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Sample records for vicinity wyoming nps

  1. Digital Geologic Map of Rocky Mountain National Park and Vicinity, Colorado (NPS, GRD, GRE, ROMO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of Rocky Mountain National Park and Vicinity, Coloradois comprised of GIS data layers, two ancillary GIS tables, a Windows Help File with...

  2. Digital Geologic Map of Great Basin National Park and Vicinity, Nevada (NPS, GRD, GRE, GRBA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of Great Basin National Park and Vicinity, Nevada is composed of GIS data layers, two ancillary GIS tables, a Windows Help File with...

  3. Digital Geologic Map of Congaree National Park and Vicinity, South Carolina (NPS, GRD, GRI, CONG, CONG digital map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of Congaree National Park and Vicinity, South Carolina is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer (.LYR) files, two...

  4. Digital Geologic Map of Bryce Canyon National Park and Vicinity, Utah (NPS, GRD, GRI, BRCA, BRCA digital map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of Bryce Canyon National Park and Vicinity, Utah is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer (.LYR) files, two ancillary...

  5. Digital Geologic Map of San Juan Island National Historical Park and vicinity, Washington (NPS, GRD, GRE, SAJH, SAJH digital map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of San Juan Island National Historical Park and vicinity, Washington is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.2 layer (.LYR)...

  6. Digital Geologic Map of the American Camp Unit and vicinity, Washington (NPS, GRD, GRE, SAJH, SJIS digital map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of the American Camp Unit and vicinity, Washington is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.2 layer (.LYR) files, two ancillary...

  7. Digital Geologic Map of Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site and vicinity, Texas (NPS, GRD, GRE, PAAL, PAAL digital map)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Map of Palo Alto Battlefield National Historic Site and vicinity, Texas is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.2 layer (.LYR)...

  8. Platinum and associated elements at the New Rambler mine and vicinity, Albany and Carbon Counties, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theobald, P.K.; Thompson, Charles Emmet

    1968-01-01

    Platinum-group metals in the Medicine Bow Mountains were first identified by W. C. Knight in 1901. In the Medicine Bow Mountains, these metals are commonly associated with copper, silver, or gold in shear zones that cut a series of mafic igneous and metamorphic rocks. At the New Rambler mine, where the initial discovery was made, about 50,000 tons of mine and mill waste contain an average of 0.3 percent copper, 7 ppm (parts per million) silver, 1 ppm platinum plus palladium, and 0.7 ppm gold. This material is believed to be from a low-grade envelope around the high-grade pod of complex ore that was mined selectively in the old workings. Soil samples in the vicinity of the New Rambler mine exhibit a wide range of content of several elements associated with the ore. Most of the variation can be attributed to contamination, from the mine workings. Even though soil samples identify a low-level copper anomaly that persists to the limit of the area sampled, soils do not offer a promising medium for tracing mineralization owing to the blanket of transported overburden. Stream sediments, if preconcentrated for analysis, do reveal anomalies not only in the contaminated stream below the New Rambler mine, but in adjacent drainage and on Dave Creek. Examination of a spectrum of elements in heavy-mineral concentrates from stream sediment may contribute to knowledge of the nature of the mineralization and of the basic geology of the environment. The sampling of bedrock exposures is not particularly fruitful because outcrops are sparse and the exposed rocks are the least altered and mineralized. Bedrock sampling does, however, provide information on the large size and provincial nature of the platinum-rich area. We feel that a properly integrated program of geological, geophysical, and geochemical exploration in the Medicine Bow Mountains and probably in the Sierra Madre to the west has a reasonable probability of successfully locating a complex ore body.

  9. Unpublished Digital Geologic Map of Jewel Cave National Monument and Vicinity, South Dakota (NPS, GRD, GRI, JECA, JECA digital map) adapted from U.S. Geological Survey mylars by DeWitt (2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Geologic Map of Jewel Cave National Monument and Vicinity, South Dakota is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer (.LYR)...

  10. Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas (NPS, GRD, GRI, HOSP, HOSP digital map) adapted from the interim Arkansas Geological Survey DGM-HSR-003 by Johnson and Hanson (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Interim Digital Geologic Map of Hot Springs National Park and Vicinity, Arkansas is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer (.LYR)...

  11. Unpublished Digital Bedrock Geologic Map of Cuyahoga National Park and Vicinity, Ohio (NPS, GRD, GRI, CUVA, CUVA digital map) adapted from Ohio Division of Geological Survey maps by Larsen and/or Slucher, and/or others (1996)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Bedrock Geologic Map of Cuyahoga National Park and Vicinity, Ohio is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer (.LYR) files,...

  12. Unpublished Digital Surficial Geologic Map of Mesa Verde National Park and Vicinity, Colorado (NPS, GRD, GRI, MEVE, MVSR digital map) adapted from a U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations map by Carrara (2012)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Surficial Geologic Map of Mesa Verde National Park and Vicinity, Colorado is composed of GIS data layers complete with ArcMap 9.3 layer...

  13. NPS and Online WOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raassens, Néomie

    2017-01-01

    The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is, according to Reichheld, the single most reliable indicator of company growth, and many companies use this recommendation-based technique for measuring customer loyalty. Despite its widespread adoption by many companies across multiple industries, the debate about NPS goes on. A major concern is that managers treat NPS as being equivalent across customers, which is often very misleading. By using a unique data set that combines customers’ promoter scores and online word-of-mouth (eWOM) behavior, this research studies how individual customers’ promoter scores are related to eWOM, including its relationship with the three categories of customers that are identified by the NPS paradigm (i.e., promoters, passives, and detractors). Based on a sample of 189 customers, their promoter scores and corresponding eWOM, the results show that there is a positive relationship between customers’ promoter scores and the valence of online messages. Further, while detractors and promoters are homogeneous with respect to the valence of the eWOM messages they spread, passives show message valence heterogeneity. Thus, although passives, the largest group of customers, have no weight in calculating the NPS, our results reveal that companies should flag passives for further attention and action. PMID:29046609

  14. NPS transportation innovative finance options

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    This paper provides a summary of innovative transportation finance techniques and discusses their applicability to the National Park Service (NPS). The primary finding of this analysis is that while NPS is engaging in innovative finance techniques su...

  15. NPS national transit inventory, 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    This document summarizes key highlights from the National Park Service (NPS) 2013 National Transit Inventory, and presents data for NPS transit systems system-wide. The document discusses statistics related to ridership, business models, fleet charac...

  16. NPS National Transit Inventory, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Working in coordination with the NPS regions and the U.S. Department of Transportations Volpe National Transportation Systems Center, the Alternative transportation program (ATP) developed a definition of National Park Service (NPS) transit system...

  17. Law in Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Law-Related Education Advisory Council, Cheyenne.

    This document is intended to give students an overview of laws in Wyoming. Subjects covered include civil and criminal law; courts in Wyoming; juvenile law, juvenile court procedure; rights of children; family law; employment law; automobile-related law; laws affecting the schools; and citizenship rights and responsibilities. The laws and courts…

  18. Unpublished Digital Geologic Map of American Memorial Park and Vicinity, Saipan, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands (NPS, GRD, GRI, AMME, AMME digital map) adapted from a U.S. Geologic Survey Open-File Report map by Weary and Burton (2011)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Unpublished Digital Geologic Map of American Memorial Park and Vicinity, Saipan, Commonwealth of Northern Mariana Islands is composed of GIS data layers complete...

  19. Thermal springs of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breckenridge, R.M.; Hinckley, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    This bulletin attempts, first, to provide a comprehensive inventory of the thermal springs of Wyoming; second, to explore the geologic and hydrologic factors producing these springs; and, third, to analyze the springs collectively as an indicator of the geothermal resources of the state. A general discussion of the state's geology and the mechanisms of thermal spring production, along with a brief comparison of Wyoming's springs with worldwide thermal features are included. A discussion of geothermal energy resources, a guide for visitors, and an analysis of the flora of Wyoming's springs follow the spring inventory. The listing and analysis of Wyoming's thermal springs are arranged alphabetically by county. Tabulated data are given on elevation, ownership, access, water temperature, and flow rate. Each spring system is described and its history, general characteristics and uses, geology, hydrology, and chemistry are discussed. (MHR)

  20. Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    The Wyoming Business Council, representing the state’s interests, is participating in a collaborative evaluation of energy development opportunities with the NGNP Industry Alliance (an industry consortium), the University of Wyoming, and the US Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory. Three important energy-related goals are being pursued by the State of Wyoming: Ensuring continued reliable and affordable sources of energy for Wyoming’s industries and people Restructuring the coal economy in Wyoming Restructuring the natural gas economy in Wyoming

  1. Wyoming : ITS/CVO business plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    Commercial Vehicle Operations (CVO) in Wyoming are among the safest and most efficient in the United States. This Business Plan recognizes the successes of Wyoming CVO and proposes seven elements to keep Wyoming a trucking leader. The Plan recommends...

  2. Environmental Contaminants Issues in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The environmental contaminants program at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Ecological Services Office in Cheyenne, Wyoming was initiated in May 1988. The goal of...

  3. Wyoming: "A Net Positive Session"

    OpenAIRE

    Schuhmann, Robert A.

    2016-01-01

    Wyoming’s general legislative session concluded March 6, 2015 with the passage of 185 bills and nearly $285 million in new spending.[1] Because this was a general session rather than a budget session, very few budget issues were addressed. However, key budgetary matters this year included: (1) addressing a $222 million shortfall brought about by falling oil prices and (2) several new capital construction projects spread across the state and at the University of Wyoming. Wyoming democrats in t...

  4. NORTH ABSAROKA WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Willis H.; Williams, Frank E.

    1984-01-01

    The North Absaroka Wilderness in Wyoming was studied to evaluate the resource potential of the area. The results of geologic field mapping, field inspection of claims and prospects, analyses of bedrock and stream-sediment samples, and an aeromagnetic survey indicate that a small area of geologic terrane with probable mineral-resource potential for silver, lead, and zinc is present on the northern edge of the wilderness. Bentonite, low-quality coal, and localized deposits of uranium and chromite have been produced from surrounding areas; but such deposits, if present in the wilderness, are probably too deeply buried, too small, or too sporadically distributed to be classed as resources. Copper and gold mines and prospects are present on the fringes of the wilderness, but otherwise the area seems to be devoid of concentrations of metallic minerals. No surface evidence of geothermal energy resources was found.

  5. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  6. Analysis of NPS Contracting Service Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Development (R&D)” (Lyons et al., 2014). Next, a brief description of the NPS Contracting Office organization is provided. C. ORGANIZATION...was altered slightly to tailor to the NPS Contracting Office organization and dynamic. As Young and Varble point out in their study, modifications to

  7. Hierarchically Structured Recommender System for Improving NPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuang, Jieyan

    2016-01-01

    Net Promoter System (NPS) is well known as an evaluation measure of the growth engine of big companies in the business area. The ultimate goal of my research is to build an action rules and meta-actions based recommender system for improving NPS scores of 34 companies (clients) dealing with similar businesses in the US and Canada. With the given…

  8. Libraries in Wyoming: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/libraries/wyoming.html Libraries in Wyoming To use the sharing features on ... please enable JavaScript. Gillette Campbell County Health Medical Library 501 S. Burma Ave. PO Box 3011 Gillette, WY ...

  9. Experimental photophysical characterization of fluorophores in the vicinity of gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosa, J P; Baptista, P V [CIGMH, Departamento de Ciencias da Vida, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Lima, J C, E-mail: pmvb@fct.unl.pt, E-mail: lima@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal)

    2011-10-14

    We propose an experimental-based tool for dealing with fluorescence modulation close to nanoparticles for application in studies of fluorophores in the vicinity of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), typically addressed via theoretical models. We performed a photophysical characterization of fluorophores in the vicinity of AuNPs, showing that correct {Phi}{sub F} determination suffers from a local pH effect, and address the observed radiative enhancement. Our approach is based on the experimental assurance that the reference fluorophores are in the same optical conditions as those of the AuNP-fluorophore conjugates. We demonstrate the relevance for introducing corrections for the inner filter effect and the reabsorption of the emitted light caused by AuNPs. The proposed approach could circumvent the need for theoretical based corrections and allow for more accurate determination of fluorescence emission in the vicinity of gold nanoparticles.

  10. NPS Focus Digital Library and Research Station

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Scope: National. NPS Focus Digital Library and Research Station information system manages images and archives of images as well as documents described by linked...

  11. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-27

    Energy used by Wyoming single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  12. Banking Wyoming big sagebrush seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert P. Karrfalt; Nancy Shaw

    2013-01-01

    Five commercially produced seed lots of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. var. wyomingensis (Beetle & Young) S.L. Welsh [Asteraceae]) were stored under various conditions for 5 y. Purity, moisture content as measured by equilibrium relative humidity, and storage temperature were all important factors to successful seed storage. Our results indicate...

  13. NPS Panel Discusses ISIS Expansion, Policy Options

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School’s (NPS) Department of Defense Analysis, the Naval War College (NWC) Monterey, and the Global Education Community Collaboration Online (GlobalECCO) counter terrorism program recently hosted a panel discussion titled, “The Islamic State: Remaining and Expanding?” in Ingersoll Hall.

  14. Wyoming DOE EPSCoR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gern, W.A.

    2004-01-15

    All of the research and human resource development projects were systemic in nature with real potential for becoming self sustaining. They concentrated on building permanent structure, such as faculty expertise, research equipment, the SEM Minority Center, and the School of Environment and Natural Resources. It was the intent of the DOE/EPSCoR project to permanently change the way Wyoming does business in energy-related research, human development for science and engineering careers, and in relationships between Wyoming industry, State Government and UW. While there is still much to be done, the DOE/EPSCoR implementation award has been successful in accomplishing that change and enhancing UW's competitiveness associated with coal utilization, electrical energy efficiency, and environmental remediation.

  15. Analysis of NPS contracting service quality

    OpenAIRE

    Baza, Joseph A.; Cabana, Timothy E.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited The purpose of this project is to identify and analyze customer expectations and customer perceptions of service quality provided by the local contracting office supporting the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS). Our goal is to identify performance gaps using the SERVQUAL instrument for measuring customers’ expectations and perceptions along five quality dimensions (tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy). The results ...

  16. Supervision and Evaluation: The Wyoming Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Range, Bret G.; Scherz, Susan; Holt, Carleton R.; Young, Suzanne

    2011-01-01

    The intent of this study was to assess the perceptions and actions of Wyoming principals concerning their role in supervising and evaluating teachers. A survey was sent to all 286 principals in the state of Wyoming, of which, 143 returned surveys, a response rate of 50%. Findings suggested that principals utilized supervisory behaviors more often…

  17. New psychoactive substances (NPS) on cryptomarket fora: An exploratory study of characteristics of forum activity between NPS buyers and vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hout, Marie Claire; Hearne, Evelyn

    2017-02-01

    The continual diversification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) circumventing legislation creates a public health and law enforcement challenge, and one particularly challenged by availability on Hidden Web cryptomarkets. This is the first study of its kind which aimed to explore and characterise cryptomarket forum members' views and perspectives on NPS vendors and products within the context of Hidden Web community dynamics. An internal site search was conducted on two cryptomarkets popular with NPS vendors and hosting fora; Alphabay and Valhalla, using the search terms of 40 popular NPS in the seven categories of stimulant/cathinone; GABA activating; hallucinogen, dissociative, cannabinoid, opioid and other/unspecified/uncategorised NPS. 852 identified threads relating to the discussion of these NPS were generated. Following exclusion of duplicates, 138 threads remained. The Empirical Phenomenological Psychological method of data analysis was applied. Four themes and 32 categories emerged. 120 vendors selling NPS were visible on Alphabay, and 21 on Valhalla. Themes were 'NPS Cryptomarkets and Crypto-community interest in NPS'; 'Motives for NPS use'; 'Indigenous Crypto Community Harm Reduction'; and 'Cryptomarket Characteristics underpinning NPS trafficking', with two higher levels of abstraction centring on 'NPS vendor reputation' and 'NPS transactioning for personal use'. NPS cryptomarket characteristics centred on generation of trust, honesty and excellent service. Users appeared well informed, with harm reduction and vendor information exchange central to NPS market dynamics. GABA activating substances appeared most popular in terms of buyer interest on cryptomarkets. Interest in sourcing 'old favorite' stimulant and dissociative NPS was evident, alongside the sequential and concurrent poly use of NPS, and use of NPS with illicit drugs such as MDMA. Continued monitoring of new trends in NPS within Surface Web and cryptomarkets are warranted. A particular

  18. Individual and Co Transport Study of Titanium Dioxide NPs and Zinc Oxide NPs in Porous Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kumari

    Full Text Available The impact of pH and ionic strength on the mobility (individual and co-transport and deposition kinetics of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in porous media was systematically investigated in this study. Packed column experiments were performed over a series of environmentally relevant ionic strengths with both NaCl (0.1-10 mM and CaCl2 (0.01-0.1mM solutions and at pH 5, 7, and 9. The transport of TiO2 NPs at pH 5 was not significantly affected by ZnO NPs in solution. At pH 7, a decrease in TiO2 NP transport was noted with co-existence of ZnO NPs, while at pH 9 an increase in the transport was observed. At pH 5 and 7, the transport of ZnO NPs was decreased when TiO2 NPs was present in the solution, and at pH 9, an increase was noted. The breakthrough curves (BTC were noted to be sensitive to the solution chemistries; the decrease in the breakthrough plateau with increasing ionic strength was observed under all examined pH (5, 7, and 9. The retention profiles were the inverse of the plateaus of BTCs, as expected from mass balance considerations. Overall, the results from this study suggest that solution chemistries (ionic strength and pH are likely the key factors that govern the individual and co-transport behavior of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in sand.

  19. Independent developer plans Wyoming project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-01-25

    Little Horn Energy Wyoming, Inc. is proposing a project on the Dry Fork of the Little Big Horn River. The lower reservoir would be impounded by a roller-compacted concrete dam and an outlet tower on the upstream face of the dam would have multilevel intakes to allow selective temperature discharges into the Dry Fork. The asphalt-lined upper reservoir on an adjacent ridge would be contained by a 100 foot high rockfill embankment. Maximum planned daily drawdown is 45 ft. Preliminary plans call for water to drop through a 21 ft. diameter shaft to a manifold. Then ft. diameter penstocks would feed a four unit underground power house.

  20. NPS National Transit Inventory and Performance Report, 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This document summarizes key highlights and performance measures relating to the National Park Service (NPS) 2016 National Transit Inventory, by presenting data for NPS transit systems and vehicles nationwide. These highlights and performance measure...

  1. NPS national transit inventory and performance report, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This document summarizes key highlights and performance measures relating to the National Park Service (NPS) 2015 National Transit Inventory, by presenting data for NPS transit systems and vehicles nationwide. These highlights and performance measure...

  2. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Means, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change (including energy development, fire, and invasive species), and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks (including climate change). Additionally, the REA may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing cumulative effects of multiple land uses. The Wyoming Basin REA will address Management Questions developed by the Bureau of Land Management and other agency partners for 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages. The maps developed for addressing Management Questions will be integrated into overall maps of landscape-level ecological values and risks. The maps can be used to address the goals of the REA at a number of levels: for individual species, species assemblages, aquatic and terrestrial systems, and for the entire ecoregion. This allows flexibility in how the products of the REA are compiled to inform planning and management actions across a broad range of spatial scales.

  3. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Grant C. Willis

    2003-09-01

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the fourth quarter of the first project year (April 1 through June 30, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs to the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone and Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation, the major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view, often in three dimensions, of reservoir-facies characteristics and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. The Nugget Sandstone was deposited in an extensive dune field that extended from Wyoming to

  4. Conductive thermal modeling of Wyoming geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, H.P.; Ruscetta, C.A.; Foley, D. (eds.)

    1981-05-01

    A summary of techniques used by the Wyoming Geothermal Resource Assessment Group in defining low-temperature hydrothermal resource areas is presented. Emphasis is placed on thermal modeling techniques appropriate to Wyoming's geologic setting. Thermal parameters discussed include oil-well bottom hole temperatures, heat flow, thermal conductivity, and measured temperature-depth profiles. Examples of the use of these techniques are from the regional study of the Bighorn Basin and two site specific studies within the Basin.

  5. NPS Solar Cell Array Tester Cubesat Flight Testing and Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    option for education purposes because of the simplicity of the technology and the ease of availability. They are rapidly becoming useful for real...NPS-SCAT as a pathfinder for the educational use of CubeSats at NPS. NPSAT1 (shown in Figure 1) is currently scheduled for a launch in 2016. 2...front face of NPS-SCAT. The antenna comprises two pieces of piano wire cut to the proper length, stowed using fishing line. Once in orbit, a piece of

  6. Navy-wide Personnel Survey (NPS) 2005: Tabulated Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Whittam, Kimberly P

    2007-01-01

    .... The NPS focused on work-life topics, such as job satisfaction, leadership satisfaction, morale, career intentions, career development, advancement and promotion, detailing, TEMPO, gender integration...

  7. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Melcher, Cynthia P.

    2015-08-28

    The Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment was conducted in partnership with the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The overall goals of the BLM Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) are to identify important ecosystems and wildlife habitats at broad spatial scales; identify where these resources are at risk from Change Agents, including development, wildfire, invasive species, disease and climate change; quantify cumulative effects of anthropogenic stressors; and assess current levels of risk to ecological resources across a range of spatial scales and jurisdictional boundaries by assessing all lands within an ecoregion. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and stakeholders for the ecoregion, identify the regionally significant information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant species and ecological communities that are of management concern. Change Agents that currently affect or are likely to affect the condition of species and communities in the future are identified and assessed. REAs also identify areas that have high conservation potential that are referred to as “large intact areas.” At the ecoregion level, the ecological value of large intact areas is based on the assumption that because these areas have not been greatly altered by human activities (such as development), they are more likely to contain a variety of plant and animal communities and to be resilient and resistant to changes resulting from natural disturbances such as fire, insect outbreaks, and disease.

  8. Life zone investigations in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cary, Merritt

    1917-01-01

    Wyoming is among the foremost of our States in its wealth of natural scenery, culminating in the grandeur of Yellowstone National Park, one of the wonders of the world. In addition to this distinction it posseses vast open plains and lofty mountains whence flow the headwaters of mighty river systems emptying far away to the west into the Pacific Ocean, to the southeast into the Gulf of Mexico, and to the southwest into the Gulf of California. The various slope exposures of its mountain ranges, the fertility of its intervening valleys or basins, and the aridity of its desert spaces present a study of geographic and vertical distribution of wild life that is in many particulars unique.The study of geographic and vertical distribution of life with the governing factors and attendant problems is valuable as a matter of scientific research and in the attainment of practical knowledge. The Biological Survey has been making detailed investigations of the transcontinental life belts, or zones, of North America for some years, and this work has been carried on with special reference to their practical value. It has become increasingly evident that life zones furnish a fairly accurate index to average climatic conditions and, therefore, are useful as marking the limits of agricultural possibilities, so far as these are dependent upon climate. The knowledge thus gained has been published and made available as the investigations have progressed and the life zones have been mapped.1

  9. Modelling the Semantics of Object Prepositions Inside Spanish NPs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høeg Müller, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a cognitive semantic framework for understanding the principles that govern the use of object prepositions inside NPs with event nominalizations (Grimshaw 1990) as heads......This paper presents a cognitive semantic framework for understanding the principles that govern the use of object prepositions inside NPs with event nominalizations (Grimshaw 1990) as heads...

  10. University Students Add Professional Certifications to Their NPS Degrees [video

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Select students in NPS' Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) take the necessary extra steps to complete professional certifications while earning their NPS degrees, demonstrating a level of competency above and beyond what is required for their graduate degree.

  11. Map service: Oil and gas development for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  12. Map service: Historical oil and gas exploration for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  13. Oil and gas wells data for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This feature class was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  14. Map service: Oil and gas wells for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service was created to assemble oil and gas well information for a comprehensive inventory of energy data pertinent to the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  15. Are Vicinal Metal Surfaces Stable?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frenken, J. W. M.; Stoltze, Per

    1999-01-01

    We use effective medium theory to demonstrate that the energies of many metal surfaces are lowered when these surfaces are replaced by facets with lower-index orientations. This implies that the low-temperature equilibrium shapes of many metal crystals should be heavily faceted. The predicted ins...... instability of vicinal metal surfaces is at variance with the almost generally observed stability of these surfaces. We argue that the unstable orientations undergo a defaceting transition at relatively low temperatures, driven by the high vibrational entropy of steps....

  16. Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

    2003-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively

  17. 78 FR 10512 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... error for grammatical correctness in subsection (c.) by changing the word ``creation'' to ``creating... Wyoming needs to correct a typographical error for grammatical correctness by changing the phrase ``where... proposed language warrants additional grammatical revisions for purposes of clarity and consistency within...

  18. Wyoming Community Colleges Annual Partnership Report, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The "Annual Partnership Report" catalogs partnerships that Wyoming community colleges established and maintained for each fiscal year. Each community college maintains numerous partnerships for the development and provision of academic, occupational-technical, workforce development, and enrichment educational programs. These partnerships…

  19. 76 FR 34815 - Wyoming Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-14

    ... augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work, excluding husbandry practices that are approved...)(iii)(E)(I)-(IV); Species of vegetation described in the reclamation plan and seeding rates (relocated... Regulations 1. Chapter 1, Section 2(j); Definition of ``Augmented Seeding'' Wyoming proposes to add a new...

  20. 76 FR 14057 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... possession and control of the University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository... of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation...

  1. NPS Executive Education and Professional Development Programs Annual Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has strong executive education and professional development (EE/PD) programs that extend the reach of its graduate programs to mid- or senior-grade professionals who are unable to take the time out of their careers to attend degree programs, or who need targeted information at their locations on their time schedules. In addition to degree and certificate courses offered for credit, Schools, Centers, Departments, Institutes and other organizations of NPS pro...

  2. Naval Postgraduate School Scheduling Support System (NPS4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    and an IBM-compatible with an Intel 80386 processor or better. The program chosen for the prototype presented in this thesis, HyperCard 6 , runs on the...1000 4500 time ( CPU seconds) Figure 4.14 NPSSPerformance NPSS could serve as the problem modelling component of NPS4 to assist the Class Scheduler in...the other to execute the final exam scheduling program. Its run time was 90-120 CPU -seconds on the NPS mainframe (IBM 3033). 159 This set of programs

  3. USGS-NPS Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) workshop report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moses, Christopher S.; Nayagandhi, Amar; Brock, John; Beavers, Rebecca

    2010-01-01

    The National Park Service (NPS) Inventory and Monitoring (I&M) Program recently allocated funds to initiate a benthic mapping program in ocean and Great Lakes parks in alignment with the NPS Ocean Park Stewardship 2007-2008 Action Plan. Seventy-four (ocean and Great Lakes) parks, spanning more than 5,000 miles of coastline, many affected by increasing coastal storms and other natural and anthropogenic processes, make the development of a Servicewide Benthic Mapping Program (SBMP) timely. The resulting maps and associated reports will be provided to NPS managers in a consistent servicewide format to help park managers protect and manage the 3 million acres of submerged National Park System natural and cultural resources. Of the 74 ocean and Great Lakes park units, the 40 parks with submerged acreage will be the focus in the early years of the SBMP. The NPS and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) convened a workshop (June 3-5, 2008) in Lakewood, CO. The assembly of experts from the NPS and other Federal and non-Federal agencies clarified the needs and goals of the NPS SBMP and was one of the key first steps in designing the benthic mapping program. The central needs for individual parks, park networks, and regions identified by workshop participants were maps including bathymetry, bottom type, geology, and biology. This workshop, although not an exhaustive survey of data-acquisition technologies, highlighted the more promising technologies being used, existing sources of data, and the need for partnerships to leverage resources. Workshop products include recommended classification schemes and management approaches for consistent application and products similar to other long-term NPS benthic mapping efforts. As part of the SBMP, recommendations from this workshop, including application of an improved version of the Coastal and Marine Ecological Classification Standard (CMECS), will be tested in several pilot parks. In 2008, in conjunction with the findings of this workshop

  4. Effect of fungicides on Wyoming big sagebrush seed germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert D. Cox; Lance H. Kosberg; Nancy L. Shaw; Stuart P. Hardegree

    2011-01-01

    Germination tests of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young [Asteraceae]) seeds often exhibit fungal contamination, but the use of fungicides should be avoided because fungicides may artificially inhibit germination. We tested the effect of seed-applied fungicides on germination of Wyoming big sagebrush at 2 different...

  5. Geothermal resources of the Washakie and Great Divide basins, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasler, H. P.; Buelow, K. L.

    1985-05-01

    The geothermal resources of the Great Divide and Washakie Basins of southern Wyoming are described. Oil well bottomhole temperatures, thermal logs of wells, and heat flow data were interpreted within a framework of geologic and hydrologic constraints. It was concluded large areas in Wyoming are underlain by water hotter than 120 F. Isolated areas with high temperature gradients exist within each basin.

  6. Comparison of postfire seeding practices for Wyoming big sagebrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey E. Ott; Robert D. Cox; Nancy L. Shaw

    2017-01-01

    Wildfires in the Great Basin have resulted in widespread loss of Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis Beetle & Young), an ecologically important shrub that has proven difficult to establish from seed.We sought to identify optimal seeding practices forWyoming big sagebrush in the context of postfire seeding operations involving...

  7. Wyoming's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chelsea P. McIver; Colin B. Sorenson; Charles E. Keegan; Todd A. Morgan; Mike T. Thompson

    2014-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Wyoming’s 2010 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Wyoming’s primary forest products industry, and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production,...

  8. Wyoming's forest products industry and timber harvest, 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Morgan; Timothy P. Spoelma; Charles E. Keegan; Alfred L. Chase; Mike T. Thompson

    2005-01-01

    This report traces the flow of Wyoming's 2000 timber harvest through the primary wood-using industries; provides a description of the structure, capacity, and condition of Wyoming's primary forest products industry; and quantifies volumes and uses of wood fiber. Historical wood products industry changes are discussed, as well as changes in harvest, production...

  9. 30 CFR 950.35 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land... STATE WYOMING § 950.35 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. (a) Wyoming certification of completing all known coal-related impacts is accepted, effective May 25, 1984. (b) The...

  10. Assessment of undiscovered conventional oil and gas resources in the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah, 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Christopher J.; Mercier, Tracey J.; Tennyson, Marilyn E.; Woodall, Cheryl A.; Brownfield, Michael E.; Le, Phuong A.; Klett, Timothy R.; Gaswirth, Stephanie B.; Finn, Thomas M.; Marra, Kristen R.; Leathers-Miller, Heidi M.

    2018-02-16

    Using a geology-based assessment methodology, the U.S. Geological Survey estimated mean undiscovered, technically recoverable resources of 26 million barrels of oil and 700 billion cubic feet of gas in the Wyoming Thrust Belt Province, Wyoming, Idaho, and Utah.

  11. Noble silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesis and characterization ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nanotechnology is rapidly growing with nanoparticles produced and utilized in a wide range of pharmaceutical and commercial products throughout the world. In this study, fig (Ficus carica) leaf extracts were used for ecofriendly extracellular synthesis of stable silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) by treating an aqueous silver ...

  12. Habitat--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the habitat map of the seafloor of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is included in...

  13. Contours--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents bathymetric contours for several seafloor maps of the Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. The raster data file is...

  14. Hydrothermal commercialization baseline for state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanny, J.A.; Lunis, B.C. [eds.

    1979-06-01

    Wyoming does have numerous hot springs; but there has been little development effort in geothermal energy, since the state's primary interests are in coal, gas and oil. The hot springs of Thermopolis are among the largest in the world. Recent data from the central portion of the state indicate the potential for electric power generation from geothermal energy. Oil and gas wells (about 70,000) have been drilled in the state and some have geothermal waters that can be utilized for direct applications. The Madison Aquifer extends into the northeastern quadrant of the state and offers considerable potential for geothermal energy. Leasing activity is very limited. Geothermal legislation is basically non-existent, but the State Engineer has the responsibility for protecting the thermal springs. This handbook provides a synopsis of various aspects of the geothermal program in Wyoming. The section on Basic State Data (Section 2) lists government personnel (both legislative and executive branches) who are most directly involved with geothermal development. Some basic demographic data are also included. The various hydrothermal resources and the pertinent geology are summarized in Section 3. Activities (ranging from leases to operational systems) that lead to commercialization are described in Section 4. Plans for various developments are summarized in Section 5, while government assistance to Wyoming projects is list4ed in Section 6. The section on energy use patterns (Section 7) summarizes existing energy use and identifies counties and industries likely to be impacted most by geothermal energy. The section on leasing and permitting policies (Section 8) deals with legal and institutional considerations and includes a time table of institutional procedures for a typical resource to show the interrelationships among various organizations involved in development and regulation of the resource.

  15. Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nealon, Teresa

    2014-06-30

    This report outlines the accomplishments of the Wyoming Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) Technology Institute (WCTI), including creating a website and online course catalog, sponsoring technology transfer workshops, reaching out to interested parties via news briefs and engaging in marketing activities, i.e., advertising and participating in tradeshows. We conclude that the success of WCTI was hampered by the lack of a market. Because there were no supporting financial incentives to store carbon, the private sector had no reason to incur the extra expense of training their staff to implement carbon storage. ii

  16. LARAMIE PEAK WILDERNESS STUDY AREA, WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerstrom, Kenneth; Weisner, R.C.

    1984-01-01

    On the basis of a mineral survey, most of the Laramie Peak Wilderness study area in Wyoming was concluded to have little promise for the occurrence of mineral or energy resources. Only three small areas in the northern part, one extending outside the study area to Esterbrook, were found to have probable mineral-resource potential for copper and lead. The geologic setting precludes the presence of fossil-fuel resources in the study area. There are no surface indications that geothermal energy could be developed within or near the study area.

  17. The presence of oleate stabilized ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and reduced the toxicity of aged NPs to Caco-2 and HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Xin; Jiang, Leying; Gong, Yu; Li, Juan; Liu, Liangliang; Cao, Yi

    2017-12-25

    The presence of food components may alter the colloidal aspects and toxicity of nanoparticles (NPs). In this study, the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 and HepG2 cells was assessed, with the emphasis on the interactions between ZnO NPs and oleate (OA). The presence of OA increased UV-Vis spectra and hydrodynamic sizes, decreased Zeta potential, and markedly reduced the release of Zn ions from the dissolution of ZnO NPs, which combined indicated that OA could coat ZnO NPs and stabilize ZnO NPs. Exposure to ZnO NPs significantly induced cytotoxicity to Caco-2 and HepG2 cells, associated with increased intracellular Zn ions but not superoxide. When OA was added to the freshly prepared ZnO NP suspensions, the cytotoxicity, intracellular Zn ions and superoxide induced by ZnO NPs were not significantly affected. However, when ZnO NPs were aged for 24 h with the presence of OA, the cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 and HepG2 cells was significantly reduced, associated with a reduction of intracellular Zn ions. The results from this study suggested that the presence of OA could increase colloidal stability of ZnO NPs and consequently reduce the toxicity of ZnO NPs after aging associated with reduced accumulation of intracellular Zn ions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. NPDES Permit for Shoshone Utility Organization in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit WY-0044580, the Shoshone Utility Organization is authorized to discharge from its wastewater treatment facility located in Fremont County, Wyoming to an unnamed irrigation drainage ditch tributary to the South Fork of the Little Wind R.

  19. Oil field produced water discharges into wetlands in Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Approximately 600 oil field produced water discharges are permitted in Wyoming by the State’s Department of Environmental Quality's (WDEQ) National Pollutant...

  20. Uranium assessment for the Precambrian pebble conglomerates in southeastern Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borgman, L.E.; Sever, C.; Quimby, W.F.; Andrew, M.E.; Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.

    1981-03-01

    This volume is a geostatistical resource estimate of uranium and thorium in quartz-pebble conglomerates, and is a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential to Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 2: Drill-Hole Data, Drill-Site Geology, and Geochemical Data from the Study of Precambrian Uraniferous Conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and the Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming.

  1. Expansion and Enhacement of the Wyoming Coalbed Methane Clearinghouse Website to the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulme, Diana [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Hamerlinck, Jeffrey [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Bergman, Harold [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States); Oakleaf, Jim [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States)

    2010-03-25

    Energy development is expanding across the United States, particularly in western states like Wyoming. Federal and state land management agencies, local governments, industry and non-governmental organizations have realized the need to access spatially-referenced data and other non-spatial information to determine the geographical extent and cumulative impacts of expanding energy development. The Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC) is a web-based portal which centralizes access to news, data, maps, reports and other information related to the development, management and conservation of Wyoming's diverse energy resources. WERIC was established in 2006 by the University of Wyoming's Ruckelshaus Institute of Environment and Natural Resources (ENR) and the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center (WyGISC) with funding from the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the US Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The WERIC web portal originated in concept from a more specifically focused website, the Coalbed Methane (CBM) Clearinghouse. The CBM Clearinghouse effort focused only on coalbed methane production within the Powder River Basin of northeast Wyoming. The CBM Clearinghouse demonstrated a need to expand the effort statewide with a comprehensive energy focus, including fossil fuels and renewable and alternative energy resources produced and/or developed in Wyoming. WERIC serves spatial data to the greater Wyoming geospatial community through the Wyoming GeoLibrary, the WyGISC Data Server and the Wyoming Energy Map. These applications are critical components that support the Wyoming Energy Resources Information Clearinghouse (WERIC). The Wyoming GeoLibrary is a tool for searching and browsing a central repository for metadata. It provides the ability to publish and maintain metadata and geospatial data in a distributed environment. The WyGISC Data Server is an internet mapping application that provides traditional GIS mapping and analysis

  2. Newcastle folio, Wyoming-South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darton, N. H.

    1904-01-01

    The Newcastle quadrangle embraces the quarter of a square degree which lies between parallels 43° 30' and 44° north latitude and meridians 104° and 104° 30' west longitude.  It measures approximately 34 1/2 miles from north to south and 25 1/8 from east to west, and its area is 863 4/5 square miles.  It lies mainly in the eastern portion of Weston County, Wyo., but includes also a narrow area of western Custer and Pennington counties, S. Dak.  The northeastern portion of the quadrangle lies on the slopes of the Black Hills, but the larger part of it belongs to the Great Plains, although these plains are lower here than in the greater part of adjoining portions of Nebraska and Wyoming.  The district is drained by branches of the South Branch of Cheyenne River.

  3. Overview of Energy Development Opportunities for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Demick

    2012-11-01

    An important opportunity exists for the energy future of Wyoming that will • Maintain its coal industry • Add substantive value to its indigenous coal and natural gas resources • Improve dramatically the environmental impact of its energy production capability • Increase its Gross Domestic Product These can be achieved through development of a carbon conversion industry that transforms coal and natural gas to synthetic transportation fuels, chemical feedstocks, and chemicals that are the building blocks for the chemical industry. Over the longer term, environmentally clean nuclear energy can provide the substantial energy needs of a carbon conversion industry and be part of the mix of replacement technologies for the current fleet of aging coal-fired electric power generating stations.

  4. NPS and the methadone queue: Spillages of space and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexandrescu, Liviu

    2017-02-01

    Between 2008 and 2013, powder-stimulants sold by 'head shops' as novel psychoactive substances (NPS) or 'legal highs' have displaced heroin among groups of injecting substance users in Bucharest, Romania. Rising HIV-infection rates and other medical or social harms have been reported to follow this trend. The study builds on two sets of original (N=30) and existing (N=20) interview data and on observations collected mainly at the site of a methadone substitution treatment facility. By disentangling the space-time continuum of the methadone queue, this paper argues that injecting drug users' (IDUs) passage from opiates to amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS) can be understood as 'spillages' of space and time. IDUs thus 'spill' out of the disciplinary flows of methadone treatment in two ways. The first is that of space and materiality. Drawing on actor-network theory (ANT), ATS/NPS appear embedded in reconfigured practices and rituals of injecting use. Such spillages see the pleasure-seeking self being fluidised in forming connections with, or spilling into, nonhuman actants such as substances, settings or objects. The second dimension of spilling is that of time. In this sense, heroin use is a 'cryogenic strategy' of inhabiting history and facing the transition to the market society that Romanian opiate injectors spill out of, not able to appropriate choice and legitimate consumption. The phenomenological qualities of stimulants that seem to accelerate lived time and generalise desire thus present them with an opportunity to alleviate a form of what a post-communist moral imaginary of transition frames as debilitating nostalgia. ATS/NPS are revealed as fluid entities that do not only shape risk conditions but also alter shared meanings and contextual configurations of bodies, substances and disciplinary regimes in unpredictable ways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal

  6. Spatial and temporal characteristics of moose highway crossings in the Buffalo Fork Valley, Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) and the Wyoming Game and Fish : Department (WGFD) with information that could be used to assess the importance of habitat, landscape, and anthropogenic features...

  7. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Wyoming. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Wyoming.

  8. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Wyoming statewide oil and gas wells feature class was developed to provide a historical perspective of drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation...

  9. 76 FR 14058 - Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human Remains...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-15

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: University of Wyoming, Anthropology Department, Human... University of Wyoming Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, Laramie, WY. The human remains were..., Anthropology Department, Human Remains Repository, professional staff in consultation with representatives of...

  10. Mule Deer (Odocoileus hemionus) Movement and Habitat Use Patterns in Relation to Roadways in Northwest Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide the Wyoming Department of Transportation and Wyoming Game and Fish Department with useful information about the patterns of mule deer seasonal habitat use, migration, road crossings, and wildlife-vehicle colli...

  11. Map showing earthquake epicenters (1964-81) in Yellowstone National Park and vicinity, Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, A.M.

    1989-01-01

    The earthquake activity in the Yellowstone region is part of a belt of seismicity extending from southern Utah to northwestern Montana. The 1959 magnitude 7.3 Hebgen Lake earthquake is the largest historical event along this trend. Yellowstone National Park is also the focus of extensive Quaternary volcanic activity that relates to a long lived volcanic system that has progressed from southwest to northeast along the trend of the Snake River Plain, ending in a 40 by 70 km caldera formed in a volcanic eruption 600,000 years ago. Thus the seismicity shown on these maps is part of a major tectonic feature of western North America and may also be influenced by or influence the volcanic processes occurring in the region. A more complete description of the geology and geophysics of the Yellowstone region can be found in Smith and Christiansen (1980), Christiansen (1984), and Smith and Brail (1984).

  12. 30 CFR 950.30 - Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., Department of Environmental Quality, Abandoned Mine Lands Division, Herschler Building, Third Floor West, 122... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land... § 950.30 Approval of Wyoming abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Wyoming Abandoned Mine Land...

  13. Synthesis of Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) with Antibacterial Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campillo Gloria, E.; Ederley, Vélez; Gladis, Morales; César, Hincapié; Jaime, Osorio; Oscar, Arnache; Uribe José, Ignacio; Franklin, Jaramillo

    2017-06-01

    The synthesis of nanomaterials is currently one of the most active in nanoscience branches; especially those help improve the human quality life. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are an example of this as it is known to have inhibitory and bactericidal effects. In this work, we report the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by chemical reduction method of silver nitrate (AgNO3) from aqueous solution, using a mix of polivinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) - Aloe Vera as reducing agent and for stabilization and control of particle size. Silver nanoparticles obtained were characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), UV-visible spectroscopy and measurements using Zetasizer Nano ZS were applied to size estimation. The existence of surface plasmon resonance peak at λmax ~ 420 nm is evidence of silver nanoparticles formation. It was possible to standardize an appropriate protocol for the evaluation of bactericidal activity of the nanoparticles, for mesophilic microorganisms. Bactericidal activity above 90% against these kinds of bacteria was demonstrated.

  14. The preparation and antibacterial effects of dopa-cotton/AgNPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Hong, E-mail: hxu@dhu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Science and Technology of Eco-textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Shi Xue; Ma Hui; Lv Yihang; Zhang Linping [Key Lab of Science and Technology of Eco-textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Mao Zhiping, E-mail: zhpmao@dhu.edu.cn [Key Lab of Science and Technology of Eco-textile, Ministry of Education, College of Chemistry, Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2011-05-15

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been known to have powerful antibacterial activity. In this paper, in situ generation of AgNPs on the surface of dopamine modified cotton fabrics (dopa-cotton/AgNPs) in aqueous solution under room temperature is presented. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM) were used to analyze the surface chemical composition and the morphology of the modified cotton fabrics, respectively. The results indicated that the surface of cotton fabrics was successfully coated with polydopamine and AgNPs. The cotton fabrics with AgNPs showed durable antibacterial activity.

  15. The effects of baicalein or baicalin on the colloidal stability of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and toxicity of NPs to Caco-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yining; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Liangliang; Gong, Yu; Xie, Yixi; Cao, Yi

    2017-11-22

    Recent study suggested that the presence of phytochemicals in food could interact with nanoparticles (NPs) and consequently reduce the toxicity of NPs, which has been attributed to the antioxidant properties of phytochemicals. In this study, we investigated the interactions between ZnO NPs and two flavonoids baicalein (Ba) or baicalin (Bn) as well as the influence of the interactions on the toxicity of ZnO NPs to Caco-2 cells. The antioxidant properties of Ba and Bn were confirmed by 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS) assays, with Ba being stronger. However, the presence of Ba or Bn did not significantly affect cytotoxicity, intracellular superoxide or release of inflammatory cytokines of Caco-2 cells after ZnO NP exposure. When Ba was present, the cellular viability of Caco-2 cells after exposure to ZnO NPs was slightly increased, associated with a modest decrease of intracellular Zn ions, but these effects were not statistically different. Ba was more effective than Bn at changing the hydrodynamic sizes, Zeta potential and UV-Vis spectra of ZnO NPs, which indicated that Ba might increase the colloidal stability of NPs. Taken together, the results of the present study indicated that the anti-oxidative phytochemical Ba might only modestly protected Caco-2 cells from the exposure to ZnO NPs associated with an insignificant reduction of the accumulation of intracellular Zn ions. These results also indicated that when assessing the combined effects of NPs and phytochemicals to cells lining gastrointestinal tract, it might be necessary to evaluate the changes of colloidal stability of NPs altered by phytochemicals.

  16. Human Rabies - Wyoming and Utah, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrist, Alexia; Styczynski, Ashley; Wynn, DonRaphael; Ansari, Safdar; Hopkin, Justin; Rosado-Santos, Harry; Baker, JoDee; Nakashima, Allyn; Atkinson, Annette; Spencer, Melanie; Dean, Debbie; Teachout, Leslie; Mayer, Jeanmarie; Condori, Rene E; Orciari, Lillian; Wadhwa, Ashutosh; Ellison, James; Niezgoda, Michael; Petersen, Brett; Wallace, Ryan; Musgrave, Karl

    2016-06-03

    In September 2015, a Wyoming woman was admitted to a local hospital with a 5-day history of progressive weakness, ataxia, dysarthria, and dysphagia. Because of respiratory failure, she was transferred to a referral hospital in Utah, where she developed progressive encephalitis. On day 8 of hospitalization, the patient's family told clinicians they recalled that, 1 month before admission, the woman had found a bat on her neck upon waking, but had not sought medical care. The patient's husband subsequently had contacted county invasive species authorities about the incident, but he was not advised to seek health care for evaluation of his wife's risk for rabies. On October 2, CDC confirmed the patient was infected with a rabies virus variant that was enzootic to the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans). The patient died on October 3. Public understanding of rabies risk from bat contact needs to be improved; cooperation among public health and other agencies can aid in referring persons with possible bat exposure for assessment of rabies risk.

  17. Wyoming Basin Rapid Ecoregional Assessment: Work Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Natasha B.; Garman, Steven L.; Walters, Annika; Ray, Andrea; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Wesner, Jeff S.; O’Donnell, Michael S.; Sherrill, Kirk R.; Babel, Nils C.; Bowen, Zachary H.

    2013-01-01

    The overall goal of the Rapid Ecoregional Assessments (REAs) being conducted for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is to provide information that supports regional planning and analysis for the management of ecological resources. The REA provides an assessment of baseline ecological conditions, an evaluation of current risks from drivers of ecosystem change, and a predictive capacity for evaluating future risks. The REA also may be used for identifying priority areas for conservation or restoration and for assessing the cumulative effects of a variety of land uses. There are several components of the REAs. Management Questions, developed by the BLM and partners for the ecoregion, identify the information needed for addressing land-management responsibilities. Conservation Elements represent regionally significant aquatic and terrestrial species and communities that are to be conserved and (or) restored. The REA also will evaluate major drivers of ecosystem change (Change Agents) currently affecting or likely to affect the status of Conservation Elements. We selected 8 major biomes and 19 species or species assemblages to be included as Conservation Elements. We will address the four primary Change Agents—development, fire, invasive species, and climate change—required for the REA. The purpose of the work plan for the Wyoming Basin REA is to document the selection process for, and final list of, Management Questions, Conservation Elements, and Change Agents. The work plan also presents the overall assessment framework that will be used to assess the status of Conservation Elements and answer Management Questions.

  18. Case studies on direct liquefaction of low rank Wyoming coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adler, P.; Kramer, S.J.; Poddar, S.K. [Bechtel Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Previous Studies have developed process designs, costs, and economics for the direct liquefaction of Illinois No. 6 and Wyoming Black Thunder coals at mine-mouth plants. This investigation concerns two case studies related to the liquefaction of Wyoming Black Thunder coal. The first study showed that reducing the coal liquefaction reactor design pressure from 3300 to 1000 psig could reduce the crude oil equivalent price by 2.1 $/bbl provided equivalent performing catalysts can be developed. The second one showed that incentives may exist for locating a facility that liquifies Wyoming coal on the Gulf Coast because of lower construction costs and higher labor productivity. These incentives are dependent upon the relative values of the cost of shipping the coal to the Gulf Coast and the increased product revenues that may be obtained by distributing the liquid products among several nearby refineries.

  19. An evaluation of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, D.; Kane, D.L.; Hinzman, L.D.; Goodison, B.E.; Metcalfe, J.R.; Louie, P.Y.T.; Leavesley, G.H.; Emerson, D.G.; Hanson, C.L.

    2000-01-01

    The Wyoming snow fence (shield) has been widely used with precipitation gauges for snowfall measurement at more than 25 locations in Alaska since the late 1970s. This gauge's measurements have been taken as the reference for correcting wind-induced gauge undercatch of snowfall in Alaska. Recently, this fence (shield) was tested in the World Meteorological Organization Solid Precipitation Measurement Intercomparison Project at four locations in the United States of America and Canada for six winter seasons. At the Intercomparison sites an octagonal vertical Double Fence with a Russian Tretyakov gauge or a Universal Belfort recording gauge was installed and used as the Intercomparison Reference (DFIR) to provide true snowfall amounts for this intercomparison experiment. The intercomparison data collected were compiled at the four sites that represent a variety of climate, terrain, and exposure. On the basis of these data sets the performance of the Wyoming gauge system for snowfall observations was carefully evaluated against the DFIR and snow cover data. The results show that (1) the mean snow catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge compared with the DFIR is about 80-90%, (2) there exists a close linear relation between the measurements of the two gauge systems and this relation may serve as a transfer function to adjust the Wyoming gauge records to obtain an estimate of the true snowfall amount, (3) catch efficiency of the Wyoming gauge does not change with wind speed and temperature, and (4) Wyoming gauge measurements are generally compatible to the snowpack water equivalent at selected locations in northern Alaska. These results are important to our effort of determining true snowfall amounts in the high latitudes, and they are also useful for regional hydrologic and climatic analyses.

  20. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2010-01-01

    This Wyoming wind-turbine data set represents locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 1, 2009. Each wind turbine is assigned to a wind farm. For each turbine, this report contains information about the following: potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, land ownership, county, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with its wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some attributes are estimates based on information that was obtained through the American Wind Energy Association and miscellaneous online reports. The locations are derived from August 2009 true-color aerial photographs made by the National Agriculture Imagery Program; the photographs have a positional accuracy of approximately ?5 meters. The location of wind turbines under construction during the development of this data set will likely be less accurate than the location of turbines already completed. The original purpose for developing the data presented here was to evaluate the effect of wind energy development on seasonal habitat used by greater sage-grouse. Additionally, these data will provide a planning tool for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Team and for other wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey's Fort Collins Science Center. Specifically, these data will be used to quantify disturbance of the landscape related to wind energy as well as quantifying indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set was developed for the 2010 project 'Seasonal predictive habitat models for greater sage-grouse in Wyoming.' This project's spatially explicit seasonal distribution models of sage-grouse in Wyoming will provide resource managers with tools for conservation planning. These

  1. Self-assembled nanostructures on vicinal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovykh, Dmitri Yourievich

    2000-10-01

    One of the first methods for visualizing crystal planes and atomic steps has been step decoration with gold on alkali-halide surfaces. An impressive body of work has been conducted since then on the role of steps in controlling surface diffusion and adsorption rates, catalytic and chemical activity, and other physical and chemical surface properties. Due to these special characteristics, vicinal surfaces offer an approach for creating self-assembled structures with one or more dimensions on nanometer scale. The storage and communications industries have been revolutionized by applications of two-dimensional electron gas confined in thin films, so an interest in one and zero-dimensional systems is not surprising. This work demonstrates how macroscopic amounts of low-dimensional structures can be produced by self-assembly using stepped surfaces as nanometer-scale templates. High-quality templates of step arrays can be prepared on vicinal Si(111) surfaces. Sub-monolayer CaF2/Si(111) heteroepitaxial growth is examined in a series of experiments. A new growth mode is observed in addition to the ones typical in three dimensions. With increasing coverage, the growth front changes from rough to smooth geometry, driven by the elastic interactions between the multiple growth fronts and the surface steps. The mechanism is thus unique to the two-dimensional growth on stepped surfaces. The possible arrangements of the CaF2 self-assembled nanostructures are arrays of stripes or islands, both interesting as potential masks for silicon nanolithography. Anisotropic surface reconstructions, such as Ca and Au induced 3 x 1 and 5 x 2 on Si(111), are effectively self-assembled one-dimensional atomic chains. Reconstructions are single-domain on vicinal surfaces and with odd electron count a metallic one-dimensional state is expected in both the above examples. However in angular-resolved photoemission both appear as semiconductors, and Au-Si(111)5 x 2 exhibits a continuous one

  2. Water resources of Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Jon P.; Miller, Kirk A.

    2004-01-01

    Sweetwater County is located in the southwestern part of Wyoming and is the largest county in the State. A study to quantify the availability and describe the chemical quality of surface-water and ground-water resources in Sweetwater County was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineers Office. Most of the county has an arid climate. For this reason a large amount of the flow in perennial streams within the county is derived from outside the county. Likewise, much of the ground-water recharge to aquifers within the county is from flows into the county, and occurs slowly. Surface-water data were not collected as part of the study. Evaluations of streamflow and stream-water quality were limited to analyses of historical data and descriptions of previous investigations. Forty-six new ground-water-quality samples were collected as part of the study and the results from an additional 782 historical ground-water-quality samples were reviewed. Available hydrogeologic characteristics for various aquifers throughout the county also are described. Flow characteristics of streams in Sweetwater County vary substantially depending on regional and local basin characteristics and anthropogenic factors. Because precipitation amounts in the county are small, most streams in the county are ephemeral, flowing only as a result of regional or local rainfall or snowmelt runoff. Flows in perennial streams in the county generally are a result of snowmelt runoff in the mountainous headwater areas to the north, west, and south of the county. Flow characteristics of most perennial streams are altered substantially by diversions and regulation. Water-quality characteristics of selected streams in and near Sweetwater County during water years 1974 through 1983 were variable. Concentrations of dissolved constituents, suspended sediment, and bacteria generally were smallest at sites on the Green River because of resistant geologic units, increased

  3. Bioprospecting for podophyllotoxin in the Big Horn Mountains, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this study was to evaluate variations in podophyllotoxin concentrations in Juniperus species found in the Big Horn Mountains in Wyoming. It was found that Juniperus species in the Big Horn Mountains included three species; J. communis L. (common juniper), J. horizontalis Moench. (c...

  4. Improving sustainable seed yield in Wyoming big sagebrush

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeremiah C. Armstrong

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Great Basin Restoration Initiative, the effects of browsing, competition removal, pruning, fertilization and seed collection methods on increasing seed production in Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp wyomingensis Beetle & Young) were studied. Study sites were located in Idaho, Nevada, and Utah. A split-plot...

  5. Ethology of Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox) (Diptera: Asilidae) in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    In southwest Wyoming, Omniablautus nigronotum (Wilcox), hunted primarily from the surface of the sandy substrate in a greasewood community. Prey, captured in flight, represented four insect orders with Diptera and Hymenoptera predominating. Courtship consisted of the male approaching the female from...

  6. Investigating the Multicultural Competency of a Sample of Wyoming Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Stacey L.

    2016-01-01

    The literature on disproportionality indicates a generally held belief that disproportionality endures, in part, because of the lack of multicultural competency in today's educators. Yet, there is a dearth of empirical evidence to support this belief. This study examined the multicultural competency of a sample of Wyoming educators in order to…

  7. The Earthworms (Oligochaeta: Lumbricidae)of Wyoming, USA, Revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    This survey of the earthworms from 22 of the 23 counties of Wyoming recorded 13 species of terrestrial Oligochaeta, all members of the family Lumbricidae. One of these species, Aporrectodea limicola, is reported for the first time from the state. Current nomenclature is applied to historical records...

  8. The NPS CISR Graduate Program in INFOSEC: Six Years of Experience

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irvine, Cynthia E; Warren, Daniel F; Clark, Paul C

    1997-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School Center for Information Systems Security "INFOSEC" Studies and Research "NPS CISR" is developing a comprehensive program in INFOSEC education and research that can become...

  9. Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Chidsey

    2007-12-31

    Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in

  10. 77 FR 24176 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Wyoming; Long Term Special Use Authorization for Wyoming Game and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... Game and Fish Commission To Use National Forest System Land for Their Winter Elk Management Programs.... SUMMARY: The Bridger-Teton National Forest received a request from the Wyoming Game and Fish Commission... 1888, Jackson, WY 83001. Individuals who use telecommunication devices for the deaf (TDD) may call the...

  11. Effects of TiO2 NPs on Silkworm Growth and Feed Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, YangYang; Ni, Min; Li, FanChi; Zhang, Hua; Xu, KaiZun; Zhao, XiaoMing; Tian, JiangHai; Hu, JingSheng; Wang, BinBin; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2016-02-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) (B. mori) is an economically important insect and a model species for Lepidoptera. It has been reported that feeding of low concentrations of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) can improve feed efficiency and increase cocoon mass, cocoon shell mass, and the ratio of cocoon shell. However, high concentrations of TiO2 NPs are toxic. In this study, we fed B. mori with different concentrations of TiO2 NPs (5, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 160 mg/L) and investigated B. mori growth, feed efficiency, and cocoon quality. We found that low concentrations of TiO2 NPs (5 and 10 mg/L) were more effective for weight gains, with significant weight gain being obtained at 72 h (P feed efficiency was significantly improved at low concentrations of 5 and 10 mg/L for 14.6 and 13.1 %, respectively (P feed efficiency, and increased cocoon production, while high concentrations (20 mg/L or higher) of TiO2 NPs showed inhibitory effect to the B. mori. Consecutive feeding of high concentrations of TiO2 NPs led to some degrees of adaptability. This study provides a reference for the research on TiO2 NPs toxicity and the basis for the development of TiO2 NPs as a feed additive for B. mori.

  12. Exploring the Attractiveness of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) among Experienced Drug Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Amsterdam, J.G.C.; Nabben, T.; Keiman, D.; Haanschoten, G.; Korf, D.

    2015-01-01

    A growing number of New Psychoactive Substances (NPS) appear yearly on the European market (81 for the first time in 2013, adding to a total of over 350 NPS). Using semi-structured interviews with 25 Dutch experienced recreational drug users, the role of the Internet and friends in gathering and

  13. Economic Development from New Generation and Transmission in Wyoming and Colorado

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keyser, D.; Lantz, E.

    2013-03-01

    This report analyzes the potential economic impacts in Colorado and Wyoming of a 225 MW natural gas fired electricity generation facility and a 900 MW wind farm constructed in Wyoming as well as a 180 mile, 345 kV transmission line that runs from Wyoming to Colorado. This report and analysis is not a forecast, but rather an estimate of economic activity associated with a hypothetical scenario.

  14. Employment Discrimination Based on Sexual Orientation and Gender Identity in Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    Mallory, Christy; Sears, Brad

    2015-01-01

    About 8,900 LGBT workers in Wyoming are not explicitly protected from discrimination under state or federal laws. Discrimination against LGBT employees in Wyoming has recently been documented in surveys, court cases, and other sources. Many corporate employers and public opinion in the state support protections for LGBT people in the workplace. If sexual orientation and gender identity were added to existing statewide non-discrimination laws, four more complaints would be filed in Wyoming eac...

  15. Environmental Assessment Bird Damage Management in the Wyoming Wildlife Services Program

    OpenAIRE

    United States Department of Agriculture; Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service; Wildlife Services

    2007-01-01

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS), Wildlife Services (WS), U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Federal Aviation Administration (FAA); Wyoming Game and Fish Department (WGFD), and Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) propose to continue the current bird damage management program in Wyoming. WS, USFWS, FAA, WGFD, and WDH use an adaptive integrated wildlife damage management (IWDM) approach to reduce bird damage to property,...

  16. Poly(amidehydroxyurethane template magnetite NPs electrosynthesis. II. Core and shell characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ursu

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Core and layer polymer characterization of magnetite nanoparticles (NPs surface-functionalized with poly(amidehydroxyurethane (PAmHU, obtained by a new electrochemical synthesis route is presented. The core magnetic properties were investigated by Vibrating Sample Magnetometer (VSM, showing that the obtained NPs have superparamagnetic to ferromagnetic behaviour (very low coercivity and remanence. The magnetite–PAmHU NPs morphology and size were studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS; both methods showed the existence of PAmHU out-flaked layer on NPs. Structural analysis by Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR and Thermogravimetry (TG confirm the out-flaking of magnetic NPs with PAmHU.

  17. GPM GROUND VALIDATION WYOMING KING AIR CLOUD MICROPHYSICS LPVEX V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The GPM Ground Validation Wyoming King Air Cloud Microphysics LPVEx dataset includes, in addition to aircraft parameters, many scientific parameters including static...

  18. U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2012 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bern, Carleton R.; Biewick, Laura; Boughton, Gregory K.; Carr, Natasha B.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Clark, Melanie L.; Fedy, Bradford C.; Foster, Katharine; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen S.; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Homer, Collin G.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Keinath, Douglas; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel J.; McDougal, Robert R.; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Montag, Jessica; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Shafer, Sarah L.; Smith, David B.; Sweat, Michael J.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    Southwest Wyoming contains abundant energy resources, wildlife, habitat, open spaces, and outdoor recreational opportunities. Although energy exploration and development have been taking place in the region since the late 1800s, the pace of development for fossil fuels and renewable energy increased significantly in the early 2000s. This and the associated urban and exurban development are leading to landscape-level environmental and socioeconomic changes that have the potential to diminish wildlife habitat and other natural resources, and the quality of human lives, in Southwest Wyoming. The potential for negative effects of these changes prompted Federal, State, and local agencies to undertake the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative for Southwest Wyoming.

  19. Determining the energetics of vicinal perovskite oxide surfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wessels, W.A.; Bollmann, Tjeerd Rogier Johannes; Koster, Gertjan; Zandvliet, Henricus J.W.; Rijnders, Augustinus J.H.M.

    2017-01-01

    The energetics of vicinal SrTiO3(001) and DyScO3(110), prototypical perovskite vicinal surfaces, has been studied using topographic atomic force microscopy imaging. The kink formation and strain relaxation energies are extracted from a statistical analysis of the step meandering. Both perovskite

  20. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo-Siguero, Maria; Madrid, Yolanda

    2017-01-01

    The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs), hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs) and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs)). Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600) were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs. PMID:28783048

  1. Exploring the Behavior and Metabolic Transformations of SeNPs in Exposed Lactic Acid Bacteria. Effect of Nanoparticles Coating Agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Palomo-Siguero

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The behavior and transformation of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs in living systems such as microorganisms is largely unknown. To address this knowledge gap, we examined the effect of three types of SeNP suspensions toward Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus LB-12 using a variety of techniques. SeNPs were synthesized using three types of coating agents (chitosan (CS-SeNPs, hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC-SeNPs and a non-ionic surfactant, surfynol (ethoxylated-SeNPs. Morphologies of SeNPs were all spherical. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM was used to locate SeNPs in the bacteria. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC on line coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS was applied to evaluate SeNP transformation by bacteria. Finally, flow cytometry employing the live/dead test and optical density measurements at 600 nm (OD600 were used for evaluating the percentages of bacteria viability when supplementing with SeNPs. Negligible damage was detected by flow cytometry when bacteria were exposed to HEC-SeNPs or CS-SeNPs at a level of 10 μg Se mL−1. In contrast, ethoxylated-SeNPs were found to be the most harmful nanoparticles toward bacteria. CS-SeNPs passed through the membrane without causing damage. Once inside, SeNPs were metabolically transformed to organic selenium compounds. Results evidenced the importance of capping agents when establishing the true behavior of NPs.

  2. 76 FR 61781 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-05

    ... concerns about genetics and connectivity, Wyoming agreed to a seasonal expansion of the WTGMA. This... depression resulting from ] the loss of genetic diversity never threatens the population. Next, Wyoming...

  3. Determination of impacts on the endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) at Mortenson National Wildlife Refuge from ammonium nitrate concentrations

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) is found only as a reintroduced population at Mortenson NWR in the Laramie Plains of southeast Wyoming. Reasons for the...

  4. National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Southwest Wyoming Province (037) Estimated Depth to the Top of the Frontier Formation

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset shows depth contours to the top of the Frontier Formation within the Southwestern Wyoming Province, southwestern Wyoming, northeastern Utah, and...

  5. Depth to the top of the Mesaverde Group -- National Assessment of Oil and Gas Project - Southwestern Wyoming Province (037)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This dataset shows depth contours to the top of the Mesaverde Group within the Southwestern Wyoming Province, southwestern Wyoming, northeastern Utah, and...

  6. Study on Synthesis and Antibacterial Properties of Ag NPs/GO Nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Using graphene oxide as substrate and stabilizer for the silver nanoparticles, silver nanoparticles-graphene oxide (Ag NPs/GO composites with different Ag loading were synthesized through a facile solution-phase method. During the synthesis process, AgNO3 on GO matrix was directly reduced by NaBH4. The structure characterization was studied through X-ray diffraction (XRD, atomic force microscopy (AFM, high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy (UV-Vis, and selected area electron diffraction (SAED. The results show that Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs with the sizes ranging from 5 to 20 nm are highly dispersed on the surfaces of GO sheets. The shape and size of the Ag NPs are decided by the volume of initial AgNO3 solution added in the GO. The antibacterial activities of Ag NPs/GO nanocomposites were investigated and the result shows that all the produced composites exhibit good antibacterial activities against Gram-negative (G− bacterial strain Escherichia coli (E. coli and Gram-positive (G+ strain Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus. Moreover, the antibacterial activities of Ag NPs/GO nanocomposites gradually increased with the increasing of volume of initial AgNO3 solution added in the GO and this improvement of the antibacterial activities results from the combined action of size effect and concentration effect of Ag NPs in Ag NPs/GO nanocomposites.

  7. Promoting Art through Technology, Education and Research of Natural Sciences (PATTERNS) across Wyoming, A Wyoming NSF EPSCoR Funded Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gellis, B. S.; McElroy, B. J.

    2016-12-01

    PATTERNS across Wyoming is a science and art project that promotes new and innovative approaches to STEM education and outreach, helping to re-contextualize how educators think about creative knowledge, and how to reach diverse audiences through informal education. The convergence of art, science and STEM outreach efforts is vital to increasing the presence of art in geosciences, developing multidisciplinary student research opportunities, expanding creative STEM thinking, and generating creative approaches of visualizing scientific data. A major goal of this project is to train art students to think critically about the value of scientific and artistic inquiry. PATTERNS across Wyoming makes science tangible to Wyoming citizens through K-14 art classrooms, and promotes novel maker-based art explorations centered around Wyoming's geosciences. The first PATTERNS across Wyoming scientific learning module (SIM) is a fish-tank sized flume that recreates natural patterns in sand as a result of fluid flow and sediment transport. It will help promotes the understanding of river systems found across Wyoming (e.g. Green, Yellowstone, Snake). This SIM, and the student artwork inspired by it, will help to visualize environmental-water changes in the central Rocky Mountains and will provide the essential inspiration and tools for Wyoming art students to design biological-driven creative explorations. Each art class will receive different fluvial system conditions, allowing for greater understanding of river system interactions. Artwork will return to the University of Wyoming for a STE{A}M Exhibition inspired by Wyoming's varying fluvial systems. It is our hope that new generations of science and art critical thinkers will not only explore questions of `why' and `how' scientific phenomena occur, but also `how' to better predict, conserve and study invaluable artifacts, and visualize conditions which allow for better control of scientific outcomes and public understanding.

  8. Benign development of cotton with antibacterial activity and metal sorpability through introduction amino triazole moieties and AgNPs in cotton structure pre-treated with periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Amina L; Hassabo, Ahmed G; Shaarawy, S; Hebeish, A

    2017-12-15

    The research work presented herein was undertaken with a view to develop, characterize and highlight modified cotton fabrics that acquire durable antibacterial activity in concomitant with high metal sorption capacity. The development is based on reacting cotton cellulose previously oxidized by sodium periodate-with 4 amino-1,2,4 triazole in presence and absence of silver nano particles (AgNPs). The idea behind the periodate pretreatment is to convert (via oxidative cleavge) the 2,3-vicinal diol of the anhydroglucose units of cotton into aldehyde groups. The latter are easily reacting with the triazole groups in the modified cotton. On the other hand AgNPs were fabricated as per the reduction method using bio-material extracted from the root of licorice. By virtue of its reducing action, the bio-material converts Ag + ions to Ag 0 atom which is also stabilized Ag the bio-material in the form of cluster which is the agregate of about 5 Ag 0 . The clusters are cropped with the stabilizer thus forming silver nanoparticles. Measurement of the particle size displays a value of 8.7nm. Charactrisation of triazole treated cotton fabrics reveals the presence of the triazole moieties inside the structure of cotton. Furthermore, Fabrictreated with triazole in presence and absence of AgNPs exhibits a relatively high antibacterial activity against gram-negative tested bacteria (E. coli) as compared to that of gram-positive tested bacteria (S. aureus). The metal sorption of triazole treated cotton fabrics was higher than those of untreated or periodate pretreated fabric due to the increase in nitrogen centers created along the cellulose chains. Experimental data were accomplished through Langmuir, Freundlich and Temkin sorption isotherm models. It was shown that sorption follows Langmuir isotherm model and suggests that the innovative fabric in question can adsorb metal ions from polluted dye bath. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. 77 FR 25664 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    ...; telephone 303-236-7400. Persons who use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) may call the Federal... Wyoming's 2011 wolf management plan (Wyoming Game and Fish Commission (WGFC) 2011) and noted that... Game and Fish Department's approach to managing wolves. On March 5, 2012, Wyoming released the addendum...

  10. 76 FR 3926 - Notice and Request for Comments: LSC Elimination of the Nevada, South Dakota, and Wyoming Migrant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-21

    ... Notice and Request for Comments: LSC Elimination of the Nevada, South Dakota, and Wyoming Migrant Service... Comments--LSC Elimination of the Nevada, South Dakota, and Wyoming Migrant Service Areas. SUMMARY: The Legal Services Corporation will eliminate the Nevada, South Dakota, and Wyoming migrant service areas...

  11. Final environmental statement related to the United Nuclear Corporation, Morton Ranch, Wyoming Uranium Mill (Converse County, Wyoming)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-02-01

    Impacts from Morton Ranch Uranium Mill will result in: alterations of up to 270 acres occupied by the mill facilities; increase in the existing background radiation levels; socioeconomic effects on Glenrock and Douglas, Wyoming. Solid waste material (tailings solids) from the mill will be deposited onsite in exhausted surface mine pits. Any license issued for the Morton Ranch mill will be subject to conditions for the protection of the environment.

  12. From vicinal to rough crystal surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balibar, S.; Guthmann, C.; Rolley, E.

    1993-06-01

    One generally expects the properties of a vicinal surface to be independent of the existence of steps as soon as these steps overlap, i.e. when their mutual distance is smaller than their width. By using the roughening theory by Nozières and Gallet [1], we show that, at least for surfaces weakly coupled to the lattice, this overlap occurs for distances significantly larger than the commonly defined width. Our prediction is supported by an analysis of the various measurements of the angular variation of the surface stiffness of helium crystals, which were performed by Wolf et al. [2], Andreeva et al. [3] and Babkin et al. [4]. As a consequence, the interaction between crystal steps should be studied on vicinal surfaces with a much smaller tilt angle than previously thought. This article is also an opportunity to return to the relation between the step width and the correlation length on smooth surfaces, as well as to the treatment of the various finite size effects which occur in the problem of roughening. We finally reconsider how the weak coupling hypothesis applies to the case of helium crystals. On s'attend généralement à ce que les propriétés d'une surface vicinale ne soient plus contrôlées par l'existence des marches lorsque celles-ci se recouvrent, donc lorsque leur distance mutuelle devient inférieure à leur largeur. En reprenant la théorie de la transition rugueuse élaborée par Nozières et Gallet [1], nous montrons que, pour des surfaces faiblement couplées au réseau cristallin, ce recouvrement doit se produire pour des distances nettement plus grandes que la largeur (telle qu'elle est habituellement définie). Notre prédiction est confirmée par l'analyse des différentes mesures de la variation angulaire de la rigidité de surface des cristaux d'hélium réalisées par Wolf et al. [2], Andreeva et al. [3] and Babkin et al. [4]. Il s'ensuit que l'étude de l'interaction entre marches cristallines doit être effectuée sur des surfaces

  13. Space Radar Image of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    These two radar images show the majestic Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, the oldest national park in the United States and home to the world's most spectacular geysers and hot springs. The region supports large populations of grizzly bears, elk and bison. In 1988, the park was burned by one of the most widespread fires to occur in the northern Rocky Mountains in the last 50 years. Surveys indicated that 793,880 acres of land burned. Of that, 41 percent was burned forest, with tree canopies totally consumed by the fire; 35 percent was a combination of unburned, scorched and blackened trees; 13 percent was surface burn under an unburned canopy; 6 percent was non-forest burn; and 5 percent was undifferentiated burn. Six years later, the burned areas are still clearly visible in these false-color radar images obtained by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar on board the space shuttle Endeavour. The image at the left was obtained using the L-band radar channel, horizontally received and vertically transmitted, on the shuttle's 39th orbit on October 2, 1994. The area shown is 45 kilometers by 71 kilometers (28 miles by 44 miles) in size and centered at 44.6 degrees north latitude, 110.7 degrees west longitude. North is toward the top of the image (to the right). Most trees in this area are lodge pole pines at different stages of fire succession. Yellowstone Lake appears as a large dark feature at the bottom of the scene. At right is a map of the forest crown, showing its biomass, or amount of vegetation, which includes foliage and branches. The map was created by inverting SIR-C data and using in situ estimates of crown biomass gathered by the Yellowstone National Biological Survey. The map is displayed on a color scale from blue (rivers and lakes with no biomass) to brown (non-forest areas with crown biomass of less than 4 tons per hectare) to light brown (areas of canopy burn with biomass of between 4 and 12 tons per hectare). Yellow

  14. Ammonia emission inventory for the state of Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Maser, Colette R.; Brown, Nancy J.

    2003-12-17

    Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is the only significant gaseous base in the atmosphere and it has a variety of impacts as an atmospheric pollutant, including the formation of secondary aerosol particles: ammonium sulfate and ammonium nitrate. NH{sub 3} preferentially forms ammonium sulfate; consequently ammonium nitrate aerosol formation may be limited by the availability of NH{sub 3}. Understanding the impact of emissions of oxides of sulfur and nitrogen on visibility, therefore, requires accurately determined ammonia emission inventories for use in air quality models, upon which regulatory and policy decisions increasingly depend. This report presents an emission inventory of NH{sub 3} for the state of Wyoming. The inventory is temporally and spatially resolved at the monthly and county level, and is comprised of emissions from individual sources in ten categories: livestock, fertilizer, domestic animals, wild animals, wildfires, soil, industry, mobile sources, humans, and publicly owned treatment works. The Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory was developed using the Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) Ammonia Model as framework. Current Wyoming-specific activity data and emissions factors obtained from state agencies and published literature were assessed and used as inputs to the CMU Ammonia Model. Biogenic emissions from soils comprise about three-quarters of the Wyoming NH{sub 3} inventory, though emission factors from soils are highly uncertain. Published emission factors are scarce and based on limited measurements. In Wyoming, agricultural land, rangeland, and forests comprise 96% of the land area and essentially all of the estimated emissions from soils. Future research on emission rates of NH{sub 3} for these land categories may lead to a substantial change in the magnitude of soil emissions, a different inventory composition, and reduced uncertainty in the inventory. While many NH{sub 3} inventories include annual emissions, air quality modeling studies require finer temporal

  15. Synthesis and optical properties study of nanocomposites based on AuNPs and AgNPs obtained by laser ablation in liquid monomer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulina, Natalia A.; Pavlovetc, Ilia M.; Baranov, Mikhail A.; Kaliabin, Viacheslav O.; Denisyuk, Igor Yu.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, Ag and Au nanoparticles (AgNPs and AuNPs) stable colloid solution were prepared by laser ablation of chemically pure silver rod and gold film in liquid monomer isodecyl acrylate (IDA). Sizes of obtained nanoparticles were determined by scanning electron microscope and vary from 30 to 130 nm. Nanocomposites films were prepared from obtained stable colloid solution by photocuring. To prepare solid film based on aliphatic polymer IDA long molecules cross-linking, 1,6-Hexandiol diacrylate was used. Obtained films were transparent, homogenous and colored in brown for AgNPs and purple for AuNPs-filled nanocomposites. Prepared nanomaterials exhibit strong third-order nonlinear optical responses under CW laser irradiation at 532 nm, which was estimated by using z-scan technique performed with open and close aperture. The real and imaginary parts of third-order nonlinear optical coefficients of the studied nanocomposites were found to be up to Reχ (3) = 1.31 × 10-5 (esu) and Imχ (3) = 7.64 × 10-5 (esu), for samples negative nonlinear refractive index was obtained, which corresponds to self-defocusing effect.

  16. 76 FR 67130 - Bridger-Teton National Forest; Big Piney Ranger District; Wyoming; Environmental Impact Statement...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-31

    .... Approximately five percent of the project area is within the DFC 12 (Backcountry Big-game Hunting, Dispersed... Forest Service Bridger-Teton National Forest; Big Piney Ranger District; Wyoming; Environmental Impact... miles northwest of Big Piney, Wyoming, and is situated on the east side of the northern end of the...

  17. 75 FR 17125 - Foreign-Trade Zone 157-Casper, Wyoming, Application for Expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-05

    ... Foreign-Trade Zones Board Foreign-Trade Zone 157--Casper, Wyoming, Application for Expansion An application has been submitted to the Foreign-Trade Zones Board (the Board) by the Casper/Natrona County..., Wyoming. The application was submitted pursuant to the provisions of the Foreign-Trade Zones Act, as...

  18. The Wyoming Infant Stimulation Program--Go WISP, Young Baby, Go WISP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelinek, Janis A.; Flamboe, Thomas C.

    The Wyoming Infant Stimulation Program (WISP) provides a comprehensive preschool program utilizing both center-based and home-based intervention for handicapped preschool children (age 0-3 years) and their families in rural Wyoming. A developmental-prescriptive model is used and the curriculum objective is that each child will progress according…

  19. 77 FR 61019 - Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ...The purpose of this notice is to request public nominations to fill four positions for the Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) Wyoming's 10-member Resource Advisory Council (RAC). The RAC provides advice and recommendations to the BLM on land use planning and management of the National System of Public Lands within the State of Wyoming.

  20. Navy-Wide Personnel Survey (NPS) 2000: Summary of Survey Results

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Olmsted, Murrey

    2003-01-01

    .... Completed questionnaires were accepted through December 31, 2000. The NPS focuses on such topics as Sailor demographics, gender integration, training/education needs, leadership satisfaction, financial status, detailing, assignment, PERSTEMPO (i.e...

  1. Nanoemulsions and nonwoven fabrics carrying AgNPs: antibacterial but may be cytotoxic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghtader, Farzaneh; Salouti, Mojtaba; Türk, Mustafa; Pişkin, Erhan

    2014-12-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to prepare nonwoven fabrics carrying silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), and to investigate their antibacterial activities and cytotoxicities in parallel. AgNPs were impregnated from their nanoemulsions onto two commercially available nonwoven fabrics: pure-cotton fabrics (PCF) and polyester/viscous fabrics (PVF), by a simple adsorption (dipping) and were then heat stabilized. PCF exhibited stronger antibacterial effects on both Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. In-vitro cell culture studies demonstrated that AgNPs nanoemulsions and also fabrics carrying them were cytotoxic on L929-fibroblasts in all concentrations used here (6.25-400 ppm) in different extends. Only the fabrics loaded with AgNPs using nanoemulsion with the lowest concentration of 6.25 ppm exhibited low cytotoxicity but were still antibacterial.

  2. Fabrication LSPR sensor chip of Ag NPs and their biosensor application based on interparticle coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghodselahi, T., E-mail: t_ghodselahi@yahoo.com [Nano Mabna Iranian Inc., PO Box 1676664116, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Neishaboorynejad, T. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Physics, Central Tehran Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Arsalani, S. [School of Physics, Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences, PO Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Medicine, Bam University of Medical Sciences, Bam (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor of silver nanoparticles on hydrogenated amorphous carbon thin film were synthetized by co-deposition of RF-sputtering and RF-PECVD. • Samples were characterized by XRD, XPS, AFM, and UV visible. • DNA primer at fM concentration was detected based on breaking of inter-particles coupling. • Dipolar plasmon of isolated Ag NPs, coupled Ag NPs plasmons, in-plane and out-plane coupling, and quadrupole plasmon modes were considered to explain biosensor properties. • The initial response, wavelength shift sensitivity, and response time of LSPR sensors were compared by morphology. - Abstract: We introduce a simple method to synthesize localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Ag NPs on the hydrogenated amorphous carbon by co-deposition of RF-Sputtering and RF-PECVD. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the content of Ag and C atoms. X-ray diffraction profile and atomic force microscopy indicate that the Ag NPs have fcc crystal structure and spherical shape and by increasing deposition time, particle sizes do not vary and only Ag NPs aggregation occurs, resulting in LSPR wavelength shift. Firstly, by increasing Ag NPs content, in-plan interparticles coupling is dominant and causes redshift in LSPR. At the early stage of agglomeration, out-plane coupling occurs and in-plane coupling is reduced, resulting a blueshift in the LSPR. By further increasing of Ag NPs content, agglomeration is completed on the substrate and in-plan coupling rises, resulting significant redshift in the LSPR. Results were used to implement biosensor application of chips. Detection of DNA primer at fM concentration was achieved based on breaking interparticles coupling of Ag NPs. A significant wavelength shift sensitivity of 30 nm and a short response time of 30 min were obtained, where both of these are prerequisite for biosensor applications.

  3. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; de Oliveira, Hugo Martins; Fagundes, Gabriela Elibio; Venâncio, Mireli; Ronconi, João Vitor Vieira; Merlini, Aline; Streck, Emílio L.; da Silva Paula, Marcos Marques; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2012-03-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro , in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  4. Evaluation of genotoxic effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-Nps) in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavares, Priscila; Balbinot, Fernanda; Martins de Oliveira, Hugo; Elibio Fagundes, Gabriela [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil); Venancio, Mireli; Vieira Ronconi, Joao Vitor; Merlini, Aline [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Streck, Emilio L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias da Saude, Unidade Academica de Ciencias da Saude, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Fisiopatologia Experimental (Brazil); Marques da Silva, Paula [Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Sintese de Complexos Multifuncionais (Brazil); Moraes de Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [PPGCS, Universidade do Extremo Sul Catarinense, Laboratorio de Biologia Celular e Molecular (Brazil)

    2012-03-15

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) are the most prominent nanoproducts. Due to their antimicrobial activity, they have been incorporated in different materials, such as catheters, clothes, electric home appliance, and many others. The genotoxicity of Ag-NPs (5-45 nm), in different concentrations and times of exposure, was evaluated by the comet assay in in vitro and in vivo conditions, respectively, using human peripheral blood and Swiss mice. The results showed the genotoxic effect of Ag-NPs in vitro, in all the doses tested in the initial hour of exposure, possibly through the reactive oxygen species generation. Nevertheless, the values for this damage decrease with time, indicating that the DNA may have been restored by the repair system. In the in vivo conditions, we found no genotoxicity of Ag-NPs in any hour of exposure and any dose investigated, which can be attributed to the activation of a cellular antioxidant network and the hydrophobic nature of Ag-NPs. Now, it is absolutely necessary to investigate the role of Ag-NPs in different cell lines in vivo.

  5. The National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey: PAs and NPs in outpatient surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salibian, Ara A; Mahboubi, Hossein; Patel, Madhukar S; Kuan, Edward C; Malinoski, Darren J; Vagefi, Parsia A; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the prevalence and occupational characteristics of physician assistants (PAs) and nurse practitioners (NPs) in outpatient surgical subspecialty clinics. The 2007 and 2008 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NAMCS) databases were queried for the number and characteristics of office visits seen by different provider types (PAs or NPs, physicians, or both) in various surgical subspecialties. More than 250 million weighted sample visits were analyzed. PAs or NPs were involved in 5.9% of visits, though the percentage of patients seen by them alone (1.1%) was significantly lower (PPAs and NPs were more likely to be involved in pre- or postoperative visits, and often saw the same diagnoses alone as physicians only. The most common procedures performed by PAs and NPs varied according to subspecialty. PAs and NPs have a minor prevalence in the ambulatory surgical workforce during the time period studied. Further integration of these providers into the outpatient setting may help optimize efficiency in ambulatory surgical care.

  6. Fabrication LSPR sensor chip of Ag NPs and their biosensor application based on interparticle coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodselahi, T.; Neishaboorynejad, T.; Arsalani, S.

    2015-07-01

    We introduce a simple method to synthesize localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) sensor chip of Ag NPs on the hydrogenated amorphous carbon by co-deposition of RF-Sputtering and RF-PECVD. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed the content of Ag and C atoms. X-ray diffraction profile and atomic force microscopy indicate that the Ag NPs have fcc crystal structure and spherical shape and by increasing deposition time, particle sizes do not vary and only Ag NPs aggregation occurs, resulting in LSPR wavelength shift. Firstly, by increasing Ag NPs content, in-plan interparticles coupling is dominant and causes redshift in LSPR. At the early stage of agglomeration, out-plane coupling occurs and in-plane coupling is reduced, resulting a blueshift in the LSPR. By further increasing of Ag NPs content, agglomeration is completed on the substrate and in-plan coupling rises, resulting significant redshift in the LSPR. Results were used to implement biosensor application of chips. Detection of DNA primer at fM concentration was achieved based on breaking interparticles coupling of Ag NPs. A significant wavelength shift sensitivity of 30 nm and a short response time of 30 min were obtained, where both of these are prerequisite for biosensor applications.

  7. Effect of AgCl NPs: Physical, thermal, absorption and luminescence properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurhafizah, H.; Rohani, M. S.

    2017-06-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgCl NPs) are embedded in Er3+/Nd3+ co-doped lithium niobate tellurite glasses of the form (68-x)TeO2-15Li2CO3-15Nb2O5-1Er2O3-1Nd2O3-(x)AgCl with x = 1,2 and 3 mol% via conventional melt-quenching technique. The physical properties such as density, ionic packing density, refractive index and electronic polarizability are computed utilizing the usual method. The existence of AgCl NPs with an average size of 3.7 nm is confirmed using TEM analysis. Moreover, the thermal stability and Hruby criterion of the glass decreases as the AgCl NPs content increases. The direct optical band gap are found decrease as the AgCl NPs content increase, but both indirect optical band gap and Urbach energy are found increases as AgCl NPs content increases. The luminescence spectra shows two strong emission which is the purple emission at 436 nm and red emission at 724 nm which also been observed has strong quenching due to the AgCl NPs, Er3+/Nd3+ dopant and modifier, lithium niobate which possessed magnetic penetration. These glass compositions may be potential for various applications such as solid state devices including laser.

  8. AuNPs-Based Colorimetric Assay for Identification of Chicken Tissues in Meat and Meat Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hejing Han

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple colorimetric assay was developed to identify chicken tissues in meat and meat products by utilizing thiol-labeled primers and unmodified gold nanoparticles (AuNPs. Primers were designed based on the chicken-specific mitochondrial D-loop gene. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR is applied to amplify the target gene, and the PCR products labeled with thiol at one end were obtained. Following the mixing of AuNPs with the PCR products, the thiol binds to the surface of AuNPs, resulting in the formation of GNP-PCR products. The resultant PCR products had abundant negative charges, which made AuNPs maintain dispersion under the role of electrostatic repulsion. As a result, in the presence of PCR products, AuNPs remained red in the presence of salt. In the absence of PCR products, the color of AuNPs changed from red to blue; therefore, the method described here could be exploited for the verification of chicken tissues with high accuracy.

  9. Size control of Au NPs supported by pH operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichiji, Masumi; Akiba, Hiroko; Hirasawa, Izumi

    2017-07-01

    Au NPs are expected to become useful functional particles, as particle gun used for plant gene transfer and also catalysts. We have studied PSD (particle size distribution) control of Au NPs by reduction crystallization. Previous study found out importance of seeds policy and also feeding profile. In this paper, effect of pH in the reduction crystallization was investigated to clarify the possibility of Au NPs PSD control by pH operation and also their growth process. Au NPs of size range 10-600 nm were obtained in single-jet system using ascorbic acid (AsA) as a reducing agent with adjusting pH of AsA. Au NPs are found to grow in the process of nucleation, agglomeration, agglomeration growth and surface growth. Au NPs tend to grow by agglomeration and become larger size in lower pH regions, and to grow only by surface growth and become smaller size in higher pH regions.

  10. Methyl Orange removal by a novel PEI-AuNPs-hemin nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Weiwen; Yu, Xuehua; Hu, Qiong; Kong, Jinming; Li, Lianzhi; Zhang, Xueji

    2017-03-01

    A novel poly(ethyleneimine)/Au nanoparticles/hemin nanocomposite (PEI-AuNPs-Hemin) acting for Methyl Orange (MO) removal has been synthesized. PEI-AuNPs was prepared firstly and it was then linked to hemin through the coupling between carboxyl groups in hemin and amino groups in PEI without the activation of carboxyl groups. The high reactivity and stability of AuNPs contributed greatly in the formation of the amido bonds in the nanocomposite. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and UV-visible spectroscopy were used to characterize the PEI-AuNPs-Hemin. Results show that PEI-AuNPs-Hemin has strong adsorption for MO. Adsorption and degradation experiments were carried out at different pHs, nanocomposite concentrations and UV irradiation times. Removal of MO in acidic solutions was more effective than in basic solutions. The real-time study showed that the MO degradation with the nanocomposite under UV irradiation was a fast process. In addition, the photocatalytic degradation mechanism was proposed. The study suggests that the PEI-AuNPs-Hemin may have promising applications in environmental monitoring and protection. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Faults--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of faults for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  12. BackscatterB [EM300]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  13. BackscatterC [7125]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  14. Folds--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the folds for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  15. Backscatter A [8101]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  16. Backscatter C [7125]--Drakes Bay and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Drakes bay and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate grids...

  17. Faults--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the faults for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  18. establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nb

    .ac.tz). *Permanent address: Department of Physics, University of Dodoma. P. O. Box 339 Dodoma. ABSTRACT. The absorbed dose rate in air in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni uranium mining project located in Singida region, Tanzania, ...

  19. Folds--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data of folds for the geologic and geomorphologic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The vector data file is...

  20. Paleoshorelines--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the paleoshorelines for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is...

  1. Aerial survey of sea otters in the Cordova vicinity

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The movement of significantly large numbers of sea otters into the Cordova vicinity has generated a local storm of protest concerning the ability of sea otters to...

  2. Submesoscale Dispersion in the Vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon Spill

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-02

    RESPONSIBLE PERSON 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code) 11-03-2014 Journal Article Submesoscale dispersion in the vicinity of the Deepwater ...ecosystems, society, and the economy as evidenced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010 and the Fukushima nuclear plant...vicinity of the Deepwater Horizon spill Andrew C. Pojea, Tamay M. Özgökmenb,1, Bruce L. Lipphardt, Jr.c, Brian K. Hausb, Edward H. Ryanb, Angelique C

  3. Fabrication of an Electrochemical Immunosensor for Determination of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Based on PtNPs/Cysteamine/AgNPs as an Efficient Interface

    OpenAIRE

    Akram Valipour; Mahmoud Roushani

    2017-01-01

    An ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was developed with a limit of detection as low as 2 pg mL-1 in phosphate buffer. The Platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) were electrodeposited to modify the gold surface and to increase enlarging the electrochemically active sites, resulting in the facilitation of electron exchange. Cysteamine (Cys) self-assembled monolayer was chemisorbed spontaneously on Pt substrates via the Pt-S ...

  4. Green synthesis of Pd NPs from Pimpinella tirupatiensis plant extract and their application in photocatalytic activity dye degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narasaiah, Palajonna; Mandal, Badal Kumar; Sarada, N. C.

    2017-11-01

    The present report the synthesis of palladium nanoparticles through the green method route offers few advantages over the common chemical and physical procedures, as it is an easy and fast, eco-friendly and does not involve any costly chemicals as well as hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported synthesis of Pd NPs by using the Pimpinella tirupatiensis plant Extract (PTPE). The synthesized Pd NPs was characterization using different technique such as UV-Visible for the formation of Pd NPs. FT-IR spectroscopy was performed to detect the bio-active molecules liable for reduction and capping of biogenic Pd NPs. Crystallinity of Pd NPs conformed by powder – XRD. In the present study performed photo catalytic activity of synthesized Pd NPs using organic dye such as Congo red (CR). Hence, this study concludes the PTPE aqueous extract produced Pd NPs can be act as promising material for the degradation of organic pollutants.

  5. Fabrication of an Electrochemical Immunosensor for Determination of Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Based on PtNPs/Cysteamine/AgNPs as an Efficient Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akram Valipour

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available An ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor for the detection of tumor marker human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG was developed with a limit of detection as low as 2 pg mL-1 in phosphate buffer. The Platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs were electrodeposited to modify the gold surface and to increase enlarging the electrochemically active sites, resulting in the facilitation of electron exchange. Cysteamine (Cys self-assembled monolayer was chemisorbed spontaneously on Pt substrates via the Pt-S bond and the amine groups array exposed on the electrode surface was used to anchor AgNPs through electrostatic interaction. AgNPs increased the immobilized amount of antibodies on the electrode to enhance the sensitivity of the sensor. Under optimal experimental parameters, Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV signal changes of the [Fe(CN6]3-/4- are used to detect hCG with two broad linear ranges: 0.007 to 1.11 and 1.11 to 68 ng mL-1. The reported strategy has provided a promising platform for highly sensitive and selective detection of hCG. Finally, the proposed immunosensor is successfully used in detecting hCG in a human serum samples.

  6. Effects of x-ray spectrum on the NPS of a computed radiography system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetterly, Kenneth A.; Hangiandreou, Nicholas J.

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the effects of various incident x-ray beam spectra on the measured noise power spectrum (NPS) of a computed radiography (CR) image acquisition device. A CR phosphor was uniformly exposed to 1 mR with x-ray beams whose peak tube potentials were 70, 95, and 120 kVp that were filtered by various thicknesses of a 'patient equivalent phantom' (PEP; 2% aluminum, 98% acrylic by thickness), aluminum, and copper. From the uniform exposure images, NPS curves were calculated and their integral values were computed. The integral noise values were found to vary substantially as a function of x-ray beam spectral content. A simple x-ray beam and filter model that accounted for the shape of the filtered x-ray spectra and the mass energy absorption coefficient of the storage phosphor verified the qualitative behavior of the integral NPS values corresponding to changes in the incident x-ray beam used. The x-ray beam and filter combinations of 70 kVp and 10.1 cm of PEP filtration and 120 kVp and 20.2 cm of PEP filtration were chosen as standard techniques for evaluating clinical imaging systems. These two combinations represent a relatively low, clinically relevant CR noise (integral NPS equals 2.6 X 10-6 mm) technique and a relatively high, clinically relevant CR noise (integral NPS equals 3.3 X 10-6 mm) technique.

  7. Green technology for durable finishing of viscose fibers via self-formation of AuNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Hossam E; El-Hawary, Nancy S; Ahmed, Hanan B

    2017-03-01

    Sensitivity of dyes' colors to the surrounding environment causes lower durability and stability of color, which reflects the importance of durable finishing treatment. Current technique offered antimicrobial/durable finishing of viscose fibers through direct formation of AuNPs inside fibers macromolecules without using any external agents. By using the reducing properties of cellulose in viscose, Au+3 was reduced to AuNPs and CHO/OH of cellulose subsequently were oxidized to COOH. For comparison, two different media were used; aqueous and alkaline. Increasing the reactivity and accessibility of cellulose macromolecules in alkali leaded to enlargement of the reduction process and more incorporation of AuNPs. Size of AuNPs inside fiber was recorded to be in range of 22-112nm and 14-100nm, in case of using aqueous and alkaline medium, respectively. Structure and properties of fibers were not changed by treatment according to XRD and ATR-FTIR data. The treated fibers were acquired durable violet color by the action of LSPR for AuNPs and darker color obtained using higher Au+3 concentration. The treated fibers exhibited good inhibition against different pathogenic microbes including bacteria and fungi. One-pot, quite simple, inexpensive, green and industrial viable are the significant advantages of the current technique for viscose finishing (pigmentation and antimicrobial action). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. NPS and Online WOM: Investigating the Relationship Between Customers' Promoter Scores and eWOM Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raassens, Néomie; Haans, Hans

    2017-08-01

    The Net Promoter Score (NPS) is, according to Reichheld, the single most reliable indicator of company growth, and many companies use this recommendation-based technique for measuring customer loyalty. Despite its widespread adoption by many companies across multiple industries, the debate about NPS goes on. A major concern is that managers treat NPS as being equivalent across customers, which is often very misleading. By using a unique data set that combines customers' promoter scores and online word-of-mouth (eWOM) behavior, this research studies how individual customers' promoter scores are related to eWOM, including its relationship with the three categories of customers that are identified by the NPS paradigm (i.e., promoters, passives, and detractors). Based on a sample of 189 customers, their promoter scores and corresponding eWOM, the results show that there is a positive relationship between customers' promoter scores and the valence of online messages. Further, while detractors and promoters are homogeneous with respect to the valence of the eWOM messages they spread, passives show message valence heterogeneity. Thus, although passives, the largest group of customers, have no weight in calculating the NPS, our results reveal that companies should flag passives for further attention and action.

  9. Histopathological effects of nanosilver (Ag-NPs in liver after dermal exposure during wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Saeed Heydarnejad

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available   Objective(s: With the advent of nanotechnology, significant progress has been made in the area of nanoscale materials such as nanosilver (Ag-Nps. These nanoparticles have a wide range of applications and been used for antimicrobial purposes for more than a century. However, little attention has been paid to the toxicity of nanosilver wound dressing. This study was designed to investigate the possible histopathological toxicity of Ag-NPs in liver of mice during wound healing.     Materials and Methods:   A group of 50 female BALB/c mice of about 8 weeks were randomly divided into two groups: Ag-NPs and control groups (n=25. After creating similar wound on the backs of all animals, the wound bed was treated in Ag-NPs group, with a volume of 50 microliters of the nanosilver solution (10ppm ,and in control group, with the same amount of distilled water. The experiment lasted for 14 days. Histopathaological samplings of liver were conducted on days 2, 7 and 14 of the experiment.   Results: Histopathological studies demonstrated time-dependent changes in mice liver treated with Ag-NPs compared to control group. Some changes include dilation in central venous, hyperemia, cell swelling, increase of Kupffer and inflammatory cells. Conclusion: This study suggests that use of nanosilver for wound healing may cause a mild toxicity, as indicated by time-dependent toxic responses in liver tissue. However, this issue will have to be considered more extensively in further studies.

  10. NiS(NPs)-PEDOT-PSS composite counter electrode for a high efficiency dye sensitized solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maiaugree, Wasan [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Center for Alternative Energy Research and Development, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Pimparue, Pachara; Jarernboon, Wirat [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Pimanpang, Samuk [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Srinakharinwirot University, Bangkok 10110 (Thailand); Amornkitbamrung, Vittaya [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Swatsitang, Ekaphan, E-mail: ekaphan@kku.ac.th [Integrated Nanotechnology Research Center, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand); Center for Alternative Energy Research and Development, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)

    2017-06-15

    Graphical abstract: Figure(a) and (b) represent models depict PEDOT-PSS counter electrodes of DSSC without and with NiS NPs modification, respectively. The active surface area of PEDOT-PSS polymer can be improved by combining with NiS(NPs). The I-V curves in figure (c) show the superior photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 8.18% for NiS(NPs)/PEDOT-PSS DSSC. - Highlights: • Active surface area of PEDOT-PSS CE can be improved by mixing with NiS(NPs). • Electrocatalytic activity of mixed NiS(NPs)/PEDOT-PSS polymer is also improved. • NiS(NPs)/PEDOT-PSS CE shows a very low charge transfer resistance of 0.46 Ω. • In this work, the high photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 8.18% is achieved. - Abstract: Nickel sulfide (NiS) nanoparticles (NPs) (NiS(NPs)) were prepared by the hydrothermal method. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicate the hexagonal structure of NiS(NPs). SEM micrographs reveal the agglomeration of irregular hexagonal – shaped NiS(NPs) with estimated particle size in the range of 50–150 nm. Counter electrodes (CEs) of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were prepared by coating the composite slurry of different NiS(NPs) loadings and Poly (3, 4-Ethylendioxythiophene) – Poly (Styrene Sulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) on fluoride-doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates using a doctor blading technique. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) results indicate that the composites of NiS(NPs) and PEDOT-PSS (NiS(NPs)/PEDOT-PSS) films could function as a catalyst for I{sub 3}{sup −} reduction with a maximum cell efficiency of 8.18% for a cell of 0.3 g NiS(NPs) loading.

  11. The Interactions between ZnO Nanoparticles (NPs and α-Linolenic Acid (LNA Complexed to BSA Did Not Influence the Toxicity of ZnO NPs on HepG2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiwei Zhou

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Nanoparticles (NPs entering the biological environment could interact with biomolecules, but little is known about the interaction between unsaturated fatty acids (UFA and NPs. Methods: This study used α-linolenic acid (LNA complexed to bovine serum albumin (BSA for UFA and HepG2 cells for hepatocytes. The interactions between BSA or LNA and ZnO NPs were studied. Results: The presence of BSA or LNA affected the hydrodynamic size, zeta potential, UV-Vis, fluorescence, and synchronous fluorescence spectra of ZnO NPs, which indicated an interaction between BSA or LNA and NPs. Exposure to ZnO NPs with the presence of BSA significantly induced the damage to mitochondria and lysosomes in HepG2 cells, associated with an increase of intracellular Zn ions, but not intracellular superoxide. Paradoxically, the release of inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6 was decreased, which indicated the anti-inflammatory effects of ZnO NPs when BSA was present. The presence of LNA did not significantly affect all of these endpoints in HepG2 cells exposed to ZnO NPs and BSA. Conclusions: the results from the present study indicated that BSA-complexed LNA might modestly interact with ZnO NPs, but did not significantly affect ZnO NPs and BSA-induced biological effects in HepG2 cells.

  12. Room temperature CO2 gas sensors of AuNPs/mesoPSi hybrid structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alwan, Alwan M.; Dheyab, Amer B.

    2017-10-01

    Mesoporous silicon (mesoPSi) layer prepared by a laser-assisted etching process in HF acid has been employed as CO2 gas sensors. The surface morphology of mesoPSi was modified by embedding gold nanoparticles AuNPs by simple and quick dipping process in different gold salts concentrations to form mesoPSi/AuNPs hybrid structures. Morphology of hybrid structures was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The electrical characteristics of the prepared gas sensor were carried out at room temperature. It was found that the nanoparticles size, shape and the specific surface area of the nanoparticle strongly influence the current-voltage characteristics. Considerable improvement was noticed in sensitivity, response and recovery times of gas sensor with decreasing incorporated AuNPs into the mesoPSi matrix.

  13. Enzyme Functionalized AuNPs and Glucometer-based Protein Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Tao; Fang, Jie; Yu, Wen; Xie, Guoming

    2017-12-01

    We here developed a novel method for protein detection by using protein aptamer-functionalized magnetic beads for protein recognition and invertase-functionalized AuNPs catalyze sucrose generate glucose that can be detected by a glucometer. First, the invertase and DNA probe P2 are immobilized onto the gold nanoparticles (I.P2@AuNPs). Next protein aptamer P1 are immobilized onto the streptavidin-coated Magnetic beads (P1@MB). P1 and P2 can complementary to form double-stranded DNA. When target protein presence, P1 combine with target and release I/P2@AuNPs. Then magnetic separation, take supernatant fluid and add sucrose after a period of reaction, detection of glucose concentration by glucometer, thus achieve the sensitive and selective detection of the target protein.

  14. Green Synthesis of AgNPs Stabilized with biowaste and their antimicrobial activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakuleshwar Dut Jasuja

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, rapid reduction and stabilization of Ag+ ions with different NaOH molar concentration (0.5 mM, 1.0 mM and 1.5 mM has been carried out in the aqueous solution of silver nitrate by the bio waste peel extract of P.granatum. Generally, chemical methods used for the synthesis of AgNPs are quite toxic, flammable and have adverse effect in medical application but green synthesis is a better option due to eco-friendliness, non-toxicity and safe for human. Stable AgNPs were synthesized by treating 90 mL aqueous solution of 2 mM AgNO3 with the 5 mL plant peels extract (0.4% w/v at different NaOH concentration (5 mL. The synthesized AgNPs were characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy, TEM and SEM. Further, antimicrobial activities of AgNPs were performed on Gram positive i.e. Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Gram negative i.e. E. coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria. The AgNPs synthesized at 1.5 mM NaOH concentration had shown maximum zone of inhibition (ZOI i.e. 49 ± 0.64 in E. coli, whereas Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus subtilius had shown 40 ± 0.29 mm, 28 ± 0.13 and 42 ± 0.49 mm ZOI respectively. The MIC value of 30 g/mL observed for E. coli Whereas, Staphylococcus aureus, Bacillus subtilius and Pseudomonas aeruginosa had shown 45 µg/mL, 38 µg/mL, 35 µg/mL respectively. The study revealed that AgNPs had shown significant antimicrobial activity as compared to Streptomycin.

  15. Calcimimetic NPS R-568 prevents parathyroid hyperplasia in rats with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, M; Nagano, N; Furuya, Y; Chin, J; Nemeth, E F; Fox, J

    2000-01-01

    Calcimimetic NPS R-568 prevents parathyroid hyperplasia in rats with severe secondary hyperparathyroidism. Secondary hyperparathyroidism (secondary HPT) in chronic renal insufficiency (CRI) is characterized by multiglandular hyperplasia. In this study, we investigated the effects of the calcimimetic NPS R-568 on the parathyroid gland in rats with CRI induced by ligation of the renal arteries and severe secondary HPT induced by dietary phosphorus loading. Six days after surgery, high-phosphorus diet feeding was started, and NPS R-568 was administered to the rats for 56 days either by daily gavage (30 or 100 micromol/kg) or by continuous subcutaneous infusion (20 micromol/kg. day). After 54 days, serum PTH levels in vehicle-treated CRI rats were 1019 vs. 104 pg/mL in sham-operated controls. Infusion of NPS R-568 maintained serum PTH at levels comparable with those of sham-operated controls, whereas daily gavage also prevented much of the increase in CRI controls and decreased PTH levels intermittently in a dose-dependent fashion. Parathyroid gland enlargement was caused predominantly by hyperplasia. Total cell number per kg body wt was 3.5-fold higher in vehicle-treated CRI rats than in sham-operated controls. Both infusion and high-dose gavage of NPS R-568 completely prevented the increase in parathyroid cell number. These results demonstrate that the calcimimetic compound NPS R-568 can prevent both the increase in serum PTH levels and parathyroid hyperplasia in rats with CRI and severe secondary HPT. Moreover, these changes occurred despite decreases in serum 1, 25(OH)2D3 and increases in serum phosphate, suggesting a dominant role for the calcium receptor in regulating parathyroid cell proliferation.

  16. Neurotoxicity and biochemical responses in the earthworm Pheretima hawayana exposed to TiO2NPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Abdelmonem M

    2015-12-01

    Serious concerns have been expressed about potential risks of manufactured TiO2NPs. In this research, toxicity of nanoparticulate and bulk TiO2 were examined to the earthworm Pheretima hawayana. The 24-h median lethal concentration (LC50) and sublethal endpoints were assessed. Both NPs and their bulk counterparts were toxic. The 24-h LC50 for TiO2NPs (145.36 mg kg(-1)) was highly toxic than that of bulk TiO2 (357.77 mg kg(-1)). The aim of the present work is to evaluate the suitability of P. hawayana and its biochemical responses to be used as a bioindicator organism and biomarkers of TiO2 toxicity. Earthworms were exposed to three sublethal concentrations of TiO2NPs (1, 10 and 100 µg kg(-1)) for 28 days to test acetylcholinesterase (AChE), antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase: SOD and catalase: CAT) activities and MDA content. The response of the antioxidant enzymes combined with AChE inhibition and MDA accumulation indicated that TiO2NPs could induce significant impairments to the earthworms at the actual environment tested concentrations. The results pointed out the high sensitivity of the antioxidant and oxidative stress related responses to TiO2NPs exposure, demonstrating their usefulness in environmental monitoring and risk assessment. The study highlights also the usefulness of earthworm P. hawayana as potential bioindicator species for assessing the risk of nanoparticles environmental contamination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Connected vehicle pilot deployment program phase 1, security management operational concept : ICF/Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The Wyoming Department of Transportations (WYDOT) Connected Vehicle (CV) Pilot Deployment Program is intended to develop a suite of applications that utilize vehicle to infrastructure (V2I) and vehicle to vehicle (V2V) communication technology to ...

  18. Energy map of southwestern Wyoming, Part B: oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewick, Laura R.H.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has compiled Part B of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). Part B consists of oil and gas, oil shale, uranium, and solar energy resource information in support of the WLCI. The WLCI represents the USGS partnership with other Department of the Interior Bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners, all of whom collaborate to maintain healthy landscapes, sustain wildlife, and preserve recreational and grazing uses while developing energy resources in southwestern Wyoming. This product is the second and final part of the Energy Map of Southwestern Wyoming series (also see USGS Data Series 683, http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/683/), and encompasses all of Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, and Uinta Counties, as well as areas in Fremont County that are in the Great Divide and Green River Basins.

  19. Resource and Environmental Economics in the Rocky Mountain West: the University of Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Thomas D.

    1987-01-01

    Describes the academic program in natural resources and environmental economics at the University of Wyoming. Differentiates natural resources economics from general economics. Discusses the emphasis of the program on public policy issues. (TW)

  20. 78 FR 55694 - Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Draft Research Report: Investigation of Ground Water Contamination Near Pavillion, Wyoming AGENCY... review of the draft research report titled, ``Investigation of Ground Water Contamination near Pavillion...

  1. Assessment of Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Wyoming for creosote contamination of wetlands

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Semi-permeable devices (SPMDs) were deployed in wetlands along a railroad right-of-way at the Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Wyoming to...

  2. Economic Development from Gigawatt-Scale Wind Deployment in Wyoming (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.

    2011-05-23

    This presentation provides an overview of economic development in Wyoming from gigawatt-scale wind development and includes a discussion of project context, definitions and caveats, a deployment scenario, modeling inputs, results, and conclusions.

  3. 76 FR 22723 - Notice of Meetings of the Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-22

    ... are asked to RSVP no later than 1 week prior to the field tour to Shelley Gregory, BLM Pinedale Field... Field Office, 1625 West Pine Street, Pinedale, Wyoming. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shelley Gregory...

  4. [Intra-Agency Agreement Documents : Rocky Mountain Arsenal & Wyoming Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Unit : 1994-1996

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In June 1994 a Committee consisting of Dr. Stanley Anderson, Chair, Wyoming Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit, Dr. David Bowden, Statistician, Colorado...

  5. Wyoming State Briefing Book for low-level radioactive waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    The Wyoming State Briefing Book is one of a series of state briefing books on low-level radioactive waste management practices. It has been prepared to assist state and federal agency officials in planning for safe low-level radioactive waste disposal. The report contains a profile of low-level radioactive waste generators in Wyoming. The profile is the result of a survey of NRC licensees in Wyoming. The briefing book also contains a comprehensive assessment of low-level radioactive waste management issues and concerns as defined by all major interested parties including industry, government, the media, and interest groups. The assessment was developed through personal communications with representatives of interested parties, and through a review of media sources. Lastly, the briefing book provides demographic and socioeconomic data and a discussion of relevant government agencies and activities, all of which may impact waste management practices in Wyoming.

  6. Environmental Contaminants Monitoring in Selected Wetlands of Wyoming: Biologically Active Elements Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Sediment, water and biota were collected from selected wetlands in Wyoming for the Biologically Active Elements (BAE) Study in 1988, 1989 and 1990 to identify...

  7. A Brief History of the NPS Field Experimentation Program: Spanning STAN, TNT, and JIFX

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    funded by the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics & Technology ASA(ALT), and executed by the UMC. ART/TSOA stil l...and flew the Dakota UAV regularly. Additionally, the NPS Frog and UCLA’s Mule RPV Flight programs utilized McMillan around the same time frame . In

  8. Green synthesis of AuNPs for eco-friendly functionalization of cellulosic substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Nabil A.; Eid, Basma M.; Abdel-Aziz, Mohamed S.

    2016-12-01

    In this research work, extracellular biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) using marine bacterial isolates (Streptomyces sp.) as a reducing/capping/stabilizing bio-agent and chlolauric acid (HAuCl4) as a precursor has been investigated. Surface modification of cotton and viscose knitted fabrics using O2-plasma followed by subsequent treatment with bio-synthesized AuNPs alone and in combination with TiO2NPs or ZnONPs to impart new functional properties namely antibacterial and UV-blocking were studied. The results show that loading of nominated nanomaterials onto the activated fabric samples results in a significant improvement in antibacterial activity against both G+ve (S. aureus) and G-ve (E. coli) along with a remarkable enhancement in the UV-protection functionality of the treated fabrics. The highest antibacterial and anti-UV values were obtained when O2-plasma treated fabrics were loaded with AuNPs/ZnONPs combination, irrespective of the used substrate. The imparted functional properties demonstrated remarkable retention even after 15 washings.

  9. Switching from CFC to HFA Inhalers: What NPs and Their Patients Need to Know.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velsor-Friedrich, Barbara; Militello, Lisa Kinsella; Zinn, Kelly K; DeWolff, Darla K

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this article is to provide nurse practitioners with a better understanding of the transition from chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) to hydrofluoralkane (HFA) metered-dose inhalers (MDIs). The authors discuss the differences in these products' propellants; the proper use, cost, and efficacy of the HFA inhalers; and the implications of the switch for NPs and for their patients with asthma.

  10. Solid-State synthesis of POPD@AgNPs nanocomposites for electrochemical sensors

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Paulraj, P

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, Poly(o-phenylenediamine) (POPD) stabilized silver nanoparticles (POPD@AgNPs) nanocomposites was synthesized by solid state oxidative polymerization method using o-phenylenediamine dihydrochloride (oPD-HCl) as monomer and silver...

  11. NPS Promotion and Tenure Ceremony Casts Light on Relevant Education, Research

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, Kenneth A.

    2015-01-01

    Faculty Showcase News Article Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) President retired Vice Adm. Ronald A. Route and Provost Dr. Douglas Hensler, honored a diverse crowd of academics during NPS’ annual promotion and tenure ceremony in the university’s Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering Auditorium, May 8.

  12. Multiplexed Activity of perAuxidase: DNA-Capped AuNPs Act as Adjustable Peroxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizir, Mustafa Salih; Top, Meryem; Balcioglu, Mustafa; Rana, Muhit; Robertson, Neil M; Shen, Fusheng; Sheng, Jia; Yigit, Mehmet V

    2016-01-05

    In this study, we have investigated the intrinsic peroxidase-like activity of citrate-capped AuNPs (perAuxidase) and demonstrated that the nanozyme function can be multiplexed and tuned by integrating oligonucleotides on a nanoparticle surface. Systematic studies revealed that by controlling the reaction parameters, the mutiplexing effect can be delayed or advanced and further used for aptasensor applications.

  13. 77 FR 75169 - Silver Nanoparticles (AgNPs); Information and Comment Request

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-19

    ... being used in workplaces where potential exposures to AgNPs occur. DATES: Electronic or written comments... Eileen Kuempel, telephone (513) 533-8363. Background Nanotechnology is generally defined as the... 100 nanometers (nm). Nanotechnology involves a wide range of chemistries and almost unlimited types of...

  14. Greater sage-grouse population trends across Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmunds, David; Aldridge, Cameron L.; O'Donnell, Michael; Monroe, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    The scale at which analyses are performed can have an effect on model results and often one scale does not accurately describe the ecological phenomena of interest (e.g., population trends) for wide-ranging species: yet, most ecological studies are performed at a single, arbitrary scale. To best determine local and regional trends for greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in Wyoming, USA, we modeled density-independent and -dependent population growth across multiple spatial scales relevant to management and conservation (Core Areas [habitat encompassing approximately 83% of the sage-grouse population on ∼24% of surface area in Wyoming], local Working Groups [7 regional areas for which groups of local experts are tasked with implementing Wyoming's statewide sage-grouse conservation plan at the local level], Core Area status (Core Area vs. Non-Core Area) by Working Groups, and Core Areas by Working Groups). Our goal was to determine the influence of fine-scale population trends (Core Areas) on larger-scale populations (Working Group Areas). We modeled the natural log of change in population size ( peak M lek counts) by time to calculate the finite rate of population growth (λ) for each population of interest from 1993 to 2015. We found that in general when Core Area status (Core Area vs. Non-Core Area) was investigated by Working Group Area, the 2 populations trended similarly and agreed with the overall trend of the Working Group Area. However, at the finer scale where Core Areas were analyzed separately, Core Areas within the same Working Group Area often trended differently and a few large Core Areas could influence the overall Working Group Area trend and mask trends occurring in smaller Core Areas. Relatively close fine-scale populations of sage-grouse can trend differently, indicating that large-scale trends may not accurately depict what is occurring across the landscape (e.g., local effects of gas and oil fields may be masked by increasing

  15. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, E.; Tegen, S.

    2011-03-01

    This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

  16. Jobs and Economic Development from New Transmission and Generation in Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lantz, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Tegen, Suzanne [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2011-03-31

    This report is intended to inform policymakers, local government officials, and Wyoming residents about the jobs and economic development activity that could occur should new infrastructure investments in Wyoming move forward. The report and analysis presented is not a projection or a forecast of what will happen. Instead, the report uses a hypothetical deployment scenario and economic modeling tools to estimate the jobs and economic activity likely associated with these projects if or when they are built.

  17. McFadden, Wyoming: A case study in narrating our changing energy landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carly-Ann Marie

    This thesis uses McFadden, Wyoming, and the Rock Creek Valley to discuss Wyoming's changing energy landscapes and argues that a cultural landscape approach to documenting our historic and cultural resources can contribute to properly siting energy developments. Though Wyoming stands to gain from the construction of wind farms, they should be carefully sited in order to balance environmental and cultural resource preservation with energy needs. Wyoming has a long history as an energy hinterland and provides a significant portion of energy to the U.S. However, the nation's demand for energy should not take precedence over preserving the cultural resources and vast open landscapes that represent Wyoming's heritage. A history of the Rock Creek Valley as a home to Native Americans, a transportation corridor, oil field, and wind farm site is presented along with a discussion of energy consumption and Wyoming's role in the energy market. The thesis also considers the importance of education, public discourse, and narrative as tools for planning a sustainable future with regard to energy, the environment, and cultural resources.

  18. Molecular Mechanisms of Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle-Induced Genotoxicity Short Running Title: Genotoxicity of ZnO NPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scherzad, Agmal; Meyer, Till; Kleinsasser, Norbert; Hackenberg, Stephan

    2017-12-14

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most frequently applied nanomaterials in consumer products. Evidence exists regarding the cytotoxic effects of ZnO NPs in mammalian cells; however, knowledge about the potential genotoxicity of ZnO NPs is rare, and results presented in the current literature are inconsistent. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data regarding the DNA damage that ZnO NPs induce, and focus on the possible molecular mechanisms underlying genotoxic events. Electronic literature databases were systematically searched for studies that report on the genotoxicity of ZnO NPs. Several methods and different endpoints demonstrate the genotoxic potential of ZnO NPs. Most publications describe in vitro assessments of the oxidative DNA damage triggered by dissoluted Zn2+ ions. Most genotoxicological investigations of ZnO NPs address acute exposure situations. Existing evidence indicates that ZnO NPs possibly have the potential to damage DNA. However, there is a lack of long-term exposure experiments that clarify the intracellular bioaccumulation of ZnO NPs and the possible mechanisms of DNA repair and cell survival.

  19. Bathymetry of the Republic of the Marshall Islands and vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, James R.; Wong, Florence L.; Mosier, Dan L.

    1999-01-01

    The bathymetric map of the Republic of the Marshall Islands and vicinity is bounded by a window of latitude 3 to 17 degrees North, longitude 153 to 175 degrees East. The map was compiled from surveys conducted by the USGS, Korean Ocean Research and Development Institute, and published gridded data. In addition to national jurisdictions, island and atoll coastlines are indicated on the map.

  20. Chemo- and Regioselective Oxidation of Secondary Alcohols in Vicinal Diols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisink, Niek; Minnaard, Adriaan; Witte, Martin

    Oxidation of secondary hydroxyl groups in vicinal diols enables the straightforward functionalization of biomolecules and biomaterials. The resulting hydroxy ketone can for example be used to form derivatives, such as the epimeric alcohol and imines, and it may be employed for chemical probe

  1. Geothermal modeling of Jackson Hole, Teton County Wyoming: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heasler, H.P.

    1987-04-01

    This study investigated the possibility of high-temperature-heat sources (greater than 300/sup 0/C) in the area of Jackson Hole, northwestern Wyoming. Analytical and finite-difference numerical models describing conductive and convective terrestrial heat transport were utilized in an attempt to define the thermal regime of this area. This report presents data which were used as constraints for the analytic and numerical thermal models. These data include a general discussion of geology of the area, thermal spring information, subsurface temperature information, and hydrology of the area. Model results are presented with a discussion of interpretations and implications for the existence of high-temperature heat sources in the Jackson Hole area.

  2. California-Wyoming Grid Integration Study: Phase 1 -- Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corbus, D.; Hurlbut, D.; Schwabe, P.; Ibanez, E.; Milligan, M.; Brinkman, G.; Paduru, A.; Diakov, V.; Hand, M.

    2014-03-01

    This study presents a comparative analysis of two different renewable energy options for the California energy market between 2017 and 2020: 12,000 GWh per year from new California in-state renewable energy resources; and 12,000 GWh per year from Wyoming wind delivered to the California marketplace. Either option would add to the California resources already existing or under construction, theoretically providing the last measure of power needed to meet (or to slightly exceed) the state's 33% renewable portfolio standard. Both options have discretely measurable differences in transmission costs, capital costs (due to the enabling of different generation portfolios), capacity values, and production costs. The purpose of this study is to compare and contrast the two different options to provide additional insight for future planning.

  3. Forecasting and evaluating patterns of energy development in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of future oil and natural gas development in southwestern Wyoming on wildlife populations are topical to conservation of the sagebrush steppe ecosystem. To aid in understanding these potential effects, the U.S. Geological Survey developed an Energy Footprint simulation model that forecasts the amount and pattern of energy development under different assumptions of development rates and well-drilling methods. The simulated disturbance patterns produced by the footprint model are used to assess the potential effects on wildlife habitat and populations. A goal of this modeling effort is to use measures of energy production (number of simulated wells), well-pad and road-surface disturbance, and potential effects on wildlife to identify build-out designs that minimize the physical and ecological footprint of energy development for different levels of energy production and development costs.

  4. National uranium resource evaluation: Sheridan Quadrangle, Wyoming and Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damp, J N; Jennings, M D

    1982-04-01

    The Sheridan Quadrangle of north-central Wyoming was evaluated for uranium favorability according to specific criteria of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation program. Procedures consisted of geologic and radiometric surveys; rock, water, and sediment sampling; studying well logs; and reviewing the literature. Five favorable environments were identified. These include portions of Eocene Wasatch and Upper Cretaceous Lance sandstones of the Powder River Basin and Lower Cretaceous Pryor sandstones of the Bighorn Basin. Unfavorable environments include all Precambrian, Cambrian, Ordovician, Permian, Triassic, and Middle Jurassic rocks; the Cretaceous Thermopolis, Mowry, Cody, Meeteetse, and Bearpaw Formations; the Upper Jurassic Sundance and Morrison, the Cretaceous Frontier, Meseverde, Lance, and the Paleocene Fort Union and Eocene Willwood Formations of the Bighorn Basin; the Wasatch Formation of the Powder River Basin, excluding two favorable areas and all Oligocene and Miocene rocks. Remaining rocks are unevaluated.

  5. Field guide to Muddy Formation outcrops, Crook County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-11-01

    The objectives of this research program are to (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline bamer reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. This report contains the data and analyses collected from outcrop exposures of the Muddy Formation, located in Crook County, Wyoming, 40 miles south of Bell Creek oil field. The outcrop data set contains permeability, porosity, petrographic, grain size and geologic data from 1-inch-diameter core plugs chilled from the outcrop face, as well as geological descriptions and sedimentological interpretations of the outcrop exposures. The outcrop data set provides information about facies characteristics and geometries and the spatial distribution of permeability and porosity on interwell scales. Appendices within this report include a micropaleontological analyses of selected outcrop samples, an annotated bibliography of papers on the Muddy Formation in the Powder River Basin, and over 950 permeability and porosity values measured from 1-inch-diameter core plugs drilled from the outcrop. All data contained in this resort are available in electronic format upon request. The core plugs drilled from the outcrop are available for measurement.

  6. Process-scale modeling of elevated wintertime ozone in Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotamarthi, V. R.; Holdridge, D. J.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-12-31

    Measurements of meteorological variables and trace gas concentrations, provided by the Wyoming Department of Environmental Quality for Daniel, Jonah, and Boulder Counties in the state of Wyoming, were analyzed for this project. The data indicate that highest ozone concentrations were observed at temperatures of -10 C to 0 C, at low wind speeds of about 5 mph. The median values for nitrogen oxides (NOx) during these episodes ranged between 10 ppbv and 20 ppbv (parts per billion by volume). Measurements of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during these periods were insufficient for quantitative analysis. The few available VOCs measurements indicated unusually high levels of alkanes and aromatics and low levels of alkenes. In addition, the column ozone concentration during one of the high-ozone episodes was low, on the order of 250 DU (Dobson unit) as compared to a normal column ozone concentration of approximately 300-325 DU during spring for this region. Analysis of this observation was outside the scope of this project. The data analysis reported here was used to establish criteria for making a large number of sensitivity calculations through use of a box photochemical model. Two different VOCs lumping schemes, RACM and SAPRC-98, were used for the calculations. Calculations based on this data analysis indicated that the ozone mixing ratios are sensitive to (a) surface albedo, (b) column ozone, (c) NOx mixing ratios, and (d) available terminal olefins. The RACM model showed a large response to an increase in lumped species containing propane that was not reproduced by the SAPRC scheme, which models propane as a nearly independent species. The rest of the VOCs produced similar changes in ozone in both schemes. In general, if one assumes that measured VOCs are fairly representative of the conditions at these locations, sufficient precursors might be available to produce ozone in the range of 60-80 ppbv under the conditions modeled.

  7. Dynorphin-dependent reduction of excitability and attenuation of inhibitory afferents of NPS neurons in the pericoerulear region of mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kay eJuengling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Neuropeptide S system, consisting of the 20-amino acid peptide neuropeptide S (NPS and its G-protein coupled receptor (NPSR, modulates arousal, wakefulness, anxiety, and fear-extinction in mice. In addition, recent evidence indicates that the NPS system attenuates stress-dependent impairment of fear extinction, and that NPS-expressing neurons in close proximity to the locus coeruleus (pericoerulear, periLC region are activated by stress. Furthermore, periLC NPS neurons receive afferents from neurons of the centrolateral nucleus of the amygdala (CeL, of which a substantial population expresses the kappa opioid receptor (KOR ligand precursor prodynorphin. This study aims to identify the effect of the dynorphinergic system on NPS neurons in the periLC via pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. Using electrophysiological recordings in mouse brain slices, we provide evidence that NPS neurons in the periLC region are directly inhibited by dynorphin A via activation of κ-opioid receptor 1 (KOR1 and a subsequent increase of potassium conductances. Thus, the dynorphinergic system is suited to inactivate NPS neurons in the periLC. In addition to this direct, somatic effect, dynorphin A reduces the efficacy of GABAergic synapses on NPS neurons via KOR1 and KOR2. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence for the interaction of the NPS and the kappa opioid system in the periLC. Therefore, the endogenous opioid dynorphin is suited to inhibit NPS neurons with a subsequent decrease in NPS release in putative target regions leading to a variety of physiological consequences such as increased anxiety or vulnerability to stress exposure.

  8. MO-FG-204-04: How Iterative Reconstruction Algorithms Affect the NPS of CT Images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, G; Liu, X; Dodge, C; Jensen, C; Rong, J [UT MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate how the third generation model based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) compares with filtered back-projection (FBP), adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASiR), and the second generation MBIR based on noise power spectrum (NPS) analysis over a wide range of clinically applicable dose levels. Methods: The Catphan 600 CTP515 module, surrounded by an oval, fat-equivalent ring to mimic patient size/shape, was scanned on a GE HD750 CT scanner at 1, 2, 3, 6, 12 and 19mGy CTDIvol levels with typical patient scan parameters: 120kVp, 0.8s, 40mm beam width, large SFOV, 0.984 pitch and reconstructed thickness 2.5mm (VEO3.0: Abd/Pelvis with Texture and NR05). At each CTDIvol level, 10 repeated scans were acquired for achieving sufficient data sampling. The images were reconstructed using Standard kernel with FBP; 20%, 40% and 70% ASiR; and two versions of MBIR (VEO2.0 and 3.0). For evaluating the effect of the ROI spatial location to the Result of NPS, 4 ROI groups were categorized based on their distances from the center of the phantom. Results: VEO3.0 performed inferiorly comparing to VEO2.0 over all dose levels. On the other hand, at low dose levels (less than 3 mGy), it clearly outperformed ASiR and FBP, in NPS values. Therefore, the lower the dose level, the relative performance of MBIR improves. However, the shapes of the NPS show substantial differences in horizontal and vertical sampling dimensions. These differences may determine the characteristics of the noise/texture features in images, and hence, play an important role in image interpretation. Conclusion: The third generation MBIR did not improve over the second generation MBIR in term of NPS analysis. The overall performance of both versions of MBIR improved as compared to other reconstruction algorithms when dose was reduced. The shapes of the NPS curves provided additional value for future characterization of the image noise/texture features.

  9. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming, Casper, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-02-01

    This report presents the preliminary environmental findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming (NPOSR-CUW) conducted June 6 through 17, 1988. NPOSR consists of the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3) in Wyoming, the Naval Oil Shale Reserves No. 1 and 3 (NOSR-1 and NOSR-3) in Colorado and the Naval Oil Shale Reserve No. 2 (NOSR-2) in Utah. NOSR-2 was not included in the Survey because it had not been actively exploited at the time of the on-site Survey. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, lead and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team specialists are outside experts being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with NPOSR. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at NPOSR and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team has developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified at NOSR-3 during the on-site Survey. There were no findings associated with either NPR-3 or NOSR-1 that required Survey-related sampling and Analysis. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the Environmental Survey Summary report. The Summary Report will reflect the final determinations of the NPOSR-CUW Survey and the other DOE site-specific Surveys. 110 refs., 38 figs., 24 tabs.

  10. Determination of pesticide aerial drift and associated effects to the endangered Wyoming toad (Bufo baxteri) at Mortenson and Hutton National Wildlife Refuges and potential reintroduction sites

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The endangered Wyoming toad is confined to Mortenson National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in southeast Wyoming. Reasons for the decline of the toad are unknown, but it is...

  11. Combined effects of ZnO NPs and seawater acidification on the haemocyte parameters of thick shell mussel Mytilus coruscus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fangli; Cui, Shuaikang; Sun, Meng; Xie, Zhe; Huang, Wei; Huang, Xizhi; Liu, Liping; Hu, Menghong; Lu, Weiqun; Wang, Youji

    2017-12-20

    Flow cytometry was used to investigate the immune parameters of haemocytes in thick-shell mussel Mytilus coruscus exposed to different concentrations of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) (0, 2.5, and 10mgl-1) at two pH levels (7.3 and 8.1) for 14days following a recovery period of 7days. ZnO NPs significantly affected all of the immune parameters throughout the experiment. At high ZnO NPs concentrations, total haemocyte counting, phagocytosis, esterase, and lysosomal content were significantly decreased whereas haemocyte mortality and reactive oxygen species (ROS) were increased. Although low pH also significantly influenced all of the immune parameters of the mussels, its effect was not as strong as that of ZnO NPs. Interactive effects were observed between pH and ZnO NPs in most haemocyte parameters during the exposure period. Although a slight recovery from the stress of ZnO NPs and pH was observed for all immune parameters, significant carry-over effects of low pH and ZnO NPs were still detected. This study revealed that high concentration of ZnO NPs and low pH exert negative and synergistic effects on mussels, and these effects remain even after the mussels are no longer exposed to such stressors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Sodium selenite/selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) protect cardiomyoblasts and zebrafish embryos against ethanol induced oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalishwaralal, Kalimuthu; Jeyabharathi, Subhaschandrabose; Sundar, Krishnan; Muthukumaran, Azhaguchamy

    2015-10-01

    Alcoholic cardiomyopathy is the damage caused to the heart muscles due to high level of alcohol consumption resulting in enlargement and inflammation of the heart. Selenium is an important trace element that is beneficial to human health. Selenium protects the cells by preventing the formation of free radicals in the body. In the present study, protein mediated synthesis of SeNPs was investigated. Two different sizes of SeNPs were synthesized using BSA and keratin. The synthesized SeNPs were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with elemental composition analysis Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy(EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). This study demonstrates the in vitro and in vivo antioxidative effects of sodium selenite and SeNPs. Further selenium and SeNPs were evaluated for their ability to protect against 1% ethanol induced oxidative stress in H9C2 cell line. The selenium and SeNPs were found to reduce the 1% ethanol-induced oxidative damage through scavenging intracellular reactive oxygen species. The selenium and SeNPs could also prevent pericardial edema induced ethanol treatment and reduced apoptosis and cell death in zebrafish embryos. The results indicate that selenium and SeNPs could potentially be used as an additive in alcoholic beverage industry to control the cardiomyopathy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Report on surface geology and groundwater investigations of Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. Final technical report, November 1980-May 1982. [Proposed WyCoalGas Project, Converse County, Wyoming; site evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1982-01-01

    The general region of investigation of this report is in the southern part of the Powder River Basin near the Town of Douglas, Wyoming. Two specific areas within this region were investigated to determine the groundwater potential with drilling and testing programs during the years 1973 to 1975. One area of investigation is located approximately 12 miles west of Douglas in T32 and 33N, R73 and 74W, and is known as the Green Valley Well Field. This area is situated in the foothills of the north end of the Laramie Range and encompasses approximately 25 square miles. In this area the Madison Formation limestone and the Flathead Formation sandstone are the aquifers of interest for groundwater production. The second area is located approximately 13 miles north of Douglas in T34 and 35N, R70 and 71W, and is known as the Mortons Well Field. This area encompasses about 30 square miles. In this area, the Lance Formation and Fox Hills Formation sandstones are the aquifers of interest. Contained within the body of this report are two geologic studies prepared by consulting geologists, Dr. Peter Huntoon and Henry Richter. These studies define the pertinent structural and groundwater geologic features in and in the vicinities of the Mortons and Green Valley Well Fields. A relatively complex structural geology was encountered in the Green Valley area. The study of the Mortons area suggests that the geology of this area is relatively uniform. Inventories of the water users in the vicinities of the two study areas are included at the back of this report in Appendix B. These inventories are comprised of water appropriations as recognized by the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Both groundwater and surface water appropriations are inventoried within the Green Valley study area. Only groundwater appropriations are inventoried within the Mortons study area.

  14. A disposable sticky electrode for the detection of commercial silver NPs in seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, W.; Stuart, E. J. E.; Tschulik, K.; Cullen, J. T.; Compton, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to perform efficient and affordable field detection and quantification of nanoparticles in aquatic environmental systems remains a significant technical challenge. Recently we reported a proof of concept of using ‘sticky’ electrodes for the detection of silver nanoparticles (Tschulik et al 2013 Nanotechnology 29 295502). Now a disposable electrode for detection and quantification of commercial Ag nanoparticles in natural seawater is presented. A disposable screen printed electrode is modified with cysteine and characterized by sticking and stripping experiments, with silver nanoparticle immobilization on the electrode surface and subsequent oxidative stripping, yielding a quantitative determination of the amount of Ag nanoparticles adhering to the electrode surface. The modified electrode was applied to natural seawater to mimic field-based environmental monitoring of Ag NPs present in seawater. The results demonstrated that commercial Ag NPs in natural seawater can be immobilized, enriched and quantified within short time period using the disposable electrodes without any need for elaborate experiments.

  15. Biological studies and electrical conductivity of paper sheet based on PANI/PS/Ag-NPs nanocomposite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youssef, A M; Mohamed, S A; Abdel-Aziz, M S; Abdel-Aziz, M E; Turky, G; Kamel, S

    2016-08-20

    Polyaniline (PANI) with/without polystyrene (PS), was successfully manufactured in the occurrence of dispersed pulp fibers via the oxidative polymerization reaction of aniline monomer to produce conductive paper sheets containing PANI, PANI/PS composites. Additionally, sliver nitrate (Ag-NO3) was added by varied loadings to the oxidative polymerization of aniline monomer to provide sliver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) emptied into the prepared paper sheets. The prepared paper sheets were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), the mechanical properties of the prepared paper sheets were evaluated. Moreover, the electrical conductivity and biological studies such as cellulases assay, Microorganism & culture condition and detection of the released of Ag-NPs were evaluated. Furthermore, the prepared paper sheets were displayed good antibacterial properties contrary to gram positive and gram negative bacteria. Consequently, the prepared paper sheet may be used as novel materials for packaging applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of biologically and chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on biofilm formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chojniak, Joanna; Biedroń, Izabela; Mendrek, Barbara; Płaza, Grażyna

    2017-11-01

    Bionanotechnology has emerged up as integration between biotechnology and nanotechnology for developing biosynthetic and environmental-friendly technology for synthesis of nanomaterials. Different types of nanomaterials like copper, zinc, titanium, magnesium, gold, and silver have applied in the various industries but silver nanoparticles have proved to be most effective against bacteria, viruses and eukaryotic microorganisms. The antimicrobial property of silver nanoparticles are widely known. Due to strong antibacterial property silver nanoparticles are used, e.g. in clothing, food industry, sunscreens, cosmetics and many household and environmental appliances. The aim of the study was to compare the effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) synthesized biologically and chemically on the biofilm formation. The biofilm was formed by the bacteria isolated from the water supply network. The commonly used crystal violet assay (CV) was applied for biofilm analysis. In this study effect of biologically synthesized Ag-NPs on the biofilm formation was evaluated.

  17. Specimens: "most of" generic NPs in a contextually flexible type theory

    OpenAIRE

    Retoré, Christian

    2011-01-01

    International audience; This paper proposes to compute the meanings associated to sentences with generic NPs correspond- ing to the most of generalized quantifier. We call these generics specimens and they resemble stereotypes or pro- totypes in lexical semantics. The meanings are viewed as logical formulae that can be thereafter interpreted in your favorite models. We rather depart from the dominant Fregean single untyped universe and go for type theory with hints from Hilbert epsilon calcul...

  18. One-step synthesis of monodisperse AuNPs@PANI composite nanospheres as recyclable catalysts for 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Runming; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Qiang; Li, Dongfeng; Shi, Jiahua, E-mail: sjiahua@henu.edu.cn; Chen, Yuewen; Yu, Shuling; Ding, Tao; Qiao, Congzhen [Henan University, Institute of Fine Chemical and Engineering, Engineering Laboratory for Flame Retardant and Functional Materials of Henan Province, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2016-06-15

    Oxidative polymerization of aniline was carried out in ethanol using chloroauric acid (HAuCl{sub 4}) as the oxidant. Simultaneous reduction of HAuCl{sub 4} and formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polyaniline (PANI) composite nanospheres (AuNPs@PANI nanospheres) were achieved without using any templates or structure-directing agents. The composite nanospheres are uniformly distributed with an average diameter of about 400 nm, in which the ultrafine AuNPs with size of about 2–4 nm were evenly embedded in the PANI matrix which acted as the dispersing agent and stabilizer of AuNPs. In addition, the catalytic performance of these composite nanospheres towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH{sub 4} was studied. Furthermore, the possible formation mechanism and catalytic mechanism of the self-assembled AuNPs@PANI nanospheres were also discussed.Graphical Abstract.

  19. One-step synthesis of monodisperse AuNPs@PANI composite nanospheres as recyclable catalysts for 4-nitrophenol reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Runming; Li, Zhiyuan; Wu, Qiang; Li, Dongfeng; Shi, Jiahua; Chen, Yuewen; Yu, Shuling; Ding, Tao; Qiao, Congzhen

    2016-06-01

    Oxidative polymerization of aniline was carried out in ethanol using chloroauric acid (HAuCl4) as the oxidant. Simultaneous reduction of HAuCl4 and formation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and polyaniline (PANI) composite nanospheres (AuNPs@PANI nanospheres) were achieved without using any templates or structure-directing agents. The composite nanospheres are uniformly distributed with an average diameter of about 400 nm, in which the ultrafine AuNPs with size of about 2-4 nm were evenly embedded in the PANI matrix which acted as the dispersing agent and stabilizer of AuNPs. In addition, the catalytic performance of these composite nanospheres towards the reduction of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of NaBH4 was studied. Furthermore, the possible formation mechanism and catalytic mechanism of the self-assembled AuNPs@PANI nanospheres were also discussed.

  20. Preparation of AuNPs/GQDs/SiO2 Composite and Its Catalytic Performance in Oxidation of Veratryl Alcohol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaoyao Yang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Composites of gold nanoparticles and graphene quantum dots (AuNPs/GQDs exhibit excellent dispersibility in aqueous solutions. Thus, it is difficult to separate them from wet reaction systems when they are used as catalysts. To resolve this issue, in this study, an AuNPs/GQDs composite was immobilized on silicon dioxide through the hydrothermal method, which involved the formation of an amide bond between the surface GQDs of the AuNPs/GQDs composite and the amino group of the silane. The as-synthesized AuNPs/GQDs/SiO2 composite was found to be suitable for use as a heterogeneous catalyst for the oxidation of veratryl alcohol in water and exhibited catalytic activity comparable to that of bare AuNPs/GQDs as well as better recyclability.

  1. Role of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the cardiovascular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Carmen; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Ramirez-Lee, Manuel Alejandro; Salazar-García, Samuel; Ali, Syed F

    2016-03-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, the use and applications of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have increased, both in consumer products as well as in medical devices. However, little is known about the effects of these nanoparticles on human health, more specific in the cardiovascular system, since this system represents an important route of action in terms of distribution, bioaccumulation and bioavailability of the different circulating substances in the bloodstream. A collection of studies have addressed the effects and applications of different kinds of AgNPs (shaped, sized, coated and functionalized) in several components of the cardiovascular system, such as endothelial cells, isolated vessels and organs as well as integrative animal models, trying to identify the underlying mechanisms involved in their actions, to understand their implication in the field of biomedicine. The purpose of the present review is to summarize the most relevant studies to date of AgNPs effects in the cardiovascular system and provide a broader picture of the potential toxic effects and exposure risks, which in turn will allow pointing out the directions of further research as well as new applications of these versatile nanomaterials.

  2. Electrical response from nanocomposite PDMS-Ag NPs generated by in situ laser ablation in solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalyva, Maria; Kumar, Susmit; Brescia, Rosaria; Petroni, Simona; La Tegola, Carola; Bertoni, Giovanni; De Vittorio, Massimo; Cingolani, Roberto; Athanassiou, Athanassia

    2013-01-01

    Laser ablation technique is employed in order to generate polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/Ag NPs in situ, starting from a silver target in a solution of PDMS prepolymer and toluene. The produced surfactant-free nanoparticles are characterized by high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and scanning TEM-high angle annular dark field (STEM-HAADF) imaging modes, showing the majority of them to be of the order of 4 nm in diameter with a small percentage of larger Ag-AgCl multidomain NPs, embedded into a PDMS matrix. Low concentrations of carbon onion-like nanoparticles or larger fibers are also formed in the toluene-PDMS prepolymer solution. In accordance with this, UV-vis spectra shows no peak from silver NPs; their small size and their coverage by the PDMS matrix suppresses the signal of surface plasmon absorption. Inductively coupled plasma measurements reveal that the concentration of silver in the polymer is characteristically low, ˜0.001% by weight. The electrical properties of the PDMS nanocomposite films are modified, with current versus voltage (I-V) measurements showing a low current of up to a few tenths of a pA at 5 V. The surface resistivity of the films is found to be up to ˜1010 Ω/sq. Under pressure (e.g. stress) applied by a dynamic mechanical analyzer (DMA), the I-V measurements demonstrate the current decreasing during the elastic deformation, and increasing during the plastic deformation.

  3. Methodology for agricultural and rural NPS pollution in a typical county of the North China Plain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Xiaolan; Ongley, Edwin; Zhao, Lei

    2012-09-01

    Agricultural non-point source (NPS) pollution has been recently identified by the Chinese government as a major source of aquatic pollution. Methodologies commonly used to make basin-wide or area-wide assessments are problematic and regional distinctions have not been made relative to rainfall and runoff. Using a typical agricultural county in the Hai River basin of the North China Plan we developed methodology to estimate potential load and delivered load for crops (field crops + rice), animal production, rural living and from atmospheric N input. We use scenarios to allow for uncertainty in delivery to estimate the relative roles of different rural forms of pollution. Livestock raising is the major source of NPS pollution. Despite a 75% rural population, rural living contributes almost nothing to surface water pollution. While over-fertilization is typical, nutrient runoff from crops is low. Our results have implications for policies now under development for NPS control in China. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Instantly AgNPs deposition through facile solventless technique for poly-functional cotton fabrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emam, Hossam E; Saleh, N H; Nagy, Khaled S; Zahran, M K

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, functional clothes are employed for human body protection in addition to be fashionable clothes. Hence functionalization of clothes increases the attention of scientists and business. In the current study, poly-functional cotton fabric was carried out by instantly deposition of AgNPs using two solventless techniques namely; sorption and padding. Sorption technique was exhibited extremely high efficiency than padding one by ca. 10 times. By using the same concentrations of AgNO3, Ag content was ranged 69.3-6094.8 mg/kg and 33.8-609.3 mg/kg for sorption and padding, respectively. After AgNPs deposition, fabrics color was turned to gray-reddish yellow. By applying 5912.3 mgAg/kg fabric, bacterial reduction and UPF value were reached 99% and 12.59. Bacterial reduction and UPF were lessened to 90% and 10.19 after 20 washings. These findings proved that the direct AgNPs deposition into cotton using solventless/sorption technique is applicable in manufacturing of antibacterial/UV resistant fabrics with acquired decorative color. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. n vivo retention of ingested Au NPs by Daphnia magna: No evidence for trans-epithelial alimentary uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Farhan R.; Kennaway, Gabrielle M.; Croteau, Marie-Noële; Dybowska, Agnieszka; Smith, Brian D.; Nogueira, António J.A.; Rainbow, Philip S.; Luoma, Samuel N.; Valsami-Jones, Eugenia

    2014-01-01

    In vivo studies with Daphnia magna remain inconclusive as to whether engineered nanoparticles (NPs) are internalized into tissues after ingestion. Here we used a three-pronged approach to study the in vivo retention and efflux kinetics of 20 nm citrate stabilized Au NPs ingested by this key aquatic species. Daphnids were exposed to suspended particles (600 μg L−1) for 5 h after which they were depurated for 24 h in clean water containing algae. Light microscopy was used to follow the passage of Au NPs through the gastrointestinal tract, Au body burdens were determined by ICP-MS (inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the presence and distribution of Au NPs in tissues. Results revealed that the elimination of Au NPs was bi-phasic. The fast elimination phase lasted −1 (±SE) which accounted for ∼75% of the ingested Au. The remaining ∼25% of the ingested Au NPs was eliminated at a 100-fold slower rate. TEM analysis revealed that Au NPs in the midgut were in close proximity to the peritrophic membrane after 1 and 24 h of depuration. There were no observations of Au NP uptake at the microvilli. Thus, although Au NPs were retained in the gut lumen, there was no observable internalization into the gut epithelial cells. Similar to carbon nanotubes and CuO NPs, our findings indicate that in daphnids the in vivo retention of Au NPs does not necessarily result in their internalization.

  6. Rapid Biosynthesis of AgNPs Using Soil Bacterium Azotobacter vinelandii With Promising Antioxidant and Antibacterial Activities for Biomedical Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunakaran, Gopalu; Jagathambal, Matheswaran; Gusev, Alexander; Torres, Juan Antonio Lopez; Kolesnikov, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Denis

    2017-07-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are applied in various fields from electronics to biomedical applications as a result of their high surface-to-volume ratio. Even though different approaches are available for synthesis of AgNPs, a nontoxic method for the synthesis has not yet been developed. Thus, this study focused on developing an easy and ecofriendly approach to synthesize AgNPs using Azotobacter vinelandii culture extracts. The biosynthesized nanoparticles were further characterized by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), energy-dispersive spectrum, particle size distribution (PSD), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). UV absorption noticed at 435 nm showed formation of AgNPs. The XRD pattern showed a face-centered cubic structure with broad peaks of 28.2°, 32.6°, 46.6°, 55.2°, 57.9°, and 67.8°. The FTIR confirmed the involvement of various functional groups in the biosynthesis of AgNPs. The PSD and TEM analyses showed spherical, well-distributed nanoparticles with an average size of 20-70 nm. The elemental studies confirmed the existence of pure AgNPs. The bacterial extract containing extracellular enzyme nitrate reductase converted silver nitrate into AgNPs. AgNPs significantly inhibited the growth of pathogenic bacteria such as Streptomyces fradiae (National Collection of Industrial Microorganisms (NCIM) 2419), Staphylococcus aureus (NCIM 2127), Escherichia coli (NCIM 2065), and Serratia marcescens (NCIM 2919). In addition, biosynthesized AgNPs were found to possess strong antioxidant activity. Thus, the results of this study revealed that biosynthesized AgNPs could serve as a lead in the development of nanomedicine.

  7. Radiation Field in the Vicinity of the Collider Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevens, A. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-10-26

    The Collider Center and the adjoining cryogenic support building are unique among the buildings close to the collider tunnel because these are locations where the occupancy by non-radiation workers is high. This note describes calculations of the dose equivalent from local beam loss at both the nearest point of these buildings to the collider ring and on the berm in the vicinity of these buildings.

  8. Environmental surveillance in the vicinity of Hanford for January 1968

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, C.B. (ed.)

    1968-04-15

    The concentrations of most radionuclides in the vicinity of Hanford during January 1968 were below comparable measurements for a year ago. Slightly increased concentrations of I-131 in Richland drinking water were observed during the last two weeks of the month. Radioiodine detected in several milk samples (maximum 25 pCi/l) was attributed to fallout from an announced nuclear weapons test of December 24, 1967. Increased beta activities on air filters were also attributed to fallout.

  9. Return on investment of advanced practice medical degrees: NPs vs. PAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Christopher K; Holmes, James H; Carter, Jeffery E

    2017-06-01

    As the United States faces a predicted physician shortage over the next 2 decades, physician assistants (PAs) and NPs are expected to fill the void. At the same time, because education is expensive, student loan and tuition increases have many potential applicants assessing differences in reimbursement and wondering about their return on investment (ROI). An analysis compared PA and NP salaries by incorporating national salary data, federal income tax, and student loans for a comparative analysis of each career pathway. Salaries were abstracted from the 2012 Bureau of Labor Statistics database. The net present value (NPV) of PA and NP salaries was calculated with a 5% discount rate. Principal and interest for student loans was calculated at a 6% interest fixed-rate loan over 30 years. NPVs were then compared with projected ROI at retirement age. Relative career values were also given to each career choice, based on a retirement age of 65 years, which translates to about 41 years of employment for both PAs and NPs. PAs' and NPs' educational loans both equalled $129,484 on total repayment. The median annual salary of a PA was $90,930 and $89,960 for an NP. PA data yielded a 5% NPV of $781,323 compared with $764,348 for NPs. Of note, the 5% NPV of a 4-year nursing degree is $728,436. PAs have a slightly higher ROI compared with NPs. These findings may change due to adjustments in nursing training models. Many PA programs allow matriculation immediately after obtaining a bachelor's degree. NP schools often require nursing experience before entering their program. Some schools are considering an accelerated NP program, allowing immediate matriculation after obtaining a bachelor's degree. Because many NP programs have become doctoral degrees, the increased duration of training, higher tuition, and fewer years worked before retirement lower the overall NP ROI. A similar reduction in ROI was considered marginal in PAs who attend residency programs-though these programs are

  10. Economics and a novel voltage conversion technique associated with exporting Wyoming's energy by HVDC transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kaili

    Wyoming is by far the largest coal producing state in the US, but local utilization is extremely low. As much as 92% of Wyoming's coal is shipped to the other states and is mainly consumed by their electricity producers. Coal accounts for more than 50% of the US electricity generation and is one of the least expensive energy sources. Wyoming could utilize its coal better by exporting electricity instead of exporting the coal only in its raw form. Natural gas is another important energy resource in Wyoming but local utilization is even lower. As a result of the development in coalbed methane fields, natural gas production in Wyoming is almost in pace with its coal production. In addition to constructing more new pipelines, new transmission lines should be considered as an alternative way of exporting this energy. Because of their enormous electricity market sizes and high electricity prices, California, Texas and Illinois are chosen to be the target markets for Wyoming's electricity. The proposed transmission schemes use High Voltage DC (HVDC) lines, which are suitable for long distance and cross-system power transmission. Technical and economic feasibilities are studied in details. The Wyoming-California scheme has a better return of investment than both the Wyoming-Texas and the Wyoming-Illinois schemes. A major drawback of HVDC transmission is the high level of harmonics generated by the converters. Elaborate filtering is required at both the AC and the DC sides. A novel pulse-multiplication method is proposed in the thesis to reduce the harmonics from the converter source. By introducing an averaging inductor, the proposed method uses less thyristors to achieve the same high-pulse operation as the existing series scheme. The reduction of thyristors makes the switching circuit more reliable and easier to control and maintain. Harmonic analysis shows that the harmonic level can be reduced to about one third of the original system. The proposed method is also

  11. 77 FR 38884 - Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Union Pacific Railroad Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Union Pacific Railroad Company Wyoming Connect Railroad LLC (WCR), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of...

  12. 77 FR 55529 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... lupus) are the largest wild members of the dog family (Canidae). Adult gray wolves range from 18-80... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Removal of the Gray Wolf in Wyoming From the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Removal of the Wyoming Wolf Population's Status as an Experimental...

  13. Environmental Assessment for Property Transfer to Cheyenne Regional Medical Center, F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-20

    Kennel Facility (Building 949) at F.E. Warren AFB, Wyoming. January. _______. 2011. Environmental Assessment for Decomissioning and Demolition of the...EDMIGNERY CHARLES PRICE The staff of the Wyoming Game and Fish Department has reviewed the proposed Action and Alternate Environmental Assessment

  14. Geodatabase of Wyoming statewide oil and gas drilling activity to 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biewick, Laura

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) compiled a geographic information system (GIS) of Wyoming statewide historical oil and gas drilling activity for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI). The WLCI is representative of the partnerships being formed by the USGS with other Department of the Interior bureaus, State and local agencies, industry, academia, and private landowners that are committed to maintaining healthy landscapes, sustaining wildlife, and preserving recreational and grazing uses as energy resources development progresses in southwestern Wyoming. This product complements the 2009 USGS publication on oil and gas development in southwestern Wyoming http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/437/) by approximating, based on database attributes, the time frame of drilling activity for each well (start and stop dates). This GIS product also adds current oil and gas drilling activity not only in the area encompassing the WLCI, but also statewide. Oil and gas data, documentation, and spatial data processing capabilities are available and can be downloaded from the USGS website. These data originated from the Wyoming Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (WOGCC), represent decades of oil and gas drilling (1900 to 2010), and will facilitate a landscape-level approach to integrated science-based assessments, resource management and land-use decision making.

  15. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some vicinal and non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 2. Kinetics and ... Kinetics of oxidation of five vicinal and four non-vicinal diols, and two of their monoethers, by tetrabutylammonium tribromide (TBATB) has been studied. The vicinal diols ... Department of Chemistry, JNV University, Jodhpur 342 005, India ...

  16. Structural, chemical and optical properties of SnO2 NPs obtained by three different synthesis routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzymała, Elżbieta; Gruzeł, Grzegorz; Depciuch, Joanna; Budziak, Andrzej; Kowal, Andrzej; Parlinska-Wojtan, Magdalena

    2017-08-01

    Polyol (P), chemical precipitation (C) and microwave-assisted (M) syntheses were chosen to produce SnO2 nanoparticles with uniform size and minimum agglomeration. Their structural, chemical and optical properties were investigated using dynamic light scattering (DLS), scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), Raman, Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) using the Attenuated Total Reflectance (ATR) technique and Ultraviolet-Visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopies. STEM observations showed that the SnO2(P) and SnO2(C) nanoparticles (NPs) are combined into larger agglomerates with heterogeneous thickness, while the microwave-assisted NPs form a uniform thin layer across the TEM grid. The strongest agglomeration of the SnO2(C) NPs, observed by DLS, STEM and UV-Vis is explained by the very moderate amount of water present on the surface of the NPs identified by FTIR spectroscopy. High resolution STEM combined with SAED and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns confirmed the crystalline character of the NPs. In the nanoparticles from polyol synthesis, chlorine from the remains of metal precursors during reduction was detected by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), contrary to the NPs obtained by the chemical precipitation and microwave-assisted methods. All three syntheses routes lead to small, 2-10 nm SnO2 NPs, which were the result of the low concentration of Cl ions in the solutions.

  17. Impact of bio-palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd NPs) on the activity and structure of a marine microbial community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Andrea; Hosseinkhani, Baharak; Boon, Nico; Zanaroli, Giulio; Fava, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Biogenic palladium nanoparticles (bio-Pd NPs) represent a promising catalyst for organohalide remediation in water and sediments. However, the available information regarding their possible impact in case of release into the environment, particularly on the environmental microbiota, is limited. In this study the toxicity of bio-Pd NPs on the model marine bacterium V. fischeri was assessed. The impacts of different concentrations of bio-Pd NPs on the respiratory metabolisms (i.e. organohalide respiration, sulfate reduction and methanogenesis) and the structure of a PCB-dechlorinating microbial community enriched form a marine sediment were also investigated in microcosms mimicking the actual sampling site conditions. Bio-Pd NPs had no toxic effect on V. fischeri. In addition, they had no significant effects on PCB-dehalogenating activity, while showing a partial, dose-dependent inhibitory effect on sulfate reduction as well as on methanogenesis. No toxic effects by bio-Pd NPs could be also observed on the total bacterial community structure, as its biodiversity was increased compared to the not exposed community. In addition, resilience of the microbial community to bio-Pd NPs exposure was observed, being the final community organization (Gini coefficient) of samples exposed to bio-Pd NPs similar to that of the not exposed one. Considering all the factors evaluated, bio-Pd NPs could be deemed as non-toxic to the marine microbiota in the conditions tested. This is the first study in which the impact of bio-Pd NPs is extensively evaluated over a microbial community in relevant environmental conditions, providing important information for the assessment of their environmental safety. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) using handheld Raman spectroscopy employing both 785 and 1064nm laser sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirguis, Amira; Girotto, Sarah; Berti, Benedetta; Stair, Jacqueline L

    2017-04-01

    The chemical identification of new psychoactive substances (NPS) in the field is challenging due not only to the plethora of substances available, but also as a result of the chemical complexity of products and the chemical similarity of NPS analogues. In this study, handheld Raman spectroscopy and the use of two excitation wavelengths, 785 and 1064nm, were evaluated for the identification of 60 NPS products. The products contained a range of NPS from classes including the aminoindanes, arylalkylamines, benzodiazepines, and piperidines & pyrrolidines. Identification was initially assessed using the instruments' in built algorithm (i.e., % HQI) and then further by visual inspection of the Raman spectra. Confirmatory analysis was preformed using gas chromatography mass spectrometry. For the 60 diverse products, an NPS was successfully identified via the algorithm in 11 products (18%) using the 785nm source and 29 products (48%) using the 1064nm source. Evaluation of the Raman spectra showed that increasing the excitation wavelength from 785 to 1064nm improved this 'first pass' identification primarily due to a significant reduction in fluorescence, which increased S/N of the characteristic peaks of the substance identified. True positive correlations between internet products and NPS signatures ranged from 57.0 to 91.3% HQI with typical RSDsbranded products were particularly challenging as a result of low NPS concentration and high chemical complexity, respectively. This study demonstrates the advantage of using a 1064nm source with handheld Raman spectroscopy for improved 'first pass' NPS identification when minimal spectral processing is required, such as when working in field. Future investigations will focus on the use of mixture algorithms, effect of NPS concentration, and further improvement of spectral libraries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Spatial mapping and attribution of Wyoming wind turbines, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.

    2014-01-01

    These data represent locations of wind turbines found within Wyoming as of August 2012. We assigned each wind turbine to a wind farm and, in these data, provide information about each turbine’s potential megawatt output, rotor diameter, hub height, rotor height, the status of the land ownership where the turbine exists, the county each turbine is located in, wind farm power capacity, the number of units currently associated with each wind farm, the wind turbine manufacturer and model, the wind farm developer, the owner of the wind farm, the current purchaser of power from the wind farm, the year the wind farm went online, and the status of its operation. Some of the attributes are estimates based on the information we found via the American Wind Energy Association and other on-line reports. The locations are derived from National Agriculture Imagery Program (2009 and 2012) true color aerial photographs and have a positional accuracy of approximately +/-5 meters. These data will provide a planning tool for wildlife- and habitat-related projects underway at the U.S. Geological Survey’s Fort Collins Science Center and other government and non-government organizations. Specifically, we will use these data to support quantifying disturbances of the landscape as related to wind energy as well as to quantify indirect disturbances to flora and fauna. This data set represents an update to a previous version by O’Donnell and Fancher (2010).

  20. Outplanting Wyoming big sagebrush following wldfire: stock performance and economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dettweiler-Robinson, Eva; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Evans, James R.; Newsome, Heidi; Davies, G. Matt; Wirth, Troy A.; Pyke, David A.; Easterly, Richard T.; Salstrom, Debra; Dunwiddle, Peter W.

    2013-01-01

    Finding ecologically and economically effective ways to establish matrix species is often critical for restoration success. Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata subsp. wyomingensis) historically dominated large areas of western North America, but has been extirpated from many areas by large wildfires; its re-establishment in these areas often requires active management. We evaluated the performance (survival, health) and economic costs of container and bare-root stock based on operational plantings of more than 1.5 million seedlings across 2 200 ha, and compared our plantings with 30 other plantings in which sagebrush survival was tracked for up to 5 yr. Plantings occurred between 2001 and 2007, and included 12 combinations of stock type, planting amendment, and planting year.We monitored 10 500 plants for up to 8 yr after planting. Survival to Year 3 averaged 21% and was higher for container stock (30%) than bare-root stock (17%). Survival did not differ among container stock plantings, whereas survival of bare-root stock was sometimes enhanced by a hydrogel dip before planting, but not by

  1. Rancher and farmer quality of life in the midst of energy development in southwest Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Leslie; Montag, Jessica; Lyon, Katie; Soileau, Suzanna; Schuster, Rudy

    2014-01-01

    Quality of life (QOL) is usually defined as a person’s general well-being, and may include individual perceptions of a variety of factors such family, work, finances, local community services, community relationships, surrounding environment, and other important aspects of their life, ultimately leading to life satisfaction. Energy development can have an effect on QOL components for rural residents. Southwest Wyoming is a rural area with a history of ranching and farming which continues today. This area has also seen a “boom” of increasing wind, solar, oil and gas energy developments over the past decade. Wyoming Department of Agriculture, as part of the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI), sponsored research to examine the effect of energy development on ranchers’ and farmers’ quality of life.

  2. Influence of HCl on the NPs-CdSe synthesis prepared by the colloidal method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Sarmiento Arellano

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium selenide nanoparticles (NPs-CdSe were synthesized by colloidal route at room temperature and atmospheric pressure using cadmium chloride (CdCl2·2.5 hydrate and elemental selenium (Se as precursors. Sodium borohydride (NaBH4 was used as reducing agent to obtain Se2− ions and an aqueous solution with a NaOH and Penta sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP was used to protect Cd2+ ions. To remove the by-products generated during the chemical reaction and to promote the precipitation of NPs-CdSe, a cleaning process with an aqueous solution of HCl was performed. The HCl volume was varied from 0.2 to 1.2 ml during the cleaning process to study its effects on CdSe synthesis. The crystalline structure was analyzed by inspection of the high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD. This analysis showed that crystals of CdSe exhibit a face-centered cubic structure (FCC. The calculated crystallite size is 3.5 nm and increases to 4.5 nm as the HCl volume increases. The morphologies of the products were observed by SEM and TEM techniques. HRTEM images showed that NPs-CdSe synthetized to 0.8 ml are composed of a great number of homogeneous and smooth nanospheres which are not appreciable in SEM but are observable in TEM. By contrast, 0.2 and 1.2 ml HCl samples are comprised of a great deal of rods of compounds of Se mixed with CdSe spheres nanostructures. This work, which did not require the use of surfactants complexes or specials environment, is considered to have advantages over other works.

  3. Colorimetric detection of melamine based on p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid-modified AuNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianfang; Huang, Pengcheng; Wu, Fangying

    2016-06-01

    A highly selective and sensitive method is developed for colorimetric detection of melamine using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid. The addition of melamine induced the aggregation of AuNPs, as evidenced from the morphological characterizations and the color changed from red wine to blue, which could also be monitored by the UV-visible spectrometer and even naked eyes. This process caused a significant increase in the absorbance ratio (A650nm/A520nm) of p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid-AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the system exhibited a linear response to melamine in the range of 6.0 × 10-7-1.5 × 10-6 mol L-1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.997, and the limit of detection can even be 2.3 nM, which was much lower than some other methods and the safe limits (20 μM in both the USA and EU, 8.0 μM for infant formula in China, 1.2 μM in the CAC (Codex Alimentarius Commission) review for melamine in liquid infant formula). More importantly, the developed method presented excellent tolerance to coexisting common metal ions such as Ca2+, Zn2+, whose concentration is 1000 times of melamine, so that it had been applied to the analysis of melamine in liquid milk and milk powder with the recovery of 97.0-101 % and 100-103 %, respectively, indicating that the proposed method is quite a highly effective means to determine melamine in milk products.

  4. Colorimetric detection of melamine based on p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid-modified AuNPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jianfang; Huang, Pengcheng; Wu, Fangying, E-mail: fywu@ncu.edu.cn [Nanchang University, College of Chemistry (China)

    2016-06-15

    A highly selective and sensitive method is developed for colorimetric detection of melamine using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) functionalized with p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid. The addition of melamine induced the aggregation of AuNPs, as evidenced from the morphological characterizations and the color changed from red wine to blue, which could also be monitored by the UV–visible spectrometer and even naked eyes. This process caused a significant increase in the absorbance ratio (A{sub 650nm}/A{sub 520nm}) of p-chlorobenzenesulfonic acid–AuNPs. Under optimized conditions, the system exhibited a linear response to melamine in the range of 6.0 × 10{sup −7}–1.5 × 10{sup −6} mol L{sup −1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.997, and the limit of detection can even be 2.3 nM, which was much lower than some other methods and the safe limits (20 μM in both the USA and EU, 8.0 μM for infant formula in China, 1.2 μM in the CAC (Codex Alimentarius Commission) review for melamine in liquid infant formula). More importantly, the developed method presented excellent tolerance to coexisting common metal ions such as Ca{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, whose concentration is 1000 times of melamine, so that it had been applied to the analysis of melamine in liquid milk and milk powder with the recovery of 97.0–101 % and 100–103 %, respectively, indicating that the proposed method is quite a highly effective means to determine melamine in milk products.

  5. Connecting the dots: a collaborative USGS-NPS effort to expand the utility of monitoring data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, James B.; Schoolmaster, Donald R.; Schweiger, E. William; Mitchell, Brian R.; Miller, Kathryn; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.

    2014-01-01

    The Natural Resource Challenge (National Park Service 1999) was a call to action. It constituted a mandate for monitoring based on the twin premises that (1) natural resources in national parks require active management and stewardship if we are to protect them from gradual degradation, and (2) we cannot protect what we do not understand. The intent of the challenge was embodied in its original description: We must expand existing inventory programs and develop efficient ways to monitor the vital signs of natural systems. We must enlist others in the scientific community to help, and also facilitate their inquiry. Managers must have and apply this information to preserve our natural resources. In this article, we report on ongoing collaborative work between the National Park Service (NPS) and the US Geological Survey (USGS) that seeks to add to our scientific understanding of the ecological processes operating behind vital signs monitoring data. The ultimate goal of this work is to provide insights that can facilitate an understanding of the systems and identify potential opportunities for active stewardship by NPS managers (Bennetts et al. 2007; Mitchell et al. 2014). The bulk of the work thus far has involved Acadia and Rocky Mountain national parks, but there are plans for extending the work to additional parks. Our story stats with work designed to consider ways of assessing the status and condition of natural resources and the potential for historical or ongoing influences of human activities. In the 1990s, the concept of "biotic integrity" began to take hold as an aspiration for developing quantitative indices describing how closely the conditions at a site resemble those found at pristine, unimpacted sites. Quantitative methods for developing indices of biotic integrity (IBIs) and elaborations of that idea (e.g., ecological integrity) have received considerable attention and application of these methods to natural resources has become widespread (Karr 1991

  6. Bio-nano complexes of ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13 and Cd (II)/Cd-s-M13 accelerate Cd (II) reduction by FeNPs through dual dispersing and separate deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shuai; Nakano, Kazuhiko; Yu, Huimin; Shen, Zhongyao

    2014-03-01

    Reduction of Cd (II) in liquor by solid zero valent Fe nanoparticles (ZVFeNPs) is a liquid-solid biphasic reaction in which the reduction efficiency was often lowered by either aggregation of ZVFeNPs or coating of the generated ZVCd. In light of the filamentous nanostructure of bacteriophage M13 with ˜2700 copies of pVIII protein in delicate distribution at the coat, a novel dual dispersing reduction route was designed by introducing two different kinds of M13 with Fe-binding specificity (Fe-s-M13) and Cd-binding specificity (Cd-s-M13) to disperse ZVFeNPs and Cd (II) ions, respectively. The Fe-s-M13 was used for synthesis of the ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13 complex, where ZVFeNPs were uniformly dispersed into small nanoparticles (5-10 nm) on Fe-s-M13. The engineered Cd-s-M13, constructed by genetic recombination of pVIII through inserting the gene of a biopanned 7-mer Cd-specific peptide (SCPICPG) into the N-terminus of pVIII gene, was used for Cd (II) dispersion before reduction. The dispersed complex of Cd(II)/Cd-s-M13 was rapidly reduced by complex of ZVFeNPs/Fe-s-M13. Kinetics results showed that the initial reduction rate and final reduction ratio of Cd (II) increased by 35.7% and 16.4%, respectively, through dispersion of ZVFeNPs by Fe-s-M13; they improved again by 53.6% and 37.0%, respectively, through further dispersion of Cd (II) by Cd-s-M13. TEM and EDS results revealed that the acceleration effect of the dual dispersing reduction was arising from uniform dispersion of the small ZVFeNPs and separate deposition of the reduced ZVCd on the two different M13 phages.

  7. Spectroscopic probe to contribution of physicochemical transformations in the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to Chlorella vulgaris: new insight into the variation of toxicity of ZnO NPs under aging process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong; Huang, Qing; Xu, An; Wu, Lijun

    2016-10-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are one of the most abundantly applied nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based industries and they may cause unexpected environmental and health risks with their physicochemical transformations in the environment. Currently, there is still a lack of the in-depth understanding of the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to aquatic organisms, particularly demanding quantitative analysis of the physicochemical transformations to distinguish their contributions in the toxicity assessment. For this purpose, therefore, we initiated the study of the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs to the model aquatic microalga, i.e. Chlorella vulgaris, and with the aid of spectroscopic tools for characterization and quantification of the physicochemical transformations, we scrutinized the toxicity variations for ZnO NPs with different aging times. As a result, we found that the toxicity altered in an abnormal manner with the aging time, i.e. the toxicity of aged ZnO NPs for 30 days showed the higher toxicity to the green alga than the fresh ZnO NPs or the ZnO NPs aged for longer time (e.g. 120 and 210 days). Through spectroscopic tools such as XRD, FTIR and Raman spectroscopy, we made both the qualitative and quantitative assessments of the physicochemical changes of the ZnO NPs, and confirmed that in the early stage, the toxicity mainly stemmed from the release of zinc ions, but with longer aging time, the neoformation of the nanoparticles played the critical role, leading to the overall reduced toxicity due to the less toxic hydrozincite and zinc hydroxide in the transformed compounds.

  8. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the Southwestern Powder River Basin, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmonson, Lee M.; Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of abundant new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for a comprehensive evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the southwestern part of the Powder River Basin in Wyoming. This report on the Southwestern Powder River Basin assessment area represents the third area within the basin to be assessed, the first being for coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field in 2008, and the second for coal resources and reserves in the northern Wyoming area of the basin in 2010.

  9. Building Healthy Tribal Nations in Montana and Wyoming Through Collaborative Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersen, Steve R.; Belcourt, Gordon M.; Langwell, Kathryn M.

    2005-01-01

    We describe a collaborative approach to reducing health disparities affecting Montana and Wyoming tribal nations while promoting health-protective practices and interventions among these populations. Under the auspices of the Montana-Wyoming Tribal Leaders Council, a consortium has undertaken activities to (1) establish the research infrastructure necessary for conducting ongoing health disparities research, (2) develop a target research agenda that addresses tribally identified priority health issues and tests the feasibility of interventions, (3) develop increased research skills and cultural competency through mentoring activities, and (4) develop effective collaborative relationships. All research projects are user-defined and -authorized, and participation is voluntary. PMID:15855453

  10. Rethinking Stability of Silver Sulfide Nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) in the Aquatic Environment: Photoinduced Transformation of Ag2S-NPs in the Presence of Fe(III).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingxiangyu; Wang, Yawei; Liu, Qian; Jiang, Guibin

    2016-01-05

    The stability of engineered nanomaterials in a natural aquatic environment has drawn much attention over the past few years. Silver sulfide nanoparticles (Ag2S-NPs) are generally assumed to be stable in a natural environment as a result of their physicochemical property; however, it may vary depending upon environmental conditions. Here, we investigated whether and how the environmentally relevant factors including light irradiation, solution pH, inorganic salts, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and dissolved oxygen (DO) individually and in combination influenced the stability of Ag2S-NPs in an aquatic environment. We presented for the first time that transformation of Ag2S-NPs can indeed occur in the aqueous system with an environmentally relevant concentration of Fe(3+) under simulated solar irradiation and natural sunlight within a short time (96 h), along with significant changes in morphology and dissolution. The photoinduced transformation of Ag2S-NPs in the presence of Fe(3+) can be dramatically influenced by solution pH, Ca(2+)/Na(+), Cl(-)/SO4(2-), DOM, and DO. Moreover, Ag2S-NP dissolution increased within 28 h, followed rapid decline in the next 68 h, which may be a result of the reconstitution of small Ag2S-NPs. Taken together, this work is of importance to comprehensively evaluate the stability of Ag2S-NPs in an aquatic environment, improving our understanding of their potential risks to human and environmental health.

  11. Scheme Transformations in the Vicinity of an Infrared Fixed Point

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryttov, Thomas; Shrock, Robert

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the effect of scheme transformations in the vicinity of an exact or approximate infrared fixed point in an asymptotically free gauge theory with fermions. We show that there is far less freedom in carrying out such scheme transformations in this case than at an ultraviolet fixed point....... We construct a transformation from the $\\bar{MS}$ scheme to a scheme with a vanishing three-loop term in the $\\beta$ function and use this to assess the scheme dependence of an infrared fixed point in SU($N$) theories with fermions. Implications for the anomalous dimension of the fermion bilinear...

  12. A biodynamic understanding of dietborne and waterborne Ag uptake from Ag NPs in the sediment-dwelling oligochaete, Tubifex tubifex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tangaa, Stine Rosendal; Selck, Henriette; Winther-Nielsen, Margrethe

    2018-01-01

    Metal nanoparticles (Me-NPs) are increasingly used in various products, such as inks and cosmetics, enhancing the likelihood of their release into aquatic environments. An understanding of the mechanisms controlling their bioaccumulation and ecotoxicity in aquatic biota will help support...... environmental risk assessment. Here we characterized unidirectional parameters for uptake and elimination of silver (Ag) in the sediment-dwelling oligochaete Tubifex tubifex after waterborne (0.01–47 nmol Ag/L) and dietborne (0.4–482 nmol Ag/g dw sed.) exposures to Ag NPs and AgNO3, respectively. Worms...... environments. However, inference of bioavailability from our estimations of Ag assimilation efficiencies (AE) suggests that Ag (AE: 3–12% for AgNO3 and 0.1–0.8% for Ag NPs) is weakly bioavailable from sediment for this species. Thus, Ag amended to sediment as NPs might not pose greater problems than...

  13. The utilization of SiNWs/AuNPs-modified indium tin oxide (ITO) in fabrication of electrochemical DNA sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Jahwarhar Izuan Abdul [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemistry and Biology, Centre for Defense Foundation Studies, National Defense University of Malaysia, Sungai Besi Camp, 57000 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Yusof, Nor Azah, E-mail: azahy@upm.edu.my [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Abdullah, Jaafar [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Hashim, Uda [Institute of Nanoelectronic Engineering, Universiti Malaysia Perlis, 01000 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Hajian, Reza, E-mail: rezahajian@upm.edu.my [Institute of Advanced Technology, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-12-01

    This work describes the incorporation of SiNWs/AuNPs composite as a sensing material for DNA detection on indium tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass slide. The morphology of SiNWs/AuNPs composite as the modifier layer on ITO was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). The morphological studies clearly showed that SiNWs were successfully decorated with 20 nm-AuNPs using self-assembly monolayer (SAM) technique. The effective surface area for SiNWs/AuNPs-modified ITO enhanced about 10 times compared with bare ITO electrode. SiNWs/AuNPs nanocomposite was further explored as a matrix for DNA probe immobilization in detection of dengue virus as a bio-sensing model to evaluate its performance in electrochemical sensors. The hybridization of complementary DNA was monitored by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the redox indicator. The fabricated biosensor was able to discriminate significantly complementary, non-complementary and single-base mismatch oligonucleotides. The electrochemical biosensor was sensitive to target DNA related to dengue virus in the range of 9.0–178.0 ng/ml with detection limit of 3.5 ng/ml. In addition, SiNWs/AuNPs-modified ITO, regenerated up to 8 times and its stability was up to 10 weeks at 4 °C in silica gel. - Highlights: • A sensitive biosensor is presented for detection of dengue virus. • SiNWs and AuNPs used as nanocomposite layers on ITO for construction of biosensor • The detection mechanism is based on the interaction of MB with DNA bonded on AuNPs. • The reduction signal of MB decreases upon complementary hybridization.

  14. Photocatalysis enhancement of Au/BFO nanoparticles using plasmon resonance of Au NPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Cai, Zhongyang; Ma, Xueming, E-mail: xmma@phy.ecnu.edu.cn

    2015-12-15

    BiFeO{sub 3} (BFO) nanoparticles was synthesized via sol–gel technique, and successfully loaded with small sizes of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) by impregnation-reduction method to extremely enhance the BFO photocatalytic activity. The obviously stronger optical absorption of Au/BFO observed from the UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrum confirmed that the surface plasmon resonance (SPR) effect occured on the surface of Au NPs. And the surface plasmon-induced localized electric field could allow the formation of electron/hole pairs in the near surface region of BFO which can migrate to the surface without undergoing electron/hole (e{sup −}/h{sup +}) pair recombination. The more electrons and holes formed, the more ·OH will be generated to decompose the CR solution. When the gold loading in Au/BFO nanoparticles is 3.36 wt%, the obtained Au/BFO catalyst exhibits best photocatalytic activity evaluated by photocatalysis degradation of Congo red (CR) solution under the visible light irradiation.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of PVK/AgNPs nanocomposites prepared by laser ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd El-Kader, F H; Hakeem, N A; Elashmawi, I S; Menazea, A A

    2015-03-05

    Nanocomposites of Poly (n-vinylcarbazole) PVK/Ag nanoparticles were prepared by laser ablation of a silver plate in aqueous solution of chlorobenzene. The influences of laser parameters such as; time of irradiation, source power and wavelength (photon energy) on structural, morphological and optical properties have been investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) and Photoluminescence (PL). A correlation between the investigated properties has been discussed. XRD, TEM and PL indicated that the complexation between AgNPs and PVK in the composite system is possible. Only the reflection peak at 2θ=38° of AgNPs appeared in the composite nanoparticles while the other reflection peaks were destroyed. The nanoparticles shape and size distribution were evaluated from TEM images. TEM analysis revealed a lower average particle size at long laser irradiation time 40min and short laser wavelength 532nm together with high laser power 570mW. From UV-Visible spectra the values of absorption coefficient, absorption edge and energy tail were calculated. The reduction of band tail value with increasing the laser ablation parameters confirms the decrease of the disorder in such composite system. The PL and UV-Vis. spectra confirm that nanocomposite samples showed quantum confinement effect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Development of HA/Ag-NPs Composite Coating from Green Process for Hip Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozoya-Rodríguez, Denisse A; de Lima, Renata; Fraceto, Leonardo F; Ledezma Pérez, Antonio; Bazaldua Domínguez, Mercedes; Gómez Batres, Roberto; Reyes Rojas, Armando; Orozco Carmona, Víctor

    2017-08-08

    In the present study, biological hydroxyapatite (HA) was obtained from bovine bones through a thermal process. A total of 0% and 1% of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) synthesized from Opuntia ficus (nopal) were added to the biological hydroxyapatite coatings using an atmospheric plasma spray (APS) on a Ti6Al4V substrate. Following this, its antimicrobial efficiency was evaluated against the following bacterial strains: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This was conducted according to the Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS) Z2801:2000 "Antimicrobial Product-Test for Antimicrobial Activity and Efficacy". Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) showed that the silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) were evenly distributed on the coating surface. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) shows that apatite deposition occurs on a daily basis, maintaining a Ca/P rate between 2.12 and 1.45. Biocompatibility properties were evaluated with osteoblast-like cells (MC3T3-E1) by single-cell gel electrophoresis assay and Tali image cytometry.

  17. Controlling the Nanoscale Patterning of AuNPs on Silicon Surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sophie E; Davies, Philip R; Bowen, Jenna L; Allender, Chris J

    2013-03-21

    This study evaluates the effectiveness of vapour-phase deposition for creating sub-monolayer coverage of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) on silicon in order to exert control over subsequent gold nanoparticle deposition. Surface coverage was evaluated indirectly by observing the extent to which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) deposited onto the modified silicon surface. By varying the distance of the silicon wafer from the APTES source and concentration of APTES in the evaporating media, control over subsequent gold nanoparticle deposition was achievable to an extent. Fine control over AuNP deposition (AuNPs/μm²) however, was best achieved by adjusting the ionic concentration of the AuNP-depositing solution. Furthermore it was demonstrated that although APTES was fully removed from the silicon surface following four hours incubation in water, the gold nanoparticle-amino surface complex was stable under the same conditions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to study these affects.

  18. Controlling the Nanoscale Patterning of AuNPs on Silicon Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris J. Allender

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the effectiveness of vapour-phase deposition for creating sub-monolayer coverage of aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES on silicon in order to exert control over subsequent gold nanoparticle deposition. Surface coverage was evaluated indirectly by observing the extent to which gold nanoparticles (AuNPs deposited onto the modified silicon surface. By varying the distance of the silicon wafer from the APTES source and concentration of APTES in the evaporating media, control over subsequent gold nanoparticle deposition was achievable to an extent. Fine control over AuNP deposition (AuNPs/μm2 however, was best achieved by adjusting the ionic concentration of the AuNP-depositing solution. Furthermore it was demonstrated that although APTES was fully removed from the silicon surface following four hours incubation in water, the gold nanoparticle-amino surface complex was stable under the same conditions. Atomic force microscopy (AFM and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS were used to study these affects.

  19. NPS: A Tested Platform for Political Transformation Against Anger & Apathy in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allah Nawaz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Political inaction is a major ‘Barrier’ to the progress of democratic values and systems in a society. It is more critical in the developing countries like Pakistan. A huge body of research on political apathy and anger in Pakistan is reporting over and over on the causes and consequences of this pathetic psychology. All that is true however, rays of hope are always there provided nations continue searching for the opportunities through scientific and rigorous research accompanied with sincerity and sense of responsibility at all the decision making levels of the state. This paper postulates a solution model for the issue in the perspectives of Pakistan by capitalizing on the role of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT in the Instant Political Transformation of the developing countries like Egypt & Lybia. The New Public Sphere (NPS is populated with Global Civil Society (GCS where International Citizens are connected together 24/7 from any corner of the Global Village and involved in use of ICT for Social Activism. Pakistan now has millions of Internet and Cell-users who are the part of GCS and waiting for a ‘Trigger’ to switch from the ‘Informal Activism to Formal & Political Activism’ through NPS.

  20. Facile biosynthesis of Ag-NPs using Otostegia limbata plant extract: Physical characterization and auspicious biological activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizwan Kausar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs synthesized through reduction by Otostegia limbata green extract are, hereby, reported for the first time. It is very interesting to observe that in this case, O. limbata plant extract acts as a strong chelating agent in Ag-NPs formation through AgNO3. Scanning electron microscope (SEM studies expose that Ag-NPs formation is highly homogenous and spherical with mean particle size of 32±0.8 nm. A typical Ag absorption peak has been observed at 419 nm by ultra violet (UV-visible spectroscopy which have endorsed the successful formation of single phase Ag-NPs. X-ray diffraction (XRD and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR examination further validates the crystalline pure phase structure of Ag-NPs. Promising results have been recorded against protein kinase inhibition assay and antibacterial assay having prominent pathogenic strains. Our present study explores that biosynthesized eco-friendly Ag-NPs have great potential, in the future, for anticancer drug development with wide range pharmaceutical applications.

  1. RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs supported on nickel foam as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Lingling; Han, Yujie; Yu, You; Xu, Miao; Zhang, Xueping; Huang, Liang; Dong, Shaojun

    2017-11-15

    In this study, three-dimensional reduced graphene oxide/Au NPs/nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (RGO/Au NPs/N-doped CNTs) assembly supported on nickel foam was utilized as an anode for enzymatic biofuel cells (EBFCs). 3D RGO/Au NPs was obtained by electrodepositing reduced graphene oxide on nickel foam (Ni foam), while Au NPs were co-deposited during the process. Afterwards, nitrogen doped CNTs (N-CNTs) were allowed to grow seamlessly on the surfaces of 3D RGO/Au NPs via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. In this nanostructure, Au NPs co-deposition and nitrogen doping offer more active sites for bioelectrocatalysis. Additionally, N-CNTs were demonstrated providing high specific surface area for enzyme immobilization and facilitating the electron transfer between glucose oxidase (GOx) and electrode. The resulting bioanode achieved efficient glucose oxidation with high current densities of 7.02mAcm-2 (0.3V vs. Ag/AgCl). Coupling with a Pt cathode, the fabricated glucose/air biofuel cell exhibited an open-circuit potential of 0.32V and generated a maximum power density 235µWcm-2 at 0.15V. This novel electrode substrate achieved high performance in current density at bioelectrochemical systems and could be useful for further exploiting the application of three dimensional carbon-based nanomaterials in EBFCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. National Uranium Resource Evaluation: Torrington Quadrangle, Wyoming and Nebraska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seeland, D

    1982-09-01

    The Torrington 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ Quadrangle in southeastern Wyoming and western Nebraska was evaluated to identify areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium deposits likely to contain 100 tons of uranium with an average grade of not less than 100 ppM (0.01 percent) U/sub 3/O/sub 8/. Almost all uranium occurrences reported in the literature were visited and sampled. Geochemical analyses of rock samples collected during the study were used in the evaluation. Hydrogeochemical and stream-sediment analyses were not available. Aerial-radiometric, and helium soil-gas surveys were analyzed. Much of the quadrangle is covered by Tertiary rocks. To assess the uranium potential of the Tertiary and pre-Tertiary rocks 270 well logs were studied and both contour and geologic maps made of the pre-Oligocene surface east and north of the Laramie Mountains. Five environments favorable for uranium deposits were outlined. The first is in the coarse-grained arkosic sandstone facies of the Wasatch Formation and the Lebo Member of the Fort Union Formation in the southern Powder River Basin. The second is in the Wind River Formation in the Shirley Basin, a stratigraphic and lithologic equivalent of the Wasatch. The third is the Lower Cretaceous Cloverly Formation in the northeastern part of the quadrangle. The fourth is in the Upper Cretaceous Lance (Laramie) Formation and the Fox Hills Sandstone in the southeastern corner of the quadrangle. The fifth favorable environment is in Precambrian rocks in the Laramie Mountains and Hartville uplift.

  3. Large scale Wyoming transportation data: a resource planning tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Michael S.; Fancher, Tammy S.; Freeman, Aaron T.; Ziegler, Abra E.; Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center created statewide roads data for the Bureau of Land Management Wyoming State Office using 2009 aerial photography from the National Agriculture Imagery Program. The updated roads data resolves known concerns of omission, commission, and inconsistent representation of map scale, attribution, and ground reference dates which were present in the original source data. To ensure a systematic and repeatable approach of capturing roads on the landscape using on-screen digitizing from true color National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery, we developed a photogrammetry key and quality assurance/quality control protocols. Therefore, the updated statewide roads data will support the Bureau of Land Management’s resource management requirements with a standardized map product representing 2009 ground conditions. The updated Geographic Information System roads data set product, represented at 1:4,000 and +/- 10 meters spatial accuracy, contains 425,275 kilometers within eight attribute classes. The quality control of these products indicated a 97.7 percent accuracy of aspatial information and 98.0 percent accuracy of spatial locations. Approximately 48 percent of the updated roads data was corrected for spatial errors of greater than 1 meter relative to the pre-existing road data. Twenty-six percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 5 meters and 17 percent of the updated roads involved correcting spatial errors of greater than 9 meters. The Bureau of Land Management, other land managers, and researchers can use these new statewide roads data set products to support important studies and management decisions regarding land use changes, transportation and planning needs, transportation safety, wildlife applications, and other studies.

  4. Water resources of the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daddow, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Existing data were used in conjunction with onsite measurements to evaluate the water resources on the Wind River Indian Reservation, Wyoming. The reservation is located mainly in the Wind River drainage basin. Ground water is used for public- supply, domestic, agricultural, and industrial purposes, and potentially for irrigation. Deposits of Quaternary age provide water for domestic and public-supply uses. Median well yields from different types of Quaternary deposits ranged from 6 to 20 gallons per minute. The Wind River Formation of Tertiary age is a major source of water for domestic and public-supply uses; well yields ranged from 0.1 to 350 gallons per minute. For the Tensleep Sandstone and Madison Limestone of Paleozoic age, wells might yield as much as 1,000 gallons per minute. The dissolved-solids concentration of water from the Little Wind River and Popo Agie River flood-plain alluvium near mountains was generally less than 400 mg/L (milligrams per liter), but with increasing distance from mountains, the range was about 600 to about 750 mg/L. Dissolved-solids concentrations of water in the Wind River Formation ranged from 211 to 5,110 mg/L. Streams provide most water used for irrigation. Discharge records from streamflow-gaging stations indicate flow characteristics of streams on the reservation are extremely variable. Average annual runoff was 122 to 1,150 acre-feet per square mile on perennial streams with gaging stations. Near the mountains, most perennial streams had dissolved-solids concentrations less than 200 mg/L, and with increasing distance from the mountains, concentrations were about 400 to 600 mg/L.

  5. Data from selected Almond Formation outcrops -- Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, S.R.; Rawn-Schatzinger, V.

    1993-12-01

    The objectives of this research program are to: (1) determine the reservoir characteristics and production problems of shoreline barrier reservoirs; and (2) develop methods and methodologies to effectively characterize shoreline barrier reservoirs to predict flow patterns of injected and produced fluids. Two reservoirs were selected for detailed reservoir characterization studies -- Bell Creek field, Carter County, Montana, that produces from the Lower Cretaceous (Albian-Cenomanian) Muddy Formation, and Patrick Draw field, Sweetwater County, Wyoming that produces from the Upper Cretaceous (Campanian) Almond Formation of the Mesaverde Group. An important component of the research project was to use information from outcrop exposures of the producing formations to study the spatial variations of reservoir properties and the degree to which outcrop information can be used in the construction of reservoir models. A report similar to this one presents the Muddy Formation outcrop data and analyses performed in the course of this study (Rawn-Schatzinger, 1993). Two outcrop localities, RG and RH, previously described by Roehler (1988) provided good exposures of the Upper Almond shoreline barrier facies and were studied during 1990--1991. Core from core well No. 2 drilled approximately 0.3 miles downdip of outcrop RG was obtained for study. The results of the core study will be reported in a separate volume. Outcrops RH and RG, located about 2 miles apart were selected for detailed description and drilling of core plugs. One 257-ft-thick section was measured at outcrop RG, and three sections {approximately}145 ft thick located 490 and 655 feet apart were measured at the outcrop RH. Cross-sections of these described profiles were constructed to determine lateral facies continuity and changes. This report contains the data and analyses from the studied outcrops.

  6. Case study of controlled recirculation at a Wyoming trona mine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, C.; Scott, D.; Frey, G.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled recirculation has been used in the metal/nonmetal mining industry for energy savings when heating and cooling air, in undersea mining and for increasing airflow to mining areas. For safe and effective use of controlled district recirculation, adequate airflow to dilute contaminants must exist prior to implementation, ventilation circuit parameters must be accurately quantified, ventilation network modeling must be up to date, emergency planning scenarios must be performed and effective monitoring and control systems must be installed and used. Safety and health issues that must be considered and may be improved through the use of controlled district recirculation include blasting fumes, dust, diesel emissions, radon and contaminants from mine fires. Controlled recirculation methods are expected to become more widely used as mines reach greater working depths, requiring that these health and safety issues be well understood. The U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted two controlled recirculation tests over three days at a Wyoming trona mine, utilizing an inline booster fan to improve airflow to a remote and difficult-to-ventilate development section. Test results were used to determine the effect that recirculation had on air qualities and quantities measured in that section and in other adjacent areas. Pre-test conditions, including ventilation quantities and pressures, were modeled using VnetPC. During each test, ventilation quantities and pressures were measured, as well as levels of total dust. Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) tracer gas was used to simulate a mine contaminant to monitor recirculation wave cycles. Results showed good correlation between the model results and measured values for airflows, pressure differentials, tracer gas arrival times, mine gasses and dust levels. PMID:26251567

  7. Retrospective Analysis of Low Flows at Headwater Watersheds in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutchkova, D. D.; Miller, S. N.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding summer low-flow variability and change in the mountainous West has important implications for water allocations downstream and for maintaining water availability for drinking water supply, reservoir storage, industrial, agricultural, and ecological needs. Wildfires and insect infestations are classical disturbance hydrology topics. It is unclear, however, what are their effects on streamflow and in particular low-flows, when vegetation disturbances are overlapping in time and combined with highly variable and potentially changing local climate. The purpose of this study, therefore, is to quantify changes in low-flows resulting from disturbance in headwater streams. Here we present a retrospective analysis based on: (1) 49-75 complete water years (wy) of daily streamflow data (USGS) for 14 high-elevation headwater watersheds with varying areas (60-1730 km2, 86-100% of watershed area >2000masl) and evergreen forest cover (15-82%), (2) 25-36 complete wy of daily snow-water equivalent accumulation (SWE) and precipitation data from Wyoming SNOTEL stations, (3) burned area boundaries for 20wy (MTBS project), (4) aerial surveys by R1, R2, R4 Forest Service Regions for 18wy (data on tree mortality). We quantify the change in various low-flow characteristics (e.g. post-snowmelt baseflow, Q90 and Q95, 3-,7-, 30- and 90-day annual minima etc.) while accounting for local inter- and multi-annual climate variability by using SWE accumulation data, as it integrates both temperature and precipitation changes. Our approach differs from typical before-after field-based investigation for paired watersheds, as it provides a synthesis over large temporal and spatial scales, resulting in spectrum of possible hydrologic responses due to varying disturbance severity. Quantifying the changes in low-flows and low-flow variability will improve our understanding and will facilitate water management and planning at local state-wide level.

  8. Boron toxicity of coal mining areas in southwestern Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, R.L. [Idaho Dept. of Health and Welfare, Boise, ID (United States); Smith, P.W. [Wyoming Dept. of Environmental Quality, Cheyenne, WY (United States); Smith, J.A. [Wyoming Dept. of Environmental Quality, Lander, WY (United States)

    1990-12-31

    Boron tolerance of native plant species is not generally known. This study was conducted to determine the B tolerance of thickspike wheatgrass [Agropyron dasystachyum (Hook.) Scribn.], a species commonly used to reclaim minelands in the semiarid and arid West. Pre-germinated thickspike wheatgrass seeds were planted in three soil materials obtained from a coal mine in southwestern Wyoming. Soils were taken from an undisturbed bottomland (clay), a topsoil stockpile (sand), and a carbonaceous shale outcrop (shale) with inherent hot water extractable-B (HWE-B) levels of 2.8, 1.3, and 3.5 mg/kg soil, respectively. Each soil material was treated with boric acid solutions to produce seven different HWE-B levels. B levels ranged from inherent conditions up to 57.9 mg/kg. Plants were grown under greenhouse conditions for 100 days in pots containing 2.9 kg of clay or shale or 3.4 kg sand. Wheatgrass shoot and root dry matter production were measured. Toxicity symptoms (leaf tip necrosis) were observed in all treatments but the controls during the study. Levels of 11.6 and 20.5 mg/kg HWE-B produced an average of 10 and 20% reductions in shoot production, respectively. Ten and 20% reductions in root growth were observed with 3.8 and 6.6 mg/kg HWE-B, respectively. Plants grown in the sand were most B sensitive. This is postulated to be a result of the drier conditions attendant in that soil. Results indicate that thickspike wheatgrass can tolerate HWE-B levels in excess of 5 mg/kg. However, actual field tolerance levels will be dependent on climatic and soil environmental conditions, particularly moisture availability.

  9. 76 FR 6496 - Special Flight Rules Area in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park, Draft Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-04

    ...Pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, 42 U.S.C. 4332(2)(C), the National Park Service announces the availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Special Flight Rules Area in the Vicinity of Grand Canyon National Park for Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona. The four alternatives in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) that are being considered include: Alternative A Current Condition: Key elements are corridors open year round, annual allocation cap of 93,971, and no quiet technology incentive. Current tours for helicopters and fixed wing remain the same. Alternative E Alternating Seasonal Use: Key elements are corridors alternating on a seasonal basis, daily allocation cap of 364 for air tour and air tour related, and conversion to quiet technology aircraft. Alternative F Modified Current Condition: Key elements are similar to current condition except for one way east bound tour for quiet technology, elimination of Nankoweap loop, incentives for quiet technology aircraft, and seasonal shift for Dragon corridor. NPS Preferred Alternative: Key elements are short-loop corridors alternate on a seasonal basis, four-year phase in of long-loop for quiet technology aircraft, annual allocation cap of 65,000 air tour and related operations and a daily cap of 364 for commercial air tours, increased altitudes for some areas and flight free zones, and conversion of quiet technology within ten years.

  10. Health effects of living in the vicinity of the landfills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Lar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Landfill sites are the easiest, the cheapest and the most common way of waste management and disposal. In the face of the increasing amount of waste, the dynamics of globalization and urbanization process, waste management is an important issue of ecological policy in highly developed countries. Landfill sites intensify environmental threats for the neighborhood and give rise to toxic substances which impair human health being released from the landfills. These are persistent organic pollutants (POPs, heavy metals and also biological gas, bioaerosols, bacteria and viruses. Scientists have conducted a lot of research to evaluate the impact of landfill sites on human health living in their vicinity. They found increased occurrence of congenital anomalies, increased risk of certain cancers and low birth weight of infants. The results of the studies didn’t deliver absolute proof of relation between the impact of landfill sites on the induction of cancer and other diseases. There is a necessity to conduct further research to evaluate the impact of landfill sites on people health living in the vicinity

  11. Energetic particle fluxes in vicinity of Jupiter's moon Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podzolko, Mikhail; Getselev, Igor; Gubar, Yuriy; Veselovsky, Igor

    Currently several projects of sending research space vehicles to Jupiter and its Galilean moons in 2020 are being developed. In particular, Russian Space Agency proposed the project of Europa lander. During the mission the spacecraft will be affected by charged particles of various origins. The greatest hazard will originate from powerful Jupiter's radiation belts, especially during the time of spacecraft operation near Europa and on its surface. The absorbed radiation dose during 2 months in Europa's orbit under shielding compared to that for "Galileo" spacecraft will amount to almost 1 megarad, the major contribution to it will originate from relativistic electrons. However, near Europa part of the charged particle flux will be shaded by the moon. Obviously, fluxes of particles of all energies on its surface will be lower by at least 2 times, than in the same point of space without Europa. But furthermore, the reduction of the fluxes in vicinity of Europa is nonuniform, and differs for the surface and the low-altitude orbit. This is caused by several factors: the complexity of particle trajectories near Europa and in Jupiter's magnetosphere in general, difference of Europa's orbital plane from Jupiter's geomagnetic equator plane, certain disturbance of Jupiter's magnetic field in vicinity of Europa, possible influence of electric fields and Europa's tenuous atmosphere. In the current study computations of energetic particle flux distribution near Europa and on its surface are made, taking into account several of the above-mentioned factors.

  12. Economic importance of elk hunting in Jackson Hole, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Lynne; Loomis, John B.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) and the National Park Service (NPS) are preparing a management plan for bison and elk inhabiting the National Elk Refuge (NER) and Grand Teton National Park (GTNP). These animals are part of the bison and elk herds in Jackson Hole, one of the largest concentrations of free-ranging bison and elk in the world. A range of alternatives for managing the bison and elk herds in the project area will be developed in an Environmental Impact Statement. The EIS will include an analysis of elk hunting programs related to the NER and GTNP. Management of the Jackson elk herd on the NER and GTNP can impact the number of hunters allowed and hunter harvest ratios on the NER, GTNP, and Bridger Teton National Forest (BTNF).

  13. Wyoming big sagebrush: Efforts towards development of target plants for restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayla R. Herriman

    2009-01-01

    Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata Nutt. ssp. wyomingensis) is a dominant shrub throughout much of the interior western United States. It is a key component of sagebrush steppe ecosystems, which have been degraded due to European settlement, improper land use, and changing fire regimes resulting from the invasion of exotic...

  14. Ecological types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range, Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaron F. Wells; Janis L. Boettinger; Kent E. Houston; David W. Roberts

    2015-01-01

    This guide presents a classification of the Ecological Types of the eastern slope of the Wind River Range (WRR) on the Shoshone National Forest in west-central Wyoming. Ecological Types integrate vegetation and environmental characteristics, including climate, geology, landform, and soils, into a comprehensive ecosystem classification. The three objectives are: (1)...

  15. 78 FR 63491 - Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-24

    ... manage the lands, resources, and facilities administered by the BLM. Donald A. Simpson, State Director... Bureau of Land Management Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of this notice is to request...

  16. 76 FR 68782 - Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-07

    ...'s responsibilities to manage the lands, resources, and facilities administered by the BLM. Donald A...] [FR Doc No: 2011-28708] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [LLWY910000 L16100000.XX0000] Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management...

  17. Growing spearmint, thyme, oregano, and rosemary in Northern Wyoming using plastic tunnels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Growing perennial herbs in northern climate such as Northern Wyoming is a challenge. Due to short frost-free period, high wind, and inclement weather it is impossible to harvest any herbs twice a year (summer and late fall) without using any form of season extension methods. Hence, we set up an expe...

  18. Influence of climate on the growth of quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Colorado and southern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    M. M. Dudley; Jose Negron; N. A. Tisserat; W. D. Shepperd; W. R. Jacobi

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed a series of increment cores collected from 260 adult dominant or co-dominant quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) trees from national forests across Colorado and southern Wyoming in 2009 and 2010. Half of the cores were collected from trees in stands with a high amount of crown dieback, and half were from lightly damaged stands. We define the level of...

  19. CO2 flux through a Wyoming seasonal snowpack: Diffusional and pressure pumping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    William Massman; Richard Sommerfeld; Karl Zeller; Ted Hehn; Laura Hudnell; Shannon Rochelle

    1995-01-01

    The movement of trace gases through porous media results from a combination of molecular diffusion and natural convection forced by turbulent atmospheric pressure pumping. This study presents observational and modeling results of an experiment to estimate the C02 flux through a seasonal snowpack in the Rocky Mountains of southern Wyoming, USA. Profiles of C02 mole...

  20. Lynx home range and movements in Montana and Wyoming: Preliminary results [Chapter 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Squires; Tom Laurion

    2000-01-01

    Preliminary telemetry data suggest that lynx in Montana and Wyoming have large home ranges; this result supports the Koehler and Aubry (1994) contention that lynx from southern lynx populations have large spatial-use areas. Annual home ranges of males were larger than females. Straight-line, daily travel distance averaged 2 to 4 km, which is similar to northern...

  1. Database for the geologic map of Upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abendini, Atosa A.; Robinson, Joel E.; Muffler, L. J. Patrick; White, D. E.; Beeson, Melvin H.; Truesdell, A. H.

    2015-01-01

    This dataset contains contacts, geologic units, and map boundaries from Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1371, "The Geologic map of upper Geyser Basin, Yellowstone, National Park, Wyoming". This dataset was constructed to produce a digital geologic map as a basis for ongoing studies of hydrothermal processes.

  2. Adapting to Mother Nature's changing climatic conditions: Flexible stocking for enhancing profitability of Wyoming ranchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranching is a dynamic business in which profitability is impacted by changing weather and climatic conditions. A ranch-level model using a representative ranch in southeastern Wyoming was used to compare economic outcomes from growing season precipitation scenarios of: 1) historical precipitation da...

  3. Do container volume, site preparation, and field fertilization affect restoration potential of Wyoming big sagebrush?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayla R. Herriman; Anthony S. Davis; Kent G. Apostol; Olga. A. Kildisheva; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Kas Dumroese

    2016-01-01

    Land management practices, invasive species expansion, and changes in the fire regime greatly impact the distribution of native plants in natural areas. Wyoming big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis), a keystone species in the Great Basin, has seen a 50% reduction in its distribution. For many dryland species, reestablishment efforts have...

  4. Bioclimatic models estimate areas with suitable climate for Armillaria spp. in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    James T. Blodgett; John W. Hanna; Eric W. I. Pitman; Sara M. Ashiglar; John E. Lundquist; Mee-Sook Kim; Amy L. Ross-Davis; Ned B. Klopfenstein

    2015-01-01

    Armillaria species range from beneficial saprobes to damaging root pathogens, and their ecological roles and impacts vary with environment and host. Armillaria solidipes [pending vote to conserve A. ostoyae . (Redhead et al. 2011 )] is known as an aggressive pathogen of conifers and causes tree mortality and significant growth loss in Wyoming and throughout...

  5. Surveillance for Baylisascaris procyonis in raccoons (Procyon lotor) from Wyoming, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipas, Michael J; Page, L Kristen; Kazacos, Kevin R

    2014-10-01

    Baylisascaris procyonis is a common roundworm of raccoons that causes severe clinical disease in many vertebrates, including humans. The distribution of B. procyonis in the US is poorly documented in portions of its range and has not been reported from Wyoming. Our objectives were to determine the statewide distribution and prevalence of this parasite in raccoons in Wyoming, using intestinal and fecal examinations. We examined 363 raccoons from 23 Wyoming counties in 2009-11, testing the reliability of two methods (intestinal extrusion and incision) to determine worm burdens. We found 163 raccoons (45%) positive for B. procyonis. The two methods of examination did not differ, although extrusion missed some infections. Neither age nor sex affected apparent prevalence or worm burdens. Prevalence did not differ with land use, yet burden was highest among rural raccoons. Fecal examination revealed that juvenile raccoons had a higher proportion of patent infections than adults, but neither sex nor location were indicators of prevalence. Egg density (eggs per gram of feces) did not differ by sex or age; however, rural raccoons had higher egg densities than urban/suburban animals. Understanding the distribution and prevalence of B. procyonis in Wyoming, especially in and around highly populated areas, is an important step in educating the general public and medical community on the potential risks of raccoon roundworm infection.

  6. 78 FR 21565 - Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Television Broadcasting Services; Jackson, Wyoming to Wilmington, DE AGENCY... the Congressional review Act, see 5 U.S.C. 801(a)(1)(A). List of Subjects in 47 CFR Part 73 Television...

  7. Using Egocentric Networks to Illustrate Information Seeking and Sharing by Alfalfa Farmers in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noy, Shiri; Jabbour, Randa

    2017-01-01

    We explored using farmers' egocentric (personal) networks to understand how they seek farming advice and how their advice networks map onto their friendship networks. We examined results from a survey of alfalfa farmers (n = 634) in Wyoming. Farmers reported seeking advice from neighbors and fellow farmers, and most indicated that these people are…

  8. Ozone and modeled stomatal conductance at a high elevation subalpine site in southeastern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert C. Musselman; Karl F. Zeller; Nedialko T. Nikolov

    1998-01-01

    Ozone concentrations have been monitored at the Glacier Lakes Ecosystem Experiment Site (GLEES) in the Snowy Range of the Medicine Bow Mountains 55 km west of Laramie, Wyoming, USA. The site is located at 3,186 m elevation in a large subalpine meadow of a mature subalpine forest near timberline. Continuous ozone and meteorological monitoring are a part of the GLEES...

  9. Assessment of Vaccine Exemptions among Wyoming School Children, 2009 and 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pride, Kerry R.; Geissler, Aimee L.; Kolasa, Maureen S.; Robinson, Byron; Van Houten, Clay; McClinton, Reginald; Bryan, Katie; Murphy, Tracy

    2014-01-01

    During 2010-2011, varicella vaccination was an added requirement for school entrance in Wyoming. Vaccination exemption rates were compared during the 2009-2010 and 2011-2012 school years, and impacts of implementing a new childhood vaccine requirement were evaluated. All public schools, grades K-12, were required to report vaccination status of…

  10. 77 FR 30953 - Approval and Promulgation of State Implementation Plans; State of Wyoming; Regional Haze Rule...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-24

    ... Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments monitoring network. xii. The initials MRR mean or... mean or refer to the State of Wyoming. Table of Contents I. General Information A. What should I... Enforcement g. Program Evaluation 2. Inventory and Tracking System 3. Strategy for Use of Alternatives to...

  11. 76 FR 23333 - Notice of Proposed Withdrawal Extension and Opportunity for Public Meeting; Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-26

    ... location and entry under the United States mining laws to protect unique topographic characteristics and... action and announces the date, time, and location of a public meeting. DATES: Comments must be received... Caribou Counties, Wyoming, from location and entry under the United States mining laws (30 U.S.C. ch. 2...

  12. Wyoming Community College Commission Agency 5 Year Strategic Plan, 2014-2018

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Wyoming Community College Commission was tasked to create a blue-ribbon panel that would forge a Strategic Plan for the Community College System as a whole. This 5 year strategic plan will serve as a road map moving forward, barring any new legislative, commission or federal requirements that may require a change in the agency's…

  13. Wyoming Community College Commission Agency 5 Year Strategic Plan, 2015-2019

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming Community College Commission, 2017

    2017-01-01

    In 2009, the Wyoming Community College Commission was tasked to create a blue-ribbon panel that would forge a Strategic Plan for the Community College System as a whole. This 5 year strategic plan will serve as a road map moving forward, barring any new legislative, commission or federal requirements that may require a change in the agency's…

  14. 75 FR 66789 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations: Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... be sent to Shelley Gregory, Bureau of Land Management, Pinedale Field Office, 1625 West Pine Street, P.O. Box 768, Pinedale, Wyoming 82941, or e-mailed to shelley[email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Shelley Gregory, Bureau of Land Management, Pinedale Field Office, 1625 West Pine Street...

  15. 75 FR 38538 - Notice of Intent To Solicit Nominations: Pinedale Anticline Working Group, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-02

    ... the Interior. ADDRESSES: Nominations should be sent to Ms. Shelley Gregory, Bureau of Land Management, Pinedale Field Office, 1625 West Pine Street, P.O. Box 768, Pinedale, Wyoming 82941, or e-mailed to shelley[email protected] . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Ms. Shelley Gregory, Bureau of Land Management...

  16. 78 FR 77644 - Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota; Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming; Teckla...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-24

    ... in Wyoming. The line would be constructed on wood or steel H-frame structures for most of its length with possibly some steel monopole structures in the Rapid City area. The structures would be 65 to 75... of transmission line Require a 125 foot right-of-way Construction of wood or steel H-frame structures...

  17. Microscale patterns of tree establishment near upper treeline, Snowy Range, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. H. Moir; Shannon G. Rochelle; A. W. Schoettle

    1999-01-01

    We report tree seedling (mostly Picea engelmannii, some Abies lasiocarpa, very infrequent Pinus contorta) invasion into meadows at upper timberline in the Snowy Range, Wyoming, from 1994 to 1996. We used gradient analysis to relate this to environmental patterns, particularly plant community structure (as aggregates of plant life-forms) and persistence of snowpack in...

  18. Distribution of Ribes, an alternate host of white pine blister rust, in Colorado and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holly S. J. Kearns; William R. Jacobi; Kelly S. Burns; Brian W. Geils

    2008-01-01

    Ribes (currants and gooseberries) are alternate hosts for Cronartium ribicola, the invasive fungus that causes blister rust of white pines (Pinus, subgenus Strobus) in the Rocky Mountain region of Colorado and Wyoming. The location, species, and density of Ribes can affect...

  19. A crocodylian trace from the Lance Formation (Upper Cretaceous) of Wyoming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Falkingham, Peter L; Milàn, Jesper; Manning, Philip L

    2010-01-01

    A 1.5-m-long double sinusoidal trace from the Lance Formation of Wyoming, U.S.A, is attributed a crocodylian origin. The trace forms part of a diverse tracksite containing dinosaur and bird tracks. The double sinusoidal nature of the trace is suggested to have originated from the dual undulatory...

  20. Conversion of Low-Rank Wyoming Coals into Gasoline by Direct Liquefaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polyakov, Oleg

    2013-12-31

    Under the cooperative agreement program of DOE and funding from Wyoming State’s Clean Coal Task Force, Western Research Institute and Thermosolv LLC studied the direct conversion of Wyoming coals and coal-lignin mixed feeds into liquid fuels in conditions highly relevant to practice. During the Phase I, catalytic direct liquefaction of sub-bituminous Wyoming coals was investigated. The process conditions and catalysts were identified that lead to a significant increase of desirable oil fraction in the products. The Phase II work focused on systematic study of solvothermal depolymerization (STD) and direct liquefaction (DCL) of carbonaceous feedstocks. The effect of the reaction conditions (the nature of solvent, solvent/lignin ratio, temperature, pressure, heating rate, and residence time) on STD was investigated. The effect of a number of various additives (including lignin, model lignin compounds, lignin-derivable chemicals, and inorganic radical initiators), solvents, and catalysts on DCL has been studied. Although a significant progress has been achieved in developing solvothermal depolymerization, the side reactions – formation of considerable amounts of char and gaseous products – as well as other drawbacks do not render aqueous media as the most appropriate choice for commercial implementation of STD for processing coals and lignins. The trends and effects discovered in DCL point at the specific features of liquefaction mechanism that are currently underutilized yet could be exploited to intensify the process. A judicious choice of catalysts, solvents, and additives might enable practical and economically efficient direct conversion of Wyoming coals into liquid fuels.

  1. Checklist of copepods (Crustacea: Calanoida, Cyclopoida,Harpacticoida) from Wyoming, USA, with new state records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presentation of a comprehensive checklist of the copepod fauna of Wyoming, USA with 41 species of copepods; based on museum specimens, literature reviews, and active surveillance. Of these species 19 were previously unknown from the state. This checklist includes species in the families Centropagida...

  2. Bioinspired and Biomimetic AgNPs/Gentamicin-Embedded Silk Fibroin Coatings for Robust Antibacterial and Osteogenetic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wenhao; Jia, Zhaojun; Xiong, Pan; Yan, Jianglong; Li, Yangyang; Li, Ming; Cheng, Yan; Zheng, Yufeng

    2017-08-09

    With the progressively increasing demand for orthopedic Ti implants, the balance between two primary complications restricting implant applications is needed to be solved: the lack of bone tissue integration and biomedical device-associated infections (BAI), where emergence of multiresistance bacteria make it worse. Notably, a combination of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) and a kind of antibiotic can synergistically inhibit bacterial growth, where a low concentration of AgNPs has been confirmed to promote the proliferation and osteogenesis of osteoblasts. In this work, we built AgNPs/gentamicin (Gen)-embedded silk fibroin (SF)-based biomimetic coatings on orthopedic titanium by a facile dipping-drying circular process and with the assistance of polydopamine (PD). Ag(+) was reduced to AgNPs by SF under ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and then they were detected by transmission electron microscope (TEM) images and UV-visible (UV-vis) analyses. Intriguingly, the addition of Gen highly improved the reduction efficiency of Ag(+). The antibacterial efficiency of SF-based coatings was examined by challenging them with pathogenic Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteria which produced biofilms, and consequently, we found that low concentration loading, durable release of Ag(+) (28 days), and 10-fold improvement of antibacterial efficiency were achieved for our novel AgNPs- and Gen-embeded silk fibroin coatings. In bacteria and a cells cocultured system, AgNPs/Gen-embedded coatings strongly inhibited adhesion and proliferation of S. aureus, simultaneously improving cell adhesion and growth. To investigate cytocompatibility and osteogenic potential, different coatings were cultured with MC3T3 cells; AgNPs/Gen-embedded coatings showed generally acceptable biocompatibility (cell adhesion, proliferation, and viability) and accelerated osteoblast maturation (alkaline phosphatase production, matrix secretion, and calcification). Expectantly, this novel biofunctional coating will

  3. Effects of computing parameters and measurement locations on the estimation of 3D NPS in non-stationary MDCT images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miéville, Frédéric A; Bolard, Gregory; Bulling, Shelley; Gudinchet, François; Bochud, François O; Verdun, François R

    2013-11-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the impact of computing parameters and the location of volumes of interest (VOI) on the calculation of 3D noise power spectrum (NPS) in order to determine an optimal set of computing parameters and propose a robust method for evaluating the noise properties of imaging systems. Noise stationarity in noise volumes acquired with a water phantom on a 128-MDCT and a 320-MDCT scanner were analyzed in the spatial domain in order to define locally stationary VOIs. The influence of the computing parameters in the 3D NPS measurement: the sampling distances bx,y,z and the VOI lengths Lx,y,z, the number of VOIs NVOI and the structured noise were investigated to minimize measurement errors. The effect of the VOI locations on the NPS was also investigated. Results showed that the noise (standard deviation) varies more in the r-direction (phantom radius) than z-direction plane. A 25 × 25 × 40 mm(3) VOI associated with DFOV = 200 mm (Lx,y,z = 64, bx,y = 0.391 mm with 512 × 512 matrix) and a first-order detrending method to reduce structured noise led to an accurate NPS estimation. NPS estimated from off centered small VOIs had a directional dependency contrary to NPS obtained from large VOIs located in the center of the volume or from small VOIs located on a concentric circle. This showed that the VOI size and location play a major role in the determination of NPS when images are not stationary. This study emphasizes the need for consistent measurement methods to assess and compare image quality in CT. Copyright © 2012 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Rapid detection of NBOME's and other NPS on blotter papers by direct ATR-FTIR spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho Neto, José

    2015-07-01

    Blotter paper is among the most common forms of consumption of new psychotropic substances (NPS), formerly referred as designer drugs. In many cases, users are misled to believe they are taking LSD when, in fact, they are taking newer and less known drugs like the NBOMEs or other substituted phenethylamines. We report our findings in quick testing of blotter papers for illicit substances like NBOMEs and other NPS by taking ATR-FTIR spectra directly from blotters seized on the streets, without any sample preparation. Both sides (front and back) of each blotter were tested. Collected data were analyzed by single- and multi-component spectral matching and submitted to chemometric discriminant analysis. Our results showed that, on 66.7% of the cases analyzed, seized blotters contained one or more types of NBOMEs, confirming the growing presence of this novel substances on the market. Matching IR signals were detected on both or just one side of the blotters and showed variable strength. Although no quantitative analysis was made, detection of these substances by the proposed approach serves as indication of variable and possibly higher dosages per blotter when compared to LSD, which showed to be below the detection limit of the applied method. Blotters containing a mescaline-like compound, later confirmed by GC-MS and LC-MS to be MAL (methallylescaline), a substance very similar to mescaline, were detected among the samples tested. Validity of direct ATR-FTIR testing was confirmed by checking the obtained results against independent GC-MS or LC-MS results for the same cases/samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Quantifying Mapping Orbit Performance in the Vicinity of Primitive Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlak, Thomas A.; Broschart, Stephen B.; Lantoine, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Predicting and quantifying the capability of mapping orbits in the vicinity of primitive bodies is challenging given the complex orbit geometries that exist and the irregular shape of the bodies themselves. This paper employs various quantitative metrics to characterize the performance and relative effectiveness of various types of mapping orbits including terminator, quasi-terminator, hovering, ping pong, and conic-like trajectories. Metrics of interest include surface area coverage, lighting conditions, and the variety of viewing angles achieved. The metrics discussed in this investigation are intended to enable mission designers and project stakeholders to better characterize candidate mapping orbits during preliminary mission formulation activities. The goal of this investigation is to understand the trade space associated with carrying out remote sensing campaigns at small primitive bodies in the context of a robotic space mission. Specifically, this study seeks to understand the surface viewing geometries, ranges, etc. that are available from several commonly proposed mapping orbits architectures

  6. Particle transport in the vicinity of divertor separatrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Y.; Lyu, J. C.

    2017-10-01

    Guiding center orbit following code in a tokamak edge geometry is developed which connects straight field line coordinate system (away from the separatrix) and Cartesian coordinate system (in the vicinity of the separatrix) smoothly in the equation of motion. In the presence of magnetic stochasticity charged particles in the closed magnetic field line region can be transported to the open field line region and then hit the divertor plates within several toroidal transits. Our preliminary studies suggest finite heat load both on the inner and outer divertor plates. Energy spectrum of particles reaching the plates (which differs from that of the bulk plasma) as function of imposed magnetic stochasticity, is analyzed. This work is supported by Taiwan MOST 104-2112-M-006-019.

  7. Neuropharmacology of new psychoactive substances (NPS: focus on the rewarding and reinforcing properties of cannabimimetics and amphetamine-like stimulants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina eMiliano

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available New psychoactive substances (NPS are a heterogeneous and rapidly evolving class of molecules available on the global illicit drug market (e.g smart shops, internet, dark net as a substitute for controlled substances. The use of NPS, mainly consumed along with other drugs of abuse and/or alcohol, has resulted in a significantly growing number of mortality and emergency admissions for overdoses, as reported by several poison centers from all over the world. The fact that the number of NPS have more than doubled over the last 10 years, is a critical challenge to governments, the scientific community, and civil society (UNODC, World Drug Report, 2014; EMCDDA, European Drug Report 2014: Trends and developments. The chemical structure (phenethylamines, piperazine, cathinones, tryptamines, synthetic cannabinoids of NPS and their pharmacological and clinical effects (hallucinogenic, anesthetic, dissociative, depressant help classify them into different categories. In the recent past, 50% of newly identified NPS have been classified as synthetic cannabinoids followed by new phenethylamines (17%(WDR, 2014. Besides peripheral toxicological effects, many NPS seem to have addictive properties. Behavioral, neurochemical, and electrophysiological evidence can help in detecting them. This manuscript will review existing literature about the addictive and rewarding properties of the most popular NPS classes: cannabimimetics (JWH, HU, CP series and amphetamine-like stimulants (amphetamine, methamphetamine, methcathinone and MDMA analogues. Moreover, the review will include recent data from our lab which links JWH-018, a CB1 and CB2 agonist more potent than Δ9-THC, to other cannabinoids with known abuse potential, and to other classes of abused drugs that increase dopamine signaling in the Nucleus Accumbens (NAc shell. Thus the neurochemical mechanisms that produce the rewarding properties of JWH-018, which most likely contributes to the greater incidence of

  8. Green synthesis of ZnO NPs from various parts of Azhadirachta indica (neem) plant as biotemplates for anti-bacterial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Savita; Oudhia, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    A green and cost effective method of production of ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) was developed using extracts from different parts of Neem plant (e.g. leaf, seed, and stem) as bio templates. ZnO NPs obtained through these bio-templates exhibit different structures, morphologies and optical properties, showing potential of the present method in preparing NPs with desired properties, FTIR and XRD techniques were used for characterization. A comparison of antibacterial activities of ZnO NPs show decreasing zone of inhibition with increasing particle sizes. The as prepared ZnO NPs functionalized with various materials to make them bio compatible. It was observed that natural tri-peptide GSH was most effective capping agents for controlling the toxicity of ZnO NPs. A mechanism is proposed to explain the variation in growth patterns and properties of ZnO NPs obtained from the aforementioned bio-templates.

  9. Relative evaluation of micronutrients (MN) and its respective nanoparticles (NPs) as additives for the enhanced methane generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juntupally, Sudharshan; Begum, Sameena; Allu, Sarat Kumar; Nakkasunchi, Shalini; Madugula, Mrudula; Anupoju, Gangagni Rao

    2017-08-01

    In the present work, effect of micro nutrients (MN) (NiCl2, Fe2O3, CoCl2, (NH4)6Mo7O24) was compared with nanoparticles (NPs) of respective MN with cattle manure (CM) slurry in single and bi-phasic anaerobic digestion (AD) at a hydraulic residence time (HRT) of 20days at a mesophilic temperature of 37±2°C for the generation of biogas with enhanced methane (70-80%). Experiments were also carried out with CM slurry as control. During single phase AD, highest biogas production of 0.16L/(gVS reduced) and 0.14L/(gVS reduced) was obtained from Fe3O4 NPs and CoCl2 MN respectively whereas in bi-phasic AD 0.3L/(gVS reduced) and 0.2L/(gVS reduced) was obtained from NiO NPs and NiCl2 MN correspondingly. The results elucidated that NiCl2 (either as MN or NPs) yielded highest biogas in comparison with either control or other MN and NPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High-performance SERS substrate based on hybrid structure of graphene oxide/AgNPs/Cu film@pyramid Si

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhe; Xu, Shi Cai; Zhang, Chao; Liu, Xiao Yun; Gao, Sai Sai; Hu, Li Tao; Guo, Jia; Ma, Yong; Jiang, Shou Zhen; Si, Hai Peng

    2016-12-01

    We present a novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on graphene oxide/silver nanoparticles/copper film covered silicon pyramid arrays (GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si) by a low-cost and simple method. The GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si substrate presents high sensitivity, good homogeneity and well stability with R6G molecules as a probe. The detected concentration of Rhodamine 6 G (R6G) is as low as 10-15 M. These sensitive SERS behaviors are also confirmed in theory via a commercial COMSOL software, the electric field enhancement is not only formed between the AgNPs, but also formed between the AgNPs and Cu film. And the GO/AgNPs/PCu@Si substrates also present good property on practical application for the detection of methylene blue (MB) and crystal violet (CV). This work may offer a novel and practical method to facilitate the SERS applications in areas of medicine, food safety and biotechnology.

  11. Laminin Receptor-Avid Nanotherapeutic EGCg-AuNPs as a Potential Alternative Therapeutic Approach to Prevent Restenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoobchandani, Menka; Katti, Kavita; Maxwell, Adam; Fay, William P.; Katti, Kattesh V.

    2016-01-01

    In our efforts to develop new approaches to treat and prevent human vascular diseases, we report herein our results on the proliferation and migration of human smooth muscles cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) using epigallocatechin-3-gallate conjugated gold nanoparticles (EGCg-AuNPs) as possible alternatives to drug coated stents. Detailed in vitro stability studies of EGCg-AuNPs in various biological fluids, affinity and selectivity towards SMCs and ECs have been investigated. The EGCg-AuNPs showed selective inhibitory efficacy toward the migration of SMCs. However, the endothelial cells remained unaffected under similar experimental conditions. The cellular internalization studies have indicated that EGCg-AuNPs internalize into the SMCs and ECs within short periods of time through laminin receptor mediated endocytosis mode. Favorable toxicity profiles and selective affinity toward SMCs and ECs suggest that EGCg-AuNPs may provide attractive alternatives to drug coated stents and therefore offer new therapeutic approaches in treating cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26938531

  12. Laminin Receptor-Avid Nanotherapeutic EGCg-AuNPs as a Potential Alternative Therapeutic Approach to Prevent Restenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menka Khoobchandani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In our efforts to develop new approaches to treat and prevent human vascular diseases, we report herein our results on the proliferation and migration of human smooth muscles cells (SMCs and endothelial cells (ECs using epigallocatechin-3-gallate conjugated gold nanoparticles (EGCg-AuNPs as possible alternatives to drug coated stents. Detailed in vitro stability studies of EGCg-AuNPs in various biological fluids, affinity and selectivity towards SMCs and ECs have been investigated. The EGCg-AuNPs showed selective inhibitory efficacy toward the migration of SMCs. However, the endothelial cells remained unaffected under similar experimental conditions. The cellular internalization studies have indicated that EGCg-AuNPs internalize into the SMCs and ECs within short periods of time through laminin receptor mediated endocytosis mode. Favorable toxicity profiles and selective affinity toward SMCs and ECs suggest that EGCg-AuNPs may provide attractive alternatives to drug coated stents and therefore offer new therapeutic approaches in treating cardiovascular diseases.

  13. Conservation assessment for groundcedar and stiff clubmoss in the Black Hills National Forest South Dakota and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    J.Hope Hornbeck; Deanna J. Reyher; Carolyn Hull Sieg; Reed W. Crook

    2002-01-01

    Stiff clubmoss (Lycopodium annotinum L.) and groundcedar (Lycopodium complanatum L.; synonym = Diphasiastrum complanatum [L.] Holub.) (Lycopodiaceae) are circumboreal clubmoss species that are widely distributed in North American boreal habitats. In the northern Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming,...

  14. Investigation of migratory bird mortality associated with exposure to Soda Ash Mine tailings water in southwestern Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Soda ash is a pulverized mineral, commonly referred to as “trona”, and harvested from underground deposits in southwestern Wyoming. Four companies own 5 mining...

  15. Unioned layer for the Point of Rocks-Black Butte coal assessment area, Green River Basin, Wyoming (porbbfing.shp)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This ArcView shapefile contains a polygon representation of the spatial query layer for the Point of Rocks-Black Butte coalfield, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming....

  16. Developing a methodology to inspect and assess conditions of short span structures on county roads in Wyoming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Ever since the introduction of the National Bridge Inspection Standards (NBIS) in 1971, there has been a : tremendous amount of effort put into bridge rehabilitation programs and safety inspections. The : Wyoming Department of Transportation (WYDOT) ...

  17. 76 FR 5607 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Resource Management Plan for the Rock Springs Field Office, Wyoming...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-01

    ... Lyman, Wyoming. The meeting times and addresses will be announced through the local news media..., riparian and wetlands, soils, invasive and noxious weeds, rangeland management, fire ecology and management...

  18. 75 FR 63853 - Notice of Intent To Reestablish and Call for Nominations for the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-18

    ...The BLM is publishing this notice in accordance with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act (FLPMA) and the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA). The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) gives notice that the Secretary of the Interior is reestablishing the Wyoming Resource Advisory Council (RAC). This notice is also to solicit public nominations for the RAC. The RAC provides advice and recommendations on land use planning and management of the public lands within the State of Wyoming.

  19. Trophic transfer and effects of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) in Gammarus fossarum from contaminated periphytic biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baudrimont, Magalie; Andrei, Jennifer; Mornet, Stéphane; Gonzalez, Patrice; Mesmer-Dudons, Nathalie; Gourves, Pierre-Yves; Jaffal, Ali; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain; Geffard, Olivier; Garric, Jeanne; Feurtet-Mazel, Agnès

    2017-01-13

    This work addressed the trophic transfer and effects of functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) from periphytic biofilms to the crustacean Gammarus fossarum. Biofilms were exposed for 48 h to 10 nm positively charged functionalized AuNPs at two concentrations, 4.6 and 46 mg/L, and crustaceans G. fossarum grazed on these for 7 days, with daily biofilm renewal. Gold bioaccumulation in biofilm and crustacean were measured to estimate the trophic transfer ratio of these AuNP, and, for the first time, a transcriptomic approach and transmission electron microscopy observations in the crustacean were made. These two approaches showed cellular damage caused by oxidative stress and, in particular, an impact of these AuNPs on mitochondrial respiration. Modulation of digestive enzyme activity was also observed, suggesting modifications of digestive functions. The damage due to these nanoparticles could then have vital consequences for the organisms during chronic exposure.

  20. Gold nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica: origin of high activity and role of Au NPs in selective oxidation of cyclohexane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Pingping; Bai, Peng; Yan, Zifeng; Zhao, George X. S.

    2016-01-01

    Homogeneous immobilization of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) on mesoporous silica has been achieved by using a one-pot synthesis method in the presence of organosilane mercapto-propyl-trimethoxysilane (MPTMS). The resultant Au NPs exhibited an excellent catalytic activity in the solvent-free selective oxidation of cyclohexane using molecular oxygen. By establishing the structure-performance relationship, the origin of the high activity of mesoporous supported Au catalyst was identified to be due to the presence of low-coordinated Au (0) sites with high dispersion. Au NPs were confirmed to play a critical role in the catalytic oxidation of cyclohexane by promoting the activation of O2 molecules and accelerating the formation of surface-active oxygen species.

  1. Assessment of coal geology, resources, and reserves in the northern Wyoming Powder River Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David C.; Haacke, Jon E.; Osmonson, Lee M.; Luppens, James A.; Pierce, Paul E.; Rohrbacher, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    The abundance of new borehole data from recent coal bed natural gas development in the Powder River Basin was utilized by the U.S. Geological Survey for the most comprehensive evaluation to date of coal resources and reserves in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. It is the second area within the Powder River Basin to be assessed as part of a regional coal assessment program; the first was an evaluation of coal resources and reserves in the Gillette coal field, adjacent to and south of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. There are no active coal mines in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area at present. However, more than 100 million short tons of coal were produced from the Sheridan coal field between the years 1887 and 2000, which represents most of the coal production within the northwestern part of the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area. A total of 33 coal beds were identified during the present study, 24 of which were modeled and evaluated to determine in-place coal resources. Given current technology, economic factors, and restrictions to mining, seven of the beds were evaluated for potential reserves. The restrictions included railroads, a Federal interstate highway, urban areas, and alluvial valley floors. Other restrictions, such as depth, thickness of coal beds, mined-out areas, and areas of burned coal, were also considered. The total original coal resource in the Northern Wyoming Powder River Basin assessment area for all 24 coal beds assessed, with no restrictions applied, was calculated to be 285 billion short tons. Available coal resources, which are part of the original coal resource that is accessible for potential mine development after subtracting all restrictions, are about 263 billion short tons (92.3 percent of the original coal resource). Recoverable coal, which is that portion of available coal remaining after subtracting mining and processing losses, was determined

  2. Synthesis and characterization of ZnO nanoparticles: effect of solvent and antifungal capacity of NPs obtained in ethylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Cenayda; Rodríguez-Páez, Jorge E.

    2017-12-01

    In this work, nanoparticles of zinc oxide (ZnO-NPs) were synthesized using acetic acid, ethanol and ethylene glycol as solvents. To determine the physicochemical and structural characteristics of the synthesized nanoparticles, IR spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were used. The characterization results indicated that the particles obtained were of nanometers size (antifungal capacity on cultures of Aspergillus niger strains. The concentrations of ZnO-NPs that showed the greatest antifungal effect were those from 9 mmol L-1.

  3. Optimization of ZnO-NPs to Investigate Their Safe Application by Assessing Their Effect on Soil Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shruti; Kushwah, Tanuja; Vishwakarma, Ashutosh; Yadav, Shweta

    2015-07-01

    Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) are increasingly receiving attention due to their widespread application in cosmetics, pigments and coatings. This has raised concerns in the public and scientific communities regarding their unexpected health effects. Toxicity effect of ZnO-NPs on the environment was assessed in the present study using Caenorhabditis elegans. Multiple toxicity end points including their mortality, behaviour, reproduction, in vitro distribution and expression of stress response mtl-1 and sod-1 genes were observed to evaluate safe application of ZnO-NPs. C. elegans were exposed to 10, 50, and 100 nm ZnO-NPs (0.1 to 2.0 g/l). Application of 10 nm ≥0.7g/l adversely affects the survivability of worms and was significantly not affected with exposure of 50 and 100 nm ≤1.0 g/l. However, reproduction was affected at much low concentration as compared to their survivability. LC50 was recorded 1.0 ± 0.06 (g/l) for 100 nm, 0.90 ± 0.60 for 50 nm and 0.620 ± 0.08 for 10 nm. Expression of mtl-1 and sod-1 was significantly increased with application of 10 nm ≥0.7g/l and significantly unaffected with exposure of 50 and 100 nm at the same concentration. ZnO-NPs (10 nm) had shown even distribution extended nearly the entire length of the body. The distribution pattern of ZnO-NPs indicates that the intestine is the major target tissues for NP toxicity. Study demonstrates that small-sized (10 nm) ZnO-NPs ≥0.7g/l is more toxic than larger-sized particles. This may be suggested on the basis of available data; application of 50 and 100 nm ≤1.0 g/l ZnO-NPs may be used to the environment as this shows no significant toxicity. However, further calibration is warranted to explore safe dose on soil compartments prior to their field application.

  4. 33 CFR 110.190 - Tortugas Harbor, in vicinity of Garden Key, Dry Tortugas, Fla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tortugas Harbor, in vicinity of Garden Key, Dry Tortugas, Fla. 110.190 Section 110.190 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.190 Tortugas Harbor, in vicinity of Garden Key, Dry Tortugas,...

  5. Transcriptional profile of P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 at low temperature: physiology of phytopathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvizu-Gómez, Jackeline Lizzeta; Hernández-Morales, Alejandro; Aguilar, Juan Ramiro Pacheco; Álvarez-Morales, Ariel

    2013-04-12

    Low temperatures play key roles in the development of most plant diseases, mainly because of their influence on the expression of various virulence factors in phytopathogenic bacteria. Thus far, studies regarding this environmental parameter have focused on specific themes and little is known about phytopathogenic bacteria physiology under these conditions. To obtain a global view regarding phytopathogenic bacteria strategies in response to physiologically relevant temperature changes, we used DNA microarray technology to compare the gene expression profile of the model bacterial pathogen P. syringae pv. phaseolicola NPS3121 grown at 18°C and 28°C. A total of 236 differentially regulated genes were identified, of which 133 were up-regulated and 103 were down-regulated at 18°C compared to 28°C. The majority of these genes are involved in pathogenicity and virulence processes. In general, the results of this study suggest that the expression profile obtained may be related to the fact that low temperatures induce oxidative stress in bacterial cells, which in turn influences the expression of iron metabolism genes. The expression also appears to be correlated with the profile expression obtained in genes related to motility, biofilm production, and the type III secretion system. From the data obtained in this study, we can begin to understand the strategies used by this phytopathogen during low temperature growth, which can occur in host interactions and disease development.

  6. Antimicrobial kinetics of Alstonia scholaris bark extract-mediated AgNPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supraja, N.; Prasad, T. N. V. K. V.; David, E.; Giridhara Krishna, T.

    2016-06-01

    Nanobiotechnology is considered as one of the important branches of nanotechnology, and research on synthesis of nanoscale materials, silver in particular, using plant and plant parts has been progressing rapidly. Herein, we used bark extract of Alstonia scholaris one of the most important medicinal plants to synthesize silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which exhibited excellent antimicrobial properties against biofilm formed in drinking water PVC pipes. The biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles was done by treating 90 mL of 1 mM AgNO3 aqueous solution with 10 mL of 5 % bark extract. As-prepared silver nanoparticles were characterized using the biophysical techniques such as UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric analysis, transmission electron microscopy, and dynamic light scattering for the measurement of hydrodynamic diameter and zeta potential. The kinetics of the antimicrobial activity against PVC biofilm of prepared silver nanoparticles were done using comparative solution suspension time-killing assessments and which are evidenced in Epi-fluorescent microscopic observations.

  7. Lignin-AuNPs liquid marble for remotely-controllable detection of Pb2+

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Guocheng; Wang, Xiaoying; Hamel, Jonathan; Zhu, Hongli; Sun, Runcang

    2016-12-01

    This work reported the green and facile fabrication of a versatile lignin-AuNP composite, which was readily and remotely encapsulated to form novel liquid marbles. The marbles can stay suspended in water, and show excellent photothermal conversion properties, as well as visual detection and adsorption towards Pb2+. More importantly, the marbles can simultaneously remotely detect and adsorb Pb2+ via co-precipitation by simply controlling the near infrared (NIR) irradiation. It is believed that the remotely-controllable NIR-responsive lignin-AuNPs liquid marble can be used in Pb2+-related reactions. The liquid marble can be placed in the system at the very beginning of the reaction and stably stays on the surface until the reaction has ended. After reacting, upon remote NIR irradiation, the liquid marble bursts to adsorb Pb2+, and the residual Pb2+ can be collected. This facile manipulation strategy does not use complicated nanostructures or sophisticated equipment, so it has potential applications for channel-free microfluidics, smart microreactors, microengines, and so on.

  8. An economic framework for analyzing reclamation after energy extraction in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Abby A.

    Wyoming's economy is highly dependent on natural gas and coal production, but energy extraction degrades rangelands. Federal and state laws and policies govern reclamation of disturbed lands. However, establishing sagebrush plant communities is difficult and defining successful reclamation can be challenging. We analyze reclamation costs in the Powder River Basin of northeastern Wyoming using coal company annual reclamation reports. We also construct a probabilistic mathematical programming model that characterizes a coal company's reclamation decision-,making process and proposes a way to incorporate uncertainty into reclamation modeling. We also use results from a plant sciences field experiment to incorporate costs into optimal seed mix and herbicide choice. This thesis also draws attention to the disconnect between the data biologists collect and the data that economists need to model reclamation decision-making.

  9. The digital geologic map of Wyoming in ARC/INFO format

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, G.N.; Drouillard, P.H.

    1994-01-01

    This geologic map was prepared as part of a study of digital methods and techniques as applied to complex geologic maps. The geologic map was digitized from the original scribe sheets used to prepare the published Geologic Map of Wyoming (Love and Christiansen, 1985). Consequently, the digital version is at 1:500,000 scale using the Lambert Conformal Conic map projection parameters of the State base map. Stable base contact prints of the scribe sheets were scanned on a Tektronix 4991 digital scanner. The scanner automatically converts the scanned image to an ASCII vector format. These vectors were transferred to a VAX minicomputer, where they were then loaded into ARC/INFO. Each vector and polygon was given attributes derived from the original 1985 geologic map. Descriptors: The Digital Geologic Map of Wyoming in ARC/INFO Format Open-File Report 94-0425

  10. Health hazard evaluation report HETA 92-0361-2343, M-I Drilling Fluids, Greybull, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Gilder, T.J.; Robinson, L.

    1993-08-01

    In response to a request from the state epidemiologist in Wyoming, an investigation was begun of two cases of acute, febrile hepatitis in employees of M-I Drilling Fluids (SIC-1459), Greybull, Wyoming. The two cases of hepatitis were caused by Coxiella-burnetii, the rickettsia which causes Q-fever. A survey of 39 workers using a self-administered questionnaire and a blood test revealed seven workers with serologic evidence of infection. Three showed evidence of recent infection and four showed evidence of past infection. The major risk factor identified through the questionnaire data was sheep ownership. Risk factors suggestive of either recent or past infection included working outdoors, operating heavy equipment, and hunting.

  11. Sagebrush ecosystem conservation and management: ecoregional assessment tools and models for the Wyoming Basins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanser, S.E.; Leu, M.; Knick, S.T.; Aldridge, C.L.

    2011-01-01

    The Wyoming Basins are one of the remaining strongholds of the sagebrush ecosystem. However, like most sagebrush habitats, threats to this region are numerous. This book adds to current knowledge about the regional status of the sagebrush ecosystem, the distribution of habitats, the threats to the ecosystem, and the influence of threats and habitat conditions on occurrence and abundance of sagebrush associated fauna and flora in the Wyoming Basins. Comprehensive methods are outlined for use in data collection and monitoring of wildlife and plant populations. Field and spatial data are integrated into a spatially explicit analytical framework to develop models of species occurrence and abundance for the egion. This book provides significant new information on distributions, abundances, and habitat relationships for a number of species of conservation concern that depend on sagebrush in the region. The tools and models presented in this book increase our understanding of impacts from land uses and can contribute to the development of comprehensive management and conservation strategies.

  12. Selenium in soils of the Lower Wasatch Formation, Campbell County, Wyoming: Geochemistry, distribution, and environmental hazards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolm, K. E.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Seleniferous Shingle series soils and sandstone outcrops of section 27, T 48 N, R 71 W, Wyoming are mapped on aerial photography by their association with Astragalus bisulcatus. Chemical leachate analyses and atomic absorption methods reveal all studied Samsil and Shingle soils to contain acid, base, and water soluble selenium compounds, and that water extractions showed varied concentration behavior due to soil pH. Acid-soluble selenium is found to be associated with smectite. Statistical analyses confirm that A. bisulcatus presence has a weak influence on soil-lens organic selenium concentration, and determine the importance of other geobotanical factors for convertor presence. Environmental procedures of high selenium lens burial, convertor plant eradication, and revegetated site monitoring are recommended. Usage of density analysis and photographic enlargement are used to successfully produce both a control area and a Campbell County, Wyoming regional map of A. bisulcatus supportive soils and outcrops using Skylab photography.

  13. Ultrasensitive paper based nucleic acid detection realized by three-dimensional DNA-AuNPs network amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ya; Deng, Xilei; Wen, Wei; Zhang, Xiuhua; Wang, Shengfu

    2017-06-15

    A novel three-dimensional DNA-AuNPs network structure amplification strategy was employed to design a lateral flow biosensor by introducing streptavidin coated gold nanoparticles (Au-SA) in this paper. They act as amplification probes which aggregate numerous gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on test line by forming a three-dimensional DNA-AuNPs network structure in the presence of target. Sensitive detection of nucleic acid with point-of-care analysis is significant for infectious agent, early diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases. The use of these particles in rapid ultrasensitive point of care (POC) lateral flow assays lead to a linear range from 0.1pM to 250nM with a limit of detection of 0.01 pM without polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The proposed method could increase the sensitivity by 4 orders of magnitudes than traditional sandwich assays labeled with AuNPs. Furthermore, the assay owns good reproducibility and stability, which will prove practical diagnostic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cocos nucifera coir-mediated green synthesis of Pd NPs and its investigation against larvae and agricultural pest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elango, Ganesh; Mohana Roopan, Selvaraj; Abdullah Al-Dhabi, Naif; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Irukatla Damodharan, Kasinathan; Elumalai, Kuppuswamy

    2016-12-01

    In recent decades, several scientists focused their process towards nanoparticles synthesis by using various sustainable approaches. Cocos nucifera (C. nucifera) was one of the versatile trees in tropical regions which also can act as a thrust quencher in all over the world. Cocos nucifera coir was one of the waste by-products in all coconut-refining industries and with the help C. nucifera coir, Palladium nanoparticles (Pd NPs) were synthesized. Green-synthesized spherical-shape Pd NPs were over layered by secondary metabolites from C. nucifera coir extract and with an average particle size of 62 ± 2 nm, which were confirmed by morphological analysis. Eco-friendly mediated Pd NPs were further subjected to several biological applications like larvicidal against Aedes aegypti (A. aegypti) and anti-feedent, ovicidal, and oviposition deterrent against agricultural pest Callasobruchus maculates (C. maculates) and compared with C. nuciferacoir methanolic extract, which results in LC50 value of 288.88 ppm and LC90 value of 483.06 ppm using LSD-Tukey's test against dengue vector (A. aegypti). Cocos nucifera coir methanolic extract shows significant output while compared with Pd NPs towards anti-feedent assays; ovicidal activity and oviposition deterrent were discussed here.

  15. The prevalence of novel psychoactive substances (NPS use in non-clinical populations: a systematic review protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma M. Khaled

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Novel psychoactive substances (NPS are new narcotic or psychotropic drugs that are not controlled by the United Nations drug convention that may pose a serious public health threat due to their wide availability for purchase on the internet and in so called “head shops.” Yet, the extent of their global use remains largely unknown. The aim of this study is to conduct a systematic review of the prevalence of NPS use in non-clinical populations. Methods This is a systematic review of observational studies. Embase, MEDLINE, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health (CINAHL, Cochrane Library, Lilacs, Scopus, Global Health, PsychINFO, Web of Science, and the World Health Organization (WHO regional databases will be searched for eligible prevalence studies published between 2010 and 2016. Data from cross-sectional studies that report the prevalence of NPS use (one or more types in participants (of any age from censuses or probabilistic or convenience samples will be included. Data will be extracted from eligible publications, using a data extraction tool developed for this study. Visual and statistical approaches will be adopted instead of traditional meta-analytic approaches. Discussion This review will describe the distributions of various types of prevalence estimates of NPS use and explore the impact of different population groups and study-related and tempo-geographical variables on characteristics of these distributions over the period of 2010 to 2016. Systematic review registration PROSPERO CRD42016037020

  16. Zinc (hydr)oxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites: role of surface features in H₂S reactive adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannakoudakis, Dimitrios A; Bandosz, Teresa J

    2014-12-15

    Zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNPs composites with various levels of complexity were synthesized using an in situ precipitation method. Then they were used as H2S adsorbents in visible light. The materials' surfaces were characterized before and after H2S adsorption by various physical and chemical methods (XRD, FTIR, thermal analysis, potentiometric titration, adsorption of nitrogen and SEM/EDX). Significant differences in surface features and synergistic effects were found depending on the materials' composition. Addition of graphite oxide and the deposition of gold nanoparticles resulted in a marked increase in the adsorption capacity in comparison with that on the zinc hydroxide and zinc hydroxide/AuNP. Addition of AuNPs to zinc hydroxide led to a crystalline ZnO/AuNP composite while the zinc hydroxide/graphite oxide/AuNP composite was amorphous. The ZnOH/GO/AuNPs composite exhibited the greatest H2S adsorption capacity due to the increased number of OH terminal groups and the conductive properties of GO that facilitated the electron transfer and consequently the formation of superoxide ions promoting oxidation of hydrogen sulfide. AuNPs present in the composite increased the conductivity, helped with electron transfer to oxygen, and prevented the fast recombination of the electrons and holes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Fabrication of small-sized silver NPs/graphene sheets for high-quality surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong; Fu, Honggang; Zhao, Tianshou; Wang, Lei; Tan, Taixing

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, small-sized and highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles (NPs) supported on graphene nanosheets are fabricated via a strategy for etching a copper template with Ag(+). Firstly, big-sized Cu NPs are supported on graphene, and then the small-sized and highly dispersed Ag NPs are supported on graphene by replacement reaction, mainly making use of graphene passing electrons between Cu and Ag(+). The graphene used in the experiment is prepared by in situ self-generating template and has good dispersion, excellent crystallinity and little defects. Thus, in the process of Ag/graphene synthesis, there is no any intervention of surfactant, which ensures that SERS activity sites have not been passivated. And, the little defects of graphene benefit the excellent conductivity of graphene and ensured the replacement reaction between Cu and Ag(+). The obtained material exhibits significant high-quality and distinctive SERS activity. Especially, a serial new peak of p-aminothiophenol (PATP) is observed, this is suggested two reasons: one is "surface geometry" of the PATP on small-sized Ag NPs and another is the charge-transfer between Ag and graphene. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Improved adhesion of Ag NPs to the polyethylene terephthalate surface via atmospheric plasma treatment and surface functionalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Tao [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, 253 Xuefu Rd, Kunming, Yunnan, 650093 (China); Liu, Yong [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, 253 Xuefu Rd, Kunming, Yunnan, 650093 (China); Solmont Technology Wuxi Co., Ltd. 228 Linghu Blvd. Tianan Tech Park, A1-602, Xinwu District, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214135 (China); Zhu, Yan, E-mail: zhuyan@kmust.edu.cn [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, 253 Xuefu Rd, Kunming, Yunnan, 650093 (China); Yang, De-Quan, E-mail: dequan.yang@gmail.com [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, 253 Xuefu Rd, Kunming, Yunnan, 650093 (China); Solmont Technology Wuxi Co., Ltd. 228 Linghu Blvd. Tianan Tech Park, A1-602, Xinwu District, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214135 (China); Sacher, Edward [Regroupement Québécois de Matériaux de Pointe, Department of Engineering Physics, École Polytechnique de Montréal, Case Postale 6079, succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, Québec H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2017-07-31

    Highlights: • A two-step process has been developed to enhance the adhesion of immobilized Ag NPs to the PET surface. • The method is simple, easy to use and low-cost for mass production. • The increased density of active sites (−OH, −CH=O and COOH) at the PET surface, after plasma treatment, permits increased reaction with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES). • The presence of APTES with high surface density permits −NH{sub 2}-Ag complex formation, increasing the adhesion of the Ag NPs. - Abstract: Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied, as important antibacterial materials, on textile and polymer surfaces. However, their adhesion to nonreactive polymer surfaces is generally too weak for many applications. Here, we propose a two-step process, atmospheric plasma treatment followed by a surface chemical modification process, which enhances their adhesion to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. We found that, compared to either plasma treatments or surface chemical functionalizations, alone, this combination greatly enhanced their adhesion. The plasma treatment resulted in an increase of active sites (−OH, −CH=O and COOH) at the PET surface, permitting increased bonding to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), whose −NH{sub 2} groups were then able to form a bonding complex with the Ag NPs.

  19. Solid-Phase Synthesis of New Trp(Nps-Containing Dipeptide Derivatives as TRPV1 Channel Blockers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosario González-Muñiz

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Trp(Nps-Lys-NH2 derivatives, bearing alkyl or guanidine groups either at the N–terminus or on the Lys side-chain or at both positions were conveniently prepared on solid-phase and evaluated as TRPV1 channel antagonists.

  20. Developmental abnormalities and neurotoxicological effects of CuO NPs on the black sea urchin Arbacia lixula by embryotoxicity assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisano, Maria; Cappello, Tiziana; Catanese, Eva; Vitale, Valeria; Natalotto, Antonino; Giannetto, Alessia; Barreca, Davide; Brunelli, Elvira; Mauceri, Angela; Fasulo, Salvatore

    2015-10-01

    The embryotoxicity of CuO NPs was evaluated in the black sea urchin Arbacia lixula embryos, by using 24-well plates. Fertilized eggs were exposed to five doses of CuO NPs ranging from 0.07 to 20 ppb, until pluteus stage. CuO NPs suspensions in artificial seawater formed agglomerates of 80-200 nm size, and copper uptake was 2.5-fold up in larvae exposed to high NP concentrations in respect to control. Developmental delay and morphological alteration, including skeletal abnormalities, were observed, as well as impairment in cholinergic and serotonergic nervous systems. These findings suggest the potential of CuO NPs to interfere with the normal neurotransmission pathways, thus affecting larval morphogenesis. Overall, the embryotoxicity tests are effective for evaluation of nanoparticle effects on the health of aquatic biota. Furthermore, as the black sea urchin A. lixula demonstrated to be vulnerable to NP exposure, it may be a valid bioindicator in marine biomonitoring and ecotoxicological programmes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reconnaissance soil geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont County, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David B.; Sweat, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Soil samples were collected and chemically analyzed from the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, which lies within the Wind River Indian Reservation in Fremont County, Wyoming. Nineteen soil samples from a depth of 0 to 5 centimeters were collected in August 2011 from the site. The samples were sieved to less than 2 millimeters and analyzed for 44 major and trace elements following a near-total multi-acid extraction. Soil pH was also determined. The geochemical data were compared to a background dataset consisting of 160 soil samples previously collected from the same depth throughout the State of Wyoming as part of another ongoing study by the U.S. Geological Survey. Risk from potentially toxic elements in soil from the site to biologic receptors and humans was estimated by comparing the concentration of these elements with soil screening values established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. All 19 samples exceeded the carcinogenic human health screening level for arsenic in residential soils of 0.39 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg), which represents a one-in-one-million cancer risk (median arsenic concentration in the study area is 2.7 mg/kg). All 19 samples also exceeded the lead and vanadium screening levels for birds. Eighteen of the 19 samples exceeded the manganese screening level for plants, 13 of the 19 samples exceeded the antimony screening level for mammals, and 10 of 19 samples exceeded the zinc screening level for birds. However, these exceedances are also found in soils at most locations in the Wyoming Statewide soil database, and elevated concentrations alone are not necessarily cause for alarm. Uranium and thorium, two other elements of environmental concern, are elevated in soils at the site as compared to the Wyoming dataset, but no human or ecological soil screening levels have been established for these elements.

  2. 77 FR 27478 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180757, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-10

    ...Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Alpha Coal West, Inc., on a pro rata cost-sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  3. 77 FR 40629 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180996, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-10

    ...Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Kiewit Mining Properties, Inc., on a pro rata cost- sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  4. 75 FR 32812 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW179006, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-09

    ...Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Black Butte Coal Company, on a pro rata cost- sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States of America in Sweetwater County, Wyoming.

  5. 77 FR 32665 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180763, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    ...Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Cordero Mining LLC, on a pro rata cost-sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States in Campbell County, Wyoming.

  6. 77 FR 15387 - Notice of Invitation To Participate; Coal Exploration License Application WYW180710, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    ...Pursuant to the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920, as amended by the Federal Coal Leasing Amendments Act of 1976, and to Bureau of Land Management (BLM) regulations, all interested parties are hereby invited to participate with Antelope Coal LLC, on a pro rata cost-sharing basis, in its program for the exploration of coal deposits owned by the United States in Campbell County and Converse County, Wyoming.

  7. Effectos of Coyote Removal on Pronghorn and Mule Deer Populations in Wyoming

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Dylan Earl

    2009-01-01

    I studied the relationship between coyote (Canis latrans) removal and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) and mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) density and fawn:doe ratios in southwest Wyoming and northeast Utah in 2007 and 2008. Coyote removal variables studied included the number of coyotes removed, ground hours worked, total hours worked, coyotes removed/aerial gunning hour, coyotes removed/ground work hour, and coyotes removed/total effort hour. None of the variables explained changes obser...

  8. Reproductive Ecology of Wyoming Big Sagebrush (Artemisia Tridentata SSP. Wyomingensis) : Effects of Herbivory and Competition

    OpenAIRE

    Decker, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    Herbivory and plant competition affect sexual reproduction of plants in various ways. Exclusion of mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) and cattle, removal of plant competition (both inter- and intraspecific), and all combinations of the above treatments were used to examine the individual and combined affects on Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis (Wyoming big sagebrush) reproduction. Reproduction of Artemisia tridentata ssp. wyomingensis was divided into hierarchical levels of the number of: ...

  9. Final Environmental Impact Statement, Peacekeeper in Minuteman Silos, F.E. Warren AFB, Wyoming. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    the late Victorian era or evidencing other important stylistic features. F.E. Warren AFB itself contains a designated Historic District/Landmark...resident, 35.8 years in 1980, was considerably higher than the County’s median age of 28.1 years. In 1981, marriage and divorce rates for Laramie County...and the State of Wyoming were considerably higher than the national rates and, although no firm conclusions can be drawn, higher marriage and divorce

  10. Microhabitat Conditions in Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Effects on Nest Site Selection and Success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinkins, Jonathan B; Smith, Kurt T; Beck, Jeffrey L; Kirol, Christopher P; Pratt, Aaron C; Conover, Michael R

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to identify microhabitat characteristics of greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) nest site selection and survival to determine the quality of sage-grouse habitat in 5 regions of central and southwest Wyoming associated with Wyoming's Core Area Policy. Wyoming's Core Area Policy was enacted in 2008 to reduce human disturbance near the greatest densities of sage-grouse. Our analyses aimed to assess sage-grouse nest selection and success at multiple micro-spatial scales. We obtained microhabitat data from 928 sage-grouse nest locations and 819 random microhabitat locations from 2008-2014. Nest success was estimated from 924 nests with survival data. Sage-grouse selected nests with greater sagebrush cover and height, visual obstruction, and number of small gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥0.5 m and sage-grouse were selecting different nest sites in Core Areas relative to areas outside of Core. The Kaplan-Meier nest success estimate for a 27-day incubation period was 42.0% (95% CI: 38.4-45.9%). Risk of nest failure was negatively associated with greater rock and more medium-sized gaps between shrubs (gap size ≥2.0 m and <3.0 m). Within our study areas, Wyoming's Core Areas did not have differing microhabitat quality compared to outside of Core Areas. The close proximity of our locations within and outside of Core Areas likely explained our lack of finding differences in microhabitat quality among locations within these landscapes. However, the Core Area Policy is most likely to conserve high quality habitat at larger spatial scales, which over decades may have cascading effects on microhabitat quality available between areas within and outside of Core Areas.

  11. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) biosynthesized using pod extract of Cola nitida enhances antioxidant activity and phytochemical composition of Amaranthus caudatus Linn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azeez, Luqmon; Lateef, Agbaje; Adebisi, Segun A.

    2017-02-01

    This study investigates the influence of different concentrations of AgNPs biologically synthesized using pod extract of Cola nitida on antioxidant activity, phenolic contents, flavonoid contents and compositions of Amaranthus caudatus L. AgNPs of 25, 50, 75, 100 and 150 ppm were utilized in growing A. caudatus while water was used as control. Delayed germination for two days was observed for A. caudatus grown with 150 ppm of AgNPs, while others showed no difference. There were 43.3, 38.7, 26.7 and 6.48% improvements in the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) antioxidant activity of A. caudatus grown with 25, 50, 75 and 100 ppm of AgNPs, respectively, compared to control. Antioxidant activity of A. caudatus grown with AgNPs reduced with increase in the concentrations of AgNPs. A. caudatus grown with 50 ppm of AgNPs was the most potent with the least IC50 of 0.67 mg/ml. Significant improvements obtained for phenolic and flavonoid contents grown with AgNPs were concentration dependent. Enhancements of 21.9, 68.19, and 1.98% in phenolic contents were achieved in treatments with 25, 50 and 75 ppm AgNPs, respectively, while 32.58, 35.80, and 7.20% improvement in flavonoids were obtained for 25, 50 and 100 ppm treatments, respectively. Kaempferol and quercetin were the most abundant flavonoids in A. caudatus treated with 50 ppm of AgNPs, showing the highest flavonoid composition. This further confirms A. caudatus grown with 50 ppm of AgNPs as the most potent. This study has shown that concentration-dependent AgNPs can be used to boost antioxidant activity and phytochemical contents of vegetables.

  12. Geology and mineral resources of the Southwestern and South-Central Wyoming Sagebrush Focal Area, Wyoming, and the Bear River Watershed Sagebrush Focal Area, Wyoming and Utah: Chapter E in Mineral resources of the Sagebrush Focal Areas of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna B.; Hayes, Timothy S.; Benson, Mary Ellen; Yager, Douglas B.; Anderson, Eric D.; Bleiwas, Donald I.; DeAngelo, Jacob; Dicken, Connie L.; Drake, Ronald M.; Fernette, Gregory L.; Giles, Stuart A.; Glen, Jonathan M. G.; Haacke, Jon E.; Horton, John D.; Parks, Heather L.; Rockwell, Barnaby W.; Williams, Colin F.

    2016-10-04

    SummaryThe U.S. Department of the Interior has proposed to withdraw approximately 10 million acres of Federal lands from mineral entry (subject to valid existing rights) from 12 million acres of lands defined as Sagebrush Focal Areas (SFAs) in Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Oregon, Utah, and Wyoming (for further discussion on the lands involved see Scientific Investigations Report 2016–5089–A). The purpose of the proposed action is to protect the greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) and its habitat from potential adverse effects of locatable mineral exploration and mining. The U.S. Geological Survey Sagebrush Mineral-Resource Assessment (SaMiRA) project was initiated in November 2015 and supported by the Bureau of Land Management to (1) assess locatable mineral-resource potential and (2) to describe leasable and salable mineral resources for the seven SFAs and Nevada additions.This chapter summarizes the current status of locatable, leasable, and salable mineral commodities and assesses the potential of locatable minerals in the Southwestern and South-Central Wyoming and Bear River Watershed, Wyoming and Utah, SFAs.

  13. Hydrology of Salt Wells Creek : a plains stream in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowham, H.W.; DeLong, L.L.; Collier, K.R.; Zimmerman, E.A.

    1982-01-01

    Development of energy minerals in plains areas of Wyoming is expanding rapidly. Such development may affect water resources and hydrologic relations of the plains; however, little information exists concerning hydrologic processes for these areas. This report summarizes results of a hydrologic study made during 1975-78 of Salt Wells creek, a drainage area of about 500 square miles located southeast of Rock Springs, Wyoming. The area is typical of arid and semiarid plains areas in southwestern Wyoming where mineral development is occurring. Salt Wells Creek is predominately an intermittent stream. Numerous springs in the headwaters cause small perennial flows in some upstream tributaries, but evaporation, freezeup, and seepage deplete these flows so that the middle and lower reaches of the main channel have only intermittent flows. The intermittent nature of streamflow affects water quality. It was observed that a flushing of dissolved solids and suspended sediment occurs during the first flows of a runoff event. A striking feature of the stream is its deeply incised channel. The downcutting is attributed to the cummulative effects of: (1) a change in the relative climate, amounts of annual precipitation occurring as rain and snow, (2) change in base level due to downstream channelization, and (3) changes in land use. Because of the incision, erosion is now expanding to include intervening tributaries. (USGS)

  14. Low-cost mercury (II) ion sensor by biosynthesized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Jet G.; Candano, Gabrielle Jackie; Mendoza, Aileen Nicole; Paderanga, Marciella; Cardino, Krenz John; Locsin, Alessandro; Bibon, Cherilou

    2017-11-01

    Biosynthesis of gold nanoparticles has attracted the curiosity of scientists over the past few decades. Nanoparticles have been proven to exhibit enhanced properties and offer a variety of applications in different fields of study. Utilizing nanoparticles instead of bulky equipment and noxious chemicals has become more convenient; reagents needed for synthesis have been proven to be benign (mostly aqueous solutions) and are cost-effective. In this study, gold nanoparticles were biosynthesized using guyabano (Annonamuricata) peel samples as the source of reducing agents. The optimum concentration ratio of gold chloride to guyabano extract was determined to be 1:7. Characterization studies were accomplished using UV Vis Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Electron Microscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Spectroscopic maximum absorbance was found to be at 532 nm thereby confirming the presence of gold nanoparticles. Hydroxyl (O-H stretching), carbonyl (C=O stretching), and amide (N-H stretching) functional groups shown in the FTIR spectra are present on possible reducing agents such as phenols, alkaloids, and saponins found in the plant extract. SEM images revealed spherical shaped nanoparticles with mean diameter of 23.18 nm. It was observed that the bio-synthesized AuNPs were selective to mercury ions through uniform color change from wine red to yellow. A novel smartphone-based mercury (II) ions assay was developed using the gold nanoparticles. A calibration curve correlated the analytical response (Red intensity) to the concentrations of Hg 2+ ions. Around 94% of the variations in the intensity is accounted for by the variations in the concentration of mercury (II) ions suggesting a good linear relationship between the two variables. A relative standard deviation (RSD) of less than 1% was achieved at all individual points. The metal sensor displayed a sensitivity of 0.039 R.I./ppm with an LOD of 93.79 ppm. Thus, the bio-fabricated gold nanoparticles

  15. Distribution and pathogenicity of Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in boreal toads from the grand teton area of western wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, P.J.; St-Hilaire, S.; Bruer, S.; Corn, P.S.; Peterson, C.R.

    2009-01-01

    The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes the skin disease chytridiomycosis, has been linked to amphibian population declines and extinctions worldwide. Bd has been implicated in recent declines of boreal toads, Bufo boreas boreas, in Colorado but populations of boreal toads in western Wyoming have high prevalence of Bd without suffering catastrophic mortality. In a field and laboratory study, we investigated the prevalence of Bd in boreal toads from the Grand Teton ecosystem (GRTE) in Wyoming and tested the pathogenicity of Bd to these toads in several environments. The pathogen was present in breeding adults at all 10 sites sampled, with a mean prevalence of 67%. In an experiment with juvenile toadlets housed individually in wet environments, 106 zoospores of Bd isolated from GRTE caused lethal disease in all Wyoming and Colorado animals within 35 days. Survival time was longer in toadlets from Wyoming than Colorado and in toadlets spending more time in dry sites. In a second trial involving Colorado toadlets exposed to 35% fewer Bd zoospores, infection peaked and subsided over 68 days with no lethal chytridiomycosis in any treatment. However, compared with drier aquaria with dry refuges, Bd infection intensity was 41% higher in more humid aquaria and 81% higher without dry refuges available. Our findings suggest that although widely infected in nature, Wyoming toads may escape chytridiomycosis due to a slight advantage in innate resistance or because their native habitat hinders Bd growth or provides more opportunities to reduce pathogen loads behaviorally than in Colorado. ?? 2009 International Association for Ecology and Health.

  16. Fabrication of an electrochemical nanoaptasensor based on AuNPs for ultrasensitive determination of cocaine in serum sample

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roushani, Mahmoud, E-mail: mahmoudroushani@yahoo.com; Shahdost-fard, Faezeh

    2016-04-01

    Herein we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nanoaptasensor for the detection of one of the most dangerous narcotic drugs available, cocaine. The nanoaptasensor was constructed by the covalent attachment of a 5′-NH{sub 2}-3′-gold nanoparticles terminated aptamer on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode which was deposited with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/GCE). It is worth noting that the interaction of the cysteamine stable self-assembled monolayer on the AuNPs/GCE surface and the covalent attachment of terephthalaldehyde via amide coupling with the amine groups in the cysteamine and aptamer, respectively, resulted in the covalent attachment of the aptamer to AuNPs/GCE. The presence of gold nanoparticles both on surface of the glassy carbon electrode and in the end of the aptamer, can provide advantages such as increase of active surface area, high acceleration of the electron transfer and improved electrochemical signal, respectively. The decrease in the peak current of [Fe(CN){sub 6}]{sup 3−/4−} as the probe redox with increase of cocaine concentration, in differential pulse voltammetry as the measuring technique, from 5 pM up to 5 nM was linear and an unprecedented detection limit of 0.5 pM was yielded. Furthermore, the effect of some common analgesic drugs as the potential interferents were investigated and also, to evaluate practical application of the proposed nanoaptasensor human blood serum sample as a real sample was used. Simple preparation, low operation cost, speed and validity are the decisive factors of this method motivating its application to biosensing investigation. - Highlights: • An electrochemical nanoaptasensor for the detection of cocaine is presented. • An AuNPs terminated aptamer was covalent bonded on the surface of the AuNPs/GCE. • The presence of AuNPs has many advantages and improved electrochemical signal. • Two linear ranges from 5 pM up to 5 nM and an unprecedented LOD of 0.5 pM were yielded. • It will shed

  17. Pleistocene glaciation of the Jackson Hole area, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, Kenneth L.; Licciardi, Joseph M.; Good, John M.; Jaworowski, Cheryl

    2018-01-24

    Pleistocene glaciations and late Cenozoic offset on the Teton fault have played central roles in shaping the scenic landscapes of the Teton Range and Jackson Hole area in Wyoming. The Teton Range harbored a system of mountain-valley glaciers that produced the striking geomorphic features in these mountains. However, the comparatively much larger southern sector of the Greater Yellowstone glacial system (GYGS) is responsible for creating the more expansive glacial landforms and deposits that dominate Jackson Hole. The glacial history is also inextricably associated with the Yellowstone hotspot, which caused two conditions that have fostered extensive glaciation: (1) uplift and consequent cold temperatures in greater Yellowstone; and (2) the lowland track of the hotspot (eastern Snake River Plain) that funneled moisture to the Yellowstone Plateau and the Yellowstone Crescent of High Terrain (YCHT).The penultimate (Bull Lake) glaciation filled all of Jackson Hole with glacial ice. Granitic boulders on moraines beyond the south end of Jackson Hole have cosmogenic 10Be exposure ages of ~150 thousand years ago (ka) and correlate with Marine Isotope Stage 6. A thick loess mantle subdues the topography of Bull Lake moraines and caps Bull Lake outwash terraces with a reddish buried soil near the base of the loess having a Bk horizon that extends down into the outwash gravel. The Bull Lake glaciation of Jackson Hole extended 48 kilometers (km) farther south than the Pinedale, representing the largest separation of these two glacial positions in the Western United States. The Bull Lake is also more extensive than the Pinedale on the west (22 km) and southwest (23 km) margins of the GYGS but not on the north and east. This pattern is explained by uplift and subsidence on the leading and trailing “bow-wave” of the YCHT, respectively.During the last (Pinedale) glaciation, mountain-valley glaciers of the Teton Range extended to the western edge of Jackson Hole and built

  18. Ground-water resources of Riverton irrigation project area, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Donald Arthur; Hackett, O.M.; Vanlier, K.E.; Moulder, E.A.; Durum, W.H.

    1959-01-01

    The Riverton irrigation project area is in the northwestern part of the Wind River basin in west-central Wyoming. Because the annual precipitation is only about 9 inches, agriculture, which is the principal occupation in the area, is dependent upon irrigation. Irrigation by surface-water diversion was begum is 1906; water is now supplied to 77,716 acres and irrigation has been proposed for an additional 31,344 acres. This study of the geology and ground-water resources of the Riverton irrigation project, of adjacent irrigated land, and of nearby land proposed for irrigation was begun during the summer of 1948 and was completed in 1951. The purpose of the investigation was to evaluate the ground-water resources of the area and to study the factors that should be considered in the solution of drainage and erosional problems within the area. The Riverton irrigation project area is characterized by flat to gently sloping stream terraces, which are flanked by a combination of badlands, pediment slopes, and broad valleys. These features were formed by long-continued erosion in an arid climate of the essentially horizontal, poorly consolidated beds of the Wind River formation. The principal streams of the area flow south-eastward. Wind River and Fivemile Creek are perennial streams and the others are intermittent. Ground-water discharge and irrigation return flow have created a major problem in erosion control along Fivemile Creek. Similar conditions might develop along Muddy and lower Cottonwood Creeks when land in their drainage basins is irrigated. The bedrock exposed in the area ranges in age from Late Cretaceous to early Tertiary (middle Eocene). The Wind River formation of early and middle Eocene age forms the uppermost bedrock formation in the greater part of the area. Unconsolidated deposits of Quaternary age, which consist of terrace gravel, colluvium, eolian sand and silt. and alluvium, mantle the Wind River formation in much of the area. In the irrigated parts

  19. Significant promotion effect of carbon nanotubes on the electrocatalytic activity of supported Pd NPs for ethanol oxidation reaction of fuel cells: the role of inner tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Cheng, Yi; Lu, Shanfu; Jia, Lichao; Shen, Pei Kang; Jiang, San Ping

    2014-11-18

    The inner tubes of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have a significant promotion effect on the electrocatalytic activity of Pd nanoparticles (NPs) for the ethanol oxidation of direct alcohol fuel cells (DAFCs) and Pd NPs supported on CNTs with 3-7 walls show a much higher activity as compared to that supported on typical single-walled and multi-walled CNTs.

  20. Development and characterisation of chitosan films impregnated with insulin loaded PEG-b-PLA nanoparticles (NPs): a potential approach for buccal delivery of macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovino, Concetta; Ayensu, Isaac; Tetteh, John; Boateng, Joshua S

    2012-05-30

    Mucoadhesive chitosan based films, incorporated with insulin loaded nanoparticles (NPs) made of poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether-block-polylactide (PEG-b-PLA) have been developed and characterised. Blank-NPs were prepared by double emulsion solvent evaporation technique with varying concentrations of the copolymer (5 and 10%, w/v). The optimised formulation was loaded with insulin (model protein) at initial loadings of 2, 5 and 10% with respect to copolymer weight. The developed NPs were analysed for size, size distribution, surface charge, morphology, encapsulation efficiency and drug release. NPs showing negative (ζ)-potential ( 300 nm and a polydispersity index (P.I.) of ≈ 0.2, irrespective of formulation process, were achieved. Insulin encapsulation efficiencies of 70% and 30% for NPs-Insulin-2 and NPs-Insulin-5 were obtained, respectively. The in vitro release behaviour of both formulations showed a classic biphasic sustained release of protein over 5 weeks which was influenced by pH of the release medium. Optimised chitosan films embedded with 3mg of insulin loaded NPs were produced by solvent casting with homogeneous distribution of NPs in the mucoadhesive matrix, which displayed excellent physico-mechanical properties. The drug delivery system has been designed as a novel platform for potential buccal delivery of macromolecules. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Functionalization of Fe₃O₄ NPs by Silanization: Use of Amine (APTES) and Thiol (MPTMS) Silanes and Their Physical Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Silvia; Riani, Paola; Locardi, Federico; Canepa, Fabio

    2016-10-12

    In this paper the results concerning the synthesis of magnetite (Fe₃O₄) nanoparticles (NPs), their functionalization using silane derivatives, such as (3-Aminopropyl)triethoxysilane (APTES) and (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS), and their exhaustive morphological and physical characterization by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) with energy dispersion X-ray spectrometer (EDX) analysis, AC magnetic susceptibility, UV-VIS and IR spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric (TGA) analyses are reported. Two different paths were adopted to achieve the desired functionalization: (1) the direct reaction between the functionalized organo-silane molecule and the surface of the magnetite nanoparticle; and (2) the use of an intermediate silica coating. Finally, the occurrence of both the functionalization with amino and thiol groups has been demonstrated by the reaction with ninhydrin and the capture of Au NPs, respectively.

  2. Improved adhesion of Ag NPs to the polyethylene terephthalate surface via atmospheric plasma treatment and surface functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Tao; Liu, Yong; Zhu, Yan; Yang, De-Quan; Sacher, Edward

    2017-07-01

    Ag nanoparticles (NPs) have been widely applied, as important antibacterial materials, on textile and polymer surfaces. However, their adhesion to nonreactive polymer surfaces is generally too weak for many applications. Here, we propose a two-step process, atmospheric plasma treatment followed by a surface chemical modification process, which enhances their adhesion to polyethylene terephthalate (PET) surfaces. We found that, compared to either plasma treatments or surface chemical functionalizations, alone, this combination greatly enhanced their adhesion. The plasma treatment resulted in an increase of active sites (sbnd OH, sbnd CHdbnd O and COOH) at the PET surface, permitting increased bonding to 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES), whose sbnd NH2 groups were then able to form a bonding complex with the Ag NPs.

  3. BackscatterA [USGS SWATH]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  4. BackscatterD [CSUMB Swath]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the acoustic-backscatter map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity map area, California. Backscatter data are provided as separate...

  5. Geology and geomorphology--Drakes Bay and Vicinity Bay Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of the Drakes Bay and Vicinity map area, California. The polygon shapefile is included in...

  6. Basalt microlapilli in deep sea sediments of Indian Ocean in the vicinity of Vityaz fracture zone

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nath, B.N.; Iyer, S.D.

    Two cores recovered from the flanks of Mid-India oceanic ridge in the vicinity of Vityaz fracture zone consist of discrete pyroclastic layers at various depths. These layers are composed of coarse-grained, angular basaltic microlapilli in which...

  7. Geology and geomorphology--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity Map Area, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for the geologic and geomorphic map of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The vector data file is included in...

  8. Life in wind turbines vicinity, effects on health – a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Pawlas

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a short review of scientific papers , and other sources concerning health effects of exposure to noise, infrasounds, electromagnetic radiation and mechanical hazards induced in dwellers living in vicinity of wind farm.

  9. Effect of the Antibiotic Neomycin on the Toxicity of the Glycoside Vicine in Rats

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arbid, Mahmoud S; Koriem, Khaled M. M; Asaad, Gihan F; Megahed, Hoda A

    2013-01-01

    .... Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration, hematocrit (Hct) value, and red blood cells (RBCs) count were significantly decreased after injection of vicine and the improvement of these values in the group pretreated with neomycin...

  10. A PC-based imaging system for the Naval Postgraduate School Infrared Search and Target Designation (NPS-IRSTD) system.

    OpenAIRE

    Engel, Raymond Charles

    1989-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A system to display images from data generated by the Naval Postgraduate School Infrared Search and Target Designation (NPS-IRSTD) system (modified AN/SAR-8 ADM) was developed using an Intel 80386 CPU based desktop computer as the base platform. This computer was enhanced with a Metrabyte PDMA-16 Input/output board to facilitate data transfers and a Data Translation DT2861 framegrabber board for image processing. Images are displayed...

  11. Characterization and In Vitro Toxicity of Copper Nanoparticles (Cu-NPs) in Murine Neuroblastoma (N2A) Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    control the growth of saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast and molds through the use of nanocomposites with spinning coatings that are equipped to release...and CuO NPs and Cu micron particles were expected to change after dry powder particles were suspended in water, dosing and growth medias . (2) Cells... growth medias . (2) Cells dosed at the same Cu particle concentration were equally exposed throughout the experiment and that the exposure method used

  12. MO-F-CAMPUS-J-04: One-Year Analysis of Elekta CBCT Image Quality Using NPS and MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakahara, S; Tachibana, M [Hiroshima International University, Hiroshma, Hiroshima (Japan); Watanabe, Y [University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare quantitative image quality (IQ) evaluation methods using Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Modulation Transfer Function (MTF) with standard IQ analyses for minimizing the observer subjectivity of the standard methods and maximizing the information content. Methods: For our routine IQ tests of Elekta XVI Cone-Beam CT, image noise was quantified by the standard deviation of CT number (CT#) (Sigma) over a small area in an IQ test phantom (CatPhan), and the high spatial resolution (HSR) was evaluated by the number of line-pairs (LP#) visually recognizable on the image. We also measured the image uniformity, the low contrast resolution ratio, and the distances of two points for geometrical accuracy. For this study, we did additional evaluation of the XVI data for 12 monthly IQ tests by using NPS for noise, MTF for HSR, and the CT#-to-density relationship. NPS was obtained by applying Fourier analysis in a small area on the uniformity test section of CatPhan. The MTF analysis was performed by applying the Droege-Morin (D-M) method to the line pairs on the phantom. The CT#-to-density was obtained for inserts in the low-contrast test section of the phantom. Results: All the quantities showed a noticeable change over the one-year period. Especially the noise level changed significantly after a repair of the imager. NPS was more sensitive to the IQ change than Sigma. MTF could provide more quantitative and objective evaluation of the HSR. The CT# was very different from the expected CT#; but, the CT#-to-density curves were constant within 5% except two months. Conclusion: Since the D-M method is easy to implement, we recommend using MTF instead of the LP# even for routine periodic QA. The month-to-month variation of IQ was not negligible; hence a routine IQ test must be performed, particularly after any modification of hardware including detector calibration.

  13. Remedial Action Plan and site conceptual design for stabilization of the inactive uranium mill tailings site at Spook, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, M L [USDOE Albuquerque Operations Office, NM (United States). Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project Office; Sullivan, M [Wyoming State Government, Cheyenne, WY (United States)

    1990-04-01

    This Remedial Action Plan (RAP) has been developed to serve a threefold purpose. It presents the series of activities which are proposed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to accomplish long-term stabilization and control of radioactive materials at an inactive uranium processing site northeast of Casper, Wyoming, and referred to as the Spook site. It provides a characterization of the present conditions at the site and also serves to document the concurrence of the State of Wyoming and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in the remedial action. This agreement, upon execution by the DOE and the State of Wyoming, and concurrence by the NRC, becomes Appendix B of the Cooperative Agreement.

  14. Transformation of Tertiary Benzyl Alcohols into the Vicinal Halo-Substituted Derivatives Using N-Halosuccinimides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njomza Ajvazi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The efficiency of direct conversion of tertiary alcohols bearing a β-hydrogen atom to vicinal halohydrins—chlorohydrins and bromohydrins—under green reaction conditions was tested preliminarily on model tertiary benzyl alcohols. Tertiary alcohols were successfully directly halogenated to vicinal halohydrins with N-halosuccinimide in aqueous media. The efficiency of the reaction in water was significantly improved in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulphate as the surfactant.

  15. An Electrochemical Microsensor Based on a AuNPs-Modified Microband Array Electrode for Phosphate Determination in Fresh Water Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangfang Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the fabrication, characterization, and application of a gold microband array electrode (MAE for the determination of phosphate in fresh water samples. The working principle of this MAE is based on the reduction of a molybdophosphate complex using the linear sweep voltammetric (LSV method. The calibration of this microsensor was performed with standard phosphate solutions prepared with KH2PO4 and pH adjusted to 1.0. The microsensor consists of a platinum counter electrode, a gold MAE as working electrode, and an Ag/AgCl electrode as reference electrode. The microelectrode chips were fabricated by the Micro Electro-Mechanical System (MEMS technique. To improve the sensitivity, gold nanoparticles (AuNPs were electrodeposited on the working electrode. With a linear range from 0.02 to 0.50 mg P/L, the sensitivity of the unmodified microsensor is 2.40 µA per (mg P/L (R2 = 0.99 and that of the AuNPs-modified microsensor is 7.66 µA per (mg P/L (R2 = 0.99. The experimental results showed that AuNPs-modified microelectrode had better sensitivity and a larger current response than the unmodified microelectrode.

  16. Self-assembly of the stretchable AuNPs@MoS2@GF substrate for the SERS application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tianming; Xu, Yuanyuan; Feng, Yang; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Chuanxi; Sun, Zhencui; Zhang, Hao; Yuan, Xiaobo; Ning, Tingyin; Yang, Cheng

    2017-11-01

    Large-area stretchable three-dimensional (3D) AuNPs@MoS2@GF as the SERS substrates are proposed here, which were fabricated by using CVD and stamp-transfer processes. 3D graphene foams (GF) are used to increase the sensitivity and stretchability, benefiting from the high specific surface area, chemical absorption and mechanical strength. Few-layered MoS2 films, which can be formed by thermal decomposition of the ammonium tetrathiomolybdate ((NH4)2MoS4), are used to absorb the molecules and form the high-density AuNPs with the reaction of tetrachloroauric acid. The stretchability (ε) of such stretchable foams up to 100% can be achieved. SERS spectra of CV molecules show that AuNPs@MoS2@GF can be applied to detect as low as 10-10 M. Such stretchable substrates can be used as ultrasensitive biosensors to detect the molecules on surfaces of any shape.

  17. Fluorescence turn-on recognition of chiral amino acids using dye incorporated β-CD functionalized AuNPs assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aswathy, B., E-mail: aswathybv@gmail.com; Sony, G., E-mail: emailtosony@gmail.com

    2014-10-15

    An assembly of dye incorporated β-cyclodextrin (βCD) functionalized AuNPs for the fluorescent probing of chiral amino acids is presented. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) possessing a high extinction coefficient function can be used as excellent fluorescent quenchers in AuNP–fluorophore system. Inclusion of fluorescein (FL) into β-cyclodextrin (βCD) makes energy transfer to occur through the donor and quencher nearby. This energy transfer switches off by virtue of the analyte induced release of FL from β-CD cavity, which results in the fluorescence recovery of the quenched dye. Analysis suggests that the assembly of AuNPs–βCDs–FL is effective as a turn-on fluorescent probe for the chiroselective optical discrimination between D,L-tryptophan, D,L-phenyl alanine and D,L-tyrosine. The detection limits for analyzing L-tryptophan, L-phenyl alanine and L-tyrosine were found to be 0.59, 1.2 and 1.5 μM respectively. - Highlights: • Fluorescence quenching AuNP–βCD–dye assembly via energy transfer. • Energy transfer from dye to AuNPs is a SET process. • Fluorescence turn-on detection of amino acids by the competitive binding method. • Chiroselective discrimination between enantiomeric amino acids.

  18. Enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of AZ31 Mg alloy using PCL/ZnO NPs via electrospinning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinwoo [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Mousa, Hamouda M. [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Engineering Materials and Mechanical Design, Faculty of Engineering, South Valley University, Qena 83523 (Egypt); Park, Chan Hee, E-mail: biochan@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Cheol Sang, E-mail: chskim@jbnu.ac.kr [Department of Bionanosystem Engineering, Graduate School, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Division of Mechanical Design Engineering, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju, Jeonbuk 561-756 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-28

    Highlights: • PCL/ZnO composite coating layer by electrospinning techniques showed the nano-scaled and porous surface structure. • Addition of zinc oxide NPs in the PCL fibers led to enhanced coating adhesion and corrosion resistance. • The composite coated surfaces on Mg substrates improved cell attachment and proliferation. - Abstract: In the efforts to improve corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnesium alloys, polycarprolactone (PCL) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) composite coatings were applied onto AZ31 Mg alloys via electrospinning technique in this study. The PCL/ZnO composite coatings on Mg alloys were characterized by using FE-SEM, EDX, XPS, and FT-IR. Moreover, coating adhesion test, electrochemical corrosion test, and biocompatibility test in vitro were performed to measure coating performance. Our results revealed that the increase in the content of ZnO NPs in the composite coatings not only improved the coating adhesion of composite coatings on Mg alloys, but also increased the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts of the PCL/ZnO composite coated samples was superior to the biocompatibility of the bare samples. Such data suggest that applying PCL/ZnO composite coating to the magnesium alloys has suitable potential in biomedical applications.

  19. Landsat - SRTM Shaded Relief Comparison, Los Angeles and Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Digital elevation models (DEMs), such as those produced by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM), allow user-controlled visualization of the Earth's landforms that is not possible using satellite imagery alone. This three-view comparison shows Los Angeles, Calif., and vicinity, with a Landsat image (only) on the left, a shaded relief rendering of the SRTM DEM on the right, and a merge of the two data sets in the middle. Note that topographic expression in the Landsat image alone is very subtle due to the fairly high sun angle (63 degrees above the horizon) during the satellite overflight in late morning of a mid-Spring day (May 4, 2001). In contrast, computer generated topographic shading of the DEM provides a pure and bold image of topographic expression with a user specified illumination direction. The middle image shows how combining the Landsat and DEM shaded relief can result in a topographically enhanced satellite image in which the information content of both data sets is merged into a single view.Landsat has been providing visible and infrared views of the Earth since 1972. SRTM elevation data matches the 30-meter (98-foot) resolution of most Landsat images and helps in analyzing the large and growing Landsat image archive, managed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).Elevation data used in this image was acquired by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) aboard the Space Shuttle Endeavour, launched on Feb. 11, 2000. SRTM used the same radar instrument that comprised the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C/X-Band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) that flew twice on the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994. SRTM was designed to collect 3-D measurements of the Earth's surface. To collect the 3-D data, engineers added a 60-meter (approximately 200-foot) mast, installed additional C-band and X-band antennas, and improved tracking and navigation devices. The mission is a cooperative project between NASA, the National Imagery and Mapping Agency (NIMA) of the U

  20. SU-G-TeP3-15: Radiation Dose Enhancement by Anatase TiO2NPs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youkhana, E; Geso, M; Feltis, B [RMIT University, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: This work investigates radiation dose enhancement caused by TiO2 nanoparticles covering entire X-ray energy ranges used in radiation therapy. Methods: Anatase TiO2NPs crystal were synthesised and modified as hydrophilic and hydrophobic to disperse in culture-medium and halocarbons (PRESAGE chemical composition) respectively. TiO2NPs were characterised using TEM, XPS, XRD, TGA and FTIR. Various Concentrations have been utilised for determination of radiation-dose enhancement. This investigation is carried out in two ways; one using PRESAGE dosimeter/phantom and the other is radiobiological and based on in vitro study using two types of cell lines, Human Keratinocyte (HaCaT) and prostate cancer cell lines. The x-ray used are both kilovoltage and megavoltage separately. The prepared PRESAGE dosimeters were scanned using optical CT scanner. Clonogenic and MTS assays were employed for cell cytotoxicity and viability measurements for determination of the levels of dose enhancement. Results: Significant about (50%, 45%) dose enhancement by TiO2-NPs for kV x-rays is measured in both ways (Presage and Cells study). Slightly more is detected with the cells. However, the dose enhancement with megavoltage beams was insignificant using Presage and under same conditions the cells survival curves indicates around 20% which is relatively high. This difference can only be attributed to some biochemical effects. Such as generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), this can affect the cells while it can’t be detected by Presage. Elevation of hydroxyl radicals (•OH) of many orders is observed with the inclusion of TiO2-NPs in cells-medium. Conclusion: Dose enhancement inflicted by TiO2-NPs is proven to be significant with megavoltage beams and minimal with kV. The high dose enhancements obtained can be attributed to higher levels of ROS generated. Since MV beams are most commonly used, this research proves potential value for more efficient beam delivery. This has

  1. Asymmetrical flow field-flow fractionation coupled to inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry for sizing SeNPs for packaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomo-Siguero, María; Vera, Paula; Echegoyen, Yolanda; Nerin, Cristina; Cámara, Carmen; Madrid, Yolanda

    2017-06-01

    This paper describes the application of Asymmetrical Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (AF4) coupled to diode array detector (DAD) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (AF4-UV-ICP-MS) to characterize selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) in an aqueous acrylic adhesive to be used in a multilayer food packaging material. SeNPs were synthesized using a solution-phase approach based on the reduction of selenite with ascorbic acid in presence of different stabilizers compatible with food industry such as polysaccharides (chitosan (poly(D-glucosamine) and hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC)) and non-ionic surfactants (Triton X-100 (t-octylphenoxypolyethoxyethanol), 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl 5decyne-4,7-diol ethoxylate, and isotridecanol ethoxylate). Several parameters such as pH, ascorbic acid and stabilizers concentration, and compatibility of the stabilizer with the adhesive were evaluated. SeNPs suspensions with spherical morphology were obtained except when isotridecanol ethoxylate was employed which provides SeNPs with a nanorod morphology. AF4-DAD-ICP-MS was further applied for sizing the different SeNPs preparations. DAD was used as detector for selecting the best AF4 separation conditions before coupling to ICP-MS to ensure unequivocal identification of NPs. AF4 calibration with polystyrene latex (PSL) beads of known sizes allowed size determination of the different SeNPs. The following estimated hydrodynamic sizes (expressed as the mean ± standard deviation, n = 6 replicates) were found: chitosan-SeNPs- (26 ± 3 nm), TritonX100-SeNPs (22 ± 10 nm) HEC- SeNPs (91 ± 8 nm) and 2,4,7,9-tetramethyl 5decyne-4,7-diol ethoxylate- SeNPs (59 ± 4 nm). The proposed methodology was successfully applied to the characterization in terms of size of aqueous acrylic adhesives containing SeNPs Results from AF4-ICP-MS and TEM shown that only those SeNPs obtained with non-ionic surfactants and HEC were compatible with the adhesive. The results reported here evidence the usefulness of AF4-ICP

  2. Environmental Assessment of Remedial Action at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Riverton, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1987-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0254) on the proposed remedial action at the inactive uranium milling site near Riverton, Wyoming. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 4321, et seq.). Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required.

  3. Digital representation of oil and natural gas well pad scars in southwest Wyoming: 2012 update

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Steven L.; McBeth, Jamie L.

    2015-01-01

    The recent proliferation of oil and natural gas energy development in the Greater Green River Basin of southwest Wyoming has accentuated the need to understand wildlife responses to this development. The location and extent of surface disturbance that is created by oil and natural gas well pad scars are key pieces of information used to assess the effects of energy infrastructure on wildlife populations and habitat. A digital database of oil and natural gas pad scars had previously been generated from 1-meter (m) National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery (NAIP) acquired in 2009 for a 7.7-million hectare (ha) (19,026,700 acres) region of southwest Wyoming. Scars included the pad area where wellheads, pumps, and storage facilities reside and the surrounding area that was scraped and denuded of vegetation during the establishment of the pad. Scars containing tanks, compressors, the storage of oil and gas related equipment, and produced-water ponds were also collected on occasion. This report updates the digital database for the five counties of southwest Wyoming (Carbon, Lincoln, Sublette, Sweetwater, Uinta) within the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) study area and for a limited portion of Fremont, Natrona, and Albany Counties using 2012 1-m NAIP imagery and 2012 oil and natural gas well permit information. This report adds pad scars created since 2009, and updates attributes of all pad scars using the 2012 well permit information. These attributes include the origination year of the pad scar, the number of active and inactive wells on or near each pad scar in 2012, and the overall status of the pad scar (active or inactive). The new 2012 database contains 17,404 pad scars of which 15,532 are attributed as oil and natural gas well pads. Digital data are stored as shapefiles projected to the Universal Transverse Mercator (zones 12 and 13) coordinate system. These data are available from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) at http://dx.doi.org/10

  4. Predicting occupancy for pygmy rabbits in Wyoming: an independent evaluation of two species distribution models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Ignizio, Drew; Keinath, Doug; Copeland, Holly

    2014-01-01

    Species distribution models are an important component of natural-resource conservation planning efforts. Independent, external evaluation of their accuracy is important before they are used in management contexts. We evaluated the classification accuracy of two species distribution models designed to predict the distribution of pygmy rabbit Brachylagus idahoensis habitat in southwestern Wyoming, USA. The Nature Conservancy model was deductive and based on published information and expert opinion, whereas the Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model was statistically derived using historical observation data. We randomly selected 187 evaluation survey points throughout southwestern Wyoming in areas predicted to be habitat and areas predicted to be nonhabitat for each model. The Nature Conservancy model correctly classified 39 of 77 (50.6%) unoccupied evaluation plots and 65 of 88 (73.9%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 63.3%. The Wyoming Natural Diversity Database model correctly classified 53 of 95 (55.8%) unoccupied plots and 59 of 88 (67.0%) occupied plots for an overall classification success of 61.2%. Based on 95% asymptotic confidence intervals, classification success of the two models did not differ. The models jointly classified 10.8% of the area as habitat and 47.4% of the area as nonhabitat, but were discordant in classifying the remaining 41.9% of the area. To evaluate how anthropogenic development affected model predictive success, we surveyed 120 additional plots among three density levels of gas-field road networks. Classification success declined sharply for both models as road-density level increased beyond 5 km of roads per km-squared area. Both models were more effective at predicting habitat than nonhabitat in relatively undeveloped areas, and neither was effective at accounting for the effects of gas-energy-development road networks. Resource managers who wish to know the amount of pygmy rabbit habitat present in an

  5. Range vegetation type mapping and above-ground green biomass estimations using multispectral imagery. [Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, R. S. (Principal Investigator); Gordon, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Range vegetation types have been successfully mapped on a portion of the 68,000 acre study site located west of Baggs, Wyoming, using ERTS-1 imagery. These types have been ascertained from field transects over a five year period. Comparable studies will be made with EREP imagery. Above-ground biomass estimation studies are being conducted utilizing double sampling techniques on two similar study sites. Information obtained will be correlated with percent relative reflectance measurements obtained on the ground which will be related to image brightness levels. This will provide an estimate of above-ground green biomass with multispectral imagery.

  6. Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, in domestic sheep flocks from Wyoming, United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftis, Amanda D; Reeves, Will K; Miller, Myrna M; Massung, Robert F

    2012-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever, is an intracellular bacterial pathogen. It has a nearly cosmopolitan distribution. We conducted a serological survey of domestic sheep herds for infections with C. burnetii in Wyoming following reports of abortion and open ewes. Based on the serologic evidence, there was no link between reproductive problems and exposure to C. burnetii. However, the overall prevalence of C. burnetii in WY sheep was 7%, which indicates that the agent is present in the environment and could pose a threat to public health.

  7. Biosynthesis of AgNPs using aqueous leaf extract of Ipomoea eriocarpa and their anti-inflammatory effect on carrageenan-induced paw edema in male Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Moonjit; Mondal, Ashaparna; Patowary, Kaustuvmani; Malipeddi, Himaja

    2017-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were synthesised from aqueous Ag nitrate through a simple, competent and eco-friendly method using the leaf extract of Ipomoea eriocarpa as reducing as well as capping agent. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy was used to confirm the formation of AgNPs which displayed the substantiation of surface plasmon bands at 425 nm. The NPs were also characterised using Fourier transformer infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction method, transmission electron microscope and zeta potential. The characterisation study confirmed the formation of AgNPs, their spherical shape and average diameter of 12.85 ± 8.65 nm. Zeta potential value of -20.5 mV suggested that the AgNPs are stable in the suspension. The aqueous extract and the AgNPs were further screened for in vivo anti-inflammatory activity using carrageenan-induced paw edema in male Wistar rats. The study demonstrated that the AgNPs (1 ml kg-1) had a significant (p < 0.05) anti-edemic effect and inhibition was observed from the first hour (21.31 ± 1.34) until the sixth hour (52.67 ± 1.41), when the inhibitory effect was greatest and superior to the aqueous extract and the standard, diclofenac.

  8. Fabrication of ITO-rGO/Ag NPs nanocomposite by two-step chronoamperometry electrodeposition and its characterization as SERS substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Rong [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-Nano Devices and System Technology, and School of Optoelectronics Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Analytical and Testing Center, Sichuan University of Science & Engineering, Zigong, Sichuan 643000 (China); Xu, Yi [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-Nano Devices and System Technology, and School of Optoelectronics Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Wang, Chunyan [Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-Nano Devices and System Technology, and School of Optoelectronics Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Zhao, Huazhou; Wang, Renjie; Liao, Xin [Chemistry and Chemical Engineering College, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-Nano Devices and System Technology, and School of Optoelectronics Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); Chen, Li; Chen, Gang [Key Disciplines Lab of Novel Micro-Nano Devices and System Technology, and School of Optoelectronics Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China); School of Optoelectronic Engineering, Chongqing University, Shapingba, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • A novel structure of ITO-rGO/Ag NPs substrate was developed for SERS application. • Two-step chronoamperometry deposition method was used to prepare SERS substrate. • The SERS substrate had high SERS activity, good uniformity and reproducibility. - Abstract: A novel composite structure of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)–Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) nanocomposite, which was integrated on the indium tin oxide (ITO) glass by a facile and rapid two-step chronoamperometry electrodeposition route, was proposed and developed in this paper. SERS-activity of the rGO/Ag NPs nanocomposite was mainly affected by the structure and size of the fabricated rGO/Ag NPs nanocomposite. In the experiments, the operational conditions of electrodeposition process were studied in details. The electrodeposited time was the important controllable factor, which decided the particle size and surface coverage of the deposited Ag NPs on ITO glass. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit for rhodamine6G (R6G) was as low as 10{sup −11} M and the Raman enhancement factor was as large as 5.9 × 10{sup 8}, which was 24 times higher than that for the ITO–Ag NPs substrate. Apart from this higher enhancement effect, it was also illustrated that extremely good uniformity and reproducibility with low standard deviation could be obtained by the prepared ITO-rGO/Ag NPs nanocomposite for SRES detection.

  9. Effect of surface coating and organic matter on the uptake of CeO2 NPs by corn plants grown in soil: Insight into the uptake mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lijuan; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Li, Chunqiang; Zhang, Jianying; Aguilera, Renato J; Keller, Arturo A; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2012-07-30

    Little is known about the fate, transport, and bioavailability of CeO(2) nanoparticles (NPs) in soil. Moreover, there are no reports on the effect of surface coating upon NPs uptake by plants. In this study, Zea mays plants were grown for one month in unenriched and organic soils treated with coated and uncoated CeO(2) NPs. In addition, plants were exposed to fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-stained CeO(2) NPs and analyzed in a confocal microscope. In organic soil, roots from uncoated and coated NPs at 100, 200, 400, and 800mg kg(-1) had 40, 80, 130, and 260% and 10, 70, 90, and 40% more Ce, respectively, compared to roots from unenriched soil. Conversely, shoots of plants from unenriched soil had significantly more Ce compared with shoots from organic soil. Confocal fluorescence images showed FITC-stained CeO(2) NP aggregates in cell walls of epidermis and cortex, suggesting apoplastic pathway. The μXRF results revealed the presence of CeO(2) NP aggregates within vascular tissues. To the authors knowledge this is the first report on the effects of surface coating and organic matter on Ce uptake from CeO(2) NPs and upon the mechanisms of CeO(2) NPs uptake by higher plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomimetic synthesis of Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NWs with visible-light-enhanced photocatalytic activity for degradation of the antibiotic ciprofloxacin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuling; Wu, Qingsheng; Zhao, Yaping

    2017-05-16

    1D Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NWs have been constructed to enhance visible-light-driven photocatalytic activity via biomimetic synthesis. Cu nanowires (NWs) were synthesized by a facile hydrothermal method. During the process of biomimetic synthesis, the porous PTFE film, which can mimic the transport process of cell membranes, plays an important role in controlling the transport speed of silver ions (Ag(+)) to decrease the reaction speed. Thus inhibition of the replacement reaction of Ag(+)/Cu and the uniform growth of Ag3PO4 nanoparticles (NPs) with a diameter of about 10 nm on Cu-NWs can be realized simultaneously. The diameter of Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NW is about 70 nm. Owing to the high electron transport of single crystal Cu-NWs, the free electrons in Ag3PO4 are transferred out to promote photogenerated electron-hole pair separation. The stability of Ag3PO4 NPs of the Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NWs was improved and the photodecomposition no longer occurred. Meanwhile, the band-gap of Ag3PO4 decreased to 2.07 eV after being coated on Cu-NWs and expanded the absorption scope of visible-light. In addition, the active species-trapping experiments indicated that the holes and ˙O2(-) play important roles in the photocatalytic reactions. The novel Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NWs were used for the degradation of ciprofloxacin (CPFX) for the first time and showed high photocatalytic degradation performance. After visible-light irradiation for 15 min, the degradation rates of CPFX with pure Ag3PO4 NPs and AC0.3 as catalysts were about 27% and 53%. In the end, the degradation efficiency of Ag3PO4-NPs/Cu-NWs was 6.07 times that of the pure Ag3PO4 NPs.

  11. Formyl-Peptide Receptor Agonists and Amorphous SiO-NPs Synergistically and Selectively Increase the Inflammatory Responses of Human Monocytes and PMNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Tavano

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We tested whether amorphous SiO 2 -NPs and formylpeptide receptor (FPRs agonists synergistically activate human monocytes and neutrophil polymorphonuclear granulocytes (PMNs. Peptide ligands specifically binding to FPR1 (f-MLP and to FPR2 (MMK-1, WKYMVM and WKYMVm human isoforms did not modify the association of SiO 2 -NPs to both cell types or their cytotoxic effects. Similarly, the extent of CD80, CD86, CD83, ICAM-1 and MHCII expression in monocytes treated with SiO 2 -NPs was not significantly altered by any FPRs agonist. However, FPR1 stimulation with f-MLP strongly increased the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8 by human monocytes, and of IL-8 by PMNs in the presence of SiO 2 -NPs, due to the synergic stimulation of gene transcription. FPR2 agonists also up-modulated the production of IL-1β induced by monocytes treated with SiO 2 -NPs. In turn, SiO 2 -NPs increased the chemotaxis of PMNs toward FPR1-specific ligands, but not toward FPR2-specific ones. Conversely, the chemotaxis of monocytes toward FPR2-specific peptides was inhibited by SiO 2 -NPs. NADPH-oxidase activation triggered by FPR1- and FPR2-specific ligands in both cell types was not altered by SiO 2 -NPs. Microbial and tissue danger signals sensed by FPRs selectively amplified the functional responses of monocytes and PMN S to SiO 2 -NPs, and should be carefully considered in the assessment of the risk associated with nanoparticle exposure.

  12. Integrated mRNA and micro RNA profiling reveals epigenetic mechanism of differential sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eom, Hyun-Jeong; Chatterjee, Nivedita; Lee, Jeongsoo; Choi, Jinhee

    2014-08-17

    In our previous in vitro study of the toxicity on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs), we observed a dramatically higher sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs than to Ag ions, and DNA damage and apoptosis were found to be involved in that toxicity. In this study, to understand underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurket T cells to AgNPs and Ag ions, mRNA microarray and micro RNA microarray were concomitantly conducted on AgNPs and Ag ions exposed Jurkat T cells. Surprisingly only a small number of genes were differentially expressed by exposure to each of the silver (15 altered mRNA by AgNPs exposure, whereas 4 altered mRNA by Ag ions exposure, as determined 1.5-fold change as the cut-off value). miRNA microarray revealed that the expression of 63 miRNAs was altered by AgNPs exposure, whereas that of 32 miRNAs was altered by Ag ions exposure. An integrated analysis of mRNA and miRNA expression revealed that the expression of hsa-miR-219-5p, was negatively correlated with the expression of metallothionein 1F (MT1F) and tribbles homolog 3 (TRIB3), in cells exposed to AgNPs; whereas, the expression of hsa-miR-654-3p was negatively correlated with the expression of mRNA, endonuclease G-like 1 (EDGL1) in cells exposed to Ag ions. Network analysis were further conducted on mRNA-miRNA pairs, which revealed that miR-219-5p-MT1F and -TRIB3 pairs by AgNPs are being involved in various cellular processes, such as, oxidative stress, cell cycle and apoptosis, whereas, miR-654-3p and ENDOGL1 pair by Ag ions generated a much simpler network. The putative target genes of AgNPs-induced miR-504, miR-33 and miR-302 identified by Tarbase 6.0 are also found to be involved in DNA damage and apoptosis. These results collectively suggest that distinct epigenetic regulation may be an underlying mechanism of different sensitivity of Jurkat T cells to AgNPs and Ag ion. Further identification of putative target genes of DE miRNA by AgNPs and Ag ions may provide additional clues for the

  13. Formyl-peptide Receptor Agonists and Amorphous SiO2-NPs Synergistically and Selectively Increase the Inflammatory Responses of Human Monocytes and PMNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Tavano

    2016-02-01

    ligands, but not toward FPR2-specific ones. Conversely, the chemotaxis of monocytes toward FPR2-specific peptides was inhibited by SiO2-NPs. NADPH-oxidase activation triggered by FPR1- and FPR2-specific ligands in both cell types was not altered by SiO2-NPs. Microbial and tissue danger signals sensed by FPRs selectively amplified the functional responses of monocytes and PMNS to SiO2-NPs, and should be carefully considered in the assessment of the risk associated with nanoparticle exposure.

  14. Fabrication of an electrochemical nanoaptasensor based on AuNPs for ultrasensitive determination of cocaine in serum sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roushani, Mahmoud; Shahdost-Fard, Faezeh

    2016-04-01

    Herein we describe an ultrasensitive electrochemical nanoaptasensor for the detection of one of the most dangerous narcotic drugs available, cocaine. The nanoaptasensor was constructed by the covalent attachment of a 5'-NH2-3'-gold nanoparticles terminated aptamer on the surface of a glassy carbon electrode which was deposited with gold nanoparticles (AuNPs/GCE). It is worth noting that the interaction of the cysteamine stable self-assembled monolayer on the AuNPs/GCE surface and the covalent attachment of terephthalaldehyde via amide coupling with the amine groups in the cysteamine and aptamer, respectively, resulted in the covalent attachment of the aptamer to AuNPs/GCE. The presence of gold nanoparticles both on surface of the glassy carbon electrode and in the end of the aptamer, can provide advantages such as increase of active surface area, high acceleration of the electron transfer and improved electrochemical signal, respectively. The decrease in the peak current of [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as the probe redox with increase of cocaine concentration, in differential pulse voltammetry as the measuring technique, from 5 pM up to 5 nM was linear and an unprecedented detection limit of 0.5pM was yielded. Furthermore, the effect of some common analgesic drugs as the potential interferents were investigated and also, to evaluate practical application of the proposed nanoaptasensor human blood serum sample as a real sample was used. Simple preparation, low operation cost, speed and validity are the decisive factors of this method motivating its application to biosensing investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO-NPs) and their antifungal activity against coffee fungus Erythricium salmonicolor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arciniegas-Grijalba, P. A.; Patiño-Portela, M. C.; Mosquera-Sánchez, L. P.; Guerrero-Vargas, J. A.; Rodríguez-Páez, J. E.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, a methodology of synthesis was designed to obtain ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) in a controlled and reproducible manner. The nanoparticles obtained were characterized using infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Also, we determined the antifungal capacity in vitro of zinc oxide nanoparticles synthesized, examining their action on Erythricium salmonicolor fungy causal of pink disease. To determine the effect of the quantity of zinc precursor used during ZnO NPs synthesis on the antifungal capacity, 0.1 and 0.15 M concentrations of zinc acetate were examined. To study the inactivation of the mycelial growth of the fungus, different concentrations of ZnO NPs of the two types of synthesized samples were used. The inhibitory effect on the growth of the fungus was determined by measuring the growth area as a function of time. The morphological change was observed with high-resolution optical microscopy (HROM), while TEM was used to observe changes in its ultrastructure. The results showed that a concentration of 9 mmol L-1 for the sample obtained from the 0.15 M and at 12 mmol L-1 for the 0.1 M system significantly inhibited growth of E. salmonicolor. In the HROM images a deformation was observed in the growth pattern: notable thinning of the fibers of the hyphae and a clumping tendency. The TEM images showed a liquefaction of the cytoplasmic content, making it less electron-dense, with the presence of a number of vacuoles and significant detachment of the cell wall.

  16. U.S. Geological Survey science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative: 2013 annual report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bern, Carleton R.; Biewick, Laura R. H.; Boughton, Gregory K.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Dematatis, Marie K.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen S.; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Homer, Collin G.; Huber, Christopher; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Sweat, Michael J.; Walters, Annika W.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the sixth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual activities conducted by USGS for addressing specific management needs identified by WLCI partners. In FY2013, there were 25 ongoing and new projects conducted by the USGS. These projects fall into 8 major categories: (1) synthesizing and analyzing existing data to describe (model and map) current conditions on the landscape; (2) developing models for projecting past and future landscape conditions; (3) monitoring indicators of ecosystem conditions and the effectiveness of on-the-ground habitat projects; (4) conducting research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying wildlife and habitat responses to changing land uses; (5) managing and making accessible the large number of databases, maps, and other products being developed; (6) helping to integrate WLCI outcomes with future habitat enhancement and research projects; (7) coordinating efforts among WLCI partners; and (8) providing support to WLCI decision-makers and assisting with overall evaluation of the WLCI program. The two new projects initiated in FY2013 address (1) important agricultural lands in southwestern Wyoming, and (2) the influence of energy development on native fish communities. The remaining activities entailed our ongoing efforts to compile data, model landscape conditions, monitor trends in habitat conditions, conduct studies of wildlife responses to energy development, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts.

  17. Basic data for thermal springs and wells as recorded in GEOTHERM: Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bliss, J.D.

    1983-05-01

    GEOTHERM sample file contains 356 records for Wyoming. Three computer-generated indexes are found in appendices A, B, and C of this report. The indexes give one line summaries of each GEOTHERM record describing the chemistry of geothermal springs and wells in the sample file for Wyoming. Each index is sorted by different variables to assist the user in locating geothermal records describing specific sites. Appendix A is sorted by the county name and the name of the source. Also given are latitude, longitude (both use decimal minutes), township, range, section, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix B is sorted by county, township, range, and section. Also given are name of source, GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). Appendix C is first sorted into one-degree blocks by latitude, and longitude, and then by name of source. Adjacent one-degree blocks which are published as a 1:250,000 map are combined under the appropriate map name. Also given are GEOTHERM record identifier, and temperature (/sup 0/C). A bibliography is given in Appendix D.

  18. Endemic chronic wasting disease causes mule deer population decline in Wyoming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melia T DeVivo

    Full Text Available Chronic wasting disease (CWD is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus, mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus, Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni, and moose (Alces alces shirasi in North America. In southeastern Wyoming average annual CWD prevalence in mule deer exceeds 20% and appears to contribute to regional population declines. We determined the effect of CWD on mule deer demography using age-specific, female-only, CWD transition matrix models to estimate the population growth rate (λ. Mule deer were captured from 2010-2014 in southern Converse County Wyoming, USA. Captured adult (≥ 1.5 years old deer were tested ante-mortem for CWD using tonsil biopsies and monitored using radio telemetry. Mean annual survival rates of CWD-negative and CWD-positive deer were 0.76 and 0.32, respectively. Pregnancy and fawn recruitment were not observed to be influenced by CWD. We estimated λ = 0.79, indicating an annual population decline of 21% under current CWD prevalence levels. A model derived from the demography of only CWD-negative individuals yielded; λ = 1.00, indicating a stable population if CWD were absent. These findings support CWD as a significant contributor to mule deer population decline. Chronic wasting disease is difficult or impossible to eradicate with current tools, given significant environmental contamination, and at present our best recommendation for control of this disease is to minimize spread to new areas and naïve cervid populations.

  19. Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative Science Workshop Proceedings, May 15-17, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Erchia, Frank

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) hosted a Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) Science Workshop at the University of Wyoming on May 15, 16, and 17, 2007. The goal of the workshop was to gather information from stakeholders about research needs and existing data resources to help develop the USGS WLCI science plan. The workshop focused on six research and management needs identified by WLCI partners prior to the workshop: *evaluate the cumulative effects of development activities; *identify key drivers of change; *identify condition and distribution of key wildlife species, habitat, and species habitat requirements; *evaluate wildlife and livestock responses to development; *develop an integrated inventory and monitoring strategy; and *develop a data clearinghouse and an information-management framework. These topics correlated to six plenary panels and discussions and six breakout sessions. Several collective needs were identified: *create a long-term, accessible information database; *identify key habitats, indicator species; *collect and research missing critical baseline data; *begin on-the-ground projects as soon as possible; and *implement a monitoring program to assist with adaptive management techniques. Several concerns were expressed repeatedly: *secure adequate and long-term funding; *meeting the WLCI workload with agencies that are already understaffed; *assess cumulative effects as an analysis approach; *perform offsite mitigation in a way that is valuable and effective; *focus all research on providing practical applications; and *involve the public in WLCI proceedings.

  20. A STUDY OF CONTINUING EDUCATION NEEDS OF SELECTED PROFESSIONAL GROUPS AND UNIVERSITY EXTENSION CONTRACT PROGRAMS IN WYOMING.

    Science.gov (United States)

    NICHOLAS, ROBERT A.

    THIS STUDY AIMED TO DEVELOP PRINCIPLES FOR A MODEL PROGRAM OF CONTINUING EDUCATION FOR THE PROFESSIONS AT THE UNIVERSITY OF WYOMING. THE AUTHOR REVIEWED THE LITERATURE ON THE GROWTH OF THE PROFESSIONS AND ON CONTINUING EDUCATION IN THE PROFESSIONS GENERALLY, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO ARCHITECTURE, DENTISTRY, LAW, MEDICINE, AND PHARMACY. FROM THIS…

  1. 78 FR 56650 - Medicine Bow-Routt National Forests and Thunder Basin National Grassland; Wyoming; Thunder Basin...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-13

    ... predator control in prairie dog colonies); and use of physical barriers (e.g., fencing and vegetative barriers). The Forest Service also proposes to make the following minor modifications to the 2009 Prairie... National Guard Armory--315 Pearson Road. October 8: Newcastle, Wyoming--USDA Hell Canyon Ranger District...

  2. Wildfire impacts on stream sedimentation: re-visiting the Boulder Creek Burn in Little Granite Creek, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra Ryan; Kathleen Dwire

    2012-01-01

    In this study of a burned watershed in northwestern Wyoming, USA, sedimentation impacts following a moderately-sized fire (Boulder Creek burn, 2000) were evaluated against sediment loads estimated for the period prior to burning. Early observations of suspended sediment yield showed substantially elevated loads (5x) the first year post-fire (2001), followed by less...

  3. 76 FR 16811 - Notice of Realty Action: Application for a Recordable Disclaimer of Interest in Land; Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Notice of Realty Action: Application for a Recordable Disclaimer of Interest in Land; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of realty action. SUMMARY: John L. Nau III and Barbara E. Nau, of Houston, Texas, and Donald and Diane Siegel, Trustees of the...

  4. The consequences of trampling disturbance in two vegetation types at the Wyoming Nature Conservancy's Sweetwater River project area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher A. Monz; Tami Pokorny; Jerry Freilich; Sharon Kehoe; Dayna Ayers-Baumeister

    2000-01-01

    The consequences of human trampling disturbance on two codominant vegetation types at the Wyoming Nature Conservancy’s Sweetwater Preserve were examined. Small trampling lanes (1.5m x 0.5m) were established in both vegetation types and trampling treatments ranging from 0 to 800 passes were applied. Artemisia (Sagebrush) vegetation type was more...

  5. Urban and community forests of the Mountain region: Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Eric J. Greenfield

    2010-01-01

    This report details how land cover and urbanization vary within the states of Arizona, Colorado, Idaho, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming by community (incorporated and census designated places), county subdivision, and county. Specifically this report provides critical urban and community forestry information for each state including human population...

  6. Home range size and habitat-use pattern of nesting prairie falcons near oil developments in northeastern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    John R. Squires; Stanley H. Anderson; Robert Oakleaf

    1993-01-01

    Movements and habitat-use patterns were evaluated for a small population (n = 6 pairs) of Prairie Falcons (Falco mexicanus) nesting near Gillette, Wyoming. A total of 2462 falcon relocations was documented through telemetry. The average (n = 6) harmonic-mean 95%-contour home-range was 69 km2, whereas the average 75% contour was 26.6 km2. The convex polygon...

  7. Spatial and temporal variability in stream sediment loads using examples from the Gros Ventre Range, Wyoming, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandra E. Ryan; Mark K. Dixon

    2007-01-01

    Sediment transport rates (dissolved, suspended, and bedload) measured over the course of several years are reported for two streams in the Gros Ventre Mountain range in western Wyoming, USA: Little Granite and Cache Creeks. Both streams drain watersheds that are in relatively pristine environments. The sites are about 20km apart, have runoff dominated by snowmelt and...

  8. Natural recruitment of Wyoming big sagebrush in and adjacent to burned areas during an El Nino year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyoming big sagebrush is known to have episodic recruitment, but the driving factors for these recruitment events is poorly understood. Sagebrush is not fire adapted, is a mid to late seral species, and can take multiple decades to reach a similar density of unburned stands. Fire and climate regimes...

  9. Climate change on the Shoshone National Forest, Wyoming: a synthesis of past climate, climate projections, and ecosystem implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janine Rice; Andrew Tredennick; Linda A. Joyce

    2012-01-01

    The Shoshone National Forest (Shoshone) covers 2.4 million acres of mountainous topography in northwest Wyoming and is a vital ecosystem that provides clean water, wildlife habitat, timber, grazing, recreational opportunities, and aesthetic value. The Shoshone has experienced and adapted to changes in climate for many millennia, and is currently experiencing a warming...

  10. Unraveling the complex behavior of AgNPs driving NP-Cell interactions and toxicity to algal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Malysheva, Anzhela; Voelcker, Nicolas; Holm, Peter Engelund

    2016-01-01

    toxicity test. In particular, we investigated NP aggregation and dissolution by time-resolved inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and ultrafiltration and performed mass balance measurements to study the distribution of Ag in the test system. We also determined the amount of extra...... to the vessels, dissolution, and aggregation impact on the distribution of AgNPs in the test system and on interactions with algal cells, AgNP toxicity is strongly correlated with the NP-cell surface interaction and internalization of Ag....

  11. Unidirectional lateral nanowire formation during the epitaxial growth of GaAsBi on vicinal substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collar, Kristen N.; Li, Jincheng; Jiao, Wenyuan; Kong, Wei; Brown, April S.

    2018-01-01

    We report on enhanced control of the growth of lateral GaAs nanowires (NWs) embedded in epitaxial (100) GaAsBi thin films enabled by the use of vicinal substrates and the growth-condition dependent role of Bi as a surfactant. Enhanced step-flow growth is achieved through the use of vicinal substrates and yields unidirectional nanowire growth. The addition of Bi during GaAsBi growth enhances Ga adatom diffusion anisotropy and modifies incorporation rates at steps in comparison to GaAs growth yielding lower density but longer NWs. The NWs grown on vicinal substrates grew unidirectionally towards the misorientation direction when Bi was present. The III/V flux ratio significantly impacts the size, shape and density of the resulting NWs. These results suggest that utilizing growth conditions which enhance step-flow growth enable enhanced control of lateral nanostructures.

  12. Cost-Performance Parametrics for Transporting Small Packages to the Mars Vicinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCleskey, C.; Lepsch, Roger A.; Martin, J.; Popescu, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the costs and performance required to deliver a small-sized payload package (CubeSat-sized, for instance) to various transportation nodes en route to Mars and near-Mars destinations (such as Mars moons, Phobos and Deimos). Needed is a contemporary assessment and summary compilation of transportation metrics that factor both performance and affordability of modern and emerging delivery capabilities. The paper brings together: (a) required mass transport gear ratios in delivering payload from Earths surface to the Mars vicinity, (b) the cyclical energy required for delivery, and (c) the affordability and availability of various means of transporting material across various Earth-Moon vicinity and Near-Mars vicinity nodes relevant to Mars transportation. Examples for unit deliveries are computed and tabulated, using a CubeSat as a unit, for periodic near-Mars delivery campaign scenarios.

  13. Bathymetry 2M Grid of NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Reserve, St. Croix, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of the a portion of the NPS's Salt River Bay National Historical Park and...

  14. Bathymetry 2M Grid, of NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (Offshore), St. John, US Virgin Islands, 2005, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 2 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of an offshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National...

  15. Bathymetry of NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument (Inshore), St. John, US Virgin Islands 2005, 1M Grid, UTM 20 NAD83

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains an ESRI Grid with 1 meter cell size representing the bathymetry of an inshore portion of the NPS's Virgin Islands Coral Reef National Monument,...

  16. Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADA) with Industry as a Value Enhancing Asset in the Academic/Research Environment. A Case Study at the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ferraris, Guillermo L

    2005-01-01

    .... Although not technically a research laboratory, the Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) is a federally funded research university that has developed an extensive sponsored program of Technology Transfer (T2...

  17. Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eckerle, William; Hall, Stephen

    2005-12-30

    In 2002, Gnomon, Inc., entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) for a project entitled, Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields in New Mexico and Wyoming (DE-FC26-02NT15445). This project, funded through DOE’s Preferred Upstream Management Practices grant program, examined cultural resource management practices in two major oil- and gas-producing areas, southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming (Figure 1). The purpose of this project was to examine how cultural resources have been investigated and managed and to identify more effective management practices. The project also was designed to build information technology and modeling tools to meet both current and future management needs. The goals of the project were described in the original proposal as follows: Goal 1. Create seamless information systems for the project areas. Goal 2. Examine what we have learned from archaeological work in the southeastern New Mexico oil fields and whether there are better ways to gain additional knowledge more rapidly or at a lower cost. Goal 3. Provide useful sensitivity models for planning, management, and as guidelines for field investigations. Goal 4. Integrate management, investigation, and decision- making in a real-time electronic system. Gnomon, Inc., in partnership with the Wyoming State Historic Preservation Office (WYSHPO) and Western GeoArch Research, carried out the Wyoming portion of the project. SRI Foundation, in partnership with the New Mexico Historic Preservation Division (NMHPD), Statistical Research, Inc., and Red Rock Geological Enterprises, completed the New Mexico component of the project. Both the New Mexico and Wyoming summaries concluded with recommendations how cultural resource management (CRM) processes might be modified based on the findings of this research.

  18. Neurite outgrowth stimulatory effects of myco synthesized AuNPs from Hericium erinaceus (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. on pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Jegadeesh; Lakshmanan, Hariprasath; John, Priscilla A; Zhijian, Chan; Periasamy, Vengadesh; David, Pamela; Naidu, Murali; Sabaratnam, Vikineswary

    2015-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus has been reported to have a wide range of medicinal properties such as stimulation of neurite outgrowth, promotion of functional recovery of axonotmetic peroneal nerve injury, antioxidant, antihypertensive, and antidiabetic properties. In recent years, the green synthesis of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) has attracted intense interest due to the potential use in biomedical applications. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of AuNPs from aqueous extract of H. erinaceus on neurite outgrowth of rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cells. The formation of AuNPs was characterized by UV-visible spectrum, energy dispersive X-ray (EDX), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), particle size distribution, and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Furthermore, the neurite extension study of synthesized AuNPs was evaluated by in vitro assay. The AuNPs exhibited maximum absorbance between 510 and 600 nm in UV-visible spectrum. FESEM and TEM images showed the existence of nanoparticles with sizes of 20-40 nm. FTIR measurements were carried out to identify the possible biomolecules responsible for capping and efficient stabilization of the nanoparticles. The purity and the crystalline properties were confirmed by EDX diffraction analysis, which showed strong signals with energy peaks in the range of 2-2.4 keV, indicating the existence of gold atoms. The synthesized AuNPs showed significant neurite extension on PC-12 cells. Nerve growth factor 50 ng/mL was used as a positive control. Treatment with different concentrations (nanograms) of AuNPs resulted in neuronal differentiation and neuronal elongation. AuNPs induced maximum neurite outgrowth of 13% at 600 ng/mL concentration. In this study, the AuNPs synthesis was achieved by a simple, low-cost, and rapid bioreduction approach. AuNPs were shown to have potential neuronal differentiation and stimulated neurite outgrowth. The water

  19. Cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs towards fresh water algae Scenedesmus obliquus at low exposure concentrations in UV-C, visible and dark conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhuvaneshwari, M.; Iswarya, V. [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India); Archanaa, S. [Department of Biotechnology, IIT Madras (India); Madhu, G.M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, M.S. Ramaiah Institute of Technology, Bangalore (India); Kumar, G.K. Suraish [Department of Biotechnology, IIT Madras (India); Nagarajan, R. [Department of Chemical Engineering, IIT Madras (India); Chandrasekaran, N. [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India); Mukherjee, Amitava, E-mail: amit.mookerjea@gmail.com [Centre for Nanobiotechnology, VIT University, Vellore 632014 (India)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • The cytotoxicity of ZnO NPs with two hydrodynamic sizes towards freshwater algae. • Size dependent toxicity under UV-C, dark and visible light conditions. • Cytotoxicity principally due to ZnO NPs not the released Zn{sup 2+} ions. • The internalization of ZnO NPs leads to membrane damage and ROS production. - Abstract: Continuous increase in the usage of ZnO nanoparticles in commercial products has exacerbated the risk of release of these particles into the aquatic environment with possible harmful effects on the biota. In the current study, cytotoxic effects of two types of ZnO nanoparticles, having different initial effective diameters in filtered and sterilized lake water medium [487.5 ± 2.55 nm for ZnO-1 NPs and 616.2 ± 38.5 nm for ZnO-2 NPs] were evaluated towards a dominant freshwater algal isolate Scenedesmus obliquus in UV-C, visible and dark conditions at three exposure concentrations: 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/L. The toxic effects were found to be strongly dependent on the initial hydrodynamic particle size in the medium, the exposure concentrations and the irradiation conditions. The loss in viability, LDH release and ROS generation were significantly enhanced in the case of the smaller sized ZnO-1 NPs than in the case of ZnO-2 NPs under comparable test conditions. The toxicity of both types of ZnO NPs was considerably elevated under UV-C irradiation in comparison to that in dark and visible light conditions, the effects being more enhanced in case of ZnO-1 NPs. The size dependent dissolution of the ZnO NPs in the test medium and possible toxicity due to the released Zn{sup 2+} ions was also noted. The surface adsorption of the nanoparticles was substantiated by scanning electron microscopy. The internalization/uptake of the NPs by the algal cells was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and elemental analyses.

  20. Correlations of Optical Absorption, Charge Trapping, and Surface Roughness of TiO2 Photoanode Layer Loaded with Neat Ag-NPs for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dongwook; Jang, Jae Gyu; Lim, Joohyun; Lee, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Sung Hyun; Hong, Jong-In

    2016-08-24

    We systematically investigated the effect of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) on the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Neat, spherical Ag-NPs at loading levels of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt % were embedded into the titanium dioxide (TiO2) photoanode layer. The plasmonic effect of the Ag-NPs strongly enhanced the incident light absorption over a wide range of the visible wavelength region in addition to the inherent absorbance of the perovskite sensitizer. The low conduction energy level of the Ag-NPs compared to that of TiO2 provides trap sites for free charge carriers. Thus, the correlation between the enhancement of the optical absorption and the number of charge traps provided by the Ag-NPs is critical to determine the device performance, especially current density (Jsc) and PCE. This is confirmed by the quantitative comparison of the incident light absorption and the time-resolved photoluminescence decay according to the loading levels of the Ag-NPs in the TiO2 layer. The absorption enhancement from 380 to 750 nm in the UV-visible spectrum is proportional to the increase in the loading levels of the Ag-NPs. However, the Jsc increases with the device with 0.5 wt % Ag-NPs and gradually decreases with increases in the loading level above 0.5 wt % because of the different contributions to the absorbance and the charge trapping by different Ag-NP loading levels. In addition, the suppression of the surface roughness with dense packing by the Ag-NPs helps to improve the Jsc and the following PCE. Consequently, the PCE of the PSC with 0.5 wt % Ag-NPs is increased to 11.96%. These results are attributed to the balance between increased absorbance by the localized surface plasmon resonance and the decreased charge trapping as well as the decreased surface roughness of the TiO2 layer with the Ag-NPs.

  1. Toxicity and trophic transfer of P25 TiO2 NPs from Dunaliella salina to Artemia salina: Effect of dietary and waterborne exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuvaneshwari, M; Thiagarajan, Vignesh; Nemade, Prateek; Chandrasekaran, N; Mukherjee, Amitava

    2018-01-01

    The recent increase in nanoparticle (P25 TiO2 NPs) usage has led to concerns regarding their potential implications on environment and human health. The food chain is the central pathway for nanoparticle transfer from lower to high trophic level organisms. The current study relies on the investigation of toxicity and trophic transfer potential of TiO2 NPs from marine algae Dunaliella salina to marine crustacean Artemia salina. Toxicity was measured in two different modes of exposure such as waterborne (exposure of TiO2 NPs to Artemia) and dietary exposure (NP-accumulated algal cells are used to feed the Artemia). The toxicity and accumulation of TiO2 NPs in marine algae D. salina were also studied. Artemia was found to be more sensitive to TiO2 NPs (48h LC50 of 4.21mgL-1) as compared to marine algae, D. salina (48h LC50 of 11.35mgL-1). The toxicity, uptake, and accumulation of TiO2 NPs were observed to be more in waterborne exposure as compared to dietary exposure. Waterborne exposure seemed to cause higher ROS production and antioxidant enzyme (SOD and CAT) activity as compared to dietary exposure of TiO2 NPs in Artemia. There were no observed biomagnification (BMF) and trophic transfer from algae to Artemia through dietary exposure. Histopathological studies confirmed the morphological and internal damages in Artemia. This study reiterates the possible effects of the different modes of exposure on trophic transfer potential of TiO2 NPs and eventually the consequences on aquatic environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mimetic Ag nanoparticle/Zn-based MOF nanocomposite (AgNPs@ZnMOF) capped with molecularly imprinted polymer for the selective detection of patulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Nafiseh; Khataee, Alireza; Habibi, Biuck; Hassanzadeh, Javad

    2018-03-01

    Here, Ag nanoparticle/flake-like Zn-based MOF nanocomposite (AgNPs@ZnMOF) with great peroxidase-like activity was applied as an efficient support for molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) and successfully used for selective determination of patulin. AgNPs@ZnMOF was simply synthesized by creating Ag nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the nano-pores of flake-like (Zn)MOF. The high surface area of MOF remarkably improved the catalytic activity of Ag NPs which was assessed by fluorometric, colorimetric and electrochemical techniques. Furthermore, it was observed that patulin could strangely reduce the catalytic activity of AgNPs@ZnMOF, probably due to its electron capturing features. This outcome was the motivation to design an assay for patulin detection. In order to make a selective interaction with patulin molecules, MIP layer was created on the surface of AgNPs@ZnMOF by co-polymerization reaction of 3-aminopropyl triethoxysilane (APTES) and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) monomers wherein patulin was applied as template agent. Combination between the selective identifying feature of MIP and outstanding peroxidase-like activity of novel AgNPs@ZnMOF nanocomposite as well as the sensitive fluorescence detection system was led to the design of a reliable probe for patulin. The prepared MIP-capped AgNPs@ZnMOF catalyzed the H 2 O 2 -terephthalic acid reaction which produced a high florescent product. In the presence of patulin, the fluorescence intensity was decreased proportional to its concentration in the range of 0.1-10µmolL -1 with a detection limit of 0.06µmolL -1 . The proposed method was able to selectively measure patulin in a complex media without significant interfering effects from analogue compounds. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of biocompatible cinnamaldehyde functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CPGF Nps for hyperthermia and drug delivery applications in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirtee D Wani

    Full Text Available Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼ 20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼ 18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7 and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231 breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6 °C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer.

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity of Mg-Doped ZnO NPs and ZnO/rGO Nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Ramin; Beheshtian, Javad; Seyed-Talebi, Seyedeh Mozhgan; Azimi, H R; Jamali-Sheini, Farid

    2018-01-18

    A systematic experimental and theoretical study of the origin of the enhanced photocatalytic performance of Mg-doped ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) and Mg-doped ZnO/reduced graphene oxide (rGO) nanocomposites has been performed. In addition to Mg, Cd was chosen as a doping material for the bandgap engineering of ZnO NPs, and its effects were compared with that of Mg in the photocatalytic performance of ZnO nanostructures. The experimental results revealed that Mg, as a doping material, recognizably ameliorates the photocatalytic performance of ZnO NPs and ZnO/graphene nanocomposites. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images showed that the Mg-doped and Cd-doped ZnO NPs had the same size. The optical properties of the samples indicated that Cd narrowed the bandgap, whereas Mg widened the bandgap of the ZnO NPs and the oxygen vacancy concentration was similar for both samples. Based on the experimental results, the narrowing of the bandgap, the particle size, and the oxygen vacancy did not enhance the photocatalytic performance. However, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Barret-Joyner-Halenda (BJH) models showed that Mg caused increased textural properties of the samples, whereas rGO played an opposite role. A theoretical study, conducted by using DFT methods, showed that the improvement in the photocatalytic performance of Mg-doped ZnO NPs was due to a higher electron transfer from the Mg-doped ZnO NPs to the dye molecules compared with pristine ZnO and Cd-doped ZnO NPs. Moreover, according to the experimental results, along with Mg, graphene also played an important role in the photocatalytic performance of ZnO. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Synthesis, characterization and in vitro study of biocompatible cinnamaldehyde functionalized magnetite nanoparticles (CPGF Nps) for hyperthermia and drug delivery applications in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wani, Kirtee D; Kadu, Brijesh S; Mansara, Prakash; Gupta, Preeti; Deore, Avinash V; Chikate, Rajeev C; Poddar, Pankaj; Dhole, Sanjay D; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2014-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde, the bioactive component of the spice cinnamon, and its derivatives have been shown to possess anti-cancer activity against various cancer cell lines. However, its hydrophobic nature invites attention for efficient drug delivery systems that would enhance the bioavailability of cinnamaldehyde without affecting its bioactivity. Here, we report the synthesis of stable aqueous suspension of cinnamaldehyde tagged Fe3O4 nanoparticles capped with glycine and pluronic polymer (CPGF NPs) for their potential application in drug delivery and hyperthermia in breast cancer. The monodispersed superparamagnetic NPs had an average particulate size of ∼ 20 nm. TGA data revealed the drug payload of ∼ 18%. Compared to the free cinnamaldehyde, CPGF NPs reduced the viability of breast cancer cell lines, MCF7 and MDAMB231, at lower doses of cinnamaldehyde suggesting its increased bioavailability and in turn its therapeutic efficacy in the cells. Interestingly, the NPs were non-toxic to the non-cancerous HEK293 and MCF10A cell lines compared to the free cinnamaldehyde. The novelty of CPGF nanoparticulate system was that it could induce cytotoxicity in both ER/PR positive/Her2 negative (MCF7) and ER/PR negative/Her2 negative (MDAMB231) breast cancer cells, the latter being insensitive to most of the chemotherapeutic drugs. The NPs decreased the growth of the breast cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner and altered their migration through reduction in MMP-2 expression. CPGF NPs also decreased the expression of VEGF, an important oncomarker of tumor angiogenesis. They induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells through loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and activation of caspase-3. Interestingly, upon exposure to the radiofrequency waves, the NPs heated up to 41.6 °C within 1 min, suggesting their promise as a magnetic hyperthermia agent. All these findings indicate that CPGF NPs prove to be potential nano-chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer.

  6. Enhanced corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of AZ31 Mg alloy using PCL/ZnO NPs via electrospinning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinwoo; Mousa, Hamouda M.; Park, Chan Hee; Kim, Cheol Sang

    2017-02-01

    In the efforts to improve corrosion resistance and biocompatibility of magnesium alloys, polycarprolactone (PCL) and zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) composite coatings were applied onto AZ31 Mg alloys via electrospinning technique in this study. The PCL/ZnO composite coatings on Mg alloys were characterized by using FE-SEM, EDX, XPS, and FT-IR. Moreover, coating adhesion test, electrochemical corrosion test, and biocompatibility test in vitro were performed to measure coating performance. Our results revealed that the increase in the content of ZnO NPs in the composite coatings not only improved the coating adhesion of composite coatings on Mg alloys, but also increased the corrosion resistance. Furthermore, the biocompatibility of MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts of the PCL/ZnO composite coated samples was superior to the biocompatibility of the bare samples. Such data suggest that applying PCL/ZnO composite coating to the magnesium alloys has suitable potential in biomedical applications.

  7. Amperometric Immunosensor for Carbofuran Detection Based on MWCNTs/GS-PEI-Au and AuNPs-Antibody Conjugate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangyou Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, an amperometric immunosensor for the detection of carbofuran was developed. Firstly, multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs and graphene sheets-ethyleneimine polymer-Au (GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites were modified onto the surface of a glass carbon electrode (GCE via self-assembly. The nanocomposites can increase the surface area of the GCE to capture a large amount of antibody, as well as produce a synergistic effect in the electrochemical performance. Then the modified electrode was coated with gold nanoparticles-antibody conjugate (AuNPs-Ab and blocked with BSA. The monoclonal antibody against carbofuran was covalently immobilized on the AuNPs with glutathione as a spacer arm. The morphologies of the GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the fabrication process of the immunosensor were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, ultraviolet and visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-vis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM, respectively. Under optimal conditions, the immunosensor showed a wide linear range, from 0.5 to 500 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 0.03 ng/mL (S/N = 3. The as-constructed immunosensor exhibited notable performance features such as high specificity, good reproducibility, acceptable stability and regeneration performance. The results are mainly due to the excellent properties of MWCNTs, GS-PEI-Au nanocomposites and the covalent immobilization of Ab with free hapten binding sites for further immunoreaction. It provides a new avenue for amperometric immunosensor fabrication.

  8. Fabrication of a cytochrome c biosensor based on cytochrome oxidase/NiO-NPs/cMWCNT/PANI modified Au electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Bhawna; Lata, Suman; Rani, Sunita; Pundir, C S

    2013-03-01

    An amperometric biosensor for determination of Cytochrome c (Cyt c) was fabricated by immobilizing Cytochrome c oxidase (COx) onto nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiO-NPs) decorated carboxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes/polyaniline (NiO-NPs/cMWCNT/PANI) film electrodeposited on the surface of a gold (Au) electrode. The electrochemical characteristics of immobilized COx were investigated by cyclic voltammetry (CV), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform Infra-red spectroscopy (FTIR). Cyclic voltammetric (CV) studies of the electrode at different stages of construction of enzyme electrode demonstrated that the modified Au electrode had enhanced electrochemical oxidation of H2O2, which offers a number of attractive features to develop amperometric biosensors based on split of H2O2. There was a good linear relationship between the current (mA) and Cyt c concentration in the range 5 x 10(-12) M to 5 x 10(-7) M. The sensor had a detection limit of 5 x 10(-12) M (S/N = 3) with a high sensitivity of 3.7 mA cm(-2) nM(-1). The sensor gave accurate and satisfactory results, when employed for determination of Cyt c in different serum samples.

  9. Tri-enzyme functionalized ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI composite film for amperometric determination of creatinine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Sandeep; Devi, Rooma; Kumar, Ashok; Pundir, C S

    2011-10-15

    A new zinc oxide nanoparticles/chitosan/carboxylated multiwall carbonnanotube/polyaniline (ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI) composite film has been synthesized on platinum (Pt) electrode using electrochemical techniques. Three enzymes, creatinine amidohydrolase (CA), creatine amidinohydrolase (CI) and sarcosine oxidase (SO) were immobilized on ZnO-NPs/CHIT/c-MWCNT/PANI/Pt electrode to construct the creatinine biosensor. The enzyme electrode was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The enzyme electrode detects creatinine level as low as 0.5 μM at a signal to noise ratio of 3 within 10s at pH 7.5 and 30°C. The fabricated creatinine biosensor showed linear working range of 10-650 μM creatinine with a sensitivity of 0.030 μA μM(-1)cm(-2). The biosensor shows only 15% loss of its initial response over a period of 120 days when stored at 4°C. The fabricated biosensor was successfully employed for determination of creatinine in human blood serum. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The Nature of Surface States on Vicinal Cu (775): An STM and Photoemission Study

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, Nader; Knox, Kevin; Osgood, Richard M.; Johnson, Peter D.; Fujii, Jun; Vobornik, Ivana; Panaccione, Giancarlo

    2014-01-01

    We report ARPES and a set of in situ STM measurements on a narrow-terrace-width vicinal Cu(111) crystal surface, Cu(775), whose vicinal cut lies close to the transition between terrace and step modulation. These measurements show sharp zone-folding (or Umklapp) features with a periodicity in k||, indicating that the predominant reference plane is that of Cu(775), i.e. that the surface is predominately step-modulated. Our measurements also show variation in Umklapp intensity with photon energy...

  11. Biogenic SeNPs from Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SelTE02: Characterization with reference to their associated organic coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piacenza, Elena; Bulgarini, Alessandra; Lampis, Silvia; Vallini, Giovanni; Turner, Raymond J.

    2017-08-01

    The exploitation of biological systems (i.e. plants, fungi and bacteria) for the production of nanomaterials relies on their ability to bioconvert toxic metal(loid) ions into their less toxic and bioavailable elemental states forming mainly nanoparticles (NPs) or nanorods (NRs). Further, these methods of nanomaterial production are nowadays recognized as eco-friendly alternatives to the chemical synthesis processes. A common feature among the so-called biogenic nanomaterials is the presence of an organic layer surrounding them. However, we are just learning the existing relation between biogenic nanostructures and their organic material. Our work is focused on the study of bacterial strains for the production of selenium nanoparticles (SeNPs) as end product of selenite (SeO32 -) bioconversion. In this context, our previous reports described the ability of two bacteria, namely Bacillus mycoides SelTE01 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia SelTE02, to generate SeNPs, which were surrounded by organic material. Here, the potential role of this organic material as stabilizing agent of SeNPs was investigated altering both the bacteria cells culturing and the SeNPs extraction procedure, in order to understand the interaction between these two elements in suspension. As a result, SeNPs produced by both bacterial strains showed the tendency to aggregate when subjected to the treatments tested, suggesting an involvement of the surrounding organic material in their stabilization in suspension.

  12. Thermo-responsive magnetic Fe3O4@P(MEO2MAX-OEGMA100-X) NPs and their applications as drug delivery systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamal Al Dine, Enaam; Ferjaoui, Zied; Ghanbaja, Jaafar; Roques-Carmes, Thibault; Meftah, Abdelaziz; Hamieh, Tayssir; Toufaily, Joumana; Schneider, Raphaël; Marchal, Sophie; Gaffet, Eric; Alem, Halima

    2017-11-05

    The unique physical properties of the superparamagnetic nanoparticles (SPIONs) have made them candidates of choice in nanomedicine especially for diagnostic imaging, therapeutic applications and drug delivery based systems. In this study, superparamagnetic Fe 3 O 4 NPs were synthesized and functionalized with a biocompatible thermoresponsive copolymer to obtain temperature responsive core/shell NPs. The ultimate goal of this work is to build a drug delivery system able to release anticancer drugs in the physiological temperatures range. The core/shell NPs were first synthesized and their chemical, physical, magnetic and thermo-responsive properties where fully characterized in a second step. The lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of the core/shell NPs was tuned in physiological media in order to release the cancer drug at a controlled temperature slightly above the body temperature to avoid any premature release of the drug. The core/shell NPs exhibiting the targeted LCST were then loaded with Doxurubicin (DOX) and the drug release properties were then studied with the temperature. Moreover the cytotoxicity tests have shown that the core/shell NPs had a very limited cytotoxicity up to concentration of 25μg/mL. This investigation showed that the significant release occurred at the targeted temperature in the physiological media making those nano-systems very promising for further use in drug delivery platform. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Enhanced antibacterial effects of green synthesized ZnO NPs using Aristolochia indica against Multi-drug resistant bacterial pathogens from Diabetic Foot Ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffy, Katherin; Shanthi, G; Maroky, Anson S; Selvakumar, S

    2017-11-14

    Increased incidence of Multi-drug resistance in microorganisms has become the greatest challenge in the treatment of Diabetic Foot Ulcer (DFU) and urges the need of a new antimicrobial agent. In this study, we determined the bactericidal effects of ZnO nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) green synthesized from Aristolochia indica against Multi-drug Resistant Organisms (MDROs) isolated from pus samples of DFU patients attending in a tertiary care hospital in South India. ZnO NPs were characterized by UV-vis-DRS spectroscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and for its zeta potential value. MIC/MBC assays were performed to determine bactericidal or bacteriostatic effects. Time-kill assays, Protein leakage and Flow cytometric analysis evaluated bacterial cell death at 1x MIC and 2x MIC concentrations of ZnO NPs. ZnO NPs of size 22.5nm with a zeta potential of -21.9±1mV exhibited remarkable bactericidal activity with MIC/MBC ranging from 25 to 400μg/ml with a significant reduction in viable count from 2h onwards. Protein leakage and Flow cytometric analysis confirmed bacterial cell death due to ZnO NPs. This study concluded that green synthesis protocol offers reliable, eco-friendly approach towards the development of antimicrobial ZnO NPs to combat antibiotic drug resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Synthesis, kinetics and photocatalytic study of "ultra-small" Ag-NPs obtained by a green chemistry method using an extract of Rosa 'Andeli' double delight petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Cerda, Javier; Alonso-Nuñez, Gabriel; Espinoza-Gómez, Heriberto; Flores-López, Lucía Z

    2015-11-15

    This paper reports the effect of different concentrations of Rosa 'Andeli' double delight petals aqueous extract (PERA) in the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs), using an easy green chemistry method. Its kinetics study and photocatalytic activity were also evaluated. The Ag-NPs were obtained using an aqueous silver nitrate solution (AgNO3) with 9.66% w/v, 7.25% w/v, and 4.20% w/v PERA as both reducing-stabilizing agent. The formation of the Ag-NPs was demonstrated by analysis of UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM analysis shows spherical nanoparticles in shape and size between ∼0.5 and 1.4nm. A comparative study was done to determine which concentration was the best reducing-stabilizing agent, and we found out that "ultra-small" nanoparticles (0.5-1.1nm) were obtained with 9.66% w/v of PERA. The size of the Ag-NPs depends on the concentration of PERA and Ag(I). The reaction of formation of "ultra-small" Ag-NPs, proved to be first order for metallic precursor (silver) and second order for reducing-stabilizing agent (PERA). The Ag-NPs showed photocatalytic activity, in degradation of commercial dye with an efficiency of 95%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Hierarchical AuNPs-Loaded Fe3O4/Polymers Nanocomposites Constructed by Electrospinning with Enhanced and Magnetically Recyclable Catalytic Capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong Guo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs have attracted widespread attention for their excellent catalytic activity, as well as their unusual physical and chemical properties. The main challenges come from the agglomeration and time-consuming separation of gold nanoparticles, which have greatly baffled the development and application in liquid phase selective reduction. To solve these problems, we propose the preparation of polyvinyl alcohol(PVA/poly(acrylic acid(PAA/Fe3O4 nanocomposites with loaded AuNPs. The obtained PVA/PAA/Fe3O4 composite membrane by electrospinning demonstrated high structural stability, a large specific surface area, and more active sites, which is conducive to promoting good dispersion of AuNPs on membrane surfaces. The subsequently prepared PVA/PAA/Fe3O4@AuNPs nanocomposites exhibited satisfactory nanostructures, robust thermal stability, and a favorable magnetic response for recycling. In addition, the PVA/PAA/Fe3O4@AuNPs nanocomposites showed a remarkable catalytic capacity in the catalytic reduction of p-nitrophenol and 2-nitroaniline solutions. In addition, the regeneration studies toward p-nitrophenol for different consecutive cycles demonstrate that the as-prepared PVA/PAA/Fe3O4@AuNPs nanocomposites have outstanding stability and recycling in catalytic reduction.

  16. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a contrast agent for imaging of animal tissue using swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Indranil; Raj, Shipra; Roy, Poulomi; Poddar, Raju

    2018-01-01

    We present noninvasive three-dimensional depth-resolved imaging of animal tissue with a swept-source optical coherence tomography system at 1064 nm center wavelength and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) as a potential contrast agent. A swept-source laser light source is used to enable an imaging rate of 100 kHz (100 000 A-scans s‑1). Swept-source optical coherence tomography is a new variant of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique, offering unique advantages in terms of sensitivity, reduction of motion artifacts, etc. To enhance the contrast of an OCT image, AgNPs are utilized as an exogeneous contrast agent. AgNPs are synthesized using a modified Tollens method and characterization is done by UV–vis spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. In vitro imaging of chicken breast tissue, with and without the application of AgNPs, is performed. The effect of AgNPs is studied with different exposure times. A mathematical model is also built to calculate changes in the local scattering coefficient of tissue from OCT images. A quantitative estimation of scattering coefficient and contrast is performed for tissues with and without application of AgNPs. Significant improvement in contrast and increase in scattering coefficient with time is observed.

  17. Secondary lead poisoning in golden eagle and ferruginous hawk chicks consuming shot black-tailed prairie dogs, Thunder Basin National Grassland, Wyoming

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Recreational shooting of black-tailed prairie dogs (Cynomys ludovicianus) is a common activity at Thunder Basin National Grassland (TSNG), Wyoming. The prairie dog...

  18. Contaminants in oil field produced waters discharged into the Loch Katrine Wetland Complex, Park County, Wyoming and their bioconcentration in the aquatic bird food chain

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The 866-acre Loch Katrine wetland complex in Park County, Wyoming provides habitat for many species of aquatic birds. However, the complex is sustained primarily by...

  19. Relationships between gas field development and the presence and abundance of pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaine, Stephen; Carter, Sarah; Ignizio, Drew A.; Freeman, Aaron T.

    2017-01-01

    More than 5957 km2 in southwestern Wyoming is currently covered by operational gas fields, and further development is projected through 2030. Gas fields fragment landscapes through conversion of native vegetation to roads, well pads, pipeline corridors, and other infrastructure elements. The sagebrush steppe landscape where most of this development is occurring harbors 24 sagebrush-associated species of greatest conservation need, but the effects of gas energy development on most of these species are unknown. Pygmy rabbits (Brachylagus idahoensis) are one such species. In 2011, we began collecting three years of survey data to examine the relationship between gas field development density and pygmy rabbit site occupancy patterns on four major Wyoming gas fields (Continental Divide–Creston–Blue Gap, Jonah, Moxa Arch, Pinedale Anticline Project Area). We surveyed 120 plots across four gas fields, with plots distributed across the density gradient of gas well pads on each field. In a 1 km radius around the center of each plot, we measured the area covered by each of 10 gas field infrastructure elements and by shrub cover using 2012 National Agriculture Imagery Program imagery. We then modeled the relationship between gas field elements, pygmy rabbit presence, and two indices of pygmy rabbit abundance. Gas field infrastructure elements—specifically buried utility corridors and a complex of gas well pads, adjacent disturbed areas, and well pad access roads—were negatively correlated with pygmy rabbit presence and abundance indices, with sharp declines apparent after approximately 2% of the area consisted of gas field infrastructure. We conclude that pygmy rabbits in southwestern Wyoming may be sensitive to gas field development at levels similar to those observed for greater sage-grouse, and may suffer local population declines at lower levels of development than are allowed in existing plans and policies designed to conserve greater sage-grouse by limiting

  20. BathymetryB Hillshade [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  1. BathymetryA [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  2. BathymetryB [5m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  3. BathymetryA Hillshade [2m]--Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This part of DS 781 presents data for 2-m and 5-m bathymetry and shaded-relief maps of Monterey Canyon and Vicinity, California. The raster data file is included in...

  4. Properties of Soils and Plants Uptake within the Vicinity of Selected ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Backyard farming is becoming popular among the auto mechanics near their workshops where spent engine oil and carcass of vehicles are continuously dumped in Nigeria. The properties of soil and maize plants sampled from the vicinity of selected auto mechanic workshops in Ile-Ife, Nigeria were investigated. The results ...

  5. Assessment of pollution trend of heavy metals in soils in the vicinity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Topsoil and subsoil obtained in the vicinity of the Nigerian Gas Company were digested and analysed for some selected trace metals using atomic absorption spectrophotometer of model pye unicam SP 2900. The trace metals determined include nickel, copper, iron, barium, lead, cadmium and zinc respectively.

  6. Formation and sintering of Pt nanopartictes on vicinal rutile TiO2 surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rieboldt, Felix; Helveg, S.; Bechstein, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    By means of scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) the nucleation, growth and sintering of platinum nanoparticles (Pt NP's) was studied on vicinal and flat rutile titanium dioxide (TiO2) surfaces. Utilising physical vapour deposition, the nucleation of Pt NP's on TiO2 surfaces at room temperature (...

  7. [Analysis of optical emission spectra from ICP of Ar in the vicinity of plasma sheath].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-Feng; Chen, Jun-Fang; Meng, Ran

    2009-11-01

    In order to control the ion density and energy distribution in the vicinity of plasma sheath independently, the inductively coupled plasma and its glow discharge mechanism in the vicinity of plasma sheath were studied by means of optical emission spectroscopy (OES) under different RF power, different discharge and different substrate DC bias voltage. It was shown that the ion density is higher and the electron temperature is lower in the vicinity of inductively coupled plasma sheath according to the ionic line and atomic line. With changing the discharge pressure and RF power, the spectral characteristics analysis shows that the ion density in the vicinity of plasma sheath linearly increases with the RF power and rises with the pressure under the low pressure. The atomic spectral intensity of low excitation states increases rapidly. The atomic spectral intensity of high excitation states rises slowly and the intensity of ion spectrum increases not obviously. By applying the DC bias voltage to substrate, the intensity of emission spectroscopy was analyzed. The result shows that the intensity of spectra rises with the increase in positive bias voltage, while first reduces then increases with the increase in negative bias voltage, and is the weakest in the case of DC bias at -30 V. This shows that the fast ions and the electrons are the main source of energy for Ar ionization and excitation.

  8. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-West Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2002-05-14

    The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-West Area and vicinity. This is the second of two reports that combine to cover the 200 Area Plateau, an area that holds the largest inventory of radionuclide and chemical waste on the Hanford Site.

  9. Revised Hydrogeology for the Suprabasalt Aquifer System, 200-East Area and Vicinity, Hanford Site, Washington

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Bruce A.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.

    2000-04-20

    This study supports the Hanford Groundwater/Vadose integration project objectives to better understand the risk of groundwater contamination and potential risk to the public via groundwater flow paths. The primary objective of this study was to refine the conceptual groundwater flow model for the 200-East Area and vicinity.

  10. Surface-water quality, Oneida Reservation and vicinity, Wisconsin, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan A.; Scudder, Barbara C.; Richards, Kevin D.

    2000-01-01

    Streamwater samples were collected at 19 sites in the vicinity of the Oneida Tribe of Indians of Wisconsin Reservation. Samples were collected during 5 sampling periods in 1997-98. Field measurements were made and samples were analyzed for nutrients, suspended sediment, major ions, and pesticides.

  11. Parental smoking in the vicinity of children and tobacco control policies in the European region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovess, V.; Pilowsky, D.J.; Boyd, A.; Pez, O.; Bitfoi, A.; Carta, M.G.; Eke, C.; Golitz, D.; Kuijpers, R.C.W.M.; Lesinskiene, S.; Mihova, Z.; Otten, R.; Susser, E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain patterns of parental smoking in the vicinity of children in Eastern and Western Europe and their relation to Tobacco Control Scale (TCS) scores. Methods: Data on parental smoking patterns were obtained from the School Child Mental Health Europe (SCMHE), a 2010

  12. 14 CFR 91.137 - Temporary flight restrictions in the vicinity of disaster/hazard areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Temporary flight restrictions in the vicinity of disaster/hazard areas. 91.137 Section 91.137 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES GENERAL OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES Flight Rules General §...

  13. Series Resistance Monitoring for Photovoltaic Modules in the Vicinity of MPP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sera, Dezso

    2010-01-01

    the time period with reduced power production. This paper focuses on the estimation of series resistance of flat silicone PV panels or arrays during operation, in the vicinity of their MPP. The method presented in this paper helps to detect failures by monitoring changes in the panel’s or array’s series...

  14. Establishment of background radiation dose rate in the vicinity of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The absorbed dose rate in air in the vicinity of the proposed Manyoni uranium mining project located in Singida region, Tanzania, was determined so as to establish the baseline data for background radiation dose rate data prior to commencement of uranium mining activities. Twenty stations in seven villages were selected ...

  15. 77 FR 71493 - Amendment of VOR Federal Airway V-8 in the Vicinity of Rifle, CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-03

    ...This action amends VHF Omnidirectional Range (VOR) Federal Airway V-8 in the vicinity of Rifle, CO, to correct the description contained in part 71 to ensure it matches the information contained in the FAA's aeronautical database, matches the depiction on the associated charts, and to ensure the safety and efficiency of the National Airspace System (NAS).

  16. Parental smoking in the vicinity of children and tobacco control policies in the European region

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kovess, V.; Pilowsky, D.J.; Boyd, A.; Pez, O.; Bitfoi, A.; Carta, M.G.; Eke, C.; Golitz, D.; Kuijpers, R.C.W.M.; Lesinskiene, S.; Mihova, Z.; Otten, R.; Susser, E.S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain patterns of parental smoking in the vicinity of children in Eastern and Western Europe and their relation to Tobacco Control Scale (TCS) scores. Methods: Data on parental smoking patterns were obtained from the School Child Mental Health Europe (SCMHE), a 2010 cross-sectional

  17. Seminoe-Kortes transmission line/substation consolidation project, Carbon County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The existing switchyards at Western Area Power Administration's (WESTERN) Seminoe and Kortes facilities, located approximately 40 miles northeast of Rawlines, Carbon County, Wyoming, were constructed in 1939 and 1951, respectively. The circuit breakers at these facilities are beyond or approaching their service life and need to be replaced. In addition, the switchyards have poor access for maintenance and replacement of equipment, and their locations create potential for oil spills into the North Platte River. WESTERN is proposing to consolidate the switchyard facilities into one new substation to provide easier access, restore proper levels of system reliability, and decrease the potential for oil contamination of the river. This environmental assessment (EA) was prepared to evaluate the impacts of the proposed Seminoe-Kortes Consolidation Project. 57 refs., 12 figs., 8 tabs.

  18. Biogeochemical evidence for subsurface hydrocarbon occurrence, Recluse oil field, Wyoming; preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalziel, Mary C.; Donovan, Terrence J.

    1980-01-01

    Anomalously high manganese-to-iron ratios occurring in pine needles and sage leaves over the Recluse oil field, Wyoming, suggest effects of petroleum microseepage on the plants. This conclusion is supported by iron and manganese concentrations in soils and carbon and oxygen isotope ratios in rock samples. Seeping hydrocarbons provided reducing conditions sufficient to enable divalent iron and manganese to be organically complexed or adsorbed on solids in the soils. These bound or adsorped elements in the divalent state are essential to plants, and the plants readily assimilate them. The magnitude of the plant anomalies, combined with the supportive isotopic and chemical evidence confirming petroleum leakage, makes a strong case for the use of plants as a biogeochemical prospecting tool.

  19. Hydrology of the abandoned coal mines in the Wyoming Valley, Pennsylvania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollowell, Jerrald R.

    1974-01-01

    Mine-water discharge, into the Susquehanna River degrades the river's quality during periods of low flow to a point critical for subsistence of aquatic life. To determine what measures are required to provide a better quality mine-water discharge in the Wyoming Valley, mine hydrology and mine-water quality are related to mine-pool management. The addition of mine-pool outlets at several locations would increase the rate of discharge and reduce interpool flow, which would reduce the total mineral load discharged to the river. Additional outlets would act as relief overflows to reduce the maximum fluctuation of mine-pool levels, decrease related mine-surface instability, and eliminate surface flooding.

  20. Site qualification studies of the UCG-SDB at North Knobs, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, B.E.; Krajewski, S.A.; Ahner, P.F.; Avasthi, J.M.; Dolde, M.E.; Greenman, C.A.; Miranda, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    The site qualification program for the North Knobs UCG site near Rawlins, Wyoming has been completed. This site will be the location for the field tests of Underground Coal Gasification of Steeply Dipping Beds undertaken by Gulf Research and Development Company for DOE in a cost shared contract. Site characterization included a comprehensive geotechnical analysis along with vegetation, historical, and archeological studies. The G coal seam chosen for these tests is a subbituminous B coal with a true seam thickness of 22 feet and has thin coal benches above and below the main seam. The water table is at 90 feet below the surface. Hydrologic studies have defined the seam as an aquiclude (non-aquifer). The site is deemed restorable to regulatory requirements. Evaluation of this site indicates total acceptability for the three-test program planned by GR and DC.

  1. Modeling winter ozone episodes near oil and natural gas fields in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuling; Rappenglück, Bernhard; Pour-Biazar, Arastoo; Field, Robert A.; Soltis, Jeff

    2017-04-01

    Wintertime ozone episodes have been reported in the oil and natural gas (O&NG) producing fields in Uintah Basin, Utah and the Upper Green River Basin (UGRB) in Wyoming in recent years. High concentrations of ozone precursors facilitated by favorable meteorological conditions, including low wind and shallow boundary layer (BL), were found in these episodes, although the exact roles of these precursor species in different O&NG fields are to be determined. Meanwhile, snow cover is also found to play an important role in these winter ozone episodes as the cold snow covered surface enhances the inversion, further limits the BL and the high snow albedo greatly boosts photolysis reactions that are closely related to ozone chemistry. In this study, we utilize model simulation to explore the role of chemical compositions, in terms of different VOC groups and NOx, and that of the enhanced photolysis due to snow cover in the UGRB ozone episodes in the late winter of 2011.

  2. U.S. Geological Survey Science for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative - 2013 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Zachary H.; Aldridge, Cameron L.; Anderson, Patrick J.; Assal, Timothy J.; Bern, Carleton R.; Biewick, Laura R; Boughton, Gregory K.; Chalfoun, Anna D.; Chong, Geneva W.; Dematatis, Marie K.; Fedy, Bradley C.; Garman, Steven L.; Germaine, Stephen S.; Hethcoat, Matthew G.; Homer, Collin G.; Huber, Christopher; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Latysh, Natalie; Manier, Daniel; Melcher, Cynthia P.; Miller, Kirk A.; Potter, Christopher J.; Schell, Spencer; Sweat, Michael J.; Walters, Annika W.; Wilson, Anna B.

    2014-01-01

    This is the sixth report produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for the Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) to detail annual activities conducted by USGS for addressing specific management needs identified by WLCI partners. In FY2013, there were 25 ongoing and new projects conducted by the USGS. These projects fall into 8 major categories: (1) synthesizing and analyzing existing data to describe (model and map) current conditions on the landscape; (2) developing models for projecting past and future landscape conditions; (3) monitoring indicators of ecosystem conditions and the effectiveness of on-the-ground habitat projects; (4) conducting research to elucidate the mechanisms underlying wildlife and habitat responses to changing land uses; (5) managing and making accessible the large number of databases, maps, and other products being developed; (6) helping to integrate WLCI outcomes with future habitat enhancement and research projects; (7) coordinating efforts among WLCI partners; and (8) providing support to WLCI decision-makers and assisting with overall evaluation of the WLCI program. The two new projects initiated in FY2013 address (1) important agricultural lands in southwestern Wyoming, and (2) the influence of energy development on native fish communities. The remaining activities entailed our ongoing efforts to compile data, model landscape conditions, monitor trends in habitat conditions, conduct studies of wildlife responses to energy development, and upgrade Web-based products in support of both individual and overall WLCI efforts. Milestone FY2013 accomplishments included completing the development of a WLCI inventory and monitoring framework and the associated monitoring strategies, protocols, and analytics; and initial development of an Interagency Inventory and Monitoring Database, which will be accessible through the Monitoring page of the WLCI Web site at http://www.wlci.gov/monitoring. We also completed the initial phase of

  3. Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative—A case study in partnership development

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Erchia, Frank

    2016-10-21

    The Wyoming Landscape Conservation Initiative (WLCI) is a successful example of collaboration between science and natural resource management at the landscape scale. In southwestern Wyoming, expanding energy and mineral development, urban growth, and other changes in land use over recent decades, combined with landscape-scale drivers such as climate change and invasive species, have presented compelling challenges to resource managers and a diverse group of Federal, State, industry, and non-governmental organizations, as well as citizen stakeholders. To address these challenges, the WLCI was established as a collaborative forum and interagency partnership to develop and implement science-based conservation actions. About a decade after being established, this report documents the establishment and history of the WLCI, focusing on the path to success of the initiative and providing insights and details that may be useful in developing similar partnerships in other locations. Not merely retrospective, the elements of the WLCI that are presented herein are still in play, still evolving, and still contributing to the resolution of compelling conservation challenges in the Western United States.The U.S. Geological Survey has developed many successful longstanding partnerships, of which the WLCI is one example.“As the Nation’s largest water, earth, and biological science and civilian mapping agency, the U.S. Geological Survey collects, monitors, analyzes, and provides scientific understanding about natural resource conditions, issues, and problems. The diversity of our scientific expertise enables us to carry out large-scale, multi-disciplinary investigations and provide impartial scientific information to resource managers, planners, and other customers” (U.S. Geological Survey, 2016).

  4. Endemic chronic wasting disease causes mule deer population decline in Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVivo, Melia T.; Edmunds, David R.; Kauffman, Matthew J.; Schumaker, Brant A.; Binfet, Justin; Kreeger, Terry J.; Richards, Bryan J.; Schatzl, Hermann M.; Cornish, Todd

    2017-01-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a fatal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy affecting white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni), and moose (Alces alces shirasi) in North America. In southeastern Wyoming average annual CWD prevalence in mule deer exceeds 20% and appears to contribute to regional population declines. We determined the effect of CWD on mule deer demography using age-specific, female-only, CWD transition matrix models to estimate the population growth rate (λ). Mule deer were captured from 2010–2014 in southern Converse County Wyoming, USA. Captured adult (≥ 1.5 years old) deer were tested ante-mortem for CWD using tonsil biopsies and monitored using radio telemetry. Mean annual survival rates of CWD-negative and CWD-positive deer were 0.76 and 0.32, respectively. Pregnancy and fawn recruitment were not observed to be influenced by CWD. We estimated λ= 0.79, indicating an annual population decline of 21% under current CWD prevalence levels. A model derived from the demography of only CWD-negative individuals yielded; λ = 1.00, indicating a stable population if CWD were absent. These findings support CWD as a significant contributor to mule deer population decline. Chronic wasting disease is difficult or impossible to eradicate with current tools, given significant environmental contamination, and at present our best recommendation for control of this disease is to minimize spread to new areas and naïve cervid populations.

  5. Effectiveness of Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Influences on Energy Development and Male Lek Attendance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamo, R Scott; Beck, Jeffrey L

    2017-02-01

    Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) populations have declined across their range due to human-assisted factors driving large-scale habitat change. In response, the state of Wyoming implemented the Sage-grouse Executive Order protection policy in 2008 as a voluntary regulatory mechanism to minimize anthropogenic disturbance within defined sage-grouse core population areas. Our objectives were to evaluate areas designated as Sage-grouse Executive Order Core Areas on: (1) oil and gas well pad development, and (2) peak male lek attendance in core and non-core sage-grouse populations. We conducted our evaluations at statewide and Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies management zone (MZ I and MZ II) scales. We used Analysis of Covariance modeling to evaluate change in well pad development from 1986-2014 and peak male lek attendance from 958 leks with consistent lek counts within increasing (1996-2006) and decreasing (2006-2013) timeframes for Core and non-core sage-grouse populations. Oil and gas well pad development was restricted in Core Areas. Trends in peak male sage-grouse lek attendance were greater in Core Areas compared to non-core areas at the statewide scale and in MZ II, but not in MZ I, during population increase. Trends in peak male lek attendance did not differ statistically between Core and non-core population areas statewide, in MZ I, or MZ II during population decrease. Our results provide support for the effectiveness of Core Areas in maintaining sage-grouse populations in Wyoming, but also indicate the need for increased conservation actions to improve sage-grouse population response in MZ.

  6. Environmental assessment for the Hoe Creek underground, Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation, Campbell County, Wyoming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this EA to assess environmental and human health Issues and to determine potential impacts associated with the proposed Hoe Creek Underground Coal Gasification Test Site Remediation that would be performed at the Hoe Creek site in Campbell County, Wyoming. The Hoe Creek site is located south-southwest of the town of Gillette, Wyoming, and encompasses 71 acres of public land under the stewardship of the Bureau of Land Management. The proposed action identified in the EA is for the DOE to perform air sparging with bioremediation at the Hoe Creek site to remove contaminants resulting from underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments performed there by the DOE in the late 1970s. The proposed action would involve drilling additional wells at two of the UCG test sites to apply oxygen or hydrogen peroxide to the subsurface to volatilize benzene dissolved in the groundwater and enhance bioremediation of non-aqueous phase liquids present in the subsurface. Other alternatives considered are site excavation to remove contaminants, continuation of the annual pump and treat actions that have been used at the site over the last ten years to limit contaminant migration, and the no action alternative. Issues examined in detail in the EA are air quality, geology, human health and safety, noise, soils, solid and hazardous waste, threatened and endangered species, vegetation, water resources, and wildlife. Details of mitigative measures that could be used to limit any detrimental effects resulting from the proposed action or any of the alternatives are discussed, and information on anticipated effects identified by other government agencies is provided.

  7. Effectiveness of Wyoming's Sage-Grouse Core Areas: Influences on Energy Development and Male Lek Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamo, R. Scott; Beck, Jeffrey L.

    2017-02-01

    Greater sage-grouse ( Centrocercus urophasianus) populations have declined across their range due to human-assisted factors driving large-scale habitat change. In response, the state of Wyoming implemented the Sage-grouse Executive Order protection policy in 2008 as a voluntary regulatory mechanism to minimize anthropogenic disturbance within defined sage-grouse core population areas. Our objectives were to evaluate areas designated as Sage-grouse Executive Order Core Areas on: (1) oil and gas well pad development, and (2) peak male lek attendance in core and non-core sage-grouse populations. We conducted our evaluations at statewide and Western Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies management zone (MZ I and MZ II) scales. We used Analysis of Covariance modeling to evaluate change in well pad development from 1986-2014 and peak male lek attendance from 958 leks with consistent lek counts within increasing (1996-2006) and decreasing (2006-2013) timeframes for Core and non-core sage-grouse populations. Oil and gas well pad development was restricted in Core Areas. Trends in peak male sage-grouse lek attendance were greater in Core Areas compared to non-core areas at the statewide scale and in MZ II, but not in MZ I, during population increase. Trends in peak male lek attendance did not differ statistically between Core and non-core population areas statewide, in MZ I, or MZ II during population decrease. Our results provide support for the effectiveness of Core Areas in maintaining sage-grouse populations in Wyoming, but also indicate the need for increased conservation actions to improve sage-grouse population response in MZ.

  8. Comment on "Comparison of dose rates calculated on Nucletron NPS v11 catheter tracking versus catheter describing"

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Laarse, R

    2003-01-01

    N D MacDougall has reported to Nucletron a dose error in the module MPS v11.33 of the Nucletron NPS brachytherapy program. This dose error occurred when an implant was reconstructed using the image tracking method. MPS v11 offers five methods for reconstruction from radiographs of the 3D localization in space of an iridium wire implant. The method using catheter-describing points is the most accurate one. It is based on digitizing the corresponding images of X-ray markers in the catheters on two radiographs, taken at different angles with an isocentric X-ray machine such as a treatment simulator. The method using tracking is the least accurate one. It tracks wire images on the radiographs to reconstruct a wire in space consisting of maximally 98 wire segments. This is the least accurate method because there is no correspondence between the image points of a wire on the radiographs.

  9. Parental smoking in the vicinity of children and tobacco control policies in the European region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovess, Viviane; Pilowsky, Daniel J; Boyd, Anders; Pez, Ondine; Bitfoi, Adina; Carta, Mauro; Eke, Ceyda; Golitz, Dietmar; Kuijpers, Rowella; Lesinskiene, Sigita; Mihova, Zlatka; Otten, Roy; Susser, Ezra

    2013-01-01

    To ascertain patterns of parental smoking in the vicinity of children in Eastern and Western Europe and their relation to Tobacco Control Scale (TCS) scores. Data on parental smoking patterns were obtained from the School Child Mental Health Europe (SCMHE), a 2010 cross-sectional survey of 5141 school children aged 6 to 11 years and their parents in six countries: Germany, Netherlands, Lithuania, Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey ranked by TCS into three level categories toward tobacco control policies. A slightly higher proportion of Eastern compared to Western European mothers (42.4 vs. 35.1%) were currently smoking in but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for maternal age and maternal educational attainment. About a fifth (19.3%) and a tenth (10.0%) of Eastern and Western European mothers, respectively, smoked in the vicinity of their children, and the difference was significant even after adjustment for potential confounders (pParents with the highest educational attainment were significantly less likely to smoke in the vicinity of their children than those with the lowest attainment. After control of these covariates lax tobacco control policies, compared to intermediate policies, were associated with a 50% increase in the likelihood of maternal smoking in the vicinity of children adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 1.52 and 1.64. Among fathers, however, the relationship with paternal smoking and TCS seems more complex since strict policy increases the risk as well AOR = 1,40. Only one country, however belongs to the strict group. Tobacco control policies seem to have influenced maternal smoking behaviors overall to a limited degree and smoking in the vicinity of children to a much greater degree. Children living in European countries with lax tobacco control policies are more likely to be exposed to second hand smoking from maternal and paternal smoking.

  10. Parental smoking in the vicinity of children and tobacco control policies in the European region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Kovess

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To ascertain patterns of parental smoking in the vicinity of children in Eastern and Western Europe and their relation to Tobacco Control Scale (TCS scores. METHODS: Data on parental smoking patterns were obtained from the School Child Mental Health Europe (SCMHE, a 2010 cross-sectional survey of 5141 school children aged 6 to 11 years and their parents in six countries: Germany, Netherlands, Lithuania, Romania, Bulgaria and Turkey ranked by TCS into three level categories toward tobacco control policies. RESULTS: A slightly higher proportion of Eastern compared to Western European mothers (42.4 vs. 35.1% were currently smoking in but the difference was not statistically significant after adjusting for maternal age and maternal educational attainment. About a fifth (19.3% and a tenth (10.0% of Eastern and Western European mothers, respectively, smoked in the vicinity of their children, and the difference was significant even after adjustment for potential confounders (p<0.001. Parents with the highest educational attainment were significantly less likely to smoke in the vicinity of their children than those with the lowest attainment. After control of these covariates lax tobacco control policies, compared to intermediate policies, were associated with a 50% increase in the likelihood of maternal smoking in the vicinity of children adjusted odds ratio (AOR = 1.52 and 1.64. Among fathers, however, the relationship with paternal smoking and TCS seems more complex since strict policy increases the risk as well AOR = 1,40. Only one country, however belongs to the strict group. SIGNIFICANCE: Tobacco control policies seem to have influenced maternal smoking behaviors overall to a limited degree and smoking in the vicinity of children to a much greater degree. Children living in European countries with lax tobacco control policies are more likely to be exposed to second hand smoking from maternal and paternal smoking.

  11. Biosynthesis of AgNPs using Carica Papaya peel extract and evaluation of its antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokila, T; Ramesh, P S; Geetha, D

    2016-12-01

    Waste fruit peel mediated synthesis of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) is a green chemistry approach that links nanotechnology and biotechnology. Using biological medium such as peel extract for the biosynthesis of nanoparticles is an ecofriendly and emerging scientific trend. With this back drop the present study focused on the biosynthesis of AgNPs using Carica Papaya peel extract (CPPE) and evaluation of its antimicrobial potentials of the nanoparticles against different human pathogens and to investigate the free radical scavenging activity. Water soluble antioxidant constituents present in Carica Papaya peel extract were mainly responsible for the reduction of silver ions to nanosized Ag particles. UV-vis spectral analysis shows surface plasmon resonance band at 430nm. The presence of active proteins and phenolic groups present in the biomass before and after reduction was identified by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction study shows the average size of the silver nanoparticles is in the range of 28nm, as well as revealed their face centered cubic structure. Atomic force microscope image gives the 3D topological characteristic of silver nanoparticles and the particle size ranges from 10 to 30nm. The average particle size distribution of silver nanoparticles is 161nm (Dynamic light scattering) and the corresponding average zeta potential value is -20.5mV, suggesting higher stability of silver nanoparticles. Biologically synthesized nanoparticles efficiently inhibited pathogenic organisms both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The biosynthesized nanoparticles might serve as a potent antioxidant as revealed by DPPH and ABT S+ assay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Fallout and drinking water contamination by I-131 and Cs-134, 137 in Japan, from the Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelecom, Alphonse; Miyashita, Erika; Kelecom, Patrick Vicent [Universidade Federal Fluminense (UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The earthquake followed by a tsunami in Japan, on last March 11, seriously damaged four of the six reactors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS). Radioactive smokes and highly contaminated water were released for weeks to the environment. Since March 12, when the plant operator TEPCO and Japan's nuclear agency (NISA) confirmed the presence of radionuclides near the NPS, a giant environmental monitoring operation was set up, covering the entire Japanese territory. Daily thousands measurements are realized. We here analyze data released during 60 days on I-131 and Cs-134,137 radioactive concentrations in drinking water and fallout for 45 prefectures. Miyagi and Fukushima, that requires a separate study, are not considered here. Drinking water contamination by I-131 was observed in 13 prefectures, including Tokyo. The most impacted one was Tochigi (maximum of 110 Bq/l, March 24). This value turned water not drinkable for infants and babies. Cs-137 was detected in drinking water in 8 prefectures, with a maximum level of 18 Bq/l in Ibaraki. These levels do not affect potability of tap water. I-131 was observed in fallout in 27 prefectures, with level reaching 93 kBq/m2 in Ibaraki and 36 kBq/m{sup 2} in Tokyo on March 21 and 23 respectively. Fallout of Cs-137 was observed in 19 prefectures. The maximum deposition occurred again in Ibaraki (13kBq/m{sup 2}, March 21) and in Tokyo (5.3 kBq/m2, March 22). Since mid April, only trace contamination has been observed for both radionuclides in drinking water. Sporadically medium levels of Cs-137 are still observed in fallout. (author)

  13. 33 CFR 334.1120 - Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. 334.1120 Section 334.1120 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.1120 Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of Point Mugu, Calif.; naval small arms firing range. (a...

  14. 33 CFR 334.620 - Straits of Florida and Florida Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational training area...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational training area, aerial gunnery range, and bombing and strafing target areas, Naval Air Station, Key West, Fla. 334.620 Section 334.620 Navigation and Navigable... REGULATIONS § 334.620 Straits of Florida and Florida Bay in vicinity of Key West, Fla.; operational training...

  15. Outcrop descriptions and fossils from the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation, Wind River Basin and adjacent areas, Wyoming: Chapter 11 in Petroleum systems and geologic assessment of oil and gas resources in the Wind River Basin Province, Wyoming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merewether, E.A.; Cobban, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    The Wind River Basin of central Wyoming trends west-northwest from near the community of Alcova to near the town of Dubois (fig. 1). On the perimeter of the basin, outcrops of the Frontier Formation were examined and described during the years 1972-1975. Invertebrate fossils were collected from those outcrops during the years 1972-1996, in places with the assistance of other earth scientists

  16. Proteomic response of mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed to CuO NPs and Cu²⁺: an exploratory biomarker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Tânia; Chora, Suze; Pereira, Catarina G; Cardoso, Cátia; Bebianno, Maria João

    2014-10-01

    CuO NPs are one of the most used metal nanomaterials nowadays with several industrial and other commercial applications. Nevertheless, less is known about the mechanisms by which these NPs inflict toxicity in mussels and to what extent it differs from Cu(2+). The aim of this study was to investigate changes in protein expression profiles in mussels Mytilus galloprovincialis exposed for 15 days to CuO NPs and Cu(2+) (10 μg L(-1)) using a proteomic approach. Results demonstrate that CuO NPs and Cu(2+) induced major changes in protein expression in mussels' showing several tissue and metal-dependent responses. CuO NPs showed a higher tendency to up-regulate proteins in the gills and down-regulate in the digestive gland, while Cu(2+) showed the opposite tendency. Distinctive sets of differentially expressed proteins were found, either common or specific to each Cu form and tissue, reflecting different mechanisms involved in their toxicity. Fifteen of the differentially expressed proteins from both tissues were identified by MALDI-TOF-TOF. Identified proteins indicate common response mechanisms induced by CuO NPs and Cu(2+), namely in cytoskeleton and cell structure (actin, α-tubulin, paramyosin), stress response (heat shock cognate 71, putative C1q domain containing protein), transcription regulation (zinc-finger BED domain-containing protein 1, nuclear receptor subfamily 1G) and energy metabolism (ATP synthase F0 subunit 6). CuO NPs alone also had a marked effect on other biological processes, namely oxidative stress (GST), proteolysis (cathepsin L) and apoptosis (caspase 3/7-1). On the other hand, Cu(2+) affected a protein associated with adhesion and mobility, precollagen-D that is associated with the detoxification mechanism of Cu(2+). Protein identification clearly showed that the toxicity of CuO NPs is not solely due to Cu(2+) dissolution and can result in mitochondrial and nucleus stress-induced cell signalling cascades that can lead to apoptosis. While the

  17. Selective colorimetric sensors based on the monitoring of an unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) reduction for a simple and rapid determination of mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Thima, Araya; Khongrangdee, Thatsanee; Mongkontong, Chakrit

    2015-05-01

    In this work, selective colorimetric sensors for simple and rapid detection of Hg(II) ions based on the monitoring of an unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) reduction were developed. The average diameter of synthesized AgNPs was 8.3 ± 1.4 nm which was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The abrupt change in absorbance of the unmodified AgNPs was observed which progressively decreased and slightly shifted to the blue wavelength as the concentration of Hg(II) increased, indicating the oxidation of Ag(0) to Ag(I) occurred. It appears that the AgNPs were oxidized by Hg(II), resulting in disintegration of the AgNPs into smaller particles as well as mediating the reduction of Hg(II) to Hg(0) adsorbed onto the surface of AgNPs. The adsorption of Hg(0) resulted in the lack of sufficient charges on AgNPs surfaces due to the decrease in the surface coverage of negatively charged citrate molecules, which then leaded to enlargement of AgNPs. The calibration curve of this technique was demonstrated from 0.5 to 7 ppm (r2 = 0.995), the limit of detection (LOD) was 0.06 ppm (SDblank/slope of calibration curve) with the precision (RSD, n = 4) of 3.24-4.53. Interestingly, the results show a significant enhance in the Hg(II) analytical sensitivity when Cu(II) is doped onto the unmodified AgNPs, which improves the quantitative detection limit to 0.008 ppm. In addition, greater selectivity toward Hg(II) compared with the other metal ions tested was observed. Furthermore, the percentage recoveries of spiked drinking water, tap water and SRM1641d (mercury in water) were in acceptable range with a good precision (RSD) which were in agreement with the values obtained from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometer (GFAAS). The technique proposed in this study provides a rapid, simple, sensitive and selective detection method for Hg(II) in water samples.

  18. Enhancement of TiO2 NPs Activity by Fe3O4 Nano-Seeds for Removal of Organic Pollutants in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Villa

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The enhancement of the photocatalytic activity of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs, synthesized in the presence of a very small amount of magnetite (Fe3O4 nanoparticles, is here presented and discussed. From X-ray diffraction (XRD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analyses, the crystallinity of TiO2 nanoparticles (NPs seems to be affected by Fe3O4, acting as nano-seeds to improve the tetragonal TiO2 anatase structure with respect to the amorphous one. Photocatalytic activity data, i.e., the degradation of methylene blue and the Ofloxacin fluoroquinolone emerging pollutant, give evidence that the increased crystalline structure of the NPs, even if correlated to a reduced surface to mass ratio (with respect to commercial TiO2 NPs, enhances the performance of this type of catalyst. The achievement of a relatively well-defined crystal structure at low temperatures (Tmax = 150 °C, preventing the sintering of the TiO2 NPs and, thus, preserving the high density of active sites, seems to be the keystone to understand the obtained results.

  19. A novel surface plasmon resonance biosensor based on the PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform for horse IgG detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Zhang, Di; Deng, Xinyu; Sun, Ying; Wang, Xinghua; Ma, Pinyi; Song, Daqian

    2018-02-01

    Herein we report a novel polydopamine-silver nanoparticle-polydopamine-gold (PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au) film based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor for horse IgG detection. The PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform was built on Au-film via layer-by-layer self-assembly. Ag ion was reduced in situ to AgNPs in presence of PDA. The top PDA layer can prevent AgNPs from being oxidized and connect with antibody via Schiff alkali reaction directly. The morphology and thickness of the modified gold film were characterized using scanning electron microscope and Talystep. Experimental results show that the PDA-AgNPs-PDA-Au film sensing platform is stable, regenerative and sensitive for horse IgG detection. The detection limit of horse IgG obtained with the present biosensor is 0.625 μg mL- 1, which is 2-fold and 4-fold lower than that obtained with biosensor based on PDA modified Au film and conventional biosensor based on MPA, respectively. Furthermore, when challenged to real serum samples, our sensor exhibited excellent specificity to horse IgG, suggesting its potential for industrial application.

  20. Effects of water quality parameters on agglomeration and dissolution of copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO-NPs) using a central composite circumscribed design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Jino; Vavra, Janna; Forbes, Valery E

    2015-07-15

    Once released into the aquatic environment, nanoparticles (NPs) are expected to interact (e.g., dissolve, agglomerate, settle), with important consequences for particle fate and toxicity. However, a clear understanding of how environmental factors influence the toxicity and fate of NPs in the environment is still in its infancy. In this study, a second order central composite circumscribed design (CCCD) was employed to systematically explore how different combinations of pH, hardness, and natural organic matter (NOM) in receiving water affect the hydrodynamic diameter, surface charge (zeta potential), and release of free Cu(2+) from CuO-NPs under a range of environmentally realistic conditions. The results clearly showed that all three CuO-NP properties varied markedly as functions of pH, hardness and dissolved NOM, confirming that agglomeration and the extent of release of free Cu(2+) largely depend on the surrounding environmental conditions. The response of hydrodynamic diameter, but not zeta potential, to water quality parameters was highly time dependent, showing very different patterns on day 2 and day 10. The approach used in this study can contribute to improving understanding of how, and to what extent, environmental factors affect the physicochemical properties of CuO-NPs once they enter aquatic environments. This understanding can help to predict the conditions under which CuO-NPs are likely to become problematic, which can inform management and mitigation actions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the reactivity of Fe NPs toward decabrominated diphenyl ether: The Ni doping, temperature, pH, and anion effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tso, Chih-Ping; Shih, Yang-Hsin

    2017-01-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are commonly used brominated flame retardants in many products. They have accumulated in the environment and become widely dispersed. In this study, carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was applied to modify nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) and bimetallic Ni/Fe nanoparticles (NPs) to prevent NP aggregation. In this study the removal kinetics of the decabrominated diphenyl ethers (DBDE) with CMC-stabilized Fe NPs were evaluated. CMC-stabilized Ni/Fe NPs with an average size of 86.7nm contained metallic Fe(0) and reduced Ni. The colloidal stability decreased with a decrease in pH, which was further accompanied by a change in the removal rate of DBDE. Our results showed that anions do not change the removal rates of DBDE, with the exception of 10mM NO3(-), which induced the formation of Fe (hydro)oxides on the Fe NP surface, which could further coagulate with DBDE. This study provides important information for our understanding of the influence of CMC coatings on the reactivity of Fe NPs. Because CMC coatings prevent the passivation of Fe in the presence of anions, CMC-coated Fe NPs show potential for the in-situ remediation of PBDEs in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites for the detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xueping [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Wang, Li [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Department of Medical Laboratory, Chongqing Emergency Medical Center (Chongqing The Fourth Hospital), Chongqing, 400016 (China); Sheng, Shangchun [The No.2 Peoples' Hospital of Yibin, Sichuan, 644000 (China); Wang, Teng; Yang, Juan [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Xie, Guoming, E-mail: guomingxie@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Feng, Wenli, E-mail: fengwlcqmu@sina.com [Key Laboratory of Laboratory Medical Diagnostics of Education, Department of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China)

    2015-08-19

    This article described a novel method by coupling a universal DNA circuit with graphene sheets/polyaniline/AuNPs nanocomposites (GS/PANI/AuNPs) for highly sensitive and specific detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene (bcr/abl) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). DNA circuit known as catalyzed hairpin assembly (CHA) is enzyme-free and can be simply operated to achieve exponential amplification, which has been widely employed in biosensing. However, application of CHA has been hindered by the need of specially redesigned sequences for each single-stranded DNA input. Herein, a transducer hairpin (HP) was designed to obtain a universal DNA circuit with favorable signal-to-background ratio. To further improve signal amplification, GS/PANI/AuNPs with excellent conductivity and enlarged effective area were introduced into this DNA circuit. Consequently, by combining the advantages of CHA and GS/PANI/AuNPs, bcr/abl could be detected in a linear range from 10 pM to 20 nM with a detection limit of 1.05 pM. Moreover, this protocol showed excellent specificity, good stability and was successfully applied for the detection of real sample, which demonstrated its great potential in clinical application. - Highlights: • A transducer hairpin was designed to improve the versatility of DNA circuit. • GS/PANI/AuNPs were introduced to the DNA circuit for further signal amplification. • The established biosensor displayed high sensitivity and good specificity.

  3. An Evaluation on Transfection Efficiency of pHRE-Egr1-EGFP in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells Bel-7402 Mediated by PEI-MZF-NPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei Lin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve transfection and expression efficiency of target gene, especially under cancer anoxic microenvironment, we have developed pHRE-Egr1-EGFP/PEI-MZF-NPs nanosystem, in which pHRE-Egr1-EGFP, eukaryotic gene expression plasmid, is constructed by combining radiation promoter Egr1 with anoxia induction components (HRE, forming anoxic radiation double sensitive HRE/Egr1 promoter to activate reporter gene EGFP expression. MZF-NPs (Mn0.5 Zn0.5 Fe2O4 magnetic nanoparticles, obtained by coprecipitation method, are coated with cation poly(ethylenimine (PEI. We transferred pHRE-Egr1-EGFP into hepatocellular carcinoma Bel-7402 cells, using PEI-MZF-NPs as the carrier and tested some relevant efficacy. The results show that PEI-MZF-NPs have good DNA-binding ability, protection ability, release ability, little toxicity, and high transfection efficiency, obviously superior to those of the liposome method and electricity perforation method. Moreover, the expression level of EGFP gene induced by anoxia and radiation was significantly higher than that of single radiation activation. It is therefore concluded that HRE/Egr1 can induce and improve target gene expression efficiency in cancer anoxic microenvironment, and that PEI-MZF-NPs can be used as a novel nonviral gene vector which offers a viable approach to the mediated radiation gene therapy of cancer.

  4. Photoconversion of 4-nitrophenol in the presence of hydrazine with AgNPs-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles prepared by the sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández-Gordillo, Agileo, E-mail: agileo12@hotmail.com [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a. sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, SLP, México (Mexico); CIIEMAD, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Calle 30 de Junio de 1520 s/n, Barrio la Laguna Ticomán, C.P. 07340, Del. Gustavo A. Madero, DF, México (Mexico); Arroyo, Missael [División de Materiales Avanzados, Instituto Potosino de Investigación Científica y Tecnológica, Camino a la Presa San José 2055 Col. Lomas 4a. sección, C.P. 78216 San Luis Potosí, SLP, México (Mexico); Zanella, R. [Centro de Ciencias Aplicadas y Desarrollo Tecnológico, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Circuito Exterior S/N, Ciudad Universitaria, A.P. 70-186, Delegación Coyoacán, C.P. 04510 México, DF, México (Mexico); and others

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • AgNPs are well dispersed on TiO{sub 2} semiconductor surface. • TiO{sub 2} with 1.5 wt% of Ag{sup 0} is the most photoactive for the 4-nitrophenol conversion. • High conversion of 4-nitrofenol to 4-aminophenol was achieved with hydrazine. • Enhanced photoactivity of Ag-TiO{sub 2} is associated with the ability to oxidize hydrazine. - Abstract: The photocatalytic properties of functionalized TiO{sub 2} with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol to 4-aminophenol in the presence of hydrazine were investigated. The TiO{sub 2} semiconductor synthesized by the sol–gel method was functionalized with AgNPs at different loadings, and their structural and optical properties were characterized by several techniques. The functionalized TiO{sub 2} with 1.5 wt% AgNPs presented the highest photocatalytic activity for the conversion of 4-nitrophenol with appropriate hydrazine concentrations (0.5 M). The photoefficiency enhancement under UV light irradiation was attributed to the electron transfer from the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor surface to the adsorbed acceptor reactant (4-nitrophenol) through the deposited AgNPs.

  5. Facile Synthesis of Highly Water-Soluble Lanthanide-Doped t-LaVO4 NPs for Antifake Ink and Latent Fingermark Detection

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Cailing

    2017-11-08

    In the information age, it is important to protect the security and integrity of the information. As a result, the fluorescent ink as an antifake technology and the fingermark as an information carrier have aroused great interest. In this work, highly water-soluble lanthanide (Ln3+ )-doped tetragonal phase (t-) LaVO4 nanoparticles (NPs) are successfully obtained via a simple, fast, and green microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The average size of t-LaVO4 NPs is about 43 nm. The aqueous solutions of Ln3+ -doped t-LaVO4 exhibit excellent fluorescence properties under ultraviolet light (UV) excitation (t-LaVO4 :10%Eu is bright red and t-LaVO4 :0.5%Dy is close to white). Some superb antifake fluorescent patterns are printed using Ln3+ -doped t-LaVO4 aqueous solution as ink, which indicates the as-prepared Ln3+ -doped t-LaVO4 NPs as fluorescent ink can meet the various antifake requirements. Notably, the designed convenient antifake fluorescent codes with improved security could be directly scanned and decoded by a smart phone. What\\'s more, the as-prepared NPs can be used for the development of latent fingermark on various substrates and the second-level detail information can be clearly obtained from the magnification of a fingermark. These results indicate that the as-prepared Ln3+ -doped t-LaVO4 fluorescent NPs have great potential in security application.

  6. Class I cultural resource overview for oil shale and tar sands areas in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Rourke, D.; Kullen, D.; Gierek, L.; Wescott, K.; Greby, M.; Anast, G.; Nesta, M.; Walston, L.; Tate, R.; Azzarello, A.; Vinikour, B.; Van Lonkhuyzen, B.; Quinn, J.; Yuen, R.; Environmental Science Division

    2007-11-01

    In August 2005, the U.S. Congress enacted the Energy Policy Act of 2005, Public Law 109-58. In Section 369 of this Act, also known as the 'Oil Shale, Tar Sands, and Other Strategic Unconventional Fuels Act of 2005', Congress declared that oil shale and tar sands (and other unconventional fuels) are strategically important domestic energy resources that should be developed to reduce the nation's growing dependence on oil from politically and economically unstable foreign sources. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) is developing a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to evaluate alternatives for establishing commercial oil shale and tar sands leasing programs in Colorado, Wyoming, and Utah. This PEIS evaluates the potential impacts of alternatives identifying BLM-administered lands as available for application for commercial leasing of oil shale resources within the three states and of tar sands resources within Utah. The scope of the analysis of the PEIS also includes an assessment of the potential effects of future commercial leasing. This Class I cultural resources study is in support of the Draft Oil Shale and Tar Sands Resource Management Plan Amendments to Address Land Use Allocations in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming and Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement and is an attempt to synthesize archaeological data covering the most geologically prospective lands for oil shale and tar sands in Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming. This report is based solely on geographic information system (GIS) data held by the Colorado, Utah, and Wyoming State Historic Preservation Offices (SHPOs). The GIS data include the information that the BLM has provided to the SHPOs. The primary purpose of the Class I cultural resources overview is to provide information on the affected environment for the PEIS. Furthermore, this report provides recommendations to support planning decisions and the management of cultural resources that could be impacted by future

  7. Fluvial deposits of Yellowstone tephras: Implications for late Cenozoic history of the Bighorn basin area, Wyoming and Montana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reheis, M.C.

    1992-01-01

    Several deposits of tephra derived from eruptions in Yellowstone National Park occur in the northern Bighorn basin area of Wyoming and Montana. These tephra deposits are mixed and interbedded with fluvial gravel and sand deposited by several different rivers. The fluvial tephra deposits are used to calculate stream incision rates, to provide insight into drainage histories and Quaternary tectonics, to infer the timing of alluvial erosion-deposition cycles, and to calibrate rates of soil development. ?? 1992.

  8. Evaluation of the rhenium–osmium geochronometer in the Phosphoria petroleum system, Bighorn Basin of Wyoming and Montana, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Lillis, Paul G.; Selby, David

    2013-01-01

    Rhenium–osmium (Re–Os) geochronometry is applied to crude oils derived from the Permian Phosphoria Formation of the Bighorn Basin in Wyoming and Montana to determine whether the radiogenic age reflects the timing of petroleum generation, timing of migration, age of the source rock, or the timing of thermochemical sulfate reduction (TSR). The oils selected for this study are interpreted to be derived from the Meade Peak Phosphatic Shale and Retort Phosphatic Shale Members of the Phosphoria For...

  9. 2480 Ma mafic magmatism in the northern Black Hills, South Dakota: A new link connecting the Wyoming and Superior cratons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, P.S.; Hamilton, M.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Foland, K.A.; Frei, R.; McCombs, J.A.; Holm, D.K.

    2006-01-01

    The Laramide Black Hills uplift of southwest South Dakota exposes a Precambrian crystalline core of ???2560-2600 Ma basement granitoids nonconformably overlain by two Paleoproterozoic intracratonic rift successions. In the northern Black Hills, a 1 km thick, layered sill (the Blue Draw metagabbro) that intrudes the older rift succession provides a key constraint on the timing of mafic magmatism and of older rift-basin sedimentation. Ion microprobe spot analyses of megacrysts of magmatic titanite from a horizon of dioritic pegmatite in the uppermost sill portion yield a 207Pb/206Pb upper-intercept age of 2480 ?? 6 Ma (all age errors ??2??), comparable to two-point 207Pb/206Pb errorchron ages obtained by Pb stepwise leaching of the same titanites. Nearly concordant domains in coexisting magmatic zircon yield apparent spot ages ranging from 2458 ?? 16 to 2284 ?? 20 Ma (i.e., differentially reset along U-Pb concordia), and hornblende from an associated metadiorite yields a partially reset date with oldest apparent-age increments ranging between 2076 ?? 16 and 2010 ?? 8 Ma. We interpret these data as indicating that an episode of gabbroic magmatism occurred at 2480 Ma, in response to earlier rifting of the eastern edge of the Wyoming craton. Layered mafic intrusions of similar thickness and identical age occur along a rifted belt in the southern Superior craton (Sudbury region, Ontario). Moreover, these mafic intrusions are spatially aligned using previous supercontinent restorations of the Wyoming and Superior cratons (Kenorland-Superia configurations). This new "piercing point" augments one previously inferred by spatial-temporal correlation of the Paleoproterozoic Huronian (southern Ontario) and Snowy Pass (southeastern Wyoming) supergroups. We propose that layered mafic intrusions extending from Nemo, South Dakota, to Sudbury, Ontario, delineate an axial rift zone along which Wyoming began to separate from Superior during initial fragmentation of the Neoarchean

  10. Public Perceptions and Practices of Solid Waste Recycling in the City of Laramie in Wyoming, U.S.A.

    OpenAIRE

    Upendra B. Bom; Shashidhar Belbase; Reni Bibriven Lila

    2017-01-01

    Managing household solid waste is a growing challenge for many cities. To tackle this problem, cities are turning to recycling, which is an effective tool for solid waste management. This research seeks to understand the public perceptions and practices of recycling in the City of Laramie, Wyoming. Recycling in Laramie began in 1983 with the establishment of the Ark Recycling Center. Laramie officially started its curbside recycling services in September 2011, and in April 2012 the city decla...

  11. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-01-01

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last 6 months (July 2004-December 2004) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the US: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico.

  12. ADAPTIVE MANAGEMENT AND PLANNING MODELS FOR CULTURAL RESOURCES IN OIL & GAS FIELDS IN NEW MEXICO AND WYOMING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peggy Robinson

    2005-07-01

    This report summarizes activities that have taken place in the last six (6) months (January 2005-June 2005) under the DOE-NETL cooperative agreement ''Adaptive Management and Planning Models for Cultural Resources in Oil and Gas Fields, New Mexico and Wyoming'' DE-FC26-02NT15445. This project examines the practices and results of cultural resource investigation and management in two different oil and gas producing areas of the United States: southeastern New Mexico and the Powder River Basin of Wyoming. The project evaluates how cultural resource investigations have been conducted in the past and considers how investigation and management could be pursued differently in the future. The study relies upon full database population for cultural resource inventories and resources and geomorphological studies. These are the basis for analysis of cultural resource occurrence, strategies for finding and evaluating cultural resources, and recommendations for future management practices. Activities can be summarized as occurring in either Wyoming or New Mexico. Gnomon as project lead, worked in both areas.

  13. One-pot synthesis of polyamines improved magnetism and fluorescence Fe3O4-carbon dots hybrid NPs for dual modal imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Xudong; Guo, Yali; Iqbal, Anam; Dong, Yaping; Li, Wu; Liu, Weisheng; Qin, Wenwu; Chen, Shizhen; Zhou, Xin; Yang, Yunhuang

    2016-04-07

    A one-step hydrothermal method was developed to fabricate Fe3O4-carbon dots (Fe3O4-CDs) magnetic-fluorescent hybrid nanoparticles (NPs). Ferric ammonium citrate (FAC) was used as a cheap and nontoxic iron precursor and as the carbon source. Moreover, triethylenetetramine (TETA) was used to improve the adhesive strength of CDs on Fe3O4 and the fluorescence intensity of CDs. The prepared water-soluble hybrid NPs not only exhibit excellent superparamagnetic properties (Ms = 56.8 emu g(-1)), but also demonstrate excitation-independent photoluminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion at 445 nm. Moreover, the prepared water-soluble Fe3O4-CDs hybrid NPs have a dual modal imaging ability for both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and fluorescence imaging.

  14. Assessing the Long-Term Hydrologic Impact of Land Use Change Using a GIS-NPS Model and the World Wide Web

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaduri, B.; Engel, B.; Harbor, J.; Jones, D.; Lim, K.J.

    1999-09-22

    Assessment of the long-term hydrologic impacts of land use change is important for optimizing management practices to control runoff and non-point source (NPS) pollution associated with watershed development. Land use change, dominated by an increase in urban/impervious areas, can have a significant impact on water resources. Non-point source (NPS) pollution is the leading cause of degraded water quality in the US and urban areas are an important source of NPS pollution. Despite widespread concern over the environmental impacts of land use changes such as urban sprawl, most planners, government agencies and consultants lack access to simple impact-assessment tools that can be used with readily available data. Before investing in sophisticated analyses and customized data collection, it is desirable to be able to run initial screening analyses using data that are already available. In response to this need, we developed a long-term hydrologic impact assessment technique (L-THIA) using the popular Curve Number (CN) method that makes use of basic land use, soils and long-term rainfall data. Initially developed as a spreadsheet application, the technique allows a user to compare the hydrologic impacts of past, present and any future land use change. Consequently, a NPS pollution module was incorporated to develop the L-THWNPS model. Long-term daily rainfall records are used in combination with soils and land use information to calculate average annual runoff and NPS pollution at a watershed scale. Because of the geospatial nature of land use and soils data, and the increasingly widespread use of GE by planners, government agencies and consultants, the model is linked to a Geographic Information System (GIS) that allows convenient generation and management of model input and output data, and provides advanced visualization of the model results. Manipulation of the land use layer, or provision of multiple land use layers (for different scenarios), allows for rapid and

  15. Anthelmintic Effect of Biocompatible Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs on Gigantocotyle explanatum, a Neglected Parasite of Indian Water Buffalo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasir Akhtar Khan

    Full Text Available Helminth parasites of veterinary importance cause huge revenue losses to agrarian economy worldwide. With the emergence of drug resistance against the current formulations, there is a need to focus on the alternative approaches in order to control this menace. In the present study, biocompatible zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs were used to see their in vitro effect on the biliary amphistomes, Gigantocotyle explanatum, infecting Bubalus bubalis because these nanoparticles are involved in generation of free radicals that induce oxidative stress, resulting in disruption of cellular machinery. The ZnO NPs were synthesized by using egg albumin as a biotemplate and subsequently characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM, Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, X-ray Diffraction and Spectrophotometrical, which showed that ZnO NPs were highly purified wurtzite type polycrystals, with a mean size of 16.7 nm. When the parasites were treated with lower concentrations (0.004% and 0.008% of the ZnO NPs, the worms mounted a protective response by stimulating the antioxidant system but the treatment of G. explanatum with 0.012% ZnO NPs produced significant inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD (p< 0.05 and glutathione S- transferase (GST (p<0.01, while the level of malondialdehyde (MDA, a lipid peroxidation marker, was significantly (p< 0.01 elevated. SEM and histopathology revealed pronounced tegumental damage showing the disruption of surface papillae and the annulations, particularly in the posterior region near acetabulum. The under expression of a number of polypeptides, loss of worm motility in a time dependent manner, further reflect strong anthelmintic potential of ZnO NPs. It can be concluded that the anthelmintic effect might be due to the production of reactive oxygen species that target a variety of macromolecules such as nucleic acid, protein and lipids which are involved in different cellular processes.

  16. Anthelmintic Effect of Biocompatible Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) on Gigantocotyle explanatum, a Neglected Parasite of Indian Water Buffalo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Yasir Akhtar; Singh, Braj Raj; Ullah, Rizwan; Shoeb, Mohd; Naqvi, Alim H.; Abidi, Syed M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Helminth parasites of veterinary importance cause huge revenue losses to agrarian economy worldwide. With the emergence of drug resistance against the current formulations, there is a need to focus on the alternative approaches in order to control this menace. In the present study, biocompatible zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) were used to see their in vitro effect on the biliary amphistomes, Gigantocotyle explanatum, infecting Bubalus bubalis because these nanoparticles are involved in generation of free radicals that induce oxidative stress, resulting in disruption of cellular machinery. The ZnO NPs were synthesized by using egg albumin as a biotemplate and subsequently characterized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), X-ray Diffraction and Spectrophotometrical, which showed that ZnO NPs were highly purified wurtzite type polycrystals, with a mean size of 16.7 nm. When the parasites were treated with lower concentrations (0.004% and 0.008%) of the ZnO NPs, the worms mounted a protective response by stimulating the antioxidant system but the treatment of G. explanatum with 0.012% ZnO NPs produced significant inhibition of the antioxidant enzymes like superoxide dismutase (SOD) (p< 0.05) and glutathione S- transferase (GST) (p<0.01), while the level of malondialdehyde (MDA), a lipid peroxidation marker, was significantly (p< 0.01) elevated. SEM and histopathology revealed pronounced tegumental damage showing the disruption of surface papillae and the annulations, particularly in the posterior region near acetabulum. The under expression of a number of polypeptides, loss of worm motility in a time dependent manner, further reflect strong anthelmintic potential of ZnO NPs. It can be concluded that the anthelmintic effect might be due to the production of reactive oxygen species that target a variety of macromolecules such as nucleic acid, protein and lipids which are involved in different cellular processes. PMID:26177503

  17. Anisotropic In Situ-Coated AuNPs on Screen-Printed Carbon Surface for Enhanced Prostate-Specific Antigen Impedimetric Aptasensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tram T. N.; Van Phi, Toan; Nguy, Tin Phan; Wagner, Patrick; Eersels, Kasper; Vestergaard, Mun'delanji C.; Truong, Lien T. N.

    2017-06-01

    An impedimetric aptasensor has been used to study the effect of charge transfer on the binding of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) to its aptamer. Full understanding of this mechanism will be beneficial to further improve its sensitivity for PSA detection in human semen at physiologically relevant concentrations. Bare gold electrodes (SPAuEs) and gold nanoparticles (AuNPs)-coated screen-printed carbon ink electrodes (AuNPs/SPCEs) were coated with aptamer solution at various concentrations and the sensor response to increasing PSA concentration in buffer solution examined. AuNPs were deposited onto carbon electrodes in 10 cycles. AuNPs/SPCEs were then coated with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 16-mercaptohexadecanoic acid prior to aptamer immobilization at dose of 5 μg mL-1. The results indicate that anisotropic AuNPs/SPCEs outperform bare gold electrodes in terms of decreased amount of aptamer bunches as well as the number of intermediate PSA-aptamer complexes formed on the electrode surface. The key finding is that the fabricated aptasensor is sensitive enough [limit of detection (LoD) 1.95 ng mL-1] for early diagnosis of prostate cancer and displays linear response in the physiologically relevant concentration range (0 ng mL-1 to 10 ng mL-1), as shown by the calibration curve of the relative change in electron transfer resistance (Δ R CT) versus PSA concentration when aptamer/SAM/AuNPs/SPCEs were exposed to buffer containing PSA at different concentrations.

  18. Electric and magnetic field testing in vicinity of 110/x kV substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbić Maja

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The levels of non-ionizing radiation (electric and magnetic fields at power frequency, which occur near 110/x kV substations are analyzed in this paper. The results of electric field strength and magnetic flux density measurements in the vicinity of three typical substations of the aforementioned voltage level are shown. With the purpose of estimating the exposure of the population to these fields, the obtained results were compared to the reference maximum levels set for increased sensitivity areas, which amount to 2 kV/m for electric field and 40 μT for magnetic flux density. The objective of the conducted analysis is to reach general conclusions on the levels of electric and magnetic fields, which may occur in the vicinity of the substations mentioned above, and evaluate their compliance with the national regulations on the population protection from non-ionizing radiation.

  19. DFT Study of the Molybdenum-Catalyzed Deoxydehydration of Vicinal Diols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lupp, Daniel; Christensen, Niels Johan; Dethlefsen, Johannes Rytter

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of the molybdenum-catalyzed deoxydehydration (DODH) of vicinal diols has been investigated using density functional theory. The proposed catalytic cycle involves condensation of the diol with an MoVI oxo complex, oxidative cleavage of the diol resulting in an MoIV complex, and extru......The mechanism of the molybdenum-catalyzed deoxydehydration (DODH) of vicinal diols has been investigated using density functional theory. The proposed catalytic cycle involves condensation of the diol with an MoVI oxo complex, oxidative cleavage of the diol resulting in an MoIV complex......, and extrusion of the alkene. We have compared the proposed pathway with several alternatives, and the results have been corroborated by comparison with the molybdenum- catalyzed sulfoxide reduction recently published by Sanz et al. and with experimental observations for the DODH itself. Improved understanding...

  20. Temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropies in ultrathin Fe film on vicinal Si(111)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong-Sheng; He, Wei; Ye, Jun; Hu, Bo; Tang, Jin; Zhang, Xiang-Qun [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Cheng, Zhao-Hua, E-mail: zhcheng@aphy.iphy.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Magnetism and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); School of Physical Sciences, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2017-05-01

    The temperature dependence of magnetic anisotropy of ultrathin Fe film with different thickness epitaxially grown on vicinal Si(111) substrate has been quantitatively investigated using the anisotropic magnetoresistance(AMR) measurements. Due to the effect of the vicinal substrate, the magnetic anisotropy is the superposition of a four-fold, a two-fold and a weakly six-fold contribution. It is found that the temperature dependence of the first-order magnetocrystalline anisotropies coefficient follows power laws of the reduced magnetization m(T)(=M(T)/M(0)) being consistent with the Callen and Callen's theory. However the temperature dependence of uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) shows novel behavior that decreases roughly as a function of temperature with different power law for samples with different thickness. We also found that the six-fold magnetocrystalline anisotropy is almost invariable over a wide temperature range. Possible mechanisms leading to the different exponents are discussed.