WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibroacoustic payload environment

  1. Vibroacoustic payload environment prediction system (VAPEPS): Data base management center remote access guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, V. C.

    1986-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Data Base Management Center has been established at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The center utilizes the Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) software package to manage a data base of shuttle and expendable launch vehicle flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to a dedicated VAPEPS computer system has been established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the JPL Data Base Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  2. Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS): VAPEPS management center remote access guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, J. P.; Mills, D.

    1991-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) Management Center was established at the JPL. The center utilizes the VAPEPS software package to manage a data base of Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicle payload flight and ground test data. Remote terminal access over telephone lines to the computer system, where the program resides, was established to provide the payload community a convenient means of querying the global VAPEPS data base. This guide describes the functions of the VAPEPS Management Center and contains instructions for utilizing the resources of the center.

  3. A Vibroacoustic Database Management Center for Shuttle and expendable launch vehicle payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Valerie C.

    1987-01-01

    A Vibroacoustic Database Management Center has recently been established at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The center uses the Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) computer program to maintain a database of flight and ground-test data and structural parameters for both Shuttle and expendable launch-vehicle payloads. Given the launch-vehicle environment, the VAPEPS prediction software, which employs Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) methods, can be used with or without the database to establish the vibroacoustic environment for new payload components. This paper summarizes the VAPEPS program and describes the functions of the Database Management Center at JPL.

  4. Shuttle payload vibroacoustic test plan evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Young, J. P.; Keegan, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    Statistical decision theory is used to evaluate seven alternate vibro-acoustic test plans for Space Shuttle payloads; test plans include component, subassembly and payload testing and combinations of component and assembly testing. The optimum test levels and the expected cost are determined for each test plan. By including all of the direct cost associated with each test plan and the probabilistic costs due to ground test and flight failures, the test plans which minimize project cost are determined. The lowest cost approach eliminates component testing and maintains flight vibration reliability by performing subassembly tests at a relatively high acoustic level.

  5. Shuttle payload minimum cost vibroacoustic tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Young, J. P.; Keegan, W. B.

    1977-01-01

    This paper is directed toward the development of the methodology needed to evaluate cost effective vibroacoustic test plans for Shuttle Spacelab payloads. Statistical decision theory is used to quantitatively evaluate seven alternate test plans by deriving optimum test levels and the expected cost for each multiple mission payload considered. The results indicate that minimum costs can vary by as much as $6 million for the various test plans. The lowest cost approach eliminates component testing and maintains flight vibration reliability by performing subassembly tests at a relatively high acoustic level. Test plans using system testing or combinations of component and assembly level testing are attractive alternatives. Component testing alone is shown not to be cost effective.

  6. Development of a vibroacoustic data base management and prediction system for payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    On, F. J.; Hendricks, W.

    1982-01-01

    A data base management and prediction system called vibroacoustic payload environment prediction system (VAPEPS) was developed to serve as a repository for shuttle or extendable booster payload component flight and ground test data. This system is to be made available to the aerospace community for multiple uses including that of establishing the vibroacoustic environment for new payload components. The VAPEPS data includes that spectral information normally processed from vibration and acoustic measurements (e.g., power spectra, sound pressure level spectra, etc.). Results of development to provide this capability by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and Lockheed Missiles and Space Company are described.

  7. Shuttle payload vibroacoustic test plan evaluation. Free flyer payload applications and sortie payload parametric variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.

    1977-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of vibroacoustic test plan optimization for free flyer STS payloads is presented and the effects on alternate test plans for Spacelab sortie payloads number of missions are also examined. The component vibration failure probability and the number of components in the housekeeping subassemblies are provided. Decision models are used to evaluate the cost effectiveness of seven alternate test plans using protoflight hardware.

  8. Vibroacoustic study of the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center OSS-1 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. A.; Henricks, W.

    1985-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of shuttle liftoff and ground test random response data obtained from the Office of Space Science-1 (OSS-1) pallet payload flown in the cargo bay of STS-3 is presented. The study was initiated to evaluate the possibility that the payload flight vibration response can exceed that occurred during ground test when the ground test acoustic excitation is normalized to the flight acoustic environment. In addition, the analytically derived response from the Vibroacoustic Payload Environment Prediction System (VAPEPS) is compared with OSS-1 ground test results.

  9. Parametric evaluation of the cost effectiveness of Shuttle payload vibroacoustic test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloff, H. R.; Keegan, W. B.; Young, J. P.

    1978-01-01

    Consideration is given to alternate vibroacoustic test plans for sortie and free flyer Shuttle payloads. Statistical decision models for nine test plans provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology is a major step toward the development of a useful tool for the quantitative tailoring of vibroacoustic test programs to sortie and free flyer payloads. A broader application of the methodology is now possible by the use of the OCTAVE computer code.

  10. Ares I-X Vibroacoustic Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Curtis E.; Schuster, David M.; Kaufman, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) team recommendations and observations following participation with the Ares I-X Vibroacoustic (VA) Environments Panel in meetings at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in March and April 2008, respectively.

  11. Human response to vibroacoustic environments of space vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    To insure efficient utilization of the system, space station design and operations will require special habitability considerations for the occupants and crew because of the relatively long duration missions. Of particular concern is the environment in which the personnel will live and work, and how it affects both the performance and comfort of the occupants. Current criteria do not consider possible effects of reduced gravity, long duration, and confinement. Preliminary to developing space station vibroacoustic habitability criteria, the adequacy of criteria for other space vehicles has been reviewed. In this paper, responses to the noise and vibration environments of both Skylab and Shuttle are discussed. Some astronauts have reported sleep interference, communication interference, distraction, and general annoyance as noise related complaints. In addition, information from the Russian Salyut missions, as well as similar based situtations (e.g., submarines), is reviewed.

  12. Skylab vibroacoustic test program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewell, R. E.

    1974-01-01

    Vibroacoustic testing was performed on the orbital workshop dynamic test article and the payload assembly, the two major elements of the Skylab payload. The testing was conducted on each of the Skylab elements separately in the reverberation chamber at the Johnson Space Center. The two test configurations were high fidelity flight article simulations. The testing was conducted in two phases; in the first phase, acoustic tests were performed at levels simulating the lift-off and atmospheric flight acoustic criteria. In the second phase, low frequency sinusoidal vibration tests were conducted to obtain modal response data. The objectives of the Skylab vibroacoustic test program were to: verify the vibration design and test criteria; qualify selected flight components to the vibroacoustic criteria; and verify analytical models used for dynamic load analyses. This paper describes the vibroacoustic testing and discusses the results.

  13. Modeling of micro-perforated panels in a complex vibro-acoustic environment using patch transfer function approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxit, L; Yang, C; Cheng, L; Guyader, J-L

    2012-03-01

    A micro-perforated panel (MPP) with a backing cavity is a well known device for efficient noise absorption. This configuration has been thoroughly studied in the experimental conditions of an acoustic tube (Kundt tube), in which the MPP is excited by a normal incident plane wave in one dimension. In a more practical situation, the efficiency of MPP may be influenced by the vibro-acoustic behavior of the surrounding systems as well as excitation. To deal with this problem, a vibro-acoustic formulation based on the patch transfer functions (PTF) approach is proposed to model the behavior of a micro-perforated structure in a complex vibro-acoustic environment. PTF is a substructuring approach, which allows assembling different vibro-acoustic subsystems through coupled surfaces. Upon casting micro-perforations and the flexibility of the MPP under transfer function framework, the proposed PTF formulation provides explicit representation of the coupling between subsystems and facilitates physical interpretation. As an illustration example, application to a MPP with a backing cavity located in an infinite baffle is demonstrated. The proposed PTF formulation is finally validated through comparison with experimental measurements available in the literature. © 2012 Acoustical Society of America

  14. Initial Assessment of the Ares I-X Launch Vehicle Upper Stage to Vibroacoustic Flight Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larko, Jeffrey M.; Hughes, William O.

    2008-01-01

    The Ares I launch vehicle will be NASA s first new launch vehicle since 1981. Currently in design, it will replace the Space Shuttle in taking astronauts to the International Space Station, and will eventually play a major role in humankind s return to the Moon and eventually to Mars. Prior to any manned flight of this vehicle, unmanned test readiness flights will be flown. The first of these readiness flights, named Ares I-X, is scheduled to be launched in April 2009. The NASA Glenn Research Center is responsible for the design, manufacture, test and analysis of the Ares I-X upper stage simulator (USS) element. As part of the design effort, the structural dynamic response of the Ares I-X launch vehicle to its vibroacoustic flight environments must be analyzed. The launch vehicle will be exposed to extremely high acoustic pressures during its lift-off and aerodynamic stages of flight. This in turn will cause high levels of random vibration on the vehicle's outer surface that will be transmitted to its interior. Critical flight equipment, such as its avionics and flight guidance components are susceptible to damage from this excitation. This study addresses the modelling, analysis and predictions from examining the structural dynamic response of the Ares I-X upper stage to its vibroacoustic excitations. A statistical energy analysis (SEA) model was used to predict the high frequency response of the vehicle at locations of interest. Key to this study was the definition of the excitation fields corresponding to lift off acoustics and the unsteady aerodynamic pressure fluctuations during flight. The predicted results will be used by the Ares I-X Project to verify the flight qualification status of the Ares I-X upper stage components.

  15. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Mike

    2015-01-01

    This presentation outlines a brief description of the Living With a Star (LWS) Program missions and detailed information about the Space Environment Testbed (SET) payload consisting of a space weather monitor and carrier containing 4 board experiments.

  16. Mars Environment and Magnetic Orbiter model payload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langlais, B.; Leblanc, F.; Fouchet, T.

    2009-01-01

    Mars Environment and Magnetic Orbiter was proposed as an answer to the Cosmic Vision Call of Opportunity as a M-class mission. The MEMO mission is designed to study the strong interconnections between the planetary interior, atmosphere and solar conditions essential to understand planetary...

  17. Vibroacoustic test plan evaluation: Parameter variation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahle, C. V.; Gongloef, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    Statistical decision models are shown to provide a viable method of evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternate vibroacoustic test plans and the associated test levels. The methodology developed provides a major step toward the development of a realistic tool to quantitatively tailor test programs to specific payloads. Testing is considered at the no test, component, subassembly, or system level of assembly. Component redundancy and partial loss of flight data are considered. Most and probabilistic costs are considered, and incipient failures resulting from ground tests are treated. Optimums defining both component and assembly test levels are indicated for the modified test plans considered. modeling simplifications must be considered in interpreting the results relative to a particular payload. New parameters introduced were a no test option, flight by flight failure probabilities, and a cost to design components for higher vibration requirements. Parameters varied were the shuttle payload bay internal acoustic environment, the STS launch cost, the component retest/repair cost, and the amount of redundancy in the housekeeping section of the payload reliability model.

  18. Evaluation of diagnostic thresholds dependability for tribologic signals received in the environment disturbed by vibroacoustic and functional signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindstedt Paweł

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of dependable diagnostic thresholds for tribologic signals received e.g. from antifriction bearings (in particular for insufficient number of measurements, only 4÷5 is a really difficult task due to complexity of working environment where such bearings are operated. Typical working environment for such objects must take account for operation time under various working conditions and accompanying (and disturbing signals, e.g. vibroacoustic ones. The sought assessment of the relationship between diagnostic signals and environmental noise can be determined from convolution of both diagnostic and environments signals that make up the complete set of received information. The convolution of these two series of signals can be obtained from an algorithm based on the Cauchy product. Then one has to find the coherence factor and the square of amplitude gain for the set of diagnostic signals with reference to various sets of signals received from environment, which makes it possible to evaluate cohesion of the investigated series of signals, thus their suitability to determine diagnostic threshold for tribologic signals intended for the analysis.

  19. Vibroacoustic sound therapy improves pain management and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd-Brewer, Chris; McCaffrey, Ruth

    2004-01-01

    Vibroacoustic therapy is a new sound technology that uses audible sound vibrations to reduce symptoms, invoke relaxation, and alleviate stress. This technology is developed based on the recognition that external vibration can influence body function. Research demonstrates the effectiveness of vibroacoustic therapy. Implications for nurses include investigating the possibilities of vibroacoustic therapy in various nursing settings to promote patient well-being and improve the therapeutic environment.

  20. Vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, N A A Castelo; Alves-Pereira, M

    2004-01-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body, systemic pathology, characterized by the abnormal proliferation of extra-cellular matrices, and caused by excessive exposure to low frequency noise (LFN). VAD has been observed in LFN-exposed professionals, such as, aircraft technicians, commercial and military pilots and cabin crewmembers, ship machinists, restaurant workers, and disk-jockeys. VAD has also been observed in several populations exposed to environmental LFN. This report summarizes what is known to date on VAD, LFN-induced pathology, and related issues. In 1987, the first autopsy of a deceased VAD patient was performed. The extent of LFN induced damage was overwhelming, and the information obtained is, still today, guiding many of the associated and ongoing research projects. In 1992, LFN-exposed animal models began to be studied in order to gain a deeper knowledge of how tissues respond to this acoustic stressor. In both human and animal models, LFN exposure causes thickening of cardiovascular structures. Indeed, pericardial thickening with no inflammatory process, and in the absence of diastolic dysfunction, is the hallmark of VAD. Depressions, increased irritability and aggressiveness, a tendency for isolation, and decreased cognitive skills are all part of the clinical picture of VAD. LFN is a demonstrated genotoxic agent, inducing an increased frequency of sister chromatid exchanges in both human and animal models. The occurrence of malignancies among LFN-exposed humans, and of metaplastic and displastic appearances in LFN-exposed animals, clearly corroborates the mutagenic outcome of LFN exposure. The inadequacy of currently established legislation regarding noise assessments is a powerful hindrance to scientific advancement. VAD can never be fully recognized as an occupational and environmental pathology unless the agent of disease--LFN--is acknowledged and properly evaluated. The worldwide suffering of LFN-exposed individuals is staggering and it is

  1. Vibroacoustical analysis of rail vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Králíček J.

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the vibroacoustical analysis of rail vehicle and is the extension of the previously presented work “Modelování podvozku kolejového vozidla s poddajným rámem”. The vibroacoustical analysis uses the outcomes of the dynamical analysis of rail vehicle bogie i.e. surface velocities of the bogie frame to compute the acoustic power radiated by the bogie frame and forces acting in the bogie-body interface. The radiated power and the force spectra are then used as the excitation to the rail body model in the environment Auto-SEA to compute the interior acoustic quantities.

  2. Modeling of micro-perforated panels in a complex vibro-acoustic environment using patch transfer function approach

    OpenAIRE

    Maxit, Laurent; C. Yang; Cheng, Li; Guyader, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    International audience; The micro-perforated panel (MPP) with a backing cavity is a well known efficient device for noise absorption. This device has been thoroughly studied in the experimental conditions of an acoustic tube (Kundt tube), in which the MPP is excited by a normal incident plane wave in one dimension. In an industrial situation, the efficiency of MPP may be influenced by the vibro-acoustic behaviour of the surrounding systems as well as excitation. To deal with this problem, a v...

  3. Shuttle measured contaminant environment and modeling for payloads. Preliminary assessment of the space telescope environment in the shuttle bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scialdone, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    A baseline gaseous and particulate environment of the Shuttle bay was developed based on the various measurements which were made during the first four flights of the Shuttle. The environment is described by the time dependent pressure, density, scattered molecular fluxes, the column densities and including the transient effects of water dumps, engine firings and opening and closing of the bay doors. The particulate conditions in the ambient and on surfaces were predicted as a function of the mission time based on the available data. This basic Shuttle environment when combined with the outgassing and the particulate contributions of the payloads, can provide a description of the environment of a payload in the Shuttle bay. As an example of this application, the environment of the Space Telescope in the bay, which may be representative of the environment of several payloads, was derived. Among the many findings obtained in the process of modeling the environment, one is that the payloads environment in the bay is not substantially different or more objectionable than the self-generated environment of a large payload or spacecraft. It is, however, more severe during ground facilities operations, the first 15 to 20 hours of the flight, during and for a short period after ater was dumped overboard, and the reaction control engines are being fired.

  4. ISS External Payload Platform - a new opportunity for research in the space environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steimle, Christian; Pape, Uwe

    The International Space Station (ISS) is a widely accepted platform for research activities in low Earth orbit. To a wide extent these activities are conducted in the pressurised laboratories of the station and less in the outside environment. Suitable locations outside the ISS are rare, existing facilities fully booked for the coming years. To overcome this limitation, an external payload platform accessible for small size payloads on a commercial basis will be launched to the ISS and installed on the Japanese Experiment Module External Facility (JEM-EF) in the third quarter of 2014 and will be ready to be used by the scientific community on a fully commercial basis. The new External Payload Platform (EPP) and its opportunities and constraints assessed regarding future research activities on-board the ISS. The small size platform is realised in a cooperation between the companies NanoRacks, Astrium North America in the United States, and Airbus Defence and Space in Germany. The hardware allows the fully robotic installation and operation of payloads. In the nominal mission scenario payload items are installed not later than one year after the signature of the contract, stay in operation for 15 weeks, and can be returned to the scientist thereafter. Payload items are transported among the pressurised cargo usually delivered to the station with various supply vehicles. Due to the high frequency of flights and the flexibility of the vehicle manifests the risk of a delay in the payload readiness can be mitigated by delaying to the next flight opportunity which on average is available not more than two months later. The mission is extra-ordinarily fast and of low cost in comparison to traditional research conducted on-board the ISS and can fit into short-term funding cycles available on national and multi-national levels. The size of the payload items is limited by handling constraints on-board the ISS. Therefore, the standard experiment payload size is a multiple of a

  5. External Contamination Environment at ISS Included: Selected Results from Payloads Contamination Mapping Delivery 3 Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Randy; Huang, Alvin; Steagall, Courtney; Kohl, Nathaniel; Koontz, Steve; Worthy, Erica

    2017-01-01

    The International Space Station is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit. Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets.

  6. Research activities on vibro-acoustics of satellites during rocket launch

    OpenAIRE

    Murakami, Keiichi; Inada, Yoshinobu; Aoyama, Takashi; Takahashi, Takashi; Aiso, Hideaki; 村上 桂一; 稲田 喜信; 青山 剛史; 高橋 孝; 相曽 秀昭

    2006-01-01

    A study to establish a prediction method for vibro-acoustics of satellites during rocket launch has been conducted using a multidisciplinary analysis method of fluid, acoustic, and vibration. This coupling method consists of following four elements: numerical analyses of (1) sound generation, (2) sound propagation, (3) sound permeation, and (4) vibro-acoustics of payload. In the sound generation analysis, it can be seen from FEM analysis of a simply modeled deflector that a strong resonance o...

  7. Vibro-acoustics

    CERN Document Server

    Nilsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    This three-volume book gives a thorough and comprehensive presentation of vibration and acoustic theories. Different from traditional textbooks which typically deal with some aspects of either acoustic or vibration problems, it is unique of this book to combine those two correlated subjects together. Moreover, it provides fundamental analysis and mathematical descriptions for several crucial phenomena of Vibro-Acoustics which are quite useful in noise reduction, including how structures are excited, energy flows from an excitation point to a sound radiating surface, and finally how a structure radiates noise to a surrounding fluid. Many measurement results included in the text make the reading interesting and informative. Problems/questions are listed at the end of each chapter and the solutions are provided. This will help the readers to understand the topics of Vibro-Acoustics more deeply. The book should be of interest to anyone interested in sound and vibration, vehicle acoustics, ship acoustics and inter...

  8. Vibroacoustic benchmarking; Vibroakustisches Benchmarking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaesler, R.; Prinzler, H. [Freudenberg Dichtungs- und Schwingungstechnik KG, Weinheim (Germany). Technische Entwicklungszentrum

    2000-03-01

    Improved driving comfort is one of the main enhancements in the automotive industry today. It affects not only the constructive design of a car and its equipment but also the vibroacoustic adaptation of the entire vehicle. For several years now, Freudenberg Dichtungs- und Schwingungstechnik has been benchmarking automobiles with respect to their vibroacoustic performance, with the aim of optimising the vibrational layout of engine mounting systems, chassis mounting concepts and finally the overall adaptation of the vehicle. The results of this benchmarking programme are listed according to vehicle class (luxury, mid-range, compact or subcompact class) and constitute an impressive vibroacoustic assessment of current developments in this field. (orig.) [German] Die Steigerung des Fahrkomforts gehoert zu den aktuellen Hauptentwicklungen der Fahrzeughersteller. Dies betrifft nicht nur die konstruktive Gestaltung und Ausstattung der Kraftfahrzeuge, sondern insbesondere die vibroakustische Abstimmung des Gesamtfahrzeugs. Freudenberg Dichtungs- und Schwingungstechnik fuehrte seit mehreren Jahren ein vibroakustisches Fahrzeug-Benchmarking durch, um die schwingungstechnische Auslegung von Aggregatelagerungssystem, Fahrwerklagerungskonzepten und in der Endstufe die Gesamtabstimmung zu optimieren. Die Ergebnisse werden nach Fahrzeugklassen (Luxus-, Mittel-, Kompaktklasse und Kleinwagen) geordnet und stellen eine vibroakustische Bestandsaufnahme der aktuellen Entwicklungen dar. (orig.)

  9. Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment -Attached Payload (SEDA-AP) on the ISS -"Kibo" Exposed Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Kiyokazu; Matsumoto, Haruhisa; Kimoto, Yugo; Obara, Takahiro; Goka, Tateo

    To support future space activities, it is very important to acquire space environmental data related to space radiation degradation of space parts and materials and spacecraft anomalies. Such data are useful for spacecraft design and manned space activity. On several satellite of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) since the Engineering Test Satellite-V (ETS-V), Technical Data Acquisition Equipment (TEDA) and Space Environment Data Acquisition Equipment (SEDA) have been installed for obtaining the data described above. SEDA-Attached Payload (AP) was mounted on Japanese experimental module, "Kibo" , at International Space Station (ISS) to take continuous measurements of the 400 kilometres altitude space station's tra-jectory for a period of around 3 years. SEDA-AP comprises common bus equipment supporting launch, RMS handling, the power/communication interface with JEM-EF, an extendible mast that extends the neutron monitor sensor 1 m separate from the bus structure, and equipment that measures space environment data. SEDA-AP has been fitted with 8 kinds of instruments. It will continuously and simultaneously measure neutrons, heavy ions, plasma, high-energy electrons and protons, atomic oxygen, space debris and dusts, etc. Furthermore, by exposing electronic devices and materials directory to the space environment, it will examine how they are affected by the environment. SEDA-AP was lanced on July 16 in 2009, and attached to EF of "Kibo" on July 25 using the robot arm of "Kibo". Initial checkout was started on Au-gust 4 and successfully ended on September 17. This paper will report the mission objectives, instrumentation, and current status of SEDA-AP.

  10. Mapping the space radiation environment in LEO orbit by the SATRAM Timepix payload on board the Proba-V satellite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granja, Carlos, E-mail: carlos.granja@utef.cvut.cz; Polansky, Stepan

    2016-07-07

    Detailed spatial- and time-correlated maps of the space radiation environment in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) are produced by the spacecraft payload SATRAM operating in open space on board the Proba-V satellite from the European Space Agency (ESA). Equipped with the hybrid semiconductor pixel detector Timepix, the compact radiation monitor payload provides the composition and spectral characterization of the mixed radiation field with quantum-counting and imaging dosimetry sensitivity, energetic charged particle tracking, directionality and energy loss response in wide dynamic range in terms of particle types, dose rates and particle fluxes. With a polar orbit (sun synchronous, 98° inclination) at the altitude of 820 km the payload samples the space radiation field at LEO covering basically the whole planet. First results of long-period data evaluation in the form of time-and spatially-correlated maps of total dose rate (all particles) are given.

  11. NuSTAR: Vibro-Acoustic Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasim, K.

    2004-09-03

    NuSTAR is a satellite that will be carrying X-ray optics that consist of many nested glass cylinders. Due to different acoustic environments, the glass may react such that cracks and/or fractures may form. Cracks and/or fractures in the glass would not allow the optic to work properly. Therefore, it is necessary to test the glass and optic prototypes to determine if they will be able to withhold when experiencing certain acoustic environments. The vibro-acoustic testing conducted at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena determined that under the minimum workmanship acoustic environments, the glass on the optics will not fail. Overall, the results of the test were successful which gives confidence that when the satellite is launched into the air and then dropped into space, the glass in the optics will not fail.

  12. The AMSAT-OSCAR-40 High Elliptical Orbit Radiation Environment Monitoring Payload - First Flight Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeting, Martin, , Sir

    Over the last decade, Surrey's micro-satellites have provided continuous monitoring of the proton and heavy-ion environment encountered in low-Earth orbit (LEO), through the use of a series of silicon PIN-diode-based particle detectors, starting with the UK Defence Evaluation Research Agency's (DERA's) Cosmic-Radiation Environment and Dosimetry (CREDO) payload, flown on-board UoSAT-3 in 1990, followed in 1992 by the Cosmic-Ray Experiment (CRE), developed at the Surrey Space Centre under a micro-satellite Technology Transfer (TT) programme operated between Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. (SSTL) and the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), and flown on the resulting KITSAT-1 micro-satellite. The CRE was flown again in 1993 on-board the PoSAT- 1 micro-satellite, developed under a similar TT programme operated between SSTL and Portugal. The results from all of these instruments have given a great deal of information on the nature of the low-Earth orbit (LEO) ionising radiation environment, and in the case of the PoSAT-1 CRE, continue to do so. However, to obtain a more complete "picture" of the magnetosphere, it is necessary to orbit instruments much further out in space An opportunity to do this arose in 1994 when amateur radio satellite groups (AMSAT) proposed launching a small (600 kg) communications satellite into highly elliptical orbit. This satellite, called AMSAT-OSCAR-40 (AO-40), was launched by Ariane 5 rocket on 16th November 2000, initially into a geostationary transfer orbit (GTO). The satellite has subsequently been manoeuvred into a highly elliptical, 1070 km x 58,700 km, 6.8o inclination orbit, and thus it affords the opportunity to observe the proton and heavy-ion environment through a large cross-section of Earth's magnetosphere. AO-40 carries a version of the CRE, which has been slightly modified in terms of interfaces and packaging to fit that particular satellite bus. However the particle detecting element is essentially

  13. Vibroacoustic: The challenges of a mission impossible?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestieri, Aldo; Carcaterra, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Why it is difficult to solve a vibroacoustic problem; what are the hidden pitfalls that one is called to overcome; are there methods or techniques suggested in other fields of physics that can help to formulate an efficient vibroacoustic prediction model? The authors provide personal answers to these questions and suggest also a classification of the numerous prediction methods proposed in the literature.

  14. Numerical Estimation of Sound Transmission Loss in Launch Vehicle Payload Fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandana, Pawan Kumar; Tiwari, Shashi Bhushan; Vukkadala, Kishore Nath

    2017-08-01

    Coupled acoustic-structural analysis of a typical launch vehicle composite payload faring is carried out, and results are validated with experimental data. Depending on the frequency range of interest, prediction of vibro-acoustic behavior of a structure is usually done using the finite element method, boundary element method or through statistical energy analysis. The present study focuses on low frequency dynamic behavior of a composite payload fairing structure using both coupled and uncoupled vibro-acoustic finite element models up to 710 Hz. A vibro-acoustic model, characterizing the interaction between the fairing structure, air cavity, and satellite, is developed. The external sound pressure levels specified for the payload fairing's acoustic test are considered as external loads for the analysis. Analysis methodology is validated by comparing the interior noise levels with those obtained from full scale Acoustic tests conducted in a reverberation chamber. The present approach has application in the design and optimization of acoustic control mechanisms at lower frequencies.

  15. Application of the Bootstrap Statistical Method in Deriving Vibroacoustic Specifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; Paez, Thomas L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the Bootstrap Method for specification of vibroacoustic test specifications. Vibroacoustic test specifications are necessary to properly accept or qualify a spacecraft and its components for the expected acoustic, random vibration and shock environments seen on an expendable launch vehicle. Traditionally, NASA and the U.S. Air Force have employed methods of Normal Tolerance Limits to derive these test levels based upon the amount of data available, and the probability and confidence levels desired. The Normal Tolerance Limit method contains inherent assumptions about the distribution of the data. The Bootstrap is a distribution-free statistical subsampling method which uses the measured data themselves to establish estimates of statistical measures of random sources. This is achieved through the computation of large numbers of Bootstrap replicates of a data measure of interest and the use of these replicates to derive test levels consistent with the probability and confidence desired. The comparison of the results of these two methods is illustrated via an example utilizing actual spacecraft vibroacoustic data.

  16. Fetal tachyarrhythmia associated with vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laventhal, Naomi T; Dildy, Gary A; Belfort, Michael A

    2003-05-01

    Vibroacoustic stimulation is commonly used in antepartum fetal testing and has known benefits. Although the procedure has been deemed safe, questions have been raised as to potentially adverse effects, and the adult cardiology literature identifies a link between abrupt sound stimulation and severe tachyarrhythmias. A fetus with premature atrial contractions converted to supraventricular tachycardia immediately after vibroacoustic stimulation. The tachyarrhythmia spontaneously reverted to baseline after 4 minutes. The infant was treated for junctional reentry tachycardia at birth. Although the cardiac effects of vibroacoustic stimulation have previously been characterized as benign, the use of this modality may warrant restriction in the setting of known fetal arrhythmias.

  17. Habitats for life in the Venusian Environment? Can the VENUS EXPRESS payload answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, C.

    2003-04-01

    The Venusian conditions are unique in the solar system. Venus abounds in molecules which could feed a life form except that the usual missing factor, energy, is present in excessive amounts from both active geothermic phenomena and from the nearby solar radiation trapped in a dense carbon dioxide atmosphere. Its surface conditions are hotter than the best practiced in hospital sterilisation; volcanism injects highly toxic gases which in the absence of water can accumulate in the atmosphere. Its upper atmosphere lays bare to solar radiation with only carbon dioxide to act as a confirmed EUV filter, so any consideration of life might seem excessive compared to what was known from life on earth before extremophile bacterias were discovered in dark undersea high temperature sulphur rich volcanic vents. However, some regions of the atmosphere might show conditions similar to the earth surface and could be a habitat of earth like microbial life. A synergy between the different atmospheric instruments of the VENUS-Express payload: SPICAM, VIRTIS and PFS can provide the way to probe the actual environmental conditions of this region and to check its capabilities of preserving an extant life or providing nutrients to a new one.

  18. Technical note: simple vibroacoustic foetal stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stojanović, D; Frković, A; Filiplić-Stojanović, H; Kirincić, N

    2001-01-01

    To build and test a simple vibroacoustic foetal stimulator. A vibroacoustic foetal stimulator was constructed and subjected to bench testing. Clinical trial was carried out in comparison to an electro laynx. Screening specificity of 98% and 100% sensitivity was achieved, with no decrease in specificity due to user's maladjustments. The device was characterized by simple use, maintenance and disinfection. The device is a good screening instrument for foetal health in prenatal care, despite its simplicity and low price.

  19. Vibroacoustic Characterization of Corrugated-Core and Honeycomb-Core Sandwich Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert; Schiller, Noah

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic characteristics of two candidate launch vehicle fairing structures, corrugated- core and honeycomb-core sandwich designs, were studied. The study of these structures has been motivated by recent risk reduction efforts focused on mitigating high noise levels within the payload bays of large launch vehicles during launch. The corrugated-core sandwich concept is of particular interest as a dual purpose structure due to its ability to harbor resonant noise control systems without appreciably adding mass or taking up additional volume. Specifically, modal information, wavelength dispersion, and damping were determined from a series of vibrometer measurements and subsequent analysis procedures carried out on two test panels. Numerical and analytical modeling techniques were also used to assess assumed material properties and to further illuminate underlying structural dynamic aspects. Results from the tests and analyses described herein may serve as a reference for additional vibroacoustic studies involving these or similar structures.

  20. Carrier Plus: A sensor payload for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS/SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Cheryl J.; Moss, Steven; Howard, Regan; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Grycewicz, Tom; Barth, Janet L.; Brewer, Dana

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTR4) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center are collaborating to develop the Carrier Plus sensor experiment platform as a capability of the Space Environments Testbed (SET). The Space Environment Testbed (SET) provides flight opportunities for technology experiments as part of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) program. The Carrier Plus will provide new capability to characterize sensor technologies such as state-of-the-art visible focal plane arrays (FPAs) in a natural space radiation environment. The technical objectives include on-orbit validation of recently developed FPA technologies and performance prediction methodologies, as well as characterization of the FPA radiation response to total ionizing dose damage, displacement damage and transients. It is expected that the sensor experiment will carry 4-6 FPAs and associated radiation correlative environment monitors (CEMs) for a 2006-2007 launch. Sensor technology candidates may include n- and p-charge coupled devices (CCDs), active pixel sensors (APS), and hybrid CMOS arrays. The presentation will describe the Carrier Plus goals and objectives, as well as provide details about the architecture and design. More information on the LWS program can be found at http://lws.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Business announcements for LWS/SET and program briefings are posted at http://lws-set.gsfc.nasa.gov

  1. The O/OREOS mission: first science data from the space environment viability of organics (SEVO) payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioda, Andrew; Cook, Amanda; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Quinn, Richard; Ricco, Antonio J; Squires, David; Bramall, Nathan; Bryson, Kathryn; Chittenden, Julie; Minelli, Giovanni; Agasid, Elwood; Allamandola, Lou; Beasley, Chris; Burton, Roland; Defouw, Greg; Diaz-Aguado, Millan; Fonda, Mark; Friedericks, Charles; Kitts, Chris; Landis, David; McIntyre, Mike; Neumann, Michael; Rasay, Mike; Ricks, Robert; Salama, Farid; Santos, Orlando; Schooley, Aaron; Yost, Bruce; Young, Anthony

    2012-09-01

    We report the first science results from the Space Environment Viability of Organics (SEVO) payload aboard the Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) free-flying nanosatellite, which completed its nominal spaceflight mission in May 2011 but continues to acquire data biweekly. The SEVO payload integrates a compact UV-visible-NIR spectrometer, utilizing the Sun as its light source, with a 24-cell sample carousel that houses four classes of vacuum-deposited organic thin films: polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), amino acid, metalloporphyrin, and quinone. The organic films are enclosed in hermetically sealed sample cells that contain one of four astrobiologically relevant microenvironments. Results are reported in this paper for the first 309 days of the mission, during which the samples were exposed for ∼2210 h to direct solar illumination (∼1080 kJ/cm(2) of solar energy over the 124-2600 nm range). Transmission spectra (200-1000 nm) were recorded for each film, at first daily and subsequently every 15 days, along with a solar spectrum and the dark response of the detector array. Results presented here include eight preflight and 16 in-flight spectra of eight SEVO sample cells. Spectra from the PAH thin film in a water-vapor-containing microenvironment indicate measurable change due to solar irradiation in orbit, while three other nominally water-free microenvironments show no appreciable change. The quinone anthrarufin showed high photostability and no significant spectroscopically measurable change in any of the four microenvironments during the same period. The SEVO experiment provides the first in situ real-time analysis of the photostability of organic compounds and biomarkers in orbit.

  2. The O/OREOS mission: first science data from the Space Environment Survivability of Living Organisms (SESLO) payload.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Wayne L; Ricco, Antonio J; Agasid, Elwood; Beasley, Christopher; Diaz-Aguado, Millan; Ehrenfreund, Pascale; Friedericks, Charles; Ghassemieh, Shakib; Henschke, Michael; Hines, John W; Kitts, Christopher; Luzzi, Ed; Ly, Diana; Mai, Nghia; Mancinelli, Rocco; McIntyre, Michael; Minelli, Giovanni; Neumann, Michael; Parra, Macarena; Piccini, Matthew; Rasay, R Mike; Ricks, Robert; Santos, Orlando; Schooley, Aaron; Squires, David; Timucin, Linda; Yost, Bruce; Young, Anthony

    2011-12-01

    We report the first telemetered spaceflight science results from the orbiting Space Environment Survivability of Living Organisms (SESLO) experiment, executed by one of the two 10 cm cube-format payloads aboard the 5.5 kg Organism/Organic Exposure to Orbital Stresses (O/OREOS) free-flying nanosatellite. The O/OREOS spacecraft was launched successfully to a 72° inclination, 650 km Earth orbit on 19 November 2010. This satellite provides access to the radiation environment of space in relatively weak regions of Earth's protective magnetosphere as it passes close to the north and south magnetic poles; the total dose rate is about 15 times that in the orbit of the International Space Station. The SESLO experiment measures the long-term survival, germination, and growth responses, including metabolic activity, of Bacillus subtilis spores exposed to the microgravity, ionizing radiation, and heavy-ion bombardment of its high-inclination orbit. Six microwells containing wild-type (168) and six more containing radiation-sensitive mutant (WN1087) strains of dried B. subtilis spores were rehydrated with nutrient medium after 14 days in space to allow the spores to germinate and grow. Similarly, the same distribution of organisms in a different set of microwells was rehydrated with nutrient medium after 97 days in space. The nutrient medium included the redox dye Alamar blue, which changes color in response to cellular metabolic activity. Three-color transmitted intensity measurements of all microwells were telemetered to Earth within days of each of the 48 h growth experiments. We report here on the evaluation and interpretation of these spaceflight data in comparison to delayed-synchronous laboratory ground control experiments.

  3. Neurological aspects of vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Mood and behavioral abnormalities are the most common early findings related to vibroacoustic disease (VAD). Other signs and symptoms have been observed in VAD patients. Brain MRI discloses small multifocal lesions in about 50% of subjects with more than 10 yr of occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. However, to date, there have been no studies globally integrating all the neurological, imaging and neurophysiological data of VAD patients. This is the main goal of this study. The 60 male Caucasians diagnosed with VAD were neurologically evaluated in extreme detail in order to systematically identify the most common and significant neurological disturbances in VAD. This population demonstrates cognitive changes (identified through psychological and neurophysiological studies (ERP P300)), vertigo and auditory changes, visual impairment, epilepsy, and cerebrovascular diseases. Neurological examination reveals pathological signs and reflexes, most commonly the palmo-mental reflex. A vascular pattern underlying the multifocal hyperintensities in T2 MR imaging, with predominant involvement of the small arteries of the white matter, is probably the visible organic substratum of the neurological picture. However, other pathophyisological mechanisms are involved in epileptic symptomatology.

  4. Selection of informative parameters of vibroacoustic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshek, L. N.

    1973-01-01

    The problem of selecting informative parameters of vibro-acoustic processes and the construction of apparatus for their determination are discussed. It is assumed that the processes being investigated are structurally uniform and either purely random or contain not very many determinative components.

  5. Vibro-acoustics of lightweight sandwich structures

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Tianjian

    2014-01-01

    Vibro-Acoustics of Lightweight Sandwich Structures introduces the study of the coupled vibration and acoustic behavior of lightweight sandwich structures in response to harmonic force and sound pressure. This book focuses on the theoretical modeling and experimental investigation of lightweight sandwich structures in order to provide a predictive framework for vibro-acoustic characteristics of typical engineering structures. Furthermore, by developing solution tools, it concentrates on the influence of key systematic parameters leading to effective guidance for optimal structure design toward lightweight, high-stiffness and superior sound insulation capability. This book is intended for researchers, scientists, engineers and graduate students in mechanical engineering especially in structural mechanics, mechanics and acoustics. Fengxian Xin and Tianjian Lu both work at the School of Aerospace, Xi’an Jiaotong University.

  6. JAXA Activities on Prediction of Vibroacoustic Prediction for Panel Mounted Equipments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Hiroki; Ando, Shigemasa; Yanagase, Keiichi; Shi, Qinzhong

    2012-07-01

    Spacecraft is exposed to the severe random vibration by acoustic during its launch. In the spacecraft design, random vibration of spacecraft equipments mounted on panel structure during launch environments needs to be predicted. In the present methods, SEA is the method for analyzing the high frequency band, FEA is for the low frequency band. This paper introduces major methods of recent years to predict the vibroacoustic response of spacecraft structure, including SEA, Joint Acceptance and most recent approach using Combination of FEA and SEA methods. The Combination method focuses on the vibroacoustic prediction which keeps advantages to use detail model of structure expressed by FEA and statistical energy approach expressed by SEA of reverberant acoustic excitation. These methods are applied to diffuse sound field excitation of honeycomb panel, and compared with the results in test verification.

  7. Prediction of the Vibroacoustic Response of the Equipment Mounted on the Infrared Space Telescope "SPICA"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akagi, Hiroki; Ando, Shigemasa; Shi, Qinzhong; Yamawaki, Toshiko

    2014-06-01

    The infrared space telescope "SPICA" (Space Infrared Telescope for Cosmology and Astrophysics) is a structurally-complex spacecraft, which requires the less conservative prediction of the random vibration at interface in order to reduce the over-margin issue for designing the strength on critical structure of optical instrument in the early stage of development, and to relieve the risk of overweight designing. This paper proposes Combination of FEA and SEA Methods to predict the vibroacoustic response of the equipment mounted on SPICA, and less conservative specification of the random vibration environments. Furthermore, a method of force-limiting to notch the specification over a certain frequency range during designing and a random vibration test is shown. Force-limiting specification is calculated using a simplified approach by multiplying the article's apparent mass to the equivalent of vibroacoustic response at interface.

  8. Correlation of FEM/BEM Vibroacoustic Prediction to System-Level Acoustic Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, G.; Ngan, I.; Santiago-Prowald, J.

    2014-06-01

    Coupled FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses are employed for deriving spacecraft random vibration environments and supporting the design of low aerial density structures. They offer deterministic predictions which are very accurate at low-frequency and meaningful across all the spectrum of interest for vibroacoustic response.An assessment of the standard procedure of FEM/BEM vibroacoustic analyses was carried out by correlation to measurements from system-level tests of several spacecraft. This allowed a quantification of the typical errors committed, and concluded on the adequacy of applying the standard factor of safety +4dB to the predictions. It was observed that a major source of error is the lack of representativeness of the models of the spacecraft, which adds to the diffuse field idealization made on the acoustic environment inside the fairing and the test chambers. In particular, it was observed a clear impact from a lack of detail of the damping of the structure, and an often crude lumped representation of units and equipment as well as tanks and fixations.

  9. Joint Motion Quality in Chondromalacia Progression Assessed by Vibroacoustic Signal Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bączkowicz, Dawid; Majorczyk, Edyta

    2016-11-01

    Because of the specific biomechanical environment of the patellofemoral joint, chondral disorders, including chondromalacia, often are observed in this articulation. Chondromalacia via pathologic changes in cartilage may lead to qualitative impairment of knee joint motion. To determine the patellofemoral joint motion quality in particular chondromalacia stages and to compare with controls. Retrospective, comparative study. Voivodship hospitals, university biomechanical laboratory. A total of 89 knees with chondromalacia (25 with stage I; 30 with stage II and 34 with stage III) from 50 patients and 64 control healthy knees (from 32 individuals). Vibroacoustic signal pattern analysis of joint motion quality. For all knees vibroacoustic signals were recorded. Each obtained signal was described by variation of mean square, mean range (R4), and power spectral density for frequency of 50-250 Hz (P1) and 250-450 Hz (P2) parameters. Differences between healthy controls and all chondromalacic knees as well as chondromalacia patellae groups were observed as an increase of analyzed parameters (P vibroacoustic signals, and there seems to be a relationship between the level of signal amplitude as well as frequency and cartilage destruction from the superficial layer to the subchondral bone. IV. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Vibroacoustic stimulation in normal term human pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Elia, A; Pighetti, M; Vanacore, F; Fabbrocini, G; Arpaia, L

    2005-05-01

    To examine the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) on fetal heart rate (FHR) in term human fetuses by computerized carditocography system. FHR was analyzed 20 min before and 30 min after vibroacoustic stimulation using the Oxford Sonicaid System 8002 for computerized FHR measurement. Recordings were made in 31 uncomplicated pregnancies at 36-42 weeks' gestation. Vibroacustic stimulation of the fetus evoked a significant increase in all the parameters evaluated (number of fetal movements, of accelerations above 10 and 15 bpm, in high- and low-variability episodes, and in short-term variations). Concerning the effect of behavioural states on the response to VAS, some changes (FHR, high-variability episodes) occurred independently of behavioural states, while other parameters (accelerations >10 and 15 bpm: short-term variation) underwent statistically significant changes only for behavioural states 1F and 2F. Our study supports the hypothesis of a significant fetal response in normal term pregnancy, as clearly shown by computerized cardiotocography. The immediate response occurred independently of behavioural states, although some differences were present (mainly for F1 and F2 states) if the evaluation was extended in time.

  11. Vibro-acoustic Imaging at the Breazeale Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, James Arthur [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lee, James Edwin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The INL is developing Vibro-acoustic imaging technology to characterize microstructure in fuels and materials in spent fuel pools and within reactor vessels. A vibro-acoustic development laboratory has been established at the INL. The progress in developing the vibro-acoustic technology at the INL is the focus of this report. A successful technology demonstration was performed in a working TRIGA research reactor. Vibro-acoustic imaging was performed in the reactor pool of the Breazeale reactor in late September of 2015. A confocal transducer driven at a nominal 3 MHz was used to collect the 60 kHz differential beat frequency induced in a spent TRIGA fuel rod and empty gamma tube located in the main reactor water pool. Data was collected and analyzed with the INLDAS data acquisition software using a short time Fourier transform.

  12. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation for facilitation of tests of fetal wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Kelvin H; Smyth, Rebecca M D; Wei, Xing

    2013-12-07

    Acoustic stimulation of the fetus has been suggested to improve the efficiency of antepartum fetal heart rate testing. To assess the advantages and disadvantages of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (30 September 2013). All published and unpublished randomised controlled trials assessing the merits of the use of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in conjunction with tests of fetal wellbeing. All review authors independently extracted data and assessed trial quality. Authors of published and unpublished trials were contacted for further information. Altogether 12 trials with a total of 6822 participants were included. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation reduced the incidence of non-reactive antenatal cardiotocography test (nine trials; average risk ratio (RR) 0.62, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.48 to 0.81). Vibroacoustic stimulation compared with mock stimulation evoked significantly more fetal movements when used in conjunction with fetal heart rate testing (one trial, RR 0.23, 95% CI 0.18 to 0.29). Vibroacoustic stimulation offers benefits by decreasing the incidence of non-reactive cardiotocography and reducing the testing time. Further randomised trials should be encouraged to determine not only the optimum intensity, frequency, duration and position of the vibroacoustic stimulation, but also to evaluate the efficacy, predictive reliability, safety and perinatal outcome of these stimuli with cardiotocography and other tests of fetal wellbeing.

  13. Amine Swingbed Payload Project Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsch, Mary; Curley, Su

    2013-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) has been designed as a laboratory for demonstrating technologies in a microgravity environment, benefitting exploration programs by reducing the overall risk of implementing such technologies in new spacecraft. At the beginning of fiscal year 2010, the ISS program manager requested that the amine-based, pressure-swing carbon dioxide and humidity absorption technology (designed by Hamilton Sundstrand, baselined for the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle, and tested at the Johnson Space Center in relevant environments, including with humans, since 2005) be developed into a payload for ISS Utilization. In addition to evaluating the amine technology in a flight environment before the first launch of the Orion vehicle, the ISS program wanted to determine the capability of the amine technology to remove carbon dioxide from the ISS cabin environment at the metabolic rate of the full 6 ]person crew. Because the amine technology vents the absorbed carbon dioxide and water vapor to space vacuum (open loop), additional hardware needed to be developed to minimize the amount of air and water resources lost overboard. Additionally, the payload system would be launched on two separate Space Shuttle flights, with the heart of the payload-the swingbed unit itself-launching a full year before the remainder of the payload. This paper discusses the project management and challenges of developing the amine swingbed payload in order to accomplish the technology objectives of both the open -loop Orion application as well as the closed-loop ISS application.

  14. ISS Payload Human Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  15. ATV Light MDPS Vibroacoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Destefanis, S.; Busa, F.; Ullio, R.

    2012-07-01

    Back in late 2010, the ATV (Automated Transfer Vehicle) program opted for the adoption of lighter MDPS (Meteoroid and Debris Protection Shield) panels, to be installed on future ATV units, starting from A TV#3. The rationale behind such decision was to save as much mass as possible, while keeping the MDPS design compliant to its requirements. One of the most critical issues was demonstrating that the installation of thinner MDPS panels (0.0012m thickness instead of 0.0016m) did not induce significant impacts on the currently defined ATV environments. If that had been the case, in fact, the proposed modification to the MDPS panels design might have been rejected, or anyway a costly and long analysis process at system level might have been necessary, to verify all ATV internal equipment environmental compatibility. Such detailed analysis cycle was not compatible with the program tight schedule.

  16. Aero and vibroacoustics of automotive turbochargers

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen-Schäfer, Hung

    2013-01-01

    Aero and Vibroacoustics of Automotive Turbochargers is a topic involving aspects from the working fields of thermodynamics of turbomachinery, aerodynamics, rotordynamics, and noise propagation computation.   In this broadly interdisciplinary subject, thermodynamics of turbomachinery is used to design the turbocharger and to determine its operating conditions.  Aerodynamics is needed to study the compressor flow dynamics and flow instabilities of rotating stall and surge, which can produce growling and whining-type noises. Rotordynamics is necessary to study rotor unbalance and self-excited oil-whirl instabilities, which lead to whistling and constant tone-type noises in rotating floating oil-film type bearings. For the special case of turbochargers using ball bearings, some high-order harmonic and wear noises also manifest in the rotor operating range. Lastly, noise propagation computation, based on Lighthill’s analogy, is required to investigate airborne noises produced by turbochargers in passenger vehi...

  17. Fetal heart rate after vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoh, Jeong Kyu; Park, Young-Sun; Cha, Kyung-Joon; Park, Moon-Il

    2009-07-01

    To define reference ranges for fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters after vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) according to gestational age by determining the relationship between FHR and gestational age using a computerized analysis system. Data were analyzed from 3453 women using 10-minute observational recordings during nonstress testing (NST) and VAS testing. FHR parameters were analyzed according to gestational age. All FHR parameters were related to gestational age except for mean baseline FHR, which did not vary significantly with gestational age. All other parameters followed trends similar to the NST results, except for decelerations. FHR parameters after VAS differed significantly according to gestational age. The results suggest that the gestational age of the fetus should be considered when interpreting FHR patterns after VAS.

  18. Low-cost fiber Bragg grating vibroacoustic sensor for voice and heartbeat detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Olivero, Massimo; Perrone, Guido

    2008-10-01

    A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) vibroacoustic sensor exploiting an intensity-based interrogation principle is presented. The optical system is complemented by signal processing techniques that allow disturbances to be mitigated and improve the spectral estimation. The sensor is capable of performing frequency analysis of sounds up to 3 kHz, with top sensitivity in the 100-500 Hz frequency range, and of dynamically tracking pulsed phenomena that induce a strain to the FBG. The sensor has been applied to the detection of voice, showing a great intelligibility of the speech despite the low-quality environment, and to the monitoring of the heartbeat rate from the wrist.

  19. Feasibility of using vibroacoustic monitoring for assessment of technical condition of hoist drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spalek, J.; Fober, S. (Politechnika Slaska, Gliwice (Poland). Instytut Mechanizacji Gornictwa)

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes use of vibroacoustic testing of gears for hoists used in underground coal mining. Accuracy of vibroacoustic testing is evaluated on the example of 4 hoists used in the Katowice black coal mine (in a main hoisting shaft, in an auxiliary shaft and in 2 blind shafts). Types of electric motors, their rated power and types of gears are compared. Effects of wear on vibroacoustic emission are analyzed. Design and use of a system for measuring vibroacoustic emission of gears are described. Measurement results are evaluated. Effects of damping mechanical vibrations and acoustic emission by individual elements of the mechanical transmissions on reliability and accuracy of vibroacoustic testing are analyzed. 10 refs.

  20. CONCEPTION OF USE VIBROACOUSTIC SIGNALS AND NEURAL NETWORKS FOR DIAGNOSING OF CHOSEN ELEMENTS OF INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINES IN CAR VEHICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr CZECH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Currently used diagnostics systems are not always efficient and do not give straightforward results which allow for the assessment of the technological condition of the engine or for the identification of the possible damages in their early stages of development. Growing requirements concerning durability, reliability, reduction of costs to minimum and decrease of negative influence on the natural environment are the reasons why there is a need to acquire information about the technological condition of each of the elements of a vehicle during its exploitation. One of the possibilities to achieve information about technological condition of a vehicle are vibroacoustic phenomena. Symptoms of defects, achieved as a result of advanced methods of vibroacoustic signals processing can serve as models which can be used during construction of intelligent diagnostic system based on artificial neural networks. The work presents conception of use artificial neural networks in the task of combustion engines diagnosis.

  1. Energy Harvesting with Piezoelectric Element Using Vibroacoustic Coupling Phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Moriyama

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the vibroacoustic coupling between the structural vibrations and internal sound fields of thin structures. In this study, a cylindrical structure with thin end plates is subjected to the harmonic point force at one end plate or both end plates, and a natural frequency of the end plates is selected as the forcing frequency. The resulting vibroacoustic coupling is then analyzed theoretically and experimentally by considering the dynamic behavior of the plates and the acoustic characteristics of the internal sound field as a function of the cylinder length. The length and phase difference between the plate vibrations, which maximize the sound pressure level inside the cavity, are clarified theoretically. The theoretical results are validated experimentally through an excitation experiment using an experimental apparatus that emulates the analytical model. Moreover, the electricity generation experiment verifies that sufficient vibroacoustic coupling can be created for the adopted electricity generating system to be effective as an electric energy-harvesting device.

  2. The effects of maternal depression on fetal heart rate response to vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allister, L; Lester, B M; Carr, S; Liu, J

    2001-01-01

    To better understand the effects of untreated maternal depression on the fetus, this study examined fetal heart rate (FHR) and FHR reactivity to vibroacoustic stimulation in pregnant women with untreated depression. The 20 participants were 32- to 36-week pregnant women divided into groups with depression (N = 10) and without depression (N = 10) based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI; Beck, 1977; Beck & Steer, 1987). Participants were attached to a fetal heart monitor, and 10 min of baseline FHR were recorded. A vibroacoustic stimulus (VAS) was presented, and an additional 10 min of FHR were recorded. Fetuses of mothers with depression had an elevated baseline FHR and a 3.5-fold delay in return to baseline FHR after VAS presentation. Additionally, mothers with depression had significantly higher anxiety levels and took fewer prenatal vitamins during pregnancy. Delayed habituation of FHR in the fetuses of mothers with depression may be due to alterations in the internal hormonal environment and could have implications for postnatal information processing.

  3. Space Shuttle payload handling on the launch pad

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rado, A.

    1979-01-01

    A payload change-out room developed to provide a controlled environment and the structural platform for a payload ground handling mechanism (PGHM), which performs the actual installation or removal of the payload is described. Design efforts to develop a PGHM compatible with the free-standing launch vehicle and the payload change-out room housing are discussed. Requirements of the PGHM considered include compensation for structural deflections resulting from wind forces and the transfer of the payload weight and protection for the payload, the orbiter, and the PGHM itself against damaging impacts that could occur during such deflections.

  4. Vibroacoustic Model Validation for a Curved Honeycomb Composite Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buehrle, Ralph D.; Robinson, Jay H.; Grosveld, Ferdinand W.

    2001-01-01

    Finite element and boundary element models are developed to investigate the vibroacoustic response of a curved honeycomb composite sidewall panel. Results from vibroacoustic tests conducted in the NASA Langley Structural Acoustic Loads and Transmission facility are used to validate the numerical predictions. The sidewall panel is constructed from a flexible honeycomb core sandwiched between carbon fiber reinforced composite laminate face sheets. This type of construction is being used in the development of an all-composite aircraft fuselage. In contrast to conventional rib-stiffened aircraft fuselage structures, the composite panel has nominally uniform thickness resulting in a uniform distribution of mass and stiffness. Due to differences in the mass and stiffness distribution, the noise transmission mechanisms for the composite panel are expected to be substantially different from those of a conventional rib-stiffened structure. The development of accurate vibroacoustic models will aide in the understanding of the dominant noise transmission mechanisms and enable optimization studies to be performed that will determine the most beneficial noise control treatments. Finite element and boundary element models of the sidewall panel are described. Vibroacoustic response predictions are presented for forced vibration input and the results are compared with experimental data.

  5. Maturation of Human Fetal Responses to Vibroacoustic Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisilevsky, Barbara S.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Fetuses received vibroacoustic stimulation while movement and heart rate were monitored. From 29 weeks, at least 83 percent of fetuses responded to stimulation with heart rate acceleration. Between 26 and 36 weeks, the percentage of fetuses responding to stimulation with movement increased from 58 to 100 percent. (BC)

  6. Vibro-acoustics of porous materials - waveguide modeling approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav; Sorokin, Sergey V.

    2016-01-01

    The porous material is considered as a compound multi-layered waveguide (i.e. a fluid layer surrounded with elastic layers) with traction free boundary conditions. The attenuation of the vibro-acoustic waves in such a material is assessed. This approach is compared with a conventional Biot's model...

  7. Velocity measurement by vibro-acoustic Doppler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Alireza; Urban, Matthew W; Kinnick, Randall R; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2012-04-01

    We describe the theoretical principles of a new Doppler method, which uses the acoustic response of a moving object to a highly localized dynamic radiation force of the ultrasound field to calculate the velocity of the moving object according to Doppler frequency shift. This method, named vibro-acoustic Doppler (VAD), employs two ultrasound beams separated by a slight frequency difference, Δf, transmitting in an X-focal configuration. Both ultrasound beams experience a frequency shift because of the moving objects and their interaction at the joint focal zone produces an acoustic frequency shift occurring around the low-frequency (Δf) acoustic emission signal. The acoustic emission field resulting from the vibration of the moving object is detected and used to calculate its velocity. We report the formula that describes the relation between Doppler frequency shift of the emitted acoustic field and the velocity of the moving object. To verify the theory, we used a string phantom. We also tested our method by measuring fluid velocity in a tube. The results show that the error calculated for both string and fluid velocities is less than 9.1%. Our theory shows that in the worst case, the error is 0.54% for a 25° angle variation for the VAD method compared with an error of -82.6% for a 25° angle variation for a conventional continuous wave Doppler method. An advantage of this method is that, unlike conventional Doppler, it is not sensitive to angles between the ultrasound beams and direction of motion.

  8. DREAMS: a payload on-board the ExoMars EDM Schiaparelli for the characterization of Martian environment during the statistical dust storm season

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molfese, Cesare; Esposito, Francesca; Debei, Stefano; Bettanini, Carlo; Arruego Rodríguez, Ignacio; Colombatti, Giacomo; Harri, Ari-Matty.; Montmessin, Franck; Wilson, Colin; Aboudan, Alessio; Mugnuolo, Raffaele; Pirrotta, Simone; Marchetti, Ernesto; Witasse, Olivier

    2015-04-01

    F. Esposito1, S. Debei2, C. Bettanini2, C. Molfese1, I. Arruego Rodríguez3, G. Colombatti2, A-M. Harri4, F. Montmessin5, C. Wilson6, A. Aboudan2, S. Abbaki5, V. Apestigue3, G. Bellucci7, J-J. Berthelier5, J. R. Brucato8, S. B. Calcutt6, F. Cortecchia1, F. Cucciarrè2, G. Di Achille1, F. Ferri2, F. Forget9, E. Friso2, M. Genzer4, P. Gilbert5, H. Haukka4, J. J. Jiménez3, S. Jiménez10, J-L. Josset11, O. Karatekin12, G. Landis13, R. Lorenz14, J. Martinez3, L. Marty1, V. Mennella1, D. Möhlmann15, D. Moirin5, R. Molinaro1, E. Palomba7, M. Patel16, J-P. Pommereau5, C.I. Popa1, S. Rafkin17, P. Rannou18, N.O. Renno19, P. Schipani1, W. Schmidt4, E. Segato2, S. Silvestro1, F. Simoes20, A. Spiga9, F. Valero21, L. Vázquez21, F. Vivat5, O. Witasse22, R. Mugnuolo23, S. Pirrotta23, E.Marchetti23 1INAF - Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Napoli, Italy, 2CISAS - Università degli Studi di Padova, Padova, Italy, 3INTA, Spain, 4Finnish Meteorological Institute (FMI),Helsinki, Finland, 5LATMOS - CNRS/UVSQ/IPSL, France, 6Oxford University, Oxford, United Kingdom, 7INAF - Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), 8INAF-Osservatorio Astrofisico di Arcetri, 9CNRS, LMD, France, 10Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Spain, 11Space Exploration Institute, Switzerland, 12Royal Observatory of Belgium,Belgium, 13NASA, GRC, USA, 14JHU Applied Physics Lab (JHU-APL), USA, 15DLR PF Leitungsbereich, Berlin, Germany, 16Open University, UK, 17SwRL, Switzerland, 18GSMA, France, 19University of Michigan, USA, 20NASA, GSFC, USA, 21Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Spain, 22ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk, The Netherlands, 23Italian Space Agency, Italy DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk assessment and Environment Analyzer on the Martian Surface) package is an integrated multi-sensor scientific payload dedicated to characterizing the landing site environment in dusty conditions. It will measure pressure, wind speed and direction, relative humidity, temperature, the solar irradiance

  9. Abnormal respiratory drive in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, João Reis; Albuquerque e Sousa, José; Foreld, Peter; Antunes, Marco; Cardoso, Sofia; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2006-01-01

    Central nervous system disorders in workers exposed to low frequency noise (LFN, vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is defined as the systemic pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. The respiratory tract continues to be under heavy scrutiny in both LFN-exposed humans and animal models and has been confirmed as a major target for LFN-induced damage. Given that both the respiratory and central nervous systems were compromised in these workers, it became pertinent to investigate the status of the neurological control of breathing in VAD patients. The P- 0.1 value, a measure of the suction pressure developed at the mouth 0.1 seconds after the start of inspiration, depends on the respiratory centres and the autonomic nervous system pathway of the neural control of respiratory function. By rebreathing CO2, (6% in air) normal individuals present an average seven-fold increase in P0.1 (CO2) as compared to basal P- 0.1. Twenty-two male VAD patients (ave. age 50.5 +/- 8.5 years, range: 36-66 years) underwent the P0.1(CO2) index respiratory drive tests, as well as standard pulmonary function tests. Seven individuals (ave. age 42.4 +/-14 years, range: 25- 61 years) with reduced LFN exposure served as controls. Pulmonary function tests were normal in both VAD patients and controls. The P0.1 (CO2) in- dex was below average value in VAD patients (average: 22.9%) while it presented normal values in the control group (average > 60%). In the involuntary response to increased PCO2 levels, central chemoreceptors are responsible for 70% of the ventilatory stimulus. In VAD patients, this dysfunction may originate in the brainstem. This is corroborated by the fact that VAD patients register abnormal values for auditory brainstem evoked potentials, and disclose lesions with magnetic resonance imaging. The neurological control of breathing is compromised in VAD patients. The P0.1 (CO2) index may be a useful clinical indicator for VAD diagnosis and follow-up.

  10. Respiratory squamous cell carcinomas in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Ferreira, José; Mendes, Carla P; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2006-01-01

    In 1987, the autopsy of a vibroacoustic disease (VAD) patient disclosed two tumours: a renal cell carcinoma and a malignant glioma in the brain. Since 1987, malignancy in VAD patients has been under close surveillance. To date, in a universe of 945 individuals, there are 46 cases of malignancies, of which 11 are multiple. Of the 11 cases of respiratory tract tumours, all were squamous cell carcinomas (SqCC). This report focuses on the morphological features of these tumours. Tumour fragments were collected (endoscopic biopsy or surgery) from 11 male VAD patients (ave. age: 58+/-9 years, 3 non-smokers): 2 in glottis and 9 in the lung. In the 3 non-smokers, 2 had lung tumours and 1 had a glottis tumour. All were employed as or retired aircraft technicians, military or commercial pilots. Fragments were fixed either for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry studies used chromagranine and synaptophysine staining. All lung tumours were located in the upper right lobe bronchi and were histologically poorly differentiated SqCC (Figs. 1, 2). The search with neuroendocrine markers was negative. The average age of tumour onset in helicopter pilots was below 50 years old while for the other professional groups it was above 50. Nine patients are deceased. The 2 surviving patients are heavy smokers (> 2 packs/day). Smoking habits had no influence on tumour outcome and progression. Epidemiological studies indicate that squamous cell carcinomas account for approximately 40% of all lung tumours in men. It seems to be highly relevant that all VAD patient respiratory tract tumours are squamous cell carcinomas. It is not surprising that helicopter pilots are the ones who are affected the earliest because previous studies have shown that helicopter pilots exhibited the highest values for the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges. Generally, epidemiological tumor studies do not take histological tumor type into account, but given the results herein, it would seem of the

  11. Vibroacoustic testing of gear transmissions for hoist drives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antoniak, J.; Spalek, J. (Politechnika Slaska, Gliwice (Poland). Instytut Mechanizacji Gornictwa)

    1990-01-01

    The drive system of a hoist used in the Knurow black coal mine in Poland was investigated using vibroacoustic testing. The system consisted of 2 electric motors each with a power of 1,300 kW (600 r.p.m.) and the GCD-17 gear transmission. Vibrations and acoustic emission generated by individual elements of the mechanical transmission (roller bearings, gear wheels etc.) are evaluated. Design and operation of a measuring system, site selection of measuring points, frequency range of vibrations generated by the bearings or gears are analyzed. Examples of vibration spectra are evaluated. Recommendations for use of vibroacoustic testing in diagnostics of heavy-duty mining equipment are made. 3 refs.

  12. Comparison of the vibroacoustical characteristics of different pianos

    CERN Document Server

    Boutillon, Xavier; Paulello, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    On the basis of a recently proposed vibro-acoustical model of the piano soundboard (X. Boutillon and K. Ege, Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: reduced models, mobility synthesis, and acoustical radiation regime. \\emph{submitted to the Journal of Sound and Vibration}, 2011.), we present several models for the coupling between the bridge and the ribbed plate of the soundboard. The models predict the modal density and the characteristic impedance at the bridge as a function of the frequency. Without parameter adjustment, the sub-structure model turns out to fit the experimental data with an excellent precision. The influence of the elastic parameters of wood is discussed. The model predictions are compared for pianos of different sizes and types.

  13. Vibroacoustic Analysis of Large Heat Rejection Radiators for Future Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larko, Jeffrey M.; McNelis, Mark E.; Hughes, William O.

    2006-01-01

    Spacecraft structures such as antennas, solar arrays and radiator panels significantly respond to high acoustic levels seen at lift-off. Some future spacecraft may utilize nuclear electric propulsion that require large radiator panels to reject waste heat. A vibroacoustic assessment was performed for two different radiator panel designs. Results from the analysis of the two designs using different analytical approaches are presented and discussed.

  14. Astrophysical payloads for picosatellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudec, R.

    2017-07-01

    The recent progress in cubesatellite technology allows to consider scientific applications of these minsatellites including astrophysical research. Miniature X-ray and UV-payloads may serve as an example.

  15. Vibro-acoustic modulation–based damage identification in a composite skin–stiffener structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.; Rogge, M.D.; Loendersloot, Richard; Warnet, Laurent; Akkerman, Remko; Tinga, Tiedo

    2016-01-01

    Vibro-acoustic modulation–based damage identification relies on the modulation of a high-frequency carrier signal by an intenser low-frequency vibration signal due to damage-induced structural nonlinearities. A time domain analysis of the vibro-acoustic modulation phenomena was presented at multiple

  16. Experimental studies of the vibroacoustic characteristics of a large-scale energy pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaev, G.P.; Kail, I.I.; Kinski, D.; Koban, I.; Zhileiko, P.G.

    1986-06-01

    The results are given from experimental studies of the vibroacoustic characteristics of a large-scale energy (velocity) pump for the purpose of diagnosing its state under various service operating conditions. Recommendations are given for measuring the statistical characteristics of vibroacoustic pump noise.

  17. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  18. An Approximate Analytical Method of the Nonlinear Vibroacoustic Coupling System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qizheng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An approximate analytical method of the nonlinear vibroacoustic coupling system is proposed for the first time. Taking the Duffing oscillator-plate-medium system as an example, the nonlinear vibroacoustic coupling equations are developed using variational principle. The two major difficulties which lie in solving the coupling equations are the uncertain motion of the oscillator and the surface acoustic pressure on the plate, a system for which the fluid-structure coupling cannot be neglected. Based on the incremental harmonic balance (IHB method, the motion of the oscillator is expressed in the form of the Fourier series, and then the modal expression method and the incoherent assumption are employed to discretize the displacement and the surface pressure of the plate. Then the approximate analytical solution is given by the IHB method. The characteristics of acoustic radiation and surface quadratic velocity of the plate, the nonlinear characteristics of oscillator, and the influence of the excitation frequency and the nonlinear stiffness on the results are investigated by the numerical simulation. The results show that the excitation at the frequency close to the natural frequency of the oscillator can produce a significant response of the third-harmonic generation which determines the vibroacoustic characteristics of the plate.

  19. Filtration of sunflower oil in the field of vibroacoustic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bredikhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Purification of crude unrefined sunflower oil along with the removal of primary oxidation products is an urgent task to remove the solid constituents formed during the processing of sunflower seeds. All of them irrespective of the chemical composition negatively affect the quality of the food product and, over time, saturate the oil with coagulants that affect its organoleptic and physico-mechanical characteristics. The problem of cleaning unrefined sunflower oil by filtration with the use of vibroacoustic action is considered. The calculation scheme of the process is given, and an experimental setup has been developed that makes it possible to vary the angle of inclination of the filter element. The research of sunflower oil filtration in the field of vibroacoustic impact is carried out. In the study, a decision was made to expand the energy effects to create a cumulative system in the liquid medium that improves the hydrodynamic situation at the scale of the oil purification plant. It is established that the process speed can be intensified by creating additional microflows that provide an active influence on the motion of liquid, gas and solid particles. The results are obtained, which testify to the effectiveness of the use of vibroacoustic effects during the filtration of sunflower oil.

  20. Universal Payload Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Ralph B.

    2003-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center has a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and control of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to remote experimenters and International Partners physically located in different parts of the world. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground-based electronic document configuration management and collaborative workflow system that was built to service the POIC's information management needs. This paper discusses the application components that comprise the PIMS system, the challenges that influenced its design and architecture, and the selected technologies it employs. This paper will also touch on the advantages of the architecture, details of the user interface, and lessons learned along the way to a successful deployment. With PIMS, a sophisticated software solution has been built that is not only universally accessible for POIC customer s information management needs, but also universally adaptable in implementation and application as a generalized information management system.

  1. Damage imaging in nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczonka, Lukasz; Klepka, Andrzej; Uhl, Tadeusz; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2015-03-01

    The paper deals with the nonlinear vibro-acoustic modulation technique (VAM) used for nondestructive damage detection in composites. In its original form the technique allows only for the determination of the presence of damage in a structure. This paper presents an enhancement of the technique that allows also for the determination of damage location. Experimental testing of the proposed procedure is performed on carbon fiber/epoxy laminated composite plates with barely visible impact damage that was generated in an impact test. Shearography was used to verify damage location. Piezoceramic actuators are used for vibration excitation and a scanning laser vibrometer is used for data acquisition.

  2. Mechanical modelling and application of vibroacoustic isolators in railway tracks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zbiciak Artur

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents systematization and description of vibroacoustic isolators used in railway tracks (due to track structure type, with special attention paid to resilient mats. As in the second part of the paper the state-space mechanical model of a system with Under-Ballast Mat is formulated. Also some numerical problems arising from the mass matrix singularity are discussed. The poles of the system were calculated by using Matlab. Moreover, the influence of various parameters on the system’s insertion loss and its transmissibility was visualized in figures.

  3. The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muri, Paul; Runco, Susan; Fontanot, Carlos; Getteau, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The High Definition Earth Viewing (HDEV) payload enables long-term experimentation of four, commercial-of-the-shelf (COTS) high definition video, cameras mounted on the exterior of the International Space Station. The payload enables testing of cameras in the space environment. The HDEV cameras transmit imagery continuously to an encoder that then sends the video signal via Ethernet through the space station for downlink. The encoder, cameras, and other electronics are enclosed in a box pressurized to approximately one atmosphere, containing dry nitrogen, to provide a level of protection to the electronics from the space environment. The encoded video format supports streaming live video of Earth for viewing online. Camera sensor types include charge-coupled device and complementary metal-oxide semiconductor. Received imagery data is analyzed on the ground to evaluate camera sensor performance. Since payload deployment, minimal degradation to imagery quality has been observed. The HDEV payload continues to operate by live streaming and analyzing imagery. Results from the experiment reduce risk in the selection of cameras that could be considered for future use on the International Space Station and other spacecraft. This paper discusses the payload development, end-to- end architecture, experiment operation, resulting image analysis, and future work.

  4. Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Demonstrations (EPO-Demos) are recorded video education demonstrations performed on the International Space Station (ISS) by crewmembers using hardware already onboard the ISS. EPO-Demos are videotaped, edited, and used to enhance existing NASA education resources and programs for educators and students in grades K-12. EPO-Demos are designed to support the NASA mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

  5. Global sensitivity analysis of analytical vibroacoustic transmission models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Jean-Loup; Ichchou, Mohamed; Troclet, Bernard; Bareille, Olivier; Ouisse, Morvan

    2016-04-01

    Noise reduction issues arise in many engineering problems. One typical vibroacoustic problem is the transmission loss (TL) optimisation and control. The TL depends mainly on the mechanical parameters of the considered media. At early stages of the design, such parameters are not well known. Decision making tools are therefore needed to tackle this issue. In this paper, we consider the use of the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) for the analysis of the impact of mechanical parameters on features of interest. FAST is implemented with several structural configurations. FAST method is used to estimate the relative influence of the model parameters while assuming some uncertainty or variability on their values. The method offers a way to synthesize the results of a multiparametric analysis with large variability. Results are presented for transmission loss of isotropic, orthotropic and sandwich plates excited by a diffuse field on one side. Qualitative trends found to agree with the physical expectation. Design rules can then be set up for vibroacoustic indicators. The case of a sandwich plate is taken as an example of the use of this method inside an optimisation process and for uncertainty quantification.

  6. The Effect of Vibroacoustic Stimulation and Music on Fetal Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoume Pirhadi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fetal movement started at the 7th weeks of pregnancy and by the end of pregnancy will gradually be perfect and harmonious. Near-term fetuses can discriminate acoustic features, such as frequencies and spectra, and process complex auditory streams. In this study, we aimed to evaluate fatal movement in response to music and vibration stimulation. Materials and Methods This study is a clinical trial that was conducted in two groups and two-steps. Participants were pregnant women (primigravida who have referring to the Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Isfahan during 2013 to receive routine prenatal care. The 64 pregnant women (32-36 weeks were randomly assigned to the groups of Vibroacoustic stimulation (n= 32 and Music (n=32. They were stimulated immediately after the first non stress test and before the second test. The researchers’ evaluated and analyzed possible changes in non-stress test results using SPSS software version 20. Results Mean age of the subjects in vibroacoustic group and in music group were (25.5±2.6 (24.9±4.4 respectively. Paired t-test showed there was no relationship between the average number of acceleration of the fetal heart rate before and after the intervention (P>0.05.On the other hand, there was a significant correlation between the average number of fetal movements in the music group before and after the intervention (P

  7. Vibroacoustic stimulation in abnormal biophysical profile: verification of facilitation of fetal well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Vassilis G; Decavalas, George O; Kondakis, Xenophon G; Beratis, Nicholas G

    2007-03-01

    To verify the effect of vibroacoustic stimulation on biophysical profile score, with a prospective randomised study. All women with singleton pregnancy, gestational age >or=30 weeks, intact membranes and biophysical profile score vibroacoustic stimulation does not alter test's statistical parameters. 1349 patients were randomised in group A and 1484 in group B (2833 in total). When comparing group A to B, application of vibroacoustic stimulation significantly decreased the number of positive tests (4.74% vs. 6.67%, pVibroacoustic stimulation improves the efficiency of biophysical profile score by decreasing false positive tests and improving test accuracy and should be considered as a means of a more thorough fetal evaluation when fetal compromise is suspected.

  8. Pointers, Lessons Learned, and Rules of Thumb for Successful Vibro-Acoustic Data Acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossoni, Peter

    1998-01-01

    This presentation contains helpful pointers for successful vibroacoustic data acquisition in the following three areas: Instrumentation, Vibration Control and Pyro-shock data acquisition and analysis. A helpful bibliography is provided.

  9. The Potential for Hosted Payloads at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andraschko, Mark; Antol, Jeffrey; Baize, Rosemary; Horan, Stephen; Neil, Doreen; Rinsland, Pamela; Zaiceva, Rita

    2012-01-01

    technical differences specific to hosted payloads and the GEO environment that must be considered when planning and developing a hosted payload mission. This paper addresses some of payload accommodation differences from the typical NASA LEO mission, including spacecraft interfaces, attitude control and knowledge, communications, data handling, mission operations, ground systems, and the thermal, radiation, and electromagnetic environment. The paper also discusses technical and programmatic differences such as limits to NASA's involvement with commercial quality assurance processes to conform to the commercial schedule and minimizing the price that makes hosted payloads an attractive option.

  10. Cross-over trial of fetal heart rate response to halogen light and vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolnick, Jay M; Garcia, Greg; Fletcher, Beverly G; Rayburn, William F

    2006-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effect of halogen light and vibroacoustic stimulation on fetal heart rate (FHR) responsiveness and on nonstress test (NST) results. Sixty consecutively-chosen patients between 33 and 39 weeks of gestation underwent an NST on at least three weekly occasions. Each received halogen light (Vector Compact Sport Spot, Ft Lauderdale, FL, USA), vibroacoustic (SolaTone Artificial Larynx, Temecula, CA, USA), and no stimulation in a randomized order. The transabdominal light or vibroacoustic stimulation lasted for 10 seconds. If no initial FHR acceleration occurred, then the stimulus was repeated 10 minutes later up to a maximum of three times. The investigators who interpreted the FHR patterns were blinded as to the type of stimulus used. Reactive results were present in 171 tests (vibroacoustic: 98.3%; light: 96.6%; none: 93.3%). Compared with no stimulation, the mean difference in time from the onset of recorded "stimulation" to the first FHR acceleration was shorter (p vibroacoustic stimulation (2.6 minutes, 95% CI 0.8-4.4 minutes). The mean time difference until a reactive result was also shorter (p vibroacoustic stimulation (2.4 minutes, 95% CI 0.1-4.7 minutes) than with no stimulation. The need for repeated stimulation during each test was infrequent (light: 5.0%; vibroacoustic: 3.3%). No adverse effect from external stimulation was noted on the FHR tracing. Halogen light stimulation is an acceptable alternative to vibroacoustic stimulation in provoking a more rapid fetal heart rate response and in shortening the time before a reactive nonstress test result.

  11. A Method of Abnormal States Detection Based on Adaptive Extraction of Transformer Vibro-Acoustic Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Zou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available State monitoring is very important for the safe operation of high-voltage transformers. A non-contact vibro-acoustic detection method based on the Blind Source Separation (BSS was proposed in this paper to promote the development of transformer on-line monitoring technology. Firstly, the algorithm of Sparse Component Analysis (SCA was applied for the adaptive extraction of vibro-acoustic signals, which utilizes the sorted local maximum values of the potential function. Then, the operating states of the transformer were detected by analyzing the vibro-acoustic signal eigenvectors. Different conditions including running normally, increasing of transformer vibro-acoustic amplitude and changing of frequency component of transformer vibro-acoustic were simulated. Moreover, experiments were carried out in a 220 kV substation. The research results show that the number of mixed noise sources can be estimated and the transformer vibro-acoustic signal was always ranked first in the separation signals. The source signals were effectively separated from the mixed signals while all of the correlation coefficients are more than 0.98 and the quadratic residuals are less than −32 dB. As for the experiments, the vibro-acoustic signal was separated out successfully from two voice signals and two interference signals. The acoustic signal reflection is considered as the main cause of the signal interference, and the transformer volume source model is considered as the main reason of unstable vibro-acoustic signal amplitude. Finally, the simulated abnormal states of the transformer were well recognized and the state of the tested transformer was judged to be normal.

  12. Increase in CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes in patients with vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, A P; Aguas, A P; Grande, N R; Monteiro, E; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Some workers employed by the aviation industry are exposed to large pressure amplitude and low frequency (LPALF) noise (> or =90 dB SPL, vibroacoustic disease (VAD), a whole-body noise-induced pathology. Since VAD patients have an increased prevalence of respiratory and skin infections, we investigated whether these individuals had any quantitative changes in the number of peripheral blood cell populations. Also, we investigated whether different types of noise environments are related to cell quantification. Quantification of peripheral blood cell populations was performed in venous blood samples of 34 VAD-diagnosed patients, and 41 controls. Leukocytes, monocytes, granulocytes, and surface phenotypes of CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes were considered. We found that VAD patients showed a statistically significant elevation in the number of circulating CD8+ and CD4+ T lymphocytes when compared with the control population, but not when compared among different noise-environments. Monocyte and granulocyte populations did not register significant differences. VAD patients present enhancement in the number of circulating cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CD8+ and CD4+ T cells) thus indicating that this environmental disease is associated with quantitative changes in immune cells.

  13. Cryogenic performance of the space infrared optical payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dawei; Tan, Fanjiao; Zhang, Wei; Liu, Mingdong; Wang, Haipeng

    2016-10-01

    A model as well as the methodology is proposed to analyze the cryogenic performance of space infrared optical payload. And the model is established from two aspects: imaging quality and background radiation. On the basis of finite element analysis, the deformation of optical surface in cryogenic environment is characterized by Zernike polynomials, and then, the varying pattern of MTF of space cryogenic optical payload could be concluded accordingly. Then from the theory of thermal radiative transfer, the temperature distribution and the deformation of the optical payload under the action of inertial load and thermal load are analyzed based on the finite element method, and the spontaneous radiation and scattering properties of the optical surface and shielding factors between the opto-mechanical structure are considered to establish the radiation calculation model. Furthermore, the cryogenic radiation characteristics of the space infrared optical payload are obtained by the radiation calculation model. Finally, experiments are conducted using an actual off-axis TMA space infrared optical payload. And the results indicate that the background radiation of the space infrared optical payload is decreased by 79% while 33% for MTF at the thermal control temperature of 240K. In this circumstance, the system background radiation is effectively suppressed and the detection sensitivity of the optical payload is improved as well, while the imaging quality is acceptable. The model proposed in this paper can be applied to the analyzing cryogenic properties of space infrared optical payload, and providing theoretical guidance for the design and application of the space cryogenic optical payload.

  14. A comparison of the response of a captive carried store to both reverberant wave acoustic excitation and the field environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cap, J.S.; Togami, T.C.; Hollingshead, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Stores that are carried on high performance military aircraft are exposed to severe vibroacoustic environments from several different sources. Sandia National Laboratories conducted a test program to determine the viability of reproducing these field 10 environments with a combined vibroacoustic test. This paper will present the results of that test series emphasizing the methods used to derive the laboratory inputs that produce the {open_quotes}best{close_quotes} possible match for the field response.

  15. Fetal exposures to sound and vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, K J; Abrams, R M

    2000-12-01

    Sounds in the environment of a pregnant woman penetrate the tissues and fluids surrounding the fetal head and stimulate the inner ear through a bone conduction route. The sounds available to the fetus are dominated by low-frequency energy, whereas energy above 0.5 kHz is attenuated by 40 to 50 dB. The fetus easily detects vowels, whereas consonants, which are higher in frequency and less intense than vowels, are largely unavailable. Rhythmic patterns of music are probably detected, but overtones are missing. A newborn human shows preference for his/her mother's voice and to musical pieces to which he/she was previously exposed, indicating a capacity to learn while in utero. Intense, sustained noises or impulses produce changes in the hearing of the fetus and damage inner and outer hair cells within the cochlea. The damage occurs in the region of the inner ear that is stimulated by low-frequency sound energy.

  16. Nonlinear vibroacoustic wave modulations for structural damage detection: an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieczonka, Lukasz; Klepka, Andrzej; Martowicz, Adam; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.

    2016-01-01

    We present an overview of research developments related to the nonlinear vibroacoustic modulation technique used for structural damage detection. The method of interest is based on nonlinear interactions of a low-frequency pumping wave and a high-frequency probing wave. These two waves are introduced to monitored structures simultaneously. Then the presence of damage is exhibited by additional frequency components that result from nonlinear damage-wave interactions. A vast amount of research has been performed in this area over the last two decades. We aim to present the state-of-the-art of these developments. The major focus is on monitoring approaches, modeling aspects, actuation/sensing, signal processing, and application examples.

  17. A vibroacoustic model of selected human larynx diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Zbigniew Witold; Kłaczyński, Maciej; Wszołek, Wiesław

    2007-01-01

    With the present development of digital registration and methods for processing speech it is possible to make effective objective acoustic diagnostics for medical purposes. These methods are useful as all pathologies and diseases of the human vocal tract influence the quality of a patient's speech signal. Diagnostics of the voice organ can be defined as an unambiguous recognition of the current condition of a specific voice source. Such recognition is based on an evaluation of essential acoustic parameters of the speech signal. This requires creating a vibroacoustic model of selected deformations of Polish speech in relation to specific human larynx diseases. An analysis of speech and parameter mapping in 29-dimensional space is reviewed in this study. Speech parameters were extracted in time, frequency and cepstral (quefrency) domains resulting in diagrams that qualified symptoms and conditions of selected human larynx diseases. The paper presents graphically selected human larynx diseases.

  18. Automatic cough episode detection using a vibroacoustic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynczak, Marcel; Pariaszewska, Katarzyna; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-08-01

    Cough monitoring is an important element of the diagnostics of respiratory diseases. The European Respiratory Society recommends objective assessment of cough episodes and the search for methods of automatic analysis to make obtaining the quantitative parameters possible. The cough "events" could be classified by a microphone and a sensor that measures the vibrations of the chest. Analysis of the recorded signals consists of calculating the features vectors for selected episodes and of performing automatic classification using them. The aim of the study was to assess the accuracy of classification based on an artificial neural networks using vibroacoustic signals collected from chest. Six healthy, young men and eight healthy, young women carried out an imitated cough, hand clapping, speech and shouting. Three methods of parametrization were used to prepare the vectors of episode features - time domain, time-frequency domain and spectral modeling. We obtained the accuracy of 95% using artificial neural networks.

  19. Effect of Stagger on the Vibroacoustic Loads from Clustered Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojo, Raymundo; Tinney, Charles E.; Ruf, Joseph H.

    2016-01-01

    The effect of stagger startup on the vibro-acoustic loads that form during the end- effects-regime of clustered rockets is studied using both full-scale (hot-gas) and laboratory scale (cold gas) data. Both configurations comprise three nozzles with thrust optimized parabolic contours that undergo free shock separated flow and restricted shock separated flow as well as an end-effects regime prior to flowing full. Acoustic pressure waveforms recorded at the base of the nozzle clusters are analyzed using various statistical metrics as well as time-frequency analysis. The findings reveal a significant reduction in end- effects-regime loads when engine ignition is staggered. However, regardless of stagger, both the skewness and kurtosis of the acoustic pressure time derivative elevate to the same levels during the end-effects-regime event thereby demonstrating the intermittence and impulsiveness of the acoustic waveforms that form during engine startup.

  20. Automation of vibroacoustic data bank for random vibration criteria development. [for the space shuttle and launch vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized data bank system was developed for utilization of large amounts of vibration and acoustic data to formulate component random vibration design and test criteria. This system consists of a computer, graphics tablet, and a dry-silver hard copier which are all desk-top type hardware and occupy minimal space. The data bank contains data from the Saturn V and Titan III flight and static test programs. The vibration and acoustic data are stored in the form of power spectral density and one-third octave band plots over the frequency range from 20 to 2000 Hz. The data was stored by digitizing each spectral plot by tracing with the graphics tablet. The digitized data was statistically analyzed and the resulting 97.5% probability levels were stored on tape along with the appropriate structural parameters. Standard extrapolation procedures were programmed for prediction of component random vibration test criteria for new launch vehicle and payload configurations. This automated vibroacoustic data bank system greatly enhances the speed and accuracy of formulating vibration test criteria. In the future, the data bank will be expanded to include all data acquired from the space shuttle flight test program.

  1. Fetal habituation to vibroacoustic stimulation in uncomplicated postterm pregnancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, C F; Boekkooi, P F; Schiphorst, R H; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G

    2001-08-01

    Testing of fetal habituation to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation might give additional information concerning the fetal condition and central nervous system (CNS) functioning in postterm pregnancies. This study is designed to investigate whether healthy postterm fetuses are able to habituate and if so, if the habituation pattern of postterm fetuses differs from that of term fetuses. Twenty women with an uncomplicated pregnancy beyond 41 weeks gestational age (GA) participated, and 37 women with a GA between 37 and 40 weeks served as controls. The vibroacoustic stimulus was repeatedly applied to the maternal abdomen above the fetal legs for a period of 1s every 30s. A fetal trunk movement within 1s of stimulus application was considered a positive response. Lack of response to four consecutive stimuli indicated habituation. The habituation rate is defined as the number of stimuli applied before the fetus stopped responding. Data were compared using Mann-Whitney U test. Of the 18 postterm fetuses in which the presence or absence of habituation could be established, 14 habituated and four persisted in responding. Twenty-six of the 32 term fetuses, in which the presence or absence of habituation could be established, habituated and six persisted in responding. The habituation rate varied widely in postterm (median of eight stimuli, quartile ranges of 6 and 18) as well as in term fetuses (median of 9.5 stimuli, quartile ranges of 6 and 15). There was no difference in median habituation rate between postterm and term fetuses. The ongoing maturation of the CNS in the last weeks of pregnancy appears not to be reflected in the fetal habituation pattern. Furthermore, the interfetal variability in habituation of healthy postterm fetuses is such that testing of habituation appears not to be suitable for the identification of the fetus at risk for an adverse neonatal outcome.

  2. Vibro-acoustic performance of newly designed tram track structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haladin, Ivo; Lakušić, Stjepan; Ahac, Maja

    2017-09-01

    Rail vehicles in interaction with a railway structure induce vibrations that are propagating to surrounding structures and cause noise disturbance in the surrounding areas. Since tram tracks in urban areas often share the running surface with road vehicles one of top priorities is to achieve low maintenance and long lasting structure. Research conducted in scope of this paper gives an overview of newly designed tram track structures designated for use on Zagreb tram network and their performance in terms of noise and vibration mitigation. Research has been conducted on a 150 m long test section consisted of three tram track types: standard tram track structure commonly used on tram lines in Zagreb, optimized tram structure for better noise and vibration mitigation and a slab track with double sleepers embedded in a concrete slab, which presents an entirely new approach of tram track construction in Zagreb. Track has been instrumented with acceleration sensors, strain gauges and revision shafts for inspection. Relative deformations give an insight into track structure dynamic load distribution through the exploitation period. Further the paper describes vibro-acoustic measurements conducted at the test site. To evaluate the track performance from the vibro-acoustical standpoint, detailed analysis of track decay rate has been analysed. Opposed to measurement technique using impact hammer for track decay rate measurements, newly developed measuring technique using vehicle pass by vibrations as a source of excitation has been proposed and analysed. Paper gives overview of the method, it’s benefits compared to standard method of track decay rate measurements and method evaluation based on noise measurements of the vehicle pass by.

  3. Applications of Payload Directed Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ippolito, Corey; Fladeland, Matthew M.; Yeh, Yoo Hsiu

    2009-01-01

    Next generation aviation flight control concepts require autonomous and intelligent control system architectures that close control loops directly around payload sensors in manner more integrated and cohesive that in traditional autopilot designs. Research into payload directed flight control at NASA Ames Research Center is investigating new and novel architectures that can satisfy the requirements for next generation control and automation concepts for aviation. Tighter integration between sensor and machine requires definition of specific sensor-directed control modes to tie the sensor data directly into a vehicle control structures throughout the entire control architecture, from low-level stability- and control loops, to higher level mission planning and scheduling reasoning systems. Payload directed flight systems can thus provide guidance, navigation, and control for vehicle platforms hosting a suite of onboard payload sensors. This paper outlines related research into the field of payload directed flight; and outlines requirements and operating concepts for payload directed flight systems based on identified needs from the scientific literature.'

  4. MESSENGER Spacecraft and Payload Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, R. E.; Solomon, S. C.; McNutt, J. R., Jr.; Leary, J. C.; MESSENGER Team

    The Mercury, Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) mission, launched in May of this year, will be the first spacecraft to orbit the planet Mercury. The >14 kWm-2 solar thermal input and the large velocity change required to reach Mercury orbit make this a very challenging mission from thermal and mass perspectives. MESSENGER overcomes these challenges with innovative applications of existing technologies and materials. The spacecraft uses ordinary space electronics, has minimal moving parts, and has extensive redundancy and cross strapping to enhance its robustness. The major innovations are a ceramic-cloth thermal shade, an integrated lightweight structure, a high-performance propulsion system, and a solar array incorporating optical solar reflectors to prevent overheating. Seven miniaturized instruments, along with the spacecraft telecommunications system, satisfy all scientific objectives of the mission. The payload includes a dual imaging system with wide-angle and narrow-angle cameras; an integrated ultraviolet, visible, and infrared spectrometer that is sensitive enough to detect atmospheric emissions and robust enough to map mineralogical absorption features on the sun-lit surface; gamma-ray, X-ray, and neutron spectrometers for remote geochemical mapping; a vector magnetometer; a laser altimeter to determine the topography of surface features and determine whether Mercury has a fluid core; and an energetic particle and plasma spectrometer to characterize ionized species in the magnetosphere. The payload was fully calibrated before launch, and an additional series of calibration measurements are planned during the 5-year cruise to Mercury. The first of the three Venus flybys and two Mercury flybys during the cruise phase of the mission will occur in November 2004

  5. Payload vehicle aerodynamic reentry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Donald

    An approach for analyzing the dynamic behavior of a cone-cylinder payload vehicle during reentry to insure proper deployment of the parachute system and recovery of the payload is presented. This analysis includes the study of an aerodynamic device that is useful in extending vehicle axial rotation through the maximum dynamic pressure region. Attention is given to vehicle configuration and reentry trajectory, the derivation of pitch static aerodynamics, the derivation of the pitch damping coefficient, pitching moment modeling, aerodynamic roll device modeling, and payload vehicle reentry dynamics. It is shown that the vehicle dynamics at parachute deployment are well within the design limit of the recovery system, thus ensuring successful payload recovery.

  6. Recent results from MAUS payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, G. H.; Staniek, S.

    1987-01-01

    Project MAUS is a part of the German material sciences program and provides autonomous payloads for the Space Shuttle. These payloads are housed in canisters which are identical with those of NASA's Get-Away-Special program. The main components of the hardware are: a standard system consisting of power supply, experiment control, data acquisition and the experiment modules containing experiment specific hardware. Up to now, three MAUS modules with experiments from the area of material sciences have been flown as GAS payloads. Results will be reported from GAS Payload Number G-27 and G-28 flown aboard STS-51G.

  7. 14 CFR 415.57 - Payload review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Payload review. 415.57 Section 415.57... TRANSPORTATION LICENSING LAUNCH LICENSE Payload Review and Determination § 415.57 Payload review. (a) Timing. A payload review may be conducted as part of a license application review or may be requested by a payload...

  8. Principles of vibroacoustic testing of technological equipment of nuclear power plant primary coolant circuit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, A.A.; Adamenkov, K.A.; Krasyuk, V.Y.; Nozdrin, G.N.; Ivanov, Y.S.; Pospelko, K.A.

    1982-04-01

    Main principles are discussed of noise analysis as is its inclusion in the system of inspecting technological equipment of nuclear power plant primary circuits. Vibrations and noise resulting as system response to external perturbations are used as diagnostic signals. The mathematical formulation of the problem is done, the sources of vibrations and noise are determined, and the possibilities are discussed of analyzing the vibroacoustic signal and the changes in frequency characteristics to diagnose equipment failure states. Experiences are outlined with the placement of transducers in the Novovoronezh Nuclear Power Plant, which considerably affects the quality of control. A flow chart is shown for the vibroacoustic testing organization, and main trends are indicated of the study of vibroacoustic testing systems in nuclear power plants.

  9. Vibroacoustic optimization of anti-tetrachiral and auxetic hexagonal sandwich panels with gradient geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjbar, Mostafa; Boldrin, Luca; Scarpa, Fabrizio; Neild, Simon; Patsias, Sophoclis

    2016-05-01

    The work describes the vibroacoustic behavior of anti-tetrachiral and auxetic hexagonal gradient sandwich panels using homogenized finite element models to determine the mechanical properties of the auxetic structures, the natural frequencies and radiated sound power level of sandwich panels made by the auxetic cores. The mechanical properties and the vibroacoustic behavior of auxetic hexagonal sandwich panels are investigated as a benchmark. The radiated sound power level of the structure over the frequency range of 0-1000 Hz is minimized by modifying the core geometry of the gradient auxetic sandwich panels. Several excitation cases are considered. First-order and random optimization methods are used for the minimization of radiated sound power level of the structures. The results of this study present significant insights into the design of auxetic structures with respect to their vibroacoustical properties.

  10. Improvement of vibroacoustic properties of toothed gears through constructional modifications of gear teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej WIECZOREK

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper draws attention to methods of minimizing values of vibroacoustic factors by reducing the sources. In the case of toothed gears such causes include, first of all, deviations in workmanship, excitations generated when teeth move in and out of mesh, as well as mesh stiffness variations. The paper presents results of experimental research on vibroacoustic properties of gear wheels with modified and non-modified high-profile teeth. Basing on these results, it was determined that the best results in counteracting vibrations and noise are obtained by using jointly an increased gear contact ratio and a tooth profile modification.

  11. Using the Saturn V and Titan III Vibroacoustic Databanks for Random Vibration Criteria Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferbee, R C.

    2009-01-01

    This is an update to TN D-7159, "Development and Application of Vibroacoustic Structural Data Banks in Predicting Vibration Design and Test Criteria for Rocket Vehicle Structures", which was originally published in 1973. Errors in the original document have been corrected and additional data from the Titan III program have been included. Methods for using the vibroacoustic databanks for vibration test criteria development are shown, as well as all of the data with drawings and pictures of the measurement locations. An Excel spreadsheet with the data included is available from the author.

  12. VIBROACOUSTIC DIAGNOSING OF DISTURBANCES IN THE CAR IGNITION SYSTEM BY AMPLITUDE ESTIMATES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr CZECH

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available An important issue in vibroacoustic examination of engines is a correct interpretation of complex measured signals by applying property methods of their processing. The main tasks in diagnostics include: separation of a useful vibroacoustic signal and selection of characteristic, damage-sensitive features of the processed signal. The paper presents an attempt of detecting disturbances in the ignition system by measuring vibrations and noise. The object of the tests was a four-cylinder engine of a Volkswagen Polo car with swept capacity 1,0 dm3, adjusted to alternative power supply with the use of LPG gas fuel

  13. Predicting the vibroacoustic response of satellite equipment panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conlon, S C; Hambric, S A

    2003-03-01

    Modern satellites are constructed of large, lightweight equipment panels that are strongly excited by acoustic pressures during launch. During design, performing vibroacoustic analyses to evaluate and ensure the integrity of the complex electronics mounted on the panels is critical. In this study the attached equipment is explicitly addressed and how its properties affect the panel responses is characterized. FEA and BEA methods are used to derive realistic parameters to input to a SEA hybrid model of a panel with multiple attachments. Specifically, conductance/modal density and radiation efficiency for nonhomogeneous panel structures with and without mass loading are computed. The validity of using the spatially averaged conductance of panels with irregular features for deriving the structure modal density is demonstrated. Maidanik's proposed method of modifying the traditional SEA input power is implemented, illustrating the importance of accounting for system internal couplings when calculating the external input power. The predictions using the SEA hybrid model agree with the measured data trends, and are found to be most sensitive to the assumed dynamic mass ratio (attachments/structure) and the attachment internal loss factor. Additional experimental and analytical investigations are recommended to better characterize dynamic masses, modal densities and loss factors.

  14. Voice acoustic patterns of patients diagnosed with vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, Ana; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2006-01-01

    Long-term low frequency noise exposure (LFN) (vibroacoustic disease (VAD), a systemic pathology characterized by the abnormal growth of extra-cellular matrices. The respiratory system is a target for LFN. Fibrosis of the respiratory tract epithelia was observed in VAD patients through biopsy, and confirmed in animal models exposed to LFN. Voice acoustic analysis can detect vocal fold variations of mass, tension, muscular and neural activity. Frequency perturbation (jitter), amplitude perturbation (shimmer) and harmonic-to-noise ratio (HNR) are used in the evaluation of the vocal function, and can be indicators of the presence and degree of severity of vocal pathology. Since the respiratory system is the energy source of the phonation process, this raises questions about the effects of VAD on voice production. The purpose of this study was to determine if voice acoustic parameters of VAD patients are different from normative data. Nine individuals (5 males and 4 females) diagnosed with VAD were recorded performing spoken and sung tasks. The spoken tasks included sustaining vowels and fricatives. The sung tasks consisted of maximum phonational frequency range (MPFR). Voice acoustic parameters ana- lysed were: fundamental frequency (F0), jitter, shimmer, HNR and temporal measures. Compared with normative data, both males and females diagnosed with VAD exhibited increased F0, shimmer and HNR. Jitter, MPFR and one temporal measure were reduced. VAD individuals presented voice acoustic parameter differences in spectral, temporal and perturbation measures, which may be indicative of small morphological changes in the phonatory system.

  15. The palmo-mental reflex in vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, M S; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD), is a multisystemic nosological entity, caused by occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude (> or = 90 dB SPL) and low frequency (< or = 500 Hz) (LPALF) noise. The most common neurological finding in patients with VAD is the palmomental reflex (PMR). The aim of this study is to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of this primitive reflex in a population of VAD patients. Sixty individuals, occupationally exposed to LPALF noise underwent a neurological examination. In each one, unilateral contraction of the chin muscles was triggered through the stimulation of the thenar eminence. When a response habituation was observed, or when there was no response except previously existing skin retraction and small dimples, an EMG was performed. All these subjects also received brain MRI and measurement of endogenous evoked potentials. Thirty individuals presented unilateral or bilateral PMR; 26 of these presented changes in the brain MRI. EMG measurement evidenced continuous contraction of the chin muscles, without visible PMR, triggered by the stimulation of the thenar eminence. PMR is present in 50% of the patients with VAD. In the VAD patients, the frequency of abnormal chin muscle activity is higher than the frequency of PMR and represents a loss of the cortical control over the brainstem structures.

  16. Vibroacoustic Response Data of Stiffened Panels and Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabell, Randolph; Klos, Jake; Buehrle, Ralph; Schiller, Noah

    2008-01-01

    NASA has collected vibroacoustic response data on a variety of complex, aerospace structures to support research into numerical modeling of such structures. This data is being made available to the modeling community to promote the development and validation of analysis methods for these types of structures. Existing data from two structures is described, as well as plans for a data set from a third structure. The first structure is a 1.22 m by 1.22 m stiffened aluminum panel, typical of a commercial aircraft sidewall section. The second is an enclosed, stiffened aluminum cylinder, approximately 3.66 m long and 1.22 m in diameter, constructed to resemble a small aircraft fuselage with no windows and a periodic structure. The third structure is a filament-wound composite cylinder with composite stiffeners. Numerous combinations of excitation and response variables were measured on the structures, including: shaker excitation; diffuse acoustic field; velocity response from a laser vibrometer; intensity scans; and point acceleration.

  17. Fetal brain activity and hemodynamic response to a vibroacoustic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulford, Jonathan; Vadeyar, Shantala H; Dodampahala, Sanani H; Ong, Stephen; Moore, Rachel J; Baker, Philip N; James, David K; Gowland, Penny

    2004-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the practicality of using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) techniques to assess fetal brain activity. The purpose of this study was to compare the fetal hemodynamic response to that of the adult. Seventeen pregnant subjects, all of whom were at more than 36 weeks gestation were scanned while the fetus was exposed to a vibroacoustic stimulus. Thirteen adult subjects were scanned with an equivalent acoustic stimulus. Of the fetal subjects, two could not be analyzed due to technical problems, eight did not show significant activation, and seven showed significant activation. In all cases, activation was localized within the temporal region. Measures of fetal hemodynamic responses revealed an average time to peak (ttp) of 7.36 +/- 0.94 sec and an average percentage change of 2.67 +/- 0.93%. In contrast, activation was detected in 5 of 13 adults with an average ttp of 6.54 +/- 0.54 sec and an average percentage change of 1.02 +/- 0.40%. The measurement of changes in the fetal hemodynamic response may be important in assessing compromised pregnancies. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Epilepsy in the vibroacoustic disease: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinho Pimenta, A J; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Late-onset epilepsy was one of the first neurological problems identified in patients diagnosed with vibroacoustic disease. Other clinical situations, such as automatisms and rage-like reaction crises were also observed. Some cases of epileptic seizures were triggered by different types of stimuli. This study describes the clinical case of a 30-yr-old male metal-worker who had epileptic seizures when he used vibratory tools common to his profession, such as drills and sanders. We performed a 21-channel EEG during a seizure induced in the laboratory by direct contact of a vibratory tool with his right hand. This allowed us to view the electrical discharge of his left hemisphere. The entire procedure was simultaneously videotaped while a partial motor crisis was observed. Brain MRI of this subject revealed multiple hyperintense focal lesions in the sub-cortical white matter. Echocardiography revealed thickening of the pericardium and valve structures. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first documented case of reflex epilepsy due to vibratory stimuli. We briefly discuss the possible pathophysiological mechanisms of this clinical event.

  19. Involvement of central airways in vibroacoustic disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, José Reis; Monteiro, Miguel B; Tavares, Fernanda; Serrano, Isabel; Monteiro, Emanuel; Mendes, Carla P; Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Branco, Nuno A A Castelo

    2006-01-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is the whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. For the past 25 years, it has been know that low frequency noise (LFN, < 500 Hz, including infrasound) targets the respiratory system. In LFN-exposed rodents, the morphological changes of respiratory tract tissue partially explained some respiratory symptoms reported by VAD patients. However, many questions remain unanswered. Recently, some volunteer VAD patients underwent bronchoscopy in order to ascertain possible damage that could be associated with their respiratory complaints. Fourteen fully-informed and volunteer VAD patients were submitted to bronchoscopy, and biopsies were removed for analysis. All patients exhibited small submucosal vascular-like lesions near the spurs, consisting of increased collagen and elastin fibres. Histology disclosed cilliary abnormalities, basal membrane hyperplasia, and thickening of vessel walls. In five patients, collagen bundles appeared degenerative and disrupted. No inflammatory process was ever identified, and no differences were seen between smokers and non-smokers. Data is in accordance with what was observed in LFN-exposed animal models and also in 8 VAD patients who developed lung tumours. Collagen disruption and degeneration was also observed in electron microscopy images of the respiratory tract of LFN-exposed rodents. Thickened blood and lymphatic vessel walls have been consistently seen in images of VAD patients and of LFN-exposed rodents. During bronchoscopy performed by other reasons, this sort of structural aspects is not frequently seen. Taken together, it is strongly suggested that these findings could be VAD-specific.

  20. Education Payload Operation - Kit D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Education Payload Operation - Kit D (EPO-Kit D) includes education items that will be used to support the live International Space Station (ISS) education downlinks and Education Payload Operation (EPO) demonstrations onboard the ISS. The main objective of EPO-Kit D supports the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) goal of attracting students to study and seek careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

  1. The responses to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation in a fetus with trisomy 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, C F; Focco Boekkooi, P; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G

    2001-05-01

    Observation of the fetal movement and fetal heart rate responses to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation might be useful as a measure to assess fetal well-being. Studies of abnormal fetuses are needed to gain insight in the spectrum of possible responses to stimulation. We present a case of a fetus with trisomy 18 that failed to respond to repeated stimulation.

  2. [Vibroacoustic factors hygienic regulation principles in Russia and abroad evolution and succession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokopenko, L V; Kravchenko, O K; Ermolenko, A E; Kurierov, N N; Lagutina, A V; Tseitlina, G S

    2013-01-01

    Brief historical summary about Institute' vibroacoustic factors investigations development in the XXth century is presented. There are shown the data of noise, vibration, ultra- and infrasound hygienic rating in comparison with international approaches; the ways of its international harmonization in modern social and economic situation are selected.

  3. Utilization of old vibro-acoustic measuring equipment to grasp basic concepts of vibration measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darula, Radoslav

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to show that even old vibro-acoustic (analog) equipment can be used as a very suitable teaching equipment to grasp basic principles of measurements in an era, when measurement equipments are more-or-less treated as ‘black-boxes’, i.e. the user cannot see directly how...

  4. Joint motion quality in vibroacoustic signal analysis for patients with patellofemoral joint disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bączkowicz, Dawid; Majorczyk, Edyta

    2014-12-12

    Chondromalacia, lateral patellar compression syndrome and osteoarthritis are common patellofemoral joint disorders leading to functional and/or structural disturbances in articular surfaces. The objective of the study was to evaluate their impact on joint motion quality via the vibroacoustic signal generated during joint movement analysis. Seventy-three patients (30 with chondromalacia, 21 with lateral patellar compression syndrome, and 22 with osteoarthritis) and 32 healthy controls were tested during flexion/extension knee motion for vibroacoustic signals using an acceleration sensor. Estimated parameters: variation of mean square (VMS), difference between mean of four maximum and mean of four minimum values (R4), power spectral density for frequency of 50-250 Hz (P1) and 250-450 Hz (P2) were analyzed. Vibroacoustic signals recorded for particular disorders were characterized by significantly higher values of parameters in comparison to the control group. Moreover, differences were found among the various types of patellofemoral joint disturbances. Chondromalacia and osteoarthritis groups showed differences in all parameters examined. In addition, osteoarthritis patients exhibited differences in VMS, P1 and P2 values in comparison to lateral patellar compression syndrome patients. However, only the value of R4 was found to differ between knees with lateral patellar compression syndrome and those with chondromalacia. Our results suggest that particular disorders are characterized by specific vibroacoustic patterns of waveforms as well as values of analyzed parameters.

  5. The effect of antenatal steroid administration on the fetal response to vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotmensch, S; Celentano, C; Liberati, M; Sadan, O; Glezerman, M

    1999-11-01

    Betamethasone transiently suppresses multiple fetal biophysical activities, including breathing movements, limb and trunk movements, heart rate variability, and heart rate accelerations. Unnecessary iatrogenic delivery of preterm fetuses due to the false diagnosis of fetal compromise has been described in this setting. The sonographically observed startle response of the fetus to vibroacoustic stimulation has been described as another modality to provide reassurance about fetal well-being. It is unknown, however, whether the startle response is also suppressed by betamethasone. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of betamethasone on this biophysical parameter. A prospective cohort study. Vibroacoustic stimulation was applied to the maternal abdomen and fetal movement responses were sonographically observed prior to (0 hours), 48 hours after, and 96 hours after betamethasone administration. We recorded the presence or absence of the fetal startle response, and, if a response was present, graded semi-quantitatively the intensity of the movements (vigorous versus sluggish). Twenty-two of 26 fetuses (84.6%) displayed a vigorous vibroacoustic startle response prior to betamethasone administration, in comparison to three of 26 fetuses (11.5%) at 48 hours after exposure (pvibroacoustic stimulation. Accordingly, this modality cannot be used for the ascertainment of fetal well-being of steroid exposed fetuses. Betamethasone seems to suppress central nervous system dependent biophysical activities. including the brain-stem dependent vibroacoustic startle reflex.

  6. Vibroacoustic Response of Residential Housing due to Sonic Boom Exposure: A Summary of two Field Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klos, Jacob; Buehrle, Ralph; Sullivan, Brenda; Gavin, Joseph; Salamone, Joseph; Haering, Edward A., jr.; Miller, Denise M.

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments have been performed to measure the vibroacoustic response of houses exposed to sonic booms. In 2006, an old home in the base housing area of Edwards Air Force Base, built around 1960 and demolished in 2007, was instrumented with 288 transducers. During a 2007 follow-on test, a newer home in the base housing area, built in 1997, was instrumented with 112 transducers. For each experiment, accelerometers were placed on walls, windows and ceilings in bedrooms of the house to measure the vibration response of the structure. Microphones were placed outside and inside the house to measure the excitation field and resulting interior sound field. The vibroacoustic response of each house was measured for sonic boom amplitudes spanning from 2.4 to 96 Pa (0.05 to 2 lbf/sq ft). The boom amplitudes were systematically varied using a unique dive maneuver of an F/A-18 airplane. In total, the database for both houses contains vibroacoustic response data for 154 sonic booms. In addition, several tests were performed with mechanical shaker excitation of the structure to characterize the forced response of the houses. The purpose of this paper is to summarize all the data from these experiments that are available to the research community, and to compare and contrast the vibroacoustic behavior of these two dissimilar houses.

  7. Vibro-Acoustic modulation based damage identification in a composite skin-stiffener structure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ooijevaar, T.H.; Loendersloot, Richard; Rogge, M.D.; Akkerman, Remko; Tinga, Tiedo; Le Cam, V.; Mevel, L.; Schoefs, F.

    2014-01-01

    The vibro-acoustic modulation method is applied to a composite skin-stiffener structure to investigate the possibilities to utilise this method for damage identification in terms of detection, localisation and damage quantification. The research comprises a theoretical part and an experimental part.

  8. Vibro-Acoustic Numerical Analysis for the Chain Cover of a Car Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Enrico Armentani; Raffaele Sepe; Antonio Parente; Mauro Pirelli

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a vibro-acoustic numerical and experimental analysis was carried out for the chain cover of a low powered four-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine, belonging to the FPT (FCA Power Train) family called SDE (Small Diesel Engine...

  9. SLS Payload Transportation Beyond LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creech, S. D.; Baker, J. D.; Jackman, A. L.; Vane, G.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has successfully completed the Critical Design Review (CDR) of the heavy lift Space Launch System (SLS) and is working towards the first flight of the vehicle in 2018. SLS will begin flying crewed missions with an Orion capsule to the lunar vicinity every year after the first 2 flights starting in the early 2020's. As early as 2021, in addition to delivering an Orion capsule to a cislunar destination, SLS will also deliver ancillary payload, termed "Co-manifested Payload (CPL)", with a mass of at least 5.5 mT and volume up to 280 m3 simultaneously to that same destination. Later SLS flights have a goal of delivering as much as 10 mT of CPL to cislunar destinations. In addition to cislunar destinations, SLS flights may deliver non-crewed, science-driven missions with Primary Payload (PPL) to more distant destinations. SLS PPL missions will utilize a unique payload fairing offering payload volume (ranging from 320 m3 to 540 m3) that greatly exceeds the largest existing Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) fairing available. The Characteristic Energy (C3) offered by the SLS system will generate opportunities to deliver up to 40 mT to cislunar space, and deliver double PPL mass or de-crease flight time by half for some outer planet destinations when compared to existing capabilities. For example, SLS flights may deliver the Europa Clipper to a Jovian destination in under 3 years by the mid 2020's, compared to the 7+ years cruise time required for current launch capabilities. This presentation will describe ground and flight accommodations, interfaces, resources, and performance planned to be made available to potential CPL and PPL science users of SLS. In addition, this presentation should promote a dialogue between vehicle developers, potential payload users, and funding sources in order to most efficiently evolve required SLS capabilities to meet diverse payload needs as they are identified over the next 35 years and beyond.

  10. Respiratory pathology in vibroacoustic disease: 25 years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branco, Nuno A A Castelo; Ferreira, José Reis; Alves-Pereira, Mariana

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory pathology induced by low frequency noise (LFN, vibroacoustic disease (VAD), a whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN, respiratory pathology takes on specific features. Initially, respiratory pathology was not considered a con- sequence of LFN exposure; but today, LFN can be regarded as a major agent of disease that targets the respiratory system. The goal of this report is to put forth what is known to date on the clinical signs of respiratory pathology seen in VAD patients. Data from the past 25 years of research will be taken together and presented. In persons exposed to LFN on the job, respiratory complaints appear af- ter the first 4 years of professional activity. At this stage, they disappear during vacation periods or when the person is removed form his /her workstation for other reasons. With long-term exposure, more serious situations can arise, such as, atypical pleural effusion, respiratory insufficiency, fibrosis and tumours. There is no correlation with smoking habits. In LFN-exposed animal models, morphological changes of the pleura, and loss of the phagocytic ability of pleural mesothelial cells (explaining the atypical pleural effusions). Fibrotic lesions and neo-vascularization were observed along the entire respiratory tract. Fibrosis lesions and neovascularisation were observed through- out the respiratory tract of the animals seen. Pre-malignant lesions, metaplasia e displasia, were also identified. LFN is an agent of disease and the respiratory tract is one of its preferential targets. The respiratory pathology associated with VAD needs further in-depth studies in order to achieve a greater understanding, and develop methods of pharmaco- logical intervention.

  11. Vibroacoustic stimulation enhances visualization of the four-chamber cardiac view in the third trimester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazebnik, N; Hill, L M; Costantino, J P; Many, A; Martin, J G

    1996-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether vibroacoustic stimulation would improve the visualization rate of the four-chamber cardiac view. Patients between 26 and 42 weeks' gestation were considered to be candidates for this study if the amniotic fluid index (AFI) was between 8.0 and 24.0 cm, no malformations were detected on a careful fetal anatomical survey and a four-chamber cardiac view was not obtainable. Once a four-chamber view was considered to be not obtainable due to fetal position, the patient was asked to withdraw a sealed envelope and was assigned to either the study or the control group. The 164 study patients received one to three 3-s vibroacoustic stimulations. Five minutes later a second attempt was made to visualize the four-chamber view adequately. The control group consisted of another 198 subjects in whom a four-chamber view could not be obtained. The control group did not receive vibroacoustic stimulation. A similar 5-min time interval was allowed to elapse before an attempt was made to visualize the four-chamber view. The study and control groups were similar with respect to fetal presentation, placental location, fetal weight category, biophysical profile score, gestational age, AFI and estimated fetal weight. The rate of the four-chamber view was significantly higher among fetuses receiving vibroacoustic stimulation (20.1%), in comparison to the control group (11.1%) (p = 0.019). Successful repositioning was more likely among fetuses with estimated fetal weight between 2251 and 3050 g, and at a gestational age between 33.1 and 37.0 weeks. We conclude that in a selected group of patients vibroacoustic stimulation can be used to enhance visualization of the four-chamber view.

  12. Comparison of halogen light and vibroacoustic stimulation on nonreactive fetal heart rate pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimikian, Fatemeh; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Modarres, Maryam; Mehran, Abbas

    2013-03-01

    One of the first-line assessment tools for fetal surveillance is nonstress test (NST), although it is limited by a high rate of false-nonreactive results. This study was performed to investigate if external stimulation from vibroacoustic and halogen light could help in provoking fetal responsiveness and altering NST results. This is a clinical trial. Sampling was done from April to July 2010. One hundred pregnant women with nonreactive NST for 20 min were allocated in two groups: Vibroacoustic stimulated NST (VNST, n = 50) who received vibration from a standard fetal vibratory stimulator and halogen light stimulated NST (LNST, n = 50) who received a halogen light source for 3 and 10 sec, respectively. Results were compared together and then compared to biophysical profile (BPP) scores as a backup test. We used Mann-Whitney U test, Chi-square test, and Fisher's exact test to compare the variables in the two groups through SPSS version 14. P vibroacoustic stimulation group changed to reactive patterns. Time to onset of the first acceleration (VNST: 2.17 min; LNST: 2.27 min) and the test duration (VNST: 4.91 min; LNST: 5.26 min) were the same in the two groups. In VNST 89.5% and in LNST 87.5% of nonreactivity followed by score 8 in BPP. There was no significant relation between stimulus NSTs and BPPs. Vibroacoustic and light stimulation offer benefits by decreasing the incidence of nonreactive results and reducing the test time. Both halogen light stimulation and vibroacoustic stimulation are safe and efficient in fetal well-being assessment services.

  13. How the factoid of wind turbines causing ‘vibroacoustic disease’ came to be ‘irrefutably demonstrated’

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chapman, Simon; St George, Alexis

    2013-01-01

    ... of these, “vibroacoustic disease” (VAD) is frequently mentioned. The aim of this study is to examine the quality of the evidence on how VAD came to be associated with wind turbine exposure by wind farm opponents. Methods...

  14. Automated payload experiment tool feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddux, Gary A.; Clark, James; Delugach, Harry; Hammons, Charles; Logan, Julie; Provancha, Anna

    1991-01-01

    To achieve an environment less dependent on the flow of paper, automated techniques of data storage and retrieval must be utilized. The prototype under development seeks to demonstrate the ability of a knowledge-based, hypertext computer system. This prototype is concerned with the logical links between two primary NASA support documents, the Science Requirements Document (SRD) and the Engineering Requirements Document (ERD). Once developed, the final system should have the ability to guide a principal investigator through the documentation process in a more timely and efficient manner, while supplying more accurate information to the NASA payload developer.

  15. Express Payload Project - A new method for rapid access to Space Station Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhran, Mark L.; Timm, Marc G.

    1993-01-01

    The deployment and permanent operation of Space Station Freedom will enable researchers to enter a new era in the 21st century, in which continuous on-orbit experimentation and observation become routine. In support of this objective, the Space Station Freedom Program Office has initiated the Express Payload Project. The fundamental project goal is to reduce the marginal cost associated with small payload development, integration, and operation. This is to be accomplished by developing small payload accommodations hardware and a new streamlined small payload integration process. Standardization of small payload interfaces, certification of small payload containers, and increased payload developer responsibility for mission success are key aspects of the Express Payload Project. As the project progresses, the principles will be applied to both pressurized payloads flown inside the station laboratories and unpressurized payloads attached to the station external structures. The increased access to space afforded by Space Station Freedom and the Express Payload Project has the potential to significantly expand the scope, magnitude, and success of future research in the microgravity environment.

  16. The first Spacelab mission. [payload management functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, R. E., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The purpose of Spacelab, an Orbiter-mounted NASA/ESA laboratory, is to include in the Space Transportation System (STS) a payload carrier with maximum flexibility to accommodate multidisciplinary scientific payloads. The major Spacelab configurations obtained by combination of two basic elements, the module and pallet, are described along with the anticipated program of experiments and payloads, and mission management general concept. The first Spacelab 7-day mission is scheduled for flight in the second half of 1980, with the primary objective being to verify system performance capabilities. Detailed attention is given to the payload mission management responsibilities for the first flight, including program control, science management, payload interfaces, integrated payload mission planning, integration requirements, payload specialist training, payload integration, launch site integration, payload flight/mission operations, and postmission activities. The Spacelab configuration (including the long module and one pallet) and the overall schedule for this mission are presented.

  17. Standard payload computer for the international space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, Karl; Taylor, Chris; Koenig, Horst; Schlosstein, Uwe

    1999-01-01

    payload developers • Core software providing a suite of common communications services including a verified protocol implementation required to communicate with the ISS • A standardized ground support equipment and accompanying software development environment • The use of commercial hardware and software standards and products.

  18. Airway flow limitation in patients with vibroacoustic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis Ferreira, J M; Couto, A R; Jalles-Tavares, N; Castelo Branco, M S; Castelo Branco, N A

    1999-03-01

    Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a pathology caused by occupational exposure to large pressure amplitude and low frequency (LPALF) noise (> or =90 dB SPL, < or =500 Hz), and has been the object of study by this group for the past 20 yr. In a group of 140 VAD-diagnosed patients, 7 non-smoker aircraft technicians developed clinical signs of respiratory insufficiency at an early age. Previously, multi-focal fibrosis had been observed in the lung of Wistar rats exposed to occupationally simulated LPALF noise and with no possibility of contamination by fumes, dust or other chemical agents. The goal of this study is to compare pulmonary imaging and/or functional changes in two age- and exposure-time matched groups of VAD-diagnosed aircraft technicians, with and without airflow limitation symptoms. In a population of 140 individuals occupationally exposed to LPALF noise and diagnosed with VAD, we excluded the smokers (45 cases) and selected 7 individuals with complaints of airway flow limitations, average age 42.3 yr (SD = 2.3). From the remaining non-smokers without respiratory complaints, we selected a group of 15, age-matched patients (average age 36 yr, SD = 6.5). All subjects received a high-resolution CT scan of the chest and respiratory function tests consisting of body plethysmography, spirometry and metacholine airway provocation. There is a significant relationship between the presence of symptoms and imaging of lung fibrosis through high-resolution CT scan (p = 0.03624). There are no significant differences when both groups are compared with respect to the percentage of predicted values of lung function: Vital Capacity (VC), Total Lung Capacity, Forced Expiratory Volume during the first second of expiration, Maximal Expiratory Flow at 50% VC, Total Airway Resistance, and Airway Reactivity after 25 mg of metacholine. High resolution CT scan is a valuable tool for diagnosis of lung fibrosis in VAD patients who have symptoms of airway flow limitations. The fact that

  19. Is intrapartum vibroacoustic stimulation an effective predictor of fetal acidosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C C; Vassallo, B; Mittendorf, R

    2001-01-01

    The hypothesis of this prospective study is that intrapartum vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) is an effective predictor of fetal acidosis during labor. Various clinical conditions, such as term versus preterm gestation, first stage versus second stage of labor, and fetal heart rate (FHR) variable decelerations versus late decelerations will be tested. During the study period, 113 patients were studied prospectively in either active phase of first stage (n = 53) or during the second stage of labor (n = 60). They were selected from cases exhibiting moderate to severe FHR variable decelerations or late decelerations. The fetuses of study subjects received a VAS for three seconds and FHR changes were recorded. Fetal scalp blood pH or umbilical arterial blood pH was obtained within 15 minutes of VAS. The relationship between FHR responses to VAS and fetal blood pH in term and preterm gestations, the relationship of two tests (VAS and fetal blood pH) to type of FHR decelerations, and the predictability of neonatal morbidity by two tests were analyzed. Where appropriate, Fisher's exact test (p or = 7.20, and between a negative response to VAS (no acceleration or decelerations) and pH or = 37 weeks) and preterm ( or = 34 weeks) fetuses. Since the preterm fetuses enrolled in the study were limited in number, it is difficult to draw adequate conclusions. The positive predictive value (PPV) of fetal acidosis was 67% in both groups of FHR variable decelerations and late decelerations, but the false negative rate of acceleration VAS response for predicting no acidosis was significantly higher in the group of late decelerations (29% vs 8%, p = 0.034). Finally, both a negative VAS response and fetal acidosis (pH < 7.20) have equal predictability for neonatal morbidity. The PPV of NICU admission by a negative VAS response was two times higher than that of fetal acidosis (PPV = 61% vs 29%, p = 0.038). We found that intrapartum VAS was an effective predictor of fetal acidosis in

  20. Vibro-acoustic model of an active aircraft cabin window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloufi, Badr; Behdinan, Kamran; Zu, Jean

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents modeling and design of an active structural acoustic control (ASAC) system for controlling the low frequency sound field transmitted through an aircraft cabin window. The system uses stacked piezoelectric elements arranged in a manner to generate out-of-plane actuation point forces acting on the window panel boundaries. A theoretical vibro-acoustic model for an active quadruple-panel system is developed to characterize the dynamic behavior of the system and achieve a good understanding of the active control performance and the physical phenomena of the sound transmission loss (STL) characteristics. The quadruple-panel system represents the passenger window design used in some classes of modern aircraft with an exterior double pane of Plexiglas, an interior dust cover pane and a glazed dimmable pane, all separated by thin air cavities. The STL characteristics of identical pane window configurations with different piezoelectric actuator sets are analyzed. A parametric study describes the influence of important active parameters, such as the input voltage, number and location of the actuator elements, on the STL is investigated. In addition, a mathematical model for obtaining the optimal input voltage is developed to improve the acoustic attenuation capability of the control system. In general, the achieved results indicate that the proposed ASAC design offers a considerable improvement in the passive sound loss performance of cabin window design without significant effects, such as weight increase, on the original design. Also, the results show that the acoustic control of the active model with piezoelectric actuators bonded to the dust cover pane generates high structural vibrations in the radiating panel (dust cover) and an increase in sound power radiation. High active acoustic attenuation can be achieved by designing the ASAC system to apply active control forces on the inner Plexiglas panel or dimmable panel by installing the actuators on the

  1. Involvement of central airways in vibroacoustic disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reis Ferreira

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD is the whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN. For the past 25 years, it has been know that low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz, including infrasound targets the respiratory system. In LFN-exposed rodents, the morphological changes of respiratory tract tissue partially explained some respiratory symptoms reported by VAD patients. However, many questions remain unanswered. Recently, some volunteer VAD patients underwent bronchoscopy in order to ascertain possible damage that could be associated with their respiratory complaints. Methods. Fourteen fully-informed and volunteer VAD patients were submitted to bronchoscopy, and biopsies were removed for analysis. Results. All patients exhibited small submucosal vascular-like lesions near the spurs, consisting of increased collagen and elastin fibres. Histology disclosed cilliary abnormalities, basal membrane hyperplasia, and thickening of vessel walls. In five patients, collagen bundles appeared degenerative and disrupted. No inflammatory process was ever identified, and no differences were seen between smokers and non-smokers. Discussion. Data is in accordance with what was observed in LFN-exposed animal models and also in 8 VAD patients who developed lung tumours. Collagen disruption and degeneration was also observed in electron microscopy images of the respiratory tract of LFN-exposed rodents. Thickened blood and lymphatic vessel walls have been consistently seen in images of VAD patients and of LFN-exposed rodents. During bronchoscopy performed by other reasons, this sort of structural aspects is not frequently seen. Taken together, it is strongly suggested that these findings could be VAD-specific. Resumo: Nos últimos vinte cinco anos constatou-se que o aparelho respiratório constitui um alvo do ruído de baixa frequência (RFB <500Hz, incluindo infra-sons. Denomina-se doença vibroacústica (VAD a patologia sistémica causada pela

  2. Respiratory pathology in vibroacoustic disease: 25 years of research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuno A.A. Castelo Branco

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Respiratory pathology induced by low frequency noise (LFN, <500 Hz, including infrasound is not a novel subject given that in the 1960's, within the context of U.S. and U.S.S.R. Space Programs, other authors have already reported its existence. Within the scope of vibroacoustic disease (VAD, a whole-body pathology caused by excessive exposure to LFN, respiratory pathology takes on specific features. Initially, respiratory pathology was not considered a consequence of LFN exposure; but today, LFN can be regarded as a major agent of disease that targets the respiratory system. The goal of this report is to put forth what is known to date on the clinical signs of respiratory pathology seen in VAD patients. Methods: Data from the past 25 years of research will be taken together and presented. Results: In persons exposed to LFN on the job, respiratory complaints appear after the first 4 years of professional activity. At this stage, they disappear during vacation periods or when the person is removed form his /her workstation for other reasons. With long-term exposure, more serious situations can arise, such as, atypical pleural effusion, respiratory insufficiency, fibrosis and tumours. There is no correlation with smoking habits. In LFN--exposed animal models, morphological changes of the pleura, and loss of the phagocytic ability of pleural mesothelial cells (explaining the atypical pleural effusions. Fibrotic lesions and neo-vascularization were observed along the entire respiratory tract. Fibrosis lesions and neovascularisation were observed throughout the respiratory tract of the animals seen. Pre-malignant lesions, metaplasia e displasia, were also identified. Discussion: LFN is an agent of disease and the respiratory tract is one of its preferential targets. The respiratory pathology associated with VAD needs further in-depth studies in order to achieve a greater understanding, and develop methods of pharmacological intervention

  3. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: Plate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-12-01

    By considering the membrane's dissipation, the membrane-type acoustic metamaterial (MAM) has been demonstrated as a super absorber for low-frequency sound. In the paper, a theoretical vibroacoustic plate model is developed to reveal sound energy absorption mechanism within the MAM under a plane normal incidence. Based on the plate model in conjunction with the point matching method, the in-plane strain energy of the membrane due to the resonant and antiresonant motion of the attached masses can be accurately captured by solving the coupled vibroacoustic integrodifferential equation. Therefore, the sound absorption of the MAM is obtained and discussed, which is also in good agreement with the prediction from the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects including eccentricity of the attached masses, the depth, thickness and loss factor of the membrane on sound absorption peak values are quantitatively investigated.

  4. Vibro-acoustics of ribbed structures: A compact modal formulation for SEA models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bremner, Paul G.

    Rib-stiffening of plates and shells is a structurally-efficient construction technique common to aerospace, shipbuilding, automotive, and many other industries. Engineers need to be able to design the vibro-acoustic behavior of these panel systems. That is, the panel vibration response to excitation by a sound pressure field and the sound radiated by panel vibration. The effect of adding rib-stiffeners to a uniform thickness, isotropic panel is to cause scattering of the panel free bending waves. The superposition of these wavefields can also be described by modal methods, if the panel has finite dimensions. The effect of rib stiffening is shown to be the re-distribution of resonant frequencies and mode shapes of the panel, which can significantly alter its noise and vibration character. This paper describes a compact modal method for description of the vibro-acoustics of ribbed panels which is currently implemented in the Statistical Energy Analysis modeling package AutoSEA.

  5. SOME PROBLEMS WITH VIBROACOUSTIC METHOD IN RELATION TO THE TRANSMISSION GEARBOX OF A MILITARY HELICOPTER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł MAJEWSKI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of a laboratory gear stage with regard to deepening its consumption. In addition, the study looked at the construction of the transmission gearbox of a military helicopter, according to the basic kinematic results of the analysis of vibroacoustic signals, in order to determine the diagnostic criteria for the assessment of the technical condition of a military helicopter’s transmission gearbox.

  6. The problem of carrying out a diagnosis of an internal combustion engine by vibroacoustical parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukanin, V. N.; Sidorov, V. I.

    1973-01-01

    The physics of noise formation in an internal combustion engine is discussed. A dependence of the acoustical radiation on the engine operating process, its construction, and operational parameters, as well as on the degree of wear on its parts, has been established. An example of tests conducted on an internal combustion engine is provided. A system for cybernetic diagnostics for internal combustion engines by vibroacoustical parameters is diagrammed.

  7. Payload Instrumentation for Probing Rockets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-12-01

    A35.191-4 was packaged for shipmeoit to White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico . The equipment for the experiment included the following: nose cone with...improved system control. Three contract members travelled to White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico , in January 1979. Project SPICE I was launched on...Range, Alaska, from 24 October to 14 November. The payload was launched on 12 November, 1977. Project A31.603 ( PIBS ) is another project which was

  8. Communications platform payload definition study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopp, H. W.; Hawkes, T. A.; Bertles, C. R.; Pontano, B. A.; Kao, T.

    1986-01-01

    Large geostationary communications platforms were investigated in a number of studies since 1974 as a possible means to more effectively utilize the geostationary arc and electromagnetic spectrum and to reduce overall satellite communications system costs. The commercial feasibility of various communications platform payload concepts circa 1998 was addressed. Promising payload concepts were defined, recurring costs were estimated, and critical technologies needed to enable eventual commercialization were identified. Ten communications service aggregation scenarios describing potential groupings of service were developed for a range of conditions. Payload concepts were defined for four of these scenarios: (1) Land Mobile Satellite Service (LMSS) meets 100% of Contiguous United States (CONUS) plus Canada demand with a single platform; (2) Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) (trunking + Customer Premises Service (CPS)), meet 20% of CONUS demand;(3) FSS (trunking + CPS + video distribution), 10 to 13% of CONUS demand; and (4) FSS (20% of demand) + Inter Satellite Links (ISL) + Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS)/Tracking and Data Acquisition System (TDAS) Data Distribution.

  9. Vibroacoustic Tailoring of a Rod-Stiffened Composite Fuselage Panel with Multidisciplinary Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Przekop, Adam

    2015-01-01

    An efficient multi-objective design tailoring procedure seeking to improve the vibroacoustic performance of a fuselage panel while maintaining or reducing weight is presented. The structure considered is the pultruded rod stitched efficient unitized structure, a highly integrated composite structure concept designed for a noncylindrical, next-generation flight vehicle fuselage. Modifications to a baseline design are evaluated within a six-parameter design space including spacing, flange width, and web height for both frame and stringer substructure components. The change in sound power radiation attributed to a design change is predicted using finite-element models sized and meshed for analyses in the 500 Hz, 1 kHz, and 2 kHz octave bands. Three design studies are carried out in parallel while considering a diffuse acoustic field excitation and two types of turbulent boundary-layer excitation. Kriging surrogate models are used to reduce the computational costs of resolving the vibroacoustic and weight objective Pareto fronts. The resulting Pareto optimal designs are then evaluated under a static pressurization ultimate load to assess structural strength and stability. Results suggest that choosing alternative configurations within the considered design space can reduce weight and improve vibroacoustic performance without compromising strength and stability of the structure under the static load condition considered, but the tradeoffs are significantly influenced by the spatial characteristics of the assumed excitation field.

  10. Blunted fetal response to vibroacoustic stimulation following chronic exposure to propranolol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, D M; Bentolila, E

    1998-08-01

    A recent, prospective randomized trial has suggested that long-term use of prophylactic beta-adrenergic blocking agents may slow the rate of aortic dilation in those patients with Marfan's syndrome exhibiting evidence of existing dilation. Accordingly, administration of such medication from the midtrimester onward has been advocated in these patients. Acute oral administration of propranolol (80 mg) has been shown to depress fetal heart rate response to vibroacoustic stimulation. We present a case in which chronic administration of propranolol 150 mg/day to a patient with Marfan's syndrome with existing aortic root dilation was associated with repeated abnormal intrapartum fetal heart rate responses to vibroacoustic stimulation. Subsequent delivery of a nonhypoxic, nonacidotic infant suggests that maternal administration of beta-blockers should be considered in the interpretation of results of fetal vibroacoustic stimulation. This case also supports that in similar clinical presentations, ultrasonographic confirmation of the fetal startle response, or alternatively observation of the resulting fetal recoil may be utilized rather than the fetal heart rate, which may be modulated by maternal medications.

  11. The first Spacelab payload - A joint NASA/ESA venture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, R.; Pace, R.; Collet, J.; Sanfourche, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    Planning for the 1980 qualification flight of Spacelab, which will involve a long module and one pallet, is discussed. The mission will employ two payload specialists, one sponsored by NASA and the other by ESA. Management of the Spacelab mission functions, including definition and execution of the on-board experiments, development of the experimental hardware and training of the payload specialists, is considered; studies proposed in the areas of atmospheric physics, space plasma physics, solar physics, earth observations, astronomy, astrophysics, life sciences and material sciences are reviewed. Analyses of the Spacelab environment and the Spacelab-to-orbiter and Spacelab-to-experiment interactions are also planned.

  12. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  13. Frequency of positive results of vibroacoustic stimulation test in evaluating fetus health of pregnant women with non-reactive NST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    soheila Akbari

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Background : Non-Stress Test (NST is one of the most common methods used to evaluat fetus health, which its results are presented as reactive and non-reactive. One of the limitations of this test is the high number of false non-reactive cases. Different studies have suggested a combination of vibroacoustic stimulation and NST to reduce the number of non-reactive cases and duration of the test. Materials and Methods: The present study examined a group of tests, and used simple randomized sampling. The number of the sample was 55 individuals and the data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments, NST result paper, a tooth brusher, a watch, a demographic questionnaire, and a checklist. Vibroacoustic stimulation with an electronic brush was performed on fetus head situated on mother’s abdomen for 3 seconds and then NST was continued for a further 20 minutes. Then the results were recorded. The obtained data were gathered by SPSS 19 software, and analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In this study, 85.5% of the non-reactive cases changed into reactive through vibroacoustic stimulation. The amount of false positive was lower with vibroacoustic stimulation in comparison with NST. Conclusion: Vibroacoustic stimulation, as a technique for evaluating fetus health, makes it possible to save time, costs and personnel. It is also leads to sooner and better diagnosis of fetus health.

  14. Distance from an intrauterine hydrophone as a factor affecting intrauterine sound pressure levels produced by the vibroacoustic stimulation test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, D P; Scardo, J A; Dillon, A E; Klein, A J; Stramm, S L; Newman, R B

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether intrauterine sound pressure levels produced by vibroacoustic stimulation were associated with distance from an intrauterine hydrophone in human parturients and to evaluate the effects of distance on the spectrum of the stimulus. Measurements of intrauterine sound were taken in eight volunteer parturients in normal active-phase labor by use of an intrauterine hydrophone. Vibroacoustic stimulation was performed on the maternal abdomen directly overlying the hydrophone; at distance of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 cm from the hydrophone; and at the maternal sternum. Intrauterine sound pressure levels were tape-recorded for later analysis. Fetal heart rate and fetal movement were assessed with each vibroacoustic stimulation. Spectral analyses were performed by taking the fast Fourier transform of the tape-recorded stimulation at each position. Analysis of variance with repeated measures indicated a statistically significant decrease (F = 4.1, p = 0.004) in the sound pressure levels as distance increased. Spectral analysis indicated large variability between and within subjects. Sound exposure of the fetal ear is on average decreased as the distance between the ear and the vibroacoustic stimulation is increased. The spectrum of the stimulus produced with vibroacoustic stimulation is highly variable.

  15. Modular Countermine Payload for Small Robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herman Herman; Doug Few; Roelof Versteeg; Jean-Sebastien Valois; Jeff McMahill; Michael Licitra; Edward Henciak

    2010-04-01

    Payloads for small robotic platforms have historically been designed and implemented as platform and task specific solutions. A consequence of this approach is that payloads cannot be deployed on different robotic platforms without substantial re-engineering efforts. To address this issue, we developed a modular countermine payload that is designed from the ground-up to be platform agnostic. The payload consists of the multi-mission payload controller unit (PCU) coupled with the configurable mission specific threat detection, navigation and marking payloads. The multi-mission PCU has all the common electronics to control and interface to all the payloads. It also contains the embedded processor that can be used to run the navigational and control software. The PCU has a very flexible robot interface which can be configured to interface to various robot platforms. The threat detection payload consists of a two axis sweeping arm and the detector. The navigation payload consists of several perception sensors that are used for terrain mapping, obstacle detection and navigation. Finally, the marking payload consists of a dual-color paint marking system. Through the multi-mission PCU, all these payloads are packaged in a platform agnostic way to allow deployment on multiple robotic platforms, including Talon and Packbot.

  16. Telemetry Options for LDB Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stilwell, Bryan D.; Field, Christopher J.

    2016-01-01

    The Columbia Scientific Balloon Facility provides Telemetry and Command systems necessary for balloon operations and science support. There are various Line-Of-Sight (LOS) and Over-The-Horizon (OTH) systems and interfaces that provide communications to and from a science payload. This presentation will discuss the current data throughput options available and future capabilities that may be incorporated in the LDB Support Instrumentation Package (SIP) such as doubling the TDRSS data rate. We will also explore some new technologies that could potentially expand the data throughput of OTH communications.

  17. A highly integrated payload suite for Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, M.; Kraft, S.; Steiger, R.; Varlet, F.; Voigt, D.; Falkner, P.; Peacock, A.

    The four Galilean moons have always held a public and scientific fascination due to their diverse and dynamic nature. Amongst the moons, Europa holds a special place for its potential liquid water ocean, beneath its icy crust. This prospect of water places Europa on a par with Mars in terms of its viability for harbouring life. The first hints of Europa's icy surface came from early telescopic observations, which noted an unusually high albedo. Ground based spectroscopy then demonstrated absorption features of relatively pure water ice. Imagery from Pioneer, Voyager, and more recently Galileo confirm this, with the kilometre scale resolution of Galileo showing what appear to be ice flows. The lack of cratering, pointing to a geologically recent surface, furthermore suggests that liquid water could well exist today. The Galileo Europa Mission (GEM) provided much more extensive data during its 8 close orbits, including limited areas of extremely high resolution imaging (6 m), and radio science that confirmed the differentiated nature of Europa. However, many fundamental questions remain that can best be answered by a dedicated orbiter. For example: - Does a liquid water ocean exist? What it its extent vertically and laterally? - What is the composition of the crust? - What are the geological processes operating? The importance of these most basic questions have inspired mission proposals from all of the major space agencies. In Europe, ESA have performed a study into a mission called the "Jupiter Minisat Explorer" in order to identify the key technologies that would have to be developed [1]. The key technological challenges are caused by the harsh Jovian radiation environment, the lack of solar energy available and the thermal problems of such a cold environment. Last, but not least, a payload must be designed that satisfies these requirements and is both low power and low mass. All of these factors dictate the use of a Highly Integrated Payload Suite (HIPS). Such a

  18. High Frequency Mechanical Pyroshock Simulations for Payload Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BATEMAN,VESTA I.; BROWN,FREDERICK A.; CAP,JEROME S.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.

    1999-12-15

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) designs mechanical systems with components that must survive high frequency shock environments including pyrotechnic shock. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past at the payload system level because of weight limitations of traditional pyroshock mechanical simulations using resonant beams and plates. A new concept utilizing tuned resonators attached to the payload system and driven with the impact of an airgun projectile allow these simulations to be performed in the laboratory with high precision and repeatability without the use of explosives. A tuned resonator has been designed and constructed for a particular payload system. Comparison of laboratory responses with measurements made at the component locations during actual pyrotechnic events show excellent agreement for a bandwidth of DC to 4 kHz. The bases of comparison are shock spectra. This simple concept applies the mechanical pyroshock simulation simultaneously to all components with the correct boundary conditions in the payload system and is a considerable improvement over previous experimental techniques and simulations.

  19. Computation of 2D vibroacoustic wave's dispersion for optimizing acoustic power flow in interaction with adaptive metacomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, M.; Ouisse, M.; Ichchou, M.; Ohayon, R.

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents an integrated methodology for optimizing vibroacoustic energy flow in interaction between an adaptive metacomposite made of periodically distributed shunted piezoelectric material glued onto passive plate and open acoustic domain. The computation of interacting Floquet-Bloch propagators is also used to optimize vibroacoustic behavior. The main purpose of this work is first to propose a numerical methodology to compute the fluid-structure multi-modal wave dispersions. In a second step, optimization of electric circuit is used to control the acoustic power flow. 3D standard computation is used to confirm the efficiency of the designed metacomposite in terms of acoustic emissivity and absorption.

  20. Multispectral Thermal Imager (MTI) Payload Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, S.C.; Brock, B.C.; Bullington, D.M.; Byrd, D.A.; Claassen, P.J.; Decker, M.L.; Henson, T.D.; Kay, R.R.; Kidner, R.E.; Lanes, C.E.; Little, C.; Marbach, K.D.; Rackley, N.G.; Rienstra, J.L.; Smith, B.W.; Taplin, R.B.; Weber, P.G.

    1999-07-07

    MTI is a comprehensive research and development project that includes up-front modeling and analysis, satellite system design, fabrication, assembly and testing, on-orbit operations, and experimentation and data analysis. The satellite is designed to collect radiometrically calibrated, medium resolution imagery in 15 spectral bands ranging from 0.45 to 10.70 pm. The payload portion of the satellite includes the imaging system components, associated electronics boxes, and payload support structure. The imaging system includes a three-mirror anastigmatic off-axis telescope, a single cryogenically cooled focal plane assembly, a mechanical cooler, and an onboard calibration system. Payload electronic subsystems include image digitizers, real-time image compressors, a solid state recorder, calibration source drivers, and cooler temperature and vibration controllers. The payload support structure mechanically integrates all payload components and provides a simple four point interface to the spacecraft bus. All payload components have been fabricated and tested, and integrated.

  1. Remote Advanced Payload Test Rig (RAPTR) Portable Payload Test System for the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, John; Freas, George, II

    2017-01-01

    The RAPTR was developed to test ISS payloads for NASA. RAPTR is a simulation of the Command and Data Handling (C&DH) interfaces of the ISS (MIL-STD 1553B, Ethernet and TAXI) and is designed to facilitate rapid testing and deployment of payload experiments to the ISS. The ISS Program's goal is to reduce the amount of time it takes a payload developer to build, test and fly a payload, including payload software. The RAPTR meets this need with its user oriented, visually rich interface. Additionally, the Analog and Discrete (A&D) signals of the following payload types may be tested with RAPTR: (1) EXPRESS Sub Rack Payloads; (2) ELC payloads; (3) External Columbus payloads; (4) External Japanese Experiment Module (JEM) payloads. The automated payload configuration setup and payload data inspection infrastructure is found nowhere else in ISS payload test systems. Testing can be done with minimal human intervention and setup, as the RAPTR automatically monitors parameters in the data headers that are sent to, and come from the experiment under test.

  2. Live From Space Station Outreach Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Live from Space Station? Outreach Payload (LFSSOP) is a technologically challenging, exciting opportunity for university students to conduct significant research...

  3. Vibro-acoustic condition monitoring of Internal Combustion Engines: A critical review of existing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, S.; Bonfiglio, P.; Pompoli, F.

    2018-01-01

    This paper deals with the state-of-the-art strategies and techniques based on vibro-acoustic signals that can monitor and diagnose malfunctions in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs) under both test bench and vehicle operating conditions. Over recent years, several authors have summarized what is known in critical reviews mainly focused on reciprocating machines in general or on specific signal processing techniques: no attempts to deal with IC engine condition monitoring have been made. This paper first gives a brief summary of the generation of sound and vibration in ICEs in order to place further discussion on fault vibro-acoustic diagnosis in context. An overview of the monitoring and diagnostic techniques described in literature using both vibration and acoustic signals is also provided. Different faulty conditions are described which affect combustion, mechanics and the aerodynamics of ICEs. The importance of measuring acoustic signals, as opposed to vibration signals, is due since the former seem to be more suitable for implementation on on-board monitoring systems in view of their non-intrusive behaviour, capability in simultaneously capturing signatures from several mechanical components and because of the possibility of detecting faults affecting airborne transmission paths. In view of the recent needs of the industry to (-) optimize component structural durability adopting long-life cycles, (-) verify the engine final status at the end of the assembly line and (-) reduce the maintenance costs monitoring the ICE life during vehicle operations, monitoring and diagnosing system requests are continuously growing up. The present review can be considered a useful guideline for test engineers in understanding which types of fault can be diagnosed by using vibro-acoustic signals in sufficient time in both test bench and operating conditions and which transducer and signal processing technique (of which the essential background theory is here reported) could be

  4. On-Board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Victor; Rugina, Ana; Trcka, Adam

    2016-08-01

    The goal of the On-board Software Reference Architecture for Payloads (OSRA-P) is to identify an architecture for payload software to harmonize the payload domain, to enable more reuse of common/generic payload software across different payloads and missions and to ease the integration of the payloads with the platform.To investigate the payload domain, recent and current payload instruments of European space missions have been analyzed. This led to a Payload Catalogue describing 12 payload instruments as well as a Capability Matrix listing specific characteristics of each payload. In addition, a functional decomposition of payload software was prepared which contains functionalities typically found in payload systems. The definition of OSRA-P was evaluated by case studies and a dedicated OSRA-P workshop to gather feedback from the payload community.

  5. Vibroacoustic flexural properties of symmetric honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillaumie, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    The vibroacoustic bending properties of honeycomb sandwich panels with composite faces are studied from the wavenumber modulus to the mechanical impedance, passing through the modal density. Numerical results extracted from finite element software computations are compared with analytical results. In both cases, the homogenization method is used to calculate the global properties of the sandwich panel. Since faces are made of composite material, the classical laminate theory serves as reference. With particular conditions used in the application for symmetric panels, the original orthotropic mechanical properties can be reduced simply to three parameters commonly used in vibroacoustic characterizations. These three parameters are the mass per unit area, the bending rigidity and the out-of-plane shear rigidity. They simultaneously govern the wavenumber modulus, the modal frequencies, the modal density and the mechanical impedance. For all of these vibroacoustic characterizations, a special frequency called the transition frequency separates two domains. In the first domain, below the transition frequency or for low frequencies, the orthotropic sandwich panel has a classical isotropic plate behavior. In the second domain, above the transition frequency or for high frequencies, the out-of-plane shear rigidity is very significant and changes the behavior. However, the results discussed are only valid up to a certain frequency which is determined by the thickness and out-of-plane shear stiffness of the honeycomb core, the thickness and the bending stiffness of the laminated face sheets and then the mass per unit area and bending stiffness of the total sandwich structure. All these parameters influence the final choice of model and simplifications presented. Experimental measurements of the bending wavenumber modulus and modal frequencies for our own application were carried out. In the vibroacoustic domain, the critical frequency is also an important frequency. It again

  6. Eigensolutions to a vibroacoustic interior coupled problem with a perturbation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claude, Bertille; Duigou, Laetitia; Girault, Gregory; Cadou, Jean-Marc

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, an efficient and robust numerical method is proposed to solve non-symmetric eigenvalue problems resulting from the spatial discretization with the finite element method of a vibroacoustic interior problem. The proposed method relies on a perturbation method. Finding the eigenvalues consists in determining zero values of a scalar that depends on angular frequency. Numerical tests show that the proposed method is not sensitive to poorly conditioned matrices resulting from the displacement-pressure formulation. Moreover, the computational times required with this method are lower than those needed with a classical technique such as, for example, the Arnoldi method.

  7. Determining generalized indicator for vibroacoustic hazard at workplaces of mining machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rezniko, I.G.

    1986-10-01

    A method is presented for calculating vibroacoustic damage to operators which is based on measuring the noise and vibration levels which occur at the workplace. A value for this indicator is presented for several types of mining machines (e.g. drills, cutter loaders, excavators etc.). It is emonstrated that when an operator is subjected to the combined effect of hazardous factors, the permissible levels of noise and vibration should be 1 1/2 times lower than those established in health and safety standards. 6 references.

  8. RTP/I Payload Type Definition for Application Launch Tools

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Jürgen

    2001-01-01

    This document specifies an application-level protocol (i.e., payload type) for application launch tools using the Real-Time Protocol for Distributed Interactive Media (RTP/I). RTP/I defines a standardized framing for the transmission of application data and provides protocol mechanisms that are universally needed for the class of distributed interactive media. An application launch tool is used to synchronously start applications in collaborative environments, i.e., a participant can trigger ...

  9. MINIMIZATION OF VIBROACOUSTIC EFFECTS AS A CRITERION FOR OPERATION OF GEAR TRANSMISSIONS IN ACCORDANCE WITH SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT PRINCIPLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej N. WIECZOREK

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In correctly functioning maintenance systems it is most important to prevent possible failures. A reduction of the vibroacoustic effects accompanying the operation of machines and equipment, including transmissions, is among the factors that lower the probability of a failure. The paper presents the results of the research on the impact of operational factors on vibroacoustic conditions of transmissions. The factors covered by the analysis included a change in the mating conditions of gear wheels associated with the wear of tooth surfaces, operation of transmissions in subharmonic conditions of the main resonance and the temperature of the lubricating oil. The study demonstrated that it was possible to reduce the vibroacoustic effects generated by gear transmissions by changing the conditions of their operation. Based on the results obtained, it has been found that the operation of gear transmissions in accordance with the sustainable development principles requires technical services to take active measures consisting in the search for optimal operating conditions in terms of the vibroacoustic conditions.

  10. Vibroacoustic analysis and experimental validation of the structural responses of NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft due to acoustic launch load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. J.

    2003-01-01

    Structural responses of a spacecraft during liftoff are dominated by the intense acoustic pressure field imping on the exterior of the launch vehicle. Statistical Energy Analysis model of the NASA Mars Exploration Rover spacecraft has been developed and the SEA model was analyzed to predict vibroacoustic responses of the spacecraft under the diffuse acoustic loading condition.

  11. Effect of abdominal vibroacoustic stimulation on sound and acceleration levels at the head of the fetal sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, R M; Peters, A J; Gerhardt, K J

    1997-08-01

    To measure the vibratory response of the fetal head and abdominal wall in sheep during vibroacoustic stimulation. A piezoresistive accelerometer was attached to the skulls of seven sheep fetuses (128-134 days' gestational age), and a miniature hydrophone was attached to the skin overlying the fetal temporal bone. During fetal preparation and vibroacoustic stimulation procedures, ewes were anesthetized and supine. Vibroacoustic stimulation of the maternal abdomen was produced by each of two clinical devices that differed in spectral content, and an electric toothbrush. The approximate fundamental frequencies (f0) and first overtones (f1), as determined by both recordings of intrauterine sound pressure level and fetal head acceleration, were as follows: fetal acoustic stimulator, 75 and 150 Hz; electronic larynx, 150 and 300 Hz; and electric toothbrush, 25 and 50 Hz, respectively. At fundamental frequencies and first overtones, the ranges of fetal head accelerations (expressed in 1/12-octave bands) were as follows: fetal acoustic stimulator, 10-53 and 25-224 mm/sec2; electronic larynx, 10-53 and 18-114 mm/sec2; and electric toothbrush, 33-792 and 8-116 mm/sec2, respectively. Sound pressure levels exceeded 110 dB in all cases. High sound pressure levels in the uterus were proportional to fetal head vibration levels. Vibroacoustic stimulation of the surface of the abdomen of pregnant sheep is accompanied by both acoustic and vibratory exposure of the fetus.

  12. Fuzzy structure theory modeling of sound-insulation layers in complex vibroacoustic uncertain systems: theory and experimental validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Charles; Soize, Christian; Gagliardini, Laurent

    2009-01-01

    The fuzzy structure theory was introduced 20 years ago in order to model the effects of complex subsystems imprecisely known on a master structure. This theory was only aimed at structural dynamics. In this paper, an extension of that theory is proposed in developing an elastoacoustic element useful to model sound-insulation layers for computational vibroacoustics of complex systems. The simplified model constructed enhances computation time and memory allocation because the number of physical and generalized degrees of freedom in the computational vibroacoustic model is not increased. However, these simplifications introduce model uncertainties. In order to take into account these uncertainties, the nonparametric probabilistic approach recently introduced is used. A robust simplified model for sound-insulation layers is then obtained. This model is controlled by a small number of physical and dispersion parameters. First, the extension of the fuzzy structure theory to elastoacoustic element is presented. Second, the computational vibroacoustic model including such an elastoacoustic element to model sound-insulation layer is given. Then, a design methodology to identify the model parameters with experiments is proposed and is experimentally validated. Finally, the theory is applied to an uncertain vibroacoustic system.

  13. Vibroacoustic stimulation for fetal assessment in labour in the presence of a nonreassuring fetal heart rate trace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, C E; Smyth, R; Leader, L R; Henshall, N E; Colditz, P B; Tan, K H

    2005-04-18

    Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation is a simple, non-invasive technique where a device is placed on the maternal abdomen over the region of the fetal head and sound is emitted at a predetermined level for several seconds. It is hypothesized that the resultant startle reflex in the fetus and subsequent fetal heart rate acceleration or transient tachycardia following vibroacoustic stimulation provide reassurance of fetal well-being. This technique has been proposed as a tool to assess fetal well-being in the presence of a non-reassuring cardiotocographic trace during the first and second stages of labour. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and safety of vibroacoustic stimulation in the assessment of fetal well-being during labour, compared with mock or no stimulation for women with a singleton pregnancy exhibiting a non-reassuring fetal heart rate pattern. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group Trials Register (30 September 2004), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2004), MEDLINE (January 1966 to January 2005), EMBASE (January 1966 to January 2005) and reference lists of all retrieved articles. We sought unpublished trials and abstracts submitted to major international congresses and contacted expert informants. All published and unpublished randomised trials that compared maternal and fetal/neonatal/infant outcomes when vibroacoustic stimulation was used to evaluate fetal status in the presence of a non-reassuring cardiotocographic trace during labour, compared with mock or no stimulation. Two independent review authors identified potential studies from the literature search and assessed them for methodological quality and appropriateness of inclusion, using a data extraction form. Attempts to contact study authors for additional information were unsuccessful. The search strategies yielded six studies for consideration of inclusion. However, none of these studies fulfilled the requirements for

  14. Columbus Payloads Flow Rate Anomalies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quaranta, Albino; Bufano, Gaetana; DePalo, Savino; Holt, James M.; Szigetvari, Zoltan; Palumberi, Sergio; Hinderer, S.

    2011-01-01

    The Columbus Active Thermal Control System (ATCS) is the main thermal bus for the pressurized racks working inside the European laboratory. One of the ATCS goals is to provide proper water flow rate to each payload (P/L) by controlling actively the pressure drop across the common plenum distribution piping. Overall flow measurement performed by the Water Pump Assembly (WPA) is the only flow rate monitor available at system level and is not part of the feedback control system. At rack activation the flow rate provided by the system is derived on ground by computing the WPA flow increase. With this approach, several anomalies were raised during these 3 years on-orbit, with the indication of low flow rate conditions on the European racks FSL, BioLab, EDR and EPM. This paper reviews the system and P/Ls calibration approach, the anomalies occurred, the engineering evaluation on the measurement approach and the accuracy improvements proposed, the on-orbit test under evaluation with NASA and finally discusses possible short and long term solutions in case of anomaly confirmation.

  15. The vibroacoustic response and sound absorption performance of multilayer, microperforated rib-stiffened plates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Haian; Wang, Xiaoming; Wu, Huayong; Meng, Jianbing

    2017-10-01

    The vibroacoustic response and sound absorption performance of a structure composed of multilayer plates and one rigid back wall are theoretically analyzed. In this structure, all plates are two-dimensional, microperforated, and periodically rib-stiffened. To investigate such a structural system, semianalytical models of one-layer and multilayer plate structures considering the vibration effects are first developed. Then approaches of the space harmonic method and Fourier transforms are applied to a one-layer plate, and finally the cascade connection method is utilized for a multilayer plate structure. Based on fundamental acoustic formulas, the vibroacoustic responses of microperforated stiffened plates are expressed as functions of a series of harmonic amplitudes of plate displacement, which are then solved by employing the numerical truncation method. Applying the inverse Fourier transform, wave propagation, and linear addition properties, the equations of the sound pressures and absorption coefficients for the one-layer and multilayer stiffened plates in physical space are finally derived. Using numerical examples, the effects of the most important physical parameters—for example, the perforation ratio of the plate, sound incident angles, and periodical rib spacing—on sound absorption performance are examined. Numerical results indicate that the sound absorption performance of the studied structure is effectively enhanced by the flexural vibration of the plate in water. Finally, the proposed approaches are validated by comparing the results of stiffened plates of the present work with solutions from previous studies.

  16. The Vibro-Acoustic Modelling of Slab Track with Embedded Rails

    Science.gov (United States)

    VAN LIER, S.

    2000-03-01

    The application of concrete slab track in railways has certain advantages compared with conventional ballasted track, but conventional slab track structures generally produce more noise than ballasted track. For this reason a “silent slab track” has been developed in the Dutch ICES “Stiller Treinverkeer” project (silent railway traffic) by optimizing the track. In the design, the rails are embedded in a cork-filled elastomeric material. The paper discusses the vibro-acoustic modelling of this track using the simulation package “TWINS”, combined with finite element techniques. The model evaluates the one-third octave band sound power spectrum radiated by train wheels and track, and provides for a tool to optimize the track design. Three track types are compared using the vibro-acoustic model: an existing slab track with embedded UIC54 rails, a newly designed, acoustically optimized slab track with a less stiff rail embedded in a stiffer elastomere, and, as a reference, a ballasted track. The models of the existing tracks have been validated with measurements. Calculations indicate that the optimized slab track will emit between 4 and 6 dB(A) less noise than the ballasted track. The existing slab track produces between 1·5 and 3 dB(A) more noise than the ballasted track; this is caused by resonances in the elastomeric moulding material in the frequency range determining the dB(A)-level.

  17. Reconstruction of vibroacoustic responses of a highly nonspherical structure using Helmholtz equation least-squares method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Huancai; Wu, Sean F

    2009-03-01

    The vibroacoustic responses of a highly nonspherical vibrating object are reconstructed using Helmholtz equation least-squares (HELS) method. The objectives of this study are to examine the accuracy of reconstruction and the impacts of various parameters involved in reconstruction using HELS. The test object is a simply supported and baffled thin plate. The reason for selecting this object is that it represents a class of structures that cannot be exactly described by the spherical Hankel functions and spherical harmonics, which are taken as the basis functions in the HELS formulation, yet the analytic solutions to vibroacoustic responses of a baffled plate are readily available so the accuracy of reconstruction can be checked accurately. The input field acoustic pressures for reconstruction are generated by the Rayleigh integral. The reconstructed normal surface velocities are validated against the benchmark values, and the out-of-plane vibration patterns at several natural frequencies are compared with the natural modes of a simply supported plate. The impacts of various parameters such as number of measurement points, measurement distance, location of the origin of the coordinate system, microphone spacing, and ratio of measurement aperture size to the area of source surface of reconstruction on the resultant accuracy of reconstruction are examined.

  18. The conformity of BPP and vibroacoustic stimulation results in fetal non reactive non stress test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Modarres

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The most frequently used test for evaluation of fetal health is the Non Stress Test (NST. Unfortunately it has a high incidence of false positive results. The combination of vibroacoustic stimulation with the NTS has been shown to reduce non reactive results. Methods: A tests assessment method was chosen with a simple randomized sampling. 40 pregnant women with non reactive NST in the first 20 minutes who received VAS in one of Tehran University's Hospitals were compared with BPP scores. A vibroacoustic stimulation was applied for a 3 seconds on the maternal abdomen and fallowed within 10 minutes.Data collection tools were NST, sonography instruments ,NST result paper, tooth brusher, watch, demographic questioner and check list. Data analysis was made by descriptive static and by using the Fisher's Exact Test (with level of significant at p<0/05. All statistical analysis were performed using an spss/win. Results: After VAS, 70% of non reactive tracing became reactive. All cases with fetal reactivity response after a VAS had a subsequent BPP score of 8 (negative predictive value of 100%. False positivity of VAS was lower than NST. Conclusion: VAS offers benefits, by decreasing the incidence of non reactive test and reducing test time. VAS lowers the rate of false positive NST. VAS is safe and allows more efficient of prenatal services. This test could be used as a rapid antepartum test to predict fetal well-being.

  19. Stochastic BEM for the Vibroacoustic Analysis of Three-Dimensional Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D'Amico

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, extending the NVH prediction reliability to the whole frequency range is an attractive goal of vibroacoustics. Deterministic methodologies are well established for the low-frequency range, but, decreasing the wavelength, energy-based methods are necessary. In such a range, a crucial role is played by small perturbations which highly influence the response sensitivity. Moreover, taking into account these variations allows to make the product design more robust and even quicker. Introducing geometrical uncertainties within the classic BEM formulation allows to obtain the so-called stochastic BEM. As a result, the solution shows deterministic behaviour at low frequencies; decreasing the wavelength, the effect of the uncertainties smooths the response. Consequently, it is possible to obtain an averaged trend over the whole frequency range which asymptotically tends to the deterministic one. In this paper, we deal with three-dimensional acoustic SBEM. First, the formulation and its basic assumptions are presented. Secondly, they are applied to academic cases to show its potentialities in predicting vibroacoustic behaviour over a wide frequency range.

  20. Reconstruction of vibroacoustic fields in half-space by using hybrid near-field acoustical holography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiang; Wu, Sean F

    2005-02-01

    In this paper we examine the accuracy and efficiency of reconstructing the vibroacoustic quantities generated by a vibrating structure in half-space by using hybrid near-field acoustic holography (NAH) and modified Helmholtz equation least squares (HELS) formulations. In hybrid NAH, we combine modified HELS with an inverse boundary element method (IBEM) to reconstruct a vibroacoustic field. The main advantage of this approach is that the majority of the input data can be regenerated but not measured, thus the efficiency is greatly enhanced. In modified HELS, we expand the field acoustic pressure in terms of outgoing and incoming spherical waves and specify the corresponding expansion coefficients by solving a system of equations obtained by matching the assumed-form solution to the measured acoustic pressure. Here the system of equations is ill conditioned and Tikhonov regularization is implemented through singular value decomposition (SVD) and the generalized cross-validation (GCV) method. Numerical examples of a dilating and oscillating spheres and finite cylinder are demonstrated. Test results show that hybrid NAH can yield a more accurate reconstruction than does a modified HELS, but a modified HELS is more efficient than is hybrid NAH [Work supported by NSF].

  1. Numerical vibroacoustic analysis of plates with constrained-layer damping patches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loredo, Alexandre; Plessy, Arnaud; El Hafidi, Ali; Hamzaoui, Nacer

    2011-04-01

    A numerical vibroacoustic model that can manage multilayered plates locally covered with damping patches is presented. All the layers can have an on-axis orthotropic viscoelastic behavior. Continuity of displacements and transverse shear stresses at each interface is enforced, which permits to write the entire displacement field in function of the displacements of the--common--first layer, leading to a two-dimensional plate model. The problem is then discretized by Rayleigh-Ritz's method using a trigonometric basis that includes both sine and cosine functions in order to treat various boundary conditions. The excitation can be of mechanical kind (concentrated or distributed forces) or of acoustic kind (plane wave of any incidence, diffuse field, etc.). The model permits to compute different vibroacoustic indicators: the mean square velocity of the plate, the radiation efficiency, and the transmission loss. Comparisons between the present model and numerical results from literature or finite element computations show that the model gives good results in both mechanical and acoustical aspects. Then, a comparison of the effects of different distributions of patches is presented. The role of the surface covering rate is first discussed, followed by a study involving different geometries for the same surface covering rate.

  2. Solving the vibroacoustic equations of plates by minimization of error on a sample of observation points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collery, Olivier; Guyader, Jean-Louis

    2010-03-01

    In the context of better understanding and predicting sound transmission through heterogeneous fluid-loaded aircraft structures, this paper presents a method of solving the vibroacoustic problem of plates. The present work considers fluid-structure coupling and is applied to simply supported rectangular plates excited mechanically. The proposed method is based on the minimization of the error of verification of the plate vibroacoustic equation of motion on a sample of points. From sampling comes an aliasing effect; this phenomenon is described and solved using a wavelet-based filter. The proposed approach is validated in presenting very accurate results of sound radiation immersed in heavy and light fluids. The fluid-structure interaction appears to be very well described avoiding time-consuming classical calculations of the modal radiation impedances. The focus is also put on different samplings to observe the aliasing effect. As perspectives sound radiation from a non-homogeneous plate is solved and compared with reference results proving all the power of this method.

  3. A study of vibroacoustic coupling between a pump and attached water-filled pipes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bilong; Hodkiewicz, Melinda; Pan, Jie

    2007-02-01

    This paper presents a model for the vibroacoustical behavior of a pump coupled with water-filled pipes. Coupling between (a) the pump and the inlet and outlet pipes, and (b) the pipe wall and the fluid contained in the pipe, is investigated through analytical modeling and numerical simulation. In the model, the pump is represented by a rigid body supported by multiple elastic mounts, and the inlet and outlet pipes by two semi-infinite water-filled pipes. The vibration characteristics of the coupled system under the excitation of mechanical forces and fluid-borne forces at the pump are calculated. The results enhance our understanding about how the input mechanical and fluid excitation energy at the pump is transmitted to the pipes and how to relate the piping vibroacoustical response to the excitations at the pump. This study assists in predicting dynamic stress in pipes for given excitations at the pump, and in developing methods to identify the nature (fluid or mechanical) of the excitation forces at the pump using the vibration and dynamic pressure measurements on the pump/pipe system.

  4. How the factoid of wind turbines causing 'vibroacoustic disease' came to be 'irrefutably demonstrated'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Simon; St George, Alexis

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, claims have proliferated in cyberspace that wind turbines cause a large variety of symptoms and diseases. One of these, "vibroacoustic disease" (VAD) is frequently mentioned. The aim of this study is to examine the quality of the evidence on how VAD came to be associated with wind turbine exposure by wind farm opponents. Searches of the web (Google advanced) and major research databases for papers on VAD and wind turbines. Self-citation analysis of research papers on VAD. Google returned 24,700 hits for VAD and wind turbines. Thirty-five research papers on VAD were found, none reporting any association between VAD and wind turbines. Of the 35 papers, 34 had a first author from a single Portuguese research group. Seventy-four per cent of citations to these papers were self-citations by the group. Median self-citation rates in science are around 7%. Two unpublished case reports presented at conferences were found asserting that VAD was "irrefutably demonstrated" to be caused by wind turbines. The quality of these reports was abject. VAD has received virtually no scientific recognition beyond the group who coined and promoted the concept. There is no evidence of even rudimentary quality that vibroacoustic disease is associated with or caused by wind turbines. The claim that wind turbines cause VAD is a factoid that has gone 'viral' in cyberspace and may be contributing to nocebo effects among those living near turbines. © 2013 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2013 Public Health Association of Australia.

  5. Vibro-Acoustic Numerical Analysis for the Chain Cover of a Car Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Armentani

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this work, a vibro-acoustic numerical and experimental analysis was carried out for the chain cover of a low powered four-cylinder four-stroke diesel engine, belonging to the FPT (FCA Power Train family called SDE (Small Diesel Engine. By applying a methodology used in the acoustic optimization of new FPT engine components, firstly a finite element model (FEM of the engine was defined, then a vibration analysis was performed for the whole engine (modal analysis, and finally a forced response analysis was developed for the only chain cover (separated from the overall engine. The boundary conditions applied to the chain cover were the accelerations experimentally measured by accelerometers located at the points of connection among chain cover, head cover, and crankcase. Subsequently, a boundary element (BE model of the only chain cover was realized to determine the chain cover noise emission, starting from the previously calculated structural vibrations. The numerical vibro-acoustic outcomes were compared with those experimentally observed, obtaining a good correlation. All the information thus obtained allowed the identification of those critical areas, in terms of noise generation, in which to undertake necessary improvements.

  6. Vibroacoustic Impact on the Architectonic Heritage When Using Replicas of 16th Century Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloret, Angel Tomas; Sendra, Sandra; Lloret, Jaime; Del Rey, Romina; Louis Cereceda, Miguel

    2017-08-14

    The recreation of historical battles next to old buildings, walls, churches, fortifications or historical facades belonging to the historical heritage of a city, has always been a source of controversy and discussion. In the absence of a clear legislation about how these buildings can be affected by the use of blunderbusses and pyrotechnics, it is necessary to carry out practical experiments to test the effect of these celebrations on these buildings. For this reason, this paper presents a set of practical experiments where the vibroacoustic effect of using weapons such as blunderbusses and harquebuses is analyzed. To gather these measurements, we have used several sound level meters and 3-axis accelerometers placed on the facade of an old building. The tests have been carried out at the Moors and Christians festival of Villajoyosa (Spain) which is internationally famous for this festival. In order to carry out the tests, six harquebusiers shot their firearms and the sensors placed along the facade of the building at different height collected the data. The results of these devices allow us to study the vibroacoustic impact on the facade depending on the height.

  7. Vibro-Acoustic Modulation Based Damage Identification in a Composite Skin-Stiffener Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ooijevaar, T. H.; Loendersloot, R.; Rogge, M. D.; Akkerman, R.; Tinga, T.

    2014-01-01

    The vibro-acoustic modulation method is applied to a composite skin-stiffener structure to investigate the possibilities to utilize this method for damage identification in terms of detection, localisation and damage quantification. The research comprises a theoretical part and an experimental part. An impact load is applied to the skin-stiffener structure, resulting in a delamination underneath the stiffener. The structure is interrogated with a low frequency pump excitation and a high frequency carrier excitation. The analysis of the response in a frequency band around the carrier frequency is employed to assess the damage identification capabilities and to gain a better understanding of the modulations occurring and the underlying physical phenomena. Though vibro-acoustic is shown to be a sensitive method for damage identification, the complexity of the damage, combined with a high modal density, complicate the understanding of the relation between the physical phenomena and the modulations occurring. more research is recommended to reveal the physics behind the observations.

  8. Vibroacoustic response of panels under diffuse acoustic field excitation from sensitivity functions and reciprocity principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, Christophe; Maxit, Laurent; Robin, Olivier; Berry, Alain

    2017-06-01

    This paper aims at developing an experimental method to characterize the vibroacoustic response of a panel to a diffuse acoustic field (DAF) excitation with a different laboratory setup than those used in standards (i.e., coupled rooms). The proposed methodology is based on a theoretical model of the DAF and on the measurement of the panel's sensitivity functions, which characterize its vibroacoustic response to wall plane waves. These functions can be estimated experimentally using variations of the reciprocity principle, which are described in the present paper. These principles can either be applied for characterizing the structural response by exciting the panel with a normal force at the point of interest or for characterizing the acoustic response (radiated pressure, acoustic intensity) by exciting the panel with a monopole and a dipole source. For both applications, the validity of the proposed approach is numerically and experimentally verified on a test case composed of a baffled simply supported plate. An implementation for estimating the sound transmission loss of the plate is finally proposed. The results are discussed and compared with measurements performed in a coupled anechoic-reverberant room facility following standards.

  9. Active vibration and noise control of vibro-acoustic system by using PID controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunlong; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Ren; Qiu, Zhiping

    2015-07-01

    Active control simulation of the acoustic and vibration response of a vibro-acoustic cavity of an airplane based on a PID controller is presented. A full numerical vibro-acoustic model is developed by using an Eulerian model, which is a coupled model based on the finite element formulation. The reduced order model, which is used to design the closed-loop control system, is obtained by the combination of modal expansion and variable substitution. Some physical experiments are made to validate and update the full-order and the reduced-order numerical models. Optimization of the actuator placement is employed in order to get an effective closed-loop control system. For the controller design, an iterative method is used to determine the optimal parameters of the PID controller. The process is illustrated by the design of an active noise and vibration control system for a cavity structure. The numerical and experimental results show that a PID-based active control system can effectively suppress the noise inside the cavity using a sound pressure signal as the controller input. It is also possible to control the noise by suppressing the vibration of the structure using the structural displacement signal as the controller input. For an airplane cavity structure, considering the issue of space-saving, the latter is more suitable.

  10. Computational Vibroacoustics in Low- and Medium- Frequency Bands: Damping, ROM, and UQ Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Ohayon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Within the framework of the state-of-the-art, this paper presents a summary of some common research works carried out by the authors concerning computational methods for the prediction of the responses in the frequency domain of general linear dissipative vibroacoustics (structural-acoustic systems for liquid and gas in the low-frequency (LF and medium-frequency (MF domains, including uncertainty quantification (UQ that plays an important role in the MF domain. The system under consideration consists of a deformable dissipative structure, coupled with an internal dissipative acoustic fluid including a wall acoustic impedance, and surrounded by an infinite acoustic fluid. The system is submitted to given internal and external acoustic sources and to prescribed mechanical forces. An efficient reduced-order computational model (ROM is constructed using a finite element discretization (FEM for the structure and the internal acoustic fluid. The external acoustic fluid is treated using a symmetric boundary element method (BEM in the frequency domain. All the required modeling aspects required for the analysis in the MF domain have been introduced, in particular the frequency-dependent damping phenomena and model uncertainties. An industrial application to a complex computational vibroacoustic model of an automobile is presented.

  11. The efficiency of neurometabolic therapy in the prevention of arterial hypertension in workers of vibroacoustic professions of aircraft enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Сергій Геннадійович Сова

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the problem of arterial hypertension, including hypertensive crisis prevention in aircraft enterprises’ workers of vibroacoustic professions. The article studies the influence of neurometabolic pharmaceutical medicine Vinpocetine on the course and prognosis of hypertension.Methods. Using the routine methods of cardiac patients’ clinical study we examined 63 persons delivered in an emergency to the inpatient units of the occupational diseases clinics with the diagnosis of "uncomplicated hypertensive crisis." The main group includes aircraft enterprises’ workers of vibroacoustic professions (n = 31 who were administered according to a therapeutic complex scheme the neurometabolic medicine Vinpocetine at a dose of 30-40 mg per day. The control group consists of the workers (n = 32 who didn’t encounter with vibroacoustic factor during their working activity and didn’t get any neurometabolic medicines according to the complex scheme of treatment.Results. The survey results have demonstrated the comparability of working groups by age, sex, main modifiable factors of cardiovascular risk, hemodynamic characteristics and cognitive abilities. Introduction of Vinpocetine into the scheme of treatment of vibroacoustic professions’ workers made it possible to achieve more significant, compared to control, decrease in blood pressure and the rates of hypertensive crises recurrence in the long-term dynamics, as well as improvement in left ventricular diastolic function of the heart and the significant increase in the scale of cognitive function data at the fifth month of observation (p<0,05.Conclusions. Using Vinpocetine can significantly improve the course and prognosis of hypertension among aircraft enterprises’ workers of vibroacoustic professions

  12. Evaluation of the effectiveness of vibroacoustic therapy treatment of patients with so-called "heel spur". A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiak, Adam; Krystosiak, Monika; Widłak, Patrycja; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The so-called "heel spur" is a radiological term referring to adaptive bone growth as a result of chronic overload enthesopathy of the proximal attachment of the plantar fascia. The main cause of the pain is continued localised pressure on the surrounding soft tissues. Vibroacoustic wave therapy is a relatively new method gaining popularity among doctors, physiotherapists and patients. The aim of this study was to confirm the clinical efficacy of vibroacoustic therapy compared to laser and ultrasound therapy. The study enrolled 60 patients treated for plantar heel spurs who were divided into a study group of 40 patients who underwent vibroacoustic therapy and a control group of 20 patients treated with ultrasound and laser therapy. The outcome measure for evaluating the effectiveness of physiotherapy was a subjective assessment of pain intensity by VAS and the modified short-form McGill Pain Questionnaire. The mean pain intensity score in patients undergoing vibroacoustic therapy decreased by about 2.6 points according to the VAS scale and 17 points according to the McGill questionnaire, compared to reductions of 0.6 and 6 points, respectively, in the ultrasound and laser therapy group. The correlation between subjective assessment of pain according to the VAS scale and palpation-based assessment of pain was significantly positive between the two groups, demonstrating similarity of the two scales, with a slight dominance of the group undergoing laser and ultrasound therapy. These results represent a tentative confirmation of analgesic effectiveness of the vibro-acoustic method in musculoskeletal overload conditions. 2. In order to confirm its effectiveness, it is necessary to conduct further prospective randomized studies with blinding and evaluate the long-term results.

  13. STS-102 Onboard Photograph-The Payload Equipment Restraint System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    In this Space Shuttle STS-102 mission image, the Payload Equipment Restraint System (PERS) Single-Strap and H-Strap are shown behind astronaut James S. Voss (left) and cosmonaut Yury V. Usachev in the U.S. Laboratory. PERS is an integrated modular system of components designed to assist the crew of the International Space Station (ISS) in restraining and carrying necessary payload equipment and tools in a microgravity environment. The Operations Development Group, Flight Projects Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), while providing operation support to the ISS Materials Science Research Facility (MSRF), recognized the need for an on-orbit restraint system to facilitate control of lose objects, payloads, and tools. The PERS is the offspring of that need and it helps the ISS crew manage tools and rack components that would otherwise float away in the near-zero gravity environment aboard the Space Station. The system combines Kevlar straps, mesh pockets, Velcro, and a variety of cornecting devices into a portable, adjustable system. The system includes the Single Strap, the H-Strap, the Belly Pack, the Laptop Restraint Belt, and the Tool Page Case. The Single Strap and the H-Strap were flown on this mission. The PERS concept was developed by industrial design students at Auburn University and the MSFC Flight Projects Directorate.

  14. Towards telecommunication payloads with photonic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vono, S.; Di Paolo, G.; Piccinni, M.; Pisano, A.; Sotom, M.; Aveline, M.; Ginestet, P.

    2017-11-01

    In the last decade, Thales Alenia Space has put a lot of its research effort on Photonic Technologies for Space Application with the aim to offer the market satellite telecommunication systems better performance and lower costs. This research effort has been concentrated on several activities, some of them sponsored by ESA. Most promising applications refer to Payload Systems. In particular, photonic payload applications have been investigated through the following two ESA studies: Artes-1 "Next Generation Telecommunication Payloads based on Photonic Technologies" and Artes-5 "OWR - Optical Wideband Receiver" activities.

  15. Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS), which is part of the JPL Phaeton early career employee hands-on training program, aims to demonstrate optical...

  16. Small Payload Integration and Testing Project Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorenson, Tait R.

    2014-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has mainly focused on large payloads for space flight beginning with the Apollo program to the assembly and resupply of the International Space Station using the Space Shuttle. NASA KSC is currently working on contracting manned Low Earth Orbit (LEO) to commercial providers, developing Space Launch System, the Orion program, deep space manned programs which could reach Mars, and providing technical expertise for the Launch Services Program for science mission payloads/satellites. KSC has always supported secondary payloads and smaller satellites as the launch provider; however, they are beginning to take a more active role in integrating and testing secondary payloads into future flight opportunities. A new line of business, the Small Payload Integration and Testing Services (SPLITS), has been established to provide a one stop shop that can integrate and test payloads. SPLITS will assist high schools, universities, companies and consortiums interested in testing or launching small payloads. The goal of SPLITS is to simplify and facilitate access to KSC's expertise and capabilities for small payloads integration and testing and to help grow the space industry. An effort exists at Kennedy Space Center to improve the external KSC website. External services has partnered with SPLITS as a content test bed for attracting prospective customers. SPLITS is an emerging effort that coincides with the relaunch of the website and has a goal of attracting external partnerships. This website will be a "front door" access point for all potential partners as it will contain an overview of KSC's services, expertise and includes the pertinent contact information.

  17. IUS/payload communication system simulator configuration definition study. [payload simulator for pcm telemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udalov, S.; Springett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The requirements and specifications for a general purpose payload communications system simulator to be used to emulate those communications system portions of NASA and DOD payloads/spacecraft that will in the future be carried into earth orbit by the shuttle are discussed. For the purpose of on-orbit checkout, the shuttle is required to communicate with the payloads while they are physically located within the shuttle bay (attached) and within a range of 20 miles from the shuttle after they have been deployed (detached). Many of the payloads are also under development (and many have yet to be defined), actual payload communication hardware will not be available within the time frame during which the avionic hardware tests will be conducted. Thus, a flexible payload communication system simulator is required.

  18. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREGORY,DANNY LYNN; CAP,JEROME S.; TOGAMI,THOMAS C.; NUSSER,MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD,JAMES RONALD

    1999-11-11

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented.

  19. Large Payload Ground Transportation and Test Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucker, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    Many spacecraft concepts under consideration by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA’s) Evolvable Mars Campaign take advantage of a Space Launch System payload shroud that may be 8 to 10 meters in diameter. Large payloads can theoretically save cost by reducing the number of launches needed--but only if it is possible to build, test, and transport a large payload to the launch site in the first place. Analysis performed previously for the Altair project identified several transportation and test issues with an 8.973 meters diameter payload. Although the entire Constellation Program—including Altair—has since been canceled, these issues serve as important lessons learned for spacecraft designers and program managers considering large payloads for future programs. A transportation feasibility study found that, even broken up into an Ascent and Descent Module, the Altair spacecraft would not fit inside available aircraft. Ground transportation of such large payloads over extended distances is not generally permitted, so overland transportation alone would not be an option. Limited ground transportation to the nearest waterway may be possible, but water transportation could take as long as 67 days per production unit, depending on point of origin and acceptance test facility; transportation from the western United States would require transit through the Panama Canal to access the Kennedy Space Center launch site. Large payloads also pose acceptance test and ground processing challenges. Although propulsion, mechanical vibration, and reverberant acoustic test facilities at NASA’s Plum Brook Station have been designed to accommodate large spacecraft, special handling and test work-arounds may be necessary, which could increase cost, schedule, and technical risk. Once at the launch site, there are no facilities currently capable of accommodating the combination of large payload size and hazardous processing such as hypergolic fuels

  20. Prediction and Control of the Vibroacoustic Environment During a Launch Sequence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The complexity of the current launch platforms makes their maintenance and operation very costly. In order to successfully design the next generation platforms, it...

  1. Effect of maternal stress on fetal heart rate assessed by vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, I; Matsuda, Y; Yoneyama, M; Hirasawa, K; Takagi, K; Ohta, H; Konishi, Y

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether maternal stress levels, state and trait anxiety levels, and stress hormones affect fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns after vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) at 30 weeks of gestation. A total of 24 healthy pregnant women with a single fetus pregnancy were enrolled. Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and adrenocorticotropic hormone in maternal plasma and cortisol, and chromogranin A in saliva were measured. The FHR patterns after VAS were divided into three types: type I, a long period of acceleration or one acceleration lasting > 1 min or at least two accelerations lasting > 15 s; type II, a biphasic response with acceleration followed by deceleration; and type III, no response or prolonged deceleration. In the high trait anxiety group, CRH levels were significantly higher than in the low trait anxiety group, and FHR patterns after VAS showed mostly a type II response pattern. These findings suggest that stress in pregnant women with high trait anxiety may influence FHR patterns after VAS.

  2. Vibroacoustic Analysis of Cyclic Structures by Using Dof’s Size Reduction and Holographic Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelkhalak El Hami

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a method for the vibroacoustic analysis of structures having symmetry properties. This method is based on the reduction of the number of the degrees of freedom involved (size reduction and the use of experimental data (confrontation numerical/experimental. We propose the extension of the method of the linear representations of finite symmetry groups to problems of coupling fluid-structure. This approach, while keeping the quality of the approximations, leads to a significant reduction of the number of degrees of freedom, with a maximal reduction for the so called repetitive structures. Finally, we present a practical case of modal analysis – in air and water – of a ship propeller formed by 3 stainless steel blades. The experimental results are obtained by using the whole-field, non-contact technique of electronic holography.

  3. Effects of vibroacoustic stimulation in music therapy for palliative care patients: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warth, Marco; Kessler, Jens; Kotz, Svenja; Hillecke, Thomas K; Bardenheuer, Hubert J

    2015-12-15

    The present study aimed at examining whether methodological strategies from a previously implemented study design could be transferred to the evaluation of the psychological and physiological effects of a music therapy intervention working with vibroacoustic stimulation in palliative care. Nine participants suffering from advanced cancer took part in single-sessions of music therapy, lasting for 30 min. The live music therapy intervention utilized singing chair sounds and vocal improvisation. Visual analogue scales (VAS) were used to assess self-ratings of pain, relaxation, and well-being before and after each session. During the intervention, we continuously recorded heart rate variability (HRV) as a measure of autonomic functioning. Data collection was complemented by a semi-structured interview to explore subjective experiences in more detail. Feasibility was defined as the ability to complete 80 % of the sessions in accordance with the study protocol. In 5 out of 9 sessions (55 %) it was possible to deliver the intervention and obtain all data as intended. VAS assessment was feasible, although graphical and statistical examination revealed only marginal mean changes between pre and post. HRV recordings were subject to artifacts. While HRV parameters differed between individuals, mean changes over time remained relatively constant. Interview data confirmed that the individual perception was very heterogeneous, ranging from "calming" to "overwhelming". The criterion of feasibility was not met in this study. Physiological data showed high attrition rates, most likely due to movement artifacts and reduced peripheral blood flow in some participants' extremities. Examination of individual-level trajectories revealed that vibroacoustic stimulation may have an impact on the autonomic response. However, the direction and mechanisms of effects needs to be further explored in future studies. German Clinical Trials Register - DRKS00006137 (July 4(th), 2014).

  4. The influence of vibroacoustic therapy on the functional status of patients with gonarthrosis. A preliminary report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Skopowska

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Gonarthrosis is a degenerative disease of the articular cartilage. Its main symptoms are pain, swelling, stiffness, limitation of functions and deformations of the joint. One of the available methods of preservative treatment of gonarthrosis is vibroacoustic therapy (VT, which evokes micro-vibrations in the tissues – through the use of sound waves of variable frequency and amplitude. The aim of the study was to estimate the influence of VT on the functional status of people with gonarthrosis. Material and methods: Forty-four people, aged over 44, with gonarthrosis were subjected to 10 sessions of VT with the Vitafon-T device, in a variable range of frequencies between 30 and 18 000 Hz. The sessions lasted 15 minutes. In order to estimate the effectiveness of the therapy, double measurements (before and after therapy of the following parameters were taken: pain (VAS, joint circumferences and function tests (Timed Up and Go – TUG, the average free walking time at the 6 m distance and the knee bends test. The statistical analysis was carried out using the Wilcoxon test, with the significance level of p < 0.0001. Results : In the examined group a decrease was observed in: pain (by 1.9 VAS points among 77% of the patients, circumference of the joints among 91% and the time of conducting the TUG test in 96%. The number of knee bends increased in 82% of the patients. All the results reached statistical significance (p < 0.0001. The free walking improved among 91%; however, this result was not statistically significant. Conclusions : Vibroacoustic therapy has brought positive treatment effects of an analgesic and anti-swelling character, which has further influenced the functional efficiency of the patients with gonarthrosis. The research still needs to be expanded to other groups of patients before the method may be popularized in primary care rehabilitation facilities.

  5. Regularities of filtration of sunflower oil with the use of vibroacoustic exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bredikhin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The residue in sunflower oil is a dispersed phase consisting of particulate products grinding sunflower seeds in the form of particles of the pulp, oil cake, meal, residual quantities of metals, pesticides. In the recycling process they are in the oil in suspension and negatively affect its quality. For research an experimental setup was developed allowing to change the angle of inclination of the filter element. The regularities of filtration were determined without preliminary purification of sunflower oil by centrifugation and after centrifugation. It is established, the contamination of centrifuged oil in the initial period is 14.6 times lower. After 10 minutes of treatment, it decreases by 62%, after 20 minutes – by 79.4%. With a 30-minute treatment, particles of 0.005-0.1 mm in size are removed to 90%, which is approximated to the refined oil in terms of contamination. The influence of vibration-acoustic action on sunflower oil during its filtration is shown. At the last stage of production, the peroxide index is reduced to 2-3 moles of active oxygen, and after 3 months of storage – from 11.8 to 7.7, which according to GOST corresponds to the highest-grade oil. The regularities of the filtration without pre-treatment of sunflower oil by centrifugation and after centrifugation. Shows the effect of vibroacoustic exposure on sunflower oil when filtering. The obtained data on the change of qualitative parameters of sunflower oil during its filtration in the field of vibroacoustic impact.

  6. Vibroacoustic diagnostic monitoring of selected primary coolant circuit components of the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahna, J.; Jaros, I. (Forschungsinstitut fuer Kernkraftwerke, Jaslovske Bohunice (Czechoslovakia))

    1983-02-01

    An information is given about vibroacoustic monitoring systems installed at the two units of the Bohunice V-1 nuclear power plant for oscillation monitoring of the reactor coolant pumps and reactor pressure vessel. Signal processing and analysis techniques have been developed for diagnostic measurements. It is reported on some experience gained from oscillation measurements at the reactor coolant pumps of the V-1 nuclear power plant since commissioning of the plant.

  7. External Contamination Control of Attached Payloads on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Olsen, Randy L.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Schmidl, William D.; Wright, Bruce D.; Koontz, Steven

    2012-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is an on-orbit platform for science utilization in low Earth orbit with multiple sites for external payloads with exposure to the natural and induced environments. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. This paper describes the external contamination control requirements and integration process for externally mounted payloads on the ISS. The external contamination control requirements are summarized and a description of the integration and verification process is detailed to guide payload developers in the certification process of attached payloads on the vehicle. A description of the required data certification deliverables covers the characterization of contamination sources. Such characterization includes identification, usage and operational data for each class of contamination source. Classes of external contamination sources covered are vacuum exposed materials, sources of leakage, vacuum venting and thrusters. ISS system level analyses are conducted by the ISS Space Environments Team to certify compliance with external contamination control requirements. This paper also addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on ISS.

  8. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzolino, M.; Accardo, D.; Rufino, G.; Oliva, E.; Tozzi, A.; Schipani, P.

    2017-03-01

    The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to 0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE), the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture) telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  9. Suspension system for gimbal supported scanning payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polites, Michael E.

    1995-03-01

    Gimballed scanning devices or instruments are the subject of this invention. Scanning is an important aspect of space science. To achieve a scan pattern some means must be provided which impart to the payload an oscillatory motion. Various forms of machines have been employed for controllably conferring on scanning instruments predetermined scan patterns. They include control moment gyroscopes, reaction wheels, torque motors, reaction control systems, and the like. But rotating unbalanced mass (RUM) devices are a new and efficient way to generate scans in gimballed payloads. RUM devices are superior to previous scanning apparatus, but they require power consuming and frequently complex auxiliary control systems to position and reposition the particular scan pattern relative to a target or a number of targets. Herein the control system is simplified. The most frequently employed method for achieving the various scan patterns is to gimbal the scanning device. Gimbals are suspended in such a way that they can be activated to generate the scan pattern. The suspension means described is for payloads supported in gimbals wherein the payload rotation is restricted by a flex pivot so that the payload oscillates, thereby moving in a scan pattern.

  10. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Iuzzolino

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to ~0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE, the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  11. A Cubesat Payload for Exoplanet Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iuzzolino, Marcella; Accardo, Domenico; Rufino, Giancarlo; Oliva, Ernesto; Tozzi, Andrea; Schipani, Pietro

    2017-03-02

    The search for undiscovered planets outside the solar system is a scientific topic that is rapidly spreading into the astrophysical and engineering communities. In this framework, the design of an innovative payload to detect exoplanets from a nano-sized space platform, like a 3U cubesat, is presented. The selected detection method is photometric transit, and the payload aims to detect flux decrements down to ~0.01% with a precision of 12 ppm. The payload design is also aimed at false positive recognition. The solution consists of a four-facets pyramid on the top of the payload, to allow for measurement redundancy and low-resolution spectral dispersion of the star images. The innovative concept is the use of a small and cheap platform for a relevant astronomical mission. The faintest observable target star has V-magnitude equal to 3.38. Despite missions aimed at ultra-precise photometry from microsatellites (e.g., MOST, BRITE), the transit of exoplanets orbiting very bright stars has not yet been surveyed photometrically from space, since any observation from a small/medium sized (30 cm optical aperture) telescope would saturate the detector. This cubesat mission can provide these missing measurements. This work is set up as a demonstrative project to verify the feasibility of the payload concept.

  12. Demonstration of a Thermally-Controlled Shipping Container for NanoRack and CubeSat Payloads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A significant challenge faced by space-bound experiment packages is the requirement for a minimally controlled environment while a small payload is awaiting launch...

  13. Environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentini, Chiara

    2017-01-01

    The term environment refers to the internal and external context in which organizations operate. For some scholars, environment is defined as an arrangement of political, economic, social and cultural factors existing in a given context that have an impact on organizational processes and structures....... For others, environment is a generic term describing a large variety of stakeholders and how these interact and act upon organizations. Organizations and their environment are mutually interdependent and organizational communications are highly affected by the environment. This entry examines the origin...... and development of organization-environment interdependence, the nature of the concept of environment and its relevance for communication scholarships and activities....

  14. Osmotic pressure-dependent release profiles of payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulation of simple salts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Shahed; Rosenauer, Christine; Kappl, Michael; Mohr, Kristin; Landfester, Katharina; Crespy, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    The encapsulation of payloads in micro- to nano-scale capsules allows protection of the payload from the surrounding environment and control of its release profile. Herein, we program the release of hydrophilic payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulating simple inorganic salts for adjusting the osmotic pressure. The latter either leads to a burst release at high concentrations of co-encapsulated salts or a sustained release at lower concentrations. Osmotic pressure causes swelling of the nanocapsule's shell and therefore sustained release profiles can be adjusted by crosslinking it. The approach presented allows for programing the release of payloads by co-encapsulating inexpensive salts inside nanocontainers without the help of stimuli-responsive materials.The encapsulation of payloads in micro- to nano-scale capsules allows protection of the payload from the surrounding environment and control of its release profile. Herein, we program the release of hydrophilic payloads from nanocontainers by co-encapsulating simple inorganic salts for adjusting the osmotic pressure. The latter either leads to a burst release at high concentrations of co-encapsulated salts or a sustained release at lower concentrations. Osmotic pressure causes swelling of the nanocapsule's shell and therefore sustained release profiles can be adjusted by crosslinking it. The approach presented allows for programing the release of payloads by co-encapsulating inexpensive salts inside nanocontainers without the help of stimuli-responsive materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01882c

  15. APPLICATION POSSIBILITY OF SMARTPHONE AS PAYLOAD FOR PHOTOGRAMMETRIC UAV SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    Yun, M. H.; Kim, J.; Seo, D; Lee, J.; Choi, C.

    2012-01-01

    Smartphone can not only be operated under 3G network environment anytime and anyplace but also cost less than the existing photogrammetric UAV since it provides high-resolution image, 3D location and attitude data on a real-time basis from a variety of built-in sensors. This study is aimed to assess the possibility of smartphone as a payload for photogrammetric UAV system. Prior to such assessment, a smartphone-based photogrammetric UAV system application was developed, through which real-tim...

  16. Communications platform payload definition study, executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clopp, H. W.; Hawkes, T. A.; Bertles, C. R.; Pontano, B. A.; Kao, T.

    1986-01-01

    Large geostationary communications platforms have been investigated in a number of studies since 1974 as a possible means to more effectively utilize the geostationary orbital arc and electromagnetic spectrum and to reduce overall satellite communications system costs. This NASA Lewis sponsored study addresses the commercial feasibility of various communications platform payload concepts circa 1998. It defines promising payload concepts, estimates recurring costs and identifies critical technologies needed to permit eventual commercialization. Ten communications service aggregation scenarios describing potential groupings of services were developed for a range of conditions. Payload concepts were defined for four of these scenarios: (1) Land Mobile Satellite Service (LMSS), meet 100% of CONUS plus Canada demand with a single platform; (2) Fixed Satellite Service (FSS) (Trunking + Customer Premises Service (CPS), meet 20% of CONUS demands; (3) FSS (Trunking + video distribution), 10 to 13% of CONUS demand; and (4) FSS (20% of demand) + Inter Satellite Links (ISL) + TDRSS/TDAS Data Distribution.

  17. Smart and intelligent sensor payload project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Engineers working on the smart and intelligent sensor payload project include (l to r): Ed Conley (NASA), Mark Mitchell (Jacobs Technology), Luke Richards (NASA), Robert Drackett (Jacobs Technology), Mark Turowski (Jacobs Technology) , Richard Franzl (seated, Jacobs Technology), Greg McVay (Jacobs Technology), Brianne Guillot (Jacobs Technology), Jon Morris (Jacobs Technology), Stephen Rawls (NASA), John Schmalzel (NASA) and Andrew Bracey (NASA).

  18. Alternative trailer configurations for maximizing payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason D. Thompson; Dana Mitchell; John Klepac

    2017-01-01

    In order for harvesting contractors to stay ahead of increasing costs, it is imperative that they employ all options to maximize productivity and efficiency. Transportation can account for half the cost to deliver wood to a mill. Contractors seek to maximize truck payload to increase productivity. The Forest Operations Research Unit, Southern Research Station, USDA...

  19. Ares V: Shifting the Payload Design Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumrall, Phil; Creech, Steve; Cockrell, Charles E.

    2009-01-01

    NASA is designing the Ares V heavy-lift cargo launch vehicle to send more crew and cargo to more places on the lunar surface than the 1960s-era Saturn V and to provide ongoing support for a permanent lunar outpost. This uncrewed cargo vehicle is designed to operate together with the Ares I crew vehicle (Figure 1). In addition to this role, however, its unmatched mass and volume capability represent a national asset for exploration, science, and commerce. The Ares V also enables or significantly enhances a large class of space missions not thought possible by scientists and engineers since the Saturn V program ended over 30 years ago. Compared to current systems, it will offer approximately five times the mass and volume to most orbits and locations. This should allow prospective mission planners to build robust payloads with margins that are three to five times the industry norm. The space inside the planned payload shroud has enough usable volume to launch the volumetric equivalent of approximately 10 Apollo Lunar Modules or approximately five equivalent Hubble Space Telescopes. This mass and volume capability to low-Earth orbit (LEO) enables a host of new scientific and observation platforms, such as telescopes, satellites, planetary and solar missions, as well as being able to provide the lift for future large in-space infrastructure missions, such as space based solar power and mining, Earth asteroid defense, propellant depots, etc. In addition, payload designers may also have the option of simplifying their designs or employing Ares V s payload as dumb mass to reduce technical and operational risk. The Ares V team is engaging the potential payload community now, two to three years before System Requirements Review (SRR), in order to better understand the additional requirements from the payload community that could be accommodated in the Ares V design in its conceptual phase. This paper will discuss the Ares V reference mission and capability, as well as its

  20. ESPA Based Secondary Payload Orbit Maneuvering System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Co. Inc. proposes to develop/design an integrated propulsion, power, ACS, and separation module for secondary ESPA payloads. The standardized secondary payload...

  1. Use of Model Payload for Europa Mission Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kari; Klaasan, Ken; Susca, Sara; Oaida, Bogdan; Larson, Melora; Vanelli, Tony; Murray, Alex; Jones, Laura; Thomas, Valerie; Frank, Larry

    2016-01-01

    This paper discusses the basis for the Model Payload and how it was used to develop the mission design, observation and data acquisition strategy, needed spacecraft capabilities, spacecraft-payload interface needs, mission system requirements and operational scenarios.

  2. Vibroacoustic Modeling and Path Control of Air-Borne Axle Whine Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Guo

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The axle whine noise will eventually affect the vehicle noise performance. In this study, a systematic modeling approach is developed to analyze the axle whine problem by considering the hypoid gear mesh from the tooth contact process as well as the system dynamics effect with gear design parameters and shaft-bearing-housing system taken into account. Moreover, the tuning of the dominant air-borne path is modeled analytically by using the sound transmission loss idea. First, gear tooth load distribution results are obtained in a 3-dimensional loaded tooth contact analysis program. Then mesh parameters are synthesized and applied to a linear multibody gear dynamic model to obtain dynamic mesh and bearing responses. The bearing responses are used as the excitation force to a housing finite element model. Finally, the vibroacoustic analysis of the axle is performed using the boundary element method; sound pressure responses in the axle surface are then simulated. Transmission losses of different panel partitions are included in the final stage to guide the tuning of air-borne paths to reduce the radiated axle whine noise. The proposed approach gives a more in-depth understanding of the axle whine generation and therefore can further facilitate the system design and trouble-shooting.

  3. Overview of the Orion Vibroacoustic Test Capability at NASA Glenn Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, William O.; Hozman, Aron D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Otten, Kim D.

    2008-01-01

    In order to support the environmental test needs for our new Orion and Constellation program, NASA is developing unique world-class test facilities. To optimize this testing of spaceflight hardware while minimizing transportation issues, a one-stop, under one roof test capability is being developed at the Space Power Facility at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station. This facility will provide the capability to perform the following environmental testing: (1) reverberation acoustic testing, (2) mechanical base-shake sine testing, (3) modal testing, (4) thermal-vacuum testing, and (5) EMI/EMC (electromagnetic interference and compatibility) testing. An overview of this test capability will be provided in this presentation, with special focus on the two new vibroacoustic test facilities currently being designed and built, the Reverberant Acoustic Test Facility (RATF) and the Mechanical Vibration Facility (MVF). Testing of the engineering developmental hardware and qualification hardware of the Orion (Crew Exploration Vehicle) will commence shortly after the facilities are commissioned.

  4. Vibroacoustic Optimization of Stiffening Ribs and Damping Material Distribution on Sheet Metal Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carfagni

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Vehicle noise and vibration levels are basic parameters in passenger comfort. Both static and dynamic stiffness of sheet metal parts is commonly increased by means of stiffening ribs. Vibrations are also reduced by adding a layer of damping material on the floor, the roof, the firewall and other parts of the vehicle. In common practice the panels to be treated are ribbed according to criteria based on the designer’s experience, rather than on well defined design procedures and are uniformly covered by a layer of damping material. However, these are not efficient design solutions, especially with regard to the effectiveness of vibration reduction and to weight containment. In this paper a novel approach to achieve an optimal distribution of stiffening ribs and damping material will be presented. The proposed method is based on a Genetic Algorithm (G.A. procedure which takes into account both the vibroacoustic performance and the weight and cost reduction. A simple case study will be illustrated to demonstrate the capabilities of the developed procedure.

  5. Recovery of Biot's transition frequency of air-saturated poroelastic media using vibroacoustic spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogam, Erick; Fellah, Z. E. A.

    2014-08-01

    The transition frequency marks the passage from low-frequency viscosity dominated flow to high-frequency inertia dominated one in porous media. It was one of the principal characteristics predicted by Biot's theory. The transition frequency has been a theoretical concept for which only theoretical expressions have been developed in recent years. A vibroacoustic spectroscopy experimental method to recover the characteristic frequency (fC) and for gaining insight into the frequency response of fluid-saturated porous materials has been developed. Long thin air-saturated porous rods solicited mechanically are employed for the experiment. Changes in the fluid flow profile with excitation frequency results in relative motion between the skeleton and the saturating-fluid. This enhances the frictional viscous forces, which, in turn, increases damping of the skeletal motion. These transitions are signaled by observable cues in the acquired laser-vibrometry spectrum of the rods' longitudinal vibration mode patterns. The resonance peaks exhibit sudden attenuation (increase in damping) and are interrupted at the transition frequencies evoking a change of propagation medium. These patterns are compared with those of two plains, single phase material (viscoelastic) rods whose modes stand out as regularly spaced moderately damped peaks.

  6. Responses to vibroacoustic stimulation in a fetus with an encephalocele compared to responses of normal fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, C F; Boekkooi, P F; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G

    2000-01-01

    Observation of fetal movement and fetal heart rate (FHR) responses to repeated vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) might be useful as a measure to assess fetal well-being and to assess the integrity of the fetal central nervous system (CNS). We observed the movement and FHR responses to repeated VAS of a term fetus with a serious brain anomaly as compared to responses of normal term fetuses. In 37 normal term fetuses and in a term fetus with an encephalocele we studied movement and FHR response to repeated VAS. All normal fetuses responded within 1 s after stimulation with general body movement and FHR acceleration. At 36 gestational weeks, no movement or FHR responses were seen in the fetus with an encephalocele. Repetition of the test in this fetus after one week still showed no response to repeated VAS. Normal fetuses showed movement and FHR responses to external stimulation. The fetus with an encephalocele did not respond to repeated VAS with a movement or FHR acceleration. Case studies in fetuses with structural anomalies of the CNS are needed to gain insight into the spectrum of possible responses to VAS.

  7. Can vibroacoustic stimulation improve the efficiency of a tertiary care antenatal testing unit?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitz, Amy L; Bastek, Jamie A; Sammel, Mary D; Parry, Samuel; Schwartz, Nadav

    2012-12-01

    Our primary objective was to determine whether vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) decreases time to fetal reactivity in the antenatal testing unit (ATU) of a tertiary care center. We performed a prospective, quality assurance initiative to determine whether VAS could increase the efficiency of our ATU. On pre-specified "VAS days," VAS was applied for 3 s, if the non-stress test was non-reactive in the first 10 min. Generalized estimating equations models were used to account for within subject correlation due to multiple appointments per patient. VAS use was associated with a 3.76-min reduction in time to reactivity (21.79 vs 25.55, p = 0.011) and a 56% reduction in the need for a biophysical profile (OR: 0.44, 95% CI: 0.21-0.90). Overall, however, we found no significant decrease in time spent on the monitor or in the ATU. Compliance with a strict VAS protocol may improve the efficiency of increasingly busy ATUs.

  8. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: Membrane model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-type Acoustic Metamaterials (MAMs) have demonstrated unusual capacity in controlling low-frequency sound transmission/reflection. In this paper, an analytical vibroacoustic membrane model is developed to study sound transmission behavior of the MAM under a normal incidence. The MAM is composed of a prestretched elastic membrane with attached rigid masses. To accurately capture finite-dimension rigid mass effects on the membrane deformation, the point matching approach is adopted by applying a set of distributed point forces along the interfacial boundary between masses and the membrane. The accuracy and capability of the theoretical model is verified through the comparison with the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects such as weight, size and eccentricity of the attached mass, pretension and thickness of the membrane on the resulting transmission peak and dip frequencies of the MAM are quantitatively investigated. New peak and dip frequencies are found for the MAM with one and multiple eccentric attached masses. The developed model can be served as an efficient tool for design of such membrane-type metamaterials.

  9. Analysis of vibroacoustic properties of dimpled beams using a boundary value model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Kyle R.

    Attention has been given recently to the use of dimples as a means of passively altering the vibroacoustic properties of structures. Because of their geometric complexity, previous studies have modeled dimpled structures using the finite element method. However, the dynamics of dimpled structures are not completely understood. The goal of this study is to provide a better understanding of these structures through the development of a boundary value model (BVM) using Hamilton's Variational Principle. The focus of this study is on dimpled beams, which represent the simplest form of a dimpled structure. A general model of a beam with N dimples in free vibration is developed. Since dimples formed via a stamping process do not change the mass of the beam, the dimple thickness is less than that of the straight segments. Differential equations of motion that describe the normal and axial motion of the dimpled beams are derived. Their numerical solution yields the natural frequencies and analytical mode shapes of a dimpled beam. The accuracy of this model is checked against those obtained using the finite element method, as well as the analytical studies on the vibrations of arches, and shown to be accurate. The effect of dimple placement, dimple angle, its chord length, its thickness, as well as beam boundary conditions on beam natural frequencies and mode shapes are investigated. For beams with axially restrictive boundary conditions, the results.

  10. Vibroacoustic Characterization of a New Hybrid Wing-Body Fuselage Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Albert R.; Przekop, Adam

    2012-01-01

    A lighter, more robust airframe design is required to withstand the loading inherent to next generation non cylindrical commercial airliners. The Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure concept, a highly integrated composite design involving a stitched and co-cured substructure, has been developed to meet such requirements. While this structure has been shown to meet the demanding out-of-plane loading requirements of the flat-sided pressurized cabin design, there are concerns that the stiff co-cured details will result in relatively high acoustic radiation efficiencies at frequencies well below the thin skin acoustic coincidence frequency. To address this concern and establish a set of baseline vibroacoustic characteristics, a representative test panel was fabricated and a suite of tests were conducted that involved measurements of panel vibration and radiated sound power during point force and diffuse acoustic field excitations. Experimental results are shown and compared with Finite Element and Statistical Energy Analysis model predictions through the use of modal and energy correlation techniques among others. The behavior of the structure subject to turbulent boundary layer excitation is also numerically examined.

  11. Vibroacoustic behavior of clamp mounted double-panel partition with enclosure air cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, F X; Lu, T J; Chen, C Q

    2008-12-01

    A theoretical study on the vibroacoustic performance of a rectangular double-panel partition clamp mounted in an infinite acoustic rigid baffle is presented. With the clamped boundary condition taken into account by the method of modal function, a double Fourier series solution to the dynamic response of the structure is obtained by employing the weighted residual method (i.e., the Galerkin method). The double series solution can be considered as the exact solution of the problem, as the structural and acoustic-structural coupling effects are fully accounted for and the solution converges numerically. The accuracy of the theoretical predictions is checked against existing experimental data, with good agreement achieved. The influence of several key parameters on the sound isolation capability of the double-panel configuration is then systematically studied, including panel dimensions, thickness of air cavity, elevation angle, and azimuth angle of incidence sound. The present method is suitable for double-panel systems of finite or infinite extent and is applicable for both low- and high-frequency ranges. With these merits, the proposed method compares favorably with a number of other approaches, e.g., finite element method, boundary element method, and statistical energy analysis method.

  12. Identification of material properties of orthotropic elastic cylinders immersed in fluid using vibroacoustic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Daniel E; Brigham, John C; Aquino, Wilkins

    2008-11-01

    A numerical study is presented to show the potential for using vibroacoustic-based experiments to identify elastic material properties of orthotropic cylindrical vessels immersed in fluids. Sensitivity analyses and a simulated inverse problem are shown to quantify the potential for material characterization through the use of acoustic emissions. For comparison purposes, the analyses are also shown with the normal component of the velocity at the surface of the cylinder as the measured response in place of the acoustic pressure. The simulated experiment consisted of an orthotropic cylinder immersed in water with an impact force applied to the surface of the cylinder. The material parameters of the cylinder considered in the analyses were the circumferential and longitudinal elastic moduli, and the in-plane shear modulus. The velocity response is shown to provide sufficient information for characterizing all three moduli from a single experiment. Alternatively, the acoustic pressure response is shown to provide sufficient information for characterizing only the two elastic moduli from a single experiment. The analyses show that the acoustic pressure response does not have sufficient sensitivity to the in-plane shear modulus for characterization purposes.

  13. Computerized fetal heart rate monitoring after vibroacoustic stimulation in the anencephalic fetus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Jin; Park, Seon-Hye; Kim, Young-Jae; Hoh, Jeong-Kyu; Park, Young-Sun; Park, Moon-Il

    2010-09-01

    To quantify changes in fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters after vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) and to evaluate the usefulness of VAS testing (VAST) in anencephalic fetuses. Our findings may also help to clarify the route(s) of vibration and sound transmission during VAST. We obtained the antepartum FHR tracings of 16 anencephalic fetuses, including both the nonstress test (NST) and VAST. Using a computerized monitoring system, HYFM, we determined all FHR parameters from data collected for 10 min before and 10 min after VAS, at successive gestational stages. We observed three false reactive responses at term. The false reactive rate for VAST (3/16) was higher than that for NST (1/16). No FHR parameters increased significantly after VAS except for the number of fetal movements (FM), which increased significantly in all gestational groups (25th-32nd and 33rd-40th weeks). These findings call attention to an increased probability of a false reactive response in VAST analysis, when the fetus is affected by a CNS disorder. Increased numbers of FM after VAS suggest that the vibratory pathway is more likely to elicit fetal response than the auditory pathway in this setting, and that the vibratory stimulation travels by subcortical rather than by cortical pathways. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient modeling of flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments for vibroacoustic finite element analysis. Direct field formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimonti, L.; Atalla, N.

    2016-04-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a simplified model for noise control treatments to speed up finite element analysis in vibroacoustic applications. The methodology relies on the assumption that the acoustic treatment is flat and homogeneous. Moreover, its finite lateral extent is neglected. This hypothesis is justified by short wavelength and large dissipation, which suggest that the reflected field emanating from the acoustic treatment lateral boundaries does not substantially affect its dynamic response. Under these circumstances, the response of the noise control treatment can be formally obtained by means of convolution integrals involving simple analytical kernels (i.e. Green functions). Such fundamental solutions can be computed efficiently by the transfer matrix method. However, some arbitrariness arises in the formulation of the mathematical model, resulting in different baffling conditions at the two ends of the treatment to be considered. Thus, the paper investigates the possibility of different formulations (i.e. baffling conditions) within the same hybrid finite element-transfer matrix framework, seeking for the best strategy in terms of tradeoff between efficiency and accuracy. Numerical examples are provided to show strengths and limitations of the proposed methodology.

  15. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: Reduced models, mobility synthesis, and acoustical radiation regime

    CERN Document Server

    Boutillon, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    In string musical instruments, the sound is radiated by the soundboard, subject to the strings excitation. This vibration of this rather complex structure is described here with models which need only a small number of parameters. Predictions of the models are compared with results of experiments that have been presented in Ege et al. [Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (Non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid- frequency ranges, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (5) (2013) 1288-1305]. The apparent modal density of the soundboard of an upright piano in playing condition, as seen from various points of the structure, exhibits two well-separated regimes, below and above a frequency flim that is determined by the wood characteristics and by the distance between ribs. Above flim, most modes appear to be localised, presumably due to the irregularity of the spacing and height of the ribs. The low-frequency regime is predicted by a model which consists of coupled sub-structures: the two ribbed ar...

  16. Analytical coupled vibroacoustic modeling of membrane-type acoustic metamaterials: membrane model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yangyang; Huang, Guoliang; Zhou, Xiaoming; Hu, Gengkai; Sun, Chin-Teh

    2014-09-01

    Membrane-type acoustic metamaterials (MAMs) have demonstrated unusual capacity in controlling low-frequency sound transmission/reflection. In this paper, an analytical vibroacoustic membrane model is developed to study sound transmission behavior of the MAM under a normal incidence. The MAM is composed of a prestretched elastic membrane with attached rigid masses. To accurately capture finite-dimension rigid mass effects on the membrane deformation, the point matching approach is adopted by applying a set of distributed point forces along the interfacial boundary between masses and the membrane. The accuracy and capability of the theoretical model is verified through the comparison with the finite element method. In particular, microstructure effects such as weight, size, and eccentricity of the attached mass, pretension, and thickness of the membrane on the resulting transmission peak and dip frequencies of the MAM are quantitatively investigated. New peak and dip frequencies are found for the MAM with one and multiple eccentric attached masses. The developed model can be served as an efficient tool for design of such membrane-type metamaterials.

  17. CALIPSO Mission Status Update: Payload Status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verhappen, Ron; Borchardt, Robert; MacDonnell, David; Cisewski, Mike

    2007-01-01

    The CALIPSO mission payload status update is presented. The contents include: 1) Wide Field Camera Overview; 2) WFC Temperatures; 3) WFC Voltages; 4) Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) Health; 5) IIR Voltages; 6) Payload Control (PLC) Voltages; 7) PLC Temperatures; 8) Low Voltage Power Supply (LVPS) (CALOPS0025N); 9) PLC Radiation Effects; 10) SDS Status (CALOPS0020N); 11) CALIOP LIDAR; 12) Laser Energy Trends; 13) Laser Energy Zoom; 14) Laser Management Approach; 15) Green / Red Ratio; 16) Pedestal @ SHG Temperature Trends; 17) LOM Heater Duty Cycle Trends; 18) LOM Pressure Trends; 19) Boresight Trend; 20) 1064 Dark Noise Trend; 21) 532 SNR Trend; 22) Spike Trends; 23) LIDAR Highlights; 24) Backup Laser Status; and 25) Future Plans.

  18. Columbus payload requirements in human physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemann, Juergen

    1993-03-01

    Most of the biological feedback loops in the human body are interrelated. This means that several different parameters have to be recorded simultaneously to understand the interrelationship of different subsystems within the body when fast and slow adaptation processes are to be studied. This determines the requirements for the payload in the Columbus module. In 1988 ESA asked some European scientists in different fields of physiology to provide a 'science study' for the Columbus payload requirements. Their report was the basis of a phase A study completed in December 1991, concerning the 'ANTHROLAB', a laboratory that covers all presently known research challenges in this area. Anthrolab is more or less an improvement of the Anthrorack to be flown on the German Spacelab mission D-2 and on the Columbus precursor flight E-1. Beside the present Anthrorack design, Anthrolab will also provide subelements for vestibular, neurophysiological, and biomechanical research.

  19. TRUPACT-II residue pipe payload container

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geinitz, R. [Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, Golden, CO (United States); Gregory, P. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Carlsbad, NM (United States). Waste Isolation Div.

    1995-06-01

    This paper summarizes the project to develop, test and certify a new payload container for the TRUPACT-II, a Type B packaging for the shipment of transuranic waste. The new payload container will provide segregation of plutonium waste materials within the TRUPACT-II. This segregation of fissile contents will support a new criticality safety analysis that may allow an increase in the TRUPACT-II Pu-239 Fissile Gram Equivalent (FGE) limit from 325 grams to 2800 grams. The need for this project was brought about by the end of the Cold War and the resulting shift in value of plutonium residues from providing recoverable Defense Program material to being considered disposable waste. This paper will not cover many of the details of the project but will instead aim to provide a general picture of all the project activities.

  20. The Science Payload of the LOFT Mission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feroci, Marco; den Herder, J.; van der Klis, M.

    The scientific payload onboard the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing mission (LOFT, see presentation by P. Ray et al. at this meeting) is composed of two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m2 effective area in the primary energy range 2-30 keV, 1-deg collimated field of view) and the ......The scientific payload onboard the Large Observatory For x-ray Timing mission (LOFT, see presentation by P. Ray et al. at this meeting) is composed of two instruments, the Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m2 effective area in the primary energy range 2-30 keV, 1-deg collimated field of view...

  1. Geostationary payload concepts for personal satellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedicto, J.; Rinous, P.; Roberts, I.; Roederer, A.; Stojkovic, I.

    1993-01-01

    This paper reviews candidate satellite payload architectures for systems providing world-wide communication services to mobile users equipped with hand-held terminals based on large geostationary satellites. There are a number of problems related to the payload architecture, on-board routing and beamforming, and the design of the S-band Tx and L-band Rx antenna and front ends. A number of solutions are outlined, based on trade-offs with respect to the most significant performance parameters such as capacity, G/T, flexibility of routing traffic to beams and re-configuration of the spot-beam coverage, and payload mass and power. Candidate antenna and front-end configurations were studied, in particular direct radiating arrays, arrays magnified by a reflector and active focused reflectors with overlapping feed clusters for both transmit (multimax) and receive (beam synthesis). Regarding the on-board routing and beamforming sub-systems, analog techniques based on banks of SAW filters, FET or CMOS switches and cross-bar fixed and variable beamforming are compared with a hybrid analog/digital approach based on Chirp Fourier Transform (CFT) demultiplexer combined with digital beamforming or a fully digital processor implementation, also based on CFT demultiplexing.

  2. Moon Express: Lander Capabilities and Initial Payload and Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spudis, P.; Richards, R.; Burns, J. O.

    2013-12-01

    chemical analysis and neutron measurements would be completed within an hour or so. If any propellant remains after landing and a 'hop' to another site was undertaken, we can repeat these analyses at the second site, adding confidence that we have obtained representative measurements. Thus, the scientific goals of the first Moon Express mission are satisfied early and easily in the mission profile. This mission scenario provides significant scientific accomplishment for very little investment in payload and operations. Although minimally configured, the payload has been chosen to provide the most critical ground truth parameters for mapping hydrogen concentrations across the entire lunar surface. As hydrogen is a key element to the development of the Moon, understanding its occurrences in both non-polar and polar environments is critical. This mission achieves significant new scientific accomplishment as well as taking the first steps towards lunar presence and permanence.

  3. System for vibroacoustic inspection of equipment in the first loop of an atomic electric power plant. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samarin, A.A.; Krasyuk, V.Ya.; Ivanov, Yu.S.; Pospelko, A.A.

    1975-11-01

    A system is described for vibroacoustic inspection of equipment in the first loop of a nuclear power plant with water-moderated water-cooled power reactors. This monitoring system is now in operation at the Novovoronezh Power Plant. The installation performs the following functions: measurement and registration of effective and peak levels of structural noise and vibrations of the main technological equipment in the first loop; amplitude-frequency analysis of structural noises and vibration of equipment; (sound and light) signaling when the current noise level and vibration level exceed the present level; provides facilities for an operator to listen to structural noise of running equipment.

  4. PIMS-Universal Payload Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, Ralph; McNair, Ann R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    As the overall manager and integrator of International Space Station (ISS) science payloads and experiments, the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) at Marshall Space Flight Center had a critical need to provide an information management system for exchange and management of ISS payload files as well as to coordinate ISS payload related operational changes. The POIC's information management system has a fundamental requirement to provide secure operational access not only to users physically located at the POIC, but also to provide collaborative access to remote experimenters and International Partners. The Payload Information Management System (PIMS) is a ground based electronic document configuration management and workflow system that was built to service that need. Functionally, PIMS provides the following document management related capabilities: 1. File access control, storage and retrieval from a central repository vault. 2. Collect supplemental data about files in the vault. 3. File exchange with a PMS GUI client, or any FTP connection. 4. Files placement into an FTP accessible dropbox for pickup by interfacing facilities, included files transmitted for spacecraft uplink. 5. Transmission of email messages to users notifying them of new version availability. 6. Polling of intermediate facility dropboxes for files that will automatically be processed by PIMS. 7. Provide an API that allows other POIC applications to access PIMS information. Functionally, PIMS provides the following Change Request processing capabilities: 1. Ability to create, view, manipulate, and query information about Operations Change Requests (OCRs). 2. Provides an adaptable workflow approval of OCRs with routing through developers, facility leads, POIC leads, reviewers, and implementers. Email messages can be sent to users either involving them in the workflow process or simply notifying them of OCR approval progress. All PIMS document management and OCR workflow controls are

  5. Hermod: optical payload technology demonstrator flying on PROBA-V: overview of the payload development, testing and results after 1 year in orbit exploitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, S.; Blasco, J.; Henriksen, V.; Samuelsson, H.; Navasquillo, O.; Grimsgaard, M.; Mellab, K.

    2017-11-01

    Proba-V is the third mission of ESA's Programme for In-orbit Technology Demonstration (IOD), based on a small, high performance satellite platform and a compact payload. Besides, the main satellite instrument aiming at Vegetation imaging, Proba-V embarks five technological payloads providing early flight opportunities for novel instruments and space technologies. Successfully launched by the ESA VEGA launcher in May 2013, it has now completed its commissioning and the full calibration of platform, main instrument and additional payloads and is, since last October, fully operational. The High dEnsity space foRM cOnnector Demonstration or HERMOD is the last payload selected to fly on Proba-V. The payload objective is to validate through an actual launch and in orbit high-density optical fibre cable assembly, cumulate space heritage for fibre optics transmission and evaluate possible degradation induced by the space environment compared to on-ground tests. The future applications of this technology are for intrasatellite optical communications in view of mass reduction, the electrical grounding simplification and to increase the transmission rate. The project has been supported under an ESA GSTP contract. T&G Elektro (Norway) developed and tested the different optical cable assembly to be validated in the payload. The electrooptic modules, control, power and mechanical interfaces have been developed by DAS Photonics (Spain). The payload contains four optical channels to be studied through the experiment, two assemblies with MTP/PC connectors and two assemblies with MPO/APC connectors. Optical data is transmitted in the four independent channels using two optoelectronic conversion modules (SIOS) working at 100Mbps including 2 full duplex channels each. A FPGA is used to generate, receive and compare the different binary patterns. The number of errors (if any) and Bit Error Rate (BER) is sent to the satellite TM interface. HERMOD successfully went through all mechanical

  6. Science and technology results from the OSS-1 payload on the Space Shuttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipman, Eric G.

    The OSS-1 Payload of nine experiments was carried on the STS-3 Space Shuttle flight in March of 1982. The OSS-1 Payload contained four instruments that evaluated specific aspects of the Orbiter's environment, including the levels of particulate, gaseous and electromagnetic emissions given off by the Orbiter, and the interactions between the Orbiter and the surrounding plasma. In addition to these environmental observations, these instruments performed scientific investigations in astronomy and in space plasma physics, including active experiments in electron beam propagation. Other experiments were in the areas of solar physics, plant growth, micrometeorite studies and the technology of actively controlled heat pipes. We present the initial results from these experiments, with some implications of these results for future operation of space experiments from the Shuttle payload bay. One major result was the unexpected discovery of a faint surface-induced optical glow created near the Shuttle surfaces by impacts of ambient atmospheric atoms and molecules.

  7. STS-39 AFP-675 and STP-1 MPESS in OV-103's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    An overview of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, aft payload bay (PLB) documents a variety of STS-39's payloads. In the foreground is the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) with the Spacecraft Kinetic Infrared Test (SKIRT) (left), ascent particle monitor (APM) (center), and advanced liquid feed experiment (ALFE) (two canisters) visible. Behind the STP-1 is the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS) with ESS tape recorders (left), Uniformly Redundant Array (URA) (front),and Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle 1A (CIRRIS-1A) (center back) visible. The ESS pallet power distribution system thermal covering (gold-colored) is visible at the bottom. AFP-675 is a Department of Defense (DOD)-sponsored collection of experiments whose objective is to gather data on the Earth's atmosphere (aurora, Earth limb, and airglow), celestial objects, and the environment in and around the PLB. In the backgroun

  8. Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) study. Volume 1: Executive summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, E. M.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 1 (Executive Summary) of the Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation Final Report for the Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) Study program conducted for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract No. NAS3-24235. This report presents the results of the study effort leading to five potential platform payloads to service CONUS and WARC Region 2 traffic demand as projected to the year 2008. The report addresses establishing the data bases, developing service aggregation scenarios, selecting and developing 5 payload concepts, performing detailed definition of the 5 payloads, costing them, identifying critical technology, and finally comparing the payloads with each other and also with non-aggregated equivalent services.

  9. Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) study. Volume 3: Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, E. M.; Driggers, T.; Jorasch, R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 3 (Addendum) of the Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation Final Report for the Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) Study Program conducted for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract No. NAS3-24235. This report presents the results of the study effort leading to five potential platform payloads to service CONUS and WARC Region 2 traffic demand as projected to the year 2008. The report addresses establishing the data bases, developing service aggregation scenarios, selecting and developing 5 payload concepts, performing detailed definition of the 5 payloads, costing them, identifying critical technology, and finally comparing the payloads with each other and also with non-aggregated equivalent services.

  10. Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) study. Volume 2: Technical report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, E. M.; Driggers, T.; Jorasch, R.

    1986-01-01

    This is Volume 2 (Technical Report) of the Ford Aerospace & Communications Corporation Final Report for the Communication Platform Payload Definition (CPPD) Study program conducted for NASA Lewis Research Center under contract No. NAS3-24235. This report presents the results of the study effort leading to five potential platform payloads to service CONUS and WARC Region 2 traffic demand as projected to the year 2008. The report addresses establishing the data bases, developing service aggregation scenarios, selecting and developing 5 payload concepts, performing detailed definition of the 5 payloads, costing them, identifying critical technology, and finally comparing the payloads with each other and also with non-aggregated equivalent services.

  11. STS-107 crew members during payload check in the OPF

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - STS-107 Payload Specialist Ilan Ramon (left), with the Israeli Space Agency, and Payload Commander Michael Anderson pause during a payload check in the Orbiter Processing Facility. A research mission, STS-107 will carry as the primary payload the first flight of the SHI Research Double Module (SHI/RDM), also known as SPACEHAB. The experiments range from material sciences to life sciences. Another payload is FREESTAR (Fast Reaction Experiments Enabling Science, Technology, Applications and Research) comprising Mediterranean Israeli Dust, Solar Constant, Shuttle Ozone Limb Sounding, Critical Viscosity of Xenon, Low Power, and Space Experimental Module experiments. STS-107 is scheduled to launch July 11, 2002

  12. The effects of Vibroacoustic treatment on girls and women with Rett Syndrome: Paper to the 2nd International Scientific Research Workshop: Infant Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Anthony Lewis

    2003-01-01

    Vibroacoustic therapy is a treatment using the relaxing effects of sedative music combined with pulsed, sinusoidal low frequency tones between 35Hz-70Hz, transmitted through bass speakers built into a bed or chair. This treatment has shown effects in reducing arousal level in girls and women with...... with Rett syndrome, and also reducing muscle tone....

  13. Ares I-X Launch Abort System, Crew Module, and Upper Stage Simulator Vibroacoustic Flight Data Evaluation, Comparison to Predictions, and Recommendations for Adjustments to Prediction Methodology and Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Harrison, Phil

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Constellation Program (CxP) has identified a series of tests to provide insight into the design and development of the Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV). Ares I-X was selected as the first suborbital development flight test to help meet CxP objectives. The Ares I-X flight test vehicle (FTV) is an early operational model of CLV, with specific emphasis on CLV and ground operation characteristics necessary to meet Ares I-X flight test objectives. The in-flight part of the test includes a trajectory to simulate maximum dynamic pressure during flight and perform a stage separation of the Upper Stage Simulator (USS) from the First Stage (FS). The in-flight test also includes recovery of the FS. The random vibration response from the ARES 1-X flight will be reconstructed for a few specific locations that were instrumented with accelerometers. This recorded data will be helpful in validating and refining vibration prediction tools and methodology. Measured vibroacoustic environments associated with lift off and ascent phases of the Ares I-X mission will be compared with pre-flight vibration predictions. The measured flight data was given as time histories which will be converted into power spectral density plots for comparison with the maximum predicted environments. The maximum predicted environments are documented in the Vibroacoustics and Shock Environment Data Book, AI1-SYS-ACOv4.10 Vibration predictions made using statistical energy analysis (SEA) VAOne computer program will also be incorporated in the comparisons. Ascent and lift off measured acoustics will also be compared to predictions to assess whether any discrepancies between the predicted vibration levels and measured vibration levels are attributable to inaccurate acoustic predictions. These comparisons will also be helpful in assessing whether adjustments to prediction methodologies are needed to improve agreement between the

  14. Comparison of Estimation Techniques for Vibro-Acoustic Transfer Path Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Eduardo França Padilha

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibro-acoustic Transfer Path Analysis (TPA is a tool to evaluate the contribution of different energy propagation paths between a source and a receiver, linked to each other by a number of connections. TPA is typically used to quantify and rank the relative importance of these paths in a given frequency band, determining the most significant one to the receiver. Basically, two quantities have to be determined for TPA: the operational forces at each transfer path and the Frequency Response Functions (FRF of these paths. The FRF are obtained either experimentally or analytically, and the influence of the mechanical impedance of the source can be taken into account or not. The operational forces can be directly obtained from measurements using force transducers or indirectly estimated from auxiliary response measurements. Two methods to obtain the operational forces indirectly – the Complex Stiffness Method (CSM and the Matrix Inversion Method (MIM – associated with two possible configurations to determine the FRF – including and excluding the source impedance – are presented and discussed in this paper. The effect of weak and strong coupling among the paths is also commented considering the techniques previously presented. The main conclusion is that, with the source removed, CSM gives more accurate results. On the other hand, with the source present, MIM is preferable. In the latter case, CSM should be used only if there is a high impedance mismatch between the source and the receiver. Both methods are not affected by a higher or lower degree of coupling among the transfer paths.

  15. A three-dimensional vibroacoustic model for the prediction of underwater noise from offshore pile driving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsouvalas, A.; Metrikine, A. V.

    2014-04-01

    Steel monopiles are nowadays widely used as foundations for a large number of offshore structures. The installation procedure commonly involves a pile driving process which can last up to several hours depending upon pile dimensions, soil conditions and input energy of the hydraulic hammer. In impact pile driving, a hydraulic hammer delivers a series of hammer blows at the head of the pile that drive the pile into the sediment. Each hammer strike results in pile vibrations that emit strong impulsive sounds into the water column which can be harmful for the marine ecosystem. With today's increasing concern regarding the environmental impact of such operations, engineering tools which will be able to provide reliable predictions of the underwater noise levels are required. In this study, a linear semi-analytical formulation of the coupled vibroacoustics of a complete pile-water-soil interaction model is addressed. The pile is described by a high order thin shell theory whereas both water and soil are modelled as three-dimensional continua. Results obtained with the developed model indicate that the near-field response in the water column consists mainly of pressure conical waves generated by the supersonic compressional waves in the pile excited by the impact hammer. The soil response is dominated by shear waves with almost vertical polarization. The Scholte waves are also generated at the water-seabed interface which can produce pressure fluctuations in the water column that are particularly significant close to the sea floor. The effects of soil elasticity and pile size are thoroughly investigated and their influence on the generated pressure levels is highlighted. The results are also compared with those ones of a similar model in which the soil is treated as an equivalent acoustic fluid. It is shown that the latter approximation can yield inaccurate results at low frequencies especially for harder soil sediments.

  16. Fetal habituation to vibroacoustic stimulation in relation to fetal states and fetal heart rate parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heteren, C F; Boekkooi, P F; Jongsma, H W; Nijhuis, J G

    2001-03-01

    Fetal habituation to repeated stimulation has the potential to become a tool in the assessment of fetal condition and of the function of the fetal central nervous system (CNS). However, the influence of fetal quiescence and activity on habituation remains to be clarified. We studied habituation and the influence of fetal state and fetal heart rate (FHR) parameters on habituation in healthy term fetuses. We studied habituation in 37 healthy fetuses in two tests with an interval of 10 min. The vibroacoustic stimuli were applied to the maternal abdomen above the fetal legs for a period of 1 s every 30 s. A fetal trunk movement within 1 s after stimulation was defined as a positive response. Habituation rate is defined as the number of stimuli applied before an observed non-response to four consecutive stimuli. The FHR patterns (FHRP) of the 10 min observation period before and after the tests were visually classified. Fetal states were defined according to the FHRP. Baseline FHR, FHR variability and the number of accelerations were calculated in a subgroup of 25 fetuses. Of the 32 fetuses that responded normally during the first test, 26 habituated and six had persistent responses. The median habituation rate decreased significantly in the second test (P=0.001). There was no difference in habituation rate between fetuses that where initially in a quiet state and those in an active state. The FHR parameters before the first test and the difference between these FHR parameters before and after the test did not correlate with the habituation rate. Although the majority of healthy fetuses was able to habituate, the interfetal variability in habituation performance is such that testing of habituation seems not to be a sensitive tool for the assessment of the fetal CNS. This variability is neither the result of differences in fetal state nor of the various FHR parameters before testing, nor of the difference in change of FHR parameters arising from stimulation.

  17. Vibroacoustic disease: biological effects of infrasound and low-frequency noise explained by mechanotransduction cellular signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Pereira, Mariana; Castelo Branco, Nuno A A

    2007-01-01

    At present, infrasound (0-20 Hz) and low-frequency noise (20-500 Hz) (ILFN, 0-500 Hz) are agents of disease that go unchecked. Vibroacoustic disease (VAD) is a whole-body pathology that develops in individuals excessively exposed to ILFN. VAD has been diagnosed within several professional groups employed within the aeronautical industry, and in other heavy industries. However, given the ubiquitous nature of ILFN and the absence of legislation concerning ILFN, VAD is increasingly being diagnosed among members of the general population, including children. VAD is associated with the abnormal growth of extra-cellular matrices (collagen and elastin), in the absence of an inflammatory process. In VAD, the end-product of collagen and elastin growth is reinforcement of structural integrity. This is seen in blood vessels, cardiac structures, trachea, lung, and kidney of both VAD patients and ILFN-exposed animals. VAD is, essentially, a mechanotransduction disease. Inter- and intra-cellular communication is achieved through both biochemical and mechanotranduction signalling. When the structural components of tissue are altered, as is seen in ILFN-exposed specimens, the mechanically mediated signalling is, at best, impaired. Common medical diagnostic tests, such as EKG, EEG, as well as many blood chemistry analyses, are based on the mal-function of biochemical signalling processes. VAD patients typically present normal values for these tests. However, when echocardiography, brain MRI or histological studies are performed, where structural changes can be identified, all consistently show significant changes in VAD patients and ILFN-exposed animals. Frequency-specific effects are not yet known, valid dose-responses have been difficult to identify, and large-scale epidemiological studies are still lacking.

  18. An advanced material science payload for GAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joensson, R.; Wallin, S.; Loeth, K.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of the experiment is to study solidification of different compositions of lead-tin. The weight of the material is quite high: 8 kilograms. Nearly 10% of the payload is sample weight. The dendritic growth and the effect of the absence of natural convection are of particular interest. The results from the flight processed samples will be compared with results from Earth processed samples in order to investigate the influence of the natural convection on the solidification process. The power systems, heat storage and rejection, and mechanical support are discussed in relationship to the scientific requirements.

  19. Optical Payload for the STARE Mission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simms, L; Riot, V; De Vries, W; Olivier, S S; Pertica, A; Bauman, B J; Phillion, D; Nikolaev, S

    2011-03-13

    Space-based Telescopes for Actionable Refinement of Ephemeris (STARE) is a nano-sat based mission designed to better determine the trajectory of satellites and space debris in orbit around earth. In this paper, we give a brief overview of the mission and its place in the larger context of Space Situational Awareness (SSA). We then describe the details of the central optical payload, touching on the optical design and characterization of the on-board image sensor used in our Cubesat based prototype. Finally, we discuss the on-board star and satellite track detection algorithm central to the success of the mission.

  20. AltiKa: a Ka-band Altimetry Payload and System for Operational Altimetry during the GMES Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Verron

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the Ka-band altimetry payload and system that has beenstudied for several years by CNES, ALCATEL SPACE and some science laboratories.Altimetry is one of the major elements of the ocean observing system to be madesustainable through the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems and GMES(Global Monitoring of the Environment and Security programs. A short review of somemission objectives to be fulfilled in terms of mesoscale oceanography in the frame of theGEOSS and GMES programs is performed. To answer the corresponding requirements, theapproach consisting in a constellation of nadir altimeter is discussed. A coupled Ka-bandaltimeter-radiometer payload is then described; technical items are detailed to explain howthis payload shall meet the science and operational requirements, and expectedperformances are displayed. The current status of the payload development and flightperspectives are given.

  1. Trans Atlantic Infrasound Payload (TAIP) Operation Plan.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lees, Jonathan M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2018-01-01

    The Carolina Infrasound package, added as a piggyback to the 2016 ULDB ight, recorded unique acoustic signals such as the ocean microbarom and a large meteor. These data both yielded unique insights into the acoustic energy transfer from the lower to the upper atmosphere as well as highlighted the vast array of signals whose origins remain unknown. Now, the opportunity to y a payload across the north Atlantic offers an opportunity to sample one of the most active ocean microbarom sources on Earth. Improvements in payload capabilities should result in characterization of the higher frequency range of the stratospheric infrasound spectrum as well. Finally, numerous large mining and munitions disposal explosions in the region may provide \\ground truth" events for assessing the detection capability of infrasound microphones in the stratosphere. The flight will include three different types of infrasound sensors. One type is a pair of polarity reversed InfraBSU microphones (standard for high altitude flights since 2016), another is a highly sensitive Chaparral 60 modified for a very low corner period, and the final sensor is a lightweight, low power Gem infrasound package. By evaluating these configurations against each other on the same flight, we will be able to optimize future campaigns with different sensitivity and mass constraints.

  2. Ensuring Payload Safety in Missions with Special Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staubus, Calvert A.; Willenbring, Rachel C.; Blankenship, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) payload space flight missions involve cooperative work between NASA and partners including spacecraft (or payload) contractors, universities, nonprofit research centers, Agency payload organization, Range Safety organization, Agency launch service organizations, and launch vehicle contractors. The role of NASA's Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) Directorate is typically fairly straightforward, but when a mission's partnerships become more complex, to realize cost and science benefits (e.g., multi-agency payload(s) or cooperative international missions), the task of ensuring payload safety becomes much more challenging. This paper discusses lessons learned from NASA safety professionals working multiple-agency missions and offers suggestions to help fellow safety professionals working multiple-agency missions.

  3. APPLICATION POSSIBILITY OF SMARTPHONE AS PAYLOAD FOR PHOTOGRAMMETRIC UAV SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Yun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Smartphone can not only be operated under 3G network environment anytime and anyplace but also cost less than the existing photogrammetric UAV since it provides high-resolution image, 3D location and attitude data on a real-time basis from a variety of built-in sensors. This study is aimed to assess the possibility of smartphone as a payload for photogrammetric UAV system. Prior to such assessment, a smartphone-based photogrammetric UAV system application was developed, through which real-time image, location and attitude data was obtained using smartphone under both static and dynamic conditions. Subsequently the accuracy assessment on the location and attitude data obtained and sent by this system was conducted. The smartphone images were converted into ortho-images through image triangulation. The image triangulation was conducted in accordance with presence or absence of consideration of the interior orientation (IO parameters determined by camera calibration. In case IO parameters were taken into account in the static experiment, the results from triangulation for any smartphone type were within 1.5 pixel (RMSE, which was improved at least by 35% compared to when IO parameters were not taken into account. On the contrary, the improvement effect of considering IO parameters on accuracy in triangulation for smartphone images in dynamic experiment was not significant compared to the static experiment. It was due to the significant impact of vibration and sudden attitude change of UAV on the actuator for automatic focus control within the camera built in smartphone under the dynamic condition. This cause appears to have a negative impact on the image-based DEM generation. Considering these study findings, it is suggested that smartphone is very feasible as a payload for UAV system. It is also expected that smartphone may be loaded onto existing UAV playing direct or indirect roles significantly.

  4. Application Possibility of Smartphone as Payload for Photogrammetric Uav System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, M. H.; Kim, J.; Seo, D.; Lee, J.; Choi, C.

    2012-07-01

    Smartphone can not only be operated under 3G network environment anytime and anyplace but also cost less than the existing photogrammetric UAV since it provides high-resolution image, 3D location and attitude data on a real-time basis from a variety of built-in sensors. This study is aimed to assess the possibility of smartphone as a payload for photogrammetric UAV system. Prior to such assessment, a smartphone-based photogrammetric UAV system application was developed, through which real-time image, location and attitude data was obtained using smartphone under both static and dynamic conditions. Subsequently the accuracy assessment on the location and attitude data obtained and sent by this system was conducted. The smartphone images were converted into ortho-images through image triangulation. The image triangulation was conducted in accordance with presence or absence of consideration of the interior orientation (IO) parameters determined by camera calibration. In case IO parameters were taken into account in the static experiment, the results from triangulation for any smartphone type were within 1.5 pixel (RMSE), which was improved at least by 35% compared to when IO parameters were not taken into account. On the contrary, the improvement effect of considering IO parameters on accuracy in triangulation for smartphone images in dynamic experiment was not significant compared to the static experiment. It was due to the significant impact of vibration and sudden attitude change of UAV on the actuator for automatic focus control within the camera built in smartphone under the dynamic condition. This cause appears to have a negative impact on the image-based DEM generation. Considering these study findings, it is suggested that smartphone is very feasible as a payload for UAV system. It is also expected that smartphone may be loaded onto existing UAV playing direct or indirect roles significantly.

  5. NASA Expendable Launch Vehicle (ELV) Payload Safety Review Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starbus, Calvert S.; Donovan, Shawn; Dook, Mike; Palo, Tom

    2007-01-01

    Issues addressed by this program: (1) Complicated roles and responsibilities associated with multi-partner projects (2) Working relationships and communications between all organizations involved in the payload safety process (3) Consistent interpretation and implementation of safety requirements from one project to the rest (4) Consistent implementation of the Tailoring Process (5) Clearly defined NASA decision-making-authority (6) Bring Agency-wide perspective to each ElV payload project. Current process requires a Payload Safety Working Group (PSWG) for eac payload with representatives from all involved organizations.

  6. A Human Factors Framework for Payload Display Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Mariea C.; Hutchinson, Sonya L.

    1998-01-01

    During missions to space, one charge of the astronaut crew is to conduct research experiments. These experiments, referred to as payloads, typically are controlled by computers. Crewmembers interact with payload computers by using visual interfaces or displays. To enhance the safety, productivity, and efficiency of crewmember interaction with payload displays, particular attention must be paid to the usability of these displays. Enhancing display usability requires adoption of a design process that incorporates human factors engineering principles at each stage. This paper presents a proposed framework for incorporating human factors engineering principles into the payload display design process.

  7. Mission-Aware Payloads for Unmanned Platforms Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sentix and Brigham Young University propose the research and development of embedded payload intelligence for inflight optimization of surveillance, reconnaissance,...

  8. 200 kg space payload recovery system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherr, Karl-Friedrich; Norrvi, Olle; Pepper, William B.

    For the recovery of a 200 kg space payload from 800 km altitude a parachute system with minimal weight was to be designed. The allowed parachute mass (without parachute canister) was 7 kg, the maximum impact velocity 8 m/s. This required the partial use of Kevlar as a high strength/low weight material. Also, two parachute systems were considered: (1) a conventional system consisting of a conical ribbon drogue chute and a very light cross main chute; and (2) an alternative system consisting of rotating parachutes with high drag coefficient. In a next step flight tests are planned with a rotating parachute as the drogue and a cross canopy as the main parachute.

  9. Digital payloads - Enhanced performance through signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjornstrom, G.

    A transparent signal-processing payload architecture applicable to mobile communication satellites is introduced, and its features and implementation issues are discussed. In its basic form it is characterized by the formation of a large number of narrowband beams directed at the individual users on ground, and is demonstrated to offer improved transmit power efficiency, frequency-reuse capability and traffic-routing flexibility. The processor implementation is envisaged to make extensive use of digital processing functions and ASIC technology combined with advanced SAW techniques. In addition to its inherent attractive features, this architecture provides many of the benefits of full onboard regeneration and processing while preserving most of the flexibility of conventional analog transponders. Simplified derivatives of the basic configuration that offer reduced processing complexity while preserving the essential advantages gained are also presented. Although initially conceived for FDMA/SCPC-type traffic, the concept can also be adapted to other transmission formats.

  10. Nonprofit, payload process improvement through lean management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Melissa

    Organizations that are successful and competitive long-term have learned to efficiently utilize their resources, such as money, people, facilities, and time. Over the last half-century, there have been a variety of theories and techniques put forth on how to do this. One recent theory applied in the aerospace industry is Lean Management (LM), which emphasizes a customer focus and a rigorous elimination of activities that do not add value from the customer's perspective. LM has not, until now, been evaluated for small, nonprofit, one-off production organizations (NOPOs). Previous research on LM focused on for-profit companies and large-scale production organizations, producing relatively similar products repetitively (e.g. automobiles, commercial satellites, aircraft, and launch vehicles). One-off production organizations typically create one-of-a-kind products. The purpose of this research is to examine the applicability of LM to a NOPO. LM will improve resource utilization and thereby competitiveness, as well as exploring a new area of knowledge and research. The research methodology consists of conducting case studies, formal and informal interviews, observation and analysis in order to assess whether and how LM may be beneficial. The research focuses on one particular NOPO, BioServe Space Technologies (BST): a nonprofit, payload development organization. Additional NOPOs were interviewed in order to draw more generalized conclusions about LM benefits. The research demonstrates that LM is applicable to NOPOs, thus providing a tool to improve efficiency and competitiveness. Results from this research are guidelines for payload development organizations to implement LM, and highlighting potential LM weaknesses. A major conclusion is that LM needs some minor modifications to be applicable and useful to NOPOs, particularly in terms of value stream mapping. The LM implementation roadmap developed for NOPOs introduces customized metrics, as well as including standard

  11. ISS Microgravity Research Payload Training Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlagheck, Ronald; Geveden, Rex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Microgravity Research Discipline has multiple categories of science payloads that are being planned and currently under development to operate on various ISS on-orbit increments. The current program includes six subdisciplines; Materials Science, Fluids Physics, Combustion Science, Fundamental Physics, Cellular Biology and Macromolecular Biotechnology. All of these experiment payloads will require the astronaut various degrees of crew interaction and science observation. With the current programs planning to build various facility class science racks, the crew will need to be trained on basic core operations as well as science background. In addition, many disciplines will use the Express Rack and the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG) to utilize the accommodations provided by these facilities for smaller and less complex type hardware. The Microgravity disciplines will be responsible to have a training program designed to maximize the experiment and hardware throughput as well as being prepared for various contingencies both with anomalies as well as unexpected experiment observations. The crewmembers will need various levels of training from simple tasks as power on and activate to extensive training on hardware mode change out to observing the cell growth of various types of tissue cultures. Sample replacement will be required for furnaces and combustion type modules. The Fundamental Physics program will need crew EVA support to provide module change out of experiment. Training will take place various research centers and hardware development locations. It is expected that onboard training through various methods and video/digital technology as well as limited telecommunication interaction. Since hardware will be designed to operate from a few weeks to multiple research increments, flexibility must be planned in the training approach and procedure skills to optimize the output as well as the equipment maintainability. Early increment lessons learned

  12. Multi-GPU and multi-CPU accelerated FDTD scheme for vibroacoustic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, J.; Otero, B.; Bleda, S.; Gallego, S.; Neipp, C.; Márquez, A.; Beléndez, A.

    2015-06-01

    The Finite-Difference Time-Domain (FDTD) method is applied to the analysis of vibroacoustic problems and to study the propagation of longitudinal and transversal waves in a stratified media. The potential of the scheme and the relevance of each acceleration strategy for massively computations in FDTD are demonstrated in this work. In this paper, we propose two new specific implementations of the bi-dimensional scheme of the FDTD method using multi-CPU and multi-GPU, respectively. In the first implementation, an open source message passing interface (OMPI) has been included in order to massively exploit the resources of a biprocessor station with two Intel Xeon processors. Moreover, regarding CPU code version, the streaming SIMD extensions (SSE) and also the advanced vectorial extensions (AVX) have been included with shared memory approaches that take advantage of the multi-core platforms. On the other hand, the second implementation called the multi-GPU code version is based on Peer-to-Peer communications available in CUDA on two GPUs (NVIDIA GTX 670). Subsequently, this paper presents an accurate analysis of the influence of the different code versions including shared memory approaches, vector instructions and multi-processors (both CPU and GPU) and compares them in order to delimit the degree of improvement of using distributed solutions based on multi-CPU and multi-GPU. The performance of both approaches was analysed and it has been demonstrated that the addition of shared memory schemes to CPU computing improves substantially the performance of vector instructions enlarging the simulation sizes that use efficiently the cache memory of CPUs. In this case GPU computing is slightly twice times faster than the fine tuned CPU version in both cases one and two nodes. However, for massively computations explicit vector instructions do not worth it since the memory bandwidth is the limiting factor and the performance tends to be the same than the sequential version

  13. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: Reduced models, mobility synthesis, and acoustical radiation regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutillon, Xavier; Ege, Kerem

    2013-09-01

    In string musical instruments, the sound is radiated by the soundboard, subject to the strings excitation. This vibration of this rather complex structure is described here with models which need only a small number of parameters. Predictions of the models are compared with the results of experiments that have been presented in Ege et al. [Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid-frequency ranges, Journal of Sound and Vibration 332 (5) (2013) 1288-1305]. The apparent modal density of the soundboard of an upright piano in playing condition, as seen from various points of the structure, exhibits two well-separated regimes, below and above a frequency flim that is determined by the wood characteristics and by the distance between ribs. Above flim, most modes appear to be localised, presumably due to the irregularity of the spacing and height of the ribs. The low-frequency regime is predicted by a model which consists of coupled sub-structures: the two ribbed areas split by the main bridge and, in most cases, one or two so-called cut-off corners. In order to assess the dynamical properties of each of the subplates (considered here as homogeneous plates), we propose a derivation of the (low-frequency) modal density of an orthotropic homogeneous plate which accounts for the boundary conditions on an arbitrary geometry. Above flim, the soundboard, as seen from a given excitation point, is modelled as a set of three structural wave-guides, namely the three inter-rib spacings surrounding the excitation point. Based on these low- and high-frequency models, computations of the point-mobility and of the apparent modal densities seen at several excitation points match published measurements. The dispersion curve of the wave-guide model displays an acoustical radiation scheme which differs significantly from that of a thin homogeneous plate. It appears that piano dimensioning is such that the subsonic regime of acoustical

  14. Selection of shuttle payload data processing drivers for the data system new technology study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    An investigation of all payloads in the IBM disciplines and the selection of driver payloads within each discipline are described. The driver payloads were selected on the basis of their data processing requirements. These requirements are measured by a weighting scheme. The total requirements for each discipline are estimated by use of the technology payload model. The driver selection process which was both a payload by payload comparison and a comparison of expected groupings of payloads was examined.

  15. View of payloads in the STS-60 Discovery's payload bay while in orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Photographic documentation of the major payloads of the Space Shuttle Discovery's STS-60 mission, backdropped against clouds over the Atlantic Ocean. In the foreground is the SPACEHAB module, with the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) partially visible in its berthed position near the Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods and the vertical stabilizer. Television cameras on the Remote Manipulator System (RMS) were being used for a survey of the cargo.

  16. Assessment of usefulness of amplitude-spectrum discriminants for vibroacoustic diagnosis of gearheads of shearer loaders with ranging arms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikora, W.; Zakrzewski, T.

    1985-01-01

    Use of vibration and acoustic measurement is analyzed for detection of failures and wear assessment of gearheads of the KWB-3RDU shearer loaders with shearer drums on ranging arms. Problems associated with selecting the optimum measuring points on the gearheads as well as measuring methods and methods for statistical analysis of measurement results are analyzed. Amplitude and frequency range of vibrations generated by the elements of mechanical transmissions in the gearheads are investigated. Use of amplitude-spectrum discriminants for analyzing vibroacoustic processes during idle running and shearer drum operation under conditions of nominal loading is evaluated. Analyses showed that vibration and acoustic measurements are an efficienct method for wear assessment and forecasting service life of gearheads of the KWB-3RDU shearer loaders. The gearheads with the maximum vibrations were characterized by the lowest service life and the highest failure probability. Loading increase caused vibration increase under conditions of idle running and nominal loading. 13 references.

  17. Expert systems applications for space shuttle payload integration automation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Keith

    1988-01-01

    Expert systems technologies have been and are continuing to be applied to NASA's Space Shuttle orbiter payload integration problems to provide a level of automation previously unrealizable. NASA's Space Shuttle orbiter was designed to be extremely flexible in its ability to accommodate many different types and combinations of satellites and experiments (payloads) within its payload bay. This flexibility results in differnet and unique engineering resource requirements for each of its payloads, creating recurring payload and cargo integration problems. Expert systems provide a successful solution for these recurring problems. The Orbiter Payload Bay Cabling Expert (EXCABL) was the first expert system, developed to solve the electrical services provisioning problem. A second expert system, EXMATCH, was developed to generate a list of the reusable installation drawings available for each EXCABL solution. These successes have proved the applicability of expert systems technologies to payload integration problems and consequently a third expert system is currently in work. These three expert systems, the manner in which they resolve payload problems and how they will be integrated are described.

  18. 14 CFR 1214.810 - Integration of payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Integration of payloads. 1214.810 Section 1214.810 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION SPACE FLIGHT Reimbursement for Spacelab Services § 1214.810 Integration of payloads. (a) The customer shall bear the cost of performing the following typical Spacelab-payloa...

  19. Vibro-Acoustic Analysis of Computer Disk Drive Components with Emphasis on Electro-Mechanical Noise Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Ran

    Vibro-acoustic characteristics of compact electro -mechanical devices are not well understood. This study examines fundamental research issues in this area through the example case of a 3.5" personal computer hard disk drive. In particular, a narrow band mathematical model of the drive has been developed to predict prominent pure tones over the high frequency range (1-6.5 KHz). Through detailed analytical studies, it has been found that the motor torque pulsation of the brushless d.c. motor is the source for this noise problem. Accordingly, a simplified disk drive model consisting of motor driving a single disk is used to investigate key components, with emphasis on the development of new mathematical models to describe the source, path and radiator characteristics. Two different mathematical models have been developed for brushless d.c. motor to predict the torque spectrum associated with invertor switching logic, pulse width modulation control scheme, eccentricity, and magnetic saturation. Frequency contents of predicted variables are identified and matched with measured sound data. Additionally, the Galerkin's method (or modified harmonic balance) is also employed successfully to develop an efficient computational scheme which predicts the Fourier coefficients of torque pulsations directly including various effects associated with inductance harmonics and the fluctuation of rotor angular velocity. For the radiator (annular disk), modal base formulations of sound radiation have been developed by approximating disk eigen-functions. Specifically, the effects of modal coupling and source rotation on radiated sound are investigated. Analytical predictions match well with numerical results obtained by using a boundary element program. New mobility transfer functions (path) are derived to couple the source and radiator formulations in order to construct an overall vibro-acoustic model. Potential areas of further research including experimental validation are discussed.

  20. Space vehicle with customizable payload and docking station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Judd, Stephen; Dallmann, Nicholas; McCabe, Kevin; Seitz, Daniel

    2018-01-30

    A "black box" space vehicle solution may allow a payload developer to define the mission space and provide mission hardware within a predetermined volume and with predetermined connectivity. Components such as the power module, radios and boards, attitude determination and control system (ADCS), command and data handling (C&DH), etc. may all be provided as part of a "stock" (i.e., core) space vehicle. The payload provided by the payload developer may be plugged into the space vehicle payload section, tested, and launched without custom development of core space vehicle components by the payload developer. A docking station may facilitate convenient development and testing of the space vehicle while reducing handling thereof.

  1. Evaluation of a multi-component approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) using guided visualizations, cranial electrotherapy stimulation, and vibroacoustic sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Donna R B; Ei, Sue; Rogers, Kim R; Cross, Chad L

    2007-05-01

    This pilot study examines the use of guided visualizations that incorporate both cognitive and behavioral techniques with vibroacoustic therapy and cranial electrotherapy stimulation to form a multi-component therapeutic approach. This multi-component approach to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) was used to treat patients presenting with a range of symptoms including anxiety, depression, and relationship difficulties. Clients completed a pre- and post-session symptom severity scale and CBT skills practice survey. The program consisted of 16 guided visualizations incorporating CBT techniques that were accompanied by vibroacoustic therapy and cranial electrotherapy stimulation. Significant reduction in symptom severity was observed in pre- and post-session scores for anxiety symptoms, relationship difficulties, and depressive symptoms. The majority of the clients (88%) reported use of CBT techniques learned in the guided visualizations at least once per week outside of the sessions.

  2. Assessment of the Influence of the RaD-X Balloon Payload on the Onboard Radiation Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gronoff, Guilluame; Mertens, Christopher J.; Norman, Ryan B.; Straume, Tore; Lusby, Terry C.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Radiation Dosimetry Experiment (RaD-X) stratospheric balloon flight mission, launched on 25 September 2015, provided dosimetric measurements above the Pfotzer maximum. The goal of taking these measurements is to improve aviation radiation models by providing a characterization of cosmic ray primaries, which are the source of radiation exposure at aviation altitudes. The RaD-X science payload consists of four instruments. The main science instrument is a tissue-equivalent proportional counter (TEPC). The other instruments consisted of three solid state silicon dosimeters: Liulin, Teledyne total ionizing dose (TID) and RaySure detectors. The instruments were housed in an aluminum structure protected by a foam cover. The structure partially shielded the detectors from cosmic rays but also created secondary particles, modifying the ambient radiation environment observed by the instruments. Therefore, it is necessary to account for the influence of the payload structure on the measured doses. In this paper, we present the results of modeling the effect of the balloon payload on the radiation detector measurements using a Geant-4 (GEometry ANd Tracking) application. Payload structure correction factors derived for the TEPC, Liulin, and TID instruments are provided as a function of altitude. Overall, the payload corrections are no more than a 7% effect on the radiation environment measurements.

  3. A strategy for damage detection on large bearing constructions based on vibroacoustic signals. Ein Strategie zur Schadenserkennung an grossen Tragkonstruktionen auf vibroakustischer Signalbasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, A. (Akademie der Wissenschaften, Chemnitz (Germany))

    1991-01-01

    In the field of technical diagnosis analysis methods based on vibroacoustic signals are often used. Also modal system parameters can be used for the assessment of the bearing capacity of constructions. At present different institutes carry out research work in this area. Here the different approaches for the experimental determination of actual system parameters differ in the measuring technique as well as in the excitation mechanism used. The article gives a survey of the latest findings. (BWI).

  4. The relationship between the response to external light stimulation and behavioral states in the human fetus: how it differs from vibroacoustic stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiuchi, M; Nagata, N; Ikeno, S; Terakawa, N

    2000-05-01

    To determine the effects of external light stimulation on fetal behavioral states and know the difference from those of vibroacoustic stimulation. A flashlight and a vibroacoustic stimulator was applied directly on the maternal abdomen to determine the response of 56 normal fetuses at 36-40 weeks gestation. Fetal heart rate (FHR) and body movements were recorded using an actocardiograph, and fetal eye movements were observed using real-time ultrasonography. Using Nijhuis's criteria, the fetal behavioral states (1F-4F) were determined. FHR acceleration was considered a fetal response to the stimulations. The lag time between stimulation and fetal response was within 4 s. A positive response rate to the light stimulation was higher at behavioral states 2F (82%) and 3F (83%) than at state 1F (4%). Light stimulation changed the behavioral state of two of the six 3F fetuses (33%) from 3F to 4F. No change of state was observed in fetuses that were in states 1F and 2F. For vibroacoustic stimulation, fetal response was 100% positive and changes of states were observed frequently irrespective of the behavioral state before the stimulation. Fetal response to light stimulation is closely connected to fetal behavioral states and may reflect some distinct stages of the sleep-wakefulness cycle.

  5. A cost and utility analysis of NIM/CAMAC standards and equipment for shuttle payload data acquisition and control systems. Volume 1: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The cost effectiveness of utilizing the Nuclear Instrumentation Modular (NIM) and the Computer Automated Measurement Control (CAMAC) equipment for Spacelab payload instrumentation was determined. Representative shuttle sortie payloads were analyzed for applicability and commonality. Modification of NIM/CAMAC equipment was analyzed for its suitability in Spacelab environments and to determine the cost. NIM/CAMAC equipment usage requirements for Spacelab payloads were converted to pool size requirements and time-phased equipment procurement requirements. A programmatic estimate of the pool equipment costs and a management plan were prepared for the pool concept. The implementation and impact of CAMAC software were assessed.

  6. Multiple Payload Ejector for Education, Science and Technology Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechworth, Gary

    2005-01-01

    The education research community no longer has a means of being manifested on Space Shuttle flights, and small orbital payload carriers must be flown as secondary payloads on ELV flights, as their launch schedule, secondary payload volume and mass permits. This has resulted in a backlog of small payloads, schedule and cost problems, and an inability for the small payloads community to achieve routine, low-cost access to orbit. This paper will discuss Goddard's Wallops Flight Facility funded effort to leverage its core competencies in small payloads, sounding rockets, balloons and range services to develop a low cost, multiple payload ejector (MPE) carrier for orbital experiments. The goal of the MPE is to provide a low-cost carrier intended primarily for educational flight research experiments. MPE can also be used by academia and industry for science, technology development and Exploration experiments. The MPE carrier will take advantage of the DARPAI NASA partnership to perform flight testing of DARPA s Falcon small, demonstration launch vehicle. The Falcon is similar to MPE fiom the standpoint of focusing on a low-cost, responsive system. Therefore, MPE and Falcon complement each other for the desired long-term goal of providing the small payloads community with a low-cost ride to orbit. The readiness dates of Falcon and MPE are complementary, also. MPE is being developed and readied for flight within 18 months by a small design team. Currently, MPE is preparing for Critical Design Review in fall 2005, payloads are being manifested on the first mission, and the carrier will be ready for flight on the first Falcon demonstration flight in summer, 2006. The MPE and attached experiments can weigh up to 900 lb. to be compatible with Falcon demonstration vehicle lift capabilities fiom Wallops, and will be delivered to the Falcon demonstration orbit - 100 nautical mile circular altitude.

  7. Airborne demonstration of a quantum key distribution receiver payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Christopher J.; Kaiser, Sarah; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Jin, Jeongwan; Sultana, Nigar; Agne, Sascha; Anisimova, Elena; Makarov, Vadim; Choi, Eric; Higgins, Brendon L.; Jennewein, Thomas

    2017-06-01

    Satellite-based quantum terminals are a feasible way to extend the reach of quantum communication protocols such as quantum key distribution (QKD) to the global scale. To that end, prior demonstrations have shown QKD transmissions from airborne platforms to receivers on ground, but none have shown QKD transmissions from ground to a moving aircraft, the latter scenario having simplicity and flexibility advantages for a hypothetical satellite. Here, we demonstrate QKD from a ground transmitter to a receiver prototype mounted on an airplane in flight. We have specifically designed our receiver prototype to consist of many components that are compatible with the environment and resource constraints of a satellite. Coupled with our relocatable ground station system, optical links with distances of 3-10 km were maintained and quantum signals transmitted while traversing angular rates similar to those observed of low-Earth-orbit satellites. For some passes of the aircraft over the ground station, links were established within 10 s of position data transmission, and with link times of a few minutes and received quantum bit error rates typically ≈3%-5% , we generated secure keys up to 868 kb in length. By successfully generating secure keys over several different pass configurations, we demonstrate the viability of technology that constitutes a quantum receiver satellite payload and provide a blueprint for future satellite missions to build upon.

  8. AN ALTERNATIVE MODEL FOR OPTIMISING PAYLOADS OF BUILDING GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Taha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: This article deals with the development of a multi-stage model for optimising payload placement on a hauler-trailer rig in an environment described by physical and regulatory constraints. The model which purports to be an improvement on an earlier model provides two types of solution i.e. a feasible solution which satisfies all zone loading and axle weight constraints, or an infeasible solution giving the cause and quantification of source(s of infeasibility which may be used to modify model inputs for further attempts at optimisation.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die artikel handel oor die ontwikkeling van 'n multistadiummodel vir die optimisering van vragplasing op 'n sleepwa onder fisiese en regsvoorskriftelike voorwaardes. Die model wat daarop aanspraak maak dat dit 'n verbetering is op 'n vorige model, lewer as uitset twee oplossingstipes naamlik 'n gangbare oplossing wat alle sone- en aslasrandvoorwaardes eerbiedig, of 'n ongangbare oplossing wat oorsaak en kwantifisering van ongangbaarheidsbronne uitwys vir die gebruik van gewysigde modelinsette by verdere pogings tot optimisering.

  9. STS safety approval process for small self-contained payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    The safety approval process established by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for Get Away Special (GAS) payloads is described. Although the designing organization is ultimately responsible for the safe operation of its payload, the Get Away Special team at the Goddard Space Flight Center will act as advisors while iterative safety analyses are performed and the Safety Data Package inputs are submitted. This four phase communications process will ultimately give NASA confidence that the GAS payload is safe, and successful completion of the Phase 3 package and review will clear the way for flight aboard the Space Transportation System orbiter.

  10. Application of photonics in next generation telecommunication satellites payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalchi, J.; Inigo, P.; Roy, B.

    2017-11-01

    Next generation broadband telecommunication satellites are required to provide very high data throughput using complex multibeam architectures. These high throughput `Terabit/s' Satellites will incorporate payloads with very large quantity of conventional RF equipment, co-axial cables, waveguides, harnesses and ancillary equipment, making the Assembly, Integration and Test (AIT) very complex. Use of `RF over Fiber' and associated photonics equipment can make the process of AIT much simpler with the added benefit of significant reduction in number of payload equipment and inherent payload mass.

  11. Retaining Device for the Interior Structure of a Spacecraft Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming. Orville N., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    A device denoted as a bumper assembly for a spacecraft payload container comprises an interior structure surrounded by skin or some other protective enclosure (see figure). When arranged with three or more like assemblies, this bumper assembly is designed to secure the interior structure within a payload s protective enclosure during the stresses endured in flight and, if required, recovery of the payload. Furthermore, proper use of this innovation facilitates the ability of designers and engineers to maximize the total placement area for components, thus increasing utilization of very valuable and limited space.

  12. Real-Time Payload Control and Monitoring on the World Wide Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Charles; Windrem, May; Givens, John J. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    World Wide Web (W3) technologies such as the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) and the Java object-oriented programming environment offer a powerful, yet relatively inexpensive, framework for distributed application software development. This paper describes the design of a real-time payload control and monitoring system that was developed with W3 technologies at NASA Ames Research Center. Based on Java Development Toolkit (JDK) 1.1, the system uses an event-driven "publish and subscribe" approach to inter-process communication and graphical user-interface construction. A C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) compatible inference engine provides the back-end intelligent data processing capability, while Oracle Relational Database Management System (RDBMS) provides the data management function. Preliminary evaluation shows acceptable performance for some classes of payloads, with Java's portability and multimedia support identified as the most significant benefit.

  13. Final payload test results for the RemoveDebris active debris removal mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forshaw, Jason L.; Aglietti, Guglielmo S.; Salmon, Thierry; Retat, Ingo; Roe, Mark; Burgess, Christopher; Chabot, Thomas; Pisseloup, Aurélien; Phipps, Andy; Bernal, Cesar; Chaumette, François; Pollini, Alexandre; Steyn, Willem H.

    2017-09-01

    Since the beginning of the space era, a significant amount of debris has progressively been generated in space. Active Debris Removal (ADR) missions have been suggested as a way of limiting and controlling future growth in orbital space debris by actively deploying vehicles to remove debris. The European Commission FP7-sponsored RemoveDebris mission, which started in 2013, draws on the expertise of some of Europe's most prominent space institutions in order to demonstrate key ADR technologies in a cost effective ambitious manner: net capture, harpoon capture, vision-based navigation, dragsail de-orbiting. This paper provides an overview of some of the final payload test results before launch. A comprehensive test campaign is underway on both payloads and platform. The tests aim to demonstrate both functional success of the experiments and that the experiments can survive the space environment. Space environmental tests (EVT) include vibration, thermal, vacuum or thermal-vacuum (TVAC) and in some cases EMC and shock. The test flow differs for each payload and depends on the heritage of the constituent payload parts. The paper will also provide an update to the launch, expected in 2017 from the International Space Station (ISS), and test philosophy that has been influenced from the launch and prerequisite NASA safety review for the mission. The RemoveDebris mission aims to be one of the world's first in-orbit demonstrations of key technologies for active debris removal and is a vital prerequisite to achieving the ultimate goal of a cleaner Earth orbital environment.

  14. 76 FR 52694 - National Environmental Policy Act: Launch of NASA Routine Payloads on Expendable Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... associated with NASA routine payloads could not be accomplished without launching orbital and interplanetary... range of payload masses, would provide the needed trajectory capabilities, and would provide highly...

  15. Rockwell International art concept view on proposed Shuttle payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Rockwell International art concept view on proposed Shuttle payloads. View is of the Solar Max Mission. The shuttle is in orbit with the remote manipulator system (RMS) grappling the satellite into place.

  16. ESPA Based Secondary Payload Orbit Maneuvering System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek proposes to develop an integrated propulsion, power, ACS, (ProPACS) system for micro-spacecraft deployed from the ESPA ring secondary payload ports. The...

  17. Low Cost Variable Conductance Heat Pipe for Balloon Payload Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — While continuously increasing in complexity, the payloads of terrestrial high altitude balloons need a thermal management system to reject their waste heat and to...

  18. Plastic Melt Waste Compactor Flight Demonstrator Payload (PFDP) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The PMWC Flight Demonstrator Payload is a trash dewatering and volume reduction system that uses heat melt compaction to remove nearly 100% of water from trash while...

  19. Implementing Ethernet Services on the Payload Executive Processor (PEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruett, David; Guyette, Greg

    2016-01-01

    The Ethernet interface is more common and easier interface to implement for payload developers already familiar with Ethernet protocol in their labs. The Ethernet interface allows for a more distributed payload architecture. Connections can be placed in locations not serviced by the PEP 1553 bus. The Ethernet interface provides a new access port into the PEP so as to use the already existing services. Initial capability will include a subset of services with a plan to expand services later.

  20. Integrated operations/payloads/fleet analysis (executive summary)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The Integrated Operations/Payloads/Fleet Analysis predicts total national space program costs and launch vehicle traffic assuming either an expendable, a partially reusable or a fully reusable launch vehicle fleet. The payload system costs are estimated and reported for each payload program at the subsystem level, payload program level, user level and national level, providing complete system cost traceability. The analysis determines the primary changes to be expected for space payload programs and space operations in the space shuttle era. When the space shuttle becomes fully operational, not only will launch costs be reduced but refurbished satellite units will be flown instead of new units and maintenance will be performed on failing satellites. It is possible to implement the concepts of satellite refurbishment and maintenance because of the space shuttle's capability to retrieve and return payloads to the earth's surface. The two-way satellite transportation capability is extended to high energy orbits by use of the space shuttle/space tug combination.

  1. System Architecture of the BCU Payload on Tatiana-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyh-Biau Jiang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In conjunction with the international collaborative project of ESEMS (Experimental Scientific Education Micro Satellite whose goal is to develop an experimental scientific-education microsatellite with science payloads, a team consisting of professors and students from the National Central University (NCU has designed and fabricated a set of space flight instruments for space weather studies. The Block of Central University (BCU made payload has been flown successfully on board Tatiana-2. To our knowledge, the BCU payload is the very first successful satellite payload which has been developed from design and component selection to the completion of the flight module mainly by students and faculty on the NCU campus in Taiwan. This paper describes some details of the engineering effort in building the BCU payload, including sensing devices (ETP and MRM, data processing unit, and power supply. Samples of flight data acquired by BCU are also presented to show that all units of the BCU system and payload-spacecraft interfaces functioned well as expected. The flight data provides direct evidence that the NCU team is capable of developing spaceflight quality instruments for future satellite missions.

  2. CNES solution for a reusable payload ground segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradels, Grégory; Baroukh, Julien; Queyrut, Olivier; Sellé, Arnaud; Malapert, Jean-Christophe

    2012-12-01

    The MYRIADE program of the French Space Agency (CNES) has been developed for research institutes proposing pertinent scientific space experiments. It is composed of a satellite bus with independent and configurable functional chains able to onboard a scientific payload of 50 kg/60 W for at least a 3-year duration. The CNES is responsible for the launch and the development of the satellite bus and the satellite ground segment, while the research institute manages the development of the payload and the payload ground segment. This paper aims at discussing the means to enhance the development of a payload ground segment for small missions as MYRIADE. The needs of this kind of experimental missions are very specific and to try developing a reusable segment has been often considered inefficient. However the lessons learnt from the previous missions show the key role played by the payload ground segment in the success of the mission and also demonstrate that a payload ground segment of a small mission is more complex than expected. After a presentation of the MYRIADE program, the ground segments of the three first CNES missions are compared. This analysis first highlights that 15 full time equivalent in average are required to develop a payload ground segment. This result is not compliant with the resources of the research institutes which are mainly devoted to the development of the payload. The comparison emphasises invariants in the functional architecture and operational concept independently of the mission that allow to provide a tested frame adapted to small missions. The engineering processes are also compared and a solution is proposed to introduce flexibility and efficiency in the development. The approach, compliant with the functional architecture presented before, consists in using tools developed for previous missions and thereby to limit the new developments for the mission specific functions. This proposition is currently tested at CNES with the TARANIS

  3. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  4. Verification of Ares I Liftoff Acoustic Environments via the Ares Scale Model Acoustic Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2012-01-01

    Launch environments, such as Liftoff Acoustic (LOA) and Ignition Overpressure (IOP), are important design factors for any vehicle and are dependent upon the design of both the vehicle and the ground systems. The NASA Constellation Program had several risks to the development of the Ares I vehicle linked to LOA which are used in the development of the vibro-acoustic environments. The risks included cost, schedule and technical impacts for component qualification due to high predicted vibro-acoustic environments. One solution is to mitigate the environment at the component level. However, where the environment is too severe to mitigate at the component level, reduction of the launch environments is required. The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program was implemented to verify the predicted Ares I launch environments and to determine the acoustic reduction for the LOA environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The test article included a 5% scale Ares I vehicle model, tower and Mobile Launcher. Acoustic and pressure data were measured by approximately 200 instruments. The ASMAT results are compared to the Ares I LOA predictions and water suppression effectiveness results are presented.

  5. Design and analysis of truck body for increasing the payload capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vamshi Krishna, K.; Yugandhar Reddy, K.; Venugopal, K.; Ravi, K.

    2017-11-01

    Truck industry is a major source of transportation in India. With an average truck travelling about 300 kilometers per day [1], every kilogram of truck weight is of concern to the industry in order to get the best out of the truck. The main objective of this project is to increase the payload capacity of automotive truck body. Every kilogram of increased vehicle weight will decrease the vehicle payload capacity in turn increasing the manufacturing cost and reducing the fuel economy by increase the fuel consumption. With the intension of weight reduction, standard truck body has been designed and analyzed in ANSYS software. C-cross section beams were used instead of conventional rectangular box sections to reduce the weight of the body. Light-weight Aluminum alloy Al 6061 T6 is used to increase the payload capacity. The strength of the Truck platform is monitored in terms of deformation and stress concentration. These parameters will be obtained in structural analysis test condition environment. For reducing the stress concentration the concept of beams of uniform strength is used. Accordingly necessary modifications are done so that the optimized model has a better stress distribution and much lesser weight compared to the conventional model. The results obtained by analyzing the modified model are compared with the standard model.

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Analysis Of Optical Payload For Lasercomm Science (OPALS) sealed enclosure module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Kevin R.; Zayas, Daniel; Turner, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) using the commercial CFD package CFDesign has been performed at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in support of the Phaeton Early Career Hire Program's Optical Payload for Lasercomm Science (OPALS) mission. The OPALS project is one which involves an International Space Station payload that will be using forced convection cooling in a hermetically sealed enclosure at 1 atm of air to cool "off-the-shelf" vendor electronics. The CFD analysis was used to characterize the thermal and fluid flow environment within a complicated labyrinth of electronics boards, fans, instrumentation, harnessing, ductwork and heat exchanger fins. The paradigm of iteratively using CAD/CAE tools and CFD was followed in order to determine the optimum flow geometry and heat sink configuration to yield operational convective film coefficients and temperature survivability limits for the electronics payload. Results from this current CFD analysis and correlation of the CFD model against thermal test data will be presented. Lessons learned and coupled thermal / flow modeling strategies will be shared in this paper.

  7. Experimental characterization of a bi-dimensional array of negative capacitance piezo-patches for vibroacoustic control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, F.; Collet, M.; Ouisse, M.; Ichchou, M. N.; Cunefare, K. A.

    2013-04-01

    A recent technological revolution in the fields of integrated MEMS has finally rendered possible the mechanical integration of active smart materials, electronics and power supply systems for the next generation of smart composite structures. Using a bi-dimensional array of electromechanical transducers, composed by piezo-patches connected to a synthetic negative capacitance, it is possible to modify the dynamics of the underlying structure. In this study, we present an application of the Floquet-Bloch theorem for vibroacoustic power flow optimization, by means of distributed shunted piezoelectric material. In the context of periodically distributed damped 2D mechanical systems, this numerical approach allows one to compute the multi-modal waves dispersion curves into the entire first Brillouin zone. This approach also permits optimization of the piezoelectric shunting electrical impedance, which controls energy diffusion into the proposed semi-active distributed set of cells. Furthermore, we present experimental evidence that proves the effectiveness of the proposed control method. The experiment requires a rectangular metallic plate equipped with seventy-five piezo-patches, controlled independently by electronic circuits. More specifically, the out-of-plane displacements and the averaged kinetic energy of the controlled plate are compared in two different cases (open-circuit and controlled circuit). The resulting data clearly show how this proposed technique is able to damp and selectively reflect the incident waves.

  8. Fetal vibroacoustic stimulation in computerized cardiotocographic analysis: the role of short-term variability and approximate entropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annunziata, Maria Laura; Scala, Mariamaddalena; Giuliano, Natascia; Tagliaferri, Salvatore; Imperato, Olga Carmela Maria; Esposito, Francesca Giovanna; Campanile, Marta; Di Lieto, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) on computerized cardiotocography short-term variability (STV) and approximate entropy (ApEn) in both low- and high-risk pregnancies. VAS was performed on 121 high- and 95 low-risk pregnancies after 10 minutes of continuous quiet, while their FHR parameters were monitored and recorded by cCTG analysis. Fetal heart rate was recorded using a computer-assisted equipment. Baseline FHR, accelerations, decelerations, STV, long-term irregularity (LTI), ApEn, and fetal movements (FMs) were calculated for defined observational periods before VAS and after 10 minutes. Data were also investigated in relationship with the perinatal outcome. In each group of patients, FHR after VAS remained almost unmodified. Fetal movements significantly increased after VAS in both groups. Results show that only in the high-risk pregnancies, the increase of STV and the decrease of ApEn after VAS were significantly associated with favorable perinatal outcomes.

  9. Fetal Vibroacoustic Stimulation in Computerized Cardiotocographic Analysis: The Role of Short-Term Variability and Approximate Entropy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Laura Annunziata

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS on computerized cardiotocography short-term variability (STV and approximate entropy (ApEn in both low- and high-risk pregnancies. VAS was performed on 121 high- and 95 low-risk pregnancies after 10 minutes of continuous quiet, while their FHR parameters were monitored and recorded by cCTG analysis. Fetal heart rate was recorded using a computer-assisted equipment. Baseline FHR, accelerations, decelerations, STV, long-term irregularity (LTI, ApEn, and fetal movements (FMs were calculated for defined observational periods before VAS and after 10 minutes. Data were also investigated in relationship with the perinatal outcome. In each group of patients, FHR after VAS remained almost unmodified. Fetal movements significantly increased after VAS in both groups. Results show that only in the high-risk pregnancies, the increase of STV and the decrease of ApEn after VAS were significantly associated with favorable perinatal outcomes.

  10. Analysis of Vibroacoustic Modulations for Crack Detection: A Time-Frequency Approach Based on Zhao-Atlas-Marks Distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Trochidis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The vibro-acoustic modulation (VAM technique is probably the most widely used nonlinear method for crack detection. The VAM method is based on the effect of modulation of high-frequency acoustic waves by a low-frequency vibration. The intensity of the modulation is related to the severity of the damage and has been used so far as a damage index. The damage index simply based on the amplitude of the first side bands in the spectral domain often leads to controversial results about the severity of the damage. In this work, the nonlinear characteristics of the vibro-modulation were systematically investigated by employing time-frequency analysis based on the Zhao-Atlas-Marks (ZAM distribution. The results of the analysis show that the amplitude of the sideband components is modulated by the low frequency vibration and the modulation amplitude depends on the size of the crack. Based on the obtained results, a new damage index was defined in relation to the strength of the modulation. The new damage index is more sensitive and robust and correlates better with crack size compared to the index based on the amplitude of the sidebands.

  11. A hybrid approach for predicting the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimov, Dmitrii N; Tanner, Gregor

    2011-09-01

    Finding the distribution of vibro-acoustic energy in complex built-up structures in the mid-to-high frequency regime is a difficult task. In particular, structures with large variation of local wavelengths and/or characteristic scales pose a challenge referred to as the mid-frequency problem. Standard numerical methods such as the finite element method (FEM) scale with the local wavelength and quickly become too large even for modern computer architectures. High frequency techniques, such as statistical energy analysis (SEA), often miss important information such as dominant resonance behavior due to stiff or small scale parts of the structure. Hybrid methods circumvent this problem by coupling FEM/BEM and SEA models in a given built-up structure. In the approach adopted here, the whole system is split into a number of subsystems that are treated by either FEM or SEA depending on the local wavelength. Subsystems with relative long wavelengths are modeled using FEM. Making a diffuse field assumption for the wave fields in the short wave length components, the coupling between subsystems can be reduced to a weighted random field correlation function. The approach presented results in an SEA-like set of linear equations that can be solved for the mean energies in the short wavelength subsystems. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  12. Development of Fetal Movement between 26 and 36 Weeks’ Gestation in Response to Vibro-acoustic Stimulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marybeth eGrant-Beuttler

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasound observation of fetal movement has documented general trends in motor development and fetal age when motor response to stimulation is observed. Evaluation of fetal movement quality, in addition to specific motor activity, may improve documentation of motor development and highlight specific motor responses to stimulation. Aims: The aim of this investigation was to assess fetal movement at 26 and 36 weeks gestation during three conditions (baseline, immediate response to vibro-acoustic stimulation (VAS, and post-response. Design: A prospective, longitudinal design was utilized. Subjects: Twelve normally developing fetuses, 8 females and 4 males, were examined with continuous ultrasound imaging. Outcome measures: The Fetal Neurobehavioral Coding System (FENS was used to evaluate the quality of motor activity during 10-second epochs over the three conditions. Results: Seventy-five percent of the fetuses at the 26 week assessment and 100% of the fetuses at the 36 week assessment responded with movement immediately following stimulation. Significant differences in head, fetal breathing, general, limb, and mouthing movements were detected between the 26 week and 36 week assessments. Movement differences between conditions were detected in head, fetal breathing, limb, and mouthing movements. Conclusions: Smoother and more complex movement was observed with fetal maturation. Following VAS stimulation, an immediate increase of large, jerky movements suggest instability in fetal capabilities. Fetal movement quality changes over gestation may reflect sensorimotor synaptogenesis in the central nervous system, while observation of immature movement patterns following VAS stimulation may reflect movement pattern instability.

  13. Experimental investigation of the influence of internal frames on the vibroacoustic behavior of a stiffened cylindrical shell using wavenumber analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Renou, Y.; Audoly, C.

    2017-09-01

    The understanding of the influence of non-axisymmetric internal frames on the vibroacoustic behavior of a stiffened cylindrical shell is of high interest for the naval or aeronautic industries. Several numerical studies have shown that the non-axisymmetric internal frame can increase the radiation efficiency significantly in the case of a mechanical point force. However, less attention has been paid to the experimental verification of this statement. That is why this paper proposes to compare the radiation efficiency estimated experimentally for a stiffened cylindrical shell with and without internal frames. The experimental process is based on scanning laser vibrometer measurements of the vibrations on the surface of the shell. A transform of the vibratory field in the wavenumber domain is then performed. It allows estimating the far-field radiated pressure with the stationary phase theorem. An increase of the radiation efficiency is observed in the low frequencies. Analysis of the velocity field in the physical and wavenumber spaces allows highlighting the coupling of the circumferential orders at the origin of the increase in the radiation efficiency.

  14. On a way to save memory when solving time domain boundary integral equations for acoustic and vibroacoustic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirard, Christophe; Parot, Jean-Marc

    2017-11-01

    Solving acoustic equations in the time domain, possibly coupled with the description of flexible structure dynamics, remains attractive as compared to solving the same in the frequency domain: this allows for better consideration of local non-linearities (acoustics/structure), and the boundary integral formulation (also known as BEM) offers an exact description of the infinite acoustic field based on a simple surface mesh (no need for 3D-volume discretization). Some issues remain however: the required memory space and computation time continue to grow rapidly when the number of elements of the surface mesh increases. In the case of a structure with a regular non-slender shape, the computational cost, measured in terms of required memory space, varies by Helmholtz number to the power of 4. This paper illustrates how the accelerating method called NGTD helps overcome this difficulty. This paper shows the applicability of 2 level NGTD to acoustic and vibroacoustic problems described solely by the hypersingular formulation for surfaces. It goes into more detail on some important aspects of the interpolation process and on the memory saving obtained. Implementation within the MOT (;March-On-Time;) ASTRYD code shows the benefits of this method. The memory requirement shows an estimated trend lower than power 1.35 of the number of surface elements.

  15. Vibroacoustic Response of the NASA ACTS Spacecraft Antenna to Launch Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larko, Jeffrey M.; Cotoni, Vincent

    2008-01-01

    The Advanced Communications Technology Satellite was an experimental NASA satellite launched from the Space Shuttle Discovery. As part of the ground test program, the satellite s large, parabolic reflector antennas were exposed to a reverberant acoustic loading to simulate the launch acoustics in the Shuttle payload bay. This paper describes the modelling and analysis of the dynamic response of these large, composite spacecraft antenna structure subjected to a diffuse acoustic field excitation. Due to the broad frequency range of the excitation, different models were created to make predictions in the various frequency regimes of interest: a statistical energy analysis (SEA) model to capture the high frequency response and a hybrid finite element-statistical energy (hybrid FE-SEA) model for the low to mid-frequency responses. The strengths and limitations of each of the analytical techniques are discussed. The predictions are then compared to the measured acoustic test data and to a boundary element (BEM) model to evaluate the performance of the hybrid techniques.

  16. Application of a computerized vibroacoustic data bank for random vibration criteria development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferebee, R. C.

    1982-01-01

    A computerized data bank system was developed for utilization of large amounts of vibration and acoustic data to formulate component random vibration design and test criteria. This system consists of a computer, graphics tablets, and a dry silver hard copier which are all desk top type hardware and occupy minimal space. Currently, the data bank contains data from the Saturn 5 and Titan 3 flight and static test programs. The vibration and acoustic data are stored in the form of power spectral density and one third octave band plots over the frequency range from 20 to 2000 Hz. The data were stored by digitizing each spectral plot by tracing with the graphics tablet. The digitized data were statistically analyzed, and the resulting 97.5 percent confidence levels were stored on tape along with the appropriate structural parameters. Standard extrapolation procedures were programmed for prediction of component random vibration test criteria for new launch vehicle and payload configurations. A user's manual is included to guide potential users through the programs.

  17. Vibroacoustic sound therapy: case studies with children with profound and multiple learning difficulties and the elderly in long-term residential care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Phil

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development of Vibroacoustic Sound Therapy, an approach which is being developed for use in special schools for children with profound and multiple learning difficulties, and in long-term care homes for the elderly and the elderly mentally infirm. Using non-invasive techniques and music/sound technology, children and the elderly are being empowered and enabled to (re)discover self expression and communication skills. Two case studies drawn from the world of the young disabled, and from the elderly, illustrate the potential for improving quality of life and well-being in these institutional settings.

  18. Payload/orbiter signal-processing and data-handling system evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teasdale, W. E.; Polydoros, A.

    1980-01-01

    Incompatibilities between orbiter subsystems and payload communication systems to assure that acceptable and to end system performamce will be achieved are identified. The potential incompatabilities are associated with either payloads in the cargo bay or detached payloads communicating with the orbiter via an RF link. The payload signal processing and data handling systems are assessed by investigating interface problems experienced between the inertial upper stage and the orbiter since similar problems are expected for other payloads.

  19. Payloads development for European land mobile satellites: A technical and economical assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrotta, G.; Rispoli, F.; Sassorossi, T.; Spazio, Selenia

    1990-01-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) has defined two payloads for Mobile Communication; one payload is for pre-operational use, the European Land Mobile System (EMS), and one payload is for promoting the development of technologies for future mobile communication systems, the L-band Land Mobile Payload (LLM). A summary of the two payloads and a description of their capabilities is provided. Additionally, an economic assessment of the potential mobile communication market in Europe is provided.

  20. Delivery of nanogram payloads using magnetic porous silicon microcarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, J Christopher; Pacholski, Claudia; Sailor, Michael J

    2006-06-01

    A transport and delivery system for nanogram quantities of molecular species that does not use microfluidic channels, pumps, or valves is described. Microparticles consisting of magnetic porous silicon are prepared, and loading and delivery of an enzymatic payload are demonstrated. The high porosity (60%) porous Si host particles are made magnetic by infusion of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (30 nm-diameter magnetite, Fe(3)O(4)) under oxidative conditions. After magnetite incorporation, the porous microparticle is still empty enough to accommodate nanogram quantities of a molecular payload; the enzymes horseradish peroxidase or pronase E are used in the present work. The assembly can be transported to a microliter water droplet containing the enzyme substrate with the aid of an external magnetic field. The enzyme is released into the droplet upon contact. The particles can be transported through air or a hydrocarbon liquid without loss in enzymatic activity of the payload.

  1. Design, fabrication and testing of the Pegasus composite payload fairing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, James R.; Davis, Fred L.; Edwards, Colby W.; Gillit, C. B.; Itchkawich, Thomas J.

    Hercules has successfully designed, fabricated and tested a composite payload fairing for the Pegasus air-launched space booster. The design features include an aluminum honeycomb core with graphite/epoxy skins for the cylindrical and ogive sections of the fairing and a monocoque graphite/epoxy nose cap. The fairing is designed to hinge at the aft end and separate along two (2) axial joints. The structure is fabricated to nearly net shape using a unique process which includes co-curing the joints and honeycomb core to the graphite/epoxy skins in one operation. This process minimizes the amount of secondary machining and bonding operations required to achieve the final configuration. The payload fairing was tested by applying static and dynamic loads to the structure. Separation testing was also performed to verify system performance. Data obtained from the first operational flight indicate the payload fairing performed as designed and two satellites were successfully deployed.

  2. EChO payload electronics architecture and SW design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Focardi, M.; Di Giorgio, A. M.; Farina, M.; Pancrazzi, M.; Ottensamer, R.; Lim, T. L.; Pezzuto, S.; Micela, G.; Pace, E.

    2015-12-01

    EChO is a three-modules (VNIR, SWIR, MWIR), highly integrated spectrometer, covering the wavelength range from 0.55 μ m to 11.0 μ m. The baseline design includes the goal wavelength extension to 0.4 μ m while an optional LWIR module extends the range to the goal wavelength of 16.0 μ m. An Instrument Control Unit (ICU) is foreseen as the main electronic subsystem interfacing the spacecraft and collecting data from all the payload spectrometers modules. ICU is in charge of two main tasks: the overall payload control ( Instrument Control Function) and the housekeepings and scientific data digital processing ( Data Processing Function), including the lossless compression prior to store the science data to the Solid State Mass Memory of the Spacecraft. These two main tasks are accomplished thanks to the Payload On Board Software (P-OBSW) running on the ICU CPUs.

  3. Adaptive digital beamforming for a CDMA mobile communications payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz-Garcia, Samuel G.; Ruiz, Javier Benedicto

    1993-01-01

    In recent years, Spread-Spectrum Code Division Multiple Access (CDMA) has become a very popular access scheme for mobile communications due to a variety of reasons: excellent performance in multipath environments, high scope for frequency reuse, graceful degradation near saturation, etc. In this way, a CDMA system can support simultaneous digital communication among a large community of relatively uncoordinated users sharing a given frequency band. Nevertheless, there are also important problems associated with the use of CDMA. First, in a conventional CDMA scheme, the signature sequences of asynchronous users are not orthogonal and, as the number of active users increases, the self-noise generated by the mutual interference between users considerably degrades the performance, particularly in the return link. Furthermore, when there is a large disparity in received powers - due to differences in slant range or atmospheric attenuation - the non-zero cross-correlation between the signals gives rise to the so-called near-far problem. This leads to an inefficient utilization of the satellite resources and, consequently, to a drastic reduction in capacity. Several techniques were proposed to overcome this problem, such as Synchronized CDMA - in which the signature sequences of the different users are quasi-orthogonal - and power control. At the expense of increased network complexity and user coordination, these techniques enable the system capacity to be restored by equitably sharing the satellite resources among the users. An alternative solution is presented based upon the use of time-reference adaptive digital beamforming on board the satellite. This technique enables a high number of independently steered beams to be generated from a single phased array antenna, which automatically track the desired user signal and null the unwanted interference source. In order to use a time-reference adaptive antenna in a communications system, the main challenge is to obtain a

  4. California Student Get Away Special Payload GAS-450

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Glen; Burke, Edmund; Waldman, Marty

    1993-10-01

    The California Student Get Away Special Payload GAS-450, recently went into orbit on the STS-57 Mission, Space Shuttle, Endeavour, 21 June 1993, 6:14 AM and landed on the 29 June 1993 at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Fifty students from 13 California Central Coast Schools and one in San Francisco designed and built 13 active experiments (6 modules) for this mission. Preliminary analysis of our completely reusable payload bus system indicated that the structure, power system, microprocessor, and sensor systems in each experiment module worked flawlessly. The experiments themselves performed exceptionally well with a 60 percent success ratio. The students are thoroughly documenting their own experiments and results via a standard research paper guideline generated by the GAS-450 technical staff. Lessons learned (program management and technical) are documented at the end of the paper. If any other organization needs payload/experiment development or NASA documentation assistance, then please contact us. We can help make your idea a space tested reality. Three years of intense effort culminated on 3 February 1993, the GSFC field operations team at Kennedy Space Center performed the final pressure decay and electrical tests upon the fully integrated GAS-450 flight canister. Subsequently, the payload was integrated with its parent GAS Bridge Assembly in mid-February and the bridge was transferred to the KSC orbiter team in late February 1993. The STS-57 mission originally scheduled to launch on the 29 April 1993 slipped until 21 June 1993. Our Payload shared the cargo bay with ten other GAS Canisters, the EUREKA experiment, the SHOOT experiment, and the SPACEHAB-1 module. The SIL technical staff retrieved the GAS-450 payload after flight from the NASA Spin Test Facility at KSC and shipped it back to California on the 22 July 1993 for student analysis at Allan Hancock College this summer.

  5. Maximizing Launch Vehicle and Payload Design Via Early Communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The United States? current fleet of launch vehicles is largely derived from decades-old designs originally made for payloads that no longer exist. They were built primarily for national security or human exploration missions. Today that fleet can be divided roughly into small-, medium-, and large-payload classes based on mass and volume capability. But no vehicle in the U.S. fleet is designed to accommodate modern payloads. It is usually the payloads that must accommodate the capabilities of the launch vehicles. This is perhaps most true of science payloads. It was this paradigm that the organizers of two weekend workshops in 2008 at NASA's Ames Research Center sought to alter. The workshops brought together designers of NASA's Ares V cargo launch vehicle (CLV) with scientists and payload designers in the astronomy and planetary sciences communities. Ares V was still in a pre-concept development phase as part of NASA?s Constellation Program for exploration beyond low Earth orbit (LEO). The space science community was early in a Decadal Survey that would determine future priorities for research areas, observations, and notional missions to make those observations. The primary purpose of the meetings in April and August of 2008, including the novel format, was to bring vehicle designers together with space scientists to discuss the feasibility of using a heavy lift capability to launch large observatories and explore the Solar System. A key question put to the science community was whether this heavy lift capability enabled or enhanced breakthrough science. The meetings also raised the question of whether some trade-off between mass/volume and technical complexity existed that could reduce technical and programmatic risk. By engaging the scientific community early in the vehicle design process, vehicle engineers sought to better understand potential limitations and requirements that could be added to the Ares V from the mission planning community. From the vehicle

  6. Experimental Study of Convective Heating on the Back Face and Payload of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator (HIAD) Aeroshell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Berry, Scott A.; Hollingsworth, Kevin E.; Wright, Sheila A.

    2017-01-01

    A wind tunnel test program has been conducted to define convective heating environments on the back-face of a Hypersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator aeroshell. Wind tunnel testing was conducted at Mach 6 and Mach 10 at unit Reynolds numbers from 0.5×10(exp 6)/ft to 3.9×10(exp 6)/ft on a 6.3088 in diameter aeroshell model. Global heating data were obtained through phosphor thermography on the aeroshell back face, as well as on the payload and the aeroshell front face. For all test conditions, laminar flow was produced on the aeroshell front face, while the separated wake shear layer and aeroshell back-face boundary layer were transitional or turbulent. Along the leeward centerline of the aeroshell back face and payload centerbody, heating levels increased with both free stream Reynolds number and angle of attack. The Reynolds number dependency was due to increasing strength of wake turbulence with Reynolds number. The angle-of-attack dependency was due to movement of the wake-vortex reattachment point on the aeroshell back face. The maximum heating levels on the aeroshell back face and payload were approximately 5% to 6%, respectively, of the aeroshell front-face stagnation point. To allow for extrapolation of the ground test data to flight conditions, the back face and payload heating levels were correlated as a function of aeroshell front-face peak momentum thickness Reynolds numbers.

  7. Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System (Vps)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marz, Bryan E.; Ash, Robert L.

    1996-01-01

    This document provides a summary of the launch and post-launch activities of Virginia Space Grant Consortium Upper Atmospheric Payload Balloon System, V(ps). It is a comprehensive overview covering launch activities, post-launch activities, experimental results, and future flight recommendations.

  8. Compact tunable and reconfigurable microwave photonic filter for satellite payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, M. C.; Yoosefi, O.

    2017-11-01

    The trend towards the photonic processing of electrical signals at microwave frequencies for satellite payloads is increasing at a breathtaking pace, mainly spurred by prospects of wide electrical bandwidth operation, low mass and volume, reduced electrical noise levels, immunity to electromagnetic interferences and resistance to both temperature and radiation.

  9. Science and application payloads in the 1990's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desanctis, Carmine E.

    1992-06-01

    During the 90's with the operation of the Extended Duration Orbiter (EDO), Space Station Freedom (SSF), large platforms in polar and Geosynchronous orbits around the Earth, and supporting systems and technology, an infrastructure will exist that will offer a wide range of opportunities for science and applications payloads. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is in a unique position of studying for NASA science missions for all of these systems. This paper will discuss a variety of payloads being studied for NASA at the MSFC that are scheduled for flight in the 90's, in support of space science and Mission to Planet Earth. These science payloads such as the Controls, Astrophysics and Structures Experiment in Space (CASES), Advanced Solar Observatory (ASO), Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), and Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), etc. will fully utilize the capabilities of EDO, SSF, Earth Observing System (EOS), and Earth Science Geostationary Platform (ESGP). Emphasis will be placed on showing how these scientific payloads can fully exploit the great potential of these new capabilities for exciting new science and application missions.

  10. Payload specialist Al-Saud siting in middeck area

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    Payload specialist Sultan Salman Abdelazize Al-Saud seated in a posture common to weightlessness as he logs notes in Discovery's middeck area. He has headphones on connected to a portable tape recorder. Behind him on the middeck lockers is a sign which reads 'Welcome to Riyadh'. On the other wall, a sleep restraint is attached to the lockers.

  11. The nature of alarm communication in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae): the integration of chemical and vibroacoustic signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaldo, Paulo F; Jandák, Vojtĕch; Kutalová, Kateřina; Rodrigues, Vinícius B; Brothánek, Marek; Jiříček, Ondřej; DeSouza, Og; Šobotník, Jan

    2015-11-04

    Alarm signalling is of paramount importance to communication in all social insects. In termites, vibroacoustic and chemical alarm signalling are bound to operate synergistically but have never been studied simultaneously in a single species. Here, we inspected the functional significance of both communication channels in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae), confirming the hypothesis that these are not exclusive, but rather complementary processes. In natural situations, the alarm predominantly attracts soldiers, which actively search for the source of a disturbance. Laboratory testing revealed that the frontal gland of soldiers produces a rich mixture of terpenoid compounds including an alarm pheromone. Extensive testing led to identification of the alarm pheromone being composed of abundant monoterpene hydrocarbons (1S)-α-pinene and myrcene, along with a minor component, (E)-β-ocimene. The vibratory alarm signalling consists of vibratory movements evidenced as bursts; a series of beats produced predominantly by soldiers. Exposing termite groups to various mixtures containing the alarm pheromone (crushed soldier heads, frontal gland extracts, mixture of all monoterpenes, and the alarm pheromone mixture made of standards) resulted in significantly higher activity in the tested groups and also increased intensity of the vibratory alarm communication, with the responses clearly dose-dependent. Lower doses of the pheromone provoked higher numbers of vibratory signals compared to higher doses. Higher doses induced long-term running of all termites without stops necessary to perform vibratory behaviour. Surprisingly, even crushed worker heads led to low (but significant) increases in the alarm responses, suggesting that other unknown compound in the worker's head is perceived and answered by termites. Our results demonstrate the existence of different alarm levels in termites, with lower levels being communicated through vibratory signals, and

  12. The nature of alarm communication in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae: the integration of chemical and vibroacoustic signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo F. Cristaldo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Alarm signalling is of paramount importance to communication in all social insects. In termites, vibroacoustic and chemical alarm signalling are bound to operate synergistically but have never been studied simultaneously in a single species. Here, we inspected the functional significance of both communication channels in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae, confirming the hypothesis that these are not exclusive, but rather complementary processes. In natural situations, the alarm predominantly attracts soldiers, which actively search for the source of a disturbance. Laboratory testing revealed that the frontal gland of soldiers produces a rich mixture of terpenoid compounds including an alarm pheromone. Extensive testing led to identification of the alarm pheromone being composed of abundant monoterpene hydrocarbons (1S-α-pinene and myrcene, along with a minor component, (E-β-ocimene. The vibratory alarm signalling consists of vibratory movements evidenced as bursts; a series of beats produced predominantly by soldiers. Exposing termite groups to various mixtures containing the alarm pheromone (crushed soldier heads, frontal gland extracts, mixture of all monoterpenes, and the alarm pheromone mixture made of standards resulted in significantly higher activity in the tested groups and also increased intensity of the vibratory alarm communication, with the responses clearly dose-dependent. Lower doses of the pheromone provoked higher numbers of vibratory signals compared to higher doses. Higher doses induced long-term running of all termites without stops necessary to perform vibratory behaviour. Surprisingly, even crushed worker heads led to low (but significant increases in the alarm responses, suggesting that other unknown compound in the worker's head is perceived and answered by termites. Our results demonstrate the existence of different alarm levels in termites, with lower levels being communicated through

  13. SmEdA vibro-acoustic modelling in the mid-frequency range including the effect of dissipative treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, H. D.; Maxit, L.; Ege, K.; Gerges, Y.; Guyader, J.-L.

    2017-04-01

    Vibro-acoustic simulation in the mid-frequency range is of interest for automotive and truck constructors. The dissipative treatments used for noise and vibration control such as viscoelastic patches and acoustic absorbing materials must be taken into account in the problem. The Statistical modal Energy distribution Analysis (SmEdA) model consists in extending Statistical Energy Analysis (SEA) to the mid-frequency range by establishing power balance equations between the modes of the different subsystems. The modal basis of uncoupled-subsystems that can be estimated by the finite element method in the mid-frequency range is used as input data. SmEdA was originally developed by considering constant modal damping factors for each subsystem. However, this means that it cannot describe the local distribution of dissipative materials. To overcome this issue, a methodology is proposed here to take into account the effect of these materials. This methodology is based on the finite element models of the subsystems that include well-known homogenized material models of dissipative treatments. The Galerkin method with subsystem normal modes is used to estimate the modal damping loss factors. Cross-modal coupling terms which appear in the formulation due to the dissipative materials are assumed to be negligible. An approximation of the energy sharing between the subsystems damped by dissipative materials is then described by SmEdA. The different steps of the method are validated experimentally by applying it to a laboratory test case composed of a plate-cavity system with different configurations of dissipative treatments. The comparison between the experimental and the simulation results shows good agreement in the mid-frequency range.

  14. The nature of alarm communication in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Blattodea: Termitoidea: Termitidae): the integration of chemical and vibroacoustic signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristaldo, Paulo F.; Jandák, Vojtĕch; Kutalová, Kateřina; Rodrigues, Vinícius B.; Brothánek, Marek; Jiříček, Ondřej; DeSouza, Og; Šobotník, Jan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Alarm signalling is of paramount importance to communication in all social insects. In termites, vibroacoustic and chemical alarm signalling are bound to operate synergistically but have never been studied simultaneously in a single species. Here, we inspected the functional significance of both communication channels in Constrictotermes cyphergaster (Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae), confirming the hypothesis that these are not exclusive, but rather complementary processes. In natural situations, the alarm predominantly attracts soldiers, which actively search for the source of a disturbance. Laboratory testing revealed that the frontal gland of soldiers produces a rich mixture of terpenoid compounds including an alarm pheromone. Extensive testing led to identification of the alarm pheromone being composed of abundant monoterpene hydrocarbons (1S)-α-pinene and myrcene, along with a minor component, (E)-β-ocimene. The vibratory alarm signalling consists of vibratory movements evidenced as bursts; a series of beats produced predominantly by soldiers. Exposing termite groups to various mixtures containing the alarm pheromone (crushed soldier heads, frontal gland extracts, mixture of all monoterpenes, and the alarm pheromone mixture made of standards) resulted in significantly higher activity in the tested groups and also increased intensity of the vibratory alarm communication, with the responses clearly dose-dependent. Lower doses of the pheromone provoked higher numbers of vibratory signals compared to higher doses. Higher doses induced long-term running of all termites without stops necessary to perform vibratory behaviour. Surprisingly, even crushed worker heads led to low (but significant) increases in the alarm responses, suggesting that other unknown compound in the worker's head is perceived and answered by termites. Our results demonstrate the existence of different alarm levels in termites, with lower levels being communicated through vibratory

  15. Vibroacoustics of the piano soundboard: (Non)linearity and modal properties in the low- and mid-frequency ranges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ege, Kerem; Boutillon, Xavier; Rébillat, Marc

    2013-03-01

    The piano soundboard transforms the string vibration into sound and therefore, its vibrations are of primary importance for the sound characteristics of the instrument. An original vibro-acoustical method is presented to isolate the soundboard nonlinearity from that of the exciting device (here: a loudspeaker) and to measure it. The nonlinear part of the soundboard response to an external excitation is quantitatively estimated for the first time, at ≈-40 dB below the linear part at the ff nuance. Given this essentially linear response, a modal identification is performed up to 3 kHz by means of a novel high resolution modal analysis technique [K. Ege, X. Boutillon, B. David, High-resolution modal analysis, Journal of Sound and Vibration 325 (4-5) (2009) 852-869]. Modal dampings (which, so far, were unknown for the piano in this frequency range) are determined in the mid-frequency domain where FFT-based methods fail to evaluate them with an acceptable precision. They turn out to be close to those imposed by wood. A finite-element modelling of the soundboard is also presented. The low-order modal shapes and the comparison between the corresponding experimental and numerical modal frequencies suggest that the boundary conditions can be considered as blocked, except at very low frequencies. The frequency-dependency of the estimated modal densities and the observation of modal shapes reveal two well-separated regimes. Below ≈1 kHz, the soundboard vibrates more or less like a homogeneous plate. Above that limit, the structural waves are confined by ribs, as already noticed by several authors, and localised in restricted areas (one or a few inter-rib spaces), presumably due to a slightly irregular spacing of the ribs across the soundboard.

  16. Focal plane actuation to achieve ultra-high resolution on suborbital balloon payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowen, Paul A.; Miller, Alex; Challa, Priya; Veach, Todd; Groppi, Chris; Mauskopf, Phil

    2014-07-01

    Over the past few years there has been remarkable success flying imaging telescope systems suspended from suborbital balloon payload systems. These imaging systems have covered optical, ultraviolet, sub-­-millimeter and infrared passbands (i.e. BLAST, STO, SBI, Fireball and others). In recognition of these advances NASA is now considering ambitious programs to promote planetary imaging from high altitude at a fraction of the cost of similar fully orbital systems. The challenge with imaging from a balloon payload is delivering the full diffraction-­-limited resolution of the system from a moving payload. Good progress has been made with damping mechanisms and oscillation control to remove most macroscopic movement in the departures of the imaging focal plane from a static configuration, however a jitter component remains that is difficult to remove using external corrections. This paper reports on work to demonstrate in the laboratory the utility and performance of actuating a detector focal plane (of whatever type) to remove the final jitter terms using an agile hexapod design. The input to this demonstration is the jitter signal generated by the pointing system of a previously flown balloon mission (the Stratospheric Terahertz Observatory, STO). Our group has a mature jitter compensation system that thermally isolates the control head from the focal plane itself. This allows the hexapod to remain at ambient temperature in a vacuum environment with the focal plane cooled to cryogenic temperatures. Our lab design mounts the focal plane on the hexapod in a custom cryostat and delivers an active optical stimulus together with the corresponding jitter signal, using the actuation of the hexapod to correct for the departures from a static, stable configuration. We believe this demonstration will make the case for inclusion of this technological solution in future balloon-­-borne imaging systems requiring ultra-­-high resolution.

  17. Art Concept of STS-47 Endeavour, OV-105, payload bay (PLB) configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-47 Endeavour, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 105, payload bay (PLB) configuration is illustrated with artist concept. OV-105 orbits the Earth with payload bay doors (PLBDs) open exposing Spacelab Japan (SL-J) module. Alternate number is 92P-144.

  18. UV Stellar Distribution Model for the Derivation of Payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jun Choi

    1999-12-01

    Full Text Available We present the results of a model calculation of the stellar distribution in a UV and centered at 2175Å corresponding to the well-known bump in the interstellar extinction curve. The stellar distribution model used here is based on the Bahcall-Soneira galaxy model (1980. The source code for model calculation was designed by Brosch (1991 and modified to investigate various designing factors for UV satellite payload. The model predicts UV stellar densities in different sky directions, and its results are compared with the TD-1 star counts for a number of sky regions. From this study, we can determine the field of view, size of optics, angular resolution, and number of stars in one orbit. There will provide the basic constrains in designing a satellite payload for UV observations.

  19. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  20. Approaching Parallelization of Payload Software Application on ARM Multicore Platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretault, Pierre; Chatonnay, Nicolas; Calmet, Brigitte

    2015-09-01

    This paper is the result of a study realized by Thales Alenia Space (TAS) in collaboration with the french space agency (CNES). It introduces an approach for parallelizing a payload oriented software application. The first part of the paper tackles with the different issues a software engineer faces when he/she starts a software development on a multicore platform. The second part exposes, through a concrete case of study, the iterative approach we adopt to distribute a payload-oriented software application. The case of study consists in parallelizing a full software signal processing chain running on top of an Execution Platform composed of a PikeOS hypervisor and of an ARM quad-core platform (Cortex A9). Finally, the conclusion of the paper focuses on returns of experience related to such a development.

  1. Offshore Wind Payload Transfer Using Flexible Mobile Crane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magnus B. Kjelland

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an offshore-simulated loading and unloading of a payload from a floating platform to a fixed structure. The experiments are performed in a dry-lab, where a Stewart platform is used to simulate the motion of the vessel. A hydraulically actuated vehicle loader crane is used to perform the tasks of payload transfer. The crane includes a hydraulic winch where the wire force is measured by a load cell. A mathematical model of the winch is derived and is experimentally verified. The control strategies include a heave compensation and a constant tension mode. A motion reference unit is used to generate the reference motion of the moving platform. Experimental results show the wire force while performing the load cases. This paper shows the advantage of using a reference motion as a feed forward control reference, instead of only relying on the constant tension.

  2. The use of artificial intelligence techniques to improve the multiple payload integration process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutts, Dannie E.; Widgren, Brian K.

    1992-01-01

    A maximum return of science and products with a minimum expenditure of time and resources is a major goal of mission payload integration. A critical component then, in successful mission payload integration is the acquisition and analysis of experiment requirements from the principal investigator and payload element developer teams. One effort to use artificial intelligence techniques to improve the acquisition and analysis of experiment requirements within the payload integration process is described.

  3. Compact L-band SAR payload for UAV

    OpenAIRE

    Zaragoza Arbo, Josep

    2016-01-01

    Design and development of a Compact L-band SAR payload for UAV Design of a signal interference canceller due to the coupling between antennas for a SAR system. Diseño de un cancelador de señal interferente debido al acoplamiento entre antenas para un sistema SAR. Disseny d'un cancel·lador de senyal interferent degut a l'acoblament entre antenes per un sistema SAR.

  4. Overview of the Sapphire payload for space surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, J.; Brisby, R.; Smith, K.

    2012-06-01

    This paper provides an overview of the satellite based Sapphire Payload developed by COM DEV to be used for observing Resident Space Objects (RSOs) from low earth orbit by the Canadian Department of National Defence. The data from this operational mission will be provided to the US Space Surveillance Network as an international contribution to assist with RSO precision positional determination. The payload consists of two modules; an all reflective visible-band telescope housed with a low noise preamplifier/focal plane, and an electronics module that contains primary and redundant electronics. The telescope forms a low distortion image on two CCDs adjacent to each other in the focal plane, creating a primary image and a redundant image that are offset spatially. This combination of high-efficiency low-noise CCDs with well-proven high-throughput optics provides a very sensitive system with low risk and cost. Stray light is well controlled to allow for observations of very faint objects within the vicinity of the bright Earth limb. Thermally induced aberrations are minimized through the use of an all aluminum construction and the strategic use of thermal coatings. The payload will acquire a series of images for each target and perform onboard image pre-processing to minimize the downlink requirements. Internal calibration sources will be used periodically to check for health of the payload and to identify, and possibly correct, any pixels with an aberrant response. This paper also provides a summary of the testing that was performed and the results achieved.

  5. STS-46 Payload Specialist Malerba uses extinguisher during JSC firefighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    STS-46 Atlantis, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 104, Italian Payload Specialist Franco Malerba shoots fire extinguisher spray at the base of a blazing fire during fire fighting and fire training exercises at JSC's Fire Training Pit located across from the Gilruth Center Bldg 207. Behind Malerba are the fire fighting training instructor, firemen, and European Space Agency (ESA) Mission Specialist (MS) Claude Nicollier, holding a camcorder.

  6. Advanced Payload Transfer Measurement System (APT-MS) Mechanical Features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, William V.

    1995-01-01

    During the last two feet or so of transfer, for a large or heavy payload to its restraining fixture, the consequences of unplanned contact (or impact) between payload and support structure can range from merely annoying to something approaching disaster. Current transfer methods employ technicians with meter sticks stationed at the various hold-down locations to estimate the distances to contact. This information is communicated orally to the crane operator. It is understandable that this work proceeds carefully and therefore slowly. The objectives of this study are (1) to explore mechanical sources of measurement error; and (2) to develop an improved prototype design that is compact, inexpensive, and addresses the measurement error issues. APT is a relatively inexpensive electro-mechanical device that reduces both time and manpower required to make shuttle payload transfers. APT measurement system would provide a GUI for the 'move-conductor' (crane operator) so he could see the displacements of all hold-down interfaces as they move together and thus have a more accurate, comprehensive and 'real-time' picture of the engagement activity. An error model attempts to include all estimatable sources of mechanical error and design features were introduced to reduce or eliminate major sources of error.

  7. Composite Payload Fairing Structural Architecture Assessment and Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krivanek, Thomas M.; Yount, Bryan C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a summary of the structural architecture assessments conducted and a recommendation for an affordable high performance composite structural concept to use on the next generation heavy-lift launch vehicle, the Space Launch System (SLS). The Structural Concepts Element of the Advanced Composites Technology (ACT) project and its follow on the Lightweight Spacecraft Structures and Materials (LSSM) project was tasked with evaluating a number of composite construction technologies for specific Ares V components: the Payload Shroud, the Interstage, and the Core Stage Intertank. Team studies strived to address the structural challenges, risks and needs for each of these vehicle components. Leveraging off of this work, the subsequent Composites for Exploration (CoEx) effort is focused on providing a composite structural concept to support the Payload Fairing for SLS. This paper documents the evaluation and down selection of composite construction technologies and evolution to the SLS Payload Fairing. Development of the evaluation criteria (also referred to as Figures of Merit or FOMs), their relative importance, and association to vehicle requirements are presented. A summary of the evaluation results, and a recommendation of the composite concept to baseline in the Composites for Exploration (CoEx) project is presented. The recommendation for the SLS Fairing is a Honeycomb Sandwich architecture based primarily on affordability and performance with two promising alternatives, Hat stiffened and Fiber Reinforced Foam (FRF) identified for eventual program block upgrade.

  8. Parachute-Payload System Flight Dynamics and Trajectory Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giorgio Guglieri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The work traces a general procedure for the design of a flight simulation tool still representative of the major flight physics of a parachute-payload system along decelerated trajectories. An example of limited complexity simulation models for a payload decelerated by one or more parachutes is given, including details and implementation features usually omitted as the focus of the research in this field is typically on the investigation of mission design issues, rather than addressing general implementation guidelines for the development of a reconfigurable simulation tool. The dynamics of the system are modeled through a simple multibody model that represents the expected behavior of an entry vehicle during the terminal deceleration phase. The simulators are designed according to a comprehensive vision that enforces the simplification of the coupling mechanism between the payload and the parachute, with an adequate level of physical insight still available. The results presented for a realistic case study define the sensitivity of the simulation outputs to the functional complexity of the mathematical model. Far from being an absolute address for the software designer, this paper tries to contribute to the area of interest with some technical considerations and clarifications.

  9. Future experiments and improved service system for automated MAUS payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, G. H.; Gronert, H.-W.; Döpkens, J.

    The German MAUS project for autonomous material science experiments was initiated in 1980 for optimum utilization of NASA's Get-Away-Special (GAS) program. It is one of the flight opportunities which is offered by the F.R.G. to scientists for performing experiments under microgravity conditions. MAUS payloads are housed in GAS containers and consist of the experimental mounting structure, the batteries, the standard electronics for experiment control and data acquisition, the house-keeping systems and the individual experiment hardware. The standard service system was developed to offer a range of services within a framework of standardized interfaces to the experimenter and to meet NASA requirements. A payload can either be flown in the American GAS-program or with specific carrier structures, like SPAS, OSTA or USS, the latter being considered for the D-2 mission. Up to now, ten MAUS experiments were flown and currently seven payloads are in preparation for future Space Shuttle missions. The top four experiments are already equipped with the recently modified and modernized standard system which has been improved in experiment control, data management and semiconductor memory. The experiments to be performed deal with critical Marangoni convection, oscillatory Marangoni convection, gas bubbles in glass melts and pool boiling in liquids. A promising means of increasing resources in the field of MAUS-experiments is the interconnection of GAS containers. In the TWIN-MAUS configuration, electrical power and data will be transferred between two containers mounted adjacent to each other.

  10. NAVIGATION AND REMOTE SENSING PAYLOADS AND METHODS OF THE SARVANT UNMANNED AERIAL SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Molina

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In a large number of scenarios and missions, the technical, operational and economical advantages of UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing over traditional airborne and satellite platforms are apparent. Airborne Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR or combined optical/SAR operation in remote areas might be a case of a typical "dull, dirty, dangerous" mission suitable for unmanned operation – in harsh environments such as for example rain forest areas in Brazil, topographic mapping of small to medium sparsely inhabited remote areas with UAS-based photogrammetry and remote sensing seems to be a reasonable paradigm. An example of such a system is the SARVANT platform, a fixed-wing aerial vehicle with a six-meter wingspan and a maximumtake- of-weight of 140 kilograms, able to carry a fifty-kilogram payload. SARVANT includes a multi-band (X and P interferometric SAR payload, as the P-band enables the topographic mapping of densely tree-covered areas, providing terrain profile information. Moreover, the combination of X- and P-band measurements can be used to extract biomass estimations. Finally, long-term plan entails to incorporate surveying capabilities also at optical bands and deliver real-time imagery to a control station. This paper focuses on the remote-sensing concept in SARVANT, composed by the aforementioned SAR sensor and envisioning a double optical camera configuration to cover the visible and the near-infrared spectrum. The flexibility on the optical payload election, ranging from professional, medium-format cameras to mass-market, small-format cameras, is discussed as a driver in the SARVANT development. The paper also focuses on the navigation and orientation payloads, including the sensors (IMU and GNSS, the measurement acquisition system and the proposed navigation and orientation methods. The latter includes the Fast AT procedure, which performs close to traditional Integrated Sensor Orientation (ISO and better than Direct Sensor

  11. Payload/orbiter signal processing and data handling system evaluation presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    It is recommended that standard digital and along interfaces be adopted. These include: (1) define interfaces compatible with NASA/DOD/industry-accepted design standards; (2) investigate costs of modifying orbiter sybsystem interfaces, (3) investigate cost of designing attached payload interface unit for NASA and commercial payloads and (4) investigate costs of designing interface circuits that can be incorporated into each payload design.

  12. Optical data transmission technology for fixed and drag-on STS payload umbilicals, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    St.denis, R. W.

    1981-01-01

    Optical data handling methods are studied as applicable to payload communications checkout and monitoring. Both payload umbilicals and interconnecting communication lines carrying payload data are examined for the following: (1) ground checkout requirements; (2) optical approach (technical survey of optical approaches, selection of optimum approach); (3) survey and select components; (4) compare with conventional approach; and (5) definition of follow on activity.

  13. Characterization of Regolith Volatile Transport and Storage Properties by The MECA MSP 2001 Lander Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, S. M.; Marshall, J.

    1999-09-01

    The diffusive and adsorptive properties of the Martian regolith influence the exchange of volatiles between the atmosphere and subsurface. Our quantitative knowledge of these properties is extremely poor -introducing substantial uncertainties in efforts to model long-term evolution of ground ice and diurnal, seasonal, and climatic cycles of CO2 and H20. This situation should significantly improve upon arrival of the 2001 Mars Surveyor Lander in 2002. In support of the Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) enterprise, the 2001 mission will include a suite of instruments to characterize the nature of the Martian environment and assess whether it contains hazards that may threaten future human exploration. A major element of this effort is the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) payload, which consists an optical microscopy system incorporating electrostatic, magnetic, and scratch-hardness materials testing palets, an atomic force microscope with imaging capabilities comparable to an SEM, a wet chemistry laboratory with four independent test cells, an electrometer on the robotic arm, material test patches, a camera also mounted on the arm, and a soil scoop for excavating down to about 50 cm into the soil. Although conceived to address the needs of HEDS, MECA payload is a sophisticated soil science laboratory that should provide a wealth of new data relevant to the volatile transport and storage properties of the regolith. Additional information os contained in the original.

  14. Space processing applications payload equipment study. Volume 2B: Payload interface analysis (power/thermal/electromagnetic compatibility)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammel, R. L. (Editor); Smith, A. G. (Editor)

    1974-01-01

    As a part of the task of performing preliminary engineering analysis of modular payload subelement/host vehicle interfaces, a subsystem interface analysis was performed to establish the integrity of the modular approach to the equipment design and integration. Salient areas that were selected for analysis were power and power conditioning, heat rejection and electromagnetic capability (EMC). The equipment and load profiles for twelve representative experiments were identified. Two of the twelve experiments were chosen as being representative of the group and have been described in greater detail to illustrate the evaluations used in the analysis. The shuttle orbiter will provide electrical power from its three fuel cells in support of the orbiter and the Spacelab operations. One of the three shuttle orbiter fuel cells will be dedicated to the Spacelab electrical power requirements during normal shuttle operation. This power supplies the Spacelab subsystems and the excess will be available to the payload. The current Spacelab sybsystem requirements result in a payload allocation of 4.0 to 4.8 kW average (24 hour/day) and 9.0 kW peak for 15 minutes.

  15. Computation of leaky guided waves dispersion spectrum using vibroacoustic analyses and the Matrix Pencil Method: a validation study for immersed rectangular waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, M; Bartoli, I; Castellazzi, G; Marzani, A

    2014-09-01

    The paper aims at validating a recently proposed Semi Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) formulation coupled with a 2.5D Boundary Element Method (2.5D BEM) for the extraction of dispersion data in immersed waveguides of generic cross-section. To this end, three-dimensional vibroacoustic analyses are carried out on two waveguides of square and rectangular cross-section immersed in water using the commercial Finite Element software Abaqus/Explicit. Real wavenumber and attenuation dispersive data are extracted by means of a modified Matrix Pencil Method. It is demonstrated that the results obtained using the two techniques are in very good agreement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Antenatal fetal assessment: contraction stress test, nonstress test, vibroacoustic stimulation, amniotic fluid volume, biophysical profile, and modified biophysical profile--an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devoe, Lawrence D

    2008-08-01

    Antenatal fetal assessment was introduced into the United States in the 1970s. The initial antepartum test, the oxytocin challenge test, later renamed as the contraction stress test, became the gold standard for fetal surveillance. Its labor intensive requirements and contraindications made it inapplicable to some high-risk pregnancies. Other testing schemes were developed subsequently, the nonstress test and its alternative, vibroacoustic stimulation, the semiquantitative assessment of amniotic fluid volume, the biophysical profile and its modified version, the modified biophysical profile. This article is a brief critical review of these testing methods and focuses on the following: (1) physiologic bases; (2) testing methodologies; (3) supportive evidence from randomized controlled and observational trials; and (4) areas needing further investigation.

  17. Would turbine uprating be allowable with respect to cavitation? An example of vibroacoustic diagnosis; Turbinenleistungserhoehung - Waere sie zulaessig im Hinblick auf die Kavitation? Beispiel einer vibroakustischen Diagnose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bajic, B.

    1999-04-01

    Velocity field disturbances at the inflow to the runner of a turbine caused by the stay and guide vanes alter the vibroacoustic cavitation signature. This telltale amplitude modulation can be a means to identify the incipient, weak, or moderate cavitation related to each vane/runner blade pair. An application of this method is presented identifying the turbine parts responsible for the increase of cavitation predicted when uprating a 60 MW Kaplan turbine. (orig.) [German] Stoerungen im Geschwindigkeitsfeld am Einlauf zu einem Turbinenlaufrad, hervorgerufen durch die Stuetz- und Leitschaufeln, veraendern die vibroakustischen Kavitationsanzeichen. Diese aussagekraeftige Amplitudenmodulation kann herangezogen werden, um die beginnende, schwache oder mittelmaessige Kavitation fuer jedes Paar aus Leitschaufel (Stuetz- und Leitschaufel) und Laufradschaufel zu bestimmen. Hier wird ein Anwendungsbeispiel dieser Methode vorgestellt, wobei diejenigen Turbinenteile identifiziert werden, die fuer die vorhergesagte Zunahme der Kavitation im Falle der Nennleistungserhoehung einer 60 MW Kaplan-Turbine verantwortlich sind. (orig.)

  18. Combination of vibroacoustic stimulation and acute variables of mFBP as a simple assessment method of low-risk fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Oleg; Finderle, Aleks; Prodan, Mirko; Skunca, Elvira; Prpić, Igor; Zaputović, Sanja

    2009-02-01

    To observe a rate of fetal breathing and gross body movement appearance as physiologic reactions to the external vibroacoustic stimulation (VAS) and to establish a rapid and reliable antepartal method for accurate selecting of non-compromised fetuses in the low-risk population. Actual condition of 742-term and near-term structurally normal and otherwise healthy singleton fetuses with favourable outcome was assessed by previously established combination of the modified fetal biophysical profile and VAS. Only inactive fetuses at the beginning of the testing were included in the study. The combined biophysical testing has been started by a transabdominal real-time ultrasound examination, followed by vibroacoustic stimulus applied over the fetal head for 5 s during fetal quiescence. Fetal breathing and gross body movements were observed with particular attention in each case at measured time intervals from the application of external VAS until the moment at which either the first 60-s episode of breathing movements or all three fetal gross body movements were detected. Obtained results have been presented numerically in 5-min periods and cumulative percentages. After the external VAS, 84.5% of studied fetuses successfully manifested their normal breathing or gross body movements in the first 5 min of the modified biophysical testing. Furthermore, approximately 96% of them were able to demonstrate at least one of these two biophysical activities after 6-7 min. Because of its simplicity, non-invasiveness, independence of precise gestational dating, reproducibility and immediate individual results, ultrasonographic observation of normal fetal breathing and/or gross body movements after the external VAS stands a real chance to become a nearly optimal antenatal test for accurate and rapid information of actual non-compromised fetal condition. Authors strongly believe that the described antenatal method should represent a rather efficient assessment procedure of fetal well

  19. Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) Component Responses to Payload Vibration Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Ronald A.

    2011-01-01

    Vibration testing of SUMI was performed at both the experiment and payload levels. No accelerometers were installed inside the experiment during testing, but it is certain that component responses were very high. The environments experienced by optical and electronic components in these tests is an area of ongoing concern. The analysis supporting this presentation included a detailed finite element model of the SUMI experiment section, the dynamic response of which, correlated well with accelerometer measurements from the testing of the experimental section at Marshall Space Flight Center. The relatively short timeframe available to complete the task and the limited design information available was a limitation on the level of detail possible for the non-experiment portion of the model. However, since the locations of interest are buried in the experimental section of the model, the calculated responses should be enlightening both for the development of test criteria and for guidance in design.

  20. STS-39 AFP-675 CIRRIS-1A in OV-103's payload bay (PLB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-39's Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) Uniformly Redundant Array (URA) and Cryogenic Infrared Radiance Instrumentation for Shuttle 1A (CIRRIS-1A) mounted on the experiment support system (ESS) pallet are documented in Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). Part of the ESS pallet power distribution system thermal covering is visible at the bottom of the frame. AFP-675 is a Department of Defense (DOD)-sponsored collection of experiments whose objective is to gather data on the Earth's atmosphere (aurora, Earth limb, and airglow), celestial objects, and the environment in and around the PLB. In the background are the aft PLB bulkhead, the vertical tail, and the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods.

  1. Scalable Sensor Data Processor: A Multi-Core Payload Data Processor ASIC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrojo, L.; Moreno, R.; Regada, R.; Garcia, E.; Trautner, R.; Rauwerda, G.; Sunesen, K.; He, Y.; Redant, S.; Thys, G.; Andersson, J.; Habinc, S.

    2015-09-01

    The Scalable Sensor Data Processor (SSDP) project, under ESA contract and with TAS-E as prime contractor, targets the development of a multi-core ASIC for payload data processing to be used, among other terrestrial and space application areas, in future scientific and exploration missions with harsh radiation environments. The SSDP is a mixed-signal heterogeneous multi-core System-on-Chip (SoC). It combines GPP and NoC-based DSP subsystems with on-chip ADCs and several standard space I/Fs to make a flexible, configurable and scalable device. The NoC comprises two state-of-the-art fixed point Xentium® DSP processors, providing the device with high data processing capabilities.

  2. Vibro-acoustic methods for the determination of the technical state of a refrigeration piston compressor. A check-up for the compressor. Vibroakustische Verfahren zur Bestimmung des technischen Zustandes eines Kaeltekolbenverdichters. Ein Check-up fuer den Verdichter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milowanow, V.I.; Lopatinskaja, E.S.

    1990-10-01

    Independent of the kind of refrigeration plant the actual service life is limited by the service life of the compressor. In case of refrigeration machinery with small-type refrigeration compressors for refrigerated transport systems a periodical check of the system before setting out is particularly important. A spectral analysis process is recommended for the diagnosis. But due to the particularities of the plants this is only suited for systems for vibroacoustic diagnosis. This technique is presented using charts and diagrams. (BWI).

  3. Pointing system for the balloon-borne astronomical payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nirmal, Kaipacheri; Sreejith, Aickara Gopinathan; Mathew, Joice; Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Ambily, Suresh; Prakash, Ajin; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-10-01

    We describe the development and implementation of a light-weight, fully autonomous 2-axis pointing and stabilization system designed for balloon-borne astronomical payloads. The system is developed using off-the-shelf components such as Arduino Uno controller, HMC 5883L magnetometer, MPU-9150 inertial measurement unit, and iWave GPS receiver unit. It is a compact and rugged system which can also be used to take images/video in a moving vehicle or in real photography. The system performance is evaluated from the ground, as well as in conditions simulated to imitate the actual flight by using a tethered launch.

  4. Shuttle orbiter with telescoping main propulsion unit and payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacConochie, Ian O.

    1993-03-01

    An improved Space Shuttle with variable internal volume is provided. The Space Shuttle Orbiter includes a telescoping main propulsion unit. This main propulsion unit contains the main rocket engines and fuel tanks and telescopes into the Space Shuttle. A variable cavity is located between this unit and the crew compartment. Accordingly, the positioning of the telescoping main propulsion unit determines the volume of the variable cavity. Thus, the volume of the variable length of the entire Space Shuttle may be increased or decreased to achieve desired configurations for optimal storage. In one embodiment of the invention, the payload also telescopes within the variable cavity.

  5. Quantitative Conjugated Payload Measurement Using Enzymatic Release of Antibody-Drug Conjugate with Cleavable Linker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rago, Brian; Tumey, L Nathan; Wei, Cong; Barletta, Frank; Clark, Tracey; Hansel, Steven; Han, Xiaogang

    2017-02-15

    As antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) design is evolving with novel payload, linker, and conjugation chemistry, the need for sensitive and precise quantitative measurement of conjugated payload to support pharmacokinetics (PK) is in high demand. Compared to ADCs containing noncleavable linkers, a strategy specific to linkers which are liable to pH, chemical reduction, or enzymatic cleavage has gained popularity in recent years. One bioanalytical approach to take advantage of this type of linker design is the development of a PK assay measuring released conjugated payload. For the ADC utilizing a dipeptide ValCit linker studied in this report, the release of payload PF-06380101 was achieved with high efficiency using a purified cathepsin B enzyme. The subsequent liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS) quantitation leads to the PK profile of the conjugated payload. For this particular linker using a maleimide-based conjugation chemistry, one potential route of payload loss would result in an albumin adduct of the linker-payload. While this adduct's formation has been previously reported, here, for the first time, we have shown that payload from a source other than ADC contributes only up to 4% of total conjugated payload while it accounts for approximately 35% of payload lost from the ADC at 48 h after dosing to rats.

  6. Coupling characteristics analysis for the disturbance free payload spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Kong, Xianren; Liu, Yanfang; Chen, Zhenpeng

    2017-09-01

    In the Disturbance-Free-Payload (DFP) architecture spacecraft, the payload-module (PM) and support-module (SM) are mechanically separated such that the disturbances and vibrations from the SM can be perfectly suppressed. However, the back-Electromotive-Force (back-EMF) of the non-contact actuators and the stiffness of the cables connecting the PM and SM can cause the coupling between the PM and SM. This paper analyzes the coupling characteristics in detail. To understand the coupling essentially, the coupling dynamics model of the DFP spacecraft is established using the combination of the Newton-Euler method with the Lagrange formulation. Then, the displacement transfer function from the SM platform to the PM platform is derived by considering the coupling dynamics equation as a second-order non-proportionally damped system, and a numerical example is developed to analyze the coupling characteristics in the time and frequency domain. The results illustrate that cross coupling exists between the PM and SM, and the low-frequency excitation on the SM will affect the PM obviously. In addition, the larger back-EMF coefficient can cause the more obvious coupling effect on the PM, while the coupling effect caused by the cables is related to the frequency of the excitation on the SM.

  7. Future MAUS payload and the TWIN-MAUS configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniek, S.; Otto, G.; Doepkens, J.

    1988-01-01

    The German MAUS project (materials science autonomous experiments in weightlessness) was initiated in 1979 for optimum utilization of NASA's Get Away Special (GAS) program. The standard MAUS system was developed to meet GAS requirements and can accommodate a wide variety of GAS-type experiments. The system offers a range of services to experimenters within the framework of standardized interfaces. Four MAUS payloads being prepared for future space shuttle flight opportunities are described. The experiments include critical Marangoni convection, oscillatory Marangoni convection, pool boiling, and gas bubbles in glass melts. Scientific objectives as well as equipment hardware are presented together with recent improvements to the MAUS standard system, e.g., a new experiment control and data management unit and a semiconductor memory. A promising means of increasing resources in the field of GAS experiments is the interconnection of GAS containers. This important feature has been studied to meet the challenge of future advanced payloads. In the TWIN-MAUS configuration, electrical power and data will be transferred between two containers mounted adjacent to each other.

  8. Ten past and ten future GAS/MAUS-payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staniek, S.; Otto, G.; Doepkess, J.

    1988-01-01

    MAUS (materials science autonomous experiments) is one out of a series of flight opportunities which the Space Program of West Germany offers to scientists from the disciplines of materials research and processing for performing materials science investigations under microgravity conditions. Up to now, ten MAUS experiments were flown which were dealing with the following scientific topics: decomposition of binary alloys with miscibility gap in the liquid state, interaction of a solidification front with dispersed particles, critical Marangoni number, investigation of the magnetic compound MnBi, shrinkage of gas bubbles in glass melts and slip casting. The ten future experiments are partly reflights with modification of the scientific objectives as well as new experiments in the fields of chemical reactions, heat transfer, glass technology and Ostwald ripening. Looking to ten flown payloads, the peculiarities of instrument technology in GAS-cans and its evolution is discussed with emphasis on structure, electronics and thermal design. A typical modern payload using 100 percent of the resource is presented.

  9. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  10. Surface phenomena in plasma environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purvis, C. K.; Ferguson, D. C.

    1989-01-01

    Plasma interactions and their effects on materials depend on a number of factors, including the pre-existing environment, the properties of surface materials and the characteristics of the system. An additional dimension is the question of mission: some payloads may be much more sensitive to plasma interactions than others. As an example, a payload whose objective is to measure the ambient environment will be more sensitive to any effects than will a power system. Material specific effects include charging and its associated effects, which can result in short- and long-term damage. Selection of materials for a particular application requires consideration of all factors and assessment of effects due to all causes. Proper selection and suitability determination requires analysis to identify the actual environment combined with testing under exposure to single and combined environment factors.

  11. The Motion Planning of Overhead Crane Based on Suppressing Payload Residual Swing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Hua-sen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the overhead crane system is subject to under actuation system due to that overhead crane and payload are connected by flexibility wire rope. The payload generates residual swing when the overhead crane is accelerating/ decelerating the motions. This may cause trouble for the payload precise positioning and motion planning. Hence, an optimization input shaping control method is presented to reduce the under actuated overhead crane’s payload swing caused via the inertia force. The dynamic model of the overhead crane is proposed according to the physics structure of the crane. The input shaper based on the motion planning of the crane is used as the feed forward input to suppress payload residual swing. Simulation and experiment results indicate that the ZV input shaper and ZVD input shaper can reduce the payload swing of the overhead crane.

  12. A CAN Solution Supporting Satcom Payload Evolution: Design, Validation and Standardisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunes-Lasnet, Sev; Furano, Gianluca; Vidaud, Olivier; Dalenq, Jean; Notebaert, Olivier

    2011-08-01

    The optimisation of telecom satellites payload through the use of efficient standard serial buses is under renewed interest especially as harness optimisation together with the ability to accommodate complex payload are key competitivity drivers. CAN has been selected as suitable for payload architecture upgrade, and further to an architecture demonstration is under full electrical characterisation and deployment. The satcom CAN will benefit from ECSS standardisation insuring harmonisation of CAN implementations in European space projects, and reduced engineering effort for interface development and compatibility.

  13. Optical distribution of local oscillators in future telecommunication satellite payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benazet, Benoît; Sotom, Michel; Maignan, Michel; Berthon, Jacques

    2017-11-01

    The distribution of high spectral purity reference signals over optical fibre in future telecommunication satellite payloads is presented. Several types of applications are considered, including the distribution of a reference frequency at 10 MHz (Ultra-Stable Reference Oscillator) as well as the distribution of a radiofrequency oscillator around 800 MHz (Master Local Oscillator). The results of both experimental and theoretical studies are reported. In order to meet phase noise requirements for the USRO distribution, the use of an optimised receiver circuit based on an optically synchronised oscillator is investigated. Finally, the optical distribution of microwave local oscillators at frequencies exceeding 20 GHz is described. Such a scheme paves the way to more advanced sub-systems involving optical frequency-mixing and optical transmission of microwave signals, with applications to multiple-beam active antennas.

  14. Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates Inc. Biomedical Experiments Payload (CIBX-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Dennis; Edmundson, Allen; Robinson, Keith (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments to find solutions for a range of biomedical issues are being hosted by the Commercial Instrumentation Technology Associates Inc. (ITA) Biomedical Experiments (CIBX-2) payload. This research encompasses more than 20 separate experiments including cancer research, commercial experiments and hands-on student experiments from 10 schools as part of ITA's ongoing University Among the Stars program. Protein crystal growth experiments will address the structure of urokinase - a protein that has been identified as a key enzyme in the spread of brain, lung, colon, prostate and breast cancers. Crystals of Bence Jones, a protein associated with bone cancer, will also be grown. Understanding their structures may help scientists develop treatments. In a related area, the Microencapsulation of Drugs (MEPS) is an anti-cancer drug delivery system, based on a 10-year partnership with NASA's Johnson Space Center. On this mission, the co-encapsulation of antibodies and immune stimulants will be made in submicron microcapsules to target pulmonary and bacterial infections.

  15. Secure Payload Access to the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitts, R. Lee; Reid, Chris

    2002-01-01

    The ISS finally reached an operational state and exists for local and remote users. Onboard payload systems are managed by the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC). Users access HOSC systems by internet protocols in support of daily operations, preflight simulation, and test. In support of this diverse user community, a modem security architecture has been implemented. The architecture has evolved over time from an isolated but open system to a system which supports local and remote access to the ISS over broad geographic regions. This has been accomplished through the use of an evolved security strategy, PKI, and custom design. Through this paper, descriptions of the migration process and the lessons learned are presented. This will include product decision criteria, rationale, and the use of commodity products in the end architecture. This paper will also stress the need for interoperability of various products and the effects of seemingly insignificant details.

  16. Vibroacoustic Skin Diagnostics Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana М. Yatsun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the mathematical modeling of biological diagnosis of complex heterogeneous structure (skin, using non-destructive control method. The mathematical model, describing interaction of the material with electrodynamic vibration generator and sensor system, controlling the propagation of small disturbances was developed. The influence of material model parameters on the spectrum in the course of the propagation of the surface disturbance

  17. Vibrotactile and Vibroacoustic Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Ann; Manresa, Cristina; Knoche, Hendrik Ole

    2017-01-01

    period. Participants wearing the vest (and their pair) completed a set of tasks. We logged use and responses, recorded all activities on video, and conducted post-experiment interviews and questionnaires. Results: The results depicted the participants’ experience, communication and connection while...

  18. Earth cloud, aerosol, and radiation explorer optical payload development status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélière, A.; Wallace, K.; Pereira do Carmo, J.; Lefebvre, A.

    2017-09-01

    The European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) are co-operating to develop as part of ESA's Living Planet Programme, the third Earth Explorer Core Mission, EarthCARE, with the ojective of improving the understanding of the processes involving clouds, aerosols and radiation in the Earth's atmosphere. EarthCARE payload consists of two active and two passive instruments: an ATmospheric LIDar (ATLID), a Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR), a Multi-Spectral Imager (MSI) and a Broad-Band Radiometer (BBR). The four instruments data are processed individually and in a synergetic manner to produce a large range of products, which include vertical profiles of aerosols, liquid water and ice, observations of cloud distribution and vertical motion within clouds, and will allow the retrieval of profiles of atmospheric radiative heating and cooling. MSI is a compact instrument with a 150 km swath providing 500 m pixel data in seven channels, whose retrieved data will give context to the active instrument measurements, as well as providing cloud and aerosol information. BBR measures reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation from the scene. Operating in the UV range at 355 nm, ATLID provides atmospheric echoes from ground to an altitude of 40 km. Thanks to a high spectral resolution filtering, the lidar is able to separate the relative contribution of aerosol and molecular scattering, which gives access to aerosol optical depth. Co-polarised and cross-polarised components of the Mie scattering contribution are measured on dedicated channels. This paper will provide a description of the optical payload implementation, the design and characterisation of the instruments.

  19. International Space Station External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos E.; Mikatarian, Ronald R.; Steagall, Courtney A.; Huang, Alvin Y.; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit. Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives. Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle. The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets. This paper addresses the ISS induced contamination environment at attached payload sites, both at the requirements level as well as measurements made on returned hardware, and contamination forecasting maps being generated to support external payload topology studies and science utilization.

  20. On-board Payload Data Processing from Earth to Space Segment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tragni, M.; Abbattista, C.; Amoruso, L.; Cinquepalmi, L.; Bgongiari, F.; Errico, W.

    2013-09-01

    environment with encapsulated low-level drivers, HW support and testing environment). Furthermore Space PDP presents an advanced processing system to be fully adopted both as on-board module for EO spacecrafts and extra-planetary exploration rovers. The main innovative aspects are: • HW and SW modularity - scalability for the Payload Data Processing and AOC S/S • Complex processing capabilities fully available onboard (on spacecrafts or rovers) • Reduced effort in mission SW design, implementation, verification and validation tasks • HW abstraction level comparable to present multitasking Unix-like systems allowing SW and algorithms re-use (also from available GS applications). The development approach addressed by SpacePDP is based both on the re-use and resources sharing with flexible elements adjustable to different missions and to different tasks within the same mission (e.g. shared between AOCS and data management S/S) and on a strong specialization in the system elements that are designed to satisfy specific mission needs and specific technological innovations. The innovative processing system is proven in many possible scenarios of use from standard compression task up to the most complex one as the image classification directly on-board. The first one is just useful for standard benchmark trade-off analysis of HW and SW capabilities respect to the other common processing modules. The classification is the ambitious objective of that system to process directly on board the data from sensor (by down-sampling or in no-full resolution acquisition modality if necessary) to detect at flight time any features on ground or observed phenomenas. For Earth application it could be the cloud coverage (to avoid the acquisition and discard the data), burning areas or vessels detection and similar. On Planetary o Universe exploration mission it could be the path recognition for a rover, or high power energy events in outbound galaxies. Sometimes it could be need to review the

  1. Behavioural and physiological effect of dental environment sensory adaptation on children's dental anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Michele; Melmed, Raphael N; Sgan-Cohen, Harold D; Eli, Ilana; Parush, Shula

    2007-12-01

    Dental anxiety is a serious obstacle in conventional oral healthcare delivery. A sensory adapted dental environment (SDE) might be effective in reducing anxiety and inducing relaxation. This study aimed to assess the efficacy of a Snoezelen SDE in reducing anxiety among children undergoing scaling and polishing by a dental hygienist. The Snoezelen environment consists of a partially dimmed room with lighting effects, vibroacoustic stimuli, and deep pressure. Nineteen children, aged 6-11 yr, participated in a cross-over intervention trial. Behavioral parameters included the mean number, duration, and magnitude of anxious behaviors, as monitored by videotaped recordings. Physiological parameters reflecting arousal were monitored by changes in dermal resistance. Results, by all measures, consistently indicated that both behavioral and psychophysiological measures of relaxation improved significantly in the SDE compared with a conventional dental environment. The findings support recommending the SDE as an effective and practical alternative in oral healthcare delivery to anxious children.

  2. Enabling Science and Deep Space Exploration through Space Launch System (LSL) Secondary Payload Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). By reaching this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. NASA is making investments to expand science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1), currently planned for launch no earlier than July 2018, will be the first mission to carry such payloads on the SLS. The EM-1 launch will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites that will be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload capacity of SLS, and the payload requirements for launch and

  3. Military Payloads Hosted on Commercial Satellites: How Can the Space and Missile Systems Center Increase the Number of Commercially Hosted Military Payload Contract Awards

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    and unnamed owner-operator customer, interview by author, September 2011. 25. Defense Contract Management Agency, Guidebook, chap. 18, sec. 1. 26...How Can the Space and Missile Systems Center Increase the Number of Commercially Hosted Military Payload Contract Awards? Peter A. Cunningham Major...in a CHMP contract 3 2 Examples of commercially hosted payloads 9 vii Foreword It is my great pleasure to present another issue of The Wright

  4. Planning and Scheduling of Payloads of AstroSat During Initial and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Pandiyan

    2017-06-20

    Jun 20, 2017 ... The process is found to be labour intensive and several operational software tools, encompassing spacecraft sub-systems, on-orbit, .... ing of scheduling and command generating software packages that were part of 'optimal .... Scheduler design for payloads. The payload scheduler has several modules ...

  5. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission–Low Energy Payload ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload was designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory (PRL) in collaboration with Space Application Centre (SAC), Ahmedabad and ISRO Satellite Centre (ISAC), Bangalore of the Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO). The SLD payload employs ...

  6. Measurements on an autonomous wireless payload at 635 km distance using a sensitive radio telescope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bentum, Marinus Jan; Leijtens, Johan; Verhoeven, Chris; van der Marel, Hans

    2011-01-01

    The Delfi-C3 spacecraft carries the first autonomous wireless payload in space. This payload is a wireless sun sensor developed by TNO in the Netherlands. The data captured by the sensor is wirelessly transported to the central computer system inside the spacecraft. Since no additional power supply

  7. Payload Performance of TDRS KL and Future Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, Marco A.; Heckler, Gregory W.; Pogorelc, Patricia M.; George, Nicholas E.; Han, Katherine S.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has accepted two of the 3nd generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellites, TDRS K, L, and M, designed and built by Boeing Defense, Space Security (DSS). TDRS K, L, and M provide S-band Multiple Access (MA) service and S-band, Ku-band and Ka-band Single Access (SA) services to near Earth orbiting satellites. The TDRS KLM satellites offer improved services relative to the 1st generation TDRS spacecraft, such as: an enhanced MA service featuring increased EIRPs and GT; and Ka-band SA capability which provides a 225 and 650 MHz return service (customer-to-TDRS direction) bandwidth and a 50 MHz forward service (TDRS-to-customer direction) bandwidth. MA services are provided through a 15 element forward phased array that forms up to two beams with onboard active beamforming and a 32 element return phased array supported by ground-based beamforming. SA services are provided through two 4.6m tri-band reflector antennas which support program track pointing and autotrack pointing. Prior to NASAs acceptance of the satellites, payload on-orbit testing was performed on each satellite to determine on-orbit compliance with design requirements. Performance parameters evaluated include: EIRP, GT, antenna gain patterns, SA antenna autotrack performance, and radiometric tracking performance. On-orbit antenna calibration and pointing optimization was also performed on the MA and SA antennas including 24 hour duration tests to characterize and calibrate out diurnal effects. Bit-Error-Rate (BER) tests were performed to evaluate the end-to-end link BER performance of service through a TDRS K and L spacecraft. The TDRS M is planned to be launched in August 2017. This paper summarizes the results of the TDRS KL communications payload on-orbit performance verification and end-to-end service characterization and compares the results with the performance of the 2nd generation TDRS J. The paper also provides a high-level overview of an optical communications application that will augment

  8. Payload Performance of Third Generation TDRS and Future Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toral, Marco; Heckler, Gregory; Pogorelc, Patsy; George, Nicholas; Han, Katherine S.

    2017-01-01

    NASA has accepted two of the 3rd generation Tracking and Data Relay Satellites, TDRS K, L, and M, designed and built by Boeing Defense, Space & Security (DSS). TDRS K, L, and M provide S-band Multiple Access (MA) service and S-band, Ku-band and Ka-band Single Access (SA) services to near Earth orbiting satellites. The TDRS KLM satellites offer improved services relative to the 1st generation TDRS spacecraft, such as: an enhanced MA service featuring increased EIRPs and G/T; and Ka-band SA capability which provides a 225 and 650 MHz return service (customer-to-TDRS direction) bandwidth and a 50 MHz forward service (TDRS-to-customer direction) bandwidth. MA services are provided through a 15 element forward phased array that forms up to two beams with onboard active beamforming and a 32 element return phased array supported by ground-based beamforming. SA services are provided through two 4.6m tri-band reflector antennas which support program track pointing and autotrack pointing. Prior to NASAs acceptance of the satellites, payload on-orbit testing was performed on each satellite to determine on-orbit compliance with design requirements. Performance parameters evaluated include: EIRP, G/T, antenna gain patterns, SA antenna autotrack performance, and radiometric tracking performance. On-orbit antenna calibration and pointing optimization was also performed on the MA and SA antennas including 24 hour duration tests to characterize and calibrate out diurnal effects. Bit-Error-Rate (BER) tests were performed to evaluate the end-to-end link BER performance of service through a TDRS K and L spacecraft. The TDRS M is planned to be launched in August 2017. This paper summarizes the results of the TDRS KL communications payload on-orbit performance verification and end-to-end service characterization and compares the results with the performance of the 2nd generation TDRS J. The paper also provides a high-level overview of an optical communications application that will

  9. Space Environment Data Acquisition with the Kibo Exposed Facility on the International Space Station (ISS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Obara

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The Space Environment Data Acquisition equipment (SEDA, which was mounted on the Exposed Facility (EF of the Japanese Experiment Module (JEM, also known as "Kibo" on the International Space Station (ISS, was developed to measure the space environment along the orbit of the ISS. This payload module, called the SEDA-Attached Payload (AP, began to measure the space environment in August 2009. This paper reports the mission objectives, instrumentation, and current status of the SEDA-AP.

  10. SAW technology for multicarrier demodulation in advanced payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringset, Vidar; Olsen, Erik; Roennekleiv, Arne; Bakken, Petter; Bjoernstroem, Gunnar

    1990-03-01

    Onboard satellite processing, including demodulation and regeneration, can greatly enhance the flexibility of resource allocation and RF power and bandwidth efficiency of advanced payloads, particularly when multibeam antennas are employed. SAW (Surface Acoustic Wave) technology is the most powerful approach when demodulation of a large number of flow data rate uplink signals is required. An Electrical Demonstration Model (EDM) of a 300 channel MultiCarrier Demodulator (MCD) employing a SAW Chirpo Fourier Transformer (CFT) for frequency demultiplexing, followed by digital demodulation is successfully designed and manufactured. The incoming signal is first multiplied in a bilinear mixer by three parallel digitally generated chirp signals and then convolved in a SAW chirp line manufactured on quartz. The digital part of the demolulator works as any other high quality demodulator, but the algorithms are selected in order to reduce the computational burden. The system is designed for a land mobile satellite transmitting coded voice and data at 9.6 kb/s. The design and performance of the EDM are described.

  11. Navigation and geo-tracking system of UAV EO payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying; Zhen, Kang; Xue, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Xiajiang; Li, Yingjuan; Tang, Chao

    2016-01-01

    A multi-function system based on inertial measurement unit (IMU) is introduced, which can fulfill navigation, attitude measurement of LOS in payload, platform stabilization and tracking control. The IMU is integrated with electro-optical sensors and a laser range finder on gimbals, which performs attitude calculation and navigation by constructing navigation coordinates in a mathematic platform, and the platform navigation information is obtained by transformation matrix between platform and gimbal coordinates. The platform comprising of gyros, electro-optical sensors and servo mechanism is capable of stabilizing line of sight and could be used to geo-tracking in the relevant field of view (FOV).The system can determine geography coordinates of the host platform and target only with navigation information and laser ranging data. The geo-tracking system always locked the target image at the center of FOV by calculating spatial geometry and adjusting LOS attitude. This tracking is different from TV tracking and geographical reference image tracking, which may be influenced by fog and obscurant. When the UAV is flying over urban or mountain areas for rescue missions, it can avoid the loss of targets due to strong maneuver or LOS obscuration, and reduce the operation load and improve rescue efficiency.

  12. Attenuation of cryocooler induced vibration in spaceborne infrared payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, A.; Twitto, A.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advancement of operational responsive space programs calls for a development of compact, reliable, low power and vibration free cryogenic cooling for sophisticated infrared payloads. The refrigeration in a typical closed cycle split Stirling linear cryocooler is achieved by a cyclic compression and expansion of a gaseous working agent due to a synchronized reciprocation of electro-dynamically and pneumatically actuated compressor and expander pistons. Attenuation of the cryocooler induced vibration usually relies on the concept of actively assisted momentum cancellation. In a typical dual-piston compressor this objective is achieved by actively synchronizing the motion of oppositely moving piston assemblies; a typical single-piston expander may be counterbalanced by a motorized counter-balancer. The above approach produces complexity, weight, size, high incurred costs and affects reliability. The authors analyze the case of passive attenuation the vibration export induced by the split Stirling linear cryocooler comprised of inline mounted single-piston compressor and expander. Placement of all the moving components onto a common axis results in a single axis consolidation of vibration export and enables use of single tuned dynamic absorber and low frequency vibration mount. From theoretical analysis and full-scale testing, the performance of such vibration protection arrangement is similar to known systems of active vibration cancellation.

  13. Autonomous Payload Operations Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetson, Howard K.; Deitsch, David K.; Cruzen, Craig A.; Haddock, Angie T.

    2007-01-01

    Operating the International Space Station (ISS) involves many complex crew tended, ground operated and combined systems. Over the life of the ISS program, it has become evident that by having automated and autonomous systems on board, more can be accomplished and at the same time reduce the workload of the crew and ground operators. Engineers at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville Alabama, working in collaboration with The Charles Stark Draper Laboratory have developed an autonomous software system that uses the Timeliner User Interface Language and expert logic to continuously monitor ISS payload systems, issue commands and signal ground operators as required. This paper describes the development history of the system, its concept of operation and components. The paper also discusses the testing process as well as the facilities used to develop the system. The paper concludes with a description of future enhancement plans for use on the ISS as well as potential applications to Lunar and Mars exploration systems.

  14. OPSys: optical payload systems facility for testing space coronagraphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineschi, S.; Crescenzio, G.; Massone, G.; Capobianco, G.; Zangrilli, L.; Antonucci, E.; Anselmi, F.

    2011-10-01

    The Turin Astronomical Observatory, Italy, has implemented in ALTEC, Turin, a new Optical Payload Systems (OPSys) facility for testing of contamination sensitive optical space flight instrumentation. The facility is specially tailored for tests on solar instruments like coronagraphs. OPSys comprises an ISO 7 clean room for instrument assembly and a relatively large (4.4 m3) optical test and calibration vacuum chamber: the Space Optics Calibration Chamber (SPOCC). SPOCC consists of a test section with a vacuum-compatible motorized optical bench, and of a pipeline section with a sun simulator at the opposite end of the optical bench hosting the instrumentation under tests. The solar simulator is an off-axis parabolic mirror collimating the light from the source with the solar angular divergence. After vacuum conditioning, the chamber will operate at an ultimate pressure of 10-6 mbar. This work describes the SPOCC's vacuum system and optical design, and the post-flight stray-light tests to be carried out on the Sounding-rocket Experiment (SCORE). This sub-orbital solar coronagraph is the prototype of the METIS coronagraph for the ESA Solar Orbital mission whose closest perihelion is one-third of the Sun-Earth distance. The plans are outlined for testing METIS in the SPOCC simulating the observing conditions from the Solar Orbiter perihelion.

  15. Mission Report on the Orbiter Camera Payload System (OCPS) Large Format Camera (LFC) and Attitude Reference System (ARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollberg, Bernard H.; Schardt, Bruton B.

    1988-01-01

    The Orbiter Camera Payload System (OCPS) is an integrated photographic system which is carried into earth orbit as a payload in the Space Transportation System (STS) Orbiter vehicle's cargo bay. The major component of the OCPS is a Large Format Camera (LFC), a precision wide-angle cartographic instrument that is capable of producing high resolution stereo photography of great geometric fidelity in multiple base-to-height (B/H) ratios. A secondary, supporting system to the LFC is the Attitude Reference System (ARS), which is a dual lens Stellar Camera Array (SCA) and camera support structure. The SCA is a 70-mm film system which is rigidly mounted to the LFC lens support structure and which, through the simultaneous acquisition of two star fields with each earth-viewing LFC frame, makes it possible to determine precisely the pointing of the LFC optical axis with reference to the earth nadir point. Other components complete the current OCPS configuration as a high precision cartographic data acquisition system. The primary design objective for the OCPS was to maximize system performance characteristics while maintaining a high level of reliability compatible with Shuttle launch conditions and the on-orbit environment. The full-up OCPS configuration was launched on a highly successful maiden voyage aboard the STS Orbiter vehicle Challenger on October 5, 1984, as a major payload aboard mission STS 41-G. This report documents the system design, the ground testing, the flight configuration, and an analysis of the results obtained during the Challenger mission STS 41-G.

  16. Turbulence Heating ObserveR - THOR: mission overview and payload summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoubet, C.-Philippe; Voirin, Thomas; Wielders, Arno; Vaivads, Andris; Retino, Alessandro; Khotyaintsev, Yuri; Soucek, Jan; Valentini, Francesco; Chen, Chris; Fazakerley, Andrew; Lavraud, Benoit; Marcucci, Federica; Narita, Yasuhito; Vainio, Rami; Romstedt, Jens; Boudin, Nathalie; Junge, Axel; Osuna, Pedro; Walsh, Andrew

    2017-04-01

    The Turbulence Heating ObserveR (THOR) mission was selected as one of the three candidates, following the Call for Medium Class Missions M4 by the European Space Agency, with a launch planned in 2026. THOR is the first mission ever flown in space dedicated to plasma turbulence. THOR will lead to an understanding of the basic plasma heating and particle energization processes, of their effect on different plasma species and of their relative importance in different turbulent regimes. The THOR mission features one single spinning spacecraft, with the spin axis pointing toward the Sun, and 10 state-of-the-art scientific instruments, measuring electromagnetic fields and waves and electrons and ions at the highest spatial and temporal resolution ever achieved. THOR focuses on particular regions: pristine solar wind, Earth's bow shock and interplanetary shocks, and compressed solar wind regions downstream of shocks, that will be observed with three different orbits of 6 x 15 RE, 6 x 25 RE and 6 x 45 RE. These regions are selected because of their differing turbulent fluctuation characteristics, and reflect similar astrophysical environments. The THOR mission, the conceptual design of the spacecraft and a summary of the payload will be presented. Furthermore, driving requirements and their implications for the spacecraft like Electromagnetic Compatibility and cleanliness will be discussed.

  17. FD-CHIRP: hosted payload system engineering lessons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schueler, Carl F.

    2012-10-01

    The Commercially Hosted Infrared Payload (CHIRP) Flight Demonstration (FD-CHIRP) launched 21 Sept 2011 was designated a "resounding success" as the first Wide Field-of-View (WFOV) staring infrared (IR) sensor flown in geostationary earth orbit (GEO) with a primary mission of Missile Warning (MW). FD-CHIRP was an Air Force research and development project initiated in July 2008 via an unsolicited industry proposal aimed to mature and reduce the risk of WFOV sensors and ground processing technologies. Unlike the Defense Support Program (DSP) and the Space Based Infrared System (SBIRS) which were acquired via traditional integrated sensor and satellite design, FDCHIRP was developed using the "commercially hosted" approach. The FD-CHIRP host spacecraft and sensor were independently designed, creating significant development risk to the industry proposer, especially under a Firm Fixed Price contract. Yet, within 39 months of contract initiation, FD-CHIRP was launched and successfully operated in GEO to 30 June 2012 at a total cost of 111M including the 82.9M CHIRP commercial-hosting contract and a $28M sensor upgrade. The commercial-hosting contract included sensor and spacecraft modifications, integration and test, design and development of secure Mission Operations and Analysis Centers, launch, and nearly a year of GEO operations with 70 Mbps secure data acquisition. The Air Force extended the contract for six months to continue operations through the end of calendar 2012. This paper outlines system engineering challenges FD-CHIRP overcame and key lessons to smooth development of future commercially hosted missions.

  18. ACT Payload Shroud Structural Concept Analysis and Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalewski, Bart B.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Aerospace structural applications demand a weight efficient design to perform in a cost effective manner. This is particularly true for launch vehicle structures, where weight is the dominant design driver. The design process typically requires many iterations to ensure that a satisfactory minimum weight has been obtained. Although metallic structures can be weight efficient, composite structures can provide additional weight savings due to their lower density and additional design flexibility. This work presents structural analysis and weight optimization of a composite payload shroud for NASA s Ares V heavy lift vehicle. Two concepts, which were previously determined to be efficient for such a structure are evaluated: a hat stiffened/corrugated panel and a fiber reinforced foam sandwich panel. A composite structural optimization code, HyperSizer, is used to optimize the panel geometry, composite material ply orientations, and sandwich core material. HyperSizer enables an efficient evaluation of thousands of potential designs versus multiple strength and stability-based failure criteria across multiple load cases. HyperSizer sizing process uses a global finite element model to obtain element forces, which are statistically processed to arrive at panel-level design-to loads. These loads are then used to analyze each candidate panel design. A near optimum design is selected as the one with the lowest weight that also provides all positive margins of safety. The stiffness of each newly sized panel or beam component is taken into account in the subsequent finite element analysis. Iteration of analysis/optimization is performed to ensure a converged design. Sizing results for the hat stiffened panel concept and the fiber reinforced foam sandwich concept are presented.

  19. The use of filtered bags to increase waste payload capacity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dustin, D.F.; Thorp, D.T. [Safe Sites of Colorado, Golden, CO (United States); Rivera, M.A. [Los Alamos Technical Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-03-03

    For the past few years, the Department of Energy has favored the direct disposal of low plutonium content residue materials from Rocky Flats rather than engage in expensive and time consuming plutonium recovery operations. One impediment to direct disposal has been the wattage limit imposed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant on hydrogenous materials such as combustibles and sludges. The issue of concern is the radiolytic generation and accumulation of hydrogen and other explosive gases in waste containers. The wattage limits that existed through 1996 restricted the amount of plutonium bearing hydrogenous materials that could be packaged in a WIPP bound waste drum to only a fraction of the capacity of a drum. Typically, only about one kilogram of combustible residue could be packaged in a waste drum before the wattage limit was exceeded resulting in an excessively large number of drums to be procured, stored, shipped, and interred. The Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site has initiated the use of filtered plastic bags (called bag-out bags) used to remove transuranic waste materials from glove box lines. The bags contain small, disk like HEPA filters which are effective in containing radioactively contaminated particulate material but allow for the diffusion of hydrogen gas. Used in conjunction with filtered 55 gallon drums, filtered bag-out bags were pursued as a means to increase the allowable wattage limits for selected residue materials. In February 1997, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission approved the use of filtered bag-out bags for transuranic waste materials destined for WIPP. The concomitant increase in wattage limits now allows for approximately four times the payload per waste drum for wattage limited materials.

  20. The Gravity Probe B Payload Hoisted by Crane

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    The Gravity Probe B (GP-B) payload was hoisted by crane to the transportation truck in the W.W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory in Stanford, California for shipment to the launch site at Vandenburg Air Force Base. GP-B is the relativity experiment being developed at Stanford University to test two extraordinary predictions of Albert Einstein's general theory of relativity. The experiment will measure, very precisely, the expected tiny changes in the direction of the spin axes of four gyroscopes contained in an Earth-orbiting satellite at a 400-mile altitude. So free are the gyroscopes from disturbance that they will provide an almost perfect space-time reference system. They will measure how space and time are very slightly warped by the presence of the Earth, and, more profoundly, how the Earth's rotation very slightly drags space-time around with it. These effects, though small for the Earth, have far-reaching implications for the nature of matter and the structure of the Universe. GP-B is among the most thoroughly researched programs ever undertaken by NASA. This is the story of a scientific quest in which physicists and engineers have collaborated closely over many years. Inspired by their quest, they have invented a whole range of technologies that are already enlivening other branches of science and engineering. Launched April 20, 2004, the GP-B program was managed for NASA by the Marshall Space Flight Center. Development of the GP-B is the responsibility of Stanford University, along with major subcontractor Lockheed Martin Corporation. (Photo Credit: Stanford University)

  1. Life sciences payload definition and integration study. Volume 1: Management summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    The objectives of a study program to determine the life sciences payloads required for conducting biomedical experiments during space missions are presented. The objectives are defined as: (1) to identify the research functions which must be performed aboard life sciences spacecraft laboratories and the equipment needed to support these functions and (2) to develop layouts and preliminary conceptual designs of several potential baseline payloads for the accomplishment of life research in space. Payload configurations and subsystems are described and illustrated. Tables of data are included to identify the material requirements for the space missions.

  2. Integrating payload design, planning, and control in the Dutch Utilisation Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    Spacecraft payload design, experiment planning and scheduling, and payload control are traditionally separate areas of activity. This paper describes the development of a prototype software tool--the Activity Scheduling System (ASS)--which integrates these activity areas. ASS is part of a larger project to build a Dutch Utilisation Centre (DUC), intended eventually to support all space utilization activities in The Netherlands. ASS has been tested on the High Performance Capillary Electrophoresis payload. The paper outlines the integrated preparation and operations concept embodied in ASS. It describes the ASS prototype, including a typical session. The results of testing are summarized. Possible enhancement of ASS, including integration into DUC, is sketched.

  3. LAVA Subsystem Integration and Testing for the RESOLVE Payload of the Resource Prospector Mission: Mass Spectrometers and Gas Chromatography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coan, Mary R.; Stewart, Elaine M.

    2015-01-01

    The Regolith and Environment Science & Oxygen and Lunar Volatile Extraction (RESOLVE) payload is part of Resource Prospector (RP) along with a rover and a lander that are expected to launch in 2020. RP will identify volatile elements that may be combined and collected to be used for fuel, air, and water in order to enable deeper space exploration. The Resource Prospector mission is a key part of In-Situ Resource Utilization (ISRU). The demand for this method of utilizing resources at the site of exploration is increasing due to the cost of resupply missions and deep space exploration goals. The RESOLVE payload includes the Lunar Advanced Volatile Analysis (LAVA) subsystem. The main instrument used to identify the volatiles evolved from the lunar regolith is the Gas Chromatograph-Mass Spectrometer (GC-MS). LAVA analyzes the volatiles emitted from the Oxygen and Volatile Extraction Node (OVEN) Subsystem. The objective of OVEN is to obtain, weigh, heat and transfer evolved gases to LAVA through the connection between the two subsystems called the LOVEN line. This paper highlights the work completed during a ten week internship that involved the integration, testing, data analysis, and procedure documentation of two candidate mass spectrometers for the LAVA subsystem in order to aid in determining which model to use for flight. Additionally, the examination of data from the integrated Resource Prospector '15 (RP' 15) field test will be presented in order to characterize the amount of water detected from water doped regolith samples.

  4. Characterization of the room temperature payload prototype for the cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector KAGRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña Arellano, Fabián Erasmo; Sekiguchi, Takanori; Fujii, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Ryutaro; Barton, Mark; Hirata, Naoatsu; Shoda, Ayaka; van Heijningen, Joris; Flaminio, Raffaele; DeSalvo, Riccardo; Okutumi, Koki; Akutsu, Tomotada; Aso, Yoichi; Ishizaki, Hideharu; Ohishi, Naoko; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Takashi; Miyakawa, Osamu; Kamiizumi, Masahiro; Takamori, Akiteru; Majorana, Ettore; Agatsuma, Kazuhiro; Hennes, Eric; van den Brand, Jo; Bertolini, Alessandro

    2016-03-01

    KAGRA is a cryogenic interferometric gravitational wave detector currently under construction in the Kamioka mine in Japan. Besides the cryogenic test masses, KAGRA will also rely on room temperature optics which will hang at the bottom of vibration isolation chains. The payload of each chain comprises an optic, a system to align it, and an active feedback system to damp the resonant motion of the suspension itself. This article describes the performance of a payload prototype that was assembled and tested in vacuum at the TAMA300 site at the NAOJ in Mitaka, Tokyo. We describe the mechanical components of the payload prototype and their functionality. A description of the active components of the feedback system and their capabilities is also given. The performance of the active system is illustrated by measuring the quality factors of some of the resonances of the suspension. Finally, the alignment capabilities offered by the payload are reported.

  5. International Space Station-Based Electromagnetic Launcher for Space Science Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    A method was developed of lowering the cost of planetary exploration missions by using an electromagnetic propulsion/launcher, rather than a chemical-fueled rocket for propulsion. An electromagnetic launcher (EML) based at the International Space Station (ISS) would be used to launch small science payloads to the Moon and near Earth asteroids (NEAs) for the science and exploration missions. An ISS-based electromagnetic launcher could also inject science payloads into orbits around the Earth and perhaps to Mars. The EML would replace rocket technology for certain missions. The EML is a high-energy system that uses electricity rather than propellant to accelerate payloads to high velocities. The most common type of EML is the rail gun. Other types are possible, e.g., a coil gun, also known as a Gauss gun or mass driver. The EML could also "drop" science payloads into the Earth's upper

  6. Mathematical Modeling of a Moving Planar Payload Pendulum on Flexible Portal Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwar Yazid

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Mathematical modeling of a moving planar payload pendulum on elastic portal framework is presented in this paper. The equations of motion of such a system are obtained by modeling the portal frame using finite element in conjunction with moving finite element method and moving planar payload pendulum by using Lagrange’s equations. The generated equations indicate the presence of nonlinear coupling between dynamics of portal framework and the payload pendulum. The combinational direct numerical integration technique, namely Newmarkand fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, is then proposed to solve the coupled equations of motion. Several numerical simulations are performed and the results are verified with several benchmarks. The results indicate that the amplitude and frequency of the payload pendulum swing angle are greatly affected by flexibility of structure and the cable in term of carriage speed. 

  7. A mass additive technique for modal testing as applied to the Space Shuttle ASTRO-1 payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, A. D.; Driskill, T. C.; Anderson, J. B.; Brown, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Traditionally, a fixed base modal test has been performed as a means of verifying the coupled loads math model for Space Shuttle flight payloads. An alternate method, a free-free configured payload using mass loaded boundary conditions, is presented as a means of verifying the coupled loads model of the ASTRO-1 flight payload. This method allows evaluation of the influence of local load paths into the frequency range of the free-free test. The method is cost effective and does not contaminate the modal test results with fixture coupled modes or boundary condition uncertainties. This paper describes the mass additive modal test technique as applied to the Space Shuttle ASTRO-1 flight payload.

  8. STS-39 Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) gas release from OV-103 payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A plume of nitrous oxide gas is released from a compressed gas canister mounted on the increased capacity adaptive payload carrier 1 (ICAPC-1) on the forward port side of Discovery's, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103's, payload bay (PLB). The gas release is part of the Critical Ionization Velocity (CIV) experiment conducted during STS-39. The Shuttle Pallet Satellite II (SPAS-II) 'parked' about two kilometers (km) away, is taking infrared, visible, and ultraviolet radiometric spatial, spectral, and temporal measurements of the gas plumes. Surrounding the CIV ICAPC-1 are: the ICAPC-2 payload support subsystem, radiometer, and Langmuir probe also mounted on the port side; the Space Test Payload 1 (STP-1) multipurpose experiment support structure (MPESS) (just beyond gas beam); and the Air Force Program 675 (AFP-675) experiment support structure (ESS).

  9. Technology Disruptions in Future Communication Payloads (Technologies de rupture pour futures charges utiles de telecommunications)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gayrard, Jean-Didier

    2005-01-01

    ...: gigantism, adaptation, or modularity. Any of these ways will require satellite payloads to evolve from present levels of complexity that are mainly suited for TV broadcasting and telephone trunking in the Ku and C bands, to a new...

  10. A crane is lowered over the payload canister with the SRTM inside

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    A crane is lowered over the payload canister with the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) inside in Orbiter Processing Facility (OPF) bay 2. The primary payload on STS-99, the SRTM will soon be lifted out of the canister and installed into the payload bay of the orbiter Endeavour. The SRTM consists of a specially modified radar system that will gather data for the most accurate and complete topographic map of the Earth's surface that has ever been assembled. SRTM will make use of radar interferometry, wherein two radar images are taken from slightly different locations. Differences between these images allow for the calculation of surface elevation. The SRTM hardware includes one radar antenna in the Shuttle payload bay and a second radar antenna attached to the end of a mast extended 60 meters (195 feet) from the shuttle. STS-99 is scheduled to launch Sept. 16 at 8:47 a.m. from Launch Pad 39A.

  11. Prediction of the vibroacoustic behavior of a submerged shell with non-axisymmetric internal substructures by a condensed transfer function method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, V.; Maxit, L.; Guyader, J.-L.; Leissing, T.

    2016-01-01

    The vibroacoustic behavior of axisymmetric stiffened shells immersed in water has been intensively studied in the past. On the contrary, little attention has been paid to the modeling of these shells coupled to non-axisymmetric internal frames. Indeed, breaking the axisymmetry couples the circumferential orders of the Fourier series and considerably increases the computational costs. In order to tackle this issue, we propose a sub-structuring approach called the Condensed Transfer Function (CTF) method that will allow assembling a model of axisymmetric stiffened shell with models of non-axisymmetric internal frames. The CTF method is developed in the general case of mechanical subsystems coupled along curves. A set of orthonormal functions called condensation functions, which depend on the curvilinear abscissa along the coupling line, is considered. This set is then used as a basis for approximating and decomposing the displacements and the applied forces at the line junctions. Thanks to the definition and calculation of condensed transfer functions for each uncoupled subsystem and by using the superposition principle for passive linear systems, the behavior of the coupled subsystems can be deduced. A plane plate is considered as a test case to study the convergence of the method with respect to the type and the number of condensation functions taken into account. The CTF method is then applied to couple a submerged non-periodically stiffened shell described using the Circumferential Admittance Approach (CAA) with internal substructures described by Finite Element Method (FEM). The influence of non-axisymmetric internal substructures can finally be studied and it is shown that it tends to increase the radiation efficiency of the shell and can modify the vibrational and acoustic energy distribution.

  12. Vibro-acoustic modeling and analysis of a coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Shuangxia; Su, Zhu; Jin, Guoyong; Liu, Zhigang

    2018-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the modeling and solution method of a three-dimensional (3D) coupled acoustic system comprising a partially opened cavity coupled with a flexible plate and an exterior field of semi-infinite size, which is ubiquitously encountered in architectural acoustics and is a reasonable representation of many engineering occasions. A general solution method is presented to predict the dynamic behaviors of the three-dimensional (3D) acoustic coupled system, in which the displacement of the plate and the sound pressure in the cavity are respectively constructed in the form of the two-dimensional and three-dimensional modified Fourier series with several auxiliary functions introduced to ensure the uniform convergence of the solution over the entire solution domain. The effect of the opening is taken into account via the work done by the sound pressure acting at the coupling aperture that is contributed from the vibration of particles on the acoustic coupling interface and on the structural-acoustic coupling interface. Both the acoustic coupling between finite cavity and exterior field and the structural-acoustic coupling between flexible plate and interior acoustic field are considered in the vibro-acoustic modeling of the three-dimensional acoustic coupled acoustic system. The dynamic responses of the coupled structural-acoustic system are obtained using the Rayleigh-Ritz procedure based on the energy expressions for the coupled system. The accuracy and effectiveness of the proposed method are validated through numerical examples and comparison with results obtained by the boundary element analysis. Furthermore, the influence of the opening and the cavity volume on the acoustic behaviors of opened cavity system is studied.

  13. Lightweight Liquid Helium Dewar for High-Altitude Balloon Payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan; James, Bryan; Fixsen, Dale

    2013-01-01

    Astrophysical observations at millimeter wavelengths require large (2-to-5- meter diameter) telescopes carried to altitudes above 35 km by scientific research balloons. The scientific performance is greatly enhanced if the telescope is cooled to temperatures below 10 K with no emissive windows between the telescope and the sky. Standard liquid helium bucket dewars can contain a suitable telescope for telescope diameter less than two meters. However, the mass of a dewar large enough to hold a 3-to-5-meter diameter telescope would exceed the balloon lift capacity. The solution is to separate the functions of cryogen storage and in-flight thermal isolation, utilizing the unique physical conditions at balloon altitudes. Conventional dewars are launched cold: the vacuum walls necessary for thermal isolation must also withstand the pressure gradient at sea level and are correspondingly thick and heavy. The pressure at 40 km is less than 0.3% of sea level: a dewar designed for use only at 40 km can use ultra thin walls to achieve significant reductions in mass. This innovation concerns new construction and operational techniques to produce a lightweight liquid helium bucket dewar. The dewar is intended for use on high-altitude balloon payloads. The mass is low enough to allow a large (3-to-5-meter) diameter dewar to fly at altitudes above 35 km on conventional scientific research balloons without exceeding the lift capability of the balloon. The lightweight dewar has thin (250- micron) stainless steel walls. The walls are too thin to support the pressure gradient at sea level: the dewar launches warm with the vacuum space vented continuously during ascent to eliminate any pressure gradient across the walls. A commercial 500-liter storage dewar maintains a reservoir of liquid helium within a minimal (hence low mass) volume. Once a 40-km altitude is reached, the valve venting the vacuum space of the bucket dewar is closed to seal the vacuum space. A vacuum pump then

  14. The Compton Spectrometer and Imager (COSI) Superpressure Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggs, Steven E.

    2014-08-01

    consumables (LN2) for ULDB flights.In this talk, we will present the redesign of the COSI instrument and payload, as well as the overall flight program and science goals of our ULDB science flight program.

  15. Positive Emotional Experience: Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation Using a Body Monochord in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders: Is Associated with an Increase in EEG-Theta and a Decrease in EEG-Alpha Power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, H; Tamm, S; Fendel, U; Rose, M; Klapp, B F; Bösel, R

    2016-07-01

    Relaxation and meditation techniques are generally characterized by focusing attention, which is associated with an increase of frontal EEG Theta. Some studies on music perception suggest an activation of Frontal Midline Theta during emotionally positive attribution, others display a lateralization of electrocortical processes in the attribution of music induced emotion of different valence. The present study examined the effects of vibroacoustic stimulation using a Body Monochord and the conventional relaxation music from an audio CD on the spontaneous EEG of patients suffering from psychosomatic disorders (N = 60). Each treatment took about 20 min and was presented to the patients in random order. Subjective experience was recorded via self-rating scale. EEG power spectra of the Theta, Alpha-1 and Alpha-2 bands were analysed and compard between the two treatment conditions. There was no lateralization of electrocortical activity in terms of the emotional experience of the musical pieces. A reduction in Alpha-2 power occurred during both treatments. An emotionally positive attribution of the experience of the vibroacoustically induced relaxation state is characterized by a more pronounced release of control. In the context of focused attention this is interpreted as flow experience. The spontaneous EEG showed an increase in Theta power, particularly in the frontal medial and central medial area, and a greater reduction in Alpha-2 power. The intensity of positive emotional feelings during the CD music showed no significant effect on the increase in Theta power.

  16. Two-Stage Vibration Isolation for Flexible Satellite Bus and Optic Payload Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-27

    and damper model and with neglectable mass . Subscripts denote degree of freedoms corresponding to actuators ( R ), actuator isolators’ locations on... damper inserted inside the elastic element. Comparing with liquid damper and viscoelastic material damper , this damper has such merits as simple...satellite bus and the optic payload are rigid body. This study indicates that a large mass ratio between the satellite bus and the optical payload can

  17. Design, Development, and Integration of A Space Shuttle Orbiter Bay 13 Payload Carrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Susan H.; Phillips, Michael W.; Upton, Lanny (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Bay 13 of the Space Shuttle Orbiter has been limited to small sidewall mounted payloads and ballast. In order to efficiently utilize this space, a concept was developed for a cross-bay cargo carrier to mount Orbital Replacement Units (ORU's) for delivery to the International Space Station and provide additional opportunities for science payloads, while meeting the Orbiter ballast requirements. The Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS) Carrie (LMC) was developed and tested by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and the Boeing Company. The Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure (MPESS), which was developed for the Spacelab program was modified, removing the keel structure and relocating the sill trunnions to fit in Bay 13. Without the keel fitting, the LMC required a new and innovative concept for transferring Y loads into the Orbiter structure. Since there is no keel fitting available in the Bay 13 location, the design had to utilize the longeron bridge T-rail to distribute the Y loads. This concept has not previously been used in designing Shuttle payloads. A concept was developed to protect for Launch-On-Need ORU's, while providing opportunities for science payloads. Categories of potential ORU's were defined, and Get-Away Special (GAS) payloads of similar mass properties were provided by NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. Four GAS payloads were manifest as the baseline configuration, preserving the capability to swap up to two ORU's for the corresponding science payloads, after installation into the Orbiter cargo bay at the pad, prior to closeout. Multiple configurations were considered for the analytical integration, to protect for all defined combinations of ORU's and GAS payloads. The first physical integration of the LMC war performed by Goddard Space Flight Center and Kennedy Space Center at an off-line facility at Kennedy Space Center. This paper will discuss the design challenges, structural testing, analytical and physical

  18. Life sciences payload definition and integration study, task C and D. Volume 1: Management summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The findings of a study to define the required payloads for conducting life science experiments in space are presented. The primary objectives of the study are: (1) identify research functions to be performed aboard life sciences spacecraft laboratories and necessary equipment, (2) develop conceptual designs of potential payloads, (3) integrate selected laboratory designs with space shuttle configurations, and (4) establish cost analysis of preliminary program planning.

  19. Workspace and Payload-Capacity of a New Reconfigurable Delta Parallel Robot

    OpenAIRE

    Mauro Maya; Eduardo Castillo; Alberto Lomelí; Emilio González-Galván; Antonio Cárdenas

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the workspace and payload capacity of a new design of reconfigurable Delta-type parallel robot is analysed. The reconfiguration is achieved by adjusting the length of the kinematic chains of a given robot link simultaneously and symmetrically during the operation of the robot. This would produce a dynamic workspace in shape and volume. A numerical analysis of the variation of shape and volume of the workspace and payload capacity of the robot is presented. Based both on the resu...

  20. Hotel Payload - a low-cost sounding rocket concept - for middle atmosphere and ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauglund, Kenneth; Hansen, Gudmund

    2005-08-01

    European scientists are invited to utilize the "Hotel Payload" concept developed at Andøya Rocket Range (ARR) for scientific research in Middle Atmosphere and Ionosphere. The concept is shaped to give scientists predictability and assurance on configuration, costs and timeframe for their projects. The scientists are offered one sounding rocket partner from planning till launch - so they can focus on their instruments. To demonstrate the capabilities, this paper presents the "Hotel Payload" concept, its configurations and specific projects with instrumentation.

  1. Secondary Payload Opportunities on NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) Enable Science and Deep Space Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Jody; Pelfrey, Joseph; Norris, George

    2016-01-01

    For the first time in almost 40 years, a NASA human-rated launch vehicle has completed its Critical Design Review (CDR). With this milestone, NASA's Space Launch System (SLS) and Orion spacecraft are on the path to launch a new era of deep space exploration. This first launch of SLS and the Orion Spacecraft is planned no later than November 2018 and will fly along a trans-lunar trajectory, testing the performance of the SLS and Orion systems for future missions. NASA is making investments to expand the science and exploration capability of the SLS by developing the capability to deploy small satellites during the trans-lunar phase of the mission trajectory. Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1) will include thirteen 6U Cubesat small satellites to be deployed beyond low earth orbit. By providing an earth-escape trajectory, opportunities are created for the advancement of small satellite subsystems, including deep space communications and in-space propulsion. This SLS capability also creates low-cost options for addressing existing Agency strategic knowledge gaps and affordable science missions. A new approach to payload integration and mission assurance is needed to ensure safety of the vehicle, while also maintaining reasonable costs for the small payload developer teams. SLS EM-1 will provide the framework and serve as a test flight, not only for vehicle systems, but also payload accommodations, ground processing, and on-orbit operations. Through developing the requirements and integration processes for EM-1, NASA is outlining the framework for the evolved configuration of secondary payloads on SLS Block upgrades. The lessons learned from the EM-1 mission will be applied to processes and products developed for future block upgrades. In the heavy-lift configuration of SLS, payload accommodations will increase for secondary opportunities including small satellites larger than the traditional Cubesat class payload. The payload mission concept of operations, proposed payload

  2. Stability of Dosage Forms in the Pharmaceutical Payload Aboard Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Brian J.; Daniels, Vernie; Boyd, Jason L.; Crady, Camille; Satterfield, Rick; Younker, Diane R.; Putcha, Lakshmi

    2009-01-01

    Efficacious pharmaceuticals with adequate shelf lives are essential for successful space medical operations. Stability of pharmaceuticals, therefore, is of paramount importance for assuring the health and wellness of astronauts on future space exploration missions. Unique physical and environmental factors of space missions may contribute to the instability of pharmaceuticals, e.g., radiation, humidity and temperature variations. Degradation of pharmaceutical formulations can result in inadequate efficacy and/or untoward toxic effects, which could compromise astronaut safety and health. Methods: Four identical pharmaceutical payload kits containing 31 medications in different dosage forms (liquid, tablet, capsule, ointment and suppository) were transported to the International Space Station aboard the Space Shuttle (STS-121). One of the 4 kits was stored on the Shuttle and the other 3 were stored on the International Space Station (ISS) for return to Earth at 6-month interval aboard a pre-designated Shuttle flight for each kit. The kit stored on the Shuttle was returned to Earth aboard STS-121 and 2 kits from ISS were returned on STS 117 and STS-122. Results: Analysis of standard physical and chemical parameters of degradation was completed for pharmaceuticals returned by STS-121 after14 days, STS - 117 after11 months and STS 122 after 19 months storage aboard ISS. Analysis of all flight samples along with ground-based matching controls was completed and results were compiled. Conclusion: Evaluation of results from the shuttle (1) and ISS increments (2) indicate that the number of formulations degraded in space increased with duration of storage in space and was higher in space compared to their ground-based counterparts. Rate of degradation for some of the formulations tested was faster in space than on Earth. Additionally, some of the formulations included in the medical kits were unstable, more so in space than on the ground. These results indicate that the

  3. Intuitive Tools for the Design and Analysis of Communication Payloads for Satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culver, Michael R.; Soong, Christine; Warner, Joseph D.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to make future communications satellite payload design more efficient and accessible, two tools were created with intuitive graphical user interfaces (GUIs). The first tool allows payload designers to graphically design their payload by using simple drag and drop of payload components onto a design area within the program. Information about each picked component is pulled from a database of common space-qualified communication components sold by commerical companies. Once a design is completed, various reports can be generated, such as the Master Equipment List. The second tool is a link budget calculator designed specifically for ease of use. Other features of this tool include being able to access a database of NASA ground based apertures for near Earth and Deep Space communication, the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) base apertures, and information about the solar system relevant to link budget calculations. The link budget tool allows for over 50 different combinations of user inputs, eliminating the need for multiple spreadsheets and the user errors associated with using them. Both of the aforementioned tools increase the productivity of space communication systems designers, and have the colloquial latitude to allow non-communication experts to design preliminary communication payloads.

  4. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassa, M.; Rapp, M.; Hartquist, T. W.; Havnes, O.

    2012-03-01

    We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE) dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  5. Secondary charging effects due to icy dust particle impacts on rocket payloads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Kassa

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We report measurements of dust currents obtained with a small probe and a larger probe during the flight of the ECOMA-4 rocket through the summer polar mesosphere. The payload included two small dust probes behind a larger dust probe located centrally at the front. For certain phases of the payload rotation, the current registered by one of the small dust probes was up to 2 times the current measured with the larger probe, even though the effective collection area of the larger probe was 4 times that of the small one. We analyze the phase dependence of the currents and their difference with a model based on the assumption that the small probe was hit by charged dust fragments produced in collisions of mesospheric dust with the payload body. Our results confirm earlier findings that secondary charge production in the collision of a noctilucent cloud/Polar Summer Mesospheric Echo (NLC/PMSE dust particle with the payload body must be several orders of magnitude larger than might be expected from laboratory studies of collisions of pure ice particles with a variety of clean surfaces. An important consequence is that for some payload configurations, one should not assume that the current measured with a detector used to study mesospheric dust is simply proportional to the number density of ambient dust particles. The higher secondary charge production may be due to the NLC/PMSE particles containing multiple meteoric smoke particles.

  6. Predicting the conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads occur in the primary coolant circuits of VVER-based NPPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proskuryakov, K. N.; Fedorov, A. I.; Zaporozhets, M. V.

    2015-08-01

    The accident at the Japanese Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant (NPP) caused by an earthquake showed the need of taking further efforts aimed at improving the design and engineering solutions for ensuring seismic resistance of NPPs with due regard to mutual influence of the dynamic processes occurring in the NPP building structures and process systems. Resonance interaction between the vibrations of NPP equipment and coolant pressure pulsations leads to an abnormal growth of dynamic stresses in structural materials, accelerated exhaustion of equipment service life, and increased number of sudden equipment failures. The article presents the results from a combined calculation-theoretical and experimental substantiation of mutual amplification of two kinds of external periodic loads caused by rotation of the reactor coolant pump (RCP) rotor and an earthquake. The data of vibration measurements at an NPP are presented, which confirm the predicted multiple amplification of vibrations in the steam generator and RCP at a certain combination of coolant thermal-hydraulic parameters. It is shown that the vibration frequencies of the main equipment may fall in the frequency band corresponding to the maximal values in the envelope response spectra constructed on the basis of floor accelerograms. The article presents the results from prediction of conditions under which vibroacoustic resonances with external periodic loads take place, which confirm the occurrence of additional earthquake-induced multiple growth of pressure pulsation intensity in the steam generator at the 8.3 Hz frequency and additional multiple growth of vibrations of the RCP and the steam generator cold header at the 16.6 Hz frequency. It is shown that at the elastic wave frequency equal to 8.3 Hz in the coolant, resonance occurs with the frequency of forced vibrations caused by the rotation of the RCP rotor. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of exceeding the design level of equipment vibrations

  7. ISS External Contamination Environment for Space Science Utilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Carlos; Mikatarian, Ron; Steagall, Courtney; Huang, Alvin; Koontz, Steven; Worthy, Erica

    2014-01-01

    (1) The International Space Station is the largest and most complex on-orbit platform for space science utilization in low Earth orbit, (2) Multiple sites for external payloads, with exposure to the associated natural and induced environments, are available to support a variety of space science utilization objectives, (3) Contamination is one of the induced environments that can impact performance, mission success and science utilization on the vehicle, and (4)The ISS has been designed, built and integrated with strict contamination requirements to provide low levels of induced contamination on external payload assets.

  8. Pay-load Estimation of a 2 DOF Flexible Link Robot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad; Ravn, Ole

    2005-01-01

    The paper presents a new method for online identification of pay-loads for a two-link flexible robot. The method benefits from the close corre-spondence between parameters of a discrete-time model represented by means of the Delta-Operator, and those of the underlying continuous-time model....... Although the applied principle might be general in nature, the pa-per is applied to the well-known problem of identifying a pay-load of a moving flexible robot. This problem is almost impossible to solve by measurements, so an estimation technique must be applied. The presented method benefits from...... the close correspondence with the continuous-time representation to allow a scalar and implicit adaptive technique which based on flexibility measurements leads to the online estimation of the pay-load....

  9. Canadian robotic arm is moved to the payload canister for STS-100

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. - In the Space Station Processing Facility, an overhead crane moves into place over the Canadian robotic arm, SSRMS, and its pallet. The crane will lift the SSRMS and move it to the payload canister. The arm is 57.7 feet (17.6 meters) long when fully extended and has seven motorized joints. It is capable of handling large payloads and assisting with docking the Space Shuttle. The SSRMS is self-relocatable with a Latching End Effector, so it can be attached to complementary ports spread throughout the Station'''s exterior surfaces. The SSRMS is part of the payload on mission STS-100, scheduled to launch April 19 at 2:41 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A, KSC.

  10. Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis for Launch Vehicles with Varying Payloads and Adapters for Structural Dynamics and Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGhee, David S.; Peck, Jeff A.; McDonald, Emmett J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis (PSA) methods and tools in an effort to understand their utility in vehicle loads and dynamic analysis. Specifically, this study addresses how these methods may be used to establish limits on payload mass and cg location and requirements on adaptor stiffnesses while maintaining vehicle loads and frequencies within established bounds. To this end, PSA methods and tools are applied to a realistic, but manageable, integrated launch vehicle analysis where payload and payload adaptor parameters are modeled as random variables. This analysis is used to study both Regional Response PSA (RRPSA) and Global Response PSA (GRPSA) methods, with a primary focus on sampling based techniques. For contrast, some MPP based approaches are also examined.

  11. Advanced transportation system study: Manned launch vehicle concepts for two way transportation system payloads to LEO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the Advanced Transportation System Study (ATSS) task area 1 study effort is to examine manned launch vehicle booster concepts and two-way cargo transfer and return vehicle concepts to determine which of the many proposed concepts best meets NASA's needs for two-way transportation to low earth orbit. The study identified specific configurations of the normally unmanned, expendable launch vehicles (such as the National Launch System family) necessary to fly manned payloads. These launch vehicle configurations were then analyzed to determine the integrated booster/spacecraft performance, operations, reliability, and cost characteristics for the payload delivery and return mission. Design impacts to the expendable launch vehicles which would be required to perform the manned payload delivery mission were also identified. These impacts included the implications of applying NASA's man-rating requirements, as well as any mission or payload unique impacts. The booster concepts evaluated included the National Launch System (NLS) family of expendable vehicles and several variations of the NLS reference configurations to deliver larger manned payload concepts (such as the crew logistics vehicle (CLV) proposed by NASA JSC). Advanced, clean sheet concepts such as an F-1A engine derived liquid rocket booster (LRB), the single stage to orbit rocket, and a NASP-derived aerospace plane were also included in the study effort. Existing expendable launch vehicles such as the Titan 4, Ariane 5, Energia, and Proton were also examined. Although several manned payload concepts were considered in the analyses, the reference manned payload was the NASA Langley Research Center's HL-20 version of the personnel launch system (PLS). A scaled up version of the PLS for combined crew/cargo delivery capability, the HL-42 configuration, was also included in the analyses of cargo transfer and return vehicle (CTRV) booster concepts. In addition to strictly manned payloads, two-way cargo

  12. Workspace and Payload-Capacity of a New Reconfigurable Delta Parallel Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Maya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the workspace and payload capacity of a new design of reconfigurable Delta-type parallel robot is analysed. The reconfiguration is achieved by adjusting the length of the kinematic chains of a given robot link simultaneously and symmetrically during the operation of the robot. This would produce a dynamic workspace in shape and volume. A numerical analysis of the variation of shape and volume of the workspace and payload capacity of the robot is presented. Based both on the results of this analysis and on practical requirements, a proposal for the design of a reconfiguring mechanism is presented.

  13. Onboard Autonomy and Ground Operations Automation for the Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) CubeSat Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Steve; Doubleday, Joshua; Ortega, Kevin; Tran, Daniel; Bellardo, John; Williams, Austin; Piug-Suari, Jordi; Crum, Gary; Flatley, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The Intelligent Payload Experiment (IPEX) is a cubesat manifested for launch in October 2013 that will flight validate autonomous operations for onboard instrument processing and product generation for the Intelligent Payload Module (IPM) of the Hyperspectral Infra-red Imager (HyspIRI) mission concept. We first describe the ground and flight operations concept for HyspIRI IPM operations. We then describe the ground and flight operations concept for the IPEX mission and how that will validate HyspIRI IPM operations. We then detail the current status of the mission and outline the schedule for future development.

  14. Efficient loads analyses of Shuttle-payloads using dynamic models with linear or nonlinear interfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, P. D.; Cao, T. T.; Hamilton, D. A.; Nelson, D. A. R.

    An efficient method for the load analysis of Shuttle-payload systems with linear or nonlinear attachment interfaces is presented which allows the kinematics of the interface degrees of freedom at a given time to be evaluated without calculating the combined system modal representation of the Space Shuttle and its payload. For the case of a nonlinear dynamic model, an iterative procedure is employed to converge the nonlinear terms of the equations of motion to reliable values. Results are presented for a Shuttle abort landing event.

  15. Factors Influencing Solar Electric Propulsion Vehicle Payload Delivery for Outer Planet Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Michael; Green, Shaun; Coverstone, Victoria

    2003-01-01

    Systems analyses were performed for missions utilizing solar electric propulsion systems to deliver payloads to outer-planet destinations. A range of mission and systems factors and their affect on the delivery capability of the solar electric propulsion system was examined. The effect of varying the destination, the trip time, the launch vehicle, and gravity-assist boundary conditions was investigated. In addition, the affects of selecting propulsion system and power systems characteristics (including primary array power variation, number of thrusters, thruster throttling mode, and thruster Isp) on delivered payload was examined.

  16. Modificações da hemodinâmica fetal pelo estímulo sonoro: avaliação pela dopplervelocimetria colorida Vibro-acoustic stimulation induced hemodynamic fetal changes assessed by color doppler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Mauad Filho

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: verificar se ocorrem ou não alterações hemodinâmicas na aréria cerebral média (ACM aferido pela dopplervelocimetria colorida após realização de um estímulo sonoro. Métodos: trinta fetos de gestantes consideradas clinicamente normais com idade gestacional igual ou superior a 28 semanas foram submetidos a um estímulo sonoro. Examinamos as alterações da velocidade sangüínea na ACM fetal por meio do índice de resistência e da freqüência cardíaca fetal, pelo doppler colorido, antes e depois do estímulo acústico. Resultados: a média da freqüência cardíaca fetal (FCF antes do estímulo sonoro foi de 142,41 batimentos por minuto (bpm com desvio padrão de 9,01 e faixa de variação de 122 a 162 bpm. Após o estímulo sonoro, a média da FCF foi de 159,44 bpm com desvio padrão de 15,49, com faixa de variação de 130 a 187 bpm (pPurpose: to determine the possible occurrence of hemodynamic changes in the middle cerebral artery of the fetus (MCA using color doppler after vibro-acoustic stimulation. Methods: thirty fetuses from pregnant women considered to be clinically normal, with a gestational age of 28 weeks or more were submitted to vibro-acoustic stimulation. We examined the changes in blood flow rate in the middle cerebral artery of the fetus on the basis of resistance index (RI and fetal heart rate (FHR by color doppler before and after the sound stimulus. Results: mean FHR before vibro-acoustic stimulation was 142.41 beats per minute (bpm with a standard deviation of 9.01 and a range of 122 to 162 bpm. After stimulation, mean FHR was 159.44 bpm with a standard deviation of 15.49 and a range of 130 to 187 bpm (p<0.01. Mean RI in the MCA of the fetuses was 75.89% (range: 64 to 91% before the experiment. After the vibro-acoustic stimulation, mean RI was 66.93% (range: 47 to 83%; p < 0.01. Conclusions: we observed that a sound stimulus provokes the well-known immediate and significant elevation of FHR and a

  17. Effect of emergency FMD vaccine antigen payload on protection, sub-clinical infection and persistence following direct contact challenge of cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, S J; Voyce, C; Parida, S; Reid, S M; Hamblin, P A; Hutchings, G; Paton, D J; Barnett, P V

    2006-04-12

    emergency vaccine can prevent or decrease local virus replication and thereby dramatically reduce the amount of virus released into the environment, particularly during the early post-exposure period. Additionally, increasing the antigen payload of the vaccine may reduce sub-clinical infection, leading to fewer persistently infected virus carrier animals.

  18. Hyperspectral characterization of fluorescent organic contaminants on optical payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Frédéric; Pansu, Robert; Faye, Delphine; Le Nouy, Patrice; Spezzigu, Piero

    2017-11-01

    The increase of performance of new optical instruments for science and Earth observation always leads to higher requirements in terms of contamination due to particle sedimentation in cleanrooms and deposition of chemical species in vacuum environment. Specific cleanliness control procedures are implemented in order to mitigate the risks of contamination on optical sensors and sensitive diopters, especially when used for UV applications. Such procedures are commonly carried out in cleanrooms and are described in both European ECSS-Q-ST-70-50C and NASA SN-C-0005D standards. UV light at 365 nm is often used for the inspection of optical sensitive surfaces to localize and to evaluate the amount of fluorescent particles, essentially coming from textile fibers. But other groups of compounds can be observed with a different spectral response and distribution, like adhesives and resins or even organic residues. Therefore, we could take advantage of this spectral information closely linked to specific molecules for partial identification of these materials before further investigation involving wipe on flight model and measurement in a laboratory.

  19. STS-40 Columbia, OV-102, payload bay aft firewall and thermal insulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    STS-40 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, payload bay (PLB) aft firewall is documented to show a loose piece of thermal insulation. The crew discovered the loose blanket soon after opening the PLB doors on 06-05-91. The vertical tail and the left orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pod are visible above the bulkhead.

  20. Training Physics Students for Space Careers: Introduction to the Balloon Payload Projects at UL Lafayette

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollerman, W. A.; Mazzino, L.; Fontenot, R.; Giovinazzo, P.; Malespin, C.

    2006-12-01

    In January 2004, the President set goals for the space program in the 21st century. This renewed sense of direction means that a whole new generation of scientists and engineers will be needed to support space- based science and technology. Declining enrollments in science, mathematics, and space related engineering programs are well documented in the United States. These enrollment reductions are also observed at Louisiana colleges and universities, which are starting to recover from last year's hurricanes. Since 2003, physics students at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette (UL Lafayette) have participated in two balloon payload projects sponsored by the Louisiana Space Grant Consortium (LaSPACE). In 2004-2005, physics students at UL Lafayette attended an informal ballooning course to design and build a student-directed payload for launch at the NASA National Scientific Ballooning Facility in Palestine, Texas in May 2005. In 2006, students participated in the High Altitude Student Payload (HASP) program to measure cosmic ray intensities using traditional film and absorbers. This 10 kg payload flew from Fort Sumner, New Mexico in early September 2006. This presentation will discuss our participation in both balloon projects. Emphasis will be placed on highlighting the "hands-on" and step-by-step approach used to provide students with practical space related skills.

  1. Packet Payload Monitoring for Internet Worm Content Detection Using Deterministic Finite Automaton with Delayed Dictionary Compression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Selvaraj

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Packet content scanning is one of the crucial threats to network security and network monitoring applications. In monitoring applications, payload of packets in a network is matched against the set of patterns in order to detect attacks like worms, viruses, and protocol definitions. During network transfer, incoming and outgoing packets are monitored in depth to inspect the packet payload. In this paper, the regular expressions that are basically string patterns are analyzed for packet payloads in detecting worms. Then the grouping scheme for regular expression matching is rewritten using Deterministic Finite Automaton (DFA. DFA achieves better processing speed during regular expression matching. DFA requires more memory space for each state. In order to reduce memory utilization, decompression technique is used. Delayed Dictionary Compression (DDC is applied for achieving better speeds in the communication links. DDC achieves decoding latency during compression of payload packets in the network. Experimental results show that the proposed approach provides better time consumption and memory utilization during detection of Internet worm attacks.

  2. A comparison between five principle strategies for adapting shaking force balance during varying payload

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Jan Johannes; Herder, Justus Laurens

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic balance has been studied to eliminate the shaking forces and vibration at the base induced by rapid motion of robotic devices. This is done by designing the mass distribution such that the total center of mass of the mechanism is stationary for all motions. However, when the payload changes,

  3. Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) Prototype Radio Verification Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, William D.; Frantz, Brian D.; Thadhani, Suresh K.; Young, Daniel P.

    2017-01-01

    This report provides an overview and results from the verification of the specifications that defines the operational capabilities of the airborne and ground, L Band and C Band, Command and Non-Payload Communications radio link system. An overview of system verification is provided along with an overview of the operation of the radio. Measurement results are presented for verification of the radios operation.

  4. Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS) Mission – Low Energy Payload ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... of 'Solar X-ray Spectrometer (SOXS)' mission, which was launched onboard GSAT-2 Indian spacecraft on 08 May 2003 by GSLV-D2 rocket to study the solar flares. The SOXS Low Energy Detector (SLD) payload was designed, developed and fabricated by Physical Research Laboratory. (PRL) in collaboration with Space ...

  5. Orbital Payload Reductions Resulting from Booster and Trajectory Modifications for Recovery of a Large Rocket Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, Alan D.; Hopkins, Edward J.

    1961-01-01

    An analysis was made to determine the reduction in payload for a 300 nautical mile orbit resulting from the addition of inert weight, representing recovery gear, to the first-stage booster of a three-stage rocket vehicle. The values of added inert weight investigated ranged from 0 to 18 percent of gross weight at lift off. The study also included the effects on the payload in orbit and the distance from the launch site at burnout and at impact caused by variation in the vertical rise time before the programmed tilt. The vertical rise times investigated ranged from 16-7 to 100 percent of booster burning time. For a vertical rise of 16.7 percent of booster burning time it was found that a 50-percent increase in the weight of the empty booster resulted in only a 10-percent reduction of the payload in orbit. For no added booster weight, increasing vertical rise time from 16-7 to 100 percent of booster burning time (so that the spent booster would impact in the launch area) reduced the payload by 37 percent. Increasing the vertical rise time from 16-7 to 50 percent of booster burning time resulted in about a 15-percent reduction in the impact distance, and for vertical rise times greater than 50-percent the impact distance decreased rapidly.

  6. Payload charging events in the mesosphere and their impact on Langmuir type electric probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. A. Bekkeng

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Three sounding rockets were launched from Andøya Rocket Range in the ECOMA campaign in December 2010. The aim was to study the evolution of meteoric smoke particles during a major meteor shower. Of the various instruments onboard the rocket payload, this paper presents the data from a multi-Needle Langmuir Probe (m-NLP and a charged dust detector. The payload floating potential, as observed using the m-NLP instrument, shows charging events on two of the three flights. These charging events cannot be explained using a simple charging model, and have implications towards the use of fixed bias Langmuir probes on sounding rockets investigating mesospheric altitudes. We show that for a reliable use of a single fixed bias Langmuir probe as a high spatial resolution relative density measurement, each payload should also carry an additional instrument to measure payload floating potential, and an instrument that is immune to spacecraft charging and measures absolute plasma density.

  7. Characterization of Extremely Lightweight Intrusion Detection (ELIDe) Power Utilization with Varying Throughput and Payload Sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    ARL-TR-7532 ● SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of Extremely Lightweight Intrusion Detection (ELIDe) Power...SEP 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Characterization of Extremely Lightweight Intrusion Detection (ELIDe) Power Utilization with Varying...Characterization of Extremely Lightweight Intrusion Detection (ELIDe) Power Utilization with Varying Throughput and Payload Sizes 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W911QX-07

  8. HERO: High Energy Replicated Optics for a Hard-X-Ray Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, B.; Engelhaupt, D.; Speegle, C. O.; ODell, S. L.; Austin, R. A.; Elsner, R. F.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    2000-01-01

    We are developing high-energy grazing-incidence replicated optics for a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope. When completed, the instrument will have 170 cm2 of effective collecting area at 40 keV and 130 square cm at 60 keV with <= 30 arc seconds half power diameter. This payload will offer unprecedented sensitivity in the hard-x-ray region, with around 250 microCrab sensitivity on long-duration flights and 50-100 microCrab on ultra- long-duration balloon missions The payload consists of 16 mirror modules, each with 14 nested mirrors made from a high-strength nickel alloy, and a corresponding array of 16 focal plane detectors. An engineering demonstration flight is scheduled for the Spring of 2000, using just two mirror modules each with 3 shells, above a pair of gas-scintillation-proportional counters. This flight is intended to test a newly designed gondola pointing and aspect system and the stability of the optical bench design. The first scientific flight of the full payload is scheduled for the Fall of 2002. Full details of the payload and its capabilities will be presented together with data from various mirror-module tests. If available data from the first flight will also be presented.

  9. A 3D CZT hard x-ray polarimeter for a balloon-borne payload

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caroli, E.; Alvarez, J. M.; Auricchio, N.

    2012-01-01

    be optimized also for this type of measurement. In this framework, we present the concept of a small high-performance spectrometer designed for polarimetry between 100 and 1000 keV suitable as a stratospheric balloon-borne payload dedicated to perform an accurate and reliable measurement of the polarization...

  10. UFFO/Lomonosov: The Payload for the Observation of Early Photons from Gamma Ray Bursts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Park, I. H.; Panasyuk, M. I.; Reglero, V.

    2018-01-01

    . Fast response measurements of the optical emission of GRB will be made by a Slewing Mirror Telescope (SMT), a key instrument of the payload, which will open a new frontier in transient studies by probing the early optical rise of GRBs with a response time in seconds for the first time. The SMT employs...

  11. Performance of Manchester-coded payload in an optical FSK labeling scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Chi, Nan; Holm-Nielsen, Pablo Villanueva

    2003-01-01

    The modulation crosstalk between combined frequency-shift keying (FSK) and intensity modulation (IM) in an optical label-switching network is analyzed both theoretically and experimentally. A comparison between the performance of nonreturn-to-zero (NRZ) and Manchester-coded payload is made. It is...

  12. Re-Engineering the ISS Payload Operations Control Center During Increased Utilization and Critical Onboard Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Stephanie R. B.; Marsh, Angela L.

    2014-01-01

    With an increase in utilization and hours of payload operations being executed onboard the International Space Station (ISS), upgrading the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) ISS Payload Control Area (PCA) was essential to gaining efficiencies and assurance of current and future payload health and science return. PCA houses the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC) responsible for the execution of all NASA payloads onboard the ISS. POIC Flight Controllers are responsible for the operation of voice, stowage, command, telemetry, video, power, thermal, and environmental control in support of ISS science experiments. The methodologies and execution of the PCA refurbishment were planned and performed within a four-month period in order to assure uninterrupted operation of ISS payloads and minimal impacts to payload operations teams. To vacate the PCA, three additional HOSC control rooms were reconfigured to handle ISS real-time operations, Backup Control Center (BCC) to Mission Control in Houston, simulations, and testing functions. This involved coordination and cooperation from teams of ISS operations controllers, multiple engineering and design disciplines, management, and construction companies performing an array of activities simultaneously and in sync delivering a final product with no issues that impacted the schedule. For each console operator discipline, studies of Information Technology (IT) tools and equipment layouts, ergonomics, and lines of sight were performed. Infusing some of the latest IT into the project was an essential goal in ensuring future growth and success of the ISS payload science returns. Engineering evaluations led to a state of the art Video Wall implementation and more efficient ethernet cabling distribution providing the latest products and the best solution for the POIC. These engineering innovations led to cost savings for the project. Constraints involved in the management of

  13. Performance analysis of IM, DPSK and DQPSK payload signals with frequency swept coherent detected spectral amplitude code labelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Yongsheng; Osadchiy, Alexey Vladimirovich; Xin, Xiangjun

    2011-01-01

    We present the performance analysis for frequency swept coherent detection of spectral amplitude code (SAC) labelled switching systems for high-speed payload signals with different modulation formats. We consider a payload bit-rate of 40 Gbit/s for an intensity modulation (IM), differential phase...

  14. Clinical toxicity of antibody drug conjugates: a meta-analysis of payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masters, Joanna C; Nickens, Dana J; Xuan, Dawei; Shazer, Ronald L; Amantea, Michael

    2017-10-13

    Background Antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) utilize a monoclonal antibody to deliver a cytotoxic payload specifically to tumor cells, limiting exposure to healthy tissues. Major clinical toxicities of ADCs include hematologic, hepatic, neurologic, and ophthalmic events, which are often dose-limiting. These events may be off-target effects caused by premature release of payload in circulation. A meta-analysis was performed to summarize key clinical safety data for ADCs by payload, and data permitting, establish a dose-response model for toxicity incidence as a function of payload, dose/regimen, and cancer type. Methods A literature search was performed to identify and extract data from clinical ADC studies. Toxicity incidence and severity were collected by treatment arm for anemia, neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, hepatic toxicity, peripheral neuropathy, and ocular toxicity. Exploratory plots, descriptive summaries, and logistic regression modelling were used to explore Grade ≥ 3 (G3/4) toxicities and assess the impact of covariates, including cancer type and dose/regimen. Results The dataset contained 70 publications; quantitative analysis included 43 studies with G3/4 toxicity information reported for the endpoints above. G3/4 anemia, neutropenia and peripheral neuropathy were consistently reported for MMAE ADCs, thrombocytopenia and hepatic toxicity for DM1, and ocular toxicity for MMAF. Safety profiles of MMAE, DM1, and DM4 ADCs differed between solid and hematologic cancers. Conclusions Published ADC clinical data is limited by non-uniform reporting for toxicity and lack of dosing information, limiting the ability to develop quantitative models relating toxicity to exposure. However, the current analysis suggests that key G3/4 toxicities of ADCs in the clinic are likely off-target and related to payload.

  15. A Robust Oil-in-Oil Emulsion for the Nonaqueous Encapsulation of Hydrophilic Payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xiaocun; Katz, Joshua S; Schmitt, Adam; Moore, Jeffrey S

    2018-02-19

    Compartmentalized structures widely exist in cellular systems (organelles) and perform essential functions in smart composite materials (microcapsules, vasculatures, and micelles) to provide localized functionality and enhance materials compatibility. An entirely water-free compartmentalization system is of significant value to the materials community as nonaqueous conditions are critical to packaging microcapsules with water-free hydrophilic payloads while avoiding energy-intensive drying steps. Few nonaqueous encapsulation techniques are known, especially when considering just the scalable processes that operate in batch mode. Herein, we report a robust oil-in-oil Pickering emulsion system that is compatible with nonaqueous interfacial reactions as required for encapsulation of hydrophilic payloads. A major conceptual advance of this work is the notion of the partitioning inhibitor - a chemical agent that greatly reduces the payload's distribution between the emulsion's two phases, thus providing appropriate conditions for emulsion-templated interfacial polymerization. As a specific example, an immiscible hydrocarbon-amine pair of liquids is emulsified by the incorporation of guanidinium chloride (GuHCl) as a partitioning inhibitor into the dispersed phase. Polyisobutylene (PIB) is added into the continuous phase as a viscosity modifier for suitable modification of interfacial polymerization kinetics. The combination of GuHCl and PIB is necessary to yield a robust emulsion with stable morphology for three weeks. Shell wall formation was accomplished by interfacial polymerization of isocyanates delivered through the continuous phase and polyamines from the droplet core. Diethylenetriamine (DETA)-loaded microcapsules were isolated in good yield, exhibiting high thermal and chemical stabilities with extended shelf-lives even when dispersed into a reactive epoxy resin. The polyamine phase is compatible with a variety of basic and hydrophilic actives, suggesting that

  16. Immolation of p-Aminobenzyl Ether Linker and Payload Potency and Stability Determine the Cell-Killing Activity of Antibody-Drug Conjugates with Phenol-Containing Payloads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Donglu; Le, Hoa; Cruz-Chuh, Josefa Dela; Bobba, Sudheer; Guo, Jun; Staben, Leanna; Zhang, Chenghong; Ma, Yong; Kozak, Katherine R; Lewis Phillips, Gail D; Vollmar, Breanna S; Sadowsky, Jack D; Vandlen, Richard; Wei, BinQing; Su, Dian; Fan, Peter; Dragovich, Peter S; Khojasteh, S Cyrus; Hop, Cornelis E C A; Pillow, Thomas H

    2018-02-07

    The valine-citrulline (Val-Cit) dipeptide and p-aminobenzyl (PAB) spacer have been commonly used as a cleavable self-immolating linker in ADC design including in the clinically approved ADC, brentuximab vedotin (Adcetris). When the same linker was used to connect to the phenol of the cyclopropabenzindolone (CBI) (P1), the resulting ADC1 showed loss of potency in CD22 target-expressing cancer cell lines (e.g., BJAB, WSU-DLCL2). In comparison, the conjugate (ADC2) of a cyclopropapyrroloindolone (CPI) (P2) was potent despite the two corresponding free drugs having similar picomolar cell-killing activity. Although the corresponding spirocyclization products of P1 and P2, responsible for DNA alkylation, are a prominent component in buffer, the linker immolation was slow when the PAB was connected as an ether (PABE) to the phenol in P1 compared to that in P2. Additional immolation studies with two other PABE-linked substituted phenol compounds showed that electron-withdrawing groups accelerated the immolation to release an acidic phenol-containing payload (to delocalize the negative charge on the anticipated anionic phenol oxygen during immolation). In contrast, efficient immolation of LD4 did not result in an active ADC4 because the payload (P4) had a low potency to kill cells. In addition, nonimmolation of LD5 did not affect the cell-killing potency of its ADC5 since immolation is not required for DNA alkylation by the center-linked pyrrolobenzodiazepine. Therefore, careful evaluation needs to be conducted when the Val-Cit-PAB linker is used to connect antibodies to a phenol-containing drug as the linker immolation, as well as payload potency and stability, affects the cell-killing activity of an ADC.

  17. Characterization of ignition overpressure using band limited temporal moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cap, J.S. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Experimental Structural Dynamics Dept.

    1994-11-01

    The ignition overpressure event is a transient vibroacoustic environment which occurs when a missile is launched. The environment is often too short to obtain a good estimate of the event using Power Spectral Densities, and Shock Response Spectra are limited in their ability to fully describe the nature of the environment. Sandia National Laboratories has employed band limited temporal moments in an effort to characterize the acceleration response of the components and payloads to the ignition overpressure environment and the related laboratory test inputs. The purpose of this paper will be to show the results of that study.

  18. Design and characteristics of a WEP test in a sounding-rocket payload

    CERN Document Server

    Reasenberg, Robert D; Phillips, James D; Thapa, Rajesh

    2012-01-01

    We describe SR-POEM, a Galilean test of the weak equivalence principle that is to be conducted during the free fall portion of the flight of a sounding rocket payload. This test of a single pair of substances will have a measurement uncertainty of {\\sigma}({\\eta}) < 2 10^17 after averaging the results of eight separate drops, each of 120 s duration. The entire payload is inverted between successive drops to cancel potential sources of systematic error. The weak equivalence principle measurement is made with a set of four of the SAO laser gauges, which have achieved an Allan deviation of 0.04 pm for an averaging time of 30 s. We discuss aspects of the current design with an emphasis on those that bear on the accuracy of the determination of {\\eta}. The discovery of a violation ({\\eta} \

  19. Activities in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) During the STS-42 IML-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured are activities in the SL POCC during STS-42, IML-1 mission.

  20. STS-35 Payload Specialist Parise sets up SAREX on OV-102's middeck

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    STS-35 Payload Specialist Ronald A. Parise enters data into the payload and general support computer (PGSC) in preparation for Earth communication via the Shuttle Amateur Radio Experiment (SAREX) aboard Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102. The SAREX equipment is secured to the middeck starboard sleep station. SAREX provided radio transmissions between ground based amateur radio operators around the world and Parise, a licensed amateur radio operator. The experiment enabled students to communicate with an astronaut in space, as Parise (call-sign WA4SIR) devoted some of his off-duty time to that purpose. Displayed on the forward lockers beside Parise is a AMSAT (Amateur Radio Satellite Corporation) / ARRL (American Radio Relay League) banner. Food items and checklists are attached to the lockers. In locker position MF43G, the Development Test Objective (DTO) Trash Compaction and Retention System Demonstration extended duration orbiter (EDO) compactor is visible.

  1. The MGSE software for the on-ground gamma-ray calibration of the AGILE payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianotti, Fulvio; Bulgarelli, Andrea; Trifoglio, Massimo; Di Cocco, Guido; Tavani, Marco; Labanti, Claudio; Traci, Alessandro

    2008-07-01

    AGILE is an ASI (Italian Space Agency) Small Space Mission for high energy astrophysics in the range 30 MeV - 50 GeV successfully launched on 23 April 2007 and currently fully operative. The on-ground Gamma Ray calibration of the Payload have been carried out 18 months before launch at the Beam Test Facility - INFN LNF (Roma) using a complement of mechanical and electrical equipment and computer systems specifically developed to that purpose. In particular, a specific software has been designed and developed to automate the operations of the Mechanical Ground Support Equipment (MGSE) which positions the Payload in front of the Beam. In this paper the architecture and the performance of the software will be described and discussed.

  2. Albumin–Polymer–Drug Conjugates: Long Circulating, High Payload Drug Delivery Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford; Zuwala, Kaja; Pilgram, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    a marginal increase in the circulation lifetime of the drugs. We combine the benefits of the two platforms and at the same time overcome their respective limitations. Specifically, we develop the synthesis of albumin–polymer–drug conjugates to obtain long circulating, high payload drug delivery vehicles......Albumin is an exquisite tool of nature used in biomedicine to achieve long blood residence time for drugs, but the payload it can carry is typically limited to one molecule per protein. In contrast, synthetic macromolecular prodrugs contain multiple copies of drugs per polymer chain but offer only....... In vivo data validate that albumin endows the conjugate with a blood residence time similar to that of the protein and well exceeding that of the polymer. Therapeutic activity of the conjugates is validated using prodrugs of panobinostat, an HIV latency reversal agent, in which case the conjugates matched...

  3. The HERO Program: High-Energy Replicated Optics for a Hard-X-Ray Balloon Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, B. D.; Engelhaupt, D.; Speegle, C. O.; Austin, R. A.; Kolodziejczak, J. J.; ODell, S. L.; Weisskopf, M. C.

    1999-01-01

    We are developing high-energy replicated optics for a balloon-borne hard-x-ray telescope. When completed, the telescope will have around 150 square cm of effective collecting area up to 65 keV, and an angular resolution of around 30 arc seconds, half power diameter. When used in conjunction with an array of focal plane imaging detectors, for which Gas Scintillation Proportional Counters are under development, the payload will provide unprecedented sensitivity for pointed observations in the hard-x-ray band. We will present an overview of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) program together with test data from the first mirror units. The overall sensitivity of the full payload, when flown on long- and ultra-long-duration balloon flights, will be compared with past and planned satellite-borne hard-x-ray missions.

  4. The Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) Payload Facility on the ISS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reibaldi, Giuseppe; Nasca, Rosario; Neubert, Torsten

    ASIM is a payload facility to be mounted on a Columbus external platform on the International Space Station (ISS). ASIM will study the coupling of thunderstorm processes to the upper atmosphere, ionosphere and radiation belts. ASIM is the most complex Earth Observation payload facility planned...... for the utilization of the ISS. ASIM will study • The recently discovered electrical discharges in the stratosphere and mesosphere above thunderstorms, • Relativistic electron beams accelerated above thunderstorms, injected into the magnetosphere, • Gravity waves in the thermosphere powered by convection in severe...... thunderstorms, • Ionisation and heating of the mesosphere and lower ionosphere by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges and TLEs, and • Precipitation of radiation belt electrons by electromagnetic waves from lightning discharges. ASIM will also study auroral dynamics, airglow, and greenhouse gas...

  5. Bioproduction of Antibody-Drug Conjugate Payload Precursors by Engineered Cell Factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jie; Xiao, Han; Qian, Zhi-Gang; Zhong, Jian-Jiang

    2017-05-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), which combine the exquisite specificity of antibodies with the cell-killing ability of cytotoxic drug payloads, have emerged as an attractive means for treating cancers. All (pre)clinical ADCs employ biosynthesized cytotoxins as their ADC payload precursors (APPs). The cost-effective bioproduction of APPs is receiving great interest from both academia and industry. Given the lack of systematic overviews of the topic, we provide the current status of APPs and focus on their state-of-the-art bioproduction strategies, illustrated with typical examples and critical analyses. Challenges in further enhancing the bioproduction efficiency of APPs and other cytotoxins are also discussed. This research has implications for bioprocess and metabolic engineering, systems and synthetic biology, and biopharmaceutical drug discovery, development, and industrialization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Separable and Error-Free Reversible Data Hiding in Encrypted Image with High Payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaoxia Yin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a separable reversible data-hiding scheme in encrypted image which offers high payload and error-free data extraction. The cover image is partitioned into nonoverlapping blocks and multigranularity encryption is applied to obtain the encrypted image. The data hider preprocesses the encrypted image and randomly selects two basic pixels in each block to estimate the block smoothness and indicate peak points. Additional data are embedded into blocks in the sorted order of block smoothness by using local histogram shifting under the guidance of the peak points. At the receiver side, image decryption and data extraction are separable and can be free to choose. Compared to previous approaches, the proposed method is simpler in calculation while offering better performance: larger payload, better embedding quality, and error-free data extraction, as well as image recovery.

  7. Payload specialist station study. Volume 3: Program study cost estimates. Part 1: Work breakdown structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-01

    The work breakdown structure (WBS) for the Payload Specialist Station (PSS) is presented. The WBS is divided into two elements--PSS contractor and mission unique requirements. In accordance with the study ground rules, it is assumed that a single contractor, hereafter referred to as PSS Contractor will perform the following: (1) provide C and D hardware (MFDS and elements of MMSE), except for GFE; (2) identify software requirements; (3) provide GSE and ground test software; and (4) perform systems engineering and integration in support of the Aft Flight Deck (AFD) C and D concept. The PSS Contractor WBS element encompasses a core or standardized PSS concept. Payload peculiar C and D requirements identified by users will originate as a part of the WBS element mission unique requirements; these requirements will be provided to the PSS Contractor for implementation.

  8. Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) Team in the Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The primary payload for Space Shuttle Mission STS-42, launched January 22, 1992, was the International Microgravity Laboratory-1 (IML-1), a pressurized manned Spacelab module. The goal of IML-1 was to explore in depth the complex effects of weightlessness of living organisms and materials processing. Around-the-clock research was performed on the human nervous system's adaptation to low gravity and effects of microgravity on other life forms such as shrimp eggs, lentil seedlings, fruit fly eggs, and bacteria. Materials processing experiments were also conducted, including crystal growth from a variety of substances such as enzymes, mercury iodide, and a virus. The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Featured is the Gravity Plant Physiology Facility (GPPF) team in the SL POCC during the IML-1 mission.

  9. IMIS desktop & smartphone software solutions for monitoring spacecrafts' payload from anywhere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroukh, J.; Queyrut, O.; Airaud, J.

    In the past years, the demand for satellite remote operations has increased guided by on one hand, the will to reduce operations cost (on-call operators out of business hours), and on the other hand, the development of cooperation space missions resulting in a world wide distribution of engineers and science team members. Only a few off-the-shelf solutions exist to fulfill the need of remote payload monitoring, and they mainly use proprietary devices. The recent advent of mobile technologies (laptops, smartphones and tablets) as well as the worldwide deployment of broadband networks (3G, Wi-Fi hotspots), has opened up a technical window that brings new options. As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission, the Centre National D'Etudes Spatiales (CNES, the French space agency) has developed a new software solution for monitoring spacecraft payloads. The Instrument Monitoring Interactive Software (IMIS) offers state-of-the-art operational features for payload monitoring, and can be accessed remotely. It was conceived as a generic tool that can be used for heterogeneous payloads and missions. IMIS was designed as a classical client/server architecture. The server is hosted at CNES and acts as a data provider while two different kinds of clients are available depending on the level of mobility required. The first one is a rich client application, built on Eclipse framework, which can be installed on usual operating systems and communicates with the server through the Internet. The second one is a smartphone application for any Android platform, connected to the server thanks to the mobile broadband network or a Wi-Fi connection. This second client is mainly devoted to on-call operations and thus only contains a subset of the IMIS functionalities. This paper describes the operational context, including security aspects, that led IMIS development, presents the selected software architecture and details the various features of both clients: the desktop and the sm

  10. Astronauts Gardner and Allen during loading of Palapa B-2 in payload bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Astronaut Joseph P. Allen, in this frame, is the sole anchor for the top portion (and most of) the captured Palapa B-2 satellite. Astronaut Dale A. Gardner is on the other end as they load it into the payload bay. Note the difference between the two stinger devices stowed on the Challenger's port side (right side of frame). The one nearer the spacecraft's vertical stabilizer is spent. The one nearer the camera is still awaiting use.

  11. The space shuttle payload planning working groups. Volume 10: Space technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the Space Technology group of the space shuttle payload planning activity are presented. The elements of the space technology program are: (1) long duration exposure facility, (2) advanced technology laboratory, (3) physics and chemistry laboratory, (4) contamination experiments, and (5) laser information/data transmission technology. The space technology mission model is presented in tabular form. The proposed experiments to be conducted by each test facility are described. Recommended approaches for user community interfacing are included.

  12. Vibroacoustic characteristics of mine locomotives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chigirinskii, S.E.; Ponomarev, N.S.; Leiman, Ya.A.

    1982-11-01

    The paper discusses noise pollution caused by locomotives used for mine haulage in underground mining. Noise pollution in a mine working and at the driver working place is measured. Mechanical vibrations of the floor in the driver cab are also determined. Noise pollution and mechanical vibrations of 3 locomotive types are comparatively evaluated: the AM-8D electric locomotive, the GR-4 inertia-type locomotive and the 1D-8 diesel locomotive. The results of investigations are shown in 2 tables. The inertia-type locomotive causes the most intensive noise pollution. Noise pollution of the diesel locomotive has been successfully suppressed by a system of shock absorbers. The following methods for noise and vibration control are discussed: use of soundproof cabs, damping vibrations at the driver's seat, use of motors with noise abatement systems and shock absorbers. (In Russian)

  13. RBFNN Control of A Two-Link Flexible Manipulator Incorporating Payload

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khairudin

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the dynamic modeling and control of a two-link flexible robot manipulator. A dynamic model of the system is developed using a combined Euler-Lagrange and assumed mode methods. The most problems of a two-link flexible manipulator are vibration of flexible link and unpredictable payload additional. Previous researchers have discussed control methods for this system; few presented the effect of a payload profile. The simulation in this research is performed to assess the dynamic model and system responses at the hub and end-point of both links are presented and analyzed in time domains and show the advantages using radial basis function neural network (RBFNN controller for solving flexible link vibration, achieve high-precision position tracking, and payload effect robustness. The results achieved by the proposed controller are compared with conventional PID to substantiate and verify the advantages the proposed scheme and its promising potential in control of a two-link flexible manipulator. It is shown that smaller overshoot, quickly steady state response and tracking performance of the proposed controller is good profile and better than PID controllers.

  14. Student-Built High-Altitude Balloon Payload with Sensor Array and Flight Computer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Russell; Slaton, William

    A payload was designed for a high-altitude weather balloon. The flight controller consisted of a Raspberry Pi running a Python 3.4 program to collect and store data. The entire payload was designed to be versatile and easy to modify so that it could be repurposed for other projects: The code was written with the expectation that more sensors and other functionality would be added later, and a Raspberry Pi was chosen as the processor because of its versatility, its active support community, and its ability to interface easily with sensors, servos, and other such hardware. For this project, extensive use was made of the Python 3.4 libraries gps3, PiCamera, and RPi.GPIO to collect data from a GPS breakout board, a Raspberry Pi camera, a geiger counter, two thermocouples, and a pressure sensor. The data collected clearly shows that pressure and temperature decrease as altitude increases, while β-radiation and γ-radiation increase as altitude increases. These trends in the data follow those predicted by theoretical calculations made for comparison. This payload was developed in such a way that future students could easily alter it to include additional sensors, biological experiments, and additional error monitoring and management. Arkansas Space Grant Consortium (ASGC) Workforce Development Grant.

  15. Capturing Uncertainty Information and Categorical Characteristics for Network Payload Grouping in Protocol Reverse Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Zhen Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As a promising tool to recover the specifications of unknown protocols, protocol reverse engineering has drawn more and more attention in research over the last decade. It is a critical task of protocol reverse engineering to extract the protocol keywords from network trace. Since the messages of different types have different sets of protocol keywords, it is an effective method to improve the accuracy of protocol keyword extraction by clustering the network payload of unknown traffic into clusters and analyzing each clusters to extract the protocol keywords. Although the classic algorithms such as K-means and EM can be used for network payload clustering, the quality of resultant traffic clusters was far from satisfactory when these algorithms are applied to cluster application layer traffic with categorical attributes. In this paper, we propose a novel method to improve the accuracy of protocol reverse engineering by applying a rough set-based technique for clustering the application layer traffic. This technique analyze multidimension uncertain information in multiple categorical attributes based on rough sets theory to cluster network payload, and apply the Minimum Description Length criteria to determine the optimal number of clusters. The experiments show that our method outperforms the existing algorithms and improves the results of protocol keyword extraction.

  16. Mobile Payload Element (MPE): Concept study for a sample fetching rover for the ESA Lunar Lander Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarmann, R.; Jaumann, R.; Claasen, F.; Apfelbeck, M.; Klinkner, S.; Richter, L.; Schwendner, J.; Wolf, M.; Hofmann, P.

    2012-12-01

    In late 2010, the DLR Space Administration invited the German industry to submit a proposal for a study about a Mobile Payload Element (MPE), which could be a German national contribution to the ESA Lunar Lander Mission. Several spots in the south polar region of the moon come into consideration as landing site for this mission. All possible spots provide sustained periods of solar illumination, interrupted by darkness periods of several 10 h. The MPE is outlined to be a small, autonomous, innovative vehicle in the 10 kg class for scouting and sampling the environment in the vicinity of the lunar landing site. The novel capabilities of the MPE will be to acquire samples of lunar regolith from surface, subsurface as well as shadowed locations, define their geological context and bring them back to the lander. This will enable access to samples that are not contaminated by the lander descent propulsion system plumes to increase the chances of detecting any indigenous lunar volatiles contained within the samples. Kayser-Threde, as prime industrial contractor for Phase 0/A, has assembled for this study a team of German partners with relevant industrial and institutional competence in space robotics and lunar science. The primary scientific objective of the MPE is to acquire clearly documented samples and to bring them to the lander for analysis with the onboard Lunar Dust Analysis Package (L-DAP) and Lunar Volatile Resources Analysis Package (L-VRAP). Due to the unstable nature of volatiles, which are of particular scientific interest, the MPE design needs to provide a safe storage and transportation of the samples to the lander. The proposed MPE rover concept has a four-wheeled chassis configuration with active suspension, being a compromise between innovation and mass efficiency. The suspension chosen allows a compact stowage of the MPE on the lander as well as precise alignment of the solar generators and instruments. Since therefore no further complex mechanics are

  17. Carcinomas epidermóides do pulmão na doença vibroacústica Respiratory squamous cell carcinomas in vibroacoustic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Reis Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    de mutagénese em modelos animais e em trabalhadores expostos a RBF: a frequência de trocas de cromátides irmãs em pilotos de helicóptero está aumentada, bem como em modelos animais expostos a ruído e vibrações simultâneos, simulando o ambiente no cockpit de helicópteros.Background: In 1987, the autopsy of a vibroacoustic disease (VAD patient disclosed two tumours: a renal cell carcinoma and a malignant glioma in the brain. Since 1987, malignancy in VAD patients has been under close surveillance. To date, in a universe of 945 individuals, there are 46 cases of malignancies, of which 11 are multiple. Of the 11 cases of respiratory tract tumours, all were squamous cell carcinomas (SqCC. This report focuses on the morphological features of these tumours. Methods: Tumour fragments were collected (endoscopic biopsy or surgery from 11 male VAD patients (ave. age: 58±9 years, 3 non-smokers: 2 in glottis and 9 in the lung. In the 3 non-smokers, 2 had lung tumours and 1 had a glottis tumour. All were employed as or retired aircraft technicians, military or commercial pilots. Fragments were fixed either for light and electron microscopy. Immunohistochemistry studies used chromagranine and synaptophysine staining. Results: All lung tumours were located in the upper right lobe bronchi and were histologically poorly differentiated SqCC (Figs. 1, 2. The search with neuroendocrine markers was negative. The average age of tumour onset in helicopter pilots was below 50 years old while for the other professional groups it was above 50. Nine patients are deceased. The 2 surviving patients are heavy smokers (> 2 packs/day. Smoking habits had no i nfluence on tumour outcome and progression. Discussion: Epidemiological studies indicate that squamous cell carcinomas account for approximately 40% of all lung tumours in men. It seems to be highly relevant that all VAD patient respiratory tract tumours are squamous cell carcinomas. It is not surprising that helicopter pilots are

  18. Control and Non-Payload Communications Generation 1 Prototype Radio Flight Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalkhauser, Kurt A.; Young, Daniel P.; Bretmersky, Steven C.; Ishac, Joseph A.; Walker, Steven H.; Griner, James H.; Kachmar, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned aircraft (UA) represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the Government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized because of the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate Unmanned Aircraft Systems in the National Airspace System (UAS in the NAS). The desire and ability to fly UA is of increasing urgency. The application of UA to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UA to the NAS. Existing Federal Aviation Regulations, procedures, and technologies do not allow routine UA access to the NAS. Access to the NAS is hampered by challenges such as the lack of an onboard pilot to see and avoid other aircraft; the ability of a single pilot or operator to control multiple UA; the reliance on command and control (C2) links; the altitudes, speeds, and duration at which the aircraft fly; and the wide variation in UA size and performance. NASA is working with other Government agencies to provide solutions that reduce technical barriers and make access to the NAS routine. This goal will be accomplished through system-level integration of key concepts, technologies, or procedures and through demonstrations of these integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. This project provides an opportunity to transition the acquired empirical data and knowledge to the Federal Aviation Administration and other stakeholders to help them define the requirements for routine UA access to the NAS.Radio communications channels for UA are currently managed through exceptions and use either Department of Defense frequencies for line-of-sight (LOS) and satellite-based communications links, low-power LOS links in amateur bands, or unlicensed Industrial/Scientific/Medical (ISM) frequencies. None of these frequency bands are designated for safety and

  19. Engineering of lipid-coated PLGA nanoparticles with a tunable payload of diagnostically active nanocrystals for medical imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mieszawska, A.J.; Gianella, A.; Cormode, D.P.; Zhao, Y.; Meijerink, A.; Langer, R.; Farokhzad, O.C.; Fayad, Z.A.; Mulder, W J M

    2012-01-01

    Polylactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA) based nanoparticles are biocompatible and biodegradable and therefore have been extensively investigated as therapeutic carriers. Here, we engineered diagnostically active PLGA nanoparticles that incorporate high payloads of nanocrystals into their core for tunable

  20. Sounding rocket payload systems for in-situ measurements of ionosphere-thermosphere structure at small spatial scales Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The methodology developed under this grant is primarily an effort to develop new sub-payload technologies and an inexpensive method of testing them. The three...

  1. Comparison of vibrations of a combination of solid-rocket launch vehicle and payload during a ground firing and launching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenster, J. A.; Pierce, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a study into the environmental vibrations of a payload mounted on the Nike rocket launch vehicle were presented. Data were obtained during the flight acceptance test of the payload, the firing of the total vehicle in a special test stand, and the powered and unpowered flights of the vehicle. The vibrational response of the structure was measured. Data were also obtained on the fluctuating pressure on the outside surface of the vehicle and inside the forward and after ends of the rocket chamber. A comparison of the data from the three test conditions indicated that external pressure fluctuations were the major source of vibrations in the payload area, and pressure fluctuations within the rocket motor were the major source of vibrations contiguous to the payload area.

  2. Ultra-Precision Manufacturing Technology for Miniature & Complex-Form Integrated Opto-Mechanical Structures for Sensors Payloads Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to demonstrate ultra precision manufacturing of components for NASA payloads, specifically for electro-optical and infrared sensors that are used in...

  3. Highly reusable space transportation: Approaches for reducing ETO launch costs to $100 - $200 per pound of payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olds, John R.

    1995-01-01

    The Commercial Space Transportation Study (CSTS) suggests that considerable market expansion in earth-to-orbit transportation would take place if current launch prices could be reduced to around $400 per pound of payload. If these low prices can be achieved, annual payload delivered to low earth orbit (LEO) is predicted to reach 6.7 million pounds. The primary market growth will occur in communications, government missions, and civil transportation. By establishing a cost target of $100-$200 per pound of payload for a new launch system, the Highly Reusable Space Transportation (HRST) program has clearly set its sights on removing the current restriction on market growth imposed by today's high launch costs. In particular, achieving the goal of $100-$200 per pound of payload will require significant coordinated efforts in (1) marketing strategy development, (2) business planning, (3) system operational strategy, (4) vehicle technical design, and (5) vehicle maintenance strategy.

  4. Cleaning Genesis Mission Payload for Flight with Ultra-Pure Water and Assembly in ISO Class 4 Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allton, Judith H.

    2012-01-01

    Genesis mission to capture and return to Earth solar wind samples had very stringent contamination control requirements in order to distinguish the solar atoms from terrestrial ones. Genesis mission goals were to measure solar composition for most of the periodic table, so great care was taken to avoid particulate contamination. Since the number 1 and 2 science goals were to determine the oxygen and nitrogen isotopic composition, organic contamination was minimized by tightly controlling offgassing. The total amount of solar material captured in two years is about 400 micrograms spread across one sq m. The contamination limit requirement for each of C, N, and O was <1015 atoms/sq cm. For carbon, this is equivalent to 10 ng/cm2. Extreme vigilance was used in pre-paring Genesis collectors and cleaning hardware for flight. Surface contamination on polished silicon wafers, measured in Genesis laboratory is approximately 10 ng/sq cm.

  5. Experimental research of thermal loading of the rocket payload fairing element during the atmospheric phase of the descent trajectory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trushlyakov, V.; Iordan, Yu; Davydovich, D.; Zharikov, K.; Dron, M.

    2018-01-01

    The thermal loading physical simulation in the experimental wind tunnel on the design element of the payload fairing made of carbon fiber was done. The experimental study is given in the speed range below 70 m/s, which corresponds to the interval of heights of the descent trajectory of the payload fairing half below 10 km. The values of heat transfer coefficient are obtained. The analysis of the results is carried out.

  6. All-optical label and payload separator for a time-serial RZ-IM/IM scheme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Koonen, A.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate an all-optical label and payload separator based on nonlinear optical signal processing with a semiconductor optical amplifier. The separator handles return-to-zero intensity modulated packets with high bandwidth efficiency utilization.......We demonstrate an all-optical label and payload separator based on nonlinear optical signal processing with a semiconductor optical amplifier. The separator handles return-to-zero intensity modulated packets with high bandwidth efficiency utilization....

  7. Using Paraffin PCM to Make Optical Communication Type of Payloads Thermally Self-Sufficient for Operation in Orion Crew Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative concept of using paraffin phase change material with a melting point of 28 C to make Optical Communication type of payload thermally self-sufficient for operation in the Orion Crew Module is presented. It stores the waste heat of the payload and permits it to operate for about one hour by maintaining its temperature within the maximum operating limit. It overcomes the problem of relying on the availability of cold plate heat sink in the Orion Crew Module.

  8. High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder Operations for Optimal Payload and Science Telemetry Management Onboard the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Michael T.; McElyea, Richard M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    All International Space Station (ISS) Ku-band telemetry transmits through the High-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (HCOR). The HCOR provides the recording and playback capability for all payload, science, and International Partner data streams transmitting through NASA's Ku-band antenna system. The HCOR is a solid-state memory recorder that provides recording capability to record all eight ISS high-rate data during ISS Loss-of-Signal periods. NASA payloads in the Destiny module are prime users of the HCOR; however, NASDA and ESA will also utilize the HCOR for data capture and playback of their high data rate links from the Kibo and Columbus modules. Marshall Space Flight Center's Payload Operations Integration Center manages the HCOR for nominal functions, including system configurations and playback operations. The purpose of this paper is to present the nominal operations plan for the HCOR and the plans for handling contingency operations affecting payload operations. In addition, the paper will address HCOR operation limitations and the expected effects on payload operations. The HCOR is manifested for ISS delivery on flight 9A with the HCOR backup manifested on flight 11A. The HCOR replaces the Medium-Rate Communications Outage Recorder (MCOR), which has supported payloads since flight 5A.1.

  9. Using Pre-melted Phase Change Material to Keep Payload Warm without Power for Hours in Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2012-01-01

    During a payload transition from the transport vehicle to its worksite on the International Space Station (ISS), the payload is unpowered for up to 6 hours. Its radiator(s) will continue to radiate heat to space. It is necessary to make up the heat loss to maintain the payload temperature above the cold survival limit. Typically an interplanetary Probe has no power generation system. It relies on its battery to provide limited power for the Communication and Data Handling (C&DH) subsystem during cruise, and heater power is unavailable. It is necessary to maintain the C&DH temperature above the minimum operating limit. This paper presents a novel thermal design concept that utilizes phase change material (PCM) to store thermal energy by melting it before the payload or interplanetary Probe is unpowered. For the ISS, the PCM is melted by heaters just prior to the payload transition from the transport vehicle to its worksite. For an interplanetary Probe, the PCM is melted by heaters just prior to separation from the orbiter. The PCM releases thermal energy to keep the payload warm for several hours after power is cut off.

  10. Where Did the Linker-Payload Go? A Quantitative Investigation on the Destination of the Released Linker-Payload from an Antibody-Drug Conjugate with a Maleimide Linker in Plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Cong; Zhang, Guodong; Clark, Tracey; Barletta, Frank; Tumey, L Nathan; Rago, Brian; Hansel, Steven; Han, Xiaogang

    2016-05-03

    The reactive thiol of cysteine is often used for coupling maleimide-containing linker-payloads to antibodies resulting in the generation of antibody drug conjugates (ADCs). Currently, a numbers of ADCs in drug development are made by coupling a linker-payload to native or engineered cysteine residues on the antibody. An ADC conjugated via hinge-cysteines to an auristatin payload was used as a model in this study to understand the impact of the maleimide linkers on ADC stability. The payload was conjugated to trastuzumab by a protease-cleavable linker, maleimido-caproyl-valine-citruline-p-amino-benzyloxy carbonyl (mcVC-PABC). In plasma stability assays, when the ADC (Trastuzumab-mcVC-PABC-Auristatin-0101) was incubated with plasma over a 144-h time-course, a discrepancy was observed between the measured released free payload concentration and the measured loss of drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR), as measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). We found that an enzymatic release of payload from ADC-depleted human plasma at 144 h was able to account for almost 100% of the DAR loss. Intact protein mass analysis showed that at the 144 h time point, the mass of the major protein in ADC-depleted human plasma had an additional 1347 Da over the native albumin extracted from human plasma, exactly matching the mass of the linker-payload. In addition, protein gel electrophoresis showed that there was only one enriched protein in the 144 h ADC-depleted and antipayload immunoprecipitated plasma sample, as compared to the 0 h plasma immunoprecipitated sample, and the mass of this enriched protein was slightly heavier than the mass of serum albumin. Furthermore, the albumin adduct was also identified in 96 h and 168 h postdose in vivo cynomolgus monkey plasma. These results strongly suggest that the majority of the deconjugated mc-VC-PABC-auristatin ultimately is transferred to serum albumin, forming a long-lived albumin-linker-payload adduct. To our knowledge, this is

  11. Relaxation – Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation via a Body Monochord and via Relaxation Music – Is Associated with a Decrease in Tonic Electrodermal Activity and an Increase of the Salivary Cortisol Level in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Hubertus; Fendel, Uta; Buße, Petra; Rose, Matthias; Bösel, Rainer; Klapp, Burghard F.

    2017-01-01

    Vibroacoustic stimulation by a Body Monochord can induce relaxation states of various emotional valence. The skin conductance level (SCL) of the tonic electrodermal activity is an indicator of sympathetic arousal of the autonomic nervous system and thus an indicator of the relaxation response. Salivary cortisol is considered to be a stress indicator of the HPA-axis. The effects of the treatment with a Body Monochord and listening to relaxation music (randomized chronological presentation) on SCL and salivary cortisol in relation to the emotional valence of the experience were examined in patients with psychosomatic disorders (N = 42). Salivary cortisol samples were collected immediately before and after the expositions. Subjective experience was measured via self-rating scales. Overall, both the exposure to the Body Monochord as well as the exposure to the relaxation music induced an improvement of patients’ mood and caused a highly significant reduction of SCL. A more emotionally positive experience of relaxation correlated with a slightly stronger reduction of the SCL. Both treatment conditions caused a slight increase in salivary cortisol, which was significant after exposure to the first treatment. The increase of salivary cortisol during a relaxation state is contrary to previous findings. It is possible that the relaxation state was experienced as an emotional challenge, due to inner images and uncommon sensations that might have occurred. PMID:28114399

  12. Relaxation - Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation via a Body Monochord and via Relaxation Music - Is Associated with a Decrease in Tonic Electrodermal Activity and an Increase of the Salivary Cortisol Level in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Hubertus; Fendel, Uta; Buße, Petra; Rose, Matthias; Bösel, Rainer; Klapp, Burghard F

    2017-01-01

    Vibroacoustic stimulation by a Body Monochord can induce relaxation states of various emotional valence. The skin conductance level (SCL) of the tonic electrodermal activity is an indicator of sympathetic arousal of the autonomic nervous system and thus an indicator of the relaxation response. Salivary cortisol is considered to be a stress indicator of the HPA-axis. The effects of the treatment with a Body Monochord and listening to relaxation music (randomized chronological presentation) on SCL and salivary cortisol in relation to the emotional valence of the experience were examined in patients with psychosomatic disorders (N = 42). Salivary cortisol samples were collected immediately before and after the expositions. Subjective experience was measured via self-rating scales. Overall, both the exposure to the Body Monochord as well as the exposure to the relaxation music induced an improvement of patients' mood and caused a highly significant reduction of SCL. A more emotionally positive experience of relaxation correlated with a slightly stronger reduction of the SCL. Both treatment conditions caused a slight increase in salivary cortisol, which was significant after exposure to the first treatment. The increase of salivary cortisol during a relaxation state is contrary to previous findings. It is possible that the relaxation state was experienced as an emotional challenge, due to inner images and uncommon sensations that might have occurred.

  13. Relaxation - Induced by Vibroacoustic Stimulation via a Body Monochord and via Relaxation Music - Is Associated with a Decrease in Tonic Electrodermal Activity and an Increase of the Salivary Cortisol Level in Patients with Psychosomatic Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hubertus Sandler

    Full Text Available Vibroacoustic stimulation by a Body Monochord can induce relaxation states of various emotional valence. The skin conductance level (SCL of the tonic electrodermal activity is an indicator of sympathetic arousal of the autonomic nervous system and thus an indicator of the relaxation response. Salivary cortisol is considered to be a stress indicator of the HPA-axis. The effects of the treatment with a Body Monochord and listening to relaxation music (randomized chronological presentation on SCL and salivary cortisol in relation to the emotional valence of the experience were examined in patients with psychosomatic disorders (N = 42. Salivary cortisol samples were collected immediately before and after the expositions. Subjective experience was measured via self-rating scales. Overall, both the exposure to the Body Monochord as well as the exposure to the relaxation music induced an improvement of patients' mood and caused a highly significant reduction of SCL. A more emotionally positive experience of relaxation correlated with a slightly stronger reduction of the SCL. Both treatment conditions caused a slight increase in salivary cortisol, which was significant after exposure to the first treatment. The increase of salivary cortisol during a relaxation state is contrary to previous findings. It is possible that the relaxation state was experienced as an emotional challenge, due to inner images and uncommon sensations that might have occurred.

  14. European Experimental Re-Entry Testbed EXPERT: Qualification of Payloads for Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratti, F.; Gavira, J.; Thirkettle, A. C.; Erba, F.; Muylaert, J.-M.; Walpot, L.; Rembiasz, J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The European Experimental Re-entry Test-bed EXPERT is developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of its General Technological Research Program (GSTP). The aim of EXPERT is to improve the understanding of critical aero-thermodynamic phenomena associated with hypersonic re-entry flights. The EXPERT project provides an opportunity to the scientific community and industries throughout Europe to propose and perform experiments in order to obtain aero-thermodynamic data for the validation of numerical models and of ground to flight extrapolation methodologies. During the last years an intense activity has been performed at ESA in order to select the most suitable experiments, bring them to a mature design, manufacture the qualification model and qualify the experiments for flight. ESA staffs coordinated and supported the work of the principal investigators of the experiments from European institutions and industrial organizations in order to maximize the scientific output in compliance with the budget resources made available to the EXPERT project and the programmatic constraints. EXPERT is a re-entry capsule having the shape of a blunted cone. The front part consists of a nose made of ceramic material developed at DLR Stuttgart. No ablative material is implemented so as not to contaminate the specific measurements of Payloads on board. The ceramic nose hosts a set of experiments: the Flush Air Data System (FADS) developed by HTG aiming at collecting free flow data required for post flight analysis, the pyrometer PYREX developed at IRS in Stuttgart collecting data on the temperature and heat flux of the ceramic nose, and the IRS spectrometer RESPECT aiming at resolving the different species generated in the plasma region during re-entry. The sides of the blunted cone are protected by a metallic thermal protection system in which several experiments are located. Two Payloads developed by IRS and VKI are dedicated to the measurement of catalytic effects. One aims

  15. Ultra-light weight undamped tuned dynamic absorber for cryogenically cooled infrared electro-optic payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veprik, Alexander; Babitsky, Vladimir

    2017-04-01

    Attenuation of tonal cryocooler induced vibration in infrared electro-optical payloads may be achieved by using of Tuned Dynamic Absorber (TDA) which is, generally speaking, a passive, weakly damped mass-spring system the resonant frequency of which is precisely matched with the driving frequency. Added TDA results in a favorable modification of the frequency response functions of combined structure. In particular, a favorable antiresonant notch appears at the frequency of tonal excitation along with the adjacent secondary resonance, the width and depth of which along with its closeness to the secondary resonance are strongly dependent on the mass and damping ratios. Using heavier TDA favorably results in wider and deeper antiresonant notch along with increased gap between antiresonant and resonant frequencies. Lowering damping in TDA favorably results in deepening the antiresonant notch. The weight of TDA is usually subjected to tight design constrains. Use of lightweight TDA not only diminishes the attainable performance but also complicates the procedure of frequency matching. Along these lines, even minor frequency deviations may negate the TDA performance and even result in TDA failure in case of resonant build up. The authors are presenting theoretical and practical aspects of designing and constructing ultra-light weight TDA in application to vibration attenuation of electro-optical infrared payload relying on Split Stirling linear cryocooler, the driving frequency of which is fixed and may be accurately tuned and maintained using a digital controller over the entire range of working conditions and lifetime; the lack of mass ratio is compensated by minimizing the damping ratio. In one particular case, in excess of 100-fold vibration attenuation has been achieved by adding as little as 5% to the payload weight.

  16. An Affordable, Low-Risk Approach to Launching Research Spacecraft as Tertiary Payloads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pranajaya, F.M.; Zee, R.E.; Thomsen, Per Lundahl

    2003-01-01

    Rapid and affordable access to space for university researchers and educators has always been a challenge. Despite the availability of lower-cost (e.g. Russian) launch vehicles, launching payloads 20 kg or less typically involves a certain minimum cost that necessitates a cost sharing arrangement...... this challenge, and has successfully led a group of international spacecraft developers in manifesting one 1-kg Canadian spacecraft, two 1-kg Danish spacecraft, and one 3-kg American spacecraft on a 2003 Eurockot launch. This paper outlines the approach taken by UTIAS/SFL in negotiating and securing launches...

  17. The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE): Enabling technology for an early lunar surface payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nein, M. E.; Hilchey, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    The Lunar Ultraviolet Telescope Experiment (LUTE) is a 1-m aperture, fixed declination, optical telescope to be operated on the surface of the Moon. This autonomous science payload will provide an unprecedented ultraviolet stellar survey even before manned lunar missions are resumed. This paper very briefly summarizes the LUTE concept analyzed by the LUTE Task Team of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Scientific capabilities and the Reference Design Concept are identified, and the expected system characteristics are summarized. Technologies which will be required to enable the early development, deployment, and operation of the LUTE are identified, and the principle goals and approaches for their advancement are described.

  18. Design and evaluation of a payload to support plant growth onboard COMET 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehn, A.; Kliss, M. H.; Luttges, M. W.; Robinson, M. C.; Stodieck, L. S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes the design and the operation principles of the Plant Module for Autonomous Space Support (P-MASS), designed to provide life support for a variety of plants, algae, and bacteria in low earth orbit during the maiden flight of COMET-1, scheduled for 1993. During flight (scheduled to continue for 30 days), both color video images and collected environmental data (including light intensity, temperature, relative humidity, CO2 and O2 concentrations, soil moisture, and nutrients released) will be downlinked to earth several times a day. These data will also be stored within the payload and retrieved from it after reentry and recovery.

  19. Biodegradable Oxamide-Phenylene-Based Mesoporous Organosilica Nanoparticles with Unprecedented Drug Payloads for Delivery in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Croissant, Jonas

    2016-06-03

    We describe biodegradable mesoporous hybrid NPs in the presence of proteins, and its application for drug delivery. We synthesized oxamide-phenylene-based mesoporous organosilica nanoparticles (MON) in the absence of silica source which had a remarkably high organic content with a high surface area. Oxamide functions provided biodegradability in the presence of trypsin model proteins. MON displayed exceptionally high payloads of hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs (up to 84 wt%), and a unique zero premature leakage without the pore capping, unlike mesoporous silica. MON were biocompatible and internalized into cancer cells for drug delivery.

  20. From LPF to eLISA: new approach in payload software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesa, Ll.; Martin, V.; Conchillo, A.; Ortega, J. A.; Mateos, I.; Torrents, A.; Lopez-Zaragoza, J. P.; Rivas, F.; Lloro, I.; Nofrarias, M.; Sopuerta, CF.

    2017-05-01

    eLISA will be the first observatory in space to explore the Gravitational Universe. It will gather revolutionary information about the dark universe. This implies a robust and reliable embedded control software and hardware working together. With the lessons learnt with the LISA Pathfinder payload software as baseline, we will introduce in this short article the key concepts and new approaches that our group is working on in terms of software: multiprocessor, self-modifying-code strategies, 100% hardware and software monitoring, embedded scripting, Time and Space Partition among others.