; CavityShield, CS, 3M ESPE) and two fluoride solutions (2% sodium fluoride, N; 8% tin(ii) fluoride, S) were applied on bovine teeth using single and combined methods (10 per group), and then the amount of fluoride release was measured for 4 wk. The electron probe microanalysis and the Vickers microhardness measurements were conducted to assess the effect of fluoride application on the surface properties of bovine teeth. The amount of fluoride release was higher in combined applications than in single application (p < 0.05). Microhardness values were higher after combined applications of N with FP, TM, and CS than single application of them, and these values were also higher after combined applications of S than single application of A (p < 0.05). Ca and P values were higher in combined applications of N with TM and CS than single application of them (p < 0.05). They were also increased after combined applications of the S with A than after single application (p < 0.05). Combined applications of fluoride could be used as a basis to design more effective methods of fluoride application to provide enhanced remineralization.

  8. Paediatric Over-the-Counter (OTC Oral Liquids Can Soften and Erode Enamel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhao

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the softening and erosive effects of various paediatric over-the-counter (OTC oral liquids on deciduous teeth. Twenty sectioned and polished deciduous enamel blocks were ground on the buccal surface (2 × 2 mm2 and randomly divided into five groups, immersed into four commercially-available paediatric OTC oral liquids (two for paracetamol, both sugared; and two for chlorpheniramine, one sugared and one sugar-free, with deionized water as control. The pH of the oral liquids ranged from 2.50 to 5.77. Each block was immersed into the test or control groups for 15 s, rinsed with deionized water, and Vickers micro-hardness (n = 5 was measured. After twenty cycles of immersion and hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS were used to evaluate the surface morphology and chemistry of the tooth blocks, respectively. The pH values of the liquids were also recorded. Rapidly descending trends in the micro-hardness ratios of the four test groups were observed that were statistically different from the control group (p < 0.001. EDS showed an increase of Ca/C ratio after drug immersion, whereas SEM showed an enamel loss in all the test groups. Paediatric OTC oral liquids could significantly soften the enamel and render them more susceptible to caries, such that the formulation of the oral liquids is the major factor.

  9. Structural study of nanocrystalline solid solution of Cu-Mo obtained by mechanical alloying

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aguilar, C., E-mail: claudio.aguilar@usm.cl [Departamento de Ingenieria Metalurgica y de Materiales, Universidad Tecnica Federico Santa Maria, Avenida Espana 1680, Valparaiso (Chile); Instituto de Materiales y Procesos Termomecanicos, Universidad Austral de Chile, General Lagos 2086, Valdivia (Chile); Castro, F. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, N Degree-Sign 15 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Martinez, V. [TEKMETALL, Metallurgical Solutions S.L., Paseo neinor, Iribar Kalea 5, F1. B. de Igara 20018, San Sebastian (Spain); Guzman, D. [Departamento de Ingenieria en Metalurgia, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad de Atacama y Centro Regional de Investigacion y Desarrollo Sustentable de Atacama (CRIDESAT), Av. Copayapu 485, Copiapo (Chile); Cuevas, F. de las; Lozada, L.; Vielma, N. [Centro de Estudios e Investigaciones Tecnicas de Gipuzkoa, Paseo de Manuel Lardizabal, N Degree-Sign 15 20018, San Sebastian (Spain)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extension of solid solution in Cu-Mo system achieved by mechanical alloying. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer X-ray characterization of Cu-Mo system processed by mechanical alloying. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural study of nanocrystalline solid solution of Cu-Mo obtained by mechanical alloying. - Abstract: This work studied the structural evolution of Cu-xMo (x = 5 and 8 wt.%) alloys processed by mechanical alloying using x-ray diffraction profiles, scanning electron microscopy, differential scanning calorimetric and microhardness. X-ray diffraction analysis was done using the modified Williamson-Hall and Warren-Averbach methods. These were used to determine structural properties, such as crystallite size, stacking fault probability and energy, dislocation density of metallic powder as a function of the amount of Mo and milling time. The main results obtained for both alloys were higher dislocation density and Vickers microhardness values were measured and crystallites sizes of around 10 nm were measured for both systems at 50 h of milling. Lattice defects increase the free energy and the free energy curves shift upwards, therefore the solubility limits change and Cu-Mo solid solution is formed.

  10. Estudo dos efeitos da restrição na microestrutura, microdureza e tenacidade em juntas soldadas em aço inoxidável duplex Study of restriction effects on mMicrostructure, microhardness and toughness in welded joints of duplex stainless steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Barbosa Nunes

    2011-06-01

    microhardness and the toughness of both HAZ and FZ. Shielded electrode AWS E2209-17 was used to weld V joints in the duplex stainless steel UNS S31803. Welding has been performed in two levels of energy C1 (15 kJ/cm and C2 (20 kJ/cm, with and without restriction. In a generalized manner, it was observed a greater amount of ferrite in the finishing passes when compared to the first passes. Bigger amounts of Widmanstätten austenite in the conditions welded with restriction had been observed. Generally, the HAZ presented a coarser microstructure in the finishing passes, in way that did not show significant differences when compared with the conditions with and without restriction. Microhardness level was lower when large amount of Widmanstätten has been presented. Differences in energy absorbed in HAZ and FZ has not been observed when comparing conditions with and without restriction. The influence of the use of restraint in welding, especially in balancing phase, microstructure and microhardness has been observed.

  11. Microstructural and mechanical development and characterization of glass ionomer cements; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao microestrutural e mecanica de cimentos de ionomero de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, W.P.; Barbosa, R.C.; Castanha, E.M.M.; Barbosa, E. F.; Fook, M.V.L., E-mail: waldeniafreire@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-07-01

    Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs) are widely used in dentistry, indicated as a restorative material, cement for orthopedic and dental prostheses. However, there is need for development of new bone cements as alternative or replacement to current polymethylmethacrylate cements. Thus the aim of this research was develop of an experimental GIC and the mechanical and microstructural characterization of this composite; as a control group it was used a commercial GIC called Vidrion R (SS WHITE). These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transform and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties of the composites were measured by Vickers microhardness testing, flexural strength and compression. These cements were characterized as a semicrystalline; in FTIR spectra observed characteristic bands of these materials and microstructural studies of experimental GIC revealed that there was no proper interaction of the inorganic particles in the polymer matrix, whereas in the control group this interaction was effective resulting in greater homogeneity among its constituent phases. Experimental cement showed a higher value of microhardness in the control group, however, flexural strength of cement experimental cement was lower than the control group, and this behavior can possibly be attributed to inadequate interaction particle / matrix. In tests of compressive strength, experimental GIC showed resistance similar to that shown for control group after variation in the processing conditions of the material. (author)

  12. Does the casting mode influence microstructure, fracture and properties of different metal ceramic alloys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Rodrigues-Filho, Leonardo Eloy; Pinto, Marcelo Mendes; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the tensile strength, elongation, microhardness, microstructure and fracture pattern of various metal ceramic alloys cast under different casting conditions. Two Ni-Cr alloys, Co-Cr and Pd-Ag were used. The casting conditions were as follows: electromagnetic induction under argon atmosphere, vacuum, using blowtorch without atmosphere control. For each condition, 16 specimens, each measuring 25 mm long and 2.5 mm in diameter, were obtained. Ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation (EL) tests were performed using a Kratos machine. Vickers Microhardness (VM), fracture mode and microstructure were analyzed by SEM. UTS, EL and VM data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA. For UTS, alloy composition had a direct influence on casting condition of alloys (Wiron 99 and Remanium CD), with higher values shown when cast with Flame/Air (p casting condition" influenced the EL and VM results, generally presenting opposite results, i.e., alloy with high elongation value had lower hardness (Wiron 99), and casting condition with the lowest EL values had the highest VM values (blowtorch). Both factors had significant influence on the properties evaluated, and prosthetic laboratories should select the appropriate casting method for each alloy composition to obtain the desired property.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of Ti-Nb-HA alloy by mechanical alloying and spark plasma sintering for hard tissue replacements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramandeep; Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Gupta, Anjali; Prakash, Chander

    2017-08-01

    In the present research work, a β-type Ti-35Nb-10HA alloy was successfully fabricated by mechanical alloying of titanium (Ti), niobium (Nb), and hydroxyaptite (HA) powders followed by consolidation using Spark Plasma Sintering technique. The effect of HA on the microstructure and mechanical properties were studied. The microstructure, surface topography, and element composition of the Ti-Nb-HA alloy was investigated using optical microscope, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The micro-hardness of the specimens was measured on a Vickers hardness tester. The microstructure examination of the compact revealed that the alloy distinctly shows the primary grain boundaries along with secondary grain boundary. It was observed that complex reactions between HA and alloy elements occurred during the sintering process of Ti-35Nb-10HA alloy and biocompatible phases [Ca3(PO4)2, CaTiO3, Nb8P5, CaO, TiP, Nb4O5, and TiO2] were generated in the compact, which is beneficial to form apatite and improved the bioactivity of the alloy for osseiointegartion. The fabricated Ti-35Nb-15HA alloy exhibits maximum micro-hardness (∼786 HV), which is very high value as compared to the alloys reported in literature. Based on these above observations, it is expected that the as-fabricated Ti-35Nb-10HA alloy is suggested for dental and orthopaedic applications.

  14. Microstructure evolution and lubricant wear performance of laser alloyed layers on automobile engine chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, G. F.; Zhou, R.; Zhang, Y. K.; Yuan, G. D.; Wang, K.; Ren, X. D.; Wen, D. P.

    2014-10-01

    Wear resistant layers on nodular cast iron chains with C-B-W-Cr powders were fabricated by laser surface alloying (LSA). Microstructure, phases and lattice parameters, were investigated by means of optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry. Micro-, nano-hardness and elastic modulus were measured with a Vickers microhardness tester and a nano-indendation tester. Lubricant sliding wear performance was performed on a ball-on-disk apparatus in ambient air using the straight line reciprocating wear form. Results indicate that microstructure of the alloyed layers changes from hyper-eutectic to hypo-eutectic, varing with laser specific energy. Nano-grain size and micro-hardness decrease while martensite lattice parameters increase with laser specific energy. Existence of graphite in the substrate increases the carbon content in the retained austenite to 1.59 wt%. Nano-hardness and elastic modulus of the alloyed layers are close. Friction and wear properties of the layers are improved by LSA compared with the substrate. Wear mechanism of them is illustrated.

  15. Effects of flux concentrations and sintering temperature on dental porcelain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghose, Polash; Gafur, Md. Abdul; Das, Sujan Kumar; Ranjan Chakraborty, Shyamal; Mohsin, Md.; Deb, Arun Kumar; Rakibul Qadir, Md.

    2014-02-01

    In this study, samples of dental porcelain bodies have been made by using the materials collected from selected deposits employing different mixing proportions of clay, quartz and feldspar. Dental porcelain ceramics have been successfully fabricated by using the sintering technique together with some Na2CO3 additive. The dental porcelain powder has been pressed into pellets at first and subsequently sintered at 700, 800, 900, 1000 and 1100 °C for 2 h. The physical and mechanical properties of the prepared samples have been investigated. The sintering behavior of the fired samples has been evaluated by bulk density, linear shrinkage, water absorption and apparent porosity measurements. This study includes the evaluation of the Vickers's microhardness by microhardness tester. Phase analysis and microstructural study have been performed by XRD and optical microscope respectively. Optical properties have been investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy. Influence of firing conditions on leucite formation, densification and microstructural development of the sintered samples has been investigated. It has been found that the choice of sintering temperature is one of the key factors in controlling leucite crystallization in dental porcelain ceramics. It has also been found that the flux concentration of material and the effect of temperature on preparation of dental porcelain contribute to the firing shrinkage and hardness, which has been found to increase with the increase of treatment temperature.

  16. Synthesis, growth and characterization of a nonlinear optical crystal: l-Leucinium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Baskaran

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An amino acid based semiorganic nonlinear optical family single crystal of l-leucinium perchlorate (LLPCl was grown by the solvent evaporation method at ambient temperature. Good optical quality single crystals up to a size of 6 mm × 5 mm × 3 mm were obtained. The single-crystal XRD analysis shows that the grown crystals have a monoclinic structure. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectral analysis and UV–vis spectral studies were also carried out. Microhardness mechanical studies show that the hardness number (Hv of a LLPCl single crystal decreases with the load as measured by the Vickers microhardness method. The dielectric properties of the grown crystal were analysed by varying the frequency. Photoconductivity analysis gives the variation of the photocurrent and dark current. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using the Kurtz and Perry powder method and the second harmonic generation efficiency was found to be 2.6 times higher than that of KDP crystals.

  17. Fabrication of Biodegradable Low Elastic Porous Mg-Zn-Mn-HA Alloy by Spark Plasma Sintering for Orthopaedic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal Singh, Bhupinder; Singh, Ramandeep; Mehta, J. S.; Prakash, Chander

    2017-08-01

    In the present research work, porous Mg-Zn-Mn-HA alloy was successfully fabricated by mechanical alloying of magnesium (Mg), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn), and hydroxyapatite (HA) powders followed by consolidation using Spark Plasma Sintering technique. The microstructure, surface topography, and element composition of the Mg-Zn-Mn-HA alloy was investigated using optical microscope, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The micro-hardness of the specimens was measured on a Vickers hardness tester. The microstructure and FESEM examination of the compact revealed that the alloy distinctly shows the porosities in the microstructure. It was observed that complex reactions between HA and alloy elements occurred during the sintering process of Mg-Zn-Mn-HA alloy and biocompatible phases such as Manganese Oxide ((MnO)0.441 (CaO)0.559), Mg0.97 Zn0.03, Manganese Phosphide (Mn1.9 P), Calcium Manganese Oxide (Ca2 Mn8 O16), and Zincite (ZnO2) were generated in the compact, which is beneficial to form apatite and improved the bioactivity of the alloy for osseiointegartion. The fabricated Mg-Zn-Mn-HA alloy exhibits maximum micro-hardness (∼97 HV), which is very high value as compared to the alloys reported in literature. Based on these above observations, it is expected that the as-fabricated Mg-Zn-Mn-HA alloy is suggested for orthopaedic applications.

  18. The effect of the solute on the structure, selected mechanical properties, and biocompatibility of Ti–Zr system alloys for dental applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, D.R.N.; Vicente, F.B. [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Laboratório de Anelasticidade e Biomateriais, 17.033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Donato, T.A.G.; Arana-Chavez, V.E. [USP — Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia, Departamento de Biologia Oral e Biomateriais, 05.508-900, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Buzalaf, M.A.R. [USP — Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Odontologia de Bauru, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, 17.012-901, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Grandini, C.R., E-mail: betog@fc.unesp.br [UNESP — Univ. Estadual Paulista, Laboratório de Anelasticidade e Biomateriais, 17.033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    New titanium alloys have been developed with the aim of utilizing materials with better properties for application as biomaterials, and Ti–Zr system alloys are among the more promising of these. In this paper, the influence of zirconium concentrations on the structure, microstructure, and selected mechanical properties of Ti–Zr alloys is analyzed. After melting and swaging, the samples were characterized through chemical analysis, density measurements, X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness, and elasticity modulus. In-vitro cytotoxicity tests were performed on cultured osteogenic cells. The results showed the formation essentially of the α′ phase (with hcp structure) and microhardness values greater than cp-Ti. The elasticity modulus of the alloys was sensitive to the zirconium concentrations while remaining within the range of values of conventional titanium alloys. The alloys presented no cytotoxic effects on osteoblastic cells in the studied conditions. - Highlights: • Ti–Zr alloys for biomedical applications were developed. • Only α′ phase was observed. • Influence of zirconium concentrations on the properties of Ti–Zr alloys was analyzed. • No cytotoxic effects were observed.

  19. The iron and cerium oxide influence on the electric conductivity and the corrosion resistance of anodized aluminium; A influencia do ferro e do oxido de cerio sobre a condutividade eletrica e a resistencia a corrosao do aluminio anodizado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Kellie Provazi de

    2006-07-01

    The influence of different treatments on the aluminum system covered with aluminum oxide is investigated. The aluminum anodization in sulphuric media and in mixed sulphuric and phosphoric media was used to alter the corrosion resistance, thickness, coverage degree and microhardness of the anodic oxide. Iron electrodeposition inside the anodic oxide was used to change its electric conductivity and corrosion resistance. Direct and pulsed current were used for iron electrodeposition and the Fe(SO{sub 4}){sub 2}(NH{sub 4}){sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O electrolyte composition was changed with the addition of boric and ascorbic acids. To the sealing treatment the CeCl{sub 3} composition was varied. The energy dispersive x-ray (EDS), the x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (FRX) and the morphologic analysis by scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) allowed to verify that, the pulsed current increase the iron content inside the anodic layer and that the use of the additives inhibits the iron oxidation. The chronopotentiometric curves obtained during iron electrodeposition indicated that the boric and ascorbic acids mixture increased the electrodeposition process efficiency. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIE), the Vickers (Hv) microhardness measurements and morphologic analysis evidenced that the sealing treatment improves the corrosion resistance of the anodic film modified with iron. The electrical impedance (EI) technique allowed to prove the electric conductivity increase of the anodized aluminum with iron electrodeposited even after the cerium low concentration treatment. Iron nanowires were prepared by using the anodic oxide pores as template. (author)

  20. Additive Manufacturing of Nickel-Base Superalloy IN100 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Amrita; Das, Suman

    2018-01-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a laser powder bed fusion (LPBF)-based additive manufacturing process that uses a high-power laser to consolidate metal powders facilitating the fabrication of three-dimensional objects. In the present study, SLE is used to produce samples of IN100, a high-γ' non-weldable nickel-base superalloy on similar chemistry substrates. A thorough analysis is performed using various advanced material characterization techniques such as high-resolution optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers microhardness measurements to characterize and compare the quality of the SLE-fabricated IN100 deposits with the investment cast IN100 substrates. The results show that the IN100 deposits have a finer γ/γ' microstructure, weaker elemental segregation, and higher microhardness compared with the substrate. Through this study, it is demonstrated that the SLE process has tremendous potential in the repair and manufacture of gas turbine hot-section components.

  1. Additive Manufacturing of Nickel-Base Superalloy IN100 Through Scanning Laser Epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basak, Amrita; Das, Suman

    2017-11-01

    Scanning laser epitaxy (SLE) is a laser powder bed fusion (LPBF)-based additive manufacturing process that uses a high-power laser to consolidate metal powders facilitating the fabrication of three-dimensional objects. In the present study, SLE is used to produce samples of IN100, a high-γ' non-weldable nickel-base superalloy on similar chemistry substrates. A thorough analysis is performed using various advanced material characterization techniques such as high-resolution optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, and Vickers microhardness measurements to characterize and compare the quality of the SLE-fabricated IN100 deposits with the investment cast IN100 substrates. The results show that the IN100 deposits have a finer γ/γ' microstructure, weaker elemental segregation, and higher microhardness compared with the substrate. Through this study, it is demonstrated that the SLE process has tremendous potential in the repair and manufacture of gas turbine hot-section components.

  2. Microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of Al/Al–12%Si multilayer processed by accumulative roll bonding (ARB)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahallawy, Nahed El [Department of Design and Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ain-Shams University (Egypt); Fathy, Adel, E-mail: afmeselhy@zu.edu.eg [Department of Mechanical Design and Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, P.O. Box 44519 (Egypt); Abdelaziem, Walaa; Hassan, Mohammed [Department of Mechanical Design and Production Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Zagazig University, P.O. Box 44519 (Egypt)

    2015-10-28

    In this study, multi-layered Al/Al–12%Si composites were produced by the accumulative roll bonding (ARB) at ambient temperature using commercial pure Al 1050 and Al–12%Si alloy sheets. The microstructures of Al and Al–12%Si alloy layers were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Vickers microhardness and tensile tests were conducted to investigate mechanical properties of the composites. It was observed that by increasing ARB cycles, thickness of individual Al and Al–12%Si alloy sheets decreased; finally, Al–12%Si layers were necked at the second cycle. After the second ARB cycle, a multi-layered Al/Al–12%Si composite with homogeneously distributed Al–12%Si layers in aluminum matrix was produced. Si phase was refined from 65.6 to 25.57 µm in length and the Al grain size was reduced from 25 to 7.2 μm. The formation of Al{sub 3.21}Si{sub 0.47} intermetallic phase after the second cycles was confirmed by X-ray diffraction. The results showed that the tensile strength increased up to 270 MPa after first cycle and dropped afterwards. Microhardness measurement indicated that hardness of individual layers increased continuously with increasing the ARB cycles.

  3. Curing efficiency of high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiotis, Christos; Patsouri, Katerina; Silikas, Nick; Kakaboura, Afrodite

    2010-06-01

    We evaluated the curing efficiency of 4 high-intensity light-emitting diode (LED) devices by assessing percentage of residual C=C (%RDB), surface microhardness (SM), depth of cure (DC), percentage of linear shrinkage-strain (%LS), and percentage of wall-to-wall contraction (%WWC). The light-curing units tested were a QTH light, the Elipar TriLight (3M/ESPE), and 4 LED devices - the Allegro (Denmat), the Bluephase (Ivoclar/Vivadent), the FreeLight2 (3M/ESPE), and The Cure TC-01 (Spring Health Products). The %RDB was measured by microFTIR spectroscopy. Microhardness measurements (Vickers) were performed at the surface (H0) and at depths of 3 mm (H3) and 5 mm (H5) of cylindrical specimens. Depth of cure was expressed as the ratio of microhardness at each depth, relative to the corresponding surface value (H3/H0 and H5/H0). The bonded disc method was used to evaluate %LS. For the %WWC evaluation, cylindrical resin restorations were imaged by high resolution micro-CT and the %WWC was calculated at depths of 0 mm and 2 mm. There were no statistical differences among the LEDs in %RDB or %LS. The Bluephase and Allegro had the highest SM values. As compared with the other LEDs, the Bluephase and The Cure TC-01 had lower values for depth of cure at depths of 3 mm and 5 mm. There were no significant differences in %WWC among the LEDs at either depth, and the QTH had the lowest %WWC at both depths.

  4. The investigation of the mechanical properties of Mn doped BaSnO3 nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazah, I.; Awad, R.

    2017-07-01

    This study investigates the effect of Mn substitution on the structural and mechanical properties of nano BaSnO3 using X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Vickers microhardness. For this investigation, samples of type BaSn1-xMnxO3 with 0.04 ≤ x ≤ 0.4 were prepared by co-precipitation method. XRD patterns indicate the formation of single phase cubic structure BaSnO3 with space group (Pm3m) for 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.1. BaMnO2 hexagonal phase appears as impurity for x > 0.1. The crystallite size, increases as x increases. Vickers microhardness Hv was carried out at different applied loads varying between 0.98 N and 9.8 N at dwell time 40 seconds. The results show that Hv increases as the Mn-content increases, whereas it decreases as the applied load increase. The Hv results were analysed using Elastic Plastic Deformation and the Modified proportional specimen resistance models. The Vickers microhardness analysis indicates that Modified Proportional Specimen Resistance model is the most suitable one for describing the load independent microhardness region of the investigated samples.

  5. Thermal treatment of the Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} alloy in it amorphous phase studied by means of Moessbauer spectroscopy; Tratamiento termico de la aleacion Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} en su fase amorfa estudiado por medio de la espectroscopia Moessbauer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral P, A. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Lopez, A.; Garcia S, F. [Facultad de Ciencias, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    The magnetic and microhardness changes, dependents of the temperature that occur in the Fe{sub 78}Si{sub 9}B{sub 13} alloy in it amorphous state were studied by means of the Moessbauer spectroscopy and Vickers microhardness. According to the Moessbauer parameters and in particular that of the hyperfine magnetic field, this it changes according to the changes of the microhardness; i.e. if the microhardness increases, the hyperfine magnetic field increases. The registered increment of hardness in the amorphous state of this alloy should be considered as anomalous, according to the prediction of the Hall-Petch equation, the one that relates negative slopes with grain sizes every time but small. (Author)

  6. Evaluation of Cold Plasma Treatment and Safety in Disinfecting 3-week Root Canal Enterococcus faecalis Biofilm In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinglong; Sun, Ke; Ye, Guopin; Liang, Yongdong; Pan, Hong; Wang, Guomin; Zhao, Yijiao; Pan, Jie; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Although endodontic infection is caused by multi-bacteria species, Enterococcus faecalis is usually isolated in chronic apical periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and mechanical safety of cold plasma therapy in disinfecting 3-week E. faecalis biofilms. Teeth with 3-week E. faecalis biofilm were treated with AC argon/oxygen (Ar/O2) cold plasma for various treatment times and compared with those treated with Ca(OH)2, 2% chlorhexidine gel, and Ca(OH)2/chlorhexidine for a week. Antimicrobial efficacy was assessed by colony-forming unit method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to assess the morphologic changes of E. faecalis biofilm by plasma. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to confirm the viability of the biofilm after the plasma treatment. Microhardness and roughness changes of root canal dentin caused by plasma were verified with Vickers Hardness Tester and 3D Profile Measurement Laser Microscope, respectively. There were no detectable live bacteria after 12 minutes of cold plasma treatment. This was further confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy results. Microhardness and roughness of root canal dentin showed no significant difference after plasma treatment. Atmospheric pressure cold plasma is an effective therapy in endodontics for its strong sterilization effect on fully matured biofilm within a few minutes. Meanwhile, it has an accepted mechanical safety for its low temperature and not affecting the microhardness and roughness of root canal dentin significantly. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Measurement evaluation

    CERN Document Server

    Boros, A

    1990-01-01

    The information obtained about a measured object is called ``crude'' measurement information and must be related to the conditions under which the measurement took place. Using ``crude'' measurement information as a starting point, evaluation produces physically correctly interpreted data with their estimated (or corrected) error. Although a number of works deal with the evaluation of measurements, they either appeared a long time ago or serve essentially different aims. This book gives a comprehensive and current overview on the basic principles, aids, devices, and methods in the eval

  8. Flexibility and hardness of dental stainless steel wrought wires used in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjakul, P; Cheunarrom, C; Ongthiemsak, C

    2001-03-01

    Stainless steel wrought wires used as clasp arms for removable partial dentures in Thailand were compared with those used in some other countries (in the as-received condition) in terms of flexibility, Vickers microhardness and composition. The results showed that there were significant differences (Psteel wire (SK) was obviously different from the others. It had the lowest proportional limit and microhardness, but its flexibility was almost the same. The chemical composition of each wire was not greatly different. The wires were about 18-20 wt% chromium and 8-9 wt% nickel, except for the SK wire, which had about 12 wt% nickel.

  9. Spectroscopic and mechanical studies on the Fe-based amorphous alloy 2605SA1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabral P, A.; Garcia S, I. [ININ, Departamento de Quimica, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Contreras V, J. A.; Garcia S, F. [Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Facultad de Ciencias, El Cerrillo Piedras Blancas, Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Nava, N., E-mail: agustin.cabral@inin.gob.m [Instituto Mexicano del Petroleo, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas No. 152, Col. San Bartolo Atepehuacan, 07730 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2010-07-01

    The Vickers micro-hardness of this alloy was unusually dependent on the heat treatment from 300 to 634 K, inferring important micro-structural changes and the presence of amorphous grains before its phase transition. Once the alloy is crystallized, the micro-hardness is characteristic of a brittle alloy, the main problem of these alloys. Within the amorphous state, other properties like free-volume, magnetic states and Fe-Fe distances were followed by Positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy and Moessbauer spectroscopy, respectively, to analyze those micro-structural changes, thermally induced, which are of paramount interest to understand their brittleness problem. (Author)

  10. Multilevel Interventions: Measurement and Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charns, Martin P.; Alligood, Elaine C.; Benzer, Justin K.; Burgess, James F.; Mcintosh, Nathalie M.; Burness, Allison; Partin, Melissa R.; Clauser, Steven B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Multilevel intervention research holds the promise of more accurately representing real-life situations and, thus, with proper research design and measurement approaches, facilitating effective and efficient resolution of health-care system challenges. However, taking a multilevel approach to cancer care interventions creates both measurement challenges and opportunities. Methods One-thousand seventy two cancer care articles from 2005 to 2010 were reviewed to examine the state of measurement in the multilevel intervention cancer care literature. Ultimately, 234 multilevel articles, 40 involving cancer care interventions, were identified. Additionally, literature from health services, social psychology, and organizational behavior was reviewed to identify measures that might be useful in multilevel intervention research. Results The vast majority of measures used in multilevel cancer intervention studies were individual level measures. Group-, organization-, and community-level measures were rarely used. Discussion of the independence, validity, and reliability of measures was scant. Discussion Measurement issues may be especially complex when conducting multilevel intervention research. Measurement considerations that are associated with multilevel intervention research include those related to independence, reliability, validity, sample size, and power. Furthermore, multilevel intervention research requires identification of key constructs and measures by level and consideration of interactions within and across levels. Thus, multilevel intervention research benefits from thoughtful theory-driven planning and design, an interdisciplinary approach, and mixed methods measurement and analysis. PMID:22623598

  11. When Measurement Benefits the Measured

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-23

    late 33% state that rework is at least 25% of their budget 2014 IT Leadership Survey - Blueprint Software Systems Inc. 5 When Measurement Benefits...People as machines. Frederick Taylor Peter Drucker 21 When Measurement Benefits the Measured Kasunic & Nichols, April 23, 2014 © 2014 Carnegie

  12. Quantum measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Busch, Paul; Pellonpää, Juha-Pekka; Ylinen, Kari

    2016-01-01

    This is a book about the Hilbert space formulation of quantum mechanics and its measurement theory. It contains a synopsis of what became of the Mathematical Foundations of Quantum Mechanics since von Neumann’s classic treatise with this title. Fundamental non-classical features of quantum mechanics—indeterminacy and incompatibility of observables, unavoidable measurement disturbance, entanglement, nonlocality—are explicated and analysed using the tools of operational quantum theory. The book is divided into four parts: 1. Mathematics provides a systematic exposition of the Hilbert space and operator theoretic tools and relevant measure and integration theory leading to the Naimark and Stinespring dilation theorems; 2. Elements develops the basic concepts of quantum mechanics and measurement theory with a focus on the notion of approximate joint measurability; 3. Realisations offers in-depth studies of the fundamental observables of quantum mechanics and some of their measurement implementations; and 4....

  13. Measurement Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael

    Measurement uncertainty is one of the key issues in quality assurance. It became increasingly important for analytical chemistry laboratories with the accreditation to ISO/IEC 17025. The uncertainty of a measurement is the most important criterion for the decision whether a measurement result is fit for purpose. It also delivers help for the decision whether a specification limit is exceeded or not. Estimation of measurement uncertainty often is not trivial. Several strategies have been developed for this purpose that will shortly be described in this chapter. In addition the different possibilities to take into account the uncertainty in compliance assessment are explained.

  14. Mechanical properties of the iron-based superconductor SmFeAsO1-xFx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malaeb, W.; Kazah, I.; Awad, R.; Fujioka, M.

    2017-07-01

    We have investigated the mechanical properties of the iron-based superconductor (FeSC) SmFeAsO1-xFx (Sm1111) with a wide doping range 0.09 ≤ x ≤ 0.3 by performing the Vickers microhardness test. The estimated Vickers microhardness number (Hv ) was analysed using Meyer’s law, Hays-Kendall approach, elastic/plastic deformation (EPD) model and proportional specimen resistance (PSR) model, where the PSR model showed the best match with our experimental data. Hv values showed an increase as x increases, indicating that fluorine doping results in an improvement in the mechanical properties of the Sm1111 compound and makes it more convenient for applications.

  15. Measuring Colour

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, R W G

    2011-01-01

    The classic authority on colour measurement now fully revised and updated with the latest CIE recommendations The measurement of colour is of major importance in many commercial applications, such as the textile, paint, and foodstuff industries; as well as having a significant role in the lighting, paper, printing, cosmetic, plastics, glass, chemical, photographic, television, transport, and communication industries. Building upon the success of earlier editions, the 4th edition of Measuring Colour has been updated throughout with new chapters on colour rendering by light sources; colorimetry

  16. Mechanical measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Venkateshan, S P

    2015-01-01

    The first edition of this book was co-published by Ane Books India, and CRC Press in 2008. This second edition is an enlarged version of the web course developed by the author at IIT Madras, and also a modified and augmented version of the earlier book.  Major additions/modifications presented are in the treatment of errors in measurement, temperature measurement, measurement of thermo-physical properties, and data manipulation. Many new worked examples have been introduced in this new and updated second edition. 

  17. Investigation of diffusion kinetics of plasma paste borided AISI 8620 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... diffraction, Vickers micro-hardness tester and the growth kinetics of the boride layers. X-ray diffraction analysis of boride layers on the surface of the steel revealed FeB and Fe2B phases. Depending on temperature and layer thickness, the activation energies of boron in steel were found to be 124.7 kJ/mol for 100% B2O3.

  18. Environmental Measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental measurement is any data collection activity involving the assessment of chemical, physical, or biological factors in the environment which affect human health. Learn more about these programs and tools that aid in environmental decisions

  19. Horizon measures

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Eugene

    2016-11-28

    In this paper we seek to answer the following question: where do contour lines and visible contour lines (silhouette) tend to occur in a 3D surface. Our study leads to two novel shape descriptors, the horizon measure and the visible horizon measure, which we apply to the visualization of 3D shapes including archeological artifacts. In addition to introducing the shape descriptors, we also provide a closed-form formula for the horizon measure based on classical spherical geometry. To compute the visible horizon measure, which depends on the exact computation of the surface visibility function, we instead of provide an image-based approach which can process a model with high complexity within a few minutes.

  20. Diversity Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MSc. Mentor Ademaj

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Diversity measures are a type of non-criminal measures foreseen in the Chapter IV of the Code of Juvenile Justice, which may be imposed on juvenile perpetrators of criminal acts. These measures can be applied in cases of minor offenses, for which is foreseen the criminal sanction with a fine or imprisonment up to three years or for criminal offenses committed by negligence for which is foreseen the sentence up to five years of imprisonment, except those cases that result in death. With the imposition of these measures is intended to prevent criminal proceedings against juveniles whenever is possible, rehabilitation and reintegration of juvenile in his/her community and the prevention of recidivist behaviour. Competent authority to impose them is the public prosecutor, the juvenile judge and juvenile court. And they are executed by the Kosovo Correctional Service.

  1. Measuring colour

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hunt, R. W. G; Pointer, Michael, Ph. D

    2011-01-01

    ... industries.Building upon the success of earlier editions, the 4th edition of [start italics]Measuring Colour[end italics] has been updated throughout with new chapters on colour rendering by light sources...

  2. Measuring Productivity

    OpenAIRE

    Del Gatto, Massimo; Di Liberto, Adriana; Petraglia, Carmelo

    2008-01-01

    Quantifying productivity is a conditio sine qua non for empirical analysis in a number of research fields. The identification of the measure that best fits with the specific goals of the analysis, as well as being data-driven, is currently complicated by the fact that an array of methodologies is available. This paper provides economic researchers with an up-to-date overview of issues and relevant solutions associated with this choice. Methods of productivity measurement are surveyed and clas...

  3. The effect of Trigona sp propolis from Luwu regency, South Sulawesi province, Indonesia on human enamel teeth (an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ardo Sabir

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a resinous substance produced by honey bees. It is well-known that propolis exhibits both antibacterial and anti-inflammatory activities therefore it has been used in folk medicine since primeval times.In recent years, propolis has been used as active component of mouthwashes in the attempt to treat gingivitis and periodontitis. The purpose of the present study is to know in vitro effect of Ethanolic Extract of Propolis (EEP solution on the microhardness of human enamel teeth. Solution of 0.125% EEP has been made from propolis which was collected from honeycombs in Luwu Regency, South Sulawesi Province. Aquadest and 1% povidone iodine were used as negative and positive control. Calcium, phosphate, fluoride concentrations and pH of the solutions were also measured using Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and a digital pH meter. Ninety human maxillary first incisors which extracted for periodontal reasons were used in this study. The roots of the teeth were removed at the cementoenamel junction. The crowns were randomly divided into three groups of 30 each and were immersed in aquadest solution pH 8.4 (Group I; 0.125% EEP solution pH 4.3 (Group II or 1% povidone iodine solution pH 3.0 (Group III for 21, 42, 63, and 84 minutes respectively. A Vickers Hardness Tester was used to measure enamel surface microhardness before and after immersion. Data was statistically analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey tests with significance level of 5%. The results showed that except immersed in aquadest, enamel microhardness increased after being immersed in EEP and povidone iodine solutions, although statistical analysis did not show significant differences (p>0.05 microhardness of enamel teeth before and after immersed in each group.In conclusion, immersion the teeth in 0.125% EEP solution pH 4.3 with 2.69 ppm phosphate, 1.49 ppm calcium, and 0.00 ppm fluoride concentrations for 84 minutes increased human enamel hardness in vitro.

  4. Measuring Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matoskova Jana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge is a key to creating a sustainable competitive advantage. Measuring knowledge of an organization as a unit allows for, in addition to other things, benchmarking it against other organizations as well as comparing the development within the organization in the course of time. Additionally, measuring the knowledge of individuals and groups helps identify key workers and can also be used when recruiting a new work force, while evaluating employees’ work performances, or to check the course of the adaptation of a new employee. Even though the field of measuring knowledge belongs, in comparison with other topics, among the lesser-developed fields in the management of knowledge, a number of approaches that can be used to measure knowledge have been introduced. The aim of this study is to present an overview of methods which can be applied when measuring the knowledge of organizations, groups or individuals and thus provide a practical list of methods which feature in literature mostly for practitioners and novices in this field. The study is based on a content-analysis of literature.

  5. Measuring needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Murianni

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The interest in measuring the health of populations, through measuring the demand and offers of health care, is deeply rooted in history. Population health indicators in use today are built upon from mortality measures from the 1500s; regular census information starting from the 1800s; civil registration records of vital statistics commencing in the 1850s; regular national surveys, which were first initiated in the 1950s; and health system and other administrative databases used widely since the 1960s. The ancient Greeks believed that the God of medicine had two daughters: Hygeia and Panacea, the first was the goddess of prevention and wellness, while the second was the goddess of treatment. Thus suggesting that people have long believed that there is more to health than health care. Today the actual concept of population health recognizes many interconnected aspects of society, the environment, and individuals all contributing to health. To increase opportunities for comparability, more valid, comprehensive and standardized ways of measuring and reporting on population health indicators are needed. The use of health indicators contributes to overall population health goals, namely improving the health populations, reducing health inequalities and measuring the performance of health care system. The objective of performance assessment is to provide governments and populations with information about the state of their health care system.

  6. Microwave Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Skinner, A D

    2007-01-01

    The IET has organised training courses on microwave measurements since 1983, at which experts have lectured on modern developments. Their lecture notes were first published in book form in 1985 and then again in 1989, and they have proved popular for many years with a readership beyond those who attended the courses. The purpose of this third edition of the lecture notes is to bring the latest techniques in microwave measurements to this wider audience. The book begins with a survey of the theory of current microwave circuits and continues with a description of the techniques for the measureme

  7. Influence of Scanning Speed on the Microhardness Property of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Akorede

    The experimental set up consists of a kuka robot with the Nd-YAG laser and the powder nozzle collocated with the laser as shown in Figure 1 (b). The laser power was maintained at 3 kW and the powder mass flow rate at 2.88 g/min. The scanning speed was varied between 0.01 and 0.12 m/sec. The processing parameter ...

  8. Study of the degree of deuteration on the microhardness of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Author Affiliations. Baoan Liu1 Shaotao Sun2 Bo Wang1 Xun Sun1 Zhengping Wang1 Xinguang Xu1. State Key Laboratory of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, PR China; Administration Center, Shandong Academy of Information and Communication Technology, Jinan 250101, PR China ...

  9. Study of the degree of deuteration on the microhardness of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The visible hard- ness anisotropy of the different faces is attributed to the inhomogeneous distribution of the oxygen–hydrogen bond on these faces. Keywords. ... ultra-pure water. The deuteration levels of the other solutions were 80, 70, 60, 50, 40, 30, 17 and 0%. The procedure of crystal growth has been described ...

  10. Study of microhardness and electrical properties of proton irradiated ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    use of polymers in radiation environments encountered in nuclear power plants, space-crafts, sterilization irradiators, high energy particle accelerators etc (Woods and Pikaev. 1994; Grossman and Gouzman 2003). The deposited en- ergies effectively modify the chemical structures of the polymers resulting in changes to the ...

  11. Influence of scanning speed on the microhardness property of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ti6Al4V is an important aerospace alloy, and it is challenging processing this material through traditional manufacturing processes. Laser metal deposition, an additive manufacturing process offers lots of advantages for processing aerospace materials, the ability to increase buy-to-fly ratio by at least 80% amongst other ...

  12. Bead on Plate Temper Pass Study: Thermal and Microhardness Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    fournissent la chaleur nécessaire pour durcir efficacement par revenu les soudures sous-jacentes et leurs zones thermiquement affectées. Dans le cas d’aciers...dureté associée aux cordons de soudure déposés, par soudage manuel à l’arc sous atmosphère de protection, sur un acier faiblement allié trempé et revenu...Les soudures ont été exécutées sur un panneau à instrumentation complète comprenant une série de thermocouples situés le long de l’axe de soudage

  13. Measuring Up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Holly; Healey, Kaleen; Sporte, Susan E.

    2014-01-01

    Moving teacher evaluation systems from measuring teachers' performance to improving their practice requires much greater attention to communication and support. In the fall of 2012, Chicago Public Schools (CPS) instituted a sweeping reform of its teacher evaluation system with the introduction of REACH Students (Recognizing Educators Advancing…

  14. Measuring Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Robert R; Hancock, P A

    2017-06-01

    As human factors and ergonomics (HF/E) moves to embrace a greater systems perspective concerning human-machine technologies, new and emergent properties, such as resilience, have arisen. Our objective here is to promote discussion as to how to measure this latter, complex phenomenon. Resilience is now a much-referenced goal for technology and work system design. It subsumes the new movement of resilience engineering. As part of a broader systems approach to HF/E, this concept requires both a definitive specification and an associated measurement methodology. Such an effort epitomizes our present work. Using rational analytic and synthetic methods, we offer an approach to the measurement of resilience capacity. We explicate how our proposed approach can be employed to compare resilience across multiple systems and domains, and emphasize avenues for its future development and validation. Emerging concerns for the promise and potential of resilience and associated concepts, such as adaptability, are highlighted. Arguments skeptical of these emerging dimensions must be met with quantitative answers; we advance one approach here. Robust and validated measures of resilience will enable coherent and rational discussions of complex emergent properties in macrocognitive system science.

  15. Determination of the Mechanical Properties of Plasma-Sprayed Hydroxyapatite Coatings Using the Knoop Indentation Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Md