WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibrio fischeri daphnia

  1. Acute and Chronic Toxicity of Soluble Fractions of Industrial Solid Wastes on Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Flohr

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Industrial wastes may produce leachates that can contaminate the aquatic ecosystem. Toxicity testing in acute and chronic levels is essential to assess environmental risks from the soluble fractions of these wastes, since only chemical analysis may not be adequate to classify the hazard of an industrial waste. In this study, ten samples of solid wastes from textile, metal-mechanic, and pulp and paper industries were analyzed by acute and chronic toxicity tests with Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri. A metal-mechanic waste (sample MM3 induced the highest toxicity level to Daphnia magna(CE50,48 h=2.21%. A textile waste induced the highest toxicity level to Vibrio fischeri (sample TX2, CE50,30 min=12.08%. All samples of pulp and paper wastes, and a textile waste (sample TX2 induced chronic effects on reproduction, length, and longevity of Daphnia magna. These results could serve as an alert about the environmental risks of an inadequate waste classification method.

  2. Ecotoxicological evaluation of selected pharmaceuticals to Vibrio fischeri and Daphnia magna before and after photooxidation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Bożena; Jośko, Izabela; Oleszczuk, Patryk

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the research was the determination of the toxicity of photocatalytically treated water contaminated by different pharmaceuticals: chloramphenicol (CPL), diclofenac (DCF) or metoprolol (MT). Daphtoxkit F™ with Dapnia magna and Microtox(®) with Vibrio fischeri were used to evaluate the toxicity of the water before and after treatment. D. magna showed higher sensitivity to the presence of pharmaceuticals than V. fischeri. Generally, both tested organisms revealed the greatest sensitivity to the presence of CPL. The application of photocatalytic oxidation has resulted in decreased toxicity. It may confirm the reduction of high toxic parent compounds to less toxic metabolites. The toxicity was reduced in the range from 30% to 100% depending on pharmaceutical tested. The highest reduction of toxicity to V. fischeri and D. magna was observed to MT and CPL respectively. Depending on bioassay the toxicity decrease as follows: CPL>DCF>MT for D. magna and CPL>MT>DCF for V. fischeri. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative evaluation of acute and chronic toxicities of CuO nanoparticles and bulk using Daphnia magna and Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetto, Ana Letícia de O F; Melegari, Silvia Pedroso; Ouriques, Luciane Cristina; Matias, William Gerson

    2014-08-15

    Copper oxide (CuO) has various applications, as highlighted by the incorporation of this compound as a biocide of antifouling paints for coating ships and offshore oil platforms. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the aquatic toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) and microparticles (MPs) through acute and chronic toxicity tests with the freshwater microcrustacean Daphnia magna and an acute toxicity test with the bioluminescent marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri. Acute toxicity results for D. magna in tests with CuO NPs (EC50, 48 h=22 mg L(-1)) were ten times higher than those for tests with CuO MPs (EC50, 48 h=223.6 mg L(-1)). In both periods of exposure of V. fischeri, the CuO NPs (EC50, 15m 248±56.39 - equivalent to 12.40%; EC50, 30 m 257.6±30.8 mg L(-1) - equivalent to 12.88%) were more toxic than the CuO MPs (EC50, 15m 2404.6±277.4 - equivalent to 60.10%; EC50, 30 m 1472.9±244.7 mg L(-1) - equivalent to 36.82%). In chronic toxicity tests, both forms of CuO showed significant effects (p<0.05) on the growth and reproduction parameters of the D. magna relative to the control. Additionally, morphological changes, such as lack of apical spine development and malformed carapaces in D. magna, were observed for organisms after the chronic test. The toxicity results demonstrate that CuO NPs have a higher level of toxicity than CuO MPs, emphasizing the need for comparative toxicological studies to correctly classify these two forms of CuO with identical CAS registration numbers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Engineering Vibrio fischeri for Inducible Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ondrey, Jakob M; Visick, Karen L

    2014-01-01

    The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri serves as a model organism for a variety of natural phenomena, including symbiotic host colonization. The ease with which the V. fischeri genome can be manipulated contributes greatly to our ability to identify the factors involved in these phenomena. Here, we have adapted genetic tools for use in V. fischeri to promote our ability to conditionally control the expression of genes of interest. Specifically, we modified the commonly used mini-Tn5 transposon to contain an outward-facing, LacI-repressible/IPTG-inducible promoter, and inserted the lacI gene into the V. fischeri chromosome. Used together, these tools permit the identification and induction of genes that control specific phenotypes. To validate this approach, we identified IPTG-controllable motility mutants. We anticipate that the ability to randomly insert an inducible promoter into the genome of V. fischeri will advance our understanding of various aspects of the physiology of this microbe.

  5. Vibrio fischeri metabolism: symbiosis and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Anne K

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri is a bioluminescent, Gram-negative marine bacterium that can be found free living and in a mutualistic association with certain squids and fishes. Over the past decades, the study of V. fischeri has led to important discoveries about bioluminescence, quorum sensing, and the mechanisms that underlie beneficial host-microbe interactions. This chapter highlights what has been learned about metabolic pathways in V. fischeri, and how this information contributes to a broader understanding of the role of bacterial metabolism in host colonization by both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, as well as in the growth and survival of free-living bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [Influence of aflatoxin on Vibrio fischeri luminescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Pan, Li; Wang, Bin

    2011-12-01

    In the present study, we aim to evaluate the inhibitory effect of aflatoxin on Vibrio fischeri luminescence. V. fischeri culture is treated with aflatoxin or the culture broth of aflatoxin-producing strains, and the luminescence intensity of V. fischeri is detected to analyze the influence of aflatoxin on V. fischeri. The logarithmic value of aflatoxin concentration and the decrease ratio of V. fischeri luminescence is in a linear relationship. Based on the regression equation between aflatoxin concentration and luminescence decrease of V. fischeri, the toxin-producing status of different microbes can be detected quickly and exactly: all of six tested Aspergillus flavus strains show toxigenicity to V. fischeri, and their toxin yield reached 14.94 mg/L - 46.45 mg/L (represented by aflatoxin concentration), while the tested Aspergillus oryzae shows no toxigenicity. The above data showed that the luminescence change of V. fischeri could exactly reflect the capability of various microbes to produce toxin (especially aflatoxin), which provided a new clue for rapid detection of aflatoxin in industrial and agricultural production and could be developed as a potential method for aflatoxin assay.

  7. Transformation Experiment Using Bioluminescence Genes of "Vibrio fischeri."

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slock, James

    1995-01-01

    Bioluminescence transformation experiments show students the excitement and power of recombinant DNA technology. This laboratory experiment utilizes two plasmids of "Vibrio fischeri" in a transformation experiment. (LZ)

  8. Arabinose induces pellicle formation by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visick, Karen L; Quirke, Kevin P; McEwen, Sheila M

    2013-03-01

    Biofilms are multicellular communities of bacteria attached to a surface and embedded in a protective matrix. In many cases, the signals that induce biofilm formation are unknown. Here, we report that biofilm formation by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri can be induced by the addition of arabinose to LBS (Luria-Bertani-salt), a tryptone-based medium. Growth of cells in the presence of 0.2% arabinose, but not other sugars, induced the production of a pellicle at the air/liquid interfaces of static cultures. V. fischeri failed to grow on arabinose as the sole carbon source, suggesting that pellicle production did not occur as a result of increased growth, but experiments using the acid/base indicator phenol red suggested that V. fischeri may partially metabolize arabinose. Pellicle production was independent of the syp polysaccharide locus but was altered upon disruption of the bcs cellulose locus. Through a screen for mutants defective for pellicle production, we found that loss of motility disrupted the formation of the arabinose-induced pellicle. Among the ∼20 mutants that retained motility were strains with insertions in a putative msh pilus locus and a strain with a defect in yidK, which is involved in galactose catabolism. Mutants with the msh gene disrupted grew poorly in the presence of arabinose, while the yidK mutant appeared to be "blind" to the presence of arabinose. Finally, arabinose impaired symbiotic colonization by V. fischeri. This work thus identifies a novel signal and new pathways involved in control of biofilm formation by V. fischeri.

  9. Toxicity of individual naphthenic acids to Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, David; Scarlett, Alan G; West, Charles E; Rowland, Steven J

    2011-11-15

    Numerous studies have suggested that the toxicity of organic compounds containing at least one carboxylic acid group and broadly classified as "naphthenic acids", is of environmental concern. For example, the acute toxicity of the more than 1 billion m(3) of oil sands process-affected water and the hormonal activity of some offshore produced waters has been attributed to the acids. However, experimental evidence for the toxicity of the individual acids causing these effects has not been very forthcoming. Instead, most data have been gathered from assays of incompletely characterized extracts of the water, which may contain other toxic constituents. An alternative approach is to assay the individual identified toxicants. Since numerous petroleum-derived naphthenic acids and some in oil sands process water, have recently been identified, we were able to measure the toxicity of some individual acids to the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri. Thirty-five pure individual acids were either synthesized or purchased for this purpose. We also used the US EPA ECOSAR computer model to predict the toxicity of each acid to the water flea, Daphnia magna. Both are well-accepted toxicological screening end points. The results show how toxic some of the naphthenic acids really are (e.g., V. fischeri Effective Concentrations for 50% response (EC(50)) 0.004 to 0.7 mM) and reveal the influence of hydrophobicity and aqueous solubility on the toxicities. Comparison with measured toxicities of other known, but more minor, constituents of oil sands process water, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and alkylphenols, helps place these toxicities into a wider context. Given the reported toxicological effects of naphthenic acids to other organisms (e.g., fish, plants), the toxicities of the acids to further end points should now be determined.

  10. Entry of Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri into the viable but nonculturable state

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah; Ravel, J.; Straube, W.L.; Hill, R.T.; Colwell, R.R.

    Physical responses of marine luminous bacteria, Vibrio harveyi (ATCC 14216) and V. fischeri (UM1373) to nutrient-limited normal strength (35 ppt iso-osmolarity) and low (10 ppt hypo-osmolarity) salinity conditions were determined. Plate counts...

  11. Shedding light on bioluminescence regulation in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Tim; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-06-01

    The bioluminescence emitted by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a particularly striking result of individual microbial cells co-ordinating a group behaviour. The genes responsible for light production are principally regulated by the LuxR-LuxI quorum-sensing system. In addition to LuxR-LuxI, numerous other genetic elements and environmental conditions control bioluminescence production. Efforts to mathematically model the LuxR-LuxI system are providing insight into the dynamics of this autoinduction behaviour. The Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes forms a natural symbiosis with V. fischeri, and utilizes the symbiont-derived bioluminescence for certain nocturnal behaviours, such as counterillumination. Recent work suggests that the tissue with which V. fischeri associates not only can detect bioluminescence but may also use this light to monitor the V. fischeri population. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Vibrio fischeri-derived outer membrane vesicles trigger host development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Wetzel, Keith; Goldman, William; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-04-01

    Outer membrane vesicles (OMV) are critical elements in many host-cell/microbe interactions. Previous studies of the symbiotic association between Euprymna scolopes and Vibrio fischeri had shown that within 12 h of colonizing crypts deep within the squid's light organ, the symbionts trigger an irreversible programme of tissue development in the host. Here, we report that OMV produced by V. fischeri are powerful contributors to this process. The first detectable host response to the OMV is an increased trafficking of macrophage-like cells called haemocytes into surface epithelial tissues. We showed that exposing the squid to other Vibrio species fails to induce this trafficking; however, addition of a high concentration of their OMV, which can diffuse into the crypts, does. We also provide evidence that tracheal cytotoxin released by the symbionts, which can induce haemocyte trafficking, is not part of the OMV cargo, suggesting two distinct mechanisms to induce the same morphogenesis event. By manipulating the timing and localization of OMV signal delivery, we showed that haemocyte trafficking is fully induced only when V. fischeri, the sole species able to reach and grow in the crypts, succeeds in establishing a sustained colonization. Further, our data suggest that the host's detection of OMV serves as a symbiotic checkpoint prior to inducing irreversible morphogenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Predation response of Vibrio fischeri biofilms to bacterivorus protists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Gorman, Clayton; Erken, Martina; Steinberg, Peter D; McDougald, Diane; Nishiguchi, Michele K

    2013-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri proliferates in a sessile, stable community known as a biofilm, which is one alternative survival strategy of its life cycle. Although this survival strategy provides adequate protection from abiotic factors, marine biofilms are still susceptible to grazing by bacteria-consuming protozoa. Subsequently, grazing pressure can be controlled by certain defense mechanisms that confer higher biofilm antipredator fitness. In the present work, we hypothesized that V. fischeri exhibits an antipredator fitness behavior while forming biofilms. Different predators representing commonly found species in aquatic populations were examined, including the flagellates Rhynchomonas nasuta and Neobodo designis (early biofilm feeders) and the ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis (late biofilm grazer). V. fischeri biofilms included isolates from both seawater and squid hosts (Euprymna and Sepiola species). Our results demonstrate inhibition of predation by biofilms, specifically, isolates from seawater. Additionally, antiprotozoan behavior was observed to be higher in late biofilms, particularly toward the ciliate T. pyriformis; however, inhibitory effects were found to be widespread among all isolates tested. These results provide an alternative explanation for the adaptive advantage and persistence of V. fischeri biofilms and provide an important contribution to the understanding of defensive mechanisms that exist in the out-of-host environment.

  14. O-antigen and Core Carbohydrate of Vibrio fischeri Lipopolysaccharide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Deborah M. B.; Yu, Liping; Krasity, Benjamin C.; Choudhury, Biswa; Mandel, Mark J.; Brennan, Caitlin A.; Ruby, Edward G.; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Apicella, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri exists in a symbiotic relationship with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, where the squid provides a home for the bacteria, and the bacteria in turn provide camouflage that helps protect the squid from night-time predators. Like other Gram-negative organisms, V. fischeri expresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on its cell surface. The structure of the O-antigen and the core components of the LPS and their possible role in colonization of the squid have not previously been determined. In these studies, an O-antigen ligase mutant, waaL, was utilized to determine the structures of these LPS components and their roles in colonization of the squid. WaaL ligates the O-antigen to the core of the LPS; thus, LPS from waaL mutants lacks O-antigen. Our results show that the V. fischeri waaL mutant has a motility defect, is significantly delayed in colonization, and is unable to compete with the wild-type strain in co-colonization assays. Comparative analyses of the LPS from the wild-type and waaL strains showed that the V. fischeri LPS has a single O-antigen repeat composed of yersiniose, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, and N-acetylfucosamine. In addition, the LPS from the waaL strain showed that the core structure consists of l-glycero-d-manno-heptose, d-glycero-d-manno-heptose, glucose, 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, phosphate, and phosphoethanolamine. These studies indicate that the unusual V. fischeri O-antigen sugars play a role in the early phases of bacterial colonization of the squid. PMID:22247546

  15. Vibrio fischeri flavohaemoglobin protects against nitric oxide during initiation of the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanling; Dunn, Anne K; Wilneff, Jacqueline; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Spiro, Stephen; Ruby, Edward G

    2010-11-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is implicated in a wide range of biological processes, including innate immunity against pathogens, signal transduction and protection against oxidative stress. However, its possible roles in beneficial host-microbe associations are less well recognized. During the early stages of the squid-vibrio symbiosis, the bacterial symbiont Vibrio fischeri encounters host-derived NO, which has been hypothesized to serve as a specificity determinant. We demonstrate here that the flavohaemoglobin, Hmp, of V. fischeri protects against NO, both in culture and during colonization of the squid host. Transcriptional analyses indicate that hmp expression is highly responsive to NO, principally through the repressor, NsrR. Hmp protects V. fischeri from NO inhibition of aerobic respiration, and removes NO under both oxic and anoxic conditions. A Δhmp mutant of V. fischeri initiates squid colonization less effectively than wild type, but is rescued by the presence of an NO synthase inhibitor. The hmp promoter is activated during the initial stage of colonization, during which the Δhmp strain fails to form normal-sized aggregates of colonizing cells. Taken together, these results suggest that the sensing of host-derived NO by NsrR, and the subsequent removal of NO by Hmp, influence aggregate size and, thereby, V. fischeri colonization efficiency. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Role for cheR of Vibrio fischeri in the Vibrio-squid symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; Visick, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Upon hatching, the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes is rapidly colonized by its symbiotic partner, the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri . Vibrio fischeri cells present in the seawater enter the light organ of juvenile squid in a process that requires bacterial motility. In this study, we investigated the role chemotaxis may play in establishing this symbiotic colonization. Previously, we reported that V. fischeri migrates toward numerous attractants, including N-acetylneuraminic acid (NANA), a component of squid mucus. However, whether or not migration toward an attractant such as squid-derived NANA helps the bacterium to localize toward the light organ is unknown. When tested for the ability to colonize juvenile squid, a V. fischeri chemotaxis mutant defective for the methyltransferase CheR was outcompeted by the wild-type strain in co-inoculation experiments, even when the mutant was present in fourfold excess. Our results suggest that the ability to perform chemotaxis is an advantage during colonization, but not essential.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of Vibrio fischeri: A Symbiotic Bacterium with Pathogenic Congeners

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    E. G. Ruby; M. Urbanowski; J. Campbell; A. Dunn; M. Faini; R. Gunsalus; P. Lostroh; C. Lupp; J. McCann; D. Millikan; A. Schaefer; E. Stabb; A. Stevens; K. Visick; C. Whistler; E. P. Greenberg

    2005-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri belongs to the Vibrionaceae, a large family of marine γ-proteobacteria that includes several dozen species known to engage in a diversity of beneficial or pathogenic interactions with animal tissue...

  18. Global discovery of colonization determinants in the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    John F. Brooks; Mattias C. Gyllborg; David C. Cronin; Sarah J. Quillin; Celeste A. Mallama; Randi Foxall; Cheryl Whistler; Andrew L. Goodman; Mark J. Mandel

    2014-01-01

    .... To understand the molecular determinants of microbiota selection, we examined colonization of a simplified model in which the light organ of Euprymna scolopes squid is colonized exclusively by Vibrio fischeri bacteria...

  19. The light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri possesses a homolog of the Vibrio cholerae transmembrane transcriptional activator ToxR.

    OpenAIRE

    Reich, K A; Schoolnik, G K

    1994-01-01

    A cross-hybridizing DNA fragment to Vibrio cholerae toxR was cloned from the nonpathogenic light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri, and three proteins homologous to V. cholerae ToxR, ToxS, and HtpG were deduced from its DNA sequence. V. fischeri ToxR was found to activate a V. cholerae ToxR-regulated promoter, and an antiserum raised against the amino-terminal domain of V. cholerae ToxR cross-reacts V. fischeri ToxR.

  20. Vibrio fischeri σ54 Controls Motility, Biofilm Formation, Luminescence, and Colonization

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfe, Alan J.; Millikan, Deborah S.; Campbell, Joy M.; Visick, Karen L.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we demonstrated that the putative Vibrio fischeri rpoN gene, which encodes σ54, controls flagellar biogenesis, biofilm development, and bioluminescence. We also show that rpoN plays a requisite role initiating the symbiotic association of V. fischeri with juveniles of the squid Euprymna scolopes.

  1. Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy in aquaculture: photoinactivation studies of Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Alves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Photodynamic antimicrobial chemotherapy (PACT combines light, a light-absorbing molecule that initiates a photochemical or photophysical reaction, and oxygen. The combined action of these three components originates reactive oxygen species that lead to microorganisms' destruction. The aim was to evaluate the efficiency of PACT on Vibrio fischeri: 1 with buffer solution, varying temperature, pH, salinity and oxygen concentration values; 2 with aquaculture water, to reproduce photoinactivation (PI conditions in situ. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To monitor the PI kinetics, the bioluminescence of V. fischeri was measured during the experiments. A tricationic meso-substituted porphyrin (Tri-Py(+-Me-PF was used as photosensitizer (5 µM in the studies with buffer solution and 10-50 µM in the studies with aquaculture water; artificial white light (4 mW cm(-2 and solar irradiation (40 mW cm(-2 were used as light sources; and the bacterial concentration used for all experiments was ≈10(7 CFU mL(-1 (corresponding to a bioluminescence level of 10(5 relative light units--RLU. The variations in pH (6.5-8.5, temperature (10-25°C, salinity (20-40 g L(-1 and oxygen concentration did not significantly affect the PI of V. fischeri, once in all tested conditions the bioluminescent signal decreased to the detection limit of the method (≈7 log reduction. The assays using aquaculture water showed that the efficiency of the process is affected by the suspended matter. Total PI of V. fischeri in aquaculture water was achieved under solar light in the presence of 20 µM of Tri-Py(+-Me-PF. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: If PACT is to be used in environmental applications, the matrix containing target microbial communities should be previously characterized in order to establish an efficient protocol having into account the photosensitizer concentration, the light source and the total light dose delivered. The possibility of using solar light in PACT to

  2. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri: Control of Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-11-04

    RR04106 411d019 11 TITLE (Include Security Classification) U. Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-Related Gene Expression...communication - - 19 ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse if necessary and identify by block number) The lux genes of Vibrio fischeri encode the ability of this...Regulation of lux Genes in Vibrio fischeri : Control of a Symbiosis-related Gene Expression System in a Marine Bacterium START DATE: 15 August 1988

  3. Reclassification of Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio logei, Vibrio salmonicida and Vibrio wodanis as Aliivibrio fischeri gen. nov., comb. nov., Aliivibrio logei comb. nov., Aliivibrio salmonicida comb. nov. and Aliivibrio wodanis comb. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanczyk, Henryk; Ast, Jennifer C; Higgins, Melissa J; Carson, Jeremy; Dunlap, Paul V

    2007-12-01

    Four closely related species, Vibrio fischeri, Vibrio logei, Vibrio salmonicida and Vibrio wodanis, form a clade within the family Vibrionaceae; the taxonomic status and phylogenetic position of this clade have remained ambiguous for many years. To resolve this ambiguity, we tested these species against other species of the Vibrionaceae for phylogenetic and phenotypic differences. Sequence identities for the 16S rRNA gene were > or =97.4 % among members of the V. fischeri group, but were Vibrio, with which they overlap in G+C content, and Enterovibrio, Grimontia and Salinivibrio, with which they do not overlap in G+C content). Combined analysis of the recA, rpoA, pyrH, gyrB and 16S rRNA gene sequences revealed that the species of the V. fischeri group form a tightly clustered clade, distinct from these other genera. Furthermore, phenotypic traits differentiated the V. fischeri group from other genera of the Vibrionaceae, and a panel of 13 biochemical tests discriminated members of the V. fischeri group from type strains of Photobacterium and Vibrio. These results indicate that the four species of the V. fischeri group represent a lineage within the Vibrionaceae that is distinct from other genera. We therefore propose their reclassification in a new genus, Aliivibrio gen. nov. Aliivibrio is composed of four species: Aliivibrio fischeri comb. nov. (the type species) (type strain ATCC 7744(T) =CAIM 329(T) =CCUG 13450(T) =CIP 103206(T) =DSM 507(T) =LMG 4414(T) =NCIMB 1281(T)), Aliivibrio logei comb. nov. (type strain ATCC 29985(T) =CCUG 20283(T) =CIP 104991(T) =NCIMB 2252(T)), Aliivibrio salmonicida comb. nov. (type strain ATCC 43839(T) =CIP 103166(T) =LMG 14010(T) =NCIMB 2262(T)) and Aliivibrio wodanis comb. nov. (type strain ATCC BAA-104(T) =NCIMB 13582(T) =LMG 24053(T)).

  4. Coordination of the arc regulatory system and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux operon

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Septer, Alecia N; Stabb, Eric V

    2012-01-01

    .... We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium...

  5. Cellulose effects on morphology and elasticity of Vibrio fischeri biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Christopher; Shabtai, Yael; Piatkovsky, Maria; Herzberg, Moshe

    2016-01-01

    Cellulose effects on Vibrio fischeri biofilm morphology were tested for the wild-type and two of its isogenic mutants that either exhibit increased cellulose production or do not produce cellulose at all. Confocal laser scanning microscopy imaging of each biofilm revealed that total sessile volume increases with cellulose expression, but the size of colonies formed with cellulose was smaller, creating a more diffuse biofilm. These morphological differences were not attributed to variations in bacterial deposition, extracellular polymeric substances affinity to the surface or bacterial growth. A positive correlation was found between cellulose expression, Young's (elastic) modulus of the biofilm analyzed with atomic force microscope and shear modulus of the related extracellular polymeric substances layers analyzed with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. Cellulose production also correlated positively with concentrations of extracellular DNA. A significant negative correlation was observed between cellulose expression and rates of diffusion through the extracellular polymeric substances. The difference observed in biofilm morphology is suggested as a combined result of cellulose and likely extracellular DNA (i) increasing biofilm Young's modulus, making shear removal more difficult, and (ii) decreased diffusion rate of nutrients and wastes into and out of the biofilm, which effectively limits colony size.

  6. Directed evolution of Vibrio fischeri LuxR signal sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Yuki; Tashiro, Yohei; Saito, Kyoichi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Umeno, Daisuke

    2016-11-01

    LuxR is the core component of Vibrio fischeri quorum sensing. It acts as the transcriptional activator by binding to its cognate signaling molecules 3-oxo-hexanoyl-homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL). Although several acyl-HSLs with 3-oxo groups are known to activate LuxR with similar efficiency, acyl-HSLs without 3-oxo groups are very weak inducers. We conducted a round of LuxR directed evolution to acquire LuxR mutants with higher signal sensitivity to octanoyl-homoserine lactone (C8HSL). All of the isolated mutants showed increased signal sensitivity to many other acyl-HSLs, including C8HSL, and some to the LuxR antagonist p-coumaroyl-HSL. The evolution of their ligand sensitivity proceeded through the stabilization of the signal-bound state, thereby elevating the effective concentration of LuxR at the ON-state. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of organics and heavy metals acute toxicities to Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Xuepeng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence inhibition has been widely used to test acute toxicities of metals and organics contaminants. However, the differences of metals and organics acute toxicities to V. fischeri have not been compared. Here, four heavy metals (Zn2+, Cu2+, Cd2+, Cr6+ and five organics (phenol, benzoic acid, p-hydroxy benzoic acid, nitro-benzene and benzene acute toxicities to V. fischeri were investigated. Heavy metals toxicities to V. fischeri were increased along with the reaction time, while the organics toxicities kept the same level in different reaction times. In order to explain the difference, the relative cell death rate of V. fischeri was detected. In metals toxicities tests, the bioluminescence inhibition rate of V. fischeri was found to be significantly higher than the relative cell death rate (P<0.05, while for the organics toxicities tests, the cell death rate was similar to the bioluminescence inhibition rate. These results indicated that organics acute toxicities to V. fischeri could reflect the death of cell, but metals acute toxicities to V. fischeri may not lead to the death of cell, just represent the bioluminescence inhibition.

  8. Chemoreceptor VfcA mediates amino acid chemotaxis in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin A; DeLoney-Marino, Cindy R; Mandel, Mark J

    2013-03-01

    Flagellar motility and chemotaxis by Vibrio fischeri are important behaviors mediating the colonization of its mutualistic host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid. However, none of the 43 putative methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) encoded in the V. fischeri genome has been previously characterized. Using both an available transposon mutant collection and directed mutagenesis, we isolated mutants for 19 of these genes, and screened them for altered chemotaxis to six previously identified chemoattractants. Only one mutant was defective in responding to any of the tested compounds; the disrupted gene was thus named vfcA (Vibrio fischeri chemoreceptor A; locus tag VF_0777). In soft-agar plates, mutants disrupted in vfcA did not exhibit the serine-sensing chemotactic ring, and the pattern of migration in the mutant was not affected by the addition of exogenous serine. Using a capillary chemotaxis assay, we showed that, unlike wild-type V. fischeri, the vfcA mutant did not undergo chemotaxis toward serine and that expression of vfcA on a plasmid in the mutant was sufficient to restore the behavior. In addition to serine, we demonstrated that alanine, cysteine, and threonine are strong attractants for wild-type V. fischeri and that the attraction is also mediated by VfcA. This study thus provides the first insights into how V. fischeri integrates information from one of its 43 MCPs to respond to environmental stimuli.

  9. The Effect of Magnetic Fields on the Quorum Sensing-Regulated Luminescence of Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Addie; Hagen, Steve; Son, Minjun

    2015-03-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a mechanism by which bacteria communicate through the secretion and detection of extracellular signaling molecules known as autoinducers. This research focuses on the quorum sensing regulated bioluminescence of Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium that lives in symbiosis with certain fish and squid species. Previous studies of V. harveyi, a close relative of V. fisheri, indicate that a strong magnetic field has a positive effect on V.harveyi bioluminescence. However the effect of magnetic fields on quorum sensing-regulated luminescence is in general poorly understood. We grew V. fischeri in solid and liquid growth media, subject to strong static magnetic fields, and imaged the bioluminescence over a period of forty-eight hours. Luminescence patterns were analyzed in both the spatial and time dimensions. We find no indication that a magnetic field influences Vibrio fischeri luminescence either positively or negatively. This research was funded by the Grant Number NSF DMR-1156737.

  10. Measurement and analysis of Vibrio fischeri cell-based microfluidic device for personal health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xinyan; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    The cell-based microfluidic chip was designed and fabricated as a low-cost detector to continuously monitor toxicants in drinking water or human urine samples, which is expected to be an important component of a household health monitoring system in the future. The bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio Fischeri, was selected to validate the function of device. Water samples and Vibrio fischeri cells were mixed and encapsulated into droplets in air flow, which can guarantee sufficient oxygen supply for cells in droplets. Preliminary tests were performed using copper ion (Cu(2+)) as the model toxicant. The droplet system was measured and analyzed at various flow rates in different observation chambers. Both deionized water and human urine samples were tested in the cell-based device. Interestingly, a strong relation between the R.L.U. (Relative Luminescence Units) in the observation chamber and the minute concentration of toxicant (Cu(2+)) was found using deionized water as solvent, whereas the relation was insignificant using human urine as solvent. This study showed the Vibrio fischeri cell-based device might be reliably employed as an early-warning system for the safety of drinking water. However, Vibrio fischeri is not competent to detect dangerous materials in a complex biofluid. With the replacement of cell sensors, the microfluidic device might be functional to analyze urine samples in theory.

  11. Natural transformation of Vibrio fischeri requires tfoX and tfoY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollack-Berti, Amber; Wollenberg, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY Recent evidence has indicated that natural genetic transformation occurs in Vibrio cholerae, and that it requires both induction by chitin oligosaccharides, like chitohexaose, and expression of a putative regulatory gene designated tfoX. Using sequence and phylogenetic analyses we have found two tfoX paralogues in all sequenced genomes of the genus Vibrio. Like V. cholerae, when grown in chitohexaose, cells of V. fischeri are able to take up and incorporate exogenous DNA. Chitohexaose-independent transformation by V. fischeri was observed when tfoX was present in multi-copy. The second tfoX paralogue, designated tfoY, is also required for efficient transformation in V. fischeri, but is not functionally identical to tfoX. Natural transformation of V. fischeri facilitates rapid transfer of mutations across strains, and provides a highly useful tool for experimental genetic manipulation in this species. The presence of chitin-induced competence in several vibrios highlights the potential for a conserved mechanism of genetic exchange across this family of environmentally important marine bacteria. PMID:21966921

  12. Gimme shelter: how Vibrio fischeri successfully navigates an animal’s multiple environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsworthy, Allison N.; Visick, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria successfully colonize distinct niches because they can sense and appropriately respond to a variety of environmental signals. Of particular interest is how a bacterium negotiates the multiple, complex environments posed during successful infection of an animal host. One tractable model system to study how a bacterium manages a host’s multiple environments is the symbiotic relationship between the marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, and its squid host, Euprymna scolopes. V. fischeri encounters many different host surroundings ranging from initial contact with the squid to ultimate colonization of a specialized organ known as the light organ. For example, upon recognition of the squid, V. fischeri forms a biofilm aggregate outside the light organ that is required for efficient colonization. The bacteria then disperse from this biofilm to enter the organ, where they are exposed to nitric oxide, a molecule that can act as both a signal and an antimicrobial. After successfully managing this potentially hostile environment, V. fischeri cells finally establish their niche in the deep crypts of the light organ where the bacteria bioluminesce in a pheromone-dependent fashion, a phenotype that E. scolopes utilizes for anti-predation purposes. The mechanism by which V. fischeri manages these environments to outcompete all other bacterial species for colonization of E. scolopes is an important and intriguing question that will permit valuable insights into how a bacterium successfully associates with a host. This review focuses on specific molecular pathways that allow V. fischeri to establish this exquisite bacteria–host interaction. PMID:24348467

  13. Gimme shelter: how Vibrio fischeri successfully navigates an animal's multiple environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norsworthy, Allison N; Visick, Karen L

    2013-01-01

    Bacteria successfully colonize distinct niches because they can sense and appropriately respond to a variety of environmental signals. Of particular interest is how a bacterium negotiates the multiple, complex environments posed during successful infection of an animal host. One tractable model system to study how a bacterium manages a host's multiple environments is the symbiotic relationship between the marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, and its squid host, Euprymna scolopes. V. fischeri encounters many different host surroundings ranging from initial contact with the squid to ultimate colonization of a specialized organ known as the light organ. For example, upon recognition of the squid, V. fischeri forms a biofilm aggregate outside the light organ that is required for efficient colonization. The bacteria then disperse from this biofilm to enter the organ, where they are exposed to nitric oxide, a molecule that can act as both a signal and an antimicrobial. After successfully managing this potentially hostile environment, V. fischeri cells finally establish their niche in the deep crypts of the light organ where the bacteria bioluminesce in a pheromone-dependent fashion, a phenotype that E. scolopes utilizes for anti-predation purposes. The mechanism by which V. fischeri manages these environments to outcompete all other bacterial species for colonization of E. scolopes is an important and intriguing question that will permit valuable insights into how a bacterium successfully associates with a host. This review focuses on specific molecular pathways that allow V. fischeri to establish this exquisite bacteria-host interaction.

  14. Gimme shelter: how Vibrio fischeri successfully navigates an animal’s multiple environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison N Norsworthy

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria successfully colonize distinct niches because they can sense and appropriately respond to a variety of environmental signals. Of particular interest is how a bacterium negotiates the multiple, complex environments posed during successful infection of an animal host. One tractable model system to study how a bacterium manages a host’s multiple environments is the symbiotic relationship between the marine bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, and its squid host, Euprymna scolopes. V. fischeri encounters many different host surroundings ranging from initial contact with the squid to ultimate colonization of a specialized organ known as the light organ. For example, upon recognition of the squid, V. fischeri forms a biofilm aggregate outside the light organ that is required for efficient colonization. The bacteria then disperse from this biofilm to enter the organ, where they are exposed to nitric oxide, a molecule that can act as both a signal and an antimicrobial. After successfully managing this potentially hostile environment, V. fischeri finally establish their niche in the deep crypts of the light organ where the bacteria bioluminesce in a pheromone-dependent fashion, a phenotype that E. scolopes utilizes for anti-predation purposes. The mechanism by which V. fischeri manages these environments to outcompete all other bacterial species for colonization of E. scolopes is an important and intriguing question that will permit valuable insights into how a bacterium successfully associates with a host. This review focuses on specific molecular pathways that allow V. fischeri to establish this exquisite bacteria-host interaction.

  15. Vibrio fischeri exhibit the growth advantage in stationary-phase phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrun, Branden; Lostroh, C Phoebe

    2013-02-01

    Vibrio fischeri are bioluminescent marine bacteria that can be isolated from their symbiotic animal partners or from ocean water. A V. fischeri population increases exponentially inside the light organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid (Euprymna scolopes) while the host is quiescent during the day. This bacterial light organ population reaches stationary phase and then remains high during the night, when the squid use bacterial bioluminescence as a counter-predation strategy. At dawn, host squid release 90%-95% of the light organ contents into the ocean water prior to burying in the sand for the day. As the squid sleeps, the cycle of bacterial population growth in the light organ begins again. These V. fischeri cells that are vented into the ocean must persist under typical marine low nutrient conditions until they encounter another opportunity to colonize a host. We hypothesized that because V. fischeri regularly encounter cycles of feast and famine in nature, they would exhibit the growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype. We found that older V. fischeri cells exhibit a Class 2 GASP response in which old cells increase dramatically in frequency while the population of young V. fischeri cells remains almost constant during co-incubation.

  16. Colonization of Euprymna scolopes squid by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Lynn M; Mandel, Mark J

    2012-03-01

    Specific bacteria are found in association with animal tissue. Such host-bacterial associations (symbioses) can be detrimental (pathogenic), have no fitness consequence (commensal), or be beneficial (mutualistic). While much attention has been given to pathogenic interactions, little is known about the processes that dictate the reproducible acquisition of beneficial/commensal bacteria from the environment. The light-organ mutualism between the marine Gram-negative bacterium V. fischeri and the Hawaiian bobtail squid, E. scolopes, represents a highly specific interaction in which one host (E. scolopes) establishes a symbiotic relationship with only one bacterial species (V. fischeri) throughout the course of its lifetime. Bioluminescence produced by V. fischeri during this interaction provides an anti-predatory benefit to E. scolopes during nocturnal activities, while the nutrient-rich host tissue provides V. fischeri with a protected niche. During each host generation, this relationship is recapitulated, thus representing a predictable process that can be assessed in detail at various stages of symbiotic development. In the laboratory, the juvenile squid hatch aposymbiotically (uncolonized), and, if collected within the first 30-60 minutes and transferred to symbiont-free water, cannot be colonized except by the experimental inoculum. This interaction thus provides a useful model system in which to assess the individual steps that lead to specific acquisition of a symbiotic microbe from the environment. Here we describe a method to assess the degree of colonization that occurs when newly hatched aposymbiotic E. scolopes are exposed to (artificial) seawater containing V. fischeri. This simple assay describes inoculation, natural infection, and recovery of the bacterial symbiont from the nascent light organ of E. scolopes. Care is taken to provide a consistent environment for the animals during symbiotic development, especially with regard to water quality and light

  17. Ecological diversification of Vibrio fischeri serially passaged for 500 generations in novel squid host Euprymna tasmanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, William; Rivera, Ferdinand M; Nishiguchi, Michele K

    2014-04-01

    Vibrio fischeri isolated from Euprymna scolopes (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) was used to create 24 lines that were serially passaged through the non-native host Euprymna tasmanica for 500 generations. These derived lines were characterized for biofilm formation, swarming motility, carbon source utilization, and in vitro bioluminescence. Phenotypic assays were compared between "ES" (E. scolopes) and "ET" (E. tasmanica) V. fischeri wild isolates to determine if convergent evolution was apparent between E. tasmanica evolved lines and ET V. fischeri. Ecological diversification was observed in utilization of most carbon sources examined. Convergent evolution was evident in motility, biofilm formation, and select carbon sources displaying hyperpolymorphic usage in V. fischeri. Convergence in bioluminescence (a 2.5-fold increase in brightness) was collectively evident in the derived lines relative to the ancestor. However, dramatic changes in other properties--time points and cell densities of first light emission and maximal light output and emergence of a lag phase in growth curves of derived lines--suggest that increased light intensity per se was not the only important factor. Convergent evolution implies that gnotobiotic squid light organs subject colonizing V. fischeri to similar selection pressures. Adaptation to novel hosts appears to involve flexible microbial metabolism, establishment of biofilm and swarmer V. fischeri ecotypes, and complex changes in bioluminescence. Our data demonstrate that numerous alternate fitness optima or peaks are available to V. fischeri in host adaptive landscapes, where novel host squids serve as habitat islands. Thus, V. fischeri founder flushes occur during the initiation of light organ colonization that ultimately trigger founder effect diversification.

  18. Ecological Diversification of Vibrio fischeri Serially Passaged for 500 Generations in Novel Squid Host Euprymna tasmanica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto, William; Rivera, Ferdinand M.; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri isolated from Euprymna scolopes (Cephalopoda: Sepiolidae) was used to create twenty-four lines that were serially passaged through the non-native host E. tasmanica for 500 generations. These derived lines were characterized for biofilm formation, swarming motility, carbon source utilization, and in vitro bioluminescence. Phenotypic assays were compared between “ES” (E. scolopes) and “ET” (E. tasmanica) V. fischeri wild isolates to determine if convergent evolution was apparent between E. tasmanica evolved lines and ET V. fischeri. Ecological diversification was observed in utilization of most carbon sources examined. Convergent evolution was evident in motility, biofilm formation, and select carbon sources displaying hyperpolymorphic usage in V. fischeri. Convergence in bioluminescence (a 2.5-fold increase in brightness) was collectively evident in the derived lines relative to the ancestor. However, dramatic changes in other properties—time points and cell densities of first light emission and maximal light output and emergence of a lag phase in growth curves of derived lines suggest increased light intensity per se was not the only important factor. Convergent evolution implies gnotobiotic squid light organs subject colonizing V. fischeri to similar selection pressures. Adaptation to novel hosts appears to involve flexible microbial metabolism, establishment of biofilm and swarmer V. fischeri ecotypes, and complex changes in bioluminescence. Our data demonstrate numerous alternate fitness optima or peaks are available to V. fischeri in host adaptive landscapes, where novel host squids serve as habitat islands. Thus, V. fischeri founder flushes occur during the initiation of light organ colonization that ultimately trigger founder effect diversification. PMID:24402368

  19. The Role of Light Organ Symbiosis in the Distribution and Diversity of the Marine Luminous Bacterium Vibrio Fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    of the marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri NOOO14-91-J-1670 Li L AUTHOR(S) Edward G. Ruby Di t .b-.ti&-- ś. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...2. Lee, K.-H., and E.G. Ruby (1992) Detection of the light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri in Hawaiian seawater using luj gene probes. Appl. Environ...the presence of a significant population of typically ’- m culturable V. fischeri cells in seawater that have entered a non-culturable state from which

  20. Colonization of Euprymna scolopes Squid by Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Lynn M.; Mandel, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    Specific bacteria are found in association with animal tissue1-5. Such host-bacterial associations (symbioses) can be detrimental (pathogenic), have no fitness consequence (commensal), or be beneficial (mutualistic). While much attention has been given to pathogenic interactions, little is known about the processes that dictate the reproducible acquisition of beneficial/commensal bacteria from the environment. The light-organ mutualism between the marine Gram-negative bacterium V. fischeri and the Hawaiian bobtail squid, E. scolopes, represents a highly specific interaction in which one host (E. scolopes) establishes a symbiotic relationship with only one bacterial species (V. fischeri) throughout the course of its lifetime6,7. Bioluminescence produced by V. fischeri during this interaction provides an anti-predatory benefit to E. scolopes during nocturnal activities8,9, while the nutrient-rich host tissue provides V. fischeri with a protected niche10. During each host generation, this relationship is recapitulated, thus representing a predictable process that can be assessed in detail at various stages of symbiotic development. In the laboratory, the juvenile squid hatch aposymbiotically (uncolonized), and, if collected within the first 30-60 minutes and transferred to symbiont-free water, cannot be colonized except by the experimental inoculum6. This interaction thus provides a useful model system in which to assess the individual steps that lead to specific acquisition of a symbiotic microbe from the environment11,12. Here we describe a method to assess the degree of colonization that occurs when newly hatched aposymbiotic E. scolopes are exposed to (artificial) seawater containing V. fischeri. This simple assay describes inoculation, natural infection, and recovery of the bacterial symbiont from the nascent light organ of E. scolopes. Care is taken to provide a consistent environment for the animals during symbiotic development, especially with regard to water

  1. Squid-derived chitin oligosaccharides are a chemotactic signal during colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, Mark J; Schaefer, Amy L; Brennan, Caitlin A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Deloney-Marino, Cindy R; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-07-01

    Chitin, a polymer of N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), is noted as the second most abundant biopolymer in nature. Chitin serves many functions for marine bacteria in the family Vibrionaceae ("vibrios"), in some instances providing a physical attachment site, inducing natural genetic competence, and serving as an attractant for chemotaxis. The marine luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the specific symbiont in the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The bacterium provides the squid with luminescence that the animal uses in an antipredatory defense, while the squid supports the symbiont's nutritional requirements. V. fischeri cells are harvested from seawater during each host generation, and V. fischeri is the only species that can complete this process in nature. Furthermore, chitin is located in squid hemocytes and plays a nutritional role in the symbiosis. We demonstrate here that chitin oligosaccharides produced by the squid host serve as a chemotactic signal for colonizing bacteria. V. fischeri uses the gradient of host chitin to enter the squid light organ duct and colonize the animal. We provide evidence that chitin serves a novel function in an animal-bacterial mutualism, as an animal-produced bacterium-attracting synomone.

  2. Assessing single and joint toxicity of three phenylurea herbicides using Lemna minor and Vibrio fischeri bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatidou, Georgia; Stasinakis, Athanasios S; Iatrou, Evangelia I

    2015-01-01

    Single and joint toxicity of three substituted urea herbicides, namely monolinuron [3-(4-chlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea], linuron [3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1-methoxy-1-methylurea] and diuron [1-(3,4 dichlorophenyl)-3,3 dimethyl urea], were studied. The duckweed Lemna minor and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri were used for the toxicity assessment and they were exposed to various concentrations of the herbicides, individually and in binary mixtures. The exposure time was 7d for the duckweed and 30 min for the bacterium. Estimation of EC50 values was performed by frond counting and reduction in light output for Lemna minor and Vibrio fischeri, respectively. Lemna minor was found to be much more sensitive than Vibrio fischeri to target compounds. The toxicity of the three herbicides applied solely was estimated to be in decreasing order: diuron (EC50=28.3 μg L(-1))≈linuron (EC50=30.5 μg L(-1))>monolinuron (EC50=300 μg L(-1)) for the duckweed and linuron (EC50=8.2 mg L(-1))>diuron (EC50=9.2 mg L(-1))>monolinuron (EC50=11.2 mg L(-1)) for the bacterium. Based on the environmental concentrations reported in the literature and EC50 values obtained from Lemna minor experiments, Risk Quotients (RQ) much higher than 1 were calculated for diuron and linuron. In Lemna minor experiments, combination of target compounds resulted to additive effects due to their same mode of phenylurea action on photosynthetic organisms. Regarding Vibrio fischeri, synergistic, additive and antagonistic effects were observed, which varied according to the concentrations of target compounds. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Coordination of the Arc Regulatory System and Pheromone-Mediated Positive Feedback in Controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux Operon: e49590

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alecia N Septer; Eric V Stabb

    2012-01-01

    .... We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium...

  4. Polyphyly of non-bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri sharing a lux-locus deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, M S; Preheim, S P; Polz, M F; Ruby, E G

    2012-03-01

    This study reports the first description and molecular characterization of naturally occurring, non-bioluminescent strains of Vibrio fischeri. These 'dark' V. fischeri strains remained non-bioluminescent even after treatment with both autoinducer and aldehyde, substrate additions that typically maximize light production in dim strains of luminous bacteria. Surprisingly, the entire lux locus (eight genes) was absent in over 97% of these dark V. fischeri strains. Although these strains were all collected from a Massachusetts (USA) estuary in 2007, phylogenetic reconstructions allowed us to reject the hypothesis that these newly described non-bioluminescent strains exhibit monophyly within the V. fischeri clade. These dark strains exhibited a competitive disadvantage against native bioluminescent strains when colonizing the light organ of the model V. fischeri host, the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes. Significantly, we believe that the data collected in this study may suggest the first observation of a functional, parallel locus-deletion event among independent lineages of a non-pathogenic bacterial species. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Genome-Wide Biases in the Rate and Molecular Spectrum of Spontaneous Mutations in Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Marcus M; Sung, Way; Sebra, Robert; Lynch, Michael; Cooper, Vaughn S

    2017-01-01

    The vast diversity in nucleotide composition and architecture among bacterial genomes may be partly explained by inherent biases in the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutations. Bacterial genomes with multiple chromosomes are relatively unusual but some are relevant to human health, none more so than the causative agent of cholera, Vibrio cholerae Here, we present the genome-wide mutation spectra in wild-type and mismatch repair (MMR) defective backgrounds of two Vibrio species, the low-%GC squid symbiont V. fischeri and the pathogen V. cholerae, collected under conditions that greatly minimize the efficiency of natural selection. In apparent contrast to their high diversity in nature, both wild-type V. fischeri and V. cholerae have among the lowest rates for base-substitution mutations (bpsms) and insertion-deletion mutations (indels) that have been measured, below 10(-)(3)/genome/generation. Vibrio fischeri and V. cholerae have distinct mutation spectra, but both are AT-biased and produce a surprising number of multi-nucleotide indels. Furthermore, the loss of a functional MMR system caused the mutation spectra of these species to converge, implying that the MMR system itself contributes to species-specific mutation patterns. Bpsm and indel rates varied among genome regions, but do not explain the more rapid evolutionary rates of genes on chromosome 2, which likely result from weaker purifying selection. More generally, the very low mutation rates of Vibrio species correlate inversely with their immense population sizes and suggest that selection may not only have maximized replication fidelity but also optimized other polygenic traits relative to the constraints of genetic drift. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  6. Dominance of Vibrio fischeri in secreted mucus outside the light organ of Euprymna scolopes: the first site of symbiont specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Spencer V; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2003-07-01

    Previous studies of the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri symbiosis have demonstrated that, during colonization, the hatchling host secretes mucus in which gram-negative environmental bacteria amass in dense aggregations outside the sites of infection. In this study, experiments with green fluorescent protein-labeled symbiotic and nonsymbiotic species of gram-negative bacteria were used to characterize the behavior of cells in the aggregates. When hatchling animals were exposed to 10(3) to 10(6) V. fischeri cells/ml added to natural seawater, which contains a mix of approximately 10(6) nonspecific bacterial cells/ml, V. fischeri cells were the principal bacterial cells present in the aggregations. Furthermore, when animals were exposed to equal cell numbers of V. fischeri (either a motile or a nonmotile strain) and either Vibrio parahaemolyticus or Photobacterium leiognathi, phylogenetically related gram-negative bacteria that also occur in the host's habitat, the symbiont cells were dominant in the aggregations. The presence of V. fischeri did not compromise the viability of these other species in the aggregations, and no significant growth of V. fischeri cells was detected. These findings suggested that dominance results from the ability of V. fischeri either to accumulate or to be retained more effectively within the mucus. Viability of the V. fischeri cells was required for both the formation of tight aggregates and their dominance in the mucus. Neither of the V. fischeri quorum-sensing compounds accumulated in the aggregations, which suggested that the effects of these small signal molecules are not critical to V. fischeri dominance. Taken together, these data provide evidence that the specificity of the squid-vibrio symbiosis begins early in the interaction, in the mucus where the symbionts aggregate outside of the light organ.

  7. Transcriptional characterization of Vibrio fischeri during colonization of juvenile Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Luke R; Nikolakakis, Kiel; Pan, Shu; Reed, Jennifer; Knight, Rob; Ruby, Edward G

    2017-05-01

    The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the monospecific symbiont of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the establishment of this association involves a number of signaling pathways and transcriptional responses between both partners. We report here the first full RNA-Seq dataset representing host-associated V. fischeri cells from colonized juvenile E. scolopes, as well as comparative transcriptomes under both laboratory and simulated marine planktonic conditions. These data elucidate the broad transcriptional changes that these bacteria undergo during the early stages of symbiotic colonization. We report several previously undescribed and unexpected transcriptional responses within the early stages of this symbiosis, including gene expression patterns consistent with biochemical stresses inside the host, and metabolic patterns distinct from those reported in associations with adult animals. Integration of these transcriptional data with a recently developed metabolic model of V. fischeri provides us with a clearer picture of the metabolic state of symbionts within the juvenile host, including their possible carbon sources. Taken together, these results expand our understanding of the early stages of the squid-vibrio symbiosis, and more generally inform the transcriptional responses underlying the activities of marine microbes during host colonization. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Observing Chemotaxis in Vibrio fischeri Using Soft Agar Assays in an Undergraduate Microbiology Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy R. DeLoney-Marino

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis, the directed movement of cells towards or away from a chemical, is both an exciting and complicated behavior observed in many bacterial species. Attempting to adequately visualize or demonstrate the chemotaxic response of bacteria in the classroom is difficult at best, with good models to illustrate the concept lacking. The BSL-1 marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri (a.k.a. Aliivibrio fischeri is easy to culture, making it an ideal candidate for experiments in an undergraduate microbiology course. A number of chemoattractants for V. fischeri have been identified, including a variety of sugars, nucleosides, and amino acids (1, 2. Below presents how the soft agar-based chemotaxis assay can be implemented in the undergraduate laboratory. As bacterial cells migrate towards one or more attractants in soft agar, students can directly observe the chemotaxic behavior of V. fischeri without the need to learn complicated techniques or use specialized equipment. Once the bands of bacterial cells are observed, the migration can then be disrupted by the addition of excess attractant to the soft agar, thereby visualizing what happens once cells are no longer in a gradient of attractant. In addition, soft agar plates lacking attractants can be used to visualize the random movements of bacterial cells that are non-chemotaxing. These exercises can be used in the microbiology laboratory to help students understand the complex behavior of bacterial chemotaxis.

  9. Comparisons of Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent using Escherichia coli as BOD measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiu-Yu; Kuo, Jong-Tar; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Liao, Yi-Ru; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2010-01-01

    To shorten the time needed to measure biochemical oxygen demand (BOD) in water samples and to provide a rapid feedback of the real condition of water quality, we tested and evaluated the validity and reliability of luminescent bacteria Vibrio fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and recombinant Escherichia coli as potential indicators of BOD in the domestic wastewaters. The results indicate that the luminescence intensities of these strains are dependent on temperature, pH, and BOD concentration. In comparison to the standard BOD(5) method, the time needed for BOD measurement can be shortened by 90, 120, and 150 min when V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant E. coli, respectively, are used. Recombinant E. coli can be adapted to measure BOD in domestic wastewater containing a wide range of BOD concentrations, V. fischeri is not suitable for measuring diluted wastewater, and P. phosphoreum has only a limited application in measuring concentrated wastewater. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in which V. fischeri, P. phosphoreum, and recombinant luminescent E. coli are compared in terms of their potential in BOD measurement systems.

  10. Toxicity assessment of ionic liquids with Vibrio fischeri: an alternative fully automated methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Susana P F; Pinto, Paula C A G; Lapa, Rui A S; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2015-03-02

    A fully automated Vibrio fischeri methodology based on sequential injection analysis (SIA) has been developed. The methodology was based on the aspiration of 75 μL of bacteria and 50 μL of inhibitor followed by measurement of the luminescence of bacteria. The assays were conducted for contact times of 5, 15, and 30 min, by means of three mixing chambers that ensured adequate mixing conditions. The optimized methodology provided a precise control of the reaction conditions which is an asset for the analysis of a large number of samples. The developed methodology was applied to the evaluation of the impact of a set of ionic liquids (ILs) on V. fischeri and the results were compared with those provided by a conventional assay kit (Biotox(®)). The collected data evidenced the influence of different cation head groups and anion moieties on the toxicity of ILs. Generally, aromatic cations and fluorine-containing anions displayed higher impact on V. fischeri, evidenced by lower EC50. The proposed methodology was validated through statistical analysis which demonstrated a strong positive correlation (P>0.98) between assays. It is expected that the automated methodology can be tested for more classes of compounds and used as alternative to microplate based V. fischeri assay kits. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. LuxCDABE?Transformed Constitutively Bioluminescent Escherichia coli for Toxicity Screening: Comparison with Naturally Luminous Vibrio fischeri

    OpenAIRE

    Anne Kahru; Olesja Bondarenko; Mariliis Sihtmäe; Imbi Kurvet; Angela Ivask

    2011-01-01

    We show that in vitro toxicity assay based on inhibition of the bioluminescence of recombinant Escherichia coli encoding thermostable luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens is a versatile alternative to Vibrio fischeri MicrotoxTM test. Performance of two luxCDABE-transformed E. coli MC1061 constructs (pDNlux) and (pSLlux) otherwise identical, but having 100-fold different background luminescence was compared with the performance of V. fischeri. The microplate luminometer and a kinetic Flash...

  12. Vibrio fischeri Outer Membrane Protein OmpU Plays a Role in Normal Symbiotic Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeckersberg, F.; Lupp, C.; Feliciano, B.; Ruby, E. G.

    2001-01-01

    The nascent light-emitting organ of newly hatched juveniles of the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes is specifically colonized by cells of Vibrio fischeri that are obtained from the ambient seawater. The mechanisms that promote this specific, cooperative colonization are likely to require a number of bacterial and host-derived factors and activities, only some of which have been described to date. A characteristic of many host-pathogen associations is the presence of bacterial mechanisms that allow attachment to specific tissues. These mechanisms have been well characterized and often involve bacterial fimbriae or outer membrane proteins (OMPs) that act as adhesins, the expression of which has been linked to virulence regulators such as ToxR in Vibrio cholerae. Analogous or even homologous mechanisms are probably operative in the initiation and persistence of cooperative bacterial associations, although considerably less is known about them. We report the presence in V. fischeri of ompU, a gene encoding a 32.5-kDa protein homolog of two other OMPs, OmpU of V. cholerae (50.8% amino acid sequence identity) and OmpL of Photobacterium profundum (45.5% identity). A null mutation introduced into the V. fischeri ompU resulted in the loss of an OMP with an estimated molecular mass of about 34 kDa; genetic complementation of the mutant strain with a DNA fragment containing only the ompU gene restored the production of this protein. The expression of the V. fischeri OmpU was not significantly affected by either (i) iron or phosphate limitation or (ii) a mutation that renders V. fischeri defective in the synthesis of a homolog of the OMP-regulatory protein ToxR. The ompU mutant grew normally in complex nutrient media but was more susceptible to growth inhibition in the presence of either anionic detergents or the antimicrobial peptide protamine sulfate. Interestingly, colonization experiments showed that the ompU null mutant initiated a symbiotic association with

  13. Impact of Salt and Nutrient Content on Biofilm Formation by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsden, Anne E; Grudzinski, Kevin; Ondrey, Jakob M; DeLoney-Marino, Cindy R; Visick, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri, a marine bacterium and symbiont of the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes, depends on biofilm formation for successful colonization of the squid's symbiotic light organ. Here, we investigated if culture conditions, such as nutrient and salt availability, affect biofilm formation by V. fischeri by testing the formation of wrinkled colonies on solid media. We found that V. fischeri forms colonies with more substantial wrinkling when grown on the nutrient-dense LBS medium containing NaCl relative to those formed on the more nutrient-poor, seawater-salt containing SWT medium. The presence of both tryptone and yeast extract was necessary for the production of "normal" wrinkled colonies; when grown on tryptone alone, the colonies displayed a divoting phenotype and were attached to the agar surface. We also found that the type and concentration of specific seawater salts influenced the timing of biofilm formation. Of the conditions assayed, wrinkled colony formation occurred earliest in LBS(-Tris) media containing 425 mM NaCl, 35 mM MgSO4, and 5 mM CaCl2. Pellicle formation, another measure of biofilm development, was also enhanced in these growth conditions. Therefore, both nutrient and salt availability contribute to V. fischeri biofilm formation. While growth was unaffected, these optimized conditions resulted in increased syp locus expression as measured by a PsypA-lacZ transcriptional reporter. We anticipate these studies will help us understand how the natural environment of V. fischeri affects its ability to form biofilms and, ultimately, colonize E. scolopes.

  14. Rotation of Vibrio fischeri Flagella Produces Outer Membrane Vesicles That Induce Host Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aschtgen, Marie-Stephanie; Lynch, Jonathan B; Koch, Eric; Schwartzman, Julia; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Ruby, Edward

    2016-08-15

    Using the squid-vibrio association, we aimed to characterize the mechanism through which Vibrio fischeri cells signal morphogenesis of the symbiotic light-emitting organ. The symbiont releases two cell envelope molecules, peptidoglycan (PG) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) that, within 12 h of light organ colonization, act in synergy to trigger normal tissue development. Recent work has shown that outer membrane vesicles (OMVs) produced by V. fischeri are sufficient to induce PG-dependent morphogenesis; however, the mechanism(s) of OMV release by these bacteria has not been described. Like several genera of both beneficial and pathogenic bacteria, V. fischeri cells elaborate polar flagella that are enclosed by an extension of the outer membrane, whose function remains unclear. Here, we present evidence that along with the well-recognized phenomenon of blebbing from the cell's surface, rotation of this sheathed flagellum also results in the release of OMVs. In addition, we demonstrate that most of the development-inducing LPS is associated with these OMVs and that the presence of the outer membrane protein OmpU but not the LPS O antigen on these OMVs is important in triggering normal host development. These results also present insights into a possible new mechanism of LPS release by pathogens with sheathed flagella. Determining the function(s) of sheathed flagella in bacteria has been challenging, because no known mutation results only in the loss of this outer membrane-derived casing. Nevertheless, the presence of a sheathed flagellum in such host-associated genera as Vibrio, Helicobacter, and Brucella has led to several proposed functions, including physical protection of the flagella and masking of their immunogenic flagellins. Using the squid-vibrio light organ symbiosis, we demonstrate another role, that of V. fischeri cells require rotating flagella to induce apoptotic cell death within surface epithelium, which is a normal step in the organ's development

  15. Toxicity evaluation of pharmaceutical wastewaters using the alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the bacterium Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Zuo, Jiane; Tang, Xinyao; Li, Ruixia; Li, Zaixing; Zhang, Fei

    2014-02-15

    The toxicity of pharmaceutical wastewaters has recently been the focus of the public in China. This study aimed to evaluate the conventional pollution parameters and toxicities of different raw and treated pharmaceutical wastewaters to algae Scenedesmus obliquus and bacteria Vibrio fischeri. Wastewater samples were collected from 16 pharmaceutical wastewater treatment plants in China. The results of the conventional parameters analysis indicated that the total suspended solids, chemical oxygen demand (COD), ammonia (NH3-N), and total phosphorus (TP) were largely removed after treatment. Pharmaceutical effluents were mainly polluted with organics and phosphorus as indicated by the average COD (388 mg/L) and TP (3.16 mg/L) concentrations. The toxicity test results indicated that the influent samples were toxic to both test species. Although the toxicities could be remarkably reduced after treatment, 10 out of the 16 effluent samples exceeded the acute toxicity discharge limit of the Chinese national standards. Spearman rank correlation coefficients indicated a significantly positive correlation between the toxicity values of S. obliquus and V. fischeri. Compared with S. obliquus, V. fischeri detected more pharmaceutical effluent samples with toxicities. Meanwhile, the toxicity indicators were significantly and positively correlated with the COD and NH3-N concentrations based on a Spearman rank correlation analysis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The putative oligosaccharide translocase SypK connects biofilm formation with quorum signaling in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyashiro, Tim; Oehlert, Dane; Ray, Valerie A; Visick, Karen L; Ruby, Edward G

    2014-12-01

    Quorum signaling (QS) describes how bacteria can use small signaling molecules (autoinducers) to coordinate group-level behaviors. In Vibrio fischeri, QS is achieved through a complex regulatory network that ultimately controls bioluminescence, motility, and host colonization. We conducted a genetic screen focused on qrr1, which encodes a small regulatory RNA that is necessary for the core quorum-signaling cascade to transduce autoinducer information into cellular responses. We isolated unique mutants with a transposon inserted into one of two genes within the syp locus, which is involved in biofilm formation. We found that overexpression of sypK, which encodes a putative oligosaccharide translocase, is sufficient to activate qrr1, and, in addition, this effect appears to depend on the kinase activity of the sensor LuxQ. Consistent with the established model for QS in V. fischeri, enhanced expression of qrr1 by the overexpression of sypK resulted in reduced bioluminescence and increased motility. Finally, we found that induction of the syp locus by overexpression of sypG was sufficient to activate qrr1 levels. Together, our results show how conditions that promote biofilm formation impact the quorum-signaling network in V. fischeri, and further highlight the integrated nature of the regulatory circuits involved in complex bacterial behaviors. © 2014 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Characterization of the Vibrio fischeri Fatty Acid Chemoreceptors, VfcB and VfcB2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakakis, K; Monfils, K; Moriano-Gutierrez, S; Brennan, C A; Ruby, E G

    2015-11-13

    Bacteria use a wide variety of methyl-accepting chemotaxis proteins (MCPs) to mediate their attraction to or repulsion from different chemical signals in their environment. The bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri is the monospecific symbiont of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and encodes a large repertoire of MCPs that are hypothesized to be used during different parts of its complex, multistage lifestyle. Here, we report the initial characterization of two such MCPs from V. fischeri that are responsible for mediating migration toward short- and medium-chain aliphatic (or fatty) acids. These receptors appear to be distributed among only members of the family Vibrionaceae and are likely descended from a receptor that has been lost by the majority of the members of this family. While chemotaxis greatly enhances the efficiency of host colonization by V. fischeri, fatty acids do not appear to be used as a chemical cue during this stage of the symbiosis. This study presents an example of straight-chain fatty acid chemoattraction and contributes to the growing body of characterized MCP-ligand interactions. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Interactions between bicarbonate, potassium, and magnesium, and sulfur-dependent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-06-01

    In spite of its central importance in research efforts, the relationship between seawater compounds and bacterial luminescence has not previously been investigated in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the effect of cations (Na(+) , K(+) , NH(4) (+) , Mg(2+) , and Ca(2+) ) and anions (Cl(-) , HCO(3) (-) , CO(3) (2-) , and NO(3) (-) ) on the induction of both inorganic (sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate) and organic (L-cysteine and L-cystine) sulfur-dependent luminescence in Vibrio fischeri. We found that HCO(3) (-) (bicarbonate) and CO(3) (2-) (carbonate), in the form of various compounds, had a stimulatory effect on sulfur-dependent luminescence. The luminescence induced by bicarbonate was further promoted by the addition of magnesium. Potassium also increased sulfur-dependent luminescence when sulfate or thiosulfate was supplied as the sole sulfur source, but not when sulfite, L-cysteine, or L-cystine was supplied. The positive effect of potassium was accelerated by the addition of magnesium and/or calcium. Furthermore, the additional supply of magnesium improved the induction of sulfite- or L-cysteine-dependent luminescence, but not the l-cystine-dependent type. These results suggest that sulfur-dependent luminescence of V. fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions is mainly controlled by bicarbonate, carbonate, and potassium. In addition, our results indicate that an additional supply of magnesium is effective for increasing V. fischeri luminescence. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. LuxU connects quorum sensing to biofilm formation in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Valerie A; Visick, Karen L

    2012-11-01

    Biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri is a complex process involving multiple regulators, including the sensor kinase (SK) RscS and the response regulator (RR) SypG, which control the symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) locus. To identify other regulators of biofilm formation in V. fischeri, we screened a transposon library for mutants defective in wrinkled colony formation. We identified LuxQ as a positive regulator of syp-dependent biofilm formation. LuxQ is a member of the Lux phosphorelay and is predicted to control bioluminescence in concert with the SK AinR, the phosphotransferase LuxU and the RR LuxO. Of these, LuxU was the only other regulator that exerted a substantial impact on biofilm formation. We propose a model in which the Lux pathway branches at LuxU to control both bioluminescence and biofilm formation. Furthermore, our evidence suggests that LuxU functions to regulate syp transcription, likely by controlling SypG activity. Finally, we found that, in contrast to its predicted function, the SK AinR has little impact on bioluminescence under our conditions. Thus, this study reveals a novel connection between the Lux and Syp pathways in V. fischeri, and furthers our understanding of how the Lux pathway regulates bioluminescence in this organism. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Heterogeneous response to a quorum-sensing signal in the luminescence of individual Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Delfino Pérez

    Full Text Available The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri regulates its bioluminescence through a quorum sensing mechanism: the bacterium releases diffusible small molecules (autoinducers that accumulate in the environment as the population density increases. This accumulation of autoinducer (AI eventually activates transcriptional regulators for bioluminescence as well as host colonization behaviors. Although V. fischeri quorum sensing has been extensively characterized in bulk populations, far less is known about how it performs at the level of the individual cell, where biochemical noise is likely to limit the precision of luminescence regulation. We have measured the time-dependence and AI-dependence of light production by individual V. fischeri cells that are immobilized in a perfusion chamber and supplied with a defined concentration of exogenous AI. We use low-light level microscopy to record and quantify the photon emission from the cells over periods of several hours as they respond to the introduction of AI. We observe an extremely heterogeneous response to the AI signal. Individual cells differ widely in the onset time for their luminescence and in their resulting brightness, even in the presence of high AI concentrations that saturate the light output from a bulk population. The observed heterogeneity shows that although a given concentration of quorum signal may determine the average light output from a population of cells, it provides far weaker control over the luminescence output of each individual cell.

  1. Intraspecific Competition Impacts Vibrio fischeri Strain Diversity during Initial Colonization of the Squid Light Organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; LaSota, Elijah D; Cecere, Andrew G; LaPenna, Kyle B; Larios-Valencia, Jessie; Wollenberg, Michael S; Miyashiro, Tim

    2016-05-15

    Animal development and physiology depend on beneficial interactions with microbial symbionts. In many cases, the microbial symbionts are horizontally transmitted among hosts, thereby making the acquisition of these microbes from the environment an important event within the life history of each host. The light organ symbiosis established between the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes and the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri is a model system for examining how hosts acquire horizontally transmitted microbial symbionts. Recent studies have revealed that the light organ of wild-caught E. scolopes squid contains polyclonal populations of V. fischeri bacteria; however, the function and development of such strain diversity in the symbiosis are unknown. Here, we report our phenotypic and phylogenetic characterizations of FQ-A001, which is a V. fischeri strain isolated directly from the light organ of an E. scolopes individual. Relative to the type strain ES114, FQ-A001 exhibits similar growth in rich medium but displays increased bioluminescence and decreased motility in soft agar. FQ-A001 outcompetes ES114 in colonizing the crypt spaces of the light organs. Remarkably, we find that animals cocolonized with FQ-A001 and ES114 harbor singly colonized crypts, in contrast to the cocolonized crypts observed from competition experiments involving single genotypes. The results with our two-strain system suggest that strain diversity within the squid light organ is a consequence of diversity in the single-strain colonization of individual crypt spaces. The developmental programs and overall physiologies of most animals depend on diverse microbial symbionts that are acquired from the environment. However, the basic principles underlying how microbes colonize their hosts remain poorly understood. Here, we report our findings of bacterial strain competition within the coevolved animal-microbe symbiosis composed of the Hawaiian squid and bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri

  2. Vibrio fischeri LuxS and AinS: comparative study of two signal synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupp, Claudia; Ruby, Edward G

    2004-06-01

    Vibrio fischeri possesses two acyl-homoserine lactone quorum-sensing systems, ain and lux, both of which are involved in the regulation of luminescence gene expression and are required for persistent colonization of the squid host, Euprymna scolopes. We have previously demonstrated that the ain system induces luminescence at cell densities that precede lux system activation. Our data suggested that the ain system both relieves repression and initially induces the lux system, thereby achieving sequential induction of gene expression by these two systems. Analysis of the V. fischeri genome revealed the presence of a putative third system based on the enzyme LuxS, which catalyzes the synthesis of the Vibrio harveyi autoinducer 2 (AI-2). In this study, we investigated the impact of V. fischeri LuxS on luminescence and colonization competence in comparison to that of the ain system. Similar to the ain system, inactivation of the AI-2 system decreased light production in culture, but not in the squid host. However, while an ainS mutant produces no detectable light in culture, a luxS mutant expressed approximately 70% of wild-type luminescence levels. A mutation in luxS alone did not compromise symbiotic competence of V. fischeri; however, levels of colonization of an ainS luxS double mutant were reduced to 50% of the already diminished level of ainS mutant colonization, suggesting that these two systems regulate colonization gene expression synergistically through a common pathway. Introduction of a luxO mutation into the luxS and ainS luxS background could relieve both luminescence and colonization defects, consistent with a model in which LuxS, like AinS, regulates gene expression through LuxO. Furthermore, while luxS transcription appeared to be constitutive and the AI-2 signal concentration did not change dramatically, our data suggest that ainS transcription is autoregulated, resulting in an over 2,000-fold increase in signal concentration as culture density

  3. Genetic determinants of swimming motility in the squid light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Mandel, Mark J; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Thomasgard, Krista A; Ruby, Edward G

    2013-08-01

    Bacterial flagellar motility is a complex cellular behavior required for the colonization of the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the beneficial bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. We characterized the basis of this behavior by performing (i) a forward genetic screen to identify mutants defective in soft-agar motility, as well as (ii) a transcriptional analysis to determine the genes that are expressed downstream of the flagellar master regulator FlrA. Mutants with severe defects in soft-agar motility were identified due to insertions in genes with putative roles in flagellar motility and in genes that were unexpected, including those predicted to encode hypothetical proteins and cell division-related proteins. Analysis of mutants for their ability to enter into a productive symbiosis indicated that flagellar motility mutants are deficient, while chemotaxis mutants are able to colonize a subset of juvenile squid to light-producing levels. Thirty-three genes required for normal motility in soft agar were also downregulated in the absence of FlrA, suggesting they belong to the flagellar regulon of V. fischeri. Mutagenesis of putative paralogs of the flagellar motility genes motA, motB, and fliL revealed that motA1, motB1, and both fliL1 and fliL2, but not motA2 and motB2, likely contribute to soft-agar motility. Using these complementary approaches, we have characterized the genetic basis of flagellar motility in V. fischeri and furthered our understanding of the roles of flagellar motility and chemotaxis in colonization of the juvenile squid, including identifying 11 novel mutants unable to enter into a productive light-organ symbiosis. © 2013 The Authors. Microbiology Open published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. CysK Plays a Role in Biofilm Formation and Colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Priyanka; Brooks, John F; Ray, Valerie A; Mandel, Mark J; Visick, Karen L

    2015-08-01

    A biofilm, or a matrix-embedded community of cells, promotes the ability of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri to colonize its symbiotic host, the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes. Biofilm formation and colonization depend on syp, an 18-gene polysaccharide locus. To identify other genes necessary for biofilm formation, we screened for mutants that failed to form wrinkled colonies, a type of biofilm. We obtained several with defects in genes required for cysteine metabolism, including cysH, cysJ, cysK, and cysN. The cysK mutant exhibited the most severe wrinkling defect. It could be complemented with a wild-type copy of the cysK gene, which encodes O-acetylserine sulfhydrolase, or by supplementing the medium with additional cysteine. None of a number of other mutants defective for biosynthetic genes negatively impacted wrinkled colony formation, suggesting a specific role for CysK. CysK did not appear to control activation of Syp regulators or transcription of the syp locus, but it did influence production of the Syp polysaccharide. Under biofilm-inducing conditions, the cysK mutant retained the same ability as that of the parent strain to adhere to the agar surface. The cysK mutant also exhibited a defect in pellicle production that could be complemented by the cysK gene but not by cysteine, suggesting that, under these conditions, CysK is important for more than the production of cysteine. Finally, our data reveal a role for cysK in symbiotic colonization by V. fischeri. Although many questions remain, this work provides insights into additional factors required for biofilm formation and colonization by V. fischeri. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Modeling Analysis of Signal Sensitivity and Specificity by Vibrio fischeri LuxR Variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deanna M Colton

    Full Text Available The LuxR protein of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri belongs to a family of transcriptional activators that underlie pheromone-mediated signaling by responding to acyl-homoserine lactones (-HSLs or related molecules. V. fischeri produces two acyl-HSLs, N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL and N-octanoyl-HSL (C8-HSL, each of which interact with LuxR to facilitate its binding to a "lux box" DNA sequence, thereby enabling LuxR to activate transcription of the lux operon responsible for bioluminescence. We have investigated the HSL sensitivity of four different variants of V. fischeri LuxR: two derived from wild-type strains ES114 and MJ1, and two derivatives of LuxRMJ1 generated by directed evolution. For each LuxR variant, we measured the bioluminescence induced by combinations of C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. We fit these data to a model in which the two HSLs compete with each other to form multimeric LuxR complexes that directly interact with lux to activate bioluminescence. The model reproduces the observed effects of HSL combinations on the bioluminescence responses directed by LuxR variants, including competition and non-monotonic responses to C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. The analysis yields robust estimates for the underlying dissociation constants and cooperativities (Hill coefficients of the LuxR-HSL complexes and their affinities for the lux box. It also reveals significant differences in the affinities of LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 for 3OC6-HSL. Further, LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 differed sharply from LuxRs retrieved by directed evolution in the cooperativity of LuxR-HSL complex formation and the affinity of these complexes for lux. These results show how computational modeling of in vivo experimental data can provide insight into the mechanistic consequences of directed evolution.

  6. Modeling Analysis of Signal Sensitivity and Specificity by Vibrio fischeri LuxR Variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Deanna M; Stabb, Eric V; Hagen, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    The LuxR protein of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri belongs to a family of transcriptional activators that underlie pheromone-mediated signaling by responding to acyl-homoserine lactones (-HSLs) or related molecules. V. fischeri produces two acyl-HSLs, N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-HSL (3OC6-HSL) and N-octanoyl-HSL (C8-HSL), each of which interact with LuxR to facilitate its binding to a "lux box" DNA sequence, thereby enabling LuxR to activate transcription of the lux operon responsible for bioluminescence. We have investigated the HSL sensitivity of four different variants of V. fischeri LuxR: two derived from wild-type strains ES114 and MJ1, and two derivatives of LuxRMJ1 generated by directed evolution. For each LuxR variant, we measured the bioluminescence induced by combinations of C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. We fit these data to a model in which the two HSLs compete with each other to form multimeric LuxR complexes that directly interact with lux to activate bioluminescence. The model reproduces the observed effects of HSL combinations on the bioluminescence responses directed by LuxR variants, including competition and non-monotonic responses to C8-HSL and 3OC6-HSL. The analysis yields robust estimates for the underlying dissociation constants and cooperativities (Hill coefficients) of the LuxR-HSL complexes and their affinities for the lux box. It also reveals significant differences in the affinities of LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 for 3OC6-HSL. Further, LuxRMJ1 and LuxRES114 differed sharply from LuxRs retrieved by directed evolution in the cooperativity of LuxR-HSL complex formation and the affinity of these complexes for lux. These results show how computational modeling of in vivo experimental data can provide insight into the mechanistic consequences of directed evolution.

  7. Implications of handling practices on the ecotoxic profile of alumina nanoparticles towards the bacteria Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiridis, Vasilios; Petala, Maria; Koukiotis, Chris; Darakas, Efthymios

    2017-01-02

    The complex nature and behavior of Engineered Nanomaterials (ENMs) has led to adoption of customized experimental ecotoxicity practices that are prone to possible artefacts in the inherent toxic properties of ENMs. In addition, the lack of standardized handling procedures for the ecotoxicity testing of ENMs prevents the development of experimental protocols for regulatory purposes. In this study, a suite of techniques for dispersion of ENMs was adopted and tested for two types of surface-modified alumina nanoparticles-one hydrophobic and one hydrophilic-towards the bacteria, Vibrio fischeri. The effect of certain handling practices on the observed ecotoxic effects on V. fischeri was examined. The overall goal was to evaluate by what means the handling practices of ENMs may affect the obtained toxicity results. It was realized that the toxicity of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic ENMs was mainly affected by the centrifugation and the salinity of the tested dispersions, respectively. It is more likely that both aluminium and coating substance contributed to the overall toxicity. Toxicity results are discussed with regard to generic physicochemical characteristics of the dispersions.

  8. Identification of a novel matrix protein that promotes biofilm maturation in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Valerie A; Driks, Adam; Visick, Karen L

    2015-02-01

    Bacteria form communities, termed biofilms, in which cells adhere to each other within a matrix, typically comprised of polysaccharides, proteins, and extracellular DNA. Biofilm formation by the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri requires the Syp polysaccharide, but the involvement of matrix proteins is as yet unknown. Here we identified three genes, termed bmpA, -B, and -C (biofilm maturation protein), with overlapping functions in biofilm maturation. A triple bmpABC mutant, but not single or double mutants, was defective in producing wrinkled colonies, a form of biofilm. Surprisingly, the triple mutant was competent to form pellicles, another biofilm phenotype, but they generally lacked a three-dimensional architecture. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the extracellular matrix of the bmp mutant contained electron-dense, thread-like structures that were also present in the wild type but lacking in syp mutant strains. We hypothesized that the bmp mutant produces the Syp polysaccharide but fails to produce/export a distinct matrix component. Indeed, a mixture of the bmp and syp mutants produced a wrinkled colony. Finally, BmpA could be detected in cell-free supernatants from disrupted pellicles. Thus, this work identifies a new matrix protein necessary for biofilm maturation by V. fischeri and, based on the conservation of bmp, potentially other microbes. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Proteomic and metabolomic profiles demonstrate variation among free-living and symbiotic vibrio fischeri biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba; Gorman, Clayton; Nishiguchi, Michele K

    2015-10-23

    A number of bacterial species are capable of growing in various life history modes that enable their survival and persistence in both planktonic free-living stages as well as in biofilm communities. Mechanisms contributing to either planktonic cell or biofilm persistence and survival can be carefully delineated using multiple differential techniques (e.g., genomics and transcriptomics). In this study, we present both proteomic and metabolomic analyses of Vibrio fischeri biofilms, demonstrating the potential for combined differential studies for elucidating life-history switches important for establishing the mutualism through biofilm formation and host colonization. The study used a metabolomics/proteomics or "meta-proteomics" approach, referring to the combined protein and metabolic data analysis that bridges the gap between phenotypic changes (planktonic cell to biofilm formation) with genotypic changes (reflected in protein/metabolic profiles). Our methods used protein shotgun construction, followed by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC-MS) detection and quantification for both free-living and biofilm forming V. fischeri. We present a time-resolved picture of approximately 100 proteins (2D-PAGE and shotgun proteomics) and 200 metabolites that are present during the transition from planktonic growth to community biofilm formation. Proteins involved in stress response, DNA repair damage, and transport appeared to be highly expressed during the biofilm state. In addition, metabolites detected in biofilms correspond to components of the exopolysaccharide (EPS) matrix (sugars and glycerol-derived). Alterations in metabolic enzymes were paralleled by more pronounced changes in concentration of intermediates from the glycolysis pathway as well as several amino acids. This combined analysis of both types of information (proteins, metabolites) has provided a more complete picture of the biochemical processes of biofilm formation and what determines

  10. Substrate specificity and function of the pheromone receptor AinR in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Two distinct but interrelated pheromone-signaling systems, LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR, positively control bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri. Although each system generates an acyl-homoserine lactone (AHL) signal, the protein sequences of LuxI/LuxR and AinS/AinR are unrelated. AinS and LuxI generate the pheromones N-octanoyl-AHL (C8-AHL) and N-3-oxo-hexanoyl-AHL (3OC6-AHL), respectively. LuxR is a transcriptional activator that responds to 3OC6-AHL, and to a lesser extent to C8-AHL. AinR is hypothesized to respond to C8-AHL and, based on homology to Vibrio harveyi LuxN, to mediate the repression of a Qrr regulatory RNA. However, a ΔainR mutation decreased luminescence, which was not predicted based on V. harveyi LuxN, raising the possibility of a distinct regulatory mechanism for AinR. Here we show that ainR can complement a luxN mutant, suggesting functional similarity. Moreover, in V. fischeri, we observed ainR-dependent repression of a Pqrr-lacZ transcriptional reporter in the presence of C8-AHL, consistent with its hypothesized regulatory role. The system appears quite sensitive, with a half-maximal effect on a Pqrr reporter at 140 pM C8-AHL. Several other AHLs with substituted and unsubstituted acyl chains between 6 and 10 carbons also displayed an AinR-dependent effect on Pqrr-lacZ; however, AHLs with acyl chains of four carbons or 12 or more carbons lacked activity. Interestingly, 3OC6-AHL also affected expression from the qrr promoter, but this effect was largely luxR dependent, indicating a previously unknown connection between these systems. Finally, we propose a preliminary explanation for the unexpected luminescence phenotype of the ΔainR mutant.

  11. The haem-uptake gene cluster in Vibrio fischeri is regulated by Fur and contributes to symbiotic colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Wang, Yanling; Ruby, Edward G; Stabb, Eric V; Dunn, Anne K

    2011-11-01

    Although it is accepted that bacteria-colonizing host tissues are commonly faced with iron-limiting conditions and that pathogenic bacteria often utilize iron from host-derived haem-based compounds, the mechanisms of iron acquisition by beneficial symbiotic bacteria are less clear. The bacterium Vibrio fischeri mutualistically colonizes the light organ of the squid Euprymna scolopes. Genome sequence analysis of V. fischeri revealed a putative haem-uptake gene cluster, and through mutant analysis we confirmed this cluster is important for haemin use by V. fischeri in culture. LacZ reporter assays demonstrated Fur-dependent transcriptional regulation of cluster promoter activity in culture. GFP-based reporter assays revealed that gene cluster promoter activity is induced in symbiotic V. fischeri as early as 14 h post inoculation, although colonization assays with the haem uptake mutant suggested an inability to uptake haem does not begin to limit colonization until later stages of the symbiosis. Our data indicate that the squid light organ is a low iron environment and that haem-based sources of iron are used by symbiotic V. fischeri cells. These findings provide important additional information on the availability of iron during symbiotic colonization of E. scolopes by V. fischeri, as well as the role of haem uptake in non-pathogenic host-microbe interactions. © 2011 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Phylogeny and fitness of Vibrio fischeri from the light organs of Euprymna scolopes in two Oahu, Hawaii populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, Michael S; Ruby, Edward G

    2012-02-01

    The evolutionary relationship among Vibrio fischeri isolates obtained from the light organs of Euprymna scolopes collected around Oahu, Hawaii, were examined in this study. Phylogenetic reconstructions based on a concatenation of fragments of four housekeeping loci (recA, mdh, katA, pyrC) identified one monophyletic group ('Group-A') of V. fischeri from Oahu. Group-A V. fischeri strains could also be identified by a single DNA fingerprint type. V. fischeri strains with this fingerprint type had been observed to be at a significantly higher abundance than other strains in the light organs of adult squid collected from Maunalua Bay, Oahu, in 2005. We hypothesized that these previous observations might be related to a growth/survival advantage of the Group-A strains in the Maunalua Bay environments. Competition experiments between Group-A strains and non-Group-A strains demonstrated an advantage of the former in colonizing juvenile Maunalua Bay hosts. Growth and survival assays in Maunalua Bay seawater microcosms revealed a reduced fitness of Group-A strains relative to non-Group-A strains. From these results, we hypothesize that there may exist trade-offs between growth in the light organ and in seawater environments for local V. fischeri strains from Oahu. Alternatively, Group-A V. fischeri may represent an example of rapid, evolutionarily significant, specialization of a horizontally transmitted symbiont to a local host population.

  13. Characterization of htrB and msbB mutants of the light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adin, Dawn M; Phillips, Nancy J; Gibson, Bradford W; Apicella, Michael A; Ruby, Edward G; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Hall, Daniel B; Stabb, Eric V

    2008-02-01

    Bacterial lipid A is an important mediator of bacterium-host interactions, and secondary acylations added by HtrB and MsbB can be critical for colonization and virulence in pathogenic infections. In contrast, Vibrio fischeri lipid A stimulates normal developmental processes in this bacterium's mutualistic host, Euprymna scolopes, although the importance of lipid A structure in this symbiosis is unknown. To further examine V. fischeri lipid A and its symbiotic function, we identified two paralogs of htrB (designated htrB1 and htrB2) and an msbB gene in V. fischeri ES114 and demonstrated that these genes encode lipid A secondary acyltransferases. htrB2 and msbB are found on the Vibrio "housekeeping" chromosome 1 and are conserved in other Vibrio species. Mutations in htrB2 and msbB did not impair symbiotic colonization but resulted in phenotypic alterations in culture, including reduced motility and increased luminescence. These mutations also affected sensitivity to sodium dodecyl sulfate, kanamycin, and polymyxin, consistent with changes in membrane permeability. Conversely, htrB1 is located on the smaller, more variable vibrio chromosome 2, and an htrB1 mutant was wild-type-like in culture but appeared attenuated in initiating the symbiosis and was outcompeted 2.7-fold during colonization when mixed with the parent. These data suggest that htrB2 and msbB play conserved general roles in vibrio biology, whereas htrB1 plays a more symbiosis-specific role in V. fischeri.

  14. Noise and crosstalk in two quorum-sensing inputs of Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, Pablo D; Weiss, Joel T; Hagen, Stephen J

    2011-09-29

    One of the puzzles in bacterial quorum sensing is understanding how an organism integrates the information gained from multiple input signals. The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri regulates its bioluminescence through a quorum sensing mechanism that receives input from three pheromone signals, including two acyl homoserine lactone (HSL) signals. While the role of the 3-oxo-C6 homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL) signal in activating the lux genes has been extensively studied and modeled, the role of the C8 homoserine lactone (C8HSL) is less obvious, as it can either activate luminescence or block its activation. It remains unclear how crosstalk between C8HSL and 3OC6HSL affects the information that the bacterium obtains through quorum sensing. We have used microfluidic methods to measure the response of individual V.fischeri cells to combinations of C8HSL and 3OC6HSL. By measuring the fluorescence of individual V.fischeri cells containing a chromosomal gfp-reporter for the lux genes, we study how combinations of exogenous HSLs affect both the population average and the cell-to-cell variability of lux activation levels. At the level of a population average, the crosstalk between the C8HSL and 3OC6HSL inputs is well-described by a competitive inhibition model. At the level of individual cells, the heterogeneity in the lux response depends only on the average degree of activation, so that the noise in the output is not reduced by the presence of the second HSL signal. Overall we find that the mutual information between the signal inputs and the lux output is less than one bit. A nonlinear correlation between fluorescence and bioluminescence outputs from lux leads to different noise properties for these reporters. The lux genes in V.fischeri do not appear to distinguish between the two HSL inputs, and even with two signal inputs the regulation of lux is extremely noisy. Hence the role of crosstalk from the C8HSL input may not be to improve sensing precision, but rather to

  15. Noise and crosstalk in two quorum-sensing inputs of Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Joel T

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the puzzles in bacterial quorum sensing is understanding how an organism integrates the information gained from multiple input signals. The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri regulates its bioluminescence through a quorum sensing mechanism that receives input from three pheromone signals, including two acyl homoserine lactone (HSL signals. While the role of the 3-oxo-C6 homoserine lactone (3OC6HSL signal in activating the lux genes has been extensively studied and modeled, the role of the C8 homoserine lactone (C8HSL is less obvious, as it can either activate luminescence or block its activation. It remains unclear how crosstalk between C8HSL and 3OC6HSL affects the information that the bacterium obtains through quorum sensing. Results We have used microfluidic methods to measure the response of individual V.fischeri cells to combinations of C8HSL and 3OC6HSL. By measuring the fluorescence of individual V.fischeri cells containing a chromosomal gfp-reporter for the lux genes, we study how combinations of exogenous HSLs affect both the population average and the cell-to-cell variability of lux activation levels. At the level of a population average, the crosstalk between the C8HSL and 3OC6HSL inputs is well-described by a competitive inhibition model. At the level of individual cells, the heterogeneity in the lux response depends only on the average degree of activation, so that the noise in the output is not reduced by the presence of the second HSL signal. Overall we find that the mutual information between the signal inputs and the lux output is less than one bit. A nonlinear correlation between fluorescence and bioluminescence outputs from lux leads to different noise properties for these reporters. Conclusions The lux genes in V.fischeri do not appear to distinguish between the two HSL inputs, and even with two signal inputs the regulation of lux is extremely noisy. Hence the role of crosstalk from the C8HSL input

  16. Topological study on the toxicity of ionic liquids on Vibrio fischeri by the quantitative structure-activity relationship method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fangyou; Shang, Qiaoyan; Xia, Shuqian; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Peisheng

    2015-04-09

    As environmentally friendly solvents, ionic liquids (ILs) are unlikely to act as air contaminants or inhalation toxins resulting from their negligible vapor pressure and excellent thermal stability. However, they can be potential water contaminants because of their considerable solubility in water; therefore, a proper toxicological assessment of ILs is essential. The environmental fate of ILs is studied by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) method. A multiple linear regression (MLR) model is obtained by topological method using toxicity data of 157 ILs on Vibrio fischeri, which are composed of 74 cations and 22 anions. The topological index developed in our research group is used for predicting the V. fischeri toxicity for the first time. The MLR model is precise for estimating LogEC50 of ILs on V. fischeri with square of correlation coefficient (R(2)) = 0.908 and the average absolute error (AAE) = 0.278. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Requirements for sulfur in cell density-independent induction of luminescence in Vibrio fischeri under nutrient-starved conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabei, Yosuke; Era, Mariko; Ogawa, Akane; Morita, Hiroshi

    2012-04-01

    Despite the universal requirement for sulfur in living organisms, it is not known whether the luminescence of Vibrio fischeri is sulfur-dependent and how sulfur affects the intensity of its luminescence. In this study, we investigated the requirement for sulfur in V. fischeri luminescence under nutrient-starved conditions. Full induction of V. fischeri luminescence required MgSO(4); in artificial seawater cultures that lacked sufficient MgSO(4), its luminescence was not fully induced. This induction of luminescence was not dependent on autoinduction because the cell density of V. fischeri did not reach the critical threshold concentration. In addition to MgSO(4), this cell density-independent luminescence was induced or maintained by nontoxic concentrations of l-cysteine, sulfate, sulfite, and thiosulfate. Moreover, the addition of N -3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone and N -octanoyl homoserine lactone, which are known autoinducers in V. fischeri, did not induce luminescence under these conditions. This result suggested that the underlying mechanism of luminescence may be different from the known autoinduction mechanism. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Oil effect in freshly spiked marine sediment on Vibrio fischeri, Corophium volutator, and Echinocardium cordatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brils, Jos M; Huwer, Sherri L; Kater, Belinda J; Schout, Peter G; Harmsen, Joop; Delvigne, Gerard A L; Scholten, Martin C Th

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide data to be used in The Netherlands for development of ecotoxicologically based quality criteria for oil-contaminated sediments and dredged material. In addition, the relation of toxicity to specific oil boiling-point fraction ranges was explored. Natural marine sediment, with a moisture, organic carbon, and silt content of approximately 80, 1.8, and 33% of the dry weight, respectively, was artificially spiked using a spiking method developed in this project. Aliquots of one part of the sediment were spiked to several concentrations of Gulf distillate marine grade A (DMA) gasoil (containing 64% C10-19) and aliquots of the other part to several concentrations of Gulf high viscosity grade 46 (HV46) hydraulic oil (containing 99.2% C19-40). Thus, for each individual oil type, a concentration series was created. Vibrio fischeri (endpoint: bioluminescence inhibition), Corophium volutator (endpoint:mortality), and Echinocardium cordatum (endpoint:mortality) were exposed to these spiked sediments for 10 min, 10 d and 14 d, respectively. Based on the test results, the effective concentration on 50% of the test animals was statistically estimated. For DMA gasoil and HV46 hydraulic oil, respectively, the effective concentrations were 43.7 and 2,682 mg/kg dry weight for V. fischeri, 100 and 9,138 mg/kg dry weight for C. volutator, 190, and 1064 mg/kg dry weight for E. cordatum. This study shows that the toxicity is strongly correlated with the lower boiling-point fractions and especially to those within the C10-C19 range.

  19. Reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical fluoxetine (Prozac) submitted to ionizing radiation to Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Dymes R.A.; Garcia, Vanessa S.G.; Vilarrubia, Anna C.S.; Borrely, Sueli I., E-mail: vanessagarcia@usp.br, E-mail: sborrely@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The constant use of pharmaceutical drugs by great part of the population and its continuous input into the environment creates a growing need of investigating its presence, behavior and the effects on aquatic biota, as well as new ways to treat wastewater containing such substances. The fluoxetine hydrochloride (FH) present in the drug Prozac is an active ingredient used in the treatment of depressive and anxiety disorders. Generally, these compounds enter the aquatic environment by sewage collectors systems after undergoing prior treatment in sewage treatment plants (STPs) or without any treatment. This study focused on evaluating the reduction of acute toxicity of the pharmaceutical FH, under its manipulated formula, for the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. It was also evaluated the acute toxicity of the aqueous solution containing the FH after its exposition to ionizing radiation from industrial electron accelerator. It was performed acute toxicity tests lasting 15 minutes, where the average EC (50) of the non-irradiated CF water solution was approximately 0.68 mg L-1. While the CF water solution irradiated with 1 kGy, 2.5 kGy, 7.5 kGy and 10 kGy, presented an average EC(50) 1.63 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.34 mg.L{sup -1}, 2.35 mg.L{sup -1} and 1.80 mg.L{sup -1}, respectively, showing a notable reduction of the acute toxicity for this organism. (author)

  20. Assessing chemical toxicity of ionic liquids on Vibrio fischeri: Correlation with structure and composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalbán, Mercedes G; Hidalgo, Juana M; Collado-González, Mar; Díaz Baños, F Guillermo; Víllora, Gloria

    2016-07-01

    One of the most important properties of ionic liquids is their non-volatility, making them potentially "green" alternatives to volatile organic compounds. However, they are widely soluble in water, meaning that they can be released into aquatic ecosystems and so contribute to water pollution. Nevertheless, although the toxicity of ILs has been widely assessed in the literature, the information is still scarce due to the great number of ionic liquids that have been synthesized. The present work reports the toxicity of twenty-nine imidazolium-, pyridinium- and ammonium-based ionic liquids towards the bioluminescent photobacterium Vibrio fischeri. When the effect of the type of anion, the length of the alkyl chain of the cation, the cation core and the presence of a functionalized side chain in the cation on ionic liquid toxicity were analyzed, the main influence was seen to be exercised by the alkyl chain length. A Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships-based method was used to compare the experimental results with previously estimated values and very good agreement was obtained. A relationship between the toxicity, expressed as Log EC50, and the 1-octanol-water partition coefficient was established. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. How the structure of ionic liquid affects its toxicity to Vibrio fischeri?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzonkowska, Monika; Sosnowska, Anita; Barycki, Maciej; Rybinska, Anna; Puzyn, Tomasz

    2016-09-01

    In the present work, we have proposed a statistical model predicting the toxicity of ionic liquids (ILs) to Vibrio fischeri bacteria using the Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships (QSAR) method. The model was developed with Multiple Linear Regression (MLR) technique, using the Gutman molecular topological index (GMTI), the lopping centric information index (LOC) and the number of oxygen atoms. Presented model is characterized by the good fit to the experimental data (R(2) = 0.78), high robustness (Q(2)CV = 0.72) and good predictive ability (Q(2)EXT = 0.75). This approach, with using very simple descriptors, helps to initially evaluate the toxicity of newly designed ionic liquids. The studied toxicity of ionic liquids depends mainly on their cations' structure: larger, more branched cations with long alkyl chains are more toxic than the smaller, linear ones. The presence of polar functional groups in the cation's structure reduces the toxic properties of ionic liquids. The structure of the anion has little effect on the toxicity of the studied ionic liquids. Obtained results will provide insight into the toxicity mechanisms and useful information for assessing the potential ecological risk of ionic liquids. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Engineering Vibrio fischeri transcriptional activator LuxR for diverse transcriptional activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang

    2016-09-01

    To alter DNA binding specificity of Vibrio fischeri LuxR and to expand the toolbox for constructing synthetic networks. A mutation library (about 10,000 individuals) of the DNA binding domain of LuxR were generated. A genetic selection was performed to obtain LuxR mutants that recognize three lux box DNA variants that are not recognized by wild-type LuxR. Six LuxR mutants were identified. The evolved LuxR mutants were further characterized by measuring the transcriptional activities of different combinations of LuxR mutants and lux box variants. Varied transcriptional activities were found in these LuxR-lux box pairs. The background expressions of the evolved LuxR-lux box systems are more tightly regulated than the wild-type LuxR-lux box system. The LuxR transcriptional system was evolved to recognize three lux box DNAs which are not recognized by wild-type LuxR.

  3. Directed evolution of the autoinducer selectivity of Vibrio fischeri LuxR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashiro, Yohei; Kimura, Yuki; Furubayashi, Maiko; Tanaka, Akira; Terakubo, Kei; Saito, Kyoichi; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Umeno, Daisuke

    2016-11-25

    LuxR family transcriptional regulators are the core components of quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria and exert their effects through binding to the signaling molecules acyl-homoserine lactones (acyl-HSLs). The function of the LuxR homologs is remarkably plastic, and naturally occurring acyl-HSLs are structurally diverse. To investigate the molecular basis of the functional plasticity of Vibrio fischeri LuxR, we directed the evolution of LuxR toward three different specificities in the laboratory. We found an orthogonal pair of LuxR mutants specific either to 3-oxo-hexanoyl homoserine lactone or to 3-oxo-octanoyl homoserine lactone. Interestingly, the majority of the specificity changes did not arise from modulating the recognition event but rather from changing the efficiency of the transition from the inactive form to the active form upon signal binding. This finding explains how quorum sensing systems can rapidly diverge in nature and in the laboratory and how signal orthogonality and mutual inhibition frequently occur among closely related diverging systems.

  4. Assessment of heavy metals bioavailability and toxicity toward Vibrio fischeri in sediment of the Huelva estuary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Daniel; Usero, José; Morillo, José

    2016-06-01

    Relationship between toxicity and bioavailable metals in sediments from the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence was analyzed. Toxicity was assessed with Microtox® bioassay using a marine luminescent bacterium: Vibrio fischeri. Bioavailable metals were considered as both, acid extractable fraction of BCR procedure and the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier sequential extraction. A bioavailable metals index was calculated to integrate results in a single figure. Toxicity and bioavailable metals showed a similar pattern. Higher levels were found in the estuary than in the littoral (140 TU/g). In Huelva estuary, highest levels were found in the Tinto estuary (5725 TU/g), followed by the Odiel estuary (5100 TU/g) and the Padre Santo Canal (2500 TU/g). Results in this area were well over than those in nearby estuaries. Furthermore, they are similar to or even higher than those in other polluted sediments around the world. Bioavailable metal index showed a stronger correlation with acid extractable fraction of BCR (R(2) = 0.704) than that for the sum of exchangeable and bound to carbonates fractions of Tessier (R(2) = 0.661). These results suggest that bioavailable metals are an important source of sediment toxicity in the Huelva estuary and its littoral of influence, an area with one of the highest mortality risks of Spain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Development of QSAR model to predict the ecotoxicity of Vibrio fischeri using COSMO-RS descriptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Ouahid Ben; Mutalib, M I Abdul; Lévêque, Jean-Marc; El-Harbawi, Mohanad

    2017-03-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are class of solvent whose properties can be modified and tuned to meet industrial requirements. However, a high number of potentially available cations and anions leads to an even increasing members of newly-synthesized ionic liquids, adding to the complexity of understanding on their impact on aquatic organisms. Quantitative structure activity∖property relationship (QSAR∖QSPR) technique has been proven to be a useful method for toxicity prediction. In this work,σ-profile descriptors were used to build linear and non-linear QSAR models to predict the ecotoxicities of a wide variety of ILs towards bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Linear model was constructed using five descriptors resulting in high accuracy prediction of 0.906. The model performance and stability were ascertained using k-fold cross validation method. The selected descriptors set from the linear model was then used in multilayer perceptron (MLP) technique to develop the non-linear model, the accuracy of the model was further enhanced achieving high correlation coefficient with the lowest value being 0.961 with the highest mean square error of 0.157. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Ecotoxicological screening of reclaimed disinfected wastewater by Vibrio fischeri bioassay after a chlorination-dechlorination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayo, Javier; Angosto, José M; Gómez-López, M Dolores

    2009-12-15

    It is well known that different substances can react with chlorine in a water disinfection process to produce disinfection by-products (DBPs). Some of these substances have proven to be carcinogenic in humans and animals. Because it is not possible to detect all DBPs produced in chlorinated wastewater, toxicity tests have been proposed as a useful tool for screening toxic chemicals in treated wastewater. In this study, the Microtox bioassay with Vibrio fischeri was used to evaluate the formation of toxic by-products in wastewater, after a chlorination-dechlorination disinfection treatment. All the variables were found to be normally distributed, so analysis of variance could be directly applied without transformation of variables. Significant correlations were obtained between toxicity values and total carbon, total inorganic carbon, total nitrogen, chlorine, and pH. In contrast, total organic carbon, chemical oxygen demand, electrical conductivity and turbidity had no effect on toxicity formation. Toxicity increased with the Cl2:NH4+ ratio at a higher chlorine concentration released from combined chlorine. Regression models provided a good fit for effective concentration (EC50) as a function of total carbon and total nitrogen, after 5, 10, and 15 min of exposure. These models had greater multiple determination coefficients than previously reported for similar studies, without autocorrelation in the residuals as indicated by the Durbin-Watson statistic test. The measured and predicted ecotoxicity values were strongly correlated.

  7. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Dunn, Anne K; Stabb, Eric V

    2010-05-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated the repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and P(arcA)-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends the characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background.

  8. Influence of Select Antibiotics on Vibrio fischeri and Desmodesmus subspicatus at μg L-1 Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vasconcelos, E C; Dalke, C R; de Oliveira, C M R

    2017-07-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals in the aquatic environment is a contemporary reality and it is necessary to understand more about the effects of this presence on organisms. The purpose of this work was to assess the ecotoxicity of antibiotics metronidazole, nitrofurantoin, trimethoprim, and sulphamethoxazole (single and mixture) in Vibrio fischeri and Desmodesmus subspicatus at μg L-1 concentrations. The evaluation of the toxic effect of the antibiotics on V. fischeri and D. subspicatus was based on fluorescence and bioluminescence tests, respectively, using nominal concentrations. When tested individually, the four antibiotics gave rise to a toxic effect on the evaluated organisms. Sulphamethoxazole caused a higher toxic effect on V. fischeri and D. subspicatus from 7.81 to 500 μg L-1. Trimethoprim and sulphamethoxazole showed hormesis for the concentrations, which ranged from 7.81 to 62.5 μg L-1. The mixture of antibiotics induced a toxic effect on the V. fischeri and D. subspicatus organisms (from 0.03 to 1 μg L-1 concentrations) than when the antibiotics were evaluated individually. These results were significant since water quality problems are widespread all over the word, and emerging pollutants such as antibiotics have been detected in the aquatic environment in very low concentrations.

  9. FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N.; Bose, Jeffrey L.; Dunn, Anne K.; Stabb, Eric V.

    2010-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri induces both anaerobic respiration and bioluminescence during symbiotic infection. In many bacteria, the oxygen-sensitive regulator FNR activates anaerobic respiration, and a preliminary study using the light-generating lux genes from V. fischeri MJ1 cloned in Escherichia coli suggested that FNR stimulates bioluminescence. To test for FNR-mediated regulation of bioluminescence and anaerobic respiration in V. fischeri, we generated fnr mutants of V. fischeri strains MJ1 and ES114. In both strains, FNR was required for normal fumarate- and nitrate-dependent respiration. However, contrary to the report in transgenic E. coli, FNR mediated repression of lux. ArcA represses bioluminescence, and ParcA-lacZ reporters showed reduced expression in fnr mutants, suggesting a possible indirect effect of FNR on bioluminescence via arcA. Finally, the fnr mutant of ES114 was not impaired in colonization of its host squid, Euprymna scolopes. This study extends characterization of FNR to the Vibrionaceae and underscores the importance of studying lux regulation in its native background. PMID:20298504

  10. Quorum Sensing Signal Synthesis May Represent a Selective Advantage Independent of Its Role in Regulation of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Chong

    Full Text Available The evolution of biological signalling systems and apparently altruistic or cooperative traits in diverse organisms has required selection against the subversive tendencies of self-interested biological entities. The bacterial signalling and response system known as quorum sensing or Acylated Homoserine Lactone (AHL mediated gene expression is thought to have evolved through kin selection. In this in vitro study on the model quorum sensing bioluminescent marine symbiont Vibrio fischeri, competition and long-term sub culturing experiments suggest that selection for AHL synthesis (encoded by the AHL synthase gene luxI is independent of the quorum sensing regulated phenotype (bioluminescence encoded by luxCDABE. Whilst results support the hypothesis that signal response (AHL binding and transcriptional activation encoded by the luxR gene is maintained through indirect fitness benefits (kin selection, signal synthesis is maintained in the V. fischeri genome over evolutionary time through direct fitness benefits at the individual level from an unknown function.

  11. The periplasmic sensing domain of Vibrio fischeri chemoreceptor protein A (VfcA): cloning, purification and crystallographic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salah Ud-Din, Abu Iftiaf Md; Roujeinikova, Anna

    2016-05-01

    Flagella-mediated motility and chemotaxis towards nutrients are important characteristics of Vibrio fischeri that play a crucial role in the development of its symbiotic relationship with its Hawaiian squid host Euprymna scolopes. The V. fischeri chemoreceptor A (VfcA) mediates chemotaxis toward amino acids. The periplasmic sensory domain of VfcA has been crystallized by the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using polyethylene glycol 3350 as a precipitating agent. The crystals belonged to space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 39.9, b = 57.0, c = 117.0 Å, α = 88.9, β = 80.5, γ = 89.7°. A complete X-ray diffraction data set has been collected to 1.8 Å resolution using cryocooling conditions and synchrotron radiation.

  12. Quorum Sensing Signal Synthesis May Represent a Selective Advantage Independent of Its Role in Regulation of Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Grace; Kimyon, Önder; Manefield, Mike

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of biological signalling systems and apparently altruistic or cooperative traits in diverse organisms has required selection against the subversive tendencies of self-interested biological entities. The bacterial signalling and response system known as quorum sensing or Acylated Homoserine Lactone (AHL) mediated gene expression is thought to have evolved through kin selection. In this in vitro study on the model quorum sensing bioluminescent marine symbiont Vibrio fischeri, competition and long-term sub culturing experiments suggest that selection for AHL synthesis (encoded by the AHL synthase gene luxI) is independent of the quorum sensing regulated phenotype (bioluminescence encoded by luxCDABE). Whilst results support the hypothesis that signal response (AHL binding and transcriptional activation encoded by the luxR gene) is maintained through indirect fitness benefits (kin selection), signal synthesis is maintained in the V. fischeri genome over evolutionary time through direct fitness benefits at the individual level from an unknown function. PMID:23825662

  13. Assessing the function of STAS domain protein SypA in Vibrio fischeri using a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Cecilia M; Visick, Karen L

    2015-01-01

    Colonization of the squid Euprymna scolopes by Vibrio fischeri requires biofilm formation dependent on the 18-gene symbiosis polysaccharide locus, syp. One key regulator, SypA, controls biofilm formation by an as-yet unknown mechanism; however, it is known that SypA itself is regulated by SypE. Biofilm-proficient strains form wrinkled colonies on solid media, while sypA mutants form biofilm-defective smooth colonies. To begin to understand the function of SypA, we used comparative analyses and mutagenesis approaches. sypA (and the syp locus) is conserved in other Vibrios, including two food-borne human pathogens, Vibrio vulnificus (rbdA) and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (sypA VP ). We found that both homologs could complement the biofilm defect of the V. fischeri sypA mutant, but their phenotypes varied depending on the biofilm-inducing conditions used. Furthermore, while SypAVP retained an ability to be regulated by SypE, RbdA was resistant to this control. To better understand SypA function, we examined the biofilm-promoting ability of a number of mutant SypA proteins with substitutions in conserved residues, and found many that were biofilm-defective. The most severe biofilm-defective phenotypes occurred when changes were made to a conserved stretch of amino acids within a predicted α-helix of SypA; we hypothesize that this region of SypA may interact with another protein to promote biofilm formation. Finally, we identified a residue required for negative control by SypE. Together, our data provide insights into the function of this key biofilm regulator and suggest that the SypA orthologs may play similar roles in their native Vibrio species.

  14. Dose-response behavior of the bacterium Vibrio fischeri exposed to pharmaceuticals and personal care products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz de García, Sheyla; García-Encina, Pedro A; Irusta-Mata, Rubén

    2016-01-01

    The presence of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in the environment has become a real and widespread concern in recent years. Therefore, the primary goal of this study was to investigate 20 common and widely used PPCPs to assess their individual and combined effect on an important species in one trophic level, i.e., bacteria. The ecotoxicological effects of PPCPs at two different concentration ranges were determined in the bacterium Vibrio fischeri using Microtox(®) and were statistically analyzed using three models in the GraphPad Prism 6 program for Windows, v.6.03. A four-parameter model best fit the majority of the compounds. The half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of each PPCP was estimated using the best-fitting model and was compared with the results from a recent study. Comparative analysis indicated that most compounds showed the same level of toxicity. Moreover, the stimulatory effects of PPCPs at environmental concentrations (low doses) were assessed. These results indicated that certain compounds have traditional inverted U- or J-shaped dose-response curves, and 55% of them presented a stimulatory effect below the zero effect-concentration point. Effective concentrations of 0 (EC0), 5 (EC5) and 50% (EC50) were calculated for each PPCP as the ecotoxicological points. All compounds that presented narcosis as a mode of toxic action at high doses also exhibited stimulation at low concentrations. The maximum stimulatory effect of a mixture was higher than the highest stimulatory effect of each individually tested compound. Moreover, when the exposure time was increased, the hormetic effect decreased. Hormesis is being increasingly included in dose-response studies because this may have a harmful, beneficial or indifferent effect in an environment. Despite the results obtained in this research, further investigations need to be conducted to elucidate the behavior of PPCPs in aquatic environments.

  15. Global discovery of colonization determinants in the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John F; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Cronin, David C; Quillin, Sarah J; Mallama, Celeste A; Foxall, Randi; Whistler, Cheryl; Goodman, Andrew L; Mandel, Mark J

    2014-12-02

    Animal epithelial tissue becomes reproducibly colonized by specific environmental bacteria. The bacteria (microbiota) perform critical functions for the host's tissue development, immune system development, and nutrition; yet the processes by which bacterial diversity in the environment is selected to assemble the correct communities in the host are unclear. To understand the molecular determinants of microbiota selection, we examined colonization of a simplified model in which the light organ of Euprymna scolopes squid is colonized exclusively by Vibrio fischeri bacteria. We applied high-throughput insertion sequencing to identify which bacterial genes are required during host colonization. A library of over 41,000 unique transposon insertions was analyzed before and after colonization of 1,500 squid hatchlings. Mutants that were reproducibly depleted following squid colonization represented 380 genes, including 37 that encode known colonization factors. Validation of select mutants in defined competitions against the wild-type strain identified nine mutants that exhibited a reproducible colonization defect. Some of the colonization factors identified included genes predicted to influence copper regulation and secretion. Other mutants exhibited defects in biofilm development, which is required for aggregation in host mucus and initiation of colonization. Biofilm formation in culture and in vivo was abolished in a strain lacking the cytoplasmic chaperone DnaJ, suggesting an important role for protein quality control during the elaboration of bacterial biofilm in the context of an intact host immune system. Overall these data suggest that cellular stress responses and biofilm regulation are critical processes underlying the reproducible colonization of animal hosts by specific microbial symbionts.

  16. NagC represses N-acetyl-glucosamine utilization genes in Vibrio fischeri within the light organ of Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Verma, Subhash C; Bogale, Haikel; Miyashiro, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria often use transcription factors to regulate the expression of metabolic genes in accordance to available nutrients. NagC is a repressor conserved among γ-proteobacteria that regulates expression of enzymes involved in the metabolism of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc). The polymeric form of GlcNAc, known as chitin, has been shown to play roles in chemotactic signaling and nutrition within the light organ symbiosis established between the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes. Here, we investigate the impact of NagC regulation on the physiology of V. fischeri. We find that NagC repression contributes to the fitness of V. fischeri in the absence of GlcNAc. In addition, the inability to de-repress expression of NagC-regulated genes reduces the fitness of V. fischeri in the presence of GlcNAc. We find that chemotaxis toward GlcNAc or chitobiose, a dimeric form of GlcNAc, is independent of NagC regulation. Finally, we show that NagC represses gene expression during the early stages of symbiosis. Our data suggest that the ability to regulate gene expression with NagC contributes to the overall fitness of V. fischeri in environments that vary in levels of GlcNAc. Furthermore, our finding that NagC represses gene expression within the squid light organ during an early stage of symbiosis supports the notion that the ability of the squid to provide a source of GlcNAc emerges later in host development.

  17. NagC represses N-acetyl-glucosamine utilization genes in Vibrio fischeri within the light organ of Euprymna scolopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eSun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria often use transcription factors to regulate the expression of metabolic genes in accordance to available nutrients. NagC is a repressor conserved among γ-proteobacteria that regulates expression of enzymes involved in the metabolism of N-acetyl-glucosamine (GlcNAc. The polymeric form of GlcNAc, known as chitin, has been shown to play roles in chemotactic signaling and nutrition within the light organ symbiosis established between the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the Hawaiian squid Euprymna scolopes. Here, we investigate the impact of NagC regulation on the physiology of V. fischeri. We find that NagC repression contributes to the fitness of V. fischeri in the absence of GlcNAc. In addition, the inability to de-repress expression of NagC-regulated genes reduces the fitness of V. fischeri in the presence of GlcNAc. We find that chemotaxis towards GlcNAc or chitobiose, a dimeric form of GlcNAc, is independent of NagC regulation. Finally, we show that NagC represses gene expression during the early stages of symbiosis. Our data suggest that the ability to regulate gene expression with NagC contributes to the overall fitness of V. fischeri in environments that vary in levels of GlcNAc. Furthermore, our finding that NagC represses gene expression within the squid light organ during an early stage of symbiosis supports the notion that the ability of the squid to provide a source of GlcNAc emerges later in host development.

  18. A genomic comparison of 13 symbiotic Vibrio fischeri isolates from the perspective of their host source and colonization behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongrand, Clotilde; Koch, Eric J; Moriano-Gutierrez, Silvia; Cordero, Otto X; McFall-Ngai, Margaret; Polz, Martin F; Ruby, Edward G

    2016-12-01

    Newly hatched Euprymna scolopes squid obtain their specific light-organ symbionts from an array of Vibrio (Allivibrio) fischeri strains present in their environment. Two genetically distinct populations of this squid species have been identified, one in Kaneohe Bay (KB), and another in Maunaloa Bay (MB), Oahu. We asked whether symbionts isolated from squid in each of these populations outcompete isolates from the other population in mixed-infection experiments. No relationship was found between a strain's host source (KB or MB) and its ability to competitively colonize KB or MB juveniles in a mixed inoculum. Instead, two colonization behaviors were identified among the 11 KB and MB strains tested: a 'dominant' outcome, in which one strain outcompetes the other for colonization, and a 'sharing' outcome, in which two strains co-colonize the squid. A genome-level comparison of these and other V. fischeri strains suggested that the core genomic structure of this species is both syntenous and highly conserved over time and geographical distance. We also identified ~250 Kb of sequence, encoding 194 dispersed orfs, that was specific to those strains that expressed the dominant colonization behavior. Taken together, the results indicate a link between the genome content of V. fischeri strains and their colonization behavior when initiating a light-organ symbiosis.

  19. Oxidative stress and antioxidant enzymes activities in the African catfish, Clarias gariepinus, experimentally challenged with Escherichia coli and Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adeyemi, Joseph A

    2014-04-01

    The impacts of bacterial infection on cultivated fish species, African catfish, were investigated using oxidative stress biomarkers [lipid peroxidation (LPO) and protein carbonylation] and the activities of important antioxidant/detoxifying enzymes [catalase and glutathione S-transferase (GST)]. Fish were inoculated via oral gavage with one of the following treatments: 1 × 10(5) CFU/ml of Escherichia coli (EC1), 2 × 10(5) CFU/ml of E. coli (EC2), 1 × 10(5) CFU/ml of Vibrio fischeri (V1), 2 × 10(5) CFU/ml of V. fischeri (V2), gavaged with distilled water and not gavaged. Fish were maintained in the laboratory for 7 days after the bacterial inoculation, and the levels of LPO, protein carbonylation, GST, and catalase activities were determined in the muscle, gills, and liver of fish. Fish inoculated with bacteria (either E. coli or V. fischeri) had a significant higher levels of tissue LPO, protein carbonylation, and GST activities in a tissue-specific pattern (liver > muscle > gills). This appears to be related with the levels of bacterial inoculation, with effects more pronounced in fish inoculated with either EC2 or V2. The catalase activity did not differ significantly between the inoculated and fish that were not inoculated. The results of this study indicate that bacterial inoculation could result in oxidative stress in fish, and liver has a higher rate of oxidative stress per mg tissue compared to the gills and the muscle.

  20. Comparative analysis reveals regulatory motifs at the ainS/ainR pheromone-signaling locus of Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2017-09-15

    Vibrio fischeri uses the AinS/AinR pheromone-signaling system to control bioluminescence and other symbiotic colonization factors. The Ain system is thought to initiate cell-cell signaling at moderate cell densities and to prime the LuxI/LuxR signaling system. Here we compared and analyzed the ain locus from two V. fischeri strains and a Vibrio salmonicida strain to explore ain regulation. The ainS and ainR genes were predicted to constitute an operon, which we corroborated using RT-PCR. Comparisons between strains revealed a stark area of conservation across the ainS-ainR junction, including a large inverted repeat in ainR. We found that this inverted repeat in cis can affect accumulation of the AinS-generated pheromone N-octanoyl homoserine lactone, which may account for the previously unexplained low-signal phenotype of a ∆ainR mutant, although the mechanism behind this regulation remains elusive. We also extended the previous observation of a possible "lux box" LuxR binding site upstream of ainS by showing the conservation of this site as well as a second putative lux box. Using a plasmid-based reporter we found that LuxR can mediate repression of ainS, providing a negative feedback mechanism in the Ain/Lux signaling cascade. Our results provide new insights into the regulation, expression, and evolution of ainSR.

  1. The iron-dependent regulator fur controls pheromone signaling systems and luminescence in the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Septer, Alecia N; Lyell, Noreen L; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-03-01

    Bacteria often use pheromones to coordinate group behaviors in specific environments. While high cell density is required for pheromones to achieve stimulatory levels, environmental cues can also influence pheromone accumulation and signaling. For the squid symbiont Vibrio fischeri ES114, bioluminescence requires pheromone-mediated regulation, and this signaling is induced in the host to a greater extent than in culture, even at an equivalent cell density. Our goal is to better understand this environment-specific control over pheromone signaling and bioluminescence. Previous work with V. fischeri MJ1 showed that iron limitation induces luminescence, and we recently found that ES114 encounters a low-iron environment in its host. Here we show that ES114 induces luminescence at lower cell density and achieves brighter luminescence in low-iron media. This iron-dependent effect on luminescence required ferric uptake regulator (Fur), which we propose influences two pheromone signaling master regulators, LitR and LuxR. Genetic and bioinformatic analyses suggested that under low-iron conditions, Fur-mediated repression of litR is relieved, enabling more LitR to perform its established role as an activator of luxR. Interestingly, Fur may similarly control the LitR homolog SmcR of Vibrio vulnificus. These results reveal an intriguing regulatory link between low-iron conditions, which are often encountered in host tissues, and pheromone-dependent master regulators.

  2. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri aminopeptidase and evidence for its influence on an early stage of squid colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidopiastis, Pat M; Rader, Bethany A; Gerling, David G; Gutierrez, Nestor A; Watkins, Katherine H; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2012-08-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and k(cat) and K(m) values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization.

  3. Characterization of a Vibrio fischeri Aminopeptidase and Evidence for Its Influence on an Early Stage of Squid Colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Bethany A.; Gerling, David G.; Gutierrez, Nestor A.; Watkins, Katherine H.; Frey, Michelle West; Nyholm, Spencer V.; Whistler, Cheryl A.

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri cells are the sole colonists of a specialized light organ in the mantle cavity of the sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes. The process begins when the bacteria aggregate in mucus secretions outside the light organ. The cells eventually leave the aggregate, enter the light organ, and encounter a rich supply of peptides. The need to dissociate from mucus and presumably utilize peptides led us to hypothesize that protease activity is integral to the colonization process. Protease activity associated with whole cells of Vibrio fischeri strain ES114 was identified as the product of a putative cell membrane-associated aminopeptidase (PepN). To characterize this activity, the aminopeptidase was cloned, overexpressed, and purified. Initial steady-state kinetic studies revealed that the aminopeptidase has broad activity, with a preference for basic and hydrophobic side chains and kcat and Km values that are lower and smaller, respectively, than those of Escherichia coli PepN. A V. fischeri mutant unable to produce PepN is significantly delayed in its ability to colonize squid within the first 12 h, but eventually it establishes a wild-type colonization level. Likewise, in competition with the wild type for colonization, the mutant is outcompeted at 12 h postinoculation but then competes evenly by 24 h. Also, the PepN-deficient strain fails to achieve wild-type levels of cells in aggregates, suggesting an explanation for the initial colonization delay. This study provides a foundation for more studies on PepN expression, localization, and role in the early stages of squid colonization. PMID:22636772

  4. Purification and crystallization of Vibrio fischeri CcdB and its complexes with fragments of gyrase and CcdA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Jonge, Natalie, E-mail: ndejonge@vub.ac.be; Buts, Lieven; Vangelooven, Joris [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Mine, Natacha; Van Melderen, Laurence [Laboratoire de Génétique des Procaryotes, Institut de Biologie et de Médecine, Université Libre de Bruxelles, Gosselies (Belgium); Wyns, Lode; Loris, Remy [Department of Molecular and Cellular Interactions, VIB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Laboratorium voor Ultrastructuur, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2007-04-01

    A CcdB homologue from V. fischeri was overexpressed in E. coli and purified. The free protein was crystallized, as were its complexes with fragments of E. coli and V. fischeri gyrase and with the F-plasmid CcdA C-terminal domain. The ccd toxin–antitoxin module from the Escherichia coli F plasmid has a homologue on the Vibrio fischeri integron. The homologue of the toxin (CcdB{sub Vfi}) was crystallized in two different crystal forms. The first form belongs to space group I23 or I2{sub 1}3, with unit-cell parameter a = 84.5 Å, and diffracts to 1.5 Å resolution. The second crystal form belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 58.5, b = 43.6, c = 37.5 Å, β = 110.0°, and diffracts to 1.7 Å resolution. The complex of CcdB{sub Vfi} with the GyrA14{sub Vfi} fragment of V. fischeri gyrase crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 53.5, b = 94.6, c = 58.1 Å, and diffracts to 2.2 Å resolution. The corresponding mixed complex with E. coli GyrA14{sub Ec} crystallizes in space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 130.1, b = 90.8, c = 58.1 Å, β = 102.6°, and diffracts to 1.95 Å. Finally, a complex between CcdB{sub Vfi} and part of the F-plasmid antitoxin CcdA{sub F} crystallizes in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.9, b = 62.6, c = 82.0 Å, and diffracts to 1.9 Å resolution.

  5. Population structure of Vibrio fischeri within the light organs of Euprymna scolopes squid from Two Oahu (Hawaii) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, M S; Ruby, E G

    2009-01-01

    We resolved the intraspecific diversity of Vibrio fischeri, the bioluminescent symbiont of the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes, at two previously unexplored morphological and geographical scales. These scales ranged from submillimeter regions within the host light organ to the several kilometers encompassing two host populations around Oahu. To facilitate this effort, we employed both novel and standard genetic and phenotypic assays of light-organ symbiont populations. A V. fischeri-specific fingerprinting method and five phenotypic assays were used to gauge the genetic richness of V. fischeri populations; these methods confirmed that the symbiont population present in each adult host's light organ is polyclonal. Upon statistical analysis of these genetic and phenotypic population data, we concluded that the characteristics of symbiotic populations were more similar within individual host populations than between the two distinct Oahu populations of E. scolopes, providing evidence that local geographic symbiont population structure exists. Finally, to better understand the genesis of symbiont diversity within host light organs, the process of symbiosis initiation in newly hatched juvenile squid was examined both experimentally and by mathematical modeling. We concluded that, after the juvenile hatches, only one or two cells of V. fischeri enter each of six internal epithelium-lined crypts present in the developing light organ. We hypothesize that the expansion of different, crypt-segregated, clonal populations creates the polyclonal adult light-organ population structure observed in this study. The stability of the luminous-bacterium-sepiolid squid mutualism in the presence of a polyclonal symbiont population structure is discussed in the context of contemporary evolutionary theory.

  6. Population Structure of Vibrio fischeri within the Light Organs of Euprymna scolopes Squid from Two Oahu (Hawaii) Populations▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenberg, M. S.; Ruby, E. G.

    2009-01-01

    We resolved the intraspecific diversity of Vibrio fischeri, the bioluminescent symbiont of the Hawaiian sepiolid squid Euprymna scolopes, at two previously unexplored morphological and geographical scales. These scales ranged from submillimeter regions within the host light organ to the several kilometers encompassing two host populations around Oahu. To facilitate this effort, we employed both novel and standard genetic and phenotypic assays of light-organ symbiont populations. A V. fischeri-specific fingerprinting method and five phenotypic assays were used to gauge the genetic richness of V. fischeri populations; these methods confirmed that the symbiont population present in each adult host's light organ is polyclonal. Upon statistical analysis of these genetic and phenotypic population data, we concluded that the characteristics of symbiotic populations were more similar within individual host populations than between the two distinct Oahu populations of E. scolopes, providing evidence that local geographic symbiont population structure exists. Finally, to better understand the genesis of symbiont diversity within host light organs, the process of symbiosis initiation in newly hatched juvenile squid was examined both experimentally and by mathematical modeling. We concluded that, after the juvenile hatches, only one or two cells of V. fischeri enter each of six internal epithelium-lined crypts present in the developing light organ. We hypothesize that the expansion of different, crypt-segregated, clonal populations creates the polyclonal adult light-organ population structure observed in this study. The stability of the luminous-bacterium-sepiolid squid mutualism in the presence of a polyclonal symbiont population structure is discussed in the context of contemporary evolutionary theory. PMID:18997024

  7. Assessing the function of STAS domain protein SypA in Vibrio fischeri using a comparative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia M Thompson

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Colonization of the squid Euprymna scolopes by Vibrio fischeri requires biofilm formation dependent on the 18-gene symbiosis polysaccharide locus, syp. One key regulator, SypA, controls biofilm formation by an as-yet unknown mechanism; however, it is known that SypA itself is regulated by SypE. Biofilm-proficient strains form wrinkled colonies on solid media, while sypA mutants form biofilm-defective smooth colonies. To begin to understand the function of SypA, we used comparative analyses and mutagenesis approaches. sypA (and the syp locus is conserved in other Vibrios, including two food-borne human pathogens, V. vulnificus (rbdA and V. parahaemolyticus (sypAVP. We found that both homologs could complement the biofilm defect of the V. fischeri sypA mutant, but their phenotypes varied depending on the biofilm-inducing conditions used. Furthermore, while SypAVP retained an ability to be regulated by SypE, RbdA was resistant to this control. To better understand SypA function, we examined the biofilm-promoting ability of a number of mutant SypA proteins with substitutions in conserved residues, and found many that were biofilm-defective. The most severe biofilm-defective phenotypes occurred when changes were made to a conserved stretch of amino acids within a predicted a-helix of SypA; we hypothesize that this region of SypA may interact with another protein to promote biofilm formation. Finally, we identified a residue required for negative control by SypE. Together, our data provide insights into the function of this key biofilm regulator and suggest that the SypA orthologs may play similar roles in their native Vibrio species.

  8. The novel sigma factor-like regulator RpoQ controls luminescence, chitinase activity, and motility in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xiaodan; Studer, Sarah V; Wassarman, Karen; Zhang, Yuanxing; Ruby, Edward G; Miyashiro, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Vibrio fischeri, the bacterial symbiont of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, uses quorum sensing to control genes involved in bioluminescence, host colonization, and other biological processes. Previous work has shown that AinS/R-directed quorum sensing also regulates the expression of rpoQ (VF_A1015), a gene annotated as an RpoS-like sigma factor. In this study, we demonstrate using phylogenetics that RpoQ is related to, but distinct from, the stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS. Overexpression of rpoQ results in elevated chitinase activity but decreased motility and luminescence, three activities associated with symbiosis. The reduction in bacterial luminescence associated with the overexpression of rpoQ occurs both in culture and within the light-emitting organ of the squid host. This suppression of bioluminescence is due to the repression of the luxICDABEG promoter. Our results highlight RpoQ as a novel regulatory component, embedded in the quorum-signaling network that controls several biological processes in V. fischeri. Quorum signaling is a widely occurring phenomenon that functions in diverse bacterial taxa. It is most often found associated with species that interact with animal or plant hosts, either as mutualists or pathogens, and controls the expression of genes critical to tissue colonization. We present the discovery of rpoQ, which encodes a new regulatory component in the quorum-signaling pathway of Vibrio fischeri. RpoQ is a novel protein in the RpoS family of stationary-phase sigma factors. Unlike many other regulatory proteins involved in the quorum-signaling pathways of the Vibrionaceae, the distribution of RpoQ appears to be restricted to only two closely related species. The role of this regulator is to enhance some quorum-signaling outputs (motility) while suppressing others (luminescence). We propose that RpoQ may be a recently evolved or acquired component in V. fischeri that provides this organism with an additional level of

  9. LuxCDABE—Transformed Constitutively Bioluminescent Escherichia coli for Toxicity Screening: Comparison with Naturally Luminous Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Kahru

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available We show that in vitro toxicity assay based on inhibition of the bioluminescence of recombinant Escherichia coli encoding thermostable luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens is a versatile alternative to Vibrio fischeri MicrotoxTM test. Performance of two luxCDABE-transformed E. coli MC1061 constructs (pDNlux and (pSLlux otherwise identical, but having 100-fold different background luminescence was compared with the performance of V. fischeri. The microplate luminometer and a kinetic Flash-Assay test format was used that differently from Microtox test is also applicable for high throughput analysis. Toxic effects (30-s till 30-min EC50 of four heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Hg, Cu and three organic chemicals (aniline, 3,5-dichloroaniline and 3,5-dichlorophenol were studied. Both E. coli strains had comparable sensitivity and the respective 30-min EC50 values highly correlated (log-log R2 = 0.99; p < 0.01 showing that the sensitivity of the recombinant bacteria towards chemicals analyzed did not depend on the bioluminescence level of the recombinant cells. The most toxic chemical for all used bacterial strains (E. coli, V. fischeri was mercury whereas the lowest EC50 values for Hg (0.04–0.05 mg/L and highest EC50 values for aniline (1,300–1,700 mg/L were observed for E. coli strains. Despite of that, toxicity results obtained with both E. coli strains (pSLlux and pDNlux significantly correlated with V. fischeri results (log-log R2 = 0.70/0.75; p < 0.05/0.01. The use of amino acids (0.25% and glucose (0.05%-supplemented M9 medium instead of leucine-supplemented saline significantly (p < 0.05 reduced the apparent toxicity of heavy metals to both E. coli strains up to three orders of magnitude, but had little or no complexing effect on organic compounds. Thus, P. luminescens luxCDABE-transformed E. coli strains can be successfully used for the acute toxicity screening of various types of organic chemicals and heavy metals and can replace V. fischeri in

  10. LuxCDABE--transformed constitutively bioluminescent Escherichia coli for toxicity screening: comparison with naturally luminous Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvet, Imbi; Ivask, Angela; Bondarenko, Olesja; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Kahru, Anne

    2011-01-01

    We show that in vitro toxicity assay based on inhibition of the bioluminescence of recombinant Escherichia coli encoding thermostable luciferase from Photorhabdus luminescens is a versatile alternative to Vibrio fischeri Microtox™ test. Performance of two luxCDABE-transformed E. coli MC1061 constructs (pDNlux) and (pSLlux) otherwise identical, but having 100-fold different background luminescence was compared with the performance of V. fischeri. The microplate luminometer and a kinetic Flash-Assay test format was used that differently from Microtox test is also applicable for high throughput analysis. Toxic effects (30-s till 30-min EC(50)) of four heavy metals (Zn, Cd, Hg, Cu) and three organic chemicals (aniline, 3,5-dichloroaniline and 3,5-dichlorophenol) were studied. Both E. coli strains had comparable sensitivity and the respective 30-min EC(50) values highly correlated (log-log R(2) = 0.99; p E. coli, V. fischeri) was mercury whereas the lowest EC(50) values for Hg (0.04-0.05 mg/L) and highest EC(50) values for aniline (1,300-1,700 mg/L) were observed for E. coli strains. Despite of that, toxicity results obtained with both E. coli strains (pSLlux and pDNlux) significantly correlated with V. fischeri results (log-log R(2) = 0.70/0.75; p heavy metals to both E. coli strains up to three orders of magnitude, but had little or no complexing effect on organic compounds. Thus, P. luminescens luxCDABE-transformed E. coli strains can be successfully used for the acute toxicity screening of various types of organic chemicals and heavy metals and can replace V. fischeri in certain cases where the thermostability of luciferase >30 °C is crucial. The kinetic Flash Assay test format of the bioluminescence inhibition assay facilitates high throughput analysis. The assay medium, especially in case of testing heavy metals should be a compromise: optimal for the viability/luminescence of the recombinant test strain and of minimum complexing potential.

  11. Comparative genomics-based investigation of resequencing targets in Vibrio fischeri: Focus on point miscalls and artefactual expansions

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    Ruby Edward G

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequence closure often represents the end-point of a genome project, without a system in place for subsequent improvement and refinement. Building on the genome project of Vibrio fischeri ES114, we used a comparative approach to identify and investigate genes that had a high likelihood of sequence error. Results Comparison of the V. fischeri ES114 genome with that of conspecific strain MJ11 identified 82 target loci in ES114 as containing likely errors, and thus of high-priority for resequencing. Analysis of the targets identified 75 loci in which an error had occurred, resulting in the correction of 10,457 base pairs to generate the new ES114 genomic sequence. A majority of the inaccurate loci involved frameshift errors, correction of which fused adjacent ORFs. Although insertions/deletions are thought to be rare in microbial genome assemblies, fourteen of the loci contained extraneous sequence of over 300 bp, likely due to imperfect contig ends that were misassembled in tandem rather than as overlapping segments. Additionally we updated the entire genome annotation with 113 new features including previously uncalled protein-coding genes, regulatory RNA genes and operon leader peptides, and we analyzed the transcriptional apparatus encoded by ES114. Conclusion We demonstrate that errors in microbial genome sequences, thought to largely be confined to point mutations, may also consist of other prevalent large-scale rearrangements such as insertions. Ongoing genome quality control and annotation programs are necessary to accompany technological advancements in data generation. These updates further advance V. fischeri as an important model for understanding intercellular communication and colonization of animal tissue.

  12. Bright luminescence of Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutants reveals a connection between citrate and the Gac/Csr regulatory system.

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    Septer, Alecia N; Bose, Jeffrey L; Lipzen, Anna; Martin, Joel; Whistler, Cheryl; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    The Gac/Csr regulatory system is conserved throughout the γ-proteobacteria and controls key pathways in central carbon metabolism, quorum sensing, biofilm formation and virulence in important plant and animal pathogens. Here we show that elevated intracellular citrate levels in a Vibrio fischeri aconitase mutant correlate with activation of the Gac/Csr cascade and induction of bright luminescence. Spontaneous or directed mutations in the gene that encodes citrate synthase reversed the bright luminescence of aconitase mutants, eliminated their citrate accumulation and reversed their elevated expression of CsrB. Our data elucidate a correlative link between central metabolic and regulatory pathways, and they suggest that the Gac system senses a blockage at the aconitase step of the tricarboxylic acid cycle, either through elevated citrate levels or a secondary metabolic effect of citrate accumulation, and responds by modulating carbon flow and various functions associated with host colonization, including bioluminescence. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Automated evaluation of pharmaceutically active ionic liquids' (eco)toxicity through the inhibition of human carboxylesterase and Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Susana P F; Justina, Vanessa D; Bica, Katharina; Vasiloiu, Maria; Pinto, Paula C A G; Saraiva, M Lúcia M F S

    2014-01-30

    The toxicity of 16 pharmaceutical active ionic liquids (IL-APIs) was evaluated by automated approaches based on sequential injection analysis (SIA). The implemented bioassays were centered on the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 2 and Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of the tested compounds. The inhibitory effects were quantified by calculating the inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of inhibition (EC50). The EC50 values demonstrated that the cetylpyridinium group was one of the most toxic cations and that the imidazolium group was the less toxic. The obtained results provide important information about the safety of the studied IL-APIs and their possible use as pharmaceutical drugs. The developed automated SIA methodologies are robust screening bioassays, and can be used as a generic tools to identify the (eco)toxicity of the structural elements of ILs, contributing to a sustainable development of drugs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli adhesion tendencies towards photolithographically modified nanosmooth poly (tert-butyl methacrylate polymer surfaces

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    Elena P Ivanova

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Elena P Ivanova1, Natasa Mitik-Dineva1, Radu C Mocanasu1, Sarah Murphy1, James Wang2, Grant van Riessen3, Russell J Crawford11Faculty Life and Social Sciences; 2IRIS, Swinburne University of Technology, Hawthorn, Victoria, Australia; 3Centre for Materials and Surface Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: This study reports the adhesion behavior of two bacterial species, Vibrio fischeri and Escherichia coli, to the photoresistant poly(tert-butyl methacrylate (P(tBMA polymer surface. The data has demonstrated that ultraviolet irradiation of P(tBMA was able to provide control over bacterial adhesion tendencies. Following photolithography, several of the surface characteristics of P(tBMA were found to be altered. Atomic force microscopy analysis indicated that photolithographically modified P(tBMA (henceforth termed ‘modified polymer’ appeared as a ‘nanosmooth’ surface with an average surface roughness of 1.6 nm. Although confocal laser scanning microscopy and scanning electron microscopy analysis clearly demonstrated that V. fischeri and E. coli presented largely different patterns of attachment in order to adhere to the same surfaces, both species exhibited a greater adhesion propensity towards the ‘nanosmooth’ surface. The adhesion of both species to the modified polymer surface appeared to be facilitated by an elevated production of extracellular polymeric substances when in contact with the substrate.Keywords: poly(tert-butylmethacrylate polymeric surfaces, surface nanotopography, bacterial attachment, extracellular polymeric substances

  15. Experimental and predicted acute toxicity of antibacterial compounds and their mixtures using the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Sara; Vighi, Marco; Finizio, Antonio

    2014-08-01

    This article investigates the bioluminescence inhibition effects of the antimicrobials triclocarban, triclosan and its metabolite methyl triclosan, using the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri as the test organism (Microtox©). The concentration response analysis was performed for the three individual substances and for a mixture in which the three compounds were mixed in a ratio of the IC50 of the individual components (equitoxic ratio). Toxicity values (the median inhibitory concentration value, in mg L(-1)) in the decreasing order of sensitivity were triclosan (0.73)>triclocarban (0.91)>methyl-triclosan (1.76). The comparison of the experimental data with those obtained by using Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship (QSAR) equations indicated that triclosan and triclocarban act as polar narcotic compounds towards V. fischeri, whereas methyl-triclosan acts as a narcotic (baseline toxicity). The toxicity of the mixture was measured experimentally and predicted by two models (CA: concentration addition; IA: independent action). The results showed that the observed mixture toxicity (IC50=0.23 mg L(-1)) had no significant differences from those predicted by both CA and IA models. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri Assays in the Assessment of Seasonal and Spatial Patterns in Toxicity of Contaminated River Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarque, Sergio; Masner, Petr; Klánová, Jana; Prokeš, Roman; Bláha, Ludek

    2016-01-01

    Several bacteria-based assays, notably Vibrio fischeri luminescence assays, are often used as environmental monitoring tool for toxicity in sediments that may serve as both sinks and secondary source of contamination in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we used 30-s kinetic bioassays based on V. fischeri to evaluate the toxicity associated to sediments from five localities with different contamination inputs (Morava River and its tributary Drevnice River in the south-eastern part of the Czech Republic). Toxicity assessed as half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) over the course of a year-long sampling was compared in bottom sediments and freshly trapped particulate material. Standard approach based on testing of aqueous elutriates was compared with toxicity of whole sediments (contact suspension toxicity). Bottom sediments showed lower toxicity compared to freshly trapped suspended materials in all cases. On the other hand, standardized elutriates induced generally weaker effects than suspended sediments likely due to losses during the extraction process. Toxicity generally increased during winter reaching maximum peaks in early spring months in all five sites. Total organic carbon (TOC) was found to be highly correlated with toxic effects. Toxicity from sites with direct industrial and agricultural water inputs also correlated with concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Single time point sampling followed by the extraction and testing of elutriates, do not truly reflect the spatial and temporal variability in natural sediments and may lead to underestimation of ecotoxic risks.

  17. Characterizing the Host and Symbiont Proteomes in the Association between the Bobtail Squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the Bacterium, Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Tyler R.; Nyholm, Spencer V.

    2011-01-01

    The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique opportunity to study host/microbe interactions within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong association with a regulated daily rhythm. Each morning the host expels an exudate from the light organ consisting of 95% of the symbiont population in addition to host hemocytes and shed epithelial cells. We analyzed the host and symbiont proteomes of adult squid exudate and surrounding light organ epithelial tissue using 1D- and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT) in an effort to understand the contribution of both partners to the maintenance of this association. These proteomic analyses putatively identified 1581 unique proteins, 870 proteins originating from the symbiont and 711 from the host. Identified host proteins indicate a role of the innate immune system and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in regulating the symbiosis. Symbiont proteins detected enhance our understanding of the role of quorum sensing, two-component signaling, motility, and detoxification of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) inside the light organ. This study offers the first proteomic analysis of the symbiotic microenvironment of the adult light organ and provides the identification of proteins important to the regulation of this beneficial association. PMID:21998678

  18. Inactivation of a novel response regulator is necessary for biofilm formation and host colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Andrew R; Darnell, Cynthia L; Visick, Karen L

    2011-10-01

    The marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri uses a biofilm to promote colonization of its eukaryotic host Euprymna scolopes. This biofilm depends on the symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) locus, which is transcriptionally regulated by the RscS-SypG two-component regulatory system. An additional response regulator (RR), SypE, exerts both positive and negative control over biofilm formation. SypE is a novel RR protein, with its three putative domains arranged in a unique configuration: a central phosphorylation receiver (REC) domain flanked by two effector domains with putative enzymatic activities (serine kinase and serine phosphatase). To determine how SypE regulates biofilm formation and host colonization, we generated a library of SypE domain mutants. Our results indicate that the N-terminus inhibits biofilm formation, while the C-terminus plays a positive role. The phosphorylation state of SypE appears to regulate these opposing activities, as disruption of the putative site of phosphorylation results in a protein that constitutively inhibits biofilm formation. Furthermore, SypE restricts host colonization: (i) sypE mutants with constitutive inhibitory activity fail to efficiently initiate host colonization and (ii) loss of sypE partially alleviates the colonization defect of an rscS mutant. We conclude that SypE must be inactivated to promote symbiotic colonization by V. fischeri. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Bioluminescent Vibrio fischeri assays in the assessment of seasonal and spatial patterns in toxicity of contaminated river sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Jarque

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Several bacteria-based assays, notably Vibrio fischeri luminescence assays, are often used as environmental monitoring tool for toxicity in sediments that may serve as both sinks and secondary source of contamination in aquatic ecosystems. In this study, we used 30-s kinetic bioassays based on V. fischeri to evaluate the toxicity associated to sediments from five localities with different contamination inputs (Morava River and its tributary Drevnice River in the south-eastern part of the Czech Republic. Toxicity assessed as half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50 over the course of a year-long sampling was compared in bottom sediments and freshly trapped particulate material. Standard approach based on testing of aqueous elutriates was compared with toxicity of whole sediments (contact suspension toxicity. Bottom sediments showed lower toxicity compared to freshly trapped suspended materials in all cases. On the other hand, standardized elutriates induced generally weaker effects than suspended sediments likely due to losses during the extraction process. Toxicity generally increased during winter reaching maximum peaks in early spring months in all five sites. Total organic carbon (TOC was found to be highly correlated with toxic effects. Toxicity from sites with direct industrial and agricultural water inputs also correlated with concentrations of metals, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs. Single time point sampling followed by the extraction and testing of elutriates, do not truly reflect the spatial and temporal variability in natural sediments and may lead to underestimation of ecotoxic risks.

  20. Joint toxicity of tetracycline with copper(II) and cadmium(II) to Vibrio fischeri: effect of complexation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Fei; Zhao, Yanping; Gu, Xueyuan; Gu, Cheng; Lee, Charles C C

    2015-03-01

    Co-contamination of antibiotic and heavy metals commonly occurs in the environment. Tetracycline (TC), a common antibiotic, can behave as an efficient organic ligand to complex with cations. In this paper, the joint toxicity of TC with two commonly existing metals, copper(II) and cadmium(II), towards a luminescent bacteria, Vibrio fischeri, are investigated. Results showed that coexistence of TC and Cu(II) showed a significant antagonistic effect, while TC and Cd(II) showed a synergistic effect. The aqueous speciation of TC with two metal cations was calculated using a chemical equilibrium software Visual MINTEQ and results indicated that a strong complexation exist between TC and Cu(II), while much weaker interaction between TC and Cd(II). Traditional joint toxicity prediction model based on independent action failed to predict the combined toxicity of TC with metals. A new method based on speciation calculation was used to evaluate the joint toxicity of ligands and cations. It is assumed that the metal-ligand complexes are non-toxic to V. fischeri and the joint toxicity is determined by the sum of toxic unit of free metal-ions and free organic ligands. It explained the joint toxicity of the mixed systems reasonably well. Meanwhile, citric acid (CA) and fulvic acid (FA) were also introduced in this study to provide a benchmark comparison with TC. Results showed it is also valid for mixed systems of CA and FA with metals except for the Cd-CA mixture.

  1. Characterizing the host and symbiont proteomes in the association between the Bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler R Schleicher

    Full Text Available The beneficial symbiosis between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bioluminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique opportunity to study host/microbe interactions within a natural microenvironment. Colonization of the squid light organ by V. fischeri begins a lifelong association with a regulated daily rhythm. Each morning the host expels an exudate from the light organ consisting of 95% of the symbiont population in addition to host hemocytes and shed epithelial cells. We analyzed the host and symbiont proteomes of adult squid exudate and surrounding light organ epithelial tissue using 1D- and 2D-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT in an effort to understand the contribution of both partners to the maintenance of this association. These proteomic analyses putatively identified 1581 unique proteins, 870 proteins originating from the symbiont and 711 from the host. Identified host proteins indicate a role of the innate immune system and reactive oxygen species (ROS in regulating the symbiosis. Symbiont proteins detected enhance our understanding of the role of quorum sensing, two-component signaling, motility, and detoxification of ROS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS inside the light organ. This study offers the first proteomic analysis of the symbiotic microenvironment of the adult light organ and provides the identification of proteins important to the regulation of this beneficial association.

  2. An annotated cDNA library of juvenile Euprymna scolopes with and without colonization by the symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tong Deyan

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biologists are becoming increasingly aware that the interaction of animals, including humans, with their coevolved bacterial partners is essential for health. This growing awareness has been a driving force for the development of models for the study of beneficial animal-bacterial interactions. In the squid-vibrio model, symbiotic Vibrio fischeri induce dramatic developmental changes in the light organ of host Euprymna scolopes over the first hours to days of their partnership. We report here the creation of a juvenile light-organ specific EST database. Results We generated eleven cDNA libraries from the light organ of E. scolopes at developmentally significant time points with and without colonization by V. fischeri. Single pass 3' sequencing efforts generated 42,564 expressed sequence tags (ESTs of which 35,421 passed our quality criteria and were then clustered via the UIcluster program into 13,962 nonredundant sequences. The cDNA clones representing these nonredundant sequences were sequenced from the 5' end of the vector and 58% of these resulting sequences overlapped significantly with the associated 3' sequence to generate 8,067 contigs with an average sequence length of 1,065 bp. All sequences were annotated with BLASTX (E-value Conclusion Both the number of ESTs generated from each library and GO categorizations are reflective of the activity state of the light organ during these early stages of symbiosis. Future analyses of the sequences identified in these libraries promise to provide valuable information not only about pathways involved in colonization and early development of the squid light organ, but also about pathways conserved in response to bacterial colonization across the animal kingdom.

  3. An Expanded Transposon Mutant Library Reveals that Vibrio fischeri δ-Aminolevulinate Auxotrophs Can Colonize Euprymna scolopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyell, Noreen L; Septer, Alecia N; Dunn, Anne K; Duckett, Drew; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2017-03-01

    Libraries of defined mutants are valuable research tools but necessarily lack gene knockouts that are lethal under the conditions used in library construction. In this study, we augmented a Vibrio fischeri mutant library generated on a rich medium (LBS, which contains [per liter] 10 g of tryptone, 5 g of yeast extract, 20 g of NaCl, and 50 mM Tris [pH 7.5]) by selecting transposon insertion mutants on supplemented LBS and screening for those unable to grow on LBS. We isolated strains with insertions in alr, glr (murI), glmS, several heme biosynthesis genes, and ftsA, as well as a mutant disrupted 14 bp upstream of ftsQ Mutants with insertions in ftsA or upstream of ftsQ were recovered by addition of Mg2+ to LBS, but their cell morphology and motility were affected. The ftsA mutant was more strongly affected and formed cells or chains of cells that appeared to wind back on themselves helically. Growth of mutants with insertions in glmS, alr, or glr was recovered with N-acetylglucosamine (NAG), d-alanine, or d-glutamate, respectively. We hypothesized that NAG, d-alanine, or d-glutamate might be available to V. fischeri in the Euprymna scolopes light organ; however, none of these mutants colonized the host effectively. In contrast, hemA and hemL mutants, which are auxotrophic for δ-aminolevulinate (ALA), colonized at wild-type levels, although mutants later in the heme biosynthetic pathway were severely impaired or unable to colonize. Our findings parallel observations that legume hosts provide Bradyrhizobium symbionts with ALA, but they contrast with virulence phenotypes of hemA mutants in some pathogens. The results further inform our understanding of the symbiotic light organ environment.IMPORTANCE By supplementing a rich yeast-based medium, we were able to recover V. fischeri mutants with insertions in conditionally essential genes, and further characterization of these mutants provided new insights into this bacterium's symbiotic environment. Most notably, we

  4. Cyclic AMP receptor protein regulates pheromone-mediated bioluminescence at multiple levels in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

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    Lyell, Noreen L; Colton, Deanna M; Bose, Jeffrey L; Tumen-Velasquez, Melissa P; Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2013-11-01

    Bioluminescence in Vibrio fischeri ES114 is activated by autoinducer pheromones, and this regulation serves as a model for bacterial cell-cell signaling. As in other bacteria, pheromone concentration increases with cell density; however, pheromone synthesis and perception are also modulated in response to environmental stimuli. Previous studies suggested that expression of the pheromone-dependent bioluminescence activator LuxR is regulated in response to glucose by cyclic AMP (cAMP) receptor protein (CRP) (P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 164:45-50, 1985; P. V. Dunlap and E. P. Greenberg, J. Bacteriol. 170:4040-4046, 1988; P. V. Dunlap, J. Bacteriol. 171:1199-1202, 1989; and W. F. Friedrich and E. P. Greenberg, Arch. Microbiol. 134:87-91, 1983). Consistent with this model, we found that bioluminescence in V. fischeri ES114 is modulated by glucose and stimulated by cAMP. In addition, a Δcrp mutant was ∼100-fold dimmer than ES114 and did not increase luminescence in response to added cAMP, even though cells lacking crp were still metabolically capable of producing luminescence. We further discovered that CRP regulates not only luxR but also the alternative pheromone synthase gene ainS. We found that His-tagged V. fischeri CRP could bind sequences upstream of both luxR and ainS, supporting bioinformatic predictions of direct regulation at both promoters. Luminescence increased in response to cAMP if either the ainS or luxR system was under native regulation, suggesting cAMP-CRP significantly increases luminescence through both systems. Finally, using transcriptional reporters in transgenic Escherichia coli, we elucidated two additional regulatory connections. First, LuxR-independent basal transcription of the luxI promoter was enhanced by CRP. Second, the effect of CRP on the ainS promoter depended on whether the V. fischeri regulatory gene litR was also introduced. These results suggest an integral role for CRP in pheromone signaling that goes

  5. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS, AND VIBRIO FISCHERI TO TOLUENE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research presented here is a continuation of work designed to further the science of available and developing online toxicity monitors(OTMs) and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system. Source waters o...

  6. Comparative evaluation of acute toxicity by Vibrio fischeri and fern spore based bioassays in the follow-up of toxic chemicals degradation by photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marugán, Javier; Bru, David; Pablos, Cristina; Catalá, Myriam

    2012-04-30

    The development of efficient bioassays is a necessary step for cost-effective environmental monitoring and evaluation of novel decontamination technologies. Marine Vibrio fischeri kits have demonstrated to be extremely sensitive but lack of ecological relevance, especially when assessing impacts on freshwater higher organisms. A novel riparian are fern spore microbioassay could merge higher ecological relevance and reduced costs. The aim of this work is the comparative evaluation of the V. fischeri and fern spore bioassays for the follow up of detoxification processes of water contaminated with cyanide and phenol by advanced oxidation technologies, using heterogeneous photocatalysis as example. In both cases, EC(50) values differed significantly for V. fischeri commercial kit, V. fischeri lab cultures and Polystichum setiferum fern spores (1.9, 16 and 101 mg cyanide L(-1) and 27.0, 49.3 and 1440 mg phenol L(-1), respectively). Whereas V. fischeri bioassays are extremely sensitive and dilution series must be prepared, toxicant solutions can be directly applied to spores. Spore microbioassay was also useful in the follow up of photoxidation processes of cyanide and phenol, also reflecting the formation of intermediate degradation by-products even more toxic than phenol. We conclude that this new microbioassay is a promising cost-effective tool for the follow up of decontamination processes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Toxicity of Nine (Doped) Rare Earth Metal Oxides and Respective Individual Metals to Aquatic Microorganisms Vibrio fischeri and Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurvet, Imbi; Juganson, Katre; Vija, Heiki; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Blinova, Irina; Syvertsen-Wiig, Guttorm; Kahru, Anne

    2017-07-05

    Despite the increasing use of rare earth elements (REEs) and oxides (REOs) in various technologies, the information on their ecotoxicological hazard is scarce. Here, the effects of La(3+), Ce(3+), Pr(3+), Nd(3+), Gd(3+), CeO₂, and eight doped REOs to marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri and freshwater protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila were studied in parallel with REO dopant metals (Co(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+), Ni(2+), Sr(2+)). The highest concentrations of REOs tested were 100 mg/L with protozoa in deionized water and 500 mg/L with bacteria in 2% NaCl. Although (i) most REOs produced reactive oxygen species; (ii) all studied soluble REEs were toxic to bacteria (half-effective concentration, EC50 3.5-21 mg metal/L; minimal bactericidal concentration, MBC 6.3-63 mg/L) and to protozoa (EC50 28-42 mg/L); and (iii) also some dopant metals (Ni(2+), Fe(3+)) proved toxic (EC50 ≤ 3 mg/L), no toxicity of REOs to protozoa (EC50 > 100 mg/L) and bacteria (EC50 > 500 mg/L; MBC > 500 mg/L) was observed except for La₂NiO₄ (MBC 25 mg/L). According to kinetics of V. fischeri bioluminescence, the toxicity of REEs was triggered by disturbing cellular membrane integrity. Fortunately, as REEs and REOs are currently produced in moderate amounts and form in the environment insoluble salts and/or oxides, they apparently present no harm to aquatic bacteria and protozoa.

  8. A Spectral-SAR Model for the Anionic-Cationic Interaction in Ionic Liquids: Application to Vibrio fischeri Ecotoxicity

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    Vasile Ostafe

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Within the recently launched the spectral-structure activity relationship (S-SARanalysis, the vectorial anionic-cationic model of a generic ionic liquid is proposed, alongwith the associated algebraic correlation factor in terms of the measured and predictedactivity norms. The reliability of the present scheme is tested by assessing the Hanschfactors, i.e. lipophylicity, polarizability and total energy, to predict the ecotoxicityendpoints of wide types of ionic liquids with ammonium, pyridinium, phosphonium,choline and imidazolium cations on the aquatic bacteria Vibrio fischeri. The results, whileconfirming the cationic dominant influence when only lipophylicity is considered,demonstrate that the anionic effect dominates all other more specific interactions. It wasalso proved that the S-SAR vectorial model predicts considerably higher activity for theionic liquids than for its anionic and cationic subsystems separately, in all consideredcases. Moreover, through applying the least norm-correlation path principle, the completetoxicological hierarchies are presented, unfolding the ecological rules of combined cationicand anionic influences in ionic liquid toxicity.

  9. Impact of Surface-Active Guanidinium-, Tetramethylguanidinium-, and Cholinium-Based Ionic Liquids on Vibrio Fischeri Cells and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Liposomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantamäki, Antti H.; Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Sklavounos, Evangelos; Kyllönen, Lasse; King, Alistair W. T.; Wiedmer, Susanne K.

    2017-04-01

    We investigated the toxicological effect of seven novel cholinium, guanidinium, and tetramethylguanidinium carboxylate ionic liquids (ILs) from an ecotoxicological point of view. The emphasis was on the potential structure-toxicity dependency of these surface-active ILs in aqueous environment. The median effective concentrations (EC50) were defined for each IL using Vibrio (Aliivibrio) fischeri marine bacteria. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes were used as biomimetic lipid membranes to study the interactions between the surface-active ILs and the liposomes. The interactions were investigated by following the change in the DPPC phase transition behaviour using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Critical micelle concentrations for the ILs were determined to clarify the analysis of the toxicity and the interaction results. Increasing anion alkyl chain length increased the toxicity, whereas branching of the chain decreased the toxicity of the ILs. The toxicity of the ILs in this study was mainly determined by the surface-active anions, while cations induced a minor impact on the toxicity. In the DSC experiments the same trend was observed for all the studied anions, whereas the cations seemed to induce more variable impact on the phase transition behaviour. Toxicity measurements combined with liposome interaction studies can provide a valuable tool for assessing the mechanism of toxicity.

  10. Automated evaluation of pharmaceutically active ionic liquids’ (eco)toxicity through the inhibition of human carboxylesterase and Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costa, Susana P.F.; Justina, Vanessa D. [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Bica, Katharina; Vasiloiu, Maria [Vienna University of Technology, Institute of Applied and Synthetic Chemistry, A-1060 Vienna (Austria); Pinto, Paula C.A.G., E-mail: ppinto@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, M. Lúcia M.F.S., E-mail: lsaraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, n° 228, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2014-01-30

    Highlights: • IL-APIs toxicity on humans and aquatic environment was evaluated by inhibition assays. • The inhibition assays were implemented through automated screening bioassays. • Automation of bioassays enabled a rigorous control of the reaction conditions. • EC{sub 50} obtained provide vital information on IL-APIs safety and potential use as drugs. -- Abstract: The toxicity of 16 pharmaceutical active ionic liquids (IL-APIs) was evaluated by automated approaches based on sequential injection analysis (SIA). The implemented bioassays were centered on the inhibition of human carboxylesterase 2 and Vibrio fischeri, in the presence of the tested compounds. The inhibitory effects were quantified by calculating the inhibitor concentration required to cause 50% of inhibition (EC{sub 50}). The EC{sub 50} values demonstrated that the cetylpyridinium group was one of the most toxic cations and that the imidazolium group was the less toxic. The obtained results provide important information about the safety of the studied IL-APIs and their possible use as pharmaceutical drugs. The developed automated SIA methodologies are robust screening bioassays, and can be used as a generic tools to identify the (eco)toxicity of the structural elements of ILs, contributing to a sustainable development of drugs.

  11. The time-dependent stimulation of sodium halide salts on redox reactants, energy supply and luminescence in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhenyang; Zhang, Jing; Hou, Meifang

    2017-08-28

    The excess of halide ions (F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) can cause adverse effects. Earlier studies demonstrated time-dependent stimulations of organic salts with halide ions on photobacteria. Therefore, inorganic ones with halide ions (e.g., NaX, X=F(-), Cl(-), Br(-), I(-)) were assumed to cause similar effects. In the present study, Vibrio fischeri was exposed to NaX. Results showed that the contents of favin mono-nucleotide (FMN), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) were stimulated by NaX with a time-dependent fashion. The maximum stimulations on FMN at 24h were 172%, 168%, 211% and 298% of the control (p<0.05) in NaF, NaCl, NaBr and NaI, respectively, with an order of NaF≈NaCl

  12. Impact of Surface-Active Guanidinium-, Tetramethylguanidinium-, and Cholinium-Based Ionic Liquids on Vibrio Fischeri Cells and Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine Liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rantamäki, Antti H; Ruokonen, Suvi-Katriina; Sklavounos, Evangelos; Kyllönen, Lasse; King, Alistair W T; Wiedmer, Susanne K

    2017-04-21

    We investigated the toxicological effect of seven novel cholinium, guanidinium, and tetramethylguanidinium carboxylate ionic liquids (ILs) from an ecotoxicological point of view. The emphasis was on the potential structure-toxicity dependency of these surface-active ILs in aqueous environment. The median effective concentrations (EC50) were defined for each IL using Vibrio (Aliivibrio) fischeri marine bacteria. Dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) liposomes were used as biomimetic lipid membranes to study the interactions between the surface-active ILs and the liposomes. The interactions were investigated by following the change in the DPPC phase transition behaviour using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Critical micelle concentrations for the ILs were determined to clarify the analysis of the toxicity and the interaction results. Increasing anion alkyl chain length increased the toxicity, whereas branching of the chain decreased the toxicity of the ILs. The toxicity of the ILs in this study was mainly determined by the surface-active anions, while cations induced a minor impact on the toxicity. In the DSC experiments the same trend was observed for all the studied anions, whereas the cations seemed to induce more variable impact on the phase transition behaviour. Toxicity measurements combined with liposome interaction studies can provide a valuable tool for assessing the mechanism of toxicity.

  13. In silico Prediction and Docking of Tertiary Structure of LuxI, an Inducer Synthase of Vibrio fischeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Zaghlool Saeed Al-Khayyat

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: LuxI is a component of the quorum sensing signaling pathway in Vibrio fischeri responsible for the inducer synthesis that is essential for bioluminescence. Methods: Homology modeling of LuxI was carried out using Phyre2 and refined with the GalaxyWEB server. Five models were generated and evaluated by ERRAT, ANOLEA, QMEAN6, and Procheck. Results: Five refined models were generated by the GalaxyWEB server, with Model 4 having the greatest quality based on the QMEAN6 score of 0.732. ERRAT analysis revealed an overall quality of 98.9%, while the overall quality of the initial model was 54%. The mean force potential energy, as analyzed by ANOLEA, were better compared to the initial model. Sterochemical quality estimation by Procheck showed that the refined Model 4 had a reliable structure, and was therefore submitted to the protein model database. Drug Discovery Workbench V.2 was used to screen 2700 experimental compounds from the DrugBank database to identify inhibitors that can bind to the active site between amino acids 24 and 110. Ten compounds with high negative scores were selected as the best in binding. Conclusion: The model produced, and the predicted acteyltransferase binding site, could be useful in modeling homologous sequences from other microorganisms and the design of new antimicrobials.

  14. Predicting the ecotoxicity of ionic liquids towards Vibrio fischeri using genetic function approximation and least squares support vector machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shuying; Lv, Min; Deng, Fangfang; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhai, Honglin; Lv, Wenjuan

    2015-01-01

    Ionic liquids (ILs) are widely used in industrial production for their unique physicochemical properties, and they are even regarded as green solvents. However, the recent study showed ILs might pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems. In the present work, the quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models, including genetic function approximation (GFA) and least squares support vector machine (LSSVM) were developed for predicting the ecotoxicity of ILs towards the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri based on the descriptors calculated from cations and anions. Five descriptors were selected by GFA and used to develop the linear model. From the discussion of descriptors, the cation structure was the main factor to the toxicity, which mainly depended on the size, lipophilic, and 3D molecular structure of cations. In order to capture the nonlinear nature, the LSSVM model was also built for more accurately predicting the ecotoxicity. The GFA and LSSVM models were performed the rigorous internal and external validation, further verifying these models with excellent robustness and predictive ability. Therefore, both of models can be used for the prediction of the ecotoxicity of newly synthesized and untested ILs, and can provide reference information and theoretical guidance for designing and synthesizing safer and more eco-friendly ILs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A DFT-based toxicity QSAR study of aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri: Consideration of aqueous freely dissolved concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Yang, Xianhai; Wang, Juying; Cong, Yi; Mu, Jingli; Jin, Fei

    2016-05-05

    In the present study, quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) techniques based on toxicity mechanism and density functional theory (DFT) descriptors were adopted to develop predictive models for the toxicity of alkylated and parent aromatic hydrocarbons to Vibrio fischeri. The acute toxicity data of 17 aromatic hydrocarbons from both literature and our experimental results were used to construct QSAR models by partial least squares (PLS) analysis. With consideration of the toxicity process, the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between water phase and lipid phase and their interaction with the target biomolecule, the optimal QSAR model was obtained by introducing aqueous freely dissolved concentration. The high statistical values of R(2) (0.956) and Q(CUM)(2) (0.942) indicated that the model has good goodness-of-fit, robustness and internal predictive power. The average molecular polarizability (α) and several selected thermodynamic parameters reflecting the intermolecular interactions played important roles in the partition of aromatic hydrocarbons between the water phase and biomembrane. Energy of the highest occupied molecular orbital (E(HOMO)) was the most influential descriptor which dominated the toxicity of aromatic hydrocarbons through the electron-transfer reaction with biomolecules. The results demonstrated that the adoption of freely dissolved concentration instead of nominal concentration was a beneficial attempt for toxicity QSAR modeling of hydrophobic organic chemicals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Relationship between acute and chronic toxicity for prevalent organic pollutants in Vibrio fischeri based upon chemical mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao H; Fan, Ling Y; Wang, Shuo; Wang, Yue; Yan, Li C; Zheng, Shan S; Martyniuk, Christopher J; Zhao, Yuan H

    2017-09-15

    Chemicals show diverse modes of action (MOAs) in aquatic organisms depending upon acute and chronic toxicity evaluations. Here, toxicity data for Vibrio fischeri involving 52 compounds for acute and chronic toxicity were used to determine the congruence of acute and chronic toxicity for assessing MOAs. Using toxic ratios, most of the compounds categorized into MOAs that included baseline, less inert or reactive compounds with acute toxicity were also categorized as baseline, less inert or reactive compounds with chronic toxicity. However, significantly different toxic effects were observed with acute and chronic toxicity for the reactive and specific-acting compounds. The acute-chronic toxic ratios were smaller and less variable for the baseline and less inert compounds, but were greater and more variable for the reactive and specific-acting compounds. Baseline and less inert compounds share same MOAs, but reactive and specific-acting compounds have different MOAs between acute and chronic toxicity. Bioconcentration processes cannot reach an equilibrium for highly hydrophilic and ionized compounds with short-term exposure, resulting in lower toxicity compared to long-term exposure. Pronounced differences for the antibiotics were not only due to the difference in bioconcentration, but also due to a predicted difference in MOAs during acute and chronic exposures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A best​ comprehension about the toxicity of phenylsulfonyl carboxylates in Vibrio fischeri using quantitative structure activity/property relationship methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Melo, Eduardo Borges; Martins, João Paulo Athaíde; Miranda, Eduardo Hösel; Ferreira, Márcia Miguel Castro

    2016-03-05

    Aromatic sulfones comprise a class of chemicals used in agrochemical and pharmaceutical industries and as floatation and extractant agents in petrochemical and metallurgy industries. In this study, new QSA(P)R studies were carried out to predict the toxicity against Vibrio fischeri of a set of 52 aromatic sulfones. The same approach was used to evaluate the relationship between these endpoint and the water solubility, another important environmental endpoint. The study resulted in models of good statistical quality and mechanistic interpretation with a possible correlation between the two endpoints, but the toxic effect is also likely to depend on other physicochemical properties. The use of the PLS2, a method not commonly used in QSA(P)R studies, also produced models of greater reliability, and the relationship between the two endpoints was reinforced to some degree. These results are useful for better understanding the process by which these compounds exert their environmental toxicity, thus aiding in the development of industrially useful compounds with less potential environmental damage. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The first engagement of partners in the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri symbiosis is a two-step process initiated by a few environmental symbiont cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altura, Melissa A; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Gillette, Amani; Kremer, Natacha; Krachler, Anne-Marie; Brennan, Caitlin; Ruby, Edward G; Orth, Kim; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2013-11-01

    We studied the Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri symbiosis to characterize, in vivo and in real time, the transition between the bacterial partner's free-living and symbiotic life styles. Previous studies using high inocula demonstrated that environmental V. fischeri cells aggregate during a 3 h period in host-shed mucus along the light organ's superficial ciliated epithelia. Under lower inoculum conditions, similar to the levels of symbiont cells in the environment, this interaction induces haemocyte trafficking into these tissues. Here, in experiments simulating natural conditions, microscopy revealed that at 3 h following first exposure, only ∼ 5 V. fischeri cells aggregated on the organ surface. These cells associated with host cilia and induced haemocyte trafficking. Symbiont viability was essential and mutants defective in symbiosis initiation and/or production of certain surface features, including the Mam7 protein, which is implicated in host cell attachment of V. cholerae, associated normally with host cilia. Studies with exopolysaccharide mutants, which are defective in aggregation, suggest a two-step process of V. fischeri cell engagement: association with host cilia followed by aggregation, i.e. host cell-symbiont interaction with subsequent symbiont-symbiont cell interaction. Taken together, these data provide a new model of early partner engagement, a complex model of host-symbiont interaction with exquisite sensitivity. © 2013 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cr(VI) reduction into Cr(III) as a mechanism to explain the low sensitivity of Vibrio fischeri bioassay to detect chromium pollution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulladosa, Elena; Desjardin, Valérie; Murat, Jean-Claude; Gourdon, Rémy; Villaescusa, Isabel

    2006-10-01

    Vibrio fischeri bacteria, used as a biological target in either acute or chronic toxicity tests, display a low sensitivity to Cr(VI). This phenomenon could be due to the capacity of these bacteria to reduce Cr(VI) into Cr(III). This reducing capacity was found to depend on culture medium composition, pH value, incubation time and the presence of a carbon source. It also depends on the nature of the carbon source, glucose being more efficient than glycerol. This is probably related to differences in bacterial metabolism when given either glucose or glycerol. The thermostable Cr(VI)-reducing activity found in the supernatants of V. fischeri cultures grown on glucose suggests that, under these conditions, the bacteria release non-proteic reducing substances which have not been identified yet.

  20. Antisocial luxO Mutants Provide a Stationary-Phase Survival Advantage in Vibrio fischeri ES114.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, John H; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-12-07

    The squid light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri controls bioluminescence using two acyl-homoserine lactone pheromone-signaling (PS) systems. The first of these systems to be activated during host colonization, AinS/AinR, produces and responds to N-octanoyl homoserine lactone (C(8)-AHL). We screened activity of a P(ainS)-lacZ transcriptional reporter in a transposon mutant library and found three mutants with decreased reporter activity, low C(8)-AHL output, and other traits consistent with low ainS expression. However, the transposon insertions were unrelated to these phenotypes, and genome resequencing revealed that each mutant had a distinct point mutation in luxO. In the wild type, LuxO is phosphorylated by LuxU and then activates transcription of the small RNA (sRNA) Qrr, which represses ainS indirectly by repressing its activator LitR. The luxO mutants identified here encode LuxU-independent, constitutively active LuxO* proteins. The repeated appearance of these luxO mutants suggested that they had some fitness advantage during construction and/or storage of the transposon mutant library, and we found that luxO* mutants survived better and outcompeted the wild type in prolonged stationary-phase cultures. From such cultures we isolated additional luxO* mutants. In all, we isolated LuxO* allelic variants with the mutations P41L, A91D, F94C, P98L, P98Q, V106A, V106G, T107R, V108G, R114P, L205F, H319R, H324R, and T335I. Based on the current model of the V. fischeri PS circuit, litR knockout mutants should resemble luxO* mutants; however, luxO* mutants outcompeted litR mutants in prolonged culture and had much poorer host colonization competitiveness than is reported for litR mutants, illustrating additional complexities in this regulatory circuit. Our results provide novel insight into the function of LuxO, which is a key component of pheromone signaling (PS) cascades in several members of the Vibrionaceae. Our results also contribute to an increasingly appreciated

  1. O-antigen and core carbohydrate of Vibrio fischeri lipopolysaccharide: composition and analysis of their role in Euprymna scolopes light organ colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Deborah M B; Yu, Liping; Krasity, Benjamin C; Choudhury, Biswa; Mandel, Mark J; Brennan, Caitlin A; Ruby, Edward G; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J; Gibson, Bradford W; Apicella, Michael A

    2012-03-09

    Vibrio fischeri exists in a symbiotic relationship with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, where the squid provides a home for the bacteria, and the bacteria in turn provide camouflage that helps protect the squid from night-time predators. Like other gram-negative organisms, V. fischeri expresses lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on its cell surface. The structure of the O-antigen and the core components of the LPS and their possible role in colonization of the squid have not previously been determined. In these studies, an O-antigen ligase mutant, waaL, was utilized to determine the structures of these LPS components and their roles in colonization of the squid. WaaL ligates the O-antigen to the core of the LPS; thus, LPS from waaL mutants lacks O-antigen. Our results show that the V. fischeri waaL mutant has a motility defect, is significantly delayed in colonization, and is unable to compete with the wild-type strain in co-colonization assays. Comparative analyses of the LPS from the wild-type and waaL strains showed that the V. fischeri LPS has a single O-antigen repeat composed of yersiniose, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, and N-acetylfucosamine. In addition, the LPS from the waaL strain showed that the core structure consists of L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, D-glycero-D-manno-heptose, glucose, 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid, N-acetylgalactosamine, 8-epi-legionaminic acid, phosphate, and phosphoethanolamine. These studies indicate that the unusual V. fischeri O-antigen sugars play a role in the early phases of bacterial colonization of the squid.

  2. Toxicity of 58 substituted anilines and phenols to algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and bacteria Vibrio fischeri: comparison with published data and QSARs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles; Kahru, Anne

    2011-09-01

    A congeneric set of 58 substituted anilines and phenols was tested using the 72-h algal growth inhibition assay with Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and 15-min Vibrio fischeri luminescence inhibition assay. The set contained molecules substituted with one, two or three groups chosen from -chloro, -methyl or -ethyl. For 48 compounds there was no REACH-compatible algal toxicity data available before. The experimentally obtained EC50 values (mg L(-1)) for algae ranged from 1.43 (3,4,5-trichloroaniline) to 197 (phenol) and for V. fischeri from 0.37 (2,3,5-trichlorophenol) to 491 (aniline). Only five of the tested 58 chemicals showed inhibitory effect to algae at concentrations >100 mg L(-1), i.e. could be classified as "not harmful", 32 chemicals as "harmful" (10-100 mg L(-1)) and 21 as "toxic" (1-10 mg L(-1)). The occupied para-position tended to increase toxicity whereas most of the ortho-substituted congeners were the least toxic. As a rule, the higher the number of substituents the higher the hydrophobicity and toxicity. However, in case of both assays, the compounds of similar hydrophobicity showed up to 30-fold different toxicities. There were also assay/organism dependent tendencies: phenols were more toxic than anilines in the V. fischeri assay but not in the algal test. The comparison of the experimental toxicity data to the data available from the literature as well as to QSAR predictions showed that toxicity of phenols to algae can be modeled based on hydrophobicity, whereas the toxicity of anilines to algae as well as toxicity of both anilines and phenols to V. fischeri depended on other characteristics in addition to log K(ow). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Sensor kinase RscS induces the production of antigenically distinct outer membrane vesicles that depend on the symbiosis polysaccharide locus in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Satoshi; Visick, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Robust biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri depends upon activation of the symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) locus, which is achieved by overexpressing the RscS sensor kinase (RscS(+)). Other than the Syp polysaccharide, however, little is known about V. fischeri biofilm matrix components. In other bacteria, biofilms contain polysaccharides, secreted proteins, and outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Here, we asked whether OMVs are part of V. fischeri biofilms. Transmission electron microscopy revealed OMV-like particles between cells within colonies. In addition, OMVs could be purified from culture supernatants of both RscS(+) and control cells, with the former releasing 2- to 3-fold more OMVs. The increase depended upon the presence of an intact syp locus, as an RscS(+) strain deleted for sypK, which encodes a putative oligosaccharide translocase, exhibited reduced production of OMVs; it also showed a severe defect in biofilm formation. Western immunoblot analyses revealed that the RscS(+) strain, but not the control strain or the RscS(+) sypK mutant, produced a distinct set of nonproteinaceous molecules that could be detected in whole-cell extracts, OMV preparations, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) extracts. Finally, deletion of degP, which in other bacteria influences OMV production, decreased OMV production and reduced the ability of the cells to form biofilms. We conclude that overexpression of RscS induces OMV production in a manner that depends on the presence of the syp locus and that OMVs produced under these conditions contain antigenically distinct molecules, possibly representing a modified form of lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Finally, our data indicate a correlation between OMV production and biofilm formation by V. fischeri.

  4. Coordination of the arc regulatory system and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in controlling the Vibrio fischeri lux operon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alecia N Septer

    Full Text Available Bacterial pheromone signaling is often governed both by environmentally responsive regulators and by positive feedback. This regulatory combination has the potential to coordinate a group response among distinct subpopulations that perceive key environmental stimuli differently. We have explored the interplay between an environmentally responsive regulator and pheromone-mediated positive feedback in intercellular signaling by Vibrio fischeri ES114, a bioluminescent bacterium that colonizes the squid Euprymna scolopes. Bioluminescence in ES114 is controlled in part by N-(3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (3OC6, a pheromone produced by LuxI that together with LuxR activates transcription of the luxICDABEG operon, initiating a positive feedback loop and inducing luminescence. The lux operon is also regulated by environmentally responsive regulators, including the redox-responsive ArcA/ArcB system, which directly represses lux in culture. Here we show that inactivating arcA leads to increased 3OC6 accumulation to initiate positive feedback. In the absence of positive feedback, arcA-mediated control of luminescence was only ∼2-fold, but luxI-dependent positive feedback contributed more than 100 fold to the net induction of luminescence in the arcA mutant. Consistent with this overriding importance of positive feedback, 3OC6 produced by the arcA mutant induced luminescence in nearby wild-type cells, overcoming their ArcA repression of lux. Similarly, we found that artificially inducing ArcA could effectively repress luminescence before, but not after, positive feedback was initiated. Finally, we show that 3OC6 produced by a subpopulation of symbiotic cells can induce luminescence in other cells co-colonizing the host. Our results suggest that even transient loss of ArcA-mediated regulation in a sub-population of cells can induce luminescence in a wider community. Moreover, they indicate that 3OC6 can communicate information about both cell density

  5. Inhibition of SypG-induced biofilms and host colonization by the negative regulator SypE in Vibrio fischeri.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew R Morris

    Full Text Available Vibrio fischeri produces a specific biofilm to promote colonization of its eukaryotic host, the squid Euprymna scolopes. Formation of this biofilm is induced by the sensor kinase RscS, which functions upstream of the response regulator SypG to regulate transcription of the symbiosis polysaccharide (syp locus. Biofilm formation is also controlled by SypE, a multi-domain response regulator that consists of a central regulatory receiver (REC domain flanked by an N-terminal serine kinase domain and a C-terminal serine phosphatase domain. SypE permits biofilm formation under rscS overexpression conditions, but inhibits biofilms induced by overexpression of sypG. We previously investigated the function of SypE in controlling biofilm formation induced by RscS. Here, we examined the molecular mechanism by which SypE naturally inhibits SypG-induced biofilms. We found that SypE's N-terminal kinase domain was both required and sufficient to inhibit SypG-induced biofilms. This effect did not occur at the level of syp transcription. Instead, under sypG-overexpressing conditions, SypE inhibited biofilms by promoting the phosphorylation of another syp regulator, SypA, a putative anti-sigma factor antagonist. Inhibition by SypE of SypG-induced biofilm formation could be overcome by the expression of a non-phosphorylatable SypA mutant, indicating that SypE functions primarily if not exclusively to control SypA activity via phosphorylation. Finally, the presence of SypE was detrimental to colonization under sypG-overexpressing conditions, as cells deleted for sypE outcompeted wild-type cells for colonization when both strains overexpressed sypG. These results provide further evidence that biofilm formation is critical to symbiotic colonization, and support a model in which SypE naturally functions to restrict biofilm formation, and thus host colonization, to the appropriate environmental conditions.

  6. Comparison of Toxicities to Vibrio fischeri and Fish Based on Discrimination of Excess Toxicity from Baseline Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao H; Yu, Yang; Huang, Tao; Qin, Wei C; Su, Li M; Zhao, Yuan H

    2016-01-01

    Investigations on the relationship of toxicities between species play an important role in the understanding of toxic mechanisms to environmental organisms. In this paper, the toxicity data of 949 chemicals to fish and 1470 chemicals to V. fischeri were used to investigate the modes of action (MOAs) between species. The results show that although there is a positive interspecies correlation, the relationship is poor. Analysis on the excess toxicity calculated from toxic ratios (TR) shows that many chemicals have close toxicities and share the same MOAs between the two species. Linear relationships between the toxicities and octanol/water partition coefficient (log KOW) for baseline and less inert compounds indicate that the internal critical concentrations (CBRs) approach a constant both to fish and V. fischeri for neutral hydrophobic compounds. These compounds share the same toxic mechanisms and bio-uptake processes between species. On the other hand, some hydrophilic compounds exhibit different toxic effects with greatly different log TR values between V. fischeri and fish species. These hydrophilic compounds were identified as reactive MOAs to V. fischeri, but not to fish. The interspecies correlation is improved by adding a hydrophobic descriptor into the correlation equation. This indicates that the differences in the toxic ratios between fish and V. fischeri for these hydrophilic compounds can be partly attributed to the differences of bioconcentration between the two species, rather than the differences of reactivity with the target macromolecules. These hydrophilic compounds may more easily pass through the cell membrane of V. fischeri than the gill and skin of fish, react with the target macromolecules and exhibit excess toxicity. The compounds with log KOW > 7 exhibiting very low toxicity (log TR < -1) to both species indicate that the bioconcentration potential of a chemical plays a very important role in the identification of excess toxicity and MOAs.

  7. Comparison of Toxicities to Vibrio fischeri and Fish Based on Discrimination of Excess Toxicity from Baseline Level.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao H Wang

    Full Text Available Investigations on the relationship of toxicities between species play an important role in the understanding of toxic mechanisms to environmental organisms. In this paper, the toxicity data of 949 chemicals to fish and 1470 chemicals to V. fischeri were used to investigate the modes of action (MOAs between species. The results show that although there is a positive interspecies correlation, the relationship is poor. Analysis on the excess toxicity calculated from toxic ratios (TR shows that many chemicals have close toxicities and share the same MOAs between the two species. Linear relationships between the toxicities and octanol/water partition coefficient (log KOW for baseline and less inert compounds indicate that the internal critical concentrations (CBRs approach a constant both to fish and V. fischeri for neutral hydrophobic compounds. These compounds share the same toxic mechanisms and bio-uptake processes between species. On the other hand, some hydrophilic compounds exhibit different toxic effects with greatly different log TR values between V. fischeri and fish species. These hydrophilic compounds were identified as reactive MOAs to V. fischeri, but not to fish. The interspecies correlation is improved by adding a hydrophobic descriptor into the correlation equation. This indicates that the differences in the toxic ratios between fish and V. fischeri for these hydrophilic compounds can be partly attributed to the differences of bioconcentration between the two species, rather than the differences of reactivity with the target macromolecules. These hydrophilic compounds may more easily pass through the cell membrane of V. fischeri than the gill and skin of fish, react with the target macromolecules and exhibit excess toxicity. The compounds with log KOW > 7 exhibiting very low toxicity (log TR < -1 to both species indicate that the bioconcentration potential of a chemical plays a very important role in the identification of excess

  8. Development of a Facile and High-Throughput Bioluminescence Assay Using Vibrio fischeri to Determine the Chronic Toxicity of Contaminated Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasuhoglu, Deniz; Westlund, Paul; Isazadeh, Siavash; Neamatallah, Sarah; Yargeau, Viviane

    2017-02-01

    Chronic toxicity testing using the luminescent bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, has recently been demonstrated to be a suitable bioassay for water quality monitoring. The toxicity evaluation is typically based on determining the EC50 at specific time points which may lead to overlooking the dynamic nature of luminescence response and limits information regarding the possible mechanisms of action of target compounds. This study investigated various approaches (standard, integral, and luminescence rate inhibition) to evaluate the chronic toxicity of three target compounds (atrazine, trimethoprim, and acetamiprid) using a 96-well plate based method. The chronic toxicity assay and the methods used for EC50 calculation provided in this work resulted in a high-throughput method of chronic toxicity testing and indicated lower EC50 than the values provided by the standard short term methods, indicating higher toxicity. This study emphasizes the need for additional chronic toxicity testing to further evaluate the toxicity of compounds or unknown samples.

  9. Growth on glucose decreases cAMP-CRP activity while paradoxically increasing intracellular cAMP in the light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colton, Deanna M; Stoudenmire, Julie L; Stabb, Eric V

    2015-09-01

    Proteobacteria often co-ordinate responses to carbon sources using CRP and the second messenger cyclic 3', 5'-AMP (cAMP), which combine to control transcription of genes during growth on non-glucose substrates as part of the catabolite-repression response. Here we show that cAMP-CRP is active and important in Vibrio fischeri during colonization of its host squid Euprymna scolopes. Moreover, consistent with a classical role in catabolite repression, a cAMP-CRP-dependent reporter showed lower activity in cells grown in media amended with glucose rather than glycerol. Surprisingly though, intracellular cAMP levels were higher in glucose-grown cells. Mutant analyses were consistent with predictions that CyaA was responsible for cAMP generation, that the EIIA(Glc) component of glucose transport could enhance cAMP production and that the phophodiesterases CpdA and CpdP consumed intracellular and extracellular cAMP respectively. However, the observation of lower cAMP levels in glycerol-grown cells seemed best explained by changes in cAMP export, via an unknown mechanism. Our data also indicated that cAMP-CRP activity decreased during growth on glucose independently of crp's native transcriptional regulation or cAMP levels. We speculate that some unknown mechanism, perhaps carbon-source-dependent post-translational modulation of CRP, may help control cAMP-CRP activity in V.fischeri. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Model-enabled gene search (MEGS) allows fast and direct discovery of enzymatic and transport gene functions in the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shu; Nikolakakis, Kiel; Adamczyk, Paul A; Pan, Min; Ruby, Edward G; Reed, Jennifer L

    2017-06-16

    Whereas genomes can be rapidly sequenced, the functions of many genes are incompletely or erroneously annotated because of a lack of experimental evidence or prior functional knowledge in sequence databases. To address this weakness, we describe here a model-enabled gene search (MEGS) approach that (i) identifies metabolic functions either missing from an organism's genome annotation or incorrectly assigned to an ORF by using discrepancies between metabolic model predictions and experimental culturing data; (ii) designs functional selection experiments for these specific metabolic functions; and (iii) selects a candidate gene(s) responsible for these functions from a genomic library and directly interrogates this gene's function experimentally. To discover gene functions, MEGS uses genomic functional selections instead of relying on correlations across large experimental datasets or sequence similarity as do other approaches. When applied to the bioluminescent marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri, MEGS successfully identified five genes that are responsible for four metabolic and transport reactions whose absence from a draft metabolic model of V. fischeri caused inaccurate modeling of high-throughput experimental data. This work demonstrates that MEGS provides a rapid and efficient integrated computational and experimental approach for annotating metabolic genes, including those that have previously been uncharacterized or misannotated. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The response regulator SypE controls biofilm formation and colonization through phosphorylation of the syp-encoded regulator SypA in Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Andrew R; Visick, Karen L

    2013-02-01

    Bacteria utilize multiple regulatory systems to modulate gene expression in response to environmental changes, including two-component signalling systems and partner-switching networks. We recently identified a novel regulatory protein, SypE, that combines features of both signalling systems. SypE contains a central response regulator receiver domain flanked by putative kinase and phosphatase effector domains with similarity to partner-switching proteins. SypE was previously shown to exert dual control over biofilm formation through the opposing activities of its terminal effector domains. Here, we demonstrate that SypE controls biofilms in Vibrio fischeri by regulating the activity of SypA, a STAS (sulphate transporter and anti-sigma antagonist) domain protein. Using biochemical and genetic approaches, we determined that SypE both phosphorylates and dephosphorylates SypA, and that phosphorylation inhibits SypA's activity. Furthermore, we found that biofilm formation and symbiotic colonization required active, unphosphorylated SypA, and thus SypA phosphorylation corresponded with a loss of biofilms and impaired host colonization. Finally, expression of a non-phosphorylatable mutant of SypA suppressed both the biofilm and symbiosis defects of a constitutively inhibitory SypE mutant strain. This study demonstrates that regulation of SypA activity by SypE is a critical mechanism by which V. fischeri controls biofilm development and symbiotic colonization. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Time-dependent hormesis of chemical mixtures: A case study on sulfa antibiotics and a quorum-sensing inhibitor of Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Ruirong; Sun, Haoyu; Yu, Yan; Lin, Zhifen; Qin, Mengnan; Liu, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Sulfa antibiotics (SAs) and quorum-sensing inhibitor (QSI) may pose potential ecological risks because mixed using of them has been proposed to inhibit bacteria from generating antibiotic resistance. This study investigated the time-dependent hormesis of single and binary mixtures of QSI and SAs of Vibrio fischeri (V. fischeri) for 0-24 h. Although the low-dose SAs stimulated the expression of LuxR protein, the high-dose SAs could inhibit bacteria growth by competitively binding to dihydropteroate synthase. Moreover, AinR protein was bound to Benzofuran-3(2H)-one (B3O) with low concentration, thus the N-octanoyl homoserine lactone signal molecules (C8) has chance to bind to LuxR protein to promote light emission. The hormesis effect induced by the mixtures could be deduced that SAs promoted the expression of LuxR protein and B3O increases the chance of C8 binding to LuxR. Our findings facilitate new insight into the mechanistic study of hormesis and ecological risks of the chemical mixtures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. TfoX-based genetic mapping identifies Vibrio fischeri strain-level differences and reveals a common lineage of laboratory strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, John F; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Kocher, Acadia A; Markey, Laura E H; Mandel, Mark J

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial strain variation exists in natural populations of bacteria and can be generated experimentally through directed or random mutation. The advent of rapid and cost-efficient whole-genome sequencing has facilitated strain-level genotyping. Even with modern tools, however, it often remains a challenge to map specific traits to individual genetic loci, especially for traits that cannot be selected under culture conditions (e.g., colonization level or pathogenicity). Using a combination of classical and modern approaches, we analyzed strain-level variation in Vibrio fischeri and identified the basis by which some strains lack the ability to utilize glycerol as a carbon source. We proceeded to reconstruct the lineage of the commonly used V. fischeri laboratory strains. Compared to the wild-type ES114 strain, we identify in ES114-L a 9.9-kb deletion with endpoints in tadB2 and glpF; restoration of the missing portion of glpF restores the wild-type phenotype. The widely used strains ESR1, JRM100, and JRM200 contain the same deletion, and ES114-L is likely a previously unrecognized intermediate strain in the construction of many ES114 derivatives. ES114-L does not exhibit a defect in competitive squid colonization but ESR1 does, demonstrating that glycerol utilization is not required for early squid colonization. Our genetic mapping approach capitalizes on the recently discovered chitin-based transformation pathway, which is conserved in the Vibrionaceae; therefore, the specific approach used is likely to be useful for mapping genetic traits in other Vibrio species. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. The syp enhancer sequence plays a key role in transcriptional activation by the σ54-dependent response regulator SypG and in biofilm formation and host colonization by Vibrio fischeri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Valerie A; Eddy, Justin L; Hussa, Elizabeth A; Misale, Michael; Visick, Karen L

    2013-12-01

    Biofilm formation by Vibrio fischeri is a complex process that requires multiple regulators. One such regulator, the NtrC-like response regulator SypG, controls biofilm formation and host colonization by V. fischeri via its impact on transcription of the symbiosis polysaccharide (syp) locus. SypG is predicted to activate syp transcription by binding to the syp enhancer (SE), a conserved sequence located upstream of four syp promoters. In this study, we performed an in-depth analysis of the sequences necessary for SypG to promote syp transcription and biofilm formation. We found that the SE sequence is necessary for SypG-mediated syp transcription, identified individual bases necessary for efficient activation, and determined that SypG is able to bind to syp promoter regions. We also identified SE sequences outside the syp locus and established that SypG recognizes these sequences as well. Finally, deletion of the SE sequence upstream of sypA led to defects in both biofilm formation and host colonization that could be restored by reintroducing the SE sequence into its native location in the chromosome. This work thus fills in critical gaps in knowledge of the Syp regulatory circuit by demonstrating a role for the SE sequence in SypG-dependent control of biofilm formation and host colonization and by identifying new putative regulon members. It may also provide useful insights into other bacteria, such as Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus, that have syp-like loci and conserved SE sequences.

  15. In silico modelling for predicting the cationic hydrophobicity and cytotoxicity of ionic liquids towards the Leukemia rat cell line, Vibrio fischeri and Scenedesmus vacuolatus based on molecular interaction potentials of ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, C-W; Ranke, J; Arning, J; Thöming, J; Preiss, U; Jungnickel, C; Diedenhofen, M; Krossing, I; Stolte, S

    2013-10-01

    In this study we present prediction models for estimating in silico the cationic hydrophobicity and the cytotoxicity (log [1/EC50]) of ionic liquids (ILs) towards the Leukemia rat cell line (IPC-81), the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri and the limnic green algae Scenedesmus vacuolatus using linear free energy relationship (LFER) descriptors computed by COSMO calculations. The LFER descriptors used for the prediction model (i.e. excess molar refraction (E), dipolarity/polarizability (S), hydrogen-bonding acidity (A), hydrogen-bonding basicity (B) and McGowan volume (V)) were calculated using sub-descriptors (sig2, sig3, HBD3, HBA4, MR, and volume) derived from COSMO-RS, COSMO and OBPROP. With the combination of two solute descriptors (B, V) of the cation we were able to predict cationic hydrophobicity values (log ko ) with r (2) = 0.987 and standard error (SE) = 0.139 log units. By using the calculated log k o values, we were able to deduce a linear toxicity prediction model. In the second prediction study for the cytotoxicity of ILs, analysis of descriptor sensitivity helped us to determine that the McGowan volume (V) terms of the cation was the most important predictor of cytotoxicity and to simplify prediction models for cytotoxicity of ILs towards the IPC-81 (r (2) of 0.778, SE of 0.450 log units), Vibrio fischeri (r (2) of 0.762, SE of 0.529 log units) and Scenedesmus vacuolatus (r (2) of 0.776, SE of 0.825 log units). The robustness and predictivity of the two models for IPC-81 and Vibrio fischeri were checked by comparing the calculated SE and r (2) (coefficient of determination) values of the test set.

  16. Time- and anion-dependent stimulation on triphosphopyridine nucleotide followed by antioxidant responses in Vibrio fischeri after exposure to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium salts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, ZhenYang; Mo, LingYun; Zhang, Jing; Liu, ShuShen

    2016-11-01

    A toxicity database of over 157 ionic liquids (ILs) was established on Vibrio fischeri (VF). The database contained mainly monotonic concentration-response relationship, and its application in risk assessment was challenged by potential non-monotonic hormetic effects of ILs. In the present study, the hormetic effects of 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium salts ([emim]X, X = BF4, Cl and Br) were confirmed on VF, and biochemical explanations were explored in a time-dependent manner. On luminescence, [emim]BF4 showed inhibitory effects compared with the control, and the median effective concentration (EC50) increased from 3.15E-02 to 8.88E-02 mol/L from 0.25 to 24 h. Notably, [emim]BF4 also showed stimulatory effects at 18 h when the maximum stimulation (Emin) was 51.8% higher than the control, and at 24 h when the Emin increased to 120% higher than the control. Compared with [emim]BF4, [emim]Cl had higher EC50 values which increased over time, while it had less maximum stimulation which also increased over time. In results of [emim]Br, there were only inhibitory effects. At the biochemical level, the stimulatory effects of [emim]BF4 and [emim]Cl on triphosphopyridine nucleotide (NADPH) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) were earlier than those on luminescence. Moreover, NAD(P)H showed stimulation in [emim]Br which did not have hormetic effects on luminescence. Meanwhile, the effects of [emim]X on flavin mononucleotide, adenosine-triphosphate, reactive oxygen species, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione and lipid peroxidases showed consistent time-dependent changes with those on luminescence. The results indicated different roles between NAD(P)H and other biochemical indices, e.g., the antioxidant responses, in the stimulation of [emim]X on luminescence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Coexpression of luxA and luxB genes of Vibrio fischeri in NIH3T3 mammalian cells and evaluation of its bioluminescence activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tehrani, Golnaz Asaadi; Mirzaahmadi, Sina; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Kazemi, Bahram

    2014-02-01

    Expression of bacterial luciferase enzyme (lux) in eukaryotic cells would provide a new bioreporter system for in vivo imaging and diagnostics technology. In spite of this, until now only a few efforts have been made to express bacterial luciferase enzyme in eukaryotic cells. We attempted to synthesize an expression construct of luxA and luxB genes from Vibrio fischeri. The luxA and luxB genes were cloned into the MCS of pTZ57R via the 5' kpnI, BamHI and BamHI, EcoRI restriction sites to generate pTZ57R/luxA and pTZ57R/luxB respectively, then newly synthesized constructs were cleaved with the same enzymes and respectively cloned into the pcDNA3.1(+) (Hyg) and pcDNA3.1(+) (Neo) expression vectors to create pcDNA3.1(+) (Hyg)/luxA and pcDNA3.1(+) (neo)/luxB. Recombinant constructs were cotransfected to the NIH3T3 cell line. Gene expression was confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting; in addition, bioluminescence characteristics of transfected NIH3T3 cell lines were evaluated by decanal supplement. In conclusion, in the current research, separate vector systems were constructed, which are composed of bacterial luciferase genes (luxA and luxB) that accordingly have not already been reported. These results hold promise toward the potential development of an autonomous light-generating lux reporter system in eukaryotic cells. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Determination of drugs in surface water and wastewater samples by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: Methods and preliminary results including toxicity studies with Vibrio fischeri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farre, M.; Ferrer, I.; Ginebreda, A.; Figueras, M.; Olivella, L.; Tirapu, L.; Vilanova, M.; Barcelo, D.

    2001-01-01

    In the present work a combined analytical method involving toxicity and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS) was developed for the determination of pharmaceutical compounds in water samples. The drugs investigated were the analgesics: ibuprofen, ketoprofen, naproxen, and diclofenac, the decomposition product of the acetyl salicylic acid: salicylic acid and one lipid lowering agent, gemfibrozil. The selected compounds are acidic substances, very polar and all of them are analgesic compounds that can be purchased without medical prescription. The developed protocol consisted, first of all, on the use Microtox?? and ToxAlert??100 toxicity tests with Vibrio fischeri for the different pharmaceutical drugs. The 50% effective concentration (EC50) values and the toxicity units (TU) were determined for every compound using both systems. Sample enrichment of water samples was achieved by solid-phase extraction procedure (SPE), using the Merck LiChrolut?? EN cartridges followed by LC-ESI-MS. Average recoveries loading 1 l of samples with pH=2 varied from 69 to 91% and the detection limits in the range of 15-56 ng/l. The developed method was applied to real samples from wastewater and surface-river waters of Catalonia (north-east of Spain). One batch of samples was analyzed in parallel also by High Resolution Gas Chromatography coupled with Mass Spectrometry (HRGC-MS) and the results have been compared with the LC-ESI-MS method developed in this work. ?? 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapid in situ toxicity testing with luminescent bacteria Photorhabdus luminescens and Vibrio fischeri adapted to a small portable luminometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masner, Petr; Javůrková, Barbora; Bláha, Luděk

    2017-02-01

    The present study demonstrates development of a rapid testing protocol based on a small portable luminometer using flash kinetic assessment of bacterial bioluminescence. The laboratory comparisons based on six model organic toxicants and two metals showed significant correlations between responses of freshwater bacteria Photorhabdus luminescens and standard marine bacterial species Vibrio fisheri. While P. luminescens was less sensitive in standard arrangements, the responses of both organisms were comparable in the newly introduced portable luminometer setup. The applicability and reproducibility of the portable luminometer protocol was further demonstrated in the assessment of 43 European wastewater effluents that were simultaneously tested for toxicity and analysed for 150 organic and 20 inorganic contaminants grouped into 13 major chemical classes. Clear association between the toxic responses in both compared bacterial species and the elevated levels of inorganic compounds (toxic metals), chlorophenols and benzotriazole anticorrosives was observed. The new protocol with a portable luminometer provides a fast (30 s) response and may be used as a tool for rapid in situ toxicity evaluation of freshwater environmental samples such as effluents.

  20. Spontaneous phenotypic suppression of GacA-defective Vibrio fischeri is achieved via mutation of csrA and ihfA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxall, Randi L; Ballok, Alicia E; Avitabile, Ashley; Whistler, Cheryl A

    2015-09-16

    Symbiosis defective GacA-mutant derivatives of Vibrio fischeri are growth impaired thereby creating a selective advantage for growth-enhanced spontaneous suppressors. Suppressors were isolated and characterized for effects of the mutations on gacA-mutant defects of growth, siderophore activity and luminescence. The mutations were identified by targeted and whole genome sequencing. Most mutations that restored multiple phenotypes were non-null mutations that mapped to conserved domains in or altered expression of CsrA, a post-transcriptional regulator that mediates GacA effects in a number of bacterial species. These represent an array of unique mutations compared to those that have been described previously. Different substitutions at the same amino acid residue were identified allowing comparisons of effects such as at the R6 residue, which conferred relative differences in luminescence and siderophore levels. The screen revealed residues not previously identified as critical for function including a single native alanine. Most csrA mutations enhanced luminescence more than siderophore activity, which was especially evident for mutations predicted to reduce the amount of CsrA. Although CsrA mutations compensate for many known GacA mutant defects, not all CsrA suppressors restore symbiotic colonization. Phenotypes of a suppressor allele of ihfA that encodes one subunit of the integration host factor (IHF) heteroduplex indicated the protein represses siderophore and activates luminescence in a GacA-independent manner. In addition to its established role in regulation of central metabolism, the CsrA regulator represses luminescence and siderophore as an intermediate of the GacA regulatory hierachy. Siderophore regulation was less sensitive to stoichiometry of CsrA consistent with higher affinity for the targets of this trait. The lack of CsrA null-mutant recovery implied these mutations do not enhance fitness of gacA mutants and alluded to this gene being

  1. Qualité de l'eau ? Détermination de l'effet inhibiteur d'échantillons d'eau sur la luminescence de Vibrio fischeri (Essai de bactéries luminescentes) : Partie 3: Méthode utilisant des bactéries lyophilisées

    CERN Document Server

    International Organization for Standardization. Geneva

    1998-01-01

    Qualité de l'eau ? Détermination de l'effet inhibiteur d'échantillons d'eau sur la luminescence de Vibrio fischeri (Essai de bactéries luminescentes) : Partie 3: Méthode utilisant des bactéries lyophilisées

  2. Chronic ecotoxic effects to Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri, and cytostatic and genotoxic effects to the hepatoma cell line (HepG2) of ofloxacin photo(cata)lytically treated solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasquez, M.I. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Garcia-Käufer, M. [University Medical Centre Freiburg, Department of Environmental Health Sciences, 115 B, Breisacher Straße, 79106 Freiburg (Germany); Hapeshi, E. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Menz, J. [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Kostarelos, K.; Fatta-Kassinos, D. [University of Cyprus, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Cyprus, 75 Kallipoleos Street, 1678 Nicosia (Cyprus); Nireas International Water Research Center, University of Cyprus (Cyprus); Kümmerer, K., E-mail: Klaus.Kuemmerer@uni.leuphana.de [Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Leuphana University Lüneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1/C13, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany)

    2013-04-15

    Ofloxacin (OFL), a broad-spectrum and widespread-used photolabile fluoroquinolone, is frequently found in treated wastewaters, aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems leading to increasing concern during the past decades regarding its effects to the environment and human health. The elimination of OFL and other xenobiotics by the application of advanced oxidation processes using photolytic (PL) and photocatalytic (PC) treatments seems promising. However, an integrated assessment scheme is needed, in which, not only the removal of the parent compound, but also the effects of the photo-transformation products (PTPs) are investigated. For this purpose, in the present study, a chronic ecotoxic assessment using representative bacteria of marine and terrestrial ecosystems and a cytostatic and genotoxic evaluation using hepatoma cell line were performed. PL and PC treatments of OFL were applied using UV radiation. The photo-transformation of OFL during the treatments was monitored by DOC measurements and UPLC–MS/MS analysis. The chronic ecotoxicity of OFL and treated samples was evaluated using Pseudomonas putida and Vibrio fischeri; whereas the cytostasis and genotoxicity were estimated by the cytokinesis-block micronucleus assay (CBMN). The main results suggest that photo-transformation of OFL took place during these treatments since the concentration of OFL decreased when the irradiation time increased, as quantified by UPLC–MS/MS analysis, and this was not coupled with an analogous DOC removal. Furthermore, nine compounds were identified as probable PTPs formed through piperazinyl dealkylation and decarboxylation. The ecotoxicity of treated solutions to the bacteria studied decreased while the cytostasis to the hepatoma cell line remained at low levels during both treatments. However, the genotoxicity to the hepatoma cell line demonstrated a different pattern in which treated samples induced a greater number of MNi for the 4–16 min of irradiation (p < 0.05) during

  3. Novel Claycunbic to Eliminate Micropollutants and Vibrio fischeri from Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montmorillonite clay (K10) was used as a precursor for the synthesis of a catalytic adsorbent, Claycunbic (Bi/Cu-pillared K10), which was characterized by SEM (EDS), TEM, XRD, BET, TGA and XPS analysis. The catalytic adsorption of cationic dye methylene blue (MB), anionic dye met...

  4. Exopolysaccharide production by Vibrio fischeri, a fouling marine bacterium

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rodrigues, C.L; Bhosle, N.B.

    stream_size 8 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt stream_source_info Biofouling_4_301.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 ...

  5. Quorum Sensing in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim Miyashiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization.

  6. Quorum Sensing in the Squid-Vibrio Symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subhash C.; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization. PMID:23965960

  7. Quorum sensing in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Subhash C; Miyashiro, Tim

    2013-08-07

    Quorum sensing is an intercellular form of communication that bacteria use to coordinate group behaviors such as biofilm formation and the production of antibiotics and virulence factors. The term quorum sensing was originally coined to describe the mechanism underlying the onset of luminescence production in cultures of the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Luminescence and, more generally, quorum sensing are important for V. fischeri to form a mutualistic symbiosis with the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. The symbiosis is established when V. fischeri cells migrate via flagella-based motility from the surrounding seawater into a specialized structure injuvenile squid called the light organ. The cells grow to high cell densities within the light organ where the infection persists over the lifetime of the animal. A hallmark of a successful symbiosis is the luminescence produced by V. fischeri that camouflages the squid at night by eliminating its shadow within the water column. While the regulatory networks governing quorum sensing are critical for properly regulating V. fischeri luminescence within the squid light organ, they also regulate luminescence-independent processes during symbiosis. In this review, we discuss the quorum-sensing network of V. fischeri and highlight its impact at various stages during host colonization.

  8. Vibrio and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2013. Vibrio Infection. [Accessed January 2015]. Available at URL: http: / / www. cdc. gov/ vibrio/ index. html Centers for ... 2013. Vibrio parahaemolyticus. [Accessed January 2015]. Available at URL: http: / / www. cdc. gov/ vibrio/ vibriop. html Centers for ...

  9. Mannitol is essential for the development of stress-resistant ascospores in Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, T T; van Leeuwen, M R; Dijksterhuis, J; Wosten, Han

    2014-01-01

    The polyol mannitol is one of the main compatible solutes in Neosartorya fischeri and accumulates in conidia and ascospores. Here, it is shown that biosynthesis of mannitol in N. fischeri mainly depends on mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MpdA). Reporter studies and qPCR analysis demonstrated

  10. Mannitol is essential for the development of stress-resistant ascospores in Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, T T; van Leeuwen, M R; Wösten, H A B; Dijksterhuis, J

    The polyol mannitol is one of the main compatible solutes in Neosartorya fischeri and accumulates in conidia and ascospores. Here, it is shown that biosynthesis of mannitol in N. fischeri mainly depends on mannitol 1-phosphate dehydrogenase (MpdA). Reporter studies and qPCR analysis demonstrated

  11. Screening for antibacterial activity in 72 species of wood-colonizing fungi by the Vibrio fisheri bioluminescence method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zrimec, Maja Berden; Zrimec, Alexis; Slanc, Petra; Kac, Javor; Kreft, Samo

    2004-01-01

    Resistance of pathogenic bacteria to antibiotics leads scientists to discover new antibacterial drugs. Ninety samples of wood-colonizing fungi were cultivated on agar plates, and their extracts tested for antibacterial activity using the Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test. Two fungi species, Serpula lacrymans and Nectria vilior, were found to be a potential new source of thermostable antibiotics. Vibrio fischeri bioluminescence test was found to be a useful method for antibacterial activity screening from the samples of natural origin. Copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.

  12. Anticonvulsant Activity Of Diospyros fischeri Root Extracts | Moshi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These results provide evidence for the potential of D. fischeri extracts to treat absence seizures, especially given their seemingly innocuous nature. Keywords: Diospyros fischeri; Pentylenetetrazole; Anticonvulsant activity; Brine shrimp toxicity. African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicines Vol.

  13. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    OpenAIRE

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit p...

  14. BEHAVIORAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF DAPHNIA MAGNA, CHLORELLA VULGARIS, CORBICULA FLUMINEA, LEPOMIS MACROCHIRUS, AND VIBRO FISCHERI

    Science.gov (United States)

    The research presented here is a continuation of work designed to further the science of available and developing continuous, automated water quality monitors and how they may be most effectively deployed in a watershed management plan and/or water quality early warning system (W...

  15. The ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colbourne, John K.; Pfrender, Michael E.; Gilbert, Donald; Thomas, W. Kelley; Tucker, Abraham; Oakley, Todd H.; Tokishita, Shinichi; Aerts, Andrea; Arnold, Georg J.; Basu, Malay Kumar; Bauer, Darren J.; Caceres, Carla E.; Carmel, Liran; Casola, Claudio; Choi, Jeong-Hyeon; Detter, John C.; Dong, Qunfeng; Dusheyko, Serge; Eads, Brian D.; Frohlich, Thomas; Geiler-Samerotte, Kerry A.; Gerlach, Daniel; Hatcher, Phil; Jogdeo, Sanjuro; Krijgsveld, Jeroen; Kriventseva, Evgenia V; Kültz, Dietmar; Laforsch, Christian; Lindquist, Erika; Lopez, Jacqueline; Manak, Robert; Muller, Jean; Pangilinan, Jasmyn; Patwardhan, Rupali P.; Pitluck, Samuel; Pritham, Ellen J.; Rechtsteiner, Andreas; Rho, Mina; Rogozin, Igor B.; Sakarya, Onur; Salamov, Asaf; Schaack, Sarah; Shapiro, Harris; Shiga, Yasuhiro; Skalitzky, Courtney; Smith, Zachary; Souvorov, Alexander; Sung, Way; Tang, Zuojian; Tsuchiya, Dai; Tu, Hank; Vos, Harmjan; Wang, Mei; Wolf, Yuri I.; Yamagata, Hideo; Yamada, Takuji; Ye, Yuzhen; Shaw, Joseph R.; Andrews, Justen; Crease, Teresa J.; Tang, Haixu; Lucas, Susan M.; Robertson, Hugh M.; Bork, Peer; Koonin, Eugene V.; Zdobnov, Evgeny M.; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Lynch, Michael; Boore, Jeffrey L.

    2011-02-04

    This document provides supporting material related to the sequencing of the ecoresponsive genome of Daphnia pulex. This material includes information on materials and methods and supporting text, as well as supplemental figures, tables, and references. The coverage of materials and methods addresses genome sequence, assembly, and mapping to chromosomes, gene inventory, attributes of a compact genome, the origin and preservation of Daphnia pulex genes, implications of Daphnia's genome structure, evolutionary diversification of duplicated genes, functional significance of expanded gene families, and ecoresponsive genes. Supporting text covers chromosome studies, gene homology among Daphnia genomes, micro-RNA and transposable elements and the 46 Daphnia pulex opsins. 36 figures, 50 tables, 183 references.

  16. Oil effect in freshly spiked marine sediment on Vibrio fischeri, Corophium volutator and Echinocardium cordatum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brils, J.M.; Huwer, S.L.; Kater, B.J.; Schout, P.G.; Harmsen, J.; Delvigne, G.A.L.; Scholten, M.C.T.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to provide data to be used in The Netherlands for development of ecotoxicologically based quality criteria for oil-contaminated sediments and dredged material. In addition, the relation of toxicity to specific oil boiling-point fraction ranges was explored. Natural

  17. Phototransformation of sulfamethoxazole under simulated sunlight: Transformation products and their antibacterial activity toward Vibrio fischeri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmurek, M., E-mail: marta.gmurek@p.lodz.pl [Lodz University of Technology, Faculty of Process & Environmental Engineering, Department of Bioprocess Engineering, Wolczanska 213, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Horn, H.; Majewsky, M. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engler-Bunte-Institut, Chair of Water Chemistry and Water Technology, Engler-Bunte-Ring 1, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2015-12-15

    Sulfamethoxazole (SMX) is a bacteriostatic antibiotic ubiquitously found in the aquatic environment. Since conventional biological wastewater treatment is not efficient to remove SMX, photolysis in natural waters can represent an important transformation pathway. It was recently shown that SMX transformation products can retain antibiotic activity. Therefore, it is crucial to better understand photochemical processes occurring in natural water just as the formation of active transformation products (TPs). During long-term SMX photolysis experiments (one week), nine TPs were identified by reference standards. Moreover, five further TPs of photodecomposition of SMX were found. For the first time, a TP with m/z 271 [M + H]{sup +} was observed during photolysis and tentatively confirmed as 4,x-dihydroxylated SMX. The DOC mass balance clearly showed that only around 5 to 10% were mineralized during the experiment emphasizing the need to elucidate the fate of TPs. Bacterial bioassays confirmed that the mixture retains its antibiotic toxicity toward luminescence (24 h) and that there is no change over the treatment time on EC{sub 50}. In contrast, growth inhibition activity was found to slightly decrease over the irradiation time. However, this decrease was not proportional to the transformation of the parent compound SMX. - Highlights: • During SMX photolysis experiments, nine TPs were identified by reference standards. • Six further TPs of SMX phototransformation were found. • A TP with a m/z 271 was tentatively confirmed as 4-,x-dihydroxylated SMX. • The mixture exhibitsluminescence inhibition without changes over the irradiation time. • Growth inhibition was found to slightly decrease over the irradiation time.

  18. Response of Vibrio fischeri to repeated exposures over time in an Online Toxicity Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Online Toxicity Monitors have been developed to provide continuous, time-relevant information regarding water quality. These systems measure a physiological or behavioral response of a sentinel organism to changes water quality. One such system, the Microlan Toxcontrol, is base...

  19. Experimental interspecific hybridization in Daphnia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenk, K.; Bijl, M.; Menken, S.B.J.

    2001-01-01

    Hybridization is a common phenomenon in Daphnia (Cladocera; Anomopoda); interspecific hybrids have been found between several species and hybrids are found in many European lakes. Although much information on the morphology, ecology and genetics of hybrids is available, little is known about the

  20. Anticonvulsant activity of extracts of Diospyros fischeri stem bark ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Evaluation of extracts of Diospyros fischeri Gurke (Ebenaceae), which is used traditionally for the treatment of epilepsy shows that the aqueous extract of the tem bark has no effect against picrotoxin induced convulsions in mice. However, an 80% ethanol extract of the bark caused dose-dependent suppression of ...

  1. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Cristiane C.; Vicente, Ana Carolina P.; Souza, Rangel C.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera) from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety...... analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in the birth of the online genomic taxonomy whereby researchers and end-users of taxonomy will be able to identify their isolates through a web...

  2. Genomic taxonomy of vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iida Tetsuya

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vibrio taxonomy has been based on a polyphasic approach. In this study, we retrieve useful taxonomic information (i.e. data that can be used to distinguish different taxonomic levels, such as species and genera from 32 genome sequences of different vibrio species. We use a variety of tools to explore the taxonomic relationship between the sequenced genomes, including Multilocus Sequence Analysis (MLSA, supertrees, Average Amino Acid Identity (AAI, genomic signatures, and Genome BLAST atlases. Our aim is to analyse the usefulness of these tools for species identification in vibrios. Results We have generated four new genome sequences of three Vibrio species, i.e., V. alginolyticus 40B, V. harveyi-like 1DA3, and V. mimicus strains VM573 and VM603, and present a broad analyses of these genomes along with other sequenced Vibrio species. The genome atlas and pangenome plots provide a tantalizing image of the genomic differences that occur between closely related sister species, e.g. V. cholerae and V. mimicus. The vibrio pangenome contains around 26504 genes. The V. cholerae core genome and pangenome consist of 1520 and 6923 genes, respectively. Pangenomes might allow different strains of V. cholerae to occupy different niches. MLSA and supertree analyses resulted in a similar phylogenetic picture, with a clear distinction of four groups (Vibrio core group, V. cholerae-V. mimicus, Aliivibrio spp., and Photobacterium spp.. A Vibrio species is defined as a group of strains that share > 95% DNA identity in MLSA and supertree analysis, > 96% AAI, ≤ 10 genome signature dissimilarity, and > 61% proteome identity. Strains of the same species and species of the same genus will form monophyletic groups on the basis of MLSA and supertree. Conclusion The combination of different analytical and bioinformatics tools will enable the most accurate species identification through genomic computational analysis. This endeavour will culminate in

  3. The dual nature of haemocyanin in the establishment and persistence of the squid–vibrio symbiosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Natacha; Schwartzman, Julia; Augustin, René; Zhou, Lawrence; Ruby, Edward G.; Hourdez, Stéphane; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J.

    2014-01-01

    We identified and sequenced from the squid Euprymna scolopes two isoforms of haemocyanin that share the common structural/physiological characteristics of haemocyanin from a closely related cephalopod, Sepia officinalis, including a pronounced Bohr effect. We examined the potential roles for haemocyanin in the animal's symbiosis with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data demonstrate that, as in other cephalopods, the haemocyanin is primarily synthesized in the gills. It transits through the general circulation into other tissues and is exported into crypt spaces that support the bacterial partner, which requires oxygen for its bioluminescence. We showed that the gradient of pH between the circulating haemolymph and the matrix of the crypt spaces in adult squid favours offloading of oxygen from the haemocyanin to the symbionts. Haemocyanin is also localized to the apical surfaces and associated mucus of a juvenile-specific epithelium on which the symbionts gather, and where their specificity is determined during the recruitment into the association. The haemocyanin has an antimicrobial activity, which may be involved in this enrichment of V. fischeri during symbiont initiation. Taken together, these data provide evidence that the haemocyanin plays a role in shaping two stages of the squid–vibrio partnership. PMID:24807261

  4. The dual nature of haemocyanin in the establishment and persistence of the squid-vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremer, Natacha; Schwartzman, Julia; Augustin, René; Zhou, Lawrence; Ruby, Edward G; Hourdez, Stéphane; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2014-06-22

    We identified and sequenced from the squid Euprymna scolopes two isoforms of haemocyanin that share the common structural/physiological characteristics of haemocyanin from a closely related cephalopod, Sepia officinalis, including a pronounced Bohr effect. We examined the potential roles for haemocyanin in the animal's symbiosis with the luminous bacterium Vibrio fischeri. Our data demonstrate that, as in other cephalopods, the haemocyanin is primarily synthesized in the gills. It transits through the general circulation into other tissues and is exported into crypt spaces that support the bacterial partner, which requires oxygen for its bioluminescence. We showed that the gradient of pH between the circulating haemolymph and the matrix of the crypt spaces in adult squid favours offloading of oxygen from the haemocyanin to the symbionts. Haemocyanin is also localized to the apical surfaces and associated mucus of a juvenile-specific epithelium on which the symbionts gather, and where their specificity is determined during the recruitment into the association. The haemocyanin has an antimicrobial activity, which may be involved in this enrichment of V. fischeri during symbiont initiation. Taken together, these data provide evidence that the haemocyanin plays a role in shaping two stages of the squid-vibrio partnership.

  5. Vibrio Parahaemolyticus: The Threat of Another Vibrio Acquiring Pandemic Potential

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramamurthy, T.; Nair, G.B.

    or indirectly via contaminated food and water. Food-borne Vibrio infections tend to occur more frequently in developed countries while transmission of Vibrio infections in developing countries is, by and large, water-borne. Further, the magnitude of food... and pandemics mainly due to poor water supply and personal hygiene. The other important and most common seafood-borne halophilic Vibrio is V. parahaemolyticus. Since its discovery in 1953 (Fujino et al., 1953), many aspects on this pathogen were explored...

  6. Nanoparticles Ecotoxicity on Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khoshnood Reza

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, development of nanotechnology as well as the toxicity potential of nanomaterials on the environment has received much attention. In order to assess the potential toxic impact of nanoparticles on aquatic environments, we used three kinds of nanoparticles, including titanium dioxide (TiO2, copper oxide (CuO, and zinc oxide (ZnO on an aquatic model species, Daphnia magna. In fact, Daphnia magna was exposed to different concentrations for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h at 20-25°C. All the important water quality parameters, such as temperature, pH, and dissolved oxygen (DO were controlled to meet the standard requirements during the experiment. The LC50 values for 24, 48, 72, and 96 h were estimated statistically using Probit methods. The LC50 48 h values for TiO2, CuO, and ZnO were 171.88 mg/l, 6.62 mg/l, and 3.23 mg/l, respectively.

  7. Outlining eicosanoid biosynthesis in the crustacean Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmermans Martijn JTN

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eicosanoids are biologically active, oxygenated metabolites of three C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. They act as signalling molecules within the autocrine or paracrine system in both vertebrates and invertebrates mainly functioning as important mediators in reproduction, the immune system and ion transport. The biosynthesis of eicosanoids has been intensively studied in mammals and it is known that they are synthesised from the fatty acid, arachidonic acid, through either the cyclooxygenase (COX pathway; the lipoxygenase (LOX pathway; or the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway. However, little is still known about the synthesis and structure of the pathway in invertebrates. Results Here, we show transcriptomic evidence from Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda together with a bioinformatic analysis of the D. pulex genome providing insight on the role of eicosanoids in these crustaceans as well as outlining a putative pathway of eicosanoid biosynthesis. Daphnia appear only to have one copy of the gene encoding the key enzyme COX, and phylogenetic analysis reveals that the predicted protein sequence of Daphnia COX clusters with other invertebrates. There is no current evidence of an epoxygenase pathway in Daphnia; however, LOX products are most certainly synthesised in daphnids. Conclusion We have outlined the structure of eicosanoid biosynthesis in Daphnia, a key genus in freshwater ecosystems. Improved knowledge of the function and synthesis of eicosanoids in Daphnia and other invertebrates could have important implications for several areas within ecology. This provisional overview of daphnid eicosanoid biosynthesis provides a guide on where to focus future research activities in this area.

  8. Outlining eicosanoid biosynthesis in the crustacean Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Sibly, Richard M; Timmermans, Martijn Jtn; Callaghan, Amanda

    2008-07-14

    Eicosanoids are biologically active, oxygenated metabolites of three C20 polyunsaturated fatty acids. They act as signalling molecules within the autocrine or paracrine system in both vertebrates and invertebrates mainly functioning as important mediators in reproduction, the immune system and ion transport. The biosynthesis of eicosanoids has been intensively studied in mammals and it is known that they are synthesised from the fatty acid, arachidonic acid, through either the cyclooxygenase (COX) pathway; the lipoxygenase (LOX) pathway; or the cytochrome P450 epoxygenase pathway. However, little is still known about the synthesis and structure of the pathway in invertebrates. Here, we show transcriptomic evidence from Daphnia magna (Crustacea: Branchiopoda) together with a bioinformatic analysis of the D. pulex genome providing insight on the role of eicosanoids in these crustaceans as well as outlining a putative pathway of eicosanoid biosynthesis. Daphnia appear only to have one copy of the gene encoding the key enzyme COX, and phylogenetic analysis reveals that the predicted protein sequence of Daphnia COX clusters with other invertebrates. There is no current evidence of an epoxygenase pathway in Daphnia; however, LOX products are most certainly synthesised in daphnids. We have outlined the structure of eicosanoid biosynthesis in Daphnia, a key genus in freshwater ecosystems. Improved knowledge of the function and synthesis of eicosanoids in Daphnia and other invertebrates could have important implications for several areas within ecology. This provisional overview of daphnid eicosanoid biosynthesis provides a guide on where to focus future research activities in this area.

  9. Shaping the microenvironment: evidence for the influence of a host galaxin on symbiont acquisition and maintenance in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Gillette, Amani A; Augustin, René; Gillette, Miles X; Goldman, William E; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2014-12-01

    Most bacterial species make transitions between habitats, such as switching from free living to symbiotic niches. We provide evidence that a galaxin protein, EsGal1, of the squid Euprymna scolopes participates in both: (i) selection of the specific partner Vibrio fischeri from the bacterioplankton during symbiosis onset and, (ii) modulation of V. fischeri growth in symbiotic maintenance. We identified two galaxins in transcriptomic databases and showed by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction that one (esgal1) was dominant in the light organ. Further, esgal1 expression was upregulated by symbiosis, a response that was partially achieved with exposure to symbiont cell-envelope molecules. Confocal immunocytochemistry of juvenile animals localized EsGal1 to the apical surfaces of light-organ epithelia and surrounding mucus, the environment in which V. fischeri cells aggregate before migration into the organ. Growth assays revealed that one repeat of EsGal1 arrested growth of Gram-positive bacterial cells, which represent the cell type first 'winnowed' during initial selection of the symbiont. The EsGal1-derived peptide also significantly decreased the growth rate of V. fischeri in culture. Further, when animals were exposed to an anti-EsGal1 antibody, symbiont population growth was significantly increased. These data provide a window into how hosts select symbionts from a rich environment and govern their growth in symbiosis. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Cyanobacteria facilitate parasite epidemics in Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tellenbach, C; Tardent, N; Pomati, F; Keller, B; Hairston, N G; Wolinska, J; Spaak, P

    2016-12-01

    The seasonal dominance of cyanobacteria in the phytoplankton community of lake ecosystems can have severe implications for higher trophic levels. For herbivorous zooplankton such as Daphnia, cyanobacteria have poor nutritional value and some species can produce toxins affecting zooplankton survival and reproduction. Here we present another, hitherto largely unexplored aspect of cyanobacteria, namely that they can increase Daphnia susceptibility to parasites. In a 12-yr monthly time-series analysis of the Daphnia community in Greifensee (Switzerland), we observed that cyanobacteria density correlated significantly with the epidemics of a common gut parasite of Daphnia, Caullerya mesnili, regardless of what cyanobacteria species was present or whether it was colonial or filamentous. The temperature from the previous month also affected the occurrence of Caullerya epidemics, either directly or indirectly by the promotion of cyanobacterial growth. A laboratory experiment confirmed that cyanobacteria increase the susceptibility of Daphnia to Caullerya, and suggested a possible involvement of cyanotoxins or other chemical traits of cyanobacteria in this process. These findings expand our understanding of the consequences of toxic cyanobacterial blooms for lake ecosystems and might be relevant for epidemics experienced by other aquatic species. © 2016 by the Ecological Society of America.

  11. Colonization state influences the hemocyte proteome in a beneficial squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Tyler R; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Shah, Manesh; Nyholm, Spencer V

    2014-10-01

    The squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri form a highly specific beneficial light organ symbiosis. Not only does the host have to select V. fischeri from the environment, but it must also prevent subsequent colonization by non-symbiotic microorganisms. Host macrophage-like hemocytes are believed to play a role in mediating the symbiosis with V. fischeri. Previous studies have shown that the colonization state of the light organ influences the host's hemocyte response to the symbiont. To further understand the molecular mechanisms behind this process, we used two quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic techniques, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and label-free spectral counting, to compare and quantify the adult hemocyte proteomes from colonized (sym) and uncolonized (antibiotic-treated/cured) squid. Overall, iTRAQ allowed for the quantification of 1,024 proteins with two or more peptides. Thirty-seven unique proteins were determined to be significantly different between sym and cured hemocytes (p value < 0.05), with 20 more abundant proteins and 17 less abundant in sym hemocytes. The label-free approach resulted in 1,241 proteins that were identified in all replicates. Of 185 unique proteins present at significantly different amounts in sym hemocytes (as determined by spectral counting), 92 were more abundant and 93 were less abundant. Comparisons between iTRAQ and spectral counting revealed that 30 of the 37 proteins quantified via iTRAQ exhibited trends similar to those identified by the label-free method. Both proteomic techniques mutually identified 16 proteins that were significantly different between the two groups of hemocytes (p value < 0.05). The presence of V. fischeri in the host light organ influenced the abundance of proteins associated with the cytoskeleton, adhesion, lysosomes, proteolysis, and the innate immune response. These data provide evidence that colonization by V. fischeri

  12. Colonization State Influences the Hemocyte Proteome in a Beneficial Squid–Vibrio Symbiosis*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Tyler R.; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C.; Shah, Manesh; Nyholm, Spencer V.

    2014-01-01

    The squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri form a highly specific beneficial light organ symbiosis. Not only does the host have to select V. fischeri from the environment, but it must also prevent subsequent colonization by non-symbiotic microorganisms. Host macrophage-like hemocytes are believed to play a role in mediating the symbiosis with V. fischeri. Previous studies have shown that the colonization state of the light organ influences the host's hemocyte response to the symbiont. To further understand the molecular mechanisms behind this process, we used two quantitative mass-spectrometry-based proteomic techniques, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and label-free spectral counting, to compare and quantify the adult hemocyte proteomes from colonized (sym) and uncolonized (antibiotic-treated/cured) squid. Overall, iTRAQ allowed for the quantification of 1,024 proteins with two or more peptides. Thirty-seven unique proteins were determined to be significantly different between sym and cured hemocytes (p value < 0.05), with 20 more abundant proteins and 17 less abundant in sym hemocytes. The label-free approach resulted in 1,241 proteins that were identified in all replicates. Of 185 unique proteins present at significantly different amounts in sym hemocytes (as determined by spectral counting), 92 were more abundant and 93 were less abundant. Comparisons between iTRAQ and spectral counting revealed that 30 of the 37 proteins quantified via iTRAQ exhibited trends similar to those identified by the label-free method. Both proteomic techniques mutually identified 16 proteins that were significantly different between the two groups of hemocytes (p value < 0.05). The presence of V. fischeri in the host light organ influenced the abundance of proteins associated with the cytoskeleton, adhesion, lysosomes, proteolysis, and the innate immune response. These data provide evidence that colonization by V. fischeri

  13. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Autecology of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in tropical waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivera, S.; Lugo, T.; Hazen, T.C. [Univ. of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras (Puerto Rico)

    1988-12-31

    Water and shellfish samples collected from estuaries, mangroves, and beaches along the coast of Puerto Rico were examined for Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus. An array of water quality parameters were also measured simultaneous with bacteria sampling. Both species of vibrio were associated with estuary and mangrove locations, and neither was isolated from sandy beaches. Densities of V. vulnificus were negatively correlated with salinity, 10--15 ppt being optimal. V. parahaemolyticus was isolated from sites with salinities between 20 and 35 ppt, the highest densities occurring at 20 ppt. Densities of Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus for a tropical estuary surpassed those reported for temperate estuaries by several orders of magnitude. Both densities of total Vibrio spp. and V. parahaemolyticus in the water were directly related to densities of fecal coliforms, unlike V. vulnificus. The incidence of ONPG(+) strains among sucrose({minus}) Vibrio spp. served as an indicator of the frequency of V. vulnificus in this group. More than 63% of the V. vulnificus isolated were pathogenic. V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus occupy clearly separate niches within the tropical estuarine-marine ecosystem.

  15. Late Winter Population and Distribution of Spectacled Eiders (Somateria fischeri) in the Bering Sea

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We conducted aerial surveys in the northern Bering Sea in late winter 1995, 1996 and 1997 to estimate the population of spectacled eiders (Somateria fischeri)...

  16. Microarray analysis of Neosartorya fischeri using different carbon sources, petroleum asphaltenes and glucose-peptone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna L. Hernández-López

    2015-09-01

    Here we describe experimental procedures and methods about our dataset (NCBI GEO accession number GSE68146 and describe the data analysis to identify different expression levels in N. fischeri using this recalcitrant carbon source.

  17. Understanding the Role of Host Hemocytes in a Squid/Vibrio Symbiosis Using Transcriptomics and Proteomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Collins

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The symbiosis between the squid, Euprymna scolopes, and the bacterium, Vibrio fischeri, serves as a model for understanding interactions between beneficial bacteria and animal hosts. The establishment and maintenance of the association is highly specific and depends on the selection of V. fischeri and exclusion of non-symbiotic bacteria from the environment. Current evidence suggests that the host’s cellular innate immune system, in the form of macrophage-like hemocytes, helps to mediate host tolerance of V. fischeri. To begin to understand the role of hemocytes in this association, we analyzed these cells by high-throughput 454 transcriptomic and liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses. 454 high-throughput sequencing produced 650,686 reads totaling 279.9 Mb while LC-MS/MS analyses of circulating hemocytes putatively identified 702 unique proteins. Several receptors involved with the recognition of microbial associated molecular patterns (MAMPs were identified. Among these was a complete open reading frame (ORF to a putative peptidoglycan recognition protein (EsPGRP5 that has conserved residues for amidase activity. Assembly of the hemocyte transcriptome showed EsPGRP5 had high coverage, suggesting it is among the 5% most abundant transcripts in circulating hemocytes. Other transcripts and proteins identified included members of the conserved NFκB signaling pathway, putative members of the complement pathway, the carbohydrate binding protein galectin, and cephalotoxin. Quantitative PCR of complement-related genes, cephalotoxin, EsPGRP5, and a nitric oxide synthase showed differential expression in circulating hemocytes isolated from adult squid with colonized light organs compared to those for which the symbionts were removed. These data suggest that the presence of the symbiont influences gene expression of the cellular innate immune system of the host.

  18. Can Daphnia lumholtzi invade European lakes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meike Wittmann

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cladoceran Daphnia lumholtzi is a subtropical and tropical zooplankter, and an invasive species in North America. Thus far, D. lumholtzi has not been detected in Europe. Here we investigated whether a hypothetical introduction to Europe could result in a successful invasion, either now or in the near future when facilitated by climate change. In laboratory experiments, we tested whether different clones of D. lumholtzi can invade a resident community consisting of native Daphnia from lake Klostersee, Germany, and how invasion success depends on temperature and the presence or absence of planktivorous fish. In some treatments, invasion success was consistently high, and D. lumholtzi reached densities similar to the native competitors by the end of the experiment. The presence of a planktivorous fish reduced the invasion success of D. lumholtzi, and a clone with an inducible defense against fish predation was a more successful invader than a permanently defended clone. Of the three temperatures tested in this study (15, 20, and 24 °C, invasion success was highest at 20 °C. To understand the competitive interaction between native and introduced Daphnia, we fit a Lotka-Volterra-type competition model to the population dynamics. Our experimental and modeling results suggest that D. lumholtzi can invade European lakes and can cause substantial declines in the population size of native Daphnia, with potential consequences for higher trophic levels.

  19. Toxicity of Brass Particulate to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    adults, were used as the experimental animals. The culture techniques used were described by Goulden et al. 2 Ten neonates were placed in each 250-mi...Density on the Acute Toxicities of Surfactants , Copper, and Phenol to Daphnia magna Straus. Arch. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 12, 51-53T9T3). 7. Berglind

  20. Canine visceral leishmaniasis in the metropolitan area of São Paulo: Pintomyia fischeri as potential vector of Leishmania infantum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galvis-Ovallos Fredy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available American visceral leishmaniasis is a zoonosis caused by Leishmania infantum and transmitted mainly by Lutzomyia longipalpis. However, canine cases have been reported in the absence of this species in the Greater São Paulo region, where Pintomyia fischeri and Migonemyia migonei are the predominant species. This raises the suspicion that they could be acting as vectors. Therefore, this study sought to investigate specific vector capacity parameters of these species and to compare them with those of Lu. longipalpis s.l. Among these parameters the blood feeding rate, the survival, and the susceptibility to the development of Le. infantum were evaluated for the three species, and the attractiveness of dogs to Pi. fischeri and Mg. migonei was evaluated. The estimated interval between blood meals was shorter for Lu. longipalpis s.l, followed by Pi. fischeri and Mg. migonei. The infection rate with Le. infantum flagellates in Lu. longipalpis was 9.8%, in Pi. fischeri 4.8%, and in Mg. migonei nil. The respective infective life expectancies (days of Lu. longipalpis, Mg. migonei, and Pi. fischeri were 2.4, 1.94, and 1.68. Both Pi. fischeri and Mg. migonei were captured in the kennel with a predominance (95% of Pi. fischeri. Considering the great attractiveness of dogs to Pi. fischeri, its susceptibility to infection by Le. infantum, infective life expectancies, and predominance in Greater São Paulo, this study presents evidence of Pi. fischeri as a potential vector of this parasite in the region.

  1. Toxicity Screening of Hydrolyzed H, HD, and HT using the Bioluminescent Marine Bacterium, Vibrio Fischeri, by Means of Microtox Assay

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Haley, Mark V; Checkai, Ronald T

    2006-01-01

    .... The mineralization of HD through hot water hydrolysis with subsequent neutralization using NaOH, followed by biodegradation, has been demonstrated to be an effective technology at the Aberdeen...

  2. Functionality and prevalence of trehalose-based oligosaccharides as novel compatible solutes in ascospores of Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri) and other fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, Timon T; van Leeuwen, M Richard; Golovina, Elena A; Hoekstra, Folkert A; Kuenstner, Eric J; Palumbo, Edward A; Snyder, Nicole L; Visagie, Cobus; Verkennis, Alex; Hallsworth, John E; Wösten, Han A B; Dijksterhuis, Jan

    Ascospores of Neosartorya, Byssochlamys and Talaromyces can be regarded as the most stress-resistant eukaryotic cells. They can survive exposure at temperatures as high as 85°C for 100 min or more. Neosartorya fischeri ascospores are more viscous and more resistant to the combined stress of heat and

  3. Predation on Daphnia pulex by Lepidurus arcticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Kirsten Seestern

    2001-01-01

    when swimming in the water. Experiments were set up to test how efficiently Lepidurus hunts Daphnia and if a functional response between predator and prey exists. It was also tested if temperature and Lepidurus size played a significant role for the predation rate. Lepidurus and Daphnia were sampled...... predation rates were biased due to the manipulated conditions (e.g. increased encounter rates), Lepidurus appears to be an active and efficient predator on planktonic prey, and its presence in arctic lakes and ponds may consequently have a significant impact on the structure of the planktonic food web....... The calculated energetic advantages of plankton as supplement to a benthic diet seemed low (5% of body weight per day)....

  4. Zoonose Vibrio vulnificus: meldingsplicht raadzaam

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkstra, A.; Haenen, O.L.M.; Moller, L.

    2010-01-01

    Op de lijst van meldingsplichtige infectieziekten komen een aantal zoönosen voor, zoals pest, rabiës en leptospirose. De relatief onbekende zoönotische Vibrio vulnificus valt opmerkelijk genoeg niet onder de meldingsplichtige infectieziekten. Juist vanwege het zeer agressieve beloop van een

  5. Prevalence of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Maryland Coastal Bays

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pascuale, V. O.

    2016-02-01

    The bacterial family of Vibrionaceae is indigenous in the marine estuarine environments such as the Maryland Coastal Bays. Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are both pathogenic bacteria. Understanding the distribution of Vibrio species is crucial because of the health concerns associated with the bacteria. The aim of this study was to evaluate the overall abundance of bacteria with a focus on Vibrio species in the Maryland Coastal Bays. Seawater samples were collected from 10 different sites that differ with regard to water quality. The total bacteria count (TBC) was determined by two methods: Total plate count and Epifluorescence microscopy. The most-probable-number (MPN) methodology was used to estimate the population of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus. In addition to the bacteriological analysis, the environmental parameters of temperature and salinity were measured using YSI 6600 multiparameter meter. The average total bacteria count was 2.21 log CFU ml-1. Vibrio vulnificus comprised 5% of the total bacteria count while Vibrio parahaemolyticus comprised only 2% of the total bacteria count. Vibrio vulnificus ranged from 0.30 to 2.48 log MPN ml-1 at the sites tested. Lower Vibrio parahaemolyticus count was observed at the sites with a range of 0.30 to 1.97 log MPN ml-1. There was no significant correlation between the environmental parameters and the Vibrio spp. Since both Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus peak in the summer, there is a potential for a risk of wound infections and gastrointestinal illness based on this data.

  6. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, D M

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from [1-14C]myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from [14C]C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from [14C]acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  7. Elongation of exogenous fatty acids by the bioluminescent bacterium Vibrio harveyi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byers, D.M.

    1989-01-01

    Bioluminescent bacteria require myristic acid (C14:0) to produce the myristaldehyde substrate of the light-emitting luciferase reaction. Since both endogenous and exogenous C14:0 can be used for this purpose, the metabolism of exogenous fatty acids by luminescent bacteria has been investigated. Both Vibrio harveyi and Vibrio fischeri incorporated label from (1-14C)myristic acid (C14:0) into phospholipid acyl chains as well as into CO2. In contrast, Photobacterium phosphoreum did not exhibit phospholipid acylation or beta-oxidation using exogenous fatty acids. Unlike Escherichia coli, the two Vibrio species can directly elongate fatty acids such as octanoic (C8:0), lauric (C12:0), and myristic acid, as demonstrated by radio-gas liquid chromatography. The induction of bioluminescence in late exponential growth had little effect on the ability of V. harveyi to elongate fatty acids, but it did increase the amount of C14:0 relative to C16:0 labeled from (14C)C8:0. This was not observed in a dark mutant of V. harveyi that is incapable of supplying endogenous C14:0 for luminescence. Cerulenin preferentially decreased the labeling of C16:0 and of unsaturated fatty acids from all 14C-labeled fatty acid precursors as well as from (14C)acetate, suggesting that common mechanisms may be involved in elongation of fatty acids from endogenous and exogenous sources. Fatty acylation of the luminescence-related synthetase and reductase enzymes responsible for aldehyde synthesis exhibited a chain-length preference for C14:0, which also was indicated by reverse-phase thin-layer chromatography of the acyl groups attached to these enzymes. The ability of V. harveyi to activate and elongate exogenous fatty acids may be related to an adaptive requirement to metabolize intracellular C14:0 generated by the luciferase reaction during luminescence development.

  8. Antiadhesive activity of poly-hydroxy butyrate biopolymer from a marine Brevibacterium casei MSI04 against shrimp pathogenic vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiran, George Seghal; Lipton, Anuj Nishanth; Priyadharshini, Sethu; Anitha, Kumar; Suárez, Lucia Elizabeth Cruz; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Choi, Ki Choon; Selvin, Joseph; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah

    2014-08-13

    Vibrio pathogens are causative agents of mid-culture outbreaks, and early mortality syndrome and secondary aetiology of most dreadful viral outbreaks in shrimp aquaculture. Among the pathogenic vibrios group, Vibrio alginolyticus and V. harveyi are considered as the most significant ones in the grow-out ponds of giant black tiger shrimp Penaeus monodon in India. Use of antibiotics was banned in many countries due to the emergence of antibiotic-resistant strains and accumulation of residual antibiotics in harvested shrimp. There is an urgent need to consider the use of alternative antibiotics for the control of vibriosis in shrimp aquaculture. Biofilm formation is a pathogenic and/or establishment mechanism of Vibrio spp. This study aims to develop novel safe antibiofilm and/or antiadhesive process using PHB to contain vibrios outbreaks in shrimp aquaculture. In this study a poly-hydroxy butyrate (PHB) polymer producing bacterium Brevibacterium casei MSI04 was isolated from a marine sponge Dendrilla nigra and production of PHB was optimized under submerged-fermentation (SmF) conditions. The effect of carbon, nitrogen and mineral sources on PHB production and enhanced production of PHB by response surface methods were demonstrated. The maximum PHB accumulation obtained was 6.74 g/L in the optimized media containing 25 g/L starch as carbon source, 96 h of incubation, 35°C and 3% NaCl. The highest antiadhesive activity upto 96% was recorded against V. vulnificus, and V. fischeri, followed by 92% against V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus and 88% inhibition was recorded against V. harveyi. In this study, a thermostable biopolymer was chemically characterized as PHB based on 1HNMR spectra, FT-IR and GC-MS spectra. The NMR spectra revealed that the polymer was an isocratic homopolymer and it also confirmed that the compound was PHB. The antiadhesive activity of PHB was determined in microtitre plate assay and an effective concentration (EC) of PHB (200

  9. Ecotoxicity tests based on phototactic behaviour in Daphnia magna; Saggi di ecotossicita` con Daphnia magna basati sul comportamento fototattico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dojmi di Delupis, Gianluigi [Istituto Superiore di Sanita`, Rome (Italy). Lab. di Tossicologia Comparata ed Ecotossicologia

    1997-03-01

    Zooplankton behaviour depending on light, such as phototaxis, is important, mainly in terms of its ecological significance, as, for example, in the role of phototaxis in the diurnal vertical migration of Daphnia magna, and its possible involvement in predator-prey relations. In Daphnia magna chemicals were found to induce roughly three types of phototaxis alteration: depression, enhancement and sign change. These phenomena are based on mechanisms that require further investigation. In spite of the complex photobehaviour of Daphnia magna and the scarce knowledge of toxic effects, it was possible to set up rapid and easy ecotoxicity tests by fixing certain experimental conditions.

  10. Occurrences of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Vellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the predominant seafood pathogen associated with human gastroenteritis. Samples were collected from Vellar estuary, shrimp ponds and shrimp for characterization of V. parahaemolyticus. A total of 26 blue green centre (BG) Vibrio strains were isolated and characterized through biochemical ...

  11. Contaminant Case Report: Spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) eggs and feathers from the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — We collected spectacled eider (Somateria fischeri) eggs and shed breast contour feathers from nests on the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, Alaska, in 1992 to evaluate...

  12. Acute and chronic toxicity of veterinary antibiotics to Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah; Halling-Sørensen, B.; Kusk, Kresten Ole

    2000-01-01

    The acute and chronic toxicity of nine antibiotics used both therapeutically and as growth promoters in intensive farming was investigated on the freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna. The effect of the antibiotics metronidazole (M), olaquindox (OL), oxolinic acid (OA), oxytetracycline (OTC...

  13. Isolation of New Aliphatic Sulfates and Sulfamate as the Daphnia Kairomones Inducing Morphological Change of a Phytoplankton Scenedesmus gutwinskii

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yasumoto, Ko; Nishigami, Akinori; Aoi, Hiroaki; Tsuchihashi, Chise; Kasai, Fumie; Kusumi, Takenori; Ooi, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    New aliphatic sulfates and sulfamates were isolated from Daphnia pulex as the Daphnia kairomones that induced morphological defense of a freshwater phytoplankton Scenedesmus gutwinskii var. heterospina (NIES-802...

  14. CRISPR/Cas-mediated targeted mutagenesis in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakanishi

    Full Text Available The water flea Daphnia magna has been used as an animal model in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences. Thanks to the recent progress in Daphnia genomics, genetic information such as the draft genome sequence and expressed sequence tags (ESTs is now available. To investigate the relationship between phenotypes and the available genetic information about Daphnia, some gene manipulation methods have been developed. However, a technique to induce targeted mutagenesis into Daphnia genome remains elusive. To overcome this problem, we focused on an emerging genome editing technique mediated by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated (CRISPR/Cas system to introduce genomic mutations. In this study, we targeted a functionally conserved regulator of eye development, the eyeless gene in D. magna. When we injected Cas9 mRNAs and eyeless-targeting guide RNAs into eggs, 18-47% of the survived juveniles exhibited abnormal eye morphology. After maturation, up to 8.2% of the adults produced progenies with deformed eyes, which carried mutations in the eyeless loci. These results showed that CRISPR/Cas system could introduce heritable mutations into the endogenous eyeless gene in D. magna. This is the first report of a targeted gene knockout technique in Daphnia and will be useful in uncovering Daphnia gene functions.

  15. Daphnia as an Emerging Epigenetic Model Organism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kami D. M. Harris

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Daphnia offer a variety of benefits for the study of epigenetics. Daphnia’s parthenogenetic life cycle allows the study of epigenetic effects in the absence of confounding genetic differences. Sex determination and sexual reproduction are epigenetically determined as are several other well-studied alternate phenotypes that arise in response to environmental stressors. Additionally, there is a large body of ecological literature available, recently complemented by the genome sequence of one species and transgenic technology. DNA methylation has been shown to be altered in response to toxicants and heavy metals, although investigation of other epigenetic mechanisms is only beginning. More thorough studies on DNA methylation as well as investigation of histone modifications and RNAi in sex determination and predator-induced defenses using this ecologically and evolutionarily important organism will contribute to our understanding of epigenetics.

  16. Assessment of bacterial biodetoxification of herbicide atrazine using Aliivibrio fischeri cytotoxicity assay with prolonged contact time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Háhn, Judit; Szoboszlay, Sándor; Tóth, Gergő; Kriszt, Balázs

    2017-07-01

    In our study, we determined and compared the atrazine-biodetoxification ability of 41 bacterial strains and 21 consortia created of those with over 50% degradation rate in pure cultures. Biodegradation capacity was measured with GC-MS. Detoxification was assessed based on the cytotoxic effect of end-products to Aliivibrio fischeri in chronic bioluminescence inhibition assay with 25 h contact time. Chronic A. fischeri assay adapted to a microplate, which is suitable for examine numerous residues simultaneously, also appeared to be significantly more sensitive to atrazine compared to the standard acute (30 min) test. Due to its sensitivity, the chronic assay could be a valuable tool to provide a more comprehensive view of the ecological risks of atrazine and other chemicals. Thirteen strains were able to degrade more than 50% of 50 ppm atrazine. Four of these belong to Rhodococcus aetherivorans, R. qingshengii, Serratia fonticola and Olivibacter oleidegradans which species' atrazine degrading ability has never been reported before. Four consortia degrading ability was more effective than that of the creating individual strains; moreover, their residues did not show cytotoxic effects to A. fischeri. However, in several cases, the degradation products of sole strains and consortia resulted in significant bioluminescence inhibition. Thus high biodegradation (>90%) does not certainly mean the reduction or cessation of toxicity highlighting the importance of the evaluation of biological effects of degradation residues to improve the efficiency and abate the ecological risks of bioremediation techniques.

  17. Complete genome sequence of a giant Vibrio phage ValKK3 infecting Vibrio alginolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamrin M. Lal

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the complete sequence of a giant lytic marine myophage, Vibrio phage ValKK3 that is specific to Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC® 17749™. Vibrio phage ValKK3 was subjected to whole genome sequencing on MiSeq sequencing platform and annotated using Blast2Go. The complete sequence of ValKK3 genome was deposited in DBBJ/EMBL/GenBank under accession number KP671755.

  18. Complete genome sequence of a giant Vibrio phage ValKK3 infecting Vibrio alginolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Tamrin M; Sano, Motohiko; Hatai, Kishio; Ransangan, Julian

    2016-06-01

    This paper describes the complete sequence of a giant lytic marine myophage, Vibrio phage ValKK3 that is specific to Vibrio alginolyticus ATCC(®) 17749™. Vibrio phage ValKK3 was subjected to whole genome sequencing on MiSeq sequencing platform and annotated using Blast2Go. The complete sequence of ValKK3 genome was deposited in DBBJ/EMBL/GenBank under accession number KP671755.

  19. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in Alginate Microspheres for Monitoring Heavy Metal Toxicity in Environmental Waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dedi Futra

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II, Cd(II, Pb(II, Zn(II, Cr(VI, Co(II, Ni(II, Ag(I and Fe(II were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD range of 2.4–5.7% (n = 8. The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD for Cu(II (6.40 μg/L, Cd(II (1.56 μg/L, Pb(II (47 μg/L, Ag(I (18 μg/L than Zn(II (320 μg/L, Cr(VI (1,000 μg/L, Co(II (1700 μg/L, Ni(II (2800 μg/L, and Fe(III (3100 μg/L. Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  20. Microencapsulated Aliivibrio fischeri in alginate microspheres for monitoring heavy metal toxicity in environmental waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futra, Dedi; Heng, Lee Yook; Surif, Salmijah; Ahmad, Asmat; Ling, Tan Ling

    2014-12-05

    In this article a luminescence fiber optic biosensor for the microdetection of heavy metal toxicity in waters based on the marine bacterium Aliivibrio fischeri (A. fischeri) encapsulated in alginate microspheres is described. Cu(II), Cd(II), Pb(II), Zn(II), Cr(VI), Co(II), Ni(II), Ag(I) and Fe(II) were selected as sample toxic heavy metal ions for evaluation of the performance of this toxicity microbiosensor. The loss of bioluminescence response from immobilized A. fischeri bacterial cells corresponds to changes in the toxicity levels. The inhibition of the luminescent biosensor response collected at excitation and emission wavelengths of 287 ± 2 nm and 487 ± 2 nm, respectively, was found to be reproducible and repeatable within the relative standard deviation (RSD) range of 2.4-5.7% (n = 8). The toxicity biosensor based on alginate micropsheres exhibited a lower limit of detection (LOD) for Cu(II) (6.40 μg/L), Cd(II) (1.56 μg/L), Pb(II) (47 μg/L), Ag(I) (18 μg/L) than Zn(II) (320 μg/L), Cr(VI) (1,000 μg/L), Co(II) (1700 μg/L), Ni(II) (2800 μg/L), and Fe(III) (3100 μg/L). Such LOD values are lower when compared with other previous reported whole cell toxicity biosensors using agar gel, agarose gel and cellulose membrane biomatrices used for the immobilization of bacterial cells. The A. fischeri bacteria microencapsulated in alginate biopolymer could maintain their metabolic activity for a prolonged period of up to six weeks without any noticeable changes in the bioluminescence response. The bioluminescent biosensor could also be used for the determination of antagonistic toxicity levels for toxicant mixtures. A comparison of the results obtained by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS) and using the proposed luminescent A. fischeri-based biosensor suggests that the optical toxicity biosensor can be used for quantitative microdetermination of heavy metal toxicity in environmental water samples.

  1. The LuxR regulator protein controls synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate in Vibrio harveyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, C M; Sun, W; Meighen, E A

    1998-05-19

    The LuxR regulatory protein of Vibrio harveyi has been shown to control synthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) as well as luminescence so as to occur at high cell density, suggesting that it is a general regulatory protein. Mutants defective in the production of LuxR (D1, D34, and MR1130) were found to be missing PHB, whose synthesis could be restored by complementation with luxR. Triparental mating with a V. harveyi genomic library revealed the presence of three genomic clones (G1, G2 and G3) that could also restore PHB synthesis and luminescence to cells which express low levels of luxR (D1 and D34) but not to luxR- cells (MR1130) suggesting that luxR expression was being stimulated. Analyses of luxR mRNA levels by mRNA dot blot hybridization and by primer extension confirmed that luxR mRNA levels were increased 4 to 7-fold in the D1 and D34 cells by the G1, G2 and G3 fragments and show that expression of a single genomic copy of luxR is sufficient to restore synthesis of PHB. The results demonstrate that V. harveyi LuxR controls the induction of a process not intimately involved in the bioluminescence system and clearly distinguishes its role in V. harveyi from that of LuxR from Vibrio (Photobacterium) fischeri, which has only been associated with regulation of light emission.

  2. Bacterial bioluminescence regulates expression of a host cryptochrome gene in the squid-Vibrio symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; Peyer, Suzanne M; Whistler, Cheryl A; Apicella, Michael A; Goldman, William E; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

    2013-04-02

    The symbiosis between the squid Euprymna scolopes and its luminous symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, is characterized by daily transcriptional rhythms in both partners and daily fluctuations in symbiont luminescence. In this study, we sought to determine whether symbionts affect host transcriptional rhythms. We identified two transcripts in host tissues (E. scolopes cry1 [escry1] and escry2) that encode cryptochromes, proteins that influence circadian rhythms in other systems. Both genes cycled daily in the head of the squid, with a pattern similar to that of other animals, in which expression of certain cry genes is entrained by environmental light. In contrast, escry1 expression cycled in the symbiont-colonized light organ with 8-fold upregulation coincident with the rhythms of bacterial luminescence, which are offset from the day/night light regime. Colonization of the juvenile light organ by symbionts was required for induction of escry1 cycling. Further, analysis with a mutant strain defective in light production showed that symbiont luminescence is essential for cycling of escry1; this defect could be complemented by presentation of exogenous blue light. However, blue-light exposure alone did not induce cycling in nonsymbiotic animals, but addition of molecules of the symbiont cell envelope to light-exposed animals did recover significant cycling activity, showing that light acts in synergy with other symbiont features to induce cycling. While symbiont luminescence may be a character specific to rhythms of the squid-vibrio association, resident microbial partners could similarly influence well-documented daily rhythms in other systems, such as the mammalian gut.

  3. Bacteriophage interactions with marine pathogenic Vibrios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalatzis, Panagiotis

    Incidents of Vibrio-associated diseases in marine aquaculture are increasingly reported on a global scale, incited also by the world’s rising temperature. Administration of antibiotics has been the most commonly applied remedy used for facing vibriosis outbreaks, giving rise to concerns about...... pathogens. The combinatory administration of virulent bacteriophages φSt2 and φGrn1, isolated against Vibrio alginolyticus significantly reduced the Vibrio load in cultures of Artemia salina live prey, decreasing subsequently the risk of a vibriosis outbreak in the marine hatchery. During infection...... to studying the interactions between marine pathogenic Vibrio and their corresponding bacteriophages, while discussing the potential and limitations of phage therapy application in the biological control of vibriosis....

  4. Occurrences of pathogenic Vibrio parahaemolyticus from Vellar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2013-04-03

    2001). Vibrio vulnificus as a health hazard for shrimp consumers. Revista do Instituto de Medicina Tropical de Sao Paulo. 43: 263- 266. Sambrook J, Fritsch EF, Maniatis T (1989). Molecular Cloning: A. Laboratory Manual, 2nd ed.

  5. Leisingera sp. JC1, a Bacterial Isolate from Hawaiian Bobtail Squid Eggs, Produces Indigoidine and Differentially Inhibits Vibrios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha M. Gromek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Female members of many cephalopod species house a bacterial consortium that is part of their reproductive system, the accessory nidamental gland (ANG. These bacteria are deposited into eggs that are then laid in the environment where they must develop unprotected from predation, pathogens and fouling. In this study, we characterized the genome and secondary metabolite production of Leisingera sp. JC1, a member of the roseobacter clade (Rhodobacteraceae of Alphaproteobacteria isolated from the jelly coat of eggs from the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes. Whole genome sequencing and MLSA analysis revealed that Leisingera sp. JC1 falls within a group of roseobacters associated with squid ANGs. Genome and biochemical analyses revealed the potential for and production of a number of secondary metabolites, including siderophores and acyl-homoserine lactones involved with quorum sensing. The complete biosynthetic gene cluster for the pigment indigoidine was detected in the genome and mass spectrometry confirmed the production of this compound. Furthermore, we investigated the production of indigoidine under co-culture conditions with Vibrio fischeri, the light organ symbiont of E. scolopes, and with other vibrios. Finally, both Leisingera sp. JC1 and secondary metabolite extracts of this strain had differential antimicrobial activity against a number of marine vibrios, suggesting that Leisingera sp. JC1 may play a role in host defense against other marine bacteria either in the eggs and/or ANG. These data also suggest that indigoidine may be partially, but not wholly, responsible for the antimicrobial activity of this squid-associated bacterium. □

  6. The ABC transporter gene family of Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunningham Phil

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The large gene superfamily of ABC (ATP-binding cassette transporters encodes membrane proteins involved in trafficking processes across biological membranes and further essential cell biological functions. ABC transporters are evolutionary ancient and involved in the biochemical defence against toxicants. We report here a genome-wide survey of ABC proteins of Daphnia pulex, providing for the first time information on ABC proteins in crustacea, a primarily aquatic arthropod subphylum of high ecological and economical importance. Results We identified 64 ABC proteins in the Daphnia genome, which possesses members of all current ABC subfamilies A to H. To unravel phylogenetic relationships, ABC proteins of Daphnia were compared to those from yeast, worm, fruit fly and human. A high conservation of Daphnia of ABC transporters was observed for proteins involved in fundamental cellular processes, including the mitochondrial half transporters of the ABCB subfamily, which function in iron metabolism and transport of Fe/S protein precursors, and the members of subfamilies ABCD, ABCE and ABCF, which have roles in very long chain fatty acid transport, initiation of gene transcription and protein translation, respectively. A number of Daphnia proteins showed one-to-one orthologous relationships to Drosophila ABC proteins including the sulfonyl urea receptor (SUR, the ecdysone transporter ET23, and the eye pigment precursor transporter scarlet. As the fruit fly, Daphnia lacked homologues to the TAP protein, which plays a role in antigene processing, and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, which functions as a chloride channel. Daphnia showed two proteins homologous to MDR (multidrug resistance P-glycoproteins (ABCB subfamily and six proteins homologous to MRPs (multidrug resistance-associated proteins (ABCC subfamily. However, lineage specific gene duplications in the ABCB and ABCC subfamilies complicated the

  7. Vibrio diseases of marine fish populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, R. R.; Grimes, D. J.

    1984-03-01

    Several Vibrio spp. cause disease in marine fish populations, both wild and cultured. The most common disease, vibriosis, is caused by V. anguillarum. However, increase in the intensity of mariculture, combined with continuing improvements in bacterial systematics, expands the list of Vibrio spp. that cause fish disease. The bacterial pathogens, species of fish affected, virulence mechanisms, and disease treatment and prevention are included as topics of emphasis in this review.

  8. Daphnia diversity in water bodies of the Po River Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Marková

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Shallow water bodies dominate the areal extent of continental waters and host a proportion of biodiversity higher than the percentage of Earth’s surface they cover. Daphnia is a key component of small aquatic ecosystems food webs. Here we present the result of a survey in 24 ponds located in the core of Po river Basin, to assess the actual spreading of Daphnia species in one of the most productive areas of the Northern hemisphere. By using diagnostic genetic markers (12S rRNA and ND5 genes we identified five Daphnia species: D. ambigua, D. curvirostris, D. longispina, D. obtusa and D. pulex in fourteen ponds. Additional analyses of two nuclear genes (LdhA and Rab4 revealed that D. pulex in the study area is native European strain. In opposite, D. ambigua shared haplotype with the North-Eastern American lineage that was introduced to Europe by long-distance dispersal. In the Po river Basin we identified a highly divergent lineage of D. longispina group that formed a clade with individuals from northern European Russia and might represent a new Daphnia species. Daphnia species in the Cremona province have European origin, except for D. ambigua which is a North American species spreading across Europe. Future attention will require monitoring of invasive species, particularly D. ambigua and the North American invasive clone of D. pulex that is already present in Northern Italy. 

  9. Vibrio chromosomes share common history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gevers Dirk

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While most gamma proteobacteria have a single circular chromosome, Vibrionales have two circular chromosomes. Horizontal gene transfer is common among Vibrios, and in light of this genetic mobility, it is an open question to what extent the two chromosomes themselves share a common history since their formation. Results Single copy genes from each chromosome (142 genes from chromosome I and 42 genes from chromosome II were identified from 19 sequenced Vibrionales genomes and their phylogenetic comparison suggests consistent phylogenies for each chromosome. Additionally, study of the gene organization and phylogeny of the respective origins of replication confirmed the shared history. Conclusions Thus, while elements within the chromosomes may have experienced significant genetic mobility, the backbones share a common history. This allows conclusions based on multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA for one chromosome to be applied equally to both chromosomes.

  10. Genome engineering in Vibrio cholerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Val, Marie-Eve; Skovgaard, Ole; Ducos-Galand, Magaly

    2012-01-01

    importance in public health, Vibrio cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, has become a preferred model to study bacteria with multipartite genomes. However, most in vivo studies in V. cholerae have been hampered by its genome architecture, as it is difficult to give phenotypes to a specific chromosome....... This difficulty was surmounted using a unique and powerful strategy based on massive rearrangement of prokaryotic genomes. We developed a site-specific recombination-based engineering tool, which allows targeted, oriented, and reciprocal DNA exchanges. Using this genetic tool, we obtained a panel of V. cholerae...... in V. cholerae and the general question concerning bacteria carrying circular chromosomes--by looking at the effect of chromosome size on topological issues. In this article, we show that Dam, RctB, and ParA2/ParB2 are strictly essential for chrII origin maintenance, and we formally demonstrate...

  11. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns of Vibrio cholerae isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S D Shrestha

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cholera is one of the most common diarrhoeal diseases in Nepal. Etiological agent of cholera is Vibrio cholerae which removes essential body fluids, salts and vital nutrients, which are necessary for life causing dehydration and malnutrition. Emerging antimicrobial resistant is common. The aim of the present study was to determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of cholera patients in Nepal. METHODS: All the laboratory works were conducted in the bacteriology section of National Public Health Laboratory, Teku from March to September 2005. During this period a total of 340 stool samples from diarrhoeal patients were collected and processed according to the standard laboratory methods. Each patient suffering from diarrhoea was directly interviewed for his or her clinical history during sample collection. RESULTS: A total of 340 stool samples were processed and studied from both sex including all ages of patients. Among the processed sample 53 Vibrio cholerae cases were found. All isolated Vibrio cholerae O1 were El Tor, Inaba. All isolated (100% Vibrio cholerae O1 were sensitive to Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline whereas all were resistant to Nalidixic acid and Cotrimoxazole. Only 15.1% cases were sensitive to Furazolidone whereas 84.9% were resistant. CONCLUSION: All V. cholerae strains isolated in this study were found resistant to Multi Drug Resistant (resistant to at least two antibiotics of different group. Ampicillin, Ciprofloxacin, Erythromycin and Tetracycline were found still more potent antibiotics against Vibrio cholerae isolated during the study. Keywords: antibiotics, susceptibility, Vibrio cholera.

  12. Identifying the cellular mechanisms of symbiont-induced epithelial morphogenesis in the squid-Vibrio association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koropatnick, Tanya; Goodson, Michael S; Heath-Heckman, Elizabeth A C; McFall-Ngai, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    The symbiotic association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid Euprymna scolopes and the luminous marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri provides a unique opportunity to study epithelial morphogenesis. Shortly after hatching, the squid host harvests bacteria from the seawater using currents created by two elaborate fields of ciliated epithelia on the surface of the juvenile light organ. After light organ colonization, the symbiont population signals the gradual loss of the ciliated epithelia through apoptosis of the cells, which culminates in the complete regression of these tissues. Whereas aspects of this process have been studied at the morphological, biochemical, and molecular levels, no in-depth analysis of the cellular events has been reported. Here we describe the cellular structure of the epithelial field and present evidence that the symbiosis-induced regression occurs in two steps. Using confocal microscopic analyses, we observed an initial epithelial remodeling, which serves to disable the function of the harvesting apparatus, followed by a protracted regression involving actin rearrangements and epithelial cell extrusion. We identified a metal-dependent gelatinolytic activity in the symbiont-induced morphogenic epithelial fields, suggesting the involvement of Zn-dependent matrix metalloproteinase(s) (MMP) in light organ morphogenesis. These data show that the bacterial symbionts not only induce apoptosis of the field, but also change the form, function, and biochemistry of the cells as part of the morphogenic program.

  13. Impact and influence of the natural Vibrio-squid symbiosis in understanding bacterial-animal interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Mandel

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Animals are colonized by bacteria, and in many cases partners have co-evolved to perform mutually beneficial functions. An exciting and ongoing legacy of the past decade has been an expansion of technology to enable study of natural associations in situ/in vivo. As a result, more symbioses are being examined, and additional details are being revealed for well-studied systems with a focus on the interactions between partners in the native context. With this framing, we review recent literature from the Vibrio fischeri-Euprymna scolopes symbiosis and focus on key studies that have had an impact on understanding bacteria-animal interactions broadly. This is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the system, but rather to focus on particular studies that have excelled at moving from pattern to process in facilitating an understanding of the molecular basis to intriguing observations in the field of host-microbe interactions. In this review we discuss the following topics: processes regulating strain and species specificity; bacterial signaling to host morphogenesis; multiple roles for nitric oxide; flagellar motility and chemotaxis; and efforts to understand unannotated and poorly annotated genes. Overall these studies demonstrate how functional approaches in vivo in a tractable system have provided valuable insight into general principles of microbe-host interactions.

  14. Hatchery mortalities of larval oysters caused by Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio coralliilyticus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchery production of bivalve shellfish has been hampered by the occasional presence of opportunistic pathogens, particularly Vibrio coralliilyticus and Vibrio tubiashii. The present study reports the results of several avenues of research to better define these pathogens and the roles they play i...

  15. Rapid proliferation of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae during freshwater flash floods in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kevin; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Mosser, Thomas; Rodier, Claire; Tournoud, Marie-George; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle; Colwell, Rita R; Monfort, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, and Vibrio cholerae of the non-O1/non-O139 serotype are present in coastal lagoons of southern France. In these Mediterranean regions, the rivers have long low-flow periods followed by short-duration or flash floods during and after heavy intense rainstorms, particularly at the end of the summer and in autumn. These floods bring large volumes of freshwater into the lagoons, reducing their salinity. Water temperatures recorded during sampling (15 to 24°C) were favorable for the presence and multiplication of vibrios. In autumn 2011, before heavy rainfalls and flash floods, salinities ranged from 31.4 to 36.1‰ and concentrations of V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, and V. cholerae varied from 0 to 1.5 × 10(3) most probable number (MPN)/liter, 0.7 to 2.1 × 10(3) MPN/liter, and 0 to 93 MPN/liter, respectively. Following heavy rainstorms that generated severe flash flooding and heavy discharge of freshwater, salinity decreased, reaching 2.2 to 16.4‰ within 15 days, depending on the site, with a concomitant increase in Vibrio concentration to ca. 10(4) MPN/liter. The highest concentrations were reached with salinities between 10 and 20‰ for V. parahaemolyticus, 10 and 15‰ for V. vulnificus, and 5 and 12‰ for V. cholerae. Thus, an abrupt decrease in salinity caused by heavy rainfall and major flooding favored growth of human-pathogenic Vibrio spp. and their proliferation in the Languedocian lagoons. Based on these results, it is recommended that temperature and salinity monitoring be done to predict the presence of these Vibrio spp. in shellfish-harvesting areas of the lagoons. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Sucralose induces biochemical responses in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson Wiklund, Ann-Kristin; Adolfsson-Erici, Margaretha; Liewenborg, Birgitta; Gorokhova, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS) in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L(-1)). The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  17. Sucralose induces biochemical responses in Daphnia magna.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Kristin Eriksson Wiklund

    Full Text Available The intense artificial sweetener sucralose has no bioconcentration properties, and no adverse acute toxic effects have been observed in standard ecotoxicity tests, suggesting negligible environmental risk. However, significant feeding and behavioural alterations have been reported in non-standard tests using aquatic crustaceans, indicating possible sublethal effects. We hypothesized that these effects are related to alterations in acetylcholinesterase (AChE and oxidative status in the exposed animals and investigated changes in AChE and oxidative biomarkers (oxygen radical absorbing capacity, ORAC, and lipid peroxidation, TBARS in the crustacean Daphnia magna exposed to sucralose (0.0001-5 mg L(-1. The sucralose concentration was a significant positive predictor for ORAC, TBARS and AChE in the daphnids. Moreover, the AChE response was linked to both oxidative biomarkers, with positive and negative relationships for TBARS and ORAC, respectively. These joint responses support our hypothesis and suggest that exposure to sucralose may induce neurological and oxidative mechanisms with potentially important consequences for animal behaviour and physiology.

  18. Ingestion of microcystins by Daphnia: Intestinal uptake and toxic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.; Dittmann, E.

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the intestinal uptake and adverse effects of microcystins ingested with Microcystis on Daphnia galeata. The gut structure, blood microcystin concentration, appearance, and movements of Daphnia fed Microcystis PCC 7806 or a microcystin-deficient PCC 7806 mutant were monitored over...... function that influences major muscle systems. Consequently, the beat rates of the thoracic legs, mandibles, and second antennae as well as the activity of the foregut decreased, whereas the midgut muscles were stimulated. Finally, the animals exhibited symptoms of exhaustion and died. The present results...

  19. Vibrios associated with red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum.

    OpenAIRE

    Romalde, J L; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1990-01-01

    Vibrios were isolated from red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum and also throughout the year in the Ria de Pontevedra, Spain. The isolates were grouped into 14 phena by numerical toxonomy. Strains associated with red tides were restricted to four phena: phena I and II were Vibrio alginolyticus, and phena III and IV were Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. V. anguillarum-like strains (phena V through XI) predominated throughout the year outside the red tide areas. Cytotoxic...

  20. Effects of Global Warming on Vibrio Ecology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Brettar, Ingrid; Höfle, Manfred; Pruzzo, Carla

    2015-06-01

    Vibrio-related infections are increasing worldwide both in humans and aquatic animals. Rise in global sea surface temperature (SST), which is approximately 1 °C higher now than 140 years ago and is one of the primary physical impacts of global warming, has been linked to such increases. In this chapter, major known effects of increasing SST on the biology and ecology of vibrios are described. They include the effects on bacterial growth rate, both in the field and in laboratory, culturability, expression of pathogenicity traits, and interactions with aquatic organisms and abiotic surfaces. Special emphasis is given to the effect of ocean warming on Vibrio interactions with zooplankters, which represent one of the most important aquatic reservoirs for these bacteria. The reported findings highlight the biocomplexity of the interactions between vibrios and their natural environment in a climate change scenario, posing the need for interdisciplinary studies to properly understand the connection between ocean warming and persistence and spread of vibrios in sea waters and the epidemiology of the diseases they cause.

  1. Suspension of oysters reduces the populations of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio vulnificus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K M; Supan, J; Ramirez, A; Johnson, C N

    2015-09-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) and Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) are associated with the consumption of raw oysters and cause illnesses ranging from simple gastroenteritis to life-threatening septicaemia. These halophilic bacteria are frequently found in marine and estuarine systems, accumulating within the tissues of a number of aquatic organisms and passing on to humans after consumption, through contaminated water, or via open wounds. As benthic organisms capable of filtering 40 gallons of water per hour, sediment is an important source of potentially pathogenic vibrios in oysters destined for raw consumption. This research used off-bottom oyster culture to reduce vibrio concentrations in oysters. Colony hybridization was used to enumerate Vp and Vv in bottom and suspended oysters. Vv and Vp concentrations were generally lower in oysters suspended off-bottom, and suspension decreased vibrio loads in oysters by an average of 13%. Suspension of oysters reduced vibrio concentrations. This study found that oyster suspension significantly reduced some populations of potentially pathogenic vibrios. These results indicate that oyster suspension could be a viable approach for preharvest treatment to reduce illness in consumers of raw oysters. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Stem Rot on Ligularia fischeri Caused by Sclerotium rolfsii in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youn-Gi Moon

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In June 2012 and 2013, a destructive stem rot symptoms of Ligularia fischeri occurred sporadically in Hoengseong- gun and Pyeongchang-gun Gangwon-do, Korea. The typical symptom included water-soaking on the main stem, rotting, wilting and blighting, which eventually leads to death of the plant. White mycelial mats were spread over lesions and brown sclerotia were formed on stems and near soil surface. The sclerotia were white to brown, spherical or irregular, 1-3 mm in size on potato dextrose agar (PDA, The optimum temperature range of hyphal growth was 25-30oC and the hyphal diameter was 4-10 mm. The typical clamp connections were observed in the hyphae of the fungus grown on PDA. The resulting sequence of 695 bp was deposited in GenBank. A BLAST search revealed that sequences of the this isolates showed >99% identity with those of Sclerotium rolfsii. On the basis of the morphological characteristics and phylogenetic analyses of molecular markers ITS rDNA, the fungi were identified as S. rolfsii. A pathogenicity test was carried out to fulfill Koch’s postulates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of S. rolfsii on Ligularia fischeri in Korea

  3. Decrease in Daphnia egg viability at elevated pH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, J.; Kalf, D.F.; Boersma, M.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of high pH on the reproduction of two Daphnia galeata clones was experimentally investigated in the laboratory. We observed that the mortality of juveniles and adults did not increase with increasing pH in the range pH 9.0- 10.5, which agrees with what is generally reported in the

  4. Evaluation of Daphnia magna as an indicator of Toxicity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Performance evaluation of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) with special reference to toxicity reduction using Daphnia magna straus as test organism is very important to study the likely adverse effects of the treated wastewater on the aquatic ecosystem of receiving waters and to detect common environmentally ...

  5. A decrease in bulk water and mannitol and accumulation of trehalose and trehalose-based oligosaccharides define a two-stage maturation process towards extreme stress resistance in ascospores of Neosartorya fischeri (Aspergillus fischeri)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wyatt, Timon T; Golovina, Elena A; van Leeuwen, Richard; Hallsworth, John E; Wösten, Han A B; Dijksterhuis, Jan

    Fungal propagules survive stresses better than vegetative cells. Neosartorya fischeri, an Aspergillus teleomorph, forms ascospores that survive high temperatures or drying followed by heat. Not much is known about maturation and development of extreme stress resistance in fungal cells. This study

  6. Foraging behavior by Daphnia in stoichiometric gradients of food quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Greg S; McCauley, Edward

    2007-10-01

    Mismatches in the elemental composition of herbivores and their resources can impact herbivore growth and reproduction. In aquatic systems, the ratio of elements, such as C, P, and N, is used to characterize the food quality of algal prey. For example, large increases in the C:P ratio of edible algae can decrease rates of growth and reproduction in Daphnia. Current theory emphasizes that Daphnia utilize only assimilation and respiration processes to maintain an optimal elemental composition, yet studies of terrestrial herbivores implicate behavioral processes in coping with local variation in food quality. We tested the ability of juvenile and adult Daphnia to locate regions of high-quality food within a spatial gradient of algal prey differing in C:P ratio, while holding food density constant over space. Both juveniles and adults demonstrated similar behavior by quickly locating (i.e., high food quality. Foraging paths were centred on regions of high food quality and these differed significantly from paths of individuals exposed to a homogeneous environment of both food density and food quality. Ingestion rate experiments on algal prey of differing stoichiometric ratio show that individuals can adjust their intake rate over fast behavioral time-scales, and we use these data to examine how individuals choose foraging locations when presented with a spatial gradient that trades off food quality and food quantity. Daphnia reared under low food quality conditions chose to forage in regions of high food quality even though they could attain the same C ingestion rate elsewhere along a spatial gradient. We argue that these aspects of foraging behavior by Daphnia have important implications for how these herbivores manage their elemental composition and our understanding of the dynamics of these herbivore-plant systems in lakes and ponds where spatial variation in food quality is present.

  7. Effects of food type on the life history of Daphnia clones from lakes differing in trophic state. I. Daphnia galeata feeding on Scenedesmus and Oscillatoria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.

    1997-01-01

    1. Effects of the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus and the filamentous cyanobacterium Oscillatoria limnetica as food sources on the growth and reproduction of nine Daphnia galeata clones were studied. A high concentration of these two algae species was fed to Daphnia clones collected from four lakes

  8. Vibrio population structure - Genetic and population structure analysis of clinical and environmental Vibrio parahaemolyticus strains

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Vibrio parahaemolyticus (Vp) is a marine bacterium capable of causing severe gastroenteritis in humans, usually through the consumption of raw shellfish. Before...

  9. Vibrio ecology - Identifying Environmental Determinants Favorable for the Presence and Transmission of Pathogenic Vibrios

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In a tri-coastal collaborative study, the population densities of vibrios are being determined in the Mississippi Sound, Puget Sound, Chesapeake Bay, and Timbalier...

  10. Effects of cell-bound microcystins on survival and feeding of Daphnia spp

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohrlack, T; Dittmann, E; Börner, T

    2001-01-01

    microcystin synthesis, were compared. Additionally, the relationship between microcystin ingestion rate by the Daphnia clones and Daphnia survival time was analyzed. Microcystins ingested with Microcystis cells were poisonous to all Daphnia clones tested. The median survival time of the animals was closely......-producing and -lacking cells, and (iv) the strength of the toxic effect can be predicted from the microcystin ingestion rate of the animals....

  11. Benthic ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in a coastal Mediterranean environment (La Spezia Gulf, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vezzulli, Luigi; Pezzati, Elisabetta; Moreno, Mariapaola; Fabiano, Mauro; Pane, Luigi; Pruzzo, Carla

    2009-11-01

    We carried out a 16-month in situ study to investigate the ecology of Vibrio spp. and pathogenic Vibrio species in coastal sediments of the Mediterranean Sea, employing multiple-regression analysis to reveal the major environmental factors controlling their occurrence in the benthic environment. In addition, association between vibrios and sediment-inhabiting meiofauna, which is a major component of benthic ecosystems, was investigated. Culturable and total Vibrio spp. estimates by most-probable-number technique coupled with standard polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR methods, respectively, were at least one order of magnitude higher in sediment than in seawater. In addition, potential human pathogenic species Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus occurred in the sediment with V. parahaemolyticus being the most frequently found. In the pelagic environment, 60% of total variance in culturable Vibrio data was explained by sea surface temperature (40%), salinity (13%) and organic matter concentration (7%). In the benthic environment, sea surface temperature was the only factor that significantly affected culturable Vibrio occurrence although it explained only 25% of total variance, suggesting that additional unexplored factors may play a role as well. No correlation was found between culturable Vibrio spp. concentrations and the abundance of harpacticoid copepods in the sediment whilst a negative correlation was found between Vibrio spp. and nematode abundance which accounted for almost 90% of the total meiofaunal density. Taxonomic analysis revealed that selective bacterial feeders accounted for nearly 50% of the total nematode community and included genera such as Terschellingia, Molgolaimus and Halalaimus, suggesting that top-down control by nematode grazing may be an important factor affecting Vibrio occurrence in these sediments. It is concluded that the benthic marine environment may function as a reservoir of Vibrio spp

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibilty of potentially pathogenic halophilic Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Surveillance of antimicrobial resistance is indispensable for empirical treatment of infections and in preventing the spread of antimicrobial resistant microorganisms. This study is aimed at determining the antibiotic susceptibility of potentially pathogenic halophylic Vibrio species isolated in Lagos, Nigeria. Susceptibility ...

  13. Comparison of classifications of aptamers against Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a novel method to detect the pathogen Vibrio alginolyticus, 45 aptamers were previously selected and tested. In order to better understand the properties of these aptamers, it was essential to classify these aptamers based on appropriate criteria. The primary structure of 45 aptamers against V. alginolyticus was analyzed ...

  14. Organic metabolites produced by Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Identification and action of several antibacterial metabolites produced by a fish pathogen Vibrio parahaemolyticus strain An3 from marine ecosystem of Goa has been demonstrated. Antibacterial activity of the crude cell extract of the test bacterium has been evaluated against indicator pathogenic bacterial strains such as ...

  15. AKTIVITAS ANTIBAKTERI EKSTRAK BUAH ADAS (Foeniculum vulgare, Mill PADA Vibrio harveyi DAN Vibrio alginolyticus Antibacterial Activity of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill Extract on Vibrio alginolyticus and Vibrio harveyi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Budianto Budianto

    2015-10-01

    Pada penelitian ini menggunakan ekstrak air dari buah adas untuk mengetahui aktivitas antibakteri terhadap Vibrio harveyi dan Vibrio alginolyticus dengan menggunakan metode uji Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC dan difusi cakram kertas. Hasil yang diperoleh pada uji MIC, konsentrasi terkecil untuk menghambat pertumbuhan adalah 0,060 g/ml, untuk kedua spesies bakteri. Variasi perlakuan pada uji cakram kertas yaitu konsentrasi A (0,065 g/ml, B (0,070 g/ml, C (0,075 g/ml, D (0,080 g/ml, E (0,085 g/ml, F (0,090 g/ml dan kontrol (0,000 g/ml, hasil yang diperoleh adalah konsentrasi 0,090 g/ml memiliki diameter zona hambat tertinggi sebesar 11,17 ± 0,5 mm (V. harveyi dan 12,53 ± 1,14 mm (V. alginolyticus, sehingga dapat disimpulkan bahwa buah adas (F. vulgare Mill memiliki peranan ekologi yang sangat penting sebagai bahan pengobatan alternatif dalam pengendalian penyebaran penyakit Vibriosis yang disebabkan oleh V. harveyi dan V. alginolyticus. Kata kunci: Foeniculum vulgare Mill, Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio alginolyticus, uji MIC dan difusi cakram kertas

  16. Identification of a novel UDP-N-acetylglucosamine enolpyruvyl transferase (MurA) from Vibrio fischeri that confers high fosfomycin resistance in Escherichia coli

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Kumar, S.; Parvathi, A; Hernandez, R.L.; Cadle, K.M.; Varela, M.F.

    MurA [UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-NAG) enolpyruvyl transferase] is a key enzyme involved in bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan synthesis and a target for the antimicrobial agent fosfomycin, a structural analog of the MurA substrate phosphoenol...

  17. Plankton composition and environmental factors contribute to Vibrio seasonality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Jeffrey W; Good, Brooks; Cole, Dana; Lipp, Erin K

    2009-09-01

    Plankton represent a nutrient-rich reservoir capable of enriching Vibrio species, which can include human pathogens, at higher densities than the surrounding water column. To better understand the relationship between vibrios and plankton, the partitioning of culturable vibrios, on TCBS, between free living and plankton associated (63-200- and >200-microm-size fractions) was monitored over a 1-year period in coastal waters of Georgia, USA. Seasonal changes in the total Vibrio concentration were then compared with changes in environmental parameters as well as changes in the relative composition of the plankton community. Using univariate analyses, Vibrio concentrations were strongly associated with temperature, especially when those vibrios were plankton associated (R(2)=0.69 and 0.88 for the water and both plankton fractions; respectively) (Pplankton fractions were also correlated to shifts in the relative abundance of specific plankton taxa. In the 63-200-micro fraction, Vibrio concentrations were inversely associated with copepods, cyanobacteria and diatoms. In the >200-micro fraction, Vibrio concentrations were positively associated with copepods and negatively associated with decapod larvae. Our results confirm the role of temperature in Vibrio seasonality and highlight an important and independent role for plankton composition in explaining seasonal changes in Vibrio concentration.

  18. Ecotoxicological testing of gas oils (daphnia magna test)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altmann, B.R.; Mueller, J.; Wenzel, A.; Hensel, R.

    2002-02-01

    The Water Accomodated Fractions WAF of 4 diesel fuels no. 2 and 4 domestic heating fuels no. 2 of differing origin were analysed on their effect on the mobility of the freshwater crustacean Daphnia Magna. Five loadings per test substance were tested. After an exposition period of 24 h a relationship between loading rates of the WAF and immobility was found for 3 samples, while after 48 h this was observed for all samples. WAF-generation and gas oil data were documented. (orig.) [German] Von 4 Dieselkraftstoff-Gasoelen und 4 Heizoel-Gasoelen EL wurden die Water Accomodated Fractions WAF auf ihre immobilisierende Wirkung auf den Wasserfloh Daphnia Magna untersucht. Von jeder Probe wurden fuenf unterschiedliche Dosierraten geprueft. Nach einer Expositionszeit von 24 Stunden zeigte sich bei 3 Proben und nach 48 Stunden bei allen Proben eine Beziehung zwischen der Dosierrate der Probe und der Immobilitaet. Die Herstellung der WAF und die Daten der Gasoele wurden dokumentiert. (orig.)

  19. Medical-biological aspects of radiation effects in Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarapultseva, E.; Uskalova, D.; Savina, N.; Ustenko, K.

    2017-01-01

    We have shown that γ-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of transgenerational effects in Daphnia. We have also shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated at doses of 10, 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Our data demonstrated that multicellular crustacean D. magna represent a very useful experimental model for analyse of long-term effects of ionising radiation at the organismal level.

  20. Evolution of a transposon in Daphnia hybrid genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vergilino Roland

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transposable elements play a major role in genome evolution. Their capacity to move and/or multiply in the genome of their host may have profound impacts on phenotypes, and may have dramatic consequences on genome structure. Hybrid and polyploid clones have arisen multiple times in the Daphnia pulex complex and are thought to reproduce by obligate parthenogenesis. Our study examines the evolution of a DNA transposable element named Pokey in the D. pulex complex. Results Portions of Pokey elements inserted in the 28S rRNA genes from various Daphnia hybrids (diploids and polyploids were sequenced and compared to sequences from a previous study to understand the evolutionary history of the elements. Pokey sequences show a complex phylogenetic pattern. We found evidence of recombination events in numerous Pokey alleles from diploid and polyploid hybrids and also from non-hybrid diploids. The recombination rate in Pokey elements is comparable to recombination rates previously estimated for 28S rRNA genes in the congener, Daphnia obtusa. Some recombinant Pokey alleles were encountered in Daphnia isolates from multiple locations and habitats. Conclusions Phylogenetic and recombination analyses showed that recombination is a major force that shapes Pokey evolution. Based on Pokey phylogenies, reticulation has played and still plays an important role in shaping the diversity of the D. pulex complex. Horizontal transfer of Pokey seems to be rare and hybrids often possess Pokey elements derived from recombination among alleles encountered in the putative parental species. The insertion of Pokey in hotspots of recombination may have important impacts on the diversity and fitness of this transposable element.

  1. The acute toxicity of lead nitrate on Daphnia magna Straus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the acute toxicity of lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2) to Daphnia magna Straus was investigated in a static bioassay. After 24 h the mobility of daphnids were examined and immobile ones were counted. The 24 h EC50 of lead nitrate to D. magna was found as 0.44 mg/L. According to Behrens-Karber method the 24 h ...

  2. The acute toxicity of lead nitrate on Daphnia magna Straus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... In this study the acute toxicity of lead nitrate (Pb(NO3)2) to Daphnia magna Straus was investigated in a static bioassay. After 24 h the mobility of daphnids were examined and immobile ones were counted. The 24 h EC50 of lead nitrate to D. magna was found as 0.44 mg/L. According to Behrens-Karber ...

  3. Cyanobacteria Affect Fitness and Genetic Structure of Experimental Daphnia Populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugă, Bogdan; Turko, Patrick; Spaak, Piet; Pomati, Francesco

    2016-04-05

    Zooplankton communities can be strongly affected by cyanobacterial blooms, especially species of genus Daphnia, which are key-species in lake ecosystems. Here, we explored the effect of microcystin/nonmicrocystin (MC/non-MC) producing cyanobacteria in the diet of experimental Daphnia galeata populations composed of eight genotypes. We used D. galeata clones hatched from ephippia 10 to 60 years old, which were first tested in monocultures, and then exposed for 10 weeks as mixed populations to three food treatments consisting of green algae combined with cyanobacteria able/unable of producing MC. We measured the expression of nine genes potentially involved in Daphnia acclimation to cyanobacteria: six protease genes, one ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme gene, and two rRNA genes, and then we tracked the dynamics of the genotypes in mixed populations. The expression pattern of one protease and the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme genes was positively correlated with the increased fitness of competing clones in the presence of cyanobacteria, suggesting physiological plasticity. The genotype dynamics in mixed populations was only partially related to the growth rates of clones in monocultures and varied strongly with the food. Our results revealed strong intraspecific differences in the tolerance of D. galeata clones to MC/non-MC-producing cyanobacteria in their diet, suggesting microevolutionary effects.

  4. Contrasting life history responses to fish released infochemicals of two co-occurring Daphnia species that show different migration behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vijverberg, J.; Doksaeter, A.; Van Donk, E.

    2006-01-01

    In a previous field study (Flik & Vijverberg 2003) we showed that in an oligotrophic-mesotrophic lake in the Netherlands (L. Maarsseveen) two co-occurring Daphnia species, Daphnia pulicaria and Daphnia galeata × hyalina performed distinct vertical migration behaviour during summer which is induced

  5. Changes in food quality of the green alga Scenedesmus induced by Daphnia infochemicals: biochemical composition and morphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; De Lange, H.J.; Van Donk, E.

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of Daphnia infochemicals on the morphology and biochemical composition of Scenedesmus were studied and subsequently their influence on Daphnia life history. Three species of Scenedesmus (S. acutus, S. obliquus and S. subspicatus) were tested for Daphnia-induced colony formation. Life

  6. Highly diverse recombining populations of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio parahaemolyticus in French Mediterranean coastal lagoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteves, Kévin; Mosser, Thomas; Aujoulat, Fabien; Hervio-Heath, Dominique; Monfort, Patrick; Jumas-Bilak, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae are ubiquitous to estuarine and marine environments. These two species found in Mediterranean coastal systems can induce infections in humans. Environmental isolates of V. cholerae (n = 109) and V. parahaemolyticus (n = 89) sampled at different dates, stations and water salinities were investigated for virulence genes and by a multilocus sequence-based analysis (MLSA). V. cholerae isolates were all ctxA negative and only one isolate of V. parahaemolyticus displayed trh2 gene. Most Sequence Types (ST) corresponded to unique ST isolated at one date or one station. Frequent recombination events were detected among different pathogenic species, V. parahaemolyticus, V. cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, and Vibrio metoecus. Recombination had a major impact on the diversification of lineages. The genetic diversity assessed by the number of ST/strain was higher in low salinity condition for V. parahaemolyticus and V. cholerae whereas the frequency of recombination events in V. cholerae was lower in low salinity condition. Mediterranean coastal lagoon systems housed V. cholerae and V. parahaemolyticus with genetic diversities equivalent to the worldwide diversity described so far. The presence of STs found in human infections as well as the frequency of recombination events in environmental vibrios populations could predict a potential epidemiological risk. PMID:26236294

  7. Comparison of Chemical Sensitivity of Fresh and Long-Stored Heat Resistant Neosartorya fischeri Environmental Isolates Using BIOLOG Phenotype MicroArray System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Panek

    Full Text Available Spoilage of heat processed food and beverage by heat resistant fungi (HRF is a major problem for food industry in many countries. Neosartorya fischeri is the leading source of spoilage in thermally processed products. Its resistance to heat processing and toxigenicity makes studies about Neosartorya fischeri metabolism and chemical sensitivity essential. In this study chemical sensitivity of two environmental Neosartorya fischeri isolates were compared. One was isolated from canned apples in 1923 (DSM3700, the other from thermal processed strawberry product in 2012 (KC179765, used as long-stored and fresh isolate, respectively. The study was conducted using Biolog Phenotype MicroArray platforms of chemical sensitivity panel and traditional hole-plate method. The study allowed for obtaining data about Neosartorya fischeri growth inhibitors. The fresh isolate appeared to be much more resistant to chemical agents than the long-stored isolate. Based on phenotype microarray assay nitrogen compounds, toxic cations and membrane function compounds were the most effective in growth inhibition of N. fischeri isolates. According to the study zaragozic acid A, thallium(I acetate and sodium selenate were potent and promising N. fischeri oriented fungicides which was confirmed by both chemical sensitivity microplates panel and traditional hole-plate methods.

  8. Vibrios associated with red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romalde, J L; Barja, J L; Toranzo, A E

    1990-11-01

    Vibrios were isolated from red tides caused by Mesodinium rubrum and also throughout the year in the Ria de Pontevedra, Spain. The isolates were grouped into 14 phena by numerical toxonomy. Strains associated with red tides were restricted to four phena: phena I and II were Vibrio alginolyticus, and phena III and IV were Vibrio tubiashii and Vibrio anguillarum, respectively. V. anguillarum-like strains (phena V through XI) predominated throughout the year outside the red tide areas. Cytotoxicity assays conducted in different poikilothermic and homoiothermic cell lines showed that cytotoxin production was not necessarily associated with the species selected during the red tides.

  9. 21 CFR 866.3930 - Vibrio cholerae serological reagents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cholera caused by the bacterium Vibrio cholerae and provides epidemiological information on cholera. Cholera is an acute infectious disease characterized by severe diarrhea with extreme fluid and electrolyte...

  10. Life-history consequences for Daphnia pulex exposed to pharmaceutical carbamazepine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Sargant, E.M.; Roessink, I.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of the antiepileptic, analgesic drug carbamazepine on the growth, morphology, and life-history characteristics of Daphnia pulex were examined at nominal concentrations of 0, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, and 200 mu g L-1. At 1 mu g carbamazepine L-1, Daphnia matured and reproduced slightly earlier

  11. Pattern formation and stochastic motion of the zooplankton Daphnia in a light field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordemann, Anke; Balazsi, Gabor; Moss, Frank

    2003-07-01

    We extend our study of single and collective motions of the zooplankton Daphnia both in experiment and computer simulation. Daphnia, as well as many other prey animals, can be observed to swarm under certain circumstances as a protective behavior against predators. Daphnia swarms can be induced by an optical marker such as a vertical shaft of light, to which they are attracted. For low Daphnia densities we observe that individual Daphnia develop a circular motion around the optical marker, whereas for high densities we can reproducibly induce swarming Daphnia to carry out a vortex motion. To learn more about this circular pattern and the associated spontaneous symmetry breaking, the motion of single Daphnia, as well as swarms, is characterized with respect to the light shaft. A stochastic model based on experimental data is compared with the observed Daphnia behavior as well as with existing models for single agents and agent swarms performing a circular motion to reveal the essential ingredients for vortex motion to occur.

  12. Interactions between predator kairomone and food level complicate the ecological interpretation of Daphnia laboratory results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weber, A.

    2001-01-01

    The effect of food concentration on the phenotypic response of life history traits to two predator kairomones war investigated in Daphnia. For the experiment, one clone of Daphnia galeata war used as the prey organism and solutions containing infochemicals (kairomones) of Chaoborus (phantom midge)

  13. A spontaneous mutant of microcystin biosynthesis: genetic characterization and effect on Daphnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kabernick, M.; Rohrlack, T.; Christoffersen, K.

    2001-01-01

    . Regardless of microcystin content, both Daphnia exhibited significantly reduced ingestion rates when fed with either strain of M. aeruginosa compared with the green alga Scenedesmus acutus. A disruption of the molting process in both Daphnia spp. was noted when these species were fed with MRC cells...

  14. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to…

  15. Modeling the growth of Byssochlamys fulva and Neosartorya fischeri on solidified apple juice by measuring colony diameter and ergosterol content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremarin, Andréia; Longhi, Daniel Angelo; Salomão, Beatriz de Cassia Martins; Aragão, Gláucia Maria Falcão

    2015-01-16

    Byssochlamys fulva and Neosartorya fischeri are heat-resistant fungi which are a concern to food industries (e.g. apple juice industry) since their growth represents significant economic liabilities. Although the most common method used to assess fungal growth in solid substrates is by measuring the colony's diameter, it is difficult to apply this method to food substrates. Alternatively, ergosterol contents have been used to quantify fungal contamination in some types of food. The current study aimed at modeling the growth of the heat-resistant fungi B. fulva and N. fischeri by measuring the colony diameter and ergosterol content, fitting the Baranyi and Roberts model to the results, and finally establishing a correlation between the parameters of the two analytical methods. Whereas the colony diameter was measured daily, the quantification of ergosterol was performed when the colonies reached diameters of 30, 60, 90, 120 and 150 mm. Results showed that B. fulva and N. fischeri were able to grow successfully on solidified apple juice at 10, 15, 20, 25 and 30 °C, and the Baranyi and Roberts model showed good ability to describe growth data. The correlation curves between the parameters of colony diameter and ergosterol content were obtained with satisfactory statistical indexes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Carriage of vibrio species by shrimps harvested from the coastal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the prevalence of Vibrio spp in unprocessed shrimps and their susceptibility to antibiotics. Design: A prospective study of Vibrio spp associated with shrimps harvested from the coastal waters of South West Cameroon. Setting: A laboratory based study at the Department of Life Sciences, University ...

  17. Environmental occurrence and clinical impact of Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a European perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Austin, Craig; Stockley, Louise; Rangdale, Rachel; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2010-02-01

    Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus are ubiquitous Gram-negative bacterial pathogens found naturally in marine and estuarine waters, and are a leading cause of seafood-associated bacterial illness. These pathogens are commonly reported in the USA and in many Asian countries, including China, Japan and Taiwan; however, there is growing concern that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus may represent an important and increasing clinical problem in Europe. Several factors underlie the need for a greater understanding of these non-cholera vibrios within a European context. First, there is a growing body of evidence to suggest that V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus infections are increasing, and tend to follow regional climatic trends, with outbreaks typically following episodes of unusually warm weather. Such findings are especially alarming given current predictions regarding warming of marine waters as a result of global climatic change. Second, a myriad of epidemiological factors may greatly increase the incidence as well as clinical burden of these pathogens - including increasing global consumption and trade of seafood produce coupled to an increase in the number of susceptible individuals consuming seafood produce. Finally, there is currently a lack of detailed surveillance information regarding non-cholerae Vibrio infections in Europe, as these pathogens are not notifiable in many countries, which probably masks the true clinical burden of many human infections. This review will present a pertinent overview of both the environmental occurrence and clinical impact of V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus in Europe. © 2010 Crown copyright.

  18. Spectral SAR Ecotoxicology of Ionic Liquids: The Daphnia magna Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai V. Putz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Aiming to provide a unified theory of ionic liquids ecotoxicity, the recent spectral structure activity relationship (S-SAR algorithm is employed for testing the two additive models of anionic-cationic interaction containing ionic liquid activity: the causal and the endpoint, |0+〉 and |1+〉 models, respectively. As a working system, the Daphnia magna ecotoxicity was characterized through the formulated and applied spectral chemical-ecobiological interaction principles. Specific anionic-cationic-ionic-liquid rules of interaction along the developed mechanistic hypersurface map of the main ecotoxicity paths together with the so-called resonance limitation of the standard statistical correlation analysis were revealed.

  19. Small scale mass culture of Daphnia magna Straus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, J.T.; Oldfather, J.M.

    1980-02-01

    Daphnia magna Straus 1820 was raised on a defined medium in 4-liter flasks with controlled light intensity, temperature, and algal food species. Adult D. magna tolerated high levels of ammonia (up to 108 ..mu..M) at high pH (> 10), although at these levels parthenogenic reproduction may be inhibited. Scenedesmus quadricauda and Ankistrodesmus sp. were satisfactory food sources, and by utilizing Ankistrodesmus densities greater than one animal per ml were achieved. Maintaining the pH at about 7 to 8 seems to be important for successful D. magna culture.

  20. Environmental plasticity of fish avoidance diapause response in Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirosław ŚLUSARCZYK

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Organisms cope with harsh environmental conditions in various ways: either by tolerating environmental stress (through physiological adaptations, or by avoiding it in space (through migration or time (diapause. Some species rely on a single strategy while others may choose from an array of options when facing different environmental stressors. Planktonic crustaceans may utilise different active (morphological, behavioural, life-history or passive (diapause defences to survive periods of high risk of fish predation. Recent evidence has indicated that resting egg production could be induced in Daphnia magna by chemical cues associated with fish predation. This suggests that contrary to most known cases of diapause, which are triggered well in advance of catastrophic events (here termed "predictive diapause", fish avoidance diapause in D. magna may exhibit a "responsive nature" and be initiated only after intensive predation appears. Experimental evidence discussed here indicates that the reaction of D. magna to chemical signals of fish predation could be conditional and determined by key environmental conditions, which in nature affect relative gains of activity vs dormancy. At high risk of fish predation, the decision of Daphnia to produce resting eggs was disfavoured by high food concentration. This reaction was claimed adaptive since high food allows for higher reproductive rates and better survival of offspring. All this may assure higher benefits due to activity despite some risk of predation (once predation pressure is not fatal to all active descendants and disfavour resting eggs production. Moreover, at moderate food conditions the decision of Daphnia to produce resting eggs was disfavoured by the availability of a dark refuge from fish visual predators and thus likely lowering the risk of being preyed upon. Furthermore, when food was at a moderate level and a dark refuge was not present the decision of Daphnia to produce resting eggs was

  1. Effects of ambient exposure, refrigeration, and icing on Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio parahaemolyticus abundances in oysters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J L; Lydon, K A; Kinsey, T P; Friedman, B; Curtis, M; Schuster, R; Bowers, J C

    2017-07-17

    Vibrio vulnificus (Vv) and V. parahaemolyticus (Vp) illnesses are typically acquired through the consumption of raw molluscan shellfish, particularly oysters. As Vibrio spp. are naturally-occurring bacteria, one means of mitigation of illness is achieved by limiting post-harvest growth. In this study, effects of ambient air storage, refrigeration, and icing of oysters on Vibrio spp. abundances were examined at two sites in Alabama (AL) [Dog River (DR) and Cedar Point (CP)] and one site in Delaware Bay, New Jersey (NJ). As the United States shellfish program recommendations include testing for total these organisms and gene targets, Vv and total (tlh) and pathogenic (tdh+ and trh+) Vp were enumerated from samples using MPN-real-time-PCR approaches. Mean Vv and Vp abundances in oysters from AL-DR were lowest in immediately iced samples (2.3 and -0.1 log MPN/g, respectively) and highest in the 5h ambient then refrigerated samples (3.4 and 0.5 log MPN/g, respectively). Similarly, in AL-CP Vv and Vp mean levels in oysters were lowest in immediately iced samples (3.6 and 1.2 log MPN/g, respectively) and highest in 5h ambient then refrigerated samples (5.1 and 3.2 log MPN/g, respectively). Mean levels of pathogenic Vp from AL sites were frequently below the limit of detection (ice resulted in lower Vibrio spp. levels in oysters, compared to those that were refrigerated post-harvest. These results suggest vibriosis risk can be mitigated by shorter storage times and more rapid cooling of oysters, providing data regulatory authorities can use to evaluate Vibrio spp. control plans. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Multigenerational genomic responses to dietary phosphorus and temperature in Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalal, Marwa; Shala, Nita K; Wojewodzic, Marcin W; Andersen, Tom; Hessen, Dag O

    2014-08-01

    Temperature and nutrient availability are both hypothesized to affect organisms at the cellular and genomic levels. In this multigenerational study, Daphnia magna (D. magna) and Daphnia pulex (D. pulex) were maintained at high (20 °C) and low (10 °C) temperatures and nourished with phosphorus (P)-sufficient (50 μmol/L) and P-deficient (2 μmol/L) algae for up to 35 generations to assess the multigenerational impacts on genome size and nucleus size. Analysis by flow cytometry revealed significant increases in nucleus size for both species as well as genome size for D. magna in response to a low temperature. The degree of endoreplication, measured as cycle value, was species specific and responded to temperature and dietary composition. Under dietary P deficiency, D. magna, but not D. pulex, showed an apparent reduction in haploid genome size (C-value). These genomic responses are unlikely to reflect differences in nucleotide numbers, but rather structural changes affecting fluorochrome binding. While the ultimate and proximate causes of these responses are unknown, they suggest an intriguing potential for genomic responses that merits further research.

  3. Environmental gradients structure Daphnia pulex × pulicaria clonal distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantel, J H; Juenger, T E; Leibold, M A

    2011-04-01

    The rarity of eukaryotic asexual reproduction is frequently attributed to the disadvantage of reduced genetic variation relative to sexual reproduction. However, parthenogenetic lineages that evolved repeatedly from sexual ancestors can generate regional pools of phenotypically diverse clones. Various theories to explain the maintenance of this genetic diversity as a result of environmental and spatial heterogeneity [frozen niche variation (FNV), general-purpose genotype] are conceptually similar to community ecological explanations for the maintenance of regional species diversity. We employed multivariate statistics common in community ecological research to study population genetic structure in the freshwater crustacean, Daphnia pulex × pulicaria. This parthenogenetic hybrid arose repeatedly from sexual ancestors. Daphnia pulex × pulicaria populations harboured substantial genetic variation among populations and the clonal composition at each pond corresponded to nutrient levels and invertebrate predator densities. The interclonal selection process described by the FNV hypothesis likely structured our D. pulex × pulicaria populations. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2011 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  4. Maternal food quantity affects offspring feeding rate in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbutt, Jennie S; Little, Tom J

    2014-07-01

    Maternal effects have wide-ranging effects on life-history traits. Here, using the crustacean Daphnia magna, we document a new effect: maternal food quantity affects offspring feeding rate, with low quantities of food triggering mothers to produce slow-feeding offspring. Such a change in the rate of resource acquisition has broad implications for population growth or dynamics and for interactions with, for instance, predators and parasites. This maternal effect can also explain the previously puzzling situation that the offspring of well-fed mothers, despite being smaller, grow and reproduce better than the offspring of food-starved mothers. As an additional source of variation in resource acquisition, this maternal effect may also influence relationships between life-history traits, i.e. trade-offs, and thus constraints on adaptation. Maternal nutrition has long-lasting effects on health and particularly diet-related traits in humans; finding an effect of maternal nutrition on offspring feeding rate in Daphnia highlights the utility of this organism as a powerful experimental model for exploring the relationship between maternal diet and offspring fitness. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. The Role of Vibrios in Diseases of Corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munn, Colin B

    2015-08-01

    The tissue, skeleton, and secreted mucus of corals supports a highly dynamic and diverse community of microbes, which play a major role in the health status of corals such as the provision of essential nutrients or the metabolism of waste products. However, members of the Vibrio genus are prominent as causative agents of disease in corals. The aim of this chapter is to review our understanding of the spectrum of disease effects displayed by coral-associated vibrios, with a particular emphasis on the few species where detailed studies of pathogenicity have been conducted. The role of Vibrio shilonii in seasonal bleaching of Oculina patagonica and the development of the coral probiotic hypothesis is reviewed, pointing to unanswered questions about this phenomenon. Detailed consideration is given to studies of V. coralliilyticus and related pathogens and changes in the dominance of vibrios associated with coral bleaching. Other Vibrio-associated disease syndromes discussed include yellow band/blotch disease and tissue necrosis in temperate gorgonian corals. The review includes analysis of the role of enzymes, resistance to oxidative stress, and quorum sensing in virulence of coral-associated vibrios. The review concludes that we should probably regard most-possibly all-vibrios as "opportunistic" pathogens which, under certain environmental conditions, are capable of overwhelming the defense mechanisms of appropriate hosts, leading to rapid growth and tissue destruction.

  6. Temperature-dependent benefits of bacterial exposure in embryonic development of Daphnia magna resting eggs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mushegian, Alexandra A; Burcklen, Elodie; Schär, Tobias M M; Ebert, Dieter

    2016-01-01

    .... In a series of laboratory experiments with diapausing eggs of the water flea Daphnia magna, we manipulated two environmental parameters, temperature and presence of bacteria, and examined their effect on development...

  7. Life history consequences for Daphnia pulex feeding on nutrient-limited phytoplankton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; Van Donk, E.

    1997-01-01

    1. The growth and feeding of Daphnia pulex De Geer on different algal species was examined. The green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Dangeard and Scenedesmus acutus Meyen, the diatom Synedra tenuissima Kutzing, the cryptophyte Cryptomonas pyrenoidifera Geitler and the cyanobacterium Microcystis

  8. Digest: The Red Queen hypothesis demonstrated by the Daphnia-Caullerya host-parasite system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Peciña, María; Osuna-Macaró, Carolina

    2018-01-30

    The Red Queen hypothesis predicts that antagonistic interactions between species lead to coevolutionary change. Turko et al. (2017) used the Daphnia-Caullerya host-parasite system to empirically confirm that the clonal turnover of Daphnia hosts is higher during Caullerya parasite epidemics, as expected under the Red Queen hypothesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  9. Colony formation in Scenedesmus: No contribution of urea in induction by a lipophilic Daphnia exudate

    OpenAIRE

    Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.; Elert, von, E.

    2001-01-01

    The common green alga Scenedesmus may respond morphologically to numerous environmental factors. The formation of colonies in Scenedesmus resulting from exposure to grazer (Daphnia) excreta is of particular interest since the induced colony formation may be an induced defense. Recent studies suggested that unicell-colony transformation in Scenedesmus could result from urea released by actively feeding Daphnia and/or by a more lipophilic substance that could be retained by lipophilic solid pha...

  10. Accumulation and inactivation of avian influenza virus by the filter-feeding invertebrate Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixell, Brandt W; Borchardt, Mark A; Spencer, Susan K

    2013-12-01

    The principal mode of avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission among wild birds is thought to occur via an indirect fecal-oral route, whereby individuals are exposed to virus from the environment through contact with virus-contaminated water. AIV can remain viable for an extended time in water; however, little is known regarding the influence of the biotic community (i.e., aquatic invertebrates) on virus persistence and infectivity in aquatic environments. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the ability of an aquatic filter-feeding invertebrate, Daphnia magna, to accumulate virus from AIV-dosed water under the hypothesis that they represent a potential vector of AIV to waterfowl hosts. We placed live daphnids in test tubes dosed with low-pathogenicity AIV (H3N8 subtype isolated from a wild duck) and sampled Daphnia tissue and the surrounding water using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) at 3- to 120-min intervals for up to 960 min following dosing. Concentrations of viral RNA averaged 3 times higher in Daphnia tissue than the surrounding water shortly after viral exposure, but concentrations decreased exponentially through time for both. Extracts from Daphnia tissue were negative for AIV by cell culture, whereas AIV remained viable in water without Daphnia present. Our results suggest daphnids can accumulate AIV RNA and effectively remove virus particles from water. Although concentrations of viral RNA were consistently higher in Daphnia tissue than the water, additional research is needed on the time scale of AIV inactivation after Daphnia ingestion to fully elucidate Daphnia's role as a potential vector of AIV infection to aquatic birds.

  11. Microcystis aeruginosa strengthens the advantage of Daphnia similoides in competition with Moina micrura.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hengxing; Hou, Xinying; Xue, Xiaofeng; Chen, Rui; Zhu, Xuexia; Huang, Yuan; Chen, Yafen

    2017-08-31

    Microcystis blooms are generally associated with zooplankton shifts by disturbing interspecific relationships. The influence of Microcystis on competitive dominance by different sized zooplanktons showed species-specific dependence. We evaluated the competitive responses of small Moina micrura and large Daphnia similoides to the presence of Microcystis using mixed diets comprising 0%, 20%, and 35% of toxic M. aeruginosa, and the rest of green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa. No competitive exclusion occurred for the two species under the tested diet combinations. In the absence of M. aeruginosa, the biomasses of the two cladocerans were decreased by the competition between them. However, the Daphnia was less inhibited with the higher biomass, suggesting the competitive dominance of Daphnia. M. aeruginosa treatment suppressed the population growths of the two cladocerans, with the reduced carrying capacities. Nonetheless, the population inhibition of Daphnia by competition was alleviated by the increased Microcystis proportion in diet. As a result, the competitive advantage of Daphnia became more pronounced, as indicated by the higher Daphnia: Moina biomass ratio with increased Microcystis proportions. These results suggested that M. aeruginosa strengthens the advantage of D. similoides in competition with M. micrura, which contributes to the diversified zooplankton shifts observed in fields during cyanobacteria blooms.

  12. Catechol Siderophore Transport by Vibrio cholerae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyckoff, Elizabeth E; Allred, Benjamin E; Raymond, Kenneth N; Payne, Shelley M

    2015-09-01

    Siderophores, small iron-binding molecules secreted by many microbial species, capture environmental iron for transport back into the cell. Vibrio cholerae synthesizes and uses the catechol siderophore vibriobactin and also uses siderophores secreted by other species, including enterobactin produced by Escherichia coli. E. coli secretes both canonical cyclic enterobactin and linear enterobactin derivatives likely derived from its cleavage by the enterobactin esterase Fes. We show here that V. cholerae does not use cyclic enterobactin but instead uses its linear derivatives. V. cholerae lacked both a receptor for efficient transport of cyclic enterobactin and enterobactin esterase to promote removal of iron from the ferrisiderophore complex. To further characterize the transport of catechol siderophores, we show that the linear enterobactin derivatives were transported into V. cholerae by either of the catechol siderophore receptors IrgA and VctA, which also transported the synthetic siderophore MECAM [1,3,5-N,N',N″-tris-(2,3-dihydroxybenzoyl)-triaminomethylbenzene]. Vibriobactin is transported via the additional catechol siderophore receptor ViuA, while the Vibrio fluvialis siderophore fluvibactin was transported by all three catechol receptors. ViuB, a putative V. cholerae siderophore-interacting protein (SIP), functionally substituted for the E. coli ferric reductase YqjH, which promotes the release of iron from the siderophore in the bacterial cytoplasm. In V. cholerae, ViuB was required for the use of vibriobactin but was not required for the use of MECAM, fluvibactin, ferrichrome, or the linear derivatives of enterobactin. This suggests the presence of another protein in V. cholerae capable of promoting the release of iron from these siderophores. Vibrio cholerae is a major human pathogen and also serves as a model for the Vibrionaceae, which include other serious human and fish pathogens. The ability of these species to persist and acquire essential

  13. Survival of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in cooked seafood at refrigeration temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, J G; Francis, D W; Twedt, R M

    1974-04-01

    The growth and survival of two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated during food-borne gastroenteritis outbreaks in Japan and surface inoculated on cooked shrimp, shrimp with sauce, or cooked crab were tested at various refrigeration temperatures during a 48-h holding period. On cooked shrimp and crab, the vibrios grew well at 18.3 C, but their numbers declined gradually at 10 C and below. At 12.8 C, vibrios remained static for the most part. Thus, it appeared that 12.8 C was the borderline temperature for growth of the organism on cooked seafood. When cocktail sauce was added to surface-inoculated shrimp at a ratio of 2:1, the vibrio die-off rate was accelerated. In the shrimp and sauce few cells remained after 48 h, but in the sauce alone die-off was complete at 6 h.

  14. Opkomst van Vibrio infecties in brakwaterkweekvis : uit de ziekenboeg

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haenen, O.L.M.; Engelsma, M.Y.

    2010-01-01

    De laatste paar jaar zijn er diverse Vibrio-soorten als ziekteverwekkende bacterie aangetoond in brak- en zoutwaterkweekvis. We gaan in dit artikel in op vibriose bij tong, tarbot, barramundi een zeebaars.

  15. Antibiotic Susceptibility Patterns and Plasmid Profile of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    32.14%) samples of Vibrio cholerae isolates recovered from water samples from Elele Community. All isolates showed a multiple resistance patterns to 7 antibiotics namely amoxicillin, cotrimoxazole, nitrofurantoin, gentamicin, tetracycline, ...

  16. Cardioactive effects of diphenhydramine and curcumin in Daphnia magna

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noelle Erin Romero

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Although used as a model for examining the cardioactive effects of various compounds, the neuromuscular regulation of the heart of the crustacean Daphnia magna (D. magna is not well understood. In the present study, we sought to determine how the heart rate of D. magna was affected by two previously untested compounds: curcumin and diphenhydramine (DPHM. DPHM produces a number of cardiotoxic side effects in vertebrates, particularly sinus tachycardia. Curcumin acts as a monoamine oxidase inhibitor (MAOI and was expected toincrease the heart rate of D. magna. DPHM was found unexpectedly to lower the heart rate of D. magna with time. Curcumin increased heart rate when administered in higher concentrations. However, co-administration of curcumin with DPHM negated this effect. These findings may be explained by the potential role of histamine as a sympathetic cardiac neurotransmitter in D. magna.

  17. Inferring Deleterious-Mutation Parameters in Natural Daphnia Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deng Hong-Wen

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Deng and Lynch (1, 2 proposed to characterize deleterious genomic mutations from changes in the mean and genetic variance of fitness traits upon selfing in outcrossing populations. Such observations can be readily acquired in cyclical parthenogens. Selfing and life-table experiments were performed for two such Daphnia populations. A significant inbreeding depression and an increase of genetic variance for all traits analyzed were observed. Deng and Lynch's (2 procedures were employed to estimate the genomic mutation rate (U, mean dominance coefficient ( , mean selection coefficient ( , and scaled genomic mutational variance ( . On average, , , and (^ indicates an estimate are 0.84, 0.30, 0.14 and 4.6E-4 respectively. For the true values, the and are lower bounds, and and upper bounds.

  18. Context-dependent individual behavioral consistency in Daphnia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heuschele, Jan; Ekvall, Mikael T.; Bianco, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    The understanding of consistent individual differences in behavior, often termed "personality," for adapting and coping with threats and novel environmental conditions has advanced considerably during the last decade. However, advancements are almost exclusively associated with higher-order animals......, whereas studies focusing on smaller aquatic organisms are still rare. Here, we show individual differences in the swimming behavior of Daphnia magna, a clonal freshwater invertebrate, before, during, and after being exposed to a lethal threat, ultraviolet radiation (UVR). We show consistency in swimming...... that of adults. Overall, we show that aquatic invertebrates are far from being identical robots, but instead they show considerable individual differences in behavior that can be attributed to both ontogenetic development and individual consistency. Our study also demonstrates, for the first time...

  19. Uptake and depuration of gold nanoparticles in Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Kern, Kristina; Hjorth, Rune

    2014-01-01

    This study presents a series of short-term studies (total duration 48 h) of uptake and depuration of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) in neonate Daphnia magna. Gold nanoparticles (Au NP) were used to study the influence of size, stabilizing agent and feeding on uptake and depuration kinetics...... and animal body burdens. 10 and 30 nm Au NP with different stabilizing agents [citrate (CIT) and mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUDA)] were tested in concentrations around 0.5 mg Au/L. Fast initial uptake was observed for all studied Au NP, with CIT stabilized Au NP showing similar rates independent of size...... and MUDA showing increased uptake for the smaller Au NP (MUDA 10 nm > CIT 10 nm, 30 nm > MUDA 30 nm). However, upon transfer to clean media no clear trend on depuration rates was found in terms of stabilizing agent or size. Independent of stabilizing agent, 10 nm Au NP resulted in higher residual whole...

  20. SMALL SCALE MASS CULTURE OF DAPHNIA MAGNA STRAUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rees, John T.; Oldfather, Joan M.

    1980-03-01

    Daphnia magna Straus 1820 was reared on a defined medium in 4-liter flasks under controlled conditions of light, temperature and species of algal food. Adult D. magna were found to be tolerant to high levels of ammonia, up to 108 {micro}M, at high pH (>10), although parthenogenic reproduction may be inhibited at these high levels. Scenedesmus quadricauda and Ankistrodesmus sp. were found to be satisfactory food sources. Densities of greater than one animal per ml in culture were attained utilizing Ankistrodesmus sp. as a food source at a pH of 7.7. Maintenance of pH at around 7-8 appears to be important to successful D. magna culture.

  1. Isolation and molecular identification of Vibrio spp. by sequencing of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Among cultured seafood samples, the highest bacterial count was recorded in clam with a count of 3.8 х104 CFU\\g. Chicken burger samples showed the highest bacterial count with 6.5 х104 CFU\\g. Molecular analysis of the isolates obtained in this study, showed that 11 samples out of 48 (22.9%) were Vibrio spp. Vibrio ...

  2. Inactivation of Vibrio anguillarum by attached and planktonic Roseobacter cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Alvise, Paul; Melchiorsen, Jette; Porsby, Cisse Hedegaard

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate inhibition of Vibrio by Roseobacter in a combined liquid-surface system. Exposure of Vibrio anguillarum to surface-attached roseobacters (10e7 cfu/cm2) resulted in significant reduction or complete killing of the pathogen inoculated at 10e2 – 10...... cfu/ml. The effect was likely associated with production of tropodithietic acid (TDA), as a TDA-negative mutant did not affect survival or growth of V. anguillarum....

  3. Fertilizers for Daphnia sp. (Crustacea, Cladocera production in experimental tanks Fertilizantes para produção de Daphnia sp. (Crustacea, Cladocera em tanques experimentais

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia de Souza Lima Cunha

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The current study was aimed at investigating the use of different fertilizers - dicalcium phosphate, biosolid and quail feces - as a strategy for water fertilization in Daphnia sp production. It was used twenty-four 100-L tanks of asbestos cement distributed in a completely randomized split-plot design with six replicates, with plots in the three kinds of fertilizers (biosolid, dicalcium phosphate, and quail feces and a control without fertilization (WF and subplots at the times of assessment (days 8 and 13. It was assessed the biomass production of Daphnia sp. and the following water quality parameters: chlorophyll a, electrical conductivity, pH, dissolved oxygen, temperature, ammonia and organic nitrogen, total phosphorus and total hardness. There was a significant correlation between the values of chlorophyll a and biomass weight of Daphnia sp, which indicates interactions between phytoplankton and zooplankton communities. The maximum weight of Daphnia sp. biomass is found in tanks fertilized with quail feces (35.98 g, followed by the biosolid (16.80 g, control without fertilization (6.75 g and dicalcium phosphate (5.24 g.Este trabalho foi conduzido com o objetivo de avaliar a utilização de fertilizantes - fosfato bicálcico, biossólido e fezes de codorna - na água de produção de Daphnia sp. Foram utilizados 24 tanques de cimento-amianto, cada um com volume útil de 100 L, em um delineamento inteiramente ao acaso em parcelas subdivididas com seis repetições, tendo nas parcelas os tipos de fertilizantes e um controle, sem adubação, e nas subparcelas as épocas de avaliação (dias 8 e 13. Foram avaliados a produção da biomassa de Daphnia sp. e os seguintes parâmetros de qualidade da água: clorofila a, condutividade elétrica, pH, oxigênio dissolvido, temperatura, nitrogênio amoniacal e orgânico, fósforo total e dureza total. Observou-se correlação significativa entre os valores de clorofila a e o peso da biomassa de Daphnia

  4. Reproduction of Daphnia pulex in a Northern Italy pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Rossi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the occurrence of Daphnia pulex in a small fishless water body of Northern Italy (Bodrio del pastore III and describes its population dynamics. Bodrio is a typical water body originated by erosion from the old Po river-bed surface. During a three year study (2011-2013, D. pulex population showed an increase in density from spring to early summer, it declined in July-August and did not recover, presumably from ephippia, until the following spring. The seasonal dynamics was related to the species thermal tolerance and to invertebrate predation by Chaoborus that resulted in juvenile high mortality and in adaptive predator-avoidance cyclomorphosis. Seasonal variation was observed in the frequency of individuals, most juveniles, showing neckteeth. D. pulex population reproduces by cyclical parthenogenesis and showed a very early investment in sexual reproduction, independent of population density. Males and ephippial females appeared at the beginning of growth season before the density peak according to a typical feature of Daphnia populations from temporary habitats. This suggests a lower influence of the environmental factors on sex determination compared to populations inhabiting more permanent habitats. Lineages that produce males and ephippial females early in the season had lower growth rate than parthenogenetic ones but may preserve from selection pressure by predators a significant percentage of genetic variation linked to sex allocation so that evolution proceeds toward earlier and increased sexual reproduction. Our results suggest further investigation to verify whether the current population is the last remnant of a once much larger metapopulation eventually reduced by anthropogenic disturbances or if it represents the invasion of North American strains.

  5. Comet Assay on Daphnia magna in eco-genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegri, Valerio; Gorbi, Gessica; Buschini, Annamaria

    2014-10-01

    Detection of potentially hazardous compounds in water bodies is a priority in environmental risk assessment. For the evaluation and monitoring of water quality, a series of methodologies may be applied. Among them, the worldwide used toxicity tests with organisms of the genus Daphnia is one of the most powerful. In recent years, some attempts were made to utilize Daphnia magna in genotoxicity testing as many of the new environmental contaminants are described as DNA-damaging agents in aquatic organisms. The aim of this research was to develop a highly standardized protocol of the Comet Assay adapted for D. magna, especially regarding the isolation of cells derived from the same tissue (haemolymph) from newborn organisms exposed in vivo. Several methods for haemolymph extraction and different Comet Assay parameters were compared. Electrophoretic conditions were adapted in order to obtain minimum DNA migration in cells derived from untreated organisms and, at the same time, maximum sensitivity in specimens treated with known genotoxicants (CdCl2 and H2O2). Additional tests were performed to investigate if life-history traits of the cladoceran (such as the age of adult organisms that provide newborns, the clutch size of origin, the number of generations reared in standard conditions) and the water composition as well, might influence the response of the assay. This study confirms the potential application of the Comet Assay in D. magna for assessing genotoxic loads in aqueous solution. The newly developed protocol could integrate the acute toxicity bioassay, thus expanding the possibility of using this model species in freshwater monitoring (waters, sediment and soil elutriates) and is in line with the spirit of the EU Water Framework Directive in reducing the number of bioassays that involve medium-sized species. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Whole genome amplification and sequencing of a Daphnia resting egg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lack, Justin B; Weider, Lawrence J; Jeyasingh, Punidan D

    2017-09-19

    Resting eggs banks are unique windows that allow us to directly observe shifts in population genetics, and phenotypes over time as natural populations evolve. Though a variety of planktonic organisms also produce resting stages, the keystone freshwater consumer, Daphnia, is a well-known model for paleogenetics and resurrection ecology. Nevertheless, paleogenomic investigations are limited largely because resting eggs do not contain enough DNA for genomic sequencing. In fact, genomic studies even on extant populations include a laborious preparatory phase of batch culturing dozens of individuals to generate sufficient genomic DNA. Here, we furnish a protocol to generate whole genomes of single ephippial (resting) eggs and single daphniids. Whole genomes of single ephippial eggs and single adults were amplified using Qiagen REPLI-g Single Cell kit reaction, followed by NEBNext Ultra DNA Library Prep Kit for library construction and Illumina sequencing. We compared the quality of the single-egg and single-individual amplified genomes to the standard batch genomic DNA extraction in the absence of genome amplification. At mean 20× depth, coverage was essentially identical for the amplified single individual relative to the unamplified batch extracted genome (>90% of the genome was covered and callable). Finally, while amplification resulted in the slight loss of heterozygosity for the amplified genomes, estimates were largely comparable and illustrate the utility and limitations of this approach in estimating population genetic parameters over long periods of time in natural populations of Daphnia and also other small species known to produce resting stages. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Vibrio cholerae Biofilms and Cholera Pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anisia J Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae can switch between motile and biofilm lifestyles. The last decades have been marked by a remarkable increase in our knowledge of the structure, regulation, and function of biofilms formed under laboratory conditions. Evidence has grown suggesting that V. cholerae can form biofilm-like aggregates during infection that could play a critical role in pathogenesis and disease transmission. However, the structure and regulation of biofilms formed during infection, as well as their role in intestinal colonization and virulence, remains poorly understood. Here, we review (i the evidence for biofilm formation during infection, (ii the coordinate regulation of biofilm and virulence gene expression, and (iii the host signals that favor V. cholerae transitions between alternative lifestyles during intestinal colonization, and (iv we discuss a model for the role of V. cholerae biofilms in pathogenicity.

  8. Viscosity dictates metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borić, Maja; Danevčič, Tjaša; Stopar, David

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about metabolic activity of bacteria, when viscosity of their environment changes. In this work, bacterial metabolic activity in media with viscosity ranging from 0.8 to 29.4 mPas was studied. Viscosities up to 2.4 mPas did not affect metabolic activity of Vibrio ruber. On the other hand, at 29.4 mPas respiration rate and total dehydrogenase activity increased 8 and 4-fold, respectively. The activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) increased up to 13-fold at higher viscosities. However, intensified metabolic activity did not result in faster growth rate. Increased viscosity delayed the onset as well as the duration of biosynthesis of prodigiosin. As an adaptation to viscous environment V. ruber increased metabolic flux through the pentose phosphate pathway and reduced synthesis of a secondary metabolite. In addition, V. ruber was able to modify the viscosity of its environment. PMID:22826705

  9. Abundance and antibiotic susceptibility of Vibrio spp. isolated from microplastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, A. L.; Darr, K.; Dobbs, F. C.

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, there has been a growing concern for `microplastics' (particles resistance profiles of Vibrio spp. found on them. We collected 22 microplastic pieces, paired seawater samples, and from them cultured 44 putative Vibrio spp. isolates, 18 of which were PCR-confirmed as V. parahaemolyticus and 3 as V. vulnificus. There were no PCR-confirmed V. cholerae isolates. We used the Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion susceptibility test to examine the isolates' response to six antibiotics: chloramphenicol (30μg), gentamicin (10μg), ampicillin (10μg), streptomycin (10μg), tetracycline (30μg), and rifampin (5μg). Vibrio isolates were susceptible to three or more of the six antibiotics tested and all were susceptible to tetracycline and chloramphenicol. There were no apparent differences between the antibiotic susceptibilities of vibrios isolated from microplastics compared to those from the water column. In every instance tested, vibrios on microplastics were enriched by at least two orders of magnitude compared to those from paired seawater samples. This study demonstrates that microplastic particles serve as a habitat for Vibrio species, in particular V. vulnificus and V. parahaemolyticus, confirming the conjecture of Zettler et al. (2013) that plastics may serve as a vector for these and other potentially pathogenic bacteria.

  10. Chronic toxicity of diphenhydramine hydrochloride and erythromycin thiocyanate to Daphnia, Daphnia magna, in a continuous exposure test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, Jeffery R.; Schreier, Theresa M.; Bernardy, Jeffry A.; Franz, Jeanne L.

    2011-01-01

    Diphenhydramine hydrochloride (DH; Benadryl(TM), an over-the-counter antihistamine) and erythromycin thiocyanate (ET; a commonly used macrolide antibiotic) are pharmaceutical compounds whose chronic toxicity to Daphnia magna had not been characterized. Continuous exposure to DH concentrations about 5 times greater than the maximum reported environmental concentration of 0.023 μg/L for 21 days or to ET concentrations about 40 times the maximum reported environmental concentration of 6 μg/L for 21 days did not significantly impact D. magna survival and production. In this study the no observable effect concentration for DH was 0.12 μg/L and for ET was 248 μg/L.

  11. Effects of food type on the life history of Daphnia clones from lakes differing in trophic state. II. Daphnia cucullata feeding on mixed diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.

    1997-01-01

    1. The effects of feeding on suboptimal foods were investigated in Daphnia cucullata a zooplankton common in many types of lakes. Eleven clones of D. cucullata were collected from four lakes of varying trophic levels and fed a high (1 mg C l1) concentration of one of two diets: (i) a 1 : 9 mixture

  12. Effects of Commercially Available Ultrasound on the Zooplankton Grazer Daphnia and Consequent Water Greening in Laboratory Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, Miquel; Tolman, Yora

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound in controlling cyanobacteria and algal blooms is ``environmental friendly'' by exposing the non-target zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna to ultrasound produced by commercially available ultrasound transducers. In populations of 15 Daphnia (similar to 2 mm body

  13. Effects of commercially available ultrasound on the zooplankton grazer Daphnia and consequent water greening in laboratory experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.F.L.L.W.; Tolman, Y.

    2014-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that ultrasound in controlling cyanobacteria and algal blooms is “environmental friendly” by exposing the non-target zooplankton grazer Daphnia magna to ultrasound produced by commercially available ultrasound transducers. In populations of 15 Daphnia (~2 mm body size)

  14. The " Daphnia" Lynx Mark I Suborbital Flight Experiment: Hardware Qualification at the Drop Tower Bremen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knie, Miriam; Schoppmann, Kathrin; Eck, Hendrik; Ribeiro, Bernard Wolfschoon; Laforsch, Christian

    2016-06-01

    The Drop Tower Bremen, a ground-based facility enabling research under real microgravity conditions, is an excellent platform for testing new types of experimental hardware to ensure full performance when deployed in costly and rare flight opportunities such as suborbital flights. Here we describe the " Daphnia" experiment which will fly on XCOR Aerospace Lynx Mark I and our experience from the hardware tests with the catapult system at the drop tower. The aim of the " Daphnia" experiment is to obtain data on the biological performance of daphnids and predator-prey interactions in microgravity, which are important for the development of aquatic bioregenerative life support systems (BLSS). The experiment consists of two subunits: The first unit is dedicated to predator-prey interactions, where behavioural analysis should reveal if microgravity interfere with prey ( Daphnia) detection or feeding and therefore may interrupt the trophic cascade. The functioning of such an artificial food web is indispensable for a long-lasting BLSS suitable for long-duration manned space missions or Earth-based explorations to extreme habitats. The second unit is designed to investigate the impact of microgravity on gene expression and the cytoskeleton in Daphnia. Next to data collection, the real microgravity conditions at the drop tower have helped to identify the weak points of the " Daphnia" experimental hardware and lead to further improvement. Hence, the drop tower is ideal for testing new experimental hardware which is indispensable before the implementation in suborbital flights.

  15. The components of the Daphnia pulex immune system as revealed by complete genome sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blaxter Mark L

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Branchiopod crustaceans in the genus Daphnia are key model organisms for investigating interactions between genes and the environment. One major theme of research on Daphnia species has been the evolution of resistance to pathogens and parasites, but lack of knowledge of the Daphnia immune system has limited the study of immune responses. Here we provide a survey of the immune-related genome of D. pulex, derived from the newly completed genome sequence. Genes likely to be involved in innate immune responses were identified by comparison to homologues from other arthropods. For each candidate, the gene model was refined, and we conducted an analysis of sequence divergence from homologues from other taxa. Results and conclusion We found that some immune pathways, in particular the TOLL pathway, are fairly well conserved between insects and Daphnia, while other elements, in particular antimicrobial peptides, could not be recovered from the genome sequence. We also found considerable variation in gene family copy number when comparing Daphnia to insects and present phylogenetic analyses to shed light on the evolution of a range of conserved immune gene families.

  16. Evaluation of acute toxicity and teratogenic effects of plant growth regulators by Daphnia magna embryo assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai-Sung; Lu, Chi-Yuan; Chang, Shih-Hsien

    2011-06-15

    This study selected common plant growth regulators (Atonik, Cytokinin, Ethephon, Gibberellic acid and Paclobutrazol) to investigate their biological toxicity to the waters of the important biological indicator Daphnia magna. The methods used in this study included traditional neonate acute toxicity test, new Daphnia embryo toxicity test, and teratogenic embryo test. The study concluded that the acute toxicity of the five PGRs to Daphnia neonate had EC(50) value range of 1.9-130.5 mg l(-1), while acute toxicity of PGRs on Daphnia embryo had EC(50) value range of 0.2-125 mg l(-1); the Daphnia embryos' LOEC values (0.05-48 mg l(-1)) for the five PGRs were lower than embryo EC(50) values. The toxic ratios of 48 h EC(50) (neonate)/48 h LOEC (embryo) for 5 PGRs were 19-512 times. The study found that teratogenic effects of Paclobutrazol and Cytokinin induced in embryo were higher than those of most other PGRs. Microscopic observation of the teratogenic effects showed that all 5 PGRs induced malformations of the second antenna, rostrum, Malpighian tube, sensory bristles, and tail spine as well as function loss and death. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Summer water clarity responses to phosphorus, Daphnia grazing, and internal mixing in Lake Mendota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lathrop, R.C.; Carpenter, S.R.; Robertson, Dale M.

    1999-01-01

    Linear models were developed for predicting mean Secchi disk depth readings as a measure of water clarity for the summer months in Lake Mendota, Wisconsin. The 20-yr (1976-1995) data set also included external phosphorus (P) loadings and in-lake April P concentrations as indices of lake nutrient status, and monthly (28 d) water column stabilities and Daphnia biomasses as indices of lake mixing and algal grazing potentials, respectively. June Secchi depths were mostly controlled by food web dynamics, which dictated whether the larger-bodied Daphnia pulicaria or the smaller-bodied D. galeata mendotae dominated during the spring clear-water phase. May Daphnia biomasses were significantly greater in D. pulicaria-dominated years than in D. galeata-dominated years; D. pulicaria-year biomasses were also greater during the summer months. The model for the midsummer (July-August) months indicated that Secchi depths were inversely related to April P concentrations and positively related to midsummer Daphnia biomasses and lake stabilities. Scenarios for midsummer Secchi depths were tested using the observed minimum and maximum values for each predictor variate. While holding two variates constant, April P, Daphnia biomass, and lake stability each resulted in relatively similar Secchi ranges (0.81, 0.81, and 1.17 m, respectively). Our results suggest that summer water clarity in eutrophic Lake Mendota is controlled by interacting ecosystem processes linked to land use activities, lake food web dynamics, and climate.

  18. Physiological responses of Daphnia pulex to acid stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pirow Ralph

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acidity exerts a determining influence on the composition and diversity of freshwater faunas. While the physiological implications of freshwater acidification have been intensively studied in teleost fish and crayfish, much less is known about the acid-stress physiology of ecologically important groups such as cladoceran zooplankton. This study analyzed the extracellular acid-base state and CO2 partial pressure (PCO2, circulation and ventilation, as well as the respiration rate of Daphnia pulex acclimated to acidic (pH 5.5 and 6.0 and circumneutral (pH 7.8 conditions. Results D. pulex had a remarkably high extracellular pH of 8.33 and extracellular PCO2 of 0.56 kPa under normal ambient conditions (pH 7.8 and normocapnia. The hemolymph had a high bicarbonate concentration of 20.9 mM and a total buffer value of 51.5 meq L-1 pH-1. Bicarbonate covered 93% of the total buffer value. Acidic conditions induced a slight acidosis (ΔpH = 0.16–0.23, a 30–65% bicarbonate loss, and elevated systemic activities (tachycardia, hyperventilation, hypermetabolism. pH 6.0 animals partly compensated the bicarbonate loss by increasing the non-bicarbonate buffer value from 2.0 to 5.1 meq L-1 pH-1. The extracellular PCO2 of pH 5.5 animals was significantly reduced to 0.33 kPa, and these animals showed the highest tolerance to a short-term exposure to severe acid stress. Conclusion Chronic exposure to acidic conditions had a pervasive impact on Daphnia's physiology including acid-base balance, extracellular PCO2, circulation and ventilation, and energy metabolism. Compensatory changes in extracellular non-bicarbonate buffering capacity and the improved tolerance to severe acid stress indicated the activation of defense mechanisms which may result from gene-expression mediated adjustments in hemolymph buffer proteins and in epithelial properties. Mechanistic analyses of the interdependence between extracellular acid-base balance and CO2 transport

  19. Bovine Lactoferrin and Lactoferrin-Derived Peptides Inhibit the Growth of Vibrio cholerae and Other Vibrio species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Smith, Erika; Viveros-Jiménez, Karina; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Reyes-Lopez, Magda; Bolscher, Jan G. M.; Nazmi, Kamran; Flores-Villaseñor, Hector; Alapizco-Castro, Gerardo; de la Garza, Mireya; Martínez-Garcia, Jesús J.; Velazquez-Roman, Jorge; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia

    2018-01-01

    Vibrio is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria, some of which can cause serious infectious diseases. Vibrio infections are associated with the consumption of contaminated food and classified in Vibrio cholera infections and non-cholera Vibrio infections. In the present study, we investigate whether bovine lactoferrin (bLF) and several synthetic peptides corresponding to bLF sequences, are able to inhibit the growth or have bactericidal effect against V. cholerae and other Vibrio species. The antibacterial activity of LF and LF-peptides was assessed by kinetics of growth or determination of colony forming unit in bacteria treated with the peptides and antibiotics. To get insight in the mode of action, the interaction between bLF and bLF-peptides (coupled to FITC) and V. cholera was evaluated. The damage of effector-induced bacterial membrane permeability was measured by inclusion of the fluorescent dye propidium iodide using flow cytometry, whereas the bacterial ultrastructural damage in bacteria treated was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that bLF and LFchimera inhibited the growth of the V. cholerae strains; LFchimera permeabilized the bacteria which membranes were seriously damaged. Assays with a multidrug-resistant strain of Vibrio species indicated that combination of sub-lethal doses of LFchimera with ampicillin or tetracycline strongly reduced the concentration of the antibiotics to reach 95% growth inhibition. Furthermore, LFchimera were effective to inhibit the V. cholerae counts and damage due to this bacterium in a model mice. These data suggest that LFchimera and bLF are potential candidates to combat the V. cholerae and other multidrug resistant Vibrio species. PMID:29375503

  20. Bovine Lactoferrin and Lactoferrin-Derived Peptides Inhibit the Growth of Vibrio cholerae and Other Vibrio species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta-Smith, Erika; Viveros-Jiménez, Karina; Canizalez-Román, Adrian; Reyes-Lopez, Magda; Bolscher, Jan G M; Nazmi, Kamran; Flores-Villaseñor, Hector; Alapizco-Castro, Gerardo; de la Garza, Mireya; Martínez-Garcia, Jesús J; Velazquez-Roman, Jorge; Leon-Sicairos, Nidia

    2017-01-01

    Vibrio is a genus of Gram-negative bacteria, some of which can cause serious infectious diseases. Vibrio infections are associated with the consumption of contaminated food and classified in Vibrio cholera infections and non-cholera Vibrio infections. In the present study, we investigate whether bovine lactoferrin (bLF) and several synthetic peptides corresponding to bLF sequences, are able to inhibit the growth or have bactericidal effect against V. cholerae and other Vibrio species. The antibacterial activity of LF and LF-peptides was assessed by kinetics of growth or determination of colony forming unit in bacteria treated with the peptides and antibiotics. To get insight in the mode of action, the interaction between bLF and bLF-peptides (coupled to FITC) and V. cholera was evaluated. The damage of effector-induced bacterial membrane permeability was measured by inclusion of the fluorescent dye propidium iodide using flow cytometry, whereas the bacterial ultrastructural damage in bacteria treated was observed by transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that bLF and LFchimera inhibited the growth of the V. cholerae strains; LFchimera permeabilized the bacteria which membranes were seriously damaged. Assays with a multidrug-resistant strain of Vibrio species indicated that combination of sub-lethal doses of LFchimera with ampicillin or tetracycline strongly reduced the concentration of the antibiotics to reach 95% growth inhibition. Furthermore, LFchimera were effective to inhibit the V. cholerae counts and damage due to this bacterium in a model mice. These data suggest that LFchimera and bLF are potential candidates to combat the V. cholerae and other multidrug resistant Vibrio species.

  1. Anti-vibrio potentials of acetone and aqueous leaf extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-vibrio potentials of acetone and aqueous leaf extracts of Ocimum gratissimum and determine its relevance in the treatment of vibrios infection. Methods: The agar-well diffusion method was used for screening the extracts for their anti-vibrio activity. Broth micro-dilution assay was used to ...

  2. Prevalence study of Vibrio species and frequency of the virulence genes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from fresh and salted shrimps in Genaveh seaport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Hosseini

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio species are important seafood-borne pathogens that are responsible for 50-70% of gasteroenteritis. The present study was carried out in order to determine the prevalence of Vibrio species and the distribution of tdh, tlh and trh virulence genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolated from fresh and salted shrimp samples. Totally, 60 fresh and salted shrimp samples were collected from the Genaveh seaport. Microbial culture was used to isolate Vibrio species. In addition, the presences of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio cholera, Vibrio vulnificus and Vibrio harveyi and the virulence genes of V. parahaemolyticus were studied using the PCR method. Results showed that 20% of fresh and 23.33% of salted shrimp samples were positive for Vibrio species. In studied samples, V. vulnificus had the highest prevalence rate (8.33%, while V. cholera had the lowest prevalence rate (1.66%. From a total of 4 detected V. parahaemolyticus, all of them had tlh gene (100%. The distribution of tdh and trh genes in isolated V. parahaemolyticus strains were 50% and 25%, respectively. High prevalence of Vibrio species and especially virulent V. parahaemolyticus in samples confirmed the lack of hygienic condition in the production and distribution centers of shrimp.

  3. Non-Cholera Vibrios: The Microbial Barometer of Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker-Austin, Craig; Trinanes, Joaquin; Gonzalez-Escalona, Narjol; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime

    2017-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the role of climate change in driving the spread of waterborne infectious diseases, such as those caused by bacterial pathogens. One particular group of pathogenic bacteria - vibrios - are a globally important cause of diseases in humans and aquatic animals. These Gram-negative bacteria, including the species Vibrio vulnificus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio cholerae, grow in warm, low-salinity waters, and their abundance in the natural environment mirrors ambient environmental temperatures. In a rapidly warming marine environment, there are greater numbers of human infections, and most notably outbreaks linked to extreme weather events such as heatwaves in temperate regions such as Northern Europe. Because the growth of pathogenic vibrios in the natural environment is largely dictated by temperature, we argue that this group of pathogens represents an important and tangible barometer of climate change in marine systems. We provide a number of specific examples of the impacts of climate change on this group of bacteria and their associated diseases, and discuss advanced strategies to improve our understanding of these emerging waterborne diseases through the integration of microbiological, genomic, epidemiological, climatic, and ocean sciences. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Surface-attachment sequence in Vibrio Cholerae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utada, Andrew; Gibiansky, Maxsim; Wong, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a gram-negative bacterium that causes the human disease cholera. It is found natively in brackish costal waters in temperate climates, where it attaches to the surfaces of a variety of different aquatic life. V. cholerae has a single polar flagellum making it highly motile, as well as a number of different pili types, enabling it to attach to both biotic and abiotic surfaces. Using in-house built tracking software we track all surface-attaching bacteria from high-speed movies to examine the early-time attachment profile of v. cholerae onto a smooth glass surface. Similar to previous work, we observe right-handed circular swimming trajectories near surfaces; however, in addition we see a host of distinct motility mechanisms that enable rapid exploration of the surface before forming a more permanent attachment. Using isogenic mutants we show that the motility mechanisms observed are due to a complex combination of hydrodynamics and pili-surface interactions. Lauga, E., DiLuzio, W. R., Whitesides, G. M., Stone, H. A. Biophys. J. 90, 400 (2006).

  5. Vibrio parahaemolyticus- An emerging foodborne pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Nelapati

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a halophilic gram negative, motile, oxidase positive, straight or curved rod-shaped, facultative anaerobic bacteria that occur naturally in the marine environment. They form part of the indigenous microflora of aquatic habitats of various salinity and are the major causative agents for some of the most serious diseases in fish, shellfish and penacid shrimp. This human pathogen causes acute gastroenteritis characterized by diarrhea, vomiting and abdominal cramps through consumption of contaminated raw fish or shellfish. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading cause of gastroenteritis due to the consumption of seafood worldwide. The incidence of V. parahaemolyticus infection has been increasing in many parts of the world, due to the emergence of O3:K6 serotype carrying the tdh gene which is responsible for most outbreaks worldwide. The pathogenicity of this organism is closely correlated with the Kanagawa phenomenon (KP + due to production of Kanagawa hemolysin or the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH. The TDH and TRH (TDH-related hemolysin encoded by tdh and trh genes are considered to be important virulence factors. [Vet. World 2012; 5(1.000: 48-63

  6. Household Transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Jonathan D; Koepke, Amanda A; Kenah, Eben E; Halloran, M Elizabeth; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful I; LaRocque, Regina C; Yang, Yang; Ryan, Edward T; Qadri, Firdausi; Calderwood, Stephen B; Harris, Jason B; Longini, Ira M

    2014-11-01

    Vibrio cholerae infections cluster in households. This study's objective was to quantify the relative contribution of direct, within-household exposure (for example, via contamination of household food, water, or surfaces) to endemic cholera transmission. Quantifying the relative contribution of direct exposure is important for planning effective prevention and control measures. Symptom histories and multiple blood and fecal specimens were prospectively collected from household members of hospital-ascertained cholera cases in Bangladesh from 2001-2006. We estimated the probabilities of cholera transmission through 1) direct exposure within the household and 2) contact with community-based sources of infection. The natural history of cholera infection and covariate effects on transmission were considered. Significant direct transmission (p-valuelevels of pre-existing immunity to cholera infection. Transmission via direct exposure occurring outside of the household was not considered. Direct exposure contributes substantially to endemic transmission of symptomatic cholera in an urban setting. We provide the first estimate of the transmissibility of endemic cholera within prospectively-followed members of households. The role of direct transmission must be considered when planning cholera control activities.

  7. Role of Vibrio polysaccharide (vps) genes in VPS production, biofilm formation and Vibrio cholerae pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Jiunn C N; Syed, Khalid A; Klose, Karl E; Yildiz, Fitnat H

    2010-09-01

    Biofilm formation enhances the survival and persistence of the facultative human pathogen Vibrio cholerae in natural ecosystems and its transmission during seasonal cholera outbreaks. A major component of the V. cholerae biofilm matrix is the Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS), which is essential for development of three-dimensional biofilm structures. The vps genes are clustered in two regions, the vps-I cluster (vpsU, vpsA-K, VC0916-27) and the vps-II cluster (vpsL-Q, VC0934-39), separated by an intergenic region containing the rbm gene cluster that encodes biofilm matrix proteins. In-frame deletions of the vps clusters and genes encoding matrix proteins drastically altered biofilm formation phenotypes. To determine which genes within the vps gene clusters are required for biofilm formation and VPS synthesis, we generated in-frame deletion mutants for all the vps genes. Many of these mutants exhibited reduced capacity to produce VPS and biofilms. Infant mouse colonization assays revealed that mutants lacking either vps clusters or rbmA (encoding secreted matrix protein RbmA) exhibited a defect in intestinal colonization compared to the wild-type. Understanding the roles of the various vps gene products will aid in the biochemical characterization of the VPS biosynthetic pathway and elucidate how vps gene products contribute to VPS biosynthesis, biofilm formation and virulence in V. cholerae.

  8. Differential metabolic responses of clam Ruditapes philippinarum to Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoli; Ji, Chenglong; Zhao, Jianmin; Wu, Huifeng

    2013-12-01

    Clam Ruditapes philippinarum is one of the important marine aquaculture species in North China. However, pathogens can often cause diseases and lead to massive mortalities and economic losses of clam. In this work, we compared the metabolic responses induced by Vibrio anguillarum and Vibrio splendidus challenges towards hepatopancreas of clam using NMR-based metabolomics. Metabolic responses suggested that both V. anguillarum and V. splendidus induced disturbances in energy metabolism and osmotic regulation, oxidative and immune stresses with different mechanisms, as indicated by correspondingly differential metabolic biomarkers (e.g., amino acids, ATP, glucose, glycogen, taurine, betaine, choline and hypotaurine) and altered mRNA expression levels of related genes including ATP synthase, ATPase, glutathione peroxidase, heat shock protein 90, defensin and lysozyme. However, V. anguillarum caused more severe oxidative and immune stresses in clam hepatopancreas than V. splendidus. Our results indicated that metabolomics could be used to elucidate the biological effects of pathogens to the marine clam R. philippinarum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. A New Reference Genome Assembly for the Microcrustacean Daphnia pulex

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    Zhiqiang Ye

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparing genomes of closely related genotypes from populations with distinct demographic histories can help reveal the impact of effective population size on genome evolution. For this purpose, we present a high quality genome assembly of Daphnia pulex (PA42, and compare this with the first sequenced genome of this species (TCO, which was derived from an isolate from a population with >90% reduction in nucleotide diversity. PA42 has numerous similarities to TCO at the gene level, with an average amino acid sequence identity of 98.8 and >60% of orthologous proteins identical. Nonetheless, there is a highly elevated number of genes in the TCO genome annotation, with ∼7000 excess genes appearing to be false positives. This view is supported by the high GC content, lack of introns, and short length of these suspicious gene annotations. Consistent with the view that reduced effective population size can facilitate the accumulation of slightly deleterious genomic features, we observe more proliferation of transposable elements (TEs and a higher frequency of gained introns in the TCO genome.

  10. Promoting effects on reproduction increase population vulnerability of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agatz, Annika; Hammers-Wirtz, Monika; Gabsi, Faten; Ratte, Hans Toni; Brown, Colin D; Preuss, Thomas G

    2012-07-01

    Environmental risk assessment of chemicals is based on single species tests at the individual level with single compounds. However, the protection goal is the sustainability of a population, which faces several natural stressors and mixtures of chemicals in the environment. Therefore, experiments were undertaken to quantify the combined effects of chemicals with different modes of action on Daphnia magna populations. Populations continuously exposed to dispersogen A and at abundance equilibrium were treated with a 2-d pulse of p353-nonylphenol. In previous studies, dispersogen A was shown to act as a natural info-chemical, promoting the reproduction of daphnids (higher offspring quantity) coupled with reduced offspring fitness, whereas nonylphenol in pulsed-exposure caused size-selective mortality. Dispersogen A caused accelerated population growth to maximum abundance, shifted the population structure towards smaller individuals, and increased the population sensitivity to nonylphenol. The authors showed that a positive effect observed at the individual level can be transposed to a negative effect when monitored at the population level. So far, positive effects are not addressed in environmental risk assessment, and even in higher-tier testing, population structure is not quantified. Both factors indicate a potential mismatch between protection aim and risk assessment practice. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  11. Molecular impact of juvenile hormone agonists on neonatal Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Kenji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Miyakawa, Hitoshi; Yatsu, Ryohei; Mizutani, Takeshi; Ogino, Yukiko; Miyagawa, Shinichi; Watanabe, Hajime; Nishide, Hiroyo; Uchiyama, Ikuo; Tatarazako, Norihisa; Iguchi, Taisen

    2014-05-01

    Daphnia magna has been used extensively to evaluate organism- and population-level responses to pollutants in acute toxicity and reproductive toxicity tests. We have previously reported that exposure to juvenile hormone (JH) agonists results in a reduction of reproductive function and production of male offspring in a cyclic parthenogenesis, D. magna. Recent advances in molecular techniques have provided tools to understand better the responses to pollutants in aquatic organisms, including D. magna. DNA microarray was used to evaluate gene expression profiles of neonatal daphnids exposed to JH agonists: methoprene (125, 250 and 500 ppb), fenoxycarb (0.5, 1 and 2 ppb) and epofenonane (50, 100 and 200 ppb). Exposure to these JH analogs resulted in chemical-specific patterns of gene expression. The heat map analyses based on hierarchical clustering revealed a similar pattern between treatments with a high dose of methoprene and with epofenonane. In contrast, treatment with low to middle doses of methoprene resulted in similar profiles to fenoxycarb treatments. Hemoglobin and JH epoxide hydrolase genes were clustered as JH-responsive genes. These data suggest that fenoxycarb has high activity as a JH agonist, methoprene shows high toxicity and epofenonane works through a different mechanism compared with other JH analogs, agreeing with data of previously reported toxicity tests. In conclusion, D. magna DNA microarray is useful for the classification of JH analogs and identification of JH-responsive genes. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Low temperature and Daphnia-associated infochemicals promote colony formation of Scenedesmus obliquus and its harvesting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuexia; Yang, Jingwen; Zhang, Xingxing; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Xiaojun; Huang, Yuan; Yang, Zhou

    2017-01-01

    To explore the combined effects of temperature and Daphnia-associated infochemicals on colony formation of Scenedesmus obliquus to faciliate harvesting the algal biomass. A three-parameter modified Gaussian model fitted the changes of the number of cells per particle in S. obliquus induced by Daphnia culture filtrate well under any temperature. Decreases in temperature enhanced the induced-colony formation of Scenedesmus. The maximum colony size at 15-25 °C was significantly larger than those at 30-35 °C. An additional 1 or 2 days at low temperature was needed to reach the maximum colony size, which indicates the best harvest time for algal biomass. Induced-colony formation of Scenedesmus by Daphnia culture filtrate at 15-25 °C is recommended to settle algal cells. This condition facilitates harvesting the biomass.

  13. Male meiosis in Crustacea: synapsis, recombination, epigenetics and fertility in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Rocío; Van Damme, Kay; Gosálvez, Jaime; Morán, Eugenio Sánchez; Colbourne, John K

    2016-09-01

    We present the first detailed cytological study of male meiosis in Daphnia (Crustacea: Branchiopoda: Cladocera)-an aquatic microcrustacean with a cyclical parthenogenetic life cycle. Using immunostaining of the testes in Daphnia magna for baseline knowledge, we characterized the different stages of meiotic division and spermiogenesis in relation to the distribution of proteins involved in synapsis, early recombination events and sister chromatid cohesion. We also studied post-translational histone modifications in male spermatocytes, in relation to the dynamic chromatin progression of meiosis. Finally, we applied a DNA fragmentation test to measure sperm quality of D. magna, with respect to levels of inbreeding. As a proxy for fertility, this technique may be used to assess the reproductive health of a sentinel species of aquatic ecosystems. Daphnia proves to be a model species for comparative studies of meiosis that is poised to improve our understanding of the cytological basis of sexual and asexual reproduction.

  14. Reclassification of the larval pathogen for marine bivalves Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus as Vibrio europaeus sp. nov.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubert, Javier; Romalde, Jesús L; Spinard, Edward J; Nelson, David R; Gomez-Chiarri, Marta; Barja, Juan L

    2016-11-01

    The Orientalis clade has a relevant significance for bivalve aquaculture since it includes the pathogens Vibrio bivalvicida, Vibrio tubiashii subsp. tubiashii and Vibrio tubiashii subsp. europaeus. However, the previous taxonomic description of the subspecies of V. tubiashii shows some incongruities that should be emended. In the genomic age, the comparison between genome assemblies is the key to clarify the taxonomic position of both subspecies. With this purpose, we have tested the ability of multilocus sequence analysis based on eight housekeeping gene sequences (gapA, gyrB, ftsZ, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA), different in silico genome-to-genome comparisons, chemotaxonomic features and phenotypic traits to reclassify the subspecies V. tubiashii subsp. europaeus within the Orientalis clade. This polyphasic approach clearly demonstrated that this subspecies is phylogenetically and phenotypically distinct from V. tubiashii and should be elevated to the rank of species as Vibrio europaeus sp. nov. This reclassification allows us to update the Orientalis clade (V. bivalvicida,V. brasiliensis, V. crosai, V. hepatarius, V. orientalis, V. sinaloensis, V. tubiashii and V. europaeus sp. nov.) and reconstruct a better phylogeny of the genus Vibrio. An emended description of V. tubiashii is provided. Finally, the proposed novel species is represented by emergent bivalve pathogens [type strain PP-638T (=CECT 8136T=DSM 27349T), PP2-843 and 07/118 T2] responsible for high mortalities in Spanish and French hatcheries.

  15. Insights into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh Letchumanan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial infections from various organisms including Vibrio sp. pose a serious hazard to humans in many forms from clinical infection to affecting the yield of agriculture and aquaculture via infection of livestock. Vibrio sp. is one of the main foodborne pathogens causing human infection and is also a common cause of losses in the aquaculture industry. Prophylactic and therapeutic usage of antibiotics has become the mainstay of managing this problem, however this in turn led to the emergence of multidrug resistant strains of bacteria in the environment; which has raised awareness of the critical need for alternative non antibiotic based methods of preventing and treating bacterial infections. Bacteriophages - viruses that infect and result in the death of bacteria – are currently of great interest as a highly viable alternative to antibiotics. This article provides an insight into bacteriophage application in controlling Vibrio species as well underlining the advantages and drawbacks of phage therapy.

  16. [Genomic variability of vibrio cholerae El Tor biovariant strains].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, N I; Kostromitina, E A; Osin, A V; Kutyrev, V V

    2005-01-01

    The authors performed comparative analysis of the genomes of 145 clinical and environmental isolates of Vibrio cholerae El Tor biovariants using single locus and multiplex PCR. The study found that clinical strains isolated from patients with cholera formed a genetically homogenous group, where bacterial chromosome contained all the tested virulence genes, situated on mobile genetic elements that had been acquired by the pathogen at various stages of its evolution. Strains isolated from water ecosystems during interepidemic period were heterogeneous and formed three groups: a small number of virulent strains; non-toxigenic vibrio strains that, in the process of reductional variation in their new econiche, had only managed to maintain individual virulence genes; non-pathogenic "water" vibrios, whose chromosome contained only the genes from its core part, mobile genetic elements being optionally represented only by the persistence island. Molecular typing established genetic relations among V. cholerae strains under study.

  17. Aphanizomenon gracile increases in width in the presence of Daphnia. A defence mechanism against grazing?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawek Cerbin

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Filamentous cyanobacteria are frequently consumed by grazers like Daphnia, which can break filaments and make them more readily available to filter-feeders. However, various defence mechanisms against grazing have also been observed in cyanobacteria. Data concerning changes in the morphology of filamentous algae, especially their width in the presence of a grazer, are scarce. Field studies of filament morphology of cyanobacteria relate their changes to nutrient availability and temperature. Moreover, filament morphology displays significant differences in filament length and width among seasons. We hypothesised that the morphological changes in filament observed in the field – especially their width – could be a defence mechanism that is induced by the presence of a grazer, such as Daphnia. Thus, two experiments were conducted in order to test the influence of Daphnia (direct grazing and infochemicals together in the first experiment and the chemicals it released (grazing excluded, only chemicals present in the second experiment on Aphanizomenon gracile’s morphology, in controlled laboratory conditions. Aphanizomenon filaments became significantly shorter and thicker in both experiments. However, Daphnia’s grazing combined with excreted chemicals had stronger effect than chemicals alone. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing the shortening and thickening of filaments in the presence of Daphnia infochemicals. It seems that the Aphanizomenon filaments in the presence of Daphnia switch their growing mode and invest more heavily in width than length. Our results support the hypothesis that Daphnia is at least partly responsible for the changes in filament width observed in the field. This could be a strategy that helps Aphanizomenon to withstand grazer’s pressure during early stages of a bloom.

  18. Vibrio spp. ISOLATED FROM SHRIMPS AND WATER FROM A MARINE FARM IN PERNAMBUCO, BRAZIL Víbrios en el agua y en las gambas del mar (Litopenaeus vannamei, Boone, 1931 cultivado en Pernambuco Vibrio spp. ISOLADOS DE CAMARÃO E ÁGUA DE CULTIVO DE FAZENDA MARINHA EM PERNAMBUCO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos André Bezerra Alves

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available

    Water and shrimp samples were collected monthly, during all cultivation phases, in three located farms at Pernambuco coast, on winter and summer, for Vibrio spp. quantification and identification. The counting’s were correlated, through mathematical models (P<0.05, with the variables season, water biochemical parameters, wet mount, histopathology exam, toxins presence and handling techniques used. Just the variable cultivation time interfered at total counting of Vibrio spp. in all samples were obtained countings that varied 0.1x 10 to 6.2 x 103 UFC/mL in water, of 7.0 x 10 to 8.2 x 105 UFC/g in powder-larva, of 1.1 x 10 to 1.1 x 105 UFC/mL in hemolymph and of 2.5 x 102 to 1.1 x 106UFC/g in hepatopancreas. The species V. mediterranei (1%, V. mimicus (1.25%, V. fischeri (4.25%, V. cincinnatiensis (4.25%, V. metschnikovii (4.25%, V. proteolyticus (5.5%, V. harveyi (5.5%, V. hollisae (5.5%, V. carchariae (7%, V. vulnificus (8.5%, V. damsela (8.5%, V. parahaemolyticus (13%, V. fluvialis (15%, V. anguillarum (16.5% were identified. It is concluded that the Vibrionaceae load increases proportionally with cultivation time, due to the organic matter increment, what can turn the susceptible animals to the infection for vibrios.

    KEY WORD: Vibrionaceae, Vibrio spp., shrimp and pond water.
    El agua y muestras de la gamba eran la publicación mensual reunido, durante todas las fases del cultivo, en tres granjas localizadas a la costa de Pernambuco, en invierno y verano, para la cuantificación e identificación el de Vibrio spp.. El contando fueron puestos en correlación, a través de los modelos matemáticos (P <0,05, con la estación de las variables, agua que los parámetros bioquímicos, montaña mojada, examen del histopatologia, presencia de las toxinas y técnicas manejando usaron. Simplemente el tiempo del cultivo inconstante interfirió a total que

  19. Long-term effects of ocean warming on vibrios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pruzzo, C.; Pezzati, E.; Brettar, I.; Reid, P. C.; Colwell, R.; Höfle, M. G.; vezzulli, L.

    2012-12-01

    Vibrios are a major source of human disease, play an important role in the ecology and health of marine animals and are regarded as an abundant fraction of culturable bacteria of the ocean. There has been a considerable global effort to reduce the risk of Vibrio infections and yet in most countries both human and non-human illnesses associated with these bacteria are increasing. The cause of this increase is not known, but since vibrios are strongly thermodependant there is good reason to believe that global warming may have contributed. To investigate this possibility we examined historical samples from the Continuous Plankton Recorder (CPR) archive using advanced molecular analysis and pyrosequencing. For the first time we were able to recover environmental DNA from CPR samples that had been stored for up to ~50 years in a formalin-fixed format, which is suitable for molecular analyses of the associated prokaryotic community. To overcome the problem of DNA degradation due to the sample age and storage in formalin we develop an unbiased index of abundance for Vibrio quantification in CPR samples termed a 'relative Vibrio Abundance Index' (VAI). VAI is defined as the ratio of Vibrio spp. cells to total bacterial cells assessed by Real-Time PCR using genus-specific and universal primers, respectively, producing small amplicons of similar size (~100bp). We assessed VAI index on 55 samples (each representing 10 nautical miles tow equal to 3 m3 of filtered sewater) collected in August by the CPR survey in the North Sea from off the Rhine and Humber estuaries between 1961 to 2005 showing that the genus Vibrio has increased in prevalence in the last 44 years and that this increase is correlated significantly, during the same period, with warming sea surface temperature. In addition, by applying deep sequencing analysis of a subset of these samples we provide evidence that bacteria belonging to the genus Vibrio, including the human pathogen V. cholerae, not only increased

  20. Toxicity of Single and Mixed Contaminants in Seawater Measured with Acute Toxicity Bioassays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.R. Fernandez-Alba

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of organic pollutants commonly detected in seawater have been evaluated by acute toxicity bioassays. Vibrio fischeri, Daphnia magna, and Selenastrum capricornotum were selected to test toxic effects of individual compounds and mixtures of these compounds, obtaining EC50 values in the range of 0.001 to 28.9 mg/l. In the case of mixtures, synergistic toxic responses were seen for a clear majority of the cases (>60%. Mixtures containing methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE exhibit accelerated processes that result in a change in concentration required to produce a toxic effect; for example, in the case of mixtures containing MTBE and Diuron and Dichlofluanid.

  1. Radiolysis of selected antibiotics and their toxic effects on various aquatic organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Y.; Yu, Seung H.; Lee, Myun J.; Kim, Tae H.; Kim, Sang D.

    2009-04-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the decomposition of three γ-irradiated antibiotics (e.g., tetracycline, sulfamethazine, and lincomycin) and to compare the toxic effects on Daphnia magna, Vibrio fischeri, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The median cell growth inhibition concentrations (IC 50) of tetracycline, lincomycin, and sulfamethazine for P. subcapitata dramatically increased (e.g., toxicity decreased) after radiolysis. The results demonstrated that γ-radiation treatment was efficient to decompose antibiotics and thereby their toxicity on P. subcaptitata remarkably decreased due to reduced parent compounds.

  2. First toxicity data of chlorophenols on marine alga Dunaliella tertiolecta: correlation of marine algal toxicity with hydrophobicity and interspecies toxicity relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertürk, M Doğa; Saçan, Melek Türker

    2012-05-01

    The toxicity of phenol and 13 chlorinated phenols to the marine alga Dunaliella tertiolecta is presented for the first time. The newly generated marine algal toxicity data was found to correlate strongly with the widely used hydrophobicity parameter-the logarithm of the n-octanol-water partition coefficient (log K(OW)). Interspecies relationships using the new marine algal toxicity data of chlorophenols with the previously published data on bacterium (Vibrio fischeri), protozoan (Tetrahymena pyriformis), daphnid (Daphnia magna), freshwater alga (Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata), and fish (Pimephales promelas) revealed promising results that could be exploited in extrapolations using freshwater data to predict marine algal toxicity. Copyright © 2012 SETAC.

  3. Radiolysis of selected antibiotics and their toxic effects on various aquatic organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun Y. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Seung H.; Lee, Myun J.; Kim, Tae H. [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup, Jeonbuk 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang D. [Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (GIST), 1 Oryong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: sdkim@gist.ac.kr

    2009-04-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the decomposition of three {gamma}-irradiated antibiotics (e.g., tetracycline, sulfamethazine, and lincomycin) and to compare the toxic effects on Daphnia magna, Vibrio fischeri, and Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata. The median cell growth inhibition concentrations (IC{sub 50}) of tetracycline, lincomycin, and sulfamethazine for P. subcapitata dramatically increased (e.g., toxicity decreased) after radiolysis. The results demonstrated that {gamma}-radiation treatment was efficient to decompose antibiotics and thereby their toxicity on P. subcaptitata remarkably decreased due to reduced parent compounds.

  4. Development of a More Sensitive and Specific Chromogenic Agar Medium for the Detection of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Other Vibrio Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeung, Marie; Thorsen, Trevor

    2016-11-08

    Foodborne infections in the US caused by Vibrio species have shown an upward trend. In the genus Vibrio, V. parahaemolyticus is responsible for the majority of Vibrio-associated infections. Thus, accurate differentiation among Vibrio spp. and detection of V. parahaemolyticus is critically important to ensure the safety of our food supply. Although molecular techniques are increasingly common, culture-depending methods are still routinely done and they are considered standard methods in certain circumstances. Hence, a novel chromogenic agar medium was tested with the goal of providing a better method for isolation and differentiation of clinically relevant Vibrio spp. The protocol compared the sensitivity, specificity and detection limit for the detection of V. parahaemolyticus between the new chromogenic medium and a conventional medium. Various V. parahaemolyticus strains (n=22) representing diverse serotypes and source of origins were used. They were previously identified by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and further verified in our laboratory by tlh-PCR. In at least four separate trials, these strains were inoculated on the chromogenic agar and thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose (TCBS) agar, which is the recommended medium for culturing this species, followed by incubation at 35-37 °C for 24-96 hr. Three V. parahaemolyticus strains (13.6%) did not grow optimally on TCBS, nonetheless exhibited green colonies if there was growth. Two strains (9.1%) did not yield the expected cyan colonies on the chromogenic agar. Non-V. parahaemolyticus strains (n=32) were also tested to determine the specificity of the chromogenic agar. Among these strains, 31 did not grow or exhibited other colony morphologies. The mean recovery of V. parahaemolyticus on the chromogenic agar was ~96.4% relative to tryptic soy agar supplemented with 2% NaCl. In conclusion, the new chromogenic agar is an effective medium to detect V

  5. Bioaccumulation and uptake routes of perfluoroalkyl acids in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Zhineng; Xia, Xinghui; Guo, Jia; Jiang, Xiaoman

    2013-02-01

    Perfluoroalkyl acids (PFAs), one kind of emerging contaminants, have attracted great attentions in recent years. However, the study about their bioaccumulation mechanism remains scarce. In this research, the bioaccumulation of six kinds of PFAs in water flea Daphnia magna was studied. The uptake rates of PFAs in D. magna ranged from 178 to 1338 L kg(-1) d(-1), and they increased with increasing perfluoroalkyl chain length; the elimination rates ranged from 0.98 to 2.82 d(-1). The bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) of PFAs ranged from 91 to 380 L kg(-1) in wet weight after 25 d exposure; they increased with increasing perfluoroalkyl chain length and had a significant positive correlation with the n-octanol/water partition coefficients (logK(ow)) of PFAs (pPFAs plays an important role in their bioaccumulation. The BAFs almost kept constant when the PFA concentrations in aqueous phase increased from 1 to 10 μg L(-1). Scenedesmus subspicatus, as the food of D. magna, did not significantly affect the bioaccumulation of PFAs by D. magna. Furthermore, the body burden of PFAs in the dead D. magna was 1.08-2.52 times higher than that in the living ones, inferring that the body surface sorption is a main uptake route of PFAs in D. magna. This study suggested that the bioaccumulation of PFAs in D. magna is mainly controlled by their partition between organisms and water; further research should be conducted to study the intrinsic mechanisms, especially the roles of protein and lipid in organisms. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. LTR retroelements in the genome of Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rho, Mina; Schaack, Sarah; Gao, Xiang; Kim, Sun; Lynch, Michael; Tang, Haixu

    2010-07-09

    Long terminal repeat (LTR) retroelements represent a successful group of transposable elements (TEs) that have played an important role in shaping the structure of many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of LTR retroelements in Daphnia pulex, a cyclical parthenogen and the first crustacean for which the whole genomic sequence is available. In addition, we analyze transcriptional data and perform transposon display assays of lab-reared lineages and natural isolates to identify potential influences on TE mobility and differences in LTR retroelements loads among individuals reproducing with and without sex. We conducted a comprehensive de novo search for LTR retroelements and identified 333 intact LTR retroelements representing 142 families in the D. pulex genome. While nearly half of the identified LTR retroelements belong to the gypsy group, we also found copia (95), BEL/Pao (66) and DIRS (19) retroelements. Phylogenetic analysis of reverse transcriptase sequences showed that LTR retroelements in the D. pulex genome form many lineages distinct from known families, suggesting that the majority are novel. Our investigation of transcriptional activity of LTR retroelements using tiling array data obtained from three different experimental conditions found that 71 LTR retroelements are actively transcribed. Transposon display assays of mutation-accumulation lines showed evidence for putative somatic insertions for two DIRS retroelement families. Losses of presumably heterozygous insertions were observed in lineages in which selfing occurred, but never in asexuals, highlighting the potential impact of reproductive mode on TE abundance and distribution over time. The same two families were also assayed across natural isolates (both cyclical parthenogens and obligate asexuals) and there were more retroelements in populations capable of reproducing sexually for one of the two families assayed. Given the importance of LTR retroelements activity in the

  7. Genes mirror geography in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Peter D; Reisser, Céline; Dukić, Marinela; Haag, Christoph R; Ebert, Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Identifying the presence and magnitude of population genetic structure remains a major consideration in evolutionary biology as doing so allows one to understand the demographic history of a species as well as make predictions of how the evolutionary process will proceed. Next-generation sequencing methods allow us to reconsider previous ideas and conclusions concerning the distribution of genetic variation, and what this distribution implies about a given species evolutionary history. A previous phylogeographic study of the crustacean Daphnia magna suggested that, despite strong genetic differentiation among populations at a local scale, the species shows only moderate genetic structure across its European range, with a spatially patchy occurrence of individual lineages. We apply RAD sequencing to a sample of D. magna collected across a wide swath of the species' Eurasian range and analyse the data using principle component analysis (PCA) of genetic variation and Procrustes analytical approaches, to quantify spatial genetic structure. We find remarkable consistency between the first two PCA axes and the geographic coordinates of individual sampling points, suggesting that, on a continent-wide scale, genetic differentiation is driven to a large extent by geographic distance. The observed pattern is consistent with unimpeded (i.e. no barriers, landscape or otherwise) migration at large spatial scales, despite the fragmented and patchy nature of favourable habitats at local scales. With high-resolution genetic data similar patterns may be uncovered for other species with wide geographic distributions, allowing an increased understanding of how genetic drift and selection have shaped their evolutionary history. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Comparative toxicity of leachates from 52 textiles to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Göran; Aspegren, Pia

    2010-10-01

    The environmental aspects of textiles are very complex and include production, processing, transport, usage, and recycling. Textiles are made from a variety of materials and can contain a large number of chemicals. Chemicals are used during production of fibres, for preservation and colouring and they are released during normal wear and during washing. The aim of this study was to investigate the release to water of toxic chemicals from various textiles. Altogether 52 samples of textiles made from cotton (21), linen (4), cotton and linen (7), cellulose (3), synthetic fibres (7), cotton and synthetic fibres (8) and wool (2). Seven were eco-labelled. All textiles were cut into squares and placed into Petri dishes with 50 ml ISO test medium in a concentration series (4-256 cm(2)/50 ml) and tested for acute toxicity to Daphnia magna. Estimated EC50s were converted into weight/volume, and 48-h EC50s ranged between 182 g/L. It was not possible to detect any difference between fibre type and toxicity (ANOVA), but a significantly higher toxicity was found for printed versus unprinted cotton and cotton/linen textiles, while the opposite was found for synthetic textiles. Eco-labelled products were evenly distributed on a toxicity scale, which means that eco-labelling in its present form does not necessarily protect users or the environment from exposure to toxic chemicals. Therefore, the results from the present study suggest that bioassays and toxicity tests should become an integrated part of textile environmental quality control programs. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The first-generation Daphnia magna linkage map

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Meester Luc

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Daphnia magna is a well-established model species in ecotoxicology, ecology and evolution. Several new genomics tools are presently under development for this species; among them, a linkage map is a first requirement for estimating the genetic background of phenotypic traits in quantitative trait loci (QTL studies and is also very useful in assembling the genome. It also enables comparative studies between D. magna and D. pulex, for which a linkage map already exists. Results Here we describe the first genetic linkage map of D. magna. We generated 214 F2 (intercross clonal lines as the foundation of the linkage analysis. The linkage map itself is based on 109 microsatellite markers, which produced ten major linkage groups ranging in size from 31.1 cM to 288.5 cM. The total size of this linkage map extends to 1211.6 Kosambi cM, and the average interval for the markers within linkage groups is 15.1 cM. The F2 clones can be used to map QTLs for traits that differ between the parental clones. We successfully mapped the location of two loci with infertility alleles, one inherited from the paternal clone (Iinb1 and the other from the maternal clone (Xinb3. Conclusions The D. magna linkage map presented here provides extensive coverage of the genome and a given density of markers that enable us to detect QTLs of moderate to strong effects. It is similar in size to the linkage map of D. pulex.

  10. Toxic effects of nanomaterial-adsorbed cadmium on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Minling; Zhang, Ze; Lv, Mengting; Song, Wenhua; Lv, Yuhua

    2018-02-01

    Chemical immobilization technologies involving the use of chemical absorbents such as nanomaterials have been recommended for the remediation of Cd-contaminated water and soil. The impact of nanomaterials or nanomaterials coexisting with other contaminants on aquatic organisms has been reported, but information on the toxic effects of nanomaterial-adsorbed cadmium (Nano-Cd) on aquatic organisms is lacking. This study aimed to investigate the acute and sub-acute toxicity of Nano-Cd on Daphnia magna by using a method developed based on the standard Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) 202 guidelines. The toxicity of cadmium chloride (Cd 2+ ), nano-manganese dioxide-cadmium (nMnO 2 -Cd), 20nm nano-hydroxyapatite-cadmium (nHAP 20 -Cd), and 40nm nano-hydroxyapatite-cadmium (nHAP 40 -Cd) to D. magna was in the following order: Cd 2+ > nMnO 2 -Cd > nHAP 20 -Cd > nHAP 40 -Cd. Further, nMnO 2 -Cd, nHAP 20 -Cd, and nHAP 40 -Cd showed acute toxicity to D. magna of level II grade according to the Commission of the European Communities and OECD standards. Exposure to low and medium, but not high, Nano-Cd concentrations increased the activities of peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and anti-superoxide anion. Thus, Nano-Cd, particularly at high concentrations, could exert oxidative damage in D. magna. An increase in Cd 2+ and Nano-Cd concentrations gradually increased the malondialdehyde content, indicating cell membrane damage caused by the production of excessive O 2 - . Thus, the use of nanomaterials after adsorption of Cd is associated with a potential risk to aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Power plays: iron transport and energy transduction in pathogenic vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustusch, Ryan J; Kuehl, Carole J; Crosa, Jorge H

    2011-06-01

    The Vibrios are a unique group of bacteria inhabiting a vast array of aquatic environments. Many Vibrio species are capable of infecting a wide assortment of hosts. Some of these species include V. parahaemolyticus, V. alginolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. anguillarum, and V. cholerae. The ability of these organisms to utilize iron is essential in establishing both an infection in their hosts as well as surviving in the environment. Bacteria are able to sequester iron through the secretion of low molecular weight iron chelators termed siderophores. The iron-siderophore complexes are bound by specific outer membrane receptors and are brought through both the outer and inner membranes of the cell. The energy needed to drive this active transport is achieved through the TonB energy transduction system. When first elucidated in E. coli, the TonB system was shown to be a three protein complex consisting of TonB, ExbB and ExbD. Most Vibrio species carry two TonB systems. The second TonB system includes a fourth protein; TtpC, which is essential for TonB2 mediated iron transport. Some Vibrio species have been shown to carry a third TonB system that also includes a TtpC protein.

  12. Localization of immunodominant linear B-cell epitopes of Vibrio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Outer membrane protein U (OmpU), an adhesion protein of Vibrio mimicus, is a good antigen, but its epitopes are still unclear. In order to locate the epitopes of OmpU protein, epitope prediction was performed using the amino acid sequence of OmpU protein of V. mimicus HX4 strain that was isolated from the diseased ...

  13. Vibrio vulnificus-infektioner i Danmark sommeren 1994

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Brita Grønbech; Frimodt-Møller, N; Dalsgaard, A.

    1996-01-01

    The clinical manifestations and epidemiological data of 11 patients infected with Vibrio vulnificus found in Denmark during the unusually warm summer of 1994 are reported. All patients had been exposed to seawater prior to illness, but none had consumed seafood. Nine patients, including four...

  14. Genome sequence of the human pathogen Vibrio cholerae Amazonia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, C.C.; Marin, M.A.; Dias, G.M.; Dutilh, B.E.; Edwards, R.A.; Iida, T.; Thompson, F.L.; Vicente, A.C.

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae O1 Amazonia is a pathogen that was isolated from cholera-like diarrhea cases in at least two countries, Brazil and Ghana. Based on multilocus sequence analysis, this lineage belongs to a distinct profile compared to strains from El Tor and classical biotypes. The genomic analysis

  15. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for polymerase chain ...

  16. Molecular analysis of the emergence of pandemic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyd, EF; Cohen, AL; Naughton, LM

    2008-01-01

    Background Vibrio parahaemolyticus is abundant in the aquatic environment particularly in warmer waters and is the leading cause of seafood borne gastroenteritis worldwide. Prior to 1995, numerous V. parahaemolyticus serogroups were associated with disease, however, in that year an O3:K6 serogroup...

  17. Detection of quorum sensing molecules from Vibrio harveyi and use ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper explores the extraction and detection processes of quorum sensing molecules such as N-aceyl homoserine lactone compounds (AHL) from marine Vibrio harveyi. The spent culture of V. harveyi was solvent partitioned for AHL, rotary evaporated and re-suspended in 50% acetonitrile then detected with reporter ...

  18. Detection of viable toxigenic Vibrio cholerae and virulent Shigella ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DRINIE

    2003-04-02

    Apr 2, 2003 ... A rapid and sensitive assay was developed for the detection of low numbers of viable Vibrio cholerae and Shigella spp. cells in environmental and drinking water samples. Water samples were filtered, and the filters were enriched in a non-selective medium. The enrichment cultures were prepared for ...

  19. Survival of Vibrio cholerae in industrially polluted water, with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    containing industrial effluents. The effect of iron as well as pH on the survival of Vibrio cholerae (non-O1, El Tor and classical strains) in water samples from 12 points, where selected industrial effluents were discharged into rivers, was studied.

  20. Detection and confirmation of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Epidemic cholera caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 is a major health problem in several developing countries. Traditional methods for identifying V. cholerae involve cultural, biochemical and immunological assays which are cumbersome and often take several days to complete. In the present study, a direct cell ...

  1. Vibrio Cholerae 01 Infections In Jos, Nigeria | Opajobi | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study to determine the prevalence of Vibrio cholerae 01 in stool sample submitted for routine examination of enteric pathogens, as well as identify the serotypes and antibiogram of the isolates to commonly used antibiotics was undertaken. The survey involved the examination of 774 (763 stool and 11 rectal swabs) ...

  2. Ion-swimming speed variation of Vibrio cholerae cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work we report the variation in swimming speed of Vibrio cholerae with respect to the change in concentration of sodium ions in the medium. We have also studied the variation in swimming speed with respect to temperature. We find that the swimming speed initially shows a linear increase with the increase of ...

  3. Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae in Nile perch ( Lates niloticus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Nile perch (Lates niloticus) industry in East Africa has suffered severe economic losses in the last few years due to failure to comply with the microbiological standards of European Union (E.U). Fresh and frozen products have been suspected to be contaminated with Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae. This has led to a ...

  4. Detection and confirmation of toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-08-20

    Aug 20, 2013 ... Epidemic cholera caused by toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 is a major health problem in several developing countries. Traditional methods for identifying V. cholerae involve cultural, biochemical and immunological assays which are cumber- some and often take several days to complete. In the present study, ...

  5. antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of vibrio cholerae 01 strains

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    East African Medical Journal Vol. 77 No. 7 July 2000. ANTIMICROBIAL SUSCEPTIBILITY PATTERN OF VIBRIO CHOLERAE 01 STRAINS DURING TWO CHOLERA OUTBREAKS IN DAR ES SALAAM,. TANZANIA. W.K. Urassa, MD, MSc, MMed, Lecturer, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Muhimbili University ...

  6. Prevalence of Vibrio cholerae in rivers of Mpumalanga province ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cholera is a life-threatening diarrhoeal disease, which mainly affects inhabitants of developing countries due to poor socio-economic conditions and lack of access to potable water and sanitation. Toxigenic Vibrio cholerae are the aetiological agents of cholera. These bacteria are autochthonous to aquatic environments, ...

  7. Vibriophages and Their Interactions with the Fish Pathogen Vibrio anguillarum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Demeng; Gram, Lone; Middelboe, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio anguillarum is an important pathogen in aquaculture, responsible for the disease vibriosis in many fish and invertebrate species. Disease control by antibiotics is a concern due to potential development and spread of antibiotic resistance. The use of bacteriophages to control the pathogen...

  8. Evaluation of in vitro Vibrio static activity of Shewanella algae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    conventional methods followed by Biolog microlog software. Since production of antagonistic agents rely on cultural conditions, antagonistic ability of candidate probioic against the mentioned Vibrios was assessed using Response Surface Methodology, with central composite design in which four independents variables ...

  9. Pseudomonas piscicida kills vibrios by two distinct mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pseudoalteromonas piscicida is a naturally-occurring marine bacterium which kills competing bacteria, including vibrios. In studies by Richards et al. (AEM00175-17), three strains of P. piscicida were isolated and characterized. Strains secreted proteolytic enzymes which likely killed competing or...

  10. Predator-induced phenotypic plasticity in Daphnia pulex: Uncoupling morphological defenses and life history shifts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Repka, S.; Pihlajamaa, K.

    1996-01-01

    Chemical cues from a predator Chaoborus sp. induce morphological defense (neck spine) and life history shifts (later reproduction, decreased fecundity but larger juvenile size) in the waterflea Daphnia pulex. These shifts have been interpreted either as costs of defense or as separate adaptation. In

  11. Symbiotic bacteria contribute to increasing the population size of a freshwater crustacean, Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Tsukada, Koji; Kato, Yasuhiko; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Watanabe, Hajime

    2015-04-01

    The filter-feeding crustacean Daphnia is a key organism in freshwater ecosystems. Here, we report the effect of symbiotic bacteria on ecologically important life history traits, such as population dynamics and longevity, in Daphnia magna. By disinfection of the daphniid embryos with glutaraldehyde, aposymbiotic daphniids were prepared and cultured under bacteria-free conditions. Removal of bacteria from the daphniids was monitored by quantitative polymerase chain reaction for bacterial 16S rRNA gene. The population of aposymbiotic daphniids was reduced 10-folds compared with that of the control daphniids. Importantly, re-infection with symbiotic bacteria caused daphniids to regain bacteria and increase their fecundity to the level of the control daphniids, suggesting that symbiotic bacteria regulate Daphnia fecundity. To identify the species of symbiotic bacteria, 16S rRNA genes of bacteria in daphniids were sequenced. This revealed that 50% of sequences belonged to the Limnohabitans sp. of the Betaproteobacteria class and that the diversity of bacterial taxa was relatively low. These results suggested that symbiotic bacteria have a beneficial effect on D. magna, and that aposymbiotic Daphnia are useful tools in understanding the role of symbiotic bacteria in the environmental responses and evolution of their hosts. © 2014 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. What Can Molecular Markers Tell Us About the Evolutionary History of Daphnia Species Complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwenk, K.; Ender, A.; Streit, B.

    1995-01-01

    Despite the wealth of information on the ecology of Daphnia species, the systematics and phylogeny of the genus is still unresolved. The taxonomic uncertainties are based in part on the phenomenon of interspecific hybridization, which has been well documented for species of the D.

  13. Nucleotide polymorphism and within-gene recombination in Daphnia magna and D. pulex, two cyclical parthenogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Christoph R; McTaggart, Seanna J; Didier, Anaïs; Little, Tom J; Charlesworth, Deborah

    2009-05-01

    Theory predicts that partially asexual organisms may make the "best of both worlds": for the most part, they avoid the costs of sexual reproduction, while still benefiting from an enhanced efficiency of selection compared to obligately asexual organisms. There is, however, little empirical data on partially asexual organisms to test this prediction. Here we examine patterns of nucleotide diversity at eight nuclear loci in continentwide samples of two species of cyclically parthenogenetic Daphnia to assess the effect of partial asexual reproduction on effective population size and amount of recombination. Both species have high nucleotide diversities and show abundant evidence for recombination, yielding large estimates of effective population sizes (300,000-600,000). This suggests that selection will act efficiently even on mutations with small selection coefficients. Divergence between the two species is less than one-tenth of previous estimates, which were derived using a mitochondrial molecular clock. As the two species investigated are among the most distantly related species of the genus, this suggests that the genus Daphnia may be considerably younger than previously thought. Daphnia has recently received increased attention because it is being developed as a model organism for ecological and evolutionary genomics. Our results confirm the attractiveness of Daphnia as a model organism, because the high nucleotide diversity and low linkage disequilibrium suggest that fine-scale mapping of genes affecting phenotypes through association studies should be feasible.

  14. Food mediated life history strategies in Daphnia magna : their relevance to ecotoxicological evaluations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Enserink, E.L.

    1995-01-01

    The waterflea Daphnia magna is a widely used test organism in ecotoxicological studies. Acute and chronic laboratory tests yield basic information for the development of water quality standards, assessment of potential hazards of (new) chemicals, waste water licences and

  15. Colony formation in Scenedesmus: No contribution of urea in induction by a lipophilic Daphnia exudate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lurling, M.F.L.L.W.; Elert, von E.

    2001-01-01

    The common green alga Scenedesmus may respond morphologically to numerous environmental factors. The formation of colonies in Scenedesmus resulting from exposure to grazer (Daphnia) excreta is of particular interest since the induced colony formation may be an induced defense. Recent studies

  16. Behavioural response of Daphnia to olfactory cues from food, competitors and predators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roozen, F.; Lürling, M.

    2001-01-01

    The behavioural response of the freshwater zooplankter Daphnia to chemicals from its food, the green alga Scenedesmus, to algal cells, to the green colour from chlorophyll, to chemicals released from congeners and conspecifics, and to chemicals released from invertebrate (Chaoborus) and vertebrate

  17. The effect of temperature on the sensitivity of Daphnia magna to cyanobacteria is genus dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hochmuth, Jennifer D; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2014-10-01

    In the present study, the authors investigated the effects of 6 different genera of cyanobacteria on multiple endpoints of Daphnia magna in a 21-d life table experiment conducted at 3 different temperatures (15 °C, 19 °C, and 23 °C). The specific aims were to test if the effect of temperature on Daphnia's sensitivity to cyanobacteria differed among different cyanobacteria and if the rank order from most to least harmful cyanobacteria to Daphnia reproduction changed or remained the same across the studied temperature range. Overall, the authors observed a decrease in harmful effects on reproduction with increasing temperature for Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon, and an increase in harmful effects with increasing temperature for Anabaena and Oscillatoria. No effect of temperature was observed on Daphnia sensitivity to Cylindrospermopsis. Harmful effects of Microcystis and Nodularia on reproduction appear to be mirrored by a decrease in length. On the other hand, harmful effects of Anabaena, Aphanizomenon, and Oscillatoria on reproduction were correlated with a decrease in intrinsic rate of natural increase, which was matched by a later onset of reproduction in exposures to Oscillatoria. In addition, the results suggest that the cyanobacteria rank order of harmfulness may change with temperature. Higher temperatures may increase the sensitivity of D. magna to the presence of some cyanobacteria (Anabaena and Oscillatoria) in their diet, whereas the harmful effects of others (Microcystis, Nodularia, and Aphanizomenon) may be reduced by higher temperatures. © 2014 SETAC.

  18. Do microplastic particles affect Daphnia magna at the morphological, life history and molecular level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes K Imhof

    Full Text Available Microplastic particles are ubiquitous not only in marine but also in freshwater ecosystems. However, the impacts of microplastics, consisting of a large variety of synthetic polymers, on freshwater organisms remains poorly understood. We examined the effects of two polymer mixtures on the morphology, life history and on the molecular level of the waterflea Daphnia magna (three different clones. Microplastic particles of ~40 μm were supplied at a low concentration (1% of the food particles leading to an average of ~30 particles in the digestive tract which reflects a high microplastic contamination but still resembles a natural situation. Neither increased mortality nor changes on the morphological (body length, width and tail spine length or reproductive parameters were observed for adult Daphnia. The analyses of juvenile Daphnia revealed a variety of small and rather subtle responses of morphological traits (body length, width and tail spine length. For adult Daphnia, alterations in expression of genes related to stress responses (i.e. HSP60, HSP70 & GST as well as of other genes involved in body function and body composition (i.e. SERCA were observed already 48h after exposure. We anticipate that the adverse effects of microplastic might be influenced by many additional factors like size, shape, type and even age of the particles and that the rather weak effects, as detected in a laboratory, may lead to reduced fitness in a natural multi-stressor environment.

  19. Genomic integration and germline transmission of plasmid injected into crustacean Daphnia magna eggs.

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    Yasuhiko Kato

    Full Text Available The water flea, Daphnia, has been the subject of study in ecology, evolution, and environmental sciences for decades. Over the last few years, expressed sequence tags and a genome sequence have been determined. In addition, functional approaches of overexpression and gene silencing based on microinjection of RNAs into eggs have been established. However, the transient nature of these approaches prevents us from analyzing gene functions in later stages of development. To overcome this limitation, transgenesis would become a key tool. Here we report establishment of a transgenic line using microinjection of plasmid into Daphnia magna eggs. The green fluorescent protein (GFP gene fused with the D. magna histone H2B gene under the control of a promoter/enhancer region of the elongation factor 1α-1 (EF1α-1 gene, EF1α-1::H2B-GFP, was used as a reporter providing high resolution visualization of active chromatin. Transgenic lines were obtained from 0.67% of the total fertile adults that survived the injections. One of the transgenic animals, which exhibited fluorescence in the nuclei of cells during embryogenesis and oogenesis, had two copies of EF1α-1::H2B-GFP in a head-to-tail array. This is the first report of a transgenesis technique in Daphnia and, together with emerging genome sequences, will be useful for advancing knowledge of the molecular biology of Daphnia.

  20. Inducible Defenses with a "Twist": Daphnia barbata Abandons Bilateral Symmetry in Response to an Ancient Predator.

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    Quirin Herzog

    Full Text Available Predation is one of the most important drivers of natural selection. In consequence a huge variety of anti-predator defenses have evolved in prey species. Under unpredictable and temporally variable predation pressure, the evolution of phenotypically plastic defensive traits is favored. These "inducible defenses", range from changes in behavior, life history, physiology to morphology and can be found in almost all taxa from bacteria to vertebrates. An important group of model organisms in ecological, evolutionary and environmental research, water fleas of the genus Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera, are well known for their ability to respond to predators with an enormous variety of inducible morphological defenses. Here we report on the "twist", a body torsion, as a so far unrecognized inducible morphological defense in Daphnia, expressed by Daphnia barbata exposed to the predatory tadpole shrimp Triops cancriformis. This defense is realized by a twisted carapace with the helmet and the tail spine deviating from the body axis into opposing directions, resulting in a complete abolishment of bilateral symmetry. The twisted morphotype should considerably interfere with the feeding apparatus of the predator, contributing to the effectiveness of the array of defensive traits in D. barbata. As such this study does not only describe a completely novel inducible defense in the genus Daphnia but also presents the first report of a free living Bilateria to flexibly respond to predation risk by abandoning bilateral symmetry.

  1. Light-induced migration behaviour of Daphnia modified by food and predator kairamones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, E.; Ringelberg, J.

    1998-01-01

    Lake-dwelling waterfleas, Daphnia, often face a dilemma;Food availability is highest, near the water surface, but predation by visually hunting predators is also most severe. Swimming downward at dawn reduces predation risk, but food availability and temperature also decrease with depth. We tested

  2. Cyanobacterial carbon supports the growth and reproduction of Daphnia: an experimental study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Xiaoxia; Liu, Zhengwen; Gulati, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we address the question of how the food value of cyanobacterial carbon might be upgraded during the decay process in order to support the growth and reproduction of Daphnia. We undertook an experimental study simulating the natural decay of the cyanobacterium Microcystis over periods

  3. Colony formation in Scenedesmus: no contribution of urea in induction by a lipophilic Daphnia exudate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lürling, M.; Von Elert, E.

    2001-01-01

    The common green alga Scenedesmus may respond morphologically to numerous environmental factors. The formation of colonies in Scenedesmus resulting from exposure to grazer (Daphnia) excreta is of particular interest since the induced colony formation may be an induced defense. Recent studies

  4. Effects of chlorpyrifos on individuals and populations of Daphnia pulex in the laboratory and field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeven, N. van der; Gerritsen, A.A.M.

    1997-01-01

    Effects of the insecticide chlorpyrifos (cpf) on young (Daphnia pulex and the ability of D. pulex to recover after exposure were tested in the laboratory. Populations of D. pulex exposed to cpf were studied in the laboratory and field. In the field, cpf was applied in

  5. A rapid bioassay for detecting saxitoxins using a Daphnia acute toxicity test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrao-Filho, Aloysio da S., E-mail: aloysio@ioc.fiocruz.b [Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Promocao da Saude Ambiental, Departamento de Biologia, Instituto Oswaldo Cruz, FIOCRUZ, Av. Brasil 4365, Manguinhos, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21045-900 (Brazil); Soares, Maria Carolina S., E-mail: mcarolsoares@gmail.co [Departamento de Engenharia Sanitaria e Ambiental Faculdade de Engenharia, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG 36036-900 (Brazil); Freitas de Magalhaes, Valeria, E-mail: valeria@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil); Azevedo, Sandra M.F.O., E-mail: sazevedo@biof.ufrj.b [Laboratorio de Ecofisiologia e Toxicologia de Cianobacterias, Instituto de Biofisica Carlos Chagas Filho, CCS, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro, RJ 21949-900 (Brazil)

    2010-06-15

    Bioassays using Daphnia pulex and Moina micrura were designed to detect cyanobacterial neurotoxins in raw water samples. Phytoplankton and cyanotoxins from seston were analyzed during 15 months in a eutrophic reservoir. Effective time to immobilize 50% of the exposed individuals (ET{sub 50}) was adopted as the endpoint. Paralysis of swimming movements was observed between approx0.5-3 h of exposure to lake water containing toxic cyanobacteria, followed by an almost complete recovery of the swimming activity within 24 h after being placed in control water. The same effects were observed in bioassays with a saxitoxin-producer strain of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii isolated from the reservoir. Regression analysis showed significant relationships between ET{sub 50}vs. cell density, biomass and saxitoxins content, suggesting that the paralysis of Daphnia in lake water samples was caused by saxitoxins found in C. raciborskii. Daphnia bioassay was found to be a sensitive method for detecting fast-acting neurotoxins in natural samples, with important advantages over mouse bioassays. - A new Daphnia bioassay, as an alternative to the mouse bioassay, is able to detect effects of fast-acting, potent neurotoxins in raw water.

  6. Differences in orientation behaviour underlie interclonal differences in phototaxis in Daphnia magna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gool, E.

    1999-01-01

    I studied the orientation direction of the body and the eye in response to contrasts in Daphnia magna. The orientation of the body was studied on pinned, but freely rotating daphnids, and on freely swimming daphnids. The orientation direction of the eye was studied on daphnids with a fixed position

  7. Demographic cost and mechanisms of adaptation to environmental stress in resurrected Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Sommer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A characteristic feature of the Daphnia (Crustacea: Cladocera life cycle are the so-called ephippia, which are fertilised eggs that need to undergo diapause. When they are shed by the female, they sink to the lake bottom, where they may become embedded in the sediment and may remain viable for decades. Extracting and hatching ephippia in the laboratory and subjecting resurrected lineages to conditions representative of historic lake environments allows retrospective investigation of life-history responses to environmental change. Here we reanalyse data from such a resurrection experiment (Piscia et al., 2015: Bull. Environ. Contam. Toxicol. 94:46–51. Contemporary and past lineages of Daphnia galeata Sars 1863 were obtained from Lake Orta (Italy, a deep, subalpine lake with a well-documented history of industrial copper pollution. Experimental Daphnia were subjected to three copper treatments representative of two levels of historic as well as to current (i.e., unpolluted lake conditions, and life-table data were collected. With these data at hand, we first estimated vital rates (survival, maturation, and reproduction and used these rates to project the asymptotic population growth rates (λ for each population-by-treatment combination. Next, we performed life-table response experiments (LTRE to estimate the contributions of the vital rates to observed differences in λ. Finally, we used elasticity analysis to explore the functional relationship between λ and each of the vital rates. We found that survival rates were only compromised at elevated copper levels. Moreover, past, resurrected Daphnia had a higher λ at low copper concentrations compared to unpolluted conditions, but a lower λ when exposed to high copper levels. Contemporary Daphnia, on the other hand, only reproduced successfully in unpolluted water. Under these conditions, however, they had a higher population growth rate than the past Daphnia, suggesting a cost of copper

  8. Household Transmission of Vibrio cholerae in Bangladesh.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Sugimoto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae infections cluster in households. This study's objective was to quantify the relative contribution of direct, within-household exposure (for example, via contamination of household food, water, or surfaces to endemic cholera transmission. Quantifying the relative contribution of direct exposure is important for planning effective prevention and control measures.Symptom histories and multiple blood and fecal specimens were prospectively collected from household members of hospital-ascertained cholera cases in Bangladesh from 2001-2006. We estimated the probabilities of cholera transmission through 1 direct exposure within the household and 2 contact with community-based sources of infection. The natural history of cholera infection and covariate effects on transmission were considered. Significant direct transmission (p-value<0.0001 occurred among 1414 members of 364 households. Fecal shedding of O1 El Tor Ogawa was associated with a 4.9% (95% confidence interval: 0.9%-22.8% risk of infection among household contacts through direct exposure during an 11-day infectious period (mean length. The estimated 11-day risk of O1 El Tor Ogawa infection through exposure to community-based sources was 2.5% (0.8%-8.0%. The corresponding estimated risks for O1 El Tor Inaba and O139 infection were 3.7% (0.7%-16.6% and 8.2% (2.1%-27.1% through direct exposure, and 3.4% (1.7%-6.7% and 2.0% (0.5%-7.3% through community-based exposure. Children under 5 years-old were at elevated risk of infection. Limitations of the study may have led to an underestimation of the true risk of cholera infection. For instance, available covariate data may have incompletely characterized levels of pre-existing immunity to cholera infection. Transmission via direct exposure occurring outside of the household was not considered.Direct exposure contributes substantially to endemic transmission of symptomatic cholera in an urban setting. We provide the first estimate of

  9. Re-description of Daphnia (Ctenodaphnia from lakes in the Khumbu Region, Nepalese Himalayas, with the erection of a new species, Daphnia himalaya, and a note on an intersex individual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinora Carolina PEÑALVA-ARANA

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available We present here a detailed description of Ctenodaphnia-type Daphnia specimens collected from lakes in the Nepalese Himalayas between 1994 and 2004, including mature females and adult males. The specimens examined share certain diagnostic traits with Daphnia tibetana (Sars 1903, and others with Daphnia fusca (Gurney 1906. A re-appraisal of their previous synonymy with D. fusca and a comparison with all published descriptions of similar species from the region indicate that they represent a new species named here as Daphnia himalaya. The chance discovery of a sex intergrade of the same species allowed a description of the secondary sexual characteristics in this interesting and rare intermediate state to be reported, and its possible ecological implications to be discussed, as well.

  10. The effect of small doses of toxic cyanobacterial food on temperature response of Daphnia galeata: Is bigger better?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Senerpont Domis, L.N.; Bartosiewicz, M.; Davis, Rebecca; Cerbin, S.

    2013-01-01

    1.Growing evidence shows that cyanobacterial blooms thrive in warmer temperatures, underlining the importance of understanding the relationship between cyanobacterial food, temperature and performance of the key freshwater herbivore Daphnia. 2.To evaluate potential effects of toxic cyanobacterial

  11. Effects of dietary phosphorus deficiency on the abundance, phosphorus balance, and growth of Daphnia cucullata in three hypereutrophic Dutch lakes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DeMott, W.R.; Gulati, R.D.; Van Donk, E.

    2001-01-01

    We studied population dynamics, phosphorus balance, and individual growth to evaluate limitation of Daphnia cucullata by dietary phosphorus (P) in three interconnected, hypereutrophic Dutch lakes. Consistent with the P-limitation hypothesis, declines in egg production and population density

  12. LTR retroelements in the genome of Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sun

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long terminal repeat (LTR retroelements represent a successful group of transposable elements (TEs that have played an important role in shaping the structure of many eukaryotic genomes. Here, we present a genome-wide analysis of LTR retroelements in Daphnia pulex, a cyclical parthenogen and the first crustacean for which the whole genomic sequence is available. In addition, we analyze transcriptional data and perform transposon display assays of lab-reared lineages and natural isolates to identify potential influences on TE mobility and differences in LTR retroelements loads among individuals reproducing with and without sex. Results We conducted a comprehensive de novo search for LTR retroelements and identified 333 intact LTR retroelements representing 142 families in the D. pulex genome. While nearly half of the identified LTR retroelements belong to the gypsy group, we also found copia (95, BEL/Pao (66 and DIRS (19 retroelements. Phylogenetic analysis of reverse transcriptase sequences showed that LTR retroelements in the D. pulex genome form many lineages distinct from known families, suggesting that the majority are novel. Our investigation of transcriptional activity of LTR retroelements using tiling array data obtained from three different experimental conditions found that 71 LTR retroelements are actively transcribed. Transposon display assays of mutation-accumulation lines showed evidence for putative somatic insertions for two DIRS retroelement families. Losses of presumably heterozygous insertions were observed in lineages in which selfing occurred, but never in asexuals, highlighting the potential impact of reproductive mode on TE abundance and distribution over time. The same two families were also assayed across natural isolates (both cyclical parthenogens and obligate asexuals and there were more retroelements in populations capable of reproducing sexually for one of the two families assayed. Conclusions

  13. Biokinetic uptake and efflux of silver nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chun-Mei; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2010-10-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNP) are widely used as antibacterial products, and there are increasing concerns for their potential environmental risks in aquatic ecosystems. The biokinetics of AgNP in aquatic organisms has not yet been determined. In the present study, we employed a radiotracer methodology to quantify the biokinetics of AgNP in a freshwater cladoceran Daphnia magna, including the uptake from water, dietary assimilation, and elimination of AgNP. We found that the uptake of AgNP was concentration dependent and governed by two phases. The uptake rate constant (k(u)) was 0.060 L/g/h at low AgNP concentrations (2, 10, and 40 μg/L), which was 4.3 times lower than that of the Ag free ion. At a higher AgNP concentration (160 and 500 μg/L), the uptake rate increased disproportionately, likely as a result of direct ingestion of these nanoparticles by the daphnids. When the AgNP were associated with the algal food, their dietary assimilation efficiency (AE) was in the range of 22-45%, which was much higher than the dietary assimilation of Ag quantified under the same food conditions. The efflux rate constants of AgNP in daphnids were also much lower than those of the Ag, again suggesting the difficulty of eliminating AgNP by the daphnids. Water excretion was the main elimination route for both AgNP and Ag, but a higher percentage of AgNP was lost through fecal production. Finally, we used a kinetic equation to compare the importance of aqueous and dietary uptake of AgNP using the quantified kinetic parameters. The biokinetic model showed that more than 70% of AgNP accumulated in the daphnids was through ingestion of algae, highlighting the importance of AgNP transport along the food chain. Our present study showed the unique characteristic of AgNP biokinetics and suggested that more attention should be paid to the dietborne AgNP toxicity in aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Mesozoic fossils (>145 Mya) suggest the antiquity of the subgenera of Daphnia and their coevolution with chaoborid predators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotov, Alexey A; Taylor, Derek J

    2011-05-19

    The timescale of the origins of Daphnia O. F. Mueller (Crustacea: Cladocera) remains controversial. The origin of the two main subgenera has been associated with the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea. This vicariance hypothesis is supported by reciprocal monophyly, present day associations with the former Gondwanaland and Laurasia regions, and mitochondrial DNA divergence estimates. However, previous multilocus nuclear DNA sequence divergence estimates at fossils from a Mesozoic Mongolian site, in hopes of gaining insights into the timescale of the evolution of Daphnia. We describe new fossils of ephippia from the Khotont site in Mongolia associated with the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary (about 145 MYA) that are morphologically similar to several modern genera of the family Daphniidae, including the two major subgenera of Daphnia, i.e., Daphnia s. str. and Ctenodaphnia. The daphniid fossils co-occurred with fossils of the predaceous phantom midge (Chaoboridae). Our findings indicate that the main subgenera of Daphnia are likely much older than previously known from fossils (at least 100 MY older) or from nuclear DNA estimates of divergence. The results showing co-occurrence of the main subgenera far from the presumed Laurasia/Gondwanaland dispersal barrier shortly after formation suggests that vicariance from the breakup of Pangaea is an unlikely explanation for the origin of the main subgenera. The fossil impressions also reveal that the coevolution of a dipteran predator (Chaoboridae) with the subgenus Daphnia is much older than previously known -- since the Mesozoic.

  15. Standardized toxicity testing may underestimate ecotoxicity: Environmentally relevant food rations increase the toxicity of silver nanoparticles to Daphnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Louise M; Krattenmaker, Katherine E; Johnson, Erica; Bowers, Alexandra J; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; McCauley, Edward; Nisbet, Roger M

    2017-11-01

    Daphnia in the natural environment experience fluctuations in algal food supply, with periods when algal populations bloom and seasons when Daphnia have very little algal food. Standardized chronic toxicity tests, used for ecological risk assessment, dictate that Daphnia must be fed up to 400 times more food than they would experience in the natural environment (outside of algal blooms) for a toxicity test to be valid. This disconnect can lead to underestimating the toxicity of a contaminant. We followed the growth, reproduction, and survival of Daphnia exposed to 75 and 200 µg/L silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) at 4 food rations for up to 99 d and found that AgNP exposure at low, environmentally relevant food rations increased the toxicity of AgNPs. Exposure to AgNP at low food rations decreased the survival and/or reproduction of individuals, with potential consequences for Daphnia populations (based on calculated specific population growth rates). We also found tentative evidence that a sublethal concentration of AgNPs (75 µg/L) caused Daphnia to alter energy allocation away from reproduction and toward survival and growth. The present findings emphasize the need to consider resource availability, and not just exposure, in the environment when estimating the effect of a toxicant. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;36:3008-3018. © 2017 SETAC. © 2017 SETAC.

  16. Evaluation of Cholera Toxin Expression in Different Populations of Vibrio cholera

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Ebrahimi Kasgari; Mahnaz Nourani; Yousef Yahyapour; Seyed Ehsanollah Mousavi; Enayatollah Kalantar; Hami Kaboosi; Seyed Mahmoud Amin Marashi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cholera is one of the most diseases of human. Cholera toxin is the most important pathogenic factor in humans that causes diarrhea. The cholera toxin is produced by V. cholerae and CTXфPhage. Objectives: In this study, we have investigated the production cholera toxin with different density of Vibrio cholerae. Materials and Methods: With this propose we inoculated classical strain O1 of Vibrio cholerae ATCC 14035 and Vibrio cholerae O1biovar El Tor N16961 into th...

  17. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

    OpenAIRE

    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.; Vergara-Jiménez M.J.; Baez-Flores M.E.; Cabrera-Chavez F.

    2014-01-01

    The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i) food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii) food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii) food without oregano oil (the control). The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae). The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p

  18. VibrioBase: A Model for Next-Generation Genome and Annotation Database Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Woh Choo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To facilitate the ongoing research of Vibrio spp., a dedicated platform for the Vibrio research community is needed to host the fast-growing amount of genomic data and facilitate the analysis of these data. We present VibrioBase, a useful resource platform, providing all basic features of a sequence database with the addition of unique analysis tools which could be valuable for the Vibrio research community. VibrioBase currently houses a total of 252 Vibrio genomes developed in a user-friendly manner and useful to enable the analysis of these genomic data, particularly in the field of comparative genomics. Besides general data browsing features, VibrioBase offers analysis tools such as BLAST interfaces and JBrowse genome browser. Other important features of this platform include our newly developed in-house tools, the pairwise genome comparison (PGC tool, and pathogenomics profiling tool (PathoProT. The PGC tool is useful in the identification and comparative analysis of two genomes, whereas PathoProT is designed for comparative pathogenomics analysis of Vibrio strains. Both of these tools will enable researchers with little experience in bioinformatics to get meaningful information from Vibrio genomes with ease. We have tested the validity and suitability of these tools and features for use in the next-generation database development.

  19. FURTHER STUDIES ON THE ETIOLOGICAL ROLE OF VIBRIO FETUS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, T; Little, R B; Taylor, M S

    1920-11-30

    The data bearing on these three cases are quite sufficient to rule out Bacillus abortus as the agent. Not only the cultures and guinea pig tests of fetal tissues and contents of the digestive tract, but also the agglutination and guinea pig tests of the milk, were negative. The same is true of the agglutination tests of the blood serum. Only in one case was the placenta obtained in part. The stained films and the sections from various regions showed no abortion bacilli. Guinea pig tests of placental tissue were negative for Bacillus abortus. On the other hand) minute organisms resembling vibrios were detected in the cytoplasm of endothelial cells within capillaries in the edematous subchorionic tissue. Subsequently the agglutination titer of the blood serum of one of these cases rose to a level indicating infection with Bacillus abortus during the second pregnancy. The peculiar distribution of abortions due to Vibrio fetus among older cows and heifers in this herd, resulting at first in cases among older cows and latterly passing to young stock, may be explained by certain occurrences in the herd itself. It may be assumed that the infection was originally brought in by purchased cows. The young stock is kept segregated from these in a special barn, and when 6 months old it is pastured on outlying farms until returned in an advanced stage of pregnancy. The heifers during the first pregnancy were thus kept away from vibrio carriers until after the first calf was born. In June and July, 1919, 55 older cows, purchased and native, were placed on the young stock pasture. The three cases of abortion in heifers due to Vibrio fetus occurred October 24, November 9, and December 2, 1919. The age and condition of the fetuses accord very well with the assumption that Vibrio fetus was introduced among the young stock in June or July of the same year. The information gathered thus far concerning vibrionic abortion in this herd enables us to formulate a tentative hypothesis

  20. Marine Vibrio Species Produce the Volatile Organic Compound Acetone

    OpenAIRE

    Nemecek-Marshall, M.; Wojciechowski, C.; Kuzma, J.; Silver, G. M.; Fall, R.

    1995-01-01

    While screening aerobic, heterotrophic marine bacteria for production of volatile organic compounds, we found that a group of isolates produced substantial amounts of acetone. Acetone production was confirmed by gas chromatography, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, and high-performance liquid chromatography. The major acetone producers were identified as nonclinical Vibrio species. Acetone production was maximal in the stationary phase of growth and was stimulated by addition of l-leucine...

  1. Characterization of the secretomes of two vibrios pathogenic to mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madec, Stéphanie; Pichereau, Vianney; Jacq, Annick; Paillard, Mathieu; Boisset, Claire; Guérard, Fabienne; Paillard, Christine; Nicolas, Jean-Louis

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio tapetis causes the brown ring disease in the Japanese clam Ruditapes philippinarum while Vibrio aestuarianus is associated with massive oyster mortalities. As extracellular proteins are often associated with the virulence of pathogenic bacteria, we undertook a proteomic approach to characterize the secretomes of both vibrios. The extracellular proteins (ECPs) of both species were fractionated by SEC-FPLC and in vitro assays were performed to measure the effects of each fraction on hemocyte cellular parameters (phagocytosis and adhesion). Fractions showing a significant effect were subjected to SDS-PAGE, and proteins were identified by nano LC-MS/MS. 45 proteins were identified for V. aestuarianus and 87 for V. tapetis. Most of them belonged to outer membrane or were periplasmic, including porins or adhesins that were already described as virulence factors in other bacterial species. Others were transporter components, flagella proteins, or proteins of unknown function (14 and 15 respectively). Interestingly, for V. aestuarianus, we noted the secretion of 3 extracellular enzymes including the Vam metalloprotease and two other enzymes (one putative lipase and one protease). For V. tapetis, we identified five extracellular enymes, i.e. two different endochitinases, one protease, one lipase and an adhesin. A comparison of both secretomes also showed that only the putative extracellular lipase was common to both secretomes, underscoring the difference in pathogenicity mechanisms between these two species. Overall, these results characterize for the first time the secretomes of these two marine pathogenic vibrios and constitute a useful working basis to further analyze the contribution of specific proteins in the virulence mechanisms of these species.

  2. Mutation of Bacterium Vibrio gazogenes for Selective Preparation of Colorants

    OpenAIRE

    Alihosseini, Farzaneh; Lango, Jozsef; Ju, Kou-San; Hammock, Bruce D.; Sun, Gang

    2010-01-01

    A novel marine bacterium strain effectively produced prodiginine type pigments. These colorants could dye wool, silk and synthetic fabrics such as polyester and polyacrylic and also show antibacterial properties against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus bacteria on the dyed products. Methyl nitrosoguanidine was used as a mutation agent to increase the genetic diversity and the production yield of the bacteria of the family of Vibrio gazogenes. The analysis of the mutated samples show...

  3. Wind direction and its linkage with Vibrio cholerae dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, Shlomit; Broza, Meir

    2007-02-01

    The relevance of climatic events as causative factors for cholera epidemics is well known. However, examinations of the involvement of climatic factors in intracontinental disease distribution are still absent. The spreading of cholera epidemics may be related to the dominant wind direction over land. We examined the geographic diffusion of three cholera outbreaks through their linkage with the wind direction: a) the progress of Vibrio cholerae O1 biotype El Tor in Africa during 1970-1971 and b) again in 2005-2006; and c) the rapid spread of Vibrio cholerae O139 over India during 1992-1993. We also discuss the possible influence of the wind direction on windborn dissemination by flying insects, which may serve as vectors. Analysis of air pressure data at sea level and at several altitudes over Africa, India, and Bangladesh show a correspondence between the dominant wind direction and the intracontinental spread of cholera. We explored the hypothesis that winds have assisted the progress of cholera Vibrios throughout continents. The current analysis supports the hypothesis that aeroplankton (the tiny life forms that float in the air and that may be caught and carried upward by the wind, landing far from their origin) carry the cholera bacteria from one body of water to an adjacent one. This finding may improve our understanding of how climatic factors are involved in the rapid distribution of new strains throughout a vast continental area. Awareness of the aerial transfer of Vibrio cholerae may assist health authorities by improving the prediction of the disease's geographic dissemination.

  4. Adsorption kinetics of laterally and polarly flagellated Vibrio.

    OpenAIRE

    Belas, M R; Colwell, R R

    1982-01-01

    The adsorption of laterally and polarly flagellated bacteria to chitin was measured, and from the data obtained, a modified Langmuir adsorption isotherm was derived. Results indicated that the adsorption of laterally flagellated Vibrio parahaemolyticus follows the Langmuir adsorption isotherm, a type of adsorption referred to as surface saturation kinetics, when conditions are favorable for the production of lateral flagella. When conditions were not favorable for the production of lateral fl...

  5. A Symposium on Bioluminescence and Chemiluminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    in marine Vibrio . (25 min) B.L. Bassler (US) • The Vibrio fischeri LuxR-LuxI system, a model for quorum sensing in Gram-negative bacteria. (20 min...The Euprymna scolopes/ Vibrio fischeri symbiosis. The squid says: Margaret McFall-Ngai (US) The bacterium responds: Edward Ruby (US) MIXER: Meigs...Education Co-chairs: S. Albrecht (Germany) and J.D. Andrade (US) • Transformation experiment using bioluminescence genes of Vibrio fischeri as a

  6. Identification of Vibrio spp. with a set of dichotomous keys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noguerola, I; Blanch, A R

    2008-07-01

    To define a binary biochemical key for the identification of all recognized Vibrio spp. A matrix of phenotypical results was developed based on the previous taxonomical studies and the first description manuscripts. A unification of results from various sources was also performed to integrate different taxonomical studies within the same data matrix. Established criteria for selecting the optimal set of tests yielded the highest discrimination, as well as the lowest number of tests. An initial identification key was defined using arginine dihydrolase, lysine decarboxylase and ornithine decarboxylase tests, as well as defining eight different clusters. This key leads each cluster to a secondary key for species identification. Most of Vibrio spp. presented an identification threshold of 100%. A new set of biochemical keys has been determined provides a scheme for the rapid identification of clinical and environmental species of Vibrio. No more than 14 are needed for even the most complicated identifications. This newly defined set of keys updates and improves similar findings published in previous studies. These biochemical keys are designed for use in routine applications, particularly in environmental and clinical studies involving a high number of isolates.

  7. Biocompatible capped iron oxide nanoparticles for Vibrio cholerae detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Anshu; Baral, Dinesh; Rawat, Kamla; Solanki, Pratima R.; Bohidar, H. B.

    2015-05-01

    We report the studies relating to fabrication of an efficient immunosensor for Vibrio cholerae detection. Magnetite (iron oxide (Fe3O4)) nanoparticles (NPs) have been synthesized by the co-precipitation method and capped by citric acid (CA). These NPs were electrophoretically deposited onto indium-tin-oxide (ITO)-coated glass substrate and used for immobilization of monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae (Ab) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) for Vibrio cholerae detection using an electrochemical technique. The structural and morphological studies of Fe3O4 and CA-Fe3O4/ITO were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and dynamic light scattering (DLS) techniques. The average crystalline size of Fe3O4, CA-Fe3O4 nanoparticles obtained were about 29 ± 1 nm and 37 ± 1 nm, respectively. The hydrodynamic radius of the nanoparticles was found to be 77.35 nm (Fe3O4) and 189.51 nm (CA-Fe3O4) by DLS measurement. The results of electrochemical response studies of the fabricated BSA/Ab/CA-Fe2O3/ITO immunosensor exhibits a good detection range of 12.5-500 ng mL-1 with a low detection limit of 0.32 ng mL-1, sensitivity 0.03 Ω/ng ml-1 cm-2, and reproducibility more than 11 times.

  8. Vibrio vulnificus infection in Southern Brazil - Case report Infecção por Vibrio vulnificus no sul do Brasil - Relato de caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João César Beenke França

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The genus Vibrio is a member of the family Vibrionaceae, and among their disease-causing species, Vibrio vulnificus, a lactose-positive gram-negative bacillus, is one of the most virulent pathogen of the noncholerae vibrios. We describe the case of a 39-year-old male patient, who was using immunosuppressive therapy, admitted to the hospital for liver transplantation. Twelve hours later, the patient presented high fever, myalgia, anuria and erythematous plaques on lower limbs, of rapid growth and proximal progression. The patient was treated with ceftriaxone, meropenem and oxacillin, however he expired within 30 hours. Blood cultures showed growth of a gram-negative bacillus, which was later identified as Vibrio vulnificus.O gênero Vibrio é membro da família Vibrionaceae, e entre as espécies patogênicas, Vibrio vulnificus, bacilo gram negativo lactose positivo, tem sido frequentemente citado. Descrevemos o caso de um paciente masculino de 39 anos, em uso de medicação imunossupressora, admitido no hospital para transplante hepático. Doze horas após a internação, o paciente evoluiu com febre, mialgias, anúria e placas eritematosas em membros inferiores, com rápido crescimento e evolução proximal. O paciente foi tratado com ceftriaxona, meropenem e oxacilina sem melhora, evoluindo para óbito em 30 horas. Hemocultura mostrou crescimento de bacilo gram negativo posteriormente identificado como Vibrio vulnificus.

  9. Epidemiology of a Daphnia-multiparasite system and its implications for the red queen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auld, Stuart K J R; Hall, Spencer R; Duffy, Meghan A

    2012-01-01

    The Red Queen hypothesis can explain the maintenance of host and parasite diversity. However, the Red Queen requires genetic specificity for infection risk (i.e., that infection depends on the exact combination of host and parasite genotypes) and strongly virulent effects of infection on host fitness. A European crustacean (Daphnia magna)--bacterium (Pasteuria ramosa) system typifies such specificity and high virulence. We studied the North American host Daphnia dentifera and its natural parasite Pasteuria ramosa, and also found strong genetic specificity for infection success and high virulence. These results suggest that Pasteuria could promote Red Queen dynamics with D. dentifera populations as well. However, the Red Queen might be undermined in this system by selection from a more common yeast parasite (Metschnikowia bicuspidata). Resistance to the yeast did not correlate with resistance to Pasteuria among host genotypes, suggesting that selection by Metschnikowia should proceed relatively independently of selection by Pasteuria.

  10. Epidemiology of a Daphnia-multiparasite system and its implications for the red queen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart K J R Auld

    Full Text Available The Red Queen hypothesis can explain the maintenance of host and parasite diversity. However, the Red Queen requires genetic specificity for infection risk (i.e., that infection depends on the exact combination of host and parasite genotypes and strongly virulent effects of infection on host fitness. A European crustacean (Daphnia magna--bacterium (Pasteuria ramosa system typifies such specificity and high virulence. We studied the North American host Daphnia dentifera and its natural parasite Pasteuria ramosa, and also found strong genetic specificity for infection success and high virulence. These results suggest that Pasteuria could promote Red Queen dynamics with D. dentifera populations as well. However, the Red Queen might be undermined in this system by selection from a more common yeast parasite (Metschnikowia bicuspidata. Resistance to the yeast did not correlate with resistance to Pasteuria among host genotypes, suggesting that selection by Metschnikowia should proceed relatively independently of selection by Pasteuria.

  11. Accumulation of dieldrin in an alga (Scenedesmus obliquus), Daphnia magna, and the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinert, Robert E.

    1972-01-01

    Scenedesmus obliquus, Daphnia magna, and Poecilia reticulata accumulated dieldrin directly from water; average concentration factors (concentration in organism, dry weight, divided by concentration in water) were 1282 for the alga, 13,954 for D. magna, and 49,307 (estimated) for the guppy. The amount accumulated by each species at equilibrium (after about 1.5, 3-4, and 18 days, respectively) was directly proportional to the concentration of dieldrin in the water. Daphnia magna and guppies accumulated more dieldrin from water than from food that had been exposed to similar concentrations in water. When guppies were fed equal daily rations of D. magna containing different concentrations of insecticide, the amounts of dieldrin accumulated by the fish were directly proportional to the concentration in D. magna; when two lots of guppies were fed different quantities of D. magna (10 and 20 organisms per day) containing identical concentrations of dieldrin, however, the amounts accumulated did not differ substantially.

  12. Biochemical properties and evaluation of washing performance in commercial detergent compatibility of two collagenolytic serine peptidases secreted by Aspergillus fischeri and Penicillium citrinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, Érika Lika; da Silva, Ronivaldo Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Tássio Brito; Souto, Tatiane Beltramini; Leite, Juliana Abigail; Rodrigues, André; Cabral, Hamilton

    2017-03-16

    Filamentous fungi secrete diverse peptidases with different biochemical properties, which is of considerable importance for application in various commercial sectors. In this study, we describe the isolation of two fungal species collected from the soil of decayed organic matter: Aspergillus fischeri and Penicillium citrinum. In a submerged bioprocess, we observed better peptidase production with the fungus P. citrinum, which reached a peak production at 168 h with 760 U/mL, in comparison with the fungus A. fischeri, which reached a peak production at 72 h with 460 U/mL. In both situations, the fermentative medium contained 0.5% crushed feathers as a source of nitrogen. On performing biochemical characterization, we detected two alkaline serine peptidases: The one secreted by P. citrinum had optimal activity at pH 7.0 and at 45°C, while the one secreted by A. fischeri had optimal activity in pH 6.5-8 and at 55-60°C. Metallic ions were effective in modulating these peptidases; in particular, Cu(2+) promoted negative modulation of both peptidases. The peptidases were stable and functional under conditions of nonionic surfactants, temperatures up to 45°C for 1 h, and incubation over a wide pH range. In addition, it was observed that both peptidases had the capacity to hydrolyze collagen and performed well in removing an egg protein stain when supplemented into a commercial powder detergent; this was especially true for the peptidase from P. citrinum.

  13. Systems biology meets stress ecology: linking molecular and organismal stress responses in Daphnia magna

    OpenAIRE

    Heckmann, L. H.; Sibly, R. M.; Connon, R.; Hooper, H. L.; Hutchinson, T. H.; Maund, S. J.; Hill, C. J.; Bouetard, A.; Callaghan, A.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been designed to interrupt eicosanoid metabolism in mammals, but little is known of how they affect nontarget organisms. Here we report a systems biology study that simultaneously describes the transcriptomic and phenotypic stress responses of the model crustacean Daphnia magna after exposure to ibuprofen. RESULTS: Our findings reveal intriguing similarities in the mode of action of ibuprofen between vertebrates and inv...

  14. Competitive outcome of Daphnia-Simocephalus experimental microcosms: salinity versus priority effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Loureiro

    Full Text Available Competition is a major driving force in freshwaters, especially given the cyclic nature and dynamics of pelagic food webs. Competition is especially important in the initial species assortment during colonization and re-colonization events, which depends strongly on the environmental context. Subtle changes, such as saline intrusion, may disrupt competitive relationships and, thus, influence community composition. Bearing this in mind, our objective was to assess whether low salinity levels (using NaCl as a proxy alter the competitive outcome (measured as the rate of population biomass increase of Daphnia-Simocephalus experimental microcosms, taking into account interactions with priority effects (sequential species arrival order. With this approach, we aimed to experimentally demonstrate a putative mechanism of differential species sorting in brackish environments or in freshwaters facing secondary salinization. Experiments considered three salinity levels, regarding NaCl added (0.00, 0.75 and 1.50 g L(-1, crossed with three competition scenarios (no priority, priority of Daphnia over Simocephalus, and vice-versa. At lower NaCl concentrations (0.00 and 0.75 g L(-1, Daphnia was a significantly superior competitor, irrespective of the species inoculation order, suggesting negligible priority effects. However, the strong decrease in Daphnia population growth at 1.50 g L(-1 alleviated the competitive pressure on Simocephalus, causing an inversion of the competitive outcome in favour of Simocephalus. The intensity of this inversion depended on the competition scenario. This salinity-mediated disruption of the competitive outcome demonstrates that subtle environmental changes produce indirect effects in key ecological mechanisms, thus altering community composition, which may lead to serious implications in terms of ecosystem functioning (e.g. lake regime shifts due to reduced grazing and biodiversity.

  15. Unusual duplication of the insulin-like receptor in the crustacean Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dufresne France

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The insulin signaling pathway (ISP has a key role in major physiological events like carbohydrate metabolism and growth regulation. The ISP has been well described in vertebrates and in a few invertebrate model organisms but remains largely unexplored in non-model invertebrates. This study is the first detailed genomic study of this pathway in a crustacean species, Daphnia pulex. Results The Daphnia pulex draft genome sequence assembly was scanned for major components of the ISP with a special attention to the insulin-like receptor. Twenty three putative genes are reported. The pathway appears to be generally well conserved as genes found in other invertebrates are present. Major findings include a lower number of insulin-like peptides in Daphnia as compared to other invertebrates and the presence of multiple insulin-like receptors (InR, with four genes as opposed to a single one in other invertebrates. Genes encoding for the Dappu_InR are likely the result of three duplication events and bear some unusual features. Dappu_InR-4 has undergone extensive evolutionary divergence and lacks the conserved site of the catalytic domain of the receptor tyrosine kinase. Dappu_InR-1 has a large insert and lacks the transmembranal domain in the β-subunit. This domain is also absent in Dappu_InR-3. Dappu_InR-2 is characterized by the absence of the cystein-rich region. Real-time q-PCR confirmed the expression of all four receptors. EST analyses of cDNA libraries revealed that the four receptors were differently expressed under various conditions. Conclusions Duplications of the insulin receptor genes might represent an important evolutionary innovation in Daphnia as they are known to exhibit extensive phenotypic plasticity in body size and in the size of defensive structures in response to predation.

  16. Isolation and Identification of Kairomone(s) in the Daphnia-Scenedesmus System

    OpenAIRE

    Holthoon, van, F.L.

    2004-01-01

    Infochemicals play an important role in interactions between living organisms in aquatic environments. Although the presence of these chemical cues is confirmed in more and more systems, the chemical structures of the compounds involved remain predominantly elusive and the identification of these compounds is essential to advance the research on chemical communication. An overview of chemical cues involving Daphnia (either as producer or receiver) is given and the progress towards their isola...

  17. Climate Effects on High Latitude Daphnia via Food Quality and Thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Przytulska

    Full Text Available Climate change is proceeding rapidly at high northern latitudes and may have a variety of direct and indirect effects on aquatic food webs. One predicted effect is the potential shift in phytoplankton community structure towards increased cyanobacterial abundance. Given that cyanobacteria are known to be a nutritionally poor food source, we hypothesized that such a shift would reduce the efficiency of feeding and growth of northern zooplankton. To test this hypothesis, we first isolated a clone of Daphnia pulex from a permafrost thaw pond in subarctic Québec, and confirmed that it was triploid but otherwise genetically similar to a diploid, reference clone of the same species isolated from a freshwater pond in southern Québec. We used a controlled flow-through system to investigate the direct effect of temperature and indirect effect of subarctic picocyanobacteria (Synechococcus on threshold food concentrations and growth rate of the high latitude clone. We also compared the direct effect of temperature on both Daphnia clones feeding on eukaryotic picoplankton (Nannochloropsis. The high latitude clone had a significantly lower food threshold for growth than the temperate clone at both 18 and 26°C, implying adaptation to lower food availability even under warmer conditions. Polyunsaturated fatty acids were present in the picoeukaryote but not the cyanobacterium, confirming the large difference in food quality. The food threshold for growth of the high latitude Daphnia was 3.7 (18°C to 4.2 (26°C times higher when fed Synechococcus versus Nannochloropsis, and there was also a significant negative effect of increased temperature and cyanobacterial food on zooplankton fatty acid content and composition. The combined effect of temperature and food quality on the performance of the high latitude Daphnia was greater than their effects added separately, further indicating the potentially strong indirect effects of climate warming on aquatic food web

  18. The chemoreceptor genes of the waterflea Daphnia pulex: many Grs but no Ors

    OpenAIRE

    Pe?alva-Arana, D Carolina; Lynch, Michael; Robertson, Hugh M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Chemoreception is vitally important for all animals, yet little is known about the genetics of chemoreception in aquatic organisms. The keystone species Daphnia pulex, a well known crustacean, is the first aquatic invertebrate to have its genome sequenced. This has allowed us the initial investigation of chemoreceptor genes in an aquatic invertebrate, and to begin the study of chemoreceptor evolution across the arthropod phylum. Results We describe 58 Grs (gustatory recept...

  19. A survey of well conserved families of C2H2 zinc-finger genes in Daphnia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bai Yang

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A recent comparative genomic analysis tentatively identified roughly 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 Zinc-finger proteins that are well conserved in "bilaterians" (i.e. worms, flies, and humans. Here we extend that analysis to include a second arthropod genome from the crustacean, Daphnia pulex. Results Most of the 40 orthologous groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are represented by just one or two proteins within each of the previously surveyed species. Likewise, Daphnia were found to possess a similar number of orthologs for all of these small orthology groups. In contrast, the number of Sp/KLF homologs tends to be greater and to vary between species. Like the corresponding mammalian Sp/KLF proteins, most of the Drosophila and Daphnia homologs can be placed into one of three sub-groups: Class I-III. Daphnia were found to have three Class I proteins that roughly correspond to their Drosophila counterparts, dSP1, btd, CG5669, and three Class II proteins that roughly correspond to Luna, CG12029, CG9895. However, Daphnia have four additional KLF-Class II proteins that are most similar to the vertebrate KLF1/2/4 proteins, a subset not found in Drosophila. Two of these four proteins are encoded by genes linked in tandem. Daphnia also have three KLF-Class III members, one more than Drosophila. One of these is a likely Bteb2 homolog, while the other two correspond to Cabot and KLF13, a vertebrate homolog of Cabot. Conclusion Consistent with their likely roles as fundamental determinants of bilaterian form and function, most of the 40 groups of C2H2 zinc-finger proteins are conserved in kind and number in Daphnia. However, the KLF family includes several additional genes that are most similar to genes present in vertebrates but missing in Drosophila.

  20. [Thermal preference and avoidance in cladoceran Daphnia magna strauss (Crustacea, Cladocera) acclimated to constant temperature].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbitskiĭ, V B; Verbitskaia, T I

    2012-01-01

    The final preferable temperature (FPT) and avoidance temperature (AT) were determined in parthenogenetic females of the crustacean Daphnia magna Strauss. The animals were preliminary acclimated to constant temperature of 23.4 degrees C followed by keeping them in a thermo-gradient device for 24 days. It was revealed that daphnia select FPT with overshoot. In the first four days, daphnia selected temperatures 0.6-1.6 degrees C higher than the acclimation temperature and 4-7.4 degrees C higher than FPT. Two zones of FPT are revealed: the first zone by the time of 5-13 days (17.6 +/- 1.2 degrees C); the second, by 16-24 days (20 +/- 1.5 degrees C). The dynamics of AT diapason followed the dynamics of FPT. Two zones of the AT plateau were observed: over five to 17 days (temperatures 25.8 degrees C were avoided) and for 21-24 days (< 8.5 degrees C and 26 degrees C).

  1. The chronic toxicity of CuO nanoparticles and copper salt to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nathalie; Vakurov, Alexander; Knapen, Dries; Blust, Ronny

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the effects of CuO nanoparticles and CuCl2·2H2O were tested on Daphnia magna under chronic exposure scenarios. During a 21-day exposure to the nanoparticles and salt, the reproduction was followed by a daily count of the number of offspring. After the exposure, the adult Daphnia length and uptake of copper was measured. The dissolved, nanoparticle and aggregated fractions were distinguished in the exposure medium. The results showed that only a small fraction of the nanoparticles dissolved, while the majority of the particles formed large aggregates (>450 nm). The dissolved fraction of the nanoparticles corresponded with the dissolved fraction of the copper salt. The effects of the nanoparticles (reproduction EC10: 0.546 mg Cu/l, EC20: 0.693 mg Cu/l, EC50: 1.041 mg Cu/l) on reproduction and length were much lower than the effects of the copper salts (reproduction EC10: 0.017 mg Cu/l, EC20: 0.019 mg Cu/l, EC50: 0.022 mg Cu/l). Based upon total body analysis, the Daphnia copper concentration appeared much higher when exposed to the nanoparticles than when exposed to the salt. These combined results indicate that the toxicity of CuO nanoparticles to D. magna is caused by copper ions formed during dissolution of the nanoparticles in the exposure medium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Daphnia magna fitness during low food supply under different water temperature and brownification scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Gall

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Much of our current knowledge about non-limiting dietary carbon supply for herbivorous zooplankton is based on experimental evidence and typically conducted at ~1 mg C L-1 and ~20°C. Here we ask how low supply of dietary carbon affects somatic growth, reproduction, and survival of Daphnia magna and test effects of higher water temperature (+3 °C relative to ambient and brownification (3X higher than natural water color; both predicted effects of climate change during fall cooling. We predicted that even at very low carbon supply (~5µg C L-1, higher water temperature and brownification will allow D. magna to increase its fitness. Neonates (<24 h old were incubated with lake seston for 4 weeks (October-November 2013 in experimental bottles submerged in outdoor mesocosms to explore effects of warmer and darker water. Higher temperature and brownification did not significantly affect food quality, as assessed by its fatty acid composition. Daphnia exposed to both increased temperature and brownification had highest somatic growth and were the only that reproduced, and higher temperature caused the highest Daphnia survival success. These results suggest that even under low temperature and thus lower physiological activity, low food quantity is more important than its quality for D. magna fitness.

  3. Mimicking Daphnia magna bioassay performance by an electronic tongue for urban water quality control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirsanov, Dmitry, E-mail: d.kirsanov@gmail.com [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Evgeny [Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sensor Systems LLC, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Zagrebin, Anatoly; Ignatieva, Natalia; Rybakin, Vladimir [Institute of Limnology, Russian Academy of Sciences, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Legin, Andrey [Laboratory of Chemical Sensors, St. Petersburg State University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Laboratory of Artificial Sensor Systems, ITMO University, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • -Daphnia magna bioassay can be simulated with multisensor system. • Urban water toxicity can be predicted from potentiometric ET data. • Independent test set validation confirms statistical significance of the results. - Abstract: Toxicity is one of the key parameters of water quality in environmental monitoring. However, being evaluated as a response of living beings (as their mobility, fertility, death rate, etc.) to water quality, toxicity can only be assessed with the help of these living beings. This imposes certain restrictions on toxicity bioassay as an analytical method: biotest organisms must be properly bred, fed and kept under strictly regulated conditions and duration of tests can be quite long (up to several days), thus making the whole procedure the prerogative of the limited number of highly specialized laboratories. This report describes an original application of potentiometric multisensor system (electronic tongue) when the set of electrochemical sensors was calibrated against Daphnia magna death rate in order to perform toxicity assessment of urban waters without immediate involvement of living creatures. PRM (partial robust M) and PLS (projections on latent structures) regression models based on the data from this multisensor system allowed for prediction of toxicity of unknown water samples in terms of biotests but in the fast and simple instrumental way. Typical errors of water toxicity predictions were below 20% in terms of Daphnia death rate which can be considered as a good result taking into account the complexity of the task.

  4. Daphnia fed algal food grown at elevated temperature have reduced fitness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna B. Sikora

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lake water temperature is negatively correlated with fatty acids content and P:C ratio in green algae. Hence, elevated temperature may indirectly reduce the fitness of Daphnia due to induced decrease in algal food quality. The aim of this study was to test the hypotheses that quality of algal food decreases with increasing temperature of its culture and that large-bodied Daphnia are more vulnerable to the temperature-related deterioration of algal food quality than small-bodied ones. Laboratory life-table experiments were performed at 20°C with large-bodied D. pulicaria and small-bodied D. cucullata fed with the green alga Scenedesmus obliquus, that had been grown at temperatures of 16, 24 or 32°C. The somatic growth rates of both species decreased significantly with increasing algal culture temperature and this effect was more pronounced in D. pulicaria than in D. cucullata. In the former species, age at first reproduction significantly increased and clutch size significantly decreased with increasing temperature of algae growth, while no significant changes in these two parameters were observed in the latter species. The proportion of egg-bearing females decreased with increasing algal culture temperature in both species. The results of this study support the notion that the quality of algal food decreases with increasing water temperature and also suggest that small-bodied Daphnia species might be less vulnerable to temperature-related decreases in algal food quality than large-bodied ones.

  5. Influence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on cadmium and lead bioaccumulations and toxicities to Daphnia magna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Sillanpää, Markus; Schultz, Eija

    2017-06-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2 NPs) have attracted considerable concerns due to the increasing production and widespread applications, while their influences on other co-existing pollutants in real environment are not well studied. In this paper, the colloidal stability of TiO2 NPs in the exposure medium was first evaluated, and then, the medium was modified so that TiO2 NP suspension remained stable over the exposure period. Finally, using the optimized exposure medium, the effects of cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) on Daphnia magna both in the absence and presence of TiO2 NPs were investigated. Results showed that 2 mg L-1 of TiO2 NPs was well dispersed in 1:20 diluted Elendt M7 medium without EDTA, and no immobility was observed. The presence of the nanoparticles increased the bioaccumulation and toxicity of Cd to the daphnias. On the contrary, while Pb bioaccumulation was enhanced by three to four times, toxicity of Pb was reduced in the presence of TiO2 NPs. The decreased toxicity of Pb was more likely attributed to the decreased bioavailability of free Pb ion due to adsorption and speciation change of Pb in the presence of TiO2 NPs. Additionally, surface-attached TiO2 NPs combined with adsorbed heavy metals caused adverse effects on daphnia swimming and molting behavior, which is supposed to lead to chronic toxicity.

  6. NUTRITIONAL VALUE OF PLANKTONIC CLADOCERAN DAPHNIA MAGNA FOR COMMON CARP (Cyprinus carpio FRY FEEDING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Bogut

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemical composition and contents of amino acids and fatty acids in the planktonic cladoceran Daphnia magna were investigated, aiming to evaluate its value for feeding of young carp. Crude protein, crude fat, crude fibre, ash and moisture contents were analyzed according to standard laboratory procedures. Amino acids content was determined by LKB 4101 automatic analyzer and that of fatty acids by Chrompack CP 9000 chromatograph, using a flame ionizing detector. Protein contents amounted to 1.18 and 39.24% of fresh and dry mass, respectively. These amounts of proteins completely meet nutritional requirements both of carp fry and its older categories and other omnivorous fishes. Raw fat and fibre contents in dry weight were 4.98 and 4.32%, respectively, which is suitable for the commercial carp breeding. Methionine and phenylalanine are partially in deficit, whereas other essential amino acids identified in dry mass of Daphnia magna were present in amounts adequate for all carp categories. The proportions of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids in lipids of Daphnia magna were 18.70 and 66.20%, respectively. Among the unsaturated fatty acids, the omega–3 group was present with 27.30%. The omega–3 : omega–6 fatty acids ratio was 5.68:1, which fully meets the carp nutrition requirements.

  7. The chemoreceptor genes of the waterflea Daphnia pulex: many Grs but no Ors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Hugh M

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreception is vitally important for all animals, yet little is known about the genetics of chemoreception in aquatic organisms. The keystone species Daphnia pulex, a well known crustacean, is the first aquatic invertebrate to have its genome sequenced. This has allowed us the initial investigation of chemoreceptor genes in an aquatic invertebrate, and to begin the study of chemoreceptor evolution across the arthropod phylum. Results We describe 58 Grs (gustatory receptors, belonging to the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, which were identified bioinformatically in the draft genome of the crustacean waterflea Daphnia pulex. No genes encoding proteins similar to the insect odorant receptors (Ors were identified. These 58 Grs form 3 distinctive subfamilies of 37, 12, and 5 genes, as well as a highly divergent singleton (Gr58. In addition, Grs55–57 share distinctive amino acid motifs and cluster with the sugar receptors of insects, and may illuminate the origin of this distinctive subfamily. ESTs, tiling array, and PCR amplification results support 34 predicted gene models, and preliminary expression data comparing the sexes indicates potential female-biased expression for some genes. Conclusion This repertoire of 58 chemoreceptors presumably mediates the many chemoperception abilities of waterfleas. While it is always possible that the entire Or gene lineage was lost at some point in the history of Daphnia pulex, we think it more likely that the insect Or lineage is indeed a relatively recently expanded gene lineage concomitant with the evolution of terrestriality in the insects or their hexapod ancestors.

  8. Evaluation of the hazardous impact of landfill leachates by toxicity and biodegradability tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalcíková, G; Vávrová, M; Zagorc-Koncan, J; Gotvajn, A Zgajnar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of our research was to assess the ecotoxicity and biodegradability of leachates originating from two parts of a municipal landfill before and after biological treatment in the existing treatment plant. Biotests represent important tools for adequate environmental characterization of landfill leachates and could be helpful in reliable assessment and monitoring of the treatment plant efficiency. For ecotoxicity testing of landfill leachate before and after biological treatment, different organisms were chosen: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri, a mixed culture of activated sludge, duckweed Lemna minor, white mustard Sinapis alba, brine shrimp Artemia salina, and water flea Daphnia magna. For assessment of biodegradability, the method for determination of oxygen demand in a closed respirometer was used. The investigated leachates were heavily polluted, and in some cases, effluent limits were exceeded even after treatment. Results indicated that toxicity tests and physico-chemical parameters determined before and after treatment equivalently assess the efficiency of the existing treatment plant. However, the investigated leachates showed higher toxicity to Daphnia magna and especially to Lemna minor in contrast to Vibrio fischeri and Artemia salina (neither was sensitive to any of the leachates). No leachates were readily biodegradable. Experiments confirmed that the battery of toxicity tests should be applied for more comprehensive assessment of landfill leachate treatment and for reliable assessment of the treated leachate's subsequent environmental impact. It was confirmed that treated leachate, in spite of its better physico-chemical characteristics, still represents a potential environmental risk and thus should not be released into the environment.

  9. Vibrio Pathogens: A Public Health Concern in Rural Water Resources in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osunla, Charles A; Okoh, Anthony I

    2017-10-07

    Members of the Vibrio genus are autochthonous inhabitants of aquatic environments and play vital roles in sustaining the aquatic milieu. The genus comprises about 100 species, which are mostly of marine or freshwater origin, and their classification is frequently updated due to the continuous discovery of novel species. The main route of transmission of Vibrio pathogens to man is through drinking of contaminated water and consumption inadequately cooked aquatic food products. In sub-Saharan Africa and much of the developing world, some rural dwellers use freshwater resources such as rivers for domestic activities, bathing, and cultural and religious purposes. This review describes the impact of inadequately treated sewage effluents on the receiving freshwater resources and the associated risk to the rural dwellers that depends on the water. Vibrio infections remain a threat to public health. In the last decade, Vibrio disease outbreaks have created alertness on the personal, economic, and public health uncertainties associated with the impact of contaminated water in the aquatic environment of sub-Saharan Africa. In this review, we carried out an overview of Vibrio pathogens in rural water resources in Sub-Saharan Africa and the implication of Vibrio pathogens on public health. Continuous monitoring of Vibrio pathogens among environmental freshwater and treated effluents is expected to help reduce the risk associated with the early detection of sources of infection, and also aid our understanding of the natural ecology and evolution of Vibrio pathogens.

  10. Vibrio Pathogens: A Public Health Concern in Rural Water Resources in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A. Osunla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Members of the Vibrio genus are autochthonous inhabitants of aquatic environments and play vital roles in sustaining the aquatic milieu. The genus comprises about 100 species, which are mostly of marine or freshwater origin, and their classification is frequently updated due to the continuous discovery of novel species. The main route of transmission of Vibrio pathogens to man is through drinking of contaminated water and consumption inadequately cooked aquatic food products. In sub-Saharan Africa and much of the developing world, some rural dwellers use freshwater resources such as rivers for domestic activities, bathing, and cultural and religious purposes. This review describes the impact of inadequately treated sewage effluents on the receiving freshwater resources and the associated risk to the rural dwellers that depends on the water. Vibrio infections remain a threat to public health. In the last decade, Vibrio disease outbreaks have created alertness on the personal, economic, and public health uncertainties associated with the impact of contaminated water in the aquatic environment of sub-Saharan Africa. In this review, we carried out an overview of Vibrio pathogens in rural water resources in Sub-Saharan Africa and the implication of Vibrio pathogens on public health. Continuous monitoring of Vibrio pathogens among environmental freshwater and treated effluents is expected to help reduce the risk associated with the early detection of sources of infection, and also aid our understanding of the natural ecology and evolution of Vibrio pathogens.

  11. The Occurrence of Vibrio species in the Gut of Sardinella madrensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The occurrence of vibrio bacteria in the gut of “Songu”: Sardinella madrensis was investigated using enrichment procedures. Seventy percent (70%) of the total fish samples examined were positive for vibrios. The mean bacterial counts ranged between 2.68 x 102 to 1.30 x 104 cfu/g in all the fish samples. The weight of fish ...

  12. Onderzoek pathogene vibrio soorten in Nederlandse mosselen en oesters in augustus en september 2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aalberts, C.H.J.

    2003-01-01

    Naar aanleiding van de hoge weerstemperatuur in augustus 2003 zijn in de kweek- en verwatergebieden van mosselen en oesters in Nederland enkele monsters onderzocht op de aanwezigheid van voor de mens pathogene vibrio soorten. In geen van de 18 monsters is Vibrio parahaemolyticus, vulnificus of

  13. Effects of Pollution on Vibrios in Woji River OJESANMI, A S; IBE, S N ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MICHAEL HORSFALL

    ABSTRACT: The effect of pollution on Vibrio spp. in five sampling stations along Woji River in Port. Harcourt was studied in the months of April and November 2010. Vibrio vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus were isolated. The Plate count technique on Thiosulphate Citrate Bile Salt agar revealed a high.

  14. Effects of Pollution on Vibrios in Woji River | Ojesanmi | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of pollution on Vibrio spp. in five sampling stations along Woji River in Port Harcourt was studied in the months of April and November 2010. Vibrio vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticus and V. alginolyticus were isolated. The Plate count technique on Thiosulphate Citrate Bile Salt agar revealed a high population density ...

  15. Impact of milk fish farming in the tropics on potentially pathogenic vibrios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichardt, W T; Reyes, J M; Pueblos, M J; Lluisma, A O

    2013-12-15

    Ratios of sucrose-negative to sucrose-positive vibrios on TCBS agar (suc-/suc+) indicate the abundance of potential human pathogenic non-cholera vibrios in coastal mariculture environments of the Lingayen Gulf (Philippines. In guts of adult maricultured milkfish (Chanos chanos) of suc- vibrios reached extreme peak values ranging between 2 and 545 million per g wet weight. Suc- vibrios outnumbered suc+ vibrios in anoxic sediments, too, and were rarely predominant in coastal waters or in oxidized sediments. Suc-/suc+ ratios in sediments increased toward the mariculture areas with distance from the open sea at decreasing redox potentials. There is circumstantial evidence that suc- vibrios can be dispersed from mariculture areas to adjacent environments including coral reefs. An immediate human health risk by pathogenic Vibrio species is discounted, since milkfish guts contained mainly members of the Enterovibrio group. A representative isolate of these contained proteolytic and other virulence factors, but no genes encoding toxins characteristic of clinical Vibrio species. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Complete genome sequence for the shellfish pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus RE98 isolated from a shellfish hatchery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vibrio coralliilyticus is a pathogen of corals and larval shellfish. Publications on strain RE98 list it as a Vibrio tubiashii; however, whole genome sequencing confirms RE98 as V. coralliilyticus containing a total of 6,037,824 bp consisting of two chromosomes (3,420,228 and 1,917,482 bp), and two...

  17. Bactericidal effect of lactoferrin and lactoferrin chimera against halophilic Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leon-Sicairos, N.; Canizalez-Roman, A.; de la Garza, M.; Reyes-Lopez, M.; Zazueta-Beltran, J.; Nazmi, K.; Gomez-Gil, B.; Bolscher, J.G.

    2009-01-01

    Infections caused by Vibrio parahaemolyticus, an halophilic member of the genus Vibrio, have increased globally in the last 5 years. Diarrhea caused by V. parahaemolyticus results from eating raw or undercooked seafood. The aim of this work was to investigate whether lactoferrin and some

  18. Efek Antibakteri Ekstrak Daun Mimba (Azadirachta indica A. Juss terhadap Bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus Secara In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uli Ayini

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Budidaya udang windu di Indonesia telah berkembang pesat. Salah satu kendala budidaya udang adalah penyakit Vibriosis yang disebabkan oleh bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui efek antibakeri ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus. Penelitian ini menggunakan metode dilusi untuk mengetahui efek antibakteri ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio algynoliticus secara in vitro. Konsentrasi ekstrak yang digunakan (% yaitu: 0; 2,5; 5; 7,5; 10; 12,5 dan sebagai kontrol terdiri dari kontrol positif, dan kontrol negatif. Pengumpulan data untuk menentukan MIC (Minimum Inhibitory Concentration dilakukan dengan membandingkan kejernihan kultur di medium TSB 2% pada berbagai konsentrasi yang berbeda, dengan kontrol positif dan kontrol negatif. Penentuan MBC (Minimum Bacterisidal Concentration dilakukan dengan melihat ada tidaknya dan jumlah koloni bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus yang muncul pada medium subkultur TSA 2% setelah inkubasi 24 jam. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan nilai MIC yaitu konsentrasi 5%, hal ini ditunjukkan dengan tabung yang mulai jernih. Nilai MBC ekstrak daun mimba terhadap bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus adalah konsentrasi 12,5% ditandai dengan sudah tidak munculnya  koloni bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus. Berdasarkan penelitian ini dapat disimpulkan bahwa ekstrak daun mimba dapat memberikan efek antibakteri terhadap bakteri Vibrio alginolyticus secara in vitro.Tiger shrimp cultivation in Indonesia has been growing rapidly. The main obstacle is the shrimp farming vibriosis disease caused by the bacterium Vibrio algynoliticus. The aim of this research was to determine the effects of neem leaf extract antibakeri against Vibrio algynoliticus. This study used a dilution method to determine the antibacterial effect of neem leaf extract against Vibrio algynoliticus bacteria in vitro. The concentration of the extract used (%: 0; 2.5; 5; 7.5; 10; 12.5 and as a control consisting of a positive

  19. Comparative assessment of Vibrio virulence in marine fish larvae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønneseth, A.; Castillo, D.; D'Alvise, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Vibrionaceae infections are a major obstacle for marine larviculture; however, little is known about virulence differences of Vibrio strains. The virulence of Vibrio strains, mostly isolated from vibriosis outbreaks in farmed fish, was tested in larval challenge trials with cod (Gadus morhua...... effects on survival. Some Vibrio strains were pathogenic in all of the larva species, while some caused disease only in one of the species. Twenty-nine of the Vibrio anguillarum strains increased the mortality of larvae from at least one fish species; however, pathogenicity of the strains differed...... markedly. Other Vibrio species had no or less pronounced effects on larval mortalities. Iron uptake has been related to V. anguillarum virulence; however, the presence or absence of the plasmid pJM1 encoding anguibactin did not correlate with virulence. The genomes of V. anguillarum were compared (D...

  20. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: A Review on the Pathogenesis, Prevalence and Advance Molecular Identification Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vengadesh eLetchumanan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. Vibrio parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, Vibrio parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. Vibrio parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh, which plays a similar role as thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2 to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the Vibrio parahemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques.

  1. Controlling Harmful Cyanobacteria: Taxa-Specific Responses of Cyanobacteria to Grazing by Large-Bodied Daphnia in a Biomanipulation Scenario.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo Urrutia-Cordero

    Full Text Available Lake restoration practices based on reducing fish predation and promoting the dominance of large-bodied Daphnia grazers (i.e., biomanipulation have been the focus of much debate due to inconsistent success in suppressing harmful cyanobacterial blooms. While most studies have explored effects of large-bodied Daphnia on cyanobacterial growth at the community level and/or on few dominant species, predictions of such restoration practices demand further understanding on taxa-specific responses in diverse cyanobacterial communities. In order to address these questions, we conducted three grazing experiments during summer in a eutrophic lake where the natural phytoplankton community was exposed to an increasing gradient in biomass of the large-bodied Daphnia magna. This allowed evaluating taxa-specific responses of cyanobacteria to Daphnia grazing throughout the growing season in a desired biomanipulation scenario with limited fish predation. Total cyanobacterial and phytoplankton biomasses responded negatively to Daphnia grazing both in early and late summer, regardless of different cyanobacterial densities. Large-bodied Daphnia were capable of suppressing the abundance of Aphanizomenon, Dolichospermum, Microcystis and Planktothrix bloom-forming cyanobacteria. However, the growth of the filamentous Dolichospermum crassum was positively affected by grazing during a period when this cyanobacterium dominated the community. The eutrophic lake was subjected to biomanipulation since 2005 and nineteen years of lake monitoring data (1996-2014 revealed that reducing fish predation increased the mean abundance (50% and body-size (20% of Daphnia, as well as suppressed the total amount of nutrients and the growth of the dominant cyanobacterial taxa, Microcystis and Planktothrix. Altogether our results suggest that lake restoration practices solely based on grazer control by large-bodied Daphnia can be effective, but may not be sufficient to control the

  2. Vibrio ecology in PNW - The Ecology of Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the Pacific Northwest: Implications for risk assessment and early warning systems

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Over the past decade, there has been a significant increase in Vibrio parahaemolyticus-related gastroenteritis from the consumption of raw oysters harvested in...

  3. From genes to behavior: investigations of neurochemical signaling come of age for the model crustacean Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Andrew E; McCoole, Matthew D

    2012-08-01

    The cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex has served as a standard organism for aquatic toxicity testing for decades. The model organism status of D. pulex rests largely on its remarkable ability to rapidly adapt morphologically, physiologically and behaviorally to a wide range of environmental challenges, as well as on its parthenogenetic reproduction and ease of laboratory culture. As in all multicellular organisms, neurochemical control systems are undoubtedly major contributors to the functional flexibility of Daphnia. Surprisingly, little work has focused on understanding its neurochemistry at any level. Recently, D. pulex has been the subject of extensive genome and transcriptome sequencing, and it is currently the only crustacean with a fully sequenced, publicly accessible genome. Although the molecular work was initiated for gene-based investigations of ecotoxicology and toxicogenomics, the data generated have allowed for investigations into numerous aspects of Daphnia biology, including its neurochemical signaling. This Commentary summarizes our knowledge of D. pulex neurochemistry obtained from recent genomic and transcriptomic studies, and places these data in context with other anatomical, biochemical and physiological experiments using D. pulex and its sister species Daphnia magna. Suggestions as to how the Daphnia molecular data may be useful for future investigations of crustacean neurochemical signaling are also provided.

  4. The acute toxic effects of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ionic liquids on Chlorella vulgaris and Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Shuai; Zhu, Lusheng; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Jun; Zhou, Tongtong

    2017-10-01

    Given their increasingly widespread application, the toxic effects of ionic liquids (ILs) have become the subject of significant attention in recent years. Therefore, the present study assessed the acute toxic effects of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate ([Cnmim]NO3 (n = 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12)) on Chlorella vulgaris and Daphnia magna. The sensitivity of the tested organism Daphnia magna and the investigated IL concentrations in water using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) were also evaluated to demonstrate the reliability of the present study. The results illustrated that Daphnia magna is indeed sensitive to the reference toxicant and the investigated ILs were stable in the aquatic environment. The 50% effect concentration (EC50) was used to represent the acute toxic effects on Chlorella vulgaris and Daphnia magna. With the increasing alkyl-chain lengths, the toxicity of the investigated ILs increased in both the test organisms. Accordingly, the alkyl-chain lengths can cause significantly toxic effects on aquatic organisms, and Daphnia magna are much more sensitive than Chlorella vulgaris to the imidazolium-based ILs used in the present study. Furthermore, the present study provides more information on the acute toxic effects of 1-alkyl-3-methylimidazolium nitrate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Occurrence and Diversity of Clinically Important Vibrio Species in the Aquatic Environment of Georgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokashvili, Tamar; Whitehouse, Chris A; Tskhvediani, Ana; Grim, Christopher J; Elbakidze, Tinatin; Mitaishvili, Nino; Janelidze, Nino; Jaiani, Ekaterine; Haley, Bradd J; Lashkhi, Nino; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R; Tediashvili, Marina

    2015-01-01

    Among the more than 70 different Vibrio species inhabiting marine, estuarine, and freshwater ecosystems, 12 are recognized as human pathogens. The warm subtropical climate of the Black Sea coastal area and inland regions of Georgia likely provides a favorable environment for various Vibrio species. From 2006 to 2009, the abundance, ecology, and diversity of clinically important Vibrio species were studied in different locations in Georgia and across seasons. Over a 33-month period, 1,595 presumptive Vibrio isolates were collected from the Black Sea (n = 657) and freshwater lakes around Tbilisi (n = 938). Screening of a subset of 440 concentrated and enriched water samples by PCR-electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS) detected the presence of DNA from eight clinically important Vibrio species: V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, V. vulnificus, V. mimicus, V. alginolyticus, V. harveyi, V. metschnikovii, and V. cincinnatiensis. Almost 90% of PCR/ESI-MS samples positive for Vibrio species were collected from June through November. Three important human-pathogenic Vibrio species (V. cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus, and V. vulnificus) were detected in 62.8, 37.8, and 21.4% of samples testing positive for Vibrios, respectively. The results of these activities suggest that natural reservoirs for human-pathogenic Vibrios exist in Georgian aquatic environments. Water temperature at all sampling sites was positively correlated with the abundance of clinically important Vibrio spp. (except V. metschnikovii), and salinity was correlated with species composition at particular Black Sea sites as well as inland reservoirs.

  6. Saharan dust nutrients promote Vibrio bloom formation in marine surface waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Jason R.; Ebling, Alina M.; Landing, William M.; Joyner, Jessica L.; Kemp, Keri M.; Griffin, Dale W.; Lipp, Erin K.

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio is a ubiquitous genus of marine bacteria, typically comprising a small fraction of the total microbial community in surface waters, but capable of becoming a dominant taxon in response to poorly characterized factors. Iron (Fe), often restricted by limited bioavailability and low external supply, is an essential micronutrient that can limit Vibrio growth. Vibrio species have robust metabolic capabilities and an array of Fe-acquisition mechanisms, and are able to respond rapidly to nutrient influx, yet Vibrio response to environmental pulses of Fe remains uncharacterized. Here we examined the population growth of Vibrioafter natural and simulated pulses of atmospherically transported Saharan dust, an important and episodic source of Fe to tropical marine waters. As a model for opportunistic bacterial heterotrophs, we demonstrated that Vibrio proliferate in response to a broad range of dust-Fe additions at rapid timescales. Within 24 h of exposure, strains of Vibrio cholerae and Vibrio alginolyticus were able to directly use Saharan dust–Fe to support rapid growth. These findings were also confirmed with in situ field studies; arrival of Saharan dust in the Caribbean and subtropical Atlantic coincided with high levels of dissolved Fe, followed by up to a 30-fold increase of culturable Vibrio over background levels within 24 h. The relative abundance of Vibrio increased from ∼1 to ∼20% of the total microbial community. This study, to our knowledge, is the first to describe Vibrio response to Saharan dust nutrients, having implications at the intersection of marine ecology, Fe biogeochemistry, and both human and environmental health.

  7. Vibrio fujianensis sp. nov., isolated from aquaculture water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yujie; Chen, Aiping; Dai, Hang; Huang, Ying; Kan, Biao; Wang, Duochun

    2018-02-13

    A Gram-stain-negative, facultatively anaerobic strain, designated FJ201301 T , was isolated from aquaculture water collected from Fujian province, China. Phylogenetic analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that strain FJ201301 T belonged to the genus Vibrio, formed a distinct cluster with Vibriocincinnatiensis ATCC 35912 T and shared the highest similarity with Vibriosalilacus CGMCC 1.12427 T . A 15 bp insertion found in the 16S rRNA gene was a significant marker that distinguished strain FJ201301 T from several phylogenetic neighbours (e.g. V. cincinnatiensis). Multilocus sequence analysis of eight genes (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA; concatenated 4135 bp sequence) showed that, forming a long and independent phylogenetic branch, strain FJ201301 T clustered with V. cincinnatiensis ATCC 35912 T , Vibrioinjenensis KCTC 32233 T and Vibriometschnikovii CIP 69.14 T clearly separated from V. salilacus CGMCC 1.12427 T . Furthermore, the highest in silico DNA-DNA hybridization and average nucleotide identity values between strain FJ201301 T and the closest related species were 26.3 and 83.1 % with V. cincinnatiensis ATCC 35912 T , less than the proposed cutoff levels for species delineation, i.e. 70 and 95 %, respectively. Biochemical, sequence and genomic analysis suggested the designation of strain FJ201301 T representing a novel species of the genus Vibrio, for which the name Vibrio fujianensis sp. nov. is proposed. The type strain is FJ201301 T (=DSM 104687 T =CGMCC 1.16099 T ).

  8. Quorum Sensing Disruption in Vibrio harveyi Bacteria by Clay Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Sajo P; Scholin, Jonathon; Ching, San; Chi, Fang; Herpfer, Marc

    2018-01-10

    This work describes the use of clay minerals as catalysts for the degradation of quorum sensing molecule N-(3-oxooctanoyl)-dl-homoserine lactone. Certain clay minerals as a result of their surface properties and porosity can catalytically degrade the quorum sensing molecule into smaller fragments. The disruption of quorum sensing by clay in a growing Gram-negative Vibrio harveyi bacteria culture was also studied by monitoring luminescence and population density of the bacteria, wherein quenching of bacterial quorum sensing activity was observed by means of luminescence reduction. The results of this study show that food-grade clays can be used as biocatalysts in disrupting bacterial activity in various media.

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Glycerin on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Doki; Seol, Sung Yong; Tak, Ryunbin; Park, Cheong Kyu

    1972-01-01

    In a study of the effect of glycerin in transport media on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella, it was found that a concentration of 30% glycerin was highly inhibitory for V. parahaemolyticus and to a lesser degree for Salmonella. The incorporation of peptone or human feces in media did not reduce the inhibitory effect of glycerin. In media with 15% glycerin, viable counts of V. parahaemolyticus and Salmonella increased after 24 hr of incubation both in the presence and absence of feces. Due to the concurrent increase in the total bacterial count in the media containing feces, no enrichment effect was noted. PMID:4565633

  10. Application of Reverse Transcriptase-PCR-DGGE as a rapid method for routine determination of Vibrio spp. in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahorm, Kanchana; Prakitchaiwattana, Cheunjit

    2018-01-02

    The aim of this research was to evaluate the feasibility of PCR-DGGE and Reverse Transcriptase-PCR-DGGE techniques for rapid detection of Vibrio species in foods. Primers GC567F and 680R were initially evaluated for amplifying DNA and cDNA of ten references Vibrio species by PCR method. The GC-clamp PCR amplicons were separated according to their sequences by the DGGE using 10% (w/v) polyacrylamide gel containing 45-70% urea and formamide denaturants. Two pair of Vibrio species, which could not be differentiated on the gel, was Vibrio fluvialis - Vibrio furnissii and Vibrio parahaemolyticus - Vibrio harveyi. To determine the detection limit, in the community of 10 reference strains containing the same viable population, distinct DNA bands of 3 species; Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus and Vibrio alginolyticus were consistently observed by PCR-DGGE technique. In fact, 5 species; Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Vibrio alginolyticus, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Vibrio fluvialis consistently observed by Reverse Transcriptase-PCR-DGGE. In the community containing different viable population increasing from 10 2 to 10 5 CFU/mL, PCR-DGGE analysis only detected the two most prevalent species, while RT-PCR-DGGE detected the five most prevalent species. Therefore, Reverse Transcriptase-PCR-DGGE was also selected for detection of various Vibrio cell conditions, including viable cell (VC), injured cells from frozen cultures (IVC) and injured cells from frozen cultures with pre-enrichment (PIVC). It was found that cDNA band of all cell conditions gave the same migratory patterns, except that multiple cDNA bands of Plesiomonas shigelloides under IVC and PIVC conditions were found. When Reverse Transcriptase-PCR-DGGE was used for detecting Vibrio parahaemolyticus in the pathogen-spiked food samples, Vibrio parahaemolyticus could be detected in the spiked samples containing at least 10 2 CFU/g of this pathogen. The results obtained also corresponded to standard method (USFDA, 2004

  11. New insights into Oculina patagonica coral diseases and their associated Vibrio spp. communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio-Portillo, Esther; Yarza, Pablo; Peñalver, Cindy; Ramos-Esplá, Alfonso A; Antón, Josefa

    2014-09-01

    Bleaching of Oculina patagonica has been extensively studied in the Eastern Mediterranean Sea, although no studies have been carried out in the Western basin. In 1996 Vibrio mediterranei was reported as the causative agent of bleaching in O. patagonica but it has not been related to bleached or healthy corals since 2003, suggesting that it was no longer involved in bleaching of O. patagonica. In an attempt to clarify the relationship between Vibrio spp., seawater temperature and coral diseases, as well as to investigate the putative differences between Eastern and Western Mediterranean basins, we have analysed the seasonal patterns of the culturable Vibrio spp. assemblages associated with healthy and diseased O. patagonica colonies. Two sampling points located in the Spanish Mediterranean coast were chosen for this study: Alicante Harbour and the Marine Reserve of Tabarca. A complex and dynamic assemblage of Vibrio spp. was present in O. patagonica along the whole year and under different environmental conditions and coral health status. While some Vibrio spp. were detected all year around in corals, the known pathogens V. mediteranei and V. coralliilyticus were only present in diseased specimens. The pathogenic potential of these bacteria was studied by experimental infection under laboratory conditions. Both vibrios caused diseased signs from 24 °C, being higher and faster at 28 °C. Unexpectedly, the co-inoculation of these two Vibrio species seemed to have a synergistic pathogenic effect over O. patagonica, as disease signs were readily observed at temperatures at which bleaching is not normally observed.

  12. Persistence, seasonal dynamics and pathogenic potential of Vibrio communities from Pacific oyster hemolymph.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendling, Carolin C; Batista, Frederico M; Wegner, K Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Vibrio occur at a continuum from free-living to symbiotic life forms, including opportunists and pathogens, that can contribute to severe diseases, for instance summer mortality events of Pacific oysters Crassostrea gigas. While most studies focused on Vibrio isolated from moribund oysters during mortality outbreaks, investigations of the Vibrio community in healthy oysters are rare. Therefore, we characterized the persistence, diversity, seasonal dynamics, and pathogenicity of the Vibrio community isolated from healthy Pacific oysters. In a reciprocal transplant experiment we repeatedly sampled hemolymph from adult Pacific oysters to differentiate population from site-specific effects during six months of in situ incubation in the field. We characterized virulence phenotypes and genomic diversity based on multilocus sequence typing in a total of 70 Vibrio strains. Based on controlled infection experiments we could show that strains with the ability to colonize healthy adult oysters can also have the potential to induce high mortality rates on larvae. Diversity and abundance of Vibrio varied significantly over time with highest values during and after spawning season. Vibrio communities from transplanted and stationary oysters converged over time, indicating that communities were not population specific, but rather assemble from the surrounding environment forming communities, some of which can persist over longer periods.

  13. Genome analysis of the coral bleaching pathogen Vibrio shiloi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reshef, Leah; Ron, Eliora; Rosenberg, Eugene

    2008-08-01

    The past few decades have seen a world-wide increase in coral diseases, yet little is known about coral pathogens. In this study, techniques commonly used in pathogenomic research were applied to the coral pathogen Vibrio shiloi in order to identify genetic elements involved in its virulence. Suppressive subtractive hybridization was used to compare the gene content of V. shiloi to that of a closely related but non-pathogenic bacterium, Vibrio mediterranei, resulting in identification of several putative virulence factors and of three novel genomic islands. The entire genome of V. shiloi was further screened for genes related to previously characterized steps in infection: adhesion, superoxide dismutase production and toxin production. Exposure of pure cultures of V. shiloi to crushed coral tissues strongly affected the expression of seven genes encoding pili, zona occludins toxin (Zot) and a superoxide dismutase. Analysis of eight V. shiloi strains isolated in the last decade shows a shift of the natural population from strains carrying all three genomic islands to strains carrying none of them. This shift occurred following appearance of resistance in the coral Oculina patagonica to infection by V. shiloi. The relevance of these findings to the bleaching disease caused by V. shiloi is discussed.

  14. Identification and Initial Characterization of Prophages in Vibrio campbellii.

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    Nicola Lorenz

    Full Text Available Phages are bacteria targeting viruses and represent the most abundant biological entities on earth. Marine environments are exceptionally rich in bacteriophages, harboring a total of 4x1030 viruses. Nevertheless, marine phages remain poorly characterized. Here we describe the identification of intact prophage sequences in the genome of the marine γ-proteobacterium Vibrio campbellii ATCC BAA-1116 (formerly known as V. harveyi ATCC BAA-1116, which presumably belong to the family of Myoviridae. One prophage was found on chromosome I and shows significant similarities to the previously identified phage ΦHAP-1. The second prophage region is located on chromosome II and is related to Vibrio phage kappa. Exposure of V. campbellii to mitomycin C induced the lytic cycle of two morphologically distinct phages and, as expected, extracellular DNA from induced cultures was found to be specifically enriched for the sequences previously identified as prophage regions. Heat stress (50°C, 30 min was also found to induce phage release in V. campbellii. Notably, promoter activity of two representative phage genes indicated heterogeneous phage induction within the population.

  15. Vibrio cholerae Represses Polysaccharide Synthesis To Promote Motility in Mucosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhenyu; Wang, Yuning; Liu, Shengyan; Sheng, Ying; Rueggeberg, Karl-Gustav; Wang, Hui; Li, Jie; Gu, Frank X.; Zhong, Zengtao; Kan, Biao

    2015-01-01

    The viscoelastic mucus layer of gastrointestinal tracts is a host defense barrier that a successful enteric pathogen, such as Vibrio cholerae, must circumvent. V. cholerae, the causative agent of cholera, is able to penetrate the mucosa and colonize the epithelial surface of the small intestine. In this study, we found that mucin, the major component of mucus, promoted V. cholerae movement on semisolid medium and in liquid medium. A genome-wide screen revealed that Vibrio polysaccharide (VPS) production was inversely correlated with mucin-enhanced motility. Mucin adhesion assays indicated that VPS bound to mucin. Moreover, we found that vps expression was reduced upon exposure to mucin. In an infant mouse colonization model, mutants that overexpressed VPS colonized less effectively than wild-type strains in more distal intestinal regions. These results suggest that V. cholerae is able to sense mucosal signals and modulate vps expression accordingly so as to promote fast motion in mucus, thus allowing for rapid spread throughout the intestines. PMID:25561707

  16. Invariant recognition of polychromatic images of Vibrio cholerae 01

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Borrego, Josue; Mourino-Perez, Rosa R.; Cristobal, Gabriel; Pech-Pacheco, Jose L.

    2002-04-01

    Cholera is an acute intestinal infectious disease. It has claimed many lives throughout history, and it continues to be a global health threat. Cholera is considered one of the most important emergence diseases due its relation with global climate changes. Automated methods such as optical systems represent a new trend to make more accurate measurements of the presence and quantity of this microorganism in its natural environment. Automatic systems eliminate observer bias and reduce the analysis time. We evaluate the utility of coherent optical systems with invariant correlation for the recognition of Vibrio cholerae O1. Images of scenes are recorded with a CCD camera and decomposed in three RGB channels. A numeric simulation is developed to identify the bacteria in the different samples through an invariant correlation technique. There is no variation when we repeat the correlation and the variation between images correlation is minimum. The position-, scale-, and rotation-invariant recognition is made with a scale transform through the Mellin transform. The algorithm to recognize Vibrio cholerae O1 is the presence of correlation peaks in the green channel output and their absence in red and blue channels. The discrimination criterion is the presence of correlation peaks in red, green, and blue channels.

  17. Antibiotic Resistance of Vibrio cholerae Isolates from Kashan, Iran

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    Afzali H.MD,

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims: Cholera is an acute diarrheal disease that can lead to severe dehydration and death. Antibiotic resistance is a big challenge in infective disease like Cholera. The present study aimed to understand the characteristics and trends of antibiotic resistance of V. cholerae isolations in and around Kashan, Iran. Instrument & Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, samples were gathered using census method from 1998 to 2013 in Kashan, Iran. 1132 fecal samples of patients with acute diarrhea and 237 samples of suspected water samples were taken. The serotypes and biotypes were determined by an enzymatic method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by using Disk Diffusion Method. Data were analyzed using SPSS 23 software. Fisher-exact and Chi-square tests were used to compare the statistical parameters. Findings: 96 fecal samples (8.5% and 18 water samples (7.6% were positive for Vibrio cholerae. Non-agglutinating (Nag isolates (75.4% were more common than serotype Inaba (13.2% and Ogawa (11.4%. Nag serotypes were mostly resistant to cefixime (44% and ampicillin (33%. In contaminated water samples also the most frequent cases were Nag serotype (50%. Nag serotype showed 22.2% of resistance to ampicillin and nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: Vibrio cholerae isolates in Kashan, Iran, are highly resistant to antibiotics, especially Nag serotypes.

  18. Profiling sex-biased gene expression during parthenogenetic reproduction in Daphnia pulex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eads, Brian D; Colbourne, John K; Bohuski, Elizabeth; Andrews, Justen

    2007-12-18

    Sexual reproduction is a core biological function that is conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, yet breeding systems are extremely variable. Genome-wide comparative studies can be effectively used to identify genes and regulatory patterns that are constrained to preserve core functions from those that may help to account for the diversity of animal reproductive strategies. We use a custom microarray to investigate gene expression in males and two reproductive stages of females in the crustacean Daphnia pulex. Most Daphnia species reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis, alternating between sexual and clonal reproduction. Both sex determination and the switch in their mode of reproduction is environmentally induced, making Daphnia an interesting comparative system for the study of sex-biased and reproductive genes. Patterns of gene expression in females and males reveal that 50% of assayed transcripts show some degree of sex-bias. Female-biased transcription is enriched for translation, metabolic and regulatory genes associated with development. Male-biased expression is enriched for cuticle and protease function. Comparison with well studied arthropods such as Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae suggests that female-biased patterns tend to be conserved, whereas male-biased genes are evolving faster in D. pulex. These findings are based on the proportion of female-biased, male-biased, and unbiased genes that share sequence similarity with proteins in other animal genomes. Some transcriptional differences between males and females appear to be conserved across Arthropoda, including the rapid evolution of male-biased genes which is observed in insects and now in a crustacean. Yet, novel patterns of male-biased gene expression are also uncovered. This study is an important first step towards a detailed understanding of the genetic basis and evolution of parthenogenesis, environmental sex determination, and adaptation to aquatic environments.

  19. Mechanisms of Action of Compounds That Enhance Storage Lipid Accumulation in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordão, Rita; Campos, Bruno; Piña, Benjamín; Tauler, Romà; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Barata, Carlos

    2016-12-20

    Accumulation of storage lipids in the crustacean Daphnia magna can be altered by a number of exogenous and endogenous compounds, like 20-hydroxyecdysone (natural ligand of the ecdysone receptor, EcR), methyl farnesoate, pyrirproxyfen (agonists of the methyl farnesoate receptor, MfR), and tributyltin (agonist of the retinoid X acid receptor, RXR). This effect, analogous to the obesogenic disruption in mammals, alters Daphnia's growth and reproductive investment. Here we propose that storage lipid accumulation in droplets is regulated in Daphnia by the interaction between the nuclear receptor heterodimer EcR:RXR and MfR. The model was tested by determining changes in storage lipid accumulation and on gene transcription in animals exposed to different effectors of RXR, EcR, and MfR signaling pathways, either individually or in combination. RXR, EcR, and MfR agonists increased storage lipid accumulation, whereas fenarimol and testosterone (reported inhibitors of ecdysteroid synthesis and an EcR antagonist, respectively) decreased it. Joint effects of mixtures with fenarimol, testosterone, and ecdysone were antagonistic, mixtures of juvenoids showed additive effects following a concentration addition model, and combinations of tributyltin with juvenoids resulted in greater than additive effects. Co-exposures of ecdysone with juvenoids resulted in deregulation of ecdysone- and farnesoid-regulated genes, accordingly with the observed changes in lipid accumulation These results indicate the requirement of ecdysone binding to the EcR:RXR:MfR complex to regulate lipid storage and that an excess of ecdysone disrupts the whole process, probably by triggering negative feedback mechanisms.

  20. Daphnia HR96 is a promiscuous xenobiotic and endobiotic nuclear receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karimullina, Elina [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Institute of Plant and Animal Ecology, Russian Academy of Sciences, Ural Branch, Yekaterinburg 620144 (Russian Federation); Li Yangchun; Ginjupalli, Gautam K. [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Baldwin, William S., E-mail: baldwin@clemson.edu [Environmental Toxicology Program, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Biological Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, SC (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Daphnia pulex is the first crustacean to have its genome sequenced. The genome project provides new insight and data into how an aquatic crustacean may respond to environmental stressors, including toxicants. We cloned Daphnia pulex HR96 (DappuHR96), a nuclear receptor orthologous to the CAR/PXR/VDR group of nuclear receptors. In Drosophila melanogaster, (hormone receptor 96) HR96 responds to phenobarbital exposure and has been hypothesized as a toxicant receptor. Therefore, we set up a transactivation assay to test whether DappuHR96 is a promiscuous receptor activated by xenobiotics and endobiotics similar to the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X-receptor (PXR). Transactivation assays performed with a GAL4-HR96 chimera demonstrate that HR96 is a promiscuous toxicant receptor activated by a diverse set of chemicals such as pesticides, hormones, and fatty acids. Several environmental toxicants activate HR96 including estradiol, pyriproxyfen, chlorpyrifos, atrazine, and methane arsonate. We also observed repression of HR96 activity by chemicals such as triclosan, androstanol, and fluoxetine. Nearly 50% of the chemicals tested activated or inhibited HR96. Interestingly, unsaturated fatty acids were common activators or inhibitors of HR96 activity, indicating a link between diet and toxicant response. The omega-6 and omega-9 unsaturated fatty acids linoleic and oleic acid activated HR96, but the omega-3 unsaturated fatty acids alpha-linolenic acid and docosahexaenoic acid inhibited HR96, suggesting that these two distinct sets of lipids perform opposing roles in Daphnia physiology. This also provides a putative mechanism by which the ratio of dietary unsaturated fats may affect the ability of an organism to respond to a toxic insult. In summary, HR96 is a promiscuous nuclear receptor activated by numerous endo- and xenobiotics.

  1. Gene response profiles for Daphnia pulex exposed to the environmental stressor cadmium reveals novel crustacean metallothioneins

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    Davey Jennifer C

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genomic research tools such as microarrays are proving to be important resources to study the complex regulation of genes that respond to environmental perturbations. A first generation cDNA microarray was developed for the environmental indicator species Daphnia pulex, to identify genes whose regulation is modulated following exposure to the metal stressor cadmium. Our experiments revealed interesting changes in gene transcription that suggest their biological roles and their potentially toxicological features in responding to this important environmental contaminant. Results Our microarray identified genes reported in the literature to be regulated in response to cadmium exposure, suggested functional attributes for genes that share no sequence similarity to proteins in the public databases, and pointed to genes that are likely members of expanded gene families in the Daphnia genome. Genes identified on the microarray also were associated with cadmium induced phenotypes and population-level outcomes that we experimentally determined. A subset of genes regulated in response to cadmium exposure was independently validated using quantitative-realtime (Q-RT-PCR. These microarray studies led to the discovery of three genes coding for the metal detoxication protein metallothionein (MT. The gene structures and predicted translated sequences of D. pulex MTs clearly place them in this gene family. Yet, they share little homology with previously characterized MTs. Conclusion The genomic information obtained from this study represents an important first step in characterizing microarray patterns that may be diagnostic to specific environmental contaminants and give insights into their toxicological mechanisms, while also providing a practical tool for evolutionary, ecological, and toxicological functional gene discovery studies. Advances in Daphnia genomics will enable the further development of this species as a model organism for

  2. Desiccation of rock pool habitats and its influence on population persistence in a Daphnia metacommunity.

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    Florian Altermatt

    Full Text Available Habitat instability has an important influence on species' occurrence and community composition. For freshwater arthropods that occur in ephemeral rock pools, the most drastic habitat instabilities are droughts and the intermittent availability of water. However, although the desiccation of a rock pool is detrimental for planktonic populations, it may also bring certain benefits: the exclusion of predators or parasites, for example, or the coexistence of otherwise competitively exclusive species. The commonness of drought resistant resting stages in many aquatic organisms shows the ecological significance of droughts. We measured daily evaporation in 50 rock pools inhabited by three Daphnia species D. magna, D. longispina and D. pulex over one summer. Daily evaporation and ultimately desiccation showed significantly seasonally influenced correlation with pool surface area, presence of vegetation, ambient temperature, wind and standardized evaporation measures. We used the estimates from this analysis to develop a simulation model to predict changes in the water level in 530 individual pools on a daily basis over a 25-year period. Eventually, hydroperiod lengths and desiccation events could be predicted for all of these rock pools. We independently confirmed the validity of this simulation by surveying desiccation events in the 530 rock pools over a whole season in 2006. In the same 530 rock pools, Daphnia communities had been recorded over the 25 years the simulation model considered. We correlated pool-specific occupation lengths of the three species with pool-specific measures of desiccation risk. Occupation lengths of all three Daphnia species were positively correlated with maximum hydroperiod length and negatively correlated with the number of desiccation events. Surprisingly, these effects were not species-specific.

  3. Profiling sex-biased gene expression during parthenogenetic reproduction in Daphnia pulex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohuski Elizabeth

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual reproduction is a core biological function that is conserved throughout eukaryotic evolution, yet breeding systems are extremely variable. Genome-wide comparative studies can be effectively used to identify genes and regulatory patterns that are constrained to preserve core functions from those that may help to account for the diversity of animal reproductive strategies. We use a custom microarray to investigate gene expression in males and two reproductive stages of females in the crustacean Daphnia pulex. Most Daphnia species reproduce by cyclical parthenogenesis, alternating between sexual and clonal reproduction. Both sex determination and the switch in their mode of reproduction is environmentally induced, making Daphnia an interesting comparative system for the study of sex-biased and reproductive genes. Results Patterns of gene expression in females and males reveal that 50% of assayed transcripts show some degree of sex-bias. Female-biased transcription is enriched for translation, metabolic and regulatory genes associated with development. Male-biased expression is enriched for cuticle and protease function. Comparison with well studied arthropods such as Drosophila melanogaster and Anopheles gambiae suggests that female-biased patterns tend to be conserved, whereas male-biased genes are evolving faster in D. pulex. These findings are based on the proportion of female-biased, male-biased, and unbiased genes that share sequence similarity with proteins in other animal genomes. Conclusion Some transcriptional differences between males and females appear to be conserved across Arthropoda, including the rapid evolution of male-biased genes which is observed in insects and now in a crustacean. Yet, novel patterns of male-biased gene expression are also uncovered. This study is an important first step towards a detailed understanding of the genetic basis and evolution of parthenogenesis, environmental sex

  4. Vibrio japonicus sp. nov., a novel member of the Nereis clade in the genus Vibrio isolated from the coast of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hiroyasu; Osawa, Ikuko; Adachi, Hayamitsu; Kawada, Manabu

    2017-01-01

    A novel Vibrio strain, JCM 31412T, was isolated from seawater collected from the Inland Sea (Setonaikai), Japan, and characterized as a Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, ovoid-shaped bacterium with one polar flagellum. Based on 16S rDNA gene identity, strain JCM 31412T showed a close relationship with type strains of Vibrio brasiliensis (LMG 20546T, 98.2% identity), V. harveyi (NBRC 15634T, 98.2%), V. caribbeanicus (ATCC BAA-2122T, 97.8%) and V. proteolyticus (NBRC 13287T, 97.8%). The G+C content of strain JCM 31412T DNA was 46.8%. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA) of eight loci (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA; 5535bp) further clustered strain JCM 31412T in the Nereis clade, genus Vibrio. Phenotypically, strain JCM 31412T differed from the closest related Vibrio species in its utilization of melibiose and raffinose, and its lack of casein and gelatin hydrolysis. It was further differentiated based on its fatty acid composition, specifically properties of C12:03OH and summed features, which were significantly different from those of V. brasiliensis, V. nigripulchritudo and V. caribbeanicus type strains. Overall, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization, and physiological and biochemical analysis differentiated strain JCM 31412T from other described species of the genus Vibrio. Based on these polyphasic taxonomic findings, it was therefore concluded that JCM 31412T was a novel Vibrio species, for which the name Vibrio japonicus sp. nov. was proposed, with JCM 31412T (= LMG 29636T = ATCC TSD-62T) as the type strain.

  5. Vibrio japonicus sp. nov., a novel member of the Nereis clade in the genus Vibrio isolated from the coast of Japan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyasu Doi

    Full Text Available A novel Vibrio strain, JCM 31412T, was isolated from seawater collected from the Inland Sea (Setonaikai, Japan, and characterized as a Gram-negative, oxidase-positive, catalase-negative, facultatively anaerobic, motile, ovoid-shaped bacterium with one polar flagellum. Based on 16S rDNA gene identity, strain JCM 31412T showed a close relationship with type strains of Vibrio brasiliensis (LMG 20546T, 98.2% identity, V. harveyi (NBRC 15634T, 98.2%, V. caribbeanicus (ATCC BAA-2122T, 97.8% and V. proteolyticus (NBRC 13287T, 97.8%. The G+C content of strain JCM 31412T DNA was 46.8%. Multi-locus sequence analysis (MLSA of eight loci (ftsZ, gapA, gyrB, mreB, pyrH, recA, rpoA and topA; 5535bp further clustered strain JCM 31412T in the Nereis clade, genus Vibrio. Phenotypically, strain JCM 31412T differed from the closest related Vibrio species in its utilization of melibiose and raffinose, and its lack of casein and gelatin hydrolysis. It was further differentiated based on its fatty acid composition, specifically properties of C12:03OH and summed features, which were significantly different from those of V. brasiliensis, V. nigripulchritudo and V. caribbeanicus type strains. Overall, the results of DNA-DNA hybridization, and physiological and biochemical analysis differentiated strain JCM 31412T from other described species of the genus Vibrio. Based on these polyphasic taxonomic findings, it was therefore concluded that JCM 31412T was a novel Vibrio species, for which the name Vibrio japonicus sp. nov. was proposed, with JCM 31412T (= LMG 29636T = ATCC TSD-62T as the type strain.

  6. Occurrence of Vibrio species, beta-lactam resistant Vibrio species, and indicator bacteria in ballast and port waters of a tropical harbor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Charmaine; Goh, Shin Giek; Saeidi, Nazanin; Gerhard, William A; Gunsch, Claudia K; Gin, Karina Yew Hoong

    2018-01-01

    Ballast water discharges are potential sources for the spread of invasive and pathogenic aquatic organisms. Ballast waters from six ships docked in the Port of Singapore were tested to determine if indictor organisms fell within proposed standards for ballast water discharge according to regulation D-2 of the Ballast Water Management Convention (BWMC) guidelines. Vibrio species were cultured on media supplemented with beta-lactam antibiotics to determine the presence of antibiotic resistant Vibrio species in the ballast waters of these vessels. Indicator organisms were quantified using culture media Colilert-18 and Enterolert in ballast waters of six ships docked in a tropical harbor, with uptake from different geographical locations. Of the six ships, one had ballast water originating from the Persian Gulf, another from the East China Sea, and four from the South China Sea. Two of the six ships which carried ballast waters from the East China Sea and the South China Sea did not meet the D-2 stipulated requirements of the Ballast Water Management Convention for indicator organisms with Enterococci values more than three times higher than the acceptable limit of 110 MPN/100mL), and Vibrio parahaemolyticus (2 to >110 MPN/100mL) were detected in at least one of six ballast water samples. Using thiosulfate-citrate-bile salts-sucrose agar (TCBS) supplemented with beta-lactam antibiotics (meropenem, ceftazidime), 11 different Vibrio species, exhibiting resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics were isolated; with Vibrio campbellii (44%) and Vibrio alginolyticus (15%) the most detected antibiotic resistant Vibrio species. A practical approach of prioritized screening of high-risk vessels should be conducted to ensure that the water quality meets D-2 standards prior to discharge. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Antimicrobial effect of dietary oregano essential oil against Vibrio bacteria in shrimps

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    Gracia-Valenzuela M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of dietary oregano essential oils on the growth of Vibrio bacteria in shrimps was evaluated. Shrimps were fed: (i food with oregano oil with a high level of thymol; (ii food with oregano oil with a high level of carvacrol, and (iii food without oregano oil (the control. The animals were infected by three species of Vibrio (vulnificus, parahaemolyticus and cholerae. The microbial counts of Vibrio species were significantly lower (p <0.05 in tissues from animals whose food was supplemented with oregano oil. We concluded that dietary supplementation of shrimps with oregano oil provides antimicrobial activity into the body of the penaeids.

  8. Proteolytic inactivation of luciferases from three species of luminous marine bacteria, Beneckea harveyi, Photobacterium fischeri, and Photobacterium phosphoreum: evidence of a conserved structural feature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzman, T F; Baldwin, T O

    1980-01-01

    Upon limited proteolysis of luciferases from the luminous marine bacteria Photobacterium fischeri, Photobacterium phosphoreum, and Beneckea harveyi, the rate of loss of luciferase activity is the same as the rate of loss of the heavier subunit of all three enzymes. It thus appears that the larger subunit of the luciferase from P. phosphoreum should be designated alpha based on its apparent homology with the alpha subunits of the luciferases from B. harveyi and P. fischeri. The luciferase from B. harveyi is more sensitive to chymotrypsin than to trypsin; the luciferases of the Photobacterium species are more sensitive to trypsin than to chymotrypsin. Proteolytic inactivation of all three luciferases results from hydrolysis of a few peptide bonds in the alpha subunit; the proteolytic fragments from the three luciferases in 0.50 M phosphate are approximately the same size, indicating that the three enzymes have a protease-labile region at about the same position in the primary structure of their alpha subunits. Phosphate stabilizes all three luciferases against inactivation by proteases. Formation and degradation of intermediate species derived from the alpha subunits are readily observable in all three luciferases. Phosphate alters both the rate of product formation and the sites of peptide bond scission. The beta subunits of the luciferases from the two Photobacterium species, unlike the enzyme of B. harveyi, appear to be degraded in buffers containing low concentrations of phosphate; in high-phosphate buffers, the beta subunits of all three luciferases appear to resist proteases. Analysis of native and chymotrypsin-inactivated P. fischeri and P. phosphoreum luciferases in the analytical ultracentrifuge indicates that, as with B. harveyi luciferase, the products of limited proteolysis do not dissociate under nondenaturing conditions. The fact that the luciferases from evolutionarily diverse species of luminous bacteria have protease-sensitive bonds in the same

  9. The behavior of a Daphnia pulex transposable element in cyclically and obligately parthenogenetic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullender, B W; Crease, T J

    2001-07-01

    Using Southern blot analysis, we have characterized restriction fragment patterns of a transposable element. Pokey, in obligately and cyclically parthenogenetic populations of the cladoceran crustacean Daphnia pulex. We show that the element is most likely active in cyclically parthenogenetic populations but is, for the most part, inactive in obligate parthenogens. This result is consistent with theory suggesting that transposable element dynamics are likely to change with a change in reproductive mode. Such changes could have important consequences for the long-term evolutionary potential of obligate parthenogens and may also be informative with regard to the underlying mechanisms that regulate transposable element frequencies in sexual organisms.

  10. Influences of the coating on silver nanoparticle toxicity in a chronic test with Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakka, Y.; Mackevica, Aiga; Skjolding, Lars Michael

    2015-01-01

    Sources for differences in silver nanoparticle toxicity at standardized conditions can be numerous. They range from particle properties and their actual concentrations to differences in uptake or depuration by the test organisms. In the present study we compared the toxicity of two differently...... coated AgNP in a chronic Daphnia test. One type of AgNP was coated with citrate (cAgNP), the other AgNP were generally uncoated (pAgNP; p= pure), but sterically stabilized by an organic dispersant. Particles with a similar shape and diameter were chosen. The focus of the study was to relate observed...

  11. Secreted protein eco-corona mediates uptake and impacts of polystyrene nanoparticles on Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasser, Fatima; Lynch, Iseult

    2016-03-30

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are defined as having at least one external dimension between 1 and 100 nm. Due to their small size, NPs have a large surface area to volume ratio giving them unique characteristics that differ from bulk material of the same chemical composition. As a result these novel materials have found numerous applications in medical and industrial fields with the result that environmental exposure to NPs is increasingly likely. Similarly, increased reliance on plastic, which degrades extremely slowly in the environment, is resulting in increased accumulation of micro-/nano-plastics in fresh and marine waters, whose ecotoxicological impacts are as yet poorly understood. Although NPs are well known to adsorb macromolecules from their environment, forming a biomolecule corona which changes the NP identity and how it interacts with organisms, significantly less research has been performed on the ecological corona (eco-corona). Secretion of biomolecules is a well established predator-prey response in aquatic food chains, raising the question of whether NPs interact with secreted proteins, and the impact of such interaction on NP uptake and ecotoxicity. We report here initial studies, including optimisation of protocols using carboxylic-acid and amino modified spherical polystyrene NPs, to assess interaction of NPs with biomolecules secreted by Daphnia magna and the impact of these interactions on NP uptake, retention and toxicity towards Daphnia magna. Daphnia magna are an important environmental indicator species who may be especially sensitive to nanoparticles (NPs) as a result of being filter-feeders. This paper demonstrates for the first time that proteins released by Daphnia magna create an eco-corona around polystyrene NPs which causes heightened uptake of the NPs and consequently increases toxicity. The secreted protein eco-corona also causes the NPs to be less efficiently removed from the gut of D. magna and NPs remaining in the gut of D. magna

  12. Trans-generational effects of parental exposure to ionizing radiation in Daphnia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarapultseva, Elena I. [Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering National Research Nuclear University ' MEPhI' - INPE NRNU MEPhI, Studgorodok,1, Obninsk, Kaluga region, 249040 (Russian Federation)

    2014-07-01

    We are currently studying the direct and trans-generational effects of exposure to ionizing radiation on fecundity and reproductive success of the exposed Daphnia magna and their non-exposed progeny. As the long-term survival of species strongly depends on the individual fertility and survival of their offspring, changes in the reproductive process are regarded as one of the most significant sub-lethal effects of environmental pollution. We have recently shown that?-irradiation at doses of 100 and 1000 mGy significantly compromised fecundity and reproductive success of the directly exposed D. magna and their non-exposed first-generation offspring. We have also observed the decrease in the size of the irradiated Daphnia. These effects were also observed among the non-exposed first-generation progeny of irradiated parents, thus implying the manifestation of trans-generational effects in Daphnia. As the compromised fertility was observed among majority of the offspring of irradiated parents, it cannot be attributed to segregation of deleterious mutations induced in the germ line of irradiated parents and is most likely underlined by epigenetic mechanisms. The results of our study also provide further support for the hypothesis of non-targeted effects of ionizing radiation. We have recently shown that compromised viability of irradiated D. magna can be attributed cytotoxic effects of irradiation. Our results suggest that the observed cytotoxic effects are mostly attributed to substantially elevated levels of free-radicals detected in the irradiated parents and their first-generation offspring. It would therefore appear that the compromised viability may be attributed to the cytotoxic effects resulted from epigenetic changes affecting some metabolic pathways involved in detoxification of free-radicals. Additionally we have analyzed more distant progeny of irradiated in doses of 100 and 1000 mGy Daphnia. Some potential mechanisms underlying non-targeted effects

  13. Biotest- and chemistry-based hazard assessment of soils, sediments and solid wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pollumaa, L.; Kahru, A. [National Inst. of Chemical Physics and Biophysics, Tallinn (Estonia); Manusadzianas, L. [Inst. of Botany, Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2004-07-01

    The aim of the current study was (1) to compare the ecotoxicity and chemistry-based environmental evaluations for 27 solid-phase environmental samples (soils, sediments, solid wastes); (2) to suggest the battery of biotests for the screening of water-extracted toxicity. 14 soils, 9 sediments and 4 oil-shale industry solid waste samples from Estonia and Lithuania were analyzed for the concentration of total PAHs, heavy metals, oil products and water-extracted phenols. The pollution level was evaluated by comparison of measured concentrations with Estonian permitted limit values in residential (PLV{sub r}) and industrial (PLV{sub i}) areas for each key pollutant. A battery of 8 aquatic toxicity tests was applied for the analysis of aqueous extracts (L/S=3) of samples: tests with microalgae Selenastrum capricornutum, macroalgae Nitellopsis obtusa, protozoa Tetrahymena thermophila, crustaceans Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus, rotifers Brachionus calyciflorus and photobacteria Vibrio fischeri. Particle-bound bioavailable toxicity was evaluated using a kinetic photobacterial assay with Vibrio fischeri (Solid-Phase Flash-Assay). The toxicity data were evaluated by MaxTox index (highest toxic signal of the battery). Results. Chemical evaluation and toxicological evaluation pointed to the same direction in half of the cases (13/27): 5 samples (including 2 presumably clean control soils) proved harmless and 8 hazardous to environment in case of both evaluations. However, there was a disagreement between chemical and toxicological evaluations for the rest of the samples (14/27). In two mismatching cases (soils from the territory of former gasoline stations) the level of oil products exceeded the PLV{sub r}, but no toxicity was detected, most probably due to the low bioavailability of aged pollutants. The results of this study show the necessity of biotesting in environmental risk assessment to avoid the falsenegative results that may result in harmful effects for

  14. Salinity-induced survival strategy of Vibrio cholerae associated with copepods in Cochin backwaters

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Thomas, K.U.; Joseph, N.; Raveendran, O.; Nair, S.

    The occurrence of Vibrio cholerae in water, sediment and copepods was studied over a wide range of salinity using conventional and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques in the Cochin backwaters. V. cholerae occurred either as culturable or non-culturable...

  15. Competitive Survival of Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella dysenteriae in Riverbed Sediments

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abia, AL

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available investigated the survival of Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium, Vibrio cholerae and Shigella dysenteriae in riverbed sediments of the Apies River. Experiments were performed in flow chambers containing three sediment types and connected...

  16. Corrosion of mild steel and stainless steel by marine Vibrio sp.

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    PrabhaDevi; Wagh, A.B.

    Microbially induced corrosion (MIC) of stainless steel and mild steel coupons exposed to media with and without a bacterial culture Vibrio sp. was studied using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Pitting type of corrosion was noticed which was more...

  17. Vibrio cholerae Detection in Water and Wastewater by Polymerase Chain Reaction Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behnaz Barzamini

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vibrio cholerae is a significant human pathogen worldwide and annually causes some cases of deaths. Contaminated water plays an important role in transmission of this pathogen, which indicates the importance of early diagnosis. Objectives: The current study aimed to perform Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR on water and wastewater samples to determine the detection limit for Vibrio cholerae. Materials and Methods: PCR was performed on the DNA extracted from Vibrio cholerae of the contaminated water and wastewater using ctxA gene specific primers. The accuracy of PCR method to detect these bacteria was also assessed. Results: The result of PCR performed on the extracted DNA showed a specific 241 base pair band. The limit of bacterial detection for water and wastewater were 40 cfu/mL and 81 cfu/mL, respectively. Conclusions: In the current study, PCR performance using the ctxA gene specific primers to detect Vibrio cholerae was found highly accurate and specific.

  18. Genome sequence of vibrio cholerae G4222, a South African clinical isolate

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Le Rouw, Wouter J

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Vibrio cholerae, a Gram-negative pathogen autochthonous to the aquatic environment, is the causative agent of cholera. Here, we report the complete genome sequence of V. cholerae G4222, a clinical isolate from South Africa....

  19. Chronic toxicity of hydrogen peroxide to Daphnia magna in a continuous exposure, flow-through test system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinertz, J.R.; Greseth, Shari L.; Gaikowski, M.P.; Schmidt, L.J.

    2008-01-01

    A flow-through, continuous exposure test system was developed to expose Daphnia magna to an unstable compound. 35% Perox-Aid?? is a specially formulated hydrogen peroxide (a highly oxidative chemical) product approved for use in U.S. aquaculture and therefore has the potential to be released from aquaculture facilities and pose a risk to aquatic invertebrates. The study objective was to assess the effects of 35% Perox-Aid?? on an aquatic invertebrate by evaluating the survival, growth, production, and gender ratio of progeny from a representative aquatic invertebrate continuously exposed to 35% Perox-Aid??. The study design consisted of 6 treatment groups (10 test chambers each) with target hydrogen peroxide concentrations of 0.0, 0.32, 0.63, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0??mg L- 1. The study was initiated with effect on Daphnia time to death compared to controls and no significant effect on the time to first brood production and the number of broods produced. Concentrations ??? 0.63??mg L- 1 had no significant effect on the total number of young produced. Concentrations ??? 0.32??mg L- 1 had a negative effect on Daphnia growth. Hydrogen peroxide had no significant effect on the gender ratio of young produced. All second generation Daphnia were female. A continuous discharge of hydrogen peroxide into aquatic ecosystems is not likely to affect cladocerans if the concentration is maintained at ??? 0.63??mg L- 1 for less than 21??days.

  20. Is the fatty acid composition of Daphnia galeata determined by the fatty acid composition of the ingested diet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weers, P.M.M.; Siewertsen, K.; Gulati, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    1. The fatty acid (FA) composition of Daphnia galeata and their algal food was analysed and showed many similarities, however, some significant differences were also found in the relative abundance of the FA C16:4 omega 3 and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA). Their relative abundances were much lower in

  1. Combined and single effects of pesticide carbaryl and toxic Microcystis aeruginosa on the life history of Daphnia pulicaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerbin, S.; Kraak, M.H.S.; De Voogt, P.; Visser, P.M.; Van Donk, E.

    2010-01-01

    The combined influence of a pesticide (carbaryl) and a cyanotoxin (microcystin LR) on the life history of Daphnia pulicaria was investigated. At the beginning of the experiments animals were pulse exposed to carbaryl for 24 h and microcystins were delivered bound in Microcystis’ cells at different,

  2. Combined and single effects of pesticide carbaryl and toxic microcystis aeruginosa on the life history of Daphnia pulicaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerbin, S.; Kraak, M.H.S.; de Voogt, P.; Visser, P.M.; van Donk, E.

    2010-01-01

    The combined influence of a pesticide (carbaryl) and a cyanotoxin (microcystin LR) on the life history of Daphnia pulicaria was investigated. At the beginning of the experiments animals were pulse exposed to carbaryl for 24 h and microcystins were delivered bound in Microcystis’ cells at different,

  3. Life history response of Daphnia magna to a mixotrophic golden alga, Poterioochromonas sp., at different food levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Xue; Hu, Hong-Ying; Perlt, Trine Warming

    2011-01-01

    The toxicity of Poterioochromonas to Daphnia magna was investigated at different food (Scenedesmus acutus) levels. Poterioochromonas alone of 0.4–20 mg C L-1 was not acutely toxic to D. magna, but did not support D. magna growth, either. When fed mixed diets (2 mg C L-1 in total), D. magna...

  4. Effect of the addition of polyunsaturated fatty acids to the diet on the growth and fecundity of Daphnia galeata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weers, P.M.M.; Gulati, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    1. The importance of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), in particular eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), for the growth and development of Daphnia galeata (Sars) was tested using food types differing in PUFA and EPA contents. 2. Life history experiments of D. galeata fed with the

  5. Sensitivity of Costa Rica's native cladoceran Daphnia ambigua and Simocephalus serrulatus to the organophosphate pesticide ethoprophos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Andrés, María; Torres, Freylan Mena; Vargas, Seiling; Solano, Karla

    2014-01-01

    The study of pesticide toxicity in aquatic environments is assessed with ecotoxicological tests and most research has been performed using species from temperate regions. In the present study, series of acute (48 hrs) toxicity tests to compare the sensibility of two indigenous cladocera of Costa Rica and two reference species were used in temperate regions to the organophosphate pesticide, Ethoprophos. Additionally, reproduction tests using S. serrulatus with sub lethal concentrations of ethoprophos and a control were assayed to check its sensitivity over a longer period exposure. The sensitivity of Costa Rica's native species Daphnia ambigua (EC50 48 hr: 12.9 +/- 3.0 microg(l(-1)) and Simocephalus serrulatus (10.6 +/- 2.1 microg l(-1)) to ethoprophos were higher (p < 0.05) when compared to the exotic species Daphnia magna (289.8 +/- 77.4 microg l(-1)), and were comparable to that of the more widely distributed species, Ceriodaphnia dubia (18.2 +/- 5.2 microg l(-1)). No effect on S. serrulatus reproduction was observed at concentrations between 1 and 4 microg l(-1). This study provides information that can be considered in the selection of species for ecosystem studies of pesticide toxicity in neotropical regions.

  6. Maladaptation to Acute Metal Exposure in Resurrected Daphnia ambigua Clones after Decades of Increasing Contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogalski, Mary Alta

    2017-04-01

    Human environmental impacts have driven some of the strongest and fastest phenotypic changes recorded in wild animal populations. Across populations, this variation is often adaptive, because populations evolve fitness advantages in response to human-modified environments. Yet some populations fail to adapt to changing environments. Evidenced by declines in relative fitness, such seemingly maladaptive outcomes are less common but may be more likely in human-modified contexts. Further, our ability to investigate the dynamics of these adaptive and maladaptive responses over time is typically limited in natural systems. I combined resurrection ecology and paleolimnology approaches to examine evolutionary responses of the freshwater zooplankter Daphnia to exposure to heavy metal contamination over the past 50-75 years, using animals hatched from diapausing egg banks. In contrast to the predicted trend of adaptation to metal exposure over time, I observed an increase in sensitivity to both copper and cadmium exposure associated with increasing historic contamination. This potentially maladaptive trend occurred in Daphnia populations in three lakes. Given that the release of toxicants such as heavy metals is widespread and that other researchers have observed local maladaptation to toxicant exposure, it is important to understand the drivers and implications of this pattern.

  7. Effects of a cyanobacterial bloom sample containing microcystin-LR on the ecophysiology of Daphnia similis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Natalia; Palacio, Jaime; Echeverri, Fernando; Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio

    2014-01-01

    Cyanobacterial blooms can affect a wide range of aquatic organisms due to the presence of toxic compounds. However, no study so far has shown the effects of natural blooms samples on the physiological parameters related to the ecology of Daphnia. In this study we used a natural bloom sample obtained from a reservoir in Colombia to evaluate its effects on five parameters related to Daphnia's feeding behavior, swimming movements and physiology: second antennae movement (swimming), mandible movement (feeding), thoracic appendages (feeding), postabdomen movement (rejection of food particles) and heart rate (physiology). The results revealed significant changes in all parameters evaluated at two different concentrations of aqueous extracts of the bloom: second antennae movements increased significantly and there were significant reductions in mandibular movements, thoracic movements and heart rate. Although postabdominal movements showed high variability with no distinctive pattern between control and treatments, the reduction in the other parameters (such as heart rate over time) could possibly reflect an intoxication by microcystins or a behavioral response (e.g., feeding inhibition).

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Assembly and Sex-Biased Gene Expression in the Cyclical Parthenogenetic Daphnia galeata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huylmans, Ann Kathrin; López Ezquerra, Alberto; Parsch, John; Cordellier, Mathilde

    2016-10-23

    Daphnia species have become models for ecological genomics and exhibit interesting features, such as high phenotypic plasticity and a densely packed genome with many lineage-specific genes. They are also cyclic parthenogenetic, with alternating asexual and sexual cycles and environmental sex determination. Here, we present a de novo transcriptome assembly of over 32,000 D. galeata genes and use it to investigate gene expression in females and spontaneously produced males of two clonal lines derived from lakes in Germany and the Czech Republic. We find that only a low percentage (18%) of genes shows sex-biased expression and that there are many more female-biased gene (FBG) than male-biased gene (MBG). Furthermore, FBGs tend to be more conserved between species than MBGs in both sequence and expression. These patterns may be a consequence of cyclic parthenogenesis leading to a relaxation of purifying selection on MBGs. The two clonal lines show considerable differences in both number and identity of sex-biased genes, suggesting that they may have reproductive strategies differing in their investment in sexual reproduction. Orthologs of key genes in the sex determination and juvenile hormone pathways, which are thought to be important for the transition from asexual to sexual reproduction, are present in D. galeata and highly conserved among Daphnia species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  9. Effects of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii (cyanobacteria) on the swimming behavior of Daphnia (cladocera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio S; Soares, Maria Carolina S; Lima, Ramon S; Magalhães, Valeria F

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to test the effects of raw water samples from a eutrophic reservoir and of a saxitoxin-producing strain of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii on the swimming behavior of 2 key herbivore species of Daphnia. Two complementary approaches were used, acute bioassays and behavioral assays using an automated movement tracking system for measuring the following activity parameters: swimming time, resting time, distance traveled, and mean velocity. In both assays, animals were exposed to field samples or to toxic filaments in different concentrations and observed for 2 h to 3 h. In the acute bioassays, there was a decrease in the number of swimming individuals during the exposure period and a recovery following removal from toxic algae. A significant relationship was found between median effective concentration and the saxitoxin content of seston (r(2)  = 0.998; p = 0.025) in the acute bioassays with raw water samples. Behavioral assays also showed significant effects in the activity parameters with both field samples and the strain of C. raciborskii, with some recovery during the exposure period. Both approaches corroborated previous research on the effects of neurotoxic C. raciborskii on the swimming activity of Daphnia, and these effects are compatible with the mechanism of action of saxitoxins. The present study showed that activity parameters of aquatic organisms may be a useful tool in the evaluation of sublethal toxicity and detection of neurotoxins in raw water. © 2013 SETAC.

  10. Systems biology meets stress ecology: linking molecular and organismal stress responses in Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Sibly, Richard M; Connon, Richard; Hooper, Helen L; Hutchinson, Thomas H; Maund, Steve J; Hill, Christopher J; Bouetard, Anthony; Callaghan, Amanda

    2008-01-01

    Ibuprofen and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been designed to interrupt eicosanoid metabolism in mammals, but little is known of how they affect nontarget organisms. Here we report a systems biology study that simultaneously describes the transcriptomic and phenotypic stress responses of the model crustacean Daphnia magna after exposure to ibuprofen. Our findings reveal intriguing similarities in the mode of action of ibuprofen between vertebrates and invertebrates, and they suggest that ibuprofen has a targeted impact on reproduction at the molecular, organismal, and population level in daphnids. Microarray expression and temporal real-time quantitative PCR profiles of key genes suggest early ibuprofen interruption of crustacean eicosanoid metabolism, which appears to disrupt signal transduction affecting juvenile hormone metabolism and oogenesis. Combining molecular and organismal stress responses provides a guide to possible chronic consequences of environmental stress for population health. This could improve current environmental risk assessment by providing an early indication of the need for higher tier testing. Our study demonstrates the advantages of a systems approach to stress ecology, in which Daphnia will probably play a major role.

  11. Effects of a cyanobacterial bloom sample containing microcystin-LR on the ecophysiology of Daphnia similis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Herrera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacterial blooms can affect a wide range of aquatic organisms due to the presence of toxic compounds. However, no study so far has shown the effects of natural blooms samples on the physiological parameters related to the ecology of Daphnia. In this study we used a natural bloom sample obtained from a reservoir in Colombia to evaluate its effects on five parameters related to Daphnia's feeding behavior, swimming movements and physiology: second antennae movement (swimming, mandible movement (feeding, thoracic appendages (feeding, postabdomen movement (rejection of food particles and heart rate (physiology. The results revealed significant changes in all parameters evaluated at two different concentrations of aqueous extracts of the bloom: second antennae movements increased significantly and there were significant reductions in mandibular movements, thoracic movements and heart rate. Although postabdominal movements showed high variability with no distinctive pattern between control and treatments, the reduction in the other parameters (such as heart rate over time could possibly reflect an intoxication by microcystins or a behavioral response (e.g., feeding inhibition.

  12. Ecotoxicity of TiO2 to Daphnia similis under irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcone, Glauciene P S; Oliveira, Adria C; Almeida, Gilberto; Umbuzeiro, Gisela A; Jardim, Wilson F

    2012-04-15

    Currently, there are a large number of products (sunscreen, pigments, cosmetics, plastics, toothpastes and photocatalysts) that use TiO(2) nanoparticles. Due to this large production, these nanoparticles can be released into the aquatic, terrestrial and aerial environments at relative high concentration. TiO(2) in natural water has the capacity to harm aquatic organisms such as the Daphnia (Cladocera) species, mainly because the photocatalytic properties of this semiconductor. However, very few toxicity tests of TiO(2) nanoparticles have been conducted under irradiation. The aim of this study was to evaluate anatase and rutile TiO(2) toxicity to Daphnia similis exploring their photocatalytic properties by incorporating UV A and visible radiation as a parameter in the assays. Anatase and rutile TiO(2) samples at the highest concentration tested (100 mg L(-1)) were not toxic to D. similis, neither in the dark nor under visible light conditions. The anatase form and a mixture of anatase and rutile, when illuminated by a UV A black light with a peak emission wavelength of 360 nm, presented photo-dependent EC50 values of 56.9-7.8 mg L(-1), which indicates a toxicity mechanism caused by ROS (reactive oxygen species) generation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Global cytosine methylation in Daphnia magna depends on genotype, environment, and their interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asselman, Jana; De Coninck, Dieter I M; Vandegehuchte, Michiel B; Jansen, Mieke; Decaestecker, Ellen; De Meester, Luc; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Janssen, Colin R; De Schamphelaere, Karel A C

    2015-05-01

    The authors characterized global cytosine methylation levels in 2 different genotypes of the ecotoxicological model organism Daphnia magna after exposure to a wide array of biotic and abiotic environmental stressors. The present study aimed to improve the authors' understanding of the role of cytosine methylation in the organism's response to environmental conditions. The authors observed a significant genotype effect, an environment effect, and a genotype × environment effect. In particular, global cytosine methylation levels were significantly altered after exposure to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, and sodium chloride compared with control conditions. Significant differences between the 2 genotypes were observed when animals were exposed to Triops predation cues, Microcystis, Cryptomonas, and sodium chloride. Despite the low global methylation rate under control conditions (0.49-0.52%), global cytosine methylation levels upon exposure to Triops demonstrated a 5-fold difference between the genotypes (0.21% vs 1.02%). No effects were found in response to arsenic, cadmium, fish, lead, pH of 5.5, pH of 8, temperature, hypoxia, and white fat cell disease. The authors' results point to the potential role of epigenetic effects under changing environmental conditions such as predation (i.e., Triops), diet (i.e., Cryptomonas and Microcystis), and salinity. The results of the present study indicate that, despite global cytosine methylation levels being low, epigenetic effects may be important in environmental studies on Daphnia. © 2015 SETAC.

  14. UV-Stressed Daphnia pulex Increase Fitness through Uptake of Vitamin D3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connelly, Sandra J; Walling, Kelly; Wilbert, Steven A; Catlin, Diane M; Monaghan, Cailin E; Hlynchuk, Sofiya; Meehl, Pamela G; Resch, Lauren N; Carrera, J Valerie; Bowles, Stephanie M; Clark, Michael D; Tan, Loraine T; Cody, Jeremy A

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is known to be highly variable in aquatic ecosystems. It has been suggested that UV-exposed organisms may demonstrate enough phenotypic plasticity to maintain the relative fitness of natural populations. Our long-term objective is to determine the potential photoprotective effect of vitamin D3 on Daphnia pulex exposed to acute or chronic UV radiation. Herein we report our initial findings in this endeavor. D. pulex survival and reproduction (fitness) was monitored for 5 d as a proof of concept study. Significantly higher fitness was observed in the D. pulex with D3 than those without (most extreme effects observed were 0% survival in the absence of D3 and 100% with 10 ppm D3). Vitamin D3 was isolated from the culture media, the algal food (Pseudokirchneriella), and the D. pulex and quantified using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Vitamin D3 was fluorescently labeled using a phenothiazinium dye and added to cultures of D. pulex. Images demonstrating the uptake of D3 into the tissues and carapace of the D. pulex were acquired. Our initial findings suggest a positive role for D3 in ecosystems as both UV-stressed algae and Daphnia sequester D3, and D. pulex demonstrate increased fitness in the presence of D3.

  15. The Toxicity of Mustard and Mustard Lewisite to Terrestrial Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-09-24

    sensitivity of Vibrio fischeri to HD and HL was evaluated by testing the 1000 mg!L stock solutions immediately after preparation, to reduce loss of the...enumeration. An attempt was made to expose Vibrio fischeri directly to HD so that exposure to products of rapid hydrolysis could be avoided, by adding...loss of compounds by hydrolysis. Despite apparent insolubility of the products in water, both HD and HL were toxic to Vibrio fischeri . HD toxicity

  16. Oxidation/Biodegradation of Solid Propellants From a 4.2-Inch Chemical Round

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-16

    Microtox (MTX) assay. The MICROTOX assay exposes a bioluminescent marine bacterium ( Vibrio fischeri ) to a sample of unknown toxicity and measuring the...the Microtox values indicates a decrease in the toxicity of the propellant feed to the Vibrio fischeri . This data can be used, as an indicator as to...not only non-toxic but has become nutritive to Vibrio fischeri . The overall effectiveness of the strategy 1 approach for both propellant types

  17. Symbiosis in Marine Luminous Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    1992) Detection of the light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri in Hawaiian seawater using lux gene probes. Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 58:942-947. 3. Lee, K...H., and E.G. Ruby (1993) Evidence of viable but non-culturable symbiotic Vibrio fischeri in Hawaiian seawater. Abstr. Gen. Meet. Amer. Soc...Microbiol. 93:258. 4. Lee, K.-H., and E.G. Ruby. Competition between Vibrio fischeri strains during initiation and maintenance of a light organ symbiosis. (in

  18. Prevalence and Antimicrobial Resistance of Vibrio spp. in Retail and Farm Shrimps in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sperling, L; Alter, T; Huehn, S

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Vibrio spp. in shrimp at retail and in shrimp farms in Ecuador and to determine the antimicrobial agent resistance patterns of farm isolates. The presence of genes linked to early mortality syndrome (EMS) or acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease (AHPND) also was evaluated. Vibrio spp. were isolated from retail shrimps in Cuenca, Ecuador, and farm shrimps originating from provinces El Oro and Guayas, Ecuador. A total of 229 shrimp samples were collected, of which 71 originated from retail markets in Cuenca and 158 came from shrimp farms. Overall, 219 (95.6%) samples tested positive for Vibrio spp. Vibrio parahaemolyticus (80.8%) was the most common species detected, followed by Vibrio alginolyticus (50.2%), Vibrio cholerae (11.3%), and Vibrio vulnificus (3.5%). None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the virulence-associated tdh and trh genes. In V. parahaemolyticus shrimp farm isolates, high resistance was found to ampicillin (92.2%), and intermediate resistance was found to tetracycline (51.3%) and amikacin (22.1%). Of the V. parahaemolyticus strains, 68 were resistant to at least three antimicrobial agents, and 2 were resistant to seven antimicrobial agents simultaneously. Up to 18 resistant isolates were found for V. alginolyticus, whereas V. vulnificus and V. cholerae isolates were more susceptible. None of the V. parahaemolyticus isolates carried the EMS-AHPND plasmid. The results of this study revealed the ubiquitous occurrence of Vibrio spp. in shrimps at retail and on shrimp farms in Ecuador.

  19. Prevalence and diversity of Aeromonas and Vibrio spp. in coastal waters of Southern Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dumontet, S.; Krovacek, K.; Svenson, S.B.

    2000-01-01

    % of samples were positive for Vibrio spp. It was interesting to note that 38% of the positive stations for both Aeromonas and Vibrio spp. showed a fecal coliform contamination of water at ... coliforms) do not always satisfactorily reflect the hygienic quality of water. The presence of Vibrionaceae on copepods was also investigated. Copepods were sampled at a station located inside the harbour of the city of Naples and were found contaminated by V. cholerae non-Ol, V. alginolyticus, V. fluvialis...

  20. Multiple Antibiotic Resistances of Vibrio Isolates from Coastal and Brackish Water Areas

    OpenAIRE

    S. Manjusha; G. B. Sarita; K. K. Elyas; Chandrasekaran, M.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment was designed to assess the occurrence of multiple antibiotic resistances in Vibrio spp. from different (brackish and marine) environments. Water samples from nine marine landing sites and two coastal inland aquaculture farms were screened for the Vibrio spp. and assessed their resistance to twenty-two different antibiotics, which are commonly encountered in the aquatic ecosystem. Tissue samples (shrimp, mussel and sepia) were tested from the sampling site wit...