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Sample records for vibrationally excited rotationally

  1. Vibrational-rotational excitation: chemical reactions of vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, C.B.; Smith, I.W.M.

    1979-03-01

    This review considers a limited number of systems, particularly gas-phase processes. Excited states and their preparation, direct bimolecular reactions, reactions of highly excited molecules, and reactions in condensed phases are discussed. Laser-induced isotope separation applications are mentioned briefly. 109 references

  2. Vibrational motions in rotating nuclei studied by Coulomb excitations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Yoshifumi R [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1998-03-01

    As is well-known Coulomb excitation is an excellent tool to study the nuclear collective motions. Especially the vibrational excitations in rotating nuclei, which are rather difficult to access by usual heavy-ion fusion reactions, can be investigated in detail. Combined with the famous 8{pi}-Spectrometer, which was one of the best {gamma}-ray detector and had discovered some of superdeformed bands, such Coulomb excitation experiments had been carried out at Chalk River laboratory just before it`s shutdown of physics division. In this meeting some of the experimental data are presented and compared with the results of theoretical investigations. (author)

  3. Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolesniková, L.; Alonso, E. R.; Mata, S.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Área de Química-Física, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Parque Científico UVa, Unidad Asociada CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47011 Valladolid (Spain)

    2017-04-01

    We report a detailed spectroscopic investigation of the interstellar aminoacetonitrile, a possible precursor molecule of glycine. Using a combination of Stark and frequency-modulation microwave and millimeter wave spectroscopies, we observed and analyzed the room-temperature rotational spectra of 29 excited states with energies up to 1000 cm{sup −1}. We also observed the {sup 13}C isotopologues in the ground vibrational state in natural abundance (1.1%). The extensive data set of more than 2000 new rotational transitions will support further identifications of aminoacetonitrile in the interstellar medium.

  4. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gredel, R.; Van Dishoeck, E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles. 70 references

  5. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredel, Roland; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination transition moments. From the theoretical population densities in the various rotational levels, flux ratios and synthetic emission profiles are calculated as functions of the a 3Pi(u) - X 1Sigma(g)+ and the c 3Sigma(u)+ - X 3Sigma(g)+ intercombination transition moments. The influence of each of these two transitions separately on the vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures is investigated. The observed emission spectra of the (0,0) Swan band in Comet Halley are presented and compared to the synthetic profiles.

  6. The Astrophysical Weeds: Rotational Transitions in Excited Vibrational States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso, José L.; Kolesniková, Lucie; Alonso, Elena R.; Mata, Santiago

    2017-06-01

    The number of unidentified lines in the millimeter and submillimeter wave surveys of the interstellar medium has grown rapidly. The major contributions are due to rotational transitions in excited vibrational states of a relatively few molecules that are called the astrophysical weeds. necessary data to deal with spectral lines from astrophysical weeds species can be obtained from detailed laboratory rotational measurements in the microwave and millimeter wave region. A general procedure is being used at Valladolid combining different time and/or frequency domain spectroscopic tools of varying importance for providing the precise set of spectroscopic constants that could be used to search for this species in the ISM. This is illustrated in the present contribution through its application to several significant examples. Fortman, S. M., Medvedev, I. R., Neese, C.F., & De Lucia, F.C. 2010, ApJ,725, 1682 Rotational Spectra in 29 Vibrationally Excited States of Interstellar Aminoacetonitrile, L. Kolesniková, E. R. Alonso, S. Mata, and J. L. Alonso, The Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series 2017, (in press).

  7. Excitation of blade vibration under rotation by synchronous electromagnet

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Luděk; Vaněk, František; Bula, Vítězslav; Cibulka, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, 3/4 (2011), s. 1-9 ISSN 1802-1484 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1166 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : blade * vibration * excitation * electromagnet Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics

  8. Bibliography on electron collisions with molecules: rotational and vibrational excitations, 1980-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itikawa, Yukikazu

    2001-04-01

    A list of papers reporting cross sections for electron-impact excitations of rotational and vibrational states of molecules is presented. The list includes both the theoretical and the experimental papers published in 1980-2000. An index by molecular species is provided at the end of the bibliography. (author)

  9. Manipulation of molecular vibrational motions via pure rotational excitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shu, Chuan-Cun; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2015-01-01

    The coupling between different molecular degrees of freedom plays a decisive role in many quantum phenomena, including electron transfer and energy redistribution. Here, we demonstrate a quantum-mechanical time-dependent simulation to explore how a vibrational motion in a molecule can be affected...

  10. Fluorescent vibration-rotation excitation of cometary C2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gredel, R.; Dishoeck, van E.F.; Black, J.H.

    1989-01-01

    The statistical equilibrium equations that determine the population densities of the energy levels in cometary C2 molecules due to fluorescent excitation are examined in detail. The adopted model and molecular parameters are discussed, and a theoretical estimate is made of the two intercombination

  11. Portable vibration exciter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beecher, L. C.; Williams, F. T.

    1970-01-01

    Gas-driven vibration exciter produces a sinusoidal excitation function controllable in frequency and in amplitude. It allows direct vibration testing of components under normal loads, removing the possibility of component damage due to high static pressure.

  12. Synchronisation and general dynamic symmetry of a vibrating system with two exciters rotating in opposite directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun-Yu, Zhao; Yi-Min, Zhang; Bang-Chun, Wen

    2010-01-01

    We derive the non-dimensional coupling equation of two exciters, including inertia coupling, stiffness coupling and load coupling. The concept of general dynamic symmetry is proposed to physically explain the synchronisation of the two exciters, which stems from the load coupling that produces the torque of general dynamic symmetry to force the phase difference between the two exciters close to the angle of general dynamic symmetry. The condition of implementing synchronisation is that the torque of general dynamic symmetry is greater than the asymmetric torque of the two motors. A general Lyapunov function is constructed to derive the stability condition of synchronisation that the non-dimensional inertia coupling matrix is positive definite and all its elements are positive. Numeric results show that the structure of the vibrating system can guarantee the stability of synchronisation of the two exciters, and that the greater the distances between the installation positions of the two exciters and the mass centre of the vibrating system are, the stronger the ability of general dynamic symmetry is

  13. Vibrations of rotating machinery

    CERN Document Server

    Matsushita, Osami; Kanki, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Keogh, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    This book opens with an explanation of the vibrations of a single degree-of-freedom (dof) system for all beginners. Subsequently, vibration analysis of multi-dof systems is explained by modal analysis. Mode synthesis modeling is then introduced for system reduction, which aids understanding in a simplified manner of how complicated rotors behave. Rotor balancing techniques are offered for rigid and flexible rotors through several examples. Consideration of gyroscopic influences on the rotordynamics is then provided and vibration evaluation of a rotor-bearing system is emphasized in terms of forward and backward whirl rotor motions through eigenvalue (natural frequency and damping ratio) analysis. In addition to these rotordynamics concerning rotating shaft vibration measured in a stationary reference frame, blade vibrations are analyzed with Coriolis forces expressed in a rotating reference frame. Other phenomena that may be assessed in stationary and rotating reference frames include stability characteristic...

  14. Excited states rotational effects on the behavior of excited molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Lim, Edward C

    2013-01-01

    Excited States, Volume 7 is a collection of papers that discusses the excited states of molecules. The first paper reviews the rotational involvement in intra-molecular in vibrational redistribution. This paper analyzes the vibrational Hamiltonian as to its efficacy in detecting the manifestations of intra-molecular state-mixing in time-resolved and time-averaged spectroscopic measurements. The next paper examines the temporal behavior of intra-molecular vibration-rotation energy transfer (IVRET) and the effects of IVRET on collision, reaction, and the decomposition processes. This paper also

  15. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.; Schram, D.C.; Doebele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has a bandwith of 0.15 cm -1 . The wavelength of the laser radiation is calibrated by simultaneous recording of the two-photon laser induced fluorescence spectrum of nitric oxide. The excited hydrogen populations are calibrated on the basis of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering measurements. A population distribution is measured in the shock region of a pure hydrogen plasma expansion. The higher rotational levels (J>5) show overpopulation compared to a Boltzmann distribution determined from the lower rotational levels (J≤5)

  16. Analytic description of highly excited vibrational-rotational states of diatomic molecules: II. Application to the hydrogen chloride molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.; Ryabikin, M.Y.

    1995-01-01

    Processing of the precise experimental data on transition frequencies and energy levels in the ground electronic state of the H 35 Cl molecule was carried out on the basis of the asymptotically correct perturbation series analytically constructed to describe the discrete vibrational-rotational spectrum of a diatomic molecule. The perturbation series was shown to converge rapidly up to the dissociation energy E D , whereas the conventional Dunham series has a distinct limit of applicability equal to 0.39E D . 12 refs., 2 figs

  17. Vibrational and rotational excitation effects of the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg +) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ziliang; Wang, Haijie; Wang, Xiquan; Shi, Yanying

    2018-05-01

    The effects of the rovibrational excitation of reactants in the N(2D) + D2(X1Σg+) → ND(X3Σ+) + D(2S) reaction are calculated in a collision energy range from the threshold to 1.0 eV using the time-dependent wave packet approach and a second-order split operator. The reaction probability, integral cross-section, differential cross-section and rate constant of the title reaction are calculated. The integral cross-section and rate constant of the initial states v = 0, j = 0, 1, are in good agreement with experimental data available in the literature. The rotational excitation of the D2 molecule has little effect on reaction probability, integral cross-section and the rate constant, but it increased the sideways and forward scattering signals. The vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the threshold and broke up the forward-backward symmetry of the differential cross-section; it also increased the forward scattering signals. This may be because the vibrational excitation of the D2 molecule reduced the lifetime of the intermediate complex.

  18. Studies of interstellar vibrationally-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Snell, R.L.; Erickson, N.R.

    1986-01-01

    Several molecules thus far have been detected in the ISM in vibrationally-excited states, including H 2 , SiO, HC 3 N, and CH 3 CN. In order for vibrational-excitation to occur, these species must be present in unusually hot and dense gas and/or where strong infrared radiation is present. In order to do a more thorough investigation of vibrational excitation in the interstellar medium (ISM), studies were done of several mm-wave transitions originating in excited vibrational modes of HCN, an abundant interstellar molecule. Vibrationally-excited HCN was recently detected toward Orion-KL and IRC+10216, using a 12 meter antenna. The J=3-2 rotational transitions were detected in the molecule's lowest vibrational state, the bending mode, which is split into two separate levels, due to l-type doubling. This bending mode lies 1025K above ground state, with an Einstein A coefficient of 3.6/s. The J=3-2 line mode of HCN, which lies 2050K above ground state, was also observed toward IRC+10216, and subsequently in Orion-KL. Further measurements of vibrationally-excited HCN were done using a 14 meter telescope, which include the observations of the (0,1,0) and (0,2,0) modes towards Orion-KL, via their J=3-2 transitions at 265-267 GHz. The spectrum of the J=3-2 line in Orion taken with the 14 meter telescope, is shown, along with a map, which indicates that emission from vibrationally-excited HCN arises from a region probably smaller than the 14 meter telescope's 20 arcsec beam

  19. Vibrational and Rotational Energy Relaxation in Liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jakob

    Vibrational and rotational energy relaxation in liquids are studied by means of computer simulations. As a precursor for studying vibrational energy relaxation of a solute molecule subsequent to the formation of a chemical bond, the validity of the classical Bersohn-Zewail model for describing......, the vibrational energy relaxation of I2 subsequent to photodissociation and recombination in CCl4 is studied using classical Molecular Dynamics simulations. The vibrational relaxation times and the time-dependent I-I pair distribution function are compared to new experimental results, and a qualitative agreement...... is found in both cases. Furthermore, the rotational energy relaxation of H2O in liquid water is studied via simulations and a power-and-work analysis. The mechanism of the energy transfer from the rotationally excited H2O molecule to its water neighbors is elucidated, i.e. the energy-accepting degrees...

  20. Vibrational excitation from heterogeneous catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purvis, G.D. III; Redmon, M.J.; Woken, G. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    Classical trajectories have been used by numerous researchers to investigate the dynamics of exothermic chemical reactions (atom + diatom) with a view toward understanding what leads to vibrational excitation of the product molecule. Unlike these studies, the case where the reaction is catalyzed by a solid surface is considered. The trajectory studies indicate that there should be conditions under which considerable vibrational energy appears in the product molecules without being lost to the solid during the course of the reaction. 2 figures, 3 tables

  1. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This invention relates to isotope separation employing isotopically selective vibrational excitation and vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. Uranium enrichment, using uranium hexafluoride, is a particular embodiment. (U.K.)

  2. A vacuum-UV laser-induced fluorescence experiment for measurement of rotationally and vibrationally excited H2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vankan, P.J.W.; Heil, S.B.S.; Mazouffre, S.; Engeln, R.A.H.; Schram, D.C.; Döbele, H.F.

    2004-01-01

    An experimental setup is built to detect spatially resolved rovibrationally excited hydrogen molecules via laser-induced fluorescence. To excite the hydrogen molecules, laser radiation is produced in the vacuum UV part of the spectrum. The laser radiation is tunable between 120 nm and 230 nm and has

  3. Laser diagnostics of high vibrational and rotational H2-states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mosbach, Th.; Schulz-von der Gathen, V.; Doebele, H.F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on measurements of vibrational and rotational excited electronic-ground-state hydrogen molecules in a magnetic multipole plasma source by LIF with VUV radiation. The measurements are taken after rapid shut-off of the discharge current. Absolute level populations are obtained using Rayleigh scattering calibration with Krypton. The theoretically predicted suprathermal population of the vibrational distribution is clearly identified. We found also non-Boltzmann rotational distributions for the high vibrational states. The addition of noble gases (Argon and Xenon) to hydrogen leads to a decrease of the vibrational population. (Abstract Copyright [2002], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  4. Detection of interstellar vibrationally excited HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziurys, L.M.; Turner, B.E.

    1986-01-01

    Vibrationally excited HCN has been observed for the first time in the interstellar medium. The J = 3-2 rotational transitions of the l-doubled (0,1/sup 1d/,1c, 0) bending mode of HCN have been detected toward Orion-KL and IRC +10216. In Orion, the overall column density in the (0,1,0) mode, which exclusively samples the ''hot core,'' is 1.7-10 16 cm -2 and can be understood in terms of the ''doughnut'' model for Orion. The ground-state HCN column density implied by the excited-state observations is 2.3 x 10 18 cm -2 in the hot core, at least one order of magnitude greater than the column densities derived for HCN in its spike and plateau/doughnut components. Radiative excitation by 14 μm flux from IRc2 accounts for the (0,1,0) population provided the hot core is approx.6-7 x 10 16 cm distant from IRc2, in agreement with the ''cavity'' model for KL. Toward IRC +10216 we have detected J = 3-2 transitions of both (0,1/sup 1c/,/sup 1d/,0) and (0,2 0 ,0) excited states. The spectral profiles have been modeled to yield abundances and excitation conditions throughout the expanding envelope

  5. Vibration of imperfect rotating disk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study is concerned with the theoretical and numerical calculations of the flexural vibrations of a bladed disk. The main focus of this study is to elaborate the basic background for diagnostic and identification methods for ascertaining the main properties of the real structure or an experimental model of turbine disks. The reduction of undesirable vibrations of blades is proposed by using damping heads, which on the experimental model of turbine disk are applied only on a limited number of blades. This partial setting of damping heads introduces imperfection in mass, stiffness and damping distribution on the periphery and leads to more complicated dynamic properties than those of a perfect disk. Calculation of FEM model and analytic—numerical solution of disk behaviour in the limited (two modes frequency range shows the splitting of resonance with an increasing speed of disk rotation. The spectrum of resonance is twice denser than that of a perfect disk.

  6. Nonlinear Response of Vibrational Conveyers with Nonideal Vibration Exciter: Superharmonic and Subharmonic Resonance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Bayıroğlu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibrational conveyers with a centrifugal vibration exciter transmit their load based on the jumping method. Common unbalanced-mass driver oscillates the trough. The motion is strictly related to the vibrational parameters. The transition over resonance of a vibratory system, excited by rotating unbalances, is important in terms of the maximum vibrational amplitude produced and the power demand on the drive for the crossover. The mechanical system is driven by the DC motor. In this study, the working ranges of oscillating shaking conveyers with nonideal vibration exciter have been analyzed analytically for superharmonic and subharmonic resonances by the method of multiple scales and numerically. The analytical results obtained in this study agree well with the numerical results.

  7. Controlling flexible rotor vibrations using parametric excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atepor, L, E-mail: katepor@yahoo.co [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Glasgow, G12 8QQ (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-01

    This paper presents both theoretical and experimental studies of an active vibration controller for vibration in a flexible rotor system. The paper shows that the vibration amplitude can be modified by introducing an axial parametric excitation. The perturbation method of multiple scales is used to solve the equations of motion. The steady-state responses, with and without the parametric excitation terms, is investigated. An experimental test machine uses a piezoelectric exciter mounted on the end of the shaft. The results show a reduction in the rotor response amplitude under principal parametric resonance, and some good correlation between theory and experiment.

  8. Sub-Doppler spectroscopy of thioformaldehyde: Excited state perturbations and evidence for rotation-induced vibrational mixing in the ground state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clouthier, D.J.; Huang, G.; Adam, A.G.; Merer, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    High-resolution intracavity dye laser spectroscopy has been used to obtain sub-Doppler spectra of transitions to 350 rotational levels in the 4 1 0 band of the A 1 A 2 --X 1 A 1 electronic transition of thioformaldehyde. Ground state combination differences from the sub-Doppler spectra, combined with microwave and infrared data, have been used to improve the ground state rotational and centrifugal distortion constants of H 2 CS. The upper state shows a remarkable number of perturbations. The largest of these are caused by nearby triplet levels, with matrix elements of 0.05--0.15 cm -1 . A particularly clear singlet--triplet avoided crossing in K a ' = 7 has been shown to be caused by interaction with the F 1 component of the 3 1 6 2 vibrational level of the a 3 A 2 state. At least 53% of the S 1 levels show evidence of very small perturbations by high rovibronic levels of the ground state. The number of such perturbations is small at low J, but increases rapidly beyond J=5 such that 40%--80% of the observed S 1 levels of any given J are perturbed by ground state levels. Model calculations show that the density and J dependence of the number of perturbed levels can be explained if there is extensive rotation-induced mixing of the vibrational levels in the ground state

  9. Impact self-excited vibrations of linear motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravlev, V. Ph.

    2010-08-01

    Impact self-exciting vibration modes in a linear motor of a monorail car are studied. Existence and stability conditions of self-exciting vibrations are found. Ways of avoiding the vibrations are discussed.

  10. Piezoelectric Vibration Damping Study for Rotating Composite Fan Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.; Duffy, Kirsten P.; Choi, Benjamin B.; Provenza, Andrew J.; Kray, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Resonant vibrations of aircraft engine blades cause blade fatigue problems in engines, which can lead to thicker and aerodynamically lower performing blade designs, increasing engine weight, fuel burn, and maintenance costs. In order to mitigate undesirable blade vibration levels, active piezoelectric vibration control has been investigated, potentially enabling thinner blade designs for higher performing blades and minimizing blade fatigue problems. While the piezoelectric damping idea has been investigated by other researchers over the years, very little study has been done including rotational effects. The present study attempts to fill this void. The particular objectives of this study were: (a) to develop and analyze a multiphysics piezoelectric finite element composite blade model for harmonic forced vibration response analysis coupled with a tuned RLC circuit for rotating engine blade conditions, (b) to validate a numerical model with experimental test data, and (c) to achieve a cost-effective numerical modeling capability which enables simulation of rotating blades within the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) Dynamic Spin Rig Facility. A numerical and experimental study for rotating piezoelectric composite subscale fan blades was performed. It was also proved that the proposed numerical method is feasible and effective when applied to the rotating blade base excitation model. The experimental test and multiphysics finite element modeling technique described in this paper show that piezoelectric vibration damping can significantly reduce vibrations of aircraft engine composite fan blades.

  11. Millimeterwave spectroscopy of active laser plasmas; the excited vibrational states of HCN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Lucia, F.C.; Helminger, P.A.

    1977-01-01

    Millimeter and submillimeter microwave techniques have been used for the spectroscopic study of an HCN laser plasma. Forty-seven rotational transitions in 12 excited vibrational states have been observed. Numerous rotational, vibrational, and perturbation parameters have been calculated from these data. A discussion of experimental techniques is included

  12. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Vibrational excitation of molecules having components of a selected isotope type is used to produce a conversion from vibrational to translational excitation of the molecules by collision with the molecules of a heavy carrier gas. The resulting difference in translaton between the molecules of the selected isotope type and all other molecules of the same compound permits their separate collection. When applied to uranium enrichment, a subsonic cryogenic flow of molecules of uranium hexafluoride in combination with an argon carrier gas is directed through a cooled chamber that is illuminated by laser radiaton tuned to vibrationally excite the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a specific uranium isotope. The excited molecules collide with carrier gas molecules, causing a conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, which results in a higher thermal energy or diffusivity than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules. The flowing molecules including the excited molecules directly enter a set of cryogenically cooled channels. The higher thermal velocity of the excited molecules increases the probability of their striking a collector surface. The molecules which strike this surface immediately condense. After a predetermined thickness of molecules is collected on the surface, the flow of uranium hexafluoride is interrupted and the chamber heated to the point of vaporization of the collected hexafluoride, permitting its removal. (LL)

  13. Rotational-vibrational states of nonaxial deformable even-even nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porodzinskii, Yu.V.; Sukhovitskii, E.Sh.

    1991-01-01

    The rotational-vibrational excitations of nonaxial even-even nuclei are studied on the basis of a Hamiltonian operator with five dynamical variables. Explicit forms of the wave functions and energies of the rotational-vibrational excitations of such nuclei are obtained. The experimental energies of excited positive-parity states of the 238 U nucleus and those calculated in terms of the model discussed in the article are compared

  14. Forced vibrations of rotating circular cylindrical shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igawa, Hirotaka; Maruyama, Yoshiyuki; Endo, Mitsuru

    1995-01-01

    Forced vibrations of rotating circular cylindrical shells are investigated. Basic equations, including the effect of initial stress due to rotation, are formulated by the finite-element method. The characteristic relations for finite elements are derived from the energy principle by considering the finite strain. The equations of motion can be separated into quasi-static and dynamic ones, i.e., the equations in the steady rotating state and those in the vibration state. Radial concentrated impulses are considered as the external dynamic force. The transient responses of circular cylindrical shells are numerically calculated under various boundary conditions and rotating speeds. (author)

  15. Vibrational excitation in a hydrogen volume source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eenshuistra, P.J.

    1989-01-01

    In this thesis the complex of processes which determines the D - or H - density in a volume source, a hydrogen discharge, is studied. D - beams are of interest for driving the current of a fusion plasma in a TOKAMAK. Densities of vibrationally excited molecules, of H atoms, and of metastable hydrogen molecules were determined using Resonance-Enhanced MultiPhoton Ionization (REMPI). An experiment in which vibrationally highly excited molecules are formed by recombination of atoms in a cold metal surface, is described. The production and destruction of vibrationally excited molecules and atoms in the discharge is discussed. The vibrational distribution for 3≤ν≤5 (ν = vibrational quantumnumber) is strongly super-thermal. This effect is more apparent at higher discharge current and lower gas pressure. The analysis with a model based on rate equations, which molecules are predominantly produced by primary electron excitation of hydrogen molecules and deexcited upon one wall collision. The atom production is compatible with dissociation of molecules by primary electrons, dissociation of molecules on the filaments, and collisions between positive ions and electrons. The electrons are predominantly destroyed by recombination on the walls. Finally the production and destruction of H - in the discharge are discussed. The density of H - in the plasma, the electron density and temperature were determined. H - extraction was measured. The ratio of the extracted H - current and the H - density in the plasma gives an indication of the drift velocity of H - in the plasma. This velocity determines the emittance of the extracted beam. It was found that the H - velocity scales with the square root of the electron temperature. The measured H - densities are compatible with a qualitative model in which dissociative attachment of plasma electrons to vibrationally excited molecules is the most important process. (author). 136 refs.; 39 figs.; 10 tabs

  16. Isotope separation using vibrationally excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    A system for isotope separation or enrichment wherein molecules of a selected isotope type in a flow of molecules of plural isotope types are vibrationally excited and collided with a background gas to provide enhanced diffusivity for the molecules of the selected isotope type permitting their separate collection. The system typically is for the enrichment of uranium using a uranium hexafluoride gas in combination with a noble gas such as argon. The uranium hexafluoride molecules having a specific isotope of uranium are vibrationally excited by laser radiation. The vibrational energy is converted to a translation energy upon collision with a particle of the background gas and the added translation energy enhances the diffusivity of the selected hexafluoride molecules facilitating its condensation on collection surfaces provided for that purpose. This process is periodically interrupted and the cryogenic flow halted to permit evaporation of the collected molecules to provide a distinct, enriched flow

  17. The photodissociation and reaction dynamics of vibrationally excited molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crim, F.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This research determines the nature of highly vibrationally excited molecules, their unimolecular reactions, and their photodissociation dynamics. The goal is to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to exploit that understanding to discover and control their chemical pathways. Most recently the author has used a combination of vibrational overtone excitation and laser induced fluorescence both to characterize vibrationally excited molecules and to study their photodissociation dynamics. The author has also begun laser induced grating spectroscopy experiments designed to obtain the electronic absorption spectra of highly vibrationally excited molecules.

  18. Rotational excitation of N2 by electron impact: 1-4 eV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, S.F.; Dube, L.

    1978-01-01

    Rotational and rotational-vibrational (v = 0 → 1) excitation in N 2 have been studied with a crossed-beam electron-impact apparatus. In the energy range 1-4 eV, the elastic and vibrational energy-loss peaks show large rotational broadening compared with the apparatus profile (full width at half-maximum, 18 meV). The branching ratios for rotational transitions with Δj = 0, +- 2, +- 4 are obtained with a line-shape analysis applied to the energy-loss profiles. The results for rotational-vibrational excitation at 2.27 eV and scattering angles 30-90 0 are in good agreement with the calculations using the resonant dπ waves and the rotational impulse approximation. The corresponding results for pure rotational excitation show that the branches with Δj = +- 2 and +- 4 are predominantly excited via resonances, while the branch with Δj = 0 contains a large contribution from direct scattering. The absolute rotational cross sections for Δj = +- 4 are measured; they exhibit a large magnitude (10 -16 cm 2 ) and peak and valley structures in the 1-4 eV range, reminiscent of well-known resonant vibrational excitation. The energy dependence and the absolute magnitude of the rotational cross sections for Δj = +- 4 can be understood in terms of a ''boomerang'' calculation. A comparison of the experiment with the relevant theoretical calculations is made

  19. Efficient forced vibration reanalysis method for rotating electric machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Akira; Suzuki, Hiromitsu; Kuroishi, Masakatsu; Nakai, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    Rotating electric machines are subject to forced vibration by magnetic force excitation with wide-band frequency spectrum that are dependent on the operating conditions. Therefore, when designing the electric machines, it is inevitable to compute the vibration response of the machines at various operating conditions efficiently and accurately. This paper presents an efficient frequency-domain vibration analysis method for the electric machines. The method enables the efficient re-analysis of the vibration response of electric machines at various operating conditions without the necessity to re-compute the harmonic response by finite element analyses. Theoretical background of the proposed method is provided, which is based on the modal reduction of the magnetic force excitation by a set of amplitude-modulated standing-waves. The method is applied to the forced response vibration of the interior permanent magnet motor at a fixed operating condition. The results computed by the proposed method agree very well with those computed by the conventional harmonic response analysis by the FEA. The proposed method is then applied to the spin-up test condition to demonstrate its applicability to various operating conditions. It is observed that the proposed method can successfully be applied to the spin-up test conditions, and the measured dominant frequency peaks in the frequency response can be well captured by the proposed approach.

  20. The rotational excitation of HF by H

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desrousseaux, Benjamin; Lique, François

    2018-06-01

    The HF molecule is a key tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Accurate modelling of the HF abundance in such media requires one to model its excitation by both radiation and collisions. In diffuse ISM, the dominant collisional partners are atomic and molecular hydrogen. We report quantum time-independent calculations of collisional cross-sections and rate coefficients for the rotational excitation of HF by H. The reactive hydrogen exchange channels are taken into account in the scattering calculations. For the first time, HF-H rate coefficients are provided for temperature ranging from 10 to 500 K. The strongest collision-induced rotational HF transitions are those with Δj = 1, and the order of magnitude of the new HF-H rate coefficients is similar to that of the HF-H2 ones previously computed. As a first application, we simulate the excitation of HF by both H and H2 in typical diffuse ISM. We show that, depending on the rotational transition, hydrogen atoms increase or decrease the simulated excitation temperatures compared to collisional excitation only due to H2 molecules. Such results suggest that the new HF-H collisional data have to be used for properly modelling the abundance of HF in diffuse ISM.

  1. Quadrupole collective excitations in rapidly rotating nuclej

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhajlov, I.N.

    1983-01-01

    The spectrum of collective quadrupole excitations in nuclei is investigated. The average nucleus field has the axial symmetry and rotation occurs relatively to this axis. Dependences of the spectrum of quadrupole oscillations on rotation rate for classic liquid drop (CLD) and for a drop of fermi-liquid (DFL) with fissionability parameter X=0.62 ( 154 Er) are presented. The dependence of probabilities of E2-transitions between single-phonon and phonon-free states on rotation rate for CLD and DFL with fussionability parameter X=0.62 ( 154 Er) is also presented. It is shown that for CLD collective E2-transition of states of yrast-consequence is absolutely forbidden. For DFL transitions are possible that lead to decay of phonon-free state with the excitation of phonons of γ-modes and decrease of angular momentum

  2. Role of initial vibrational and rotational

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    To investigate the effects of reagent vibrational and rotational states on the stereodynamical pro- ... Han et al.8 reported the total reaction cross-section, the ... ity k is contained in the xz plane, while the y-axis ...... Han B R, Yang H, Zheng Y J and Varandas A J C 2010 ... Zhang L, Chen M D, Wang M L and Han K L 2000 J.

  3. The millimeter-wave spectrum of highly vibrationally excited SiO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mollaaghababa, R.; Gottlieb, C.A.; Vrtilek, J.M.; Thaddeus, P.

    1991-01-01

    The millimeter-wave rotational spectra of SiO in high vibrational states (v = 0-40) in its electronic ground state were measured between 228 and 347 GHz in a laboratory discharge through SiH4 and CO. On ascending the vibrational ladder, populations decline precipitously for the first few levels, with a vibrational temperature of about 1000 K; at v of roughly 3, however, they markedly flatten out, and from there to v of roughly 40 the temperature is of the order of 10,000 K. With the Dunham coefficients determined here, the rotational spectrum of highly vibrationally excited SiO can now be calculated into the far-infrared to accuracies required for radioastronomy. Possible astronomical sources of highly vibrationally excited SiO are certain stellar atmospheres, ultracompact H II regions, very young supernova ejecta, and dense interstellar shocks. 16 refs

  4. Theoretical resonant electron-impact vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation cross sections of ro-vibrationally excited BeH"+ ion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laporta, V.; Chakrabarti, K.; Celiberto, R.; Janev, R. K.; Mezei, J. Zs.; Niyonzima, S.; Tennyson, J.; Schneider, I.F.

    2017-01-01

    A theoretical study of resonant vibrational excitation, dissociative recombination and dissociative excitation processes of the beryllium monohydride cation, BeH"+ , induced by electron impact, is reported. Full sets of ro-vibrationally-resolved cross sections and of the corresponding Maxwellian rate coefficients are presented for the three processes. Particular emphasis is given to the high-energy behaviour. Potential curves of "2σ"+, "2σ and "2δ symmetries and the corresponding resonance widths, obtained from R-matrix calculations, provide the input for calculations which use a local complex-potential model for resonant collisions in each of the three symmetries. Rotational motion of nuclei and isotopic effects are also discussed. The relevant results are compared with those obtained using a multichannel quantum defect theory method. Full results are available from the Phys4Entry database.

  5. Catalytic synthesis of ammonia using vibrationally excited nitrogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Billing, Gert D.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    1992-01-01

    In a previous study we have considered the catalytic synthesis of ammonia in the presence of vibrationally excited nitrogen. The distribution over vibrational states was assumed to be maintained during the reaction, and it was shown that the yield of ammonia increased considerably compared...... to that from conventional synthesis. In the present study the nitrogen molecules are only excited at the inlet of a plug flow reactor, and the importance of vibrational relaxation is investigated. We show that vibrational excitation can give an enhanced yield of ammonia also in the situation where vibrational...

  6. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295 0 K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295 0 K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ΔJ transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references

  7. Rotational laser cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold molecular ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staanum, Peter; Højbjerre, Klaus; Skyt, Peter Sandegaard

    2010-01-01

    Stationary molecules in well-defined internal states are of broad interest for physics and chemistry. In physics, this includes metrology 1, 2, 3 , quantum computing 4, 5 and many-body quantum mechanics 6, 7 , whereas in chemistry, state-prepared molecular targets are of interest for uni......-molecular reactions with coherent light fields 8, 9 , for quantum-state-selected bi-molecular reactions 10, 11, 12 and for astrochemistry 12 . Here, we demonstrate rotational ground-state cooling of vibrationally and translationally cold MgH+ ions, using a laser-cooling scheme based on excitation of a single...

  8. Ultrasensitive magnetometers based on rotational magnetic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hristoforou, E.; Svec, P. Sr.

    2014-01-01

    Three new types of fluxgate magnetometers are presented in this paper, able to monitor the three components of the ambient field, all of them based on the principle of rotational excitation field. The first type is based on Yttrium- Iron Garnet (YIG) single crystal film, magnetized with rotational field on its plane, where the 2"n"d, 4"t"h and 6"t"h harmonics offer the three components of the ambient field with sensitivity better than 1 pT at 0.2 Hz, its size being 25 cm"3. The second type is based on permalloy film, where the rotational excitation field on its plane offers change of magnetoresistance with sensitivity better than 10 pT at 1 Hz, uncertainty of 1 ppm and size ∼ 8 cm"3. The third type, is based on amorphous film, where the rotation field mode offer sensitivity better than 100 pT at 1 Hz, uncertainty of 10 ppm and size ∼ 10 mm"3. (authors)

  9. On rotational solutions for elliptically excited pendulum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belyakov, Anton O.

    2011-01-01

    The author considers the planar rotational motion of the mathematical pendulum with its pivot oscillating both vertically and horizontally, so the trajectory of the pivot is an ellipse close to a circle. The analysis is based on the exact rotational solutions in the case of circular pivot trajectory and zero gravity. The conditions for existence and stability of such solutions are derived. Assuming that the amplitudes of excitations are not small while the pivot trajectory has small ellipticity the approximate solutions are found both for high and small linear dampings. Comparison between approximate and numerical solutions is made for different values of the damping parameter. -- Highlights: → We study rotations of the mathematical pendulum when its pivot moves along an ellipse. → There are stable exact solutions for a circular pivot trajectory and zero gravity. → Asymptotic solutions are found for an elliptical pivot trajectory

  10. Supervision of the vibration of rotating components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-06-01

    The aim of the investifation was to plead for the systematization and uniformity of surveillance and to form a source of information to the makers of instruments, suppliers of engines, consultants and others. Two essential topics are treated, namely rotor dynamics and measuring methods for vibration control. An inventory of damages and problems of rotating machinery is presented. Recommendations concerning various supervision programs of reactor safety, the importance of components, risk of missiles and erroreous operations are given along with instructions how to get hold of suitable instruments. Experience from nuclear power plants is said to be essential. Experimental activity at Ringhals and/or Forsmark power plant is proposed. (G.B.)

  11. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-01-01

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H 2 CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to J max = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm −1 and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments

  12. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yachmenev, Andrey; Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter

    2013-11-01

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H2CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to Jmax = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm-1 and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  13. Theoretical rotation-vibration spectrum of thioformaldehyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yachmenev, Andrey [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Polyak, Iakov; Thiel, Walter [Max-Planck-Institut für Kohlenforschung, Kaiser-Wilhelm-Platz 1, D–45470 Mülheim an der Ruhr (Germany)

    2013-11-28

    We present a variational calculation of the first comprehensive T = 300 K rovibrational line list for thioformaldehyde, H{sub 2}CS. It covers 41 809 rovibrational levels for states up to J{sub max} = 30 with vibrational band origins up to 5000 cm{sup −1} and provides the energies and line intensities for 547 926 transitions from the ground vibrational state to these levels. It is based on our previously reported accurate ab initio potential energy surface and a newly calculated ab initio dipole moment surface. Minor empirical adjustments are made to the ab initio equilibrium geometry to reduce systematic errors in the predicted intra-band rotational energy levels. The rovibrational energy levels and transition intensities are computed variationally by using the methods implemented in the computer program TROVE. Transition wavelengths and intensities are found to be in excellent agreement with the available experimental data. The present calculations correctly reproduce the observed resonance effects, such as intensity borrowing, thus reflecting the high accuracy of the underlying ab initio surfaces. We report a detailed analysis of several vibrational bands, especially those complicated by strong Coriolis coupling, to facilitate future laboratory assignments.

  14. Submillimeter vibrationally excited water emission from the peculiar red supergiant VY Canis Majoris

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menten, K. M.; Philipp, S. D.; Güsten, R.; Alcolea, J.; Polehampton, E. T.; Brünken, S.

    2006-08-01

    Context: .Vibrationally excited emission from the SiO and H2O molecules probes the innermost circumstellar envelopes of oxygen-rich red giant and supergiant stars. VY CMa is the most prolific known emission source in these molecules. Aims: .Observations were made to search for rotational lines in the lowest vibrationally excited state of H2O. Methods: .The APEX telescope was used for observations of H2O lines at frequencies around 300 GHz. Results: .Two vibrationally excited H2O lines were detected, a third one could not be found. In one of the lines we find evidence for weak maser action, similar to known (sub)millimeter ν2 = 1 lines. We find that the other line's intensity is consistent with thermal excitation by the circumstellar infrared radiation field. Several SiO lines were detected together with the H2O lines.

  15. Spectroscopy and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai, H.L. [Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Spectroscopy, energy transfer and reactions of vibrationally excited transient molecules are studied through a combination of laser-based excitation techniques and efficient detection of emission from the energized molecules with frequency and time resolution. Specifically, a Time-resolved Fourier Transform Emission Spectroscopy technique has been developed for detecting dispersed laser-induced fluorescence in the IR, visible and UV regions. The structure and spectroscopy of the excited vibrational levels in the electronic ground state, as well as energy relaxation and reactions induced by specific vibronic excitations of a transient molecule can be characterized from time-resolved dispersed fluorescence in the visible and UV region. IR emissions from highly vibrational excited levels, on the other hand, reveal the pathways and rates of collision induced vibrational energy transfer.

  16. Multi-Exciter Vibroacoustic Simulation of Hypersonic Flight Vibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREGORY, DANNY LYNN; CAP, JEROME S.; TOGAMI, THOMAS C.; NUSSER, MICHAEL A.; HOLLINGSHEAD, JAMES RONALD

    1999-01-01

    Many aerospace structures must survive severe high frequency, hypersonic, random vibration during their flights. The random vibrations are generated by the turbulent boundary layer developed along the exterior of the structures during flight. These environments have not been simulated very well in the past using a fixed-based, single exciter input with an upper frequency range of 2 kHz. This study investigates the possibility of using acoustic ardor independently controlled multiple exciters to more accurately simulate hypersonic flight vibration. The test configuration, equipment, and methodology are described. Comparisons with actual flight measurements and previous single exciter simulations are also presented

  17. Spectroscopic investigation of the vibrational quasi-continuum arising from internal rotation of a methyl group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hougen, J.T. [NIST, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this project is to use spectroscopic techniques to investigate in detail phenomena involving the vibrational quasi-continuum in a simple physical system. Acetaldehyde was chosen for the study because: (i) methyl groups have been suggested to be important promotors of intramolecular vibrational relaxation, (ii) the internal rotation of a methyl group is an easily describle large-amplitude motion, which should retain its simple character even at high levels of excitation, and (iii) the aldehyde carbonyl group offers the possibility of both vibrational and electronic probing. The present investigation of the ground electronic state has three parts: (1) understanding the {open_quotes}isolated{close_quotes} internal-rotation motion below, at, and above the top of the torsional barrier, (2) understanding in detail traditional (bond stretching and bending) vibrational fundamental and overtone states, and (3) understanding interactions involving states with multiquantum excitations of at least one of these two kinds of motion.

  18. Nonlinear vibrations analysis of rotating drum-disk coupling structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaofeng, Li; Boqing, Miao; Qiansheng, Tang; Chenyang, Xi; Bangchun, Wen

    2018-04-01

    A dynamic model of a coupled rotating drum-disk system with elastic support is developed in this paper. By considering the effects of centrifugal and Coriolis forces as well as rotation-induced hoop stress, the governing differential equation of the drum-disk is derived by Donnell's shell theory. The nonlinear amplitude-frequency characteristics of coupled structure are studied. The results indicate that the natural characteristics of the coupling structure are sensitive to the supporting stiffness of the disk, and the sensitive range is affected by rotating speeds. The circumferential wave numbers can affect the characteristics of the drum-disk structure. If the circumferential wave number n = 1 , the vibration response of the drum keeps a stable value under an unbalanced load of the disk, there is no coupling effect if n ≠ 1 . Under the excitation, the nonlinear hardening characteristics of the forward traveling wave are more evident than that of the backward traveling wave. Moreover, because of the coupling effect of the drum and the disk, the supporting stiffness of the disk has certain effect on the nonlinear characteristics of the forward and backward traveling waves. In addition, small length-radius and thickness-radius ratios have a significant effect on the nonlinear characteristics of the coupled structure, which means nonlinear shell theory should be adopted to design rotating drum's parameter for its specific structural parameters.

  19. Zero-point vibrational effects on optical rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruud, K.; Taylor, P.R.; Åstrand, P.-O.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate the effects of molecular vibrations on the optical rotation in two chiral molecules, methyloxirane and trans-2,3-dimethylthiirane. It is shown that the magnitude of zero-point vibrational corrections increases as the electronic contribution to the optical rotation increases....... Vibrational effects thus appear to be important for an overall estimate of the molecular optical rotation, amounting to about 20-30% of the electronic counterpart. We also investigate the special case of chirality introduced in a molecule through isotopic substitution. In this case, the zero-point vibrational...

  20. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Segerink, Franciscus B.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in

  1. Multiple scattering approach to the vibrational excitation of molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drukarev, G.

    1976-01-01

    Another approach to the problem of vibrational excitation of homonuclear two-atomic molecules by slow electrons possibly accompanied by rotational transitions is presented based on the picture of multiple scattering of an electron inside the molecule. The scattering of two fixed centers in the zero range potential model is considered. The results indicate that the multiple scattering determines the order of magnitude of the vibrational excitation cross sections in the energy region under consideration even if the zero range potential model is used. Also the connection between the multiple scattering approach and quasi-stationary molecular ion picture is established. 9 refs

  2. Tunable submillimeter sources applied to the excited state rotational spectroscopy and kinetics of CH3F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, W.A.M.; Fetterman, H.R.; Peck, D.D.; Goldsmith, P.F.

    1979-01-01

    Tunable submillimeter radiation, generated and detected using optically pumped lasers and Schottky diode mixers, has been used in an infrared-submillimeter double resonance investigation of CH 3 F. This technique permits the direct observation of the molecular rotational spectra and kinetics of excited vibrational states and is particularly important for those molecules which are candidates for optically pumped submillimeter lasers

  3. Corticospinal excitability changes following prolonged muscle tendon vibration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steyvers, M.; Levin, O.; Baelen, M.G.M. van; Swinnen, S.P.

    2003-01-01

    The present experiment addressed the time course of corticospinal excitability changes following interventional muscle tendon vibration. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation, motor evoked potentials of the flexor carpi radialis and extensor carpi radialis brevis muscle were recorded for a period

  4. Initial vibrational and rotational yields from subexcitation electrons in molecular hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Douthat, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    As the energy of a single source electron injected into a molecular gas is degraded through collisions, initial products include secondary electrons, ions, and excited molecules. Electrons with kinetic energies less than the minimum required for excitation of the lowest electronic state are given the designation subexcitation electrons. These electrons are still capable of exciting vibrational and rotational states of molecular gases. In this calculation, the initial numbers of vibrational and rotational excitations (yields) produced as the subexcitation electrons undergo further energy degradation are determined for molecular hydrogen. The calculation requires a complete set of cross section data for numerical solution of the Boltzmann equation. The initial energy distribution of electrons is taken to be the subexcitation distribution which was determined previously. The initial yields are tabulated for gas temperatures from 50 K to 1500 K for a source electron with initial energy 10 keV. 26 references

  5. Measurements of vibrational excitation of N2, CO, and NO by low energy proton impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krutein, J.; Linder, F.

    1979-01-01

    Differential scattering experiments are reported for proton impact on N 2 , CO, and NO in the energy range E/sub lab/=30--80 eV. The measurements include the range of very small scattering angles around 0 0 as well as the rainbow region. The vibrationally resolved energy-loss spectra show a relatively low vibrational inelasticity for all three systems. Differential cross sections, transition probabilities, and the mean vibrational energy transfer are presented. Rotational excitation is indicated by the broadening of the energy-loss peaks which is most significant for H + --NO. The small-angle scattering data for vibrational excitation in CO show good agreement with the impact parameter theory using the known long-range interactions for this system

  6. Vibration mode and vibration shape under excitation of a three phase model transformer core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Seiji; Ishigaki, Yusuke; Omura, Takeshi

    2018-04-01

    Structural vibration characteristics and vibration shapes under three-phase excitation of a archetype transformer core were investigated to consider their influences on transformer noise. Acoustic noise and vibration behavior were measured in a three-limb model transformer core. Experimental modal analysis by impact test was performed. The vibration shapes were measured by a laser scanning vibrometer at different exciting frequencies. Vibration amplitude of the core in out-of-plane direction were relatively larger than those in other two in-plane directions. It was consistent with the result that the frequency response function of the core in out-of-plane direction was larger by about 20 dB or more than those in in-plane directions. There were many vibration modes having bending deformation of limbs in out-of-plane direction. The vibration shapes of the core when excited at 50 Hz and 60 Hz were almost the same because the fundamental frequencies of the vibration were not close to the resonance frequencies. When excitation frequency was 69 Hz which was half of one of the resonance frequencies, the vibration shape changed to the one similar to the resonance vibration mode. Existence of many vibration modes in out-of-plane direction of the core was presumed to be a reason why frequency characteristics of magnetostriction and transformer noise do not coincide.

  7. Influence of delayed excitation on vibrations of turbine blades couple

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Půst L.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the presented paper, the computational model of the turbine blade couple is investigated with the main attention to the influence two harmonic excitation forces, having the same frequency and amplitude but with moderate delay in time. Time delay between the exciting harmonic forces depends on the revolutions of bladed disk, on the number of blades on a rotating disk and on the number of stator blades. The reduction of resonance vibrations realized by means of dry friction between the shroud blade-heads increases roughly proportional to the difference of stator and rotor blade-numbers and also to the magnitude of dry friction force. From the analysis of blade couple with direct contact it was proved that the increase of friction forces causes decrease of resonance peaks, but the influence of elastic micro-deformations in the contact surfaces (modeled e.g. by the modified Coulomb dry friction law is rather small. Analysis of a blade couple with a friction element shows that the lower number of stator blades has negligible influence on the amplitudes of both blades, but decreases amplitudes of the friction element oscillations. Similarly the increase of friction forces causes a decrease of resonance peaks, but an increase of friction element amplitudes.

  8. Vibration-rotational overtones absorption of solid hydrogens using optoacoustic spectroscopy technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.M.F.

    1985-01-01

    Vibrational-rotational overtones absorption solid hydrogens (H 2 , D 2 , HD) is studied using pulsed laser piezoeletric transducer (PULPIT) optoacoustic spectroscopy is studied. A general downward shift in energy from isolated molecular energies is observed. Studying normal-hydrogen it was observed that the phonon excitations associated with double-molecular transitions are predominantly transverse-optical phonons, whereas the excitations associated with single-molecular transitions are predominantly longitudinal - optical phonons. Multiplet structures were observed for certain double transitions in parahydrogen and orthodeuterium. The HD spectrum, besides presenting the sharp zero-phonon lines and the associated phonon side bands, like H 2 and D 2 , showed also two different features. This observation was common to all the transitions involving pure rotational excitation in H 2 and D 2 , which showed broad linewidths. This, together with some other facts (fluorescence lifetime *approx*10 5 sec; weak internal vibration and lattice coupling), led to the proposition of a mechanism for the fast nonradiative relaxation in solid hydrogens, implied from some observed experimental evidences. This relaxation, due to strong coupling, would happen in two steps: the internal vibration modes would relax to the rotational modes of the molecules, and then this rotational modes would relax to the lattice vibration modes. (Author) [pt

  9. Quantum dynamics of vibrational excitations and vibrational charge ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Dedicated to the memory of the late Professor S K Rangarajan ... Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600 036. # ... likely ways to improve the results are discussed in terms of the inclusion of higher excited ...

  10. Vibrational Suspension of Light Sphere in a Tilted Rotating Cylinder with Liquid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor G. Kozlov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of a light sphere in a quickly rotating inclined cylinder filled with liquid under transversal vibrations is experimentally investigated. Due to inertial oscillations of the sphere relative to the cavity, its rotation velocity differs from the cavity one. The intensification of the lagging motion of a sphere and the excitation of the outstripping differential rotation are possible under vibrations. It occurs in the resonant areas where the frequency of vibrations coincides with the fundamental frequency of the system. The position of the sphere in the center of the cylinder could be unstable. Different velocities of the sphere are matched with its various quasistationary positions on the axis of rotating cavity. In tilted rotating cylinder, the axial component of the gravity force appears; however, the light sphere does not float to the upper end wall but gets the stable position at a definite distance from it. It makes possible to provide a vibrational suspension of the light sphere in filled with liquid cavity rotating around the vertical axis. It is found that in the wide range of the cavity inclination angles the sphere position is determined by the dimensionless velocity of body differential rotation.

  11. Analytic vibration-rotational matrix elements for diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouanich, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    The vibration-rotational matrix elements for infrared or Raman transitions vJ → v'J' of diatomic molecules are calculated for powers of the reduced displacement X from parameters of the Dunham potential-energy function. (orig.)

  12. METHOD FOR DETERMINATION OF ROTATION CENTER IN VIBRATING OBJECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. P. Kauryha

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear piezoelectric gauges, eddy current transducers and other control and measuring devices have been widely applied for vibration diagnostics of objects in industry. Methods based on such gauges and used for measuring angular and linear vibrations do not provide the possibility to assess a rotation center or point angle of an object. Parasitic oscillations may occur during rotor rotation and in some cases the oscillations are caused by dis-balance. The known methods for measuring angular and linear vibrations make it possible to detect the phenomenon and they do not provide information for balancing of the given object. For this very reason the paper describes a method for obtaining instantaneous rotation center in the vibrating object. It allows to improve informational content of the measurements owing to obtaining additional data on position of object rotation center. The obtained data can be used for balancing of a control object. Essence of the given method is shown by an example of piezoelectric gauges of linear vibrations. Two three-axial gauges are fixed to the investigated object. Then gauge output signals are recalculated in angular vibrations of the object (for this purpose it is necessary to know a distance between gauges. Further projection positions of the object rotation center are determined on three orthogonal planes. Instantaneous rotation center is calculated according to the position of one of the gauges. The proposed method permits to obtain data on linear and angular vibrations and rotation center position of the vibrating object using one system of linear gauge. Possibilities of object diagnostics are expanded due to increase in number of determined parameters pertaining to object moving. The method also makes it possible to reduce material and time expenses for measurement of an angular vibration component. 

  13. Rotational and vibrational synthetic spectra of linear parent molecules in comets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crovisier, J.

    1987-01-01

    We evaluate and model the excitation conditions of linear parent molecules in cometary atmospheres. The model is valid for most linear molecules without electronic angular momentum. It takes into account collisions and infrared excitation. The molecule rotational population distribution is computed as a function of distance to nucleus. The line intensities of the strongest parallel and perpendicular fundamental vibrational bands, as well as the pure rotational lines, can then be evaluated. This model is applied to several candidate parent molecules, for observing conditions corresponding to available or planned instruments, either ground-based or aboard aircrafts, satellites or space probes

  14. Off-axis Modal Active Vibration Control Of Rotational Vibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Babakhani, B.; de Vries, Theodorus J.A.; van Amerongen, J.

    Collocated active vibration control is an effective and robustly stable way of adding damping to the performance limiting vibrations of a plant. Besides the physical parameters of the Active Damping Unit (ADU) containing the collocated actuator and sensor, its location with respect to the

  15. An expert system for vibration based diagnostics of rotating machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korteniemi, A.

    1990-01-01

    Very often changes in the mechanical condition of the rotating machinery can be observed as changes in its vibration. This paper presents an expert system for vibration-based diagnosis of rotating machines by describing the architecture of the developed prototype system. The importance of modelling the problem solving knowledge as well as the domain knowledge is emphasized by presenting the knowledge in several levels

  16. Vibration-Induced Kinesthetic Illusions and Corticospinal Excitability Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheva, Kapka; Rollnik, Jens D; Wolf, Werner; Dengler, Reinhard; Kossev, Andon

    2017-01-01

    The authors' aim was to investigate the changes of corticospinal excitability during kinesthetic illusions induced by tendon vibration. Motor-evoked potentials in response to transcranial magnetic stimulation were recorded from the vibrated flexor carpi radialis and its antagonist, extensor carpi radialis. The illusions were evoked under vision conditions without feedback for the position of the wrist (open or closed eyes). In these two conditions motor-evoked potential changes during vibration in the antagonist were not identical. This discrepancy may be a result of 2 simultaneously acting, different and opposite influences and the balance between them depends on visual conditions. Thus, the illusion was accompanied by the facilitation of corticospinal excitability in both vibrated muscle and its antagonist.

  17. Calculations on the vibrational level density in highly excited formaldehyde

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashev, Svetoslav; Moule, David C.

    2003-01-01

    The object of the present work is to develop a model that provides realistic estimates of the vibrational level density in polyatomic molecules in a given electronic state, at very high (chemically relevant) vibrational excitation energies. For S 0 formaldehyde (D 2 CO), acetylene, and a number of triatomics, the estimates using conventional spectroscopic formulas have yielded densities at the dissociation threshold, very much lower than the experimentally measured values. In the present work we have derived a general formula for the vibrational energy levels of a polyatomic molecule, which is a generalization of the conventional Dunham spectroscopic expansion. Calculations were performed on the vibrational level density in S 0 D 2 CO, H 2 C 2 , and NO 2 at excitation energies in the vicinity of the dissociation limit, using the newly derived formula. The results from the calculations are in reasonable agreement with the experimentally measured data

  18. Collision dynamics of methyl radicals and highly vibrationally excited molecules using crossed molecular beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, P.M.Y.

    1991-10-01

    The vibrational to translational (V→T) energy transfer in collisions between large highly vibrationally excited polyatomics and rare gases was investigated by time-of-flight techniques. Two different methods, UV excitation followed by intemal conversion and infrared multiphoton excitation (IRMPE), were used to form vibrationally excited molecular beams of hexafluorobenzene and sulfur hexafluoride, respectively. The product translational energy was found to be independent of the vibrational excitation. These results indicate that the probability distribution function for V→T energy transfer is peaked at zero. The collisional relaxation of large polyatomic molecules with rare gases most likely occurs through a rotationally mediated process. Photodissociation of nitrobenzene in a molecular beam was studied at 266 nm. Two primary dissociation channels were identified including simple bond rupture to produce nitrogen dioxide and phenyl radical and isomerization to form nitric oxide and phenoxy radical. The time-of-flight spectra indicate that simple bond rupture and isomerization occurs via two different mechanisms. Secondary dissociation of the phenoxy radicals to carbon monoxide and cyclopentadienyl radicals was observed as well as secondary photodissociation of phenyl radical to give H atom and benzyne. A supersonic methyl radical beam source is developed. The beam source configuration and conditions were optimized for CH 3 production from the thermal decomposition of azomethane. Elastic scattering of methyl radical and neon was used to differentiate between the methyl radicals and the residual azomethane in the molecular beam

  19. Robust structural design against self-excited vibrations

    CERN Document Server

    Spelsberg-Korspeter, Gottfried

    2013-01-01

    This book studies methods for a robust design of rotors against self-excited vibrations. The occurrence of self-excited vibrations in engineering applications if often unwanted and in many cases difficult to model. Thinking of complex systems such as machines with many components and mechanical contacts, it is important to have guidelines for design so that the functionality is robust against small imperfections. This book discusses the question on how to design a structure such that unwanted self-excited vibrations do not occur. It shows theoretically and practically that the old design rule to avoid multiple eigenvalues points toward the right direction and have optimized structures accordingly. This extends results for the well-known flutter problem in which equations of motion with constant coefficients occur to the case of a linear conservative system with arbitrary time periodic perturbations.

  20. A study of vibrational relaxation of electronically-excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datsyuk, V.V.; Izmailov, I.A.; Kochelap, V.A.

    1992-09-01

    The time kinetics of the vibrational relaxation of excimers is studied in the diffusional approximation. Simple formulae for functions of nonstationary vibrational distribution are found for the electronically excited molecules. Some spectral-kinetic dependencies of the excimer luminescence are explained in a new way. The possibilities of the determination of excimer parameters are discussed. The dependence of energetical characteristics of excimer lasers on these parameters is particularly emphasized. (author). 22 refs, 5 figs

  1. Vibration analysis for trending ageing in rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinha, S.K.; Rama Rao, A.

    2006-01-01

    The need for condition monitoring system for important equipment and machinery is a growing requirement in every industry and more so in the nuclear power plants because of stringent safety requirements. This is largely because of the inherent benefit of being able to promote predictive maintenance practice rather than uneconomical preventive maintenance practice in the plant. Forerunner among the condition monitoring parameter is vibration signatures measured on a rotating machine. It is known that every moving element in a rotating machine generates vibration signal that is uniquely its own. Detection of such signals and monitoring the changing conditions in a machine through vibration analysis is a technique involving the knowledge of engineering art and the mathematical theory. This blend of sound engineering judgement and vibration data interpretation skill is in fact the basis of vibration diagnostic techniques. (author)

  2. Molecular equilibrium structures from experimental rotational constants and calculated vibration-rotation interaction constants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawlowski, F; Jorgensen, P; Olsen, Jeppe

    2002-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out of the accuracy of molecular equilibrium geometries obtained from least-squares fits involving experimental rotational constants B(0) and sums of ab initio vibration-rotation interaction constants alpha(r)(B). The vibration-rotation interaction constants have been...... calculated for 18 single-configuration dominated molecules containing hydrogen and first-row atoms at various standard levels of ab initio theory. Comparisons with the experimental data and tests for the internal consistency of the calculations show that the equilibrium structures generated using Hartree......-Fock vibration-rotation interaction constants have an accuracy similar to that obtained by a direct minimization of the CCSD(T) energy. The most accurate vibration-rotation interaction constants are those calculated at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ level. The equilibrium bond distances determined from these interaction...

  3. Vibrot, a simple device for the conversion of vibration into rotation mediated by friction: preliminary evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Altshuler

    Full Text Available While "vibrational noise" induced by rotating components of machinery is a common problem constantly faced by engineers, the controlled conversion of translational into rotational motion or vice-versa is a desirable goal in many scenarios ranging from internal combustion engines to ultrasonic motors. In this work, we describe the underlying physics after isolating a single degree of freedom, focusing on devices that convert a vibration along the vertical axis into a rotation around this axis. A typical Vibrot (as we label these devices consists of a rigid body with three or more cantilevered elastic legs attached to its bottom at an angle. We show that these legs are capable of transforming vibration into rotation by a "ratchet effect", which is caused by the anisotropic stick-slip-flight motion of the leg tips against the ground. Drawing an analogy with the Froude number used to classify the locomotion dynamics of legged animals, we discuss the walking regime of these robots. We are able to control the rotation frequency of the Vibrot by manipulating the shaking amplitude, frequency or waveform. Furthermore, we have been able to excite Vibrots with acoustic waves, which allows speculating about the possibility of reducing the size of the devices so they can perform tasks into the human body, excited by ultrasound waves from the outside.

  4. Vibrational excitation of D2 by low energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckman, S.J.; Phelps, A.V.

    1985-01-01

    Excitation coefficients for the production of vibrationally exicted D 2 by low energy electrons have been determined from measurements of the intensity of infrared emission from mixtures of D 2 and small concentrations of CO 2 or CO. The measurements were made using the electron drift tube technique and covered electric field to gas density ratios (E/n) from (5 to 80) x 10 -21 V m 2 , corresponding to mean electron energies between 0.45 and 4.5 eV. The CO 2 and CO concentrations were chosen to allow efficient excitation transfer from the D 2 to the carbon containing molecule, but to minimize direct excitation of the CO 2 or CO. The measured infrared intensities were normalized to predicted values for N 2 --CO 2 and N 2 --CO mixtures at E/n where the efficiency of vibrational excitation is known to be very close to 100%. The experimental excitation coefficients are in satisfactory agreement with predictions based on electron--D 2 cross sections at mean electron energies below 1 eV, but are about 50% too high at mean energies above about 2 eV. Application of the technique to H 2 did not yield useful vibrational excitation coefficients. The effective coefficients in H 2 --CO 2 mixtures were a factor of about 3 times the predicted values. For our H 2 --CO mixtures the excitation of CO via excitation transfer from H 2 is small compared to direct electron excitation of CO molecules. Published experiments and theories on electron--H 2 and electron--D 2 collisions are reviewed to obtain the cross sections used in the predictions

  5. Quantum control of vibrational excitations in a heteronuclear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    WINTEC

    Optimal control theory is applied to obtain infrared laser pulses for selective vibrational exci- tation in a ... introduced in the field prior to evaluation of the cost functional for better field shape. Conjugate ... focused greater attention on optimal control of quan- tum states ... from the ground state to the first excited state in a.

  6. On the nature of highly vibrationally excited states of thiophosgene

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Understanding the nature of the highly excited molecu- lar eigenstates is equivalent to deciphering the mecha- nism of intramolecular vibrational energy redistribution. (IVR) occurring in the molecule.1 However, the assign- ment of eigenstates is far from simple. The existence of and interplay of several strong anharmonic ...

  7. Spectroscopic probes of vibrationally excited molecules at chemically significant energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rizzo, T.R. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project involves the application of multiple-resonance spectroscopic techniques for investigating energy transfer and dissociation dynamics of highly vibrationally excited molecules. Two major goals of this work are: (1) to provide information on potential energy surfaces of combustion related molecules at chemically significant energies, and (2) to test theoretical modes of unimolecular dissociation rates critically via quantum-state resolved measurements.

  8. Energy-dependent collisional deactivation of vibrationally excited azulene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, J.; Barker, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Collisional energy transfer parameters for highly vibrationally excited azulene have been deduced from new infrared fluorescence (IRF) emission lifetime data with an improved calibration relating IRF intensity to vibrational energy [J. Shi, D. Bernfeld, and J. R. Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 88, XXXX (1988), preceding paper]. In addition, data from previous experiments [M. J. Rossi, J. R. Pladziewicz, and J. R. Barker, J. Chem. Phys. 78, 6695 (1983)] have been reanalyzed based on the improved calibration. Inversion of the IRF decay curves produced plots of energy decay, which were analyzed to determine , the average energy transferred per collision. Master equation simulations reproduced both the original IRF decays and the deduced energy decays. A third (simple) method of determination agrees well with the other two. The results show to be nearly directly proportional to the vibrational energy of the excited azulene from ∼8000 to 33 000 cm -1 . At high energies, there are indications that the energy dependence may be slightly reduced

  9. Electron scattering by CO2: Elastic scattering, rotational excitation, and excitation of the asymmetric stretch at 10 eV impact energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirumalai, D.; Onda, K.; Truhlar, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    Coupled-channels calculations based on an effective potential are presented for electron scattering by CO 2 at 10 eV impact energy. The processes studied are pure elastic scattering, rotational excitation, and vibrational excitation of the asymmetric stretch; the vibrational excitation is always accompanied by rotational excitation. The quantities calculated are differential, partial, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections, both state to state and summed over final rotational states for a given final vibrational level. The effective potential is based on the INDOX2/1s method for the static and polarization potentials and the semiclassical exchange approximation for the exchange potential. There are no empirical parameters. The present calculations are compared to experiment and to previous calculations where available, and we also perform calculations with an altered polarization potential to further elucidate the reasons for the differences from one of the previous calculations. The agreement of the present results with the experimental rotationally summed, vibrationally inelastic differential cross section is excellent

  10. UV dissociation of vibrationally excited UF6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexandre, M.; Clerc, M.; Gagnon, R.; Gilbert, M.; Isnard, P.; Nectoux, P.; Rigny, P.; Weulersse, J.M.

    1983-01-01

    Before application of laser photodissociation of UF 6 to the separation of uranium isotopes becomes practical, isotopic selectivity should be optimized. We present here results on the cross sections involved in the irradiation of UF 6 simultaneously with infrared and ultraviolet lasers, as a function of wavelengths, fluence and temperature (at 293 K and 105 K, in an adiabatic expansion). The experiment uses a Nd 3+ YAG pumped lithium niobate optical parametric oscillator as a tunable 16 μ light source. Energies of the order of 1 mJ can be obtained with linewidths smaller than 0.1 cm - . The UV source used is based on ND 3+ YAG pumped dye laser and various frequency mixing schemes. At low temperature the frequency variation of the absorbed infrared energy per molecule depends markedly on the IR fluence phisub(IR) with a maximum value varying as phisub(IR)sup(-1/2) and a frequency extension far beyond the low level absorption spectrum. The absorbed vibrational energy leads to a change in the UV cross section comparable with the effect of a rise in temperature. Using this a model is put forward to express the isotopic selectivity 235 U/ 238 U as a function of UV wavelength and IR irradiation conditions. Experimental results agree with this model, and yield to maximum selectivity close to two [fr

  11. On selection rules in vibrational and rotational molecular spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guichardet, A.

    1986-01-01

    The aim of this work is a rigorous proof of the Selection Rules in Molecular Spectroscopy (Vibration and Rotation). To get this we give mathematically rigorous definitions of the (tensor) transition operators, in this case the electric dipole moment; this is done, firstly by considering the molecule as a set of point atomic kernels performing arbitrary motions, secondly by limiting ourselves either to infinitesimal vibration motions, or to arbitrary rotation motions. Then the selection rules follow from an abstract formulation of the Wigner-Eckart theorem. In a last paragraph we discuss the problem of separating vibration and rotation motions; very simple ideas from Differential Geometry, linked with the ''slice theorem'', allow us to define the relative speeds, the solid motions speeds, the Coriolis energies and the moving Eckart frames [fr

  12. Simultaneous rotational and vibrational CARS generation through a multiple-frequency combination technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alden, M.; Bengtsson, P.E.; Edner, H.

    1987-01-01

    One most promising laser technique for probing combustion processes is coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), which due to its coherent nature and signal strength is applied in several real-world applications. Until today almost all CARS experiments are based on probing the population of molecular vibrational energy levels. However, there are several reasons rotational CARS, i.e. probing of rotational energy levels, may provide a complement to or even a better choice than vibrational CARS. Recently an alternative way to produce rotational CARS spectra is proposed, which is based on a multiple-frequency combination technique. The energy-level diagram for this process is presented. Two dye laser beams at ω/sub r/, and one fix frequency laser beam at ω/sub g/ are employed. ω/sub r,1/ and ω/sub r,2/ are two frequencies of many possible pairs with a frequency difference matching a rotational transition in a molecule. The excitation induced by ω/sub r,1/ and ω/sub r,2/ is then scattered by the narrowband ω/sub g/ beam resulting in a CARS beam ω/sub g/ at ω/sub g/ + ω/sub r,1/ - ω/sub r,2/. An interesting feature with this technique is that it is possible to generate simultaneously a rotational and vibrational CARS spectrum by using a double-folded boxcars phase matching approach. The authors believe that the proposed technique for producing rotational and vibration CARS spectra could be of interest, e.g., when measuring in highly turbulent flows. In this case the rotational CARS spectra could use for temperature measurements in the cooler parts, whereas vibrational CARS are to be preferred when measuring in the hotter parts

  13. INTERPRETATION OF INFRARED VIBRATION-ROTATION SPECTRA OF INTERSTELLAR AND CIRCUMSTELLAR MOLECULES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacy, John H.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared vibration-rotation lines can be valuable probes of interstellar and circumstellar molecules, especially symmetric molecules, which have no pure rotational transitions. But most such observations have been interpreted with an isothermal absorbing slab model, which leaves out important radiative transfer and molecular excitation effects. A more realistic non-LTE and non-isothermal radiative transfer model has been constructed. The results of this model are in much better agreement with the observations, including cases where lines in one branch of a vibration-rotation band are in absorption and another in emission. In general, conclusions based on the isothermal absorbing slab model can be very misleading, but the assumption of LTE may not lead to such large errors, particularly if the radiation field temperature is close to the gas temperature.

  14. A microscopic derivation of nuclear collective rotation-vibration model and its application to nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulshani, P., E-mail: matlap@bell.net [NUTECH Services, 3313 Fenwick Crescent, Mississauga, Ontario, L5L 5N1 (Canada)

    2016-07-07

    We derive a microscopic version of the successful phenomenological hydrodynamic model of Bohr-Davydov-Faessler-Greiner for collective rotation-vibration motion of an axially symmetric deformed nucleus. The derivation is not limited to small oscillation amplitude. The nuclear Schrodinger equation is canonically transformed to collective co-ordinates, which is then linearized using a constrained variational method. The associated constraints are imposed on the wavefunction rather than on the particle co-ordinates. The approach yields three self-consistent, time-reversal invariant, cranking-type Schrodinger equations for the rotation-vibration and intrinsic motions, and a self-consistency equation. For harmonic oscillator mean-field potentials, these equations are solved in closed forms for excitation energy, cut-off angular momentum, and other nuclear properties for the ground-state rotational band in some deformed nuclei. The results are compared with measured data.

  15. Spatial distribution of FIR rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar PDR⋆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, A.; Habart, E.; Bernard-Salas, J.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Abergel, A.; Pilleri, P.; Dartois, E.; Joblin, C.; Gerin, M.; Godard, B.

    2016-01-01

    Context The methylidyne cation (CH+) and hydroxyl (OH) are key molecules in the warm interstellar chemistry, but their formation and excitation mechanisms are not well understood. Their abundance and excitation are predicted to be enhanced by the presence of vibrationally excited H2 or hot gas (~500–1000 K) in photodissociation regions with high incident FUV radiation field. The excitation may also originate in dense gas (> 105 cm−3) followed by nonreactive collisions with H2, H, and electrons. Previous observations of the Orion Bar suggest that the rotationally excited CH+ and OH correlate with the excited CO, a tracer of dense and warm gas, and formation pumping contributes to CH+ excitation. Aims Our goal is to examine the spatial distribution of the rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar in order to establish their physical origin and main formation and excitation mechanisms. Methods We present spatially sampled maps of the CH+ J=3-2 transition at 119.8 µm and the OH Λ-doublet at 84 µm in the Orion Bar over an area of 110″×110″ with Herschel (PACS). We compare the spatial distribution of these molecules with those of their chemical precursors, C+, O and H2, and tracers of warm and dense gas (high-J CO). We assess the spatial variation of CH+ J=2-1 velocity-resolved line profile at 1669 GHz with Herschel HIFI spectrometer observations. Results The OH and especially CH+ lines correlate well with the high-J CO emission and delineate the warm and dense molecular region at the edge of the Bar. While notably similar, the differences in the CH+ and OH morphologies indicate that CH+ formation and excitation are strongly related to the observed vibrationally excited H2. This, together with the observed broad CH+ line widths, indicates that formation pumping contributes to the excitation of this reactive molecular ion. Interestingly, the peak of the rotationally excited OH 84 µm emission coincides with a bright young object, proplyd

  16. Spatial distribution of FIR rotationally excited CH+ and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar PDR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikka, A; Habart, E; Bernard-Salas, J; Goicoechea, J R; Abergel, A; Pilleri, P; Dartois, E; Joblin, C; Gerin, M; Godard, B

    2017-03-01

    The methylidyne cation (CH + ) and hydroxyl (OH) are key molecules in the warm interstellar chemistry, but their formation and excitation mechanisms are not well understood. Their abundance and excitation are predicted to be enhanced by the presence of vibrationally excited H 2 or hot gas (~500-1000 K) in photodissociation regions with high incident FUV radiation field. The excitation may also originate in dense gas (> 10 5 cm -3 ) followed by nonreactive collisions with H 2 , H, and electrons. Previous observations of the Orion Bar suggest that the rotationally excited CH + and OH correlate with the excited CO, a tracer of dense and warm gas, and formation pumping contributes to CH + excitation. Our goal is to examine the spatial distribution of the rotationally excited CH + and OH emission lines in the Orion Bar in order to establish their physical origin and main formation and excitation mechanisms. We present spatially sampled maps of the CH + J=3-2 transition at 119.8 µm and the OH Λ-doublet at 84 µm in the Orion Bar over an area of 110″×110″ with Herschel (PACS). We compare the spatial distribution of these molecules with those of their chemical precursors, C + , O and H 2 , and tracers of warm and dense gas (high-J CO). We assess the spatial variation of CH + J=2-1 velocity-resolved line profile at 1669 GHz with Herschel HIFI spectrometer observations. The OH and especially CH + lines correlate well with the high-J CO emission and delineate the warm and dense molecular region at the edge of the Bar. While notably similar, the differences in the CH + and OH morphologies indicate that CH + formation and excitation are strongly related to the observed vibrationally excited H 2 . This, together with the observed broad CH + line widths, indicates that formation pumping contributes to the excitation of this reactive molecular ion. Interestingly, the peak of the rotationally excited OH 84 µm emission coincides with a bright young object, proplyd 244

  17. Dynamic balancing of super-critical rotating structures using slow-speed data via parametric excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tresser, Shachar; Dolev, Amit; Bucher, Izhak

    2018-02-01

    High-speed machinery is often designed to pass several "critical speeds", where vibration levels can be very high. To reduce vibrations, rotors usually undergo a mass balancing process, where the machine is rotated at its full speed range, during which the dynamic response near critical speeds can be measured. High sensitivity, which is required for a successful balancing process, is achieved near the critical speeds, where a single deflection mode shape becomes dominant, and is excited by the projection of the imbalance on it. The requirement to rotate the machine at high speeds is an obstacle in many cases, where it is impossible to perform measurements at high speeds, due to harsh conditions such as high temperatures and inaccessibility (e.g., jet engines). This paper proposes a novel balancing method of flexible rotors, which does not require the machine to be rotated at high speeds. With this method, the rotor is spun at low speeds, while subjecting it to a set of externally controlled forces. The external forces comprise a set of tuned, response dependent, parametric excitations, and nonlinear stiffness terms. The parametric excitation can isolate any desired mode, while keeping the response directly linked to the imbalance. A software controlled nonlinear stiffness term limits the response, hence preventing the rotor to become unstable. These forces warrant sufficient sensitivity required to detect the projection of the imbalance on any desired mode without rotating the machine at high speeds. Analytical, numerical and experimental results are shown to validate and demonstrate the method.

  18. Group-theoretical and topological analysis of localized rotation-vibration states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadovskii, D.A.; Zhilinskii, B.I.

    1993-01-01

    A general scheme of qualitative analysis is applied to molecular rovibrational problems. The classical-quantum correspondence provides a description of different classes of localized quantum rotation-vibration states associated with localized classical motion. A description of qualitative features, such as localized motion, and of qualitative changes, such as localization phenomena, is based on the concept of the simplest Hamiltonian. It uses only the topological properties of the compact reduced phase space and the action of the symmetry group on this space. The qualitative changes of the simplest Hamiltonian are analyzed as bifurcations caused by rotational or vibrational excitation. The relation between the stationary points of the classical Hamiltonian function on the reduced phase space and the principal periodic trajectories in the coordinate space is analyzed for vibrational Hamiltonians. In particular, the relation between the nonlinear normal modes, proposed by Montaldi, Roberts, and Stewart [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 325, 237 (1988)], and normal- and local-mode models widely used in molecular physics is discussed. Along with a general consideration of localized rotational and vibrational states a more detailed analysis of the vibrational dynamics of an X 3 molecule with the D 3h symmetry, such as the H 3 + molecular ion, is given

  19. How do nuclei really vibrate or rotate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andresen, H.G.; Kunz, J.; Mosel, U.; Mueller, M.; Schuh, A.; Wust, U.

    1983-01-01

    By means of the adiabatic cranking model the properties of the current and velocity fields of nuclear quadrupole vibrations for even-even nuclei in the rare-earth region are investigated. BCS correlated wave functions based on the Nilsson single particle Hamiltonian have been used. The current fields are analyzed in terms of vector spherical harmonics. The realistic microscopic currents show a vortex structure not present in the classical irrotational flow. The microscopic origin of the vortex structure is investigated

  20. Construction of a Vibration Monitoring System for HANARO's Rotating Machinery and Analysis of Pump Vibration Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jeong Soo; Yoon, Doo Byung

    2005-01-01

    HANARO is an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor with a thermal power of 30MW. In order to remove the heat generated by the reactor core and the reflector vessel, primary cooling pumps and reflector cooling pumps circulate coolant. These pumps are installed at the RCI(Reactor Concrete Island) which is covered by heavy concrete hatches. For the prevention of an abnormal operation of these pumps in the RCI, it is necessary to construct a vibration monitoring system that provides an alarm signal to the reactor control room when the rotating speed or the vibration level exceeds the allowable limit. The first objective of this work is to construct a vibration monitoring system for HANARO's rotating machinery. The second objective is to verify the possibility of condition monitoring of the rotating machinery. To construct a vibration monitoring system, as a first step, the standards and references related to the vibration monitoring system were investigated. In addition, to determine the number and the location of sensors that can effectively characterize the overall vibration of a pump, the vibration of the primary cooling pumps and the reflector cooling pumps were measured. Based on these results, detailed construction plans for the vibration monitoring system for HANARO were established. Then, in accordance with the construction plans, the vibration monitoring system for HANARO's rotating machinery was manufactured and installed at HANARO. To achieve the second objective, FFT analysis and bearing fault detection of the measured vibration signals were performed. The analysis results demonstrate that the accelerometers mounted at the bearing locations of the pumps can effectively monitor the pump condition

  1. Rotational-vibrational coupling in the BPS Skyrme model of baryons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, C.; Naya, C.; Sanchez-Guillen, J. [Departamento de Física de Partículas, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela and Instituto Galego de Física de Altas Enerxias (IGFAE), E-15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Wereszczynski, A. [Institute of Physics, Jagiellonian University, Reymonta 4, Kraków (Poland)

    2013-11-04

    We calculate the rotational-vibrational spectrum in the BPS Skyrme model for the hedgehog skyrmion with baryon number one. The resulting excitation energies for the nucleon and delta Roper resonances are slightly above their experimental values. Together with the fact that in the standard Skyrme model these excitation energies are significantly lower than the experimental ones, this provides strong evidence for the conjecture that the inclusion of the BPS Skyrme model is required for a successful quantitative description of physical properties of baryons and nuclei.

  2. Solar excitation of bicentennial Earth rotation oscillations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ron, Cyril; Chapanov, Y.; Vondrák, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 3 (2012), s. 259-268 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/08/0908 Grant - others:Bulgarian NSF(BG) DO02-275; FP7(BG) MCA PIRSES-GA-2009-246874 Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Earth rotation * solar activity Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 0.530, year: 2011

  3. Behavior of ro-vibrationally excited H2 molecules and H atoms in a plasma expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vankan, P.; Schram, D.C.; Engeln, R.

    2005-01-01

    The behavior in a supersonic plasma expansion of H atom and H2 molecules, both ground-state and ro-vibrationally excited, is studied using various laser spectroscopic techniques. The ground-state H2 molecules expand like a normal gas. The behavior of H atoms and H 2 rv molecules, on the other hand, is considerably influenced, and to some extend even determined, by their reactivity. The H atoms diffuse out of the expansion due to surface association at the walls of the vacuum vessel. Moreover, by reducing the surface area of the nozzle by a factor of two, the amount of H atoms leaving the source is increased by one order of magnitude, due to a decreased surface association of H atoms in the nozzle. The evolution of the ro-vibrational distributions along the expansion axis shows the relaxation of the molecular hydrogen from the high temperature in the up-stream region to the low ambient temperature in the down-stream region. Whereas the vibrational distribution resembles a Boltzmann distribution, the rotational distribution is a non-equilibrium one, in which the high rotational levels (J > 7) are much more populated than what is expected from the low rotational levels (J <5). We observed overpopulations of up to seven orders of magnitude. The production of the high rotational levels is very probably connected to the surface association in the nozzle

  4. Structural Characteristics of Rotate Vector Reducer Free Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For RV reducer widely used in robots, vibration significantly affects its performance. A lumped parameter model is developed to investigate free vibration characteristics without and with gyroscopic effects. The dynamic model considers key factors affecting vibration such as involute and cycloid gear mesh stiffness, crankshaft bending stiffness, and bearing stiffness. For both nongyroscopic and gyroscopic systems, free vibrations are examined and compared with each other. Results reveal the specific structure of vibration modes for both systems, which results from symmetry structure of RV reducer. According to vibration of the central components, vibration modes of two systems can be classified into three types, rotational, translational, and planetary component modes. Different from nongyroscopic system, the eigenvalues with gyroscopic effects are complex-valued and speed-dependent. The eigenvalue for a range of carrier speeds is obtained by numerical simulation. Divergence and flutter instability is observed at speeds adjacent to critical speeds. Furthermore, the work studies effects of key factors, which include crankshaft eccentricity and the number of pins, on eigenvalues. Finally, experiment is performed to verify the effectiveness of the dynamic model. The research of this paper is helpful for the analysis on free vibration and dynamic design of RV reducer.

  5. Diagnosis of subharmonic vibrations in rotating machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mott, J.E.

    1977-01-01

    The subject is discussed by reference to figures entitled as follows: an illustration of a shaft, mounted on rigid bearings, subjected to such a vibration; an illustration of fluid bearing whip; the displacement spectrum of an 1190 rpm (20Hz) pump with fluid bearing whip; an illustration of rubbing or dry frictional whip; the displacement spectrum measured by two sensors, located at the ten o'clock and two o'clock positions, on a horizontal pump with rub; and the vector resultant of these displacements, portraying the effect of two rubbing conditions. (UK)

  6. Structure of vibrational and rotational nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otsuka, Takaharu

    1980-01-01

    The nuclear collective motion is discussed in terms of the Interacting Boson Model (IBM). Results of phenomenological studies by the IBM are presented, and the relation between the IBM and the geometrical models such as the vibration model, the rotor model, etc., is pointed out. A microscopic picture for the IBM is shown, in which bosons are introduced as a tool to describe the motion of nucleon pairs. It is emphasized that the IBM can give a unified understanding of the nuclear collective motion. (author)

  7. Resonant vibrations and acoustic radiation of rotating spherical structures.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available involved into rotation (precession) with respect to the inertial space with scale factors depending on nature of elastic modes and their numbers. Corresponding scales factors or Bryan’s factors of the vibrating mode’s precession are calculated depending...

  8. Vibratory synchronization transmission of a cylindrical roller in a vibrating mechanical system excited by two exciters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xueliang; Wen, Bangchun; Zhao, Chunyu

    2017-11-01

    In present work vibratory synchronization transmission (VST) of a cylindrical roller with dry friction in a vibrating mechanical system excited by two exciters, is studied. Using the average method, the criterion of implementing synchronization of two exciters and that of ensuring VST of a roller, are achieved. The criterion of stability of the synchronous states satisfies the Routh-Hurwitz principle. The influences of the structural parameters of the system to synchronization and stability, are discussed numerically, which can be served as the theoretical foundation for engineering designs. An experiment is carried out, which approximately verify the validity of the theoretical and numerical results, as well as the feasibility of the method used. Utilizing the VST theory of a roller, some types of vibrating crushing or grinding equipments, etc., can be designed.

  9. Synchronization of Two Asymmetric Exciters in a Vibrating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhaohui Ren

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate synchronization of two asymmetric exciters in a vibrating system. Using the modified average method of small parameters, we deduce the non-dimensional coupling differential equations of the two exciters (NDDETE. By using the condition of existence for the zero solutions of the NDDETE, the condition of implementing synchronization is deduced: the torque of frequency capture is equal to or greater than the difference in the output electromagnetic torque between the two motors. Using the Routh-Hurwitz criterion, we deduce the condition of stability of synchronization that the inertia coupling matrix of the two exciters is positive definite. A numeric result shows that the structural parameters can meet the need of synchronization stability.

  10. Fluorescence Imaging of Rotational and Vibrational Temperature in a Shock Tunnel Nozzle Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Philip C.; Danehy, Paul M.; Houwing, A. F. P.

    2003-01-01

    Two-dimensional rotational and vibrational temperature measurements were made at the nozzle exit of a free-piston shock tunnel using planar laser-induced fluorescence. The Mach 7 flow consisted predominantly of nitrogen with a trace quantity of nitric oxide. Nitric oxide was employed as the probe species and was excited at 225 nm. Nonuniformities in the distribution of nitric oxide in the test gas were observed and were concluded to be due to contamination of the test gas by driver gas or cold test gas.The nozzle-exit rotational temperature was measured and is in reasonable agreement with computational modeling. Nonlinearities in the detection system were responsible for systematic errors in the measurements. The vibrational temperature was measured to be constant with distance from the nozzle exit, indicating it had frozen during the nozzle expansion.

  11. Rotational distributions of molecular photoions following resonant excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poliakoff, E.D.; Chan, J.C.K.; White, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    We demonstrate that the photoelectron energy mediates the rotational energy distribution of N + 2 ions created by photoionization, and conversely, that rotational energy determinations probe resonant excitation in molecular photoionization. Experimentally, this is accomplished by monitoring the dispersed fluorescence from N + 2 (B 2 Σ + /sub u/) photoions to determine their rotational energy distribution. These results demonstrate that while dipole selection rules constrain the total angular momentum of the electron--ion complex, the partitioning of angular momentum between the photoelectron and photoion depends on the photoejection dynamics. Implications for photoionization and electron impact ionizatin studies are discussed

  12. Eckart frame vibration-rotation Hamiltonians: Contravariant metric tensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesonen, Janne

    2014-01-01

    Eckart frame is a unique embedding in the theory of molecular vibrations and rotations. It is defined by the condition that the Coriolis coupling of the reference structure of the molecule is zero for every choice of the shape coordinates. It is far from trivial to set up Eckart kinetic energy operators (KEOs), when the shape of the molecule is described by curvilinear coordinates. In order to obtain the KEO, one needs to set up the corresponding contravariant metric tensor. Here, I derive explicitly the Eckart frame rotational measuring vectors. Their inner products with themselves give the rotational elements, and their inner products with the vibrational measuring vectors (which, in the absence of constraints, are the mass-weighted gradients of the shape coordinates) give the Coriolis elements of the contravariant metric tensor. The vibrational elements are given as the inner products of the vibrational measuring vectors with themselves, and these elements do not depend on the choice of the body-frame. The present approach has the advantage that it does not depend on any particular choice of the shape coordinates, but it can be used in conjunction with all shape coordinates. Furthermore, it does not involve evaluation of covariant metric tensors, chain rules of derivation, or numerical differentiation, and it can be easily modified if there are constraints on the shape of the molecule. Both the planar and non-planar reference structures are accounted for. The present method is particular suitable for numerical work. Its computational implementation is outlined in an example, where I discuss how to evaluate vibration-rotation energies and eigenfunctions of a general N-atomic molecule, the shape of which is described by a set of local polyspherical coordinates

  13. Flow induced vibrational excitation of nuclear reactor structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibert, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    The pressure fluctuations generated by disturbed flows, encountered in nuclear reactors induce vibrations in the structures. In order to make forecastings for these vibrational levels, it is necessary to know the characteristics of the random pressure fluctuations induced in the walls by the main flow peculiarities of the circuits. This knowledge is essentially provided by experimentation which shows that most of the energy from these fluctuations is in the low frequency area. It is also necessary to determine the transfer functions of the fluid-structure coupled system. Given the frequency range of the excitations, a calculation of the characteristics of the first eigenmodes is generally sufficient. This calculation is carried out by finite element codes, the modal dampings being assessed separately. In this paper, emphasis is placed mainly on the analysis of the sources of excitation due to flow peculiarities. Some examples will also be given of assessments of vibrations in real structures (pipes, reactor internals, etc.) and of comparisons with the experimental results obtained on models or on a site [fr

  14. Analysis of collective excitations of rapidly rotating nuclei in an oscillator potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akbarov, A.; Ignatyuk, A.V.; Mikhailov, I.N.; Molina, K.L.; Nazmitdinov, R.G.; Janssen, D.

    1981-01-01

    The spectrum of positive-parity collective excitations is analyzed in the random phase approximation for a wide range of angular momenta. The Hamiltonian of the model is taken in the form of a spherical harmonic-oscillator potential and isoscalar quadrupole forces. This model permits a description of the known data on the position of a giant quadrupole resonance for small spins and allows the variation of the resonance characteristics to be followed as the spin increases. It is shown that as the rotation velocity increases the energy of one of the branches of the resonance decreases to zero while the state remains strongly collectivized. The model also reproduces the low energy vibration mode which is related to the precession mode. The excitation energy and the B(E2) factor corresponding to this mode differ considerably from the estimates obtained in the rigid rotator model

  15. Self-excited vibration control for axially fast excited beam by a time delay state feedback

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamdi, Mustapha; Belhaq, Mohamed

    2009-01-01

    This work examines the control of self-excited vibration of a simply-supported beam subjected to an axially high-frequency excitation. The investigation of the resonant cases are not considered in this paper. The control is implemented via a corrective position feedback with time delay. The objective of this control is to eliminate the undesirable self-excited vibrations with an appropriate choice of parameters. The issue of stability is also addressed in this paper. Using the technique of direct partition of motion, the dynamic of discretized equations is separated into slow and fast components. The multiple scales method is then performed on the slow dynamic to obtain a slow flow for the amplitude and phase. Analysis of this slow flow provides analytical approximations locating regions in parameters space where undesirable self-excited vibration can be eliminated. A numerical study of these regions is performed on the original discretized system and compared to the analytical prediction showing a good agreement.

  16. Identification of rotating and vibrating tetrahedrons in the heavy nucleus {sup 208}Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heusler, A.

    2017-11-15

    Ten known states in the heavy nucleus {sup 208}Pb at 2.6 < E{sub x} < 7.9 MeV are described by rotating and vibrating tetrahedrons. The 3{sup -} and 4{sup +} yrast states are the first members of the rotational band. A 2{sup ±} doublet state with the 2{sup +} yrast state as one member and the newly recognized 2{sup -} yrast state as the other member, the 1{sup -} yrast state, and the third 0{sup +} state are the heads of the three elementary tetrahedral rotating and vibrating bands. The newly recognized state at E{sub x} = 4142 keV was assigned spin 2 in 1975 and is suggested to have negative parity by the absent {sup 208}Pb(α, α{sup '}) excitation. Four more states at 5.7 < E{sub x} < 7.9 MeV are identified as the next members of the three elementary tetrahedral rotating and vibrating bands. The ambiguous spin assignment to the state at E{sub x} = 7020 keV is settled with 3{sup -}, the state at E{sub x} = 7137 keV is assigned 4{sup -}. (orig.)

  17. Vibrational-rotational model of odd-odd nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'ev, A.V.; Guseva, T.V.; Tamberg, Yu.Ya.

    1988-01-01

    The rotational vibrational (RV) model of odd nuclei is generalized to odd-odd nuclei. The hamiltonian, wave functions and matrix elements of the RV-model of odd-odd nuclei are obtained. The expressions obtained for matrix elements of the RV-model of odd-odd nuclei can be used to study the role of vibrational additions in low-lying two-particle states of odd-odd deformed nuclei. Such calculations permit to study more correctly the residual neutron-proton interaction of valent nucleons with respect to collectivization effects

  18. Non-adiabatic rotational excitation of dipolar molecule under the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Chem. Sci. Vol. 125, No. 5, September 2013, pp. 1213–1221. c Indian Academy of Sciences. ... The rotational wave packets of LiCl molecule excited non-adiabatically by half cycle pulse. (HCP) is .... pared to the intensities required for the ionization of ..... out and with delayed ultrashort HCP at different initial pulse dura-.

  19. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H + and OH - ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H 2 O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10 -9 to 4 x 10 -5 for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm -1 . In D 2 O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H 2 O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D 2 O than for excitation of D 2 O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H 2 O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1 0 C

  20. Dissociative ionization of liquid water induced by vibrational overtone excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natzle, W.C.

    1983-03-01

    Photochemistry of vibrationally activated ground electronic state liquid water to produce H/sup +/ and OH/sup -/ ions has been initiated by pulsed, single-photon excitation of overtone and combination transitions. Transient conductivity measurements were used to determine quantum yields as a function of photon energy, isotopic composition, and temperature. The equilibrium relaxation rate following perturbation by the vibrationally activated reaction was also measured as a function of temperature reaction and isotopic composition. In H/sub 2/O, the quantum yield at 283 +- 1 K varies from 2 x 10/sup -9/ to 4 x 10/sup -5/ for wave numbers between 7605 and 18140 cm/sup -1/. In D/sub 2/O, the dependence of quantum yield on wavelength has the same qualitative shape as for H/sub 2/O, but is shifted to lower quantum yields. The position of a minimum in the quantum yield versus hydrogen mole fraction curve is consistent with a lower quantum yield for excitation of HOD in D/sub 2/O than for excitation of D/sub 2/O. The ionic recombination distance of 5.8 +- 0.5 A is constant within experimental error with temperature in H/sub 2/O and with isotopic composition at 25 +- 1/sup 0/C.

  1. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  2. Probing highly obscured, self-absorbed galaxy nuclei with vibrationally excited HCN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aalto, S.; Martín, S.; Costagliola, F.; González-Alfonso, E.; Muller, S.; Sakamoto, K.; Fuller, G. A.; García-Burillo, S.; van der Werf, P.; Neri, R.; Spaans, M.; Combes, F.; Viti, S.; Mühle, S.; Armus, L.; Evans, A.; Sturm, E.; Cernicharo, J.; Henkel, C.; Greve, T. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present high resolution (0.̋4) IRAM PdBI and ALMA mm and submm observations of the (ultra) luminous infrared galaxies ((U)LIRGs) IRAS 17208-0014, Arp220, IC 860 and Zw049.057 that reveal intense line emission from vibrationally excited (ν2 = 1) J = 3-2 and 4-3 HCN. The emission is emerging from buried, compact (r 5 × 1013 L⊙ kpc-2. These nuclei are likely powered by accreting supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and/or hot (>200 K) extreme starbursts. Vibrational, ν2 = 1, lines of HCN are excited by intense 14 μm mid-infrared emission and are excellent probes of the dynamics, masses, and physical conditions of (U)LIRG nuclei when H2 column densities exceed 1024 cm-2. It is clear that these lines open up a new interesting avenue to gain access to the most obscured AGNs and starbursts. Vibrationally excited HCN acts as a proxy for the absorbed mid-infrared emission from the embedded nuclei, which allows for reconstruction of the intrinsic, hotter dust SED. In contrast, we show strong evidence that the ground vibrational state (ν = 0), J = 3-2and 4-3 rotational lines of HCN and HCO+ fail to probe the highly enshrouded, compact nuclear regions owing to strong self- and continuum absorption. The HCN and HCO+ line profiles are double-peaked because of the absorption and show evidence of non-circular motions - possibly in the form of in- or outflows. Detections of vibrationally excited HCN in external galaxies are so far limited to ULIRGs and early-type spiral LIRGs, and we discuss possible causes for this. We tentatively suggest that the peak of vibrationally excited HCN emission is connected to a rapid stage of nuclear growth, before the phase of strong feedback. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM Plateau de Bure and ALMA Interferometers. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany), and IGN (Spain). ALMA is a partnership of ESO (representing its member states), NSF (USA), and NINS (Japan), together with NRC (Canada) and NSC and ASIAA

  3. Vibration control in smart coupled beams subjected to pulse excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarski, Dominik; Bajer, Czesław I.; Dyniewicz, Bartłomiej; Bajkowski, Jacek M.

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, a control method to stabilize the vibration of adjacent structures is presented. The control is realized by changes of the stiffness parameters of the structure's couplers. A pulse excitation applied to the coupled adjacent beams is imposed as the kinematic excitation. For such a representation, the designed control law provides the best rate of energy dissipation. By means of a stability analysis, the performance in different structural settings is studied. The efficiency of the proposed strategy is examined via numerical simulations. In terms of the assumed energy metric, the controlled structure outperforms its passively damped equivalent by over 50 percent. The functionality of the proposed control strategy should attract the attention of practising engineers who seek solutions to upgrade existing damping systems.

  4. Molecular vibration-rotation spectra starting from the Fues potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ley Koo, E.

    1976-01-01

    The solution of Schroedinger's equation for the Fues potential is analyzed and compared with the corresponding problems for the Coulomb, harmonic oscillator and molecular potentials. These comparisons allow us to emphasize certain pedagogical, conceptual and computational advantages of the Fues potential which make it a favorable alternative as the starting point in the analysis of molecular vibration-rotation and in the determination of potential energy curves. (author)

  5. Resonances in photoionization. Cross section for vibrationally excited H2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mezei, J.Zs.; Jungen, Ch.

    2011-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Diatomic molecular Hydrogen is the most abundant molecule in interstellar molecular clouds. The modeling of these environments relies on accurate cross sections for the various relevant processes. Among them, the photoionization plays a major role in the kinetics and in the energy exchanges involving H 2 . The recent discovery of vibrationally excited molecular hydrogen in extragalactic environments revealed the need for accurate evaluation of the corresponding photoionization cross sections. In the present work we report theoretical photoionization cross sections for excitation from excited vibrational levels of the ground state, dealing with the Q(N = 1) (ΔN = 0, where N is the total angular momentum of the molecule) transitions which account for roughly one third of the total photoabsorption cross section. We will focus on the v' = 1 excited level of the ground electronic state. Our calculations are based on Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT), which allows us to take into account of the full manifold of Rydberg states and their interactions with the electronic continuum. We have carried out two types of MQDT calculations. First, we omitted all open channels and calculated energy levels, wave functions and spontaneous emission Einstein coefficients, making use of the theoretical method presented in [2]. In a second set of calculations we included the open ionization channels in the computations getting the continuum phase shifts, channel mixing coefficients and channel dipole moments and finally the photoabsorption/ photoionization cross section. The cross section is dominated by the presence of resonance structures corresponding to excitation of various vibrational levels of bound electronic states which lie above the ionization threshold. In order to assess the importance of the resonances we have calculated for each vibrational interval (the energy interval between two consecutive ionization thresholds) the

  6. On some aspects of Coulomb excitation of nuclear rotational states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massmann, H.; Robotham, H.

    1979-01-01

    The Coulomb excitation of nuclear rotational states is studied with a semiclassical method using classical trajectories and the classical action in order to construct the excitation probabilities. This method allows one to consider the effect on the excitation probabilities of a weak nuclear potential. An explicit expression for the 'safe bombarding energy' that is the largest bombarding energy for which the nuclear force can be neglected, is found. Also the transfer of angular momentum to the projectile's orbit is considered. One finds that the dynamical distortion of the orbit has a measurable effect on the excitation probabilities for the case of very heavy ions. Furthermore, new dimensionless parameters measuring the dynamical distortion and the effect of the adiabaticity of the collision are introduced and discussed. (author)

  7. Vibration of rotating-shaft design spindles with flexible bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chaw-Wu

    The purpose of this study is to demonstrate an accurate mathematical model predicting forced vibration of rotating-shaft HDD spindle motors with flexible stationary parts. The mathematical model consists of three parts: a rotating part, a stationary part, and bearings. The rotating part includes a flexible hub, a flexible shaft press-fit into the hub, and N elastic disks mounted on the hub. The stationary part can include motor bracket (stator), base casting, and top cover. The bearings under consideration can be ball bearings or hydrodynamic bearings (HDB). The rotating disks are modelled through the classical plate theory. The rotating part (except the disks) and the stationary part are modelled through finite element analyses (FEA). With mode shapes and natural frequencies obtained from FEA, the kinetic and potential energies of the rotating and stationary parts are formulated and discretized to compensate for the gyroscopic effects from rotation. Finally, use of Lagrange equation results in the equations of motion. To verify the mathematical model, frequency response functions are measured experimentally for an HDB spindle carrying two identical disks at motor and drive levels. Experimental measurements agree very well with theoretical predictions not only in resonance frequency but also in resonance amplitude.

  8. Collective 0+, 1+ and 2+ excitations in rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balbutsev, E.B.; Piperova, J.

    1988-01-01

    The energies and B(Eγ) factors of the isoscalar and isovector 0 + and 2 + resonances are calculated with Skyrme interaction. A satisfactory agreement with experimental data is obtained. It is shown that in rotating nuclei the 2 + excitations split into five branches and also 5 low-lying excitations appear. Two of these low-lying modes are angular resonances and the theory reproduces their energies and B(M1) factors. The experimentally observed splitting of giant monopole resonance in deformed nuclei is confirmed. 34 refs.; 10 figs.; 1 tab

  9. Comparative analysis of the vibrational structure of the absorption spectra of acrolein in the excited ( S 1) electronic state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroleva, L. A.; Tyulin, V. I.; Matveev, V. K.; Pentin, Yu. A.

    2012-04-01

    The assignments of absorption bands of the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum are compared with the assignments of bands obtained by the CRDS method in a supersonic jet from the time of laser radiation damping for the trans isomer of acrolein in the excited ( S 1) electronic state. The ν00 trans = 25861 cm-1 values and fundamental frequencies, including torsional vibration frequency, obtained by the two methods were found to coincide in the excited electronic state ( S 1) for this isomer. The assignments of several absorption bands of the vibrational structure of the spectrum obtained by the CRDS method were changed. Changes in the assignment of (0-v') transition bands of the torsional vibration of the trans isomer in the Deslandres table from the ν00 trans trans origin allowed the table to be extended to high quantum numbers v'. The torsional vibration frequencies up to v' = 5 were found to be close to the frequencies found by analyzing the vibrational structure of the UV spectrum and calculated quantum-mechanically. The coincidence of the barrier to internal rotation (the cis-trans transition) in the one-dimensional model with that calculated quantum-mechanically using the two-dimensional model corresponds to a planar structure of the acrolein molecule in the excited ( S 1) electronic state.

  10. Process and system for isotope separation using the selective vibrational excitation of molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodroffe, J.A.; Keck, J.C.

    1976-01-01

    This invention concerns the separation of isotopes by using the isotopically selective vibrational excitation and the vibration-translation reactions of the excited particles. UF 6 molecular mixed with a carrier gas, such as argon, are directed through a refrigerated chamber lighted by a laser radiation tuned to excite vibrationally the uranium hexafluoride molecules of a particular uranium isotope. The density of the carrier gas is preferably maintained above the density of the uranium hexafluoride to allow a greater collision probability of the vibrationally excited molecules with a carried molecule. In such a case, the vibrationally excited uranium hexafluoride will collide with a carrier gas molecule provoking the conversion of the excitation energy into a translation of the excited molecule, resulting in thermal energy or greater diffusibility than that of the other uranium hexafluoride molecules [fr

  11. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules. [Relaxation rates, self-relaxation, upper limits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasch, C.J.

    1978-09-01

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 295/sup 0/K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 295/sup 0/K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ..delta..J transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references.

  12. Influence of vibrations and rotations of diatomic molecules on their physical properties: II. Refractive index, reactivity and diffusion coefficients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharipov, Alexander S; Loukhovitski, Boris I; Starik, Alexander M

    2016-01-01

    The influence of the excitation of vibrational and rotational states of diatomic molecules (H 2 , N 2 , O 2 , NO, OH, CO, CH, HF and HCl) on refractive index, reactivity and transport coefficients was analyzed by using ab initio calculated data on the effective state-specific dipole moment and static polarizability obtained in the preceding paper of the present series. It has been revealed that, for non-polar molecules, the excitation both of vibrational and rotational degrees of freedom increases the averaged polarizability and, as a consequence, the refractive index. Meanwhile, for polar molecules, the effect of molecule excitation is more complex: it can either increase or decrease the refractive index. It was also shown that the excitation of molecules slightly influences the rate constants of barrierless chemical reactions between neutral particles; whereas, for ion–molecule reactions, this effect can be more pronounced. Analysis of the variation of diffusion coefficients, taking into account the effect of molecule excitation both on the collision diameter and on the well depth of intermolecular potential, exhibited that, for non-polar molecules, the effect associated with the change of collision diameter prevails. However, for polar molecules, the effect of the excitation of vibrational states on the well depth of intermolecular potential can compensate or even exceed the decrease of diffusion coefficient due to the averaged collision diameter rise. (paper)

  13. LABORATORY CHARACTERIZATION AND ASTROPHYSICAL DETECTION OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED STATES OF ETHYL CYANIDE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, A. M.; Bermudez, C.; Alonso, J. L. [Grupo de Espectroscopia Molecular (GEM), Edificio Quifima, Area de Quimica-Fisica, Laboratorios de Espectroscopia y Bioespectroscopia, Unidad Asociada del CSIC, Universidad de Valladolid, E-47005 Valladolid (Spain); Lopez, A.; Tercero, B.; Cernicharo, J. [Department of Astrophysics, CAB, INTA-CSIC, Crta Torrejon, E-28850 Torrejon de Ardoz, Madrid (Spain); Pearson, J. C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Padadena, CA 91109 (United States); Marcelino, N., E-mail: adammichael.daly@uva.es, E-mail: cbermu@qf.uva.es, E-mail: jlalonso@qf.uva.es, E-mail: lopezja@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: terceromb@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: jcernicharo@cab.inta-csic.es, E-mail: John.C.Pearson@jpl.nasa.gov, E-mail: nmarceli@nrao.edu [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Ethyl cyanide, CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, is an important interstellar molecule with a very dense rotational-vibrational spectrum. On the basis of new laboratory data in the range of 17-605 GHz and ab initio calculations, two new vibrational states, {nu}{sub 12} and {nu}{sub 20}, have been detected in molecular clouds of Orion. Laboratory data consist of Stark spectroscopy (17-110 GHz) and frequency-modulated spectrometers (GEM laboratory in Valladolid: 17-170, 270-360 GHz; Toyama: 26-200 GHz; Emory: 200-240 GHz; Ohio State: 258-368 GHz; and JPL: 270-318, 395-605 GHz). More than 700 distinct lines of each species were measured in J up to 71 and in K{sub a} up to 25. The states were fitted with Watson's S-reduction Hamiltonian. The two new states have been identified in the interstellar medium toward the Orion Nebula (Orion KL). The ground state, the isotopologues of CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CN, and the vibrationally excited states have been fitted to obtain column densities and to derive vibrational temperatures. All together, ethyl cyanide is responsible for more than 2000 lines in the observed frequency range of 80-280 GHz.

  14. Faraday rotation due to excitation of magnetoplasmons in graphene microribbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tymchenko, Mykhailo; Nikitin, Alexey Yu; Martín-Moreno, Luis

    2013-11-26

    A single graphene sheet, when subjected to a perpendicular static magnetic field, provides a Faraday rotation that, per atomic layer, greatly surpasses that of any other known material. In continuous graphene, Faraday rotation originates from the cyclotron resonance of massless carriers, which allows dynamical tuning through either external electrostatic or magneto-static setting. Furthermore, the rotation direction can be controlled by changing the sign of the carriers in graphene, which can be done by means of an external electric field. However, despite these tuning possibilities, the requirement of large magnetic fields hinders the application of the Faraday effect in real devices, especially for frequencies higher than a few terahertz. In this work we demonstrate that large Faraday rotation can be achieved in arrays of graphene microribbons, through the excitation of the magnetoplasmons of individual ribbons, at larger frequencies than those dictated by the cyclotron resonance. In this way, for a given magnetic field and chemical potential, structuring graphene periodically can produce large Faraday rotation at larger frequencies than what would occur in a continuous graphene sheet. Alternatively, at a given frequency, graphene ribbons produce large Faraday rotation at much smaller magnetic fields than in continuous graphene.

  15. Earth rotation excitation mechanisms derived from geodetic space observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göttl, F.; Schmidt, M.

    2009-04-01

    Earth rotation variations are caused by mass displacements and motions in the subsystems of the Earth. Via the satellite Gravity and Climate Experiment (GRACE) gravity field variations can be identified which are caused by mass redistribution in the Earth system. Therefore time variable gravity field models (GFZ RL04, CSR RL04, JPL RL04, ITG-Grace03, GRGS, ...) can be used to derive different impacts on Earth rotation. Furthermore satellite altimetry provides accurate information on sea level anomalies (AVISO, DGFI) which are caused by mass and volume changes of seawater. Since Earth rotation is solely affected by mass variations and motions the volume (steric) effect has to be reduced from the altimetric observations in order to infer oceanic contributions to Earth rotation variations. Therefore the steric effect is estimated from physical ocean parameters such as temperature and salinity changes in the oceans (WOA05, Ishii). In this study specific individual geophysical contributions to Earth rotation variations are identified by means of a multitude of accurate geodetic space observations in combination with a realistic error propagation. It will be shown that due to adjustment of altimetric and/or gravimetric solutions the results for polar motion excitations can be improved.

  16. Transmission of High Frequency Vibrations in Rotating Systems. Application to Cavitation Detection in Hydraulic Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Valentín

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the main causes of damage in hydraulic turbines is cavitation. While not all cavitation appearing in a turbine is of a destructive type, erosive cavitation can severely affect the structure, thus increasing maintenance costs and reducing the remaining useful life of the machine. Of all types of cavitation, the maximum erosion occurs when clouds of bubbles collapse on the runner surface (cloud cavitation. When this occurs it is associated with a substantial increase in noise, and vibrations that are propagated everywhere throughout the machine. The generation of these cavitation clouds may occur naturally or it may be the response to a periodic pressure fluctuation, like the rotor/stator interaction in a hydraulic turbine. Erosive bubble cavitation generates high-frequency vibrations that are modulated by the shedding frequency. Therefore, the methods for the detection of erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines are based on the measurement and demodulation of high-frequency vibrations. In this paper, the feasibility of detecting erosive cavitation in hydraulic turbines is investigated experimentally in a rotating disk system, which represents a simplified hydraulic turbine structure. The test rig used consists of a rotating disk submerged in a tank of water and confined with nearby axial and radial rigid surfaces. The excitation patterns produced by cloud cavitation are reproduced with a PZT (piezoelectric patch located on the disk. These patterns include pseudo-random excitations of different frequency bands modulated by one low carrier frequency, which model the erosive cavitation characteristics. Different types of sensors have been placed in the stationary and in the rotating parts (accelerometers, acoustic emission (AE, and a microphone in order to detect the excitation pattern. The results obtained for all the sensors tested have been compared in detail for the different excitation patterns applied to the disk. With this information

  17. Rotation and rotation-vibration spectroscopy of the 0+-0- inversion doublet in deuterated cyanamide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Zbigniew; Kraśnicki, Adam; Jabs, Wolfgang; Herbst, Eric; Winnewisser, Brenda P; Winnewisser, Manfred

    2013-10-03

    The pure rotation spectrum of deuterated cyanamide was recorded at frequencies from 118 to 649 GHz, which was complemented by measurement of its high-resolution rotation-vibration spectrum at 8-350 cm(-1). For D2NCN the analysis revealed considerable perturbations between the lowest Ka rotational energy levels in the 0(+) and 0(-) substates of the lowest inversion doublet. The final data set for D2NCN exceeded 3000 measured transitions and was successfully fitted with a Hamiltonian accounting for the 0(+) ↔ 0(-) coupling. A smaller data set, consisting only of pure rotation and rotation-vibration lines observed with microwave techniques was obtained for HDNCN, and additional transitions of this type were also measured for H2NCN. The spectroscopic data for all three isotopic species were fitted with a unified, robust Hamiltonian allowing confident prediction of spectra well into the terahertz frequency region, which is of interest to contemporary radioastronomy. The isotopic dependence of the determined inversion splitting, ΔE = 16.4964789(8), 32.089173(3), and 49.567770(6) cm(-1), for D2NCN, HDNCN, and H2NCN, respectively, is found to be in good agreement with estimates from a simple reduced quartic-quadratic double minimum potential.

  18. Design and Experimental Characterization of a Vibration Energy Harvesting Device for Rotational Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutao Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new vibration based electromagnetic power generator to transfer energy from stationary to rotating equipment, which can be a new attempt to substitute slip ring in rotational systems. The natural frequencies and modes are simulated in order to have a maximum and steady power output from the device. Parameters such as piezoelectric disk location and relative motion direction of the magnet are theoretically and experimentally analyzed. The results show that the position that is close to the fixed end of the cantilever and the relative motion along the long side gives higher power output. Moreover, the capability of the energy harvester to extract power from lower energy environment is experimentally validated. The voltage and power output are measured at different excitation frequencies.

  19. Vibration-rotation band intensities in the IR spectra of polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El'kin, M.D.; Kosterina, E.K.; Berezin

    1995-01-01

    Using the curvilinear vibrational coordinates for a nuclear subsystem, expressions for the effective dipole-moment operators are derived in order to analyze the vibrational-rotational transitions in the IR spectra of polyatomic rigid molecules. The explicit expressions obtained for the intensities of hot bands allow one to estimate the influence of the vibration-rotation interaction within the framework of the adopted molecular-vibration model. The suggested method is shown to be suitable for Raman spectra analysis. 12 refs

  20. An inverse method for identification of a distributed random excitation acting on a vibrating structure flow-induced vibration application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perotin, L.; Granger, S.

    1997-01-01

    In order to improve the prediction of wear problems due to flow-induced vibration in PWR components, an inverse method for identifying a distributed random excitation acting on a dynamical system has been developed at EDF. This method, whose applications go far beyond the flow-induced vibration field, has been implemented into the MEIDEE software. This method is presented. (author)

  1. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  2. Comparison of methods for separating vibration sources in rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Renata

    2017-12-01

    Vibro-acoustic signatures are widely used for diagnostics of rotating machinery. Vibration based automatic diagnostics systems need to achieve a good separation between signals generated by different sources. The separation task may be challenging, since the effects of the different vibration sources often overlap. In particular, there is a need to separate between signals related to the natural frequencies of the structure and signals resulting from the rotating components (signal whitening), as well as a need to separate between signals generated by asynchronous components like bearings and signals generated by cyclo-stationary components like gears. Several methods were proposed to achieve the above separation tasks. The present study compares between some of these methods. The paper also presents a new method for whitening, Adaptive Clutter Separation, as well as a new efficient algorithm for dephase, which separates between asynchronous and cyclo-stationary signals. For whitening the study compares between liftering of the high quefrencies and adaptive clutter separation. For separating between the asynchronous and the cyclo-stationary signals the study compares between liftering in the quefrency domain and dephase. The methods are compared using both simulated signals and real data.

  3. Trajectory study of supercollision relaxation in highly vibrationally excited pyrazine and CO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziman; Sansom, Rebecca; Bonella, Sara; Coker, David F; Mullin, Amy S

    2005-09-01

    Classical trajectory calculations were performed to simulate state-resolved energy transfer experiments of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (E(vib) = 37,900 cm(-1)) and CO(2), which were conducted using a high-resolution transient infrared absorption spectrometer. The goal here is to use classical trajectories to simulate the supercollision energy transfer pathway wherein large amounts of energy are transferred in single collisions in order to compare with experimental results. In the trajectory calculations, Newton's laws of motion are used for the molecular motion, isolated molecules are treated as collections of harmonic oscillators, and intermolecular potentials are formed by pairwise Lennard-Jones potentials. The calculations qualitatively reproduce the observed energy partitioning in the scattered CO(2) molecules and show that the relative partitioning between bath rotation and translation is dependent on the moment of inertia of the bath molecule. The simulations show that the low-frequency modes of the vibrationally excited pyrazine contribute most to the strong collisions. The majority of collisions lead to small DeltaE values and primarily involve single encounters between the energy donor and acceptor. The large DeltaE exchanges result from both single impulsive encounters and chattering collisions that involve multiple encounters.

  4. The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited rotating nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Civitarese, O.; Furui, S.; Ploszajczak, M.; Faessler, A.

    1983-01-01

    The giant quadrupole resonance in highly excited, fast rotating nuclei is studied as a function of both the nuclear temperature and the nuclear angular momentum. The photo-absorption cross sections for quadrupole radiation in 156 Dy, 160 Er and 164 Er are evaluated within the linear response theory. The strength functions of the γ-ray spectrum obtained from the decay of highly excited nuclear states by deexcitation of the isoscalar quadrupole mode show a fine structure, which depends on the temperature T, the angular momentum I and the deformation of the nucleus β. The splitting of the modes associated with the signature-conserving and signature-changing components of the quadrupole field is discussed. (orig.)

  5. Off-resonant vibrational excitation: Orientational dependence and spatial control of photofragments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Machholm, Mette; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2000-01-01

    Off-resonant and resonant vibrational excitation with short intense infrared (IR) laser pulses creates localized oscillating wave packets, but differs by the efficiency of the excitation and surprisingly by the orientational dependence. Orientational selectivity of the vibrational excitation...... of randomly oriented heteronuclear diatomic molecules can be obtained under simultaneous irradiation by a resonant and an off-resonant intense IR laser pulse: Molecules with one initial orientation will be vibrationally excited, while those with the opposite orientation will be at rest. The orientation-dependent...... distribution. (C) 2000 American Institute of Physics....

  6. Ground vibration test results of a JetStar airplane using impulsive sine excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kehoe, Michael W.; Voracek, David F.

    1989-01-01

    Structural excitation is important for both ground vibration and flight flutter testing. The structural responses caused by this excitation are analyzed to determine frequency, damping, and mode shape information. Many excitation waveforms have been used throughout the years. The use of impulsive sine (sin omega t)/omega t as an excitation waveform for ground vibration testing and the advantages of using this waveform for flight flutter testing are discussed. The ground vibration test results of a modified JetStar airplane using impulsive sine as an excitation waveform are compared with the test results of the same airplane using multiple-input random excitation. The results indicated that the structure was sufficiently excited using the impulsive sine waveform. Comparisons of input force spectrums, mode shape plots, and frequency and damping values for the two methods of excitation are presented.

  7. Sequences of extremal radially excited rotating black holes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blázquez-Salcedo, Jose Luis; Kunz, Jutta; Navarro-Lérida, Francisco; Radu, Eugen

    2014-01-10

    In the Einstein-Maxwell-Chern-Simons theory the extremal Reissner-Nordström solution is no longer the single extremal solution with vanishing angular momentum, when the Chern-Simons coupling constant reaches a critical value. Instead a whole sequence of rotating extremal J=0 solutions arises, labeled by the node number of the magnetic U(1) potential. Associated with the same near horizon solution, the mass of these radially excited extremal solutions converges to the mass of the extremal Reissner-Nordström solution. On the other hand, not all near horizon solutions are also realized as global solutions.

  8. A Study on the Vibration Measurement and Analysis of Rotating Machine Foundations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Rim; Jeon, Kyu Sik; Suh, Young Pyo; Cho, Chul Hwan; Kim, Sung Taeg; Lee, Myung Kyu [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-31

    To search for the cause of vibration problem of rotating machine in the power plant, first the rotating machine is classified according to their type and each vibration characteristic is reviewed. The criteria for the evaluation of mechanical vibration effect on the structure and human being during the design of machine foundation is described below. The foundation of rotating machine is classified according to its shape and some factors are described which should be considered during dynamic modeling analysis for its correct result. Also the methods of incorporating foundation vibration into mechanical vibration analysis are reviewed. Type of vibration measurement and analysis which is used to find out the dynamic characteristic of structure is described in accordance with its signal processing and measuring method. Measurement of vibration and its analysis when there occurs real vibration troubles in power plant are compared with the results of numerical modeling as case studies. (author). 16 refs., 23 figs.

  9. Laboratory characterization and astrophysical detection of vibrationally excited states of vinyl cyanide in Orion-KL

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, A.; Tercero, B.; Kisiel, Z.; Daly, A. M.; Bermúdez, C.; Calcutt, H.; Marcelino, N.; Viti, S.; Drouin, B. J.; Medvedev, I. R.; Neese, C. F.; Pszczółkowski, L.; Alonso, J. L.; Cernicharo, J.

    2014-12-01

    Context. We perform a laboratory characterization in the 18-1893 GHz range and astronomical detection between 80-280 GHz in Orion-KL with IRAM-30 m of CH2CHCN (vinyl cyanide) in its ground and vibrationally excited states. Aims: Our aim is to improve the understanding of rotational spectra of vibrationally excited vinyl cyanide with new laboratory data and analysis. The laboratory results allow searching for these excited state transitions in the Orion-KL line survey. Furthermore, rotational lines of CH2CHCN contribute to the understanding of the physical and chemical properties of the cloud. Methods: Laboratory measurements of CH2CHCN made on several different frequency-modulated spectrometers were combined into a single broadband 50-1900 GHz spectrum and its assignment was confirmed by Stark modulation spectra recorded in the 18-40 GHz region and by ab-initio anharmonic force field calculations. For analyzing the emission lines of vinyl cyanide detected in Orion-KL we used the excitation and radiative transfer code (MADEX) at LTE conditions. Results: Detailed characterization of laboratory spectra of CH2CHCN in nine different excited vibrational states: ν11 = 1, ν15 = 1, ν11 = 2, ν10 = 1 ⇔ (ν11 = 1,ν15 = 1), ν11 = 3/ν15 = 2/ν14 = 1, (ν11 = 1,ν10 = 1) ⇔ (ν11 = 2,ν15 = 1), ν9 = 1, (ν11 = 1,ν15 = 2) ⇔ (ν10 = 1,ν15 = 1) ⇔ (ν11 = 1,ν14 = 1), and ν11 = 4 are determined, as well as the detection of transitions in the ν11 = 2 and ν11 = 3 states for the first time in Orion-KL and of those in the ν10 = 1 ⇔ (ν11 = 1,ν15 = 1) dyad of states for the first time in space. The rotational transitions of the ground state of this molecule emerge from four cloud components of hot core nature, which trace the physical and chemical conditions of high mass star forming regions in the Orion-KL Nebula. The lowest energy vibrationally excited states of vinyl cyanide, such as ν11 = 1 (at 328.5 K), ν15 = 1 (at 478.6 K), ν11 = 2 (at 657.8 K), the ν10

  10. Non-contact test set-up for aeroelasticity in a rotating turbomachine combining a novel acoustic excitation system with tip-timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freund, O; Seume, J R; Montgomery, M; Mittelbach, M

    2014-01-01

    Due to trends in aero-design, aeroelasticity becomes increasingly important in modern turbomachines. Design requirements of turbomachines lead to the development of high aspect ratio blades and blade integral disc designs (blisks), which are especially prone to complex modes of vibration. Therefore, experimental investigations yielding high quality data are required for improving the understanding of aeroelastic effects in turbomachines. One possibility to achieve high quality data is to excite and measure blade vibrations in turbomachines. The major requirement for blade excitation and blade vibration measurements is to minimize interference with the aeroelastic effects to be investigated. Thus in this paper, a non-contact—and thus low interference—experimental set-up for exciting and measuring blade vibrations is proposed and shown to work. A novel acoustic system excites rotor blade vibrations, which are measured with an optical tip-timing system. By performing measurements in an axial compressor, the potential of the acoustic excitation method for investigating aeroelastic effects is explored. The basic principle of this method is described and proven through the analysis of blade responses at different acoustic excitation frequencies and at different rotational speeds. To verify the accuracy of the tip-timing system, amplitudes measured by tip-timing are compared with strain gage measurements. They are found to agree well. Two approaches to vary the nodal diameter (ND) of the excited vibration mode by controlling the acoustic excitation are presented. By combining the different excitable acoustic modes with a phase-lag control, each ND of the investigated 30 blade rotor can be excited individually. This feature of the present acoustic excitation system is of great benefit to aeroelastic investigations and represents one of the main advantages over other excitation methods proposed in the past. In future studies, the acoustic excitation method will be used

  11. PGOPHER: A program for simulating rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Western, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The PGOPHER program is a general purpose program for simulating and fitting molecular spectra, particularly the rotational structure. The current version can handle linear molecules, symmetric tops and asymmetric tops and many possible transitions, both allowed and forbidden, including multiphoton and Raman spectra in addition to the common electric dipole absorptions. Many different interactions can be included in the calculation, including those arising from electron and nuclear spin, and external electric and magnetic fields. Multiple states and interactions between them can also be accounted for, limited only by available memory. Fitting of experimental data can be to line positions (in many common formats), intensities or band contours and the parameters determined can be level populations as well as rotational constants. PGOPHER is provided with a powerful and flexible graphical user interface to simplify many of the tasks required in simulating, understanding and fitting molecular spectra, including Fortrat diagrams and energy level plots in addition to overlaying experimental and simulated spectra. The program is open source, and can be compiled with open source tools. This paper provides a formal description of the operation of version 9.1. - Highlights: • Easy-to-use graphical interface for assigning and understanding molecular spectra. • Simulates rotational and vibrational structure of many types of molecular spectra. • Fits molecular properties to line positions or spectral contours. • Handles linear molecules and symmetric and asymmetric tops. • Handles perturbations, nuclear and electron spin, and electric and magnetic fields.

  12. Properties of Highly Rotationally Excited H2 in Photodissociation Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Sally Jane; Wan, Yier; Stancil, Phillip C.; Yang, Benhui H.; Zhang, Ziwei

    2018-06-01

    H2 is the dominant molecular species in the vast majority of interstellar environments and it plays a crucial role as a radiative coolant. In photodissociation regions, it is one of the primary emitters in the near to mid-infrared which are due to lines originating from highly excited rotational levels. However, collisional data for rotational levels j>10 are sparse, particularly for H2-H2 collisions. Utilizing new calculations for para-H2 and ortho-H2 collisional rate coefficients with H2 for j as high as 30, we investigate the effects of the new results in standard PDR models with the spectral simulation package Cloudy. We also perform Cloudy models of the Orion Bar and use Radex to explore rotational line ratio diagnostics. The resulting dataset of H2 collisional data should find wide application to other molecular environments. This work was support by Hubble Space Telescope grant HST-AR-13899.001-A and NASA grants NNX15AI61G and NNX16AF09G.

  13. Rotating permanent magnet excitation for blood flow measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Sarath S; Vinodkumar, V; Sreedevi, V; Nagesh, D S

    2015-11-01

    A compact, portable and improved blood flow measurement system for an extracorporeal circuit having a rotating permanent magnetic excitation scheme is described in this paper. The system consists of a set of permanent magnets rotating near blood or any conductive fluid to create high-intensity alternating magnetic field in it and inducing a sinusoidal varying voltage across the column of fluid. The induced voltage signal is acquired, conditioned and processed to determine its flow rate. Performance analysis shows that a sensitivity of more than 250 mV/lpm can be obtained, which is more than five times higher than conventional flow measurement systems. Choice of rotating permanent magnet instead of an electromagnetic core generates alternate magnetic field of smooth sinusoidal nature which in turn reduces switching and interference noises. These results in reduction in complex electronic circuitry required for processing the signal to a great extent and enable the flow measuring device to be much less costlier, portable and light weight. The signal remains steady even with changes in environmental conditions and has an accuracy of greater than 95%. This paper also describes the construction details of the prototype, the factors affecting sensitivity and detailed performance analysis at various operating conditions.

  14. Millimeter-wave and Submillimeter-wave Spectra of Aminoacetonitrile in the Three Lowest Vibrational Excited States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esposti, Claudio Degli; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia [Dipartimento di Chimica “Giacomo Ciamician”, Università di Bologna, via Selmi 2, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Kobayashi, Kaori [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Toyama, 3190 Gofuku, Toyama 930-8555 (Japan); Fujita, Chiho; Ozeki, Hiroyuki, E-mail: ozeki@env.sci.toho-u.ac.jp [Department of Environmental Science, Faculty of Science, Toho University, 2-2-1 Miyama, Funabashi, 274-8510 (Japan)

    2017-06-01

    It is important to study possible precursors of amino acids such as glycine to enable future searches in interstellar space. Aminoacetonitrile (NH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}CN) is one of the most feasible molecules for this purpose. This molecule was already detected toward Sgr B2(N). Aminoacetonitrile has a few low-lying vibrational excited states, and transitions within these states may be found in space. In this study, the pure-rotational transitions in the three lowest vibrational states in the 80–450 GHz range have been assigned and analyzed. It was found to be very important to include Coriolis coupling between the two lowest vibrational fundamentals, while the third one was unperturbed. The partition function was evaluated considering these new results.

  15. Amplitude control of the track-induced self-excited vibration for a maglev system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Danfeng; Li, Jie; Zhang, Kun

    2014-09-01

    The Electromagnet Suspension (EMS) maglev train uses controlled electromagnetic forces to achieve suspension, and self-excited vibration may occur due to the flexibility of the track. In this article, the harmonic balance method is applied to investigate the amplitude of the self-excited vibration, and it is found that the amplitude of the vibration depends on the voltage of the power supplier. Based on this observation, a vibration amplitude control method, which controls the amplitude of the vibration by adjusting the voltage of the power supplier, is proposed to attenuate the vibration. A PI controller is designed to control the amplitude of the vibration at a given level. The effectiveness of this method shows a good prospect for its application to commercial maglev systems. Copyright © 2013 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Algebraic descriptions of nuclear and molecular rotation-vibration spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roosmalen, O.S. van.

    1982-01-01

    The application of algebraic models to the description of rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of nuclei and molecules are discussed. Simple model Hamiltonians are shown to give good agreement with the energy spectra of diatomic molecules and nuclei. Some formal aspects of path integral methods for many-boson systems are treated. The two representations for the quantum mechanical propagator are compared and appear to be identical in leading order in 1/N (N is the number of bosons). Approximations for both are static and dynamic problems are discussed. Applications of mean field techniques are also treated. A description of tri- and tetra-atomic molecules in terms of a U(4)xU(4) and U(4)xU(4)xU(4) group structure is given. Linear molecules appear to correspond with symmetries of O(4) type. S-matrix elements are calculated to test mean field methods, and the results compared with exact calculations. (Auth.)

  17. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    [7,8,9]. Furthermore, in order to learn more about the chemistry in interstellar clouds, astrochemists can benefit greatly from direct measurements on cold reactions in laboratories [9]. Working with MgH+ molecular ions in a linear Paul trap, we routinely cool their translational degree of freedom...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...... results imply that, through this technique, cold molecular-ion experiments can now be carried out at cryogenic temperatures in room-temperature set-ups. References [1] Koelemeij, J. C. J., Roth, B., Wicht, A., Ernsting, I. and Schiller, S., Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 173002 (2007). [2] Hudson, J. J., Sauer, B...

  18. Rotational Laser Cooling of Vibrationally and Translationally Cold Molecular Ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drewsen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    an excellent alternative to atomic qubits in the realization of a practical ion trap based quantum computer due to favourable internal state decoherence rates. In chemistry, state prepared molecular targets are an ideal starting point for uni-molecular reactions, including coherent control...... of photofragmentation through the application of various laser sources [5,6]. In cold bi-molecular reactions, where the effect of even tiny potential barriers becomes significant, experiments with state prepared molecules can yield important information on the details of the potential curves of the molecular complexes...... by sympathetic cooling with Doppler laser cooled Mg+ ions. Giving the time for the molecules to equilibrate internally to the room temperature blackbody radiation, the vibrational degree of freedom will freeze out, leaving only the rotational degree of freedom to be cooled. We report here on the implementation...

  19. Analysis of rotation-vibration relative equilibria on the example of a tetrahedral four atom molecule

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Efstathiou, K; Sadovskii, DA; Zhilinskii, BI

    2004-01-01

    We study relative equilibria ( RE) of a nonrigid molecule, which vibrates about a well-defined equilibrium configuration and rotates as a whole. Our analysis unifies the theory of rotational and vibrational RE. We rely on the detailed study of the symmetry group action on the initial and reduced

  20. Very high rotational excitation of CO in a cooled electric discharge through carbon monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossart-Magos, Claudina; Cossart, Daniel

    2000-02-01

    Infrared emission from 12CO and 13CO, excited in the cathode region of a discharge tube immersed in liquid nitrogen, was recorded by Fourier-transform spectrometry at a resolution of 0.005 cm-1. The Δv=1 sequence bands recorded in the 2500-1800 cm-1 spectral interval, indicate the existence of three different rotational populations; (i) molecules in the zero-ground level with Trot≈100 K (responsible for reabsorption of part of the 1-0 emission band); (ii) molecules with Trot≈275 K (maximum intensity for Jmax'≈6 in each band, Tvib≈3000 K for v'=2-4, Tvib≈8600 K for v'=5-13); (iii) molecules with v' limited to 6, for which R-rotational lines are observed for J' values between 50 and 120 (Jmax'≈90, non-Boltzmannian population distribution). The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of all the observed lines is less than 0.007 cm-1. A Doppler width of 0.005 cm-1 and translational temperature Ttr≈280 K can be deduced. Such high-J levels of the CO molecule had never been observed in the laboratory. In the absorption spectrum of the Sun photosphere, the same lines present FWHM values 5-8 times larger. The best available Dunham coefficients are checked to reproduce the high-J lines wave numbers to at least 0.001 cm-1. Dissociative recombination of the dimer (CO)2+ cation, which is likely to be formed in our experimental conditions, is discussed as a possible mechanism to produce CO fragments with very high rotational excitation, while keeping vibrational excitation limited to v'=6.

  1. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C 9 H 7 N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν 45 and ν 44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm −1 and 178 cm −1 , respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations

  2. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirali, O.; Kisiel, Z.; Goubet, M.; Gruet, S.; Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G.

    2015-03-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C9H7N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν45 and ν44 vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm-1 and 178 cm-1, respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations.

  3. Evolution from vibration to rotation in 108Cd nucleus within microscopic theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Shaoyong; Tong Hong; Zhao Xingzhi; Shi Zhuyi; The Secon Northwest Inst. for Minority, Yinchuan; Zhang Chunmei; Lei Yuxi

    2008-01-01

    Based on the microscopic sdIBM-F max model and the single-particle energies from experiment, with the use of the most general Hamiltonian, the vibrational band and rotational band in 108 Cd nucleus as well as its evolutional process were reproduced very well by two different groups of nucleon-nucleon effective interaction parameters. And phenomenological study identifies that: 1) The coexisting region of two excitation models is on the interval between the state 8+ and state 14 1 + (this is a interval with E x =3.683-5.503 MeV), and the 8 1 + state is a state preponderant in the vibrational model, the 14 1 + state is one predominant in the rotational model, while the state 10 1 + is a cross- bencher state relative to the two models; 2) The yrast states from the ground-state up to the 24 1 + state all are collective states, hereafter the first breaking up and aligning state maybe is a two-quasiparticle state of neutron on the intruder orbits h 11/2 ; 3) This structure evolution has been achieved via the moderate changes of the pair coupling probability of valence nucleons in the coexisting region, and thus is not very rapidly. (authors)

  4. Vibration of a rotating shaft on hydrodynamic bearings: multi-scales surface effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rebufa, Jocelyn

    2016-01-01

    The hydrodynamic bearing provides good damping properties in rotating machineries. However, the performances of rotor-bearings systems are highly impacted by nonlinear effects that are difficult to analyze. The rotor dynamics prediction requires advanced models for the flow in the bearings. The surface of the bearings seems to have a strong impact on the lubricant flow, acting on the static and dynamic properties of the rotating parts. This study aims to enhance the simulation of the bearings' surface state effect on the motion of the rotating shaft. The flexible shaft interacts with textured hydrodynamic bearings. Multi-scales homogenization is used in a multi-physics algorithm in order to describe the fluid-structure interaction. Different models are used to account for the cavitation phenomenon in the bearings. Nonlinear harmonic methods allow efficient parametric studies of periodic solutions as well as their stability. Moreover, a test rig has been designed to compare predictions to real measurements. Several textured shaft samples modified with femto-seconds LASER surface texturing are tested. In most cases the experimental study showed similar results than the simulation. Enhancements of the vibration behaviors of the rotor-bearing system have been revealed for certain texturing patterns. The self-excited vibration, also known as 'oil whirl' phenomenon, is stabilized on a wide rotating frequency range. However, the simulation tool does not predict well the enhancements that are observed. Vortices in surface texturing patterns have been revealed numerically with Navier-Stokes equation resolution. These results are opposed to the classical lubrication hypothesis. It is also a possible explanation of the enhancements that are experimentally measured with textured bearings. (author) [fr

  5. Kinetics of highly vibrationally excited O2(X) molecules in inductively-coupled oxygen plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annušová, Adriana; Marinov, Daniil; Booth, Jean-Paul; Sirse, Nishant; Lino da Silva, Mário; Lopez, Bruno; Guerra, Vasco

    2018-04-01

    The high degree of vibrational excitation of O2 ground state molecules recently observed in inductively coupled plasma discharges is investigated experimentally in more detail and interpreted using a detailed self-consistent 0D global kinetic model for oxygen plasmas. Additional experimental results are presented and used to validate the model. The vibrational kinetics considers vibrational levels up to v = 41 and accounts for electron impact excitation and de-excitation (e-V), vibration-to-translation relaxation (V-T) in collisions with O2 molecules and O atoms, vibration-to-vibration energy exchanges (V-V), excitation of electronically excited states, dissociative electron attachment, and electron impact dissociation. Measurements were performed at pressures of 10–80 mTorr (1.33 and 10.67 Pa) and radio frequency (13.56 MHz) powers up to 500 W. The simulation results are compared with the absolute densities in each O2 vibrational level obtained by high sensitivity absorption spectroscopy measurements of the Schumann–Runge bands for O2(X, v = 4–18), O(3 P) atom density measurements by two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) calibrated against Xe, and laser photodetachment measurements of the O‑ negative ions. The highly excited O2(X, v) distribution exhibits a shape similar to a Treanor-Gordiets distribution, but its origin lies in electron impact e-V collisions and not in V-V up-pumping, in contrast to what happens in all other molecular gases known to date. The relaxation of vibrational quanta is mainly due to V-T energy-transfer collisions with O atoms and to electron impact dissociation of vibrationally excited molecules, e+O2(X, v)→O(3P)+O(3P).

  6. Power system stabilization by superconducting magnetic energystorage connected to rotating exciter

    OpenAIRE

    Mitani, Yasunori; Tsuji, K

    1993-01-01

    The authors describe a combination of a rotating exciter and a superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system for efficient power system stabilization. A SMES system connected to an exciter rotating with a turbine-rotor shaft is proposed. The exciter is installed exclusively to supply current for the SMES. Since electrical power output from the SMES is converted into a mechanical torque of the generator directly by the exciter, it is expected that power swings of the generator will be ...

  7. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y. [Department of Engineering Mechanics, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  8. Linear stochastic evaluation of tyre vibration due to tyre/road excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rustighi, E.; Elliott, S. J.; Finnveden, S.; Gulyás, K.; Mócsai, T.; Danti, M.

    2008-03-01

    Tyre/road interaction is recognised as the main source of interior and exterior noise for velocities over the 40 km/h. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D) elemental approach has been adopted to predict the stochastic tyre vibration and hence the interior and exterior noise due to this kind of excitation. The road excitation has been modelled from the spectral density of a common road profile, supposing the road to be an isotropic surface. A linear Winkler bedding connects the 3D model of the tyre with the ground. The exterior noise has been evaluated by an elemental calculation of the radiation matrix of the tyre deformed by the static load on a concrete road. The noise inside the vehicle has also been calculated, using the transfer functions from the force transmitted to the hub and the noise inside the vehicle, which have been computed by a FEM model of a common car body. The simple formulation allows much quicker calculation than traditional nonlinear approaches, and appears to give results consistent with available measurements, although the effects of tyre rotation and of the nonlinearities in the contact model are yet to be quantified, and the method requires further experimental validation before practical application.

  9. selective excitation of vibrational modes of polyatomic molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Mode-selective dynamics of triatomic molecule in the electronic ground state under continuous wave laser pulse is investigated for the discrete vibrational bound states. A non-perturbative approach has been used to analyse the vibrational couplings and dynamics of the molecule. Keywords. Polyatomic molecule ...

  10. Nonlinear quantum dynamics in diatomic molecules: Vibration, rotation and spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Ciann-Dong; Weng, Hung-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper reveals the internal nonlinear dynamics embedded in a molecular quantum state. ► Analyze quantum molecular dynamics in a deterministic way, while preserving the consistency with probability interpretation. ► Molecular vibration–rotation interaction and spin–orbital coupling are considered simultaneously. ► Spin is just the remnant angular motion when orbital angular momentum is zero. ► Spin is the “zero dynamics” of nonlinear quantum dynamics. - Abstract: For a given molecular wavefunction Ψ, the probability density function Ψ ∗ Ψ is not the only information that can be extracted from Ψ. We point out in this paper that nonlinear quantum dynamics of a diatomic molecule, completely consistent with the probability prediction of quantum mechanics, does exist and can be derived from the quantum Hamilton equations of motion determined by Ψ. It can be said that the probability density function Ψ ∗ Ψ is an external representation of the quantum state Ψ, while the related Hamilton dynamics is an internal representation of Ψ, which reveals the internal mechanism underlying the externally observed random events. The proposed internal representation of Ψ establishes a bridge between nonlinear dynamics and quantum mechanics, which allows the methods and tools already developed by the former to be applied to the latter. Based on the quantum Hamilton equations of motion derived from Ψ, vibration, rotation and spin motions of a diatomic molecule and the interactions between them can be analyzed simultaneously. The resulting dynamic analysis of molecular motion is compared with the conventional probability analysis and the consistency between them is demonstrated.

  11. Effect of collision energy and vibrational excitation on endothermic ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, T.P.

    1984-07-01

    This thesis is divided into two major parts. In the first part an experimental study of proton and deuteron transfer in H 2 + + He and HD + + He has been carried out as a function of kinetic and vibrational energy. The data gives evidence that at lower kinetic energies, the spectator stripping mechanism indeed plays an important role when H 2 + or HD + is vibrationally excited. The second half of this thesis examines the relative efficiencies between the excitation of C-C stretching vibration and collision energy on the promotion of the H atom transfer reaction of C 2 H 2 + + H 2 → C 2 H 3 + + H

  12. Studies on the substrate mediated vibrational excitation of CO/Si(100) by means of SFG spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Xu; Lass, Kristian; Balgar, Thorsten; Hasselbrink, Eckart [Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, Fachbereich Chemie, 45117 Essen (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    Vibrational excitations of adsorbates play an important role in chemical reaction dynamics. In the past decade CO on solid surfaces was chosen as adequate model system for studying vibrational relaxation dynamics. Our work is focused on the energy dissipation of vibrationally excited CO adsorbed on a silicon surface by means of IR/Vis sum frequency generation (SFG) spectroscopy. Here we present studies on substrate mediated excitation of vibrational modes of CO on Si(100) induced by UV radiation. We suppose the observation of highly excited internal stretch vibrations of CO caused by hot electrons generated within the silicon substrate.

  13. Current Density Distribution on the Perimeter of Waveguide Exciter Cylindrical Vibrator Conductor

    OpenAIRE

    Zakharia, Yosyp

    2010-01-01

    On ground of electrodynamic analysis the surface current distribution nonuniformity on the perimeter of waveguide-exciter cylindrical conductor is found. Considerable influence of current distribution nonuniformity on exciter input reactance is established. It is also showed, that the current distribution on the vibrator perimeter, for conductor radius no greater then 0,07 of waveguide cross section breadth, approximately uniform is.

  14. Vibrations of a delivery car excited by railway track crossing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litak, Grzegorz; Borowiec, Marek; Hunicz, Jacek; Koszalka, Grzegorz; Niewczas, Andrzej

    2009-01-01

    Vertical vibrations of a delivery car passing through railway tracks have been investigated in this paper. The application of recurrence plots allows to examine short time series of acceleration non-stationary courses. Recurrence quantification analysis and square deviations estimated in small windows have been used to monitor car vibrations and transient behaviour. Measuring acceleration on the 'sprung' and 'unsprung' masses of a vehicle has enabled also to test the quality of a car suspension.

  15. Use of a magnetic force exciter to vibrate a piezocomposite generating element in a small-scale windmill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luong, Hung Truyen; Goo, Nam Seo

    2012-01-01

    A piezocomposite generating element (PCGE) can be used to convert ambient vibrations into electrical energy that can be stored and used to power other devices. This paper introduces a design of a magnetic force exciter for a small-scale windmill that vibrates a PCGE to convert wind energy into electrical energy. A small-scale windmill was designed to be sensitive to low-speed wind in urban regions for the purpose of collecting wind energy. The magnetic force exciter consists of exciting magnets attached to the device’s input rotor and a secondary magnet fixed at the tip of the PCGE. The PCGE is fixed to a clamp that can be adjusted to slide on the windmill’s frame in order to change the gap between exciting and secondary magnets. Under an applied wind force, the input rotor rotates to create a magnetic force interaction that excites the PCGE. The deformation of the PCGE enables it to generate electric power. Experiments were performed with different numbers of exciting magnets and different gaps between the exciting and secondary magnets to determine the optimal configuration for generating the peak voltage and harvesting the maximum wind energy for the same range of wind speeds. In a battery-charging test, the charging time for a 40 mA h battery was approximately 3 h for natural wind in an urban region. The experimental results show that the prototype can harvest energy in urban regions with low wind speeds and convert the wasted wind energy into electricity for city use. (paper)

  16. Exciting a rotating mass on a spring without change to its rotation rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, Kern E.

    2001-01-01

    An exact mathematical solution, in terms of elementary functions, is presented for the two-dimensional problem of a mass rotating on a linear spring. The two governing equations in polar coordinates are nonlinear, coupled ordinary differential equations, but they can be solved analytically in sequence. In general, the orbit of the mass is an ellipse with the fixed end of the spring located at the centre of the ellipse. The orbital frequency is identical to the natural frequency of the spring and it is independent of the amplitude of the motion (independent of the major and minor axes of the ellipse). Based on the solution the following claim is made. No matter how the mass is perturbed, within its plane of motion, the orbital frequency will remain constant. The disturbance can be infinitesimal or finite and it can cause either the total energy or the angular momentum of the system or both to increase or decrease but the orbital period will not change. It follows from the fixed end of the spring being at the ellipse's centre that the radial vibration of the mass has twice the natural frequency of the spring; i.e. two maxima and minima in one orbital period, which is not possible unless there is rotation. (author)

  17. Nuclear structure and nuclear reaction aspects of Faessler and Greiner's rotation-vibration coupling theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspelund, O.

    In the nuclear structure part, the foundations of Faessler and Greiner's rotation-vibration coupling theory are reviewed, whereafter an alternative derivation of Faessler and Greiner's Hamiltonian is presented. A non-spherical quadrupole phonon number N is defined and used in the matrix elements reported for odd-even/even-odd nuclei. These matrix elements are shown to evince oblate-prolate effects that can be exploited for assessing the signs of quadrupole deformations. In the nuclear reaction part, the wave functions emerging from the structure part are applied in a complete and consistent description of elastic and inelastic particle scattering, one-nucleon transfer, and particle/γ-ray angular correlations. The intentions are to demonstrate that anomolous angular distributions and 1=2 j-effects observed in one-nucleon transfer are interrelated phenomena, that can be satisfactorily explained in terms of the elementary vibrational excitation modes inherent in Faessler and Greiner's theory. The latter is regarded as a non-spherical approach to the theory of the quadrupole component of the nuclear potential energy surface. (Auth.)

  18. Roles of the Excitation in Harvesting Energy from Vibrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Zhang

    Full Text Available The study investigated the role of excitation in energy harvesting applications. While the energy ultimately comes from the excitation, it was shown that the excitation may not always behave as a source. When the device characteristics do not perfectly match the excitation, the excitation alternately behaves as a source and a sink. The extent to which the excitation behaves as a sink determines the energy harvesting efficiency. Such contradictory roles were shown to be dictated by a generalized phase defined as the instantaneous phase angle between the velocity of the device and the excitation. An inductive prototype device with a diamagnetically levitated seismic mass was proposed to take advantage of the well established phase changing mechanism of vibro-impact to achieve a broader device bandwidth. Results suggest that the vibro-impact can generate an instantaneous, significant phase shift in response velocity that switches the role of the excitation. If introduced properly outside the resonance zone it could dramatically increase the energy harvesting efficiency.

  19. Vibrationally Excited Carbon Monoxide Produced via a Chemical Reaction Between Carbon Vapor and Oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jans, Elijah R.; Eckert, Zakari; Frederickson, Kraig; Rich, Bill; Adamovich, Igor V.

    2017-06-01

    Measurements of the vibrational distribution function of carbon monoxide produced via a reaction between carbon vapor and molecular oxygen has shown a total population inversion on vibrational levels 4-7. Carbon vapor, produced using an arc discharge to sublimate graphite, is mixed with an argon oxygen flow. The excited carbon monoxide is vibrationally populated up to level v=14, at low temperatures, T=400-450 K, in a collision-dominated environment, 15-20 Torr, with total population inversions between v=4-7. The average vibrational energy per CO molecule formed by the reaction is 0.6-1.2 eV/molecule, which corresponds to 10-20% of the reaction enthalpy. Kinetic modeling of the flow reactor, including state specific vibrational processes, was performed to infer the vibrational distribution of the products of the reaction. The results show viability of developing of a new chemical CO laser from the reaction of carbon vapor and oxygen.

  20. Observation of the adsorption and desorption of vibrationally excited molecules on a metal surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirhatti, Pranav R.; Rahinov, Igor; Golibrzuch, Kai; Werdecker, Jörn; Geweke, Jan; Altschäffel, Jan; Kumar, Sumit; Auerbach, Daniel J.; Bartels, Christof; Wodtke, Alec M.

    2018-06-01

    The most common mechanism of catalytic surface chemistry is that of Langmuir and Hinshelwood (LH). In the LH mechanism, reactants adsorb, become thermalized with the surface, and subsequently react. The measured vibrational (relaxation) lifetimes of molecules adsorbed at metal surfaces are in the range of a few picoseconds. As a consequence, vibrational promotion of LH chemistry is rarely observed, with the exception of LH reactions occurring via a molecular physisorbed intermediate. Here, we directly detect adsorption and subsequent desorption of vibrationally excited CO molecules from a Au(111) surface. Our results show that CO (v = 1) survives on a Au(111) surface for 1 × 10-10 s. Such long vibrational lifetimes for adsorbates on metal surfaces are unexpected and pose an interesting challenge to the current understanding of vibrational energy dissipation on metal surfaces. They also suggest that vibrational promotion of surface chemistry might be more common than is generally believed.

  1. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin; Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational

  2. Deviations from the Boltzmann distribution in vibrationally excited gas flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Offenhaeuser, F.; Frohn, A.

    1986-01-01

    A new model for the exchange of vibrational energy in one-dimensional flows of CO 2 -H 2 O-N 2 -O 2 -He gas mixtures is presented. In contrast to previous models, the assumption of local Boltzmann distributions for the vibrational degrees of freedom is not required. This generalization was achieved by the assumption that the molecules are harmonic oscillators with one or more degrees of freedom represented by finite numbers of energy levels. The population densities of these energy levels are coupled by a set of rate equations. It is shown that in some cases of molecular gas flow the Boltzmann distribution for the vibrational degrees of freedom may be disturbed. 12 references

  3. Translational, rotational and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc discharge at atmospheric pressure air

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Gao, Jinlong; Ehn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    and vibrational temperatures of a gliding arc generated at atmospheric pressure air are investigated. Translational temperatures (about 1100 K) were measured by laser-induced Rayleigh scattering, and two-dimensional temperature imaging was performed. Rotational and vibrational temperatures (about 3600 K and 6700...

  4. The influence of molecular rotation on vibration--translation energy transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKenzie, R.L.

    1977-01-01

    The role of molecular rotations in the exchange of vibrational and translational energy is investigated for collisions between anharmonic diatomic molecules and structureless atoms. A three-dimensional, semiclassical, impact parameter description is applied with emphasis directed towards the influence of rotational coupling on the net rate of vibrational energy transfer summed over all final rotational states. These results are then related to the predictions of an equivalent collinear collision model, and their comparison allows an evaluation of the collinear approximation. The mechanisms of vibrational energy transfer including rotational transitions are shown to be separable into three classes, with the molecules belonging to each class identified first and foremost by their ratio of fundamental vibrational and rotational frequencies, ω/sub e//B/sub e/, and second by the proximity of their initial state to a near-resonant vibration--rotation transition with a small change in angular momentum. While the dynamics of molecules with ω/sub e//B/sub e/ ratios that are comparable to the range of angular momentum transitions having strong coupling are found to require a complete three-dimensional description, the rates of vibrational energy transfer in molecules with large ω/sub e//B/sub e/ ratios appear to be well approximated by a collinear collision model

  5. Cases of coupled vibrations and prametric instability in rotating machines

    OpenAIRE

    Luneno, Jean-Claude

    2012-01-01

    The principal task in this research project was to analyse the causes and consequences of coupled vibrations and parametric instability in hydropower rotors; where both horizontal and vertical machines are involved. Vibration is a well-known undesirable behavior of dynamical systems characterised by persistent periodic, quasi-periodic or chaotic motions. Vibrations generate noise and cause fatigue, which initiates cracks in mechanical structures. Motions coupling can in some cases augment the...

  6. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9681 Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited -State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 59 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited -state

  7. Coherent excitation of vibrational levels using ultra short pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    De Clercq, LE

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available population in a specific vibrational level. We used two approaches to do this, in the one model we used Von Neumann’s equations and the other the Optical Bloch equations (OBE’s). In this poster presentation the Optical Bloch model was used to do...

  8. Characterizing human activity induced impulse and slip-pulse excitations through structural vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Shijia; Mirshekari, Mostafa; Fagert, Jonathon; Ramirez, Ceferino Gabriel; Chung, Albert Jin; Hu, Chih Chi; Shen, John Paul; Zhang, Pei; Noh, Hae Young

    2018-02-01

    Many human activities induce excitations on ambient structures with various objects, causing the structures to vibrate. Accurate vibration excitation source detection and characterization enable human activity information inference, hence allowing human activity monitoring for various smart building applications. By utilizing structural vibrations, we can achieve sparse and non-intrusive sensing, unlike pressure- and vision-based methods. Many approaches have been presented on vibration-based source characterization, and they often either focus on one excitation type or have limited performance due to the dispersion and attenuation effects of the structures. In this paper, we present our method to characterize two main types of excitations induced by human activities (impulse and slip-pulse) on multiple structures. By understanding the physical properties of waves and their propagation, the system can achieve accurate excitation tracking on different structures without large-scale labeled training data. Specifically, our algorithm takes properties of surface waves generated by impulse and of body waves generated by slip-pulse into account to handle the dispersion and attenuation effects when different types of excitations happen on various structures. We then evaluate the algorithm through multiple scenarios. Our method achieves up to a six times improvement in impulse localization accuracy and a three times improvement in slip-pulse trajectory length estimation compared to existing methods that do not take wave properties into account.

  9. The dissociation of vibrationally excited CH3OSO radicals and their photolytic precursor, methoxysulfinyl chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligood, Bridget W; Womack, Caroline C; Straus, Daniel B; Blase, Frances R; Butler, Laurie J

    2011-05-21

    The dissociation dynamics of methoxysulfinyl radicals generated from the photodissociation of CH(3)OS(O)Cl at 248 nm is investigated using both a crossed laser-molecular beam scattering apparatus and a velocity map imaging apparatus. There is evidence of only a single photodissociation channel of the precursor: S-Cl fission to produce Cl atoms and CH(3)OSO radicals. Some of the vibrationally excited CH(3)OSO radicals undergo subsequent dissociation to CH(3) + SO(2). The velocities of the detected CH(3) and SO(2) products show that the dissociation occurs via a transition state having a substantial barrier beyond the endoergicity; appropriately, the distribution of velocities imparted to these momentum-matched products is fit by a broad recoil kinetic energy distribution extending out to 24 kcal/mol in translational energy. Using 200 eV electron bombardment detection, we also detect the CH(3)OSO radicals that have too little internal energy to dissociate. These radicals are observed both at the parent CH(3)OSO(+) ion as well as at the CH(3)(+) and SO(2)(+) daughter ions; they are distinguished by virtue of the velocity imparted in the original photolytic step. The detected velocities of the stable radicals are roughly consistent with the calculated barriers (both at the CCSD(T) and G3B3 levels of theory) for the dissociation of CH(3)OSO to CH(3) + SO(2) when we account for the partitioning of internal energy between rotation and vibration as the CH(3)OSOCl precursor dissociates. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.

  10. Investigation on method of estimating the excitation spectrum of vibration source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Kun; Sun Lei; Lin Song

    2010-01-01

    In practical engineer area, it is hard to obtain the excitation spectrum of the auxiliary machines of nuclear reactor through direct measurement. To solve this problem, the general method of estimating the excitation spectrum of vibration source through indirect measurement is proposed. First, the dynamic transfer matrix between the virtual excitation points and the measure points is obtained through experiment. The matrix combined with the response spectrum at the measure points under practical work condition can be used to calculate the excitation spectrum acts on the virtual excitation points. Then a simplified method is proposed which is based on the assumption that the vibration machine can be regarded as rigid body. The method treats the centroid as the excitation point and the dynamic transfer matrix is derived by using the sub structure mobility synthesis method. Thus, the excitation spectrum can be obtained by the inverse of the transfer matrix combined with the response spectrum at the measure points. Based on the above method, a computing example is carried out to estimate the excitation spectrum acts on the centroid of a electrical pump. By comparing the input excitation and the estimated excitation, the reliability of this method is verified. (authors)

  11. Diode laser probe of CO2 vibrational excitation produced by collisions with hot deuterium atoms from the 193 nm excimer laser photolysis D2S

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Neill, J.A.; Cai, J.Y.; Flynn, G.W.; Weston, R.E. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The 193 nm excimer laser photolysis of D 2 S in D 2 S/CO 2 mixtures produces fast deuterium atoms (E/sub TR/approx.2.2 eV) which vibrationally excite CO 2 molecules via inelastic translation--vibration/rotation (T--V/R) energy exchange processes. A high resolution (10 -3 cm -1 ) cw diode laser probe was used to monitor the excitation of ν 3 (antisymmetric stretch) and ν 2 (bend) vibrations in CO 2 . The present results are compared with previous experiments involving hot hydrogen atom excitation of CO 2 in H 2 S/CO 2 mixtures as well as with theoretical calculations of the excitation probability. The probability for excitation of a ν 3 quantum in CO 2 is about 1%--2% per gas kinetic D/CO 2 collision. Bending (ν 2 ) quanta are produced about eight times more efficiently than antisymmetric stretching (ν 3 ) quanta. The thermalization rate for cooling hot D atoms below the threshold for production of a ν 3 vibrational quantum corresponds to less than 2 D*/D 2 S collisions or 15 D*/CO 2 collisions

  12. The effect of vibrationally excited nitrogen on the low-latitude ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jenkins

    1997-11-01

    Full Text Available The first five vibrationally excited states of molecular nitrogen have been included in the Sheffield University plasmasphere ionosphere model. Vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen reacts much more strongly with atomic oxygen ions than ground-state nitrogen; this means that more O+ ions are converted to NO+ ions, which in turn combine with the electrons to give reduced electron densities. Model calculations have been carried out to investigate the effect of including vibrationally excited molecular nitrogen on the low-latitude ionosphere. In contrast to mid-latitudes, a reduction in electron density is seen in all seasons during solar maximum, the greatest effect being at the location of the equatorial trough.

  13. Using narrowband excitation to confirm that the S∗ state in carotenoids is not a vibrationally-excited ground state species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jailaubekov, Askat E.; Song, Sang-Hun; Vengris, Mikas; Cogdell, Richard J.; Larsen, Delmar S.

    2010-02-01

    The hypothesis that S∗ is a vibrationally-excited ground-state population is tested and discarded for two carotenoid samples: β-carotene in solution and rhodopin glucoside embedded in the light harvesting 2 protein from Rhodopseudomonas acidophila. By demonstrating that the transient absorption signals measured in both systems that are induced by broadband (1000 cm -1) and narrowband (50 cm -1) excitation pulses are near identical and hence bandwidth independent, the impulsive stimulated Raman scattering mechanism proposed as the primary source for S∗ generation is discarded. To support this conclusion, previously published multi-pulse pump-dump-probe signals [17] are revisited to discard secondary mechanisms for S∗ formation.

  14. Vibrational-rotational relaxation of the simplest hydrogen-containing molecules (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molevich, N.E.; Oraevskii, A.N.

    1987-01-01

    In connection with the development of chemical lasers much attention is now devoted to the study of kinetic processes is gaseous mixtures containing the hydrogen halides. Vibrational relaxation of molecules if primarily studied without specifying its relation to the rational levels. Rotational relaxation is regarded a priori as faster than vibrational relaxation, so that the population of the rotational levels is assumed to be in equilibrium. This approach to the relaxation of hydrogen halide molecules (and other diatomic hydrogen-containing molecules), however, is unable to explain satisfactorily the results of the papers discussed below. An analysis of the data obtained in these papers leads to the conclusion that the general picture of relaxation in diatomic hydrogen-containing molecules must be viewed as a unified process of vibrational and rotational relaxation. It is shown that those effects observed during vibrational relaxation of such molecules which are unusual from the standpoint of the theory of vibrational-translational relaxation are well explained in terms of intermolecular vibrational-rotational relaxation together with pure rotational relaxation

  15. Rotation-vibration interactions in the spectra of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Quinoline as a test-case species

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pirali, O.; Gruet, S. [AILES Beamline, Synchrotron SOLEIL, l’Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay, UMR8214 CNRS – Université Paris-Sud, Bât. 210, 91405 Orsay cedex (France); Kisiel, Z. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Goubet, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Lasers, Atomes et Molécules, UMR 8523 CNRS - Université Lille 1, Bâtiment P5, F-59655 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Martin-Drumel, M. A.; Cuisset, A.; Hindle, F.; Mouret, G. [Laboratoire de Physico-Chimie de l’Atmosphère, EA-4493, Université du Littoral – Côte d’Opale, 59140 Dunkerque (France)

    2015-03-14

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are highly relevant for astrophysics as possible, though controversial, carriers of the unidentified infrared emission bands that are observed in a number of different astronomical objects. In support of radio-astronomical observations, high resolution laboratory spectroscopy has already provided the rotational spectra in the vibrational ground state of several molecules of this type, although the rotational study of their dense infrared (IR) bands has only recently become possible using a limited number of experimental set-ups. To date, all of the rotationally resolved data have concerned unperturbed spectra. We presently report the results of a high resolution study of the three lowest vibrational states of quinoline C{sub 9}H{sub 7}N, an N-bearing naphthalene derivative. While the pure rotational ground state spectrum of quinoline is unperturbed, severe complications appear in the spectra of the ν{sub 45} and ν{sub 44} vibrational modes (located at about 168 cm{sup −1} and 178 cm{sup −1}, respectively). In order to study these effects in detail, we employed three different and complementary experimental techniques: Fourier-transform microwave spectroscopy, millimeter-wave spectroscopy, and Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopy with a synchrotron radiation source. Due to the high density of states in the IR spectra of molecules as large as PAHs, perturbations in the rotational spectra of excited states should be ubiquitous. Our study identifies for the first time this effect and provides some insights into an appropriate treatment of such perturbations.

  16. Do vibrationally excited OH molecules affect middle and upper atmospheric chemistry?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. von Clarmann

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Except for a few reactions involving electronically excited molecular or atomic oxygen or nitrogen, atmospheric chemistry modelling usually assumes that the temperature dependence of reaction rates is characterized by Arrhenius' law involving kinetic temperatures. It is known, however, that in the upper atmosphere the vibrational temperatures may exceed the kinetic temperatures by several hundreds of Kelvins. This excess energy has an impact on the reaction rates. We have used upper atmospheric OH populations and reaction rate coefficients for OH(v=0...9+O3 and OH(v=0...9+O to estimate the effective (i.e. population weighted reaction rates for various atmospheric conditions. We have found that the effective rate coefficient for OH(v=0...9+O3 can be larger by a factor of up to 1470 than that involving OH in its vibrational ground state only. At altitudes where vibrationally excited states of OH are highly populated, the OH reaction is a minor sink of Ox and O3 compared to other reactions involving, e.g., atomic oxygen. Thus the impact of vibrationally excited OH on the ozone or Ox sink remains small. Among quiescent atmospheres under investigation, the largest while still small (less than 0.1% effect was found for the polar winter upper stratosphere and mesosphere. The contribution of the reaction of vibrationally excited OH with ozone to the OH sink is largest in the upper polar winter stratosphere (up to 4%, while its effect on the HO2 source is larger in the lower thermosphere (up to 1.5% for polar winter and 2.5% for midlatitude night conditions. For OH(v=0...9+O the effective rate coefficients are lower by up to 11% than those involving OH in its vibrational ground state. The effects on the odd oxygen sink are negative and can reach −3% (midlatitudinal nighttime lowermost thermosphere, i.e. neglecting vibrational excitation overestimates the odd

  17. Picosecond dynamics of the glutamate receptor in response to agonist-induced vibrational excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubo, Minoru; Shiomitsu, Eiji; Odai, Kei; Sugimoto, Tohru; Suzuki, Hideo; Ito, Etsuro

    2004-02-01

    Conformational changes of proteins are dominated by the excitation and relaxation processes of their vibrational states. To elucidate the mechanism of receptor activation, the conformation dynamics of receptors must be analyzed in response to agonist-induced vibrational excitation. In this study, we chose the bending vibrational mode of the guanidinium group of Arg485 of the glutamate receptor subunit GluR2 based on our previous studies, and we investigated picosecond dynamics of the glutamate receptor caused by the vibrational excitation of Arg485 via molecular dynamics simulations. The vibrational excitation energy in Arg485 in the ligand-binding site initially flowed into Lys730, and then into the J-helix at the subunit interface of the ligand-binding domain. Consequently, the atomic displacement in the subunit interface around an intersubunit hydrogen bond was evoked in about 3 ps. This atomic displacement may perturb the subunit packing of the receptor, triggering receptor activation. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Synthesis of vibration control and health monitoring of building structures under unknown excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, Jia; Huang, Qin; Xu, You-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The vibration control and health monitoring of building structures have been actively investigated in recent years but often treated separately according to the primary objective pursued. In this study, a time-domain integrated vibration control and health monitoring approach is proposed based on the extended Kalman filter (EKF) for identifying the physical parameters of the controlled building structures without the knowledge of the external excitation. The physical parameters and state vectors of the building structure are then estimated and used for the determination of the control force for the purpose of the vibration attenuation. The interaction between the health monitoring and vibration control is revealed and assessed. The feasibility and reliability of the proposed approach is numerically demonstrated via a five-story shear building structure equipped with magneto-rheological (MR) dampers. Two types of excitations are considered: (1) the EI-Centro ground excitation underneath of the building and (2) a swept-frequency excitation applied on the top floor of the building. Results show that the structural parameters as well as the unknown dynamic loadings could be identified accurately; and, at the same time, the structural vibration is significantly reduced in the building structure. (paper)

  19. The Nonlinear Behavior of Vibrational Conveyers with Single-Mass Crank-and-Rod Exciters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Füsun Alışverişçi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The single-mass, crank-and-rod exciters vibrational conveyers have a trough supported on elastic stands which are rigidly fastened to the trough and a supporting frame. The trough is oscillated by a common crank drive. This vibration causes the load to move forward and upward. The moving loads jump periodically and move forward with relatively small vibration. The movement is strictly related to vibrational parameters. This is applicable in laboratory conditions in the industry which accommodate a few grams of loads, up to those that accommodate tons of loading capacity. In this study I explore the transitional behavior across resonance, during the starting of a single degree of freedom vibratory system excited by crank-and-rod. A loaded vibratory conveyor is more safe to start than an empty one. Vibrational conveyers with cubic nonlinear spring and ideal vibration exciter have been analyzed analytically for primary and secondary resonance by the Method of Multiple Scales, and numerically. The approximate analytical results obtained in this study have been compared with the numerical results and have been found to be well matched.

  20. Antibonding intermediate state in the theory of vibrational excitation of diatomic molecules by slow electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazanskii, A.K.

    1982-01-01

    An exactly solvable model is constructed for the description of the processes that take place when a slow electron collides with a diatomic molecule (vibrational excitation, associative detachment, and dissociative attachment). As a particular model of the variant, the case of an antibonding (virtual) state of an intermediate state is considered, and a term of this state is parametrized in a very simple manner. The vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment are calculated for a system corresponding to the HCl molecule. The results are in good qualitative agreement with experiment

  1. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Do, T. P. T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  2. Use of VUK-170 elastic vibration exciter to free instrument from landslide and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akopov, E A; Dublenich, Y V; Leskovskii, G A

    1981-01-01

    The mechanical institute of Moscow State Univ. and VNIIBT have developed a mechanical long stroke drilling jar named VUK-170M elastic vibration exciter. It is able to function in two modes: percussion and wave-impulse. Tests have established that the VUK-1/0 elastic vibration exciter is an effective means for eliminating tool sticking, such as drill bit wedging, use in permeable deposits, or rockburst in the annulary space after walls of well collapse. In the latter case a number of measures should be undertaken: use of the device in a wave-impulse or percussion mode; oil slug; turn the drilling string by section.

  3. Influence of defects on the vibrations of rotating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, A.

    2008-01-01

    For high rotation speeds, the imperfections (cracks, anisotropy...) of rotating machinery of the energy sector lead to a specific vibratory behavior which can damage the machine. The simulation of rotating machinery are usually realized for systems without defect. The aim of this thesis is to understand the influence of defects and to propose an algorithm to predict the dynamical behavior. In a first part the author studies the simplified rotating oscillators to propose a numerical method in order to taking into account the dynamic of these systems. This method is then applied to real rotating machinery with the Cast3m software. The numerical results are validated with experiments. (A.L.B.)

  4. Acoustic and Vibration Control for an Underwater Structure under Mechanical Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Jian Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic and vibration control for an underwater structure under mechanical excitation has been investigated by using negative feedback control algorithm. The underwater structure is modeled with cylindrical shells, conical shells, and circular bulkheads, of which the motion equations are built with the variational approach, respectively. Acoustic property is analyzed by the Helmholtz integration formulation with boundary element method. Based on negative feedback control algorithm, a control loop with a coupling use of piezoelectric sensor and actuator is built, and accordingly some numerical examples are carried out on active control of structural vibration and acoustic response. Effects of geometrical and material parameters on acoustic and vibration properties are investigated and discussed.

  5. Rate coefficients of exchange reactions accounting for vibrational excitation of reagents and products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kustova, E. V.; Savelev, A. S.; Kunova, O. V.

    2018-05-01

    Theoretical models for the vibrational state-resolved Zeldovich reaction are assessed by comparison with the results of quasi-classical trajectory (QCT) calculations. An error in the model of Aliat is corrected; the model is generalized taking into account NO vibrational states. The proposed model is fairly simple and can be easily implemented to the software for non-equilibrium flow modeling. It provides a good agreement with the QCT rate coefficients in the whole range of temperatures and reagent/product vibrational states. The developed models are tested in simulations of vibrational and chemical relaxation of air mixture behind a shock wave. The importance of accounting for excitated NO vibrational states and accurate prediction of Zeldovich reactions rates is shown.

  6. Chemical reactions of water molecules on Ru(0001) induced by selective excitation of vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mugarza, Aitor; Shimizu, Tomoko K.; Ogletree, D. Frank; Salmeron, Miquel

    2009-05-07

    Tunneling electrons in a scanning tunneling microscope were used to excite specific vibrational quantum states of adsorbed water and hydroxyl molecules on a Ru(0 0 0 1) surface. The excited molecules relaxed by transfer of energy to lower energy modes, resulting in diffusion, dissociation, desorption, and surface-tip transfer processes. Diffusion of H{sub 2}O molecules could be induced by excitation of the O-H stretch vibration mode at 445 meV. Isolated molecules required excitation of one single quantum while molecules bonded to a C atom required at least two quanta. Dissociation of single H{sub 2}O molecules into H and OH required electron energies of 1 eV or higher while dissociation of OH required at least 2 eV electrons. In contrast, water molecules forming part of a cluster could be dissociated with electron energies of 0.5 eV.

  7. Photoelectron spectra of N2 +: Rotational line profiles studied with He;I endash excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oehrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    1999-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N 2 + , with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Σ states, the X 2 Σ g + and the B 2 Σ u + , we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in β value. The well-known difference in β value for the ν=0 and ν=1 vibrations of the X 2 Σ g + state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different β values of the rotational branches. For the ν=0 endash 2 vibrations of the A 2 Π u state, the β value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the ν=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Σ g + and B 2 Σ u + states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and the B state between 23 and 45 eV. The results for the X state have recently been presented in a Letter [G. Oehrwall, P. Baltzer, and J. Bozek, Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 546, 1998]. The rotational branching ratios of the two states have very different behaviors as functions of photon energy. The relative intensities of the rotational branches in the X state change significantly over the studied energy range. The 3σ g →kσ u shape resonance apparently gives rise to a non-Franck-Condon-like behavior for the rotational branching ratio of the X state. In the B state, the rotational branching ratios remain essentially constant over the studied energy range. copyright 1999 The American Physical Society

  8. Piezoelectric pushers for active vibration control of rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzolo, A. B.; Lin, R. R.; Alexander, R. M.; Kascak, A. F.; Montague, J.

    1989-01-01

    The active control of rotordynamic vibrations and stability by magnetic bearings and electromagnetic shakers have been discussed extensively in the literature. These devices, though effective, are usually large in volume and add significant weight to the stator. The use of piezoelectric pushers may provide similar degrees of effectiveness in light, compact packages. Tests are currently being conducted with piezoelectric pusher-based active vibration control. Results from tests performed on NASA test rigs as preliminary verification of the related theory are presented.

  9. Vibration monitoring of EDF rotating machinery using artificial neural networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alguindigue, I.E.; Loskiewicz-Buczak, A.; Uhrig, R.E.; Hamon, L.; Lefevre, F.

    1991-01-01

    Vibration monitoring of components in nuclear power plants has been used for a number of years. This technique involves the analysis of vibration data coming from vital components of the plant to detect features which reflect the operational state of machinery. The analysis leads to the identification of potential failures and their causes, and makes it possible to perform efficient preventive maintenance. Earlydetection is important because it can decrease the probability of catastrophic failures, reduce forced outgage, maximize utilization of available assets, increase the life of the plant, and reduce maintenance costs. This paper documents our work on the design of a vibration monitoring methodology based on neural network technology. This technology provides an attractive complement to traditional vibration analysis because of the potential of neural networks to operate in real-time mode and to handle data which may be distorted or noisy. Our efforts have been concentrated on the analysis and classification of vibration signatures collected by Electricite de France (EDF). Two neural networks algorithms were used in our project: the Recirculation algorithm and the Backpropagation algorithm. Although this project is in the early stages of development it indicates that neural networks may provide a viable methodology for monitoring and diagnostics of vibrating components. Our results are very encouraging

  10. Coulomb excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGowan, F.K.; Stelson, P.H.

    1974-01-01

    The theory of Coulomb excitation and a brief review of pertinent treatments of the Coulomb excitation process that are useful for the analysis of experiments are given. Examples demonstrating the scope of nuclear structure information obtainable from gamma spectroscopy are presented. Direct Elambda excitation of 232 Th is discussed in terms of the one phonon octupole vibrational spectrum. B(MI) reduced transition probabilities resulting from Coulomb excitation of odd-A deformed nuclei with heavy ions are presented as a test of the rotational model. The use of gamma ray coincidence and particle-gamma coincidence as tools for investigating Coulomb excitation is discussed. (U.S.)

  11. Exploring the vibrational fingerprint of the electronic excitation energy via molecular dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deyne, Andy Van Yperen-De; Pauwels, Ewald; Ghysels, An; Waroquier, Michel; Van Speybroeck, Veronique; Hemelsoet, Karen; De Meyer, Thierry; De Clerck, Karen

    2014-01-01

    A Fourier-based method is presented to relate changes of the molecular structure during a molecular dynamics simulation with fluctuations in the electronic excitation energy. The method implies sampling of the ground state potential energy surface. Subsequently, the power spectrum of the velocities is compared with the power spectrum of the excitation energy computed using time-dependent density functional theory. Peaks in both spectra are compared, and motions exhibiting a linear or quadratic behavior can be distinguished. The quadratically active motions are mainly responsible for the changes in the excitation energy and hence cause shifts between the dynamic and static values of the spectral property. Moreover, information about the potential energy surface of various excited states can be obtained. The procedure is illustrated with three case studies. The first electronic excitation is explored in detail and dominant vibrational motions responsible for changes in the excitation energy are identified for ethylene, biphenyl, and hexamethylbenzene. The proposed method is also extended to other low-energy excitations. Finally, the vibrational fingerprint of the excitation energy of a more complex molecule, in particular the azo dye ethyl orange in a water environment, is analyzed

  12. ExoMol line lists - XXIX. The rotation-vibration spectrum of methyl chloride up to 1200 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, A.; Yachmenev, A.; Thiel, W.; Fateev, A.; Tennyson, J.; Yurchenko, S. N.

    2018-06-01

    Comprehensive rotation-vibration line lists are presented for the two main isotopologues of methyl chloride, 12CH335Cl and 12CH337Cl. The line lists, OYT-35 and OYT-37, are suitable for temperatures up to T = 1200 K and consider transitions with rotational excitation up to J = 85 in the wavenumber range 0-6400 cm-1 (wavelengths λ > 1.56 μm). Over 166 billion transitions between 10.2 million energy levels have been calculated variationally for each line list using a new empirically refined potential energy surface, determined by refining to 739 experimentally derived energy levels up to J = 5, and an established ab initio dipole moment surface. The OYT line lists show excellent agreement with newly measured high-temperature infrared absorption cross-sections, reproducing both strong and weak intensity features across the spectrum. The line lists are available from the ExoMol database and the CDS database.

  13. Vibration Feature Extraction and Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rotating Machinery-A Literature Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleem Riaz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Safety, reliability, efficiency and performance of rotating machinery in all industrial applications are the main concerns. Rotating machines are widely used in various industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery faults are very important and often complex and labor-intensive. Feature extraction techniques play a vital role for a reliable, effective and efficient feature extraction for the diagnosis of rotating machinery. Therefore, developing effective bearing fault diagnostic method using different fault features at different steps becomes more attractive. Bearings are widely used in medical applications, food processing industries, semi-conductor industries, paper making industries and aircraft components. This paper review has demonstrated that the latest reviews applied to rotating machinery on the available a variety of vibration feature extraction. Generally literature is classified into two main groups: frequency domain, time frequency analysis. However, fault detection and diagnosis of rotating machine vibration signal processing methods to present their own limitations. In practice, most healthy ingredients faulty vibration signal from background noise and mechanical vibration signals are buried. This paper also reviews that how the advanced signal processing methods, empirical mode decomposition and interference cancellation algorithm has been investigated and developed. The condition for rotating machines based rehabilitation, prevent failures increase the availability and reduce the cost of maintenance is becoming necessary too. Rotating machine fault detection and diagnostics in developing algorithms signal processing based on a key problem is the fault feature extraction or quantification. Currently, vibration signal, fault detection and diagnosis of rotating machinery based techniques most widely used techniques. Furthermore, the researchers are widely interested to make automatic

  14. Theoretical and Experimental Study on Synchronization of the Two Homodromy Exciters in a Non-Resonant Vibrating System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Liang Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we give some theoretical analyses and experimental results on synchronization of the two non-identical exciters. Using the average method of modified small parameters, the dimensionless coupling equation of the two exciters is deduced. The synchronization criterion for the two exciters is derived as the torque of frequency capture being equal to or greater than the absolute value of difference between the residual electromagnetic torques of the two motors. The stability criterion of synchronous state is verified to satisfy the Routh-Hurwitz criterion. The regions of implementing synchronization and that of stability of phase difference for the two exciters are manifested by numeric method. Synchronization of the two exciters stems from the coupling dynamic characteristic of the vibrating system having selecting motion, especially, under the condition that the parameters of system are complete symmetry, the torque of frequency capture stemming from the circular motion of the rigid frame drives the phase difference to approach PI and carry out the swing of the rigid frame; that from the swing of the rigid frame forces the phase difference to near zero and achieve the circular motion of the rigid frame. In the steady state, the motion of rigid frame will be one of three types: pure swing, pure circular motion, swing and circular motion coexistence. The numeric and experiment results derived thereof show that the two exciters can operate synchronously as long as the structural parameters of system satisfy the criterion of stability in the regions of frequency capture. In engineering, the distance between the centroid of the rigid frame and the rotational centre of exciter should be as far as possible. Only in this way, can the elliptical motion of system required in engineering be realized.

  15. Response of the rf-extraction-wing balcony and floor, and the storage ring to forced and ambient vibration excitation and coupling to tunnel/basemat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jendrzejczyk, J.A.; Wambsganss, M.W.; Smith, R.K.; Rosas-Velez, P.

    1993-08-01

    To ensure successful operation of the APS, vibration of the storage ring quadrupole magnets must be limited to very low levels for frequencies >10 Hz. There will be many sources of vibration, such as pumps, fans, compressors, generators, and other rotating and reciprocating machinery when the APS is operational. In general, such vibration sources are isolated from the structural components and base foundations by vibration dampers and isolators. Pumps are typically mounted on seismic isolators, which are massive bases with response frequencies of <10 Hz, and fans are mounted with elastic-type isolators to minimize vibration coupling. The attenuation of expansion/isolation joints is a very important factor in predicting the response of the storage ring basemat to the various excitation sources. Several 75-hp pumps are located on the balcony of the rf extraction wing, which is close to the storage ring basemat. The pumps per se may prove to be a vibration excitation source of concern. Additional pumps will be placed in the RF extraction building and could add to the vibration levels. If the dynamic unbalance force of the pump motor, and the efficiency of the associated expansion joints were known, one could predict the response of the storage ring basemat. This information would also be useful in determining the placement of additional pumps. This report discusses vibration tests and measurements that were performed on July 28, 1993, in the rf extraction building. The purpose of the investigation was to study the efficiency of two specific expansion joints: (1) the joint that separates a structural column pad from the extraction wing floor, and (2) the joint that separates the extraction wing floor from the roof of the storage ring tunnel. A small electrodynamic exciter, with a maximum RMS force output of ∼0.5 lb at the frequencies of interest, was used

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of the vibrational excitations in ethane monolayers adsorbed on graphite (0001) surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Taub, H.

    1987-01-01

    The collective vibrational excitations of two different crystalline monolayer phases of ethane (C2H6) adsorbed on the graphite (0001) surface have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The monolayer phases studied are the commensurate 7/8 ×4 structure in which the ethane molecules lie...

  17. Blades Forced Vibration Under Aero-Elastic Excitation Modeled by Van der Pol

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Půst, Ladislav; Pešek, Luděk

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 11 (2017), č. článku 1750166. ISSN 0218-1274 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA16-04546S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : ade vibration * aero-elastic force * self-excitation * van der Pol Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics OBOR OECD: Applied mechanics Impact factor: 1.329, year: 2016

  18. Intermediate energy electron impact excitation of composite vibrational modes in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A.; Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Oliveira, E. M. de; Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física ‘Gleb Wataghin,’ Universidade Estadual de Campinas, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, 09210-580 Santo André, São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, C.P. 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Silva, G. B. da [Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, G.P.O. Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report differential cross section results from an experimental investigation into the electron impact excitation of a number of the low-lying composite (unresolved) vibrational modes in phenol (C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH). The measurements were carried out at incident electron energies in the range 15–40 eV and for scattered-electron angles in the range 10–90°. The energy resolution of those measurements was typically ∼80 meV. Calculations, using the GAMESS code, were also undertaken with a B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level model chemistry, in order to enable us to assign vibrational modes to the features observed in our energy loss spectra. To the best of our knowledge, the present cross sections are the first to be reported for vibrational excitation of the C{sub 6}H{sub 5}OH molecule by electron impact.

  19. Observation of an energy threshold for large ΔE collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine (Evib=31 000-41 000 cm-1) by CO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elioff, Michael S.; Wall, Mark C.; Lemoff, Andrew S.; Mullin, Amy S.

    1999-03-01

    Energy dependent studies of the collisional relaxation of highly vibrationally excited pyrazine through collisions with CO2 were performed for initial pyrazine energies Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. These studies are presented along with earlier results for pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1. High-resolution transient IR laser absorption of individual CO2 (0000) rotational states (J=56-80) was used to investigate the magnitude and partitioning of energy gain into CO2 rotation and translation, which comprises the high energy tail of the energy transfer distribution function. Highly vibrationally excited pyrazine was prepared by absorption of pulsed UV light at seven wavelengths in the range λ=281-324 nm, followed by radiationless decay to pyrazine's ground electronic state. Nascent CO2 (0000) rotational populations were measured for each UV excitation wavelength and distributions of nascent recoil velocities for individual rotational states of CO2 (0000) were obtained from Doppler-broadened transient linewidth measurements. Measurements of energy transfer rate constants at each UV wavelength yield energy-dependent probabilities for collisions involving large ΔE values. These results reveal that the magnitude of large ΔE collisional energy gain in CO2 (0000) is fairly insensitive to the amount of vibrational energy in pyrazine for Evib=31 000-35 000 cm-1. A comparison with earlier studies on pyrazine with Evib=36 000-41 000 cm-1 indicates that the V→RT energy transfer increases both in magnitude and probability for Evib>36 000 cm-1. Implications of incomplete intramolecular vibrational relaxation, electronic state coupling, and isomerization barriers are discussed in light of these results.

  20. Electromagnetic harvester for lateral vibration in rotating machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araujo, Marcus Vinícius Vitoratti; Nicoletti, Rodrigo

    2015-02-01

    Energy harvesters are devices that convert mechanical energy, usually vibration, into electrical energy that can be used to supply low power circuits (e.g. sensors). In this work, an energy harvester is designed for converting the mechanical energy of the lateral vibrations of shafts into electrical energy. For that, permanent magnets are mounted in the shaft and coils are mounted in a fixed structure. A configuration analysis is performed to find the appropriated polarization of the magnets and orientation of the coils in order to have electromagnetic induction without resisting torque on the shaft. Experimental tests are done for different electrical configurations of the coils: independent, in series and, in parallel. The results show that more electric power is induced when the coils are connected in series, and vibration reduction is more evident when the coils are connected independently.

  1. Nonlinear modeling of tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) in rotating wind turbine blades for damping edgewise vibrations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Zili; Nielsen, Søren R. K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2015-01-01

    Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g. This facilit......Tuned liquid dampers (TLDs) utilize the sloshing motion of the fluid to suppress structural vibrations and become a natural candidate for damping vibrations in rotating wind turbine blades. The centrifugal acceleration at the tip of a wind turbine blade can reach a magnitude of 7–8g...... free-surface elevation equally well, the one-mode model can still be utilized for the design of TLD. Parametric optimization of the TLD is carried out based on the one-mode model, and the optimized damper effectively improves the dynamic response of wind turbine blades....

  2. Photoelectron spectra of N2+: Rotational line profiles studied with HeI-excited angle-resolved spectroscopy and with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohrwall, G.; Baltzer, P.; Bozek, J.

    2004-01-01

    We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outer most valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu =1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles are resolved. The intensities of the rotational branches were studied as function of photon energy, the X state between 23 and 65 eV, and We have recorded angle-resolved He I photoelectron spectra of the three outermost valence states in N+2, with high enough resolution to observe rotational line profiles. For the two Sigma states, the X 2 Sigma +g and the B 2 Sigma +u, we found that the rotational branches corresponding to different changes in rotational quantum number can differ dramatically in beta value. The well-known difference in beta value for the nu=0 and nu=1 vibrations of the X 2 Sigma +g state was found to be due to different rotational branching ratios and also different beta values of the rotational branches. For the nu=0-2 vibrations of the A 2 Pi u state, the beta value difference between rotational branches is much less pronounced than in the X and B states. We have also recorded synchrotron-radiation-excited photoelectron spectra of the nu=0 vibrational peaks of the X 2 Sigma +g and B 2 Sigma +u states where rotational line profiles a

  3. Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Jiajian; Ehn, Andreas; Gao, Jinlong

    2017-01-01

    , 0) band was used to simulate the rotational temperature (Tr) of the gliding arc discharge whereas the NO A–X (1, 0) and (0, 1) bands were used to determine its vibrational temperature (Tv). The instantaneous reduced electric field strength E/N was obtained by simultaneously measuring......Translational, rotational, vibrational and electron temperatures of a gliding arc discharge in atmospheric pressure air were experimentally investigated using in situ, non-intrusive optical diagnostic techniques. The gliding arc discharge was driven by a 35 kHz alternating current (AC) power source...... and operated in a glow-type regime. The two-dimensional distribution of the translational temperature (Tt) of the gliding arc discharge was determined using planar laser-induced Rayleigh scattering. The rotational and vibrational temperatures were obtained by simulating the experimental spectra. The OH A–X (0...

  4. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wibowo,; Zakaria,; Lambang, Lullus; Triyono,; Muhayat, Nurul

    2016-01-01

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  5. Study on antilock brake system with elastic membrane vibration generated by controlled solenoid excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wibowo,, E-mail: wibowo-uns@yahoo.com; Zakaria,, E-mail: zakaaria27@gmail.com; Lambang, Lullus, E-mail: lulus-l@yahoo.com; Triyono,, E-mail: tyon-bila@yahoo.co.id; Muhayat, Nurul, E-mail: nurulmuhayat@ymail.com [Mechanical Engineering Department, Sebelas Maret University, Surakarta 57128 (Indonesia)

    2016-03-29

    The most effective chassis control system for improving vehicle safety during severe braking is anti-lock braking system (ABS). Antilock effect can be gained by vibrate the pad brake at 7 to 20 cycle per second. The aim of this study is to design a new method of antilock braking system with membrane elastic vibrated by solenoid. The influence of the pressure fluctuations of brake fluid is investigated. Vibration data is collected using a small portable accelerometer-slam stick. The experiment results that the vibration of brake pad caused by controlled solenoid excitation at 10 Hz is obtained by our new method. The result of measurements can be altered by varying brake fluid pressure.

  6. Vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and third-harmonic generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Hara, Hideaki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2018-01-01

    We report the coherent excitation of the vibrational state of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and the resultant third-harmonic generation (THG). Parahydrogen molecules cooled by liquid nitrogen are irradiated by mid-infrared nanosecond pulses at 4.8 μm with a nearly Fourier-transform-limited linewidth. The first excited vibrational state of parahydrogen is populated by two-photon absorption of the mid-infrared photons. Because of the narrow linewidth of the mid-infrared pulses, coherence between the ground and excited states is sufficient to induce higher-order processes. Near-infrared photons from the THG are observed at 1.6 μm. The dependence of the intensity of the near-infrared radiation on mid-infrared pulse energy, target pressure, and cell length is determined. We used a simple formula for THG with consideration of realistic experimental conditions to explain the observed results.

  7. Coupled channel analysis of the 142Ce (α,α)142Ce* reaction: study of a vibrational-rotational transition nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appoloni, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    The angular distribution of the elastic and inelastic scattering of a particles corresponding to the excitation of the low-lying collective states of 142 Ce were measured at an incident energy of 18.0 MeV. The angular distribution of the following excited states were obtained: 641, 1.219, 1.450, 1.536, 1.653, 1.742, 2.004, 2.043, 2.114, 2.125, 2.279, 2.364, 2.542, 2.604 e 3.067 MeV. The angular distributions of the ground state and the first six excited states were analysed within the flamework of the Anharmonic Vibrational and Symmetric Rotational Models, with the Coupled Channel Theory. The Anharmonic Vibrational Model gave the best and most complete description of the experimental data. The wave functions and the deformation parameters of the analysed states were determined. (Author) [pt

  8. WAVELETS AND PRINCIPAL COMPONENT ANALYSIS METHOD FOR VIBRATION MONITORING OF ROTATING MACHINERY

    OpenAIRE

    Bendjama, Hocine; S. Boucherit, Mohamad

    2017-01-01

    Fault diagnosis is playing today a crucial role in industrial systems. To improve reliability, safety and efficiency advanced monitoring methods have become increasingly important for many systems. The vibration analysis method is essential in improving condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery. Effective utilization of vibration signals depends upon effectiveness of applied signal processing techniques. In this paper, fault diagnosis is performed using a com...

  9. Hybrid Vibration Control under Broadband Excitation and Variable Temperature Using Viscoelastic Neutralizer and Adaptive Feedforward Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João C. O. Marra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibratory phenomena have always surrounded human life. The need for more knowledge and domain of such phenomena increases more and more, especially in the modern society where the human-machine integration becomes closer day after day. In that context, this work deals with the development and practical implementation of a hybrid (passive-active/adaptive vibration control system over a metallic beam excited by a broadband signal and under variable temperature, between 5 and 35°C. Since temperature variations affect directly and considerably the performance of the passive control system, composed of a viscoelastic dynamic vibration neutralizer (also called a viscoelastic dynamic vibration absorber, the associative strategy of using an active-adaptive vibration control system (based on a feedforward approach with the use of the FXLMS algorithm working together with the passive one has shown to be a good option to compensate the neutralizer loss of performance and generally maintain the extended overall level of vibration control. As an additional gain, the association of both vibration control systems (passive and active-adaptive has improved the attenuation of vibration levels. Some key steps matured over years of research on this experimental setup are presented in this paper.

  10. Vibration properties of a rotating piezoelectric energy harvesting device that experiences gyroscopic effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Haohui; Chai, Tan; Cooley, Christopher G.

    2018-03-01

    This study investigates the vibration of a rotating piezoelectric device that consists of a proof mass that is supported by elastic structures with piezoelectric layers. Vibration of the proof mass causes deformation in the piezoelectric structures and voltages to power the electrical loads. The coupled electromechanical equations of motion are derived using Newtonian mechanics and Kirchhoff's circuit laws. The free vibration behavior is investigated for devices with identical (tuned) and nonidentical (mistuned) piezoelectric support structures and electrical loads. These devices have complex-valued, speed-dependent eigenvalues and eigenvectors as a result of gyroscopic effects caused by their constant rotation. The characteristics of the complex-valued eigensolutions are related to physical behavior of the device's vibration. The free vibration behaviors differ significantly for tuned and mistuned devices. Due to gyroscopic effects, the proof mass in the tuned device vibrates in either forward or backward decaying circular orbits in single-mode free response. This is proven analytically for all tuned devices, regardless of the device's specific parameters or operating speed. For mistuned devices, the proof mass has decaying elliptical forward and backward orbits. The eigenvalues are shown to be sensitive to changes in the electrical load resistances. Closed-form solutions for the eigenvalues are derived for open and close circuits. At high rotation speeds these devices experience critical speeds and instability.

  11. Vibration Signal Forecasting on Rotating Machinery by means of Signal Decomposition and Neurofuzzy Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Zurita-Millán

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration monitoring plays a key role in the industrial machinery reliability since it allows enhancing the performance of the machinery under supervision through the detection of failure modes. Thus, vibration monitoring schemes that give information regarding future condition, that is, prognosis approaches, are of growing interest for the scientific and industrial communities. This work proposes a vibration signal prognosis methodology, applied to a rotating electromechanical system and its associated kinematic chain. The method combines the adaptability of neurofuzzy modeling with a signal decomposition strategy to model the patterns of the vibrations signal under different fault scenarios. The model tuning is performed by means of Genetic Algorithms along with a correlation based interval selection procedure. The performance and effectiveness of the proposed method are validated experimentally with an electromechanical test bench containing a kinematic chain. The results of the study indicate the suitability of the method for vibration forecasting in complex electromechanical systems and their associated kinematic chains.

  12. Vibration-resistant Er-doped superfluorescent fiber source incorporating a Faraday rotator mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Enkang; Yang, Liu; Gao, Zhongxing; Xue, Bing; Zhang, Yonggang

    2018-04-01

    Improvement in the mean wavelength vibration stability is crucial to the realization of a high-precision fiber-optic gyroscope. We design a vibration-resistant Er-doped superfluorescent fiber source (VR-EDSFS) incorporated with a Faraday rotator mirror and compare it with the conventional Er-doped superfluorescent fiber source (ED-SFS) under different vibration conditions. As shown by experimental results, the mean wavelength vibration stability of the VR-EDSFS is much better than that of the conventional ED-SFS. Under the 1000 to 2000 Hz vibration condition, the former is just 3.4 ppm, which is about 7 ppm less than the latter over 2 h.

  13. Stochastic output error vibration-based damage detection and assessment in structures under earthquake excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, J. S.; Fassois, S. D.

    2006-11-01

    A stochastic output error (OE) vibration-based methodology for damage detection and assessment (localization and quantification) in structures under earthquake excitation is introduced. The methodology is intended for assessing the state of a structure following potential damage occurrence by exploiting vibration signal measurements produced by low-level earthquake excitations. It is based upon (a) stochastic OE model identification, (b) statistical hypothesis testing procedures for damage detection, and (c) a geometric method (GM) for damage assessment. The methodology's advantages include the effective use of the non-stationary and limited duration earthquake excitation, the handling of stochastic uncertainties, the tackling of the damage localization and quantification subproblems, the use of "small" size, simple and partial (in both the spatial and frequency bandwidth senses) identified OE-type models, and the use of a minimal number of measured vibration signals. Its feasibility and effectiveness are assessed via Monte Carlo experiments employing a simple simulation model of a 6 storey building. It is demonstrated that damage levels of 5% and 20% reduction in a storey's stiffness characteristics may be properly detected and assessed using noise-corrupted vibration signals.

  14. Directing the path of light-induced electron transfer at a molecular fork using vibrational excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delor, Milan; Archer, Stuart A.; Keane, Theo; Meijer, Anthony J. H. M.; Sazanovich, Igor V.; Greetham, Gregory M.; Towrie, Michael; Weinstein, Julia A.

    2017-11-01

    Ultrafast electron transfer in condensed-phase molecular systems is often strongly coupled to intramolecular vibrations that can promote, suppress and direct electronic processes. Recent experiments exploring this phenomenon proved that light-induced electron transfer can be strongly modulated by vibrational excitation, suggesting a new avenue for active control over molecular function. Here, we achieve the first example of such explicit vibrational control through judicious design of a Pt(II)-acetylide charge-transfer donor-bridge-acceptor-bridge-donor 'fork' system: asymmetric 13C isotopic labelling of one of the two -C≡C- bridges makes the two parallel and otherwise identical donor→acceptor electron-transfer pathways structurally distinct, enabling independent vibrational perturbation of either. Applying an ultrafast UVpump(excitation)-IRpump(perturbation)-IRprobe(monitoring) pulse sequence, we show that the pathway that is vibrationally perturbed during UV-induced electron transfer is dramatically slowed down compared to its unperturbed counterpart. One can thus choose the dominant electron transfer pathway. The findings deliver a new opportunity for precise perturbative control of electronic energy propagation in molecular devices.

  15. Lifetime-vibrational interference effects in resonantly excited x-ray emission spectra of CO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytt, P.; Glans, P.; Gunnelin, K. [Uppsala Univ. (Sweden)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The parity selection rule for resonant X-ray emission as demonstrated for O{sub 2} and N{sub 2} can be seen as an effect of interference between coherently excited degenerate localized core states. One system where the core state degeneracy is not exact but somewhat lifted was previously studied at ALS, namely the resonant X-ray emission of amino-substituted benzene (aniline). It was shown that the X-ray fluorescence spectrum resulting from excitation of the C1s at the site of the {open_quotes}aminocarbon{close_quotes} could be described in a picture separating the excitation and the emission processes, whereas the spectrum corresponding to the quasi-degenerate carbons could not. Thus, in this case it was necessary to take interference effects between the quasi-degenerate intermediate core excited states into account in order to obtain agreement between calculations and experiment. The different vibrational levels of core excited states in molecules have energy splittings which are of the same order of magnitude as the natural lifetime broadening of core excitations in the soft X-ray range. Therefore, lifetime-vibrational interference effects are likely to appear and influence the band shapes in resonant X-ray emission spectra. Lifetime-vibrational interference has been studied in non-resonant X-ray emission, and in Auger spectra. In this report the authors discuss results of selectively excited soft X-ray fluorescence spectra of molecules, where they focus on lifetime-interference effects appearing in the band shapes.

  16. Experimental studies of processes with vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are important for tokamak edge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadez, I.; Markelj, S.; Rupnik, Z.; Pelicon, P.

    2006-01-01

    We are currently conducting a series of different laboratory experimental studies of processes involving vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules that are relevant to fusion edge plasma. A general overview of our activities is presented together with results of studies of hydrogen recombination on surfaces. This includes vibrational spectroscopy of molecules formed by recombination on metal surfaces exposed to the partially dissociated hydrogen gas and recombination after hydrogen permeation through metal membrane. The goal of these studies is to provide numerical parameters needed for edge plasma modelling and better understanding of plasma wall interaction processes. (author)

  17. Vibrational frequencies and dephasing times in excited electronic states by femtosecond time-resolved four-wave mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joo, Taiha; Albrecht, A. C.

    1993-06-01

    Time-resolved degenerate four-wave mixing (TRDFWM) for an electronically resonant system in a phase-matching configuration that measures population decay is reported. Because the spectral width of input light exceeds the vibrational Bohr frequency of a strong Raman active mode, the vibrational coherence produces strong oscillations in the TRDFWM signal together with the usual population decay from the excited electronic state. The data are analyzed in terms of a four-level system: ground and excited electronic states each split by a vibrational quantum of a Raman active mode. Absolute frequencies and their dephasing times of the vibrational modes at ≈590 cm -1 are obtained for the excited as well as the ground electronic state. The vibrational dephasing rate in the excited electronic state is about an order of magnitude faster than that in the ground state, the origin of which is speculated upon.

  18. Characteristics of steady vibration in a rotating hub-beam system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhen; Liu, Caishan; Ma, Wei

    2016-02-01

    A rotating beam features a puzzling character in which its frequencies and modal shapes may vary with the hub's inertia and its rotating speed. To highlight the essential nature behind the vibration phenomena, we analyze the steady vibration of a rotating Euler-Bernoulli beam with a quasi-steady-state stretch. Newton's law is used to derive the equations governing the beam's elastic motion and the hub's rotation. A combination of these equations results in a nonlinear partial differential equation (PDE) that fully reflects the mutual interaction between the two kinds of motion. Via the Fourier series expansion within a finite interval of time, we reduce the PDE into an infinite system of a nonlinear ordinary differential equation (ODE) in spatial domain. We further nondimensionalize the ODE and discretize it via a difference method. The frequencies and modal shapes of a general rotating beam are then determined numerically. For a low-speed beam where the ignorance of geometric stiffening is feasible, the beam's vibration characteristics are solved analytically. We validate our numerical method and the analytical solutions by comparing with either the past experiments or the past numerical findings reported in existing literature. Finally, systematic simulations are performed to demonstrate how the beam's eigenfrequencies vary with the hub's inertia and rotating speed.

  19. Active and passive vibration isolation in piezoelectric phononic rods with external voltage excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qicheng Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Active piezoelectric materials are applied to one-dimensional phononic crystals, for the control of longitudinal vibration propagation both in active and passive modes. Based on the electromechanical coupling between the acoustical vibration and electric field, the electromechanical equivalent method is taken to theoretically predict the transmission spectrum of the longitudinal vibration. It is shown that the phononic rod can suppress the vibration efficiently at the frequencies of interest, by actively optimizing the motions of piezoelectric elements. In an illustrated phononic rod of 11.2cm long, active tunable isolations of more than 20dB at low frequencies (500Hz-14kHz are generated by controlling the excitation voltages of piezoelectric elements. Meanwhile, passive fixed isolation at high frequencies (14k-63kHz are presented by its periodicity characteristics. Finite element simulations and vibration experiments on the rod demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach in terms of its vibration isolation capabilities and tunable characteristics. This phononic rod can be manufactured easily and provides numerous potential applications in designing isolation mounts and platforms.

  20. Magnetic resonance described in the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahayori, Bahman; Johnston, Leigh A; Mareels, Iven M Y; Farrell, Peter M

    2008-01-01

    An excitation dependent rotating frame of reference to observe the magnetic resonance phenomenon is introduced in this paper that, to the best of our knowledge, has not been used previously in the nuclear magnetic resonance context. The mathematical framework for this new rotating frame of reference is presented based on time scaling the Bloch equation after transformation to the classical rotating frame of reference whose transverse plane is rotating at the Larmor frequency. To this end, the Bloch equation is rewritten in terms of a magnetisation vector observed from the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference. The resultant Bloch equation is referred to as the time scaled Bloch equation. In the excitation dependent rotating frame of reference whose coordinates are rotating at the instantaneous Rabi frequency the observed magnetisation vector is a much slower signal than the true magnetisation in the rotating frame of reference. As a result the ordinary differential equation solvers have the ability to solve the time scaled version of the Bloch equation with a larger step size resulting in a smaller number of samples for solving the equation to a desired level of accuracy. The simulation results for different types of excitation are presented in this paper. This method may be used in true Bloch simulators in order to reduce the simulation time or increase the accuracy of the numerical solution. Moreover, the time scaled Bloch equation may be employed to determine the optimal excitation pattern in magnetic resonance imaging as well as designing pulses with better slice selectivity which is an active area of research in this field.

  1. Simultaneous analysis of rotational and vibrational-rotational spectra of DF and HF to obtain irreducible molecular constants for HF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horiai, Koui; Uehara, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Available rotational and vibrational-rotational spectral lines of DF and HF are analyzed simultaneously using a non-Born-Oppenheimer effective Hamiltonian. Research highlights: → Simultaneous analysis of DF and HF spectral data. → Application of a non-Born-Oppenheimer effective Hamiltonian. → Twenty irreducible molecular constants for HF have been determined. - Abstract: Analytic expressions of corrections for the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer approximation to Dunham's Y ij with optimal parameters, i.e., determinable clusters of expansion coefficients, are applied to a data analysis of the rotational and vibrational-rotational transitions of HF reported in the literature. All the available spectral lines of the two isotopologues, DF and HF, are simultaneously fitted to a single set of molecular parameters of HF within experimental errors. Fitting of a data set of 595 spectral transitions for DF and HF has generated only 20 minimal independent parameter values, i.e., 'irreducible' molecular constants of HF, that are sufficient to precisely generate 82 Y ij coefficients and 144 band constants in total: 41 Y ij and 72 band constants each for DF and HF.

  2. An analysis of vibration-rotation lines of OH in the solar infrared spectrum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grevesse, N.; Sauval, A.J.; Dishoeck, van E.F.

    1984-01-01

    High resolution solar spectra have permitted the measurement with great accuracy of equivalent widths of vibration-rotation lines of OH in the X2Pi state near 3-micron wavelength. Using recent theoretical results for the transition probabilities, a solar oxygen abundance of (8.93 + or - 0.02) is

  3. Rotation-vibrational spectra of diatomic molecules and nuclei with Davidson interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Rowe, D J

    1998-01-01

    Complete rotation-vibrational spectra and electromagnetic transition rates are obtained for Hamiltonians of diatomic molecules and nuclei with Davidson interactions. Analytical results are derived by dynamical symmetry methods for diatomic molecules and a liquid-drop model of the nucleus. Numerical solutions are obtained for a many-particle nucleus with quadrupole Davidson interactions within the framework of the microscopic symplectic model. (author)

  4. Can Internal Conversion BE Controlled by Mode-Specific Vibrational Excitation in Polyatomic Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portnov, Alexander; Epshtein, Michael; Bar, Ilana

    2017-06-01

    Nonadiabatic processes, dominated by dynamic passage of reactive fluxes through conical intersections (CIs) are considered to be appealing means for manipulating reaction paths. One approach that is considered to be effective in controlling the course of dissociation processes is the selective excitation of vibrational modes containing a considerable component of motion. Here, we have chosen to study the predissociation of the model test molecule, methylamine and its deuterated isotopologues, excited to well-characterized quantum states on the first excited electronic state, S_{1}, by following the N-H(D) bond fission dynamics through sensitive H(D) photofragment probing. The branching ratios between slow and fast H(D) photofragments, the internal energies of their counter radical photofragments and the anisotropy parameters for fast H photofragments, confirm correlated anomalies for predissociation initiated from specific rovibronic states, reflecting the existence of a dynamic resonance in each molecule. This resonance strongly depends on the energy of the initially excited rovibronic states, the evolving vibrational mode on the repulsive S_{1} part during N-H(D) bond elongation, and the manipulated passage through the CI that leads to radicals excited with C-N-H(D) bending and preferential perpendicular bond breaking, relative to the photolyzing laser polarization, in molecules containing the NH_{2} group. The indicated resonance plays an important role in the bifurcation dynamics at the CI and can be foreseen to exist in other photoinitiated processes and to control their outcome.

  5. Neutral molecules in tokamak edge plasma - role of vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadez, I.; Cercek, M.; Pelicon, P.; Razpet, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of neutral molecules in edge plasma is discussed with special emphasis on the vibrationally excited hydrogen. Neutral molecules are formed mostly by surface processes on the walls and then released to the edge plasma where they take part in volumetric reactions with other particles. Typically these molecules are formed in excited states and data are needed for their reactions on the wall and in the volume. Processes in edge plasma determine particle and energy flux what is especially critical issue in tokamak divertor region. Various cross sections and reaction rates are needed for modelling edge plasma and its interaction with walls. (author)

  6. Dibaryon resonances as rotational excitations of six-quark states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondratyuk, L.A.; Martem'yanov, B.V.; Shchepkin, M.G.

    1986-01-01

    Using the model of streched rotating (stringlike) bags with spin-orbit interaction of quarks the properties of nonstrange dibaryon spectrum are considered. The resonance d'(T=0, J P =2 - ) near the πNN threshold with the mass 1.95+2.05 GeV is predicted. Two other members of this family in spin-orbit are also predicted: d''(1 - ) and d'''(0 - ) (δE ls =30-40 MeV). Possible exostence of narrow dibaryon states with isospin T=1 and 2 is doscussed

  7. Noncontact measurement of rotating blade vibrations. Doyoku shindo no hisesshoku keisokuho no kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuda, Yukio; Endo, Masanori; Sugiyama, Nanahisa; Koshinuma, Takeshi

    1989-08-01

    The noncontact measurement method of rotating blade vibrations was developed for fans, compressors and turbines, and applied to turbofan engines and industrial gas turbines. The method required no machining of blades and rotor except sensors attached to a casing to detect blade-tips. The method allowed to measure simultaneously the vibration of all blades, by measuring elapsed times of blade-tips rotating from a measuring start point to a detecting point, and detecting the time differences between a vibration and non-vibration condition. The measuring system was composed of the detectors and subsystems for signal processing, control, calculation and display. The vibration wave forms of a few blades and the maximum vibration amplitudes of all the blades were displayed on a realtime basis in an on-line monitoring mode, and an off-line data processing mode was also available for subsequent analyses and reviews. The results of application to existing engines favorably agreed with those of strain gage measurements. 16 refs., 75 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. Self-Tuning Vibration Control of a Rotational Flexible Timoshenko Arm Using Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Sasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A self-tuning vibration control of a rotational flexible arm using neural networks is presented. To the self-tuning control system, the control scheme consists of gain tuning neural networks and a variable-gain feedback controller. The neural networks are trained so as to make the root moment zero. In the process, the neural networks learn the optimal gain of the feedback controller. The feedback controller is designed based on Lyapunov's direct method. The feedback control of the vibration of the flexible system is derived by considering the time rate of change of the total energy of the system. This approach has the advantage over the conventional methods in the respect that it allows one to deal directly with the system's partial differential equations without resorting to approximations. Numerical and experimental results for the vibration control of a rotational flexible arm are discussed. It verifies that the proposed control system is effective at controlling flexible dynamical systems.

  9. Time delay for resonant vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauyacq, J.P.

    1990-01-01

    An analysis of the time delay associated with vibrational excitation in electron--molecule collision is presented. It consists of a direct study of the time dependence of the process for three model systems. An electron wave packet, that is narrow in time, is sent on the target and the amplitudes in the different inelastic channels are studied as functions of time. The time delay is found to correspond to very different time effects: broadenings, shifts in time of the wave packet, but also complex distortions that cannot be represented by a time delay. The direct analysis of the scattered wave also provides new insights into the vibrational excitation process. It should be a useful tool to analyze complex collision processes

  10. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Blanco, F.; Brunger, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°-90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  11. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-900, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Costa, R. F. da [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, Santo André, 09210-580 São Paulo (Brazil); Varella, M. T. do N. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, CP 66318, 05315-970 São Paulo, São Paulo (Brazil); Bettega, M. H. F. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal do Paraná, CP 19044, 81531-990 Curitiba, Paraná (Brazil); Lima, M. A. P. [Instituto de Física “Gleb Wataghin,” Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, 13083-859 São Paulo (Brazil); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); and others

    2015-12-14

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule.

  12. Excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural by intermediate-energy electrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Costa, R. F. da; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.

    2015-01-01

    We report cross sections for electron-impact excitation of vibrational quanta in furfural, at intermediate incident electron energies (20, 30, and 40 eV). The present differential cross sections are measured over the scattered electron angular range 10°–90°, with corresponding integral cross sections subsequently being determined. Furfural is a viable plant-derived alternative to petrochemicals, being produced via low-temperature plasma treatment of biomass. Current yields, however, need to be significantly improved, possibly through modelling, with the present cross sections being an important component of such simulations. To the best of our knowledge, there are no other cross sections for vibrational excitation of furfural available in the literature, so the present data are valuable for this important molecule

  13. Semi-analytical Vibration Characteristics of Rotating Timoshenko Beams Made of Functionally Graded Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzad Ebrahimia

    Full Text Available AbstractFree vibration analysis of rotating functionally graded (FG thick Timoshenko beams is presented. The material properties of FG beam vary along the thickness direction of the constituents according to power law model. Governing equations are derived through Hamilton's principle and they are solved applying differential transform method. The good agreement between the results of this article and those available in literature validated the presented approach. The emphasis is placed on investigating the effect of several beam parameters such as constituent volume fractions, slenderness ratios, rotational speed and hub radius on natural frequencies and mode shapes of the rotating thick FG beam.

  14. Free and forced vibrations of an eccentrically rotating string on a viscoelastic foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soedel, S. M.; Soedel, W.

    1989-12-01

    Equations of motion of an eccentrically rotating cord on a viscoelastic foundation, derived by way of Hamilton's principle, are solved for free and forced vibrations. The natural frequencies during rotation are bifurcations of the stationary string values. The natural modes are complex and can be interpreted as mode pairs spinning with and against the string rotation. The general forced solution is expanded in terms of these complex modes. Results are given for an example of steady state harmonic response because of its practical significance to aircraft or automobile tire design.

  15. Fault diagnosis in rotating machinery by vibration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Behzad, M.; Asayesh, M.

    2002-01-01

    Dynamic behavior of unbalanced bent shaft has been investigated in this research. Finite element method is used for unbalance response calculation of a bent shaft. The result shows the effect of bent on the unbalance response. The angle between bent vector and unbalance force, position and type of supports, shaft diameter and disk position can affect the outcome. The results of this research can significantly help in fault diagnosis in rotating machinery

  16. Selective vibrational excitation of the ethylene--fluorine reaction in a nitrogen matrix. II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frei, H.

    1983-01-01

    The product branching between 1,2-difluoroethane and vinyl fluoride (plus HF) of the selective vibrationally stimulated reaction of molecular fluorine with C 2 H 4 has been studied in a nitrogen matrix at 12 K and found to be the same for five different vibrational transitions of C 2 H 4 between 1896 and 4209 cm -1 . The HF/DF branching ratio of the reaction of F 2 with CH 2 CD 2 , trans-CHDCHD, and cis-CHDCHD was determined to be 1.1, independent of precursor C 2 H 2 D 2 isomer and particular mode which excited the reaction. These results, as well as the analysis of the mixtures of partially deuterated vinyl fluoride molecules produced by each C 2 H 2 D 2 isomer indicate that the product branching occurs by αβ elimination of HF(DF) from a vibrationally excited, electronic ground state 1,2-difluoroethane intermediate. Selective vibrational excitation of fluorine reactions in isotopically mixed matrices t-CHDCHD/C 2 H 4 /F 2 /N 2 and CH 2 CD 2 /C 2 H 4 /F 2 /N 2 , and in matrices C 2 H 2 /C 2 H 4 /F 2 /N 2 revealed a high degree of isotopic and molecular selectivity. The extent to which intermolecular energy transfer occurred is qualitatively explained in terms of dipole coupled vibrational energy transfer. A study of the loss of absorbance of the C 2 H 4 x F 2 pairs in case of ν 9 as a function of both the laser irradiation frequency within the absorption profile, and the ethylene concentration showed that the C 2 H 4 x F 2 absorption is inhomogeneously broadened. Substantial depletion of reactive pairs which did not absorb laser light is interpreted in terms of Forster transfer

  17. The origin of small and large molecule behavior in the vibrational relaxation of highly excited molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    An explanation is proposed for the qualitatively different types of behavior that have been reported for the vibrational relaxation of highly excited diatomic and polyatomic molecules. It is argued that all of the diatomic molecules that have been studied in bulk relax adiabatically at room temperature. In contrast, large polyatomic molecules have low frequency modes which act at ''doorway'' modes for the rest of the molecules, producing an impulsive relaxation mechanism. The theoretical work of Nesbitt and Hynes showed that impulsive collisions result in an exponential decay of the average vibrational energy of a Morse oscillator, whereas adiabatic collisions produce nonexponential power law behavior. We propose that this result explains a large body of data for the vibrational relaxation of small and large molecules

  18. Control Application of Piezoelectric Materials to Aeroelastic Self-Excited Vibrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Amin Rashidifar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for application of piezoelectric materials to aeroelasticity of turbomachinery blades is presented. The governing differential equations of an overhung beam are established. The induced voltage in attached piezoelectric sensors due to the strain of the beam is calculated. In aeroelastic self-excited vibrations, the aerodynamic generalized force of a specified mode can be described as a linear function of the generalized coordinate and its derivatives. This simplifies the closed loop system designed for vibration control of the corresponding structure. On the other hand, there is an industrial interest in measurement of displacement, velocity, acceleration, or a contribution of them for machinery condition monitoring. Considering this criterion in quadratic optimal control systems, a special style of performance index is configured. Utilizing the current relations in an aeroelastic case with proper attachment of piezoelectric elements can provide higher margin of instability and lead to lower vibration magnitude.

  19. Vibrational excitation and dissociative recombination of the LiH+ ion

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čurík, Roman; Greene, C. H.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 105, 11-12 (2007), s. 1565-1574 ISSN 0026-8976 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100400501; GA AV ČR 1ET400400413 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : dissociative recombination * vibrational excitation * lithium hydride * quantum defect the ory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; The oretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.568, year: 2007

  20. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yin; Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S(λ 1 ,T ~ 2 ,λ 3 )) along the population time (T ~ 2 ) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S(λ 1 ,ν ~ 2 ,λ 3 )). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ν ~ 2 ) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (−ν ~ 2 ) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems

  1. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  2. A nonlocal, ab initio model of dissociative electron attachment and vibrational excitation of NO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trevisan, Cynthia S.; Houfek, Karel; Zhang, Zhiyong; Orel, Ann E.; McCurdy, C. William; Rescigno, Thomas N.

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of an ab initio study of elastic scattering and vibrational excitation of NO by electron impact in the loW--energy (0-2 eV) region where the cross sections are dominated by resonance contributions. The 3Sigma-, 1Delta and 1Sigma+ NO- resonance lifetimes are taken from our earlier study [Phys. Rev. A 69, 062711 (2004)], but the resonance energies used here are obtained from new configuration-interaction studies. Here we employ a more elaborate nonlocal treatment of the nuclear dynamics, which is found to remedy the principal deficiencies of the local complex potential model we employed in our earlier study, and gives cross sections in better agreement with the most recent experiments. We also present cross sections for dissociative electron attachment to NO leading to groundstate products. The calculations show that, while the peak cross sections starting from NO in its ground vibrational state are very small, the cross sections are extremely sensitive to vibrational excitation of the target and should be readily observable for target NO molecules excited to v = 10 and above

  3. THE CHEMISTRY OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED H2 IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agundez, M.; Roueff, E.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Cernicharo, J.; Faure, A.

    2010-01-01

    The internal energy available in vibrationally excited H 2 molecules can be used to overcome or diminish the activation barrier of various chemical reactions of interest for molecular astrophysics. In this paper, we investigate in detail the impact on the chemical composition of interstellar clouds of the reactions of vibrationally excited H 2 with C + , He + , O, OH, and CN, based on the available chemical kinetics data. It is found that the reaction of H 2 (v>0) and C + has a profound impact on the abundances of some molecules, especially CH + , which is a direct product and is readily formed in astronomical regions with fractional abundances of vibrationally excited H 2 , relative to the ground state H 2 , in excess of ∼10 -6 , independently of whether the gas is hot or not. The effects of these reactions on the chemical composition of the diffuse clouds ζOph and HD 34078, the dense photon-dominated region (PDR) Orion Bar, the planetary nebula NGC 7027, and the circumstellar disk around the B9 star HD 176386 are investigated through PDR models. We find that formation of CH + is especially favored in dense and highly FUV illuminated regions such as the Orion Bar and the planetary nebula NGC 7027, where column densities in excess of 10 13 cm -2 are predicted. In diffuse clouds, however, this mechanism is found to be not efficient enough to form CH + with a column density close to the values derived from astronomical observations.

  4. Maximizing direct current power delivery from bistable vibration energy harvesting beams subjected to realistic base excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Quanqi; Harne, Ryan L.

    2017-04-01

    Effective development of vibration energy harvesters is required to convert ambient kinetic energy into useful electrical energy as power supply for sensors, for example in structural health monitoring applications. Energy harvesting structures exhibiting bistable nonlinearities have previously been shown to generate large alternating current (AC) power when excited so as to undergo snap-through responses between stable equilibria. Yet, most microelectronics in sensors require rectified voltages and hence direct current (DC) power. While researchers have studied DC power generation from bistable energy harvesters subjected to harmonic excitations, there remain important questions as to the promise of such harvester platforms when the excitations are more realistic and include both harmonic and random components. To close this knowledge gap, this research computationally and experimentally studies the DC power delivery from bistable energy harvesters subjected to such realistic excitation combinations as those found in practice. Based on the results, it is found that the ability for bistable energy harvesters to generate peak DC power is significantly reduced by introducing sufficient amount of stochastic excitations into an otherwise harmonic input. On the other hand, the elimination of a low amplitude, coexistent response regime by way of the additive noise promotes power delivery if the device was not originally excited to snap-through. The outcomes of this research indicate the necessity for comprehensive studies about the sensitivities of DC power generation from bistable energy harvester to practical excitation scenarios prior to their optimal deployment in applications.

  5. An Efficient Method of Vibration Diagnostics For Rotating Machinery Using a Decision Tree

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Suk Yang

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an efficient method to automatize vibration diagnosis for rotating machinery using a decision tree, which is applicable to vibration diagnosis expert system. Decision tree is a widely known formalism for expressing classification knowledge and has been used successfully in many diverse areas such as character recognition, medical diagnosis, and expert systems, etc. In order to build a decision tree for vibration diagnosis, we have to define classes and attributes. A set of cases based on past experiences is also needed. This training set is inducted using a result-cause matrix newly developed in the present work instead of using a conventionally implemented cause-result matrix. This method was applied to diagnostics for various cases taken from published work. It is found that the present method predicts causes of the abnormal vibration for test cases with high reliability.

  6. Rotational structure of the five lowest frequency fundamental vibrational states of dimethylsulfoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuisset, Arnaud; Drumel, Marie-Aline Martin; Hindle, Francis; Mouret, Gaël; Sadovskií, Dmitrií A.

    2013-10-01

    We report on the successful extended analysis of the high-frequency (200-700 GHz) part of the gas phase (sub)mm-wave spectra of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The spectrum was recorded at 100 kHz resolution using a solid state subTHz spectrometer. The five lowest energy fundamental vibrational states of DMSO with frequencies below 400 cm-1 were observed as sidebands along with the main 0←0 band. Neglecting the internal rotation of methyls, our rotational Hamiltonian reproduced the spectrum to the subMHz accuracy. We have found that the asymmetric bending state ν23 is the only low frequency fundamental vibrational state with the "anomalous" rotational structure uncovered in Cuisset et al. [1]. dmsomw 2013-09-04 15:03

  7. A low noise discrete velocity method for the Boltzmann equation with quantized rotational and vibrational energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Peter; Varghese, Philip; Goldstein, David

    2018-01-01

    A discrete velocity method is developed for gas mixtures of diatomic molecules with both rotational and vibrational energy states. A full quantized model is described, and rotation-translation and vibration-translation energy exchanges are simulated using a Larsen-Borgnakke exchange model. Elastic and inelastic molecular interactions are modeled during every simulated collision to help produce smooth internal energy distributions. The method is verified by comparing simulations of homogeneous relaxation by our discrete velocity method to numerical solutions of the Jeans and Landau-Teller equations, and to direct simulation Monte Carlo. We compute the structure of a 1D shock using this method, and determine how the rotational energy distribution varies with spatial location in the shock and with position in velocity space.

  8. Communication: Rotational excitation of interstellar heavy water by hydrogen molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

    2010-12-21

    Cross sections and rate coefficients for low lying rotational transitions in D(2)O induced by para-H(2) collisions are presented for the first time. Calculations have been performed at the close-coupling level with the deuterated variant of the H(2)O-H(2) interaction potential of Valiron et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008)]. Rate coefficients are presented for temperatures between 1 and 30 K and are compared to the corresponding rate coefficients for H(2)O. Significant differences caused by the isotopic substitution are observed and are attributed to both kinematics and intramolecular geometry effects. Astrophysical implications are briefly discussed in view of the very recent detection of D(2)O by the Herschel Space Observatory.

  9. PGOPHER: A program for simulating rotational, vibrational and electronic spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western, Colin M.

    2017-01-01

    The PGOPHER program is a general purpose program for simulating and fitting molecular spectra, particularly the rotational structure. The current version can handle linear molecules, symmetric tops and asymmetric tops and many possible transitions, both allowed and forbidden, including multiphoton and Raman spectra in addition to the common electric dipole absorptions. Many different interactions can be included in the calculation, including those arising from electron and nuclear spin, and external electric and magnetic fields. Multiple states and interactions between them can also be accounted for, limited only by available memory. Fitting of experimental data can be to line positions (in many common formats), intensities or band contours and the parameters determined can be level populations as well as rotational constants. PGOPHER is provided with a powerful and flexible graphical user interface to simplify many of the tasks required in simulating, understanding and fitting molecular spectra, including Fortrat diagrams and energy level plots in addition to overlaying experimental and simulated spectra. The program is open source, and can be compiled with open source tools. This paper provides a formal description of the operation of version 9.1.

  10. Piezoelectric Wind Energy Harvesting from Self-Excited Vibration of Square Cylinder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junlei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Self-excited vibration of a square cylinder has been considered as an effective way in harvesting piezoelectric wind energy. In present work, both of the vortex-induced vibration and unstable galloping phenomenon process are investigated in a reduced velocity (Ur=U/ωn·D range of 4≤Ur≤20 with load resistance ranging in 100 Ω≤R≤1 MΩ. The vortex-induced vibration covers presynchronization, synchronization, and postsynchronization branches. An aeroelectromechanical model is given to describe the coupling of the dynamic equation of the fluid-structure interaction and the equation of Gauss law. The effects of load resistance are investigated in both the open-circuit and close-circuit system by a linear analysis, which covers the parameters of the transverse displacement, aerodynamic force, output voltage, and harvested power utilized to measure the efficiency of the system. The highest level of the transverse displacement and the maximum value of harvested power of synchronization branch during the vortex-induced vibration and galloping are obtained. The results show that the large-amplitude galloping at high wind speeds can generate energy. Additionally, energy can be harvested by utilization of the lock-in phenomenon of vortex-induced vibration under low wind speed.

  11. Modelling and Analysis of Automobile Vibration System Based on Fuzzy Theory under Different Road Excitation Information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-wen Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A fuzzy increment controller is designed aimed at the vibration system of automobile active suspension with seven degrees of freedom (DOF. For decreasing vibration, an active control force is acquired by created Proportion-Integration-Differentiation (PID controller. The controller’s parameters are adjusted by a fuzzy increment controller with self-modifying parameters functions, which adopts the deviation and its rate of change of the body’s vertical vibration velocity and the desired value in the position of the front and rear suspension as the input variables based on 49 fuzzy control rules. Adopting Simulink, the fuzzy increment controller is validated under different road excitation, such as the white noise input with four-wheel correlation in time-domain, the sinusoidal input, and the pulse input of C-grade road surface. The simulation results show that the proposed controller can reduce obviously the vehicle vibration compared to other independent control types in performance indexes, such as, the root mean square value of the body’s vertical vibration acceleration, pitching, and rolling angular acceleration.

  12. Excited-state dynamics of acetylene excited to individual rotational level of the V04K01 subband

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarov, Vladimir I.; Kochubei, Sergei A.; Khmelinskii, Igor V.

    2006-01-01

    Dynamics of the IR emission induced by excitation of the acetylene molecule using the (32Ka0,1,2,ÃAu1←41la1,X˜Σg+1) transition was investigated. The observed IR emission was assigned to transitions between the ground-state vibrational levels. Acetylene fluorescence quenching induced by external electric and magnetic fields acting upon the system prepared using the (34Ka1,ÃAu1←00la0,X˜Σg+1) excitation was also studied. External electric field creates an additional radiationless pathway to the ground-state levels, coupling levels of the ÃAu1 excited state to the quasiresonant levels of the X˜Σg+1 ground state. The level density of the ground state in the vicinity of the excited state is very high, thus the electric-field-induced transition is irreversible, with the rate constant described by the Fermi rule. Magnetic field alters the decay profile without changing the fluorescence quantum yield in collisionless conditions. IR emission from the CCH transient was detected, and was also affected by the external electric and magnetic fields. Acetylene predissociation was demonstrated to proceed by the direct S1→S0 mechanism. The results were explained using the previously developed theoretical approach, yielding values of the relevant model parameters.

  13. Rate coefficients for dissociative attachment and resonant electron-impact dissociation involving vibrationally excited O{sub 2} molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laporta, V. [Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari, Italy and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Celiberto, R. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile, Ambientale, del Territorio, Edile e di Chimica, Politecnico di Bari, Italy and Istituto di Metodologie Inorganiche e dei Plasmi, CNR, Bari (Italy); Tennyson, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-09

    Rate coefficients for dissociative electron attachment and electron-impact dissociation processes, involving vibrationally excited molecular oxygen, are presented. Analytical fits of the calculated numerical data, useful in the applications, are also provided.

  14. Selective excitation of a vibrational level within the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule with ultra pulses

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    de Clercq, L

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Coherent control of the upper vibrational level populations in the electronic ground state of a polyatomic molecule was simulated. Results indicate that selective excitation of a specific upper state level is possible...

  15. Basis states for the rotational and vibrational limits of nuclear collective motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanagas, V.; Alishauskas, S.; Kalinauskas, R.; Nadzhakov, E.

    1980-01-01

    Basis states characterized by quantum numbers traditionally used in the rotational and the vibrational limits are treated in an unified way. An explicit basis construction in the Hilbert space of the collective phenomenological nuclear Hamiltonian generalized to six degrees of freedom in both limits is given. This generalization reduces to including an additional degree of freedom allowing to treat both cases within a collective substance of the complete many-body Hilbert space. A group-theoretical approach is applied. From this point of view the problem is reduced to the construction of a set of U(6)-irreducible states labelled by quantum numbers of two special chains of subgroups adapted for the rotational and vibrational limits. In particular, the generalization is more complicated in the case of the chain for the rotational limits. The explicit construction of a basis for both limits is carried out in two steps: 1) construction of the highest weight state for corresponding group irreducible representation - in the case of the rotational limit U(3) and of the vibrational limit O(5); 2) generating a complete set of states by the projection technique. In this framework it is possible to diagonalize a general phenomenological Hamiltonian in cases different from both limits. It is also possible to calculate transition probabilities induced by any physical quantity

  16. Vibration-rotation spectrum of BH X1Σ+ by Fourier transform emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pianalto, F. S.; O'Brien, L. C.; Keller, P. C.; Bernath, P. F.

    1988-06-01

    The vibration-rotation emission spectrum of the BH X1Σ+ state was observed with the McMath Fourier transform spectrometer at Kitt Peak. The 1-0, 2-1, and 3-2 bands were observed in a microwave discharge of B2H6 in He. Spectroscopic constants of the individual vibrational levels and equilibrium molecular constants were determined. An RKR potential curve was calculated from the equilibrium constants. Alfred P. Sloan Fellow; Camille and Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar.

  17. ALMA INVESTIGATION OF VIBRATIONALLY EXCITED HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC EMISSION LINES IN THE AGN-HOSTING ULTRALUMINOUS INFRARED GALAXY IRAS 20551−4250

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imanishi, Masatoshi [Subaru Telescope, 650 North A’ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Nakanishi, Kouichiro [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Izumi, Takuma, E-mail: masa.imanishi@nao.ac.jp [Institute of Astronomy, School of Science, The University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan)

    2016-07-01

    We present the results of ALMA Cycle 2 observations of the ultraluminous infrared galaxy IRAS 20551−4250 at HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 3–2 lines at both vibrational ground ( v = 0) and vibrationally excited ( v {sub 2} = 1) levels. This galaxy contains a luminous buried active galactic nucleus (AGN), in addition to starburst activity, and our ALMA Cycle 0 data revealed a tentatively detected vibrationally excited HCN v {sub 2} = 1f J = 4–3 emission line. In our ALMA Cycle 2 data, the HCN/HCO{sup +}/HNC J = 3–2 emission lines at v = 0 are clearly detected. The HCN and HNC v {sub 2} = 1f J = 3–2 emission lines are also detected, but the HCO{sup +} v {sub 2} = 1f J = 3–2 emission line is not. Given the high energy level of v {sub 2} = 1 and the resulting difficulty of collisional excitation, we compared these results with those of the calculation of infrared radiative pumping, using the available infrared 5–35 μ m spectrum. We found that all of the observational results were reproduced if the HCN abundance was significantly higher than that of HCO{sup +} and HNC. The flux ratio and excitation temperature between v {sub 2} = 1f and v = 0, after correction for possible line opacity, suggests that infrared radiative pumping affects rotational ( J -level) excitation at v = 0 at least for HCN and HNC. The HCN-to-HCO{sup +} v = 0 flux ratio is higher than those of starburst-dominated regions, and will increase even more when the derived high HCN opacity is corrected. The enhanced HCN-to-HCO{sup +} flux ratio in this AGN-hosting galaxy can be explained by the high HCN-to-HCO{sup +} abundance ratio and sufficient HCN excitation at up to J = 4, rather than the significantly higher efficiency of infrared radiative pumping for HCN than HCO{sup +}.

  18. Interrogating the vibrational relaxation of highly excited polyatomics with time-resolved diode laser spectroscopy: C6H6, C6D6, and C6F6+CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sedlacek, A.J.; Weston, R.E. Jr.; Flynn, G.W.

    1991-01-01

    The vibrational relaxation of highly excited ground state benzene, benzene d 6 , and hexafluorobenzene by CO 2 has been investigated with high resolution diode laser spectroscopy. The vibrationally hot polyatomics are formed by single photon 248 nm excitation to the S 1 state followed by rapid radiationless transitions. It has been found that in all cases less than 1% of the energy initially present in the polyatomics is deposited into the high frequency mode of CO 2 (ν 3 ). An investigation of the CO 2 (00 0 1) nascent rotational distribution under single collision conditions reveals that very little rotational excitation accompanies vibrational energy transfer to the ν 3 mode. The CO 2 (ν 3 ) rotational states can be described by temperatures, T rot , as follows: C 6 H 6 , T rot =360±30 K; C 6 D 6 , T rot =350±35 K and C 6 F 6 , T rot =340±23 K. An estimate of left-angle ΔE right-angle ν3 , the mean energy transferred to the CO 2 ν 3 mode per collision, suggests that as the availability of low frequency modes in the excited molecule increases, less energy is deposited into the high frequency mode of CO 2 . Finally, evidence is presented suggesting that even at moderate laser fluences, the two-photon ionization of benzene can lead to substantial CO 2 ν 3 excitation via electron+CO 2 inelastic collisions

  19. Reduction of the Glauber amplitude for electron impact rotational excitation of quadrupolar molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathur, K.C.; Gupta, G.P.; Pundir, R.S.

    1981-06-01

    A reduction of the Glauber amplitude for the rotational excitation of pure quadrupolar molecular ions by electron impact is presented in a form suitable for numerical evaluation. The differential cross-section is expressed in terms of one dimensional integrals over impact parameter. (author)

  20. Structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band of /sup 16/O

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikebata, Yasuhiko; Suekane, Shota

    1983-10-01

    The structure of the lowest excited 0/sup +/ rotational band is investigated by using the extended Nilsson model wave functions with angular momentum projection and the B1 interaction, two-body LS-force of the Skyrme type and the Coulomb interaction. The results obtained show good agreement with energy interval in this band.

  1. Comment on the accuracy of Rabitz' effective potential approximation for rotational excitation by collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, S.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for rotational excitation of HCN by low energy collisions with He have been computed with the effective potential approximation of Rabitz and compared with accurate quantum close-coupling results. Elastic cross sections are found to agree to about 20%; inelastic cross sections agree in general magnitude but not in detailed values for specific quantum transitions

  2. Nonlinear Analysis of Cable Vibration of a Multispan Cable-Stayed Bridge under Transverse Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear vibrations of cable in a multispan cable-stayed bridge subjected to transverse excitation are investigated. The MECS (multielements cable system model, where multielements per cable stay are used, is built up and used to analyze the model properties of the multispan cable-stayed bridges. Then, a simplified two-degrees-of-freedom (2-DOFs model, where the tower or the deck is reduced to a beam, is proposed to analyze the nonlinear dynamic behaviors of the beam and cable. The results of MECS model analysis show that the main tower in the multispan cable-stayed bridge is prone to the transverse vibration, and the local vibration of cables only has a little impact on the frequency values of the global modes. The results of simplified model analysis show that the energy can be transformed between the modes of the beam and cable when the nature frequencies of them are very close. On the other hand, with the transverse excitation changing, the cable can exhibit richer quasi-periodic or chaotic motions due to the nonlinear terms caused by the coupled mode between the beam and cable.

  3. The workings of a molecular thermometer: the vibrational excitation of carbon tetrachloride by a solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Polly B; Matus, Kira J M; Stratt, Richard M

    2004-09-15

    An intriguing energy-transfer experiment was recently carried out in methanol/carbon tetrachloride solutions. It turned out to be possible to watch vibrational energy accumulating in three of carbon tetrachloride's modes following initial excitation of O-H and C-H stretches in methanol, in effect making those CCl(4) modes "molecular thermometers" reporting on methanol's relaxation. In this paper, we use the example of a CCl(4) molecule dissolved in liquid argon to examine, on a microscopic level, just how this kind of thermal activation occurs in liquid solutions. The fact that even the lowest CCl(4) mode has a relatively high frequency compared to the intermolecular vibrational band of the solvent means that the only solute-solvent dynamics relevant to the vibrational energy transfer will be extraordinarily local, so much so that it is only the force between the instantaneously most prominent Cl and solvent atoms that will significantly contribute to the vibrational friction. We use this observation, within the context of a classical instantaneous-pair Landau-Teller calculation, to show that energy flows into CCl(4) primarily via one component of the nominally degenerate, lowest frequency, E mode and does so fast enough to make CCl(4) an excellent choice for monitoring methanol relaxation. Remarkably, within this theory, the different symmetries and appearances of the different CCl(4) modes have little bearing on how well they take up energy from their surroundings--it is only how high their vibrational frequencies are relative to the solvent intermolecular vibrational band edge that substantially favors one mode over another.

  4. Rotational temperature measurement of NO gas using two-photon excitation spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Tadao; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Ohsawa, Toshihiko

    1981-04-01

    The rotational temperature of nitric oxide gas has been measured by means of a single-beam two-photon excitation spectrum method using a pulsed continuously tunable dye laser. The nitric oxide gas was enclosed at about 40 Torr in a quartz cell which was put in an electric oven. The NO γ (0-0) band and R11+Q21 branches were used to obtain the two-photon excitation spectrum. The rotational temperatures were determined using the fact that molecules are distributed in the rotational levels according to the Boltzmann law. The temperature range was from room temperature to about 470 K. Observed temperatures were in good agreement with cell temperatures which were obtained by using a thermocouple.

  5. Cross sections for the vibrational excitation of the H2 X 1Σ+g(v) levels generated by electron collisional excitation of the higher singlet states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiskes, J.R.

    1991-01-01

    The excitation cross sections, σ(v,v double-prime), for an H 2 molecule initially in any one of the 15 vibrational levels, v belonging to the ground electronic state and excited to a final vibrational level, v double-prime are evaluated for direct excitations via all members of the excited electronic singlet spectrum. Account is taken of predissociation, autoionization, and radiative decay of the excited electronic spectrum that leads to a final population distribution for the ground electronic state, X 1 Σ + g (v double-prime). For v=0, account is taken explicitly of transitions via the B, C, B', and D electronic states in evaluating the cross sections. The additional contribution of excitations via all Rydberg states lying above the D state enhances these cross sections by approximately 10%. For v>0, cross sections are evaluated taking explicit account of transitions through the B and C states; higher singlet excitations enhance these values by 25%. The choice of the reference total cross sections remains a subjective one, causing the values calculated here to have a possible uncertainty of +20% -30% . For excitations occurring within a hydrogen discharge, collisional excitation-ionization events among the intermediate singlet states will effectively quench the v, v double-prime excitation process for discharge densities in excess of the range 10 15 --10 16 electrons/cm -3

  6. Rotational and High-resolution Infrared Spectrum of HC3N: Global Ro-vibrational Analysis and Improved Line Catalog for Astrophysical Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizzocchi, Luca; Tamassia, Filippo; Laas, Jacob; Giuliano, Barbara M.; Degli Esposti, Claudio; Dore, Luca; Melosso, Mattia; Canè, Elisabetta; Pietropolli Charmet, Andrea; Müller, Holger S. P.; Spahn, Holger; Belloche, Arnaud; Caselli, Paola; Menten, Karl M.; Garrod, Robin T.

    2017-11-01

    HC3N is a ubiquitous molecule in interstellar environments, from external galaxies to Galactic interstellar clouds, star-forming regions, and planetary atmospheres. Observations of its rotational and vibrational transitions provide important information on the physical and chemical structures of the above environments. We present the most complete global analysis of the spectroscopic data of HC3N. We recorded the high-resolution infrared spectrum from 450 to 1350 cm-1, a region dominated by the intense {ν }5 and {ν }6 fundamental bands, located at 660 and 500 cm-1, respectively, and their associated hot bands. Pure rotational transitions in the ground and vibrationally excited states were recorded in the millimeter and submillimeter regions in order to extend the frequency range so far considered in previous investigations. All of the transitions from the literature and from this work involving energy levels lower than 1000 cm-1 were fitted together to an effective Hamiltonian. Because of the presence of various anharmonic resonances, the Hamiltonian includes a number of interaction constants, in addition to the conventional rotational and vibrational l-type resonance terms. The data set contains about 3400 ro-vibrational lines of 13 bands and some 1500 pure rotational lines belonging to 12 vibrational states. More than 120 spectroscopic constants were determined directly from the fit, without any assumption deduced from theoretical calculations or comparisons with similar molecules. An extensive list of highly accurate rest frequencies was produced to assist astronomical searches and data interpretation. These improved data enabled a refined analysis of the ALMA observations toward Sgr B2(N2).

  7. Identification of forbidden vibration-rotation transitions in 15NH3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Š.; D'Cunha, Romola; Narahari Rao, K.

    1984-07-01

    Forbidden Δk - l = 3 vibration-rotation transitions have been observed in the ν4 band of 15NH3. The analysis of these transitions, together with previously published data on the allowed transitions, has made it possible to determine a set of molecular parameters, including for the first time the rotational constant C as well as the centrifugal distortion constants DK and HKKK, which are necessary for the calculation of energy levels. Some weak forbidden transitions in the ν2 band have also been observed.

  8. Vibration-response due to thickness loss on steel plate excited by resonance frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudus, S. A.; Suzuki, Y.; Matsumura, M.; Sugiura, K.

    2018-04-01

    The degradation of steel structure due to corrosion is a common problem found especially in the marine structure due to exposure to the harsh marine environment. In order to ensure safety and reliability of marine structure, the damage assessment is an indispensable prerequisite for plan of remedial action on damaged structure. The main goal of this paper is to discuss simple vibration measurement on plated structure to give image on overview condition of the monitored structure. The changes of vibration response when damage was introduced in the plate structure were investigated. The damage on plate was simulated in finite element method as loss of thickness section. The size of damage and depth of loss of thickness were varied for different damage cases. The plate was excited with lower order of resonance frequency in accordance estimate the average remaining thickness based on displacement response obtain in the dynamic analysis. Significant reduction of natural frequency and increasing amplitude of vibration can be observed in the presence of severe damage. The vibration analysis summarized in this study can serve as benchmark and reference for researcher and design engineer.

  9. Vibrational response of a rectangular duct of finite length excited by a turbulent internal flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Antoine; Hugues, Florian; Dauchez, Nicolas; Perrey-Debain, Emmanuel

    2018-05-01

    Gas transport ductwork in industrial plants or air conditioning networks can be subject to vibrations induced by the internal flow. Most studies in this matter have been carried out on circular ducts. This paper focuses specifically on the vibratory response of a rectangular duct of finite length excited by an internal turbulent flow. A semi-analytical model taking into account the modal response of the structure due to both aerodynamic and acoustic contributions is derived. The aerodynamic component of the excitation is applied on the basis of Corcos model where the power spectral density of the wall pressure is determined experimentally. The acoustic component is based on the propagating modes in the duct where the acoustic modal contribution are extracted via cross-spectral densities. The vibrational response is given for a 0.2 × 0.1 × 0.5 m3 duct made of 3 mm steel plates excited by 20 m/s or 30 m/s flows. Comparisons between experimental results and numerical predictions show a good agreement. The competition between acoustic and aerodynamic components is highlighted.

  10. The effect of gas and fluid flows on nonlinear lateral vibrations of rotating drill strings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khajiyeva, Lelya; Kudaibergenov, Askar; Kudaibergenov, Askat

    2018-06-01

    In this work we develop nonlinear mathematical models describing coupled lateral vibrations of a rotating drill string under the effect of external supersonic gas and internal fluid flows. An axial compressive load and a torque also affect the drill string. The mathematical models are derived by the use of Novozhilov's nonlinear theory of elasticity with implementation of Hamilton's variation principle. Expressions for the gas flow pressure are determined according to the piston theory. The fluid flow is considered as added mass inside the curved tube of the drill string. Using an algorithm developed in the Mathematica computation program on the basis of the Galerkin approach and the stiffness switching method the numerical solution of the obtained approximate differential equations is found. Influences of the external loads, drill string angular speed of rotation, parameters of the gas and fluid flows on the drill string vibrations are shown.

  11. Molecular rotation-vibration dynamics of low-symmetric hydrate crystal in the terahertz region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaojian; Wu, Hongya; Xi, Xiaoqing; Zhou, Ji

    2014-01-16

    The rotational and vibrational dynamics of molecules in copper sulfate pentahydrate crystal are investigated with terahertz dielectric spectra. It is shown that the relaxation-like dielectric dispersion in the low frequency region is related to the reorientation of water molecules under the driving of terahertz electric field, whereas the resonant dispersion can be ascribed to lattice vibration. It is also found that, due to the hydrogen-bond effect, the vibrational mode at about 1.83 THz along [-111] direction softens with decreasing temperature, that is, the crystal expands in this direction when cooled. On the contrary, the mode hardens in the direction perpendicular to [-111] during the cooling process. This contributes to the further understanding of the molecular structure and bonding features of hydrate crystals.

  12. Commutator perturbation method in the study of vibrational-rotational spectra of diatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matamala-Vasquez, A.; Karwowski, J.

    2000-01-01

    The commutator perturbation method, an algebraic version of the Van Vleck-Primas perturbation method, expressed in terms of ladder operators, has been applied to solving the eigenvalue problem of the Hamiltonian describing the vibrational-rotational motion of a diatomic molecule. The physical model used in this work is based on Dunham's approach. The method facilitates obtaining both energies and eigenvectors in an algebraic way

  13. Effect of vibrational excitation on the dynamics of ion-molecule reactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, S.L.

    1981-11-01

    A new experimental technique for the study of vibrational effects on ion-molecule reaction cross sections is described. Vibrational and collision energy dependent cross sections are presented for proton and H atom transfer, charge transfer and collision induced dissociation reactions in various isotopic H 2 + + H 2 systems. Charge and proton transfer cross sections are presented for the reactions of H 2 + and D 2 + with Ar, N 2 , CO, and O 2 . All the reactions are shown to be highly influenced by avoided crossings between the ground and first excited potential energy surfaces. Because of the nature of the crossings, vibrational motion of the systems can cause both adiabatic and non-adiabatic behavior of the system. This makes the vibrational dependences of the various cross sections a very sensitive probe of the dynamics of the collisions particularly, their behavior in the region of the crossings. Evidence is seen for charge transfer between reagents as they approach each other, transition to and in some cases reactions on excited potential energy surfaces, competition between different channels, and strong coupling of proton and charge transfer channels which occurs only for two of the systems studied (H 2 + + Ar, N 2 ). Oscillatory structure is observed in the collision energy dependence of the endoergic H 2 + (v = 0) + Ar charge transfer reaction for the first time, and a simple model which is commonly used for atom-atom charge transfer is used to fit the peaks. Finally a simple model is used to assess the importance of energy resonance and Franck-Condon effects on molecular charge transfer

  14. Simultaneous acquisition of pure rotational and vibrational nitrogen spectra using three-laser CARS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lucht, R.P.; Maris, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    The author used three-laser coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering to acquire simultaneously the pure rotational and vibrational spectra from the nitrogen molecule. The energy level schematic for the three-laser CARS process is shown in this paper. Frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser radiation at frequency ω/sub 1/ is used to pump a broadband dye laser which lasers at a range of frequencies ω/sub s/ and a narrowband dye laser with frequency ω/sub 2/. The three-beams are focused to a common CARS probe volume using a three-dimensional phase-matching geometry. A CARS polarization is established when the frequency difference ω/sub 1/ - ω/sub s/ corresponds to a vibrational Raman resonance. The vibrational polarization scatters the incident ω/sub 2/ beam to produce anti-Stokes radiation at frequency ω/sub 1/ - ω/sub s/ + ω/sub 2/. In a similar fashion, a CARS polarization is also established when the frequency difference ω/sub 2/ - ω/sub s/ is equal to a pure rotational Raman resonance. The pure rotational polarization scatters the Nd:YAG laser radiation at ω/sub 1/ to produce anti-Stokes radiation at ω/sub 2/ - ω/sub s/ + ω/sub 1/

  15. Quantum dynamics study on the binding of a positron to vibrationally excited states of hydrogen cyanide molecule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayanagi, Toshiyuki; Suzuki, Kento; Yoshida, Takahiko; Kita, Yukiumi; Tachikawa, Masanori

    2017-05-01

    We present computational results of vibrationally enhanced positron annihilation in the e+ + HCN/DCN collisions within a local complex potential model. Vibrationally elastic and inelastic cross sections and effective annihilation rates were calculated by solving a time-dependent complex-potential Schrödinger equation under the ab initio potential energy surface for the positron attached HCN molecule, [HCN; e+], with multi-component configuration interaction level (Kita and Tachikawa, 2014). We discuss the effect of vibrational excitation on the positron affinities from the obtained vibrational resonance features.

  16. ESR measurement of the concentration of vibrationally excited hydrogen and deuterium molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gershenzon, Yu.M.; Ivanov, A.V.; Il'in, S.D.; Kucheryavyi, S.I.; Rozenshtein, V.B.

    1988-01-01

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of vibrationally excited H 2 and D 2 molecules using an ESR microwave spectrometer. The essence of the method is the titration of H 2 (v = 1) and D 2 (v = 1) with D and H atoms and measurement of the concentrations of the titration products H and D, respectively. Stoichiometric titration coefficients were determined in the form of proportionality coefficients between the titration signals Δ[H], Δ[D] and the concentrations of H 2 (v = 1), D 2 (v = 1)

  17. Vibrational excitation of methane by slow electrons revisited: theoretical and experimental study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Čurík, Roman; Čársky, Petr; Allan, M.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 11 (2008), 115203-1--7 ISSN 0953-4075 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 857; GA AV ČR IAA100400501; GA AV ČR 1ET400400413; GA AV ČR KJB400400803; GA ČR GA202/08/0631 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : molecular calculation * vibrational excitation * methane Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.089, year: 2008

  18. Use of CFD to predict trapped gas excitation as source of vibration and noise in screw compressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willie, James

    2017-08-01

    This paper investigates the source of noise in oil free screw compressors mounted on highway trucks and driven by a power take-off (PTO) transmission system. Trapped gas at the discharge side is suggested as possible source of the excitation of low frequency torsional resonance in these compressors that can lead to noise and vibration. Measurements and lumped mass torsional models have shown low frequency torsional resonance in the drive train of these compressors when they are mounted on trucks. This results in high torque peak at the compressor input shaft and in part to pulsating noise inside the machine. The severity of the torque peak depends on the amplitude of the input torque fluctuation from the drive (electric motor or truck engine). This in turn depends on the prop-shaft angle. However, the source of the excitation of this low torsional resonance inside the machine is unknown. Using CFD with mesh motion at every 1° rotation of the rotors, it is shown that the absence of a pressure equalizing chamber at the discharge can lead to trapped gas creation, which can lead to over-compression, over-heating of the rotors, and to high pressure pulsations at the discharge. Over-compression can lead to shock wave generation at the discharge plenum and the pulsation in pressure can lead to noise generation. In addition, if the frequency of the pressure pulsation in the low frequency range coincides with the first torsional frequency of the drive train the first torsional resonance mode can be excited.

  19. Rotational bands on few-particle excitations of very high spin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andersson, C.G.; Krumlinde, J.; Leander, G.; Szymanski, Z.

    1980-01-01

    An RPA formalism is developed to investigate the existence and properties of slow collective rotation around a non-symmetry axis, when there already exists a large angular momentum K along the symmetry axis built up by aligned single-particle spins. It is found necessary to distinguish between the collectivity and the repeatability of the rotational excitations. First the formalism is applied to bands on hihg-K isomers in the well-deformed nucleus 176 Hf, where the rotational-model picture is reproduced for intermediate K-values in agreement with experiment. At high K there is a suppression of the collectivity corresponding to the diminishing vector-coupling coefficient of the rotational model, but the repeatability actually improves. The moment of inertia is predicted to remain substantially smaller than the rigid-body value so the bands slope up steeply from the yrast line at spins where pairing effects are gone. A second application is to the initially spherical nucleus 212 Rn, which is believed to acquire an oblate deformation that increases steadily with K due to the oblate shape of the aligned orbitals. In this case the repeatable excitations come higher above the yrast line than in 176 Hf, even at comparable deformations. Some collective states may occur very close to yrast, but these are more like dressed singleparticle excitations. The main differences between the two nuclei studied is interpreted as a general consequence of their different shell structure. (author)

  20. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  1. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duque, H. V.; Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z.; Silva, G. B. da; Limão-Vieira, P.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; White, R. D.; Lopes, M. C. A.; Brunger, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results

  2. Intermediate-energy differential and integral cross sections for vibrational excitation in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Chiari, L.; Jones, D. B.; Pettifer, Z. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Silva, G. B. da [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso, Barra do Garças, Mato Grosso (Brazil); Limão-Vieira, P. [Laboratório de Colisões Atómicas e Moleculares, CEFITEC, Departamento de Física, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid E-28040 (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); White, R. D. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, James Cook University, Townsville, 4810 Queensland (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora, MG (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2014-06-07

    Differential and integral cross section measurements, for incident electron energies in the 20–50 eV range, are reported for excitation of several composite vibrational modes in α-tetrahydrofurfuryl alcohol (THFA). Optimisation and frequency calculations, using GAUSSIAN 09 at the B3LYP/aug-cc-pVDZ level, were also undertaken for the two most abundant conformers of THFA, with results being reported for their respective mode classifications and excitation energies. Those calculations assisted us in the experimental assignments of the composite features observed in our measured energy loss spectra. There are, to the best of our knowledge, no other experimental or theoretical data currently available in the literature against which we can compare the present results.

  3. Vibrational excitation of methane by positron impact: Computed quantum dynamics and sensitivity tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Tamio; Gianturco, Franco A.

    2002-01-01

    We report the quantum dynamical close-coupling equations relevant for vibrationally inelastic processes in low-energy collisions between a beam of positrons and the CH 4 molecule in the gas phase. The interaction potential is described in detail and we report also our numerical technique for solving the scattering equations. The cross sections are obtained for the excitations of all the modes of the title molecule and are compared both with simpler computational approximations and with the recent experiments for the two distinct energy regions that correspond to the combined symmetric and antisymmetric stretching modes and to twisting and scissoring modes, respectively. Our calculations reproduce well the shape and the values of the experimental findings and give useful insights into the microscopic dynamics for molecular excitation processes activated by low-energy positron scattering

  4. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM. The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults.

  5. Fault Diagnosis for Rotating Machinery Using Vibration Measurement Deep Statistical Feature Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chuan; Sánchez, René-Vinicio; Zurita, Grover; Cerrada, Mariela; Cabrera, Diego

    2016-06-17

    Fault diagnosis is important for the maintenance of rotating machinery. The detection of faults and fault patterns is a challenging part of machinery fault diagnosis. To tackle this problem, a model for deep statistical feature learning from vibration measurements of rotating machinery is presented in this paper. Vibration sensor signals collected from rotating mechanical systems are represented in the time, frequency, and time-frequency domains, each of which is then used to produce a statistical feature set. For learning statistical features, real-value Gaussian-Bernoulli restricted Boltzmann machines (GRBMs) are stacked to develop a Gaussian-Bernoulli deep Boltzmann machine (GDBM). The suggested approach is applied as a deep statistical feature learning tool for both gearbox and bearing systems. The fault classification performances in experiments using this approach are 95.17% for the gearbox, and 91.75% for the bearing system. The proposed approach is compared to such standard methods as a support vector machine, GRBM and a combination model. In experiments, the best fault classification rate was detected using the proposed model. The results show that deep learning with statistical feature extraction has an essential improvement potential for diagnosing rotating machinery faults.

  6. Harmonic pulsed excitation and motion detection of a vibrating reflective target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Matthew W; Greenleaf, James F

    2008-01-01

    Elasticity imaging is an emerging medical imaging modality. Methods involving acoustic radiation force excitation and pulse-echo ultrasound motion detection have been investigated to assess the mechanical response of tissue. In this work new methods for dynamic radiation force excitation and motion detection are presented. The theory and model for harmonic motion detection of a vibrating reflective target are presented. The model incorporates processing of radio frequency data acquired using pulse-echo ultrasound to measure harmonic motion with amplitudes ranging from 100 to 10,000 nm. A numerical study was performed to assess the effects of different parameters on the accuracy and precision of displacement amplitude and phase estimation and showed how estimation errors could be minimized. Harmonic pulsed excitation is introduced as a multifrequency radiation force excitation method that utilizes ultrasound tonebursts repeated at a rate f(r). The radiation force, consisting of frequency components at multiples of f(r), is generated using 3.0 MHz ultrasound, and motion detection is performed simultaneously with 9.0 MHz pulse-echo ultrasound. A parameterized experimental analysis showed that displacement can be measured with small errors for motion with amplitudes as low as 100 nm. The parameterized numerical and experimental analyses provide insight into how to optimize acquisition parameters to minimize measurement errors.

  7. Electron-impact vibrational excitation of the hydroxyl radical in the nighttime upper atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Laurence; Brunger, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Chemical processes produce vibrationally excited hydroxyl (OH) in a layer centred at an altitude of about 87 km in the Earth's atmosphere. Observations of this layer are used to deduce temperatures in the mesosphere and to observe the passage of atmospheric gravity waves. Due to the low densities and energies at night of electrons at the relevant altitude, it is not expected that electron-impact excitation of OH would be significant. However, there are unexplained characteristics of OH densities and radiative emissions that might be explained by electron impact. These are measurements of higher than expected densities of OH above 90 km and of emissions at higher energies that cannot be explained by the chemical production processes. This study simulates the role of electron impact in these processes, using theoretical cross sections for electron-impact excitation of OH. The simulations show that electron impact, even in a substantial aurora, cannot fully explain these phenomena. However, in the process of this investigation, apparent inconsistencies in the theoretical cross sections and reaction rates were found, indicating that measurements of electron-impact excitation of OH are needed to resolve these problems and scale the theoretical predictions to allow more accurate simulations.

  8. Quantum mechanical study of elastic scattering and rotational excitation of CO by electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onda, K.; Truhlar, D. G.

    1980-01-01

    Coupling calculations of differential, integral, and momentum transfer cross sections for pure elastic scattering and rotational excitation of CO by electron impact are reported. The calculations are based on a static charge distribution that has correct dipole and quadrupole moments, has cusps at the nuclei, and is augmented by an SCF treatment of charge polarization and a local approximation for exchange. The rotationally summed cross sections, with no adjustable parameters in the scattering calculation, are in reasonably good agreement with the experimental cross sections but are somewhat larger at small scattering angles.

  9. Vibration analysis of rotating nanobeam systems using Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaniki, Hossein Bakhshi

    2018-05-01

    Due to the inability of differential form of nonlocal elastic theory in modelling cantilever beams and inaccurate results for some type of boundaries, in this study, a reliable investigation on transverse vibrational behavior of rotating cantilever size-dependent beams is presented. Governing higher order equations are written in the framework of Eringen's two-phase local/nonlocal model and solved using a modified generalized differential quadrature method. In order to indicate the influence of different material and scale parameters, a comprehensive parametric study is presented. It is shown that increasing the nonlocality term leads to lower natural frequency terms for cantilever nanobeams especially for the fundamental frequency parameter which differential nonlocal model is unable to track appropriately. Moreover, it is shown that rotating speed and hub radius have a remarkable effect in varying the mechanical behavior of rotating cantilever nanobeams. This study is a step forward in analyzing nanorotors, nanoturbines, nanoblades, etc.

  10. ExoMol line lists - IV. The rotation-vibration spectrum of methane up to 1500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2014-05-01

    A new hot line list is calculated for 12CH4 in its ground electronic state. This line list, called 10to10, contains 9.8 billion transitions and should be complete for temperatures up to 1500 K. It covers the wavelengths longer than 1 μm and includes all transitions to upper states with energies below hc · 18 000 cm-1 and rotational excitation up to J = 39. The line list is computed using the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of CH4 obtained by variational solution of the Schrödinger equation for the rotation-vibration motion of nuclei employing program TROVE and a new `spectroscopic' potential energy surface (PES) obtained by refining an ab initio PES (CCSD(T)-F12c/aug-cc-pVQZ) through least-squares fitting to the experimentally derived energies with J = 0-4 and a previously reported ab initio dipole moment surface (CCSD(T)-F12c/aug-cc-pVTZ). Detailed comparisons with other available sources of methane transitions including HITRAN, experimental compilations and other theoretical line lists show that these sources lack transitions both higher temperatures and near-infrared wavelengths. The 10to10 line list is suitable for modelling atmospheres of cool stars and exoplanets. It is available from the CDS data base as well as at www.exomol.com.

  11. ExoMol line lists - VII. The rotation-vibration spectrum of phosphine up to 1500 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Silva, Clara; Al-Refaie, Ahmed F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Yurchenko, Sergei N.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive hot line list is calculated for 31PH3 in its ground electronic state. This line list, called SAlTY, contains almost 16.8 billion transitions between 7.5 million energy levels and it is suitable for simulating spectra up to temperatures of 1500 K. It covers wavelengths longer than 1 μm and includes all transitions to upper states with energies below hc × 18 000 cm-1 and rotational excitation up to J = 46. The line list is computed by variational solution of the Schrödinger equation for the rotation-vibration motion employing the nuclear-motion program TROVE. A previously reported ab initio dipole moment surface is used as well as an updated `spectroscopic' potential energy surface, obtained by refining an existing ab initio surface through least-squares fitting to the experimentally derived energies. Detailed comparisons with other available sources of phosphine transitions confirms SAlTY's accuracy and illustrates the incompleteness of previous experimental and theoretical compilations for temperatures above 300 K. Atmospheric models are expected to severely underestimate the abundance of phosphine in disequilibrium environments, and it is predicted that phosphine will be detectable in the upper troposphere of many substellar objects. This list is suitable for modelling atmospheres of many astrophysical environments, namely carbon stars, Y dwarfs, T dwarfs, hot Jupiters and Solar system gas giant planets. It is available in full from the Strasbourg data centre, CDS, and at www.exomol.com.

  12. Three-dimensional analytic probabilities of coupled vibrational-rotational-translational energy transfer for DSMC modeling of nonequilibrium flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamovich, Igor V.

    2014-01-01

    A three-dimensional, nonperturbative, semiclassical analytic model of vibrational energy transfer in collisions between a rotating diatomic molecule and an atom, and between two rotating diatomic molecules (Forced Harmonic Oscillator–Free Rotation model) has been extended to incorporate rotational relaxation and coupling between vibrational, translational, and rotational energy transfer. The model is based on analysis of semiclassical trajectories of rotating molecules interacting by a repulsive exponential atom-to-atom potential. The model predictions are compared with the results of three-dimensional close-coupled semiclassical trajectory calculations using the same potential energy surface. The comparison demonstrates good agreement between analytic and numerical probabilities of rotational and vibrational energy transfer processes, over a wide range of total collision energies, rotational energies, and impact parameter. The model predicts probabilities of single-quantum and multi-quantum vibrational-rotational transitions and is applicable up to very high collision energies and quantum numbers. Closed-form analytic expressions for these transition probabilities lend themselves to straightforward incorporation into DSMC nonequilibrium flow codes

  13. Intermediate energy cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Ellis-Gibbings, L.; García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nixon, K. L. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); School of Biology, Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1LY (United Kingdom); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-09-07

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) and integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of pyrimidine, at incident electron energies in the range 15–50 eV. The scattered electron angular range for the DCS measurements was 15°–90°. The measurements at the DCS-level are the first to be reported for vibrational-excitation in pyrimidine via electron impact, while for the ICS we extend the results from the only previous condensed-phase study [P. L. Levesque, M. Michaud, and L. Sanche, J. Chem. Phys. 122, 094701 (2005)], for electron energies ⩽12 eV, to higher energies. Interestingly, the trend in the magnitude of the lower energy condensed-phase ICSs is much smaller when compared to the corresponding gas phase results. As there is no evidence for the existence of any shape-resonances, in the available pyrimidine total cross sections [Baek et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 032702 (2013); Fuss et al., ibid. 88, 042702 (2013)], between 10 and 20 eV, this mismatch in absolute magnitude between the condensed-phase and gas-phase ICSs might be indicative for collective-behaviour effects in the condensed-phase results.

  14. Possible interaction between thermal electrons and vibrationally excited N2 in the lower E-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.-I. Oyama

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available As one of the tasks to find the energy source(s of thermal electrons, which elevate(s electron temperature higher than neutral temperature in the lower ionosphere E-region, energy distribution function of thermal electron was measured with a sounding rocket at the heights of 93–131 km by the applying second harmonic method. The energy distribution function showed a clear hump at the energy of ~0.4 eV. In order to find the reason of the hump, we conducted laboratory experiment. We studied difference of the energy distribution functions of electrons in thermal energy range, which were measured with and without EUV radiation to plasma of N2/Ar and N2/O2 gas mixture respectively. For N2/Ar gas mixture plasma, the hump is not clearly identified in the energy distribution of thermal electrons. On the other hand for N2/O2 gas mixture, which contains vibrationally excited N2, a clear hump is found when irradiated by EUV. The laboratory experiment seems to suggest that the hump is produced as a result of interaction between vibrationally excited N2 and thermal electrons, and this interaction is the most probable heating source for the electrons of thermal energy range in the lower E-region. It is also suggested that energy distribution of the electrons in high energy part may not be Maxwellian, and DC probe measures the electrons which are non Maxwellian, and therefore "electron temperature" is calculated higher.

  15. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guerra, Vasco; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine

    2013-10-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1-5 Torr and discharge currents ˜40-120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O_3^{*} , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O_3^{*} is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O2(a 1Δg) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established.

  16. Ozone kinetics in low-pressure discharges: vibrationally excited ozone and molecule formation on surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Guaitella, Olivier; Booth, Jean-Paul; Rousseau, Antoine; Guerra, Vasco

    2013-01-01

    A combined experimental and modeling investigation of the ozone kinetics in the afterglow of pulsed direct current discharges in oxygen is carried out. The discharge is generated in a cylindrical silica tube of radius 1 cm, with short pulse durations between 0.5 and 2 ms, pressures in the range 1–5 Torr and discharge currents ∼40–120 mA. Time-resolved absolute concentrations of ground-state atoms and ozone molecules were measured simultaneously in situ, by two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence and ultraviolet absorption, respectively. The experiments were complemented by a self-consistent model developed to interpret the results and, in particular, to evaluate the roles of vibrationally excited ozone and of ozone formation on surfaces. It is found that vibrationally excited ozone, O 3 * , plays an important role in the ozone kinetics, leading to a decrease in the ozone concentration and an increase in its formation time. In turn, the kinetics of O 3 * is strongly coupled with those of atomic oxygen and O 2 (a 1 Δ g ) metastables. Ozone formation at the wall does not contribute significantly to the total ozone production under the present conditions. Upper limits for the effective heterogeneous recombination probability of O atoms into ozone are established. (paper)

  17. Effects of phase and coupling between the vibrational modes on selective excitation in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patel, Vishesha; Malinovsky, Vladimir S.; Malinovskaya, Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy has been a major tool of investigation of biological structures as it contains the vibrational signature of molecules. A quantum control method based on chirped pulse adiabatic passage was recently proposed for selective excitation of a predetermined vibrational mode in CARS microscopy [Malinovskaya and Malinovsky, Opt. Lett. 32, 707 (2007)]. The method utilizes the chirp sign variation at the peak pulse amplitude and gives a robust adiabatic excitation of the desired vibrational mode. Using this method, we investigate the impact of coupling between vibrational modes in molecules on controllability of excitation of the CARS signal. We analyze two models of two coupled two-level systems (TLSs) having slightly different transitional frequencies. The first model, featuring degenerate ground states of the TLSs, gives robust adiabatic excitation and maximum coherence in the resonant TLS for positive value of the chirp. In the second model, implying nondegenerate ground states in the TLSs, a population distribution is observed in both TLSs, resulting in a lack of selectivity of excitation and low coherence. It is shown that the relative phase and coupling between the TLSs play an important role in optimizing coherence in the desired vibrational mode and suppressing unwanted transitions in CARS microscopy.

  18. Piezoelectric Shunt Vibration Damping of F-15 Panel under High Acoustic Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shu-Yau; Turner, Travis L.; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    At last year's SPIE symposium, we reported results of an experiment on structural vibration damping of an F-15 underbelly panel using piezoelectric shunting with five bonded PZT transducers. The panel vibration was induced with an acoustic speaker at an overall sound pressure level (OASPL) of about 90 dB. Amplitude reductions of 13.45 and 10.72 dB were achieved for the first and second modes, respectively, using single- and multiple-mode shunting. It is the purpose of this investigation to extend the passive piezoelectric shunt-damping technique to control structural vibration induced at higher acoustic excitation levels, and to examine the controllability and survivability of the bonded PZT transducers at these high levels. The shunting experiment was performed with the Thermal Acoustic Fatigue Apparatus (TAFA) at the NASA Langley Research Center using the same F-15 underbelly panel. The TAFA is a progressive wave tube facility. The panel was mounted in one wall of the TAFA test section using a specially designed mounting fixture such that the panel was subjected to grazing-incidence acoustic excitation. Five PZT transducers were used with two shunt circuits designed to control the first and second modes of the structure between 200 and 400 Hz. We first determined the values of the shunt inductance and resistance at an OASPL of 130 dB. These values were maintained while we gradually increased the OASPL from 130 to 154 dB in 6-dB steps. During each increment, the frequency response function between accelerometers on the panel and the acoustic excitation measured by microphones, before and after shunting, were recorded. Good response reduction was observed up to the 148dB level. The experiment was stopped at 154 dB due to wire breakage from vibration at a transducer wire joint. The PZT transducers, however, were still bonded well on the panel and survived at this high dB level. We also observed shifting of the frequency peaks toward lower frequency when the OASPL

  19. Vibration tests on pile-group foundations using large-scale blast excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Hideo; Hijikata, Katsuichirou; Hashimoto, Takayuki; Fujiwara, Kazushige; Kontani, Osamu; Miyamoto, Yuji; Suzuki, Atsushi

    2005-01-01

    Extensive vibration tests have been performed on pile-supported structures at a large-scale mining site. Ground motions induced by large-scale blasting operations were used as excitation forces for vibration tests. The main objective of this research is to investigate the dynamic behavior of pile-supported structures, in particular, pile-group effects. Two test structures were constructed in an excavated 4 m deep pit. One structure had 25 steel tubular piles and the other had 4 piles. The super-structures were exactly the same. The test pit was backfilled with sand of appropriate grain size distributions in order to obtain good compaction, especially between the 25 piles. Accelerations were measured at the structures, in the test pit and in the adjacent free field, and pile strains were measured. The vibration tests were performed six times with different levels of input motions. The maximum horizontal acceleration recorded at the adjacent ground surface varied from 57 cm/s 2 to 1683 cm/s 2 according to the distances between the test site and the blast areas. Maximum strains were 13,400 micro-strains were recorded at the pile top of the 4-pile structure, which means that these piles were subjected to yielding

  20. Laser selective cutting of biological tissues by impulsive heat deposition through ultrafast vibrational excitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franjic, Kresimir; Cowan, Michael L; Kraemer, Darren; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2009-12-07

    Mechanical and thermodynamic responses of biomaterials after impulsive heat deposition through vibrational excitations (IHDVE) are investigated and discussed. Specifically, we demonstrate highly efficient ablation of healthy tooth enamel using 55 ps infrared laser pulses tuned to the vibrational transition of interstitial water and hydroxyapatite around 2.95 microm. The peak intensity at 13 GW/cm(2) was well below the plasma generation threshold and the applied fluence 0.75 J/cm(2) was significantly smaller than the typical ablation thresholds observed with nanosecond and microsecond pulses from Er:YAG lasers operating at the same wavelength. The ablation was performed without adding any superficial water layer at the enamel surface. The total energy deposited per ablated volume was several times smaller than previously reported for non-resonant ultrafast plasma driven ablation with similar pulse durations. No micro-cracking of the ablated surface was observed with a scanning electron microscope. The highly efficient ablation is attributed to an enhanced photomechanical effect due to ultrafast vibrational relaxation into heat and the scattering of powerful ultrafast acoustic transients with random phases off the mesoscopic heterogeneous tissue structures.

  1. CN molecule vibrational spectra excitation in several LTE plasma sources conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iova, I.; Iova, Floriana; Ionita, I.; Bazavan, M.; Ilie, Gh.; Stanescu, G.

    2001-01-01

    Our interest in CN plasma study steams of the facilities to obtain the CN radicals in a free atmosphere electric discharge where the C of the coal electrodes can to combine in the enough high temperature plasma with the atmospheric nitrogen. Also of much interest is the very important phenomena in which the CN vibrational spectra can be implied and used as a diagnostic tool (plasma chemistry, astrophysics and so on). A peculiar importance presents the CN vibrational spectra in the transient plasmas. It is the reason why we have investigated here some internal processes of a continued and interrupted arc of various pulse lengths. To these purposes we present with enough accuracy the behaviour of the relative band head intensities of the sequences Δ v = +1 and Δ v = 0 belonging to the CN electronic transition (B 2 Σ - X 2 Σ), as a function of the pulse length (50 - 200 ms) as well as a function of the cathode to anode separation. These behaviours give us indications on the vibrational levels of the electronic state populations in several regions of the arc plasma as well on the efficiency of these levels excitation for several plasma pulse lengths. (authors)

  2. Nonlinear vibration behaviors of suspended cables under two-frequency excitation with temperature effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yaobing; Huang, Chaohui; Chen, Lincong; Peng, Jian

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate temperature effects on the nonlinear vibration behaviors of suspended cables under two-frequency excitation. For this purpose, two combination and simultaneous resonances are chosen and studied in detail. First of all, based on the assumptions of the temperature effects, the partial differential equations of the in-plane and out-of-plane motions with thermal effects under multi-frequency excitations are obtained. The Galerkin method is adopted to discretize the nonlinear dynamic equations, and the single-mode planar discretization is considered. Then, in the absence of the primary and internal resonances, the frequency response equations are obtained by using the multiple scales method. The stability analyses are conducted via investigating the nature of the singular points of equations. After that, temperature effects on nonlinear vibration characteristics of the first symmetric mode are studied. Parametric investigations of temperature effects on corresponding non-dimensional factors and coefficients of linear and nonlinear terms are performed. Numerical results are presented to show the temperature effects via the frequency-response curves and detuning-phase curves of four different sag-to-span ratios. It is found out that effects of temperature variations would lead to significant quantitative and/or qualitative changes of the nonlinear vibration properties, and these effects are closely related to the sag-to-span ratio and the degree of the temperature variation. Specifically, the softening/hardening-type spring behaviors, the response amplitude, the range of the resonance, the intersection and number of branches, the number and phase of the steady-state solutions are all affected by the temperature changes.

  3. Rotational excitation of linear triatomic molecules: Ar, Kr + N2O, CO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrar, J.M.; Parson, J.M.; Lee, Y.T.

    1974-01-01

    Rotational excitation of N 2 O and CO 2 in collisions with Ar and Kr has been studied by crossing two supersonic molecular beams and detecting scattered products with a mass spectrometer. Measurement of the time of flight spectrum of the products as a function of laboratory scattering angle theta indicates that the inelasticity is concentrated in the forward direction in the center of mass system. Difference between CO 2 and N 2 O are discussed briefly

  4. A piezoelectric energy harvester for broadband rotational excitation using buckled beam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengqiu Xie

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester using a piezoelectric bistable buckled beam to harvest low-speed rotational energy. The proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric buckled beam with a center magnet, and a rotary magnet pair with opposite magnetic poles mounted on a revolving host. The magnetic plucking is used to harvest the angular kinetic energy of the host. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is utilized to improve the vibration displacement and output voltage of the piezoelectric layer over a wide rotation frequency range. Theoretical simulation and experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester can yield a stable average output power ranging between 6.91-48.01 μW over a rotation frequency range of 1-14 Hz across a resistance load of 110 kΩ. Furthermore, dual attraction magnets were employed to overcome the suppression phenomenon at higher frequencies, which yields a broadband and flat frequency response over 6-14 Hz with the output power reaching 42.19-65.44 μW, demonstrating the great potential of the bistable buckled beam for wideband rotation motion energy harvesting.

  5. A piezoelectric energy harvester for broadband rotational excitation using buckled beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhengqiu; Kitio Kwuimy, C. A.; Wang, Zhiguo; Huang, Wenbin

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a rotational energy harvester using a piezoelectric bistable buckled beam to harvest low-speed rotational energy. The proposed harvester consists of a piezoelectric buckled beam with a center magnet, and a rotary magnet pair with opposite magnetic poles mounted on a revolving host. The magnetic plucking is used to harvest the angular kinetic energy of the host. The nonlinear snap-through mechanism is utilized to improve the vibration displacement and output voltage of the piezoelectric layer over a wide rotation frequency range. Theoretical simulation and experimental results show that the proposed energy harvester can yield a stable average output power ranging between 6.91-48.01 μW over a rotation frequency range of 1-14 Hz across a resistance load of 110 kΩ. Furthermore, dual attraction magnets were employed to overcome the suppression phenomenon at higher frequencies, which yields a broadband and flat frequency response over 6-14 Hz with the output power reaching 42.19-65.44 μW, demonstrating the great potential of the bistable buckled beam for wideband rotation motion energy harvesting.

  6. Excitation of Earth Rotation Variations "Observed" by Time-Variable Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Ben F.; Cox, C. M.

    2005-01-01

    Time variable gravity measurements have been made over the past two decades using the space geodetic technique of satellite laser ranging, and more recently by the GRACE satellite mission with improved spatial resolutions. The degree-2 harmonic components of the time-variable gravity contain important information about the Earth s length-of-day and polar motion excitation functions, in a way independent to the traditional "direct" Earth rotation measurements made by, for example, the very-long-baseline interferometry and GPS. In particular, the (degree=2, order= 1) components give the mass term of the polar motion excitation; the (2,O) component, under certain mass conservation conditions, gives the mass term of the length-of-day excitation. Combining these with yet another independent source of angular momentum estimation calculated from global geophysical fluid models (for example the atmospheric angular momentum, in both mass and motion terms), in principle can lead to new insights into the dynamics, particularly the role or the lack thereof of the cores, in the excitation processes of the Earth rotation variations.

  7. Origin of enhanced vibrational excitation in N2 by electron impact in the 15--35 eV region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehmer, J.L.; Siegel, J.; Welch, J.; Dill, D.

    1980-01-01

    The authors calculate the integrated vibrational excitation cross section for e-N 2 scattering in the interval 0 --50 eV using the continuum multiple-scattering model with the Hara exchange approximation. Resonant enhancement is observed at 2.4 eV owing to the well-known π/sub g/ shape resonance. In addition, however, enhanced vibrational excitation is found centered at approx.26 eV, arising from a broad shape resonance in the sigma/sub u/ channel. The authors propose this one-electron feature as the main source of the enhanced vibrational excitation observed by Pavlovic et al. in the 15--35 eV region

  8. Steady flow instability in an annulus with deflectors at rotational vibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozlov, Nikolai V [Lab. Vibrational Hydromechanics, Perm State-Humanitarian Pedagogical University 24 Sibirskaya av., 614990 Perm (Russian Federation); Pareau, Dominique; Stambouli, Moncef [Lab. Chemical Engineering, CentraleSupélec-Université Paris Saclay, Grande Voie des Vignes, 92295 Châtenay-Malabry (France); Ivantsov, Andrey, E-mail: kozlov.n@icmm.ru [Lab. Computational Hydrodynamics Institute of Continuous Media Mechanics UB RAS1 Acad. Korolev st., 614013 Perm (Russian Federation)

    2016-12-15

    Experimental study and direct numerical simulation of the dynamics of an isothermal low-viscosity fluid are done in a coaxial gap of a cylindrical container making rotational vibrations relative to its axis. On the inner surface of the outer wall of the container, semicircular deflectors are regularly situated, playing the role of flow activators. As a result of vibrations, the activators oscillate tangentially. In the simulation, a 2D configuration is considered, excluding the end-wall effects. In the experiment, a container with a large aspect ratio is used. Steady streaming is generated in the viscous boundary layers on the activators. On each of the latter, beyond the viscous domain, a symmetric vortices pair is formed. The steady streaming in the annulus has an azimuthal periodicity. With an increase in the vibration intensity, a competition between the vortices occurs, as a result of which one of the vortices (let us call it even) approaches the activator and the other one (odd) rolls away and couples with the vortices from the neighbouring pairs. Streamlines of the odd vortices close on each other, forming a cog-wheel shaped flow that encircles the inner wall. Comparison of the experiment and the simulation reveals an agreement at moderate vibration intensity. (paper)

  9. Parametric and Non-Parametric Vibration-Based Structural Identification Under Earthquake Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentaris, Fragkiskos P.; Fouskitakis, George N.

    2014-05-01

    The problem of modal identification in civil structures is of crucial importance, and thus has been receiving increasing attention in recent years. Vibration-based methods are quite promising as they are capable of identifying the structure's global characteristics, they are relatively easy to implement and they tend to be time effective and less expensive than most alternatives [1]. This paper focuses on the off-line structural/modal identification of civil (concrete) structures subjected to low-level earthquake excitations, under which, they remain within their linear operating regime. Earthquakes and their details are recorded and provided by the seismological network of Crete [2], which 'monitors' the broad region of south Hellenic arc, an active seismic region which functions as a natural laboratory for earthquake engineering of this kind. A sufficient number of seismic events are analyzed in order to reveal the modal characteristics of the structures under study, that consist of the two concrete buildings of the School of Applied Sciences, Technological Education Institute of Crete, located in Chania, Crete, Hellas. Both buildings are equipped with high-sensitivity and accuracy seismographs - providing acceleration measurements - established at the basement (structure's foundation) presently considered as the ground's acceleration (excitation) and at all levels (ground floor, 1st floor, 2nd floor and terrace). Further details regarding the instrumentation setup and data acquisition may be found in [3]. The present study invokes stochastic, both non-parametric (frequency-based) and parametric methods for structural/modal identification (natural frequencies and/or damping ratios). Non-parametric methods include Welch-based spectrum and Frequency response Function (FrF) estimation, while parametric methods, include AutoRegressive (AR), AutoRegressive with eXogeneous input (ARX) and Autoregressive Moving-Average with eXogeneous input (ARMAX) models[4, 5

  10. Absolute Configuration of 3-METHYLCYCLOHEXANONE by Chiral Tag Rotational Spectroscopy and Vibrational Circular Dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelisti, Luca; Holdren, Martin S.; Mayer, Kevin J.; Smart, Taylor; West, Channing; Pate, Brooks

    2017-06-01

    The absolute configuration of 3-methylcyclohexanone was established by chiral tag rotational spectroscopy measurements using 3-butyn-2-ol as the tag partner. This molecule was chosen because it is a benchmark measurement for vibrational circular dichroism (VCD). A comparison of the analysis approaches of chiral tag rotational spectroscopy and VCD will be presented. One important issue in chiral analysis by both methods is the conformational flexibility of the molecule being analyzed. The analysis of conformational composition of samples will be illustrated. In this case, the high spectral resolution of molecular rotational spectroscopy and potential for spectral simplification by conformational cooling in the pulsed jet expansion are advantages for chiral tag spectroscopy. The computational chemistry requirements for the two methods will also be discussed. In this case, the need to perform conformer searches for weakly bound complexes and to perform reasonably high level quantum chemistry geometry optimizations on these complexes makes the computational time requirements less favorable for chiral tag rotational spectroscopy. Finally, the issue of reliability of the determination of the absolute configuration will be considered. In this case, rotational spectroscopy offers a "gold standard" analysis method through the determination of the ^{13}C-subsitution structure of the complex between 3-methylcyclohexanone and an enantiopure sample of the 3-butyn-2-ol tag.

  11. Supercritical Nonlinear Vibration of a Fluid-Conveying Pipe Subjected to a Strong External Excitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Lei Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonlinear vibration of a fluid-conveying pipe subjected to a transverse external harmonic excitation is investigated in the case with two-to-one internal resonance. The excitation amplitude is in the same magnitude of the transverse displacement. The fluid in the pipes flows in the speed larger than the critical speed so that the straight configuration becomes an unstable equilibrium and two curved configurations bifurcate as stable equilibriums. The motion measured from each of curved equilibrium configurations is governed by a nonlinear integro-partial-differential equation with variable coefficients. The Galerkin method is employed to discretize the governing equation into a gyroscopic system consisting of a set of coupled nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The method of multiple scales is applied to analyze approximately the gyroscopic system. A set of first-order ordinary differential equations governing the modulations of the amplitude and the phase are derived via the method. In the supercritical regime, the subharmonic, superharmonic, and combination resonances are examined in the presence of the 2 : 1 internal resonance. The steady-state responses and their stabilities are determined. The various jump phenomena in the amplitude-frequency response curves are demonstrated. The effects of the viscosity, the excitation amplitude, the nonlinearity, and the flow speed are observed. The analytical results are supported by the numerical integration.

  12. Nuclear spin-isospin excitations from covariant quasiparticle-vibration coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Caroline; Litvinova, Elena

    2016-09-01

    Methods based on the relativistic Lagrangian of quantum hadrodynamics and nuclear field theory provide a consistent framework for the description of nuclear excitations, naturally connecting the high- and medium-energy scales of mesons to the low-energy domain of nucleonic collective motion. Applied in the neutral channel, this approach has been quite successful in describing the overall transition strength up to high excitation energies, as well as fine details of the low-lying distribution. Recently, this method has been extended to the description of spin-isospin excitations in open-shell nuclei. In the charge-exchange channel, the coupling between nucleons and collective vibrations generates a time-dependent proton-neutron effective interaction, in addition to the static pion and rho-meson exchange, and introduces complex configurations that induce fragmentation and spreading of the resonances. Such effects have a great impact on the quenching of the strength and on the computing of weak reaction rates that are needed for astrophysics modeling. Gamow-Teller transitions in medium-mass nuclei and associated beta-decay half-lives will be presented. Further developments aiming to include additional ground-state correlations will also be discussed. This work is supported by US-NSF Grants PHY-1404343 and PHY-1204486.

  13. Use of piezoelectric actuators in active vibration control of rotating machinery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Reng Rong; Palazzolo, Alan B.; Kascak, Albert F.; Montague, Gerald

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical and test results for the development of piezoelectric-actuator-based active vibration control (AVC) are presented. The evolution of this technology starts with an ideal model of the actuator and progresses to a more sophisticated model where the pushers force the squirrel cage ball bearing supports of a rotating shaft. The piezoelectric pushers consist of a stack of piezoelectric ceramic disks that are arranged on top of one another and connected in parallel electrically. This model consists of a prescribed displacement that is proportional to the input voltage and a spring that represents the stiffness of the stack of piezoelectric disks. System tests were carried out to stabilize the AVC system, verify its effectiveness in controlling vibration, and confirm the theory presented.

  14. Vibration suppression of a rotating flexible cantilever pipe conveying fluid using piezoelectric layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Khajehpour

    Full Text Available AbstractIn this study, the governing equations of a rotating cantilever pipe conveying fluid are derived and the longitudinal and lateral induced vibrations are controlled. The pipe considered as an Euler Bernoulli beam with tip mass which piezoelectric layers attached both side of it as sensors and actuators. The follower force due to the fluid discharge causes both conservative and non-conservative work. For mathematical modeling, the Lagrange-Rayleigh-Ritz technique is utilized. An adaptive-robust control scheme is applied to suppress the vibration of the pipe. The adaptive-robust control method is robust against parameter uncertainties and disturbances. Finally, the system is simulated and the effects of varying parameters are studied. The simulation results show the excellent performance of the controller.

  15. Folding-type coupling potentials in the context of the generalized rotation-vibration model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamon, L. C.; Morales Botero, D. F.

    2018-03-01

    The generalized rotation-vibration model was proposed in previous works to describe the structure of heavy nuclei. The model was successfully tested in the description of experimental results related to the electron-nucleus elastic and inelastic scattering. In the present work, we consider heavy-ion collisions and assume this model to calculate folding-type coupling potentials for inelastic states, through the corresponding transition densities. As an example, the method is applied to coupled-channel data analyses for the α + 70,72,74,76Ge systems.

  16. On the O2(a1Δ) quenching by vibrationally excited ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azyazov, V. N.; Mikheyev, P. A.; Heaven, M. C.

    2010-09-01

    The development of a discharge oxygen iodine laser (DOIL) requires efficient production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a)) in electric discharge. It is important to understand the mechanisms by which O2(a) is quenched in these devices. To gain understanding of this mechanisms quenching of O2(a) in O(3P)/O2/O3/CO2/He/Ar mixtures has been investigated. Oxygen atoms and singlet oxygen molecules were produced by the 248 nm laser photolysis of ozone. The kinetics of O2(a) quenching were followed by observing the 1268 nm fluorescence of the O2 a --> X transition. Fast quenching of O2(a) in the presence of oxygen atoms and molecules was observed. The mechanism of the process has been examined using kinetic models, which indicate that quenching by vibrationally excited ozone is the dominant reaction.

  17. Multi-modal vibration amplitudes of taut inclined cables due to direct and/or parametric excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, J. H. G.

    2016-02-01

    Cables are often prone to potentially damaging large amplitude vibrations. The dynamic excitation may be from external loading or motion of the cable ends, the latter including direct excitation, normally from components of end motion transverse to the cable, and parametric excitation induced by axial components of end motion causing dynamic tension variations. Geometric nonlinearity can be important, causing stiffening behaviour and nonlinear modal coupling. Previous analyses of the vibrations, often neglecting sag, have generally dealt with direct and parametric excitation separately or have reverted to numerical solutions of the responses. Here a nonlinear cable model is adopted, applicable to taut cables such as on cable-stayed bridges, that allows for cable inclination, small sag (such that the vibration modes are similar to those of a taut string), multiple modes in both planes and end motion and/or external forcing close to any natural frequency. Based on the method of scaling and averaging it is found that, for sinusoidal inputs and positive damping, non-zero steady state responses can only occur in the modes in each plane with natural frequencies close to the excitation frequency and those with natural frequencies close to half this frequency. Analytical solutions, in the form of non-dimensional polynomial equations, are derived for the steady state vibration amplitudes in up to three modes simultaneously: the directly excited mode, the corresponding nonlinearly coupled mode in the orthogonal plane and a parametrically excited mode with half the natural frequency. The stability of the solutions is also identified. The outputs of the equations are consistent with previous results, where available. Example results from the analytical solutions are presented for a typical inclined bridge cable subject to vertical excitation of the lower end, and they are validated by numerical integration of the equations of motion and against some previous experimental

  18. Theoretical studies for the N2–N2O van der Waals complex: The potential energy surface, intermolecular vibrations, and rotational transition frequencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Rui; Zheng, Limin; Yang, Minghui; Lu, Yunpeng

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical studies of the potential energy surface (PES) and bound states are performed for the N 2 –N 2 O van der Waals (vdW) complex. A four-dimensional intermolecular PES is constructed at the level of single and double excitation coupled-cluster method with a non-iterative perturbation treatment of triple excitations [CCSD(T)] with aug-cc-pVTZ basis set supplemented with bond functions. Two equivalent T-shaped global minima are located, in which the O atom of N 2 O monomer is near the N 2 monomer. The intermolecular fundamental vibrational states are assigned by inspecting the orientation of the nodal surface of the wavefunctions. The calculated frequency for intermolecular disrotation mode is 23.086 cm −1 , which is in good agreement with the available experimental data of 22.334 cm −1 . A negligible tunneling splitting with the value of 4.2 MHz is determined for the ground vibrational state and the tunneling splitting increases as the increment of the vibrational frequencies. Rotational levels and transition frequencies are calculated for both isotopomers 14 N 2 –N 2 O and 15 N 2 –N 2 O. The accuracy of the PES is validated by the good agreement between theoretical and experimental results for the transition frequencies and spectroscopic parameters

  19. Vibration due to non-circularity of a rotating ring having discrete radial supports - With application to thin-walled rotor/magnetic bearing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakkaew, Wichaphon; Cole, Matthew O. T.

    2018-06-01

    This paper investigates the vibration arising in a thin-walled cylindrical rotor subject to small non-circularity and coupled to discrete space-fixed radial bearing supports. A Fourier series description of rotor non-circularity is incorporated within a mathematical model for vibration of a rotating annulus. This model predicts the multi-harmonic excitation of the rotor wall due to bearing interactions. For each non-circularity harmonic there is a set of distinct critical speeds at which resonance can potentially arise due to flexural mode excitation within the rotor wall. It is shown that whether each potential resonance occurs depends on the multiplicity and symmetry of the bearing supports. Also, a sufficient number of evenly spaced identical supports will eliminate low order resonances. The considered problem is pertinent to the design and operation of thin-walled rotors with active magnetic bearing (AMB) supports, for which small clearances exist between the rotor and bearing and so vibration excitation must be limited to avoid contacts. With this motivation, the mathematical model is further developed for the case of a distributed array of electromagnetic actuators controlled by feedback of measured rotor wall displacements. A case study involving an experimental system with short cylindrical rotor and a single radial AMB support is presented. The results show that flexural mode resonance is largely avoided for the considered design topology. Moreover, numerical predictions based on measured non-circularity show good agreement with measurements of rotor wall vibration, thereby confirming the validity and utility of the theoretical model.

  20. Stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance in an excitable system: The golden mean barrier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stan, Cristina; Cristescu, C.P.; Alexandroaei, D.; Agop, M.

    2009-01-01

    We report on stochastic resonance and vibrational resonance in an electric charge double layer configuration as usually found in electrical discharges, biological cell membranes, chemical systems and nanostructures. The experiment and numerical computation show the existence of a barrier expressible in terms of the golden mean above which the two phenomena do not take place. We consider this as new evidence for the importance of the golden mean criticality in the oscillatory dynamics, in agreement with El Naschie's E-infinity theory. In our experiment, the dynamics of a charge double layer generated in the inter-anode space of a twin electrical discharge is investigated under noise-harmonic and harmonic-harmonic perturbations. In the first case, a Gaussian noise can enhance the response of the system to a weak injected periodic signal, a clear mark of stochastic resonance. In the second case, similar enhancement can appear if the noise is replaced by a harmonic perturbation with a frequency much higher than the frequency of the weak oscillation. The amplitude of the low frequency oscillation shows a maximum versus the amplitude of the high frequency perturbation demonstrating vibrational resonance. In order to model these dynamics, we derived an excitable system by modifying a biased van der Pol oscillator. The computational study considers the behaviour of this system under the same types of perturbation as in the experimental investigations and is found to give consistent results in both situations.

  1. An Experimental Validated Control Strategy of Maglev Vehicle-Bridge Self-Excited Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lianchun Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study discusses an experimentally validated control strategy of maglev vehicle-bridge vibration, which degrades the stability of the suspension control, deteriorates the ride comfort, and limits the cost of the magnetic levitation system. First, a comparison between the current-loop and magnetic flux feedback is carried out and a minimum model including flexible bridge and electromagnetic levitation system is proposed. Then, advantages and disadvantages of the traditional feedback architecture with the displacement feedback of electromagnet yE and bridge yB in pairs are explored. The results indicate that removing the feedback of the bridge’s displacement yB from the pairs (yE − yB measured by the eddy-current sensor is beneficial for the passivity of the levitation system and the control of the self-excited vibration. In this situation, the signal acquisition of the electromagnet’s displacement yE is discussed for the engineering application. Finally, to validate the effectiveness of the aforementioned control strategy, numerical validations are carried out and the experimental data are provided and analyzed.

  2. Nonlinear Vibration Analysis for a Jeffcott Rotor with Seal and Air-Film Bearing Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuefang Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The nonlinear coupling vibration and bifurcation of a high-speed centrifugal compressor with a labyrinth seal and two air-film journal bearings are presented in this paper. The rotary shaft and disk are modeled as a rigid Jeffcott rotor. Muszynska's model is used to express the seal force with multiple parameters. For air-film journal bearings, the model proposed by Zhang et al. is adopted to express unsteady bearing forces. The Runge-Kutta method is used to numerically determine the vibration responses of the disk center and the bearings. Bifurcation diagrams for transverse motion of the rotor are presented with parameters of rotation speed and pressure drop of the seal. Multiple subharmonic, periodic, and quasiperiodic motions are presented with two seal-pressure drops. The bifurcation characteristics show inherent interactions between forces of the air-film bearings and the seal, presenting more complicated rotor dynamics than the one with either of the forces alone. Bifurcation diagrams are obtained with parameters of pressure drop and seal length determined for the sake of operation safety.

  3. Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states in a particle number and isospin projected generator coordinate method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.T.; Muether, H.; Faessler, A.

    1978-01-01

    Pairing vibrational and isospin rotational states are described in different approximations based on particle number and isospin projected, proton-proton, neutron-neutron and proton-neutron pairing wave functions and on the generator coordinate method (GCM). The investigations are performed in models for which an exact group theoretical solution exists. It turns out that a particle number and isospin projection is essential to yield a good approximation to the ground state or isospin yrast state energies. For strong pairing correlations (pairing force constant equal to the single-particle level distance) isospin cranking (-ωTsub(x)) yields with particle number projected pairing wave function also good agreement with the exact energies. GCM wave functions generated by particle number and isospin projected BCS functions with different amounts of pairing correlations yield for the lowest T=0 and T=2 states energies which are practically indistinguishable from the exact solutions. But even the second and third lowest energies of charge-symmetric states are still very reliable. Thus it is concluded that also in realistic cases isospin rotational and pairing vibrational states may be described in the framework of the GCM method with isospin and particle number projected generating wave functions. (Auth.)

  4. The Implications of the Excited Rotation of Comet 252P/2000 G1 (LINEAR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Samarasinha, Nalin H.; Kelley, Michael S. P.; Farnocchia, Davide; Mutchler, Max J.; Ren, Yanqiong; Lu, Xiaoping; Tholen, David J.; Lister, Tim; Micheli, Marco

    2018-01-01

    of 252P, the origin of its excited rotational state is interesting. Exploring the possible scenarios to excite the rotation of 252P may place constraints on its activity history. We will discuss results from our investigations.

  5. Asymptotic theory of neutral stability of the Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'ev, Yu. N.; Ershov, I. V.

    2017-01-01

    An asymptotic theory of the neutral stability curve for a supersonic plane Couette flow of a vibrationally excited gas is developed. The initial mathematical model consists of equations of two-temperature viscous gas dynamics, which are used to derive a spectral problem for a linear system of eighth-order ordinary differential equations within the framework of the classical linear stability theory. Unified transformations of the system for all shear flows are performed in accordance with the classical Lin scheme. The problem is reduced to an algebraic secular equation with separation into the "inviscid" and "viscous" parts, which is solved numerically. It is shown that the thus-calculated neutral stability curves agree well with the previously obtained results of the direct numerical solution of the original spectral problem. In particular, the critical Reynolds number increases with excitation enhancement, and the neutral stability curve is shifted toward the domain of higher wave numbers. This is also confirmed by means of solving an asymptotic equation for the critical Reynolds number at the Mach number M ≤ 4.

  6. Vibrational and electronic excitation of hexatriacontane thin films by low energy electron impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vilar, M.R.; Schott, M.; Pfluger, P.

    1990-01-01

    Thin polycrystalline films of hexatriacontane (HTC) were irradiated with low energy (E=0.5--15 eV) electrons, and off-specular backscattered electron spectra were measured. Below E∼7 eV, single and multiple vibrational excitations only are observed, which relax the electrons down to the bottom of the HTC conduction band. Due to the negative electron affinity of HTC, thermal electrons are emitted into vacuum. Structure in the backscattered electron current at kinetic energies about 1.5 and 4 eV are associated to conduction band density of states. Above E∼7 eV, the dominant losses correspond to electronic excitations, excitons, or above a threshold (energy of the electron inside the HTC film) at 9.2±0.1 eV, electron--hole pair generation. The latter process is very efficient and reaches a yield of the order of one ∼11 eV. Evidence for chemical reaction above E∼4 eV is observed

  7. Damping of vibrational excitations in glasses at terahertz frequency: The case of 3-methylpentane

    KAUST Repository

    Baldi, Giacomo

    2017-10-24

    We report a compared analysis of inelastic X ray scattering (IXS) and of low frequency Raman data of glassy 3-methylpentane. The IXS spectra have been analysed allowing for the existence of two distinct excitations at each scattering wavevector obtaining a consistent interpretation of the spectra. In particular, this procedure allows us to interpret the linewidth of the modes in terms of a simple model which relates them to the width of the first sharp diffraction peak in the static structure factor. In this model, the width of the modes arises from the blurring of the dispersion curves which increases approaching the boundary of the first pseudo-Brillouin zone. The position of the boson peak contribution to the density of vibrational states derived from the Raman scattering measurements is in agreement with the interpretation of the two excitations in terms of a longitudinal mode and a transverse mode, the latter being a result of the mixed character of the transverse modes away from the center of the pseudo-Brillouin zone.

  8. Damping of vibrational excitations in glasses at terahertz frequency: The case of 3-methylpentane

    KAUST Repository

    Baldi, Giacomo; Benassi, Paola; Fontana, Aldo; Giugni, Andrea; Monaco, Giulio; Nardone, Michele; Rossi, Flavio

    2017-01-01

    We report a compared analysis of inelastic X ray scattering (IXS) and of low frequency Raman data of glassy 3-methylpentane. The IXS spectra have been analysed allowing for the existence of two distinct excitations at each scattering wavevector obtaining a consistent interpretation of the spectra. In particular, this procedure allows us to interpret the linewidth of the modes in terms of a simple model which relates them to the width of the first sharp diffraction peak in the static structure factor. In this model, the width of the modes arises from the blurring of the dispersion curves which increases approaching the boundary of the first pseudo-Brillouin zone. The position of the boson peak contribution to the density of vibrational states derived from the Raman scattering measurements is in agreement with the interpretation of the two excitations in terms of a longitudinal mode and a transverse mode, the latter being a result of the mixed character of the transverse modes away from the center of the pseudo-Brillouin zone.

  9. The Modeling and Analysis for the Self-Excited Vibration of the Maglev Vehicle-Bridge Interaction System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhui Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the self-excited vibration problems of maglev vehicle-bridge interaction system which greatly degrades the stability of the levitation control, decreases the ride comfort, and restricts the cost of the whole system. Firstly, two levitation models with different complexity are developed, and the comparison of the energy curves associated with the two models is carried out. We conclude that the interaction model with a single levitation control unit is sufficient for the study of the self-excited vibration. Then, the principle underlying the self-excited vibration is explored from the standpoint of work acting on the bridge done by the levitation system. Furthermore, the influences of the parameters, including the modal frequency and modal damping of bridge, the gain of the controller, the sprung mass, and the unsprung mass, on the stability of the interaction system are carried out. The study provides a theoretical guidance for solving the self-excited vibration problems of the vehicle-bridge interaction systems.

  10. Effects of real and sham whole-body mechanical vibration on spinal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hortobagyi, T.; Rider, P.; DeVita, P.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the effects of whole-body mechanical vibration (WBV) on indices of motoneuronal excitability at rest and during muscle contraction in healthy humans. Real and sham WBV at 30Hz had no effect on reflexes measured during muscle contraction. Real WBV at 30 and 50Hz depressed the H-reflex

  11. Interpretation of rotationally excited far-infrared OH emission in Orion-KL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melnick, G.J.; Genzel, R.; Lugten, J.B.; California Univ., Berkeley; Max-Planck-Institut fuer Physik und Astrophysik, Garching, Germany, F.R.)

    1987-01-01

    The 2Pi(1/2) OH 163-micron J = 3/2-1/2 rotational transitions in Orion-KL were observed and an upper limit was set to the line strength of the 2II(1/2) OH 56-micron J = 9/2-7/2 doublet in this source. The 163-micron line intensities were modeled, along with the previously measured 2II(3/2) 119 and 84-micron rotational line emission and it is found that the gas in the Orion-KL postshocked region can produce OH 119-micron line emission of the same strength as measured; however, the resultant 84 and 163-micron line intensities would be weaker than observed. Shocked gas plus a second component which experiences strong radiative excitation can reproduce the observations. 35 references

  12. An evaluation method of critical velocity for self-excited vibration of cross-shaped tube bundle in cross flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Fumio; Nishihara, Takashi; Yasuo, Akira; Morita, Ryo

    2002-01-01

    The applicability of the cross-shaped tube bundle as a lower plenum component of pressure vessel is examined to develop a next generation LWR in Japanese electric utilities. The flow-induced vibration characteristics are not understood well. Methods to evaluate turbulence induced vibration and vortex induced vibration were proposed by CRIEPI. In this study, vibration response is obtained experimentally to propose a method to evaluate self-excited vibration of cross-shaped tube bundle. The self-excited vibration was found to be generated when nondimensional flow velocity was above a critical value. The nondimensional critical velocity of normal configuration is 15% smaller than that of staggered configuration, which means that the nondimensional critical velocity of normal configuration can give conservative evaluation. The result of Reynolds number Re=6.2 x 10 4 agrees well with that of Re=6.8 x 10 5 , in which region, the effect of Reynolds number on the critical velocity is small. (author)

  13. An inverse method for the identification of a distributed random excitation acting on a vibrating structure. Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Granger, S.; Perotin, L.

    1997-01-01

    Maintaining the PWR components under reliable operating conditions requires a complex design to prevent various damaging processes, including fatigue and wear problems due to flow-induced vibration. In many practical situations, it is difficult, if not impossible, to perform direct measurements or calculations of the external forces acting on vibrating structures. Instead, vibrational responses can often be conveniently measured. This paper presents an inverse method for estimating a distributed random excitation from the measurement of the structural response at a number of discrete points. This paper is devoted to the presentation of the theoretical development. The force identification method is based on a modal model for the structure and a spatial orthonormal decomposition of the excitation field. The estimation of the Fourier coefficients of this orthonormal expansion is presented. As this problem turns out to be ill-posed, a regularization process is introduced. The minimization problem associated to this process is then formulated and its solutions is developed. (author)

  14. Effect of rotation and magnetic field on free vibrations in a spherical non-homogeneous embedded in an elastic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayones, F. S.; Abd-Alla, A. M.

    2018-06-01

    The prime objective of the present paper is to analyze the effect of magnetic field and rotation on the free vibrations of an elastic hollow sphere. The one-dimensional equation of motion is solved in terms of radial displacement. The frequency equation is obtained when the boundaries are free and fixed boundary conditions. The determination is concerned with the eigenvalues of the natural frequency of the free vibrations in the case of harmonic vibrations. The natural frequencies and the mode shapes are calculated numericall and the effects of rotation and magnetic field are discussed. It was shown that the dispersion curves of waves were significantly influenced by the magnetic field and rotation of the elastic sphere.

  15. Automated misfire diagnosis in engines using torsional vibration and block rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J; Randall, R B; Peeters, B; Auweraer, H Van der; Desmet, W

    2012-01-01

    Even though a lot of research has gone into diagnosing misfire in IC engines, most approaches use torsional vibration of the crankshaft, and only a few use the rocking motion (roll) of the engine block. Additionally, misfire diagnosis normally requires an expert to interpret the analysis results from measured vibration signals. Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) are potential tools for the automated misfire diagnosis of IC engines, as they can learn the patterns corresponding to various faults. This paper proposes an ANN-based automated diagnostic system which combines torsional vibration and rotation of the block for more robust misfire diagnosis. A critical issue with ANN applications is the network training, and it is improbable and/or uneconomical to expect to experience a sufficient number of different faults, or generate them in seeded tests, to obtain sufficient experimental results for the network training. Therefore, new simulation models, which can simulate combustion faults in engines, were developed. The simulation models are based on the thermodynamic and mechanical principles of IC engines and therefore the proposed misfire diagnostic system can in principle be adapted for any engine. During the building process of the models, based on a particular engine, some mechanical and physical parameters, for example the inertial properties of the engine parts and parameters of engine mounts, were first measured and calculated. A series of experiments were then carried out to capture the vibration signals for both normal condition and with a range of faults. The simulation models were updated and evaluated by the experimental results. Following the signal processing of the experimental and simulation signals, the best features were selected as the inputs to ANN networks. The automated diagnostic system comprises three stages: misfire detection, misfire localization and severity identification. Multi-layer Perceptron (MLP) and Probabilistic Neural Networks were

  16. Self-excited multi-scale skin vibrations probed by optical tracking micro-motions of tracers on arms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wei-Chia; Chen, Hsiang-Ying; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Tian, Yong; I, Lin

    2017-07-01

    The self-excited multi-scale mechanical vibrations, their sources and their mutual coupling of different regions on the forearms of supine subjects, are experimentally investigated, using a simple noncontact method, optical video microscopy, which provides 1 μm and 25 ms spatiotemporal resolutions. It is found that, in proximal regions far from the radial artery, the vibrations are the global vibrations of the entire forearm excited by remote sources, propagating through the trunk and the limb. The spectrum is mainly composed of peaks of very low frequency motion (down to 0.05 Hz), low frequency respiration modes, and heartbeat induced modes (about 1 Hz and its harmonics), standing out of the spectrum floor exhibiting power law decay. The nonlinear mode-mode coupling leads to the cascaded modulations of higher frequency modes by lower frequency modes. The nearly identical waveforms without detectable phase delays for a pair of signals along or transverse to the meridian of regions far away from the artery rule out the detectable contribution from the propagation of Qi, some kind of collective excitation which more efficiently propagates along meridians, according to the Chinese medicine theory. Around the radial artery, in addition to the global vibration, the local vibration spectrum shows very slow breathing type vibration around 0.05 Hz, and the artery pulsation induced fundamental and higher harmonics with descending intensities up to the fifth harmonics, standing out of a flat spectrum floor. All the artery pulsation modes are also modulated by respiration and the very slow vibration.

  17. Vibration and acoustic noise emitted by dry-type air-core reactors under PWM voltage excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingsong; Wang, Shanming; Hong, Jianfeng; Yang, Zhanlu; Jiang, Shengqian; Xia, Shichong

    2018-05-01

    According to coupling way between the magnetic field and the structural order, structure mode is discussed by engaging finite element (FE) method and both natural frequency and modal shape for a dry-type air-core reactor (DAR) are obtained in this paper. On the basis of harmonic response analysis, electromagnetic force under PWM (Pulse Width Modulation) voltage excitation is mapped with the structure mesh, the vibration spectrum is gained and the consequences represents that the whole structure vibration predominates in the radial direction, with less axial vibration. Referring to the test standard of reactor noise, the rules of emitted noise of the DAR are measured and analyzed at chosen switching frequency matches the sample resonant frequency and the methods of active vibration and noise reduction are put forward. Finally, the low acoustic noise emission of a prototype DAR is verified by measurement.

  18. A 3D finite element model for the vibration analysis of asymmetric rotating machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prabel, B.; Combescure, D. [CEA Saclay, DEN, DM2S, SEMT, DYN, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette (France); Lazarus, A. [Ecole Polytech, Mecan Solides Lab, F-91128 Palaiseau (France)

    2010-07-01

    This paper suggests a 3D finite element method based on the modal theory in order to analyse linear periodically time-varying systems. Presentation of the method is given through the particular case of asymmetric rotating machines. First, Hill governing equations of asymmetric rotating oscillators with two degrees of freedom are investigated. These differential equations with periodic coefficients are solved with classic Floquet theory leading to parametric quasi-modes. These mathematical entities are found to have the same fundamental properties as classic Eigenmodes, but contain several harmonics possibly responsible for parametric instabilities. Extension to the vibration analysis (stability, frequency spectrum) of asymmetric rotating machines with multiple degrees of freedom is achieved with a fully 3D finite element model including stator and rotor coupling. Due to Hill expansion, the usual degrees of freedom are duplicated and associated with the relevant harmonic of the Floquet solutions in the frequency domain. Parametric quasi-modes as well as steady-state response of the whole system are ingeniously computed with a component-mode synthesis method. Finally, experimental investigations are performed on a test rig composed of an asymmetric rotor running on non-isotropic supports. Numerical and experimental results are compared to highlight the potential of the numerical method. (authors)

  19. Rotational excitation of HCN by para- and ortho-H{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, Mario Hernández, E-mail: marhvera@gmail.com [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France); InSTEC, Quinta de Los Molinos, Plaza, La Habana 10600 (Cuba); Kalugina, Yulia [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France); Tomsk State University, 36 Lenin av., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Denis-Alpizar, Otoniel [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Departamento de Física, Universidad de Matanzas, Matanzas 40100 (Cuba); Stoecklin, Thierry [Université de Bordeaux, ISM, CNRS UMR 5255, 33405 Talence Cedex (France); Lique, François, E-mail: francois.lique@univ-lehavre.fr [LOMC - UMR 6294, CNRS-Université du Havre, 25 rue Philippe Lebon, BP 1123, 76 063 Le Havre cedex (France)

    2014-06-14

    Rotational excitation of the hydrogen cyanide (HCN) molecule by collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0, 2) and ortho-H{sub 2}( j = 1) is investigated at low temperatures using a quantum time independent approach. Both molecules are treated as rigid rotors. The scattering calculations are based on a highly correlated ab initio 4-dimensional (4D) potential energy surface recently published. Rotationally inelastic cross sections among the 13 first rotational levels of HCN were obtained using a pure quantum close coupling approach for total energies up to 1200 cm{sup −1}. The corresponding thermal rate coefficients were computed for temperatures ranging from 5 to 100 K. The HCN rate coefficients are strongly dependent on the rotational level of the H{sub 2} molecule. In particular, the rate coefficients for collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) are significantly lower than those for collisions with ortho-H{sub 2}( j = 1) and para-H{sub 2}( j = 2). Propensity rules in favor of even Δj transitions were found for HCN in collisions with para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) whereas propensity rules in favor of odd Δj transitions were found for HCN in collisions with H{sub 2}( j ⩾ 1). The new rate coefficients were compared with previously published HCN-para-H{sub 2}( j = 0) rate coefficients. Significant differences were found due the inclusion of the H{sub 2} rotational structure in the scattering calculations. These new rate coefficients will be crucial to improve the estimation of the HCN abundance in the interstellar medium.

  20. Application of Time-Delay Absorber to Suppress Vibration of a Dynamical System to Tuned Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Ganaini, W A A; El-Gohary, H A

    2014-08-01

    In this work, we present a comprehensive investigation of the time delay absorber effects on the control of a dynamical system represented by a cantilever beam subjected to tuned excitation forces. Cantilever beam is one of the most widely used system in too many engineering applications, such as mechanical and civil engineering. The main aim of this work is to control the vibration of the beam at simultaneous internal and combined resonance condition, as it is the worst resonance case. Control is conducted via time delay absorber to suppress chaotic vibrations. Time delays often appear in many control systems in the state, in the control input, or in the measurements. Time delay commonly exists in various engineering, biological, and economical systems because of the finite speed of the information processing. It is a source of performance degradation and instability. Multiple time scale perturbation method is applied to obtain a first order approximation for the nonlinear differential equations describing the system behavior. The different resonance cases are reported and studied numerically. The stability of the steady-state solution at the selected worst resonance case is investigated applying Runge-Kutta fourth order method and frequency response equations via Matlab 7.0 and Maple11. Time delay absorber is effective, but within a specified range of time delay. It is the critical factor in selecting such absorber. Time delay absorber is better than the ordinary one as from the effectiveness point of view. The effects of the different absorber parameters on the system behavior and stability are studied numerically. A comparison with the available published work showed a close agreement with some previously published work.

  1. Calculation of Ground State Rotational Populations for Kinetic Gas Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules including Electron-Impact Excitation and Wall Collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farley, David R.

    2010-01-01

    A model has been developed to calculate the ground-state rotational populations of homonuclear diatomic molecules in kinetic gases, including the effects of electron-impact excitation, wall collisions, and gas feed rate. The equations are exact within the accuracy of the cross sections used and of the assumed equilibrating effect of wall collisions. It is found that the inflow of feed gas and equilibrating wall collisions can significantly affect the rotational distribution in competition with non-equilibrating electron-impact effects. The resulting steady-state rotational distributions are generally Boltzmann for N (ge) 3, with a rotational temperature between the wall and feed gas temperatures. The N = 0,1,2 rotational level populations depend sensitively on the relative rates of electron-impact excitation versus wall collision and gas feed rates.

  2. Image-based tracking system for vibration measurement of a rotating object using a laser scanning vibrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dongkyu, E-mail: akein@gist.ac.kr; Khalil, Hossam; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan, E-mail: khpark@gist.ac.kr [School of Mechatronics, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Buk-gu, Gwangju, South Korea, 500-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-28

    An image-based tracking system using laser scanning vibrometer is developed for vibration measurement of a rotating object. The proposed system unlike a conventional one can be used where the position or velocity sensor such as an encoder cannot be attached to an object. An image processing algorithm is introduced to detect a landmark and laser beam based on their colors. Then, through using feedback control system, the laser beam can track a rotating object.

  3. Analysis of nonlinear vibrations and stability of rotating asymmetrical nano-shafts incorporating surface energy effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodousi, Maryam; Shahgholi, Majid; Payganeh, Gholamhassan

    2018-03-01

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the nonlinear vibrations of the rotating asymmetrical nano-shafts by considering surface effect. In order to compute the surface stress tensor, the surface elasticity theory is used. The governing nonlinear equations of motion are obtained with the aid of variational approach. Bubnov-Galerkin is a very effective method for exploiting the reduced-order model of the equations of motion. The averaging method is employed to analyze the reduced-order model of the system. For this purpose, the well-known Van der Pol transformation in the complex form and angle-action transformation are utilized. The effect of surface stress on the forward and backward speeds, steady state responses of the system, fixed points, close orbits and stability of the solutions is examined. The preliminary results of the research show that the absolute values of forward and backward whirling speeds in the presence of surface effect with positive residual surface stress are higher than those of regarding the system without surface effect and in the presence of surface effect with negative residual surface stress. In addition, it is seen that the undamped rotating asymmetrical nano-shaft, for specified value of detuning parameter, in the absence or presence of surface effect has various number of stable and unstable periodic solutions. Besides, there is different number of separatrix (homoclinic orbit type). Furthermore, bifurcations, number of solutions and their stability for damped rotating asymmetrical nano-shaft are investigated. Also, the above results have been obtained for rotating symmetrical nano-shaft.

  4. FAULT DIAGNOSIS IN ROTATING MACHINE USING FULL SPECTRUM OF VIBRATION AND FUZZY LOGIC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ROGER R. DA SILVA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Industries are always looking for more efficient maintenance systems to minimize machine downtime and productivity liabilities. Among several approaches, artificial intelligence techniques have been increasingly applied to machine diagnosis. Current paper forwards the development of a system for the diagnosis of mechanical faults in the rotating structures of machines, based on fuzzy logic, using rules foregrounded on the full spectrum of the machine´s complex vibration signal. The diagnostic system was developed in Matlab and it was applied to a rotor test rig where different faults were introduced. Results showed that the diagnostic system based on full spectra and fuzzy logic is capable of identifying with precision different types of faults, which have similar half spectrum. The methodology has a great potential to be implemented in predictive maintenance programs in industries and may be expanded to include the identification of other types of faults not covered in the case study under analysis.

  5. Vibrational-rotational temperature measurement of N2 in the lower thermosphere by the rocket experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurihara, J.; Oyama, K.; Suzuki, K.; Iwagami, N.

    The vibrational temperature (Tv), the rotational temperature (Tr) and the density of atmospheric N2 between 100 - 150 km were measured in situ by a sounding rocket S310-30, over Kagoshima, Japan at 10:30 UT on February 6, 2002. The main purpose of this rocket experiment is to study the dynamics and the thermal energy budget in the lower thermosphere. N2 was ionized using an electron gun and the emission of the 1st negative bands of N2+ was measured by a sensitive spectrometer. Tv and Tr were determined by fitting the observed spectrum for the simulated spectrum, and the number density was deduced from the intensities of the spectrum. We will report preliminary results of our measurement and discuss the observed thermal structure that indicates the effect of tides and gravity waves.

  6. The Vibration Analysis of Tube Bundles Induced by Fluid Elastic Excitation in Shell Side of Heat Exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Minle; Wang, Lu; Li, Wenyao; Gao, Tianze

    2017-09-01

    Fluid elastic excitation in shell side of heat exchanger was deduced theoretically in this paper. Model foundation was completed by using Pro / Engineer software. The finite element model was constructed and imported into the FLUENT module. The flow field simulation adopted the dynamic mesh model, RNG k-ε model and no-slip boundary conditions. Analysing different positions vibration of tube bundles by selecting three regions in shell side of heat exchanger. The results show that heat exchanger tube bundles at the inlet of the shell side are more likely to be failure due to fluid induced vibration.

  7. IUPAC critical evaluation of the rotational-vibrational spectra of water vapor. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tennyson, Jonathan; Bernath, Peter F.; Brown, Linda R.; Campargue, Alain; Csaszar, Attila G.; Daumont, Ludovic; Gamache, Robert R.; Hodges, Joseph T.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Polyansky, Oleg L.; Rothman, Laurence S.; Toth, Robert A.; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Fally, Sophie; Fazliev, Alexander Z.; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Gordon, Iouli E.; Hu, Shui-Ming

    2010-01-01

    This is the second of a series of articles reporting critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions, transition intensities, pressure dependences, and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed assignments and uncertainties, for all the main isotopologues of water. This article presents energy levels and line positions of the following singly deuterated isotopologues of water: HD 16 O, HD 17 O, and HD 18 O. The MARVEL (measured active rotational-vibrational energy levels) procedure is used to determine the levels, the lines, and their self-consistent uncertainties for the spectral regions 0-22 708, 0-1674, and 0-12 105 cm -1 for HD 16 O, HD 17 O, and HD 18 O, respectively. For HD 16 O, 54 740 transitions were analyzed from 76 sources, the lines come from spectra recorded both at room temperature and from hot samples. These lines correspond to 36 690 distinct assignments and 8818 energy levels. For HD 17 O, only 485 transitions could be analyzed from three sources; the lines correspond to 162 MARVEL energy levels. For HD 18 O, 8729 transitions were analyzed from 11 sources and these lines correspond to 1864 energy levels. The energy levels are checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing exact kinetic energy operators. This comparison shows that the measured transitions account for about 86% of the anticipated absorbance of HD 16 O at 296 K and that the transitions predicted by the MARVEL energy levels account for essentially all the remaining absorbance. The extensive list of MARVEL lines and levels obtained are given in the Supplementary Material of this article, as well as in a distributed information system applied to water, W-DIS, where they can easily be retrieved. In addition, the transition and energy level information for H 2 17 O and H 2 18 O, given in the first paper of this series [Tennyson, et al. J Quant Spectr Rad Transfer 2009;110:573-96], has been updated.

  8. NRC sponsored rotating equipment vibration research: a program description and progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nitzel, M.E.

    1986-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is currently involved in a research project sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regarding operational vibration in rotating equipment. The object of this program is to assess the nature of vibrational failures and the effect that improved qualification standards may have in reducing the incidence of failure. In order to limit the scope of the initial effort, safety injection (SI) pumps were chosen as the component group for concentrated study. The task has been oriented to addressing the issues of whether certain SI pumps experience more failures than others, examining the dynamic environments in operation, examining the adequacy of current qualification standards, and examining what performance parameters could be used more efficiently to predict degradation or failure. Results of a literature search performed to survey SI pump failures indicate that failures are due to a diversity of causes, many of which may not be influenced by qualification criteria. Cooperative efforts have been undertaken with a limited number of nuclear utilities to describe the variety of possible operating environments and to analyze available data. The results of this analysis as they apply to the research issues are presented and possibilities for the future direction of the program are discussed

  9. Low-energy vibrational excitations in carbon nanotubes studied by heat capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasjaunias, J. C.; Biljakovic, K.; Monceau, P.; Sauvajol, J. L.

    2003-09-01

    We present low-temperature heat capacity measurements performed on two different kinds of single-walled carbon nanotube bundles which essentially differ in their mean number of tubes (NT) per bundle. For temperatures below a few kelvin, the vibrational heat capacity can be analysed as the sum of two contributions. The first one is a regular T3 phononic one, characteristic of the three-dimensional (3D) elastic character of the bundle for long-wavelength phonons. A crossover to a lower effective dimensionality appears at a few kelvin. From the 3D contribution, we estimate a mean sound velocity, and hence a mean shear modulus of the bundle. The difference in amplitude of the acoustic term and in the crossover temperature between the two samples is ascribed to the different bundle topology (i.e. NT). The second contribution, of similar amplitude in both kinds of samples, shows a peculiar power law Talpha variation (alpha < 1) indicative of localized excitations, very probably due to intrinsic structural defects of the nanotubes.

  10. Vibrational spectra and boson-like excitations in different amorphous forms of ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolesnikov, A.I.; Li, J.C.; Uffindell, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Glasses are very interesting objects in the physics of condensed matter, with many universal properties, such as low-energy excitations (LEE) coexisting with the sound waves and giving an excess of vibrational modes with respect to the crystalline spectrum (the so called 'boson' peak) in Raman and inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Recently it was discovered that films of hydrogenated amorphous silicon do not show such LEE, whereas films of amorphous silicon do [1]. Also, the resonant absorption by two-level systems was observed for the high-density amorphous (hda) ice but not for the low-density amorphous (lda) ice in the far infrared spectra [2]. Thus, the nature of these near universal LEE becomes rather puzzling. This report presents the results of INS studies for hda and lda ice produced by high-pressure treatment and for vapor-deposited lda ice. Clear LEE were observed in the spectra for hda and deposited lda ice unlike their crystalline analogues. (author)

  11. Magnetostrictive patch sensor system for battery-less real-time measurement of torsional vibrations of rotating shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun Kyu; Seung, Hong Min; Park, Chung Il; Lee, Joo Kyung; Lim, Do Hyeong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2018-02-01

    Real-time uninterrupted measurement for torsional vibrations of rotating shafts is crucial for permanent health monitoring. So far, strain gauge systems with telemetry units have been used for real-time monitoring. However, they have a critical disadvantage in that shaft operations must be stopped intermittently to replace telemetry unit batteries. To find an alternative method to carry out battery-less real-time measurement for torsional vibrations of rotating shafts, a magnetostrictive patch sensor system was proposed in the present study. Since the proposed sensor does not use any powered telemetry system, no battery is needed and thus there is no need to stop rotating shafts for battery replacement. The proposed sensor consists of magnetostrictive patches and small magnets tightly bonded onto a shaft. A solenoid coil is placed around the shaft to convert magnetostrictive patch deformation by shaft torsional vibration into electric voltage output. For sensor design and characterization, investigations were performed in a laboratory on relatively small-sized stationary solid shaft. A magnetostrictive patch sensor system was then designed and installed on a large rotating propulsion shaft of an LPG carrier ship in operation. Vibration signals were measured using the proposed sensor system and compared to those measured with a telemetry unit-equipped strain gauge system.

  12. ExoMol molecular line lists - XVII. The rotation-vibration spectrum of hot SO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Underwood, Daniel S.; Yurchenko, Sergei N.; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Sulphur trioxide (SO3) is a trace species in the atmospheres of the Earth and Venus, as well as being an industrial product and an environmental pollutant. A variational line list for 32S16O3, named UYT2, is presented containing 21 billion vibration-rotation transitions. UYT2 can be used to model...

  13. Asymptotically-correct description of vibration-rotation spectrum of diatomic molecule with hydrogen iodide molecule as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burenin, A.V.; Ryabikin, M.Yu.

    1990-01-01

    Asymptotically correct series of perturbation theory was constructed analytically to describe the vibration-rotational spectrum of diatomic molecule in Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The series was used for processing of precision experimental data on frequencies of absorption of hydrogen iodide molecule. Advantage of this approach over Dunham approach is shown. Isotope ratios for spectroscopic constants of asymptotically correct series are considered

  14. Free vibration analysis of a multiple rotating nano-beams system based on the Eringen nonlocal elasticity theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghafarian, M.; Ariaei, A., E-mail: ariaei@eng.ui.ac.ir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Isfahan, Isfahan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-07

    The free vibration analysis of a multiple rotating nanobeams' system applying the nonlocal Eringen elasticity theory is presented. Multiple nanobeams' systems are of great importance in nano-optomechanical applications. At nanoscale, the nonlocal effects become non-negligible. According to the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam theory, the governing partial differential equations are derived by incorporating the nonlocal scale effects. Assuming a structure of n parallel nanobeams, the vibration of the system is described by a coupled set of n partial differential equations. The method involves a change of variables to uncouple the equations and the differential transform method as an efficient mathematical technique to solve the nonlocal governing differential equations. Then a number of parametric studies are conducted to assess the effect of the nonlocal scaling parameter, rotational speed, boundary conditions, hub radius, and the stiffness coefficients of the elastic interlayer media on the vibration behavior of the coupled rotating multiple-carbon-nanotube-beam system. It is revealed that the bending vibration of the system is significantly influenced by the rotational speed, elastic mediums, and the nonlocal scaling parameters. This model is validated by comparing the results with those available in the literature. The natural frequencies are in a reasonably good agreement with the reported results.

  15. Vibrations of beams with a variable cross-section fixed on rotational rigid disks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slawomir Zolkiewski

    Full Text Available The work is focused on the problem of vibrating beams with a variable cross-section fixed on a rotational rigid disk. The beam is loaded by a transversal time varying force orthogonal to an axis of the beam and simultaneously parallel to the disk's plane. There are many ways of usage of the technical moveable systems composed of elements with the variable cross-sections. The main applications are used in numerous types of turbines and pumps. The paper is a kind of introduction to the dynamic analysis of above mentioned beam systems. The equations of motion of rotational beams fixed on the rigid disks were derived. After introducing the Coriolis forces and the centrifugal forces, the transportation effect in the mathematical model was considered. This particular project is the first stage research, where there were proposed certain solutions of problems connected with the linear variable cross-sections systems. The further investigation considering the nonlinear systems has been proceeding. The results, analysis and comparison will be presented in the future works.

  16. ANALYSIS OF VIBRATORY PROTECTION SYSTEM VIBRATION DURING HARMONIC AND POLYHARMONIC EXCITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Mikulik

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mathematical model of local «driver-seat» system and an algorithm for vibratory loading formation at external actions. Results of the investigations on the system vibration according to minimum vibration acceleration depending on transfer force factor acting on the seat and a vibration isolation factor are presented in the paper.

  17. Possible conservation of the K-quantum number in excited rotating nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracco, A.; Bosetti, P.; Leoni, S. [Universita di Milano (Italy)]|[INFN, Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The {gamma}-cascades feeding into low-K and high-K bands in the nucleus {sup 163}Er are investigated by analyzing variances and covariances of the spectrum fluctuations. The study of the covariance between pairs of gated spectra reveals that the cascades feeding into the low-K bands are completely different from those feeding the high-K bands. In addition, the number of decay paths obtained analyzing the ridge and the valley in spectra gated by high-K transitions is different than that deduced from the total spectrum. This result is well reproduced with microscopic calculations of strongly interacting bands. It is concluded that the K-selection rules are effective for the excited rotational bands within the angular momentum region probed by the experiment, 30{Dirac_h} {le} I {le} 40{Dirac_h}.

  18. Inelastic neutron excitation of the ground state rotational band of 238U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guenther, P.; Smith, A.

    1975-01-01

    Cross sections for the neutron excitation of the 2+(45 keV), 4+(148 keV) and 6+(308 keV) states in 238 U were measured to incident energies of approximately 3.0 MeV. The experimental resolution was sufficient to resolve these components throughout the measured energy range. Particular attention was given to energies near threshold and in the few MeV range where direct reaction contributions were appreciable. The experimental results were compared with theoretical estimates based upon statistical and coupled-channel models deduced from comprehensive studies of neutron scattering from heavy-rotational-deformed nuclei. An evaluated inelastic scattering data set was derived from the present experimental and calculational results and previously reported experimental values and compared with respective values from the ENDF-IV file. 4 figures

  19. Design and experimental investigation of a magnetically coupled vibration energy harvester using two inverted piezoelectric cantilever beams for rotational motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Hong-Xiang; Zhang, Wen-ming; Li, Wen-Bo; Wei, Ke-Xiang; Gao, Qiu-Hua; Peng, Zhi-Ke; Meng, Guang

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom harvester for rotation is proposed. • The electromechanical coupling model is developed and validated experimentally. • The harvester can generate high voltage at low rotating speeds. • The harvester can harvest vibration energy in multiple frequency bands. - Abstract: Energy can be harvested from rotational motion for powering wireless autonomous electronic devices. The paper presents a magnetically coupled two-degree-of-freedom vibration energy harvester for rotary motion applications. The design consists of two inverted piezoelectric cantilever beams whose free ends point to the rotating shaft. The centrifugal force of the inverted cantilever beam is beneficial to producing large amplitude in a low speed range. The electromechanical coupling dynamical model is developed by the energy method from Hamilton’s principle and validated experimentally. The experimental results indicate that the presented harvester is suitable for low speed rotation and can harvest vibration energy in multiple frequency bands. The first and second resonant behaviors of voltage can be obtained at 420 r/min and 550 r/min, and the average output powers are 564 μW and 535.3 μW, respectively.

  20. Angular momentum from CMIP5 climate change simulations, as related to Earth rotation excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salstein, D.; Quinn, K.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric angular momentum parameters are calculated from revised scenarios of greenhouse gas concentration in use in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, phase 5, which investigates expected climate change. This phase includes new estimates for the so-called Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP), designed to simulate more realistically the future path of emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases throughout the 21st century. From time series of atmosphere-ocean models that adopt these parameters, we calculate the impact on the excitations for length of day and polar motion through the course of the current century, and hence portions of the expected changes in the ERP's due to the atmosphere. We diagnose the most important geographic areas as regional sources of such variations; earlier such models revealed the particular importance of resulting relevant wind changes in the upper atmosphere of the middle latitudes and the southern hemisphere high latitudes. The spread among the RCP scenarios and among a number of different models gives us an understanding of possible uncertainties in the estimates. Earlier calculations were for the 20th and 21st centuries with less sophisticated greenhouse gas concentration scenarios. We can compare the Earth rotation excitations from the retrospective portions of the model-based estimates with atmospheric reanalyses that are in archives at the IERS Special Bureau for the Atmosphere.

  1. Rotational Excitation of Aluminium Monofluoride (AlF) by He Atom at Low Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owono Owono, L.C.; Gotoum, N.; Nkem, C.; Hammami, K.; Jaidane, N.

    2010-05-01

    We report on the calculation of collision induced rotational excitation cross sections and rate coefficients of AlF by He atom at low temperature. These quantities were obtained by first computing the interaction potential energy surface (PES) of the AlF(X 1 Σ + )-He( 1 S) van der Waals complex at the ab initio Coupled Cluster with Single and Double and perturbative Triple excitations [CCSD(T)] level of theory. The aug-cc-pVQZ guassian basis, to which was added a set of bond functions, was used for that purpose. The calculations account for basis set superposition errors (BSSE). The interaction potential presents a minimum of ∼24 cm -1 below the AlF-He dissociation limit. The PES was fitted on a basis of Legendre polynomial functions to allow for the calculation of cross sections in the close-coupling (CC) approach. By averaging these cross sections over a Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution, rate coefficients were inferred at low temperatures (T ≤ 300 K). From our computations, a propensity towards ΔJ = 1 transitions is observed. (author)

  2. Dissociation pathways of a single dimethyl disulfide on Cu(111): Reaction induced by simultaneous excitation of two vibrational modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motobayashi, Kenta, E-mail: kmotobayashi@cat.hokudai.ac.jp [Catalysis Research Center, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan); Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Kim, Yousoo [Surface and Interface Science Laboratory, RIKEN, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Arafune, Ryuichi [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba 305-0044 (Japan); Ohara, Michiaki; Ueba, Hiromu; Kawai, Maki, E-mail: maki@k.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Advanced Materials Science, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561 (Japan)

    2014-05-21

    We present a novel reaction mechanism for a single adsorbed molecule that proceeds via simultaneous excitation of two different vibrational modes excited by inelastic tunneling electrons from a scanning tunneling microscope. Specifically, we analyze the dissociation of a single dimethyl disulfide (DMDS, (CH{sub 3}S){sub 2}) molecule on Cu(111) by using a versatile theoretical method, which permits us to simulate reaction rates as a function of sample bias voltage. The reaction is induced by the excitation of C-H stretch and S-S stretch modes by a two-electron process at low positive bias voltages. However, at increased voltages, the dissociation becomes a single-electron process that excites a combination mode of these stretches, where excitation of the C-H stretch is the energy source and excitation of the S-S stretch mode enhances the anharmonic coupling rate. A much smaller dissociation yield (few orders of magnitude) at negative bias voltages is understood in terms of the projected density of states of a single DMDS on Cu(111), which reflects resonant excitation through the molecular orbitals.

  3. Rotational excitation of methylidynium (CH+) by helium atom at low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owono Owono, L.C.; Hammami, K.; Jaidane, N.; Ben Lakhdar, Z.

    1997-12-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) potential energy surface (PES) for the CH + (X 1 Σ + )-He( 1 S) system is calculated at the Coupled Cluster with Single and Double and perturbative Triple excitations (CCSD(T)) level of theory with the augmented correlation consistent valence quadruple zeta (aVQZ) gaussian basis set for a fixed value of the CH + bond length ($2.1371 bohr). Our computations account for basis set superposition errors (BSSE). Bond functions, which have been proven very efficient in reproducing the intersystem correlation interaction energy are placed at mid-distance between the CH + center of mass and He. The PES is found to have a minimum of about 537 cm -1 below the CH + He dissociation limit. This well depth is enough to give rise to a cluster-like, bound structure with a considerable number of rotational levels in the electronic ground state. The PES is fitted on a basis of Legendre polynomials functions. This allows to perform the calculation of state to state rotational integral cross sections of the CH + collision with He in the close-coupling (CC) approach. By averaging the cross sections over a Maxwell-Boltzmann velocity distribution, collisional rates are computed at low temperature (T ≤ 200 K). It is shown that there is, except for energies E -1 , a propensity towards ΔJ even parity transitions. The present study may be of great practical interest for astrophysical observations and laboratory experiments. (author)

  4. Vibration Pattern Related to Transverse Cracks in Rotors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolò Bachschmid

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A method for calculating the breathing behavior of transverse cracks of different types in rotating shafts is described. Thermal effects are included. Some results in terms of vibration excitation related to different shapes of cracks are presented.

  5. The recruiter's excitement--features of thoracic vibrations during the honey bee's waggle dance related to food source profitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrncir, Michael; Maia-Silva, Camila; Mc Cabe, Sofia I; Farina, Walter M

    2011-12-01

    The honey bee's waggle dance constitutes a remarkable example of an efficient code allowing social exploitation of available feeding sites. In addition to indicating the position (distance, direction) of a food patch, both the occurrence and frequency of the dances depend on the profitability of the exploited resource (sugar concentration, solution flow rate). During the waggle dance, successful foragers generate pulsed thoracic vibrations that putatively serve as a source of different kinds of information for hive bees, who cannot visually decode dances in the darkness of the hive. In the present study, we asked whether these vibrations are a reliable estimator of the excitement of the dancer when food profitability changes in terms of both sugar concentration and solution flow rate. The probability of producing thoracic vibrations as well as several features related to their intensity during the waggle phase (pulse duration, velocity amplitude, duty cycle) increased with both these profitability variables. The number of vibratory pulses, however, was independent of sugar concentration and reward rate exploited. Thus, pulse number could indeed be used by dance followers as reliable information about food source distance, as suggested in previous studies. The variability of the dancer's thoracic vibrations in relation to changes in food profitability suggests their role as an indicator of the recruiter's motivational state. Hence, the vibrations could make an important contribution to forager reactivation and, consequently, to the organisation of collective foraging processes in honey bees.

  6. Highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules in low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas detected by high sensitivity ultra-broad-band optical absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Carbone, Emile; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-08-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2 (at pressures of 5-80 mTorr and radiofrequency power up to 500 W) were studied by optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range 200-450 nm, showing the presence of highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules (up to vʺ = 18) by Schumann-Runge band absorption. Analysis of the relative band intensities indicates a vibrational temperature up to 10,000 K, but these hot molecules only represent a fraction of the total O2 density. By analysing the (11-0) band at higher spectral resolution the O2 rotational temperature was also determined, and was found to increase with both pressure and power, reaching 900 K at 80 mTorr 500 W. These measurements were achieved using a new high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup, based on a laser-plasma light source, achromatic optics and an aberration-corrected spectrograph. This setup allows the measurement of weak broadband absorbances due to a baseline variability lower than 2   ×   10-5 across a spectral range of 250 nm.

  7. Coulomb excitation of rotational states in the 162Dy nucleus in the framework of the generalized semiclassical approximation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bolotin, Yu.L.; Gonchar, V.Yu.; Chekanov, N.A.

    1985-01-01

    Coulomb excitation of rotational states induced in heavyion collisions is treated in the framework of the generalized semiclassical approximation. The Hamiltonian of the system under consideration involves not only Coulomb forces (monopole, quadrupole, and hexadecapole) but as well a real nuclear potential in the form of the deformed Woods-Saxon potential. Strong dependence of the excitation probability on the interference between the Coulomb and nuclear interactions is shown. Calculations are carried out for the reaction 40 Ar+ 162 Dy at E=148.6 MeV. The calculated Coulomb excitation probabilities agree satisfactory with the corresponding experimental values

  8. Dissociative electron attachment to vibrationally excited H2 molecules involving the 2Σg+ resonant Rydberg electronic state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Celiberto, R.; Janev, R.K.; Wadehra, J.M.; Tennyson, J.

    2012-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections as a function of the incident electron energy and for the initial vibration levels v i = 0–5, 10 of the H 2 molecule. Highlights: ► We calculated electron–hydrogen dissociative attachment cross sections and rates coefficients. ► Collision processes occurring through a resonant Rydberg state are considered. ► Cross sections and rates were obtained for vibrationally excited hydrogen molecules. ► The cross sections exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. ► A comparison with the process involving the electron–hydrogen resonant ground state is discussed. - Abstract: Dissociative electron attachment cross sections (DEA) on vibrationally excited H 2 molecule taking place via the 2 Σ g + Rydberg-excited resonant state are studied using the local complex potential (LCP) model for resonant collisions. The cross sections are calculated for all initial vibrational levels (v i = 0–14) of the neutral molecule. In contrast to the previously noted dramatic increase in the DEA cross sections with increasing v i , when the process proceeds via the X 2 Σ u + shape resonance of H 2 , for the 2 Σ g + Rydberg resonance the cross sections increase only gradually up to v i = 3 and then decrease. Moreover, the cross sections for v i ⩾ 6 exhibit pronounced oscillatory structures. A discussion of the origin of the observed behavior of calculated cross sections is given. The DEA rate coefficients for all v i levels are also calculated in the 0.5–1000 eV temperature range.

  9. Rotational and vibrational spectra of ethynol from quantum-mechanical calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defrees, D. J.; Mclean, A. D.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that ethynol (HCCOH), despite the theoretical prediction of its stability to tautomerization to ketene, has thus far not been observed. It is shown here that the identification of this unknown molecule, both in space and in the laboratory, can be aided by an ab initio calculation of spectroscopic parameters. At the HF/3-21G level, harmonic vibrational frequencies are computed by way of analytic second differentiation of the Hartee-Fock (HF) energy with respect to the nuclear coordinates. After applying an empirical scale factor, the resultant frequencies are (per cm) 473, 517, 773, 841, 1003, 1217, 2206, 3285, and 3418. The computed dipole moment at the CISD/DZ+P level is 1.79 D. At the CISD+Q/DZ+P level, the molecule's rotational constants are determined. After scaling by empirical correction factors, they are used in deriving the 4(04) - 3(03) frequency of 76.81 + or - 0.3 GHz with a triplet splitting of 0.30 + or - 0.01 GHz. The triplet splitting involves 4(14) - 3(13) and 4(13) - 3(12) relative to the 4(04) - 3(03) transition as the central line.

  10. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi; Kanazawa, Chikara; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2009-02-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N2 are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  11. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi [Graduate Student, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan); Kanazawa, Chikara [Undergraduate, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 63-8522 (Japan); Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo, E-mail: maeno@faculty.chiba-u.j [Graduate School of Engineering, Chiba University 1-33 Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, 263-8522 (Japan)

    2009-02-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N{sub 2} are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  12. Nonlinear CARS measurement of nitrogen vibrational and rotational temperatures behind hypervelocity strong shock wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Takashi; Endo, Youichi; Kanazawa, Chikara; Ota, Masanori; Maeno, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    The hypervelocity strong shock waves are generated, when the space vehicles reenter the atmosphere from space. Behind the shock wave radiative and non-equilibrium flow is generated in front of the surface of the space vehicle. Many studies have been reported to investigate the phenomena for the aerospace exploit and reentry. The research information and data on the high temperature flows have been available to the rational heatproof design of the space vehicles. Recent development of measurement techniques with laser systems and photo-electronics now enables us to investigate the hypervelocity phenomena with greatly advanced accuracy. In this research strong shock waves are generated in low-density gas to simulate the reentry range gas flow with a free-piston double-diaphragm shock tube, and CARS (Coherent Anti-stokes Raman Spectroscopy) measurement method is applied to the hypervelocity flows behind the shock waves, where spectral signals of high space/time resolution are acquired. The CARS system consists of YAG and dye lasers, a spectroscope, and a CCD camera system. We obtain the CARS signal spectrum data by this special time-resolving experiment, and the vibrational and rotational temperatures of N 2 are determined by fitting between the experimental spectroscopic profile data and theoretically estimated spectroscopic data.

  13. The role of vibrationally excited nitrogen and oxygen in the ionosphere over Millstone Hill during 16-23 March, 1990

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a comparison of the observed behavior of the F region ionosphere over Millstone Hill during the geomagnetically quiet and storm period on 16-23 March, 1990, with numerical model calculations from the time-dependent mathematical model of the Earth's ionosphere and plasmasphere. The effects of vibrationally excited N2(v and O2(v on the electron density and temperature are studied using the N2(v and O2(v Boltzmann and non-Boltzmann distribution assumptions. The deviations from the Boltzmann distribution for the first five vibrational levels of N2(v and O2(v were calculated. The present study suggests that these deviations are not significant at vibrational levels v = 1 and 2, and the calculated distributions of N2(v and O2(v are highly non-Boltzmann at vibrational levels v > 2. The N2(v and O2(v non-Boltzmann distribution assumption leads to the decrease of the calculated daytime NmF2 up to a factor of 1.44 (maximum value in comparison with the N2(v and O2(v Boltzmann distribution assumption. The resulting effects of N2(v > 0 and O2(v > 0 on the NmF2 is the decrease of the calculated daytime NmF2 up to a factor of 2.8 (maximum value for Boltzmann populations of N2(v and O2(v and up to a factor of 3.5 (maximum value for non-Boltzmann populations of N2(v and O2(v . This decrease in electron density results in the increase of the calculated daytime electron temperature up to about 1040-1410 K (maximum value at the F2 peak altitude giving closer agreement between the measured and modeled electron temperatures. Both the daytime and nighttime densities are not reproduced by the model without N2(v > 0 and O2(v > 0 , and inclusion of vibrationally excited N2 and O2 brings the model and data into better agreement. The effects of vibrationally excited O2 and N2 on the electron density and temperature are most pronounced during daytime.Key words: Ionosphere (ion chemistry and composition; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions; ionospheric disturbances

  14. Micro-vibration response of a stochastically excited sandwich beam with a magnetorheological elastomer core and mass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ying, Z G; Ni, Y Q

    2009-01-01

    Magnetorheological (MR) elastomers are used to construct a smart sandwich beam for micro-vibration control. The micro-vibration response of a clamped–free sandwich beam with an MR elastomer core and a supplemental mass under stochastic support micro-motion excitation is studied. The dynamic behavior of MR elastomer as a smart viscoelastic material is described by a complex modulus which is controllable by external magnetic field. The sixth-order partial differential equation of motion of the sandwich beam is derived from the dynamic equilibrium, constitutive and geometric relations. A frequency-domain solution method for the stochastic micro-vibration response of the sandwich beam is developed by using the frequency-response function, power spectral density function and spatial eigensolution. The root-mean-square velocity response in terms of the one-third octave frequency band is calculated, and then the response reduction capacity through optimizing the complex modulus of the core is analyzed. Numerical results illustrate the influences of the MR elastomer core parameters on the root-mean-square velocity response and the high response reduction capacity of the sandwich beam. The developed analysis method is applicable to sandwich beams with arbitrary cores described by complex shear moduli under arbitrary stochastic excitations described by power spectral density functions

  15. A Computer Assisted Procedure of Assignments of Vibration-Rotation Bands of Asymmetric and Symmetric Top Molecules

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Urban, Štěpán; Behrend, J.; Pracna, Petr

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 690, - (2004), s. 105-114 ISSN 0022-2860 R&D Projects: GA MŠk ME 445; GA ČR GA203/01/1274 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : assigments of vibration-rotation spectra * combination differences * Loomis-Wood algorithm Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.200, year: 2004

  16. A Strategy for Magnifying Vibration in High-Energy Orbits of a Bistable Oscillator at Low Excitation Levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Guang-Qing; Liao Wei-Hsin

    2015-01-01

    This work focuses on how to maintain a high-energy orbit motion of a bistable oscillator when subjected to a low level excitation. An elastic magnifier (EM) positioned between the base and the bistable oscillator is used to magnify the base vibration displacement to significantly enhance the output characteristics of the bistable oscillator. The dimensionless electromechanical equations of the bistable oscillator with an EM are derived, and the effects of the mass and stiffness ratios between the EM and the bistable oscillator on the output displacement are studied. It is shown that the jump phenomenon occurs at a lower excitation level with increasing the mass and stiffness ratios. With the comparison of the displacement trajectories and the phase portraits obtained from experiments, it is validated that the bistable oscillator with an EM can effectively oscillate in a high-energy orbit and can generate a superior output vibration at a low excitation level as compared with the bistable oscillator without an EM. (paper)

  17. Phase transitions in solid Kr-CH4 solutions and rotational excitations in phase II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagatskii, M.I.; Mashchenko, D.A.; Dudkin, V.V.

    2007-01-01

    The heat capacity C p of solid Kr-n CH 4 solutions with the CH 4 concentrations n=0.82, 0.86, 0.90 as well as solutions with n=0.90, 0.95 doped with 0.002 O 2 impurity has been investigated under equilibrium vapor pressure over the internal 1-24 K. The (T,n)-phase diagram was refined and the region of two-phase states was determined for Kr-n CH 4 solid solutions. The contribution of the rotational subsystem, C r ot, to the heat capacity of the solutions has been separated. Analysis of C r ot(T) at T 1 and E 2 between the tunnel levels of the A-, T- and A-, E--nuclear-spin species of CH 4 molecules in the orientationally ordered subsystem, and to determine the effective energy gaps E 1 between lowest levels of the A- and T- species. The relations τ(n) and E 1 (n) stem from changes of the effective potential field caused as the replacement of CH 4 molecules by Kr atoms at sites of the ordered sublattices. The effective gaps E L between a group of tunnel levels of the ground-state liberation state and the nearest group of excited levels of the liberation state of the ordered CH 4 molecules in the solutions with n=0.90 (E L =52 K) and 0.95 (E L =55 K) has been estimated

  18. Application of Piezofilms for Excitation and Active Damping of Blade Flexural Vibration

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pešek, Luděk; Půst, Ladislav; Bula, Vítězslav; Cibulka, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 40, č. 1 (2015), s. 59-69 ISSN 0137-5075 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : vibration suppression * parametric antiresonance * active damping * PVDF films Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.661, year: 2015

  19. Observing pure effects of counter-rotating terms without ultrastrong coupling: A single photon can simultaneously excite two qubits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Miranowicz, Adam; Li, Hong-Rong; Nori, Franco

    2017-12-01

    The coherent process that a single photon simultaneously excites two qubits has recently been theoretically predicted by Garziano et al. [L. Garziano, V. Macrì, R. Stassi, O. Di Stefano, F. Nori, and S. Savasta, One Photon Can Simultaneously Excite two or More Atoms, Phys. Rev. Lett. 117, 043601 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.117.043601]. We propose a different approach to observe a similar dynamical process based on a superconducting quantum circuit, where two coupled flux qubits longitudinally interact with the same resonator. We show that this simultaneous excitation of two qubits (assuming that the sum of their transition frequencies is close to the cavity frequency) is related to the counter-rotating terms in the dipole-dipole coupling between two qubits, and the standard rotating-wave approximation is not valid here. By numerically simulating the adiabatic Landau-Zener transition and Rabi-oscillation effects, we clearly verify that the energy of a single photon can excite two qubits via higher-order transitions induced by the longitudinal couplings and the counter-rotating terms. Compared with previous studies, the coherent dynamics in our system only involves one intermediate state and, thus, exhibits a much faster rate. We also find transition paths which can interfere. Finally, by discussing how to control the two longitudinal-coupling strengths, we find a method to observe both constructive and destructive interference phenomena in our system.

  20. Impulsive IR-multiphoton dissociation of acrolein: observation of non-statistical product vibrational excitation in CO ( v=1-12) by time resolved IR fluorescence spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, P. K.

    2000-10-01

    On IR-multiphoton excitation, vibrationally highly excited acrolein molecules undergo concerted dissociation generating CO and ethylene. The vibrationally excited products, CO and ethylene, are detected immediately following the CO 2 laser pulse by observing IR fluorescence at 4.7 and 3.2 μm, respectively. The nascent CO is formed with significant vibrational excitation, with a Boltzmann population distribution for v=1-12 levels corresponding to T v=12 950±50 K. The average vibrational energy in the product CO is found to be 26 kcal mol -1, in contrast to its statistical share of 5 kcal mol -1, available from the product energy distribution. The nascent vibrationally excited ethylene either dissociates by absorbing further infrared laser photons from the tail of the CO 2 laser pulse or relaxes by collisional deactivation. Ethylene IR-fluorescence excitation spectrum showed a structure in the quasi-continuum, with a facile resonance at 10.53 μm corresponding to the 10P(14) CO 2 laser line, which explains the higher acetylene yield observed at a higher pressure. A hydrogen atom transfer mechanism followed by C-C impulsive break in the acrolein transition state may be responsible for such non-statistical product energy distribution.

  1. Femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy as a tool to detect molecular vibrations in ground and excited electronic states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelin, Maxim F.; Domcke, Wolfgang [Department of Chemistry, Technische Universität München, D-85747 Garching (Germany); Rao, B. Jayachander [Departamento de Química and Centro de Química, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-535 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2016-05-14

    We give a detailed theoretical analysis of the simplest variant of femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy, where a picosecond Raman pump pulse and a femtosecond Raman probe pulse are applied resonantly to a chromophore in thermal equilibrium in the ground electronic state. We demonstrate that this technique is capable of the detection of dephasing-free Raman-like lines revealing vibrational modes not only in the electronic ground state but also in the excited electronic state of the chromophore. The analytical results obtained with simplifying assumptions for the shape of the laser pulses are substantiated by numerical simulations with realistic laser pulses, employing the equation-of-motion phase-matching approach.

  2. Observation of Electronic Excitation Transfer Through Light Harvesting Complex II Using Two-Dimensional Electronic-Vibrational Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, NHC; Gruenke, NL; Oliver, TAA; Ballottari, M; Bassi, R; Fleming, GR

    2016-10-05

    Light-harvesting complex II (LHCII) serves a central role in light harvesting for oxygenic photosynthesis and is arguably the most important photosynthetic antenna complex. In this article, we present two-dimensional electronic–vibrational (2DEV) spectra of LHCII isolated from spinach, demonstrating the possibility of using this technique to track the transfer of electronic excitation energy between specific pigments within the complex. We assign the spectral bands via comparison with the 2DEV spectra of the isolated chromophores, chlorophyll a and b, and present evidence that excitation energy between the pigments of the complex are observed in these spectra. Lastly, we analyze the essential components of the 2DEV spectra using singular value decomposition, which makes it possible to reveal the relaxation pathways within this complex.

  3. Vibrational spectroscopy of the electronically excited state. 4. Nanosecond and picosecond time-resolved resonance Raman spectroscopy of carotenoid excited states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dallinger, R.F.; Farquharson, S.; Woodruff, W.H.; Rodgers, M.A.J.

    1981-01-01

    Resonance Raman and electronic absorption spectra are reported for the S 0 and T 1 states of the carotenoids β-carotene, zeaxanthin, echinenone, canthaxanthin, dihydroxylycopene, astaxanthin, decapreno(C 50 )-β-carotene, β-apo-8'-carotenal, and ethyl β-apo-8'-carotenoate. The results reveal qualitatively similar ground-state spectra and similar frequency shifts in all observed resonance Raman modes between S 0 and T 1 , regardless of carotenoid structure. Examinations of the relationship of the putative C--C and C==C frequencies in S 0 and T 1 reveals anomalous shifts to lower frequency in the ''single-bond'' mode upon electronic excitation. These shifts may be due to molecular distortions in the excited state which force changes in molecular motions comprising the observed modes. However, another possibility requiring no distortion is that the interaction (off-diagonal) force constants connecting the C--C and C==C modes change sign upon electronic excitation. This latter phenomenon may provide a unitary explanation for the ''anomalous'' frequency shifts in the C--C and C==C modes, both in the T 1 states of carotenoids and in the S 1 states of simpler polyenes, without postulating large, unpredicted structural changes upon excitation or general errors in existing vibrational or theoretical analyses. Resonance Raman and absorbance studies with 35-ps time resolution suggest that S 1 lifetime (of the 1 B/sub u/ and/or the 1 A/sub g/* states) of β-carotene in benzene is less than 1 ps

  4. A novel vibration-based fault diagnostic algorithm for gearboxes under speed fluctuations without rotational speed measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Liu; Qu, Yongzhi; Dhupia, Jaspreet Singh; Sheng, Shuangwen; Tan, Yuegang; Zhou, Zude

    2017-09-01

    The localized failures of gears introduce cyclic-transient impulses in the measured gearbox vibration signals. These impulses are usually identified from the sidebands around gear-mesh harmonics through the spectral analysis of cyclo-stationary signals. However, in practice, several high-powered applications of gearboxes like wind turbines are intrinsically characterized by nonstationary processes that blur the measured vibration spectra of a gearbox and deteriorate the efficacy of spectral diagnostic methods. Although order-tracking techniques have been proposed to improve the performance of spectral diagnosis for nonstationary signals measured in such applications, the required hardware for the measurement of rotational speed of these machines is often unavailable in industrial settings. Moreover, existing tacho-less order-tracking approaches are usually limited by the high time-frequency resolution requirement, which is a prerequisite for the precise estimation of the instantaneous frequency. To address such issues, a novel fault-signature enhancement algorithm is proposed that can alleviate the spectral smearing without the need of rotational speed measurement. This proposed tacho-less diagnostic technique resamples the measured acceleration signal of the gearbox based on the optimal warping path evaluated from the fast dynamic time-warping algorithm, which aligns a filtered shaft rotational harmonic signal with respect to a reference signal assuming a constant shaft rotational speed estimated from the approximation of operational speed. The effectiveness of this method is validated using both simulated signals from a fixed-axis gear pair under nonstationary conditions and experimental measurements from a 750-kW planetary wind turbine gearbox on a dynamometer test rig. The results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can identify fault information from typical gearbox vibration measurements carried out in a resource-constrained industrial environment.

  5. Electron energy distribution functions and thermalization times in methane and in argon--methane mixtures: An effect of vibrational excitation processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krajcar-Bronic, I.; Kimura, M.

    1995-01-01

    Electron thermalization in methane and argon--methane mixtures is studied by using the Boltzmann equation. The presence of low-lying vibrational excited states in methane significantly changes electron energy distribution functions and relaxation times. We found that (i) the mean electron energy just below the first vibrational excited state is reached faster by 1000 times when the vibrational states are taken into account, and (ii) electron energy distribution functions have distinct peaks at energy intervals equal to the vibrational threshold energies. Both these effects are due to large vibrational stopping cross section. The thermalization time in mixtures of argon--methane (without vibrational states) smoothly changes as the mixture composition varies, and no significant difference in the electron energy distribution function is observed. When the vibrational excited states are taken into account, thermalization is almost completely defined by CH 4 , even at very low fractional concentrations of CH 4 . The sensitivity of the electron energy distribution functions on the momentum transfer cross sections used in calculation on the thermalization is discussed. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  6. Nonlinear vibrations of thin arbitrarily laminated composite plates subjected to harmonic excitations using DKT elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, C. K.; Xue, David Y.; Mei, Chuh

    1993-04-01

    A finite element formulation is presented for determining the large-amplitude free and steady-state forced vibration response of arbitrarily laminated anisotropic composite thin plates using the Discrete Kirchhoff Theory (DKT) triangular elements. The nonlinear stiffness and harmonic force matrices of an arbitrarily laminated composite triangular plate element are developed for nonlinear free and forced vibration analyses. The linearized updated-mode method with nonlinear time function approximation is employed for the solution of the system nonlinear eigenvalue equations. The amplitude-frequency relations for convergence with gridwork refinement, triangular plates, different boundary conditions, lamination angles, number of plies, and uniform versus concentrated loads are presented.

  7. Sensibility to Changes of Vibrational Modes of Excited Electron: Sum Frequency Signals Versus Difference Frequency Signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Anna; Liang Xianting

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate a two electronic level system with vibrational modes coupled to a Brownian oscillator bath. The difference frequency generation (DFG) signals and sum frequency generation (SFG) signals are calculated. It is shown that, for the same model, the SFG signals are more sensitive than the DFG signals to the changes of the vibrational modes of the electronic two-level system. Because the SFG conversion efficiency can be improved by using the time-delay method, the findings in this paper predict that the SFG spectrum may probe the changes of the microstructure more effectively. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  8. Condition monitoring of PARR-1 rotating machines by vibration analysis technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qadir Javed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Vibration analysis is a key tool for preventive maintenance involving the trending and analysis of machinery performance parameters to detect and identify developing problems before failure and extensive damage can occur. A lab-based experimental setup has been established for obtaining fault-free and fault condition data. After this analysis, primary and secondary motor and pump vibration data of the Pakistan Research Reactor-1 were obtained and analyzed. Vibration signatures were acquired in horizontal, vertical, and axial directions. The 48 vibration signatures have been analyzed to assess the operational status of motors and pumps. The vibration spectrum has been recorded for a 2000 Hz frequency span with a 3200 lines resolution. The data collected should be helpful in future Pakistan Research Reactor-1 condition monitoring.

  9. Vibration Feature Extraction and Analysis for Fault Diagnosis of Rotating Machinery-A Literature Survey

    OpenAIRE

    Saleem Riaz; Hassan Elahi; Kashif Javaid; Tufail Shahzad

    2017-01-01

    Safety, reliability, efficiency and performance of rotating machinery in all industrial applications are the main concerns. Rotating machines are widely used in various industrial applications. Condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rotating machinery faults are very important and often complex and labor-intensive. Feature extraction techniques play a vital role for a reliable, effective and efficient feature extraction for the diagnosis of rotating machinery. Therefore, deve...

  10. MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF SELF-EXCITED VIBRATION OF PIPES CONTAINING MOBILE BOILING FLUID CLOTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy Tolbatov

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling dynamic behavior of a pipe containing inner nonhomogeneous flows of a boiling fluid has been carried out. The system vibrations at different values of the parameters of the flow nonhomogeneity and its velocity are observed. The possibility of forming stable and unstable flows depending on the character ofnonhomogeneity and the velocity of fluid clots has been found.

  11. DETERMINING THE RESPONSE IN CASE OF VIBRATIONS OF STRAIGHT BARS WITH RANDOM EXCITATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica BALDEA

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available By applying the finite element calculus to the study of bar vibrations, one obtains a system of linear diferential equations. One carries out the determination of the response to random stimulations by calculating the statistical terms as a function of the statistical terms of the stimulation

  12. Automatic vibration mode selection and excitation; combining modal filtering with autoresonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Solomon; Bucher, Izhak

    2018-02-01

    Autoresonance is a well-known nonlinear feedback method used for automatically exciting a system at its natural frequency. Though highly effective in exciting single degree of freedom systems, in its simplest form it lacks a mechanism for choosing the mode of excitation when more than one is present. In this case a single mode will be automatically excited, but this mode cannot be chosen or changed. In this paper a new method for automatically exciting a general second-order system at any desired natural frequency using Autoresonance is proposed. The article begins by deriving a concise expression for the frequency of the limit cycle induced by an Autoresonance feedback loop enclosed on the system. The expression is based on modal decomposition, and provides valuable insight into the behavior of a system controlled in this way. With this expression, a method for selecting and exciting a desired mode naturally follows by combining Autoresonance with Modal Filtering. By taking various linear combinations of the sensor signals, by orthogonality one can "filter out" all the unwanted modes effectively. The desired mode's natural frequency is then automatically reflected in the limit cycle. In experiment the technique has proven extremely robust, even if the amplitude of the desired mode is significantly smaller than the others and the modal filters are greatly inaccurate.

  13. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-01

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  14. Ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). Applications in laser surgery, mass spectrometry and towards ultimate limits in biodiagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Ling

    2015-07-15

    The prospects for minimally invasive surgery, spatial imaging with mass spectrometry and rapid high throughput biodiagnosis require new means of tissue incision and biomolecule extraction with conserved molecular structure. Towards this aim, a laser ablation process is utilized in this dissertation, which is capable of performing precise tissue incision with minimal collateral damage and extracting intact biological entities with conserved biological functions. The method is based on the recently developed Picosecond Infrared Laser (PIRL) designed to excite selectively the water vibrational modes under the condition of ultrafast Desorption by Impulsive Vibrational Excitation (DIVE). The basic concept is that the selectively excited water molecules act as propellant to ablate whole biological complexes into the plume, faster than any thermal deleterious effect or fragmentation that would mask molecular identities.The PIRL ablation under DIVE condition is applied for the first time to six types of ocular tissues, rendering precise and minimally invasive incisions in a well-controlled and reproducible way. An eminent demonstration is the contact-free and applanation-free corneal trephination with the PIRL. Mass spectrometry and other analytical techniques show that great abundance of proteins with various molecular weights are extracted from the tissue by the PIRL ablation, and that fragmentation or other chemical alternation does not occur to the proteins in the ablation plume. With various microscope imaging and biochemical analysis methods, nano-scale single protein molecules, viruses and cells in the ablation plume are found to be morphologically and functionally identical to their corresponding controls. The PIRL ablation provides a new means to push the frontiers of laser surgery in ophthalmology and can be applied to resolve chemical activities in situ and in vivo. The most important finding is the conserved nature of the extracted biological entities

  15. Production of a Beam of Highly Vibrationally Excited CO Using Perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, N.; Schäfer, T.; Hühnert, J.; Wodtke, A. M.; Field, R. W.

    2012-06-01

    For many experimentalists (especially those, who are not spectroscopists), molecular pertubations are a curse, as they make assignments and analysis of spectral data more difficult. Nevertheless, they can also be a boon! In this talk we will show how a molecular beam of CO in high vibrational states (v=17,18) can be prepared by an optical pumping scheme that we call PUMP-PUMP-PERTURB and DUMP (P^3D). P^3D exploits the loaning, via spin-orbit perturbations, of the large oscillator strength of the 4th positive system, A ^1 π ← X ^1 Σ ^+, to the triplet manifold. This allows some nominally spin-forbidden transitions to be exploited in multistep optical pumping schemes. The ability to {state-selectively} prepare CO in high vibrational states opens up new opportunities for molecular beam scattering experiments.

  16. Lattice vibrations and barrier to hindered rotation in lithium tetradeuteroaluminate by 2H, 7Li and 27Al NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarasov, V.P.; Kirakosyan, G.A.

    1996-01-01

    Temperature dependences of 2 H, 7 Li, 27 Al NMR line shape in LiAlD 4 lithium polycrystal tetradeuteroaluminate in the range of 103-420 K have been studied. The quadrupole bond constants and asymmetry parameters of electric field gradient tensor have been measured. The frequencies of lattice vibrations have been evaluated in the framework of the Buyer model. From temperature dependences of spin-lattice relaxation time and 2 H NMR line shape the activation energies of AlD 4 anion decelerated rotation, amounting to 74 and 62 k J/mol respectively, have been determined. 15 refs.; 5 figs.; 2 tabs

  17. Dynamics of rotating and vibrating thin hemispherical shell with mass and damping imperfections and parametrically driven by discrete electrodes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, M

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Shatalov2_2009.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 22572 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Shatalov2_2009.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 1 DYNAMICS OF ROTATING... AND VIBRATING THIN HEMISPHERICAL SHELL WITH MASS AND DAMPING IMPERFECTIONS AND PARAMETRICALLY DRIVEN BY DISCRETE ELECTRODES Michael Shatalov1,2 and Charlotta Coetzee2 1Sensor Science and Technology (SST) of CSIR Material Science and Manufacturing (MSM...

  18. Active vibration reduction of rigid rotor by kinematic excitation of bushes of journal bearings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ondrouch

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Possibilities of active lateral vibration reduction of a symmetric, rigid rotor supported by journal bearings are given. They were obtained by computational modelling. Efficiency of the feedback P and PD controllers in the stable revolution interval was examined. The linearized rotor system model was used. The results of the theoretical analysis are assigned for a testing stand where the bearing bush motions are deactivated by piezoelectric actuators connected to the controllers.

  19. Vibration vector monitoring of rotating machinery: A predictive/preventative maintenance technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humes, B.R.

    1990-01-01

    Monitoring of overall vibration amplitudes to indicate machinery faults is a standard practice in most industries. The appearance of shaft cracks in machines retrofitted for extended life have prompted development of higher levels of machinery monitoring. Part 1 of this paper discusses vibration vector monitoring for machinery malfunction prediction and failure prevention. Machinery faults which can be diagnosed by this type of monitoring, such as rotor rubs, loose parts, shaft cracks, ..., are presented along with their most common characteristics. The newest, most effective methods of permanent machinery monitoring are presented and critiqued. An extensive case history is presented in Part 2 in which a potentially disastrous machinery fault was predicted using vibration vector monitoring and analysis. The addition of vector monitoring to the normal, overall vibration monitoring proved more effective in diagnosing the machinery fault and predicting impending failure

  20. CINE: Comet INfrared Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-08-01

    CINE calculates infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. One of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets is the fluorescence by the solar radiation followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state. This command-line tool calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Fluorescence coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  1. Calculated rotational and vibrational g factors of LiH X 1S+ and evaluation of parameters in radial functions from rotational and vibration-rotational spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sauer, Stephan P. A.; Paidarová, Ivana; Oddershede, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The vibrational g factor, that is, the nonadiabatic correction to the vibrational reduced mass, of LiH has been calculated for internuclear distances over a wide range. Based on multiconfigurational wave functions with a large complete active space and an extended set of gaussian type basis...

  2. Single photon excimer laser photodissociation of highly vibrationally excited polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiee, J.J.; Wampler, F.B.; Rice, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    The ir + uv photodissociation of SF 6 has been performed using CO 2 and ArF lasers. The two-color photolysis significantly enhances the photodissociation process over ArF irradiation alone and is found to preserve the initial isotopic specificity of the ir excitation process

  3. Monitoring of Rotor-Stator Interaction in Pump-Turbine Using Vibrations Measured with On-Board Sensors Rotating with Shaft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian G. Rodriguez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Current trends in design of pump-turbines have led into higher rotor-stator interaction (RSI loads over impeller-runner. These dynamic loads are of special interest having produced catastrophic failures in pump-turbines. Determining RSI characteristics facilitates the proposal of actions that will prevent these failures. Pressure measurements all around the perimeter of the impeller-runner are appropriate to monitor and detect RSI characteristics. Unfortunately most installed pump-turbines are not manufactured with in-built pressure sensors in appropriate positions to monitor RSI. For this reason, vibration measurements are the preferred method to monitor RSI in industry. Usually vibrations are measured in two perpendicular radial directions in bearings where valuable information could be lost due to bearing response. In this work, in order to avoid the effect of bearing response on measurement, two vibration sensors are installed rotating with the shaft. The RSI characteristics obtained with pressure measurements were compared to those determined using vibration measurements. The RSI characteristics obtained with pressure measurements were also determined using vibrations measured rotating with shaft. These RSI characteristics were not possible to be determined using the vibrations measured in guide bearing. Finally, it is recommended to measure vibrations rotating with shaft to detect RSI characteristics in installed pump-turbines as a more practical and reliable method to monitor RSI characteristics.

  4. A projection-based model reduction strategy for the wave and vibration analysis of rotating periodic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beli, D.; Mencik, J.-M.; Silva, P. B.; Arruda, J. R. F.

    2018-05-01

    The wave finite element method has proved to be an efficient and accurate numerical tool to perform the free and forced vibration analysis of linear reciprocal periodic structures, i.e. those conforming to symmetrical wave fields. In this paper, its use is extended to the analysis of rotating periodic structures, which, due to the gyroscopic effect, exhibit asymmetric wave propagation. A projection-based strategy which uses reduced symplectic wave basis is employed, which provides a well-conditioned eigenproblem for computing waves in rotating periodic structures. The proposed formulation is applied to the free and forced response analysis of homogeneous, multi-layered and phononic ring structures. In all test cases, the following features are highlighted: well-conditioned dispersion diagrams, good accuracy, and low computational time. The proposed strategy is particularly convenient in the simulation of rotating structures when parametric analysis for several rotational speeds is usually required, e.g. for calculating Campbell diagrams. This provides an efficient and flexible framework for the analysis of rotordynamic problems.

  5. Absolute vibrational excitation cross sections for 1-18 eV electron scattering from condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemelin, V.; Bass, A. D.; Wagner, J. R.; Sanche, L.

    2017-12-01

    Absolute cross sections (CSs) for vibrational excitation by 1-18 eV electrons incident on condensed dimethyl phosphate (DMP) were measured with a high-resolution electron energy loss (EEL) spectrometer. Absolute CSs were extracted from EEL spectra of DMP condensed on multilayer film of Ar held at about 20 K under ultra-high vacuum (˜1 × 10-11 Torr). Structures observed in the energy dependence of the CSs around 2, 4, 7, and 12 eV were compared with previous results of gas- and solid-phase experiments and with theoretical studies on dimethyl phosphate and related molecules. These structures were attributed to the formation of shape resonances.

  6. Generalized vibrating potential model for collective excitations in spherical, deformed and superdeformed systems: (1) atomic nuclei, (2) metal clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterenko, V.O.; Kleinig, W.

    1995-01-01

    The self-consistent vibrating potential model (VPM) is extended for description of Eλ collective excitations in atomic nuclei and metal clusters with practically any kind of static deformation. The model is convenient for a qualitative analysis and provides the RPA accuracy of numerical calculations. The VPM is applied to study Eλ giant resonances in spherical metal clusters and deformed and superdeformed nuclei. It is shown that the deformation splitting of superdeformed nuclei results in a very complicated (''jungle-like'') structure of the resonances, which makes the experimental observation of E2 and E3 giant resonances in superdeformed nuclei quite problematic. Calculations of E1 giant resonance in spherical sodium clusters Na 8 , Na 20 and Na 40 are presented, as a test of the VPM in this field. The results are in qualitative agreement with the experimental data. (orig.)

  7. The dance of molecules: new dynamical perspectives on highly excited molecular vibrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellman, Michael E; Tyng, Vivian

    2007-04-01

    At low energies, molecular vibrational motion is described by the normal modes model. This model breaks down at higher energy, with strong coupling between normal modes and onset of chaotic dynamics. New anharmonic modes are born in bifurcations, or branchings of the normal modes. Knowledge of these new modes is obtained through the window of frequency-domain spectroscopy, using techniques of nonlinear classical dynamics. It may soon be possible to "watch" molecular rearrangement reactions spectroscopically. Connections are being made with reaction rate theories, condensed phase systems, and motions of electrons in quantum dots.

  8. Determination of the Rotational Barrier in Ethane by Vibrational Spectroscopy and Statistical Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolani, Gianfranco

    2005-01-01

    The finite-difference boundary-value method is a numerical method suited for the solution of the one-dimensional Schrodinger equation encountered in problems of hindered rotation. Further, the application of the method, in combination with experimental results for the evaluation of the rotational energy barrier in ethane is presented.

  9. MODELING OF EQUIVALENT STIFFNESS OF A MAGNETIC SPRING OF VIBRATION EXCITER BASED ON COAXIAL-LINEAR MOTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.M. Golenkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The research of the influence of value and direction of current on the equivalent spring magnetic force based on coaxial-linear motor (CLM – MS. Methodology. We carried out investigation of the equivalent harshness of magnetic spring with determination of electromechanical propulsion performance characteristics by the methods of computer modeling and experimental research of physical model of CLM – MS. The modeling of magnetic spring of CLM – MS is carried out by the finite-element method. The challenge is met as an axisymmetric challenge in cylindrical co-ordinates in magnetostatic approach. The experimental investigattion of the propulsion performance characteristics of magnetic spring is carried out on the test bench. Results. After the computer modeling and the experimental investigation of the electromechanical propulsion performance characteristics of magnetic spring the expressions of equivalent stiffness coefficient depending on the current in winding are obtained. The results of computer modeling are confirmed experimentally. Originality. The determination of equivalent stiffness coefficient of magnetic spring of vibration exciter based on coaxial-linear motor. Practical value. The obtained determination of equivalent stiffness coefficient of magnetic spring may be used in process of designing of vibration machines with devices for change of natural oscillation frequency.

  10. Generation of interior cavity noise due to window vibration excited by turbulent flows past a generic side-view mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Hua-Dong; Davidson, Lars

    2018-03-01

    We investigate the interior noise caused by turbulent flows past a generic side-view mirror. A rectangular glass window is placed downstream of the mirror. The window vibration is excited by the surface pressure fluctuations and emits the interior noise in a cuboid cavity. The turbulent flows are simulated using a compressible large eddy simulation method. The window vibration and interior noise are predicted with a finite element method. The wavenumber-frequency spectra of the surface pressure fluctuations are analyzed. The spectra are identified with some new features that cannot be explained by the Chase model for turbulent boundary layers. The spectra contain a minor hydrodynamic domain in addition to the hydrodynamic domain caused by the main convection of the turbulent boundary layer. The minor domain results from the local convection of the recirculating flow. These domains are formed in bent elliptic shapes. The spanwise expansion of the wake is found causing the bending. Based on the wavenumber-frequency relationships in the spectra, the surface pressure fluctuations are decomposed into hydrodynamic and acoustic components. The acoustic component is more efficient in the generation of the interior noise than the hydrodynamic component. However, the hydrodynamic component is still dominant at low frequencies below approximately 250 Hz since it has low transmission losses near the hydrodynamic critical frequency of the window. The structural modes of the window determine the low-frequency interior tonal noise. The combination of the mode shapes of the window and cavity greatly affects the magnitude distribution of the interior noise.

  11. MARVEL analysis of the rotational-vibrational states of the molecular ions H2D+ and D2H+.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtenbacher, Tibor; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Fábri, Csaba; Császár, Attila G

    2013-07-07

    Critically evaluated rotational-vibrational line positions and energy levels, with associated critically reviewed labels and uncertainties, are reported for two deuterated isotopologues of the H3(+) molecular ion: H2D(+) and D2H(+). The procedure MARVEL, standing for Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels, is used to determine the validated levels and lines and their self-consistent uncertainties based on the experimentally available information. The spectral ranges covered for the isotopologues H2D(+) and D2H(+) are 5.2-7105.5 and 23.0-6581.1 cm(-1), respectively. The MARVEL energy levels of the ortho and para forms of the ions are checked against ones determined from accurate variational nuclear motion computations employing the best available adiabatic ab initio potential energy surfaces of these isotopologues. The number of critically evaluated, validated and recommended experimental (levels, lines) are (109, 185) and (104, 136) for H2D(+) and D2H(+), respectively. The lists of assigned MARVEL lines and levels and variational levels obtained for H2D(+) and D2H(+) as part of this study are deposited in the ESI to this paper.

  12. Quantum-mechanical theory for electronic-vibrational-rotational energy transfer in atom--diatom collisions: Analysis of the Hamiltonian

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellum, J.C.; McGuire, P.

    1983-01-01

    We investigate forms of the molecular system Hamiltonian valid for rigorous quantum-mechanical treatments of inelastic atom--diatom collisions characterized by exchange of energy between electronic, vibrational, and rotational degrees of freedom. We analyze this Hamiltonian in terms of various choices of independent coordinates which unambiguously specify the electronic and nuclear positions in the context of space-fixed and body-fixed reference frames. In particular we derive forms of the Hamiltonian in the context of the following four sets of independent coordinates: (1) a so-called space-fixed set, in which both electronic and nuclear positions are relative to the space-fixed frame; (2) a so-called mixed set, in which nuclear positions are relative to the body-fixed frame while electronic positions are relative to the space-fixed frame; (3) a so-called body-fixed set, in which both electronic and nuclear positions are relative to the body-fixed frame; and (4) another mixed set, in which nuclear positions are relative to the space-fixed frame while electronic positions are relative to the body-fixed frame. Based on practical considerations in accounting for electronic structure and nonadiabatic coupling of electronic states of the collision complex we find the forms of the Hamiltonian in the context of coordinate sets (3) and (4) above to be most appropriate, respectively, for body-fixed and space-fixed treatments of nuclear dynamics in collisional transfer of electronic, vibrational, and rotational energies

  13. Intramolecular Dynamics: A Study of Molecules at High Levels of Vibrational Excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-27

    aareemlent stith the photoa.couxueC rexults.,I4 % obintied t r iii pfii ioaCOI it tic tveaxu retntsx." Si ne thle xhoxs xthat Iii the I ott fi nence...t 0 200 400 ns 6000 between pump and probe pulse for CH3 CHF2 at 660 Pa. Infrared excitation: 10.6 pim P(20) line, 0.5 ns pulse with average fluence

  14. A new autogenous mobile system driven by vibration without impacts, excited by an impulse periodic force

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duong The-Hung

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes a new proposed design for autogenous mobile systems which can move without any external mechanisms such as legs or wheels. A Duffing oscillator with a cubic spring, which is excited by an impulse periodic force, is utilized to drive the whole system. The rectilinear motion of the system is performed employing the periodically oscillation of the internal mass interacting without collisions with the main body. Utilizing the nonlinear restoring force of the cubic spring, the system can move in desired directions. When the ratio between the excitation force and the friction force is smaller than 2.5, backward or forward motion can be easily achieved by applying an excitation force in the same desired direction. Different from other vibro-impact drifting devices, no impact needed to drive the new proposed system. This novel structure allows to miniaturize the device as well as to simplify the control algorithm thus can significantly expand applicability of the proposed system.

  15. Critical evaluation of measured rotational-vibrational transitions of four sulphur isotopologues of S16O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóbiás, Roland; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Császár, Attila G.; Naumenko, Olga V.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Flaud, Jean-Marie; Kumar, Praveen; Poirier, Bill

    2018-03-01

    A critical evaluation and validation of the complete set of previously published experimental rotational-vibrational line positions is reported for the four stable sulphur isotopologues of the semirigid SO2 molecule - i.e., 32S16O2, 33S16O2, 34S16O2, and 36S16O2. The experimentally measured, assigned, and labeled transitions are collated from 43 sources. The 32S16O2, 33S16O2, 34S16O2, and 36S16O2 datasets contain 40,269, 15,628, 31,080, and 31 lines, respectively. Of the datasets collated, only the extremely limited 36S16O2 dataset is not subjected to a detailed analysis. As part of a detailed analysis of the experimental spectroscopic networks corresponding to the ground electronic states of the 32S16O2, 33S16O2, and 34S16O2 isotopologues, the MARVEL (Measured Active Rotational-Vibrational Energy Levels) procedure is used to determine the rovibrational energy levels. The rovibrational levels and their vibrational parent and asymmetric-top quantum numbers are compared to ones obtained from accurate variational nuclear-motion computations as well as to results of carefully designed effective Hamiltonian models. The rovibrational energy levels of the three isotopologues having the same labels are also compared against each other to ensure self-consistency. This careful, multifaceted analysis gives rise to 15,130, 5852, and 10,893 validated rovibrational energy levels, with a typical accuracy of a few 0.0001 cm-1 , for 32S16O2, 33S16O2, and 34S16O2, respectively. The extensive list of validated experimental lines and empirical (MARVEL) energy levels of the S16O2 isotopologues studied are deposited in the Supplementary Material of this article, as well as in the distributed information system ReSpecTh (http://respecth.hu).

  16. Determination of excitation temperature and vibrational temperature of the N2(C 3Πu, ν') state in Ne-N2 RF discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, N U; Naveed, M A; Zakaullah, M; Khan, F U

    2008-01-01

    Optical emission spectroscopy is used to investigate the effect of neon mixing on the excitation and vibrational temperatures of the second positive system in nitrogen plasma generated by a 13.56 MHz RF generator. The excitation temperature is determined from Ne I line intensities, using Boltzmann's plot. The overpopulation of the levels of the N 2 (C 3 Π u , ν') states with neon mixing are monitored by measuring the emission intensities of the second positive system of nitrogen molecules. The vibrational temperature is calculated for the sequence Δν = -2, with the assumption that it follows Boltzmann's distribution. But due to overpopulation of levels, e.g. 1, 4, a linearization process was employed for such distributions allowing us to calculate the vibrational temperature of the N 2 (C 3 Π u , ν') state. It is found that the excitation temperature as well as the vibrational temperature of the second positive system can be raised significantly by mixing neon with nitrogen plasma. It is also found that the vibrational temperature increases with power and pressure up to 0.5 mbar.

  17. A study on the annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. 1st report. Stability for translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Dong-Wei; Kaneko, Shigehiko; Hayama, Shinji

    1999-01-01

    This study reports the stability of annular leakage-flow-induced vibrations. The pressure distribution of fluid between a fixed outer cylinder and a vibrating inner cylinder was obtained in the case of a translationally and rotationally coupled motion of the inner cylinder. The unsteady fluid force acting on the inner cylinder in the case of translational and rotational single-degree-of-freedom vibrations was then expressed in terms proportional to the acceleration, velocity, and displacement. Then the critical flow rate (at which stability was lost) was determined for an annular leakage-flow-induced vibration. Finally, the stability was investigated theoretically. It is known that instability will occur in the case of a divergent passage, but the critical flow rate depends on the passage increment in a limited range: the eccentricity of the passage and the pressure loss factor at the inlet of the passage lower the stability. (author)

  18. The role of vibrationally excited oxygen and nitrogen in the D and E regions of the ionosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Pavlov

    1994-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the results of a study of the effect of vibrationally excited oxygen, O*2, and nitrogen, N*2, on the electron density, Ne, and the electron temperature, Te, in the D and E regions. The sources of O*2 are O-atom recombination, the photodissociation of O3, and the reaction of O3 with O at D region altitudes. The first calculations of O*2( j number densities, Nj, are obtained by solving continuity equations for the models of harmonic and anharmonic oscillator energy levels, j=1-22. It is found that day time values of Nj are less than nighttime values. We also show that the photoionization of O*2 ( j ≥ 11 by Lα-radiation has no influence on the D region Ne. In the nighttime D region the photoionization O*2 ( j ≥ 11 by scattered Lα-radiation can be a new source of O+2. We show that the N*2 and O*2 de-excitation effect on the electron temperature is small in the E region of the ionosphere and cannot explain experimentally observed higher electron temperatures.

  19. Penetration of steady fluid motions into an outer stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehiro, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Youhei

    2018-03-01

    Penetration of steady magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) disturbances into an upper strongly stratified stable layer excited by MHD thermal convection in rotating spherical shells is investigated. The theoretical model proposed by Takehiro (2015) is reexamined in the case of steady fluid motion below the bottom boundary. Steady disturbances penetrate into a density stratified MHD fluid existing in the semi-infinite region in the vertical direction. The axis of rotation of the system is tilted with respect to the vertical. The basic magnetic field is uniform and may be tilted with respect to the vertical and the rotation axis. Linear dispersion relation shows that the penetration distance with zero frequency depends on the amplitude of Alfvén wave speed. When Alfvén wave speed is small, viscous diffusion becomes dominant and penetration distance is similar to the horizontal scale of the disturbance at the lower boundary. In contrast, when Alfvén wave speed becomes larger, disturbance can penetrate deeper, and penetration distance becomes proportional to the Alfvén wave speed and inversely proportional to the geometric average of viscous and magnetic diffusion coefficients and to the total horizontal wavenumber. The analytic expression of penetration distance is in good agreement with the extent of penetration of mean zonal flow induced by finite amplitude convection in a rotating spherical shell with an upper stably stratified layer embedded in an axially uniform basic magnetic field. The theory expects that the stable layer suggested in the upper part of the outer core of the earth could be penetrated completely by mean zonal flows excited by thermal/compositional convection developing below the stable layer.

  20. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations (i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface) is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules.

  1. Systematic studies of molecular vibrational anharmonicity and vibration-rotation interaction by self-consistent-field higher derivative methods: Applications to asymmetric and symmetric top and linear polyatomic molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clabo, D.A. Jr.

    1987-04-01

    Inclusion of the anharmonicity normal mode vibrations [i.e., the third and fourth (and higher) derivatives of a molecular Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface] is necessary in order to theoretically reproduce experimental fundamental vibrational frequencies of a molecule. Although ab initio determinations of harmonic vibrational frequencies may give errors of only a few percent by the inclusion of electron correlation within a large basis set for small molecules, in general, molecular fundamental vibrational frequencies are more often available from high resolution vibration-rotation spectra. Recently developed analytic third derivatives methods for self-consistent-field (SCF) wavefunctions have made it possible to examine with previously unavailable accuracy and computational efficiency the anharmonic force fields of small molecules

  2. Performance enhancement of a rotational energy harvester utilizing wind-induced vibration of an inclined stay cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In-Ho; Jung, Hyung-Jo; Jang, Seon-Jun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, an innovative strategy for improving the performance of a recently developed rotational energy harvester is proposed. Its performance can be considerably enhanced by replacing the electromagnetic induction part, consisting of moving permanent magnets and a fixed solenoid coil, with a moving mass and a rotational generator (i.e., an electric motor). The proposed system is easily tuned to the natural frequency of a target structure using the position change of a proof mass. Owing to the high efficiency of the rotational generator, the device can more effectively harness electrical energy from the wind-induced vibration of a stay cable. Also, this new configuration makes the device more compact and geometrically tunable. In order to validate the effectiveness of the new configuration, a series of laboratory and field tests are carried out with the prototype of the proposed device, which is designed and fabricated based on the dynamic characteristics of the vibration of a stay cable installed in an in-service cable-stayed bridge. From the field test, it is observed that the normalized output power of the proposed system is 35.67 mW (m s −2 ) −2 , while that of the original device is just 5.47 mW (m s −2 ) −2 . These results show that the proposed device generates much more electrical energy than the original device. Moreover, it is verified that the proposed device can generate sufficient electricity to power a wireless sensor node placed on a cable under gentle–moderate wind conditions. (paper)

  3. Influence analysis of electronically and vibrationally excited particles on the ignition of methane and hydrogen under the conditions of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deminskii, M. A.; Konina, K. M.; Potapkin, B. V.

    2018-03-01

    The vibronic and electronic energy relaxation phenomena in the specific conditions of a gas turbine engine were investigated in this paper. The plasma-chemical mechanism has been augmented with the results of recent investigations of the processes that involve electronically and vibrationally excited species. The updated mechanism was employed for the computer simulation of plasma-assisted combustion of hydrogen-air and methane-air mixtures under high pressure and in the range of initial temperatures T  =  500-900 K. The updated mechanism was verified using the experimental data. The influence of electronically excited nitrogen on the ignition delay time was analyzed. The rate coefficient of the vibration-vibration exchange between N2 and HO2 was calculated as well as the rate coefficient of HO2 decomposition.

  4. The Impact of Complex Forcing on the Viscous Torsional Vibration Damper’s Work in the Crankshaft of the Rotating Combustion Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Jagiełowicz-Ryznar C.

    2016-01-01

    The numerical calculations results of torsional vibration of the multi-cylinder crankshaft in the serial combustion engine (MC), including a viscous damper (VD), at complex forcing, were shown. In fact, in the MC case the crankshaft rotation forcings spectrum is the sum of harmonic forcing whose amplitude can be compared with the amplitude of the 1st harmonic. A significant impact, in the engine operational velocity, on the vibration damping process of MC, may be the amplitude of the 2nd harm...

  5. The vibration of a layered rotating planet and Bryan’s effect

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available As among other seismological observations, it is important to be able to predict the location of the vibrating pattern of an earthquake. In this chapter, the authors take the first tentative steps towards including "Bryan’s effect" in a mathematical...

  6. Experimental and analytical study on vibration control effects of eddy-current tuned mass dampers under seismic excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zheng; Huang, Biao; Zhang, Qi; Lu, Xilin

    2018-05-01

    Eddy-current tuned mass dampers (EC-TMDs) are non-contacting passive control devices and are developed on the basis of conventional tuned mass dampers. They comprise a solid mass, a stiffness element, and a damping element, wherein the damping mechanism originates from eddy currents. By relative motion between a non-magnetic conductive metal and a permanent magnet in a dynamic system, a time-varying magnetic field is induced in the conductor, thereby generating eddy currents. The eddy currents induce a magnetic field with opposite polarity, causing repulsive forces, i.e., damping forces. This technology can overcome the drawbacks of conventional tuned mass dampers, such as limited service life, deterioration of mechanical properties, and undesired additional stiffness. The experimental and analytical study of this system installed on a multi-degree-of-freedom structure is presented in this paper. A series of shaking table tests were conducted on a five-story steel-frame model with/without an EC-TMD to evaluate the effectiveness and performance of the EC-TMD in suppressing the vibration of the model under seismic excitations. The experimental results show that the EC-TMD can effectively reduce the displacement response, acceleration response, interstory drift ratio, and maximum strain of the columns under different earthquake excitations. Moreover, an analytical method was proposed on the basis of electromagnetic and structural dynamic theories. A comparison between the test and simulation results shows that the simulation method can be used to estimate the response of structures with an EC-TMD under earthquake excitations with acceptable accuracy.

  7. Inelastic Neutron Scattering Study of the Rotational Excitations in (KBr)l-x (KCN)x in the Paraelastic and Structural Glass State

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loidl, A.; Feile, R.; Knorr, K.

    1984-01-01

    The coupled rotational-translational excitations in (KBr)1-x(KCN)x were studied by inelastic neutron scattering for concentrations 0.008≤x≤0.20. We followed the A1g-T2g tunneling transition and the A1g-Eg librational excitation through the transition from the paraelastic to the structural glass...... state. We found that these two excitations and their coupling to the lattice strains exhibit a very different temperature dependence in the glass state. While the tunneling transition, which triggers reorientations of the CN- ions, shows a drastic reduction of the T2g rotation-translation coupling...

  8. Synchronization of Two Non-Identical Coupled Exciters in a Non-Resonant Vibrating System of Linear Motion. Part II: Numeric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the quantitative analysis of the coupling dynamic characteristics of two non-identical exciters in a non-resonant vibrating system. The load torque of each motor consists of three items, including the torque of sine effect of phase angles, that of coupling sine effect and that of coupling cosine effect. The torque of frequency capture results from the torque of coupling cosine effect, which is equal to the product of the coupling kinetic energy, the coefficient of coupling cosine effect, and the sine of phase difference of two exciters. The motions of the system excited by two exciters in the same direction make phase difference close to π and that in opposite directions makes phase difference close to 0. Numerical results show that synchronous operation is stable when the dimensionless relative moments of inertia of two exciters are greater than zero and four times of their product is greater than the square of their coefficient of coupling cosine effect. The stability of the synchronous operation is only dependent on the structural parameters of the system, such as the mass ratios of two exciters to the vibrating system, and the ratio of the distance between an exciter and the centroid of the system to the equivalent radius of the system about its centroid.

  9. Particle excitation, airglow and H2 vibrational disequilibrium in the atmosphere of Jupiter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shemansky, D.E.

    1984-09-01

    The extreme ultraviolet EUV emission produced by particle excitation of the hydrogen atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn is examined using model calculations to determine the nature of the energy deposition process and the effect of such processes on atmospheric structure. Tasks ranging from examination of phenomenologically related processes on Saturn and Titan to analysis of experimental laboratory data required to allow accurate modeling of emissions from hydrogenic atmospheres are investigated. An explanation of the hydrogen H Ly(alpha) bulge in Jupiter's emission from the equatorial region is presented. It is proposed that Saturn, rather than Titan is the major source of the extended hydrogen cloud. The atomic hydrogen detected at the rings of Saturn may originate predominantly from the same source. A cross calibration is obtained between the Pioneer 10 EUV photometer and the Voyager EUV spectrometers, thus providing a direct measure of the temporal morphology of Jupiter between a minimum and a maximum in solar activity. Atomic and molecular data required for the research program are analyzed. An extrapolation of conditions in the upper atmospheres of Jupiter and Saturn produces a predicted condition at Uranus in terms of excitation and hydrogen escape rates that may be observed at Voyager-Uranus encounter

  10. The Impact of Complex Forcing on the Viscous Torsional Vibration Damper’s Work in the Crankshaft of the Rotating Combustion Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagiełowicz-Ryznar C.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The numerical calculations results of torsional vibration of the multi-cylinder crankshaft in the serial combustion engine (MC, including a viscous damper (VD, at complex forcing, were shown. In fact, in the MC case the crankshaft rotation forcings spectrum is the sum of harmonic forcing whose amplitude can be compared with the amplitude of the 1st harmonic. A significant impact, in the engine operational velocity, on the vibration damping process of MC, may be the amplitude of the 2nd harmonic of a forcing moment. The calculations results of MC vibration, depending on the amplitude of the 2nd harmonic of the forcing moment, for the first form of the torsional vibration, were shown. Higher forms of torsional vibrations have no practical significance. The calculations assume the optimum damping coefficient VD, when the simple harmonic forcing is equal to the base critical velocity of the MC crankshaft.

  11. Modeling and Parameter Identification of the Vibration Characteristics of Armature Assembly in a Torque Motor of Hydraulic Servo Valves under Electromagnetic Excitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinghui Peng

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The resonance of the armature assembly is the main problem leading to the fatigue of the spring pipe in a torque motor of hydraulic servo valves, which can cause the failure of servo valves. To predict the vibration characteristics of the armature assembly, this paper focuses on the mathematical modeling of the vibration characteristics of armature assembly in a hydraulic servo valve and the identification of parameters in the models. To build models more accurately, the effect of the magnetic spring is taken into account. Vibration modal analysis is performed to obtain the mode shapes and natural frequencies, which are necessary to implement the identification of damping ratios in the mathematical models. Based on the mathematical models for the vibration characteristics, the harmonic responses of the armature assembly are analyzed using the finite element method and measured under electromagnetic excitations. The simulation results agree well with the experimental studies.

  12. Evaluation of Aero Commander sidewall vibration and interior acoustic data: Static operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piersol, A. G.; Wilby, E. G.; Wilby, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    Results for the vibration measured at five locations on the fuselage structure during static operations are presented. The analysis was concerned with the magnitude of the vibration and the relative phase between different locations, the frequency response (inertance) functions between the exterior pressure field and the vibration, and the coherent output power functions at interior microphone locations based on sidewall vibration. Fuselage skin panels near the plane of rotation of the propeller accept propeller noise excitation more efficiently than they do exhaust noise.

  13. Decadal Cycles of Earth Rotation, Mean Sea Level and Climate, Excited by Solar Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chapanov, Y.; Ron, Cyril; Vondrák, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 2 (2017), s. 241-250 ISSN 1214-9705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15943S Institutional support: RVO:67985815 Keywords : Earth rotation * solar activity * mean sea level Subject RIV: DE - Earth Magnetism, Geodesy, Geography OBOR OECD: Physical geography Impact factor: 0.699, year: 2016

  14. Near-degeneracy in Excited Vibrational States of 207PbF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mawhorter, Richard; Nguyen, Alexander; Kim, Yongrak; Biekert, Andreas; Sears, Trevor; Grabow, Jens-Uwe; Kudashov, A. D.; Skripnikov, L. V.; Titov, A. V.; Petrov, A. N.

    2017-04-01

    High-resolution Fourier transform microwave (FTMW) spectroscopy studies of 207PbF have demonstrated the near-degeneracy of two levels of opposite parity. These have attracted attention for the study of parity violation effects and the variation of fundamental constants using 207PbF. Further theoretical work has improved our detailed understanding of both 207PbF and 208PbF, and furthermore recently indicated that the finely split +/- parity levels grow monotonically closer for higher vibrational states. Our experimental results for v = 0-3 confirm this, and are in excellent agreement with our extended theoretical calculations up to v = 4; both will be presented. TJS acknowledges support from Contract No. DE-SC0012704 with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, supported by its Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences within the Office of Basic Energy Sciences., as do RM, AB, YK, & AN from Pomona College & J-UG from the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG).

  15. Investigation of a bistable dual-stage vibration isolator under harmonic excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kai; Huang, Hai; Harne, R L; Wang, K W

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the steady-state performance of a dual-stage vibration isolator, which is configured by a bistable oscillator and a linear oscillator. The potential force of the bistable stage comprises negative linear and positive cubic nonlinear stiffnesses such that the two restoring force contributions may counterbalance to minimize dynamic force transmission. By applying a first-order harmonic balance, it is predicted that the bistable dual-stage isolator may significantly outperform an equivalent pure linear dual-stage isolator. This conclusion is verified through a series of numerical investigations. Following a parametric study, design guidelines are detailed to achieve performance improvements. Then, the ‘valley’ response, which is the special phenomenon of the bistable dual-stage isolator due to the counterbalance of the negative linear and positive nonlinear potential forces, is revealed and quantitatively explained. Numerical studies demonstrate the role of initial conditions, and it is shown that the likelihood of beneficial single periodic valley and intra-well responses for isolation purposes can be increased by greater bistable stage damping. Finally, a bistable dual-stage isolator prototype is developed and tested, and the numerical and experimental results verify the theoretical predictions. (paper)

  16. Wind tunnel experiments on unstable self-excited vibration of sectional girders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Král, Radomil; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Náprstek, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a wind tunnel analysis of two degrees-of-freedom system represented by sectional girders is carried out. Besides an evaluation of the aeroelastic coefficients, the analysis is focused on the influence of the natural frequency ratio on the initiation of unstable vibration, which can be of practical interest. On the phenomenological level, the paper also discusses experimentally ascertained response regimes, with an emphasis on their stability character. The attention is paid to the memory effect in the response described by the hysteresis loop together with the separation curves determining the stability boundaries. The influence of initial disturbance on the stability is examined. Two types of cross-sections were investigated: (i) rectangular one with the aspect ratio 1:5, and (ii) bridge-like cross-section with comparable principal dimensions. For both types of cross-sections, the limits of the stability are significantly affected by an intentionally introduced initial disturbance. This holds especially with regard to the rectangular profile where the separation curves create very narrow sub-domains between a stable and an unstable response, while the bridge-like cross-section demonstrates much stable behaviour.

  17. Non-linear vibrating systems excited by a nonideal energy source with a large slope characteristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Carbajal, Javier; Domínguez, Jaime

    2017-11-01

    This paper revisits the problem of an unbalanced motor attached to a fixed frame by means of a nonlinear spring and a linear damper. The excitation provided by the motor is, in general, nonideal, which means it is affected by the vibratory response. Since the system behaviour is highly dependent on the order of magnitude of the motor characteristic slope, the case of large slope is considered herein. Some Perturbation Methods are applied to the system of equations, which allows transforming the original 4D system into a much simpler 2D system. The fixed points of this reduced system and their stability are carefully studied. We find the existence of a Hopf bifurcation which, to the authors' knowledge, has not been addressed before in the literature. These analytical results are supported by numerical simulations. We also compare our approach and results with those published by other authors.

  18. Active Lubrication: Feasibility and Limitations on Reducing Vibration in Rotating Machinery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoletti, Rodrigo; Santos, Ilmar

    2004-01-01

    of increasing their operational range. As a result, one achieves intelligent machines that are more flexible to operate in a fast-changing demand environment. Some limitations of the active lubrication are also discussed based on experimental data, where the response of the servo valves and the supply pressure...... play an important role: the eigenfrequency of the servo valves establishes the operational frequency range of the active lubrication, whereas the supply pressure establishes the amplitude of vibration reduction achieved with the active lubrication....

  19. HBr Formation from the Reaction between Gas-phase Bromine Atom and Vibrationally Excited Chemisorbed Hydrogen Atoms on a Si(001)-(2 x 1) Surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ree, J.; Yoon, S. H.; Park, K. G.; Kim, Y. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have calculated the probability of HBr formation and energy disposal of the reaction exothermicity in HBr produced from the reaction of gas-phase bromine with highly covered chemisorbed hydrogen atoms on a Si (001)-(2 x 1) surface. The reaction probability is about 0.20 at gas temperature 1500 K and surface temperature 300 K. Raising the initial vibrational state of the adsorbate(H)-surface(Si) bond from the ground to v = 1, 2 and 3 states causes the vibrational, translational and rotational energies of the product HBr to increase equally. However, the vibrational and translational motions of product HBr share most of the reaction energy. Vibrational population of the HBr molecules produced from the ground state adsorbate-surface bond (vHSi = 0) follows the Boltzmann distribution, but it deviates seriously from the Boltzmann distribution when the initial vibrational energy of the adsorbate-surface bond increases. When the vibration of the adsorbate-surface bond is in the ground state, the amount of energy dissipated into the surface is negative, while it becomes positive as vHSi increases. The energy distributions among the various modes weakly depends on surface temperature in the range of 0-600 K, regardless of the initial vibrational state of H(ad)-Si(s) bond

  20. Symmetry Adaptation of the Rotation-Vibration Theory for Linear Molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katy L. Chubb

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available A numerical application of linear-molecule symmetry properties, described by the D ∞ h point group, is formulated in terms of lower-order symmetry groups D n h with finite n. Character tables and irreducible representation transformation matrices are presented for D n h groups with arbitrary n-values. These groups can subsequently be used in the construction of symmetry-adapted ro-vibrational basis functions for solving the Schrödinger equations of linear molecules. Their implementation into the symmetrisation procedure based on a set of “reduced” vibrational eigenvalue problems with simplified Hamiltonians is used as a practical example. It is shown how the solutions of these eigenvalue problems can also be extended to include the classification of basis-set functions using ℓ, the eigenvalue (in units of ℏ of the vibrational angular momentum operator L ^ z . This facilitates the symmetry adaptation of the basis set functions in terms of the irreducible representations of D n h . 12 C 2 H 2 is used as an example of a linear molecule of D ∞ h point group symmetry to illustrate the symmetrisation procedure of the variational nuclear motion program Theoretical ROVibrational Energies (TROVE.

  1. Vibration measurements of the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope mount, Coudé rotator, and enclosure assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, William R.; McBride, Daniel R.

    2016-08-01

    The Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST) will be the largest solar telescope in the world, with a 4-meter off-axis primary mirror and 16 meter rotating Coudé laboratory within the telescope pier. The off-axis design requires a mount similar to an 8-meter on-axis telescope. Both the telescope mount and the Coudé laboratory utilize a roller bearing technology in place of the more commonly used hydrostatic bearings. The telescope enclosure utilizes a crawler mechanism for the altitude axis. As these mechanisms have not previously been used in a telescope, understanding the vibration characteristics and the potential impact on the telescope image is important. This paper presents the methodology used to perform jitter measurements of the enclosure and the mount bearings and servo system in a high-noise environment utilizing seismic accelerometers and high dynamic-range data acquisition equipment, along with digital signal processing (DSP) techniques. Data acquisition and signal processing were implemented in MATLAB. In the factory acceptance testing of the telescope mount, multiple accelerometers were strategically located to capture the six axes-of-motion of the primary and secondary mirror dummies. The optical sensitivity analysis was used to map these mirror mount displacements and rotations into units of image motion on the focal plane. Similarly, tests were done with the Coudé rotator, treating the entire rotating instrument lab as a rigid body. Testing was performed by recording accelerometer data while the telescope control system performed tracking operations typical of various observing scenarios. The analysis of the accelerometer data utilized noise-averaging fast Fourier transform (FFT) routines, spectrograms, and periodograms. To achieve adequate dynamic range at frequencies as low as 3Hz, the use of special filters and advanced windowing functions were necessary. Numerous identical automated tests were compared to identify and select the data sets

  2. Theoretical and Spectroscopic investigations of conformations, rotational barriers and scaled vibrations of 2,3-dimethyl hexane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Aboulmouhajir

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2,3-dimethyl hexane conformational isomerism has been investigated in detail, based on HF, Post-HF and DFT calculations at different basis set. The effect of size of basis, ZPE, thermal contributions, electronic correlation and optimization methods on the conformational stability was discussed. The rotational barriers from the most stable conformer to the lowest energy secondary conformers and their correspondent inversion barriers at both HF and MP2 methods using 6-31G* basis set have also been approached. A normal mode calculation of the most and less-stable conformers using a scaled ab initio force field in terms of non-redundant local symmetry coordinates have been made to elucidate the conformational dependence of the vibrational spectra.

  3. Topological spin excitations induced by an external magnetic field coupled to a surface with rotational symmetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho-Santos, Vagson L.; Dandoloff, Rossen

    2013-01-01

    We study the Heisenberg model in an external magnetic field on curved surfaces with rotational symmetry. The Euler-Lagrange static equations, derived from the Hamiltonian, lead to the inhomogeneous double sine-Gordon equation. Nonetheless, if the magnetic field is coupled to the metric elements of the surface, and consequently to its curvature, the homogeneous double sine-Gordon equation emerges and a 2π-soliton solution is obtained. In order to satisfy the self-dual equations, surface deformations are predicted to appear at the sector where the spin direction is opposite to the magnetic field. On the basis of the model, we find the characteristic length of the 2π-soliton for three specific rotationally symmetric surfaces: the cylinder, the catenoid, and the hyperboloid. On finite surfaces, such as the sphere, torus, and barrels, fractional 2π-solitons are predicted to appear. (author)

  4. State resolved rotational excitation cross-sections and rates in H2 + H2 collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultanov, Renat A.; Guster, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    Rotational transitions in molecular hydrogen collisions are computed. The two most recently developed potential energy surfaces for the H 2 -H 2 system are used from the following works: [A.I. Boothroyd, P.G. Martin, W.J. Keogh, M.J. Peterson, J. Chem. Phys., 116 (2002) 666; P. Diep, J.K. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys., 113 (2000) 3480; P. Diep, J.K. Johnson, J. Chem. Phys., 112 (2000) 4465]. Cross-sections for rotational transitions 00 → 20, 22, 40, 42, 44 and corresponding rate coefficients are calculated using a quantum-mechanical approach. Results are compared for a wide range of kinetic temperatures 300 K ≤ T≤ 3000 K

  5. Frozen orientation disorder and rotation excitation in solid mixtures of methane and krypton (neutron diffraction experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grondey, S.

    1986-09-01

    The effect of a statistical replacement of CH 4 molecules by Kr atoms on the rotational states in solid methane has been examined. Obviously the anisotropic molecular interaction (octopole-octopole interaction) is disturbed in a way analogous to magnetic systems with random internal fields. Inelastic neutron scattering experiments on solid mixtures (CH 4 ) 1-x Kr x with 0≤x≤0.35 have been carried out, and simple models have been developed to interpret the spectra. (orig./BHO)

  6. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  7. Bound state potential energy surface construction: ab initio zero-point energies and vibrationally averaged rotational constants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettens, Ryan P A

    2003-01-15

    Collins' method of interpolating a potential energy surface (PES) from quantum chemical calculations for reactive systems (Jordan, M. J. T.; Thompson, K. C.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1995, 102, 5647. Thompson, K. C.; Jordan, M. J. T.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1998, 108, 8302. Bettens, R. P. A.; Collins, M. A. J. Chem. Phys. 1999, 111, 816) has been applied to a bound state problem. The interpolation method has been combined for the first time with quantum diffusion Monte Carlo calculations to obtain an accurate ground state zero-point energy, the vibrationally average rotational constants, and the vibrationally averaged internal coordinates. In particular, the system studied was fluoromethane using a composite method approximating the QCISD(T)/6-311++G(2df,2p) level of theory. The approach adopted in this work (a) is fully automated, (b) is fully ab initio, (c) includes all nine nuclear degrees of freedom, (d) requires no assumption of the functional form of the PES, (e) possesses the full symmetry of the system, (f) does not involve fitting any parameters of any kind, and (g) is generally applicable to any system amenable to quantum chemical calculations and Collins' interpolation method. The calculated zero-point energy agrees to within 0.2% of its current best estimate. A0 and B0 are within 0.9 and 0.3%, respectively, of experiment.

  8. Torsion-inversion tunneling patterns in the CH-stretch vibrationally excited states of the G12 family of molecules including methylamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawadi, Mahesh B; Bhatta, Ram S; Perry, David S

    2013-12-19

    Two torsion-inversion tunneling models (models I and II) are reported for the CH-stretch vibrationally excited states in the G12 family of molecules. The torsion and inversion tunneling parameters, h(2v) and h(3v), respectively, are combined with low-order coupling terms involving the CH-stretch vibrations. Model I is a group theoretical treatment starting from the symmetric rotor methyl CH-stretch vibrations; model II is an internal coordinate model including the local-local CH-stretch coupling. Each model yields predicted torsion-inversion tunneling patterns of the four symmetry species, A, B, E1, and E2, in the CH-stretch excited states. Although the predicted tunneling patterns for the symmetric CH-stretch excited state are the same as for the ground state, inverted tunneling patterns are predicted for the asymmetric CH-stretches. The qualitative tunneling patterns predicted are independent of the model type and of the particular coupling terms considered. In model I, the magnitudes of the tunneling splittings in the two asymmetric CH-stretch excited states are equal to half of that in the ground state, but in model II, they differ when the tunneling rate is fast. The model predictions are compared across the series of molecules methanol, methylamine, 2-methylmalonaldehyde, and 5-methyltropolone and to the available experimental data.

  9. Investigation of gyroscopic effects in vibrating fluid-filled cylinders subjected to axial rotation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Shatalov, MY

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available , according to him, showed that nodes revolve at an angular rate different from that of the shell. He then attempted to quantify this difference in angular rate by a quantity known as Bryan's factor. Faraday [2], Spurr [3] and Apfel [4] discussed similar...", Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society for Mathematical and Physical Sciences 7,101- 111 (1890). [2] M. Faraday, "On a peculiar class of acoustical figures and on certain forms assumed by groups of particles upon vibrating elastic surfaces...

  10. Electric dipole moment function of the X1 Sigma/+/ state of CO - Vibration-rotation matrix elements for transitions of gas laser and astrophysical interest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The electric dipole moment function of the ground electronic state of carbon monoxide has been determined by combining numerical solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation with absolute intensity data of vibration-rotation bands. The derived dipole moment function is used to calculate matrix elements of interest to stellar astronomy and of importance in the carbon monoxide laser.

  11. An analytical approach for predicting the energy capture and conversion by impulsively-excited bistable vibration energy harvesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harne, R. L.; Zhang, Chunlin; Li, Bing; Wang, K. W.

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive energies are abundant throughout the natural and built environments, for instance as stimulated by wind gusts, foot-steps, or vehicle-road interactions. In the interest of maximizing the sustainability of society's technological developments, one idea is to capture these high-amplitude and abrupt energies and convert them into usable electrical power such as for sensors which otherwise rely on less sustainable power supplies. In this spirit, the considerable sensitivity to impulse-type events previously uncovered for bistable oscillators has motivated recent experimental and numerical studies on the power generation performance of bistable vibration energy harvesters. To lead to an effective and efficient predictive tool and design guide, this research develops a new analytical approach to estimate the electroelastic response and power generation of a bistable energy harvester when excited by an impulse. Comparison with values determined by direct simulation of the governing equations shows that the analytically predicted net converted energies are very accurate for a wide range of impulse strengths. Extensive experimental investigations are undertaken to validate the analytical approach and it is seen that the predicted estimates of the impulsive energy conversion are in excellent agreement with the measurements, and the detailed structural dynamics are correctly reproduced. As a result, the analytical approach represents a significant leap forward in the understanding of how to effectively leverage bistable structures as energy harvesting devices and introduces new means to elucidate the transient and far-from-equilibrium dynamics of nonlinear systems more generally.

  12. Vibration Control of Novel Passive Multi-joints Rotational Friction Dampers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mualla, Imad H.; Koss, Holger

    2017-01-01

    that the damper performance is: - Independent of forcing frequency within applicable range - Linearly dependent on displacement amplitudes - Linearly dependent on normal forces - Very stable over many cycles Furthermore, a numerical model of the 4-joint damper has been developed based on an analytical derivation...... that are supplied by Damptech A/S have been installed in many projects in Japan, among them Japan tallest building and in other countries around the world. The paper provides a number of show cases demonstrating versatile application of rotational friction dampers (RFD)....... or strong winds. The damper is based on a rotational friction concept that was developed by Mualla, I.H. The devices have a stable energy dissipating behavior. They are flexible in the application, since they only need limited space. The devices can be installed easily. The damping capacity of the devices...

  13. Effect of centrifugal force on natural frequency of lateral vibration of rotating shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzad, M.; Bastami, A. R.

    2004-07-01

    This paper investigates the effect of shaft rotation on its natural frequency. Apart from gyroscopic effect, the axial force originated from centrifugal force and the Poisson effect results in change of shaft natural frequency. D'Alembert principle for shaft in cylindrical co-ordinate system, along with the stress-strain relation, gives the non-homogenous linear differential equation, which can be used to calculate axial stress in the shaft. Numerical results of this study show that axial stress produced by shaft rotation has a major effect on the natural frequency of long high-speed shafts, while shaft diameter has no influence on the results. In addition, change in lateral natural frequency due to gyroscopic effect is compared with the results of this study.

  14. Rapid vibrational and rotational energy-transfer rates in heated carbon dioxide collisions by double-resonance laser spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomason, M.D.

    1982-07-01

    Rates for resonant vibrational and rotational energy transfer from the 001 state by CO 2 + CO 2 collisions have been measured. All data were obtained by double resonance spectroscopy with CO 2 lasers in a 2.5 meter absorption cell at 700 0 K. Results for rotation transfer include pumped-level relaxation and the response of other 001 levels with ΔJ up to 18. These data are compared to four relevant collision models via a 35-level rate equation analysis. Sequence-band (002 → 101) and hot-band (011 → 110) lasting have been used to observe resonant nu 3 -transfer relaxation involving 001 + 001 reversible 002 + 000, 001 + 100 reversible 101 + 000, and 001 + 010 reversible 011 + 000. A multilevel rate analysis has been utilized to determine the rate coefficients for 001 going to the 002, the 101, and the 011 levels. Part of the hot-band data has been interpreted as due to 110 + 000 reversible 100 + 010, and the associated rate constant has been estimated. The results of the study are compared to the theory and to other experiments

  15. Vibration analysis of a rotating functionally graded tapered microbeam based on the modified couple stress theory by DQEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab; Alireza Mousavi, S.

    2016-09-01

    Due to having difficulty in solving governing nonlinear differential equations of a non-uniform microbeam, a few numbers of authors have studied such fields. In the present study, for the first time, the size-dependent vibration behavior of a rotating functionally graded (FG) tapered microbeam based on the modified couple stress theory is investigated using differential quadrature element method (DQEM). It is assumed that physical and mechanical properties of the FG microbeam are varying along the thickness that will be defined as a power law equation. The governing equations are determined using Hamilton's principle, and DQEM is presented to obtain the results for cantilever and propped cantilever boundary conditions. The accuracy and validity of the results are shown in several numerical examples. In order to display the influence of size on the first two natural frequencies and consequently changing of some important microbeam parameters such as material length scale, rate of cross section, angular velocity and gradient index of the FG material, several diagrams and tables are represented. The results of this article can be used in designing and optimizing elastic and rotary-type micro-electro-mechanical systems like micro-motors and micro-robots including rotating parts.

  16. Optimization of Sensing and Feedback Control for Vibration/Flutter of Rotating Disk by PZT Actuators via Air Coupled Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bingfeng Ju

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin’s discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  17. Optimization of sensing and feedback control for vibration/flutter of rotating disk by PZT actuators via air coupled pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Tianhong; Xu, Xinsheng; Han, Jianqiang; Lin, Rongming; Ju, Bingfeng; Li, Qing

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a feedback control mechanism and its optimization for rotating disk vibration/flutter via changes of air-coupled pressure generated using piezoelectric patch actuators are studied. A thin disk rotates in an enclosure, which is equipped with a feedback control loop consisting of a micro-sensor, a signal processor, a power amplifier, and several piezoelectric (PZT) actuator patches distributed on the cover of the enclosure. The actuator patches are mounted on the inner or the outer surfaces of the enclosure to produce necessary control force required through the airflow around the disk. The control mechanism for rotating disk flutter using enclosure surfaces bonded with sensors and piezoelectric actuators is thoroughly studied through analytical simulations. The sensor output is used to determine the amount of input to the actuator for controlling the response of the disk in a closed loop configuration. The dynamic stability of the disk-enclosure system, together with the feedback control loop, is analyzed as a complex eigenvalue problem, which is solved using Galerkin's discretization procedure. The results show that the disk flutter can be reduced effectively with proper configurations of the control gain and the phase shift through the actuations of PZT patches. The effectiveness of different feedback control methods in altering system characteristics and system response has been investigated. The control capability, in terms of control gain, phase shift, and especially the physical configuration of actuator patches, are also evaluated by calculating the complex eigenvalues and the maximum displacement produced by the actuators. To achieve a optimal control performance, sizes, positions and shapes of PZT patches used need to be optimized and such optimization has been achieved through numerical simulations.

  18. Rotational excitation of H2O by para-H2 from an adiabatically reduced dimensional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scribano, Yohann; Faure, Alexandre; Lauvergnat, David

    2012-03-07

    Cross sections and rate coefficients for low lying rotational transitions in H(2)O colliding with para-hydrogen pH(2) are computed using an adiabatic approximation which reduces the dimensional dynamics from a 5D to a 3D problem. Calculations have been performed at the close-coupling level using the recent potential of Valiron et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 129, 134306 (2008)]. A good agreement is found between the reduced adiabatic calculations and the 5D exact calculations, with an impressive time saving and memory gain. This adiabatic reduction of dimensionality seems very promising for scattering studies involving the excitation of a heavy target molecule by a light molecular projectile. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  19. A ROTATING MOLECULAR DISK TOWARD IRAS 18162-2048, THE EXCITING SOURCE OF HH 80-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Lopez, M.; Curiel, S.; Girart, J. M.; Gomez, Y.; Ho, P. T. P.; Patel, N.

    2011-01-01

    We present several molecular line emission arcsecond and subarcsecond observations obtained with the Submillimeter Array in the direction of the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048, the exciting source of HH 80-81. The data clearly indicate the presence of a compact (radius ∼425-850 AU) SO 2 structure, enveloping the more compact (radius ∼ sun . The SO 2 spectral line data also allow us to constrain the structure temperature between 120 and 160 K and the volume density ∼> 2 x 10 9 cm -3 . We also find that such a rotating flattened system could be unstable due to gravitational disturbances. The data from C 17 O line emission show a dense core within this star-forming region. Additionally, the H 2 CO and SO emissions appear clumpy and trace the disk-like structure, a possible interaction between a molecular core and the outflows, and in part, the cavity walls excavated by the thermal radio jet.

  20. Vibration-Based Data Used to Detect Cracks in Rotating Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyekenyesi, Andrew L.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.; Martin, Richard E.; Baaklini, George Y.

    2004-01-01

    Rotor health monitoring and online damage detection are increasingly gaining the interest of aircraft engine manufacturers. This is primarily due to the fact that there is a necessity for improved safety during operation as well as a need for lower maintenance costs. Applied techniques for the damage detection and health monitoring of rotors are essential for engine safety, reliability, and life prediction. Recently, the United States set the ambitious goal of reducing the fatal accident rate for commercial aviation by 80 percent within 10 years. In turn, NASA, in collaboration with the Federal Aviation Administration, other Federal agencies, universities, and the airline and aircraft industries, responded by developing the Aviation Safety Program. This program provides research and technology products needed to help the aerospace industry achieve their aviation safety goal. The Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Group of the Optical Instrumentation Technology Branch at the NASA Glenn Research Center is currently developing propulsion-system-specific technologies to detect damage prior to catastrophe under the propulsion health management task. Currently, the NDE group is assessing the feasibility of utilizing real-time vibration data to detect cracks in turbine disks. The data are obtained from radial blade-tip clearance and shaft-clearance measurements made using capacitive or eddy-current probes. The concept is based on the fact that disk cracks distort the strain field within the component. This, in turn, causes a small deformation in the disk's geometry as well as a possible change in the system's center of mass. The geometric change and the center of mass shift can be indirectly characterized by monitoring the amplitude and phase of the first harmonic (i.e., the 1 component) of the vibration data. Spin pit experiments and full-scale engine tests have been conducted while monitoring for crack growth with this detection methodology. Even so, published data are

  1. Model of daytime emissions of electronically-vibrationally excited products of O3 and O2 photolysis: application to ozone retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Yankovsky

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The traditional kinetics of electronically excited products of O3 and O2 photolysis is supplemented with the processes of the energy transfer between electronically-vibrationally excited levels O2(a1Δg, v and O2(b1Σ+g, v, excited atomic oxygen O(1D, and the O2 molecules in the ground electronic state O2(X3Σg−, v. In contrast to the previous models of kinetics of O2(a1Δg and O2 (b1Σ+g, our model takes into consideration the following basic facts: first, photolysis of O3 and O2 and the processes of energy exchange between the metastable products of photolysis involve generation of oxygen molecules on highly excited vibrational levels in all considered electronic states – b1Σ+g, a1Δg and X3Σg−; second, the absorption of solar radiation not only leads to populating the electronic states on vibrational levels with vibrational quantum number v equal to 0 – O2(b1Σ+g, v=0 (at 762 nm and O2(a1Δg, v=0 (at 1.27 µm, but also leads to populating the excited electronic–vibrational states O2(b1Σ+g, v=1 and O2(b1Σ+g, v=2 (at 689 nm and 629 nm. The proposed model allows one to calculate not only the vertical profiles of the O2(a1Δg, v=0 and O2(b1Σg, v=0 concentrations, but also the profiles of [O2(a1Δg, v≤5], [O2 (b1Σ+g , v=1, 2] and O2(X3Σg−, v=1–35. In the altitude range 60–125 km, consideration of the electronic-vibrational kinetics significantly changes the calculated concentrations of the metastable oxygen molecules and reduces the discrepancy between the altitude profiles of ozone concentrations retrieved from the 762-nm and 1.27-µm emissions measured simultaneously.

  2. Search for the characters of chiral rotation in excited bands for the idea chiral nuclei with A ∼ 130

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Qibo; Yao Jiangming; Meng Jie; Zhang Shuangquan; Qi Bin

    2010-01-01

    Since the occurrence of chirality was originally suggested in 1997 by Frauendorf and Meng [1] and experimentally observed in 2001 [2] , the investigation of chiral symmetry in atomic nuclei becomes one of the most important topics in nuclear physics. More and more chiral doublet bands [3-7] in atomic nuclei [8] have been reported. There are also many discussions about the fingerprints of chirality. In the pioneer paper [1] , the two lowest near degenerate bands given by the particle-rotor model (PRM) are interpreted as chiral doublet bands. If the nucleus has chiral geometry with proper configuration, the character of chiral rotation may appear not only in the two lowest bands, but also in the other bands. Therefore, it is interesting to search for the character of chiral rotation, Based on the PRM model with configuration corresponding to A ∼ 130 mass region, we examine the theoretical spectroscopy of higher excited bands (band3, band4, band5 and band6) beyond the two lowest bands (bandl and band2), including energies, spin-alignments, projection of total angular momentum and electromagnetic transition probabilities. The results show that band3 and band4 have characters of chirality in some spin region. (authors)

  3. Ab initio calculation of the cross sections for electron impact vibrational excitation of CO via the {sup 2}Π shape resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falcetta, Michael F., E-mail: mffalcetta@gcc.edu; Fair, Mark C.; Tharnish, Emily M.; Williams, Lorna M.; Hayes, Nathan J. [Department of Chemistry, Grove City College, Grove City, Pennsylvania 16127 (United States); Jordan, Kenneth D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15260 (United States)

    2016-03-14

    The stabilization method is used to calculate the complex potential energy curve of the {sup 2}Π state of CO{sup −} as a function of bond length, with the refinement that separate potentials are determined for p-wave and d-wave attachment and detachment of the excess electron. Using the resulting complex potentials, absolute vibrational excitation cross sections are calculated as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The calculated cross sections agree well with experiment.

  4. Dynamic Model and Vibration Power Flow of a Rigid-Flexible Coupling and Harmonic-Disturbance Exciting System for Flexible Robotic Manipulator with Elastic Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yufei Liu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the dynamic of a flexible robotic manipulator (FRM which consists of rigid driving base, flexible links, and flexible joints. With considering the motion fluctuations caused by the coupling effect, such as the motor parameters and mechanism inertias, as harmonic disturbances, the system investigated in this paper remains a parametrically excited system. An elastic restraint model of the FRM with elastic joints (FRMEJ is proposed, which considers the elastic properties of the connecting joints between the flexible arm and the driving base, as well as the harmonic disturbances aroused by the electromechanical coupling effect. As a consequence, the FRMEJ accordingly remains a flexible multibody system which conveys the effects of rigid-flexible couple and electromechanical couple. The Lagrangian function and Hamilton’s principle are used to establish the dynamic model of the FRMEJ. Based on the dynamic model proposed, the vibration power flow is introduced to show the vibration energy distribution. Numerical simulations are conducted to investigate the effect of the joint elasticities and the disturbance excitations, and the influences of the structure parameters and motion parameters on the vibration power flow are studied. The results obtained in this paper contribute to the structure design, motion optimization, and vibration control of FRMs.

  5. Synchronization of Two Non-Identical Coupled Exciters in a Non-Resonant Vibrating System of Linear Motion. Part I: Theoretical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunyu Zhao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper an analytical approach is proposed to study the feature of frequency capture of two non-identical coupled exciters in a non-resonant vibrating system. The electromagnetic torque of an induction motor in the quasi-steady-state operation is derived. With the introduction of two perturbation small parameters to average angular velocity of two exciters and their phase difference, we deduce the Equation of Frequency Capture by averaging two motion equations of two exciters over their average period. It converts the synchronization problem of two exciters into that of existence and stability of zero solution for the Equation of Frequency Capture. The conditions of implementing frequency capture and that of stabilizing synchronous operation of two motors have been derived. The concept of torque of frequency capture is proposed to physically explain the peculiarity of self-synchronization of the two exciters. An interesting conclusion is reached that the moments of inertia of the two exciters in the Equation of Frequency Capture reduce and there is a coupling moment of inertia between the two exciters. The reduction of moments of inertia and the coupling moment of inertia have an effect on the stability of synchronous operation.

  6. Electron-excited molecule interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christophorou, L.G.; Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN

    1991-01-01

    In this paper the limited but significant knowledge to date on electron scattering from vibrationally/rotationally excited molecules and electron scattering from and electron impact ionization of electronically excited molecules is briefly summarized and discussed. The profound effects of the internal energy content of a molecule on its electron attachment properties are highlighted focusing in particular on electron attachment to vibrationally/rotationally and to electronically excited molecules. The limited knowledge to date on electron-excited molecule interactions clearly shows that the cross sections for certain electron-molecule collision processes can be very different from those involving ground state molecules. For example, optically enhanced electron attachment studies have shown that electron attachment to electronically excited molecules can occur with cross sections 10 6 to 10 7 times larger compared to ground state molecules. The study of electron-excited molecule interactions offers many experimental and theoretical challenges and opportunities and is both of fundamental and technological significance. 54 refs., 15 figs

  7. Targeted energy transfer in laminar vortex-induced vibration of a sprung cylinder with a nonlinear dissipative rotator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Antoine; Bergman, Lawrence A.; Vakakis, Alexander F.

    2017-07-01

    We computationally investigate the dynamics of a linearly-sprung circular cylinder immersed in an incompressible flow and undergoing transverse vortex-induced vibration (VIV), to which is attached a rotational nonlinear energy sink (NES) consisting of a mass that freely rotates at constant radius about the cylinder axis, and whose motion is restrained by a rotational linear viscous damper. The inertial coupling between the rotational motion of the attached mass and the rectilinear motion of the cylinder is ;essentially nonlinear;, which, in conjunction with dissipation, allows for one-way, nearly irreversible targeted energy transfer (TET) from the oscillating cylinder to the nonlinear dissipative attachment. At the intermediate Reynolds number Re = 100, the NES-equipped sprung cylinder undergoes repetitive cycles of slowly decaying oscillations punctuated by intervals of chaotic instabilities. During the slowly decaying portion of each cycle, the dynamics of the cylinder is regular and, for large enough values of the ratio ε of the NES mass to the total mass (i.e., NES mass plus cylinder mass), can lead to significant vortex street elongation with partial stabilization of the wake. As ε approaches zero, no such vortex elongation is observed and the wake patterns appear similar to that for a sprung cylinder with no NES. We apply proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) to the velocity flow field during a slowly decaying portion of the solution and show that, in situations where vortex elongation occurs, the NES, though not in direct contact with the surrounding fluid, has a drastic effect on the underlying flow structures, imparting significant and continuous passive redistribution of energy among POD modes. We construct a POD-based reduced-order model for the lift coefficient to characterize energy transactions between the fluid and the cylinder throughout the slowly decaying cycle. We introduce a quantitative signed measure of the work done by the fluid on the

  8. The Nonsmooth Vibration of a Relative Rotation System with Backlash and Dry Friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minjia He

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a relative rotation system with backlash and dry friction. Firstly, the corresponding nonsmooth characters are discussed by the differential inclusion theory, and the analytic conditions for stick and nonstick motions are developed to understand the motion switching mechanism. Based on such analytic conditions of motion switching, the influence of the maximal static friction torque and the driving torque on the stick motion is studied. Moreover, the sliding time bifurcation diagrams, duty cycle figures, time history diagrams, and the K-function time history diagram are also presented, which confirm the analytic results. The methodology presented in this paper can be applied to predictions of motions in nonsmooth dynamical systems.

  9. Muon spin rotation studies of electronic excitations and magnetism in the vortex cores of superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonier, J E

    2007-01-01

    The focus of this paper is on recent progress in muon spin rotation (μSR) studies of the vortex cores in type-II superconductors. By comparison of μSR measurements of the vortex core size in a variety of materials with results from techniques that directly probe electronic states, the effect of delocalized quasiparticles on the spatial variation of field in a lattice of interacting vortices has been determined for both single-band and multi-band superconductors. These studies demonstrate the remarkable accuracy of what some still consider an exotic technique. In recent years μSR has also been used to search for magnetism in and around the vortex cores of high-temperature superconductors. As a local probe μSR is specially suited for detecting static or quasistatic magnetism having short-range or random spatial correlations. As discussed in this review, μSR experiments support a generic phase diagram of competing superconducting and magnetic order parameters, characterized by a quantum phase transition to a state where the competing order is spatially nonuniform

  10. Analysis of the Rotational Spectrum of HDO in its v_2 = 0 and 1 Vibrational States up to 2.8 THz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Holger S. P.; Brünken, S.; Endres, C. P.; Lewen, F.; Pearson, J. C.; Yu, S.; Drouin, B. J.; Mäder, H.

    2011-06-01

    The rotational and rovibrational spectra of H_2O and its isotopologs, including HDO, are of great importance for atmospheric chemistry, astrophysics, and basic sciences. We recorded rotational spectra of HDO in the ground and first excited bending state from the microwave region up to 2.8 THz. Several spectrometers were employed in Kiel, Köln, and Pasadena. An up-to-date combined analysis with rovibrational data was presented, footnote{S. Brünken, PhD thesis, Universität zu Köln, July 2005, Cuvillier Verlag, Göttingen} in which a Hamiltonian based on Euler functions was used to overcome convergence difficulties of the conventional Watson Hamiltonian. The model had been employed previously, e. g., in a related analysis of D_2O spectra with v_2 ≤ 1. Recently, many more data have been obtained in Köln as well as in Pasadena. Including multiple measurements, these add up to about 230 and 100 new transition frequencies in v_2 = 0 and 1, respectively, reaching J = 17/13 and K_a = 9/5. In addition, a critically evaluated compilation of IR data was published very recently. Difficulties in reproducing the data within experimental uncertainties prompted a reanalysis of the data starting at small quantum numbers and extending the data set in small portions. At lower quantum numbers, difficulties were due to, e. g., few typographical errors and misassignments. At higher quantum numbers, interactions between v_2 = 0 and 1 as well as between these and higher states (e. g. v_2 = 2/v_1 = 1, which interact through Fermi resonance) are more important. The limitation of the present analysis to the lowest two vibrational states affords some transitions to be excluded from the analysis and causes a truncation of the data set at some values of J and K_a. S. Brünken, PhD thesis, Universität zu Köln, July 2005, Cuvillier Verlag, Göttingen H. M. Pickett, J. C. Pearson, C. P. Miller, J. Mol. Spectrosc. 233 (2005) 174. J. Tennyson et al., J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 111

  11. Performance Analysis of Wind-Induced Piezoelectric Vibration Bimorph Cantilever for Rotating Machinery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gongbo Zhou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Harvesting the energy contained in the running environment of rotating machinery would be a good way to supplement energy to the wireless sensor. In this paper, we take piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam with parallel connection mode as energy collector and analyze the factors which can influence the generation performance. First, a modal response theory model is built. Second, the static analysis, modal analysis, and piezoelectric harmonic response analysis of the wind-induced piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam are given in detail. Finally, an experiment is also conducted. The results show that wind-induced piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam has low resonant frequency and stable output under the first modal mode and can achieve the maximum output voltage under the resonant condition. The output voltage increases with the increase of the length and width of wind-induced piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam, but the latter increasing amplitude is relatively smaller. In addition, the output voltage decreases with the increase of the thickness and the ratio of metal substrate to piezoelectric patches thickness. The experiment showed that the voltage amplitude generated by the piezoelectric bimorph cantilever beam can reach the value simulated in ANSYS, which is suitable for actual working conditions.

  12. Fluid dynamic forces acting on a circular tube bundle in cross flow. Proposals of generation condition of vortex-induced vibration and correlation equation of turbulence-induced exciting force

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inada, Fumio; Yoneda, Kimitoshi; Yasuo, Akira; Nishihara, Takashi

    2000-01-01

    In the circular tube bundle immersed in the crossflow, the exciting force induced by the turbulence and periodically discharged vortices becomes large, and it is necessary to confirm a long-term integrity to the flow induced vibration. In this report, the local fluid exciting force and the correlation length in the direction of tube axis were measured. The exciting force acting on the first row was smaller than that inside the tube bundle, and the exciting force was almost saturated at the third row. As for vortex induced vibration, there could be an influence when a dimensionless frequency was 0.4 or less. When vortex induced vibration did not affect the vibration, a correlation composed of a correlation length and power spectrum density of the local fluid exciting force were proposed, with which we could estimate the amplitude of the vibration. A computer program to estimate the vibration amplitude and maximum stress was made using the flow velocity distribution and the mode of vibration. (author)

  13. Extended Thermodynamics of Rarefied Polyatomic Gases: 15-Field Theory Incorporating Relaxation Processes of Molecular Rotation and Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Arima

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available After summarizing the present status of Rational Extended Thermodynamics (RET of gases, which is an endeavor to generalize the Navier–Stokes and Fourier (NSF theory of viscous heat-conducting fluids, we develop the molecular RET theory of rarefied polyatomic gases with 15 independent fields. The theory is justified, at mesoscopic level, by a generalized Boltzmann equation in which the distribution function depends on two internal variables that take into account the energy exchange among the different molecular modes of a gas, that is, translational, rotational, and vibrational modes. By adopting the generalized Bhatnagar, Gross and Krook (BGK-type collision term, we derive explicitly the closed system of field equations with the use of the Maximum Entropy Principle (MEP. The NSF theory is derived from the RET theory as a limiting case of small relaxation times via the Maxwellian iteration. The relaxation times introduced in the theory are shown to be related to the shear and bulk viscosities and heat conductivity.

  14. Vibration analysis of rotating functionally graded Timoshenko microbeam based on modified couple stress theory under different temperature distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiri, Majid; Shafiei, Navvab

    2016-04-01

    In this study, thermal vibration of rotary functionally graded Timoshenko microbeam has been analyzed based on modified couple stress theory considering temperature change in four types of temperature distribution on thermal environment. Material properties of FG microbeam are supposed to be temperature dependent and vary continuously along the thickness according to the power-law form. The axial forces are also included in the model as the thermal and true spatial variation due to the rotation. Governing equations and boundary conditions have been derived by employing Hamiltonian's principle. The differential quadrature method is employed to solve the governing equations for cantilever and propped cantilever boundary conditions. Validations are done by comparing available literatures and obtained results which indicate accuracy of applied method. Results represent effects of temperature changes, different boundary conditions, nondimensional angular velocity, length scale parameter, different boundary conditions, FG index and beam thickness on fundamental, second and third nondimensional frequencies. Results determine critical values of temperature changes and other essential parameters which can be applicable to design micromachines like micromotor and microturbine.

  15. The vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of N2-H2O and N2-D2O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Gang; Carrington, Tucker

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we report vibration-rotation-tunneling levels of the van der Waals clusters N2-H2O and N2-D2O computed from an ab initio potential energy surface. The only dynamical approximation is that the monomers are rigid. We use a symmetry adapted Lanczos algorithm and an uncoupled product basis set. The pattern of the cluster's levels is complicated by splittings caused by H-H exchange tunneling (larger splitting) and N-N exchange tunneling (smaller splitting). An interesting result that emerges from our calculation is that whereas in N2-H2O, the symmetric H-H tunnelling state is below the anti-symmetric H-H tunnelling state for both K = 0 and K = 1, the order is reversed in N2-D2O for K = 1. The only experimental splitting measurements are the D-D exchange tunneling splittings reported by Zhu et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 139, 214309 (2013)] for N2-D2O in the v2 = 1 region of D2O. Due to the inverted order of the split levels, they measure the sum of the K = 0 and K = 1 tunneling splittings, which is in excellent agreement with our calculated result. Other splittings we predict, in particular those of N2-H2O, may guide future experiments.

  16. Rotational spectroscopy with an optical centrifuge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korobenko, Aleksey; Milner, Alexander A; Hepburn, John W; Milner, Valery

    2014-03-07

    We demonstrate a new spectroscopic method for studying electronic transitions in molecules with extremely broad range of angular momentum. We employ an optical centrifuge to create narrow rotational wave packets in the ground electronic state of (16)O2. Using the technique of resonance-enhanced multi-photon ionization, we record the spectrum of multiple ro-vibrational transitions between X(3)Σg(-) and C(3)Πg electronic manifolds of oxygen. Direct control of rotational excitation, extending to rotational quantum numbers as high as N ≳ 120, enables us to interpret the complex structure of rotational spectra of C(3)Πg beyond thermally accessible levels.

  17. Electron-impact excitation of molecular ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neufeld, D.A.; Dalgarno, A.

    1989-01-01

    A simple expression is derived that relates the rate coefficient for dipole-allowed electron-impact excitation of a molecular ion in the Coulomb-Born approximation to the Einstein A coefficient for the corresponding radiative decay. Results are given for several molecular ions of astrophysical interest. A general analytic expression is obtained for the equilibrium rotational level populations in the ground vibrational state of any molecular ion excited by collisions with electrons. The expression depends only upon the electron temperature, the electron density, and the rotational constant of the molecular ion. A similar expression is obtained for neutral polar molecules

  18. Description of low-lying states in odd-odd deformed nuclei taking account of the coupling with core rotations and vibrations. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvasil, J.; Hrivnacova, I.; Nesterenko, V.O.

    1990-01-01

    The microscopic approach for description of low-lyinig states in deformed odd-odd nuclei is formulated as a generalization of the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) with including the rotational degrees of freedom and n-p interaction between external nucleons into the QPM. In comparison with other models, the approach proposed includes all three the most important effects coupling with rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom of doubly-even core and p-n interaction mentioned above even treates them on the microscopic base. 36 refs

  19. Femtosecond time-resolved studies of coherent vibrational Raman scattering in large gas-phase molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayden, C.C.; Chandler, D.W.

    1995-01-01

    Results are presented from femtosecond time-resolved coherent Raman experiments in which we excite and monitor vibrational coherence in gas-phase samples of benzene and 1,3,5-hexatriene. Different physical mechanisms for coherence decay are seen in these two molecules. In benzene, where the Raman polarizability is largely isotropic, the Q branch of the vibrational Raman spectrum is the primary feature excited. Molecules in different rotational states have different Q-branch transition frequencies due to vibration--rotation interaction. Thus, the macroscopic polarization that is observed in these experiments decays because it has many frequency components from molecules in different rotational states, and these frequency components go out of phase with each other. In 1,3,5-hexatriene, the Raman excitation produces molecules in a coherent superposition of rotational states, through (O, P, R, and S branch) transitions that are strong due to the large anisotropy of the Raman polarizability. The coherent superposition of rotational states corresponds to initially spatially oriented, vibrationally excited, molecules that are freely rotating. The rotation of molecules away from the initial orientation is primarily responsible for the coherence decay in this case. These experiments produce large (∼10% efficiency) Raman shifted signals with modest excitation pulse energies (10 μJ) demonstrating the feasibility of this approach for a variety of gas phase studies. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  20. Evolution of disturbances in the shock layer on a flat plate in the flow of a mixture of vibrationally excited gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirilovskiy, S. V.; Poplavskaya, T. V.; Tsyryulnikov, I. S.; Maslov, A. A.

    2017-05-01

    The results of the numerical and experimental investigations of the evolution of the disturbances in a hypersonic shock layer on a flat plate streamlined by a flow of the mixture of vibrationally excited gases are presented. The experimental study was conducted in the hot-shot high-enthalpy wind tunnel IT-302 of the ITAM SB RAS. The numerical simulation was carried out with the aid of the ANSYS Fluent package using the solution of the unsteady two-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations with the incorporation of the user-created modules and enabling the consideration of the vibrational non-equilibrium of the carbon dioxide molecules within the framework of the model of the two-temperature aerodynamics. It was obtained that an increase in the carbon dioxide concentration in the mixture with air leads to a reduction of the intensity of pressure disturbances on the surface. The efficiency (up to 20 %) of the method of sound absorbing coatings in the vibrationally excited flows of the mixture of the carbon dioxide and air has been shown.