WorldWideScience

Sample records for vibrational raman scattering

  1. Epi-detection of vibrational phase contrast coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a system for the phase-resolved epi-detection of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in highly scattering and/or thick samples. With this setup, we measure the complex vibrational responses of multiple components in a thick, highly-scattering pharmaceutical tablet in

  2. Revealing silent vibration modes of nanomaterials by detecting anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with femtosecond laser pulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jianhua; Chen, Lei; Dai, Qiaofeng; Lan, Sheng; Tie, Shaolong

    2016-01-21

    We proposed a scheme in which normal Raman scattering is coupled with hyper-Raman scattering for generating a strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering in nanomaterials by using femtosecond laser pulses. The proposal was experimentally demonstrated by using a single-layer MoS2 on a SiO2/Si substrate, a 17 nm-thick MoS2 on an Au/SiO2 substrate and a 9 nm-thick MoS2 on a SiO2-SnO2/Ag/SiO2 substrate which were confirmed to be highly efficient for second harmonic generation. A strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering was also observed in other nanomaterials possessing large second-order susceptibilities, such as silicon quantum dots self-assembled into "coffee" rings and tubular Cu-doped ZnO nanorods. In all the cases, many Raman inactive vibration modes were clearly revealed in the anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering. Apart from the strong anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering, Stokes hyper-Raman scattering with small Raman shifts was detected during the ablation process of thick MoS2 layers. It was also observed by slightly defocusing the excitation light. The detection of anti-Stokes hyper-Raman scattering may serve as a new technique for studying the Raman inactive vibration modes in nanomaterials.

  3. The impact of vibrational Raman scattering of air on DOAS measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, J.; Frieß, U.; Platt, U.

    2015-09-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered. After inelastic scattering on N2 and O2 molecules, the scattered photons occur as additional intensity at a different wavelength, effectively leading to "filling-in" of both solar Fraunhofer lines and absorptions of atmospheric constituents, if the inelastic scattering happens after the absorption. Measured spectra in passive DOAS applications are typically corrected for rotational Raman scattering (RRS), also called Ring effect, which represents the main contribution to inelastic scattering. Inelastic scattering can also occur in liquid water, and its influence on DOAS measurements has been observed over clear ocean water. In contrast to that, vibrational Raman scattering (VRS) of N2 and O2 has often been thought to be negligible, but it also contributes. Consequences of VRS are red-shifted Fraunhofer structures in scattered light spectra and filling-in of Fraunhofer lines, additional to RRS. At 393 nm, the spectral shift is 25 and 40 nm for VRS of O2 and N2, respectively. We describe how to calculate VRS correction spectra according to the Ring spectrum. We use the VRS correction spectra in the spectral range of 420-440 nm to determine the relative magnitude of the cross-sections of VRS of O2 and N2 and RRS of air. The effect of VRS is shown for the first time in spectral evaluations of Multi-Axis DOAS data from the SOPRAN M91 campaign and the MAD-CAT MAX-DOAS intercomparison campaign. The measurements yield in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections that the observed VRS(N2) cross-section at 393 nm amounts to 2.3 ± 0.4 % of the cross-section of RRS at 433 nm under tropospheric conditions. The contribution of VRS(O2) is also found to be in agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections. It is concluded, that this phenomenon has to be included in the spectral evaluation of weak absorbers as it

  4. Adsorption and Vibrational Study of Folic Acid on Gold Nanopillar Structures Using Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Castillo, John J.; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Rozo, Ciro E.

    2015-01-01

    on the nanopillars within the high electromagnetic field areas. The adsorption behaviour of folic acid and the band assignment of the main vibrations together with the optimized geometry of folic acid and folic acid in the presence of a cluster of 10 gold atoms were assessed using the density functional theory (B3......This paper presents a study of adsorption and vibrational features of folic acid, using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A gold-capped silicon nanopillar (Au NP) with a height of 600 nm and a width of 120 nm was utilized to study the vibrational features of FA molecules adsorbed......LYP(6-31G(d))) and the scalar relativistic effective core potential with a double-zeta basis set (LANL2DZ). The vibrations obtained from the solid-state folic acid and the folic acid on a gold cluster were in accordance with those observed experimentally. The analysis of the main vibrations indicated...

  5. Anomalous lattice vibrations of monolayer MoS 2 probed by ultraviolet Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Hsiang Lin

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive Raman scattering study of monolayer MoS2 with increasing laser excitation energies ranging from the near-infrared to the deep-ultraviolet. The Raman scattering intensities from the second-order phonon modes are revealed to be enhanced anomalously by only the ultraviolet excitation wavelength 354 nm. We demonstrate theoretically that such resonant behavior arises from a strong optical absorption that forms near the Γ point and of the band structure and an inter-valley resonant electronic scattering by the M-point phonons. These results advance our understanding of the double resonance Raman scattering process in low-dimensional semiconducting nanomaterials and provide a foundation for the technological development of monolayer MoS2 in the ultraviolet frequency range. © the Owner Societies 2015.

  6. Controlling cross pumping between C-N and C-H vibration in nitromethane by selective fluorescence-enhanced stimulated Raman scattering

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Shenghan; Fang, Wenhui; Li, Tianyu; Li, Fangfang; Sun, Chenglin; Li, Zuowei; Men, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the vibrational features of nitromethane (NM), which is a kind of energy material and a well known low-sensitivity and high explosive, experiments are performed to obtain the stimulated Raman scattering (SRS...

  7. Impact of input field characteristics on vibrational femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering thermometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao-Bo; He, Ping; Escofet-Martin, David; Peng, Jiang-Bo; Fan, Rong-Wei; Yu, Xin; Dunn-Rankin, Derek

    2018-01-10

    In this paper, three ultrashort-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) thermometry approaches are summarized with a theoretical time-domain model. The difference between the approaches can be attributed to variations in the input field characteristics of the time-domain model. That is, all three approaches of ultrashort-pulse (CARS) thermometry can be simulated with the unified model by only changing the input fields features. As a specific example, the hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS is assessed for its use in combustion flow diagnostics; thus, the examination of the input field has an impact on thermometry focuses on vibrational hybrid femtosecond/picosecond CARS. Beginning with the general model of ultrashort-pulse CARS, the spectra with different input field parameters are simulated. To analyze the temperature measurement error brought by the input field impacts, the spectra are fitted and compared to fits, with the model neglecting the influence introduced by the input fields. The results demonstrate that, however the input pulses are depicted, temperature errors still would be introduced during an experiment. With proper field characterization, however, the significance of the error can be reduced.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Furtak, Thomas

    1982-01-01

    In the course of the development of surface science, advances have been identified with the introduction of new diagnostic probes for analytical characterization of the adsorbates and microscopic structure of surfaces and interfaces. Among the most recently de­ veloped techniques, and one around which a storm of controversy has developed, is what has now been earmarked as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Within this phenomenon, molecules adsorbed onto metal surfaces under certain conditions exhibit an anomalously large interaction cross section for the Raman effect. This makes it possible to observe the detailed vibrational signature of the adsorbate in the ambient phase with an energy resolution much higher than that which is presently available in electron energy loss spectroscopy and when the surface is in contact with a much larger amount of material than that which can be tolerated in infrared absorption experiments. The ability to perform vibrational spectroscopy under these conditions would l...

  9. Vibrational Phase Contrast Microscopy by Use of Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cornelis; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2009-01-01

    In biological samples the resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signal of less abundant constituents can be overwhelmed by the nonresonant background, preventing detection of those molecules. We demonstrate a method to obtain the phase of the oscillators in the focal volume that allows

  10. Low-frequency vibrational excitations in the amorphous and crystalline states of triphenyl phosphite: A neutron and Raman scattering investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hédoux, Alain; Derollez, Patrick; Guinet, Yannick; Dianoux, Albert José; Descamps, Marc

    2001-04-01

    The vibrational density of states in the triphenyl phosphite, measured by inelastic neutron scattering, were obtained during isothermal aging at Ta=210, 213, and 216 K. The low-frequency ωn behavior of the vibrational density of states was observed to be time dependent. This is suggestive of an abortive crystallization process because the ω exponent has not reached the characteristic value of the crystalline state (n=2) at the end of the transformation. The confrontation of inelastic neutron scattering and Raman data in the low-frequency range reveals interesting information about the structural organization in the liquid, the glass, the undercooled liquid, and the glacial state, through the observation of the boson peak.

  11. On the impact of Vibrational Raman Scattering of N2/O2 on MAX-DOAS Measurements of atmospheric trace gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampel, Johannes; Zielcke, Johannes; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In remote sensing applications, such as the applications of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), atmospheric scattering processes need to be considered since they can modify the observed spectra. Inelastic scattering of photons by N2 and O2 molecules can be observed as additional intensity, effectively leading to filling-in of both, solar Fraunhofer lines and absorption bands of atmospheric constituents. The main contribution is due to rotational Raman scattering, which can lead to changes in observed optical densities of absorption lines up to several percent. Measured optical densities are typically corrected for this effect (also known as Ring Effect). In contrast to that Vibrational Raman scattering of N2 and O2 was often thought to be negligible, but also contributes to this effect. We present calculations of Vibrational Raman cross-sections for O2 and N2 for the application in passive DOAS measurements. Consequences of vibrational Raman scattering are red-shifted Fraunhofer structures, so called 'Fraunhofer Ghost' lines (FGL), in scattered light spectra and filling-in of Fraunhofer lines, additional to rotational Raman scattering. We also present first unequivocal observations of FGL at optical densities of up to several 104. From our measurements and calculations of the optical density of these FGL, we conclude, that this phenomenon has to be included in the spectral evaluation of weak absorbers. Its relevance is demonstrated in spectral evaluations of Multi-Axis (MAX)-DOAS data and an agreement with calculated scattering cross-sections is found. To exclude cross-sensitivities with other absorbers, such as water vapour, MAX-DOAS data from different latitudes and different instruments were analysed. We evaluate the influence of the additional intensities due to vibrational Raman scattering on the spectral retrieval of IO, Glyoxal, H2O and NO2 in the blue wavelength range. In the case of NO2 the column densities derived from certain wavelength

  12. Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, D.F.

    1988-09-30

    A tutorial presentation is given of Raman scattering in crystals. The physical concepts are emphasized rather than the detailed mathematical formalism. Starting with an introduction to the concepts of phonons and conservation laws, the effects of photon-phonon interactions are presented. This interaction concept is shown for a simple cubic crystal and is extended to a uniaxial crystal. The correlation table method is used for determining the number and symmetry of the Raman active modes. Finally, examples are given to illustrate the relative ease of using this group theoretical method and the predictions are compared with measured Raman spectra. 37 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Visualizing Resonances in the Complex Plane with Vibrational Phase Contrast Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jurna, M.; Garbacik, E.T.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2010-01-01

    In coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), the emitted signal carries both amplitude and phase information of the molecules in the focal volume. Most CARS experiments ignore the phase component, but its detection allows for two advantages over intensity-only CARS. First, the pure resonant

  14. Anomalous vibrational modes in few layer WTe2 revealed by polarized Raman scattering and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yan; Sheremetyeva, Natalya; Liang, Liangbo; Yuan, Hui; Zhong, Tingting; Meunier, Vincent; Pan, Minghu

    2017-09-01

    When layered transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) are scaled down from a three- to a 2D geometry, electronic and structural transitions occur, leading to the emergence of properties not usually found in the bulk. Here, we report a systematic Raman study of exfoliated semi-metallic WTe2 flakes with thickness ranging from few layers down to a single layer. A dramatic change in the Raman spectra occurs between the monolayer and few-layer WTe2 as a vibrational mode centered at ~86.9 cm-1 in the monolayer splits into two active modes at 82.9 and 89.6 cm-1 in the bilayer. Davydov splitting of these two modes is found in the bilayer, as further evidenced by polarized Raman measurements. Strong angular dependence of Raman modes on the WTe2 film thickness reflects that the existence of directional interlayer interaction, rather than isotropic van der Waals (vdw) coupling, is playing an essential role affecting the phonon modes, especially in anisotropic 2D WTe2 material. Therefore, the strong evolution of Raman modes with thickness and polarization direction, can not only be a reliable fingerprint for the determination of the thickness and the crystallographic orientation, but can also be an ideal probe for such strong and directional interlayer interaction.

  15. Characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from hydrogen-filled hollow-core fiber by vibrational stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Bo; Chen, Yubin; Wang, Zefeng

    2016-12-01

    We report here the characteristics of 1.9-μm laser emission from a gas-filled hollow-core fiber by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). A 6.5-m hydrogen-filled ice-cream negative curvature hollow-core fiber is pumped with a high peak-power, narrow linewidth, linearly polarized subnanosecond pulsed 1064-nm microchip laser, generating a pulsed vibrational Stokes wave at 1908.5 nm. The maximum quantum efficiency of about 48% is obtained, which is mainly limited by the mode mismatch between the pump laser beam and the Stokes wave in the hollow-core fiber. The linewidths of the pump laser and the first-order vibrational Stokes wave are measured to be about 1 and 2 GHz, respectively, by a scanning Fabry-Perot interferometer. The pressure selection phenomenon of the vibrational anti-Stokes waves is also investigated. The pulse duration of the vibrational Stokes wave is recorded to be narrower than that of the pump laser. The polarization properties of the hollow-core fiber and the polarization dependence of the vibrational and the rotational SRS are also studied. The beam profile of the vibrational Stokes wave shows good quality.

  16. A new SERS: scattering enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, Joel N.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2014-03-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a powerful technique that can be used to obtain detailed chemical information about a system without the need for chemical markers. It has been widely used for a variety of applications such as cancer diagnosis and material characterization. However, Raman scattering is a highly inefficient process, where only one in 1011 scattered photons carry the needed information. Several methods have been developed to enhance this inherently weak effect, including surface enhanced Raman scattering and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. These techniques suffer from drawbacks limiting their commercial use, such as the need for spatial localization of target molecules to a `hot spot', or the need for complex laser systems. Here, we present a simple instrument to enhance spontaneous Raman scattering using elastic light scattering. Elastic scattering is used to substantially increase the interaction volume. Provided that the scattering medium exhibits very low absorption in the spectral range of interest, a large enhancement factor can be attained in a simple and inexpensive setting. In our experiments, we demonstrate an enhancement of 107 in Raman signal intensity. The proposed novel device is equally applicable for analyzing solids, liquids, and gases.

  17. Modeling Raman scattering in porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Miguel [Seccion de Estudios de Posgrado, ESIME-Culhuacan, IPN, Av. Santa Ana 1000, 04430, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Wang, Chumin [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, A.P. 70-360, 04510, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-06-01

    In this work, we model the Raman scattering by phonons using the Born potential and the Green's function formalism, which takes into account the long-range correlation of atomic vibrations. The porous silicon is viewed as a sponge, in which periodical column pores are dug in direction [001] from crystalline silicon, i.e., a supercell model is used to calculate the Raman response. The results show that the main Raman peak shifts to lower energies when the porosity increases, and for square pores it asymptotically approaches to a limit value of 475 cm{sup -1}. Finally, the supercell results are compared with the quantum wire model, in which the main Raman peaks move to higher energies as the width of the wires grows. (copyright 2005 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  18. Vibration-free Raman Doppler velocimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exton, R. J.

    1986-11-01

    A method and apparatus unaffected by vibrational environments for obtaining measurements using Raman Doppler Velocimetry is described. Two laser beams, a pump beam, and a probe beam, are focused by a lens to a point in a flow. A lens collimates the two beams. A beam splitter dumps the beam and the other beam is reflected by a corner cube back to the lens. The other lens then focuses the beam back to the point. The reflected beam and the backward and forward scattering at the point are detected by a detector and processed by a boxcar averager. The lens and corner cube combination, called a retrometer, ensure that the measurements are unaffected by vibrations.

  19. QED description of Raman scattering from molecules in plasmonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, Mikolaj K; Gonzalez-Tudela, Alejandro; Giedke, Geza; Aizpurua, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering can push single-molecule vibrational spectroscopy beyond a regime addressable by classical electrodynamics. We employ a quantum electrodynamics (QED) description of the coherent interaction of plasmons and molecular vibrations that reveal the emergence of nonlinearities in the inelastic response of the system. For realistic situations, we predict the onset of \\textit{phonon-stimulated Raman scattering} and an counter-intuitive dependence of the anti-Stokes emission on the frequency of excitation. We further show that this novel QED framework opens a venue to analyze the correlations of photons emitted at a plasmonic cavity

  20. Energetics, structures, vibrational frequencies, vibrational absorption, vibrational circular dichroism and Raman intensities of Leu-enkephalin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.

    2003-01-01

    Here we present several low energy conformers of Leu-enkephalin (LeuE) calculated with the density functional theory using the Becke 3LYP hybrid functional and the 6-31G* basis set. The structures, conformational energies, vibrational frequencies, vibrational absorption (VA) intensities......, vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) intensities and Raman scattering intensities are reported for the conformers of LeuE which are expected to be populated at room temperature. The species of LeuE-present in non-polar solvents is the neutral non-ionic species with the NH2 and CO2H groups, in contrast...... to the zwitterionic neutral species with the NH3+ and CO2- groups which predominates in aqueous solution and in the crystal. All of our attempts to find the zwitterionic species in the isolated state failed, with the result that a hydrogen atom from the positively charged N-terminus ammonium group transferred either...

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a new optical probe in molecular biophysics and biomedicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, J.; Wittig, B.; Bohr, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    Sensitive and detailed molecular structural information plays an increasing role in molecular biophysics and molecular medicine. Therefore, vibrational spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, which provide high structural information content are of growing interest in biophysical...

  2. Three-beam double stimulated Raman scatterings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Minhaeng

    2018-01-07

    Two-beam stimulated Raman scattering with pump and Stokes beams is manifest in both the Raman loss of the pump beam and the Raman gain of the Stokes beam, and it has been used in various label-free bioimaging applications. Here, a three-beam stimulated Raman scattering that involves pump, Stokes, and depletion beams is considered, where two stimulated Raman gain-loss processes are deliberately made to compete with each other. It is shown that the three-beam Raman scattering process can be described by coupled differential equations for the increased numbers of Stokes and depletion beam photons. From approximate solutions of the coupled differential equations and numerical calculation results, it is shown that a highly efficient suppression of the Stokes Raman gain is possible by using an intense depletion beam whose frequency difference from that of the pump beam is identical to another acceptor Raman mode frequency. I anticipate that the present work will provide a theoretical framework for super-resolution stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

  3. Contrast in coherent raman scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is becoming a widely used technique for sub-micron, chemically-selective imaging at high rates of speed In this thesis I discuss three methods for increasing the specificity and selectivity of coherent Raman experiments. The first method is the

  4. Structure and behaviour of proteins, nucleic acids and viruses from vibrational Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barron, L.D.; Blanch, E.W.; McColl, I.H.

    2003-01-01

    On account of its sensitivity to chirality Raman optical activity (ROA), which may be measured as a small difference in vibrational Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized incident light, is a powerful probe of structure and behaviour of biomolecules in aque...

  5. Raman Scattering of Inorganic Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    SASAKI, Yoshiro; Sato, Mitsuhiko; OKAMURA, Kiyohito; NISHINA, Yuichiro

    1985-01-01

    We have examined evolution of Raman spectra of carbon fibers and SiC fibers through structural transformations caused by heat treatment. Raman spectra of the SiC fibers indicate that the fibers consist of amorphous or microcrystalline SiC and graphitic microcrystals. We discuss the correlation between the tensile strength of the fibers and their microscopic structure deduced from the Raman data.

  6. Raman scattering in right angle configuration on Cu2ZnSiSe4 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guc, M.; Levcenko, S.; Zalamai, V.; Arushanov, E.; Syrbu, N. N.

    2017-11-01

    Polarized Raman scattering and resonance Raman scattering spectra of Cu2ZnSiSe4 crystals measured at temperature 300 and 10 K were investigated. Nine vibrational modes of A2 symmetry, seven modes of B2 symmetry and nine modes of B1 symmetry were determined in Raman spectra taken at right angle configuration from the (2 1 0) crystal plane. A resonance Raman scattering with participation of 2LO, 3LO and more phonons was observed at photon energies higher than the ground state of exciton transition at low temperature.

  7. Enhanced Raman Scattering by Molecular Nanoaggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Akins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The formation of a molecular aggregate in a confined, nanodimensioned region of space leads to what might be termed a ‘molecular nanoaggregate’. The present review deals with a theoretical formulation termed ‘aggregation-enhanced Raman scattering’ (AERS, and its use in discussion of relative Raman band intensities and selection rules for nanoaggregates. AERs represents a concept for discussion of nanoaggregates that is different from those provided by resonance Raman scattering, surface-enhanced Raman scattering and Mie scattering, all of which ignore the impact of aggregation of molecules on Raman scattering. Beyond the theoretical formulation behind the AERS phenomenon, also outlined in this review are representative samples of the publications of other authors and researchers using AERS to provide explanations for experimental findings. In addition to clarifying issues regarding the use of nanocomposites involving aggregated molecules, it is found that increasing use of AERS concepts is being made to rationalize Raman spectral observations in a range of other disciplines that fall in both the physical sciences and the medical fields.

  8. Raman Scattering Study of Lattice Vibrations in the Type-II Superlattice InAs /InAs1 -xSbx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Henan; Zhang, Yong; Steenbergen, Elizabeth H.; Liu, Shi; Lin, Zhiyuan; Zhang, Yong-Hang; Kim, Jeomoh; Ji, Mi-Hee; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Kim, Jin K.; Hawkins, Samuel D.; Klem, John F.

    2017-09-01

    The InAs /InAs1 -xSbx superlattice system distinctly differs from two well-studied superlattice systems GaAs /AlAs and InAs /GaSb in terms of electronic band alignment, common elements at the interface, and phonon spectrum overlapping of the constituents. This fact leads to the unique electronic and vibrational properties of the InAs /InAs1 -xSbx system when compared to the other two systems. In this work, we report a polarized Raman study of the vibrational properties of the InAs /InAs1 -xSbx superlattices (SLs) as well as selected InAs1 -xSbx alloys, all grown on GaSb substrates by either MBE or metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) from both the growth surface and cleaved edge. In the SL, from the (001) backscattering geometry, an InAs-like longitudinal optical (LO) mode is observed as the primary feature, and its intensity is found to increase with increasing Sb composition. From the (110) cleaved-edge backscattering geometry, an InAs-like transverse optical (TO) mode is observed as the main feature in two cross-polarization configurations, but an additional InAs-like "forbidden" LO mode is observed in two parallel-polarization configurations. The InAs1 -xSbx alloys lattice matched to the substrate (xSb˜0.09 ) grown by MBE are also found to exhibit the forbidden LO mode, implying the existence of some unexpected [001] modulation. However, the strained samples (xSb˜0.35 ) grown by MOCVD are found to behave like a disordered alloy. The primary conclusions are (1) the InAs-like LO or TO mode can be either a confined or quasiconfined mode in the InAs layers of the SL or extended mode of the whole structure depending on the Sb composition. (2) InAs /InAs1 -xSbx and InAs /GaSb SLs exhibit significantly different behaviors in the cleaved-edge geometry but qualitatively similar in the (001) geometry. (3) The appearance of the forbidden LO-like mode is a universal signature for SLs and bulk systems resulting from the mixing of phonon modes due to structural

  9. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Matthew W. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2013-01-01

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  10. Nanorough gold for enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeonghwan; Kang, Kyung-Nam; Sarkar, Anirban; Malempati, Pallavi; Hah, Dooyoung; Daniels-Race, Theda; Feldman, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Conventional Raman scattering is a workhorse technique for detecting and identifying complex molecular samples. In surface enhanced Raman scattering, a nanorough metallic surface close to the sample enhances the Raman signal enormously. In this work, the surface is on a clear epoxy substrate. The epoxy is cast on a silicon wafer, using 20 nm of gold as a mold release. This single step process already produces useful enhanced Raman signals. However, the Raman signal is further enhanced by (1) depositing additional gold on the epoxy substrate and (2) by using a combination of wet and dry etches to roughen the silicon substrate before casting the epoxy. The advantage of a clear substrate is that the Raman signal may be obtained by passing light through the substrate, with opaque samples simply placed against the surface. Results were obtained with solutions of Rhodamine 6G in deionized water over a range of concentrations from 1 nM to 1 mM. In all cases, the signal to noise ratio was greater than 10:1.

  11. Theory of Spatial Coherence in Near-Field Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Gustavo Cançado

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical study describing the coherence properties of near-field Raman scattering in two- and one-dimensional systems is presented. The model is applied to the Raman modes of pristine graphene and graphene edges. Our analysis is based on the tip-enhanced Raman scheme, in which a sharp metal tip located near the sample surface acts as a broadband optical antenna that transfers the information contained in the spatially correlated (but nonpropagating near field to the far field. The dependence of the scattered signal on the tip-sample separation is explored, and the theory predicts that the signal enhancement depends on the particular symmetry of a vibrational mode. The model can be applied to extract the correlation length L_{c} of optical phonons from experimentally recorded near-field Raman measurements. The coherence properties of optical phonons have been broadly explored in the time and frequency domains, and the spatially resolved approach presented here provides a complementary methodology for the study of local material properties at the nanoscale.

  12. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering in Molecular Junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwane, Madoka; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-08-18

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy that allows Raman spectroscopy on a single molecular scale. Here, we present a review of SERS from molecular junctions, in which a single molecule or molecules are made to have contact from the top to the bottom of metal surfaces. The molecular junctions are nice platforms for SERS as well as transport measurement. Electronic characterization based on the transport measurements of molecular junctions has been extensively studied for the development of miniaturized electronic devices. Simultaneous SERS and transport measurement of the molecular junctions allow both structural (geometrical) and electronic information on the single molecule scale. The improvement of SERS measurement on molecular junctions open the door toward new nanoscience and nanotechnology in molecular electronics.

  13. Using Raman Spectroscopy and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to Identify Colorants in Art: An Experiment for an Upper-Division Chemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayhew, Hannah E.; Frano, Kristen A.; Svoboda, Shelley A.; Wustholz, Kristin L.

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) studies of art represent an attractive way to introduce undergraduate students to concepts in nanoscience, vibrational spectroscopy, and instrumental analysis. Here, we present an undergraduate analytical or physical chemistry laboratory wherein a combination of normal Raman and SERS spectroscopy is used to…

  14. Generation of Pseudoscalar Bosons by Stimulated Raman Scattering of Light in Dielectric Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorelik V.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The conditions of pseudoscalar excitations of liquids and crystals vibration states in spontaneous and stimulated Raman spectra revealing are reported. The selection rules for pseudoscalar modes of molecules and crystals observation have been obtained. The experiments on observation of spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering on pseudoscalar modes of molecules and crystals have been fulfilled. The excitation of stimulated Raman scattering was with using of solid state laser YAG:Nd3+, generating intense (up to 1 TW/cm2 ultrashort (60 ps laser pulses with energy 10 mJ and frequency repetition 10 Hz. The relationship between pseudoscalar bosons of dielectric media and axion of vacuum is analyzed.

  15. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering under electric field stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitaine, Erwan; Ould Moussa, Nawel; Louot, Christophe; Lefort, Claire; Pagnoux, Dominique; Duclère, Jean-René; Kaneyasu, Junya F.; Kano, Hideaki; Duponchel, Ludovic; Couderc, Vincent; Leproux, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    We introduce an experiment using electro-CARS, an electro-optical method based on the combination of ultrabroadband multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (M-CARS) spectroscopy and electric field stimulation. We demonstrate that this method can effectively discriminate the resonant CARS signal from the nonresonant background owing to a phenomenon of molecular orientation in the sample medium. Such molecular orientation is intrinsically related to the induction of an electric dipole moment by the applied static electric field. Evidence of the electro-CARS effect is obtained with a solution of n -alkanes (CnH2 n +2 , 15 ≤n ≤40 ), for which an enhancement of the CARS signal-to-noise ratio is achieved in the case of CH2 and CH3 symmetric/asymmetric stretching vibrations. Additionally, an electric-field-induced second-harmonic generation experiment is performed in order to corroborate the orientational organization of molecules due to the electric field excitation. Finally, we use a simple mathematical approach to compare the vibrational information extracted from electro-CARS measurements with spontaneous Raman data and to highlight the impact of electric stimulation on the vibrational signal.

  16. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in plant virus suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donchenko, E. K.; Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Pershin, S. M.; Savichev, V. I.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2017-11-01

    The study deals with laser pulse interaction with plant viruses: we investigated tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and two types of potato viruses (PVX and PVA) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water. We used 20 ns ruby laser pulses for excitation. We employed Fabry–Pérot interferometers to record spectra of the light passing through the sample and reflected from it. For TMV and PVX in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer, same as for PVA in water, we observed additional spectral lines corresponding to the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS). We believe we were the first to measure SLFRS frequency shifts, conversion efficiency and threshold. High conversion efficiency of the scattered light is evidence of laser pulses efficiently exciting gigahertz vibrations in viruses. SLFRS can be used to identify and affect biological nanoparticles.

  17. Raman scattering in the high T c superconductors MBa 2Cu 3O 7-x

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Merlin, R.; Cardona, M.; Mattausch, Hj.; Bauhofer, W.; Simon, A.; Garcia-Alvarado, F.; Moran, E.; Vallet, M.; Gonzalez-Calbet, J. M.; Alario, M. A.

    1987-09-01

    We report Raman scattering measurements of MBa 2Cu 3O 7 ( M = Y, Sm, Eu) polycrystalline superconductors in the region of Cu-O stretching vibrations. Four peaks are seen. On the basis of the factor group analysis given here they are assigned to two Raman allowed and two ir-allowed LO modes. The latter are probably induced by disorder (e.g. O-vacancies).

  18. Enhancement of the stimulated Raman scattering of benzene, acetonitrile and pyridine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munoz, L; Contreras, W A; Cabanzo, R; Aya-RamIrez, O; Mejia-Ospino, E, E-mail: emejia@uis.edu.co [Laboratorio de Espectroscopia Atomica y Molecular (LEAM) Universidad Industrial de Santander, Escuela de Fisica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Industrial de Santander (UIS). AA. 678 Bucaramanga (Colombia)

    2011-01-01

    In this work we used the second harmonic of Nd:YAG laser to observe stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). SRS was observed on benzene, acetonitrile and pyridine using a single shot laser. The SRS radiation is very intense due their laser characteristics, and it is possible to observe several harmonics of different vibrational modes to each molecule studied here.

  19. Theoretical calculation (DFT), Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of ponceau 4R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yunfei; Li, Yan; Sun, Yingying; Wang, Heya; Qian, He; Yao, Weirong

    2012-10-01

    Ponceau 4R is used as a coloring agent in many different products, such as food, drinks, medicines, cosmetics and tobacco. However, ponceau 4R also shows carcinogenic, teratogenic and mutagenic behavior in high doses. In this work, standard Raman, theoretical Raman and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectra have been used to investigate ponceau 4R. More specifically, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to calculate the optimized Raman spectrum of ponceau 4R at the B3LYP/6-31G(d) level. This has provided a better understanding of the optimized geometry and vibrational frequencies of this dye. In addition, the experimental spectrum of ponceau 4R has been compared with the theoretical spectrum; good agreement was obtained. Finally, it has shown that using SERS the detection limit of the ponceau 4R solution can be as low as 5 μg/mL. This has been achieved by SERS measurements of ponceau 4R on a substrate of gold nanoparticles. The SERS peaks at 1030, 1236, 1356 and 1502 cm-1 were chosen as index for semi-quantitative analysis, showing that the SERS technique provided a useful ultrasensitive method for the detection of ponceau 4R.

  20. Lowering backward Raman and Brillouin scattering in waveguide Raman wavelength converters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phan Huy, Min Châu; Delaye, Philippe; Pauliat, Gilles; Dubreuil, Nicolas; Gérôme, Frédéric; Debord, Benoît; Benabid, Fetah; Lebrun, Sylvie

    2017-01-01

    .... However, and depending on the pulse duration, the optimization of Raman converters turns to be rather challenging since the desired forward Raman scattering may compete with counter-propagating...

  1. Vibrational analysis of various irotopes of L-alanyl-L-alanine in aqueous solution: Vibrational Absorption (VA), Vibrational Circular Dichroism (VCD), Raman and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R.M.; Knapp-Mohammady, M.

    2003-01-01

    been reported. Subsequently, the vibrational absorption (VA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and the Raman and Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra have been reported. In this work an analysis of the aqueous solution VA, VCD, Raman, and ROA spectra for various isotopomers of LALA are reported...... with the experimentally measured spectra. With the DFT, explicit water molecules, and a continuum solvent model we are better able to reproduce the vibrational absorption and Raman spectra than previously reported. The AAT have been implemented at the DFT level, although not within the continuum treatment. The VCD sign...

  2. Raman Scattering in a New Carbon Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, O. A.; Street, K. W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Samples of a new carbon material, Diamonite-B, were fabricated under high pressure from a commercial carbon black--identified as mixed fullerenes. The new material is neither graphite-like nor diamond-like, but exhibits electrical properties close to graphite and mechanical properties close to diamond. The use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate the vibrational dynamics of this new carbon material and to provide structural characterization of its short-, medium- and long-range order is reported. We also provide the results of investigations of these samples by high-resolution electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Hardness, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and other properties of this new material are compared with synthetic graphite-like and diamond-like materials, two other phases of synthetic bulk carbon.

  3. Nanostructured surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates for explosives detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Michael Stenbaek; Olsen, Jesper Kenneth; Boisen, Anja

    2010-01-01

    Here we present a method for trace detection of explosives in the gas phase using novel surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy substrates. Novel substrates that produce an exceptionally large enhancement of the Raman effect were used to amplify the Raman signal of explosives molecu...

  4. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of single nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Iestyn; Payne, Lukas; Zoriniants, George; Thomas, Evan; Williams, Oliver; Watson, Peter; Langbein, Wolfgang; Borri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention for biomedical applications as optical labels, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents in vivo. In the quest for superior photostability and bio-compatibility, nanodiamonds (NDs) are considered one of the best choices due to their unique structural, chemical, mechanical, and optical properties. So far, mainly fluorescent NDs have been utilized for cell imaging. However, their use is limited by the efficiency and costs in reliably producing fluorescent defect centers with stable optical properties. Here, we show that single non-fluorescing NDs exhibit strong coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) at the sp3 vibrational resonance of diamond. Using correlative light and electron microscopy, the relationship between CARS signal strength and ND size is quantified. The calibrated CARS signal in turn enables the analysis of the number and size of NDs internalized in living cells in situ, which opens the exciting prospect of following complex cellular trafficking pathways quantitatively. PMID:25305746

  5. Chemical state speciation by resonant Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Karydas, A G; Zarkadas, C; Paradelis, T; Kallithrakas-Kontos, N

    2002-01-01

    In the resonant Raman scattering (RRS) process the emitted photon exhibits a continuous energy distribution with a high energy cutoff limit. This cutoff energy depends on the chemical state of the element under examination. In the present work, the possibility of identifying the chemical state of V atoms by employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor Si(Li) detector is investigated. A proton induced Cr K alpha x-ray beam was used as the incident radiation, having a fixed energy lower than the V K-absorption edge. The net RRS distributions extracted from the energy dispersive spectra of metallic V and its compound targets were simulated by an appropriate theoretical model. The results showed the possibility of employing RRS spectroscopy with a semiconductor detector for chemical speciation studies.

  6. Anisotropic effects in the Raman scattering of Re-doped 2H-MoSe2 layered semiconductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-Ti Wu

    Full Text Available We present the anisotropic Raman spectra of the Re-doped MoSe2 layered semiconductor with thicker edge plane grown by chemical vapor transport method. The anisotropic lattice dynamics in the doped MoSe2 layered material are investigated by Raman scattering. The vibrational spectra measured on the planes perpendicular and parallel to the crystal c-axis can be correlated, respectively, to the Raman active E1g, A1g and E2g1 modes. The linewidth parameter Γ and correlation length L evaluated using spatial correlation model for describing the Raman spectra lineshape are further discussed to understand the in-plane and out-of-plane vibration of the Se atoms in the E1g and A1g modes. Keywords: MoSe2, Anisotropic, Layered semiconductors, Raman scattering

  7. Raman scattering study of rare-earth hexaboride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, N.; Nagai, S.; Udagawa, M.; Iga, F.; Sera, M.; Oguchi, T.; Akimitsu, J.; Kunii, S.

    2005-04-01

    The excitation-energy, polarization, pressure, and temperature dependences of Raman scattering spectra have been measured for the RB6 crystals ( R=Ca, La, Ce, Pr, Sm, Gd, Dy, and Yb). In the Raman spectra, the extra peaks have been clearly observed at around 200 cm-1, except for the Raman-active phonons and CEF excitations. The extra peaks show anomalous behavior in the temperature, polarization, and lattice parameter dependences. These anomalous behaviors originate from the vibration of the rare-earth ions in octahedral B 6 cage, and the extra peaks can be assigned as the second-order Raman excitations of T 1u[3]. To check the validity of our assignment, we have measured the pressure dependence. In this paper, the results of the “ extra peaks” at about 200 cm -1, and pressure dependence of SmB 6 are presented. The sample preparation and experimental details are explained in our previous report [3]. The Pm3m symmetry of RB 6 gives us the phonon numbers at Brilloiun zone center; Γ=A1g+Eg+T1g+T2g+3T1u+T2u. The Raman-active phonons are A1g, Eg, and T2g, which are the vibration of boron octahedra. In cubic symmetry, all Raman-active phonons appear in the (x+y,x+y) polarization geometry. In the notation of (x,y), x and y denote the polarization directions of incident and scattered light, respectively. x and y correspond to the crystal axes of [1 0 0] and [0 1 0], respectively. Fig. 1 shows the Raman spectra of trivalent RB6 at room temperature in the energy region below T2g phonons ( ≃700 cm-1). Each spectrum is depicted in the order of the decreasing lattice parameters from top to bottom. As shown in Fig. 1, the energy of T2g phonon decreases with increasing lattice parameter, and this is normal dependence. However, the extra peaks (arrows) show an anti-trend for T2g phonon's. Focusing on the size of cage space consisting of surrounding borons for rare earth ion a-rR( a and rR are lattice parameter and ionic radius, respectively), the energy of the peaks is

  8. Nanopillars array for surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Chang, A; Bora, M; Nguyen, H T; Behymer, E M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Carter, J C; Bond, T C

    2011-04-14

    The authors present a new class of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. Two types of nanopillars within this class are discussed: vertical pillars and tapered pillars. For the vertical pillars, the gap between each pair of nanopillars is small enough (< 50 nm) such that highly confined plasmonic cavity resonances are supported between the pillars when light is incident upon them, and the anti-nodes of these resonances act as three-dimensional hotspots for SERS. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of 1,2 bis-(4-pyridyl)-ethylene (BPE), benzenethiol (BT) monolayer and toluene vapor. The results show that SERS enhancement factor of over 0.5 x 10{sup 9} can be achieved, and BPE can be detected down to femto-molar concentration level. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors such as volatile organic compounds.

  9. Resonant X-ray Raman scattering on molecules: A benchmark study on HCl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carniato, Stephane [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Taieb, Richard, E-mail: richard.taieb@upmc.f [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Journel, Loic; Guillemin, Renaud [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); Stolte, Wayne C.; Lindle, Dennis W. [Department of Chemistry, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4003 (United States); Gel' mukhanov, Faris [Theoretical Chemistry, Roslagstullsbacken 15, Royal Institute of Technology, S-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Simon, Marc [UPMC Univ Paris 06, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France); CNRS, UMR 7614, Laboratoire de Chimie Physique Matiere et Rayonnement, F-75005 Paris (France)

    2010-08-15

    Resonant X-ray Raman scattering is a powerful tool to study molecular dynamics and subtle chemical effects like the molecular field beyond vibrational and lifetime limitations. Using this technique in the tender X-ray region, gas phase HCl is studied as a benchmark molecule for other compounds like freons, which play an important role in physical-chemical properties of the ozone layer of atmosphere.

  10. Molecular vibrations the theory of infrared and Raman vibrational spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Wilson, E Bright; Cross, Paul C

    1980-01-01

    Pedagogical classic and essential reference focuses on mathematics of detailed vibrational analyses of polyatomic molecules, advancing from application of wave mechanics to potential functions and methods of solving secular determinant.

  11. Aggregation-Enhanced Raman Scattering by a Water-Soluble Porphyrin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akins, Daniel L.

    1995-01-01

    Much interest in our laboratory has focused on aggregation of organic compounds, particularly cyanine dyes and porphyrins. For this discussion we have applied absorption and Raman scattering spectroscopies to characterize aggregated TSPP (tetrakis-(p-sulfonatophynyl) porphyrin) in aqueous solution. Based on concentration, pH and ionic strength dependence of TSPP absorption, we deduce that aggregation evolves through the formation of TSPP diacid and that the diacid is the repeating unit in the aggregate. The Raman bands of TSPP in strongly acidic solution lead us further to conclude that vibrations of adjacent molecules are perturbed in a fashion that is consistent with the pyrrolic ring in the porphinato macrocycle being ruffled, and that two aggregate arrangements occur: specifically J- and H-type aggregates. Furthermore, aggregation enhancement is advanced as a viable mechanism to explain enhanced Raman Scattering for homogeneous aqueous phase TSPP, where the surface-enhancement mechanism is not applicable.

  12. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Katrin; Wang, Yang; Kneipp, Harald; Perelman, Lev T.; Itzkan, Irving; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Feld, Michael S.

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections ( 10-17-10-16 cm2/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2×105 W/cm2 nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear ``fingerprint'' of its Raman features between 700 and 1700 cm-1. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules.

  13. Fingerprints of quantum spin ice in Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Jianlong; Rau, Jeffrey G.; Gingras, Michel J. P.; Perkins, Natalia B.

    2017-07-01

    We develop a theory of the dynamical response of a minimal model of quantum spin ice (QSI) by means of inelastic light scattering. In particular, we are interested in the Raman response of the fractionalized U(1) spin liquid realized in the XXZ QSI. We show that the low-energy Raman intensity is dominated by spinon and gauge fluctuations. We find that the Raman response in the QSI state of that model appears only in the T2 g polarization channel. We show that the Raman intensity profile displays a broad continuum from the spinons and coupled spinon and gauge fluctuations, and a low-energy peak arising entirely from gauge fluctuations. Both features originate from the exotic interaction between photon and the fractionalized excitations of QSI. Our theoretical results suggest that inelastic Raman scattering can in principle serve as a promising experimental probe of the nature of a U(1) spin liquid in QSI.

  14. Enhancement of Raman light scattering in dye-labeled cell membrane on metal-containing conducting polymer film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grushevskaya, H. V.; Krylova, N. G.; Lipnevich, I. V.; Orekhovskaja, T. I.; Egorova, V. P.; Shulitski, B. G.

    2016-03-01

    An enhanced Raman spectroscopy method based on a plasmon resonance in ultrathin metal-containing LB-film deposited on nanoporous anodic alumina supports has been proposed. This material has been utilized to enhance Raman scattering of light in fluorescent-labeled subcellular membrane structures. It has been shown that the plasmon resonance between vibrational modes of the organometallic complexes monolayers and dye-labeled subcellular structures happens. It makes possible to detect interactions between living cell monolayers and an extracellular matrix.

  15. X-ray resonant Raman scattering in the rare earths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veenendaal, M.A.; Carra, P.; Thole, B.T

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a theory of resonant Raman scattering within the framework of a localized model. Expressions for the scattering amplitude and cross section are derived by employing the methods of spherical-tensor analysis. a simple factorization is obtained for the geometrical (angular

  16. Enhanced optical coupling and Raman scattering via microscopic interface engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jonathan V.; Hokr, Brett H.; Kim, Wihan; Ballmann, Charles W.; Applegate, Brian E.; Jo, Javier A.; Yamilov, Alexey; Cao, Hui; Scully, Marlan O.; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2017-11-01

    Spontaneous Raman scattering is an extremely powerful tool for the remote detection and identification of various chemical materials. However, when those materials are contained within strongly scattering or turbid media, as is the case in many biological and security related systems, the sensitivity and range of Raman signal generation and detection is severely limited. Here, we demonstrate that through microscopic engineering of the optical interface, the optical coupling of light into a turbid material can be substantially enhanced. This improved coupling facilitates the enhancement of the Raman scattering signal generated by molecules within the medium. In particular, we detect at least two-orders of magnitude more spontaneous Raman scattering from a sample when the pump laser light is focused into a microscopic hole in the surface of the sample. Because this approach enhances both the interaction time and interaction region of the laser light within the material, its use will greatly improve the range and sensitivity of many spectroscopic techniques, including Raman scattering and fluorescence emission detection, inside highly scattering environments.

  17. Shape sensitive Raman scattering from Nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Apell, S P; Antosiewicz, Tomasz; Aizpurua, J

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the interplay of shape changes and localized surface plasmons in small metal particles with the potential of a large enhancement of the Raman signal from the particles own vibrations. The framework is a geometrical one where we study the change in geometric factors during the vibrational movement. The resulting cross-section is found to be of a detectable order of magnitude however much smaller than the elastic cross-section.

  18. High pressure Raman scattering of silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, Sevak; Scheel, Harald; Thomsen, Christian [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, 10623 Berlin (Germany); Papagelis, Konstantinos [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, 26504 Patras (Greece); Colli, Alan [Nokia Research Centre, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom); Ferrari, Andrea C, E-mail: khachadorian@physik.tu-berlin.de [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-13

    We study the high pressure response, up to 8 GPa, of silicon nanowires (SiNWs) with {approx} 15 nm diameter, by Raman spectroscopy. The first order Raman peak shows a superlinear trend, more pronounced compared to bulk Si. Combining transmission electron microscopy and Raman measurements we estimate the SiNWs' bulk modulus and the Grueneisen parameters. We detect an increase of Raman linewidth at {approx} 4 GPa, and assign it to pressure induced activation of a decay process into LO and TA phonons. This pressure is smaller compared to the {approx} 7 GPa reported for bulk Si. We do not observe evidence of phase transitions, such as discontinuities or change in the pressure slopes, in the investigated pressure range.

  19. Raman scattering by phonons and crystal-field excitations in cerium hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avisar, David [Nuclear Research Center, Negev, P.O. Box 9001, Beer- Sheva, 84190 Israel (Israel); Livneh, Tsachi, E-mail: T.Livneh@nrcn.org.i [Nuclear Research Center, Negev, P.O. Box 9001, Beer- Sheva, 84190 Israel (Israel)

    2010-04-02

    The effect of cerium hydrides (deutrides) stoichiometry, CeH(D){sub 2+x} (x = 0-0.90), on the vibrational and Ce{sup +3} crystal-field excitations was studied at room temperature by means of Raman scattering spectroscopy. The assignment of CeH{sub 2+x} vibrational Raman bands, with x < 0.6, are facilitated by the remarkable similarity of their frequencies to the previously measured inelastic neutron scattering (INS) frequencies for the corresponding LaH{sub 2+x}. Above x{approx}0.60 the INS and Raman spectra become increasingly different presumably due to the repulsive H-H interactions, which are also known to increase the magnitude of dispersion in optic-mode vibrations. The intensity of a band at {approx}810 cm{sup -1} relative to that of a band at {approx}710 cm{sup -1} decreases by an order of magnitude from x{approx}0.60 to x{approx}0.72 and remain practically constant up to x = 0.90. Since at room temperature the composition dependent structural tetragonal-cubic and electronic metal-semiconductor transitions occur at x{approx}0.60 and 0.7 < x < 0.8, respectively, the above spectral changes cannot be clearly assigned to either.

  20. Terahertz mechanical vibrations in lysozyme: Raman spectroscopy vs modal analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpinteri, Alberto; Lacidogna, Giuseppe; Piana, Gianfranco; Bassani, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    The mechanical behaviour of proteins is receiving an increasing attention from the scientific community. Recently it has been suggested that mechanical vibrations play a crucial role in controlling structural configuration changes (folding) which govern proteins biological function. The mechanism behind protein folding is still not completely understood, and many efforts are being made to investigate this phenomenon. Complex molecular dynamics simulations and sophisticated experimental measurements are conducted to investigate protein dynamics and to perform protein structure predictions; however, these are two related, although quite distinct, approaches. Here we investigate mechanical vibrations of lysozyme by Raman spectroscopy and linear normal mode calculations (modal analysis). The input mechanical parameters to the numerical computations are taken from the literature. We first give an estimate of the order of magnitude of protein vibration frequencies by considering both classical wave mechanics and structural dynamics formulas. Afterwards, we perform modal analyses of some relevant chemical groups and of the full lysozyme protein. The numerical results are compared to experimental data, obtained from both in-house and literature Raman measurements. In particular, the attention is focused on a large peak at 0.84 THz (29.3 cm-1) in the Raman spectrum obtained analyzing a lyophilized powder sample.

  1. Raman scattering study of polymorphism in sodium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, I.; Lee, S. A.; Rupprecht, A.

    2001-10-01

    Raman scattering has been used to study wet-spun films of sodium hyaluronate. Substantial differences are observed in the Raman spectra, particularly in the low frequency region, from films spun under very similar conditions. The observed differences indicate that the molecules in the different films are in different confirmations. This suggests that the free energy barriers separating the different conformations of sodium hyaluronate are very small.

  2. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Physics and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kneipp, Katrin; Kneipp, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Almost 30 years after the first reports on surface-enhanced Raman signals, the phenomenon of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is now well established. Yet, explaining the enhancement of a spectroscopic signal by fouteen orders of magnitude continues to attract the attention of physicists and chemists alike. And, at the same time and rapidly growing, SERS is becoming a very useful spectroscopic tool with exciting applications in many fields. SERS gained particular interest after single-molecule Raman spectroscopy had been demonstrated. This bookl summarizes and discusses present theoretical approaches that explain the phenomenon of SERS and reports on new and exciting experiments and applications of the fascinating spectroscopic effect.

  3. Plasmonic Nanogap-Enhanced Raman Scattering with Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Oh, Jeong-Wook; Lee, Haemi; Suh, Yung Doug

    2016-12-20

    Plasmonic coupling-based electromagnetic field localization and enhancement are becoming increasingly important in chemistry, nanoscience, materials science, physics, and engineering over the past decade, generating a number of new concepts and applications. Among the plasmonically coupled nanostructures, metal nanostructures with nanogaps have been of special interest due to their ultrastrong electromagnetic fields and controllable optical properties that can be useful for a variety of signal enhancements such as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The Raman scattering process is highly inefficient, with a very small cross-section, and Raman signals are often poorly reproducible, meaning that very strong, controllable SERS is needed to obtain reliable Raman signals with metallic nanostructures and thus open up new avenues for a variety of Raman-based applications. More specifically, plasmonically coupled metallic nanostructures with ultrasmall (∼1 nm or smaller) nanogaps can generate very strong and tunable electromagnetic fields that can generate strong SERS signals from Raman dyes in the gap, and plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering can be defined as Raman signal enhancement from plasmonic nanogap particles with ∼1 nm gaps. However, these promising nanostructures with extraordinarily strong optical signals have shown limited use for practical applications, largely due to the lack of design principles, high-yield synthetic strategies with nanometer-level structural control and reproducibility, and systematic, reliable single-molecule/single-particle-level studies on their optical properties. All these are extremely important challenges because even small changes (plasmonic nanogaps can significantly affect the plasmon mode and signal intensity. In this Account, we examine and summarize recent breakthroughs and advances in plasmonic nanogap-enhanced Raman scattering with metal nanogap particles with respect to the design and synthesis of plasmonic

  4. Stimulated Raman scattering excited by incoherent light in plasma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao Zhao

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS excited by incoherent light is studied via particle-in-cell simulations. It is shown that a large bandwidth of incoherent light can reduce the growth of SRS and electron heating considerably in the linear stage. However, different components of the incoherent light can be coupled by the Langmuir waves, so that stimulated Raman backward scattering can develop. When the bandwidth of incoherent light is larger than the Langmuir wave frequency, forward SRS can be seeded between different components of the incoherent light. The incoherent light can only increase the time duration for nonlinear saturation but cannot diminish the saturation level obviously.

  5. Resonance electronic Raman scattering in rare earth crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.M.

    1988-11-10

    The intensities of Raman scattering transitions between electronic energy levels of trivalent rare earth ions doped into transparent crystals were measured and compared to theory. A particle emphasis was placed on the examination of the effect of intermediate state resonances on the Raman scattering intensities. Two specific systems were studied: Ce/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 1/) in single crystals of LuPO/sub 4/ and Er/sup 3 +/(4f/sup 11/) in single crystals of ErPO/sub 4/. 134 refs., 92 figs., 33 tabs.

  6. Gold nanoparticles on polarizable surfaces as Raman scattering antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shiuan-Yeh; Mock, Jack J; Hill, Ryan T; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Smith, David R; Lazarides, Anne A

    2010-11-23

    Surface plasmons supported by metal nanoparticles are perturbed by coupling to a surface that is polarizable. Coupling results in enhancement of near fields and may increase the scattering efficiency of radiative modes. In this study, we investigate the Rayleigh and Raman scattering properties of gold nanoparticles functionalized with cyanine deposited on silicon and quartz wafers and on gold thin films. Dark-field scattering images display red shifting of the gold nanoparticle plasmon resonance and doughnut-shaped scattering patterns when particles are deposited on silicon or on a gold film. The imaged radiation patterns and individual particle spectra reveal that the polarizable substrates control both the orientation and brightness of the radiative modes. Comparison with simulation indicates that, in a particle-surface system with a fixed junction width, plasmon band shifts are controlled quantitatively by the permittivity of the wafer or the film. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectra and images are collected from cyanine on particles on gold films. SERRS images of the particles on gold films are doughnut-shaped as are their Rayleigh images, indicating that the SERRS is controlled by the polarization of plasmons in the antenna nanostructures. Near-field enhancement and radiative efficiency of the antenna are sufficient to enable Raman scattering cyanines to function as gap field probes. Through collective interpretation of individual particle Rayleigh spectra and spectral simulations, the geometric basis for small observed variations in the wavelength and intensity of plasmon resonant scattering from individual antenna on the three surfaces is explained.

  7. Momentum angular mapping of enhanced Raman scattering of single-walled carbon nanotube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Padmnabh; Singh, Tapender; Brulé, Thibault; Bouhelier, Alexandre; Finot, Eric

    2017-07-01

    We perform momentum mapping of the Raman scattering of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) or thin ropes of SWNTs enhanced by surface plasmons sustained by either a linear chain of nanoantennas or flower-shaped nanoparticles. The momentum spectroscopy of Raman scattering of the carbon nanotube (CNT) demonstrates the direct verification of momentum selection rules and identifies the characteristic bands of the molecules or the nanomaterials under scrutiny. The characteristic vibrational signatures of the D, G-, and G bands provide an isotropic response in k-space irrespective of the arrangement of the enhancing platform. However, other dispersive or double resonance bands, such as D-, D+, D', M, and iTOLA bands appear as a dipolar emission oriented towards the long axis of the CNT regardless of the CNT orientation but strongly depend on the patterning of enhancement of the electromagnetic field.

  8. Lipid-cell interactions in human monocytes investigated by doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan; den Hartigh, Laura J.; Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering can provide enhanced and highly specific contrast for molecules containing unique Raman-active small molecular groups. This combination provides contrast for molecules that can otherwise be difficult to discriminate by Raman spectroscopy. Here, human monocytes were incubated with either deuterated oleic acid or 17-octadecynoic acid (a fatty acid with an end terminal acetylene group). The carbon-deuterium stretching vibration of the deuterated fatty acid, as well as the unique alkyne stretching vibration of the alkyne-containing fatty acid, were used to provide contrast for these exogenous free fatty acids. The combination of these unique modes with the common aliphatic carbon-hydrogen stretching vibration inherent to all fatty acid allowed for doubly-resonant detection of these unique molecules and enabled us to detect the presence of these lipids in areas within a cell where each molecular resonance by itself did not generate sufficient signal.

  9. Lipid-cell interactions in human monocytes investigated by doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan; den Hartigh, Laura J; Rutledge, John C; Huser, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering can provide enhanced and highly specific contrast for molecules containing unique Raman-active small molecular groups. This combination provides contrast for molecules that can otherwise be difficult to discriminate by Raman spectroscopy. Here, human monocytes were incubated with either deuterated oleic acid or 17-octadecynoic acid (a fatty acid with an end terminal acetylene group). The carbon-deuterium stretching vibration of the deuterated fatty acid, as well as the unique alkyne stretching vibration of the alkyne-containing fatty acid, were used to provide contrast for these exogenous free fatty acids. The combination of these unique modes with the common aliphatic carbon-hydrogen stretching vibration inherent to all fatty acid allowed for doubly-resonant detection of these unique molecules and enabled us to detect the presence of these lipids in areas within a cell where each molecular resonance by itself did not generate sufficient signal.

  10. Infrared dispersion analysis and Raman scattering spectra of taurine single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Roberto L.; Lobo, Ricardo P. S. M.; Dias, Anderson

    2018-01-01

    A comprehensive set of optical vibrational modes of monoclinic taurine crystals was determined by Raman scattering, and infrared reflectivity and transmission spectroscopies. By using appropriate scattering/reflection geometries, the vibrational modes were resolved by polarization and the most relevant modes of the crystal could be assigned. In particular, we were able to review the symmetry of the gerade modes and to resolve ambiguities in the literature. Owing to the non-orthogonal character of Bu modes in monoclinic crystals (lying on the optic axial plane), we carried out a generalized Lorentz dispersion analysis consisting of simultaneous adjust of infrared-reflectivity spectra at various light polarization angles. The Au modes (parallel to the C2-axis) were treated within the classical Lorentz model. The behavior of off-diagonal and diagonal terms of the complex dielectric tensors and the presence of anomalous dispersion were discussed as consequences of the low symmetry of the crystal.

  11. Polarized Raman scattering of single ZnO nanorod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, J. L., E-mail: jlyu@semi.ac.cn; Lai, Y. F., E-mail: laiyunfeng@gmail.com; Wang, Y. Z.; Cheng, S. Y. [Institute of Micro/Nano Devices and Solar Cells, School of Physics and Information Engineering, Fuzhou University, Fuzhou (China); Chen, Y. H. [Key Laboratory of Semiconductor Materials Science, Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 912, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-01-21

    Polarized Raman scattering measurement on single wurtzite c-plane (001) ZnO nanorod grown by hydrothermal method has been performed at room temperature. The polarization dependence of the intensity of the Raman scattering for the phonon modes A{sub 1}(TO), E{sub 1}(TO), and E{sub 2}{sup high} in the ZnO nanorod are obtained. The deviations of polarization-dependent Raman spectroscopy from the prediction of Raman selection rules are observed, which can be attributed to the structure defects in the ZnO nanorod as confirmed by the comparison of the transmission electron microscopy, photoluminescence spectra as well as the polarization dependent Raman signal of the annealed and unannealed ZnO nanorod. The Raman tensor elements of A{sub 1}(TO) and E{sub 1}(TO) phonon modes normalized to that of the E{sub 2}{sup high} phonon mode are |a/d|=0.32±0.01, |b/d|=0.49±0.02, and |c/d|=0.23±0.01 for the unannealed ZnO nanorod, and |a/d|=0.33±0.01, |b/d|=0.45±0.01, and |c/d|=0.20±0.01 for the annealed ZnO nanorod, which shows strong anisotropy compared to that of bulk ZnO epilayer.

  12. Single Molecule Detection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneipp, K.; Wang, Y.; Kneipp, H.; Perelman, L.T.; Itzkan, I.; Dasari, R.R.; Feld, M.S. [George R. Harrison Spectroscopy Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Technical University of Berlin, D 10623 Berlin (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    By exploiting the extremely large effective cross sections (10{sup -17}{endash}10{sup -16}cm{sup 2}/molecule) available from surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), we achieved the first observation of single molecule Raman scattering. Measured spectra of a single crystal violet molecule in aqueous colloidal silver solution using one second collection time and about 2{times}10{sup 5}W/cm{sup 2} nonresonant near-infrared excitation show a clear {open_quotes}fingerprint{close_quotes} of its Raman features between 700 and 1700cm{sup -1}. Spectra observed in a time sequence for an average of 0.6 dye molecule in the probed volume exhibited the expected Poisson distribution for actually measuring 0, 1, 2, or 3 molecules. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. Electronic Raman scattering in cuprate superconductors and parent insulating phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, M.V.; Liu, R.; Salamon, D.; Blumberg, G.; Reznik, D.; Cooper, S.L.; Lee, W.C.; Ginsberg, D.M. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States); Cheong, S.W. [AT and T Labs., Murray Hill, NJ (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Raman scattering from charge and spin excitations in cuprates is reviewed. The two-magnon resonance Raman profile is used to determine the most probable energy for photon-assisted charge transfer leading to exchange between two spins. The difference between this energy and that for absorption is attributed to spin relaxation (spin polaron) effects. Two-magnon spectra in superconducting cuprates are presented. It is argued that their presence is evidence that the antiferromagnetic correlation length is equal to or greater than three lattice constants. The recently-discovered Raman-active excitons are described and possible assignments of them are discussed. It is pointed out that in highly correlated metals and insulators, the mechanisms for fight scattering that are familiar for doped semiconductors or conventional metals are not necessarily the only ones that are operative.

  14. Standoff ultraviolet raman scattering detection of trace levels of explosives.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Bisson, Scott E.; Reichardt, Thomas A.

    2011-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) Raman scattering with a 244-nm laser is evaluated for standoff detection of explosive compounds. The measured Raman scattering albedo is incorporated into a performance model that focused on standoff detection of trace levels of explosives. This model shows that detection at {approx}100 m would likely require tens of seconds, discouraging application at such ranges, and prohibiting search-mode detection, while leaving open the possibility of short-range point-and-stare detection. UV Raman spectra are also acquired for a number of anticipated background surfaces: tile, concrete, aluminum, cloth, and two different car paints (black and silver). While these spectra contained features in the same spectral range as those for TNT, we do not observe any spectra similar to that of TNT.

  15. Surface Raman Scattering from Effervescent Magnetic Peroxyborates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-30

    1960. 14. J. W. Moore and R. G. Pearson, "Kinetics and Mechanisms, " Wiley, N w York, 1981. 15. "FMC, Sodium Perborate , Tetrahydrate/Monohy, drate...0.4- 0.2- 11. 2 3. i Caption Figure 4. Quantitative Raman intensities, Ii(t), versus heating time in hours at 115 0C for ( sodium ) EMPB samples. The... perborates . Hovever, the term metaborate refers to salts formally containing the BO2- ion, e.g., NaBO. 2. The formulas NaO 3 " H 20 or NaBO2"H202 and NaBO

  16. Raman and Surface Enhanced Raman of Biological Material

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Guicheteau, Jason A; Gonser, Kristina; Christesen, Steven Dale

    2004-01-01

    .... Vibrational spectroscopic methods such as Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) provide rapid detailed fingerprint information about the molecular composition of biomaterial in a non-destructive manner...

  17. Rapid spectro-polarimetry to probe molecular symmetry in multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Würthwein, Thomas; Brinkmann, Maximilian; Hellwig, Tim; Fallnich, Carsten

    2017-11-21

    We present the simultaneous detection of the spectrum and the complete polarization state of a multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signal with a fast division-of-amplitude spectro-polarimeter. The spectro-polarimeter is based on a commercial imaging spectrograph, a birefringent wedge prism, and a segmented polarizer. Compared to the standard rotating-retarder fixed-analyzer spectro-polarimeter, only a single measurement is required and an up to 21-fold reduced acquisition time is shown. The measured Stokes parameters allow us to differentiate between vibrational symmetries and to determine the depolarization ratio ρ by data post-processing.

  18. Raman scattering method for measuring HNO[sub 3] concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, J.; Johnson, G.W.; Cassidy, K.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.; Gordon, S.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Processing Technology (APT) group has been experimenting with several processes which are dependent upon nitric acid concentrations, thus a need exists to diagnose these quantities. This report describes a series of experiments which used the Raman scattering method for measuring nitric acid concentrations. These tests were performed at LLNL in Bldg. 241 during the months of September 1991 to December 1991. The basic instrument used for this series was a Spex Raman Spectrometer, Model 1488, with a DM1B computer system.

  19. Raman scattering method for measuring HNO{sub 3} concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wooldridge, J.; Johnson, G.W.; Cassidy, K.; Summers, L.; Lewis, P.; Gordon, S.

    1992-06-01

    The Advanced Processing Technology (APT) group has been experimenting with several processes which are dependent upon nitric acid concentrations, thus a need exists to diagnose these quantities. This report describes a series of experiments which used the Raman scattering method for measuring nitric acid concentrations. These tests were performed at LLNL in Bldg. 241 during the months of September 1991 to December 1991. The basic instrument used for this series was a Spex Raman Spectrometer, Model 1488, with a DM1B computer system.

  20. High-speed stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for studying the metabolic diversity of motile Euglena gracilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Y.; Wakisaka, Y.; Iwata, O.; Nakashima, A.; Ito, T.; Hirose, M.; Domon, R.; Sugawara, M.; Tsumura, N.; Watarai, H.; Shimobaba, T.; Suzuki, K.; Goda, K.; Ozeki, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Microalgae have been receiving great attention for their ability to produce biomaterials that are applicable for food supplements, drugs, biodegradable plastics, and biofuels. Among such microalgae, Euglena gracilis has become a popular species by virtue of its capability of accumulating useful metabolites including paramylon and lipids. In order to maximize the production of desired metabolites, it is essential to find ideal culturing conditions and to develop efficient methods for genetic transformation. To achieve this, understanding and controlling cell-to-cell variations in response to external stress is essential, with chemically specific analysis of microalgal cells including E. gracilis. However, conventional analytical tools such as fluorescence microscopy and spontaneous Raman scattering are not suitable for evaluation of diverse populations of motile microalgae, being restricted either by the requirement for fluorescent labels or a limited imaging speed, respectively. Here we demonstrate video-rate label-free metabolite imaging of live E. gracilis using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) - an optical spectroscopic method for probing the vibrational signatures of molecules with orders of magnitude higher sensitivity than spontaneous Raman scattering. Our SRS's highspeed image acquisition (27 metabolite images per second) allows for population analysis of live E. gracilis cells cultured under nitrogen-deficiency - a technique for promoting the accumulation of paramylon and lipids within the cell body. Thus, our SRS system's fast imaging capability enables quantification and analysis of previously unresolvable cell-to-cell variations in the metabolite accumulation of large motile E. gracilis cell populations.

  1. Raman scattering study of phonons in Bi-based superconductor thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mejia-Garcia, C. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Edif. 9 UPALM, Av. Politecnico sn, Mexico 07738 DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: cmejia@esfm.ipn.mx; Diaz-Valdes, E. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Edif. 9 UPALM, Av. Politecnico sn, Mexico 07738 DF (Mexico); Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Edif. 9 UPALM, Av. Politecnico sn, Mexico 07738 DF (Mexico); Lopez-Lopez, J.L. [Departamento de Matematica Educativa, CINVESTAV, IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico 07300 DF (Mexico); Jergel, M. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV, IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico 07300 DF (Mexico); Morales, A. [Departamento de Fisica, CINVESTAV, IPN, A.P. 14-740, Mexico 07300 DF (Mexico)

    2004-11-15

    Raman spectra were obtained from samples of Bi-Pb-Sr-Ca-Cu-O (BPSCCO) thin films after varying several growth parameters, such as covering material, annealing time (t{sub R}), annealing temperature (T{sub R}), and nominal lead content (x). Thin films with the nominal composition Bi{sub 1.4}Pb{sub x}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {delta}} were grown on MgO substrates by a spray pyrolysis technique, followed by a solid state reaction. The results of Raman scattering measurements at room temperature show a series of vibrational optical modes within the range 300-900 cm{sup -1}. The assignment of these modes was made by involving mainly the 2212 and 2223 phases and was confirmed by both X-ray diffraction and resistance in dependence of the temperature (R-T) measurements as well.

  2. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy employing an octave spanning pulse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Keisuke; Suda, Akira; Tanaka, Masahiro; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Kannari, Fumihiko; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Mizuno, Hideaki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2009-07-06

    We demonstrate two complementary types of microscopy using an identical setup for single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging, which employs an ultrabroadband laser pulse with a spectral bandwidth of 4800 cm(-1) and enables the suppression of nonresonant CARS signals. One is a novel type of microscopy that uses spectral phase modulation for the selective excitation of a single Raman mode. The selective excitation is achieved by the modulated pulse focusing its difference-frequency spectrum into a narrow spectral region. Another type is Fourier-transform CARS (FT-CARS) microspectroscopy based on the measurement of the CARS spectrum obtained from the Fourier-transform of the interferometric autocorrelation (IAC) signal. Vibrational spectral imaging of chemical and biological samples is demonstrated using the two types of microscopy.

  3. Characterization of photodamage in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yan; Wang, Haifeng; Shi, Riyi; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2006-05-01

    We report a mechanistic analysis of photodamage in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Photodamage to the myelin sheath in spinal tissues is induced by using the point scan mode and is featured by myelin splitting and shockwaves with broadband emission. Our measurement of photodamage rate versus the excitation power reveals that both linear and nonlinear mechanisms are involved. Moreover, we show that vibrational absorption induced by coherent Raman processes significantly contributes to the nonlinear damage at high peak powers. For CARS imaging of cultured cells, the photodamage is characterized by plasma membrane blebbing and is dominated by a second order mechanism. Our study suggests that for dense samples such as the myelin sheath, CARS imaging induced photodamage can be minimized by using laser beams with relatively long near IR wavelengths and a repetition rate of a few MHz. For less dense samples such as cultured cells, laser pulses of higher repetition rates are preferred.

  4. The Inclusion of Raman Scattering Effects in the Combined Ocean-Atmosphere Radiative Transfer Model MOMO to Estimate the Influence of Raman Scattering in Case 1 Waters on Satellite Ocean Remote Sensing Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Bismarck, J.; Fischer, J.

    2011-12-01

    Raman scattering of the solar lightfield, due to energy absorption by vibrational modes of water molecules, may contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites over water. The inelastic fraction of the water-leaving radiance for clear water reaches values of 30% in the red part of the visible spectrum, and still reaches values of several percent in moderately turbid waters. Furthermore, inelastic scattering due to chlorophyll and yellow substance fluorescence adds to this fraction. For these reasons the inclusion of inelastic scattering sources into radiative-transfer models, used in ocean remote sensing applications or atmosphere remote sensing over the ocean, can be important. MOMO is a computer code based on the matrix-operator method designed to calculate the lightfield in the stratified atmosphere-ocean system. It has been developed at the Institute for Space Sciences of the Freie Universität Berlin and provides the full polarization state (in the newest version) and an air-sea interface accounting for radiative effects of the wind roughened water surface. The inclusion of Raman scattering effects is done by a processing module, that starts a primary MOMO program run with a high spectral resolution, to calculate the radiative energy available for inelastic scattering at each model layer boundary. The processing module then calculates the first order Raman source-terms for every observation wavelength at every layer boundary, accounting for the non-isotropicity (including the azimuthal dependence) of the Raman phase-function, the spectral redistribution, and the spectral dependence of the Raman scattering coefficient. These elementary source-terms then serve as input for the second program run, which then calculates the source-terms of all model layers, using the doubling-adding method, and the resulting radiance field. Higher orders of the Raman contribution can be computed with additional program runs. Apart from the Raman

  5. THE DISCOVERY OF RAMAN SCATTERING IN H II REGIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dopita, Michael A.; Nicholls, David C.; Sutherland, Ralph S.; Kewley, Lisa J.; Groves, Brent A., E-mail: Michael.Dopita@anu.edu.au [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2016-06-10

    We report here on the discovery of faint extended wings of H α observed out to an apparent velocity of ∼7600 km s{sup −1} in the Orion Nebula (M42) and in five H ii regions in the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. We show that these wings are caused by Raman scattering of both the O i and Si ii resonance lines and stellar continuum UV photons with H i followed by radiative decay to the H i n = 2 level. The broad wings also seen in H β and in H γ result from Raman scattering of the UV continuum in the H i n = 4 and n = 5 levels, respectively. The Raman scattering fluorescence is correlated with the intensity of the narrow permitted lines of O i and Si ii. In the case of Si ii, this is explained by radiative pumping of the same 1023.7 Å resonance line involved in the Raman scattering by the Ly β radiation field. The subsequent radiative cascade produces enhanced Si ii λλ 5978.9, 6347.1, and 6371.4 Å permitted transitions. Finally, we show that in O i, radiative pumping of the 1025.76 Å resonance line by the Lyman series radiation field is also the cause of the enhancement in the permitted lines of this species lying near H α in wavelength, but here the process is a little more complex. We argue that all these processes are active in the zone of the H ii region near the ionization front.

  6. Cancer imaging using surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Stefan; Wall, Matthew A; Huang, Ruimin; Kircher, Moritz F

    2017-07-01

    The unique spectral signatures and biologically inert compositions of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) nanoparticles make them promising contrast agents for in vivo cancer imaging. Our SERRS nanoparticles consist of a 60-nm gold nanoparticle core that is encapsulated in a 15-nm-thick silica shell wherein the resonant Raman reporter is embedded. Subtle aspects of their preparation can shift their limit of detection by orders of magnitude. In this protocol, we present the optimized, step-by-step procedure for generating reproducible SERRS nanoparticles with femtomolar (10-15 M) limits of detection. We provide ways of characterizing the optical properties of SERRS nanoparticles using UV/VIS and Raman spectroscopy, and their physicochemical properties using transmission electron microscopy and nanoparticle tracking analysis. We introduce several applications of these nanoprobes for biomedical research, with a focus on intraoperative cancer imaging via Raman imaging. A detailed account is provided for successful i.v. administration of SERRS nanoparticles such that delineation of cancerous lesions can be achieved in vivo and ex vivo on resected tissues without the need for specific biomarker targeting. This straightforward, yet comprehensive, protocol-from initial de novo gold nanoparticle synthesis to SERRS nanoparticle contrast-enhanced preclinical Raman imaging in animal models-takes ∼96 h.

  7. Vibrational Scattering Anisotropy Generated by Multichannel Quantum Interference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Catalin; Kimberg, Victor; Morin, Paul; Nicolas, Christophe; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Gavrilyuk, Sergey; Gel'Mukhanov, Faris

    2010-08-01

    Based on angularly and vibrationally resolved electron spectroscopy measurements in acetylene, we report the first observation of anomalously strong vibrational anisotropy of resonant Auger scattering through the C 1s→π* excited state. We provide a theoretical model explaining the new phenomenon by three coexisting interference effects: (i) interference between resonant and direct photoionization channels, (ii) interference of the scattering channels through the core-excited bending states with orthogonal orientation of the molecular orbitals, (iii) scattering through two wells of the double-well bending mode potential. The interplay of nuclear and electronic motions offers in this case a new type of nuclear wave packet interferometry sensitive to the anisotropy of nuclear dynamics: whether which-path information is available or not depends on the final vibrational state serving for path selection.

  8. Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Spectroscopy of Single Molecules in Solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sunney Xie, Wei Min, Chris Freudiger, Sijia Lu

    2012-01-18

    During this funding period, we have developed two breakthrough techniques. The first is stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, providing label-free chemical contrast for chemical and biomedical imaging based on vibrational spectroscopy. Spontaneous Raman microscopy provides specific vibrational signatures of chemical bonds, but is often hindered by low sensitivity. We developed a three-dimensional multiphoton vibrational imaging technique based on stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). The sensitivity of SRS imaging is significantly greater than that of spontaneous Raman microscopy, which is achieved by implementing high-frequency (megahertz) phase-sensitive detection. SRS microscopy has a major advantage over previous coherent Raman techniques in that it offers background-free and readily interpretable chemical contrast. We demonstrated a variety of biomedical applications, such as differentiating distributions of omega-3 fatty acids and saturated lipids in living cells, imaging of brain and skin tissues based on intrinsic lipid contrast, and monitoring drug delivery through the epidermis. This technology offers exciting prospect for medical imaging. The second technology we developed is stimulated emission microscopy. Many chromophores, such as haemoglobin and cytochromes, absorb but have undetectable fluorescence because the spontaneous emission is dominated by their fast non-radiative decay. Yet the detection of their absorption is difficult under a microscope. We use stimulated emission, which competes effectively with the nonradiative decay, to make the chromophores detectable, as a new contrast mechanism for optical microscopy. We demonstrate a variety of applications of stimulated emission microscopy, such as visualizing chromoproteins, non-fluorescent variants of the green fluorescent protein, monitoring lacZ gene expression with a chromogenic reporter, mapping transdermal drug distribu- tions without histological sectioning, and label-free microvascular

  9. Spatially distinct Raman scattering characteristics of individual ZnO nanorods under controlled polarization: intense end scattering from forbidden modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Matthew; Truong, Johnson; Xie, Tian; Hahm, Jong-In

    2017-06-22

    In this study, we characterize incident/scattered polarization-specific and NR position-resolved Raman scattering behaviors of individual zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs). We quantify Raman signals from the five key ZnO phonon modes of E2L, E2H-2L, A1T, E1T, and E2H, and reveal the NR position-dependent Raman scattering characteristics of the phonon modes per given light-matter interaction geometry. We then present Raman intensity maps and elucidate Raman behaviors consistent and incongruous with Raman selection rules. In particular, we identify an intriguing Raman scattering phenomenon from the forbidden modes, distinctively occurring at the two NR ends. Their unexpectedly strong and localized scattering signals at the NR termini are contrasted by the scattering behaviors from the rest of the NR positions agreeing with the selection predictions. By carrying out control measurements on isotropic ZnO microparticles (MPs), we ascertain that the unique NR position-specific Raman responses observed on ZnO NRs originate from their high shape anisotropy. Owing to the superior optical property coupled with reduced dimensionality and high geometric anisotropy, ZnO NRs have gained much attention recently for use in optoelectronic, photonic, and biosensor technologies. Raman scattering has been increasingly exploited as a noninvasive and sensitive analytical tool to investigate NR properties pertinent to these applications. Hence, our endeavors, explicitly providing the spatially distinct, polarized Raman scattering behaviors from individual ZnO NRs, will be central to the correct interpretation of Raman data of both the individual and ensemble NRs as well as to the accurate correlation of the measurement outcomes to their chemical/physical/optical properties. Our efforts may also promote novel applications for polarized Raman scattering whose optical outputs on the various positions along the ZnO NRs can be selectively modulated.

  10. Breast cancer study in rats by using Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez E, J. C. [IPN, Unidad Profesional Interdisciplinaria de Ingenieria, Campus Guanajuato, Av. Mineral de Valenciana 200, Col. Fracc. Industrial Puerto Interior, 36275 Silao, Guanajuato (Mexico); Cordova F, T.; Roca Ch, J. M.; Hernandez R, A., E-mail: jcmartineze@ipn.mx [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: The use of Raman scattering to differentiate the biochemistry and hence distinguish between normal and abnormal samples of breast cancer with induced stress was investigated. Twelve different rat serum samples (5 control samples and 7 breast cancer samples) were measured. 25 spectra per sample were acquired in a region of 50 X 50 microns. Three hundred spectra were recorded and the spectral diagnostic models were constructed by using multivariate statistical analysis on the spectral matrix to carry out the discrimination between the control samples and cancers samples with induced stress. The spectral recording was performed with Raman microscopy system Thermo Scientific XRD in the range from 200 to 2000 cm{sup -1} with a laser source of 780 nm, 24 m W of power and 50 s and exposure time were used for each spectrum. It is shown that the serum samples from rats with breast cancer and the control group can be discriminate when the multivariate analysis methods are applied to their Raman data set. The ratios were significant and correspond to proteins and phospholipids. The preliminary results suggest that the Raman spectroscopy could be an alternative technique to study the breast cancer in humans in a near future. (Author)

  11. Environmental vibration reduction utilizing an array of mass scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peplow, Andrew; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius

    2017-01-01

    Ground vibration generated by rail and road traffic is a major source of environmental noise and vibration pollution in the low-frequency range. A promising and cost effective mitigation method can be the use of heavy masses placed as a periodic array on the ground surface near the road or track (e......” resonating masses. A semi-analytical lumped-parameter method is utilized assuming that the blocks are point masses situated on an elastic half-space. The work is enhanced by examples highlighting advantages and disadvantages of single-mass scatterers and periodic scatterers. © 2017 The Authors. Published...

  12. Plasmonic nanopillar structures for surface-enhanced raman scattering applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindzevicius, Tomas; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk; Wu, Kaiyu

    2016-01-01

    experimentally and theoretically. Simulations show that that a single Agcoated NP supports two LSPR modes, i.e. the particle mode and the Ag cap resonant cavity mode. The Ag cap resonant cavity mode contributes most to the enhancement of the Raman scattering signal. The electric field distribution calculations...... have been utilized in surfaceenhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) for biological and chemical sensing. We present Au nanopillar (NP) SERS structures that are excellent for molecular detection. The NP structures can be fabricated using a simple two-step process. We analyze NP optical properties...... show that the EM hot spots are located at the bottom of the Ag cap which is important observation for practical SERS sensing. Reproducible and repeatable SERS signal intensities can be obtained across large surface areas (>mm2). Application examples include detection of TAMRA-labeled vasopressin...

  13. Raman scattering characterization of space solar cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintairov, Alexander M.; Khvostikov, V. P.; Paleeva, E. V.; Sorokina, S. V.

    1995-01-01

    A contactless method for the determination of the free-carrier density and the composition distribution across the thickness of 3-5 multi-layer solar cell structures, using the Raman scattering method, is developed. The method includes a step analysis of Raman spectra from optical phonons and phonon-plasmon modes of different layers. The method provides simultaneous measurements of the element composition and the thickness of the structure's layers together with the free-carrier density. The results of measurements of the free-carrier density composition distributions of the liquid phase epitaxy grown AlGaAs/GaAs and GaSb solar cell structures are presented and discussed.

  14. Dental caries imaging using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi; Zheng, Wei; Jian, Lin; Huang, Zhiwei

    2016-03-01

    We report the development of a polarization-resolved hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) imaging technique based on a picosecond (ps) laser-pumped optical parametric oscillator system for label-free imaging of dental caries. In our imaging system, hyperspectral SRS images (512×512 pixels) in both fingerprint region (800-1800 cm-1) and high-wavenumber region (2800-3600 cm-1) are acquired in minutes by scanning the wavelength of OPO output, which is a thousand times faster than conventional confocal micro Raman imaging. SRS spectra variations from normal enamel to caries obtained from the hyperspectral SRS images show the loss of phosphate and carbonate in the carious region. While polarization-resolved SRS images at 959 cm-1 demonstrate that the caries has higher depolarization ratio. Our results demonstrate that the polarization resolved-hyperspectral SRS imaging technique developed allows for rapid identification of the biochemical and structural changes of dental caries.

  15. Extremely slow intramolecular vibrational redistribution: Direct observation by time-resolved raman spectroscopy in trifluoropropyne

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinovsky, A. L.; Makarov, A. A.; Ryabov, E. A.

    2011-04-01

    We have studied the dynamics of intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) from the initially excited mode v1 ≈ 3330 cm-1 (acetylene-type H-C bond) in H-C≡C-CF3 molecules in the gaseous phase by means of anti-Stokes spontaneous Raman scattering. The time constant of this process is estimated as 2.3 ns—this is the slowest IVR time reported so far for the room-temperature gases. It is suggested that so long IVR time with respect to the other propyne derivatives can be explained by a larger defect, in this case, of the Fermi resonance of v1 with v2 + 2v7—the most probable doorway state leading to IVR from v1 to the bath of all vibrational-rotational states with the close energies. In addition, it is shown that the observed dynamics is in agreement with a theoretical model assuming strong vibrational-rotational mixing.

  16. Signal enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering using in situ colloidal synthesis in microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rab; Bowden, Stephen A; Parnell, John; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2010-03-01

    We demonstrate the enhanced analytical sensitivity of both surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) responses, resulting from the in situ synthesis of silver colloid in a microfluidic flow structure, where both mixing and optical interrogation were integrated on-chip. The chip-based sensor was characterized with a model Raman active label, rhodamine-6G (R6G), and had a limit of detection (LOD) of ca. 50 fM (equivalent to single molecule detection). The device was also used for the determination of the natural pigment, scytonemin, from cyanobacteria (as an analogue for extraterrestrial life existing in extreme environments). The observed LOD of approximately 10 pM (ca. <400 molecules) demonstrated the analytical advantages of working with freshly synthesized colloid in such a flow system. In both cases, sensitivities were between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude greater in the microfluidic system than those measured using the same experimental parameters, with colloid synthesized off-chip, under quiescent conditions.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of suspended monolayer graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Lin, Bing-Jie; Lin, Hsing-Ying; Huang, Chen-Han; Shih, Fu-Yu; Wang, Wei-Hua; Liu, Chih-Yi; Chui, Hsiang-Chen

    2013-11-01

    The interactions between phonons and electrons induced by the dopants or the substrate of graphene in spectroscopic investigation reveal a rich source of interesting physics. Raman spectra and surface-enhanced Raman spectra of supported and suspended monolayer graphenes were measured and analyzed systemically with different approaches. The weak Raman signals are greatly enhanced by the ability of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy which has attracted considerable interests. The technique is regarded as wonderful and useful tool, but the dopants that are produced by depositing metallic nanoparticles may affect the electron scattering processes of graphene. Therefore, the doping and substrate influences on graphene are also important issues to be investigated. In this work, the peak positions of G peak and 2D peak, the I 2D/ I G ratios, and enhancements of G and 2D bands with suspended and supported graphene flakes were measured and analyzed. The peak shifts of G and 2D bands between the Raman and SERS signals demonstrate the doping effect induced by silver nanoparticles by n-doping. The I 2D/ I G ratio can provide a more sensitive method to carry out the doping effect on the graphene surface than the peak shifts of G and 2D bands. The enhancements of 2D band of suspended and supported graphenes reached 138, and those of G band reached at least 169. Their good enhancements are helpful to measure the optical properties of graphene. The different substrates that covered the graphene surface with doping effect are more sensitive to the enhancements of G band with respect to 2D band. It provides us a new method to distinguish the substrate and doping effect on graphene.

  18. Multibeam Stimulated Raman Scattering in Inertial Confinement Fusion Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, P; Divol, L; Dewald, E L; Milovich, J L; Hohenberger, M; Jones, O S; Hopkins, L Berzak; Berger, R L; Kruer, W L; Moody, J D

    2015-07-31

    Stimulated Raman scattering from multiple laser beams arranged in a cone sharing a common daughter wave is investigated for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions in a inhomogeneous plasma. It is found that the shared electron plasma wave (EPW) process, where the lasers collectively drive the same EPW, can lead to an absolute instability when the electron density reaches a matching condition dependent on the cone angle of the laser beams. This mechanism could explain recent experimental observations of hot electrons at early times in ICF experiments, at densities well below quarter critical when two plasmon decay is not expected to occur.

  19. Gas Sensor for Volatile Anesthetic Agents Based on Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlüter, Sebastian; Popovska-Leipertz, Nadejda; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    Continuous monitoring of respiratory and anesthetic gases during a surgery is of vital importance for the patient safety. Commonly the gas composition is determined by gas chromatography or a combination of IR-spectroscopy and electrochemical sensors. This study presents a concept for an optical sensor based on spontaneous Raman scattering which offers several advantages compared to established systems. All essential components can be detected simultaneously, no sample preparation is necessary and it provides fast response times. To reach the performance of a commonly used gas monitor signal gain has to be increased e.g. by using a multi pass setup.

  20. Stimulated Raman scattering microscopy for rapid brain tumor histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Yang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Rapid histology of brain tissues with sufficient diagnostic information has the great potential to aid neurosurgeons during operations. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS microscopy is an emerging label-free imaging technique, with the intrinsic chemical resolutions to delineate brain tumors from normal tissues without the need of time-consuming tissue processing. Growing number of studies have shown SRS as a “virtual histology” tool for rapid diagnosis of various types of brain tumors. In this review, we focus on the basic principles and current developments of SRS microscopy, as well as its applications for brain tumor imaging.

  1. The vibrational spectrum of solid ferrocene by inelastic neutron scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemner, E.; De Schepper, I.M.; Kearley, G.J.; Jayasooriya, U.A.

    2000-01-01

    We calculate the spectrum of internal vibrations of a single ferrocene Fe(C5H5)2 molecule using ab initio density functional theory (without free parameters) and compare this with inelastic neutron scattering data on ferrocene in the solid state at 28 K. Due to the good agreement, we can assign each

  2. A study of aliphatic amino acids using simulated vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Ganesan, Aravindhan; Wang, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra, such as vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra, of aliphatic amino acids are simulated using density functional theory (DFT) methods in both gas phase (neutral form) and solution (zwitterionic form), together with their respective infrared (IR) and Raman spectra of the amino acids. The DFT models, which are validated by excellent agreements with the available experimental Raman and ROA spectra of alanine in solution, are employed to study other aliphatic amino acids. The inferred (IR) intensive region (below 2000 cm-1) reveals the signature of alkyl side chains, whereas the Raman intensive region (above 3000 cm-1) contains the information of the functional groups in the amino acids. Furthermore, the chiral carbons of the amino acids (except for glycine) dominate the VCD and ROA spectra in the gas phase, but the methyl group vibrations produce stronger VCD and ROA signals in solution. The C-H related asymmetric vibrations domina...

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Spectral Interference of Spontaneous Raman Scattering in High-Pressure Fuel-Rich H2-Air Combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet

    2004-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the spectral interferences in the spontaneous Raman scattering spectra of major combustion products in 30-atm fuel-rich hydrogen-air flames. An effective methodology is introduced to choose an appropriate line-shape model for simulating Raman spectra in high-pressure combustion environments. The Voigt profile with the additive approximation assumption was found to provide a reasonable model of the spectral line shape for the present analysis. The rotational/vibrational Raman spectra of H2, N2, and H2O were calculated using an anharmonic-oscillator model using the latest collisional broadening coefficients. The calculated spectra were validated with data obtained in a 10-atm fuel-rich H2-air flame and showed excellent agreement. Our quantitative spectral analysis for equivalence ratios ranging from 1.5 to 5.0 revealed substantial amounts of spectral cross-talk between the rotational H2 lines and the N2 O-/Q-branch; and between the vibrational H2O(0,3) line and the vibrational H2O spectrum. We also address the temperature dependence of the spectral cross-talk and extend our analysis to include a cross-talk compensation technique that removes the nterference arising from the H2 Raman spectra onto the N2, or H2O spectra.

  4. Origin invariance in vibrational resonance Raman optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Luciano N; Egidi, Franco; Barone, Vincenzo; Cappelli, Chiara

    2015-05-07

    A theoretical investigation on the origin dependence of the vibronic polarizabilities, isotropic and anisotropic rotational invariants, and scattering cross sections in Resonance Raman Optical Activity (RROA) spectroscopy is presented. Expressions showing the origin dependence of these polarizabilities were written in the resonance regime using the Franck-Condon (FC) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) approximations for the electronic transition moments. Differently from the far-from-resonance scattering regime, where the origin dependent terms cancel out when the rotational invariants are calculated, RROA spectrum can exhibit some origin dependence even for eigenfunctions of the electronic Hamiltonian. At the FC level, the RROA spectrum is completely origin invariant if the polarizabilities are calculated using a single excited state or for a set of degenerate states. Otherwise, some origin effects can be observed in the spectrum. At the HT level, RROA spectrum is origin dependent even when the polarizabilities are evaluated from a single excited state but the origin effect is expected to be small in this case. Numerical calculations performed for (S)-methyloxirane, (2R,3R)-dimethyloxirane, and (R)-4-F-2-azetidinone at both FC and HT levels using the velocity representation of the electric dipole and quadrupole transition moments confirm the predictions of the theory and show the extent of origin effects and the effectiveness of suggested ways to remove them.

  5. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: overcoming technical barriers for clinical translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A

    2014-01-01

    Clinical translation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy is of great interest because of the advantages of noninvasive label-free imaging, high sensitivity, and chemical specificity. For this to happen, we have identified and review the technical barriers that must be overcome. Prior investigations have developed advanced techniques (features), each of which can be used to effectively overcome one particular technical barrier. However, the implementation of one or a small number of these advanced features in previous attempts for clinical translation has often introduced more tradeoffs than benefits. In this review, we outline a strategy that would integrate multiple advanced features to overcome all the technical barriers simultaneously, effectively reduce tradeoffs, and synergistically optimize CARS microscopy for clinical translation. The operation of the envisioned system incorporates coherent Raman micro-spectroscopy for identifying vibrational biomolecular markers of disease and single-frequency (or hyperspectral) Raman imaging of these specific biomarkers for real-time in vivo diagnostics and monitoring. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Coupled effect of stimulated Raman scattering and random lasing of dyes in multiple scattering medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashchuk, Vasil P.

    2015-07-01

    Random lasing (RL) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) of dye in multiple scattering media (MSM) appears simultaneously and each couple with other. This coupling has considerable influence on the SRS regularities of dye in MSM. The main feature of this impact is that RL radiation promotes the Raman lines revealing in the RL spectrum range as part of total radiation. SRS initiation occurs owing to the CARS-like mechanism provided by the two component pump: incident monochromatic radiation (laser pump) and RL radiation arising inside the MSM. It leads to important consequences: the RL spectrum must overlap with the spectral region of the possible Stokes lines of the dye; only those Stokes lines appear which are in a range of the RL spectrum; all conditions which promote RL assist SRS also. It is shown MSM promotes the best conditions for SRS and RL coupling due to optimal matching of RL localization regions and pump radiation.

  7. Applications of Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering to the Analysis of Eukaryotic Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Franziska; Joseph, Virginia; Panne, Ulrich; Kneipp, Janina

    In this chapter, we discuss Raman scattering and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis of cellular samples of plant and animal origin which are several tens to hundreds of microns in size. As was shown in the past several years, the favorable properties of noble metal nanostructures can be used to generate SERS signals in very complex biological samples such as cells, and result in an improved sensitivity and spatial resolution. Pollen grains, the physiological containers that produce the male gametes of seed plants, consist of a few vegetative cells and one generative cell, surrounded by a biopolymer shell. Their chemical composition has been a subject of research of plant physiologists, biochemists [1, 2], and lately even materials scientists [3, 4] for various reasons. In spite of a multitude of applied analytical approaches it could not be elucidated in its entirety yet. Animal cells from cell cultures have been a subject of intense studies due to their application in virtually all fields of biomedical research, ranging from studies of basic biological mechanisms to models for pharmaceutical and diagnostic research. Many aspects of all kinds of cellular processes including signalling, transport, and gene regulation have been elucidated, but many more facts about cell biology will need to be understood in order to efficiently address issues such as cancer, viral infection or genetic disorder. Using the information from spectroscopic methods, in particular combining normal Raman spectroscopy and SERS may open up new perspectives on cellular biochemistry. New sensitive Raman-based tools are being developed for the biochemical analysis of cellular processes [5-8].

  8. RAMAN LIGHT SCATTERING IN PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON MODEL AT STRONG PSEUDOSPIN-ELECTRON INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.S.Mysakovych

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Anharmonic phonon contributions to Raman scattering in locally anharmonic crystal systems in the framework of the pseudospin-electron model with tunneling splitting of levels are investigated. The case of strong pseudospin-electron coupling is considered. Pseudospin and electron contributions to scattering are taken into account. Frequency dependences of Raman scattering intensity for different values of model parameters and for different polarization of scattering and incident light are investigated.

  9. Combustion Temperature Measurement by Spontaneous Raman Scattering in a Jet-A Fueled Gas Turbine Combustor Sector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Yolanda R.; DeGroot, Wilhelmus A.; Locke, Randy J.; Anderson, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    Spontaneous vibrational Raman scattering was used to measure temperature in an aviation combustor sector burning jet fuel. The inlet temperature ranged from 670 K (750 F) to 756 K (900 F) and pressures from 13 to 55 bar. With the exception of a discrepancy that we attribute to soot, good agreement was seen between the Raman-derived temperatures and the theoretical temperatures calculated from the inlet conditions. The technique used to obtain the temperature uses the relationship between the N2 anti-Stokes and Stokes signals, within a given Raman spectrum. The test was performed using a NASA-concept fuel injector and Jet-A fuel over a range of fuel/air ratios. This work represents the first such measurements in a high-pressure, research aero-combustor facility.

  10. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of anthocyanidins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaffino, Chiara; Russo, Bianca; Bruni, Silvia

    2015-10-01

    Anthocyanins are an important class of natural compounds responsible for the red, purple and blue colors in a large number of flowers, fruits and cereal grains. They are polyhydroxy- and polymethoxy-derivatives of 2-phenylbenzopyrylium (flavylium) salts, which are present in nature as glycosylated molecules. The aim of the present study is to assess the identification of anthocyanidins, i.e. anthocyanins without the glycosidic moiety, by means of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), a very chemically-specific technique which is moreover sensitive to subtle changes in molecular structures. These features can lead to elect SERS, among the spectroscopic tools currently at disposal of scientists, as a technique of choice for the identification of anthocyanidins, since: (1) anthocyanidins structurally present the same benzopyrylium moiety and differentiate only for the substitution pattern on their phenyl ring, (2) different species are present in aqueous solution depending on the pH. It will be demonstrated that, while resonance Raman spectra of anthocyanidins are very similar to one another, SER spectra show greater differences, leading to a further step in the identification of such important compounds in diluted solutions by means of vibrational spectroscopy. Moreover, the dependence on the pH of the six most common anthocyanidins, i.e. cyanidin, delphinidin, pelargonidin, peonidin, malvidin and petunidin, is studied. To the best of the authors' knowledge, a complete SERS study of such important molecules is reported in the present work for the first time.

  11. Discrimination of chemical warfare simulants via multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, John J.; Farrell, Mikella E.; Pellegrino, Paul M.

    2014-02-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) is used to detect several chemical warfare simulants, such as dimethyl methylphosphonate and 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide, with high specificity. The spectral bandwidth of the femtosecond laser pulse used in these studies is sufficient to coherently and simultaneously drive all the vibrational modes in the molecule of interest. Evidence shows that MCARS is capable of overcoming common sensitivity limitations of spontaneous Raman scattering, thus allowing for the detection of the target material in milliseconds with standard, uncooled universal serial bus spectrometers as opposed to seconds with cooled, intensified CCD-based spectrometers. In addition, the obtained MCARS spectrum of the investigated sample provides multiple unique signatures. These signatures are used in an off-line multivariate statistical analysis allowing for the material's discrimination with high fidelity.

  12. FT-IR and Raman vibrational microspectroscopies used for spectral biodiagnosis of human tissues

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Cheng, Wen-Ting

    2007-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and Raman vibrational microspectroscopies used for biomedical diagnosis of human tissues are reviewed from basic principle to biological applications. The advantages and disadvantages of both vibrational microspectroscopies are compared to highlight their efficiency and adaptability for noninvasively investigating the chemical compositions of ultrastructual human tissues at different disease states. Biochemical fingerprints applied to the biological samples ...

  13. Quantitative surface-enhanced Raman scattering ultradetection of atomic inorganic ions: the case of chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsoutsi, Dionysia; Montenegro, Jose Maria; Dommershausen, Fabian; Koert, Ulrich; Liz-Marzán, Luis M; Parak, Wolfgang J; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A

    2011-09-27

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy can be used for the determination and quantification of biologically representative atomic ions. In this work, the detection and quantification of chloride is demonstrated by monitoring the vibrational changes occurring at a specific interface (a Cl-sensitive dye) supported on a silver-coated silica microbead. The engineered particles play a key role in the detection, as they offer a stable substrate to support the dye, with a dense collection of SERS hot spots. These results open a new avenue toward the generation of microsensors for fast ultradetection and quantification of relevant ions inside living organisms such as cells. Additionally, the use of discrete particles rather than rough films, or other conventional SERS supports, will also enable a safe remote interrogation of highly toxic sources in environmental problems or biological fluids. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  14. Effects of Raman scattering in quantum state-preserving frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Castaneda, Mario A. Usuga

    2014-01-01

    We analyse frequency conversion by Bragg scattering numerically including Raman scattering. The frequency configuration that performs the best under influence of Raman noise results in 95% conversion over a 3.25 THz bandwidth with a 2.5-dB noise figure....

  15. Effect of scattering on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; De Vito, Giuseppe; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2017-04-17

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We apply the Huygens-Fresnel wave-based electric field superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2μm diameter solid sphere, 2μm diameter myelin cylinder and 2μm diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike the CARS intensity image, CARS images formed by taking the ratio of CARS signals obtained using x- and y-polarized input fields is relatively insensitive to the effects of spherical scatterers. Our computational framework provide a mechanistic approach to characterizing scattering-induced distortions in coherent imaging of turbid media and may inspire bottom-up approaches for adaptive optical methods for image correction.

  16. Vibrational Properties of a Monolayer Silicene Sheet Studied by Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Shaoxiang; Wu, Jiang-bin; Cong, Xin; Li, Wenbin; Gou, Jian; Zhong, Qing; Cheng, Peng; Tan, Ping-heng; Chen, Lan; Wu, Kehui

    2017-11-01

    Combining ultrahigh sensitivity, spatial resolution, and the capability to resolve chemical information, tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) is a powerful tool to study molecules or nanoscale objects. Here we show that TERS can also be a powerful tool in studying two-dimensional materials. We have achieved a 109 Raman signal enhancement and a 0.5 nm spatial resolution using monolayer silicene on Ag(111) as a prototypical 2D material system. Because of the selective enhancement on Raman modes with vertical vibrational components in TERS, our experiment provides direct evidence of the origination of Raman modes in silicene. Furthermore, the ultrahigh sensitivity of TERS allows us to identify different vibrational properties of silicene phases, which differ only in the bucking direction of the Si-Si bonds. Local vibrational features from defects and domain boundaries in silicene can also be identified.

  17. Analysis of polymer surfaces and thin-film coatings with Raman and surface enhanced Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    McAnally, G D

    2001-01-01

    This thesis investigates the potential of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for the analysis and characterisation of polymer surfaces. The Raman and SERS spectra from a PET film are presented. The SERS spectra from the related polyester PBT and from the monomer DMT are identical to PET, showing that only the aromatic signals are enhanced. Evidence from other compounds is presented to show that loss of the carbonyl stretch (1725 cm sup - sup 1) from the spectra is due to a chemical interaction between the silver and surface carbonyl groups. The interaction of other polymer functional groups with silver is discussed. A comparison of Raman and SERS spectra collected from three faces of a single crystal shows the SERS spectra are depolarised. AFM images of the silver films used to obtain SERS are presented. They consist of regular islands of silver, fused together to form a complete film. The stability and reproducibility and of these surfaces is assessed. Band assignments for the SERS spectrum of PET are ...

  18. Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

    2012-03-22

    The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

  19. In-line balanced detection stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Crisafi, Francesco

    2017-08-31

    We introduce a novel configuration for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, called In-line Balanced Detection (IBD), which employs a birefringent plate to generate a time-delayed polarization-multiplexed collinear replica of the probe, acting as a reference. Probe and reference cross the sample at the same position, thus maintaining their balance during image acquisition. IBD can be implemented in any conventional SRS setup, by adding a few simple elements, bringing its sensitivity close to the shot-noise limit even with a noisy laser. We tested IBD with a fiber-format laser system and observed signal-to-noise ratio improvement by up to 30 dB.

  20. Q-branch Raman scattering and modern kinetic thoery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monchick, L. [The Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The program is an extension of previous APL work whose general aim was to calculate line shapes of nearly resonant isolated line transitions with solutions of a popular quantum kinetic equation-the Waldmann-Snider equation-using well known advanced solution techniques developed for the classical Boltzmann equation. The advanced techniques explored have been a BGK type approximation, which is termed the Generalized Hess Method (GHM), and conversion of the collision operator to a block diagonal matrix of symmetric collision kernels which then can be approximated by discrete ordinate methods. The latter method, which is termed the Collision Kernel method (CC), is capable of the highest accuracy and has been used quite successfully for Q-branch Raman scattering. The GHM method, not quite as accurate, is applicable over a wider range of pressures and has proven quite useful.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on gold nanotrenches and nanoholes

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-04-01

    Dependent effects on edge-to-edge distance and incidence polarization in surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) were studied in detection of 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) molecules absorbed on gold nanotrenches and nanoholes. The gold nanostructures with controllable size and period were fabricated using electron-beam lithography. Large SERS enhancement in detection of 4-MPy molecules on both nanostructred substrates was observed. The SERS enhancement increased exponentially with decrease of edge to-edge distance for both the nanotrenches and nanoholes while keeping the sizes of the nanotrenches and nanoholes unchanged. Investigation of polarization dependence showed that the SERS enhancement of nanotrenches was much more sensitive to the incidence polarizations than that of nanoholes. © 2012 American Scientific Publishers.

  2. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopic OCT (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Francisco E.; Zhou, Kevin C.; Fischer, Martin C.; Warren, Warren S.

    2017-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) enables non-invasive, high-resolution, tomographic imaging of biological tissues by leveraging principles of low coherence interferometry; however, OCT lacks molecular specificity. Spectroscopic OCT (SOCT) overcomes this limitation by providing depth-resolved spectroscopic signatures of chromophores, but SOCT has been limited to a couple of endogenous molecules, namely hemoglobin and melanin. Stimulated Raman scattering, on the other hand, can provide highly specific molecular information of many endogenous species, but lacks the spatial and spectral multiplexing capabilities of SOCT. In this work we integrate the two methods, SRS and SOCT, to enable simultaneously multiplexed spatial and spectral imaging with sensitivity to many endogenous biochemical species that play an important role in biology and medicine. The method, termed SRS-SOCT, has the potential to achieve fast, volumetric, and highly sensitive label-free molecular imaging, which would be valuable for many applications. We demonstrate the approach by imaging excised human adipose tissue and detecting the lipids' Raman signatures in the high-wavenumber region. Details of this method along with validations and results will be presented.

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) fabrics for trace analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jun [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Zhou, Ji [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Tang, Bin, E-mail: bin.tang@deakin.edu.au [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Zeng, Tian; Li, Yaling [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Li, Jingliang [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia); Ye, Yong, E-mail: yeyong@hubu.edu.cn [Hubei Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Organic Chemical Materials & Key Laboratory for the Synthesis and Application of Organic Functional Molecules, Ministry of Education & College of Chemistry & Chemical Engineering, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Wang, Xungai [National Engineering Laboratory for Advanced Yarn and Fabric Formation and Clean Production, Wuhan Textile University, Wuhan 430073 (China); Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, Victoria 3216 (Australia)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • Gold nanoparticles are in-situ synthesized on silk fabrics by heating. • Flexible silk fabrics with gold nanoparticles are used for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). • SERS activities of silk fabrics with different gold contents are investigated. - Abstract: Flexible SERS active substrates were prepared by modification of silk fabrics with gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles were in-situ synthesized after heating the silk fabrics immersed in gold ion solution. Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of the treated silk fabrics varied as the concentration of gold ions changed, in relation to the morphologies of gold nanoparticles on silk. In addition, X-ray diffraction (XRD) was used to observe the structure of the gold nanoparticle treated silk fabrics. The SERS enhancement effect of the silk fabrics treated with gold nanoparticles was evaluated by collecting Raman signals of different concentrations of p-aminothiophenol (PATP), 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and crystal violet (CV) solutions. The results demonstrate that the silk fabrics corresponding to 0.3 and 0.4 mM of gold ions possess high SERS activity compared to the other treated fabrics. It is suggested that both the gold content and morphologies of gold nanoparticles dominate the SERS effect of the treated silk fabrics.

  4. High-speed Vibrational Imaging and Spectral Analysis of Lipid Bodies by Compound Raman Microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Slipchenko, Mikhail N.; Le, Thuc T.; Chen, Hongtao; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2009-01-01

    Cells store excess energy in the form of cytoplasmic lipid droplets. At present, it is unclear how different types of fatty acids contribute to the formation of lipid-droplets. We describe a compound Raman microscope capable of both high-speed chemical imaging and quantitative spectral analysis on the same platform. We use a picosecond laser source to perform coherent Raman scattering imaging of a biological sample and confocal Raman spectral analysis at points of interest. The potential of t...

  5. Raman scattering of photons by the channeling electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badreeva, D. R.; Kalashnikov, N. P.

    2017-07-01

    The motion of channeling particles in the accompanying coordinate system can be considered as a two-dimensional atom in the case of axial channeling. The transversal motion of the channeling particles is characterized by discrete spectrum. The occupation probability of the transversal motion levels depends on the entrance angle of the charged particles relative to the crystallographic axis. In the scattering of a photon by the ;quasi-bound; electron moving in the axial channeling regime would appear the frequencies ω which are a combination of the incident photon frequency ω0 and the frequency ωNM (ωNM is the transition frequency in transverse quantized motion of the channeling electron: ω =ω0 ±ωMN , where ℏωMN = 2γ2 ΔE⊥NM for the relativistic electron, γ2 = E / (mc2) is the Lorentz factor of the channeling electron). In the article are discussed the criteria for choosing an adequate continuous potential of the crystallographic axis and the quantum characteristics of a transversal motion of the channeling electron. The peculiarities of the Raman scattering spectrum of photons by electrons in the axial channeling regime are analyzed and the differential cross section of this process is found.

  6. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi4Te3 films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xu

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Bi4Te3, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi2Te3, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi4Te3 films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi4Te3 films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi4Te3 films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi4Te3 films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi2Te3 films.

  7. Effect of Scatterering on Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signals

    CERN Document Server

    Ranasinghesagara, Janaka C; Piazza, Vincenzo; Potma, Eric O; Venugopalan, Vasan

    2016-01-01

    We develop a computational framework to examine the factors responsible for scattering-induced distortions of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) signals in turbid samples. We use the Huygens-Fresnel Wave-based Electric Field Superposition (HF-WEFS) method combined with the radiating dipole approximation to compute the effects of scattering-induced distortions of focal excitation fields on the far-field CARS signal. We analyze the effect of spherical scatterers, placed in the vicinity of the focal volume, on the CARS signal emitted by different objects (2{\\mu}m diameter solid sphere, 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin cylinder and 2{\\mu}m diameter myelin tube). We find that distortions in the CARS signals arise not only from attenuation of the focal field but also from scattering-induced changes in the spatial phase that modifies the angular distribution of the CARS emission. Our simulations further show that CARS signal attenuation can be minimized by using a high numerical aperture condenser. Moreover, unlike...

  8. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with a photonic crystal fiber based light source

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, H.N.; Hilligsøe, Karen Marie; Thøgersen, J.

    2003-01-01

    A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup is demonstra......A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscope based on a Ti:sapphire femtosecond oscillator and a photonic crystal fiber is demonstrated. The nonlinear response of the fiber is used to generate the additional wavelength needed in the Raman process. The applicability of the setup...

  9. High Sensitivity Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Detection of Tryptophan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandakkathara, Archana

    Raman spectroscopy has the capability of providing detailed information about molecular structure, but the extremely small cross section of Raman scattering prevents this technique from applications requiring high sensitivity. Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) on the other hand provides strongly increased Raman signal from molecules attached to metallic nanostructures. SERS is thus a promising technique for high sensitivity analytical applications. One particular area of interest is the application of such techniques for the analysis of the composition of biological cells. However, there are issues which have to be addressed in order to make SERS a reliable technique such as the optimization of conditions for any given analyte, understanding the kinetic processes of binding of the target molecules to the nanostructures and understanding the evolution and coagulation of the nanostructures, in the case of colloidal solutions. The latter processes introduce a delay time for the observation of maximum enhancement factors which must be taken into account for any given implementation of SERS. In the present thesis the goal was to develop very sensitive SERS techniques for the measurement of biomolecules of interest for analysis of the contents of cells. The techniques explored could be eventually be applicable to microfluidic systems with the ultimate goal of analyzing the molecular constituents of single cells. SERS study of different amino acids and organic dyes were performed during the course of this thesis. A high sensitivity detection system based on SERS has been developed and spectrum from tryptophan (Trp) amino acid at very low concentration (10-8 M) has been detected. The concentration at which good quality SERS spectra could be detected from Trp is 4 orders of magnitude smaller than that previously reported in literature. It has shown that at such low concentrations the SERS spectra of Trp are qualitatively distinct from the spectra commonly reported in

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Raman scattering cross sections for H2 (Oklopcic+,

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopcic, A.; Hirata, C. M.; Heng, K.

    2017-02-01

    An important source of opacity in exoplanet atmospheres at short visible and near-UV wavelengths is Rayleigh scattering of light on molecules. It is accompanied by a related, albeit weaker process-Raman scattering. We analyze the signatures of Raman scattering imprinted in the reflected light and the geometric albedo of exoplanets, which could provide information about atmospheric properties. Raman scattering affects the geometric albedo spectra of planets in the following ways. First, it causes filling-in of strong absorption lines in the incident radiation, thus producing sharp peaks in the albedo. Second, it shifts the wavelengths of spectral features in the reflected light causing the so-called Raman ghost lines. Raman scattering can also cause a broadband reduction of the albedo due to wavelength shifting of a stellar spectrum with red spectral index. Observing the Raman peaks in the albedo could be used to measure the column density of gas, thus providing constraints on the presence of clouds in the atmosphere. Observing the Raman ghost lines could be used to spectroscopically identify the main scatterer in the atmosphere, even molecules like H2 or N2, which do not have prominent spectral signatures in the optical wavelength range. If detected, ghost lines could also provide information about the temperature of the atmosphere. In this paper, we investigate the effects of Raman scattering in hydrogen- and nitrogen-dominated atmospheres. We analyze the feasibility of detecting the signatures of Raman scattering with the existing and future observational facilities, and of using these signatures as probes of exoplanetary atmospheres. (1 data file).

  11. Identification of metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity using graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bo-Hyun; Kim, Daechul; Song, Sungho; Park, DongHyuk; Kang, Il-Suk; Jeong, Dae Hong; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2014-03-18

    Graphene-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (GERRS) was performed for the detection of three different metallo-octaethylporphyrins (M-OEPs; M = 2H, FeCl, and Pt) homogeneously thermal vapor deposited on a graphene surface. GERRS of M-OEPs were measured using three different excitation wavelengths, λ(ex) = 405, 532, and 633 nm, and characterized detail vibrational bands for the identification of M-OEPs. The GERRS spectra of Pt-OEP at λ(ex) = 532 nm showed ~29 and ~162 times signal enhancement ratio on graphene and on graphene with Ag nanoclusters, respectively, compared to the spectra from bare SiO2 substrate. This enhancement ratio, however, was varied with M-OEPs and excitation wavelengths. The characteristic peaks and band shapes of GERRS for each M-OEP were measured with high sensitivity (100 pmol of thermal vapor deposited Pt-OEP), and these facilitate the selectively recognition of molecules. Also, the peaks shift and broadening provide the evidence of the interaction between graphene and M-OEPs through the charge transfer and π-orbital interaction. The increase of graphene layer induced the decrease of signal intensity and GERRS effect was almost not observed on the thick graphite flakes. Further experiments with various substrates demonstrated that the interaction of single layer of graphene with molecule is the origin of the Raman signal enhancement of M-OEPs. In this experiment, we proved the graphene is a good alternative substrate of Raman spectroscopy for the selective detection of various metalloporphyrins with high sensitivity.

  12. Self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering using plasmon waveguide resonance for surface and bulk sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiu-mei; Gao, Ran; Lu, Dan-feng; Qi, Zhi-mei

    2018-01-01

    Surface plasmon-coupled emission has been widely used in fluorescence imaging, biochemical sensing, and enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering for simultaneous detection of surface and bulk effects by using plasmon waveguide resonance (PWR) based surface plasmon-coupled emission has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. Raman scattering was captured on the prism side in Kretschmann-surface plasmon-coupled emission. The distinct penetration depths (δ) of the evanescent field for the transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) modes result in different detected distances of the Raman signal. The experimental results demonstrate that the self-referenced directional enhanced Raman scattering of the TE and TM modes based on the PWR can detect and distinguish the surface and bulk effects simultaneously, which appears to have potential applications in researches of chemistry, medicine, and biology.

  13. Live-cell stimulated Raman scattering imaging of alkyne-tagged biomolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Senlian; Chen, Tao; Zhu, Yuntao; Li, Ang; Huang, Yanyi; Chen, Xing

    2014-06-02

    Alkynes can be metabolically incorporated into biomolecules including nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and glycans. In addition to the clickable chemical reactivity, alkynes possess a unique Raman scattering within the Raman-silent region of a cell. Coupling this spectroscopic signature with Raman microscopy yields a new imaging modality beyond fluorescence and label-free microscopies. The bioorthogonal Raman imaging of various biomolecules tagged with an alkyne by a state-of-the-art Raman imaging technique, stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, is reported. This imaging method affords non-invasiveness, high sensitivity, and molecular specificity and therefore should find broad applications in live-cell imaging. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Direct observation of single DNA structural alterations at low forces with surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Satish; Raj, Saurabh; Cossins, Benjamin; Marro, Monica; Guallar, Victor; Petrov, Dmitri

    2013-01-08

    DNA experiences numerous mechanical events, necessitating single-molecule force spectroscopy techniques to provide insight into DNA mechanics as a whole system. Inherent Brownian motion limits current force spectroscopy methods from observing possible bond level structural changes. We combine optical trapping and surface-enhanced Raman scattering to establish a direct relationship between DNA's extension and structure in the low force, entropic regime. A DNA molecule is trapped close to a surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate to facilitate a detectable Raman signal. DNA Raman modes shift in response to applied force, indicating phosphodiester mechanical alterations. Molecular dynamic simulations confirm the local structural alterations and the Raman sensitive band identified experimentally. The combined Raman and force spectroscopy technique, to our knowledge, is a novel methodology that can be generalized to all single-molecule studies. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. FT-IR, RAMAN AND DFT STUDIES ON THE VIBRATIONAL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    aminoethoxy)propane (baep) were examined both experimentally and theoretically including FT-IR and Raman spectroscopic methods. Among the possible structural configurations, 30 of them were handled in the framework of this study.

  16. Silicon nanohybrid-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Houyu; Jiang, Xiangxu; Lee, Shuit-Tong; He, Yao

    2014-11-01

    Nanomaterial-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) sensors are highly promising analytical tools, capable of ultrasensitive, multiplex, and nondestructive detection of chemical and biological species. Extensive efforts have been made to design various silicon nanohybrid-based SERS substrates such as gold/silver nanoparticle (NP)-decorated silicon nanowires, Au/Ag NP-decorated silicon wafers (AuNP@Si), and so forth. In comparison to free AuNP- and AgNP-based SERS sensors, the silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors feature higher enhancement factors (EFs) and excellent reproducibility, since SERS hot spots are efficiently coupled and stabilized through interconnection to the semiconducting silicon substrates. Consequently, in the past decade, giant advancements in the development of silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors have been witnessed for myriad sensing applications. In this review, the representative achievements related to the design of high-performance silicon nanohybrid-based SERS sensors and their use for chemical and biological analysis are reviewed in a detailed way. Furthermore, the major opportunities and challenges in this field are discussed from a broad perspective and possible future directions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Raman scattering study of the phase transition in wet-spun films of lithium hyaluronate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reineck, I.; Suleski, T. J.; Lee, S. A.; Rupprecht, A.

    2002-03-01

    Raman scattering experiments have been performed on wet-spun films of lithium hyaluronate as a function of relative humidity (RH). Near 84 percent RH several of the internal Raman modes, but not all, are observed to shift to different frequencies. These data indicate these modes are affected by the phase transition known to occur near this RH. The frequencies of the effected Raman modes return to their "normal" value after the phase transition has been passed.

  18. Exciton-mediated Raman scattering in CdS quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaotong; Liu, Cuihong

    2017-09-01

    A theoretical calculation of the differential cross section (DCS) is presented for the exciton-mediated Stokes Raman scattering in CdS quantum dot within the frame work of effective mass approximation at T = 0 K. Numerical calculations reveal that the excitonic effects cause blue shifts in Raman spectroscopy. The magnitude of the Raman shift depends on the quantum confinement, the Coulomb interaction, and the incident photon energy.

  19. Raman scattering in Si/SiGe nanostructures: Revealing chemical composition, strain, intermixing, and heat dissipation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mala, S. A.; Tsybeskov, L., E-mail: tsybesko@njit.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States); Lockwood, D. J.; Wu, X.; Baribeau, J.-M. [National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario K1A 0R6 (Canada)

    2014-07-07

    We present a quantitative analysis of Raman scattering in various Si/Si{sub 1-x}Ge{sub x} multilayered nanostructures with well-defined Ge composition (x) and layer thicknesses. Using Raman and transmission electron microscopy data, we discuss and model Si/SiGe intermixing and strain. By analyzing Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman signals, we calculate temperature and discuss heat dissipation in the samples under intense laser illumination.

  20. Imaging Nonequilibrium Atomic Vibrations with X-ray Diffuse Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trigo, M.; Chen, J.; Vishwanath, V.H.; /SLAC; Sheu, Y.M.; /Michigan U.; Graber, T.; Henning, R.; /U. Chicago; Reis, D; /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2011-03-03

    We use picosecond x-ray diffuse scattering to image the nonequilibrium vibrations of the lattice following ultrafast laser excitation. We present images of nonequilibrium phonons in InP and InSb throughout the Brillouin-zone which remain out of equilibrium up to nanoseconds. The results are analyzed using a Born model that helps identify the phonon branches contributing to the observed features in the time-resolved diffuse scattering. In InP this analysis shows a delayed increase in the transverse acoustic (TA) phonon population along high-symmetry directions accompanied by a decrease in the longitudinal acoustic (LA) phonons. In InSb the increase in TA phonon population is less directional.

  1. Mode coupling mechanisms in liquids studied by 2D Raman scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steffen, T; Duppen, K.; Elsaesser, T; Fujimoto, JG; Wiersma, DA; Zinth, W

    1998-01-01

    Femtosecond temporally two-dimensional Raman scattering, that was originally designed to characterize the time scale(s) of intermolecular dynamics in liquids, also provides information on mode coupling mechanisms. Polarizability mode coupling suppresses the formation of motional echoes, that

  2. Stark-induced adiabatic Raman ladder for preparing highly vibrationally excited quantum states of molecular hydrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Nandini; Perreault, William E.; Zare, Richard N.

    2017-07-01

    We present a multi-color ladder excitation scheme that exploits Stark-induced adiabatic Raman passage to selectively populate a highly excited vibrational level of a molecule. We suggest that this multi-color coherent ladder excitation provides a practical way of accessing levels near the vibrational dissociation limit as well as the dissociative continuum, which would allow the generation of an entangled pair of fragments with near-zero relative kinetic energy. Specifically, we consider four- and six-photon coherent excitation of molecular hydrogen to high vibrational levels via intermediate vibrational levels, which are pairwise coupled by two-photon resonant interaction. Using a sequence of three partially overlapping, single-mode, nanosecond laser pulses we show that the sixth vibrational level of H2, which is too weakly coupled to be easily accessed by direct two-photon Raman excitation from the ground vibrational level, can be efficiently populated without leaving any population stranded in the intermediate level. Furthermore, we show that the fourteenth vibrational level of H2, which is the highest vibrational level in the ground electronic state with a binding energy of 22 meV, can be efficiently and selectively populated using a sequence of four pulses. The present technique offers the unique possibility of preparing entangled quantum states of H atoms without resorting to an ultracold system.

  3. Picosecond Raman spectroscopy with a fast intensified CCD camera for depth analysis of diffusely scattering media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ariese, F.; Meuzelaar, H.; Kerssens, M.M.; Buijs, J.B.; Gooijer, C.

    2009-01-01

    A spectroscopic depth profiling approach is demonstrated for layers of non-transparent, diffusely scattering materials. The technique is based on the temporal discrimination between Raman photons emitted from the surface and Raman photons originating from a deeper layer. Excitation was carried out

  4. Impulsive rotational Raman scattering of N2 by a remote "air laser" in femtosecond laser filament

    CERN Document Server

    Ni, Jielei; Zhang, Haisu; Zeng, Bin; Yao, Jinping; Li, Guihua; Jing, Chenrui; Xie, Hongqiang; Xu, Huailiang; Cheng, Ya; Xu, Zhizhan

    2014-01-01

    We report on experimental realization of impulsive rotational Raman scattering from neutral nitrogen molecules in a femtosecond laser filament using an intense self-induced white-light seeding "air laser" generated during the filamentation of an 800 nm Ti: Sapphire laser in nitrogen gas. The impulsive rotational Raman fingerprint signals are observed with a maximum conversion efficiency of ~0.8%. Our observation provides a promising way of remote identification and location of chemical species in atmosphere by rotational Raman scattering of molecules.

  5. Ab-initio molecular dynamics and vibrational Raman spectroscopy investigations of quartz polymorph at high temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sediki, Hayet; Simon, Patrick; Hadjadj, Aomar; Krallafa, Abdelghani M.

    2017-09-01

    Quartz has found a wide range of applications over the past years. In the present work, the temperature dependence of microcrystalline quartz is investigated with Raman spectroscopy and DFT-based molecular dynamics simulations. We aimed to determine the structure at short and medium range distances as a function of the increasing temperature. The dynamics and the structural changes are analysed in terms of time-dependent properties, and the vibrational analysis obtained from calculated dipole trajectory and vibrational density of states (VDOS). The computed data is compared to Raman and infrared spectroscopic measurements. The approach is of a particularly great interest when we focus on the structural behaviour, and the dynamical disorder observed and characterised through geometric and thermodynamic data. The calculations confirm that the infrared and Raman signature as a function of temperature provide a sensitive analysis of the structural behaviour of quartz.

  6. Silicon nanocrystals with high boron and phosphorus concentration hydrophilic shell—Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujii, Minoru, E-mail: fujii@eedept.kobe-u.ac.jp; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Masataka; Imakita, Kenji [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Boron (B) and phosphorus (P) codoped silicon (Si) nanocrystals, which exhibit very wide range tunable luminescence due to the donor to acceptor transitions and can be dispersed in polar liquids without organic ligands, are studied by Raman scattering and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies. Codoped Si nanocrystals exhibit a Raman spectrum significantly different from those of intrinsic ones. First, the Raman peak energy is almost insensitive to the size and is very close to that of bulk Si crystal in the diameter range of 2.7 to 14 nm. Second, the peak is much broader than that of intrinsic ones. Furthermore, an additional broad peak, the intensity of which is about 20% of the main peak, appears around 650 cm{sup −1}. The peak can be assigned to local vibrational modes of substitutional B and B-P pairs, B clusters, B-interstitial clusters, etc. in Si crystal. The Raman and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic studies suggest that a crystalline shell heavily doped with these species is formed at the surface of a codoped Si nanocrystal and it induces the specific properties, i.e., hydrophilicity, high-stability in water, high resistance to hydrofluoric acid, etc.

  7. [A study of phonon vibration like modes for aggregation structure in silicate melts by high temperature Raman spectrum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei-Cang; Li, Ru-Bi; Shang, Tong-Ming; Zhou, Jian; Sun, Jian-Hua; You, Jing-Lin

    2010-05-01

    Silicate melts are special fractal dimension system that is metastable state of near-way order and far-way disorder. In this paper, the size of nanometer aggregation structure and the frequences of phonon vibration like mode in the low dimension silicate series (CaO-Al2O3-SiO2 and Na2-Al2O3-SiO2 series) synthesized via high temperature melting and sol gel methods were measured by means of small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), low wavenumber Raman spectrum (LWRS) and high temperature Raman spectrum (HTRS in situ measuring). The nanometer self-similarity aggregation structure(it's size is about a few nm to a few tens nm) and phonic phonon vibration like modes of low temperature silicate gel, high temperature silicate melts and it's quenching glasses phases were obtained. So a quantitative method by HTRS for measuring the aggregation size in the high temperature melts was established. The results showed that the aggregation size of the silicate melts is smaller at high temperature than at room temperature and the number of bridge oxygen in one Si-O tetrahedron in network structure units is decreasing at high temperature. This study work provides important theory and information for deliberating geochemistry characteristic, crystallization & evolution of natural magma and enhancing performance of low dimension silicate matelials.

  8. The Nanofabrication and Application of Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xian Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS was discovered in 1974 and impacted Raman spectroscopy and surface science. Although SERS has not been developed to be an applicable detection tool so far, nanotechnology has promoted its development in recent decades. The traditional SERS substrates, such as silver electrode, metal island film, and silver colloid, cannot be applied because of their enhancement factor or stability, but newly developed substrates, such as electrochemical deposition surface, Ag porous film, and surface-confined colloids, have better sensitivity and stability. Surface enhanced Raman scattering is applied in other fields such as detection of chemical pollutant, biomolecules, DNA, bacteria, and so forth. In this paper, the development of nanofabrication and application of surface-enhanced Ramans scattering substrate are discussed.

  9. Fast-neutron scattering from vibrational palladium nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, A.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States); Guenther, P.T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1993-10-01

    Neutron total cross sections of elemental palladium are measured from {approx}0.6--4.5 MeV. These results, combined with others previously reported from this laboratory, provide a detailed knowledge of the neutron total cross sections of palladium from {approx}0.1--20 MeV. Differential neutron elastic-scattering cross sections are measured from {approx}1.5--10 MeV in sufficient energy and angle detail to well define the energy-average behavior. Concurrently, neutron inelastic-scattering cross sections are measured from {approx}1.5--8 MeV. Inelastically-scattered neutron groups are observed corresponding to excitations of: 306 {+-} 14, 411 {+-} 47, {approx}494, 791 {+-} 20, 924 {+-} 20, 1,156 {+-} 24, 1,358 {+-} 35, 1,554 {+-} 47 and 1,706 {+-} 59 keV, with additional tentative groups at 1,938 and 2,059 keV. Particular attention is given to the inelastic excitation of the 2{sup +} yrast states of the even isotopes. This broad data base is examined in the context of optical-statistical and coupled-channels models. The resulting model parameters are consistent with systematic trends in this vibrational mass region previously noted at this laboratory, and provide a suitable vehicle for many applications.

  10. Low-frequency Raman scattering in alkali tellurite glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    TeO3 units with a varying number of non-bridging oxygen atoms. Emphasis has also been given to the low- frequency modes and particular points related to the low-frequency Raman phenomenology are discussed in view of the experimental findings. Keywords. Tellurites; Raman spectroscopy; alkali tellurite glasses. 1.

  11. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for pharmaceutics: a shift in the right direction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.

    2014-01-01

    This dissertation demonstrates coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a tool in pharmaceutical solid state development. CARS microscopy is a nonlinear optical imaging technique that uses inelastic scattering of light to provide chemically specific imaging. CARS microscopy is

  12. Effects of Raman scattering and attenuation in silica fiber-based parametric frequency conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis, Søren Michael Mørk; Andersen, Lasse Mejling; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    Four-wave mixing in the form of Bragg scattering (BS) has been predicted to enable quantum noise-less frequency conversion by analytic quantum approaches. Using a semi-classical description of quantum noise that accounts for loss and stimulated and spontaneous Raman scattering, which...

  13. Influence of Stimuled Raman Scattering on Transmitted Optical Signal in WDM System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ján Ružbarský

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Paper is focused on simulations behavior of signals in high-speed networks. Huge amount of transmitted information and increase in transmission speed create unwanted events in optical fiber. The main influences comprise effects such as: stimulated Raman scattering and stimulated Brillouin scattering. This paper is focused only on Raman scattering. For transmitting a signal through optical fiber one needs to select an appropriate wavelength. This is one of goals the experiment in this article. Signals were transmitted accordance with Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM and spacing among channels 100GHz.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering using bismuth nanoparticles: a study with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, A. G.; Cavassin, P.; Machado, T. N.; Woiski, T. D.; Caetano, R.; Schreiner, W. H.

    2017-11-01

    Bismuth nanoparticles produced by laser ablation synthesis in solution (LASiS) show localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs). The nanoparticles show surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity for several tested amino acids. Optical absorption, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) as well as Raman scattering were used to characterize the samples. The search for new biocompatible nanoparticles for diagnostic purposes is important, and the demonstration that a semimetal is capable to act as a SERS active system opens new possibilities for molecular detection.

  15. Simulation of stimulated Brillouin scattering and stimulated Raman scattering in shock ignition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hao, L.; Li, J.; Liu, W. D.; Yan, R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Ren, C., E-mail: chuang.ren@rochester.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 (United States)

    2016-04-15

    We study stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in shock ignition by comparing fluid and particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. Under typical parameters for the OMEGA experiments [Theobald et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 102706 (2012)], a series of 1D fluid simulations with laser intensities ranging between 2 × 10{sup 15} and 2 × 10{sup 16 }W/cm{sup 2} finds that SBS is the dominant instability, which increases significantly with the incident intensity. Strong pump depletion caused by SBS and SRS limits the transmitted intensity at the 0.17n{sub c} to be less than 3.5 × 10{sup 15 }W/cm{sup 2}. The PIC simulations show similar physics but with higher saturation levels for SBS and SRS convective modes and stronger pump depletion due to higher seed levels for the electromagnetic fields in PIC codes. Plasma flow profiles are found to be important in proper modeling of SBS and limiting its reflectivity in both the fluid and PIC simulations.

  16. VIBRATIONAL RAMAN OPTICAL-ACTIVITY CALCULATIONS USING LONDON ATOMIC ORBITALS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helgaker, T.; Ruud, K.; Bak, Keld L.

    1994-01-01

    Ab initio calculations of Raman differential intensities are presented at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory. The electric dipole-electric dipole, electric dipole-magnetic dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizability tensors are calculated at the frequency of the inc...... of the incident light, using SCF linear response theory. London atomic orbitals are employed, imposing gauge origin invariance on the calculations. Calculations have been carried out in the harmonic approximation for CFHDT and methyloxirane.......Ab initio calculations of Raman differential intensities are presented at the self-consistent field (SCF) level of theory. The electric dipole-electric dipole, electric dipole-magnetic dipole and electric dipole-electric quadrupole polarizability tensors are calculated at the frequency...

  17. Resonance surface enhanced Raman optical activity of myoglobin as a result of optimized resonance surface enhanced Raman scattering conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Johannessen, Christian; Nygaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    Using Surface enhanced ROA (SEROA), novel results are achieved by combining Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and resonance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERRS), applied on myoglobin. The novelty of this work is ascribed the first time reporting on chiral results of a study performed on a protein...... has shown that the SERS effect behaves consequently, depending on the concentration ratio of each component, i.e., myoglobin, Ag colloids and NaCl. Accordingly, it is shown here that SERS intensity has its maximum at certain concentration of these components, whereas below or above this value...

  18. Guiding Brain Tumor Resection Using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanoparticles and a Hand-Held Raman Scanner

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The current difficulty in visualizing the true extent of malignant brain tumors during surgical resection represents one of the major reasons for the poor prognosis of brain tumor patients. Here, we evaluated the ability of a hand-held Raman scanner, guided by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanoparticles, to identify the microscopic tumor extent in a genetically engineered RCAS/tv-a glioblastoma mouse model. In a simulated intraoperative scenario, we tested both a static Raman imaging device and a mobile, hand-held Raman scanner. We show that SERS image-guided resection is more accurate than resection using white light visualization alone. Both methods complemented each other, and correlation with histology showed that SERS nanoparticles accurately outlined the extent of the tumors. Importantly, the hand-held Raman probe not only allowed near real-time scanning, but also detected additional microscopic foci of cancer in the resection bed that were not seen on static SERS images and would otherwise have been missed. This technology has a strong potential for clinical translation because it uses inert gold–silica SERS nanoparticles and a hand-held Raman scanner that can guide brain tumor resection in the operating room. PMID:25093240

  19. Micro-Raman Vibrational Identification of 10-MDP Bond to Zirconia and Shear Bond Strength Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Martins De-Paula

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available So far, there is no report regarding the micro-Raman vibrational fingerprint of the bonds between 10-methacryloyloxy-decyl dihydrogen phosphate (10-MDP and zirconia ceramics. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify the Raman vibrational peaks related to the bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, as well as the influence on microshear bond strength. Micro-Raman spectroscopy was employed to assess the vibrational peak of 10-MDP binding to zirconia. Microshear bond strength of the dual-cure resin cement to zirconia with the presence of 10-MDP in composition of experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement was also surveyed. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (p<0.05. Peaks at 1545 cm−1 and 1562 cm−1 were found to refer to zirconia binding with 10-MDP. The presence of 10-MDP in both experimental ceramic primer and self-adhesive resin cement improved microshear bond strength to zirconia ceramic. It can be concluded that the nondestructive method of micro-Raman spectroscopy was able to characterize chemical bonds of 10-MDP with zirconia, which improves the bond strengths of resin cement.

  20. Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Gas Phase Thermometry at 5 kHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fineman, Claresta; Lucht, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the thermal instabilities occurring in turbulent combustion, such as in modern gas turbine combustors, is critical for more reliable and fuel-efficient operation. Non-intrusive laser based spectroscopy methods have been documented as the techniques of choice for turbulent combustion diagnostics. Specifically, femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) thermometry has been established for temporal resolution of turbulent fluctuations in flame structure and provides accurate measurements across a wide range of temperatures. Experiments performed to date include 5 kHz pure vibrational N2 chirped probe-pulse fs-CARS thermometry on non-premixed hydrogen jet diffusion flames, methane jet diffusion flames, and the DLR gas turbine model combustor (GTMC). The fs-CARS signal generation process requires precise spatial and temporal overlap of tightly focused pulsed laser beams of less than 100 fs pulse duration. Here, signal loss due to beam steering, pressure fluctuations, or shear layer density gradients can become a problem. The effect of such interferences has been investigated using high velocity flow of compressed nitrogen gas from a converging-diverging nozzle. Resulting changes in fs-CARS spectra have been studied. Funding for this work was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences.

  1. Imaging the intact mouse cornea using coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering (CARS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammar, David A; Lei, Tim C; Kahook, Malik Y; Masihzadeh, Omid

    2013-08-05

    The aim of this study was to image the cellular and noncellular structures of the cornea and limbus in an intact mouse eye using the vibrational oscillation of the carbon-hydrogen bond in lipid membranes and autofluorescence as label-free contrast agents. Freshly enucleated mouse eyes were imaged using two nonlinear optical techniques: coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two-photon autofluorescence (TPAF). Sequential images were collected through the full thickness of the cornea and limbal regions. Line scans along the transverse/sagittal axes were also performed. Analysis of multiple CARS/TPAF images revealed that corneal epithelial and endothelial cells could be identified by the lipid-rich plasma membrane CARS signal. The fluorescent signal from the collagen fibers of the corneal stroma was evident in the TPAF channel. The transition from the cornea to sclera at the limbus was marked by a change in collagen pattern (TPAF channel) and thickness of surface cells (CARS channel). Regions within the corneal stroma that lack collagen autofluorescence coincided with CARS signal, indicating the presence of stromal fibroblasts or nerve fibers. The CARS technique was successful in imaging cells in the intact mouse eye, both at the surface and within corneal tissue. Multiphoton images were comparable to histologic sections. The methods described here represent a new avenue for molecular specific imaging of the mouse eye. The lack of need for tissue fixation is unique compared with traditional histology imaging techniques.

  2. Toward digital staining using stimulated Raman scattering and statistical machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanji, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Satoh, S.; Hashimoto, H.; Ozeki, Y.; Itoh, Kazuyoshi

    2014-03-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral microscopy is a promising imaging method, based on vibrational spectroscopy, which can visualize biological tissues with chemical specificity. SRS spectral microscopy has been used to obtain two-dimensional spectral images of rat liver tissue, three-dimensional images of a vessel in rat liver, and in vivo spectral images of mouse ear skin. Various multivariate analysis techniques, such as principal component analysis and independent component analysis, have been used to obtain spectral images. In this study, we propose a digital staining method. This method uses SRS spectra and statistical machine learning that makes use of prior knowledge of spectral peaks and their two-dimensional distributional patterns corresponding to the composition of tissue samples. The method selects spectral peaks on the basis of Mahalanobis distance, which is defined as the ratio of inter-group variation to intragroup variation. We also make use of higher-order local autocorrelations as feature values for two-dimensional distributional patterns. This combination of techniques allows groups corresponding to different intracellular structures to be clearly discriminated in the multidimensional feature space. We investigate the performance of our method on mouse liver tissue samples and show that the proposed method can digitally stain each intracellular structure such as cell nuclei, cytoplasm, and erythrocytes separately and clearly without time-consuming chemical staining processes. We anticipate that our method could be applied to computer-aided pathological diagnosis.

  3. Three-dimensional chemical imaging of skin using stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drutis, Dane M.; Hancewicz, Thomas M.; Pashkovski, Eugene; Feng, Lin; Mihalov, Dawn; Holtom, Gary; Ananthapadmanabhan, Kavssery P.; Xie, X. Sunney; Misra, Manoj

    2014-11-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy is used to generate structural and chemical three-dimensional images of native skin. We employed SRS microscopy to investigate the microanatomical features of skin and penetration of topically applied materials. Image depth stacks are collected at distinct wavelengths corresponding to vibrational modes of proteins, lipids, and water in the skin. We observed that corneocytes in stratum corneum are grouped together in clusters, 100 to 250 μm in diameter, separated by 10- to 25-μm-wide microanatomical skin-folds called canyons. These canyons occasionally extend down to depths comparable to that of the dermal-epidermal junction below the flat surface regions in porcine and human skin. SRS imaging shows the distribution of chemical species within cell clusters and canyons. Water is predominately located within the cell clusters, and its concentration rapidly increases at the transition from stratum corneum to viable epidermis. Canyons do not contain detectable levels of water and are rich in lipid material. Oleic acid-d34 applied to the skin surface lines the canyons down to a depth of 50 μm below the surface of the skin. This observation could have implications on the evaluation of penetration profiles of bioactive materials measured using traditional methods, such as tape-stripping.

  4. Organelle-targeting surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors for subcellular pH sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanting; Liang, Lijia; Zhang, Shuqin; Huang, Dianshuai; Zhang, Jing; Xu, Shuping; Liang, Chongyang; Xu, Weiqing

    2018-01-25

    The pH value of subcellular organelles in living cells is a significant parameter in the physiological activities of cells. Its abnormal fluctuations are commonly believed to be associated with cancers and other diseases. Herein, a series of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) nanosensors with high sensitivity and targeting function was prepared for the quantification and monitoring of pH values in mitochondria, nucleus, and lysosome. The nanosensors were composed of gold nanorods (AuNRs) functionalized with a pH-responsive molecule (4-mercaptopyridine, MPy) and peptides that could specifically deliver the AuNRs to the targeting subcellular organelles. The localization of our prepared nanoprobes in specific organelles was confirmed by super-high resolution fluorescence imaging and bio-transmission electron microscopy (TEM) methods. By the targeting ability, the pH values of the specific organelles can be determined by monitoring the vibrational spectral changes of MPy with different pH values. Compared to the cases of reported lysosome and cytoplasm SERS pH sensors, more accurate pH values of mitochondria and nucleus, which could be two additional intracellular tracers for subcellular microenvironments, were disclosed by this SERS approach, further improving the accuracy of discrimination of related diseases. Our sensitive SERS strategy can also be employed to explore crucial physiological and biological processes that are related to subcellular pH fluctuations.

  5. Modeling and theoretical study of electronic anti-Stokes Raman scattering in quantum cascade lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefvand, Hossein Reza

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a self-consistent model for studying the electronic anti-Stokes (AS) Raman scattering in quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). The model is developed by employing a five-level rate-equation for the carrier dynamics in whole of the device and a two-level energy balance equations to adopt the electron-temperature in the pump and AS active regions. Using the presented model, the effect of temperature on the steady and transient characteristics of the device is investigated. Because of considering the parametric interaction between the incident and the scattered lights in the stimulated Raman process, the model accurately predicts the existence of Raman gain's saturation in both the steady and transient regimes. Additionally, using a steady-state analysis of the rate equations in the nonlinear region, an expression for the threshold current of the AS Raman laser is derived and the effects of pump power and temperature are examined. It is found that the electronic AS Raman scattering is affected by interplay between the various temperature-dependent parameters such as the pump intensity, the intrinsic gain of the nonlinear optical medium, and the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon scattering times between the states involved in the stimulated Raman process.

  6. Observation of the low frequency vibrational modes of bacteriophage M13 in water by Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsen Shaw-Wei D

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently, a technique which departs radically from conventional approaches has been proposed. This novel technique utilizes biological objects such as viruses as nano-templates for the fabrication of nanostructure elements. For example, rod-shaped viruses such as the M13 phage and tobacco mosaic virus have been successfully used as biological templates for the synthesis of semiconductor and metallic nanowires. Results and discussion Low wave number (≤ 20 cm-1 acoustic vibrations of the M13 phage have been studied using Raman spectroscopy. The experimental results are compared with theoretical calculations based on an elastic continuum model and appropriate Raman selection rules derived from a bond polarizability model. The observed Raman mode has been shown to belong to one of the Raman-active axial torsion modes of the M13 phage protein coat. Conclusion It is expected that the detection and characterization of this low frequency vibrational mode can be used for applications in nanotechnology such as for monitoring the process of virus functionalization and self-assembly. For example, the differences in Raman spectra can be used to monitor the coating of virus with some other materials and nano-assembly process, such as attaching a carbon nanotube or quantum dots.

  7. Biomedical Applications of Micro-Raman and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    al., "Visible, near-infrared, and ultraviolet laser- excited Raman spectroscopy of the monocytes/macrophages (U937) cells", J. Raman Spectrosc., 41...Visible, near-infrared, and ultraviolet laser-excited Raman spectroscopy of the monocytes/macrophages (U937) cells,” J. Raman Spectrosc., 41(3), 268...spectroscopy,” Journal of Photochemistry and Photobiology B-Biology, 16(2), 211-233 (1992). [17] K. Kneipp, H. Kneipp, and H. G. Bohr, “Single-molecule SERS

  8. Surface Plasmon-Coupled Directional Enhanced Raman Scattering by Means of the Reverse Kretschmann Configuration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Si-Xin; Liu, Qian; Cao, Shuo-Hui; Cai, Wei-Peng; Meng, Ling-Yan; Xie, Kai-Xin; Zhai, Yan-Yun; Zong, Cheng; Yang, Zhi-Lin; Ren, Bin; Li, Yao-Qun

    2015-06-04

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a unique analytical technique that provides fingerprint spectra, yet facing the obstacle of low collection efficiency. In this study, we demonstrated a simple approach to measure surface plasmon-coupled directional enhanced Raman scattering by means of the reverse Kretschmann configuration (RK-SPCR). Highly directional and p-polarized Raman scattering of 4-aminothiophenol (4-ATP) was observed on a nanoparticle-on-film substrate at 46° through the prism coupler with a sharp angle distribution (full width at half-maximum of ∼3.3°). Because of the improved collection efficiency, the Raman scattering signal was enhanced 30-fold over the conventional SERS mode; this was consistent with finite-difference time-domain simulations. The effect of nanoparticles on the coupling efficiency of propagated surface plasmons was investigated. Possessing straightforward implementation and directional enhancement of Raman scattering, RK-SPCR is anticipated to simplify SERS instruments and to be broadly applicable to biochemical assays.

  9. Vibrational microspectroscopy of food. Raman vs. FT-IR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thygesen, Lisbeth Garbrecht; Løkke, Mette Marie; Micklander, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    . The high spatial resolution makes it possible to study areas down to approximately 10x10 mum with FT-IR microspectroscopy and approximately 1 x 1 mum with Raman microspectroscopy. This presentation highlights the advantages and disadvantages of the two microspectroscopic techniques when applied......) the composition of blisters found on the surface of bread, (4) the microstructure of high-lysine barley and (5) the composition of white spots in the shell of frozen shrimps. (C) 2003 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. Lattice dynamics of hexagonal and cubic InN: Raman-scattering experiments and calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaczmarczyk, G.; Kaschner, A.; Reich, S.; Hoffmann, A.; Thomsen, C.; As, D. J.; Lima, A. P.; Schikora, D.; Lischka, K.; Averbeck, R.; Riechert, H.

    2000-04-01

    We present results of first- and second-order Raman-scattering experiments on hexagonal and cubic InN covering the acoustic and optical phonon and overtone region. Using a modified valence-force model, we calculated the phonon dispersion curves and the density of states in both InN modifications. The observed Raman shifts agree well the calculated Γ-point frequencies and the corresponding overtone density of states. A tentative assignment to particular phonon branches is given.

  11. Frontiers of surface-enhanced Raman scattering single nanoparticles and single cells

    CERN Document Server

    Ozaki, Yukihiro; Aroca, Ricardo

    2014-01-01

    A comprehensive presentation of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) theory, substrate fabrication, applications of SERS to biosystems, chemical analysis, sensing and fundamental innovation through experimentation. Written by internationally recognized editors and contributors. Relevant to all those within the scientific community dealing with Raman Spectroscopy, i.e. physicists, chemists, biologists, material scientists, physicians and biomedical scientists. SERS applications are widely expanding and the technology is now used in the field of nanotechnologies, applications to biosystems, nonosensors, nanoimaging and nanoscience.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Xu, Yijun; Xu, Pengyu; Pan, Zhenghui; Chen, Sheng; Shen, Qishen; Zhan, Li; Zhang, Yuegang; Ni, Weihai

    2015-10-01

    We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials.We developed a facile approach toward hybrid AgNP-graphene-AgNP sandwiched structures using self-organized monolayered AgNPs from wet chemical synthesis for the optimized enhancement of the Raman response of monolayer graphene. We demonstrate that the Raman scattering of graphene can be enhanced 530 fold in the hybrid structure. The Raman enhancement is sensitively dependent on the hybrid structure, incident angle, and excitation wavelength. A systematic simulation is performed, which well explains the enhancement mechanism. Our study indicates that the enhancement resulted from the plasmonic coupling between the AgNPs on the opposite sides of graphene. Our approach towards ideal substrates offers great potential to produce a ``hot surface'' for enhancing the Raman response of two-dimensional materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional SEM images, electric field enhancement profiles, Raman scattering spectra, and structure-dependent peak ratios. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04500b

  13. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering from finite arrays of gold nano-patches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincenti, M. A.; Ceglia, D. de [AEgis Technologies Inc., 410 Jan Davis Dr, 35806 Huntsville, Alabama (United States); US Army-Charles M. Bowden Research Laboratory, 35898 Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama (United States); Grande, M.; Petruzzelli, V.; D' Orazio, A. [Dipartimento di Elettrotecnica ed Elettronica, Politecnico di Bari, Via Re David 200, 70125 Bari (Italy); Bianco, G. V.; Bruno, G. [Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Stomeo, T. [Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnology, Istituto Italiano di Technologia (IIT), Via Barsanti, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); De Vittorio, M. [Center for Bio-Molecular Nanotechnology, Istituto Italiano di Technologia (IIT), Via Barsanti, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); National Nanotechnology Laboratory (NNL), CNR-Istituto di Nanoscienze, Dip. Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Universita Del Salento, Via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Scalora, M. [US Army-Charles M. Bowden Research Laboratory, 35898 Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, Alabama (United States)

    2013-01-07

    We experimentally investigate the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) response of a 2D-periodic array of square gold nano-patches, functionalized by means of a conjugated, rigid thiol. We measure a Raman signal enhancement up to 200 times more intense compared to other plasmon-based nanostructures functionalized with the same molecule, and show that the enhancement is not strictly correlated to the presence of plasmonic resonances. The agreement between experimental and theoretical results reveals the importance of a full-wave analysis based on the inclusion of the actual scattering cross section of the molecule. The proposed numerical approach may serve not only as a tool to predict the enhancement of Raman signal scattered from strongly resonant nanostructure but also as an effective instrument to engineer SERS platforms that target specific molecules.

  14. Low frequency Raman scattering for high resolution low temperature optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabia, M. K.; Jurdyc, A.-M.; Le Brusq, J.; Champagnon, B.; Vouagner, D.

    2017-09-01

    Raman distributed optical fiber temperature sensors are based on the intensity ratio of the anti-Stokes to the Stokes Raman band at 440 cm-1 of silica. In this paper we predict that the sensitivity of the Raman measurements for low temperatures can be improved by considering the Boson peak in the low frequency Raman scattering domain at 60 cm-1. In this way Raman temperature sensors can be performed down to cryogenic temperatures. It is further shown that the Boson peak is less dependent than the 440 cm-1 band to the polarization of light. For the usual excitation at 1550 nm the anti-Stokes Boson peak at 1536 nm is in the low loss transmission window of the silica fibers.

  15. Resonant anti-Stokes Raman scattering in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, Georgy; Jorio, Ado; Kusch, Patryk; Vieira, Bruno G. M.; Flavel, Benjamin; Krupke, Ralph; Barros, Eduardo B.; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-12-01

    The dependence of the anti-Stokes Raman intensity on the excitation laser energy in carbon nanotubes is studied by resonant Raman spectroscopy. The complete resonant anti-Stokes and Stokes Raman profiles of the high-energy longitudinal phonon (G+) are obtained for (8,3), (7,5), (6,4), and (6,5) single chirality enriched samples. A high asymmetry between the intensity of the incoming and outgoing resonance is observed in the resonant Raman profiles. In contrast to Stokes scattering, anti-Stokes scattering is more intense at the outgoing resonance then at the incoming resonance. The resonance profiles are explained by a Raman process that includes the phonon-mediated interactions with the dark excitonic state. The chirality dependence of the Raman profiles is due to the variation in the exciton-phonon matrix elements, in agreement with tight-binding calculations. Based on the asymmetric Raman profiles we present the resonance factors for the Stokes/anti-Stokes ratios in carbon nanotubes.

  16. Stimulated Raman scattering in soft glass fluoride fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune Vestergaard Lund; Agger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650 nm. We found a peak gain of gR=4.0±2×10−14 m W−1.......We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650 nm. We found a peak gain of gR=4.0±2×10−14 m W−1....

  17. Stimulated Raman scattering in soft glass fluoride fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Christian; Dupont, Sune; Agger, Christian

    2011-01-01

    We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650nm. We found a peak gain of gR ¼ 4:0 2 × 10−14mW−1.......We have measured the absolute Raman gain spectrum in short fluoride soft glass fibers with a pump wavelength of 1650nm. We found a peak gain of gR ¼ 4:0 2 × 10−14mW−1....

  18. Temperature dependent Raman scattering in YCrO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mall, A. K.; Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, Y.; Garg, A.; Gupta, R.

    2014-04-01

    High quality polycrystalline YCrO3 samples were synthesized using solid-state-reaction method. The samples were subsequently characterized using X-ray diffraction and magnetometry. Further, temperature dependent Raman spectroscopy over a spectral range from 100 to 800 cm-1 was used to examine the variation of phonons as a function of temperature from 90 to 300 K. In the low temperature ferroelectric phase of YCrO3, the observed phonon spectra showed softening of some Raman modes below the magnetic ordering temperature (TN ˜ 142K), suggesting a coupling between the spin and phonon degrees of freedom.

  19. Observation of forbidden phonons, Fano resonance and dark excitons by resonance Raman scattering in few-layer WS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Qing-Hai; Sun, Yu-Jia; Liu, Xue-Lu; Zhao, Yanyuan; Xiong, Qihua; Tan, Ping-Heng; Zhang, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The optical properties of the two-dimensional (2D) crystals are dominated by tightly bound electron-hole pairs (excitons) and lattice vibration modes (phonons). The exciton-phonon interaction is fundamentally important to understand the optical properties of 2D materials and thus helps to develop emerging 2D crystal based optoelectronic devices. Here, we presented the excitonic resonant Raman scattering (RRS) spectra of few-layer WS2 excited by 11 lasers lines covered all of A, B and C exciton transition energies at different sample temperatures from 4 to 300 K. As a result, we are not only able to probe the forbidden phonon modes unobserved in ordinary Raman scattering, but also can determine the bright and dark state fine structures of 1s A exciton. In particular, we also observed the quantum interference between low-energy discrete phonon and exciton continuum under resonant excitation. Our works pave a way to understand the exciton-phonon coupling and many-body effects in 2D materials.

  20. A Fourier transform-Raman and infrared vibrational study of delorazepam, fludiazepam, flurazepam, and tetrazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, G A; Beckstead, H D; Shurvell, H F

    1994-02-01

    Fourier transform-Raman and IR spectra of four compounds that are closely related to diazepam (Valium) have been recorded. The compounds, delorazepam, fludiazepam, flurazepam, and tetrazepam, are all 7-chloro-1,3-dihydro-[2H]-1,4-benzodiazepine -2-ones and differ from diazepam by the substituents at positions 1 and 5 of the diazepine ring. The spectra show characteristic features associated with both the diazepine ring and substituents. A strong line near 1610 cm-1 in the Raman spectra is assigned to the C = N stretch of the diazepine ring, and very strong IR absorption near 1690 cm-1 is attributed to the C = O stretching mode. Various IR and Raman vibrational features serve to characterize and differentiate these molecules. Evidence for intermolecular hydrogen bonding in one of the compounds (delorazepam) is presented.

  1. Enhancement of photoluminescence and raman scattering in one-dimensional photonic crystals based on porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonchar, K. A., E-mail: k.a.gonchar@gmail.com [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation); Musabek, G. K.; Taurbayev, T. I. [Al Farabi Kazakh National University, Physics Department (Kazakhstan); Timoshenko, V. Yu. [Moscow State University, Physics Faculty (Russian Federation)

    2011-05-15

    In porous-silicon-based multilayered structures that exhibit the properties of one-dimensional photonic crystals, an increase in the photoluminescence and Raman scattering intensities is observed upon optical excitation at the wavelength 1.064 {mu}m. When the excitation wavelength falls within the edge of the photonic band gap of the structures, a multiple increase (by a factor larger than 400) in the efficiency of Raman scattering is detected. The effect is attributed to partial localization of excitation light and, correspondingly, to the much longer time of interaction of light with the material in the structures.

  2. Theory of Two-Magnon Raman Scattering in Iron Pnictides and Chalcogenides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. C.

    2011-08-15

    Although the parent iron-based pnictides and chalcogenides are itinerant antiferromagnets, the use of local moment picture to understand their magnetic properties is still widespread. We study magnetic Raman scattering from a local moment perspective for various quantum spin models proposed for this new class of superconductors. These models vary greatly in the level of magnetic frustration and show a vastly different two-magnon Raman response. Light scattering by two-magnon excitations thus provides a robust and independent measure of the underlying spin interactions. In accord with other recent experiments, our results indicate that the amount of magnetic frustration in these systems may be small.

  3. Symmetry-derived selection rules for plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorio, Ado; Mueller, Niclas S.; Reich, Stephanie

    2017-04-01

    We show how to obtain the symmetry-imposed selection rules for plasmonic enhancement in surface- (SERS) and tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). Plasmon-enhanced light scattering is described as a higher-order Raman process, which introduces a series of Hamiltonians representing the interaction between light, plasmons, electrons, and phonons. Using group theory, we derive the active representations for point group symmetries of exemplary plasmonic nanostructures. The phonon representations that are enhanced by SERS and TERS are then found as induced representations for the symmetry group of the molecule or another Raman probe. The selection rules are discussed for graphene that is coupled to a nanodisk dimer as an example for SERS and coupled to a tip as a TERS example. The phonon eigenmodes that are enhanced depend on the symmetry breaking when combining the plasmonic structures with graphene. We show that the most prominent optical phonon modes (E2 g and A1 g) are allowed in all scattering configurations when using a nanodimer as a plasmonic hotspot. We predict the activation of the silent B2 g as well as infrared-active A2 u and E1 u modes in SERS for crossed configurations of the incoming and scattered light. There is a systematic difference between spatially coherent and incoherent plasmon-enhanced Raman scattering, which is responsible for a dependence of TERS on the phonon coherence length.

  4. Analysis of Raman scattering of self-focused Gaussian laser beam in plasma without WKB approximation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffari-Oskooei, Sara S.; Aghamir, Farzin M.

    2017-02-01

    The self-focusing and propagation of intense Gaussian laser beams in plasmas are investigated, and the explicit form of intensity of self-focused laser beams is derived without the use of WKB approximation. Propagation of self-focused laser beams in plasmas is strongly affected by Raman scattering and Brillouin scattering that are expected for hohlraum targets in inertial confinement fusion. The intensity of Raman and Brillouin scattered waves is derived in paraxial approximation where the effect of plasma temperature and Landau damping is considered through the kinetic theory of plasmas. The effect of plasma temperature and its density, as well as laser wavelength and its intensity, on self-focusing and spatial growth of scattered waves is considered.

  5. Study of the low-frequency Raman scattering in NaNbO sub 3 crystal

    CERN Document Server

    Bouziane, E; Ayadi, M

    2003-01-01

    The Raman scattering spectrum of the sodium niobate crystal, in both P and R phases, has been investigated from room temperature up to 440 sup d eg C. The dependence of the low-frequency (LF) spectrum clearly reveals, for the first time, over a wide temperature range, the presence of a strong quasi-elastic scattering below a LF zone centre phonon. The phase transition mechanism is discussed, considering an order-disorder process induced by the relaxation of the Nb ions.

  6. Immunoassay using probe-labelling immunogold nanoparticles with silver staining enhancement via surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuping; Ji, Xiaohui; Xu, Weiqing; Li, Xiaoling; Wang, Lianying; Bai, Yubai; Zhao, Bing; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2004-01-01

    This paper reports a novel immunoassay based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and immunogold labelling with silver staining enhancement. Immunoreactions between immunogold colloids modified by a Raman-active probe molecule (e.g., 4-mercaptobenzoic acid) and antigens, which were captured by antibody-assembled chips such as silicon or quartz, were detected via SERS signals of Raman-active probe molecule. All the self-assembled steps were subjected to the measurements of ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectra to monitor the formation of a sandwich structure onto a substrate. The immunoassay was performed by a sandwich structure consisting of three layers. The first layer was composed of immobilized antibody molecules of mouse polyclonal antibody against Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (PAb) on a silicon or quartz substrate. The second layer was the complementary Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (Antigen) molecules captured by PAb on the substrate. The third layer was composed of the probe-labelling immunogold nanoparticles, which were modified by mouse monoclonal antibody against Hepatitis B virus surface antigen (MAb) and 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (MBA) as the Raman-active probe on the surface of gold colloids. After silver staining enhancement, the antigen is identified by a SERS spectrum of MBA. A working curve of the intensity of a SERS signal at 1585 cm(-1) due to the [small nu](8a) aromatic ring vibration of MBA versus the concentration of analyte (Antigen) was obtained and the non-optimized detection limit for the Hepatitis B virus surface antigen was found to be as low as 0.5 [micro sign]g mL(-1).

  7. Modified stimulated Raman scattering of a laser induced by trapped electrons in a plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliyan, Sweta; Rafat, Mohd.; Ahmad, Nafis; Sajal, Vivek

    2017-10-01

    The plasma wave, generated in stimulated Raman scattering process by an intense laser in the plasmas, traps a significant number of electrons in its potential energy minima. These electrons travel with the phase velocity of plasma wave and oscillate with bounce frequency. When the bounce frequency of electrons becomes equal to the growth rate of Raman process, resonance takes place. Now, Raman scattering gets modified by parametrically exciting a trapped electron mode and an electromagnetic sideband. The ponderomotive force due to the pump and sideband drives the plasma wave, whereas the density perturbation due to the trapped electron mode couples with the oscillating velocity of electrons due to the laser to produce a nonlinear current, driving the sideband.

  8. Silver nanocluster films for glucose sensing by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju Botta

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The detection of glucose by Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS is a challenging problem because glucose molecules have a small Raman scattering cross-section and they have a low affinity for adsorption on metal nanoparticle surfaces. In this study we used 2-Thienylboronic acid (2-TBA as a bridge or linker molecule between the metal surface and the glucose molecule and observed an intense Raman line at 986 cm−1 that was used to quantify the glucose concentration in the molar concentration range 1 μM–500 μM. A good correlation was observed between the intensity of this line and molar concentration of glucose. These results would find applications in the development of a non-invasive glucose sensor for diabetic patients using saliva as the body fluid instead of blood serum.

  9. Surface enhanced raman scattering on tardigrada - Towards monitoring and imaging molecular structures in live cryptobiotic organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kneipp, Harald; Møbjerg, Nadja; Jørgensen, Aslak

    2013-01-01

    Tardigrades are microscopic metazoans which are able to survive extreme physical and chemical conditions by entering a stress tolerant state called cryptobiosis. At present, the molecular mechanisms behind cryptobiosis are still poorly understood. We show that surface enhanced Raman scattering su...

  10. Imaging Localized Electric Fields with Nanometer Precision through Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattarai, Ashish; El-Khoury, Patrick Z.

    2017-07-07

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be used to image plasmon-enhanced local electric field variations with extremely high spatial resolution under ambient conditions. This is illustrated through TERS images recorded using a silver atomic force microscope tip coated with strategically selected molecular reporters and used to image a sputtered silver film.

  11. Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson-Engels, Stefan; Andersen, Peter E.

    2014-01-01

    The Special Section on Selected Topics in Biophotonics: Optical Coherence Tomography and Biomolecular Imaging with Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy comprises two invited review papers and several contributed papers from the summer school Biophotonics ’13, as well as contributed papers within...

  12. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an

  13. Optimized signal-to-noise ratio with shot noise limited detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moester, M.J.B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved

  14. Rapid identification of heterogeneous mixture components with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garbacik, E.T.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn; Otto, Cornelis; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2012-01-01

    For the rapid analysis of complicated heterogeneous mixtures, we have developed a method to acquire and intuitively display hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) images. The imaging is performed with a conventional optical setup based around an optical parametric oscillator.

  15. A comparison study on Raman scattering properties of alpha- and beta-MnO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Tao; Fjellväg, Helmer; Norby, Poul

    2009-01-01

    In this comment to a recent paper [Anal. Chim. Acta 585 (2007) 241–245], we report a comparison study on Mn oxide-related compounds with different crystallographic forms, which distinguish between β-MnO2 and α-MnO2 type materials via Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy. The tetragonal rutile-type β...

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for quantitative characterization of mixing and flow in microfluidics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, D.; Müller, M.; Bonn, M.; Marr, D.W.M.; van Maarseveen, J.; Squier, J.

    2009-01-01

    We present an optical, noninvasive and label-free approach to characterize flow profiles in microfluidic devices. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering signals were used to map the mass transport in a microfluidic device that was then related back to the local flow rate of dilute solutes having

  17. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy driving the future of loaded mesoporous silica imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fussell, A.L.; Mah, Pei Ting; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Niemi, Sanna-Mari; Salonen, Jarno; Santos, Helder A.; Strachan, Clare

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the use of variants of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel method for improved physicochemical characterization of drug-loaded silica particles. Ordered mesoporous silica is a biomaterial that can be loaded to carry a number of biochemicals,

  18. Stable silver/biopolymer hybrid plasmonic nanostructures for high performance surface enhanced raman scattering (SERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver/biopolymer nanoparticles were prepared by adding 100 mg silver nitrate to 2% polyvinyl alcohol solution and reduced the silver nitrate into silver ion using 2 % trisodium citrate for high performance Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrates. Optical properties of nanoparticle were ...

  19. Completely background free broadband coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xing; Niu, Hanben; Liu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    For the first time it was proposed a numerical approach to obtain non-NRB time-frequency coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) spectrograms. In order to evaluate the validity of the CARS spectrogram for background free broadband CARS spectroscopy, the authors numerically constructed a CARS...

  20. Rapid detection of benzoyl peroxide in wheat flour by using Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Juan; Peng, Yankun; Chao, Kuanglin; Qin, Jianwei; Dhakal, Sagar; Xu, Tianfeng

    2015-05-01

    Benzoyl peroxide is a common flour additive that improves the whiteness of flour and the storage properties of flour products. However, benzoyl peroxide adversely affects the nutritional content of flour, and excess consumption causes nausea, dizziness, other poisoning, and serious liver damage. This study was focus on detection of the benzoyl peroxide added in wheat flour. A Raman scattering spectroscopy system was used to acquire spectral signal from sample data and identify benzoyl peroxide based on Raman spectral peak position. The optical devices consisted of Raman spectrometer and CCD camera, 785 nm laser module, optical fiber, prober, and a translation stage to develop a real-time, nondestructive detection system. Pure flour, pure benzoyl peroxide and different concentrations of benzoyl peroxide mixed with flour were prepared as three sets samples to measure the Raman spectrum. These samples were placed in the same type of petri dish to maintain a fixed distance between the Raman CCD and petri dish during spectral collection. The mixed samples were worked by pretreatment of homogenization and collected multiple sets of data of each mixture. The exposure time of this experiment was set at 0.5s. The Savitzky Golay (S-G) algorithm and polynomial curve-fitting method was applied to remove the fluorescence background from the Raman spectrum. The Raman spectral peaks at 619 cm-1, 848 cm-1, 890 cm-1, 1001 cm-1, 1234 cm-1, 1603cm-1, 1777cm-1 were identified as the Raman fingerprint of benzoyl peroxide. Based on the relationship between the Raman intensity of the most prominent peak at around 1001 cm-1 and log values of benzoyl peroxide concentrations, the chemical concentration prediction model was developed. This research demonstrated that Raman detection system could effectively and rapidly identify benzoyl peroxide adulteration in wheat flour. The experimental result is promising and the system with further modification can be applicable for more products in near

  1. Boosting the Amount of Molecular Information Through Polarized Resolved Resonance Raman Scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hassing, Søren

    2017-01-01

    Ramanscattered light. The goal is achieved through: (1) a discussion of the basic properties of Raman scattering with special focus on polarization and polarization dispersion. The discussion includes the rotational invariants of Raman tensors, the non-commuting generator approach to molecular symmetry as a tool...... and near-infrared absorption spectroscopy, i.e. only the spectral distribution is analysed. The goal of the present chapter is to demonstrate that the amount of molecular information (also for solutions and powders) can be increased considerably by analysing also the polarization of the Raman and resonance...... for construction of state and Raman tensors for single molecules and dimers and higher aggregates and thereby predict the polarization; (2) a discussion of two illustrative case studies: Case study 1: Aggregation of haemoglobin in red blood cells (RBC); and Case study 2: In vitro polarization resolved RRS study...

  2. Optimized Signal-To Ratio with Shot Noise Limited Detection in Stimulated Raman Scattering Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moester, M. J. B.; Ariese, F.; de Boer, J. F.

    2015-04-01

    We describe our set-up for Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) microscopy with shot noise limited detection for a broad window of biologically relevant laser powers. This set-up is used to demonstrate that the highest signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in SRS with shot noise limited detection is achieved with a time-averaged laser power ratio of 1:2 of the unmodulated and modulated beam. In SRS, two different coloured laser beams are incident on a sample. If the energy difference between them matches a molecular vibration of a molecule, energy can be transferred from one beam to the other. By applying amplitude modulation to one of the beams, the modulation transfer to the other beam can be measured. The efficiency of this process is a direct measure for the number of molecules of interest in the focal volume. Combined with laser scanning microscopy, this technique allows for fast and sensitive imaging with sub-micrometre resolution. Recent technological advances have resulted in an improvement of the sensitivity of SRS applications, but few show shot noise limited detection. The dominant noise source in this SRS microscope is the shot noise of the unmodulated, detected beam. Under the assumption that photodamage is linear with the total laser power, the optimal SNR shifts away from equal beam powers, where the most signal is generated, to a 1:2 power ratio. Under these conditions the SNR is maximized and the total laser power that could induce photodamage is minimized. Compared to using a 1:1 laser power ratio, we show improved image quality and a signal-to-noise ratio improvement of 8 % in polystyrene beads and C. Elegans worms. Including a non-linear damage mechanism in the analysis, we find that the optimal power ratio converges to a 1:1 ratio with increasing order of the non-linear damage mechanism.

  3. Explosive and chemical threat detection by surface-enhanced Raman scattering: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakonen, Aron; Andersson, Per Ola; Stenbæk Schmidt, Michael; Rindzevicius, Tomas; Käll, Mikael

    2015-09-17

    Acts of terror and warfare threats are challenging tasks for defense agencies around the world and of growing importance to security conscious policy makers and the general public. Explosives and chemical warfare agents are two of the major concerns in this context, as illustrated by the recent Boston Marathon bombing and nerve gas attacks on civilians in the Middle East. To prevent such tragic disasters, security personnel must be able to find, identify and deactivate the threats at multiple locations and levels. This involves major technical and practical challenges, such as detection of ultra-low quantities of hazardous compounds at remote locations for anti-terror purposes and monitoring of environmental sanitation of dumped or left behind toxic substances and explosives. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is one of todays most interesting and rapidly developing methods for label-free ultrasensitive vibrational "fingerprinting" of a variety of molecular compounds. Performance highlights include attomolar detection of TNT and DNT explosives, a sensitivity that few, if any, other technique can compete with. Moreover, instrumentation needed for SERS analysis are becoming progressively better, smaller and cheaper, and can today be acquired for a retail price close to 10,000 US$. This contribution aims to give a comprehensive overview of SERS as a technique for detection of explosives and chemical threats. We discuss the prospects of SERS becoming a major tool for convenient in-situ threat identification and we summarize existing SERS detection methods and substrates with particular focus on ultra-sensitive real-time detection. General concepts, detection capabilities and perspectives are discussed in order to guide potential users of the technique for homeland security and anti-warfare purposes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Raman facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raman scattering is a powerful light scattering technique used to diagnose the internal structure of molecules and crystals. In a light scattering experiment, light...

  5. NIR–FT Raman, FT–IR and surface-enhanced Raman scattering ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    The observed C–H in-plane bending and out-of- plane bending modes obtain their SERS intensity from these Raman polarizability components. 17,18. This leads to evidence for a tilted orientation of. SPSA on the silver surface. The appearances of both in-plane modes and out-of-plane modes suggest that there is a certain ...

  6. Implementation of a Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) System on a Ti:Sapphire and OPO Laser Based Standard Laser Scanning Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mytskaniuk, Vasyl; Bardin, Fabrice; Boukhaddaoui, Hassan; Rigneault, Herve; Tricaud, Nicolas

    2016-07-17

    Laser scanning microscopes combining a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser and an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to duplicate the laser line have become available for biologists. These systems are primarily designed for multi-channel two-photon fluorescence microscopy. However, without any modification, complementary non-linear optical microscopy such as second-harmonic generation (SHG) or third harmonic generation (THG) can also be performed with this set-up, allowing label-free imaging of structured molecules or aqueous medium-lipid interfaces. These techniques are well suited for in-vivo observation, but are limited in chemical specificity. Chemically selective imaging can be obtained from inherent vibration signals based on Raman scattering. Confocal Raman microscopy provides 3D spatial resolution, but it requires high average power and long acquisition time. To overcome these difficulties, recent advances in laser technology have permitted the development of nonlinear optical vibrational microscopy, in particular coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS). CARS microscopy has therefore emerged as a powerful tool for biological and live cell imaging, by chemically mapping lipids (via C-H stretch vibration), water (via O-H stretch vibrations), proteins or DNA. In this work, we describe the implementation of the CARS technique on a standard OPO-coupled multiphoton laser scanning microscope. It is based on the in-time synchronization of the two laser lines by adjusting the length of one of the laser beam path. We present a step-by-step implementation of this technique on an existing multiphoton system. A basic background in experimental optics is helpful and the presented system does not require expensive supplementary equipment. We also illustrate CARS imaging obtained on myelin sheaths of sciatic nerve of rodent, and we show that this imaging can be performed simultaneously with other nonlinear optical imaging, such as standard two-photon fluorescence technique

  7. Novel routes to electromagnetic enhancement and its characterisation in surface- and tip-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, P; Frey, D; Kalathingal, V; Mehfuz, R; Mitra, J

    2017-09-08

    Quantitative understanding of the electromagnetic component in enhanced Raman spectroscopy is often difficult to achieve on account of the complex substrate structures utilised. We therefore turn to two structurally simple systems amenable to detailed modelling. The first is tip-enhanced Raman scattering under electron scanning tunnelling microscopy control (STM-TERS) where, appealing to understanding developed in the context of photon emission from STM, it is argued that the localised surface plasmon modes driving the Raman enhancement exist in the visible and near-infrared regime only by virtue of significant modification to the optical properties of the tip and sample metals (gold here). This is due to the strong dc field-induced (∼10(9) V m(-1)) non-linear corrections to the dielectric function of gold via the third order susceptibility term in the polarisation. Also, sub-5 nm spatial resolution is shown in the modelling. Secondly, we suggest a novel deployment of hybrid plasmonic waveguide modes in surface enhanced Raman scattering (HPWG-SERS). This delivers strong confinement of electromagnetic energy in a ∼10 nm oxide 'gap' between a high-index dielectric material of nanoscale width (a GaAs nanorod and a 100 nm Si slab are considered here) and a metal, yielding a monotonic variation in the Raman enhancement factor as a function of wavelength with no long-wavelength cut-off, both features that contrast with STM-TERS.

  8. Rapid thyroid dysfunction screening based on serum surface-enhanced Raman scattering and multivariate statistical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Dayong; Lü, Guodong; Zhai, Zhengang; Du, Guoli; Mo, Jiaqing; Lü, Xiaoyi

    2018-01-01

    In this paper, serum surface-enhanced Raman scattering and multivariate statistical analysis are used to investigate a rapid screening technique for thyroid function diseases. At present, the detection of thyroid function has become increasingly important, and it is urgently necessary to develop a rapid and portable method for the detection of thyroid function. Our experimental results show that, by using the Silmeco-based enhanced Raman signal, the signal strength greatly increases and the characteristic peak appears obviously. It is also observed that the Raman spectra of normal and anomalous thyroid function human serum are significantly different. Principal component analysis (PCA) combined with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) was used to diagnose thyroid dysfunction, and the diagnostic accuracy was 87.4%. The use of serum surface-enhanced Raman scattering technology combined with PCA–LDA shows good diagnostic performance for the rapid detection of thyroid function. By means of Raman technology, it is expected that a portable device for the rapid detection of thyroid function will be developed.

  9. A Unique Probe for Tip Enhanced Raman Scattering and Shadow NSOM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Aaron; Taha, Hesham; Dekhter, Rimma; Zinoviev, Galia; Fish, Galina

    2008-03-01

    We present a unique atomic force microscope [AFM] probe for tip enhanced Raman scattering [TERS] and a new form of near-field microscopy, ``Shadow Near-field Scanning Optical Microscopy''. The probe consists of a single gold nanoparticle grown at the tip of a cantilevered nanopipette, exposed to the optical axis of an upright or inverted optical microscope. When these probes are used in combination with a Nanonics MV 2000 AFM/NSOM system, we show that a protocol for independent motion of the probe and the sample can produce enhancement or a shadow effect. Both of these effects are enhanced by the ability to affect different Raman spectra with the tip in & out of contact while independently scanning the sample. We analyzed Raman signals of a thin nanometric strained Si layer deposited on bulk Si and developed an understanding of optical mechanisms of enhancement, scattering and shadowing. Our results show different optical mechanisms occur as a result of tip & sample interactions, including TERS effect obtained by near-field interaction of the probe with the top layer of strained Si. Large enhancements of at least 4 orders of magnitude are seen and analyses of relative intensities of bulk and strained Si Raman peaks show an increase in light scattered by bulk or effective shadowing of the surface.

  10. Development of single shot 1D-Raman scattering measurements for flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biase, Amelia; Uddi, Mruthunjaya

    2017-11-01

    The majority of energy consumption in the US comes from burning fossil fuels which increases the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. The increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has negative impacts on the environment. One solution to this problem is to study the oxy-combustion process. A pure oxygen stream is used instead of air for combustion. Products contain only carbon dioxide and water. It is easy to separate water from carbon dioxide by condensation and the carbon dioxide can be captured easily. Lower gas volume allows for easier removal of pollutants from the flue gas. The design of a system that studies the oxy-combustion process using advanced laser diagnostic techniques and Raman scattering measurements is presented. The experiments focus on spontaneous Raman scattering. This is one of the few techniques that can provide quantitative measurements of the concentration and temperature of different chemical species in a turbulent flow. The experimental design and process of validating the design to ensure the data is accurate is described. The Raman data collected form an experimental data base that is used for the validation of spontaneous Raman scattering in high pressure environments for the oxy-combustion process. NSF EEC 1659710.

  11. Optical absorptions and Raman scattering of metalloporphycenes reveal electronic and vibronic properties distinct from those of metalloporphyrins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oertling, W.A.; Wu, Weishih; Lopez-Garriga, J.J.; Kim, Younkyoo; Chang, Chi, K. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (USA))

    1991-01-02

    The newly synthesized metalloporphycenes represent a class of molecules that are structural isomers of metalloporphyrins. In particular, the Ni{sup II} and Cu{sup II} complexes of 2,7,12,17-tetrapropylporphycene (NiPPC and CuPPC) display UV-visible absorption and resonance Raman (RR) spectra superficially like those of analogous complexes of octaethylporphyrin (OEP). However, close examination of absorption band positions and spectral shifts caused by metal substitution and ring bromination, as well as relative oscillator strengths, suggest that, unlike those of metalloporphyrins, the {pi} {yields} {pi}* states of NiPPC and CuPPC are adequately defined by one-electron wave functions. Thus, the {pi}-electron configuration interaction that gives rise to Gouterman's Q and B metalloporphyrin excited states is weak in metalloporphycenes. Rather, these novel complexes appear to be a near-perfect example of Platt's long-field molecules. Raman spectra in resonance with the major absorptions of CuPPC show little evidence of Jahn-Teller or Herzber-Teller coupling. Thus, the rich vibronic coupling present in metalloporphyrins giving rise to the celebrated anomalously polarized scattering most likely does not complicate the spectra of metalloporphycenes. Vibrational analyses of RR spectra of specifically deuterated derivatives of NiPPC give some insight into the normal mode compositions.

  12. Detection of explosives by surface enhanced Raman scattering using substrate with a monolayer of ordered Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, T. F.; Lu, S. H.; Wang, A. J.; Zheng, D.; Wu, Z. L.; Wang, Y. S.

    2014-10-01

    Monolayers with different structures arranged by 5 nm Au nanoparticles were grown using a self-assembly method on Si substrates. Raman spectra of ammonium nitrate (NH4NO3) and cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine (RDX) explosives adsorbed on bare and Au nanoparticle covered Si substrates were measured. Effects of Au monolayers and their structures on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of NH4NO3 and RDX were investigated. The monolayer arranged by Au nanoparticles into linear arrays is more sensitive to the explosives than that arranged into hexagonal close-packed structure. The detection limit using the substrate covered by a monolayer of Au nanoparticle linear arrays is about 7.7 ppm for NH4NO3 and 0.19 ppm for RDX. The integrated intensity of the vibration peak increases linearly with an increase in explosive concentration in log-log scales for both NH4NO3 and RDX. The enhancement factor is 7.0 × 104 for RDX. Monolayers of Au nanoparticles arranged into linear arrays have potential applications in detecting or identifying explosives at very low levels of concentration.

  13. Hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy for in situ analysis of solid-state crystal polymorphs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, E. T.; Fussell, A. L.; Güres, S.; Korterik, J. P.; Otto, C.; Herek, J. L.; Offerhaus, H. L.

    2013-02-01

    Hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is quickly becoming a prominent imaging modality because of its many advantages over the traditional paradigm of multispectral CARS. In particular, recording a significant portion of the vibrational spectrum at each spatial pixel allows image-wide spectral analysis at much higher rates than can be achieved with spontaneous Raman. We recently developed a hyperspectral CARS method, the driving principle behind which is the fast acquisition and display of a hyperspectral datacube as a set of intuitive images wherein each material in a sample appears with a unique trio of colors. Here we use this system to image and analyze two types of polymorphic samples: the pseudopolymorphic hydration of theophylline, and the packing polymorphs of the sugar alcohol mannitol. In addition to these solid-state form modifications we have observed spectral variations of crystalline mannitol and diprophylline as functions of their orientations relative to the optical fields. We use that information to visualize the distributions of these compounds in a pharmaceutical solid oral dosage form.

  14. Imaging the inelastic scattering of vibrationally excited NO (v = 1) with Ar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamasah, Alexander; Li, Hongwei; Onvlee, Jolijn; van der Avoird, Ad; Parker, David H.; Suits, Arthur G.

    2018-01-01

    The inelastic scattering of vibrationally excited NO (v = 1) with Ar at a collision energy of 3.0 kcal mol-1 was investigated in crossed beams. Vibrationally excited NO was generated by flash heating and rotationally cooled by the supersonic expansion. The differential cross sections were compared to those of the vibrational ground state NO (v = 0) with Ar, which were also compared to theoretical calculations for scattering from the ground vibrational level. The differential cross sections show a similar strong j dependence of the rotational rainbow maxima from the inelastic scattering for both NO (v = 0) and (v = 1) but no significant differences between NO (v = 0) and (v = 1) were seen.

  15. Surface enhanced Raman scattering technique for simultaneous detection of four trace polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FU Shuyue

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Phytic acid modified Au (IP6@Au nanoparticles with high surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS activity as well as hydrophobicity were synthesized.Based on IP6@Au and the molecular fingerprint information,we developed a SERS-based method for simultaneous detection of four polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon species in river water by using a portable Raman system.The limit of detection for anthracene,fluoranthene,pyrene and benzopyrene were 100,100,10 and 1 μg/L,respectively.

  16. Surface enhanced Raman scattering study of the antioxidant alkaloid boldine using prismatic silver nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M. A.; Jara, G. P.; Villarroel, R.; Aliaga, A. E.; Gómez-Jeria, J. S.; Clavijo, E.; Garrido, C.; Aguayo, T.; Campos Vallette, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Prismatic silver nanoparticles (PNps) were used in the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) study of the antioxidant alkaloid boldine (5,6,6a,7-tetrahydro-1,10-dimethoxy-6-methyl-4H-dibenzo[de,g]quinoline-2,9-diol). Prismatic and quasi-spherical (QsNps) silver nanoparticles were synthesized and characterized by UV-Vis spectra, topographic profile (AFM) and zeta potential measurements. Raman and infrared (IR) spectra of the boldine were registered. Theoretical model calculations of the boldine onto the Ag surface predict a nearly coplanar orientation of the benzo[de]quinoline moiety and non-bonded interactions (electrostatic).

  17. Efficient Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering substrates from femtosecond laser based fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Vinod; Kanaujia, Pawan K.; Bommali, Ravi Kumar; Vijaya Prakash, G.

    2017-10-01

    A fast and simple femtosecond laser based methodology for efficient Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) substrate fabrication has been proposed. Both nano scaffold silicon (black silicon) and gold nanoparticles (Au-NP) are fabricated by femtosecond laser based technique for mass production. Nano rough silicon scaffold enables large electromagnetic fields for the localized surface plasmons from decorated metallic nanoparticles. Thus giant enhancement (approximately in the order of 104) of Raman signal arises from the mixed effects of electron-photon-phonon coupling, even at nanomolar concentrations of test organic species (Rhodamine 6G). Proposed process demonstrates the low-cost and label-less application ability from these large-area SERS substrates.

  18. Origin of the frequency shift of Raman scattering in chalcogenide glasses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Han, X.C.; Tao, H.Z.; Gong, L.J.

    2014-01-01

    of the shift is associated with the topological connectivity of global network and/or the local environment of structural units, (e.g., tetrahedral GeSe4). Here we show the compositional evolution of the main Raman scattering frequency in Ge(SxSe1−x)2 glasses, and then clarify its structural origin. We keep...... units such as GeS4 tetrahedra. The ab-initio calculations of normal Raman mode combined with group theory analysis provide insight into the structural evolution of chalcogenide glasses with varying composition....

  19. Enhanced Control of Transient Raman Scattering Using Buffered Hydrogen in Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, P.; Novoa, D.; Abdolvand, A.; Russell, P. St. J.

    2017-12-01

    Many reports on stimulated Raman scattering in mixtures of Raman-active and noble gases indicate that the addition of a dispersive buffer gas increases the phase mismatch to higher-order Stokes and anti-Stokes sidebands, resulting in a preferential conversion to the first few Stokes lines, accompanied by a significant reduction in the Raman gain due to collisions with gas molecules. Here we report that, provided the dispersion can be precisely controlled, the effective Raman gain in a gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fiber can actually be significantly enhanced when a buffer gas is added. This counterintuitive behavior occurs when the nonlinear coupling between the interacting fields is strong and can result in a performance similar to that of a pure Raman-active gas, but at a much lower total gas pressure, allowing competing effects such as Raman backscattering to be suppressed. We report high modal purity in all the emitted sidebands, along with anti-Stokes conversion efficiencies as high as 5% in the visible and 2% in the ultraviolet. This new class of gas-based waveguide device, which allows the nonlinear optical response to be beneficially pressure-tuned by the addition of buffer gases, may find important applications in laser science and spectroscopy.

  20. Quantifying Local Thickness and Composition in Thin Films of Organic Photovoltaic Blends by Raman Scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Rodríguez-Martínez, Xabier

    2017-07-06

    We report a methodology based on Raman spectroscopy that enables the non-invasive and fast quantitative determination of local thickness and composition in thin films (from few monolayers to hundreds of nm) of one or more components. We apply our methodology to blends of organic conjugated materials relevant in the field of organic photovoltaics. As a first step, we exploit the transfer-matrix formalism to describe the Raman process in thin films including reabsorption and interference effects of the incoming and scattered electric fields. This allows determining the effective solid-state Raman cross-section of each material by studying the dependence of the Raman intensity on film thickness. These effective cross sections are then used to estimate the local thickness and composition in a series of polymer:fullerene blends. We find that the model is accurate within ±10 nm in thickness and ±5 vol% in composition provided that (i) the film thickness is kept below the thickness corresponding to the first maximum of the calculated Raman intensity oscillation; (ii) the materials making up the blend show close enough effective Raman cross-sections; and (iii) the degree of order attained by the conjugated polymer in the blend is similar to that achieved when cast alone. Our methodology opens the possibility to make quantitative maps of composition and thickness over large areas (from microns to centimetres squared) with diffraction-limited resolution and in any multi-component system based thin film technology.

  1. Coherent Anti-Stokes and Coherent Stokes in Raman Scattering by Superconducting Nanowire Single-Photon Detector for Temperature Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annepu Venkata Naga Vamsi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have reported the measurement of temperature by using coherent anti-Stroke and coherent Stroke Raman scattering using superconducting nano wire single-photon detector. The measured temperatures by both methods (Coherent Anti-Raman scattering & Coherent Stroke Raman scattering and TC 340 are in good accuracy of ± 5 K temperature range. The length of the pipe line under test can be increased by increasing the power of the pump laser. This methodology can be widely used to measure temperatures at instantaneous positions in test pipe line or the entire temperature of the pipe line under test.

  2. Sparse-sampling with time-encoded (TICO) stimulated Raman scattering for fast image acquisition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakert, Hubertus; Eibl, Matthias; Karpf, Sebastian; Huber, Robert

    2017-07-01

    Modern biomedical imaging modalities aim to provide researchers a multimodal contrast for a deeper insight into a specimen under investigation. A very promising technique is stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, which can unveil the chemical composition of a sample with a very high specificity. Although the signal intensities are enhanced manifold to achieve a faster acquisition of images if compared to standard Raman microscopy, there is a trade-off between specificity and acquisition speed. Commonly used SRS concepts either probe only very few Raman transitions as the tuning of the applied laser sources is complicated or record whole spectra with a spectrometer based setup. While the first approach is fast, it reduces the specificity and the spectrometer approach records whole spectra -with energy differences where no Raman information is present-, which limits the acquisition speed. Therefore, we present a new approach based on the TICO-Raman concept, which we call sparse-sampling. The TICO-sparse-sampling setup is fully electronically controllable and allows probing of only the characteristic peaks of a Raman spectrum instead of always acquiring a whole spectrum. By reducing the spectral points to the relevant peaks, the acquisition time can be greatly reduced compared to a uniformly, equidistantly sampled Raman spectrum while the specificity and the signal to noise ratio (SNR) are maintained. Furthermore, all laser sources are completely fiber based. The synchronized detection enables a full resolution of the Raman signal, whereas the analogue and digital balancing allows shot noise limited detection. First imaging results with polystyrene (PS) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) beads confirm the advantages of TICO sparse-sampling. We achieved a pixel dwell time as low as 35 μs for an image differentiating both species. The mechanical properties of the applied voice coil stage for scanning the sample currently limits even faster acquisition.

  3. Linear optics, Raman scattering, and spin noise spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazov, M M; Zapasskii, V S

    2015-05-04

    Spin noise spectroscopy (SNS) is a new method for studying magnetic resonance and spin dynamics that has gained, in the last several years, a considerable popularity. The method is based on measuring magnetization noise of a paramagnet using the Faraday rotation technique. In strong contrast with methods of nonlinear optics, the spectroscopy of spin noise is considered to be essentially nonperturbative. At the same time, presently, it became clear that the SNS, as an optical technique, demonstrates abilities lying far beyond the bounds of conventional linear optics. Specifically, the SNS allows one to penetrate inside an inhomogeneously broadened absorption band and to determine its homogeneous width, to realize a sort of pump-probe spectroscopy without any optical nonlinearity, to probe a bulk inhomogeneous medium by focal point of a probe beam, etc. This may seem especially puzzling when taken into account that SNS can be considered just as a version of Raman spectroscopy, which is known to be deprived of such abilities. Understanding of these paradoxical features of SNS technique is required for the present-day applications of SNS and its further development. In this paper, we present a general analysis of this apparent inconsistency from the viewpoint of distinction between spectroscopy of the light intensity and of the light field and provide its resolution.

  4. Environmental vibration reduction utilizing an array of mass scatterers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peplow, Andrew; Andersen, Lars Vabbersgaard; Bucinskas, Paulius

    2017-01-01

    Ground vibration generated by rail and road traffic is a major source of environmental noise and vibration pollution in the low-frequency range. A promising and cost effective mitigation method can be the use of heavy masses placed as a periodic array on the ground surface near the road or track (e.......g. concrete or stone blocks, specially designed brick walls, etc.). The natural frequencies of vibration for such blocks depend on the local ground stiffness and on the mass of the blocks which can be chosen to provide resonance at specified frequencies. This work concerns the effectiveness of such “blocking...

  5. Vibrational properties of SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} studied via Density Functional Theory calculations and compared to Raman and infrared spectroscopy measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Even, J., E-mail: jacky.even@insa.rennes.fr [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Pedesseau, L.; Durand, O. [Université Européenne de Bretagne, INSA, FOTON, UMR CNRS 6082, 20 Avenue des Buttes de Coësmes, F-35708 Rennes (France); Modreanu, M. [Tyndall National Institute, Lee Maltings, Prospect Row, Cork (Ireland); Huyberechts, G. [FLAMAC, Technologiepark 903, 9052 Zwijnaarde (Belgium); Servet, B. [Thales Research and Technology France, Campus Polytechnique, 1, avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau cedex France (France); Chaix-Pluchery, O. [Laboratoire des Matériaux et du Génie Physique, Grenoble INP—Minatec, 3, parvis Louis Néel, BP 257, 38016 Grenoble Cedex 1 (France)

    2013-08-31

    The SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} material is a p-type transparent conductive oxide. A theoretical study of the SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystal is performed with a state of the art implementation of the Density Functional Theory. The simulated crystal structure is compared with available X-ray diffraction data and previous theoretical modeling. Density Functional Perturbation Theory is used to study the vibrational properties of the SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystal. A symmetry analysis of the optical phonon eigenvectors at the Brillouin zone center is proposed. The Raman spectra simulated using the derivatives of the dielectric susceptibility, show a good agreement with Raman scattering experimental results. - Highlights: ► The symmetry properties of the optical phonons of the SrCu{sub 2}O{sub 2} crystal are analyzed. ► Born charges and the dynamical matrix are calculated at the Brillouin zone center. ► Density Functional Perturbation Theory (DFPT) is used to compute Raman spectrum. ► DFPT Raman spectrum is compared with experimental results.

  6. Influences of composition on Raman scattering from GeSi alloy core-shell nanowire heterostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Delong; Ye, Han; Yu, Zhongyuan; Zhang, Yunzhen; Liu, Yumin; Li, Yinfeng

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, the influences of composition on Raman scattering from Ge/Si-GeSi core-shell nanowire heterostructures standing along [011] and [111] crystal directions are numerically investigated. Uniform, linear and spontaneous nonlinear composition profiles (CPs) in GeSi alloy shell are taken into consideration. In uniform CP case, clear double peaks in Raman spectra contributed by core and shell are observed. The strain-induced shift follows linear relation with Ge concentration and nonlinear relation with shell thickness. Larger strain-induced shifts are obtained in nanowires along [111] direction. In linear CP case, the peaks contributed by shell cannot be distinguished in the total spectra and plateaus are formed on the low frequency side. Moreover, the nonlinear CP accounts for the spontaneous composition transition near heterointerface during lateral epitaxy of GeSi shell. Due to the rapid Ge concentration transition, Raman spectra are shown nearly identical to uniform CP cases.

  7. Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering from Virus-like Particle Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufort, Christopher; Dragnea, Bogdan

    2008-03-01

    Recently, a method for the encapsidation of gold nanoparticules by an icosahedral virus protein coat, termed a virus-like particle (VLP), has been developed. Of particular interest is in observing their spectroscopic properties upon arrangement into a three-dimensional crystal lattice. Here we present the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectrum of such an assembly. This is made possible by the plasmonic coupling of adjacent gold nanoparticules when excited near their plasmon resonant frequency. To determine whether the SERS effect is arising from isolated hot spots or a large number of junctions acting in unison we employed scanning confocal Raman spectroscopy. This seems to indicate the latter, as a uniform Raman intensity is observed across entire crystals.

  8. Chemical imaging and microspectroscopy with spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bi-Chang; Sung, Jiha; Wu, Xiaoxi; Lim, Sang-Hyun

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate two different coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy and microspectroscopy methods based on the spectral focusing mechanism. The first method uses strongly chirped broadband pulses from a single Ti:sapphire laser and generates CARS signals at the fingerprint region. Fast modulation of the time delay between the pump and Stokes laser pulses coupled with lock-in signal detection significantly reduces the nonresonant background and produces Raman-like CARS signals with a spectral resolution of 20 cm-1. The second method generates CARS signals in the CH (carbon-hydrogen) stretching region with IR supercontinuum pulses from a photonic crystal fiber. The spectral resolution of 30 cm-1 is achieved. Maximum entropy method is used to retrieve a Raman-equivalent CARS spectrum from lipid membranes. Chemical imaging and microspectroscopy are demonstrated with various samples.

  9. Plasmonic photoluminescence for recovering native chemical information from surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kai-Qiang; Yi, Jun; Zhong, Jin-Hui; Hu, Shu; Liu, Bi-Ju; Liu, Jun-Yang; Zong, Cheng; Lei, Zhi-Chao; Wang, Xiang; Aizpurua, Javier; Esteban, Rubén; Ren, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy has attracted tremendous interests as a highly sensitive label-free tool. The local field produced by the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) dominates the overall enhancement of SERS. Such an electromagnetic enhancement is unfortunately accompanied by a strong modification in the relative intensity of the original Raman spectra, which highly distorts spectral features providing chemical information. Here we propose a robust method to retrieve the fingerprint of intrinsic chemical information from the SERS spectra. The method is established based on the finding that the SERS background originates from the LSPR-modulated photoluminescence, which contains the local field information shared also by SERS. We validate this concept of retrieval of intrinsic fingerprint information in well controlled single metallic nanoantennas of varying aspect ratios. We further demonstrate its unambiguity and generality in more complicated systems of tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TERS) and SERS of silver nanoaggregates.

  10. Electron Raman scattering in a double quantum well tuned by an external nonresonant intense laser field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiutiunnyk, A.; Mora-Ramos, M. E.; Morales, A. L.; Duque, C. M.; Restrepo, R. L.; Ungan, F.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Kasapoglu, E.; Duque, C. A.

    2017-02-01

    In this work we shall present a study of inelastic light scattering involving inter-subband electron transitions in coupled GaAs-(Ga,Al)As quantum wells. Calculations include the electron related Raman differential cross section and Raman gain. The effects of an external nonresonant intense laser field are used in order to tune these output properties. The confined electron states will be described by means of a diagonalization procedure within the effective mass and parabolic band approximations. It is shown that the application of the intense laser field can produce values of the intersubband electron Raman gain above 400 cm-1. The system proposed here is an alternative choice for the development of AlxGa1-xAs semiconductor laser diodes that can be tuned via an external nonresonant intense laser field.

  11. Cancer imaging using Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmsen, Stefan; Wall, Matthew A.; Huang, Ruimin

    2017-01-01

    The unique spectral signatures and biologically inert compositions of surface-enhanced (resonance) Raman scattering (SE(R)RS) nanoparticles make them promising contrast agents for in vivo cancer imaging. Subtle aspects of their preparation can shift their limit of detection by orders of magnitude. In this protocol, we present the optimized, step-by-step procedure for generating reproducible SERRS nanoparticles with femtomolar (10−15 M) limits of detection. We introduce several applications of these nanoprobes for biomedical research, with a focus on intraoperative cancer imaging via Raman imaging. A detailed account is provided for successful intravenous administration of SERRS nanoparticles such that delineation of cancerous lesions may be achieved without the need for specific biomarker targeting. The time estimate for this straightforward, yet comprehensive protocol from initial de novo gold nanoparticle synthesis to SE(R)RS nanoparticle contrast-enhanced preclinical Raman imaging in animal models is ~96 h. PMID:28686581

  12. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS Studies of Gold and Silver Nanoparticles Prepared by Laser Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel P. Hernandez-Rivera

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Gold and silver nanoparticles (NPs were prepared in water, acetonitrile and isopropanol by laser ablation methodologies. The average characteristic (longer size of the NPs obtained ranged from 3 to 70 nm. 4-Aminobenzebethiol (4-ABT was chosen as the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS probe molecule to determine the optimum irradiation time and the pH of aqueous synthesis of the laser ablation-based synthesis of metallic NPs. The synthesized NPs were used to evaluate their capacity as substrates for developing more analytical applications based on SERS measurements. A highly energetic material, TNT, was used as the target compound in the SERS experiments. The Raman spectra were measured with a Raman microspectrometer. The results demonstrate that gold and silver NP substrates fabricated by the methods developed show promising results for SERS-based studies and could lead to the development of micro sensors.

  13. Microwave, infrared and Raman spectra, conformational stability and vibrational assignment of methoxyflurane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y. S.; Durig, J. R.

    1982-05-01

    The low resolution microwave spectrum of methoxyflurane, CHCl 2CF 2OCH 3, has been recorded from 26.5 to 39.0 GHz. From the spacing of the major transitions it is shown that the value of 2036 MHz for B + C is consistent with the trans-trans or gauche-trans conformers where the first term ( trans or gauche) refers to the internal rotation around the C-C bond. The infrared (40-3500 cm -1) and the Raman (20-3500 cm -1) spectra have been recorded for gaseous and solid methoxyflurane. Additionally, the Raman spectrum of the liquid has been obtained and qualitative depolarization ratios measured. From these data it is shown that the most stable form in the fluid phases at ambient temperature is the gauche-trans conformer but the trans-trans form is the most stable in the solid state. A complete vibrational analysis based on infrared band contours, depolarization values and group frequencies is proposed for this conformer. From the analysis of the low frequency vibrational data, values of some of the barriers to internal rotation are estimated. These results are compared to some similar quantities for some corresponding molecules.

  14. Electronic Raman scattering and the renormalization of the electron spectrum in LuB{sub 12}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponosov, Yu. S., E-mail: ponosov@imp.uran.ru; Streltsov, S. V., E-mail: streltsov@gmail.com [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Metal Physics, Ural Branch (Russian Federation); Levchenko, A. V.; Filippov, V. B. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Frantsevich Institute of Materials Science Problems (Ukraine)

    2016-09-15

    The electronic Raman scattering in LuB{sub 12} single crystals of various isotope compositions is studied in the temperature range 10–650 K. The shape and the energy position of spectral maxima depend on the direction and magnitude of a probe wavevector, the temperature, and the excitation symmetry and remain unchanged when the isotope composition changes. Experimental spectra are compared with the spectra simulated on the basis of a calculated electronic structure. The experimental results are successfully described when the electron spectrum renormalization effects caused by electron–phonon coupling are taken into account. This confirms that the origin of the observed spectra in LuB{sub 12} is due to Raman scattering by electrons. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data makes it possible to determine the coupling constant (λ{sub ep} = 0.32) that gives the correct superconducting transition temperature.

  15. Feasibility of Single Molecule DNA Sequencing using Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talley, C E; Reboredo, F; Chan, J; Lane, S M

    2006-02-03

    We have used a combined theoretical and experimental approach in order to assess the feasibility of using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for DNA sequencing at the single molecule level. We have developed a numerical tool capable of calculating the E-field and resulting SERS enhancement factors for metallic structures of arbitrary size and shape. Measurements of the additional SERS enhancement by combining SERS with coherent antistokes Raman scattering (CARS) show that only modest increases in the signal are achievable due to thermal damage at higher laser powers. Finally, measurements of the SERS enhancement from nanoparticles coated with an insulating layer show that the SERS enhancement is decreased by as much as two orders of magnitude when the molecule is not in contact with the metal surface.

  16. Monitoring lipid accumulation in the green microalga Botryococcus braunii with frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chun-Chin; Chandrappa, Dayananda; Smirnoff, Nicholas; Moger, Julian

    2015-03-01

    The potential of microalgae as a source of renewable energy has received considerable interest because they can produce lipids (fatty acids and isoprenoids) that can be readily converted into biofuels. However, significant research in this area is required to increase yields to make this a viable renewable source of energy. An analytical tool that could provide quantitative in situ spectroscopic analysis of lipids synthesis in individual microalgae would significantly enhance our capability to understand the synthesis process at the cellular level and lead to the development of strategies for increasing yield. Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has great potential in this area however, the pump-probe signal from two-color two-photon absorption of pigments (chlorophyll and carotenoids) overwhelm the SRS signal and prevent its application. Clearly, the development of a background suppression technique is of significant value for this important research area. To overcome the limitation of SRS in pigmented specimens, we establish a frequency-modulated stimulated Raman scattering (FM-SRS) microscopy that eliminates the non-Raman background by rapidly toggling on-and-off the targeted Raman resonance. Moreover, we perform the background-free imaging and analysis of intracellular lipid droplets and extracellular hydrocarbons in a green microalga with FM-SRS microscopy. We believe that FM-SRS microscopy demonstrates the potential for many applications in pigmented cells and provides the opportunity for improved selective visualization of the chemical composition of algae and plants

  17. Enhancement of Raman scattering signal of a few molecules using photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, G. M.; Parit, M. K.; Laha, R.; Dantham, V. R., E-mail: dantham@iitp.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta, Bihar, India 801103 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Now a days, single molecule surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SMSERS) has become a fascinating tool for studying the structural properties, static and dynamic events of single molecules (instead of ensemble average), with the help of efficient plasmonic nanostructures. This is extremely useful in the field of proteomics because the structural properties of protein molecules are heterogeneous. Even though, SMSERS provides wealthy information about single molecules, it demands high quality surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates. So far, a very few researchers succeeded in demonstrating the single molecule Raman scattering using conventional SERS technique. However, the experimental S/N of the Raman signal has been found to be very poor. Recently, with the help of photonic nanojet of an optical microsphere, we were able to enhance the SERS signal of a few molecules adsorbed on the SERS substrates (gold symmetric and asymmetric nanodimers and trimers dispersed on a glass slide). Herein, we report a few details about photonic nanojet mediated SERS technique, a few experimental results and a detailed theoretical study on symmetric and asymmetric nanosphere dimers to understand the dependence of localised surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) wavelength of a nanodimer on the nanogap size and polarization of the excitation light.

  18. A versatile setup using femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Yujie, E-mail: styojm@physics.tamu.edu [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Voronine, Dmitri V.; Sokolov, Alexei V. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Scully, Marlan O. [Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Baylor University, Waco, Texas 76798 (United States); Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    We report a versatile setup based on the femtosecond adaptive spectroscopic techniques for coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering. The setup uses a femtosecond Ti:Sapphire oscillator source and a folded 4f pulse shaper, in which the pulse shaping is carried out through conventional optical elements and does not require a spatial light modulator. Our setup is simple in alignment, and can be easily switched between the collinear single-beam and the noncollinear two-beam configurations. We demonstrate the capability for investigating both transparent and highly scattering samples by detecting transmitted and reflected signals, respectively.

  19. Surface potential and morphology mapping to investigate analyte adsorption effects on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Gale, David J G; Grebennikov, Dmytro; Whelan, Liam D; Merschrod S, Erika F

    2017-11-02

    We demonstrate the power of Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM) in enabling a comprehensive study of enhancement mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) through the correlation of surface electrical and topographical effects. Local electric fields generated on Au/ZnO nanohybrid films impact analyte adsorption, while roughness is linked to hotspot generation. Optimizing the interplay between these two effects yields SERS enhancement factors (EFs) of 106, enabling ppb detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water.

  20. Solution-based characterization of surface-enhanced Raman response of single scattering centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurence, T A; Talley, C; Schwartzberg, A; Braun, G; Moskovits, M; Reich, N; Huser, T

    2008-03-06

    We demonstrate the rapid optical characterization of large numbers of individual metal nanoparticles freely diffusing in colloidal solution by confocal laser spectroscopy. We find that hollow gold nanospheres and solid silver nanoparticles linked with a bifunctional ligand, both designed nanostructures, exhibit significantly higher monodispersity in their Rayleigh and Raman scattering response than randomly aggregated gold and silver nanoparticles. We show that measurements of rotational diffusion timescales allow sizing of particles significantly more reliably than can be obtained using translational diffusion timescales.

  1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of the Complexes of Silver with Adenine and dAMP

    OpenAIRE

    Otto, Cornelis; Hoeben, F.P.; Hoeben, F.P.; Greve, Jan

    1991-01-01

    The behaviour of adenine and 2'-deoxyadenosine-5'-monophosphate (dAMP) at positive surface potentials of a silver working electrode was investigated using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The use of positive potentials in the presence of adenine or dAMP leads to a rapid accumulation of an intense spectrum. It is proposed that complexes of adenine (dAMP) with silver generate the observed spectra. Adenine and dAMP can be distinguished spectroscopically due to various different complexe...

  2. Supercontinuum generation for coherent anti- Stokes Raman scattering microscopy with photonic crystal fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Isomäki, Antti; Hansen, Kim P.

    2011-01-01

    with power concentrated around the relevant wavelengths for lipid imaging (648 nm and 1027 nm). This new PCF is characterized by varying the fiber length, the average power, and the pulse width of the fs pump pulses. It was found that the selected PCF design gave a significantly improved spectral...... analysis, the nonlinear effects responsible for the spectral broadening are explained to be soliton fission processes, dispersive waves, and stimulated Raman scattering....

  3. Three-Dimensional Nanoporous Graphene Substrate for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Zhiqiang; Wu, Shangfei; Yang, Fan; Li, Yongfeng; Zhang, Liqiang; Liu, Hongwen; Ding, Hong; Richard, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    We synthesized three-dimensional nanoporous graphene films by a chemical vapor deposition method with nanoporous copper as a catalytic substrate. The resulting nanoporous graphene has the same average pore size as the underlying copper substrate. Our surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) investigation indicates that the nanoporosity of graphene significantly improves the SERS efficiency of graphene as a substrate as compared to planar graphene substrates.

  4. Waste Fiber Powder Functionalized with Silver Nanoprism for Enhanced Raman Scattering Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Bin; Zeng, Tian; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Ji; Ye, Yong; Wang, Xungai

    2017-01-01

    Biomass disks based on fine powder produced from disposed wool fibers were prepared for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The wool powders (WPs) were modified by silver nanoprisms via an assembly method and then pressed into disks using a hydraulic laboratory pellet press. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the WPs and disks before and after treatment with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The W...

  5. Enhanced Raman Scattering from NCM523 Cathodes Coated with Electrochemically Deposited Gold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tornheim, Adam; Maroni, Victor A.; He, Meinan; Gosztola, David J.; Zhang, Zhengcheng

    2017-01-01

    Materials with the general composition LiMO2, where M is a mix of nickel, cobalt, and manganese, have been studied extensively as cathodes for lithium-based electrochemical cells. Some compositions, like LiNi0.5Co0.2Mn0.3O2 (NCM523), have already found application in commercial lithium-ion batteries. Pre-test and post-test analyses of these types of cathodes have benefited greatly from the use of Raman spectroscopy. Specifically, Raman spectroscopy can be used to investigate the phonons of the LiMO2 lattice. This is particularly useful for studies of the LiMO2 after it has been formed into the type of polymer-bonded laminate from which typical battery cathodes are cut. One of the problems that occurs in such studies is that the scattering from the LiMO2 phase gets progressively weaker as the nickel content increases. NCM523 poses one example of this behavior owing to the fact that half of the transition metal content is nickel. In this study we show that the intensity of the Raman scattering from the NCM523 phonons can be significantly increased by electroplating clusters of sub-micron gold particles on NCM523-containing laminate structures. The gold appears to plate somewhat selectively on the NCM523 particles in randomly sized clusters. These clusters stimulate the Raman scattering from the NCM523 to varying extents that can reach nearly 100 times the scattering intensity from uncoated pristine laminates.

  6. Lipid-cell interactions in human monocytes investigated by doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Weeks, Tyler; Schie, Iwan; den Hartigh, Laura J.; Rutledge, John C.; Huser, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate that doubly-resonant coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering can provide enhanced and highly specific contrast for molecules containing unique Raman-active small molecular groups. This combination provides contrast for molecules that can otherwise be difficult to discriminate by Raman spectroscopy. Here, human monocytes were incubated with either deuterated oleic acid or 17-octadecynoic acid (a fatty acid with an end terminal acetylene group). The carbon-deuterium stretching vibr...

  7. Time-Resolved Study of the Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Effect of Silver Nanoparticles Generated in Voltammetry Experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, David; Fernández Blanco, Ana Cristina; Heras, Aránzazu; Colina, Álvaro

    2014-01-01

    UV–vis absorption and Raman spectroelectrochemistry have been used to study silver nanoparticle (AgNP) electrodeposition, allowing a better understanding about the metal nanoparticle (NP) formation process and its influence on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect. These techniques have provided in situ information related to the synthesis of AgNPs by cyclic voltammetry. With a marker, such as cyanide anion (CN–), Raman spectroscopy has allowed us to study all changes that take ...

  8. Phase-shift effect of amplitude spread function on spectrum and image formation in coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukutake, Naoki

    2016-03-01

    Coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy, which includes coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microspectroscopy, permits label-free hyperspectral imaging. We report the theoretical study of the phase-shift effect of the impulse response function on the spectral and image-forming properties of coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy. We show that the spectrum and image are influenced by not only the NA of objective for excitation (NA(ex)) but also that for signal collection (NA(col)), in association with the phase-shift effect. We discuss that, under the condition NA(ex)≠NA(col), both the spectrum and the image become deformed by the phase-shift effect, which can be applied to the direct measurement of the imaginary part of the nonlinear susceptibility in CARS spectroscopy. We point out that, even in SRS microscopy, the nonresonant background can contribute to the image formation and cause the artifact in the image.

  9. A surface enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopic study of UO{sub 2}{sup 2+} at trace concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franzen, Carola [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Carstensen, Lale [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany); Firkala, T. [Helmholtz Institute Freiberg for Resource Technology, Freiberg (Germany); Steudtner, Robin [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology

    2017-06-01

    Techniques for rapid screening of uranium in environmental samples are needed. This study entails the development of Surface-Enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for analyzing uranium(VI) in aqueous media with improved sensitivity.

  10. Simulations and analysis of the Raman scattering and differential Raman scattering/Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of amino acids, peptides and proteins in aqueous solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jalkanen, Karl J.; Nieminen, R. M.; Bohr, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    shell which strongly interact with the molecule are treated explicitly while the waters in the bulk are treated by a continuum model. The structures are optimized and the harmonic force elds are calculated. The derivatives needed to simulate the Raman and ROA intensities are calculated from first...

  11. Stimulated Stokes and Antistokes Raman Scattering in Microspherical Whispering Gallery Mode Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnesi, Daniele; Berneschi, Simone; Cosi, Franco; Righini, Giancarlo C; Soria, Silvia; Nunzi Conti, Gualtiero

    2016-04-04

    Dielectric microspheres can confine light and sound for a length of time through high quality factor whispering gallery modes (WGM). Glass microspheres can be thought as a store of energy with a huge variety of applications: compact laser sources, highly sensitive biochemical sensors and nonlinear phenomena. A protocol for the fabrication of both the microspheres and coupling system is given. The couplers described here are tapered fibers. Efficient generation of nonlinear phenomena related to third order optical non-linear susceptibility Χ((3)) interactions in triply resonant silica microspheres is presented in this paper. The interactions here reported are: Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS), and four wave mixing processes comprising Stimulated Anti-stokes Raman Scattering (SARS). A proof of the cavity-enhanced phenomenon is given by the lack of correlation among the pump, signal and idler: a resonant mode has to exist in order to obtain the pair of signal and idler. In the case of hyperparametric oscillations (four wave mixing and stimulated anti-stokes Raman scattering), the modes must fulfill the energy and momentum conservation and, last but not least, have a good spatial overlap.

  12. Controlling stimulated Raman scattering by two-color light in inertial confinement fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Z. J.; Chen, Y. H.; Zheng, C. Y.; Cao, L. H.; Li, B.; Xiang, J.; Hao, L.; Lan, K.

    2017-08-01

    A method is proposed to control the stimulated Raman scattering in the inertial confinement fusion by using auxiliary 2ω light to suppress the stimulated Raman scattering of the 3ω light. In this scheme, inverse bremsstrahlung absorption and parametric instabilities in the 2ω light increase the electron temperature and the plasma-density fluctuation, thus preventing the development of Raman scattering of the 3ω light. This scheme is successfully demonstrated by both one-dimensional kinetic simulations and two-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulations. The one-dimensional Vlasov results show that the time-averaged transmissivity of the 3ω light increases from 0.75 to 0.95 under certain conditions. Results obtained using the particle-in-cell method with Monte Carlo collisions show that the electron temperature is greatly increased with the increasing intensity of the 2ω light. The two-dimensional radiative hydrodynamic simulation results show that the electron temperature increases from 3.2 keV to 3.5 keV, and the time-averaged backscattering level decreases from 0.28 to 0.1 in the presence of the auxiliary 2ω light.

  13. Silver nanoparticles decorated nanoporous gold for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min; Zhang, Ling; Chen, Bin; Wang, Zheng; Chen, Chao; Zeng, Heping

    2017-02-01

    Raman spectra are considered as signatures of matter and have been widely used to identify several classes of materials. The development of mobile spectrometers further extends applications of Raman spectroscopy, and both indoor/outdoor and in vivo/in vitro measurements have been evaluated on site. However, the finite detection level restricts its application in high density matters. Here we report a facile silver nanoparticle decorated nanoporous gold (NanoAg@NPG) substrate, which can provide high enhancement of the Raman signal from nearby molecules by 785 nm photoexcitation. This enhancement is attributed to the abundant Raman-active nanogaps constructed by adjacent nanoparticles and also by the NPG ligaments and adhered nanoparticles. This NanoAg@NPG substrate shows great potential as a reproducible and quantifiable near infrared surface-enhanced Raman scattering probe for various targets, since it performs well in the so-called biological window which can avoid autofluorescence and absorption either from targets or surroundings in the visible optical region.

  14. Design and measurement technique of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detection of bisphenol A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Norhayati; Mat Salleh, Muhamad; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Shapter, Joseph George

    2017-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a highly sensitive measurement technique that provides Raman peaks at different Raman shift for different molecule structures. The SERS sensor is potentially used to detect food contamination and monitor environmental pollutants. A self-developed SERS system for specific analysis with low development cost is a challenging issue. This study attempts to develop a simple SERS sensor system for detection of bisphenol A (BPA) molecule using SERS substrate of silver nanoplate film. A SERS sensor system was developed, consisting of a light source to excite analyte molecules, Inphotonic Raman probe, sensor chamber and spectrophotometer as an analyser system. A duplex fibre optic is used to transmit light from the source to the probe and from the probe to the spectrophotometer. For SERS measurement, BPA detection was done by comparing the Raman signal spectra of the BPA on the quartz substrate and BPA on the silver nanoplate film. This SERS sensor successfully sensed BPA with SERS enhancement factor (EF) 5.55  ×  103 and a detection limit of BPA concentration at 1 mM.

  15. Microscopie "CARS" (Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering). Génération du signal au voisinage d'interfaces et à l'intérieur d'une cavité Fabry-Perot.

    OpenAIRE

    Gachet, D

    2007-01-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (``CARS'') is a spectroscopic technique that gives access to intra-molecular vibrational information. It was first proposed as a contrast mechanism in microscopy in 1982, and was implemented under a convenient colinear configuration in 1999. Since then, the signal generation in CARS microscopy has been studied in the litterature on some simple configurations. In this PhD dissertation, we extend the CARS signal generation study in isotropic media using a f...

  16. Vibrational Raman spectra of hydrogen clathrate hydrates from density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, K. R.; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2013-03-01

    Hydrogen clathrate hydrates are promising sources of clean energy and are known to exist in a sII hydrate lattice, which consists of H2 molecules in dodecahedron (512) and hexakaidecahedron (51264) water cages. The formation of these hydrates which occur in extreme thermodynamic conditions is known to be considerably reduced by an inclusion of tetrahydrofuran (THF) in cages of these hydrate lattice. In this present work, we employ the density functional theory with a dispersion corrected (B97-D) functional to characterize vibrational Raman modes in the cages of pure and THF doped hydrogen clathrate hydrates. Our calculations show that the symmetric stretch of the H2 molecule in the 51264H2.THF cage is blueshifted compared to the 51264H2 cage. However, all vibrational modes of water molecules are redshifted which suggest reduced interaction between the H2 molecule and water molecules in the 51264H2.THF cage. The symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch of water molecules in 512H2, 51264H2, and 51264H2.THF cages are redshifted compared with the corresponding guest free cages due to interactions between encapsulated H2 molecules and water molecules of the cages. The low frequency modes contain contributions from contraction and expansion of water cages and vibration of water molecules due to hydrogen bonding and these modes could possibly play an important role in the formation of the hydrate lattice.

  17. Raman excitation profiles of hybrid systems constituted by single-layer graphene and free base phthalocyanine: Manifestations of two mechanisms of graphene-enhanced Raman scattering

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhlířová, T.; Mojzeš, P.; Melníková Komínková, Zuzana; Kalbáč, Martin; Sutrová, Veronika; Šloufová, I.; Vlčková, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 10 (2017), s. 1270-1281 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-01953S Institutional support: RVO:61388955 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : graphene-enhanced Raman scattering * single-layer graphene * free base phthalocyanine * Raman excitation profiles * photoinduced charge transfer Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  18. The relationship study between texture vibrating plate dynamic wettability and elastic wave scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jing; Li, Bin; Zhou, Chuanping; Xiao, Jing; Ni, Jing

    2017-07-01

    An experimental investigation of wetting behavior of liquid droplet on texture vibrating substrate and the theoretical calculations of elastic wave scattering with two holes which based on the elastodynamics, employing complex functions are investigated to study the relationship between texture vibrating plate dynamic wettability and elastic wave scattering. Experimental results show the dynamic behavior of droplet was unstable. In 0 to π/2 cycle, droplet appeared the waveform with front steep and rear gentle along the flow direction. In π/2 to π cycle, droplet appeared slightly periodic oscillation and accompanied by a certain ripple. Based on the dynamic wetting phenomenon in a single cycle, the influence of elastic wave scattering on wetting property are analyzed. Analysis has shown that the stress concentration is caused by complex elastic wave scattering. The more concentrated the stress, the more concentrated the elastic wave energy. Compared with the single hole, the variations of dynamic stress concentration factors for two holes are complex due to the influence of interaction between two holes. Droplet emerge movement is response to the local vibration. The vibration spread in elastic plate at a time of strain, this elastic force cause droplet displacement and vibration, and accompanied with energy transfer.

  19. Picosecond Raman spectroscopy with a fast intensified CCD camera for depth analysis of diffusely scattering media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariese, Freek; Meuzelaar, Heleen; Kerssens, Marleen M; Buijs, Joost B; Gooijer, Cees

    2009-06-01

    A spectroscopic depth profiling approach is demonstrated for layers of non-transparent, diffusely scattering materials. The technique is based on the temporal discrimination between Raman photons emitted from the surface and Raman photons originating from a deeper layer. Excitation was carried out with a frequency-doubled, 3 ps Ti:sapphire laser system (398 nm; 76 MHz repetition rate). Time-resolved detection was carried out with an intensified CCD camera that can be gated with a 250 ps gate width. The performance of the system was assessed using 1 mm and 2 mm pathlength cuvettes with powdered PMMA and trans-stilbene (TS) crystals, respectively, or solid white polymer blocks: Arnite (polyethylene terephthalate), Delrin (polyoxymethylene), polythene (polyethylene) and Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene). These samples were pressed together in different configurations and Raman photons were collected in backscatter mode in order to study the time difference in such media corresponding with several mm of extra net photon migration distance. We also studied the lateral contrast between two different second layers. The results demonstrate that by means of a picosecond laser system and the time discrimination of a gated intensified CCD camera, molecular spectroscopic information can be obtained through a turbid surface layer. In the case of the PMMA/TS two-layer system, time-resolved detection with a 400 ps delay improved the relative intensity of the Raman bands of the second layer with a factor of 124 in comparison with the spectrum recorded with a 100 ps delay (which is more selective for the first layer) and with a factor of 14 in comparison with a non-gated setup. Possible applications will be discussed, as well as advantages/disadvantages over other Raman techniques for diffusely scattering media.

  20. Determining the crystalline degree of silicon nanoclusters/SiO{sub 2} multilayers by Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, S.; López-Vidrier, J.; López-Conesa, L.; Peiró, F.; Garrido, B. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Hiller, D.; Gutsch, S.; Zacharias, M. [IMTEK, Faculty of Engineering, Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg, Georges-Köhler-Allee 103, D-79110, Freiburg (Germany); Ibáñez, J. [Institute of Earth Sciences Jaume Almera, ICTJA-CSIC, Lluís Solé i Sabarís s/n, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); Estradé, S. [MIND-IN2UB, Departament d' Electrònica, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, E-08028, Barcelona (Spain); CCiT, Scientific and Technical Center, Universitat de Barcelona, Lluís Solé i Sabarís 1, E-08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-05-28

    We use Raman scattering to investigate the size distribution, built-in strains and the crystalline degree of Si-nanoclusters (Si-nc) in high-quality Si-rich oxynitride/SiO{sub 2} multilayered samples obtained by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and subsequent annealing at 1150 °C. An initial structural characterization of the samples was performed by means of energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy (EFTEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) to obtain information about the cluster size and the presence of significant amounts of crystalline phase. The contributions to the Raman spectra from crystalline and amorphous Si were analyzed by using a phonon confinement model that includes the Si-nc size distribution, the influence of the matrix compressive stress on the clusters, and the presence of amorphous Si domains. Our lineshape analysis confirms the existence of silicon precipitates in crystalline state, in good agreement with XRD results, and provides also information about the presence of a large compressive stress over the Si-nc induced by the SiO{sub 2} matrix. By using the Raman spectra from low temperature annealed samples (i.e., before the crystallization of the Si-nc), the relative scattering cross-section between crystalline and amorphous Si was evaluated as a function of the crystalline Si size. Taking into account this parameter and the integrated intensities for each phase as extracted from the Raman spectra, we were able to evaluate the degree of crystallization of the precipitated Si-nc. Our data suggest that all samples exhibit high crystalline fractions, with values up to 89% for the biggest Si-nc. The Raman study, supported by the EFTEM characterization, indicates that this system undergoes a practically abrupt phase separation, in which the precipitated Si-nanoclusters are formed by a crystalline inner part surrounded by a thin amorphous shell of approximately 1–2 atomic layers.

  1. Measurements and modeling of Raman side-scatter in ICF experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Pierre; Rosenberg, M. J.; Chapman, T.; Short, R. W.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A.; Goyon, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Moody, J. D.; Regan, S. P.; Myatt, J. F.

    2017-10-01

    Raman side-scatter, whereby the Raman scattered light is resonant at its turning point in a density gradient, was identified experimentally in planar-target experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in conditions relevant to the direct-drive scheme of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This process was found to be one of the principal sources of supra-thermal electrons in such conditions, which can preheat the target and reduce its compressibility. We have developed a new semi-analytical model of the instability, which describes both its convective and absolute aspects; we derived quantitative estimates of the amplification region in typical ICF regimes, which highlights the need for sufficiently large laser spots to allow the instability to develop. Full-scale simulations of these experiments using the laser-plasma interaction code ``pF3d'' show SRS side-scatter largely dominating over back-scatter, and reproduce the essential features observed in the experiments and derived in the theory; we provide extrapolations to the case of spherical geometries relevant to direct-drive and discuss implications for indirect-drive ICF experiments. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  2. Non-labeling multiplex surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chi Lok; Dinish, U. S.; Schmidt, Michael Stenbæk

    2014-01-01

    -pillars. In this experiment, detections of acetone and ethanol vapor at different concentrations were demonstrated. The detection limits were found to be 0.0017 ng and 0.0037 ng for ethanol and acetone vapor molecules respectively. Our approach is a non-labeling method such that it does not require the incorporation of any...... of acetone and ethanol vapor was also successfully demonstrated. The vibrational fingerprints of molecular structures provide specific Raman peaks for different VOCs contents. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first multiplex VOCs detection using SERS. We believe that this work may lead to a portable...

  3. A Biomedical Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate: Functionalized Three-Dimensional Porous Membrane Decorated with Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We fabricated a simple, cheap, and functional surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate for biomedical application. Hot spots between two close silver nanoparticles distributed in the skeleton of a three-dimensional porous membrane, especially in the pores, were formed. The dual poles of micropores in the membrane were discussed. The pores could protect the silver nanoparticles in the pores from being oxidized, which makes the membrane effective for a longer period of time. In addition, Staphylococcus aureus cells could be trapped by the micropores and then the Raman signal became stronger, indicating that the functional surface enhanced Raman scattering substrate is reliable.

  4. Reduction of the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering in Raman-active media introduced into pores of a globular photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almohamed, Y.; Barille, R.; Vodchits, A. I.; Voinov, Yu. P.; Gorelik, V. S.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Orlovich, V. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.

    2015-03-01

    The characteristics of stimulated Raman scattering in benzene and carbon disulfide introduced in pores of globular photonic crystals—opal matrices formed from close-packed balls (globules) of amorphous quartz (silica)—have been experimentally studied. Stimulated Raman scattering spectra have been excited by giant pulses of the second optical harmonic (532 nm) of a YAG laser. The spectra have been recorded in the direction of mirror reflection from the (111) growth surface of a globular photonic crystal at various angles of incidence (10°-70°) of laser radiation. It has been shown that the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering decreases sharply (by more than an order of magnitude) at a certain angle of mirror reflection and additional Stokes and anti-Stokes Raman satellites appear in the spectrum. The observed sharp decrease in the threshold of stimulated Raman scattering has been explained by an increase in the spectral density of the electromagnetic field in the surface region of the photonic crystal because of the approach of the spectral position of the stopband of the photonic crystal to the exciting line (532 nm) under variation of the angle of incidence of pump radiation on the (111) surface.

  5. Rapid label-free identification of Klebsiella pneumoniae antibiotic resistant strains by the drop-coating deposition surface-enhanced Raman scattering method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheong, Youjin; Kim, Young Jin; Kang, Heeyoon; Choi, Samjin; Lee, Hee Joo

    2017-08-01

    Although many methodologies have been developed to identify unknown bacteria, bacterial identification in clinical microbiology remains a complex and time-consuming procedure. To address this problem, we developed a label-free method for rapidly identifying clinically relevant multilocus sequencing typing-verified quinolone-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains. We also applied the method to identify three strains from colony samples, ATCC70063 (control), ST11 and ST15; these are the prevalent quinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae strains in East Asia. The colonies were identified using a drop-coating deposition surface-enhanced Raman scattering (DCD-SERS) procedure coupled with a multivariate statistical method. Our workflow exhibited an enhancement factor of 11.3 × 106 to Raman intensities, high reproducibility (relative standard deviation of 7.4%), and a sensitive limit of detection (100 pM rhodamine 6G), with a correlation coefficient of 0.98. All quinolone-resistant K. pneumoniae strains showed similar spectral Raman shifts (high correlations) regardless of bacterial type, as well as different Raman vibrational modes compared to Escherichia coli strains. Our proposed DCD-SERS procedure coupled with the multivariate statistics-based identification method achieved excellent performance in discriminating similar microbes from one another and also in subtyping of K. pneumoniae strains. Therefore, our label-free DCD-SERS procedure coupled with the computational decision supporting method is a potentially useful method for the rapid identification of clinically relevant K. pneumoniae strains.

  6. Diagnostic of the Symbiotic Stars Environment by Thomson, Raman and Rayleigh Scattering Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sekeráš

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic stars are long-period interacting binaries consisting of a cool giant as the donor star and a white dwarf as the acretor. Due to acretion of the material from the giant’s stellar wind, the white dwarf becomes very hot and luminous. The circumstellar material partially ionized by the hot star, represents an ideal medium for processes of scattering. To investigate the symbiotic nebula we modeled the wide wings of the resonance lines OVI λ1032 Å, λ1038 Å and HeII λ1640 Å emission line in the spectrum of AG Dra, broadened by Thomson scattering. On the other hand, Raman and Rayleigh scattering arise in the neutral part of the circumstellar matter around the giant and provide a powerful tool to probe e.g. the ionization structure of the symbiotic systems and distribution of the neutral hydrogen atoms in the giant’s wind.

  7. Nonlinear Fluid Simulation Study of Stimulated Raman and Brillouin Scatterings in Shock Ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chuang; Hao, Liang; Yan, Rui; Li, Jun; Liu, Wenda

    2017-10-01

    We developed a new nonlinear fluid laser-plasma-instability code FLAME using a multi-fluid plasma model combined with full electromagnetic wave equations. The completed one-dimensional (1D) version of FLAME was used to study laser-plasma instabilities in shock ignition. The simulations results showed that absolute Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) modes growing near the quarter-critical surface were saturated by Langmuir-wave Decay Instabilities (LDI) and pump depletion. The ion-acoustic waves from LDI acted as seeds of Stimulated Brillouin Scattering (SBS), which displayed a bursting pattern and caused strong pump depletion. Re-scattering of SRS was also observed in a high temperature case. These results largely agreed with corresponding Particle-in-Cell simulations. Work funded by DOE (DE-SC0012316), NSF (PHY-1314734), NSFC (11642020, 11621202), and Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A505).

  8. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric P. A. Vogt

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4 of the Very Large Telescope (VLT, we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å–9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N_{2}, O_{2}, CO_{2}, H_{2}O, and (tentatively CH_{4} molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT. At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam

  9. Detection and Implications of Laser-Induced Raman Scattering at Astronomical Observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Frédéric P. A.; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico; Hackenberg, Wolfgang; Opitom, Cyrielle; Comin, Mauro; Schmidtobreik, Linda; Smoker, Jonathan; Blanchard, Israel; Espinoza Contreras, Marcela; Aranda, Ivan; Milli, Julien; Jaffe, Yara L.; Selman, Fernando; Kolb, Johann; Hibon, Pascale; Kuntschner, Harald; Madec, Pierre-Yves

    2017-04-01

    Laser guide stars employed at astronomical observatories provide artificial wavefront reference sources to help correct (in part) the impact of atmospheric turbulence on astrophysical observations. Following the recent commissioning of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF) on Unit Telescope 4 (UT4) of the Very Large Telescope (VLT), we characterize the spectral signature of the uplink beams from the 22-W lasers to assess the impact of laser scattering from the 4LGSF on science observations. We use the Multi-Unit Spectroscopic Explorer (MUSE) optical integral field spectrograph mounted on the Nasmyth B focus of UT4 to acquire spectra at a resolution of R ≅3000 of the uplink laser beams over the wavelength range of 4750 Å-9350 Å. We report the first detection of laser-induced Raman scattering by N2 , O2 , CO2 , H2O , and (tentatively) CH4 molecules in the atmosphere above the astronomical observatory of Cerro Paranal. In particular, our observations reveal the characteristic spectral signature of laser photons—but 480 Å to 2210 Å redder than the original laser wavelength of 5889.959 Å—landing on the 8.2-m primary mirror of UT4 after being Raman-scattered on their way up to the sodium layer. Laser-induced Raman scattering, a phenomenon not usually discussed in the astronomical context, is not unique to the observatory of Cerro Paranal, but it is common to any astronomical telescope employing a laser guide star (LGS) system. It is thus essential for any optical spectrograph coupled to a LGS system to thoroughly handle the possibility of a Raman spectral contamination via a proper baffling of the instrument and suitable calibrations procedures. These considerations are particularly applicable for the HARMONI optical spectrograph on the upcoming Extremely Large Telescope (ELT). At sites hosting multiple telescopes, laser-collision-prediction tools should also account for the presence of Raman emission from the uplink laser beam(s) to avoid the unintentional

  10. Vibrational dynamics (IR, Raman, NRVS) and DFT study of new antitumor tetranuclearstannoxanecluster, Sn(IV)$-$oxo$-${di$-$o$-$vanillin} dimethyl dichloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arjmand, F. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Sharma, S. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Usman, M. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry; Leu, B. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Hu, M. Y. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS); Toupet, L. [Univ. de Rennes, Rennes (France). Inst. de Physique de Rennes; Gosztola, David J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Center for Nanoscale Materials; Tabassum, S. [Aligarh Muslim Univ., Aligarh (India). Dept. of Chemistry

    2016-06-21

    The vibrational dynamics of a newly synthesized tetrastannoxane was characterized with a combination of experimental (Raman, IR and tin-based nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy) and computational (DFT/B3LYP) methods, with an emphasis on the vibrations of the tin sites. The cytotoxic activity revealed a significant regression selectively against the human pancreatic cell lines.

  11. Dimensional scale effects on surface enhanced Raman scattering efficiency of self-assembled silver nanoparticle clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fasolato, C. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Center for Life Nanoscience@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, V.le Regina Elena, 291, 00185 Rome (Italy); Domenici, F., E-mail: fabiodomenici@gmail.com, E-mail: paolo.postorino@roma1.infn.it; De Angelis, L.; Luongo, F.; Postorino, P., E-mail: fabiodomenici@gmail.com, E-mail: paolo.postorino@roma1.infn.it [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Sennato, S. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); CNR-IPCS UOS Roma, Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Mura, F. [Dip. Scienze di Base Applicate all' Ingegneria, Università Sapienza, Via A. Scarpa, 16, 00185 Rome (Italy); Costantini, F. [Dip. Ingegneria Astronautica Elettrica ed Energetica, Università Sapienza, Via Eudossiana, 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Bordi, F. [Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy); Center for Life Nanoscience@Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, V.le Regina Elena, 291, 00185 Rome (Italy); CNR-IPCS UOS Roma, Dip. Fisica, Università Sapienza, P.le Aldo Moro, 5, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2014-08-18

    A study of the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) from micrometric metallic nanoparticle aggregates is presented. The sample is obtained from the self-assembly on glass slides of micro-clusters of silver nanoparticles (60 and 100 nm diameter), functionalized with the organic molecule 4-aminothiophenol in water solution. For nanoparticle clusters at the micron scale, a maximum enhancement factor of 10{sup 9} is estimated from the SERS over the Raman intensity ratio normalized to the single molecule contribution. Atomic force microscopy, correlated to spatially resolved Raman measurements, allows highlighting the connection between morphology and efficiency of the plasmonic system. The correlation between geometric features and SERS response of the metallic structures reveals a linear trend of the cluster maximum scattered intensity as a function of the surface area of the aggregate. On given clusters, the intensity turns out to be also influenced by the number of stacking planes of the aggregate, thus suggesting a plasmonic waveguide effect. The linear dependence results weakened for the largest area clusters, suggesting 30 μm{sup 2} as the upper limit for exploiting the coherence over large scale of the plasmonic response.

  12. Raman scattering from high-frequency phonons in supported n-graphene layer films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A; Chen, G; Joshi, P; Tadigadapa, S; Eklund, P C

    2006-12-01

    Results of room-temperature Raman scattering studies of ultrathin graphitic films supported on Si (100)/SiO2 substrates are reported. The results are significantly different from those known for graphite. Spectra were collected using 514.5 nm radiation on films containing from n = 1 to 20 graphene layers, as determined by atomic force microscopy. Both the first- and second-order Raman spectra show unique signatures of the number of layers in the film. The nGL film analogue of the Raman G-band in graphite exhibits a Lorentzian line shape whose center frequency shifts linearly relative to graphite as approximately 1/n (for n = 1 omegaG approximately 1587 cm-1). Three weak bands, identified with disorder-induced first-order scattering, are observed at approximately 1350, 1450, and 1500 cm-1. The approximately 1500 cm-1 band is weak but relatively sharp and exhibits an interesting n-dependence. In general, the intensity of these D-bands decreases dramatically with increasing n. Three second-order bands are also observed (approximately 2450, approximately 2700, and 3248 cm-1). They are analogues to those observed in graphite. However, the approximately 2700 cm-1 band exhibits an interesting and dramatic change of shape with n. Interestingly, for n < 5 this second-order band is more intense than the G-band.

  13. Temperature dependence of first- and second-order Raman scattering in silicon nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khachadorian, S.; Scheel, H.; Vierck, A.; Thomsen, C. [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Colli, A. [Nokia Research Centre, Broers Building, 21 J J Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA (United Kingdom)

    2010-12-15

    The first- and second-order Raman scattering of the silicon nanowires grown without any metal catalyst is studied in the temperature range from 77 to 873 K. The first- and second-order Raman peaks were found to shift and broaden differently with increasing temperature. We show that this is due to the confinement related enhanced anharmonic effects in silicon nanowires. Our measurements also show that both the second- to first-order Raman peak intensity ratio [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.} and I(2TO){sub int.}/I(1TO){sub int.}] and the Raman relative intensities [I(2TA){sub int.}/I(2TO){sub int.}] increase with increasing temperature. TEM image of SiNWs. The SiNW are 15 nm in diameter and up to a few microns long. (Copyright copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering imaging facilitates accurate diagnosis of human prostate cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Sishan; Wang, Ping; Yue, Shuhua

    2017-02-01

    Due to the subject nature of histopathology, there is a significant inter-observer discordance for the differentiation between low-risk prostate cancer (Gleason score Gleason score >6), which requires active treatment. Our previous study using Raman spectromicroscopy reveals that cholesteryl ester accumulation underlies human prostate cancer aggressiveness. However, Raman spectromicroscopy could only provide compositional information of certain lipid droplets of interest, which overlooked cell-to-cell variation and hindered translation to accurate automated diagnosis. Here, we demonstrated quantitative mapping of cholesteryl ester molar percentage in human prostate cancer tissues using hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy that renders compositional information for every pixel in the image. Specifically, hundreds of SRS images at Raman shift between 2800 3000 cm-1 were taken, and multivariate curve resolution algorism was used to retrieve concentration images of lipid, lipofuscin, and protein. We found that the height ratio between the prominent cholesterol band at 2870 cm-1 and the CH2 stretching band at 2850 cm-1 was proportional to the molar percentage of cholesteryl ester present in the total lipids. Based on the calibration curve, we were able to quantitatively map cholesteryl ester level in intact prostate cancer tissues. Our data showed that not only the amount of cholesteryl ester-rich lipid droplets, but also the CE molar percentage, was significantly greater in prostate cancer tissues with Gleason score > 6 compared to the ones with Gleason score <= 6. Our study offers an opportunity towards more accurate prostate cancer diagnosis.

  15. Molecular near-field antenna effect in resonance hyper-Raman scattering: Intermolecular vibronic intensity borrowing of solvent from solute through dipole-dipole and dipole-quadrupole interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimada, Rintaro; Hamaguchi, Hiro-o, E-mail: hhama@nctu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Chemistry and Institute of Molecular Science, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-28

    We quantitatively interpret the recently discovered intriguing phenomenon related to resonance Hyper-Raman (HR) scattering. In resonance HR spectra of all-trans-β-carotene (β-carotene) in solution, vibrations of proximate solvent molecules are observed concomitantly with the solute β-carotene HR bands. It has been shown that these solvent bands are subject to marked intensity enhancements by more than 5 orders of magnitude under the presence of β-carotene. We have called this phenomenon the molecular-near field effect. Resonance HR spectra of β-carotene in benzene, deuterated benzene, cyclohexane, and deuterated cyclohexane have been measured precisely for a quantitative analysis of this effect. The assignments of the observed peaks are made by referring to the infrared, Raman, and HR spectra of neat solvents. It has been revealed that infrared active and some Raman active vibrations are active in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed spectra in the form of difference spectra (between benzene/deuterated benzene and cyclohexane/deuterated cyclohexane) are quantitatively analyzed on the basis of the extended vibronic theory of resonance HR scattering. The theory incorporates the coupling of excited electronic states of β-carotene with the vibrations of a proximate solvent molecule through solute–solvent dipole–dipole and dipole–quadrupole interactions. It is shown that the infrared active modes arise from the dipole–dipole interaction, whereas Raman active modes from the dipole–quadrupole interaction. It is also shown that vibrations that give strongly polarized Raman bands are weak in the HR molecular near-field effect. The observed solvent HR spectra are simulated with the help of quantum chemical calculations for various orientations and distances of a solvent molecule with respect to the solute. The observed spectra are best simulated with random orientations of the solvent molecule at an intermolecular distance of 10 Å.

  16. A modified transmission tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) setup provides access to opaque samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckert-Gaudig, Tanja; Richter, Marc; Knebel, Detlef; Jähnke, Torsten; Jankowski, Tilo; Stock, Erik; Deckert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The combination of scanning probe microscopy and Raman spectroscopy enables chemical characterization of surfaces at highest spatial resolution. This so-called tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be employed for a variety of samples where a label-free characterization or identification of constituents on the nanometer scale is pursued. Present TERS setup geometries are always a compromise for specific dedicated applications and show different advantages and disadvantages: Transmission back-reflection setups, when using immersion objectives with a high numerical aperture, intrinsically provide the highest collection efficiency but cannot be applied for opaque samples. Those samples demand upright setups, at the cost of lower collection efficiency, even though very efficient systems using a parabolic mirror for illumination and collection have been demonstrated. In this contribution it is demonstrated that the incorporation of a dichroic mirror to a transmission TERS setup provides easy access to opaque samples without further modification of the setup.

  17. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Victor G. [Faculty of Physics, Sofia University, 5 James Bourchier Blvd., 1164 Sofia (Bulgaria); Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, BAS, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Vlakhov, Emil S. [Georgi Nadjakov Institute of Solid State Physics, BAS, 72 Tzarigradsko Chaussee, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stan, George E.; Socol, Marcela [National Institute of Material Physics, 105 bis Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania); Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N., E-mail: ion.mihailescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, 409 Atomistilor Street, 077125 Magurele-Ilfov (Romania)

    2015-11-28

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 3} times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  18. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering activity of niobium surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Victor G.; Vlakhov, Emil S.; Stan, George E.; Zamfirescu, Marian; Albu, Catalina; Mihailescu, Natalia; Negut, Irina; Luculescu, Catalin; Socol, Marcela; Ristoscu, Carmen; Mihailescu, Ion N.

    2015-11-01

    The chemical modification of the niobium (Nb) surface after irradiation with femtosecond laser pulses was investigated by scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The physical-chemical analyses indicated that the laser treatment results in oxidation of the Nb surface, as well as in the formation of Nb hydrides. Remarkably, after the samples' washing in ethanol, a strong Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) signal originating from the toluene residual traces was evidenced. Further, it was observed that the laser irradiated Nb surface is able to provide a SERS enhancement of ˜1.3 × 103 times for rhodamine 6G solutions. Thus, for the first time it was shown that Nb/Nb oxide surfaces could exhibit SERS functionality, and so one can expect applications in biological/biochemical screening or for sensing of dangerous environmental substances.

  19. Development of batch producible hot embossing 3D nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman scattering chip technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chu-Yu; Tsai, Ming-Shiuan

    2017-09-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a batch producible hot embossing 3D nanostructured surface-enhanced Raman chip technology for high sensitivity label-free plasticizer detection. This study utilizing the AAO self-assembled uniform nano-hemispherical array barrier layer as a template to create a durable nanostructured nickel mold. With the hot embossing technique and the durable nanostructured nickel mold, we are able to batch produce the 3D Nanostructured Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering Chip with consistent quality. In addition, because of our SERS chip can be fabricated by batch processing, the fabrication cost is low. Therefore, the developed method is very promising to be widespread and extensively used in rapid chemical and biomolecular detection applications.

  20. Suspended graphene with periodic dimer nanostructure on Si cavities for surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Chia; Nien, Li-Wei; Li, Jia-Han; Hsueh, Chun-Hway

    2017-04-01

    Periodic gold dimer nanoantennas on a one-atomic-layer graphene sheet elevated above Si cavities were fabricated to systematically study the effects of the cavity depth on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The periodic trend of Raman intensity as a function of the cavity depth resulting from the interference effect between the plasmonic resonance of the gold dimer and the cavity resonance of the underlying Si cavity was observed, and the electric field was greatly enhanced compared with the non-suspended system. The finite-difference time-domain method was used to simulate the interaction between the electromagnetic wave and the suspended system and to verify the observed SERS response in experiments. Our work has the advantages of combining the superior properties of graphene with suspended metallic nanostructures to result in the enhanced electric field for SERS applications.

  1. Probing the pairing symmetry of the iron pnictides with electronic Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyd, G.R.

    2010-04-29

    An important issue in the study of the iron-arsenic based superconductors is the symmetry of the superconducting gap, a problem complicated by multiple gaps on different Fermi surface sheets. Electronic Raman scattering is a flexible bulk probe which allows one in principle to determine gap magnitudes and test for gap nodes in different regions of the Brillouin zone by employing different photon polarization states. Here we calculate the clean Raman intensity for A{sub 1g}, B{sub 1g} and B{sub 2g} polarizations, and discuss the peak structures and low-energy power laws which might be expected for several popular models of the superconducting gap in these systems.

  2. Effects of tissue fixation on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering images of brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galli, Roberta; Uckermann, Ortrud; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Steiner, Gerald

    2014-07-01

    Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy is an emerging multiphoton technique for the label-free histopathology of the central nervous system, by imaging the lipid content within the tissue. In order to apply the technique on standard histology sections, it is important to know the effects of tissue fixation on the CARS image. Here, we report the effects of two common fixation methods, namely with formalin and methanol-acetone, on mouse brain and human glioblastoma tissue. The variations induced by fixation on the CARS contrast and intensity were compared and interpreted using Raman microspectroscopy. The results show that, whenever unfixed cryosections cannot be used, fixation with formalin constitutes an alternative which does not deteriorate substantially the contrast generated by the different brain structures in the CARS image. Fixation with methanol-acetone strongly modifies the tissue lipid content and is therefore incompatible with the CARS imaging.

  3. Raman scattering investigation of the water-bridge phenomenon: Some preliminary results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Aliotta

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available A floating water-bridge is formed if a high-voltage direct current is applied between two beakers filled of chemically pure water. Raman spectra of the OH-stretching region have been obtained at ambient condition of temperature and pressure. These preliminary results seem to indicate that the hydrogen-bond structure is only slightly modified by the presence of the electric field applied to form the floating water-bridge in agreement with recent neutron scattering investigation. In fact, the polarized Raman spectrum of the pure water and of the water-bridge is almost superimposable. We are planning to carry out further spectroscopic analysis, at different thermodynamic conditions, for better understanding the role played by the hydrogen-bond in driving the formation of the floating water-bridge.

  4. Fabrication and Robotization of Ultrasensitive Plasmonic Nanosensors for Molecule Detection with Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaobin Xu

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS, discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications.

  5. Carbon nanotubes doped with trivalent elements by using back - scattering Raman spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Babanejad

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available  In this paper by using DC arc discharge method and acetylene gas, as the carbon source, and nitrogen, as the carrier gas, canrbon nanotubes, CNTs, doped with trivalent element boron, B, have been produced. The deposited CNTs on the cathod electrod, which have structural doped properties to boron element, have been collected and after purification have been investigated by back-scattering Raman spectroscopy. The results reveal that the high frequency G mode component in CNTs doped with electron acceptor element, B, shift to higher wavenumbers. The low frequency G mode component which can appear at approximately 1540–1570 cm-1 wavenumber region, called BWF mode, is a sign of metallic CNT. In the synthesized doped CNTs due to the presence of boron dopant, D mode has sharp peaks and has relatively high intensity in the Raman spectra .

  6. Raman scattering applied to gas mixing in the successive channel flow of two gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillard, M. E., Jr.; Guy, R. W.; Emory, M. L.

    1973-01-01

    The Raman scattering technique has been applied to investigate the effects of fluid undercutting in a simulation of the fluid-piston concept for wind-tunnel design. Measurements of the structure of the driver-driven gas interface and of the effect of undercutting on test duration were performed. Tests were conducted over a Froude number range of 0.0021 to 0.526 at driver-to-driven gas density ratios of 1.103 and 1.573. The effects of inlet design, test-channel inclination angle, and pretest pressurization were also examined. The results are compared with shadowgraph and pressure measurements to illustrate the characteristics of the Raman technique and to explain the discrepancy between the shadowgraph and pressure results.

  7. Fabrication and robotization of ultrasensitive plasmonic nanosensors for molecule detection with Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaobin; Kim, Kwanoh; Liu, Chao; Fan, Donglei

    2015-05-04

    In this work, we introduce the history and mechanisms of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), discuss various techniques for fabrication of state-of-the-art SERS substrates, and review recent work on robotizing plasmonic nanoparticles, especially, the efforts we made on fabrication, characterization, and robotization of Raman nanosensors by design. Our nanosensors, consisting of tri-layer nanocapsule structures, are ultrasensitive, well reproducible, and can be robotized by either electric or magnetic tweezers. Three applications using such SERS nanosensors were demonstrated, including location predictable detection, single-cell bioanalysis, and tunable molecule release and monitoring. The integration of SERS and nanoelectromechanical system (NEMS) devices is innovative in both device concept and fabrication, and could potentially inspire a new device scheme for various bio-relevant applications.

  8. In vitro colocalization of plasmonic nano-biolabels and biomolecules using plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhari, Kamalesh; Pradeep, Thalappil

    2015-04-01

    An insight into the intracellular fate of theranostics is important for improving their potential in biological applications. In vivo efficacy of plasmonic theranostics depends on our ability to monitor temporal changes in their size, shape, and state of aggregation, and the identification of molecules adsorbed on their surfaces. We develop a technique which combines plasmonic and Raman scattering microspectroscopy to colocalize plasmonic scattering from metallic nanoparticles with the Raman signatures of biomolecules adsorbed on the surface of the former. Using this technique, we have colocalized biomolecules with the plasmonic scattering from silver nanoparticles in the vicinity of Escherichia coli bacteria. To prove the applicability of this setup for the measurements on mammalian cells, imaging of HEK293 cells treated with gold nanoparticles was performed. We discuss the importance of such correlated measurements over individual techniques, although the latter may lead to misinterpretation of results. Finally, with the above-mentioned examples, we have given criteria to improve the specificity of theranostics. We believe that this methodology will be considered as a prime development in the assessment of theranostics.

  9. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrates Made by Oblique Angle Deposition: Methods and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hin On Chu

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy presents a rapid, non-destructive method to identify chemical and biological samples with up to single molecule sensitivity. Since its discovery in 1974, the technique has become an intense field of interdisciplinary research, typically generating >2000 publications per year since 2011. The technique relies on the localised surface plasmon resonance phenomenon, where incident light can couple with plasmons at the interface that result in the generation of an intense electric field. This field can propagate from the surface from the metal-dielectric interface, so molecules within proximity will experience more intense Raman scattering. Localised surface plasmon resonance wavelength is determined by a number of factors, such as size, geometry and material. Due to the requirements of the surface optical response, Ag and Au are typical metals used for surface enhanced Raman applications. These metals then need to have nano features that improve the localised surface plasmon resonance, several variants of these substrates exist; surfaces can range from nanoparticles in a suspension, electrochemically roughened electrodes to metal nanostructures on a substrate. The latter will be the focus of this review, particularly reviewing substrates made by oblique angle deposition. Oblique angle deposition is the technique of growing thin films so that the material flux is not normal to the surface. Films grown in this fashion will possess nanostructures, due to the atomic self-shadowing effect, that are dependent mainly on the deposition angle. Recent developments, applications and highlights of surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates made by oblique angle deposition will be reviewed.

  10. Structural and vibrational characterization of sugar arabinitol structures employing micro-Raman spectra and DFT calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hédoux, Alain; Guinet, Yannick; Carpentier, Laurent; Paccou, Laurent; Derollez, Patrick; Brandán, Silvia Antonia

    2017-06-01

    In this work, three monomeric forms of arabinitol, usually named arabitol, and their dimeric species have been structural and vibrationally studied by using the micro-Raman spectra in the solid phase accomplished with theoretical calculations based on the theory of the functional of the density (DFT). The hybrid B3LYP method was used for all the calculations together with the 6-31G* and 6-311++g** basis sets. Two different L structures with minima energies were predicted in accordance to the two polymorphic structures revealed by recent X-ray diffraction experiments. The studies by natural bond orbital (NBO) calculations reveals high stabilities of the L form as compared with the D one but the topological properties by using the atoms in molecules (AIM) suggest a higher stability of the D form due to a strong H bond interactions. The scaled mechanical force fields (SQMFF) procedure was used to perform the complete vibrational assignments for the monomeric forms and their dimer. On the other hand, the similarity in the gap values computed for the three forms of arabitol with those observed for sucrose, trehalose, maltose and lactose in gas phase at the same level of theory could partially explain the sweetening property of this alcohol. In addition, the influences of the size of the basis set on some properties were evidenced.

  11. Chip-Scale Bioassays Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Fundamentals and Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hye-Young [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2005-01-01

    This work explores the development and application of chip-scale bioassays based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for high throughput and high sensitivity analysis of biomolecules. The size effect of gold nanoparticles on the intensity of SERS is first presented. A sandwich immunoassay was performed using Raman-labeled immunogold nanoparticles with various sizes. The SERS responses were correlated to particle densities, which were obtained by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The response of individual particles was also investigated using Raman-microscope and an array of gold islands on a silicon substrate. The location and the size of individual particles were mapped using AFM. The next study describes a low-level detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and simulants of biological warfare agents in a sandwich immunoassay format using SERS labels, which have been termed Extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs). A new ERL scheme based on a mixed monolayer is also introduced. The mixed monolayer ERLs were created by covering the gold nanoparticles with a mixture of two thiolates, one thiolate for covalently binding antibody to the particle and the other thiolate for producing a strong Raman signal. An assay platform based on mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on gold is then presented. The mixed SAMs were prepared from dithiobis(succinimidyl undecanoate) (DSU) to covalently bind antibodies on gold substrate and oligo(ethylene glycol)-terminated thiol to prevent nonspecific adsorption of antibodies. After the mixed SAMs surfaces, formed from various mole fraction of DSU were incubated with antibodies, AFM was used to image individual antibodies on the surface. The final study presents a collaborative work on the single molecule adsorption of YOYO-I labeled {lambda}-DNA at compositionally patterned SAMs using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. The role of solution pH, {lambda}-DNA concentration, and domain size was investigated. This work also revealed

  12. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition of cancer cells by stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Luyuan; Min, Wei

    2017-10-01

    Study of metabolic changes during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) of cancer cells is important for basic understanding and therapeutic management of cancer progression. We here used metabolic labeling and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a strategy of bioorthogonal chemical imaging, to directly visualize changes in anabolic metabolism during cancer EMT at a single-cell level. MCF-7 breast cancer cell is employed as a model system. Four types of metabolites (amino acids, glucose, fatty acids, and choline) are labeled with either deuterium or alkyne (C≡C) tag. Their intracellular incorporations into MCF-7 cells before or after EMT are visualized by SRS imaging targeted at the signature vibration frequency of C-D or C≡C bonds. Overall, after EMT, anabolism of amino acids, glucose, and choline is less active, reflecting slower protein and membrane synthesis in mesenchymal cells. Interestingly, we also observed less incorporation of glucose and palmitate acids into membrane lipids, but more of them into lipid droplets in mesenchymal cells. This result indicates that, although mesenchymal cells synthesize fewer membrane lipids, they are actively storing energy into lipid droplets, either through de novo lipogenesis from glucose or direct scavenging of exogenous free fatty acids. Hence, metabolic labeling coupled with SRS can be a straightforward method in imaging cancer metabolism.

  13. Analysis of defects in low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin films related to surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahara, Kuninori; Yeh, Wenchang; Hara, Akito

    2018-01-01

    The analysis of Raman scattering (RS) spectroscopy is presented for low-temperature polycrystalline silicon (poly-Si) thin films on glass substrates fabricated by excimer laser crystallization. In this material, RS is enhanced by specific protrusions at the grain boundary (GB). As a result, the Si lattice mode predominantly reflects the characteristics of GB and its neighborhood. A combination of low-damage hydrogenation and RS analysis enables the detection of lattice defects as Si–hydrogen (H) local vibration modes (LVMs). The characteristics of LVMs peculiar to this material are examined by chemical etching and postannealing. One of the dominant LVMs centered at ∼2000 cm‑1 is assigned to H-terminated dangling bonds in the amorphous structures at GB, which is also enhanced by protrusions. The other dominant band centered at ∼2100 cm‑1 is attributed to the strained Si–Si lattice near the Si/underlayer interface in grains that is broken and stabilized by extrinsic H atoms.

  14. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of DNA derived from the West Nile virus genome using magnetic capture of Raman-active gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    A model paramagnetic nanoparticle (MNP) assay is demonstrated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of DNA oligonucleotides derived from the West Nile virus (WNV) genome. Detection is based on the capture of WNV target sequences by hybridization with complementary oligonucleotide pr...

  15. Optical properties of individual nano-sized gold particle pairs. Mie-scattering, fluorescence, and Raman-scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olk, Phillip

    2008-07-01

    This thesis examines and exploits the optical properties of pairs of MNPs. Pairs of MNPs offer two further parameters not existent at single MNPs, which both affect the local optical fields in their vicinity: the distance between them, and their relative orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. These properties are subject of three chapters: One section examines the distance-dependent and orientation-sensitive scattering cross section (SCS) of two equally sized MNPs. Both near- and far-field interactions affect the spectral position and spectral width of the SCS. Far-field coupling affects the SCS even in such a way that a two-particle system may show both a blue- and redshifted SCS, depending only on the distance between the two MNPs. The maximum distance for this effect is the coherence length of the illumination source - a fact of importance for SCS-based experiments using laser sources. Another part of this thesis examines the near-field between two MNPs and the dependence of the locally enhanced field on the relative particle orientation with respect to the polarisation of the excitation light. To attain a figure of merit, the intensity of fluorescence light from dye molecules in the surrounding medium was measured at various directions of polarisation. The field enhancement was turned into fluorescence enhancement, even providing a means for sensing the presence of very small MNPs of 12 nm in diameter. In order to quantify the near-field experimentally, a different technique is devised in a third section of this thesis - scanning particle-enhanced Raman microscopy (SPRM). This device comprises a scanning probe carrying an MNP which in turn is coated with a molecule of known Raman signature. By manoeuvring this outfit MNP into the vicinity of an illuminated second MNP and by measuring the Raman signal intensity, a spatial mapping of the field enhancement was possible. (orig.)

  16. Hierarchical surface rough ordered Au particle arrays and their surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Guotao; Cai, Weiping; Luo, Yuanyuan; Li, Yue; Lei, Yong

    2006-10-01

    A simple, effective, and low-cost method is presented to fabricate an ordered Au particle array with hierarchical surface roughness on an indium tin oxide substrate based on an ordered alumina through-pore template, induced by solution dipping on colloidal monolayer, using an electrochemical deposition strategy. The array consists of periodically arranged and isolated Au microparticles, which show nanoscaled surface roughness. Importantly, this hierarchically rough particle array exhibits strong surface-enhanced Raman scattering effect using rhodamine 6G as probe molecules, associated with its surface geometry. Such structure could be useful, e.g., in sensors, biotechnology, and nanodevices.

  17. Stimulated-emission-depletion microscopy with a multicolor stimulated-Raman-scattering light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rankin, Brian R; Kellner, Robert R; Hell, Stefan W

    2008-11-01

    We describe a subdiffraction-resolution far-field fluorescence microscope employing stimulated emission depletion (STED) with a light source consisting of a microchip laser coupled into a standard single-mode fiber, which, via stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), yields a comb-like spectrum of seven discrete peaks extending from the fundamental wavelength at 532 nm to 620 nm. Each of the spectral peaks can be used as STED light for overcoming the diffraction barrier. This SRS light source enables the simple implementation of multicolor STED and provides a spectral output with multiple available wavelengths from green to red with potential for further expansion.

  18. Raman scattering of a photon with frequency doubling by a channelled positron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalashnikov, N P [National Research Nuclear University ' ' MEPhI' ' (Russian Federation); Krokhin, O N [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-31

    We have analysed the possibility of appearance of anti-Stokes lines in the spectrum of Raman scattering of a photon by a 'quasi-bound' charged particle in the regime of planar (axial) channelling. It is shown that radiation may emerge at the frequency, which is a combination of the incident photon frequency ω{sub 0} and transition frequency ω{sub i} in the transverse quantised motion of a channelled particle: ω = ω{sub 0} ± 2γ{sup 2}ω{sub i}, where γ is the relativistic (Lorentz) factor of a channelled particle. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  19. Intensity dependent waiting time for strong electron trapping events in speckle stimulated raman scatter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, Harvey [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Daughton, W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yin, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The onset of Stimulated Raman scatter from an intense laser speckle is the simplest experimentally realizable laser-plasma-interaction environment. Despite this data and recent 3D particle simulations, the controlling mechanism at the onset of backscatter in the kinetic regime when strong electron trapping in the daughter Langmuir wave is a dominant nonlinearity is not understood. This paper explores the consequences of assuming that onset is controlled by large thermal fluctuations. A super exponential dependence of mean reflectivity on speckle intensity in the onset regime is predicted.

  20. Nonlinear kinetic modeling and simulations of Raman scattering in a two-dimensional geometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bénisti Didier

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present our nonlinear kinetic modeling of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS by the means of envelope equations, whose coefficients have been derived using a mixture of perturbative and adiabatic calculations. First examples of the numerical resolution of these envelope equations in a two-dimensional homogeneous plasma are given, and the results are compared against those of particle-in-cell (PIC simulations. These preliminary comparisons are encouraging since our envelope code provides threshold intensities consistent with those of PIC simulations while requiring computational resources reduced by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude compared to full-kinetic codes.

  1. Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering for Quantification of p-Coumaric Acid Produced by Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morelli, Lidia; Zor, Kinga; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2017-01-01

    The number of newly developed genetic variants of microbial cell factories for production of biochemicals has been rapidly growing in recent years, leading to an increased need for new screening techniques. We developed a method based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) coupled with liquid-liquid...... extraction (LLE) for quantification of p-coumaric acid (pHCA) in the supernatant of genetically engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) cultures. pHCA was measured in a dynamic range from 1 μM up to 50 μM on highly uniform SERS substrates based on leaning gold-capped nanopillars, which showed an in...

  2. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering in femtosecond laser-nanostructured Ag substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dai Ye; He Min; Yan Xiaona; Ma Guohong [Department of Physics, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China); Lu Bo, E-mail: yedai@shu.edu.cn [Instrumental Analysis and Research Center, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200444 (China)

    2011-02-01

    We demonstrate that a surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate could be directly fabricated on the surface of Ag film by femtosecond laser micromachining. According to the morphology observation by SEM, an amount of nanoparticles, nanoprotrusions, and nanospikes were found to form in the ablation region and the density and size distribution of these Ag nanoparticles depended possibly on the incident laser intensity. Additionally, a large area of nanostructured region was produced by fast line scanning, and an enhancement factor of {approx}10{sup 5} was obtained in this region after the sample was soaked in the rhodamine 6G solution for 30 min.

  3. Gold cluster coatings enhancing Raman scattering from surfaces: Ink analysis and document identification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zhixun; Smith, Jordan C.; Goff, Trevor M.; Adair, James H.; Castleman, A. W.

    2013-09-01

    Based on the method of laser-ablation in liquids (LAL) with a strategy of bubbling nitrogen through a custom-made chamber, we prepared chemically-pure gold clusters which were found to be metastable for an extensive period of time beyond months. A practical use of discrimination among different surfaces is demonstrated here by applying the gold clusters as surface coatings which result in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) due to the surface plasmon resonance (SPR). This technique identifies various documents from different printers/copiers and written with different pen-inks. The stable and additive-free gold clusters enable repetitive examinations without impurity interference.

  4. Raman-Scattering Line Profiles of the Symbiotic Star AG Peg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong-Jae; Hyung, Siek

    2017-06-01

    The high dispersion Hα and Hβ line profiles of the Symbiotic star AG Peg consist of top double Gaussian and bottom components. We investigated the formation of the broad wings with Raman scattering mechanism. Adopting the same physical parameters from the photo-ionization study of Kim and Hyung (2008) for the white dwarf and the ionized gas shell, Monte Carlo simulations were carried out for a rotating accretion disk geometry of non-symmetrical latitude angles from -7° structure involving the outflowing gas from the giant star caused an asymmetry of the disk and double Gaussian profiles found in AG Peg.

  5. In situ monitoring of biomolecular processes in living systems using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altunbek, Mine; Kelestemur, Seda; Culha, Mustafa

    2015-12-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) continues to strive to gather molecular level information from dynamic biological systems. It is our ongoing effort to utilize the technique for understanding of the biomolecular processes in living systems such as eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. In this study, the technique is investigated to identify cell death mechanisms in 2D and 3D in vitro cell culture models, which is a very important process in tissue engineering and pharmaceutical applications. Second, in situ biofilm formation monitoring is investigated to understand how microorganisms respond to the environmental stimuli, which inferred information can be used to interfere with biofilm formation and fight against their pathogenic activity.

  6. Nanostructures with the Hilbert curve geometry as surface enhanced Raman scattering substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigorenko, Ilya

    2013-07-01

    In this work, we consider fractal substrates for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering measurements. The shape of the substrates is based on self-similar space filling Hilbert curves, which possess properties of both one dimensional and two dimensional geometries. The dielectric response of a doped semiconductor nanostructure, where conducting electrons are trapped in an effective potential having the geometry of the Hilbert curve is calculated and analysed. It is found that the system may exhibit electronic collective excitations specific for either a two dimensional or one dimensional system, depending on the excitation frequency.

  7. Stimulated Raman forward scattering of a laser in a plasma with transverse magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassoon, Khaleel; Salih, Hyder [School of Applied Sciences, University of Technology, Baghdad (Iraq); Tripathi, V K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)], E-mail: kihassoun@yahoo.com

    2009-12-15

    The effect of a transverse static magnetic field on stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) of a laser in a plasma is studied. The x-mode excites an upper hybrid wave and two localized Stokes/anti-Stokes sidebands. The laser and the sideband exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the upper hybrid wave. The latter couples with the pump to drive the sidebands. The growth rate of SRFS monotonically increases by applying a static magnetic field. It also increases with the pump amplitude; however, the dependence is slower than linear.

  8. Stimulated Raman forward scattering of a laser in a plasma with transverse magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassoon, Khaleel; Salih, Hyder; Tripathi, V. K.

    2009-12-01

    The effect of a transverse static magnetic field on stimulated Raman forward scattering (SRFS) of a laser in a plasma is studied. The x-mode excites an upper hybrid wave and two localized Stokes/anti-Stokes sidebands. The laser and the sideband exert a ponderomotive force on electrons driving the upper hybrid wave. The latter couples with the pump to drive the sidebands. The growth rate of SRFS monotonically increases by applying a static magnetic field. It also increases with the pump amplitude; however, the dependence is slower than linear.

  9. Raman scattering enhanced by plasmonic clusters and its application to single-molecule imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuike, Tomokazu [The Open University of Japan, Wakaba 2-11, Mihama-ku, Chiba 261-8586 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan); Nobusada, Katsuyuki [Institute for Molecular Science and SOKENDAI, Nishigonaka 38, Okazaki, 444-8585 (Japan); ESICB, Kyoto University, Kyoto daigaku-Katsura, Nishikyo-ku, Kyoto 615-8530 (Japan)

    2015-12-31

    The optical response of the linear Au{sub 8} cluster is investigated by the linear response theory based on the density functional theory. It is revealed that the observed many peaks in the visible region originate from the interaction of the ideal plasmonic excitation along the molecular axis with the background d-electron excitations, i.e., the Landau damping. In spite of the existence of the damping, the Raman scattering is shown to be enhanced remarkably by the incident light resonant to the visible excitations. The novel imaging experiment with the atomic resolution is proposed by utilizing a plasmonic cluster as the probing tip.

  10. The relationship between extraordinary optical transmission and surface-enhanced Raman scattering in subwavelength metallic nanohole arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qianhong; Yang, Zhilin; Ren, Bin; Xu, Hongxing; Tian, Zhongqun

    2010-11-01

    Nanohole arrays in an Ag film were used as a substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering in the optical range. Extraordinary optical transmission and local field enhancement in Ag nanohole arrays were theoretically simulated using three-dimensional finite difference time domain method. The periodicity of the holes was adjusted to control the transmission intensity and electric field intensity. The calculation results show that the peak position of transmission red-shifts as the periodicity increases, while the peak intensity decreases linearly. The electric field is localized in a very small region at the edges of the holes, which means the surface-enhanced Raman scattering originates only from a small number of molecules located in the edge regions. The electric field intensity changes with the excitation wavelength in a similar trend to the transmission intensity. Both the electric field intensity and transmission intensity reach their maximum value at the frequency of surface plasmon resonance. The structure that gives resonant transmission provides the maximum surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal. Controllable and predictable surface-enhanced Raman scattering can be produced by using this novel nanostructure. The structure can be optimized to get the maximum surface-enhanced Raman scattering signal at a certain excitation wavelength through numerical simulations.

  11. Polarization dependence of tip-enhanced Raman and plasmon-resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitahama, Yasutaka; Uemura, Shohei; Katayama, Ryota; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Itoh, Tamitake; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2017-06-01

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) spectroscopy has high sensitivity and high spatial resolution, although it shows low reproducibility due to the variable optical properties of the tips. In the present study, polarized scattering spectra of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at the apex of the tip induced by conventional dark field illumination were compared with the corresponding TERS spectra, generated by excitation using polarization not only parallel and perpendicular to the tip, but also vertical to the sample plane (z-polarization). The polarization-dependence of LSPR was consistent with that of the TERS. Thus, the optical properties of the tip can be easily optimized before TERS measurement by excitation polarization that induces the largest LSPR signal.

  12. Anomalously Hot Electrons due to Rescatter of Stimulated Raman Scattering in the Kinetic Regime

    CERN Document Server

    Winjum, B J; Tsung, F S; Mori, W B

    2012-01-01

    Using particle-in-cell simulations, we examine hot electron generation from electron plasma waves excited by stimulated Raman scattering and rescattering in the kinetic regime where the wavenumber times the Debye length (k\\lambda_D) is greater than 0.3 for backscatter. We find that for laser and plasma conditions of possible relevance to experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), anomalously energetic electrons can be produced through the interaction of a discrete spectrum of plasma waves generated from SRS (back and forward scatter), rescatter, and the Langmuir decay of the rescatter-generated plasma waves. Electrons are bootstrapped in energy as they propagate into plasma waves with progressively higher phase velocities.

  13. Quantitative detection of codeine in human plasma using surface-enhanced Raman scattering via adaptation of the isotopic labelling principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subaihi, Abdu; Muhamadali, Howbeer; Mutter, Shaun T; Blanch, Ewan; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2017-03-27

    In this study surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) combined with the isotopic labelling (IL) principle has been used for the quantification of codeine spiked into both water and human plasma. Multivariate statistical approaches were employed for the analysis of these SERS spectral data, particularly partial least squares regression (PLSR) which was used to generate models using the full SERS spectral data for quantification of codeine with, and without, an internal isotopic labelled standard. The PLSR models provided accurate codeine quantification in water and human plasma with high prediction accuracy (Q(2)). In addition, the employment of codeine-d6 as the internal standard further improved the accuracy of the model, by increasing the Q(2) from 0.89 to 0.94 and decreasing the low root-mean-square error of predictions (RMSEP) from 11.36 to 8.44. Using the peak area at 1281 cm(-1) assigned to C-N stretching, C-H wagging and ring breathing, the limit of detection was calculated in both water and human plasma to be 0.7 μM (209.55 ng mL(-1)) and 1.39 μM (416.12 ng mL(-1)), respectively. Due to a lack of definitive codeine vibrational assignments, density functional theory (DFT) calculations have also been used to assign the spectral bands with their corresponding vibrational modes, which were in excellent agreement with our experimental Raman and SERS findings. Thus, we have successfully demonstrated the application of SERS with isotope labelling for the absolute quantification of codeine in human plasma for the first time with a high degree of accuracy and reproducibility. The use of the IL principle which employs an isotopolog (that is to say, a molecule which is only different by the substitution of atoms by isotopes) improves quantification and reproducibility because the competition of the codeine and codeine-d6 for the metal surface used for SERS is equal and this will offset any difference in the number of particles under analysis or any fluctuations in

  14. Rapid detection of polychlorinated biphenyls at trace levels in real environmental samples by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qin; Zhang, Xian; Huang, Yu; Li, Zhengcao; Zhang, Zhengjun

    2011-01-01

    Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10(-6) mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls.

  15. Rational design of Raman-labeled nanoparticles for a dual-modality, light scattering immunoassay on a polystyrene substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsen, Nathan D; Wooley, Donald; Hanson, Cynthia; Vargis, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful light scattering technique that can be used for sensitive immunoassay development and cell labeling. A major obstacle to using SERS is the complexity of fabricating SERS probes since they require nanoscale characterization and optical uniformity. The light scattering response of SERS probes may also be modulated by the substrate used for SERS analysis. A typical SERS substrate such as quartz can be expensive. Polystyrene is a cheaper substrate option but can decrease the SERS response due to interfering Raman emission peaks and high background fluorescence. The goal of this research is to develop an optimized process for fabricating Raman-labeled nanoparticles for a SERS-based immunoassay on a polystyrene substrate. We have developed a method for fabricating SERS nanoparticle probes for use in a light scattering immunoassay on a polystyrene substrate. The light scattering profile of both spherical gold nanoparticle and gold nanorod SERS probes were characterized using Raman spectroscopy and optical absorbance spectroscopy. The effects of substrate interference and autofluorescence were reduced by selecting a Raman reporter with a strong light scattering response in a spectral region where interfering substrate emission peaks are minimized. Both spherical gold nanoparticles and gold nanorods SERS probes used in the immunoassay were detected at labeling concentrations in the low pM range. This analytical sensitivity falls within the typical dynamic range for direct labeling of cell-surface biomarkers using SERS probes. SERS nanoparticle probes were fabricated to produce a strong light scattering signal despite substrate interference. The optical extinction and inelastic light scattering of these probes was detected by optical absorbance spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. This immunoassay demonstrates the feasibility of analyzing strongly enhanced Raman signals on polystyrene, which is an

  16. Rapid qualitative and quantitative determination of food colorants by both Raman spectra and Surface-enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ai, Yu-Jie; Liang, Pei; Wu, Yan-Xiong; Dong, Qian-Min; Li, Jing-Bin; Bai, Yang; Xu, Bi-Jie; Yu, Zhi; Ni, Dejiang

    2018-02-15

    Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) spectroscopy technology is widely used in materials analysis, environmental monitoring, biomedical, food security and other fields. Flower-shaped silver nanoparticles have been successfully synthesized by a simple aqueous phase silver nitrate reduction by ascorbic acid in the presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) surfactant. The nanoparticles diameters were adjusted from 450 to 1000nm with surface protrusions up to 10-25nm. The flower-shaped silver nanostructures obtained were used as stable SERS substrates with high SERS activity for detecting Rhodamine 6G (R6G), at a concentration of only 10(-9)mol/L, where the SERS signal is still clear. SERS spectroscopy of four different food colorants (e.g. food blue, tartrazine, sunset yellow, acid red) were analysed and the characteristic bands were identified. An improved principle component analysis (PCA) was used for four different food colorants detection, at concentrations down to about 10(-8)mol/L. Thus, the LOD of food blue, tartrazine, sunset yellow and acid red are 79.285μg/L, 5.3436μg/L, 45.238μg/L and 50.244μg/L, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Green preparation of gold nanoparticles with Tremella fuciformis for surface enhanced Raman scattering sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Liu, Jun; Fan, Linpeng; Li, Daili; Chen, Xinzhu; Zhou, Ji; Li, Jingliang

    2018-01-01

    A simple in-situ synthesis method was developed to fabricate complex of Tremella fuciformis (TF) and gold nanoparticles (Au NPs). TF, one of the most popular fungi in the cuisine and medicine, acted as a biomass reducing agent and scaffold in the preparation of Au NPs. The intensities of the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of the complex of TF and Au NPs (Au@TFs) increased as the complex shrunk due to drying. The textures of TF prevent the aggregation of Au NPs during the drying process. The TFs show strong adsorption capacity for cationic dyes. It is suggested that the adsorption of the dyes onto TFs are achieved through electrostatic interactions between the TF and the dyes. Kinetics studies indicated that adsorption process could be well described by a pseudo-second-order model. Furthermore, the as-prepared Au@TFs were used as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates for analyzing trace dye molecules. The shrinkage of the TFs caused by drying concentrated dyes on their fruiting bodies, which led to the enhancement of Raman signals of dyes. The Au NPs on TF further enhanced the Raman signals. In-situ synthesis of Au NPs on TF may promote the applications of fungus materials in optical sensing of targets.

  18. Synthesis of gold nanostars with fractal structure: application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jian; Liu, Mei-Jin; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu

    2017-11-01

    Multi-branched gold nanostars with fractal feature were synthesized using the Triton X-100 participant seed-growth method. By increasing the amount of ascorbic acid, the branch length of gold nanostars could be greatly increased. It has been interesting to find that the secondary growth of new branches takes place from the elementary structure when the aspect ratio of the branches is greater than 8.0 and the corresponding plasmon absorption wavelength is greater than 900 nm. Raman activity of the gold nanostar films has been investigated by using the 4-mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) as Raman active probe. Experimental results show that the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) ability of the gold nanostars could be efficiently improved when the fractal structure appears. The physical mechanism has been attributed to the intense increased secondary branch number and the increased "hot spots". These unique multi-branched gold nanostars with fractal feature and great SERS activity should have great potential in sensing applications.

  19. Combined laser ultrasonics, laser heating, and Raman scattering in diamond anvil cell system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinin, Pavel V.; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Burgess, Katherine; Odake, Shoko; Chigarev, Nikolay; Sharma, Shiv K.

    2016-12-01

    We developed a multi-functional in situ measurement system under high pressure equipped with a laser ultrasonics (LU) system, Raman device, and laser heating system (LU-LH) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC). The system consists of four components: (1) a LU-DAC system (probe and pump lasers, photodetector, and oscilloscope) and DAC; (2) a fiber laser, which is designed to allow precise control of the total power in the range from 2 to 100 W by changing the diode current, for heating samples; (3) a spectrometer for measuring the temperature of the sample (using black body radiation), fluorescence spectrum (spectrum of the ruby for pressure measurement), and Raman scattering measurements inside a DAC under high pressure and high temperature (HPHT) conditions; and (4) an optical system to focus laser beams on the sample and image it in the DAC. The system is unique and allows us to do the following: (a) measure the shear and longitudinal velocities of non-transparent materials under HPHT; (b) measure temperature in a DAC under HPHT conditions using Planck's law; (c) measure pressure in a DAC using a Raman signal; and (d) measure acoustical properties of small flat specimens removed from the DAC after HPHT treatment. In this report, we demonstrate that the LU-LH-DAC system allows measurements of velocities of the skimming waves in iron at 2580 K and 22 GPa.

  20. Surfactant size effect on surface-enhanced Raman scattering intensity from silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Doo Ri; Chang, Sung-Jin; Huh, Yun Suk; Han, Young-Kyu; Lee, You-Jin; Yi, Gi-Ra; Kim, Soohyun; Lee, Gaehang

    2013-08-01

    We report on the synthesis of two types of Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and the influence of adsorbed surfactant size on the NP surface for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) signals. Both particles were of similar size and morphology but were covered by surfactants of different sizes; one surfactant was sodium citrate (molecular weight: 258) and the other was sodium polyacrylate (molecular weight: 2100). For SERS measurement, 4-mecapobenzoic acid and 4-naphthalene thiol as Raman-active dyes were immobilized on the surface of each AgNP. The signals from Raman-active dyes on AgNPs covered with citrate displayed 10 times higher intensity than those from polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs. Elemental analysis (EA) revealed that the average weight percentage of sulfur is 0.94 wt% and 0.12 wt% for citrate-stabilized and polyacrylate-stabilized AgNPs, respectively. The sulfur content difference was attributed to the size of the existing surfactant influencing the ligand exchange by steric hindrance and subsequently the amount of sulfur content of the particles. These experimental results suggest that the size of initial surfactant should be taken into account when synthesizing a metal particle for enhancing SERS signal.

  1. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Danting; Zhou, Haibo; Ying, Yibin; Niessner, Reinhard; Haisch, Christoph

    2013-11-01

    Ethyl carbamate, a by-product of fermentation and storage with widespread occurrence in fermented food and alcoholic beverages, is a compound potentially toxic to humans. In this work, a new approach for quantitative detection of ethyl carbamate in alcoholic beverages, based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), is reported. Individual silver-coated gold nanoparticle colloids are used as SERS amplifiers, yielding high Raman enhancement of ethyl carbamate in three kinds of alcoholic beverages (vodka, Obstler, and white rum). The characteristic band at 1,003 cm(-1), which is the strongest and best reproducible peak in the SERS spectra, was used for quantitative evaluation of ethyl carbamate. The limit of detection, which corresponds to a signal-to-noise ratio of 3, was 9.0 × 10(-9) M (0.8 μg · L(-1)), 1.3 × 10(-7) M (11.6 μg · L(-1)), and 7.8 × 10(-8) M (6.9 μg · L(-1)), respectively. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy offers great practical potential for the in situ assessment and identification of ethyl carbamate in the alcoholic beverage industry.

  2. Structural, optical and Raman scattering studies on DC magnetron sputtered titanium dioxide thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karunagaran, B.; Kim, Kyunghae; Mangalaraj, D.; Yi, Junsin [School of Information and Communication Engineering, Sungkyunkwan University, Chunchun-dong, Jangan-gu, Suwon 440-476 (Korea, Republic of); Velumani, S. [Coordinacion de Investigacion y Desarrollo de Ductos, IMP, Eje Central Lazaro Cardenas 152, D.F., C.P.07720 (Mexico)

    2005-07-15

    Thin films of TiO{sub 2} were deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. The thicknesses of the films were measured using alpha step profilometer technique. Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) is used to determine the composition of the films. The influence of post-deposition annealing at 673 and 773K on the structural, optical and Raman scattering was studied. The thicknesses of the films were found to be more or less the same irrespective of the annealing temperature and time. XRD results reveal the amorphous nature of the as-deposited film while the annealed samples were found to be crystalline with a tetragonal symmetry. Using the optical transmittance method, the optical constants such as band gap, refractive index and absorption coefficient were calculated and the influence of thermal annealing on these properties was reported. Raman study was employed to study the existence of different frequency modes and improvement of crystallinity of the TiO{sub 2} films and the effect of annealing temperature on the Raman shift is studied and reported.

  3. A novel cyanide ion sensing approach based on Raman scattering for the detection of environmental cyanides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Gopal Reddy, C V; Zhang, Yan; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes a direct optical approach based on Raman scattering for selective and sensitive detection of cyanide ions in aqueous environment without requiring time-consuming sample pretreatment and the formation of hydrogen cyanide. Due to the strong affinity between copper (I) and cyanide ion, evaporated copper (I) iodide (CuI) thin films are shown to be excellent substrates for selective recognition of free cyanide ions in aqueous matrices. The amount of cyanide ion retained by the copper (I) in the CuI thin films reflects its actual concentration in tested samples, and the subsequent Raman measurements of the substrate are shown to be capable of detecting toxic cyanide content at levels under international drinking water standard and environmental regulatory concentrations. Measurements obtained from the same batch of evaporated CuI thin films (approximately 100-nm thickness) show excellent linearity over a variety of cyanide concentrations ranging from 1.5 microM to 0.15 mM. This detection method offers the advantage of selectively detecting cyanides causing a health hazard while avoiding detection of other common interfering anions such as Cl-, Br-, PO4(3-), SO4(2-), NO2-, S2- and SCN-. Coupled with portable Raman systems that are commercially available, our detection approach will provide on-site monitoring capability with little sample preparation or instrument supervision, which will greatly expedite the assessment of potential environmental cyanide risks. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Manifestation of hydrogen bonds of aqueous ethanol solutions in the Raman scattering spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolenko, T. A.; Burikov, S. A.; Patsaeva, S. V.; Yuzhakov, V. I.

    2011-03-01

    Spectra of Raman scattering of light by aqueous ethanol solutions in the range of concentrations from pure water to 96% alcohol are studied. For water, 25%, and 40% solutions of ethanol in water, as well as for 96% alcohol the Raman spectra are measured at temperatures from the freezing point to nearly the boiling point. The changes in the shape of the stretching OH band are interpreted in terms of strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonds between the molecules in the solution. The strongest hydrogen bonding of hydroxyl groups is observed at the ethanol content from 20 to 25 volume percent, which is explained by formation of ethanol hydrates of a definite type at the mentioned concentrations of alcohol. This is confirmed by means of the method of multivariate curve resolution, used to analyse the Raman spectra of aqueous ethanol solutions. With growing temperature the weakening of hydrogen bonding occurs in all studied systems, which consists in reducing the number of OH groups, linked by strong hydrogen bonds.

  5. Neutron diffraction and micro-Raman scattering studies on rare-earth carbide halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henn, R. W.; Strach, T.; Kremer, R. K.; Simon, A.

    1998-12-01

    Neutron-diffraction experiments on powder samples and micro-Raman scattering investigations on single crystals of the layered compounds R2CxHal2, (R=Y, Gd, x=1,2, and Hal=Br, I) have been performed in order to study their static and dynamic lattice properties. For the superconductors Y2C2I2 (Tc=9.97 K) and Y2C2Br2 (Tc=5.04 K), the C-C atomic distances were obtained with high accuracy from neutron-diffraction experiments between T=1.5 and 270 K. The expected Raman-active phonons were determined from a factor-group analysis of the crystal structures. In the monocarbide Y2CBr2, the Raman-active phonons of the heavy-ion sublattices have been observed. In the dicarbide compounds R2C2Hal2, additionally, the stretching and tilting modes of the dimeric C2 units were clearly identified by analyzing spectra from natC and 13C substituted samples. The influence of the quasimolecular C2 unit on the electronic properties in the R2C2Hal2 compounds and its interaction with the surrounding metal atom octahedra is discussed.

  6. Diagnosis of tumors during tissue-conserving surgery with integrated autofluorescence and Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Kenny; Rowlands, Christopher J.; Varma, Sandeep; Perkins, William; Leach, Iain H.; Koloydenko, Alexey A.; Williams, Hywel C.; Notingher, Ioan

    2013-01-01

    Tissue-conserving surgery is used increasingly in cancer treatment. However, one of the main challenges in this type of surgery is the detection of tumor margins. Histopathology based on tissue sectioning and staining has been the gold standard for cancer diagnosis for more than a century. However, its use during tissue-conserving surgery is limited by time-consuming tissue preparation steps (1–2 h) and the diagnostic variability inherent in subjective image interpretation. Here, we demonstrate an integrated optical technique based on tissue autofluorescence imaging (high sensitivity and high speed but low specificity) and Raman scattering (high sensitivity and high specificity but low speed) that can overcome these limitations. Automated segmentation of autofluorescence images was used to select and prioritize the sampling points for Raman spectroscopy, which then was used to establish the diagnosis based on a spectral classification model (100% sensitivity, 92% specificity per spectrum). This automated sampling strategy allowed objective diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma in skin tissue samples excised during Mohs micrographic surgery faster than frozen section histopathology, and one or two orders of magnitude faster than previous techniques based on infrared or Raman microscopy. We also show that this technique can diagnose the presence or absence of tumors in unsectioned tissue layers, thus eliminating the need for tissue sectioning. This study demonstrates the potential of this technique to provide a rapid and objective intraoperative method to spare healthy tissue and reduce unnecessary surgery by determining whether tumor cells have been removed. PMID:24003124

  7. Temperature dependence of low-frequency polarized Raman scattering spectra in TlInS{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paucar, Raul; Wakita, Kazuki [Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, Chiba (Japan); Shim, YongGu; Mimura, Kojiro [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka Prefecture University, Osaka (Japan); Alekperov, Oktay; Mamedov, Nazim [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Sciences, Baku (Azerbaijan)

    2017-06-15

    In this work, we examined phase transitions in the layered ternary thallium chalcogenide TlInS{sub 2} by studying the temperature dependence of polarized Raman spectra with the aid of the Raman confocal microscope system. The Raman spectra were measured over the temperature range of 77-320 K (which includes the range of successive phase transitions) in the low-frequency region of 35-180 cm{sup -1}. The optical phonons that showed strong temperature dependence were identified as interlayer vibrations related to phase transitions, while the phonons that showed weak temperature dependence were identified as intralayer vibrations. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Enhanced Raman Scattering of Elliptical Laser Beam in a Collisionless Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Arvinder; Walia, Keshav

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents the Enhanced Raman scattering of a elliptical laser beam in a collisionless plasma. The transverse intensity gradient of a pump beam generates a Ponderomotive force, which modifies the background plasma density profile in a direction transverse to pump beam axis. This modification in density effects the incident laser beam, plasma wave and back-scattered beam. Non-linear differential equations for the beam width parameters of pump laser beam, plasma wave and back-scattered beam are set up and solved numerically. The interplay between the self-focusing of the main beam and SRS has been studied in detail. The analysis clearly shows a coupling between the main beam and the plasma wave, therefore an increase in the self-focusing of the pump beam at lower intensities increases the self-focusing of the plasma wave which inturn leads to an increase in the back-reflectivity of the scattered wave. Further, it is also predicted that strong self-focusing of the pump beam at higher plasma density leads to strong self-focusing of the plasma wave and results in an increase in SRS reflectivity.

  9. Self-assembly of silver nanoparticles as high active surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate for rapid and trace analysis of uranyl(VI) ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaofei; Jiang, Jiaolai; Wu, Haoxi; Jia, Jianping; Shao, Lang; Tang, Hao; Ren, Yiming; Chu, Mingfu; Wang, Xiaolin

    2017-06-01

    A facile surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate based on the self-assembly of silver nanoparticles on the modified silicon wafer was obtained, and for the first time, an advanced SERS analysis method basing on this as-prepared substrate was established for high sensitive and rapid detection of uranyl ions. Due to the weakened bond strength of Odbnd Udbnd O resulting from two kinds of adsorption of uranyl species (;strong; and ;weak; adsorption) on the substrate, the ν1 symmetric stretch vibration frequency of Odbnd Udbnd O shifted from 871 cm- 1 (normal Raman) to 720 cm- 1 and 826 cm- 1 (SERS) along with significant Raman enhancement. Effects of the hydrolysis of uranyl ions on SERS were also investigated, and the SERS band at 826 cm- 1 was first used to approximately define the constitution of uranyl species at trace quantity level. Besides, the SERS intensity was proportional to the variable concentrations of uranyl nitrate ranging from 10- 7 to 10- 3 mol L- 1 with an excellent linear relation (R2 = 0.998), and the detection limit was 10- 7 mol L- 1. Furthermore, the related SERS approach involves low-cost substrate fabrication, rapid and trace analysis simultaneously, and shows great potential applications for the field assays of uranyl ions in the nuclear fuel cycle and environmental monitoring.

  10. How Does the Shape of the Stellar Spectrum Affect the Raman Scattering Features in the Albedo of Exoplanets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Hirata, Christopher M.; Heng, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    The diagnostic potential of the spectral signatures of Raman scattering, imprinted in planetary albedo spectra at short optical wavelengths, has been demonstrated in research on planets in the solar system, and has recently been proposed as a probe of exoplanet atmospheres, complementary to albedo studies at longer wavelengths. Spectral features caused by Raman scattering offer insight into the properties of planetary atmospheres, such as the atmospheric depth, composition, and temperature, as well as the possibility of detecting and spectroscopically identifying spectrally inactive species, such as H2 and N2, in the visible wavelength range. Raman albedo features, however, depend on both the properties of the atmosphere and the shape of the incident stellar spectrum. Identical planetary atmospheres can produce very different albedo spectra depending on the spectral properties of the host star. Here we present a set of geometric albedo spectra calculated for atmospheres with H2/He, N2, and CO2 composition, irradiated by different stellar types ranging from late A to late K stars. Prominent albedo features caused by Raman scattering appear at different wavelengths for different types of host stars. We investigate how absorption due to the alkali elements sodium and potassium may affect the intensity of Raman features, and we discuss the preferred strategies for detecting Raman features in future observations.

  11. Vibrational properties of epitaxial Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films as studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hao; Pan, Wenwu; Chen, Qimiao; Wu, Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, No.19A Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Song, Yuxin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se; Gong, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Lu, Pengfei [State Key Laboratory of Information Photonics and Optical Communications, Ministry of Education, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, P.O. Box 72, Beijing 100876 (China); Wang, Shumin, E-mail: songyuxin@mail.sim.ac.cn, E-mail: shumin@chalmers.se [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 865 Changning Road, Shanghai 200050 (China); Department of Microtechnology and Nanoscience, Chalmers University of Technology, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3}, as one of the phases of the binary Bi–Te system, shares many similarities with Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, which is known as a topological insulator and thermoelectric material. We report the micro-Raman spectroscopy study of 50 nm Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films on Si substrates prepared by molecular beam epitaxy. Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films completely resolve the six predicted Raman-active phonon modes for the first time. Structural features and Raman tensors of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films are introduced. According to the wavenumbers and assignments of the six eigenpeaks in the Raman spectra of Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films, it is found that the Raman-active phonon oscillations in Bi{sub 4}Te{sub 3} films exhibit the vibrational properties of those in both Bi and Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} films.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of dipolar molecules by the graphene Fermi surface modulation with different dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjia; Leng, Yandan; Huang, Jing; Yu, JiaoJiao; Lan, Zhenggang; Huang, Changshui

    2017-12-01

    We report the modulation of Raman scattering spectrum of chromophore/graphene hybrids by tunning the molecular polarization with different terminal groups (methyl, methoxy, nitrile, and two nitros). Based on the density functional theory, the specific dipole moment values of the chromophore molecules are calculated. An obvious surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was observed and the scattering intensity of molecule increases with enlarged dipole moment. According to the analysis of G band Raman shifts of graphene, the enhancement of the Raman signal can be attributed to strong electronic coupling between graphene and chromophore, which is closely related with the modulation of graphene Fermi surface by changing the dipole moment of the molecule. Besides, the optimization of the ground state geometry and the binding energy of the hybrids were also calculated with the Density Functional Based Tight Bonding (DFTB) method, which confirms that the enhanced Raman scattering of molecules on graphene arises from the improved energy level matching between graphene Fermi surface and molecular band, further providing a new way to design novel SERS devices.

  13. Chemical Stability of Graphene Coated Silver Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Seiya; Yoshimura, Masamichi

    2017-11-01

    Surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is a novel method to sense molecular and lattice vibrations at a high sensitivity. Although nanostructured silver surface provides intense SERS signals, the silver surface is unstable under acidic environment and heated environment. Graphene, a single atomic carbon layer, has a prominent stability for chemical agents, and its honeycomb lattice completely prevents the penetration of small molecules. Here, we fabricated a SERS substrate by combining nanostructured silver surface and single-crystal monolayer graphene (G-SERS), and focused on its chemical stability. The G-SERS substrate showed SERS even in concentrated hydrochloric acid (35-37%) and heated air up to 400 °C, which is hardly obtainable by normal silver SERS substrates. The chemically stable G-SERS substrate posesses a practical and feasible application, and its high chemical stability provides a new type of SERS technique such as molecular detections at high temperatures or in extreme acidic conditions.

  14. Raman spectra of vibrational and librational modes in methane clathrate hydrates using density functional theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, K. R.; Pavan Kumar, G. V.; Venkatnathan, Arun

    2012-05-01

    The sI type methane clathrate hydrate lattice is formed during the process of nucleation where methane gas molecules are encapsulated in the form of dodecahedron (512CH4) and tetrakaidecahedron (51262CH4) water cages. The characterization of change in the vibrational modes which occur on the encapsulation of CH4 in these cages plays a key role in understanding the formation of these cages and subsequent growth to form the hydrate lattice. In this present work, we have chosen the density functional theory (DFT) using the dispersion corrected B97-D functional to characterize the Raman frequency vibrational modes of CH4 and surrounding water molecules in these cages. The symmetric and asymmetric C-H stretch in the 512CH4 cage is found to shift to higher frequency due to dispersion interaction of the encapsulated CH4 molecule with the water molecules of the cages. However, the symmetric and asymmetric O-H stretch of water molecules in 512CH4 and 51262CH4 cages are shifted towards lower frequency due to hydrogen bonding, and interactions with the encapsulated CH4 molecules. The CH4 bending modes in the 512CH4 and 51262CH4 cages are blueshifted, though the magnitude of the shifts is lower compared to modes in the high frequency region which suggests bending modes are less affected on encapsulation of CH4. The low frequency librational modes which are collective motion of the water molecules and CH4 in these cages show a broad range of frequencies which suggests that these modes largely contribute to the formation of the hydrate lattice.

  15. Experimental Raman and IR spectral and theoretical studies of vibrational spectrum and molecular structure of Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Mayuri; Singh, N. P.; Yadav, R. A.

    2014-08-01

    Vibrational spectrum of Pantothenic acid has been investigated using experimental IR and Raman spectroscopies and density functional theory methods available with the Gaussian 09 software. Vibrational assignments of the observed IR and Raman bands have been proposed in light of the results obtained from computations. In order to assign the observed IR and Raman frequencies the potential energy distributions (PEDs) have also been computed using GAR2PED software. Optimized geometrical parameters suggest that the overall symmetry of the molecule is C1. The molecule is found to possess eight conformations. Conformational analysis was carried out to obtain the most stable configuration of the molecule. In the present paper the vibrational features of the lowest energy conformer C-I have been studied. The two methyl groups have slightly distorted symmetries from C3V. The acidic Osbnd H bond is found to be the smallest one. To investigate molecular stability and bond strength we have used natural bond orbital analysis (NBO). Charge transfer occurs in the molecule have been shown by the calculated highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (HOMO-LUMO) energies. The mapping of electron density iso-surface with electrostatic potential (ESP), has been carried out to get the information about the size, shape, charge density distribution and site of chemical reactivity of the molecule.

  16. In planta imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid in Cannabis sativa L. with hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbacik, Erik T.; Korai, Roza P.; Frater, Eric H.; Korterik, Jeroen P.; Otto, Cees; Offerhaus, Herman L.

    2013-04-01

    Nature has developed many pathways to produce medicinal products of extraordinary potency and specificity with significantly higher efficiencies than current synthetic methods can achieve. Identification of these mechanisms and their precise locations within plants could substantially increase the yield of a number of natural pharmaceutics. We report label-free imaging of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinolic acid (THCa) in Cannabis sativa L. using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. In line with previous observations we find high concentrations of THCa in pistillate flowering bodies and relatively low amounts within flowering bracts. Surprisingly, we find differences in the local morphologies of the THCa-containing bodies: organelles within bracts are large, diffuse, and spheroidal, whereas in pistillate flowers they are generally compact, dense, and have heterogeneous structures. We have also identified two distinct vibrational signatures associated with THCa, both in pure crystalline form and within Cannabis plants; at present the exact natures of these spectra remain an open question.

  17. Directly probing redox-linked quinones in photosystem II membrane fragments via UV resonance Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Yao, Mingdong; Pagba, Cynthia V; Zheng, Yang; Fei, Liping; Feng, Zhaochi; Barry, Bridgette A

    2015-01-01

    In photosynthesis, photosystem II (PSII) harvests sunlight with bound pigments to oxidize water and reduce quinone to quinol, which serves as electron and proton mediators for solar-to-chemical energy conversion. At least two types of quinone cofactors in PSII are redox-linked: QA, and QB. Here, we for the first time apply 257-nm ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) spectroscopy to acquire the molecular vibrations of plastoquinone (PQ) in PSII membranes. Owing to the resonance enhancement effect, the vibrational signal of PQ in PSII membranes is prominent. A strong band at 1661 cm(-1) is assigned to ring CC/CO symmetric stretch mode (ν8a mode) of PQ, and a weak band at 469 cm(-1) to ring stretch mode. By using a pump-probe difference UVRR method and a sample jet technique, the signals of QA and QB can be distinguished. A frequency difference of 1.4 cm(-1) in ν8a vibrational mode between QA and QB is observed, corresponding to ~86 mV redox potential difference imposed by their protein environment. In addition, there are other PQs in the PSII membranes. A negligible anharmonicity effect on their combination band at 2130 cm(-1) suggests that the 'other PQs' are situated in a hydrophobic environment. The detection of the 'other PQs' might be consistent with the view that another functional PQ cofactor (not QA or QB) exists in PSII. This UVRR approach will be useful to the study of quinone molecules in photosynthesis or other biological systems. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of Multiple Water-Iodide Species in Concentrated NaI Solutions Based on the Raman Bending Vibration of Water

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Besemer, M.; Bloemenkamp, R.; Ariese, F.; van Manen, H.J.

    2016-01-01

    The influence of aqueous electrolytes on the water bending vibration was studied with Raman spectroscopy. For all salts investigated (NaI, NaBr, NaCl, and NaSCN), we observed a nonlinear intensity increase of the water bending vibration with increasing concentration. Different lasers and a tunable

  19. A study of the eigenvectors of the low-frequency vibrational modes in crystalline adenosine via high pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2014-12-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline adenosine at 295 K by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency with respect to pressure: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials such as adenosine will have vibrational modes that are localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) as well as modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes). The value of the logarithmic derivative is found to be a diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes. Stretching modes which are predominantly internal to the molecule have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. Particular interest is paid to the low-frequency (≤150 cm(-1)) modes. Based on the pressure dependence of its logarithmic derivative, a mode near 49 cm(-1) is identified as internal mode. The other modes below 400 cm(-1) have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being either (1) modes which are mainly external, meaning that the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in translational or librational motions (or linear combinations thereof), or (2) torsional or bending modes involving a large number of atoms, mainly within a molecule. The modes above 400 cm(-1) all have pressure dependences of their logarithmic derivatives consistent with being mainly internal modes.

  20. A study of the eigenvectors of the vibrational modes in crystalline cytidine via high-pressure Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Scott A; Pinnick, David A; Anderson, A

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been used to study the eigenvectors and eigenvalues of the vibrational modes of crystalline cytidine at 295 K and high pressures by evaluating the logarithmic derivative of the vibrational frequency ω with respect to pressure P: [Formula: see text]. Crystalline samples of molecular materials have strong intramolecular bonds and weak intermolecular bonds. This hierarchy of bonding strengths causes the vibrational optical modes localized within a molecular unit ("internal" modes) to be relatively high in frequency while the modes in which the molecular units vibrate against each other ("external" modes) have relatively low frequencies. The value of the logarithmic derivative is a useful diagnostic probe of the nature of the eigenvector of the vibrational modes because stretching modes (which are predominantly internal to the molecule) have low logarithmic derivatives while external modes have higher logarithmic derivatives. In crystalline cytidine, the modes at 85.8, 101.4, and 110.6 cm(-1) are external in which the molecules of the unit cell vibrate against each other in either translational or librational motions (or some linear combination thereof). All of the modes above 320 cm(-1) are predominantly internal stretching modes. The remaining modes below 320 cm(-1) include external modes and internal modes, mostly involving either torsional or bending motions of groups of atoms within a molecule.

  1. Prof. C. V. Raman | History | About IASc | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sc. Work in Vibrations and Musical Instruments, Geometrical and Wave Optics, Light and X-ray Scattering, Physics of Crystals, Colour. Best known for the Phenomenon of inelastic light scattering named the 'Raman effect' after him. Large body of experimental work was concerned with waves - wave motions of vibrating ...

  2. Development of a miRNA surface-enhanced Raman scattering assay using benchtop and handheld Raman systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechinger, Monika; Marks, Haley; Locke, Andrea; Choudhury, Mahua; Cote, Gerard

    2018-01-01

    DNA-functionalized nanoparticles, when paired with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), can rapidly detect microRNA. However, widespread use of this approach is hindered by drawbacks associated with large and expensive benchtop Raman microscopes. MicroRNA-17 (miRNA-17) has emerged as a potential epigenetic indicator of preeclampsia, a condition that occurs during pregnancy. Biomarker detection using an SERS point-of-care device could enable prompt diagnosis and prevention as early as the first trimester. Recently, strides have been made in developing portable Raman systems for field applications. An SERS assay for miRNA-17 was assessed and translated from traditional benchtop Raman microscopes to a handheld system. Three different photoactive molecules were compared as potential Raman reporter molecules: a chromophore, malachite green isothiocyanate (MGITC), a fluorophore, tetramethylrhodamine isothiocyanate, and a polarizable small molecule 5,5-dithio-bis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB). For the benchtop Raman microscope, the DTNB-labeled assay yielded the greatest sensitivity under 532-nm laser excitation, but the MGITC-labeled assay prevailed at 785 nm. Conversely, DTNB was preferable for the miniaturized 785-nm Raman system. This comparison showed significant SERS enhancement variation in response to 1-nM miRNA-17, implying that the sensitivity of the assay may be more heavily dependent on the excitation wavelength, instrumentation, and Raman reporter chosen than on the plasmonic coupling from DNA/miRNA-mediated nanoparticle assemblies.

  3. Magnons and magnetodielectric effects in CoCr2O4 : Raman scattering studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, A.; Byrum, T.; McAuliffe, R. D.; Gleason, S. L.; Slimak, J. E.; Shoemaker, D. P.; Cooper, S. L.

    2017-05-01

    Magnetoelectric materials have generated wide technological and scientific interest because of the rich phenomena these materials exhibit, including the coexistence of magnetic and ferroelectric orders, magnetodielectric behavior, and exotic hybrid excitations such as electromagnons. The multiferroic spinel material CoCr2O4 is a particularly interesting example of a multiferroic material, because evidence for magnetoelectric behavior in the ferrimagnetic phase seems to conflict with traditional noncollinear-spin-driven mechanisms for inducing a macroscopic polarization. With the overall goal of clarifying the magnetodielectric behavior previously reported below TC in CoCr2O4 , in this paper we report an inelastic light scattering study of the magnon and phonon spectrum of CoCr2O4 as simultaneous functions of temperature, pressure, and magnetic field. Below the Curie temperature (TC=94 K ) of CoCr2O4 we observe a ω ˜16 cm-1 q =0 magnon having T1g-symmetry, which has the transformation properties of an axial vector. The anomalously large Raman intensity of the T1g-symmetry magnon is characteristic of materials with a large magneto-optical response and likely arises from large magnetic fluctuations that strongly modulate the dielectric response in CoCr2O4 . The Raman susceptibility of the T1g-symmetry magnon exhibits a strong magnetic-field dependence that is consistent with the magnetodielectric response observed in CoCr2O4 , suggesting that magnetodielectric behavior in CoCr2O4 primarily arises from the field-dependent suppression of magnetic fluctuations that are strongly coupled to long-wavelength phonons. Increasing the magnetic anisotropy in CoCr2O4 with applied pressure decreases the magnetic-field dependence of the T1g-symmetry magnon Raman susceptibility, suggesting that strain can be used to control the magnetodielectric response in CoCr2O4 .

  4. Nanoparticle-Functionalized Porous Polymer Monolith Detection Elements for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jikun; White, Ian; DeVoe, Don L.

    2011-01-01

    The use of porous polymer monoliths functionalized with silver nanoparticles is introduced in this work for high-sensitivity surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. Preparation of the SERS detection elements is a simple process comprising the synthesis of a discrete polymer monolith section within a silica capillary, followed by physically trapping silver nanoparticle aggregates within the monolith matrix. A SERS detection limit of 220 fmol for Rhodamine 6G (R6G) is demonstrated, with excellent signal stability over a 24 h period. The capability of the SERS-active monolith for label-free detection of biomolecules was demonstrated by measurements of bradykinin and cyctochrome c. The SERS-active monoliths can be readily integrated into miniaturized micro-total-analysis systems for on-line and label-free detection for a variety of biosensing, bioanalytical, and biomedical applications. PMID:21322579

  5. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering on gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-08-01

    We demonstrate that surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) enhancement could be tuned by adjusting the width of a connection bar at the bottom of a gold nanorod pair. Arrays of gold nanorod pairs with interconnection bars of different widths at the bottom of the interspace were fabricated by electron-beam lithography and used for the SERS study. Rhodamine 6G (R6G) was used as the probe molecule for the SERS. In addition to the large SERS enhancement observed in the nanostructured substrates, the SERS enhancement increases as the width of the connection bar increases. This result provides an important method for tuning SERS enhancement. Numerical simulations of electromagnetic properties on the nanostructures were performed with CST Microwave Studio, and the results correspond well with the experimental observations. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Electron-beam lithography of gold nanostructures for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-26

    The fabrication of nanostructured substrates with precisely controlled geometries and arrangements plays an important role in studies of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Here, we present two processes based on electron-beam lithography to fabricate gold nanostructures for SERS. One process involves making use of metal lift-off and the other involves the use of the plasma etching. These two processes allow the successful fabrication of gold nanostructures with various kinds of geometrical shapes and different periodic arrangements. 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) and Rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules are used to probe SERS signals on the nanostructures. The SERS investigations on the nanostructured substrates demonstrate that the gold nanostructured substrates have resulted in large SERS enhancement, which is highly dependent on the geometrical shapes and arrangements of the gold nanostructures. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  7. Polarization Dependence of Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering on a Single Dielectric Nanowire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Qi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Our measurements of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS on Ga2O3 dielectric nanowires (NWs core/silver composites indicate that the SERS enhancement is highly dependent on the polarization direction of the incident laser light. The polarization dependence of the SERS signal with respect to the direction of a single NW was studied by changing the incident light angle. Further investigations demonstrate that the SERS intensity is not only dependent on the direction and wavelength of the incident light, but also on the species of the SERS active molecule. The largest signals were observed on an NW when the incident 514.5 nm light was polarized perpendicular to the length of the NW, while the opposite phenomenon was observed at the wavelength of 785 nm. Our theoretical simulations of the polarization dependence at 514.5 nm and 785 nm are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman scattering, antibacterial and antifungal active triangular gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitha, S. L.; Gopchandran, K. G.

    2013-02-01

    Shape controlled syntheses of gold nanoparticles have attracted a great deal of attention as their optical, electronic, magnetic and biological properties are strongly dependent on the size and shape of the particles. Here is a report on the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum leaf broth reduced gold nanoparticles consisting of triangular and spherical like particles, using 2-aminothiophenol (2-ATP) and crystal violet (CV) as probe molecules. Nanoparticles prepared with a minimum leaf broth concentration, having a greater number of triangular like particles exhibit a SERS activity of the order of 107. The synthesized nanoparticles exhibit efficient antibacterial activity against the tested gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli and gram positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. Investigations on the antifungal activity of the synthesized nanoparticles against Aspergillus niger and Fusarium oxysporum positive is also discussed.

  9. Quantitative Determination of Total Amino Acids Based on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Ninhydrin Derivatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Huimin; Chen, Lei; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhang, Xiaolei; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Bing

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we propose a simple and sensitive method for the determination of total amino acids without any separation steps. The procedure described here is based on the ninhydrin derivatization reaction with amino acids, followed by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurements of the producing mixtures. A good linear correlation of excess ninhydrin SERS signals and the log values of the total amino acids concentrations is obtained; the detection limit of the method is 4.3 × 10-9 mol L-1. The derivatization reaction is reliable and the whole experimental procedure is very simple. The sensitivity of the proposed protocol allows quantitative analysis of total amino acids at picomole levels without any separation procedures. On the basis of the conventional ninhydrin reaction, we put forward a simple SERS method for determining the total amino acids concentrations with high sensitivity, which is a promising way for routine detection.

  10. Oxide Nanolayers in Stratified Samples Studied by X-Ray Resonant Raman Scattering at Grazing Incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan José Leani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray resonant Raman scattering is applied at grazing incidence conditions with the aim of discriminating and identifying chemical environment of iron in different layers of stratified materials using a low resolution energy dispersive system. The methodology allows for depth studies with nanometric resolution. Nanostratified samples of Fe oxides were studied at the Brazilian synchrotron facility (LNLS using monochromatic radiation and an EDS setup. The measurements were carried out in grazing incident regime with incident photon energy lower than and close to the Fe-K absorption edge. The result allowed for characterizing oxide nanolayers, not observable with conventional geometries, identifying the oxidation state present in a particular depth of a sample surface with nanometric, or even subnanometric, resolution using a low-resolution system.

  11. Rational design of a bisphenol A aptamer selective surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanoprobe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Haley L; Pishko, Michael V; Jackson, George W; Coté, Gerard L

    2014-12-02

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) optical nanoprobes offer a number of advantages for ultrasensitive analyte detection. These functionalized colloidal nanoparticles are a multifunctional assay component. providing a platform for conjugation to spectral tags, stabilizing polymers, and biorecognition elements such as aptamers or antibodies. We demonstrate the design and characterization of a SERS-active nanoprobe and investigate the nanoparticles' biorecognition capabilities for use in a competitive binding assay. Specifically, the nanoprobe is designed for the quantification of bisphenol A (BPA) levels in the blood after human exposure to the toxin in food and beverage plastic packaging. The nanoprobes demonstrated specific affinity to a BPA aptamer with a dissociation constant Kd of 54 nM, and provided a dose-dependent SERS spectra with a limit of detection of 3 nM. Our conjugation approach shows the versatility of colloidal nanoparticles in assay development, acting as detectable spectral tagging elements and biologically active ligands concurrently.

  12. Observation of magnons in Mn2Au films by inelastic Brillouin and Raman light scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arana, M.; Estrada, F.; Maior, D. S.; Mendes, J. B. S.; Fernandez-Outon, L. E.; Macedo, W. A. A.; Barthem, V. M. T. S.; Givord, D.; Azevedo, A.; Rezende, S. M.

    2017-11-01

    The intermetallic antiferromagnetic compound Mn2Au has been attracting considerable interest for antiferromagnetic spintronics due to its high Néel temperature and strong spin-orbit coupling. We report on the experimental investigation of the zero-wave number magnon frequencies in Mn2Au films using Brillouin and Raman inelastic light scattering techniques. The derived effective anisotropy field values are in close agreement with theoretical calculations. With the values of the anisotropy and exchange fields, the full magnon dispersion curves in Mn2Au were calculated. Due to the weak in-plane anisotropy, the k ˜ 0 frequency of the lower magnon branch, 121 GHz, is among the lowest for 3D antiferromagnets, suggesting that Mn2Au is a good candidate for realizing the generation of spin currents by antiferromagnetic resonance driven spin-pumping, as proposed theoretically.

  13. Quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Kideog; Zheng, Wei; Huang, Zhiwei

    2017-08-01

    We report the quantitative assessment of spinal cord injury using the circularly polarized coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CP-CARS) technique together with Stokes parameters in the Poincaré sphere. The pump and Stokes excitation beams are circularly polarized to suppress both the linear polarization-dependent artifacts and the nonresonant background of tissue CARS imaging, enabling quantitative CP-CARS image analysis. This study shows that CP-CARS imaging uncovers significantly increased phase retardance of injured spinal cord tissue as compared to normal tissue, suggesting that CP-CARS is an appealing label-free imaging tool for determining the degree of tissue phase retardance, which could serve as a unique diagnostic parameter associated with nervous tissue injury.

  14. Hollow-Core Photonic Crystal Fibers for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Photonic crystal fiber (PCF sensors based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS have become increasingly attractive in chemical and biological detections due to the molecular specificity, high sensitivity, and flexibility. In this paper, we review the development of PCF SERS sensors with emphasis on our recent work on SERS sensors utilizing hollow-core photonic crystal fibers (HCPCFs. Specifically, we discuss and compare various HCPCF SERS sensors, including the liquid-filled HCPCF and liquid-core photonic crystal fibers (LCPCFs. We experimentally demonstrate and theoretically analyze the high sensitivity of the HCPCF SERS sensors. Various molecules including Rhodamine B, Rhodamine 6G, human insulin, and tryptophan have been tested to show the excellent performance of these fiber sensors.

  15. A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lioe, DeXing; Mars, Kamel; Takasawa, Taishi; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kawahito, Shoji

    2016-03-01

    A CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectroscopy is presented in this paper. The effective SRS signal from the stimulated emission of SRS mechanism is very small in contrast to the offset of a probing laser source, which is in the ratio of 10-4 to 10-5. In order to extract this signal, the common offset component is removed, and the small difference component is sampled using switched-capacitor integrator with a fully differential amplifier. The sampling is performed over many integration cycles to achieve appropriate amplification. The lock-in pixels utilizes high-speed lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) to demodulate the SRS signal which is modulated at high-frequency of 20MHz. A prototype chip is implemented using 0.11μm CMOS image sensor technology.

  16. Improved surface-enhanced Raman scattering on arrays of gold quasi-3D nanoholes

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2012-10-04

    Arrays of gold quasi-3D nanoholes were proposed and fabricated as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). By detecting rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, the gold quasi-3D nanoholes demonstrated an SERS intensity that was 25-62 times higher than that of two-dimensional nanoholes with the same geometrical shapes and periodicities. The larger SERS enhancement of the quasi-3D nanoholes is attributed to the enhanced electromagnetic field on the top-layer nanohole, the bottom nanodiscs and the field coupling between the two layers. In addition, the investigation of the shape dependence of the SERS on the quasi-3D nanoholes demonstrated that the quadratic, circular, triangular and rhombic holes exhibited different SERS properties. Numerical simulations of the electromagnetic properties on the nanostructures were performed with CST Microwave Studio, and the results agree with the experimental observations. © 2012 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  17. Design and Analysis of Stimulated Raman Scattering-Aware Algorithm in RWA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Wai S.; Tan, Saw C.; Yusoff, Zulfadzli

    2017-05-01

    A stimulated Raman scattering (SRS)-aware routing and wavelength assignment (RWA) scheme, called assign minimum interference and shortest algorithm, is proposed to minimize the effect of SRS in network. The design parameter, the number of interference of routes in the proposed algorithm is investigated to analyze its capabilities of influence the network performance. The various setting of the parameter is tested in 15-nodes Mesh and 14-nodes National Science Foundation networks for analysis in order to provide useful guidelines for designing effective SRS-aware RWA scheme. The ultimate objective is to define the necessary and sufficient rules that must be followed in the proposed algorithm by identifying the necessary RWA parameters in order to minimize the effect of SRS in optical networks. The result shows that the smaller the number of interference of routes, the lower the blocking probability in the mentioned topologies.

  18. Silicon nanowire arrays coated with electroless Ag for increased surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bai

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The ordered Ag nanorod (AgNR arrays are fabricated through a simple electroless deposition technique using the isolated Si nanowire (SiNW arrays as the Ag-grown scaffold. The AgNR arrays have the single-crystallized structure and the plasmonic crystal feature. It is found that the formation of the AgNR arrays is strongly dependent on the filling ratio of SiNWs. A mechanism is proposed based on the selective nucleation and the synergistic growth of Ag nanoparticles on the top of the SiNWs. Moreover, the special AgNR arrays grown on the substrate of SiNWs exhibit a detection sensitivity of 10−15M for rhodamine 6G molecules, which have the potential application to the highly sensitive surface-enhanced Raman scattering sensors.

  19. Density measurement in a laser-plasma-accelerator capillary using Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Weineisen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Laser wakefield accelerators have shown 1 GeV electron beams with some 10 pC charge from centimeter-length gas capillaries. The electrons are accelerated by the field of a plasma wave trailing an intense laser pulse. For improving the stability, electron injection and acceleration should be separated. One possible scheme is self-injection with a plasma density gradient and subsequent acceleration at constant density. This can be realized by embedding a high-density gas jet into a capillary. A critical parameter for this scheme to work is the realization of a specific density gradient, therefore a robust measurement is desirable. A new method utilizing the density dependence of Raman scattering has been used to characterize the high-density region of a neutral gas within a capillary with a few ten micrometer longitudinal resolution. This allowed us to measure a density drop of a factor of 4 within 200 micrometers.

  20. Visualizing Electric Fields at Au(111) Step Edges via Tip-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-10-05

    Tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS) can be used to image plasmon-enhanced local electric fields on the nanoscale. This is illustrated through ambient TERS measurements recorded using silver atomic force microscope tips coated with 4-mercaptobenzonitrile molecules and used to image step edges on an Au(111) surface. The observed 2D TERS images uniquely map electric fields localized at Au(111) step edges following 671-nm excitation. We establish that our measurements are not only sensitive to spatial variations in the enhanced electric fields but also to their vector components. We also experimentally demonstrate that (i) few nanometer precision is attainable in TERS nanoscopy using corrugated tips with nominally radii on the order of 100-200 nm, and (ii) TERS signals do not necessarily exhibit the expected E4 dependence. Overall, we illustrate the concept of electric field imaging via TERS and establish the connections between our observations and conventional TERS chemical imaging measurements.

  1. Darkfield microspectroscopy of nanostructures on silver tip-enhanced Raman scattering probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Tamitake, E-mail: tamitake-itou@aist.go.jp [Nano-Bioanalysis Team, Health Technology Research Center, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0395 (Japan); Yamamoto, Yuko S., E-mail: yamayulab@gmail.com [Research Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-8472 (Japan); Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kagawa University, Takamatsu, Kagawa 761-0396 (Japan); Suzuki, Toshiaki [UNISOKU Co. Ltd., 2-4-3 Kasugano, Hirakata, Osaka 573-0131 (Japan); Kitahama, Yasutaka; Ozaki, Yukihiro [Department of Chemistry, School of Science and Technology, Kwansei Gakuin University, Sanda, Hyogo 669-1337 (Japan)

    2016-01-11

    We report an evaluation method employing darkfield microspectroscopy for silver probes used in tip-enhanced Raman scattering (TERS). By adjusting the darkfield illumination, the diffracted light from the probe outlines disappears and the diffracted light from the surface nanostructures and tips of the probes appears as colorful spots. Scanning electron microscopy reveals that the spectral variations in these spots reflect the shapes of the surface nanostructures. The tip curvatures correlate to the spectral maxima of their spots. Temporal color changes in the spots indicate the deterioration due to the oxidation of the silver surfaces. These results show that the proposed method is useful for in situ evaluation of plasmonic properties of TERS probes.

  2. Raman scattering in transition metal compounds: Titanium and compounds of titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimenez, J.; Ederer, D.L.; Shu, T. [Tulane Univ., New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    The transition metal compounds form a very interesting and important set of materials. The diversity arises from the many states of ionization the transition elements may take when forming compounds. This variety provides ample opportunity for a large class of materials to have a vast range of electronic and magnetic properties. The x-ray spectroscopy of the transition elements is especially interesting because they have unfilled d bands that are at the bottom of the conduction band with atomic like structure. This group embarked on the systematic study of transition metal sulfides and oxides. As an example of the type of spectra observed in some of these compounds they have chosen to showcase the L{sub II, III} emission and Raman scattering in some titanium compounds obtained by photon excitation.

  3. Fabrication of rice-like gold nanoparticles and application in surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Ma, Zhanfang; Li, Kai

    2011-04-01

    A simple method for the synthesis of rice-like gold nanoparticles using gold nanorods (GNRs) as precursors in the aqueous phase was exploited. The method used in this work involves eroding GNRs with potassium ferricyanide in the aqueous phase. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) bands of the resulting nanoparticles present a notable blue-shift from 670 to 570 nm with increasing amounts of potassium ferricyanide, and subsequently the shape of the resulting nanoparticles can be readily controlled. Most importantly, the SPR response is an almost linear function of the quantity of potassium ferricyanide added. The synthesis of the resulting nanoparticles with various aspect ratios has been extensively studied and is well established. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity enhancement of the adsorbate on the surface of these gold nanoparticles was also studied.

  4. TECHNIQUE OF ESTIMATE OF ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT LASER RADIATION IN BORON DOPED DIAMONDS BY INTENSITY OF RAMAN SCATTERING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. N. Poklonskaya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Results of measurements of Raman scattering at the room temperature in air in boron doped synthetic diamonds (five with boron concentrations 2·1017; 6·1017; 2·1018; 1,7·1019; 1·1020 cm–3 and one intentionally undoped are presented. The laser with wavelength 532 nm was used for Raman scattering excitation. Dependences of integral intensity and halfwidth of diamond Raman line with respect to the doping level are presented. In the geometrical optics approximation an expression for doped to undoped integral intensity ratio is obtained. Qualitative estimates of conductivity of the studied samples are conducted. The obtained results can be applied for mapping of near-surface laser radiation absorption coefficient of synthetic single crystal diamonds and for their quality control.

  5. Detection of amino acid neurotransmitters by surface enhanced Raman scattering and hollow core photonic crystal fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Vidhu S.; Khetani, Altaf; Monfared, Ali Momenpour T.; Smith, Brett; Anis, Hanan; Trudeau, Vance L.

    2012-03-01

    The present work explores the feasibility of using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detecting the neurotransmitters such as glutamate (GLU) and gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA). These amino acid neurotransmitters that respectively mediate fast excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain, are important for neuroendocrine control, and upsets in their synthesis are also linked to epilepsy. Our SERS-based detection scheme enabled the detection of low amounts of GLU (10-7 M) and GABA (10-4 M). It may complement existing techniques for characterizing such kinds of neurotransmitters that include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) or mass spectrography (MS). This is mainly because SERS has other advantages such as ease of sample preparation, molecular specificity and sensitivity, thus making it potentially applicable to characterization of experimental brain extracts or clinical diagnostic samples of cerebrospinal fluid and saliva. Using hollow core photonic crystal fiber (HC-PCF) further enhanced the Raman signal relative to that in a standard cuvette providing sensitive detection of GLU and GABA in micro-litre volume of aqueous solutions.

  6. Monitoring cell culture media degradation using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Amandine; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-08-20

    The quality of the cell culture media used in biopharmaceutical manufacturing is a crucial factor affecting bioprocess performance and the quality of the final product. Due to their complex composition these media are inherently unstable, and significant compositional variations can occur particularly when in the prepared liquid state. For example photo-degradation of cell culture media can have adverse effects on cell viability and thus process performance. There is therefore, from quality control, quality assurance and process management view points, an urgent demand for the development of rapid and inexpensive tools for the stability monitoring of these complex mixtures. Spectroscopic methods, based on fluorescence or Raman measurements, have now become viable alternatives to more time-consuming and expensive (on a unit analysis cost) chromatographic and/or mass spectrometry based methods for routine analysis of media. Here we demonstrate the application of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy for the simple, fast, analysis of cell culture media degradation. Once stringent reproducibility controls are implemented, chemometric data analysis methods can then be used to rapidly monitor the compositional changes in chemically defined media. SERS shows clearly that even when media are stored at low temperature (2-8°C) and in the dark, significant chemical changes occur, particularly with regard to cysteine/cystine concentration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Derivatization reaction-based surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for detection of trace acetone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ying; Chen, Zhuo; Zheng, Chengbin; Lee, Yong-Ill; Hou, Xiandeng; Wu, Li; Tian, Yunfei

    2016-08-01

    A facile method was developed for determination of trace volatile acetone by coupling a derivatization reaction to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). With iodide modified Ag nanoparticles (Ag IMNPs) as the SERS substrate, acetone without obvious Raman signal could be converted to SERS-sensitive species via a chemical derivatization reaction with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine (2,4-DNPH). In addition, acetone can be effectively separated from liquid phase with a purge-sampling device and then any serious interference from sample matrices can be significantly reduced. The optimal conditions for the derivatization reaction and the SERS analysis were investigated in detail, and the selectivity and reproducibility of this method were also evaluated. Under the optimal conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) for acetone was 5mgL(-1) or 0.09mM (3σ). The relative standard deviation (RSD) for 80mgL(-1) acetone (n=9) was 1.7%. This method was successfully used for the determination of acetone in artificial urine and human urine samples with spiked recoveries ranging from 92% to 110%. The present method is convenient, sensitive, selective, reliable and suitable for analysis of trace acetone, and it could have a promising clinical application in early diabetes diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative chemical imaging and unsupervised analysis using hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masia, Francesco; Glen, Adam; Stephens, Phil; Borri, Paola; Langbein, Wolfgang

    2013-11-19

    In this work, we report a method to acquire and analyze hyperspectral coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy images of organic materials and biological samples resulting in an unbiased quantitative chemical analysis. The method employs singular value decomposition on the square root of the CARS intensity, providing an automatic determination of the components above noise, which are retained. Complex CARS susceptibility spectra, which are linear in the chemical composition, are retrieved from the CARS intensity spectra using the causality of the susceptibility by two methods, and their performance is evaluated by comparison with Raman spectra. We use non-negative matrix factorization applied to the imaginary part and the nonresonant real part of the susceptibility with an additional concentration constraint to obtain absolute susceptibility spectra of independently varying chemical components and their absolute concentration. We demonstrate the ability of the method to provide quantitative chemical analysis on known lipid mixtures. We then show the relevance of the method by imaging lipid-rich stem-cell-derived mouse adipocytes as well as differentiated embryonic stem cells with a low density of lipids. We retrieve and visualize the most significant chemical components with spectra given by water, lipid, and proteins segmenting the image into the cell surrounding, lipid droplets, cytosol, and the nucleus, and we reveal the chemical structure of the cells, with details visualized by the projection of the chemical contrast into a few relevant channels.

  9. Waste Fiber Powder Functionalized with Silver Nanoprism for Enhanced Raman Scattering Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Bin; Zeng, Tian; Liu, Jun; Zhou, Ji; Ye, Yong; Wang, Xungai

    2017-05-01

    Biomass disks based on fine powder produced from disposed wool fibers were prepared for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The wool powders (WPs) were modified by silver nanoprisms via an assembly method and then pressed into disks using a hydraulic laboratory pellet press. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the WPs and disks before and after treatment with silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). The WPs retained porous structures after treatment with AgNPs. The silver nanoprisms on WPs were observed clearly and the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) properties of silver nanoprisms led to blue color of wool powder (WP). The obtained WP disks with AgNPs were confirmed to enhance greatly the Raman signal of thiram. The SERS disks are low-cost and convenient to use, with high sensitivity. The characteristic SERS bands of 10-8 M thiram can be identified from WP disks containing silver nanoparticles.

  10. Rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering spectroscopy with heterodyne detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Kotaro; Luo, Yizhi; Ideguchi, Takuro; Goda, Keisuke

    2017-11-01

    High-speed Raman spectroscopy has become increasingly important for analyzing chemical dynamics in real time. To address the need, rapid-scan Fourier-transform coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (FT-CARS) spectroscopy has been developed to realize broadband CARS measurements at a scan rate of more than 20,000 scans/s. However, the detection sensitivity of FT-CARS spectroscopy is inherently low due to the limited number of photons detected during each scan. In this Letter, we show our experimental demonstration of enhanced sensitivity in rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy by heterodyne detection. Specifically, we implemented heterodyne detection by superposing the CARS electric field with an external local oscillator (LO) for their interference. The CARS signal was amplified by simply increasing the power of the LO without the need for increasing the incident power onto the sample. Consequently, we achieved enhancement in signal intensity and the signal-to-noise ratio by factors of 39 and 5, respectively, compared to FT-CARS spectroscopy with homodyne detection. The sensitivity-improved rapid-scan FT-CARS spectroscopy is expected to enable the sensitive real-time observation of chemical dynamics in a broad range of settings, such as combustion engines and live biological cells.

  11. Bromide-Assisted Anisotropic Growth of Gold Nanoparticles as Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa A. Kerr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report herein a one-step synthesis of gold nanoparticles (Au NPs of various shapes such as triangles, hexagons, and semispheres, using 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA as the reducing agent in the presence of potassium bromide (KBr. Anisotropic Au NPs have received ever-increasing attention in various areas of research due to their unique physical and chemical properties. Numerous synthetic methods involving either top-down or bottom-up approaches have been developed to synthesize Au NPs with deliberately varied shapes, sizes, and configurations; however, the production of templateless, seedless, and surfactant-free singular-shaped anisotropic Au NPs remains a significant challenge. The concentrations of hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4, 5-HIAA, and KBr, as well as the reaction temperature, were found to influence the resulting product morphology. A detailed characterization of the resulting Au NPs was performed using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. The as-prepared Au NPs exhibited excellent surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS properties, which make them very attractive for the development of SERS-based chemical and biological sensors.

  12. Combined piezoresponse force microscopyand Raman scattering investigation of domainboundaries in BiFeO.sub.3./sub. ceramics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Borodavka, Fedir; Pokorný, Jan; Hlinka, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, 7-8 (2016), 746-751 ISSN 0141-1594 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-04121S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : phase transition * BiFeO 3 * Raman scattering * piezoresponse force microscopy Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.060, year: 2016

  13. Poly-l-lysine-Coated Silver Nanoparticles as Positively Charged Substrates for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsich, L.; Bonifacio, A.; Mandal, S.; Krol, S.; Beleites, C.; Sergo, V.

    2012-01-01

    Positively charged nanoparticles to be used as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) were prepared by coating citrate-reduced silver nanoparticles with the cationic polymer poly-l-lysine. The average diameter of the coated nanoparticles is 75 nm, and their zeta potential is +62.3

  14. Spatially dependent Rabi oscillations: An approach to sub-diffraction-limited coherent anti-Stokes Raman-scattering microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beeker, Willem; Beeker, W.P.; Lee, Christopher James; Boller, Klaus J.; Gross, P.; Cleff, Carsten; Fallnich, Carsten; Offerhaus, Herman L.; Herek, Jennifer Lynn

    2010-01-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) that is modulated by periodically depleting the ground-state population through Rabi oscillations driven by an additional control laser. We find that such a process generates optical sidebands in the CARS spectrum

  15. Surface-Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering and Visible Extinction Spectroscopy of Copper Chlorophyllin: An Upper Level Chemistry Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzer, Cheryl S.; Reim, Candace Lawson; Sirois, John J.; House, Paul G.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced chemistry students are introduced to surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) by studying how sodium copper chlorophyllin (CuChl) adsorbs onto silver colloids (CuChl/Ag) as a function of pH. Using both SERRS and visible extinction spectroscopy, the extent of CuChl adsorption and colloidal aggregation are monitored. Initially at…

  16. Self phase modulation and stimulated raman scattering due to high power femtosecond pulse propagation in silicon-on-insulator waveguides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mégret, P.; Dekker, R.; Wuilpart, M.; Klein, E.J.; Niehusmann, J.; Bette, S.; Staquet, N.; Först, M.; Ondracek, F.; Ctyroky, J.; Usechak, N.; Driessen, A.

    2005-01-01

    Self Phase Modulation (SPM) and Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) in silicon waveguides have been observed and will be discussed theoretically using a modified Nonlinear Schrödinger Equation. The high optical peak powers needed for the experiments were obtained by coupling sub-picosecond (200fs)

  17. Unveiling NIR Aza-Boron-Dipyrromethene (BODIPY) Dyes as Raman Probes: Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS)-Guided Selective Detection and Imaging of Human Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adarsh, Nagappanpillai; Ramya, Adukkadan N; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar; Ramaiah, Danaboyina

    2017-10-12

    The development of new Raman reporters has attracted immense attention in diagnostic research based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) techniques, which is a well established method for ultrasensitive detection through molecular fingerprinting and imaging. Herein, for the first time, we report the unique and efficient Raman active features of the selected aza-BODIPY dyes 1-6. These distinctive attributes could be extended at the molecular level to allow detection through SERS upon adsorption onto nano-roughened gold surface. Among the newly revealed Raman reporters, the amino substituted derivative 4 showed high signal intensity at very low concentrations (ca. 0.4 μm for 4-Au). Interestingly, an efficient nanoprobe has been constructed by using gold nanoparticles as SERS substrate, and 4 as the Raman reporter (4-Au@PEG), which unexpectedly showed efficient recognition of three human cancer cells (lung: A549, cervical: HeLa, Fibrosarcoma: HT-1080) without any specific surface marker. We observed well reflected and resolved Raman mapping and characteristic signature peaks whereas, such recognition was not observed in normal fibroblast (3T3L1) cells. To confirm these findings, a SERS nanoprobe was conjugated with a specific tumour targeting marker, EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor), a well known targeted agent for Human Fibrosarcoma (HT1080). This nanoprobe efficiently targeted the surface marker of HT1080 cells, threreby demonstrating its use as an ultrasensitive Raman probe for detection and targeted imaging, leaving normal cells unaffected. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Optimization of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) assay for the transition from benchtop to handheld Raman systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schechinger, Monika; Marks, Haley; Locke, Andrea; Choudhury, Mahua; Coté, Gerard

    2017-02-01

    Human biomarkers are indicative of the body's relative state prior to the onset of disease, and sometimes before symptoms present. While blood biomarker detection has achieved considerable success in laboratory settings, its clinical application is lagging and commercial point-of-care devices are rare. A physician's ability to detect biomarkers such as microRNA-17, a potential epigenetic indicator of preeclampsia in pregnant woman, could enable early diagnosis and preventive intervention as early as the 1st trimester. One detection approach employing DNA-functionalized nanoparticles to detect microRNA-17, in conjunction with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), has shown promise but is hindered, in part, by the use of large and expensive benchtop Raman microscopes. However, recent strides have been made in developing portable Raman systems for field applications. Characteristics of the SERS assay responsible for strengthening the assay's plasmonic response were explored, whilst comparing the results from both benchtop and portable Raman systems. The Raman spectra and intensity of three different types of photoactive molecules were compared as potential Raman reporter molecules: chromophores, fluorophores, and highly polarizable small molecules. Furthermore, the plasmonic characteristics governing the formation of SERS colloidal nanoparticle assemblies in response to DNA/miRNA hybridization were investigated. There were significant variations in the SERS enhancement in response to microRNA-17 using our assay depending on the excitation lasers at wavelengths of 532 nm and 785 nm, depending on which of the three different Raman systems were used (benchtop, portable, and handheld), and depending on which of the three different Raman reporters (chromophore, fluorophore, or Raman active molecule) were used. Analysis of data obtained did indicate that signal enhancement was better for the chromophore (MGITC) and Raman active molecule (DTNB) than it was for the

  19. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG [or quantum wire(s for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES and the inelastic light scattering (ILS from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of

  20. Raman active modes of NiSi crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan Li, E-mail: liwan_china@yahoo.com.c [Department of Physics, Wenzhou University (China); Tang Bo; Cheng Xinhong; Ren Yiming; Zhang Xuefei; Xu Dapeng; Luo Haijun; Huang Yunmi [Department of Physics, Wenzhou University (China)

    2009-08-01

    Raman scattering intensities of the NiSi Raman-active modes have been calculated with three Raman measurement configurations, which can be used for the symmetry assignment of the NiSi Raman peaks. Raman-active vibrations of the NiSi crystal have also been theoretically studied. Results show that the lattices with A{sub g} and B{sub 2g} modes vibrate only in the plane normal to the NiSi[0 1 0] direction while the lattices with B{sub 1g} and B{sub 3g} modes vibrate only along the NiSi[0 1 0] axis. Based on such study, the relationship between the anisotropic strain distribution in the NiSi thin film and the Raman peak shifts has been briefly discussed.

  1. Ultra-sensitive molecular detection using surface-enhanced Raman scattering on periodic metal-dielectric nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nien, Chun; Li, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Vin-Cent; Kuan, Chieh-Hsiung

    2017-02-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) is a powerful technique for trace chemical analysis and single molecule detection in the application of biochemical monitoring and food safety due to its ability to enhance the Raman scattering of molecules near the metallic surface or nanostructures. Here, we present a comprehensive study of the SERS enhancement by the periodically nanostructured surface, where the thin film of silver is deposited onto the surface, except the sidewall of posts, of 1-D lamellar gratings with varying pitch to forming metal-dielectric composite nanostructures. By enhancing the localized and surface-propagating mode in the vicinity of the concaves, the SERS signal can be improved by amplifying the intensity of electric field and increasing the optical path length of the incident light. Experimental investigations show that the enhancement factor can be manipulated by varying the polarization of incident light and the pitch size of gratings. To demonstrate the SERS effects of the proposed structures, thin layers of benzoic acid, which is commonly used as a food preservative, are deposited on the SERS substrates by spin-coating a solution of benzoic acid and dried at room temperature. A Confocal Raman microscope with a 532 nm laser source is used to illuminate light and measure the Raman spectrum of benzoic acid. We demonstrate the Raman signal of benzoic acid can be enhanced on the order of 102 on the SERS substrates.

  2. Conductance and Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Single Molecules Utilizing Dimers of Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dadosh, Tali

    conductance at certain voltage values. The position of peaks in the spectrum was affected by the electrostatic environment, resulting in random gating. In view of the above developments, my thesis focuses on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) measurement of single molecules. Single-molecule spectroscopy is an emerging field that provides detailed information on molecular response, which is unavailable in measurements performed on an assembly of molecules. The obvious problem, however, in implementing most spectroscopic techniques, such as Raman scattering, is the very weak signal obtained from a single molecule. Interestingly, the Raman signal from a molecule has been shown to increase dramatically when the molecule is adsorbed to metal particles of certain types having sub-wavelength dimensions [1, 2]. This enhancement technique, known as surface-enhanced Raman scattering, can increase the Raman signal by as much as 14--15 orders of magnitude, which has been shown to be sufficient for performing single-molecule spectroscopy successfully. Dimer structures are not only attractive for conductance measurements on single-molecule devices; they could also serve as an efficient antenna system that greatly enhances the electromagnetic field at the center of the dimer, where the molecule resides. Dimers provide a basic experimental model for studying the fundamentals of the SERS enhancement, which are not well understood. Dimers have the advantage of possessing a small gap (on the order of a nanometer) that is beyond the limit of today's sophisticated lithography techniques. By utilizing the dimer structures that contain a Rhodamine 123 molecule, we were able to resolve some fundamental questions regarding the SERS enhancement mechanism. The issue of how the nanoparticles' surface plasmon properties affects the SERS enhancement was addressed both experimentally and by calculations. Moreover, it was predicted by our calculations that when the dimers consist of large

  3. Surface enhanced Raman scattering optimization of gold nanocylinder arrays: Influence of the localized surface plasmon resonance and excitation wavelength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Guillot

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available We here emphasize that the Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS intensity has to be optimized by choosing the appropriate gold nanoparticles size for two excitation wavelengths: 632.8 and 785 nm. We discuss the role of the position and of the order of the Localized Surface Plasmon Resonance (LSPR in such optimization for both wavelengths. At 632.8 nm, the best SERS intensity is reached for a LSPR located between the excitation and Raman wavelengths whereas at 785 nm, the LSPR should be placed outside this range. The third order of LSPR is shown to have no influence on the SERS intensity.

  4. Investigation of Surface Enhanced Coherent Raman Scattering on Nano-patterned Insect Wings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ujj, Laszlo; Lawhead, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Many insect wings (cicadas, butterflies, mosquitos) poses nano-patterned surface structure. Characterization of surface morphology and chemical composition of insect wings is important to understand the extreme mechanical properties and the biophysical functionalities of the wings. We have measured the image of the membrane of a cicada's wing with the help of Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The results confirm the existing periodic structure of the wing measured previously. In order to identify the chemical composition of the wing, we have deposited silver nanoparticles on it and applied Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy to measure the vibrational spectra of the molecules comprising the wing for the first time. The measured spectra are consistent with the original assumption that the wing membrane is composed of protein, wax, and chitin. The results of these studies can be used to measure other nano-patterned surfaces and to make artificial materials in the future. Authors grateful for financial support from the Department of Physics of the College of Sciences Engineering and Health of UWF and the Pall Corporation for SEM imaging.

  5. Raman and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy studies of changes in lipid content and composition in hormone-treated breast and prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potcoava, Mariana C; Futia, Gregory L; Aughenbaugh, Jessica; Schlaepfer, Isabel R; Gibson, Emily A

    2014-01-01

    Increasing interest in the role of lipids in cancer cell proliferation and resistance to drug therapies has motivated the need to develop better tools for cellular lipid analysis. Quantification of lipids in cells is typically done by destructive chromatography protocols that do not provide spatial information on lipid distribution and prevent dynamic live cell studies. Methods that allow the analysis of lipid content in live cells are therefore of great importance. Using micro-Raman spectroscopy and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy, we generated a lipid profile for breast (T47D, MDA-MB-231) and prostate (LNCaP, PC3) cancer cells upon exposure to medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) and synthetic androgen R1881. Combining Raman spectra with CARS imaging, we can study the process of hormone-mediated lipogenesis. Our results show that hormone-treated cancer cells T47D and LNCaP have an increased number and size of intracellular lipid droplets and higher degree of saturation than untreated cells. MDA-MB-231 and PC3 cancer cells showed no significant changes upon treatment. Principal component analysis with linear discriminant analysis of the Raman spectra was able to differentiate between cancer cells that were treated with MPA, R1881, and untreated.

  6. Macrocycle and substituent vibrational modes of nonplanar nickel (II) octaethyltetraphenylporphyrin from its resonance Raman, near-infrared-excited FT Raman, and FT-IR spectra and deuterium isotope shifts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stichternath, A.; Schweitzer-Stenner, R.; Dreybrodt, W. (Univ. of Bremen (Germany)); Mak, R.S.W.; Li, X.Y. (Hong Kong Univ. of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)); Sparks, L.D.; Shelnutt, J.A. (Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States) Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States)); Medforth, C.J.; Smith, K.M. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1993-04-15

    We have employed Raman dispersion, FT Raman, and FT-IR spectroscopy to identify a large number of resonance Raman lines of Ni(II) octaethyltetraphenylporphyrin dissolved in CS[sub 2]. The Raman depolarization dispersion technique was used to derive the symmetry of the normal modes giving rise to the observed Raman lines. By combining this information and the already available normal coordinates of Ni(II) tetraphenylporphyrin and Ni(II) octaethylporphyrin, many of the Raman-modes of the macrocycle could be assigned. Some resonance-enhanced Raman lines were found to arise from vibrations of the ethyl and phenyl substituents. They were identified by comparing resonance Raman, FT Raman, and FT infrared spectra of the Ni(II) octaethyltetraphenylporphyrin and its d[sub 20] isotopomer. All Raman lines normally referred to as core-size markers are found to be significantly shifted to lower frequencies with respect to their positions in Ni(II) octaethylporphyrin, in accordance with earlier findings (Shelnutt et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 4077, 1991). This suggests that the molecule is in a highly nonplanar conformation. This notion is further corroborated by the strong dispersion of the depolarization ratio observed for nearly all A[sub 1g] and A[sub 2g] modes of the macrocycle. 27 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. A Au nanoparticle-incorporated sponge as a versatile transmission surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Kayeong; Chung, Hoeil

    2015-08-07

    We report a sponge-based transmission surface-enhanced Raman scattering (TSERS) substrate that combines the bulk sampling capabilities of a transmission measurement to improve the quantitative representation of sample concentration with several sponge properties useful for analysis such as fast sample uptake, easy sample enrichment, and a stable polymeric structure. Among nine commercially available sponges made of different materials, a melamine sponge was ultimately selected for this study because it provided the fastest sample uptake and a low background Raman signal. Simultaneously, the amino groups and three-nitrogen hybrid rings in its structure could easily hold Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) inside the sponge. AuNP-incorporated sponges (AuNP sponges) were prepared by simply soaking a melamine sponge in a AuNP solution; these sponges were initially used to measure 4-nitrobenzenethiol (4-NBT) samples with different concentrations in order to evaluate their ability as TSERS substrates. The intensities of the 4-NBT peaks clearly varied according to changes in the concentration, and the relative standard deviation (RSD) of the peak intensity estimated by the measurements of five independently prepared AuNP sponges was 10.0%. Sample enrichment was easily completed by repeated suctioning of the sample into the AuNP sponges followed by depletion of the solvent, so three-time enrichment doubled the intensity. Furthermore, paraquat samples were prepared in diverse matrices (de-ionized water, tap water, river water, and orange juice) and measured using the AuNP sponges. The paraquat peaks were clearly observed from these samples and their peak intensities became smaller with the increased compositional complexity of the matrices. Our overall results demonstrate that the TSERS sponge substrates are easy to prepare and practically versatile for SERS analysis of diverse samples.

  8. Rapid detection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biomarkers in biological fluids using surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yiping; Zughaier, Susu M.

    2014-05-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen that causes major infection not only in Cystic Fibrosis patients but also in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and in critically ill patients in intensive care units. Successful antibiotic treatment of the infection relies on accurate and rapid identification of the infectious agents. Conventional microbiological detection methods usually take more than 3 days to obtain accurate results. We have developed a rapid diagnostic technique based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering to directly identify PA from biological fluids. P. aeruginosa strains, PAO1 and PA14, are cultured in lysogeny broth, and the SERS spectra of the broth show the signature Raman peaks from pyocyanin and pyoverdine, two major biomarkers that P. aeruginosa secretes during its growth, as well as lipopolysaccharides. This provides the evidence that the presence of these biomarkers can be used to indicate P. aeruginosa infection. A total of 22 clinical exhaled breath condensates (EBC) samples were obtained from subjects with CF disease and from non-CF healthy donors. SERS spectra of these EBC samples were obtained and further analyzed by both principle component analysis and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA can discriminate the samples with P. aeruginosa infection and the ones without P. aeruginosa infection at 99.3% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity. In addition, this technique can also discriminate samples from subject with CF disease and healthy donor with 97.5% sensitivity and 100% specificity. These results demonstrate the potential of using SERS of EBC samples as a rapid diagnostic tool to detect PA infection.

  9. Morphology modification of gold nanoparticles from nanoshell to C-shape: Improved surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Ting-Yang; Zhu, Jian; Li, Jian-Jun; Zhao, Jun-Wu, E-mail: nanoptzhao@163.com [The Key Laboratory of Biomedical Information Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2016-06-28

    Morphology modification of nanostructures is of great interest, because it can be used to fabricate nanostructures which are hard to be done using other methods. Different from traditional lithographic technique which is slow and expensive, morphology modification is easy, cheap, and reproducible. In this paper, modification of the optical and morphological properties of a hollow gold nanoshell (HGNS) is achieved by using H{sub 2}O{sub 2} as an oxidizer. The reshaping of these nanostructures has been demonstrated as a consequence of an oxidation process in which HGNSs are dissolved by H{sub 2}O{sub 2} under the acidic conditions provided by HCl. We investigate the oxidation process by a transmission electron microscope and propose a reshaping model involving four different shapes (HGNS, HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle) which are corresponding to the oxidation products of HGNSs at different pH values. Besides, the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of each oxidation product has been evaluated by using rhodamine 6G as the Raman active probe. It has been observed that the C-shaped gold nanoparticles which are corresponding to the oxidation products at the minimum pH value have the highest SERS activity and this result can also be interpreted by discrete-dipole approximation simulations. We demonstrate that the morphology modification of HGNSs becomes possible in a controlled manner using wet chemistry and can be used in preparation of gold nanoparticles such as HGNS with hole, gold nanoring, and C-shaped gold nanoparticle with large SERS activity. These nanostructures must have potential use in many plasmonic areas, including sensing, catalysis, and biomedicine.

  10. An examination of errors in computed water-leaving radiances due to a simplified treatment of water Raman scattering effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bismarck, Jonas von; Fischer, Jürgen

    2013-05-01

    Studies in the past have shown that solar shortwave radiation that has been Raman scattered in the ocean, and therefore undergone a wavelength shift, can contribute significantly to the signals observed by remote sensing satellites. While radiative transfer models that qualitatively approximate the effect of water Raman scattering on the water leaving irradiance have been available for a while, we have developed a new version of the radiative transfer code MOMO, which enables the accurate and fully angle resolved inclusion of inelastic scattering sources, and therefore allows detailed quantitative analyses of the effect on the light field in the ocean-atmosphere system. This article focuses on a study performed with this new model on the impact of azimuthally averaging the Raman scattering phase function, which is done in some RT models and significantly decreases computation time, on the water-leaving radiance. At the request of the authors and Proceedings Editors the above article has been updated to include a number of post-publication amendments. Changes made to the previously published article are detailed in the pages attached to the end of the updated article PDF file. The updated article was re-published on 15 August 2013.

  11. Numerical generalized vibration density of states evaluation for inelastic neutron scattering in solid matter

    CERN Document Server

    Kazmianec, V; Aranghel, D

    2002-01-01

    A computational method for improved evaluation of the generalized vibration density of states (GVDS) is proposed. It is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FPT) technique and gives the possibility for more precise analyses of the neutron double differential scattering cross section. The method was applied to zirconium hydride investigation. The results were presented for ZrH sub 1 sub . sub 6 U sub 0 sub . sub 3 sub 2 sample at various temperatures on time-of-flight (TOF) Spectrometry at IBR-2 reactor of JINR-Dubna and were compared to GVDS values obtained by traditional single-phonon approximation method

  12. Elastic scattering and vibrational excitation for electron impact on para-benzoquinone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, D. B.; Blanco, F.; García, G.; da Costa, R. F.; Kossoski, F.; Varella, M. T. do N.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; White, R. D.; Brunger, M. J.

    2017-12-01

    We report on theoretical elastic and experimental vibrational-excitation differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron scattering from para-benzoquinone (C6H4O2), in the intermediate energy range 15-50 eV. The calculations were conducted with two different theoretical methodologies, the Schwinger multichannel method with pseudopotentials (SMCPP) and the independent atom method with screening corrected additivity rule (IAM-SCAR) that also now incorporates a further interference (I) term. The SMCPP with N energetically open electronic states (Nopen) at the static-exchange-plus-polarisation (Nopench-SEP) level was used to calculate the scattering amplitudes using a channel coupling scheme that ranges from 1ch-SE up to the 89ch-SEP level of approximation. We found that in going from the 38ch-SEP to the 89ch-SEP, at all energies considered here, the elastic DCSs did not change significantly in terms of both their shapes and magnitudes. This is a good indication that our SMCPP 89ch-SEP elastic DCSs are converged with respect to the multichannel coupling effect for the investigated intermediate energies. While agreement between our IAM-SCAR+I and SMCPP 89ch-SEP computations improves as the incident electron energy increases from 15 eV, overall the level of accord is only marginal. This is particularly true at middle scattering angles, suggesting that our SCAR and interference corrections are failing somewhat for this molecule below 50 eV. We also report experimental DCS results, using a crossed-beam apparatus, for excitation of some of the unresolved ("hybrid") vibrational quanta (bands I-III) of para-benzoquinone. Those data were derived from electron energy loss spectra that were measured over a scattered electron angular range of 10°-90° and put on an absolute scale using our elastic SMCPP 89ch-SEP DCS results. The energy resolution of our measurements was ˜80 meV, which is why, at least in part, the observed vibrational features were only partially resolved. To

  13. Optical reflectivity and Raman scattering in few-layer-thick graphene highly doped by K and Rb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Naeyoung; Kim, Bumjung; Crowther, Andrew C; Kim, Namdong; Nuckolls, Colin; Brus, Louis

    2011-07-26

    We report the optical reflectivity and Raman scattering of few layer (L) graphene exposed to K and Rb vapors. Samples many tens of layers thick show the reflectivity and Raman spectra of the stage 1 bulk alkali intercalation compounds (GICs) KC(8) and RbC(8). However, these bulk optical and Raman properties only begin to appear in samples more than about 15 graphene layers thick. The 1 L to 4 L alkali exposed graphene Raman spectra are profoundly different than the Breit-Wigner-Fano (BWF) spectra of the bulk stage 1 compounds. Samples less than 10 layers thick show Drude-like plasma edge reflectivity dip in the visible; alkali exposed few layer graphenes are significantly more transparent than intrinsic graphene. Simulations show the in-plane free electron density is lower than in the bulk stage 1 GICs. In few layer graphenes, alkalis both intercalate between layers and adsorb on the graphene surfaces. Charge transfer electrically dopes the graphene sheets to densities near and above 10(+14) electrons/cm(2). New intrinsic Raman modes at 1128 and 1264 cm(-1) are activated by in-plane graphene zone folding caused by strongly interacting, locally crystalline alkali adlayers. The K Raman spectra are independent of thickness for L = 1-4, indicating that charge transfer from adsorbed and intercalated K layers are similar. The Raman G mode is downshifted and significantly broadened from intrinsic graphene. In contrast, the Rb spectra vary strongly with L and show increased doping by intercalated alkali as L increases. Rb adlayers appear to be disordered liquids, while intercalated layers are locally crystalline solids. A significant intramolecular G mode electronic resonance Raman enhancement is observed in K exposed graphene, as compared with intrinsic graphene.

  14. Nanoantenna-assisted plasmonic enhancement of IR absorption of vibrational modes of organic molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander G. Milekhin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Nanoantenna-assisted plasmonic enhancement of IR absorption and Raman scattering was employed for studying the vibrational modes in organic molecules. Ultrathin cobalt phthalocyanine films (3 nm were deposited on Au nanoantenna arrays with specified structural parameters. The deposited organic films reveal the enhancement of both Raman scattering and IR absorption vibrational modes. To extend the possibility of implementing surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA for biological applications, the detection and analysis of the steroid hormone cortisol was demonstrated.

  15. Surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering spectroscopy applied to phytochrome and its model compounds. 1. Biliverdin photoisomers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holt, R.E.; Farrens, D.L.; Song, Pillsoon; Cotton, T.M. (Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln (USA))

    1989-12-20

    The application of surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) spectroscopy to the analysis of the configuration of biliverdin dimethyl ester (BVDE) is reported. SERRS spectra obtained by adsorption of the compounds onto an electrochemically roughened silver electrode and recorded at 7 K were intense and free of significant photodegradation. The similarity of the SERRS and resonance Raman (RR) spectra obtained under identical conditions suggests that no perturbation of the electronic structure of the BVDE occurs upon interaction with the silver surface, and that the distribution of conformers comprising the BVDE solution is not changed. SERRS spectra of the deuterated and monoprotonated Z,Z,Z isomer are also presented. To investigate the influence of configuration upon the Raman spectrum we have synthesized and purified the E,Z,A, and Z,Z,E isomers of BVDE. Excellent SERRS spectra were obtained from the solutions of the compounds eluted directly from the TLC plates.

  16. New insight of squaraine-based biocompatible surface-enhanced Raman scattering nanotag for cancer-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, An; Samanta, Animesh; Nisha, N; Chang, Young-Tae; Maiti, Kaustabh Kumar

    2015-03-01

    Development of highly sensitive diagnostic nanoprobe for cancer imaging based on surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) platform. Synthesis of novel squaraine dyes as a Raman signature molecule denoted as lipoic-squaraine-lipoic (LSL), propyl-squaraine-lipoic (PSL) and propyl-squaraine-propyl (PSP). The SERS-nanotag constructed with a Raman signature molecule which is attached on gold nanoparticle and further encapsulated with heterofunctionalized PEG. Antibody conjugation with best SERS-nanotag for target specific recognition. SERS nanotag Au-LSL-PEG showed significant signal intensity and remarkable stability. Anti-EGF receptor and Her2-conjugated Au-LSL-PEG-nanotag were successfully applied for selective recognition of cancer cells like A549, OSCC and MCF7. The newly developed SERS-nanotag Au-LSL-PEG serves as a valuable tool for diagnostic detection of cancer cells, and may find potential applications for cancer screening in real patient samples.

  17. Compositional dependencies in the vibrational properties of amorphous Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenide alloys studied by Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shportko, K.; Revutska, L.; Paiuk, O.; Baran, J.; Stronski, A.; Gubanova, A.; Venger, E.

    2017-11-01

    This work is focused on the compositional dependencies in the Raman spectra of amorphous Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenides with the systematic increase of the Ge-content. Studied Ge-As-Se and Ge-Sb-Te chalcogenides are promising for applications in the photonics, optical, and electronic data storages. Gaussians used to fit the obtained Raman spectra were attributed to the vibrations of the structural units in Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se samples. Systematic compositional dependencies of the intensities of the characteristic Raman bands correlate with evolution of concentration of the different structural units in Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se alloys along the studied compositional lines. Obtained compositional trends in the intensities of Raman bands may enable one to predict vibrational properties of other amorphous Ge-Sb-Te and Ge-As-Se chalcogenides.

  18. Ultra broadband UV generation by stimulated Raman scattering of two-color KrF laser in deuterium confined in a hollow fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Eiichi; Kato, Susumu; Matsumoto, Yuji; Losev, Leonid L

    2007-03-05

    Broad Raman-multi-frequency spectra were generated from the resonant two-color excitation of the deuterium molecule rotational Raman transition (J=0?2), using ultraviolet bi-harmonic lasers with a quartz hollow fiber. Fifty pure rotational Raman spectral lines (34 lines that have intensity within 10% of the strongest spectral line) from 230 to 290 nm were generated at a gas pressure of 30 kPa. Furthermore, vibrational-rotational Raman spectral lines of almost 300 lines from 220 to 600 nm were also generated by increasing the gas pressure to 60 kPa.

  19. Non-Gaussian statistics of extreme events in stimulated Raman scattering: The role of coherent memory and source noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfared, Yashar E.; Ponomarenko, Sergey A.

    2017-10-01

    We explore theoretically and numerically extreme event excitation in stimulated Raman scattering in gases. We consider gas-filled hollow-core photonic crystal fibers as a particular system realization. We show that moderate amplitude pump fluctuations obeying Gaussian statistics lead to the emergence of heavy-tailed non-Gaussian statistics as coherent seed Stokes pulses are amplified on propagation along the fiber. We reveal the crucial role that coherent memory effects play in causing non-Gaussian statistics of the system. We discover that extreme events can occur even at the initial stage of stimulated Raman scattering when one can neglect energy depletion of an intense, strongly fluctuating Gaussian pump source. Our analytical results in the undepleted pump approximation explicitly illustrate power-law probability density generation as the input pump noise is transferred to the output Stokes pulses.

  20. Rapid Detection of Polychlorinated Biphenyls at Trace Levels in Real Environmental Samples by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengjun Zhang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Detection of trace levels of persistent pollutants in the environment is difficult but significant. Organic pollutant homologues, due to their similar physical and chemical properties, are even more difficult to distinguish, especially in trace amounts. We report here a simple method to detect polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs in soil and distilled spirit samples by the surface-enhanced Raman scattering technique using Ag nanorod arrays as substrates. By this method, polychlorinated biphenyls can be detected to a concentration of 5 μg/g in dry soil samples within 1 minute. Furthermore, based on simulation and understanding of the Raman characteristics of PCBs, we recognized homologues of tetrachlorobiphenyl by using the surface-enhance Raman scattering method even in trace amounts in acetone solutions, and their characteristic Raman peaks still can be distinguished at a concentration of 10-6 mol/L. This study provides a fast, simple and sensitive method for the detection and recognition of organic pollutants such as polychlorinated biphenyls.

  1. Intracellular imaging of docosanol in living cells by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Sixian; Liu, Yuan; Arp, Zane; Zhao, Youbo; Chaney, Eric J.; Marjanovic, Marina; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-07-01

    Docosanol is an over-the-counter topical agent that has proved to be one of the most effective therapies for treating herpes simplex labialis. However, the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation remains poorly understood. To elucidate its mechanism of action, we investigated the uptake of docosanol in living cells using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. Based on direct visualization of the deuterated docosanol, we observed highly concentrated docosanol inside living cells 24 h after drug treatment. In addition, different spatial patterns of drug accumulation were observed in different cell lines. In keratinocytes, which are the targeted cells of docosanol, the drug molecules appeared to be docking at the periphery of the cell membrane. In contrast, the drug molecules in fibroblasts appeared to accumulate in densely packed punctate regions throughout the cytoplasm. These results suggest that this molecular imaging approach is suitable for the longitudinal tracking of drug molecules in living cells to identify cell-specific trafficking and may also have implications for elucidating the mechanism by which docosanol suppresses lesion formation.

  2. Temporal evolution of resonant Raman-scattering in ZnCdSe quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschner, A.; Strassburg, M.; Hoffmann, A.; Thomsen, C.; Bartels, M.; Lischka, K.; Schikora, D.

    2000-05-01

    We investigated ZnCdSe/ZnSe quantum-dot structures which include planar and coherently strained three-dimensional islands with different sizes. Optical excitation of these islands well below the ZnSe band gap leads to a resonant enhancement of the Zn0.7Cd0.3Se longitudinal-optical (LO) phonon-scattering efficiency and makes the 2LO and 3LO multiphonon emission observable. Resonant excitation with a power density of about 1.3 MW/cm2 using a micro-Raman setup results in an exponential decrease of the 1LO, 2LO, and 3LO intensity with irradiation time. This decay behavior is not observed for pure ZnSe crystals and can be avoided for the ZnCdSe/ZnSe structures using much lower excitation densities. The decrease in intensity is accompanied by a shift of the LO mode to higher frequencies resulting from a lower cadmium concentration in the alloy. From these experimental findings, we conclude that resonant excitation at a certain power density leads to cadmium out-diffusion from the planar quantum dots, which shifts the resonance away from the excitation energy.

  3. Nanotextured thin films for detection of chemicals by surface enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korivi, Naga; Jiang, Li; Ahmed, Syed; Nujhat, Nabila; Idrees, Mohanad; Rangari, Vijaya

    2017-11-01

    We report on the development of large area, nanostructured films that function as substrates for surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection of chemicals. The films are made of polyethylene terephthalate layers partially embedded with multi-walled carbon nanotubes and coated with a thin layer of gold. The films are fabricated by a facile method involving spin-coating, acid dip, and magnetron sputtering. The films perform effectively as SERS substrates when used in the detection of dye pollutants such as Congo red dye, with an enhancement factor of 1.1  ×  106 and a detection limit of 10‑7 M which is the lowest reported for CR detection by freestanding SERS film substrates. The films have a long shelf life, and cost US0.20 per cm2 of active area, far less than commercially available SERS substrates. This is the first such work on the use of a polymer layer modified with carbon nanotubes to create a nano-scale texture and arbitrary ‘hot-spots’, contributing to the SERS effect.

  4. Insights into Caco-2 cell culture structure using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saarinen, Jukka; Sözeri, Erkan; Fraser-Miller, Sara J; Peltonen, Leena; Santos, Hélder A; Isomäki, Antti; Strachan, Clare J

    2017-05-15

    We have used coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a novel and rapid, label-free and non-destructive imaging method to gain structural insights into live intestinal epithelial cell cultures used for drug permeability testing. Specifically we have imaged live Caco-2 cells in (bio)pharmaceutically relevant conditions grown on membrane inserts. Imaging conditions were optimized, including evaluation of suitable membrane materials and media solutions, as well as tolerable laser powers for non-destructive imaging of the live cells. Lipid structures, in particular lipid droplets, were imaged within the cells on the insert membranes. The size of the individual lipid droplets increased substantially over the 21-day culturing period up to approximately 10% of the volume of the cross section of individual cells. Variation in lipid content has important implications for intestinal drug permeation testing during drug development but has received limited attention to date due to a lack of suitable analytical techniques. CARS microscopy was shown to be well suited for such analysis with the potential for in situ imaging of the same individual cell-cultures that are used for permeation studies. Overall, the method may be used to provide important information about cell monolayer structure to better understand drug permeation results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Label-free imaging of human breast tissues using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yaliang; Gao, Liang; Wang, Zhiyong; Thrall, Michael J.; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Wong, Stephen T.

    2011-03-01

    Breast cancer is a common disease in women. Current imaging and diagnostic methods for breast cancer confront several limitations, like time-consuming, invasive and with a high cost. Alternative strategies are in high demand to alleviate patients' trauma and lower medical expenses. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) imaging technique offers many advantages, including label-free, sub-wavelength spatial resolution and video-rate imaging speed. Therefore, it has been demonstrated as a powerful tool for various biomedical applications. In this study, we present a label-free fast imaging method to identify breast cancer and its subtypes using CARS microscopy. Human breast tissues, including normal, benign and invasive carcinomas, were imaged ex vivo using a custom-built CARS microscope. Compared with results from corresponding hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stains, the CARS technique has demonstrated its capability in identifying morphological features in a similar way as in H&E stain. These features can be used to distinguish breast cancer from normal and benign tissues, and further separate cancer subtypes from each other. Our pilot study suggests that CARS microscopy could be used as a routine examination tool to characterize breast cancer ex vivo. Moreover, its label-free and fast imaging properties render this technique as a promising approach for in vivo and real-time imaging and diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. Iron layer-dependent surface-enhanced raman scattering of hierarchical nanocap arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Sun, Huanhuan; Zhao, Yue; Gao, Renxian; Wang, Yaxin; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Yongjun; Hua, Zhong; Yang, Jinghai

    2017-11-01

    In this report, we fabricated the multi-layer Ag/Fe/Ag sandwich cap-shaped films on monolayer non-closed packed (ncp) polystyrene colloidal particle (PSCP) templates through a layer-by-layer (LBL) depositing method. This research focused on the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) effect of the thickness of the deposited Fe film which was controlled by the sputtering time. The SERS intensities were increased firstly, and then decreased as the thickness of Fe layer grows gradually, which is attributed to the charge transition from the Fermi level of the Ag NPs to Fe layer. The use of multi-layer Ag/Fe/Ag sandwich cap-shaped films enables us to evaluate the contribution of surface plasmon resonance and charge distribution between Ag and Fe to SERS enhancement. Our work introduced a novel system (Ag/Fe/Ag) for high performance SERS and extended the SERS application of Fe. Furthermore, we have designed the Ag/Fe/Ag SERS-active substrate as the immunoassay chip for quantitative determination of AFP-L3 which is the biomarker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The proposed research demonstrates that the SERS substrates with Ag/Fe/Ag sandwich cap-shaped arrays have a high sensitivity for bioassay.

  7. Development of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy monitoring of fuel markers to prevent fraud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Timothy; Clarkson, John; White, Peter C.; Meakin, Nicholas; McDonald, Ken

    2013-05-01

    Governments often tax fuel products to generate revenues to support and stimulate their economies. They also subsidize the cost of essential fuel products. Fuel taxation and subsidization practices are both subject to fraud. Oil marketing companies also suffer from fuel fraud with loss of legitimate sales and additional quality and liability issues. The use of an advanced marking system to identify and control fraud has been shown to be effective in controlling illegal activity. DeCipher has developed surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy as its lead technology for measuring markers in fuel to identify and control malpractice. SERS has many advantages that make it highly suitable for this purpose. The SERS instruments are portable and can be used to monitor fuel at any point in the supply chain. SERS shows high specificity for the marker, with no false positives. Multiple markers can also be detected in a single SERS analysis allowing, for example, specific regional monitoring of fuel. The SERS analysis from fuel is also quick, clear and decisive, with a measurement time of less than 5 minutes. We will present results highlighting our development of the use of a highly stable silver colloid as a SERS substrate to measure the markers at ppb levels. Preliminary results from the use of a solid state SERS substrate to measure fuel markers will also be presented.

  8. Capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hao; Deng, Min; Ga, Shan; Chen, Shouhui; Kang, Lin; Wang, Junhong; Xin, Wenwen; Zhang, Tao; You, Zherong; An, Yuan; Wang, Jinglin; Cui, Daxiang

    2014-03-01

    Herein, we firstly demonstrate the design and the proof-of-concept use of a capillary-driven surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)-based microfluidic chip for abrin detection. The micropillar array substrate was etched and coated with a gold film by microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) process to integrate into a lateral flow test strip. The detection of abrin solutions of various concentrations was performed by the as-prepared microfluidic chip. It was shown that the correlation between the abrin concentration and SERS signal was found to be linear within the range of 0.1 ng/mL to 1 μg/mL with a limit of detection of 0.1 ng/mL. Our microfluidic chip design enhanced the operability of SERS-based immunodiagnostic techniques, significantly reducing the complication and cost of preparation as compared to previous SERS-based works. Meanwhile, this design proved the superiority to conventional lateral flow test strips in respect of both sensitivity and quantitation and showed great potential in the diagnosis and treatment for abrin poisoning as well as on-site screening of abrin-spiked materials.

  9. A rapid method to authenticate vegetable oils through surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Ming Yang; Zhang, Xin; Ren, Hai Rui; Liu, Luo; Zhao, Yong Mei; Wang, Zheng; Wu, Zheng Long; Liu, Li Min; Xu, Hai Jun

    2016-03-01

    Vegetable oils are essential in our daily diet. Among various vegetable oils, the major difference lies in the composition of fatty acids, including unsaturated fatty acids (USFA) and saturated fatty acids (SFA). USFA include oleic acid (OA), linoleic acid (LA), and α-linolenic acid (ALA), while SFA are mainly palmitic acid (PA). In this study, the most typical and abundant USFA present with PA in vegetable oils were quantified. More importantly, certain proportional relationships between the integrated intensities of peaks centered at 1656 cm-1 (S1656) in the surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectra of different USFA were confirmed. Therefore, the LA or ALA content could be converted into an equivalent virtual OA content enabling the characterization of the USFA content in vegetable oils using the equivalent total OA content. In combination with the S1656 of pure OA and using peanut, sesame, and soybean oils as examples, the ranges of S1656 corresponding to the National Standards of China were established to allow the rapid authentication of vegetable oils. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer analyses verified the accuracy of the method, with relative errors of less than 5%. Moreover, this method can be extended to other detection fields, such as diseases.

  10. Coherent Raman Scattering Microscopy for Evaluation of Head and Neck Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoesli, Rebecca C; Orringer, Daniel A; McHugh, Jonathan B; Spector, Matthew E

    2017-09-01

    Objective We aim to describe a novel, label-free, real-time imaging technique, coherent Raman scattering (CRS) microscopy, for histopathological evaluation of head and neck cancer. We evaluated the ability of CRS microscopy to delineate between tumor and nonneoplastic tissue in tissue samples from patients with head and neck cancer. Study Design Prospective case series. Setting Tertiary care medical center. Subjects and Methods Patients eligible were surgical candidates with biopsy-proven, previously untreated head and neck carcinoma and were consented preoperatively for participation in this study. Tissue was collected from 50 patients, and after confirmation of tumor and normal specimens by hematoxylin and eosin (H&E), there were 42 tumor samples and 42 normal adjacent controls. Results There were 42 confirmed carcinoma specimens on H&E, and CRS microscopy identified 37 as carcinoma. Of the 42 normal specimens, CRS microscopy identified 40 as normal. This resulted in a sensitivity of 88.1% and specificity of 95.2% in distinguishing between neoplastic and nonneoplastic images. Conclusion CRS microscopy is a unique label-free imaging technique that can provide rapid, high-resolution images and can accurately determine the presence of head and neck carcinoma. This holds potential for implementation into standard practice, allowing frozen margin evaluation even at institutions without a histopathology laboratory.

  11. Single-Molecule Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering: Can STEM/EELS Image Electromagnetic Hot Spots?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsaleh-Kohan, Nasrin; Iberi, Vighter; Simmons, Philip D; Bigelow, Nicholas W; Vaschillo, Alex; Rowland, Meng M; Best, Michael D; Pennycook, Stephen J; Masiello, David J; Guiton, Beth S; Camden, Jon P

    2012-08-16

    Since the observation of single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS) in 1997, questions regarding the nature of the electromagnetic hot spots responsible for such observations still persist. For the first time, we employ electron-energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) to obtain maps of the localized surface plasmon modes of SMSERS-active nanostructures, which are resolved in both space and energy. Single-molecule character is confirmed by the bianalyte approach using two isotopologues of Rhodamine 6G. Surprisingly, the STEM/EELS plasmon maps do not show any direct signature of an electromagnetic hot spot in the gaps between the nanoparticles. The origins of this observation are explored using a fully three-dimensional electrodynamics simulation of both the electron-energy-loss probability and the near-electric field enhancements. The calculations suggest that electron beam excitation of the hot spot is possible, but only when the electron beam is located outside of the junction region.

  12. Single-step, high yield synthesis of gold nanoworms and their surface enhanced Raman scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Waqqar; van Ruitenbeek, Jan M.

    Rod-shaped gold nanoparticles have attracted enormous attention owing to their interesting optical properties arising from the surface plasmon resonances. Slight deviation from the rod morphology can markedly change the optical properties. For-example, worm-shaped gold nanoparticles can have more than two plasmon peaks. Furthermore, they show much higher local field enhancements as compared to their rod-shaped counterparts. We have devised a simple seedless, high-yield protocol for the synthesis of gold nanoworms (NWs). NWs were grown simply by reducing HAuCl4 with ascorbic acid in a high pH reaction medium, and in the presence of growth directional agents, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and AgNO3. In contrast to the seed-mediated growth of gold nanorods where a seed grows into a rod, NWs grow by oriental attachment of nanoparticles. By varying different reaction parameters we were able to control the length of NWs from a few nanometers to micrometers. Furthermore, the aspect ratio can also be tuned over a wide range. Gold NWs show excellent surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) properties. Ultra-low concentrations of various target molecules were detected using NWs based SERS substrates.

  13. Surface enhanced Raman scattering of monolayer MX2 with metallic nano particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan; Wu, Ye-Cun; Yang, Mei; Liu, Xiao; Coileáin, Cormac Ó.; Abid, Mourad; Abid, Mohamed; Wang, Jing-Jing; Shvets, Igor; Xu, Hongjun; Chun, Byong Sun; Liu, Huajun; Wu, Han-Chun

    2016-07-01

    Monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides MX2 (M = Mo, W; X = S) exhibit remarkable electronic and optical properties, making them candidates for application within flexible nano-optoelectronics. The ability to achieve a high optical signal, while quantitatively monitoring strain in real-time is the key requirement for applications in flexible sensing and photonics devices. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) allows us to achieve both simultaneously. However, the SERS depends crucially on the size and shape of the metallic nanoparticles (NPs), which have a large impact on its detection sensitivity. Here, we investigated the SERS of monolayer MX2, with particular attention paid to the effect of the distribution of the metallic NPs. We show that the SERS depends crucially on the distribution of the metallic NPs and also the phonon mode of the MX2. Moreover, strong coupling between MX2 and metallic NPs, through surface plasmon excitation, results in splitting of the and modes and an additional peak becomes apparent. For a WS2-Ag system the intensity of the additional peak increases exponentially with local strain, which opens another interesting window to quantitatively measure the local strain using SERS. Our experimental study may be useful for the application of monolayer MX2 in flexible nano-optoelectronics.

  14. Gold split-ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Yue, Weisheng

    2013-10-24

    We used gold split ring resonators (SRRs) as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The arrays of SRRs were fabricated by electron-beam lithography in combination with plasma etching. In the detection of rhodamine 6G (R6G) molecules, SERS enhancement factors of the order of 105 was achieved. This SERS enhancement increased as the size of the split gap decrease as a consequence of the matching between the resonance wavelength of the SRRs and the excitation wavelength of SERS. As the size of the split gap decreased, the localized surface plasmon resonance shifted to near the excitation wavelength and, thus, resulted in the increase in the electric field on the nanostructures. We used finite integration method (FIT) to simulate numerically the electromagnetic properties of the SRRs. The results of the simulation agreed well with our experimental observations. We anticipate this work will provide an approach to manipulate the SERS enhancement by modulating the size of split gap with SRRs without affecting the area and structural arrangement. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  15. Combined Dynamic Light Scattering and Raman Spectroscopy Approach for Characterizing the Aggregation of Therapeutic Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Neil Lewis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Determination of the physicochemical properties of protein therapeutics and their aggregates is critical for developing formulations that enhance product efficacy, stability, safety and manufacturability. Analytical challenges are compounded for materials: (1 that are formulated at high concentration, (2 that are formulated with a variety of excipients, and (3 that are available only in small volumes. In this article, a new instrument is described that measures protein secondary and tertiary structure, as well as molecular size, over a range of concentrations and formulation conditions of low volume samples. Specifically, characterization of colloidal and conformational stability is obtained through a combination of two well-established analytical techniques: dynamic light scattering (DLS and Raman spectroscopy, respectively. As the data for these two analytical modalities are collected on the same sample at the same time, the technique enables direct correlation between them, in addition to the more straightforward benefit of minimizing sample usage by providing multiple analytical measurements on the same aliquot non-destructively. The ability to differentiate between unfolding and aggregation that the combination of these techniques provides enables insights into underlying protein aggregation mechanisms. The article will report on mechanistic insights for aggregation that have been obtained from the application of this technique to the characterization of lysozyme, which was evaluated as a function of concentration and pH.

  16. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holthoff, Ellen L.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra N.; Hankus, Mikella E.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3) × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 μM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest. PMID:22163761

  17. A Nanosensor for TNT Detection Based on Molecularly Imprinted Polymers and Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikella E. Hankus

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We report on a new sensor strategy that integrates molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS. The sensor was developed to detect the explosive, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT. Micron thick films of sol gel-derived xerogels were deposited on a SERS-active surface as the sensing layer. Xerogels were molecularly imprinted for TNT using non-covalent interactions with the polymer matrix. Binding of the TNT within the polymer matrix results in unique SERS bands, which allow for detection and identification of the molecule in the MIP. This MIP-SERS sensor exhibits an apparent dissociation constant of (2.3 ± 0.3 × 10−5 M for TNT and a 3 µM detection limit. The response to TNT is reversible and the sensor is stable for at least 6 months. Key challenges, including developing a MIP formulation that is stable and integrated with the SERS substrate, and ensuring the MIP does not mask the spectral features of the target analyte through SERS polymer background, were successfully met. The results also suggest the MIP-SERS protocol can be extended to other target analytes of interest.

  18. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering-Based Immunoassay Technologies for Detection of Disease Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Smolsky

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Detection of biomarkers is of vital importance in disease detection, management, and monitoring of therapeutic efficacy. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the development of novel diagnostic methods that detect and quantify biomarkers with higher sensitivity and reliability, contributing to better disease diagnosis and prognosis. When it comes to such devastating diseases as cancer, these novel powerful methods allow for disease staging as well as detection of cancer at very early stages. Over the past decade, there have been some advances in the development of platforms for biomarker detection of diseases. The main focus has recently shifted to the development of simple and reliable diagnostic tests that are inexpensive, accurate, and can follow a patient’s disease progression and therapy response. The individualized approach in biomarker detection has been also emphasized with detection of multiple biomarkers in body fluids such as blood and urine. This review article covers the developments in Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS and related technologies with the primary focus on immunoassays. Limitations and advantages of the SERS-based immunoassay platform are discussed. The article thoroughly describes all components of the SERS immunoassay and highlights the superior capabilities of SERS readout strategy such as high sensitivity and simultaneous detection of a multitude of biomarkers. Finally, it introduces recently developed strategies for in vivo biomarker detection using SERS.

  19. Surfactant uptake dynamics in mammalian cells elucidated with quantitative coherent anti-stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanari Okuno

    Full Text Available The mechanism of surfactant-induced cell lysis has been studied with quantitative coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS microspectroscopy. The dynamics of surfactant molecules as well as intracellular biomolecules in living Chinese Hamster Lung (CHL cells has been examined for a low surfactant concentration (0.01 w%. By using an isotope labeled surfactant having CD bonds, surfactant uptake dynamics in living cells has been traced in detail. The simultaneous CARS imaging of the cell itself and the internalized surfactant has shown that the surfactant molecules is first accumulated inside a CHL cell followed by a sudden leak of cytosolic components such as proteins to the outside of the cell. This finding indicates that surfactant uptake occurs prior to the cell lysis, contrary to what has been believed: surface adsorption of surfactant molecules has been thought to occur first with subsequent disruption of cell membranes. Quantitative CARS microspectroscopy enables us to determine the molecular concentration of the surfactant molecules accumulated in a cell. We have also investigated the effect of a drug, nocodazole, on the surfactant uptake dynamics. As a result of the inhibition of tubulin polymerization by nocodazole, the surfactant uptake rate is significantly lowered. This fact suggests that intracellular membrane trafficking contributes to the surfactant uptake mechanism.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis of sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Lixin; Wang, Haibo; Wang, Jian; Gong, Ke; Jia, Yi; Zhang, Huili; Sun, Mengtao

    2008-10-01

    A sensitive silver substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy is synthesized under multimode microwave irradiation. The microwave-assisted synthesis of the SERS-active substrate was carried out in a modified domestic microwave oven of 2450MHz, and the reductive reaction was conducted in a polypropylene container under microwave irradiation with a power of 100W for 5min. Formaldehyde was employed as both the reductant and microwave absorber in the reductive process. The effects of different heating methods (microwave dielectric and conventional) on the properties of the SERS-active substrates were investigated. Samples obtained with 5min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100W have more well-defined edges, corners, and sharper surface features, while the samples synthesized with 1h of conventional heating at 40°C consist primarily of spheroidal nanoparticles. The SERS peak intensity of the ˜1593cm-1 band of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid adsorbed on silver nanoparticles synthesized with 5min of microwave irradiation at a power of 100W is about 30 times greater than when it is adsorbed on samples synthesized with 1h of conventional heating at 40°C. The results of quantum chemical calculations are in good agreement with our experimental data. This method is expected to be utilized for the synthesis of other metal nanostructural materials.

  1. Self-assembled plasmonic templates produced by microwave annealing: applications to surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panagiotopoulos, N. T.; Kalfagiannis, N.; Vasilopoulos, K. C.; Pliatsikas, N.; Kassavetis, S.; Vourlias, G.; Karakassides, M. A.; Patsalas, P.

    2015-05-01

    Perhaps the simplest method for creating metal nanoparticles on a substrate is by driving their self-assembly with the thermal annealing of a thin metal film. By properly tuning the annealing parameters one hopes to discover a recipe that allows the pre-determined design of the NP arrangement. However, thermal treatment is known for detrimental effects and is not really the manufacturer’s route of choice when it comes to large-scale applications. An alternative method is the use of microwave annealing, a method that has never been applied for metal processing, due to the high reflectance of microwave radiation at the surface of a metal. However, in this work we challenge the widely used nanostructuring methods by proving the microwave’s annealing ability to produce plasmonic templates, out of extremely thin metal films, by simply using a domestic microwave oven apparatus. We show that this process is generic and independent of the deposition method used for the metal and we further quantify the suitability of these plasmonic templates for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering applications.

  2. Surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of dual-functional Fe3O4/Au composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li-Ping; Huang, Yu-Bin; Lai, Ying-Huang

    2018-03-01

    There is a high demand for multifunctional materials that can integrate sample collection and sensing. In this study, magnetic Fe3O4 clusters were fabricated using a simple solvent-thermal method. The effect of the reductant (sodium citrate, SC) on the structure and morphology of Fe3O4 was examined by the variation in the reagent amount. The resulting Fe3O4 clusters were functionalized with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane (APTES) to anchor Au nanoparticles to its surface. The fabricated composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. Dual-functional Fe3O4/Au clusters were obtained, effectively combining magnetic and plasmonic optical properties. The magnetic Fe3O4 cluster cores permitted the adsorption of the probe molecules, while sample concentration and collection were carried out under an external magnetic field. In addition, 4-nitrothiophenol (4-NTP) was chosen as the probe molecule to examine the analyte concentration ability and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of the Fe3O4/Au composites. The results indicated that the Fe3O4/Au clusters exhibit a prominent SERS effect. The best 4-NTP detection limit obtained was 1 × 10-8 M, with a corresponding SERS analytical enhancement factor (AEF) exceeding 2 × 105.

  3. Fast quantitative detection of thiram using surface-enhanced Raman scattering and support vector machine regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weng, Shizhuang; Yuan, Baohong; Zhu, Zede; Huang, Linsheng; Zhang, Dongyan; Zheng, Ling

    2016-03-01

    As a novel and ultrasensitive detection technology that had advantages of fingerprint effect, high speed and low cost, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) was used to develop the regression models for the fast quantitative detection of thiram by support vector machine regression (SVR) in the paper. Meanwhile, three parameter optimization methods, which were grid search (GS), genetic algorithm (GA) and particle swarm optimization (PSO), were employed to optimize the internal parameters of SVR. Furthermore, the influence of the spectral number, spectral wavenumber range and principal component analysis (PCA) on the quantitative detection was also discussed. Firstly, the experiments demonstrate the proposed method can realize the fast and quantitative detection of thiram, and the best result is obtained by GS-SVR with the spectra of the range of characteristic peak which are processed by PCA. And the effect of GS, GA, PSO on the parameter optimization is similar, but the analysis time has a great difference in which GS is the fastest. Considering the analysis accuracy and time simultaneously, the spectral number of samples over each concentration should be set to 50. Then, developing the quantitative model with the spectra of range of characteristic peak can reduce analysis time on the promise of ensuring the detection accuracy. Additionally, PCA can further reduce the detection error through reserving the main information of the spectra data and eliminating the noise.

  4. Detection of human brain tumor infiltration with quantitative stimulated Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Minbiao; Lewis, Spencer; Camelo-Piragua, Sandra; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Snuderl, Matija; Venneti, Sriram; Fisher-Hubbard, Amanda; Garrard, Mia; Fu, Dan; Wang, Anthony C; Heth, Jason A; Maher, Cormac O; Sanai, Nader; Johnson, Timothy D; Freudiger, Christian W; Sagher, Oren; Xie, Xiaoliang Sunney; Orringer, Daniel A

    2015-10-14

    Differentiating tumor from normal brain is a major barrier to achieving optimal outcome in brain tumor surgery. New imaging techniques for visualizing tumor margins during surgery are needed to improve surgical results. We recently demonstrated the ability of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy, a nondestructive, label-free optical method, to reveal glioma infiltration in animal models. We show that SRS reveals human brain tumor infiltration in fresh, unprocessed surgical specimens from 22 neurosurgical patients. SRS detects tumor infiltration in near-perfect agreement with standard hematoxylin and eosin light microscopy (κ = 0.86). The unique chemical contrast specific to SRS microscopy enables tumor detection by revealing quantifiable alterations in tissue cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in tumor-infiltrated tissues. To ensure that SRS microscopic data can be easily used in brain tumor surgery, without the need for expert interpretation, we created a classifier based on cellularity, axonal density, and protein/lipid ratio in SRS images capable of detecting tumor infiltration with 97.5% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity. Quantitative SRS microscopy detects the spread of tumor cells, even in brain tissue surrounding a tumor that appears grossly normal. By accurately revealing tumor infiltration, quantitative SRS microscopy holds potential for improving the accuracy of brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  5. Sparsely-sampled hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering microscopy: a theoretical investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Haonan; Liao, Chien-Sheng; Wang, Pu; Huang, Kai-Chih; Bouman, Charles A.; Kong, Nan; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2017-02-01

    A hyperspectral image corresponds to a data cube with two spatial dimensions and one spectral dimension. Through linear un-mixing, hyperspectral images can be decomposed into spectral signatures of pure components as well as their concentration maps. Due to this distinct advantage on component identification, hyperspectral imaging becomes a rapidly emerging platform for engineering better medicine and expediting scientific discovery. Among various hyperspectral imaging techniques, hyperspectral stimulated Raman scattering (HSRS) microscopy acquires data in a pixel-by-pixel scanning manner. Nevertheless, current image acquisition speed for HSRS is insufficient to capture the dynamics of freely moving subjects. Instead of reducing the pixel dwell time to achieve speed-up, which would inevitably decrease signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), we propose to reduce the total number of sampled pixels. Location of sampled pixels are carefully engineered with triangular wave Lissajous trajectory. Followed by a model-based image in-painting algorithm, the complete data is recovered for linear unmixing. Simulation results show that by careful selection of trajectory, a fill rate as low as 10% is sufficient to generate accurate linear unmixing results. The proposed framework applies to any hyperspectral beam-scanning imaging platform which demands high acquisition speed.

  6. Indirect glyphosate detection based on ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Meng-Lei; Gao, Yu; Li, Yali; Li, Xueliang; Zhang, Huanjie; Han, Xiao Xia; Zhao, Bing; Su, Liang

    2018-01-05

    Glyphosate is one of the most commonly-used and non-selective herbicides in agriculture, which may directly pollute the environment and threaten human health. A simple and effective approach to assessment of its damage to the natural environment is thus quite necessary. However, traditional chromatography-based detection methods usually suffer from complex pretreatment procedures. Herein, we propose a simple and sensitive method for the determination of glyphosate by combining ninhydrin reaction and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy. The product (purple color dye, PD) of the ninhydrin reaction is found to SERS-active and directly correlate with the glyphosate concentration. The limit of detection of the proposed method for glyphosate is as low as 1.43×10 -8 mol·L -1 with a relatively wider linear concentration range (1.0×10 -7 -1.0×10 -4 mol·L -1 ), which demonstrates its great potential in rapid, highly sensitive concentration determination of glyphosate in practical applications for safety assessment of food and environment. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two photon excited fluorescence for neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romeike, Bernd F M; Meyer, Tobias; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf; Petersen, Iver; Dietzek, Benjamin; Popp, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    There is no established method for in vivo imaging during biopsy and surgery of the brain, which is capable to generate competitive images in terms of resolution and contrast comparable with histopathological staining. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and two photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy are non-invasive all optical imaging techniques that are capable of high resolution, label-free, real-time, nondestructive examination of living cells and tissues. They provide image contrast based on the molecular composition of the specimen which allows the study of large tissue areas of frozen tissue sections ex vivo. Here, preliminary data on 55 lesions of the central nervous system are presented. The generated images very nicely demonstrate cytological and architectural features required for pathological tumor typing and grading. Furthermore, information on the molecular content of a probe is provided. The tool will be implemented into a biopsy needle or endoscope in the near future for in vivo studies. With this promising multimodal imaging approach the neurosurgeon might directly see blood vessels to minimize the risk for biopsy associated hemorrhages. The attending neuropathologist might directly identify the tumor and guide the selection of representative specimens for further studies. Thus, collection of non-representative material could be avoided and the risk to injure eloquent brain tissue minimized. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioorthogonal chemical imaging of metabolic activities in live mammalian hippocampal tissues with stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fanghao; Lamprecht, Michael R.; Wei, Lu; Morrison, Barclay; Min, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Brain is an immensely complex system displaying dynamic and heterogeneous metabolic activities. Visualizing cellular metabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids in brain with chemical specificity has been a long-standing challenge. Recent development in metabolic labeling of small biomolecules allows the study of these metabolisms at the global level. However, these techniques generally require nonphysiological sample preparation for either destructive mass spectrometry imaging or secondary labeling with relatively bulky fluorescent labels. In this study, we have demonstrated bioorthogonal chemical imaging of DNA, RNA, protein and lipid metabolism in live rat brain hippocampal tissues by coupling stimulated Raman scattering microscopy with integrated deuterium and alkyne labeling. Heterogeneous metabolic incorporations for different molecular species and neurogenesis with newly-incorporated DNA were observed in the dentate gyrus of hippocampus at the single cell level. We further applied this platform to study metabolic responses to traumatic brain injury in hippocampal slice cultures, and observed marked upregulation of protein and lipid metabolism particularly in the hilus region of the hippocampus within days of mechanical injury. Thus, our method paves the way for the study of complex metabolic profiles in live brain tissue under both physiological and pathological conditions with single-cell resolution and minimal perturbation.

  9. Restorable piezochromism phenomenon in an AIE molecular crystal: combined synchronous Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liqun; Wang, Kai; Deng, Jian; Zhang, Zhe; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yuguang

    2017-02-22

    Many AIE active molecules have been designed and synthesized, and have been found to possess many interesting characteristics. In recent years, research into AIE crystals has increased, and it has been clearly shown that the piezochromic effect of AIE crystals depends on their structure. While most of the related research has given qualitative results, to quantitatively reveal molecular conditions under different pressure conditions, crystals of an AIE material (2Z,2'Z)-3,3'-(1,4-phenylene)bis(2-(naphthalen-2-yl)acrylonitrile) were investigated by synchronous Raman scattering and fluorescence spectroscopies. The molecular structure of the crystal changed during the process of pressurizing and then depressurizing under hydrostatic pressure, and a 142 nm red-shift value was observed in the emission spectrum of the PBNA crystal. The crystal was transformed into a new phase when the pressure was above 1.03 GPa and returned to the original phase when the pressure was decreased. The unique restorable phase transformation process of the crystal of this AIE active material could be used for erasable optical information storage and stress sensing devices.

  10. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Bacteria in Microwells Constructed from Silver Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Çulha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Whole bacterial cell characterization is critically important for fast bacterial identification. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS is proven to be powerful technique to serve such a goal. In this study, the characterization of whole bacterial cells in the microwells constructed from colloidal silver nanoparticles (AgNPs with “convective-assembly” method is reported. The proper size of the microwells for the model bacteria, Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus cohnii, is determined to be 1.2 μm from their electron microscopy images. A minimum dilution factor of 20 is necessary for the bacterial samples collected from growth media to diminish the bacterial aggregation to place the bacterial cells into the microwells. The constructed microwell structures are tested for their bacterial SERS performance and compared to the SERS spectra obtained from the samples prepared with a simple mixing of bacteria and AgNPs for the same bacteria. The results indicate that microwell structures not only improve the spectral quality but also increase the reproducibility of the SERS spectra.

  11. Dual-Pump Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering Temperature and CO2 Concentration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucht, Robert P.; Velur-Natarajan, Viswanathan; Carter, Campbell D.; Grinstead, Keith D., Jr.; Gord, James R.; Danehy, Paul M.; Fiechtner, G. J.; Farrow, Roger L.

    2003-01-01

    Measurements of temperature and CO2 concentration using dual-pump coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering, (CARS) are described. The measurements were performed in laboratory flames,in a room-temperature gas cell, and on an engine test stand at the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. A modeless dye laser, a single-mode Nd:YAG laser, and an unintensified back-illuminated charge-coupled device digital camera were used for these measurements. The CARS measurements were performed on a single-laser-shot basis. The standard deviations of the temperatures and CO2 mole fractions determined from single-shot dual-pump CARS spectra in steady laminar propane/air flames were approximately 2 and 10% of the mean values of approximately 2000 K and 0.10, respectively. The precision and accuracy of single-shot temperature measurements obtained from the nitrogen part of the dual-pump CARS system were investigated in detail in near-adiabatic hydrogen/air/CO2 flames. The precision of the CARS temperature measurements was found to be comparable to the best results reported in the literature for conventional two-laser, single-pump CARS. The application of dual-pump CARS for single-shot measurements in a swirl-stabilized combustor fueled with JP-8 was also demonstrated.

  12. Investigation of lipid homeostasis in living Drosophila by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Cheng-Hao; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wu, June-Tai; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2012-12-01

    To improve our understanding of lipid metabolism, Drosophila is used as a model animal, and its lipid homeostasis is monitored by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy. We are able to achieve in vivo imaging of larval fat body (analogous to adipose tissue in mammals) and oenocytes (analogous to hepatocytes) in Drosophila larvae at subcellular level without any labeling. By overexpressing two lipid regulatory proteins-Brummer lipase (Bmm) and lipid storage droplet-2 (Lsd-2)-we found different phenotypes and responses under fed and starved conditions. Comparing with the control larva, we observed more lipid droplet accumulation by ˜twofold in oenocytes of fat-body-Bmm-overexpressing (FB-Bmm-overexpressing) mutant under fed condition, and less lipid by ˜fourfold in oenocytes of fat-body-Lsd-2-overexpressing (FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing) mutant under starved condition. Moreover, together with reduced size of lipid droplets, the lipid content in the fat body of FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant decreases much faster than that of the control and FB-Lsd-2-overexpressing mutant during starvation. From long-term starvation assay, we found FB-Bmm-overexpressing mutant has a shorter lifespan, which can be attributed to faster consumption of lipid in its fat body. Our results demonstrate in vivo observations of direct influences of Bmm and Lsd-2 on lipid homeostasis in Drosophila larvae.

  13. Design of Ag nanorods for sensitivity and thermal stability of surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Lingwei; Zhang, Zhengjun; Huang, Hanchen

    2017-10-01

    The technology of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has found many applications and may find more if it can possess both sensitivity and thermal stability. This paper reports a rational design of Ag nanorods to simultaneously achieve two competing goals: the sensitivity and the thermal stability of SERS substrates. The Ag nanorods are designed and synthesized using physical vapor deposition under the condition of glancing angle incidence. The working pressure of the vacuum chamber is controlled so the mean free path of depositing atoms is comparable to the dimension of the chamber, so as to grow Ag nanorods with small diameter, and small but clear separation for optimal SERS sensitivity. Such Ag nanorods are further capped with Al2O3 on their top surfaces to reduce the diffusion-induced coarsening at high temperatures, and thereby to improve the thermal stability for SERS detections. Meanwhile, since the side surfaces of Ag nanorods are not coated with oxides in this approach, the SERS sensitivity is largely preserved while good thermal stability is achieved.

  14. Polarized Raman scattering in single crystals of Nd 0.7 Sr 0.3 MnO 3

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 58; Issue 5-6. Polarized Raman scattering in single crystals of Nd0.7Sr0.3MnO3. M Pattabiraman G Rangarajan Kwang-Yong Choi P Lemmens G Guentherodt G Balakrishnan D McK Paul M R Less. Colossal Magnetoresistance & Other Materials Volume 58 Issue 5-6 ...

  15. Soliton breathing induced by stimulated Raman scattering and self-steepening in octave-spanning Kerr frequency comb generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Chengying; Zhang, Lin; Kimerling, Lionel C; Michel, Jurgen; Yang, Changxi

    2015-07-13

    We investigate the impact of stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and self-steepening (SS) on breather soliton dynamics in octave-spanning Kerr frequency comb generation. SRS and SS can transform chaotic fluctuations in cavity solitons into periodic breathing. Furthermore, with SRS and SS considered, bandwidth of the soliton breathes more than two times stronger. The simultaneous presence of SRS and SS also make the soliton breathe slower and degrades the coherence of the soliton.

  16. Evaluation of NaCl Effect on Vibration-Delaminated Metal-Polymer Composites by Improved Micro-Raman Methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Zumelzu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyethylene terephthalate (PET is a polymer coating that protects the electrolytic chromium coated steel (ECCS against aggressive electrolytes like NaCl. It is widely accepted by manufacturers that NaCl has no effect on the PET coating, which is inert. However, we showed that there are some effects at the structural level, caused by vibrations, and facilitated by defects on the layers. The vibrations occurring during the transportation of food containers produce delaminations at given points of the metal-polymer interface, known as antinodes, which in turn may produce PET degradation affecting food quality. The former can be determined by electrochemical measurements, and the changes in composition or structural order can be characterized by Raman. The present work applied this latter technique in experimental samples of PET-coated ECCS sheets by performing perpendicular and parallel analyses to the surface, and determined that it constitutes a new potential methodology to determine the behavior of the composite under the above conditions. The results demonstrated that the delamination areas on the PET facilitated polymer degradation by the electrolyte. Moreover, the Raman characterization evidenced the presence of multilayers and crystalline orderings, which limited its functionality as a protective coating.

  17. OMI/Aura Cloud Pressure and Fraction (Raman Scattering) 200-km swath subset along CloudSat track V003 (OMCLDRR_CPR) at GES DISC

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This is the OMI/Aura Cloud Pressure and Fraction (Raman Scattering) subset along CloudSat tracks, for the purposes of the A-Train mission. The original data product...

  18. Temperature Measurements in Reacting Flows Using Time-Resolved Femtosecond Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (fs-CARS) Spectroscopy (Postprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Roy, Sukesh; Kinnius, Paul J; Lucht, Robert P; Gord, James R

    2007-01-01

    Time-resolved femtosecond coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (fs-CARS) spectroscopy of the nitrogen molecule is used for the measurement of temperature in atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic, hydrogen-air diffusion flames...

  19. Polarized radiative transfer through terrestrial atmosphere accounting for rotational Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelli, Luca; Rozanov, Vladimir V.; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2017-10-01

    This paper is devoted to the phenomenological derivation of the vector radiative transfer equation (VRTE) accounting for first-order source terms of rotational Raman scattering (RRS), which is responsible for the in-filling of Fraunhofer and telluric lines by inelastic scattered photons. The implementation of the solution of the VRTE within the framework of the forward-adjoint method is given. For the Ca II and the oxygen A-band (O2 A) spectral windows, values of reflectance, degree of linear polarization (DOLP) and in-filling, in zenith and nadir geometry, are compared with results given in literature. Moreover, the dependence of these quantities on the columnar loading and vertical layering of non-spherical dust aerosols is investigated, together with their changes as function of two habits of ice crystals, modeled as regular icosahedra and severely rough aggregated columns. Bi-directional effects of an underlying polarizing surface are accounted for. The forward simulations are performed for one selected wavelength in the continuum and one in the strong absorption of the O2 A, as their combination can be exploited for the spaceborne retrieval of aerosol and cloud properties. For this reason, we also mimic seasonal maps of reflectance, DOLP and in-filling, that are prototypical measurements of the Ultraviolet-Visible-Near Infrared (UVN) sensor, at a nominal spectral resolution of 0.12 nm. UVN is the core payload of the upcoming European Sentinel-4 mission, that will observe Europe in geostationary orbit for air quality monitoring purposes. In general, in the core of O2 A, depending on the optical thickness and altitude of the scatterers, we find RRS-induced in-filling values ranging from 1.3% to 1.8%, while DOLP decreases by 1%. Conversely, while negligible differences of RRS in-filling are calculated with different ice crystal habits, the severely rough aggregated column model can reduce DOLP by a factor up to 10%. The UVN maps of in-filling show values varying

  20. Differentiation of bacterial versus viral otitis media using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry probe (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Youbo; Shelton, Ryan L.; Tu, Haohua; Nolan, Ryan M.; Monroy, Guillermo L.; Chaney, Eric J.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2016-02-01

    Otitis media (OM) is a highly prevalent disease that can be caused by either a bacterial or viral infection. Because antibiotics are only effective against bacterial infections, blind use of antibiotics without definitive knowledge of the infectious agent, though commonly practiced, can lead to the problems of potential harmful side effects, wasteful misuse of medical resources, and the development of antimicrobial resistance. In this work, we investigate the feasibility of using a combined Raman scattering spectroscopy and low coherence interferometry (LCI) device to differentiate OM infections caused by viruses and bacteria and improve our diagnostic ability of OM. Raman spectroscopy, an established tool for molecular analysis of biological tissue, has been shown capable of identifying different bacterial species, although mostly based on fixed or dried sample cultures. LCI has been demonstrated recently as a promising tool for determining tympanic membrane (TM) thickness and the presence and thickness of middle-ear biofilm located behind the TM. We have developed a fiber-based ear insert that incorporates spatially-aligned Raman and LCI probes for point-of-care diagnosis of OM. As shown in human studies, the Raman probe provides molecular signatures of bacterial- and viral-infected OM and normal middle-ear cavities, and LCI helps to identify depth-resolved structural information as well as guide and monitor positioning of the Raman spectroscopy beam for relatively longer signal acquisition time. Differentiation of OM infections is determined by correlating in vivo Raman data collected from human subjects with the Raman features of different bacterial and viral species obtained from cultured samples.

  1. Silver nanocrystal-modified silicon nanowires as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Weinan; Yasseri, Amir A; Sharma, Shashank; Li, Zhiyong; Woo, Han Young; Vak, Doojin; Bazan, Guillermo C; Kelley, Anne Myers

    2006-09-01

    Metal catalyzed, CVD-grown silicon nanowires decorated by chemical assembly of closely spaced Ag nanocrystals were modified with the well-known "silver mirror" reaction and investigated as substrates for surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) and hyper-Raman (SEHRS) spectroscopy. Four chromophores were examined: Rhodamine 6G, crystal violet, a cyanine dye, and a cationic donor-acceptor substituted stilbene. After soaking the substrates overnight in 10(-4) M aqueous chromophore solutions, all four chromophores gave good-quality SERS spectra in < or =60 s using <1 microW of 458-nm cw laser power, and SEHRS spectra are obtained in < or =120 s using <1 mW of mode-locked 916-nm laser power. Results from this substrate are compared with those on colloidal silver nanoparticles deposited as a film, as well as surfaces grown by the silver mirror reaction.

  2. Vibrational analysis by Raman spectroscopy of the interface between dental adhesive resin and dentin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, M; Kato, H; Wakumoto, S

    1991-07-01

    The Raman microprobe technique was applied for analysis of the molecular components at the adhesive interface between 4-META/MMA-TBB resin and dentin. The Raman spectra showed that the 4-META molecules in monomer solution were mostly hydrolyzed into 4-MET molecules, which were then co-polymerized with MMA molecules to form resin and resin-reinforced dentin layers. On the basis of line analysis by the Raman microprobe, resin molecules were estimated to penetrate 6 microns into the dentin from the interface. Raman intensity studies indicated that the concentration of 4-MET molecular units in the resin-reinforced dentin was more than four times the concentration in the original monomer solution. This demonstrated the excellent infiltration ability of 4-MET monomer into dentin substrate in situ.

  3. Ultraviolet Resonant Raman Enhancements in the Detection of Explosives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Short Jr., Billy Joe [Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA (United States)

    2009-06-01

    Raman-based spectroscopy is potentially militarily useful for standoff detection of high explosives. Normal (non-resonance) and resonance Raman spectroscopies are both light scattering techniques that use a laser to measure the vibrational spectrum of a sample. In resonance Raman, the laser is tuned to match the wavelength of a strong electronic absorbance in the molecule of interest, whereas, in normal Raman the laser is not tuned to any strong electronic absorbance bands. The selection of appropriate excitation wavelengths in resonance Raman can result in a dramatic increase in the Raman scattering efficiency of select band(s) associated with the electronic transition. Other than the excitation wavelength, however, resonance Raman is performed experimentally the same as normal Raman. In these studies, normal and resonance Raman spectral signatures of select solid high explosive (HE) samples and explosive precursors were collected at 785 nm, 244 nm and 229 nm. Solutions of PETN, TNT, and explosive precursors (DNT & PNT) in acetonitrile solvent as an internal Raman standard were quantitatively evaluated using ultraviolet resonance Raman (UVRR) microscopy and normal Raman spectroscopy as a function of power and select excitation wavelengths. Use of an internal standard allowed resonance enhancements to be estimated at 229 nm and 244 nm. Investigations demonstrated that UVRR provided ~2000-fold enhancement at 244 nm and ~800-fold improvement at 229 nm while PETN showed a maximum of ~25-fold at 244 nm and ~190-fold enhancement at 229 nm solely from resonance effects when compared to normal Raman measurements. In addition to the observed resonance enhancements, additional Raman signal enhancements are obtained with ultraviolet excitation (i.e., Raman scattering scales as !4 for measurements based on scattered photons). A model, based partly on the resonance Raman enhancement results for HE solutions, is presented for estimating Raman enhancements for solid HE samples.

  4. Analysis of environmental microplastics by vibrational microspectroscopy: FTIR, Raman or both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käppler, Andrea; Fischer, Dieter; Oberbeckmann, Sonja; Schernewski, Gerald; Labrenz, Matthias; Eichhorn, Klaus-Jochen; Voit, Brigitte

    2016-11-01

    The contamination of aquatic ecosystems with microplastics has recently been reported through many studies, and negative impacts on the aquatic biota have been described. For the chemical identification of microplastics, mainly Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy are used. But up to now, a critical comparison and validation of both spectroscopic methods with respect to microplastics analysis is missing. To close this knowledge gap, we investigated environmental samples by both Raman and FTIR spectroscopy. Firstly, particles and fibres >500 μm extracted from beach sediment samples were analysed by Raman and FTIR microspectroscopic single measurements. Our results illustrate that both methods are in principle suitable to identify microplastics from the environment. However, in some cases, especially for coloured particles, a combination of both spectroscopic methods is necessary for a complete and reliable characterisation of the chemical composition. Secondly, a marine sample containing particles microplastics as well as spectra quality, measurement time and handling. We show that FTIR imaging leads to significant underestimation (about 35 %) of microplastics compared to Raman imaging, especially in the size range microplastics fraction into 500-50 μm (rapid and reliable analysis by FTIR imaging) and into 50-1 μm (detailed and more time-consuming analysis by Raman imaging). Graphical Abstract Marine microplastic sample (fraction <400 μm) on a silicon filter (middle) with the corresponding Raman and IR images.

  5. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) for Detection in Immunoassays. Applications, fundamentals, and optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Driskell, Jeremy Daniel [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2006-08-09

    Immunoassays have been utilized for the detection of biological analytes for several decades. Many formats and detection strategies have been explored, each having unique advantages and disadvantages. More recently, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has been introduced as a readout method for immunoassays, and has shown great potential to meet many key analytical figures of merit. This technology is in its infancy and this dissertation explores the diversity of this method as well as the mechanism responsible for surface enhancement. Approaches to reduce assay times are also investigated. Implementing the knowledge gained from these studies will lead to a more sensitive immunoassay requiring less time than its predecessors. This dissertation is organized into six sections. The first section includes a literature review of the previous work that led to this dissertation. A general overview of the different approaches to immunoassays is given, outlining the strengths and weaknesses of each. Included is a detailed review of binding kinetics, which is central for decreasing assay times. Next, the theoretical underpinnings of SERS is reviewed at its current level of understanding. Past work has argued that surface plasmon resonance (SPR) of the enhancing substrate influences the SERS signal; therefore, the SPR of the extrinsic Raman labels (ERLs) utilized in our SERS-based immunoassay is discussed. Four original research chapters follow the Introduction, each presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 2 modifies a SERS-based immunoassay previously developed in our group, extending it to the low-level detection of viral pathogens and demonstrating its versatility in terms of analyte type, Chapter 3 investigates the influence of ERL size, material composition, and separation distance between the ERLs and capture substrate on the SERS signal. This chapter links SPR with SERS enhancement factors and is consistent with many of the results from theoretical treatments

  6. Templated green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in onion epidermal cells suitable for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Espina Palanco

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We report fast and simple green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in the epidermal cells of onions after incubation with AgNO3 solution. The biological environment supports the generation of silver nanostructures in two ways. The plant tissue delivers reducing chemicals for the initial formation of small silver clusters and their following conversion to plasmonic particles. Additionally, the natural morphological structures of the onion layers, in particular the extracellular matrix provides a biological template for the growth of plasmonic nanostructures. This is indicated by red glowing images of extracellular spaces in dark field microscopy of onion layers a few hours after AgNO3 exposure due to the formation of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanostructures generated in the extracellular space of onion layers and within the epidermal cell walls can serve as enhancing plasmonic structures for one- and two-photon-excited spectroscopy such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS and surface enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS. Our studies demonstrate a templated green preparation of enhancing plasmonic nanoparticles and suggest a new route to deliver silver nanoparticles as basic building blocks of plasmonic nanosensors to plants by the uptake of solutions of metal salts.

  7. Templated green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in onion epidermal cells suitable for surface-enhanced Raman and hyper-Raman scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espina Palanco, Marta; Bo Mogensen, Klaus; Gühlke, Marina; Heiner, Zsuzsanna; Kneipp, Janina; Kneipp, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    We report fast and simple green synthesis of plasmonic silver nanoparticles in the epidermal cells of onions after incubation with AgNO3 solution. The biological environment supports the generation of silver nanostructures in two ways. The plant tissue delivers reducing chemicals for the initial formation of small silver clusters and their following conversion to plasmonic particles. Additionally, the natural morphological structures of the onion layers, in particular the extracellular matrix provides a biological template for the growth of plasmonic nanostructures. This is indicated by red glowing images of extracellular spaces in dark field microscopy of onion layers a few hours after AgNO3 exposure due to the formation of silver nanoparticles. Silver nanostructures generated in the extracellular space of onion layers and within the epidermal cell walls can serve as enhancing plasmonic structures for one- and two-photon-excited spectroscopy such as surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface enhanced hyper-Raman scattering (SEHRS). Our studies demonstrate a templated green preparation of enhancing plasmonic nanoparticles and suggest a new route to deliver silver nanoparticles as basic building blocks of plasmonic nanosensors to plants by the uptake of solutions of metal salts.

  8. Vapor-phase Raman spectra, theoretical calculations, and the vibrational and structural properties of cis- and trans-stilbene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Toru; Shinashi, Kiyoaki; Ueda, Toyotoshi; Ocola, Esther J; Chiang, Whe-Yi; Laane, Jaan

    2014-02-13

    The vapor-phase Raman spectra of cis- and trans-stilbene have been collected at high temperatures and assigned. The low-frequency skeletal modes were of special interest. The molecular structures and vibrational frequencies of both molecules have also been obtained using MP2/cc-pVTZ and B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations, respectively. The two-dimensional potential map for the internal rotations around the two Cphenyl-C(═C) bonds of cis-stilbene was generated by using a series of B3LYP/cc-pVTZ calculations. It was confirmed that the molecule has only one conformer with C2 symmetry. The energy level calculation with a two-dimensional Hamiltonian was carried out, and the probability distribution for each level was obtained. The calculation revealed that the "gearing" internal rotation in which the two phenyl rings rotate with opposite directions has a vibrational frequency of 26 cm(-1), whereas that of the "antigearing" internal rotation in which the phenyl rings rotate with the same direction is about 52 cm(-1). In the low vibrational energy region the probability distribution for the gearing internal rotation is similar to that of a one-dimensional harmonic oscillator, and in the higher region the motion behaves like that of a free rotor.

  9. The use of surface-enhanced Raman scattering for detecting molecular evidence of life in rocks, sediments, and sedimentary deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, Stephen A; Wilson, Rab; Cooper, Jonathan M; Parnell, John

    2010-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a versatile analytical technique capable of characterizing the composition of both inorganic and organic materials. Consequently, it is frequently suggested as a payload on many planetary landers. Only approximately 1 in every 10(6) photons are Raman scattered; therefore, the detection of trace quantities of an analyte dispersed in a sample matrix can be much harder to achieve. To overcome this, surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and surface-enhanced resonance Raman scattering (SERRS) both provide greatly enhanced signals (enhancements between 10(5) and 10(9)) through the analyte's interaction with the locally generated surface plasmons, which occur at a "roughened" or nanostructured metallic surface (e.g., Cu, Au, and Ag). Both SERS and SERRS may therefore provide a viable technique for trace analysis of samples. In this paper, we describe the development of SERS assays for analyzing trace amounts of compounds present in the solvent extracts of sedimentary deposits. These assays were used to detect biological pigments present in an Arctic microoasis (a small locale of elevated biological productivity) and its detrital regolith, characterize the pigmentation of microbial mats around hydrothermal springs, and detect fossil organic matter in hydrothermal deposits. These field study examples demonstrate that SERS technology is sufficiently mature to be applied to many astrobiological analog studies on Earth. Many current and proposed imaging systems intended for remote deployment already posses the instrumental components needed for SERS. The addition of wet chemistry sample processing facilities to these instruments could yield field-deployable analytical instruments with a broadened analytical window for detecting organic compounds with a biological or geological origin.

  10. A new design for simultaneous temperature and strain measurement with spontaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Fuchang; Chen, Bai; Lin, Zunqi

    2010-11-01

    We design a new system for simultaneous distributed measurement of temperature and strain based on both spontaneous Raman and Brillouin backscattered signals. The Raman signal can determine the temperature. Although the Brillouin frequency shift is dependent on both temperature and strain of fiber, once the temperature is determined from the Raman signal, the strain can then be computed from the frequency measurement of the Brillouin signal.

  11. Vibrational Raman and optical studies of Cm in zirconia-based pyrochlores and related oxide matrices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assefa, Z.; Haire, R.G. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Raison, P.E. [CEA-DRN/DEC/SPUA/LACA, Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Cadarache (France)

    2002-11-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been employed to follow the phase behavior of Cm-Zr oxide materials as a function of Cm:Zr ratio. Three different structural phases, monoclinic, cubic and pyrochlore, are formed when the Cm:Zr ratio is varied from > 0 to 1. Each phase produces a distinct Raman profile in the 100-700 cm{sup -1} spectral region. Up to 10 atom % Cm, the Raman spectra indicate that the monoclinic structure is dominant. Raman bands corresponding to the monoclinic phase are absent in samples containing 20-40 atom % Cm. Concomitantly, a band at {approx}600 cm{sup -1} broadens and increases in intensity with increasing curium content, indicating that the cubic phase is dominant in this concentration range. The pyrochlore oxide structure, which forms at 50 atom % Cm, generates three Raman bands (the center of mass are at 283, 387, 495 cm{sup -1}) out of six bands predicted by nuclear site group analyses. The strongest of these is at 283 cm{sup -1}, and corresponds to the O-Cm-O bending mode. Details of these studies will be compared and discussed with data obtained for comparable systems containing selected analogous 4f-elements. (author)

  12. New imaging-based biomarkers for melanoma diagnosis using coherent Raman Scattering microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hequn; Osseiran, Sam; Roider, Elisabeth; Fisher, David E.; Evans, Conor L.

    2016-02-01

    Recently, pheomelanin has been found to play a critical role in melanoma progression given its pro-oxidant chemical properties as well as its marked presence in pre-cancerous and malignant melanoma lesions, even in the absence of ultraviolet radiation. In addition, epidemiological evidence indicates a strong correlation between melanoma incidence and skin type, with the highest incidence occurring in individuals of the red-haired/fair-skinned phenotype. Interestingly, nevus count correlates well with melanoma incidence and skin type, except in the population most prone to developing melanoma, where nevus count strikingly drops. As such, a current hypothesis proposes that fair-skinned red-haired individuals, who are unable to stimulate production of eumelanin due to a mutation in MC1R in melanocytes, may actually harbor numerous "invisible", pheomelanin-rich nevi that evade clinical detection, supporting the high incidence of melanoma in that population. Here, we show for the very first time that melanocytes extracted from genetically modified MC1R-mutant, red-haired mice displayed bright perinuclear distributions of signal within the cells under coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. Changes in pheomelanin production in siRNA knockdowns of cultured human melanoma cells were also sensed. We then successfully imaged pheomelanin distributions in both ex vivo and in vivo mouse ear skin. Finally, melanosomes within amelanotic melanoma patient tissue sections were found to show bright pheomelanin signals. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that pheomelanin has been found spatially localized in a human amelanotic melanoma sample. These pheomelanotic CARS features may be used as potential biomarkers for melanoma detection, especially for amelanotic melanomas.

  13. Construction and surface enhanced Raman scattering activity of gold nanoparticles array on boron doped diamond film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Y.S., E-mail: yshzou75@gmail.com; He, L.L.; Zhang, Y.C.; Li, Z.X.; Wang, H.P.; Gu, L.; Tu, C.J.; Zeng, H.B.

    2013-09-16

    Surface functionalization of diamond with amine groups and immobilization of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on boron doped nanocrystalline diamond (BDND) films deposited by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition were investigated. Hydrogen-terminated BDND film surfaces were activated through bonding with allylamine molecules under UV light irradiation. The resulting diamond surfaces were characterized by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and water contact angle measurement. The amine groups were successfully bonded covalently on the BDND diamond surface via a direct photochemical reaction with allylamine. Gold nanoparticles with the average size of 15 nm were then further self-assembled on the amine-terminated diamond surface by immersing the film surface into the gold colloidal solution, and a dense and well distributed AuNPs array in two dimensions with controlled density was obtained. Standard Rhodamine 6G probe molecules were used to access the surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) activity of the prepared new SERS substrate based on AuNPs modified BDND film. The results indicated that such AuNPs modified BDND film showed an excellent and stable SERS activity in the low concentration detection of R6G due to the electromagnetic enhancement mechanism. - Highlights: • A homogeneous layer of amine groups was bonded covalently on BDND surface via a photochemical reaction with allylamine. • A dense and well distributed AuNPs array with controlled density was self-assembled on the amine-terminated BDND film surface. • A new and highly efficient SERS active substrate based on AuNPs modified BDND film was constructed. • The AuNPs modified BDND film exhibited good SERS performance with stable and reproducible SERS activity for detection of R6G.

  14. A simple approach for ultrasensitive detection of bisphenols by multiplexed surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Bleye, C., E-mail: cdebleye@ulg.ac.be; Dumont, E.; Hubert, C.; Sacré, P.-Y.; Netchacovitch, L.; Chavez, P.-F.; Hubert, Ph.; Ziemons, E.

    2015-08-12

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is well known for its use in plastic manufacture and thermal paper production despite its risk of health toxicity as an endocrine disruptor in humans. Since the publication of new legislation regarding the use of BPA, manufacturers have begun to replace BPA with other phenolic molecules such as bisphenol F (BPF) and bisphenol B (BPB), but there are no guarantees regarding the health safety of these compounds at this time. In this context, a very simple, cheap and fast surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) method was developed for the sensitive detection of these molecules in spiked tap water solutions. Silver nanoparticles were used as SERS substrates. An original strategy was employed to circumvent the issue of the affinity of bisphenols for metallic surfaces and the silver nanoparticles surface was functionalized using pyridine in order to improve again the sensitivity of the detection. Semi-quantitative detections were performed in tap water solutions at a concentrations range from 0.25 to 20 μg L{sup −1} for BPA and BPB and from 5 to 100 μg L{sup −1} for BPF. Moreover, a feasibility study for performing a multiplex-SERS detection of these molecules was also performed before successfully implementing the developed SERS method on real samples. - Highlights: • Development of a simple, fast and ultrasensitive SERS method to detect bisphenols. • Multiplexed-SERS detection of bisphenol A, bisphenol B and bisphenol F. • Implementation of the SERS developed method on real samples to detect bisphenols.

  15. Imaging microscopic distribution of antifungal agents in dandruff treatments with stimulated Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Natalie L.; Singh, Bhumika; Jones, Andrew; Moger, Julian

    2017-06-01

    Treatment of dandruff condition usually involves use of antidandruff shampoos containing antifungal agents. Different antifungal agents show variable clinical efficacy based on their cutaneous distribution and bioavailability. Using stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), we mapped the distribution of unlabeled low-molecular weight antifungal compounds zinc pyrithione (ZnPT) and climbazole (CBZ) on the surface of intact porcine skin with cellular precision. SRS has sufficient chemical selectivity and sensitivity to detect the agents on the skin surface based on their unique chemical motifs that do not occur naturally in biological tissues. Moreover, SRS is able to correlate the distribution of the agents with the morphological features of the skin using the CH2 stretch mode, which is abundant in skin lipids. This is a significant strength of the technique since it allows the microscopic accumulation of the agents to be correlated with physiological features and their chemical environment without the use of counter stains. Our findings show that due to its lower solubility, ZnPT coats the surface of the skin with a sparse layer of crystals in the size range of 1 to 4 μm. This is consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of ZnPT. In contrast, CBZ being more soluble and hydrophobic resulted in diffuse homogeneous distribution. It predominantly resided in microscopic lipid-rich crevasses and penetrated up to 60 μm into the infundibular spaces surrounding the hair shaft. The ability of the SRS to selectively map the distribution of agents on the skin's surface has the potential to provide insight into the mechanisms underpinning the topical application of antifungal or skin-active agents that could lead to the rational engineering of enhanced formulations.

  16. Evans blue dye-enhanced imaging of the brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Ram Lee

    Full Text Available We performed dye-enhanced imaging of mouse brain microvessels using spectral focusing coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (SF-CARS microscopy. The resonant signals from C-H stretching in forward CARS usually show high background intensity in tissues, which makes CARS imaging of microvessels difficult. In this study, epi-detection of back-scattered SF-CARS signals showed a negligible background, but the overall intensity of resonant CARS signals was too low to observe the network of brain microvessels. Therefore, Evans blue (EB dye was used as contrasting agent to enhance the back-scattered SF-CARS signals. Breakdown of brain microvessels by inducing hemorrhage in a mouse was clearly visualized using backward SF-CARS signals, following intravenous injection of EB. The improved visualization of brain microvessels with EB enhanced the sensitivity of SF-CARS, detecting not only the blood vessels themselves but their integrity as well in the brain vasculature.

  17. X-ray Raman scattering provides evidence for interfacial acetonitrile-water dipole interactions in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ningdong; Nordlund, Dennis; Huang, Congcong; Bergmann, Uwe; Weiss, Thomas M.; Pettersson, Lars G. M.; Nilsson, Anders

    2011-01-01

    Aqueous solutions of acetonitrile (MeCN) have been studied with oxygen K-edge x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) which is found to be sensitive to the interaction between water and MeCN. The changes in the XRS spectra can be attributed to water directly interacting with MeCN and are reproduced by density functional theory calculations on small clusters of water and MeCN. The dominant structural arrangement features dipole interaction instead of H-bonds between the two species as revealed by the XRS spectra combined with spectrum calculations. Small-angle x-ray scattering shows the largest heterogeneity for a MeCN to water ratio of 0.4 in agreement with earlier small-angle neutron scattering data. PMID:22047254

  18. Facile synthesis of terminal-alkyne bioorthogonal molecules for live -cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging through Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Bo; Gao, Mingxia; Zhang, Xiangmin

    2018-02-03

    Alkyne is unique, specific and biocompatible in the Raman-silent region of the cell, but there still remains a challenge to achieve ultrasensitive detection in living systems due to its weak Raman scattering. Herein, a terminal alkyne ((E)-2-[4-(ethynylbenzylidene)amino]ethane-1-thiol (EBAE)) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering is synthesized. The EBAE molecule possesses S- and C-termini, which can be directly bonded to gold nanoparticles and dopamine/silver by forming the Au-S chemical bond and the carbon-metal bond, respectively. The distance between Raman reporter and AuNPs/AgNPs can be reduced, contributing to forming hot-spot-based SERS substrate. The alkyne functionalized nanoparticles are based on Au core and encapsulating polydopamine shell, defined as Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell (ACDS). The bimetallic ACDS induce strong SERS signals for molecular imaging that arise from the strong electromagnetic field. Furthermore, the EBAE provides a distinct peak in the cellular Raman-silent region with nearly zero background interference. The EBAE Raman signals could be tremendously enhanced when the Raman reporter is located at the middle of the Au-core and dopamine/Ag-shell. Therefore, this work could have huge potential benefits for the highly sensitive detection of intercellular information delivery by connecting the recognition molecules in biomedical diagnostics. Graphical abstract Terminal-alkyne-functionalized Au-core and silver/dopamine-shell nanotags for live-cell surface-enhanced Raman scattering imaging.

  19. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, Kamel; Lioe, De Xing; Kawahito, Shoji; Yasutomi, Keita; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Yamada, Takahiro; Hashimoto, Mamoru

    2017-11-09

    Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM) employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  20. Label-Free Biomedical Imaging Using High-Speed Lock-In Pixel Sensor for Stimulated Raman Scattering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamel Mars

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Raman imaging eliminates the need for staining procedures, providing label-free imaging to study biological samples. Recent developments in stimulated Raman scattering (SRS have achieved fast acquisition speed and hyperspectral imaging. However, there has been a problem of lack of detectors suitable for MHz modulation rate parallel detection, detecting multiple small SRS signals while eliminating extremely strong offset due to direct laser light. In this paper, we present a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS image sensor using high-speed lock-in pixels for stimulated Raman scattering that is capable of obtaining the difference of Stokes-on and Stokes-off signal at modulation frequency of 20 MHz in the pixel before reading out. The generated small SRS signal is extracted and amplified in a pixel using a high-speed and large area lateral electric field charge modulator (LEFM employing two-step ion implantation and an in-pixel pair of low-pass filter, a sample and hold circuit and a switched capacitor integrator using a fully differential amplifier. A prototype chip is fabricated using 0.11 μm CMOS image sensor technology process. SRS spectra and images of stearic acid and 3T3-L1 samples are successfully obtained. The outcomes suggest that hyperspectral and multi-focus SRS imaging at video rate is viable after slight modifications to the pixel architecture and the acquisition system.

  1. Study of CVD diamond layers with amorphous carbon admixture by Raman scattering spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dychalska Anna

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy is a most often used standard technique for characterization of different carbon materials. In this work we present the Raman spectra of polycrystalline diamond layers of different quality, synthesized by Hot Filament Chemical Vapor Deposition method (HF CVD. We show how to use Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of the Raman bands to determine the structure of diamond films as well as the structure of amorphous carbon admixture. Raman spectroscopy has become an important technique for the analysis of CVD diamond films. The first-order diamond Raman peak at ca. 1332 cm−1 is an unambiguous evidence for the presence of diamond phase in the deposited layer. However, the existence of non-diamond carbon components in a CVD diamond layer produces several overlapping peaks in the same wavenumber region as the first order diamond peak. The intensities, wavenumber, full width at half maximum (FWHM of these bands are dependent on quality of diamond layer which is dependent on the deposition conditions. The aim of the present work is to relate the features of diamond Raman spectra to the features of Raman spectra of non-diamond phase admixture and occurrence of other carbon structures in the obtained diamond thin films.

  2. Theoretical study of collinear optical frequency comb generation under multi-wave, transient stimulated Raman scattering in crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smetanin, S N [A M Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-11-30

    Using mathematical modelling we have studied the conditions of low-threshold collinear optical frequency comb generation under transient (picosecond) stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) and parametric four-wave coupling of SRS components in crystals. It is shown that Raman-parametric generation of an octave-spanning optical frequency comb occurs most effectively under intermediate, transient SRS at a pump pulse duration exceeding the dephasing time by five-to-twenty times. We have found the optimal values of not only the laser pump pulse duration, but also of the Raman crystal lengths corresponding to highly efficient generation of an optical frequency comb from the second anti-Stokes to the fourth Stokes Raman components. For the KGd(WO{sub 4}){sub 2} (high dispersion) and Ba(NO{sub 3}){sub 2} (low dispersion) crystals pumped at a wavelength of 1.064 μm and a pulse duration five or more times greater than the dephasing time, the optimum length of the crystal was 0.3 and 0.6 cm, respectively, which is consistent with the condition of the most effective Stokes – anti-Stokes coupling ΔkL ≈ 15, where Δk is the wave detuning from phase matching of Stokes – anti-Stokes coupling, determined by the refractive index dispersion of the SRS medium. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Fa-Ke F.; Calligaris, David; Suo, Yuanzhen; Santagata, Sandro; Golby, Alexandra J.; Xie, X. Sunney; Mallory, Melissa A.; Golshan, Mehra; Dillon, Deborah A.; Agar, Nathalie Y. R.

    2017-02-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

  4. Jet delivery system for Raman scattering on bio-inorganic compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetzel, A.; Biebl, F.; Beyerlein, K. R.; Stanek, J.; Gumprecht, L.; Hoffmann, A.; Herres-Pawlis, S.; Bajt, S.; Chapman, H. N.; Grimm-Lebsanft, B.; Rukser, D.; Rübhausen, M.

    2016-11-01

    We present a micro-jet sample delivery system for Raman measurements. Compared to cuvette measurements, the observed Raman signal is enhanced by more than one order of magnitude and does not contain signal distortions from the liquid-glass interface. Furthermore, the signal stability of repeated measurements is enhanced due to reduced sample damage effects by constantly replenishing the sample. This allows the study of sensitive samples that can only be produced in low concentrations. Our setup consists of a controlled sample environment that can be either under vacuum or an exchange gas, which allows the study of samples that are unstable in air. Finally, by matching the effective source point of the Raman instrument with the diameter of the jet, controlled experiments using laser beams of different wavelengths are possible. We see future applications of our setup for resonance Raman and time-resolved Raman measurements of bioinorganic samples.

  5. Nanoparticle Properties and Synthesis Effects on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Enhancement Factor: An Introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D. Israelsen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Raman spectroscopy has enabled researchers to map the specific chemical makeup of surfaces, solutions, and even cells. However, the inherent insensitivity of the technique makes it difficult to use and statistically complicated. When Raman active molecules are near gold or silver nanoparticles, the Raman intensity is significantly amplified. This phenomenon is referred to as surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS. The extent of SERS enhancement is due to a variety of factors such as nanoparticle size, shape, material, and configuration. The choice of Raman reporters and protective coatings will also influence SERS enhancement. This review provides an introduction to how these factors influence signal enhancement and how to optimize them during synthesis of SERS nanoparticles.

  6. To Avoid Chasing Incorrect Chemical Structures of Chiral Compounds: Raman Optical Activity and Vibrational Circular Dichroism Spectroscopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polavarapu, Prasad L; Covington, Cody L; Raghavan, Vijay

    2017-09-20

    A chemical structure (CS) identifies the connectivities between atoms, and the nature of those connections, for a given elemental composition. For chiral molecules, in addition to the identification of CS, the identification of the correct absolute configuration (AC) is also needed. Several chiral natural products are known whose CSs were initially misidentified and later corrected, and these errors were often discovered during the total synthesis of natural products. In this work, we present a new and convenient approach that can be used with Raman optical activity (ROA) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopies, to distinguish between the correct and incorrect CSs of chiral compounds. This approach involves analyzing the spectral similarity overlap between experimental spectra and those predicted with advanced quantum chemical theories. Significant labor needed for establishing the correct CSs via chemical syntheses of chiral natural products can thus be avoided. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. ITER Plasma at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Domain: Stimulated Raman Scattering off Gould-Trivelpiece Modes and Generation of Suprathermal Electrons and Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2011-04-01

    Stimulated Raman scattering in the electron cyclotron frequency range of the X-Mode and O-Mode driver with the ITER plasma leads to the ``tail heating'' via the generation of suprathermal electrons and energetic ions. The scattering off Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for the gyrotron frequency of 170GHz; X-Mode and O-Mode power of 24 MW CW; on-axis B-field of 10T. The synergy between the two-plasmon decay and Raman scattering is analyzed in reference to the bulk plasma heating. Supported in part by Nikola TESLA Labs, La Jolla, CA

  8. Helicity-resolved Raman scattering of MoS₂, MoSe₂, WS₂, and WSe₂ atomic layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shao-Yu; Zheng, Changxi; Fuhrer, Michael S; Yan, Jun

    2015-04-08

    The two-fold valley degeneracy in two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) (Mo,W)(S,Se)2 is suitable for "valleytronics", the storage and manipulation of information utilizing the valley degree of freedom. The conservation of luminescent photon helicity in these 2D crystal monolayers has been widely regarded as a benchmark indicator for charge carrier valley polarization. Here we perform helicity-resolved Raman scattering of the TMDC atomic layers. In drastic contrast to luminescence, the dominant first-order zone-center Raman bands, including the low energy breathing and shear modes as well as the higher energy optical phonons, are found to either maintain or completely switch the helicity of incident photons. In addition to providing a useful tool for characterization of TMDC atomic layers, these experimental observations shed new light on the connection between photon helicity and valley polarization.

  9. Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microspectroscopy of brain tissue with higher ranking data classification for biomedical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohling, Christoph; Bocklitz, Thomas; Duarte, Alex S.; Emmanuello, Cinzia; Ishikawa, Mariana S.; Dietzeck, Benjamin; Buckup, Tiago; Uckermann, Ortrud; Schackert, Gabriele; Kirsch, Matthias; Schmitt, Michael; Popp, Jürgen; Motzkus, Marcus

    2017-06-01

    Multiplex coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (MCARS) microscopy was carried out to map a solid tumor in mouse brain tissue. The border between normal and tumor tissue was visualized using support vector machines (SVM) as a higher ranking type of data classification. Training data were collected separately in both tissue types, and the image contrast is based on class affiliation of the single spectra. Color coding in the image generated by SVM is then related to pathological information instead of single spectral intensities or spectral differences within the data set. The results show good agreement with the H&E stained reference and spontaneous Raman microscopy, proving the validity of the MCARS approach in combination with SVM.

  10. Conformational analysis and vibrational study of daidzein by using FT-IR and FT-Raman spectroscopies and DFT calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Harshita; Singh, Swapnil; Srivastava, Anubha; Tandon, Poonam; Bharti, Purnima; Kumar, Sudhir; Maurya, Rakesh

    2014-01-01

    Daidzein (C15H10O4) is a type of isoflavone. It was isolated from Butea monosperma that belongs to the Fabaceae family. Soybeans and soy products are the abundant source of daidzein. It is the subject of investigation for many reasons, as it has got wide applications, such as anti-tumor, anti-estrogen, weak pro-estrogen and anti-cancer activities. In the present study, a complete vibrational assignment is provided for the observed IR and Raman spectra of daidzein. Electronic properties have been analyzed using TD-DFT method for both gaseous and solvent phase. The optimized geometry, total energy, potential energy surface and vibrational wavenumbers of daidzein have been determined using density functional theory (DFT/B3LYP) method with 6-311++G(d,p) basis set and a good correlation was found between observed and calculated values. The double well potential energy curve of the molecule about three bonds, has been plotted, as obtained from DFT/6-31G basis. The HOMO-LUMO energy gap of possible conformers has been calculated for comparing their chemical activity. Global reactivity descriptors have been calculated for predicting the chemical reactivity and the stability of chemical systems. Electrostatic potential surface has been plotted for predicting the structure activity relationship. NBO analysis has also been performed to study the stability of the molecule. NLO study reveals the nonlinear properties of the molecule. 1H and 13C NMR spectra have also been studied. Finally, the calculated results were used to simulate infrared and Raman spectra of the title compound which showed a good agreement with the observed spectra. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Antimicrobial activity, structural evaluation and vibrational (FT-IR and FT-Raman) study of pyrrole containing vinyl derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, R. N.; Rawat, Poonam; Sahu, Sangeeta; Kumar, Yashvinder

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we present structural and vibrational study of three vinylpyrrole derivatives: 2-Cyano-3-(1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-acrylamide (CPA), 1-(1H-Pyrrol-2-yl)-Pent-1-en-3-one (PP) and 1-(1H-Pyrrol-2-yl)-but-1-en-3-one (PB), using ab initio, DFT and experimental approaches. The quantum chemical calculation have been performed on B3LYP method and 6-311 + G(d,p) basis set. The experimental FT-IR and Raman wavenumbers were compared with the respective theoretical values obtained from DFT calculations and found to agree well. The experimental FT-IR and Raman study clearly indicate that the compound exist as dimer in solid state. The binding energies of (CPA), (PP) and (PB) dimers are found to be 20.95, 18.75 and 19.18 kcal/mol, respectively. The vibrational analysis shows red shifts in vN-H and vCdbnd O stretching as result of dimer formation. Stability of the molecule arising from hyperconjugative interactions and charge delocalization has been analyzed using NBO analysis. Topological and energetic parameters reveal the nature of interactions in dimer. The local electronic descriptors analyses were used to predict the reactive sites in the molecule. Calculated first static hyperpolarizability of CPA, PP and PB is found to be 10.41 × 10- 30, 18.93 × 10- 30, 18.29 × 10- 30 esu, respectively, shows that investigated molecules will have non-linear optical response and might be used as non-linear optical (NLO) material. These vinylpyrrole compounds (CPA), (PP) and (PB) showed antifungal and antibacterial activity against Aspergillus niger and gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtili.

  12. Raman scattering of 2H-MoS2 at simultaneous high temperature and high pressure (up to 600 K and 18.5 GPa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JianJun Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The Raman spectroscopy of natural molybdenite powder was investigated at simultaneous conditions of high temperature and high pressure in a heatable diamond anvil cell (DAC, to obtain the temperature and pressure dependence of the main Raman vibrational modes (E1g, E 2 g 1 ,A1g, and 2LA(M. Over our experimental temperature and pressure range (300–600 K and 1 atm−18.5 GPa, the Raman modes follow a systematic blue shift with increasing pressure, and red shift with increasing temperature. The results were calculated by three-variable linear fitting. The mutual correlation index of temperature and pressure indicates that the pressure may reduce the temperature dependence of Raman modes. New Raman bands due to structural changes emerged at about 3–4 GPa lower than seen in previous studies; this may be caused by differences in the pressure hydrostaticity and shear stress in the sample cell that promote the interlayer sliding.

  13. Simultaneous temperature and strain measurement with combined spontaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, M. N.; Cho, Y. T.; Newson, T. P.

    2005-06-01

    We report on a novel method for simultaneous distributed measurement of temperature and strain based on spatially resolving both spontaneous Raman and Brillouin backscattered anti-Stokes signals. The magnitude of the intensity of the anti-Stokes Raman signal permits the determination of the temperature. The Brillouin frequency shift is dependent on both the temperature and the strain of the fiber; once the temperature has been determined from the Raman signal, the strain can then be computed from the frequency measurement of the Brillouin signal.

  14. Raman scattering in heavily boron-doped single-crystal diamond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Faggio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A series of boron-doped homoepitaxial diamond films grown by Microwave Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition at the University of Rome "Tor Vergata" have been investigated with Raman spectroscopy. As the boron content increases, we observed systematic modifications in the Raman spectra of single-crystal diamonds. A significant change in the lineshape of the first-order Raman peak as well as a wide and structured signal at lower wavenumbers appeared simultaneously in samples grown at higher boron content.

  15. Plasmon Mapping in Metallic Nanostructures and its Application to Single Molecule Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering: Imaging Electromagnetic Hot-Spots and Analyte Location

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camden, Jon P. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    2013-07-12

    A major component of this proposal is to elucidate the connection between optical and electron excitation of plasmon modes in metallic nanostructures. These accomplishments are reported: developed a routine protocol for obtaining spatially resolved, low energy EELS spectra, and resonance Rayleigh scattering spectra from the same nanostructures; correlated optical scattering spectra and plasmon maps obtained using STEM/EELS; and imaged electromagnetic hot spots responsible for single-molecule surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SMSERS).

  16. Raman scattering study of delafossite magnetoelectric multiferroic compounds: CuFeO2 and CuCrO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, O.; Truong, K. D.; Otani, T.; Balakrishnan, G.; Clouter, M. J.; Kimura, T.; Quirion, G.

    2012-01-01

    Ultrasonic velocity measurements on the magnetoelectric multiferroic compound CuFeO2 reveal that the antiferromagnetic transition observed at TN1 = 14 K might be induced by an R\\bar {3}m\\rightharpoonup C 2/m pseudoproper ferroelastic transition [1]. In that case, the group theory states that the order parameter associated with the structural transition must belong to a two-dimensional irreducible representation Eg (x2 - y2, xy). Since this type of transition can be driven by a Raman Eg mode, we performed Raman scattering measurements on CuFeO2 between 5 and 290 K. Considering that the isostructural multiferroic compound CuCrO2 might show similar structural deformations at the antiferromagnetic transition TN1 = 24.3 K, Raman measurements have also been performed for comparison. At ambient temperature, the Raman modes in CuFeO2 are observed at ωEg = 352 cm-1 and ωA1g = 692 cm-1, while these modes are detected at ωEg = 457 cm-1 and ωA1g = 709 cm-1 in CuCrO2. The analysis of the temperature dependence of the modes in both compounds shows that the frequencies of all modes increase with decreasing temperature. This typical behavior is attributed to anharmonic phonon-phonon interactions. These results clearly indicate that none of the Raman active modes observed in CuFeO2 and CuCrO2 drive the pseudoproper ferroelastic transitions observed at the Néel temperature TN1. Finally, a broad band at about 550 cm-1 observed in the magnetoelectric phase of CuCrO2 below TN2 could be associated with magnons.

  17. Raman scattering study of delafossite magnetoelectric multiferroic compounds: CuFeO2 and CuCrO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aktas, O; Truong, K D; Otani, T; Balakrishnan, G; Clouter, M J; Kimura, T; Quirion, G

    2012-01-25

    Ultrasonic velocity measurements on the magnetoelectric multiferroic compound CuFeO(2) reveal that the antiferromagnetic transition observed at T(N1) = 14 K might be induced by an R3m --> pseudoproper ferroelastic transition. In that case, the group theory states that the order parameter associated with the structural transition must belong to a two-dimensional irreducible representation E(g) (x(2) - y(2), xy). Since this type of transition can be driven by a Raman E(g) mode, we performed Raman scattering measurements on CuFeO(2) between 5 and 290 K. Considering that the isostructural multiferroic compound CuCrO(2) might show similar structural deformations at the antiferromagnetic transition T(N1) = 24.3 K, Raman measurements have also been performed for comparison. At ambient temperature, the Raman modes in CuFeO(2) are observed at ω(E(g)) = 352 cm(-1) and ω(A(1g)) = 692 cm(-1), while these modes are detected at ω(E(g)) = 457 cm(-1) and ω(A(1g)) = 709 cm(-1) in CuCrO(2). The analysis of the temperature dependence of the modes in both compounds shows that the frequencies of all modes increase with decreasing temperature. This typical behavior is attributed to anharmonic phonon-phonon interactions. These results clearly indicate that none of the Raman active modes observed in CuFeO(2) and CuCrO(2) drive the pseudoproper ferroelastic transitions observed at the Néel temperature T(N1). Finally, a broad band at about 550 cm(-1) observed in the magnetoelectric phase of CuCrO(2) below T(N2) could be associated with magnons.

  18. Fabrication and characterization of homogeneous surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrates by single pulse UV-laser treatment of gold and silver films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christou, Konstantin; Knorr, Inga; Ihlemann, Jürgen; Wackerbarth, Hainer; Beushausen, Volker

    2010-12-07

    The fabrication of SERS-active substrates, which offer high enhancement factors as well as spatially homogeneous distribution of the enhancement, plays an important role in the expansion of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) spectroscopy to a powerful, quantitative, and noninvasive measurement technique for analytical applications. In this paper, a novel method for the fabrication of SERS-active substrates by laser treatment of 20, 40, and 60 nm thick gold and of 40 nm thick silver films supported on quartz glass is presented. Single 308 nm UV-laser pulses were applied to melt the thin gold and silver films. During the cooling process of the noble metal, particles were formed. The particle size and density were imaged by atomic force microscopy. By varying the fluence, the size of the particles can be controlled. The enhancement factors of the nanostructures were determined by recording self-assembled monolayers of benzenethiol. The intensity of the SERS signal from benzenethiol is correlated to the mean particle size and thus to the fluence. Enhancement factors up to 10(6) with a high reproducibility were reached. Finally we have analyzed the temperature dependence of the SERS effect by recording the intensity of benzenethiol vibrations from 300 to 120 K. The temperature dependence of the SERS effect is discussed with regard to the metal properties.

  19. Multimodal coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy reveals microglia-associated myelin and axonal dysfunction in multiple sclerosis-like lesions in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imitola, Jaime; Côté, Daniel; Rasmussen, Stine; Xie, X. Sunney; Liu, Yingru; Chitnis, Tanuja; Sidman, Richard L.; Lin, Charles. P.; Khoury, Samia J.

    2011-02-01

    Myelin loss and axonal degeneration predominate in many neurological disorders; however, methods to visualize them simultaneously in live tissue are unavailable. We describe a new imaging strategy combining video rate reflectance and fluorescence confocal imaging with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy tuned to CH2 vibration of myelin lipids, applied in live tissue of animals with chronic experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Our method allows monitoring over time of demyelination and neurodegeneration in brain slices with high spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio. Local areas of severe loss of lipid signal indicative of demyelination and loss of the reflectance signal from axons were seen in the corpus callosum and spinal cord of EAE animals. Even in myelinated areas of EAE mice, the intensity of myelin lipid signals is significantly reduced. Using heterozygous knock-in mice in which green fluorescent protein replaces the CX3CR1 coding sequence that labels central nervous system microglia, we find areas of activated microglia colocalized with areas of altered reflectance and CARS signals reflecting axonal injury and demyelination. Our data demonstrate the use of multimodal CARS microscopy for characterization of demyelinating and neurodegenerative pathology in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis, and further confirm the critical role of microglia in chronic inflammatory neurodegeneration.

  20. Origin of photoinduced defects in glassy As{sub 2}S{sub 3} under band gap illumination studied by Raman scattering: A revisory approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yannopoulos, S.N.; Andrikopoulos, K.S.; Kastrissios, D.T.; Papatheodorou, G.N. [Foundation for Research and Technology, Hellas Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH-ICE/HT), P.O. Box 1414, 26504, Rio-Patras (Greece)

    2012-10-15

    We report on a detailed study of the photostructural changes in bulk glassy As{sub 2}S{sub 3} under vacuum using Raman scattering. Various excitation energies were employed to achieve resonance and off-resonance conditions. Temperature-induced structural changes were also investigated at conditions far from resonance, in order to clarify the role of bandgap light on the induced structural changes. Bandgap illumination induces structural changes much stronger than those reported up to now for this glass. The absence of oxygen is considered as a possible cause of this observation. The kinetics of the structural changes was monitored in the course of bandgap illumination and the role of in situ annealing was considered. The formation of As-As bonds is the main light-induced structural change, which if contemplated together with the absence of S-S bond formation points to the failure of models adopting realgar-type structures and calls for new structural defects based on centers with increased coordination number. The vibrational features of few such defects based on over-coordinated As centers are discussed in conjunction with the present experimental findings. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  1. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1 ± 2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6 ± 8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  2. The synthesis of four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver core-shell nanomushroom with inbuilt Raman molecule for surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Wang, Xiaolong; Zhou, Jun

    2017-12-01

    A facial two-step reduction method was proposed to synthesize four-layer gold-silver-polymer-silver (Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag) core-shell nanomushrooms (NMs) with inbuilt Raman molecule. The surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity of 4MBA adhered on the surface of Au core gradually increased with the modification of middle Ag shell and then Ag mushroom cap due to the formation of two kinds of ultra-small interior nanogap. Compared with the initial Au nanoparticles, the SERS enhancement ratio of the Au@Ag@PSPAA@Ag NMs approached to nearly 40. The novel core-shell NMs also exhibited homogeneous SERS signals for only one sample and reproducible signals for 10 different samples, certified by the low relative standard deviation values of less than 10% and 15% for the character peaks of 4-mercaptobenzoic acid, respectively. Such a novel four-layer core-shell nanostructure with reliable SERS performance has great potential application in quantitative SERS-based immunoassay.

  3. Penetration of silver nanoparticles into porcine skin ex vivo using fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, Raman microscopy, and surface-enhanced Raman scattering microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yongjian; Choe, Chun-Sik; Ahlberg, Sebastian; Meinke, Martina C.; Alexiev, Ulrike; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2015-05-01

    In order to investigate the penetration depth of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) inside the skin, porcine ears treated with Ag NPs are measured by two-photon tomography with a fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (TPT-FLIM) technique, confocal Raman microscopy (CRM), and surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) microscopy. Ag NPs are coated with poly-N-vinylpyrrolidone and dispersed in pure water solutions. After the application of Ag NPs, porcine ears are stored in the incubator for 24 h at a temperature of 37°C. The TPT-FLIM measurement results show a dramatic decrease of the Ag NPs' signal intensity from the skin surface to a depth of 4 μm. Below 4 μm, the Ag NPs' signal continues to decline, having completely disappeared at 12 to 14 μm depth. CRM shows that the penetration depth of Ag NPs is 11.1±2.1 μm. The penetration depth measured with a highly sensitive SERS microscopy reaches 15.6±8.3 μm. Several results obtained with SERS show that the penetration depth of Ag NPs can exceed the stratum corneum (SC) thickness, which can be explained by both penetration of trace amounts of Ag NPs through the SC barrier and by the measurements inside the hair follicle, which cannot be excluded in the experiment.

  4. High-pressure X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering of LiTaO sub 3

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang Wei; Pan Yue Wu; Dong Shu Shan; Zou Guang Tian; Liu Jing

    2002-01-01

    The authors study the energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction and Raman scattering of LiTaO sub 3 at high pressure. The result remains stable up to 36 GPa. The average isothermal bulk modulus and its pressure derivative are obtained to be k sub 0 =(225 +- 6) GPa and k sub 0 '=1.3 +- 0.5 at zero pressure by the Birch-Murnaghan equation of state and the 'universal' equation of state. The linear incompressibility of LiTaO sub 3 between the a- and c-directions differs by a factor of four, which shows that the compression is anisotropic

  5. Fluid modeling on three dimensional two plasmon decay instabilities and stimulated Raman scattering using FLAME-MD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Rui; Cao, Shihui; Wan, Zhenhua; Hu, Guangyue; Zheng, Jian; Hao, Liang; Liu, Wenda; Ren, Chuang

    2017-10-01

    We push our FLAME project forward with a newly developed code FLAME-MD (Multi-Dimensional) based on the fluid model presented in Ref.. Simulations are performed to study two plasmon decay (TPD) instabilities and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in three dimensions (3D) with parameters relevant to ICF. 3D effects on the growth of TPD and SRS, including laser polarizations and multi beam configurations, are studied. This material is based upon work supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC) under Grant No. 11642020, 11621202; by Science Challenge Project (No. JCKY2016212A505); and by DOE Office of Fusion Energy Sciences Grant DE-SC0014318.

  6. Robustness of surface-enhanced Raman scattering substrate with a mercaptosilane adhesive layer for in vivo sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Yasuaki; Jans, Hilde; van Dorpe, Pol; Li, Jiaqi; Minamiguchi, Masaru; Shioi, Masahiko; Vlaminck, Lieven; Lagae, Liesbet; Kawamura, Tatsuro

    2015-06-01

    A highly robust surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in vivo sensing applications is reported. In vivo sensing demands structurally robust substrates with good optical performance. SERS substrates containing gold nanostructures on SiO2 supports often suffer from a low adhesion strength of gold on SiO2. The proposed SERS substrate contains a mercaptosilane adhesive layer, which provides a high robustness without deteriorating the plasmon performance, in contrast to traditional titanium adhesive layers. The mercaptosilane-modified SERS substrate is sufficiently robust for in vivo sensing, as evidenced by its implantation in the animal skin for 2 months.

  7. 3D nanostar dimers with a sub-10-nm gap for single-/few-molecule surface-enhanced raman scattering

    KAUST Repository

    Chirumamilla, Manohar

    2014-01-22

    Plasmonic nanostar-dimers, decoupled from the substrate, have been fabricated by combining electron-beam lithography and reactive-ion etching techniques. The 3D architecture, the sharp tips of the nanostars and the sub-10 nm gap size promote the formation of giant electric-field in highly localized hot-spots. The single/few molecule detection capability of the 3D nanostar-dimers has been demonstrated by Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Simultaneous distributed measurements of temperature and strain using spontaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alahbabi, M. N.; Cho, Y. T.; Newson, Trevor P.

    2004-06-01

    We report on a novel method for simultaneous distributed measurement of the temperature and strain in an optical fiber based on spatially resolving the anti-Stokes signals of both the spontaneous Raman and Brillouin backscattered signals.

  9. Phase discrimination in CdSe structures by means of Raman scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusco, R.; Artus, L. [Institut Jaume Almera (ICTJA-CSIC), Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Lluis Sole i Sabaris s.n., 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Consonni, V. [Universite Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, LMGP, 38016 Grenoble (France); Bellet-Amalric, E. [Universite Grenoble Alpes and CEA, INAC-PHEILQS, Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs Group, 38000 Grenoble (France); Andre, R. [Universite Grenoble Alpes and CNRS, Institut Neel, Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs Group, 38000 Grenoble (France)

    2017-05-15

    Raman spectra of epitaxial layers of CdSe grown by molecular beam epitaxy have been measured for the cubic (zincblende) and hexagonal (wurtzite) phases. The Raman spectra are examined in the light of density functional calculations for these two highly similar structures. Characteristic Raman frequencies and spectral features associated with the different symmetry are discussed and reliable criteria for phase discrimination based on Raman spectroscopy are proposed. Although LO frequencies are virtually identical in both structures and may be affected by size effects, the observation of a low energy E{sub 2} mode at 33 cm{sup -1} unambiguously identifies the wurtzite structure and can be used as a specific fingerprint to distinguish between these two phases in CdSe-based nanostructures. The slightly lower LO frequency measured in the zincblende epitaxial layer is ascribed to residual tensile strain. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Detection of chemical interfaces in coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy: Dk-CARS. I. Axial interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gachet, David; Rigneault, Hervé

    2011-12-01

    We develop a full vectorial theoretical investigation of the chemical interface detection in conventional coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy. In Part I, we focus on the detection of axial interfaces (i.e., parallel to the optical axis) following a recent experimental demonstration of the concept [Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 213905 (2010)]. By revisiting the Young's double slit experiment, we show that background-free microscopy and spectroscopy is achievable through the angular analysis of the CARS far-field radiation pattern. This differential CARS in k space (Dk-CARS) technique is interesting for fast detection of interfaces between molecularly different media. It may be adapted to other coherent and resonant scattering processes.

  11. Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Based on Controllable-Layer Graphene Shells Directly Synthesized on Cu Nanoparticles for Molecular Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hengwei; Huo, Yanyan; Li, Zhen; Zhang, Chao; Chen, Peixi; Jiang, Shouzhen; Xu, Shicai; Ma, Yong; Wang, Shuyun; Li, Hongsheng

    2015-10-05

    Graphene shells with a controllable number of layers were directly synthesized on Cu nanoparticles (CuNPs) by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to fabricate a graphene-encapsulated CuNPs (G/CuNPs) hybrid system for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The enhanced Raman spectra of adenosine and rhodamine 6G (R6G) showed that the G/CuNPs hybrid system can strongly suppress background fluorescence and increase signal-to-noise ratio. In four different types of SERS systems, the G/CuNPs hybrid system exhibits more efficient SERS than a transferred graphene/CuNPs hybrid system and pure CuNPs and graphene substrates. The minimum detectable concentrations of adenosine and R6G by the G/CuNPs hybrid system can be as low as 10(-8) and 10(-10)  M, respectively. The excellent linear relationship between Raman intensity and analyte concentration can be used for molecular detection. The graphene shell can also effectively prevent surface oxidation of Cu nanoparticles after exposure to ambient air and thus endow the hybrid system with a long lifetime. This work provides a basis for the fabrication of novel SERS substrates. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Surface-enhanced Raman scattering of amorphous silica gel adsorbed on gold substrates for optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degioanni, S.; Jurdyc, A. M.; Cheap, A.; Champagnon, B.; Bessueille, F.; Coulm, J.; Bois, L.; Vouagner, D.

    2015-10-01

    Two kinds of gold substrates are used to produce surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of amorphous silica obtained via the sol-gel route using tetraethoxysilane Si(OC2H5)4 (TEOS) solution. The first substrate consists of a gold nanometric film elaborated on a glass slide by sputter deposition, controlling the desired gold thickness and sputtering current intensity. The second substrate consists of an array of micrometer-sized gold inverted pyramidal pits able to confine surface plasmon (SP) enhancing electric field, which results in a distribution of electromagnetic energy inside the cavities. These substrates are optically characterized to observe SPR with, respectively, extinction and reflectance spectrometries. Once coated with thin layers of amorphous silica (SiO2) gel, these samples show Raman amplification of amorphous SiO2 bands. This enhancement can occur in SERS sensors using amorphous SiO2 gel as shells, spacers, protective coatings, or waveguides, and represents particularly a potential interest in the field of Raman distributed sensors, which use the amorphous SiO2 core of optical fibers as a transducer to make temperature measurements.

  13. Graphene Dendrimer-stabilized silver nanoparticles for detection of methimazole using Surface-enhanced Raman scattering with computational assignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Tawfik A.; Al-Shalalfeh, Mutasem M.; Al-Saadi, Abdulaziz A.

    2016-08-01

    Graphene functionalized with polyamidoamine dendrimer, decorated with silver nanoparticles (G-D-Ag), was synthesized and evaluated as a substrate with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) for methimazole (MTZ) detection. Sodium borohydride was used as a reducing agent to cultivate silver nanoparticles on the dendrimer. The obtained G-D-Ag was characterized by using UV-vis spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (TEM), Fourier-transformed infrared (FT-IR) and Raman spectroscopy. The SEM image indicated the successful formation of the G-D-Ag. The behavior of MTZ on the G-D-Ag as a reliable and robust substrate was investigated by SERS, which indicated mostly a chemical interaction between G-D-Ag and MTZ. The bands of the MTZ normal spectra at 1538, 1463, 1342, 1278, 1156, 1092, 1016, 600, 525 and 410 cm-1 were enhanced due to the SERS effect. Correlations between the logarithmical scale of MTZ concentrations and SERS signal intensities were established, and a low detection limit of 1.43 × 10-12 M was successfully obtained. The density functional theory (DFT) approach was utilized to provide reliable assignment of the key Raman bands.

  14. Coupling and scattering power exchange between phonon modes observed in surface-enhanced Raman spectra of single-wall carbon nanotubes on silver colloidal clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, K.; Perelman, L. T.; Kneipp, H.; Backman, V.; Jorio, A.; Dresselhaus, G.; Dresselhaus, M. S.

    2001-05-01

    In the surface-enhanced Raman spectra of single-wall carbon nanotubes on silver colloidal clusters, at high excitation laser intensities, we observed with increasing laser excitation intensity, an exchange in the scattering power between two phonon modes that constitute the 1590 cm-1 feature of the G band. We explain this effect in terms of phonon-phonon coupling, which occurs for the extremely strong Raman effect in intense optical fields in the ``hot'' areas of silver clusters.

  15. Protonation–deprotonation of the glycine backbone as followed by Raman scattering and multiconformational analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernández, Belén; Pflüger, Fernando [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France); Kruglik, Sergei G. [Laboratoire Jean Perrin, FRE 3231, Université Pierre et Marie Curie (Paris 6), Case courrier 138, 75252 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Ghomi, Mahmoud, E-mail: mahmoud.ghomi@univ-paris13.fr [Groupe de Biophysique Moléculaire, UFR Santé-Médecine-Biologie Humaine, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 74 rue Marcel Cachin, 93017 Bobigny cedex (France)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: • New pH-dependent Raman spectra in the middle wavenumber region (1800-300 cm{sup −1}). • New quantum mechanical calculations for exploring the Gly conformational landscape. • Construction of muticonformation based theoretical Raman spectra. - Abstract: Because of the absence of the side chain in its chemical structure and its well defined Raman spectra, glycine was selected here to follow its backbone protonation–deprotonation. The scan of the recorded spectra in the 1800–300 cm{sup −1} region led us to assign those obtained at pH 1, 6 and 12 to the cationic, zwitterionic and anionic species, respectively. These data complete well those previously published by Bykov et al. (2008) [16] devoted to the high wavenumber Raman spectra (>2500 cm{sup −1}). To reinforce our discussion, DFT calculations were carried out on the clusters of glycine + 5H{sub 2}O, mimicking reasonably the first hydration shell of the amino acid. Geometry optimization of 141 initial clusters, reflecting plausible combinations of the backbone torsion angles, allowed exploration of the conformational features, as well as construction of the theoretical Raman spectra by considering the most stable clusters containing each glycine species.

  16. Facile synthesis of AgCl/polydopamine/Ag nanoparticles with in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Wenqi; Wang, Lin; Wang, Feng, E-mail: wangfeng@shnu.edu.cn; Yang, Haifeng

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • AgCl/PDA/AgNPs (polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (AgNPs)) was fabricated for in-situ SERS detection. • Such SERS substrate shows in-situ laser improving Raman scattering effect due to the generation of more AgNPs. • Enhancement factor could reach 10{sup 7}. • Such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility and long term stability. - Abstract: We reported a simple and fast method to prepare a composite material of polydopamine (PDA) adlayer covered cubic AgCl core, which was inlaid with Ag nanoparticles (NPs), shortly named as AgCl/PDA/AgNPs. The resultant AgCl/PDA/AgNPs could be employed as surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate for in-situ detection and the SERS activity could be further greatly improved due to the production of more AgNPs upon laser irradiation. With 4-mercaptopyridine (4-Mpy) as the probe molecule, the enhancement factor could reach 10{sup 7}. Additionally, such SERS substrate shows good reproducibility with relative standard deviation of 7.32% and long term stability (after storage for 100 days under ambient condition, SERS intensity decay is less than 25%). In-situ elevating SERS activity of AgCl/PDA/AgNPs induced by laser may be beneficial to sensitive analysis in practical fields.

  17. Detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds in artificial sea-water using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péron, Olivier; Rinnert, Emmanuel; Lehaitre, Michel; Crassous, Philippe; Compère, Chantal

    2009-07-15

    This paper reports an accurate synthesis of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) active substrates, based on gold colloidal monolayer, suitable for in situ environmental analysis. Quartz substrates were functionalized by silanization with (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPMS) or (3-aminopropyl)trimethoxysilane (APTMS) and they subsequently reacted with colloidal suspension of gold metal nanoparticles: respectively, the functional groups SH and NH(2) bound gold nanoparticles. Gold nanoparticles were prepared by the chemical reduction of HAuCl(4) using sodium tricitrate and immobilized onto silanized quartz substrates. Active substrate surface morphology was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) measurements and gold nanoparticles presented a diameter in the range 40-100 nm. Colloidal hydrophobic films, allowing nonpolar molecule pre-concentration, were obtained. The surfaces exhibit strong enhancement of Raman scattering from molecules adsorbed on the films. Spectra were recorded for two PAHs, naphthalene and pyrene, in artificial sea-water (ASW) with limits of detection (LODs) of 10 ppb for both on MPMS silanized substrates.

  18. Review of Recent Progress of Plasmonic Materials and Nano-Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alan X.; Kong, Xianming

    2015-01-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has demonstrated single-molecule sensitivity and is becoming intensively investigated due to its significant potential in chemical and biomedical applications. SERS sensing is highly dependent on the substrate, where excitation of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) enhances the Raman scattering signals of proximate analyte molecules. This paper reviews research progress of SERS substrates based on both plasmonic materials and nano-photonic structures. We first discuss basic plasmonic materials, such as metallic nanoparticles and nano-rods prepared by conventional bottom-up chemical synthesis processes. Then, we review rationally-designed plasmonic nano-structures created by top-down approaches or fine-controlled synthesis with high-density hot-spots to provide large SERS enhancement factors (EFs). Finally, we discuss the research progress of hybrid SERS substrates through the integration of plasmonic nano-structures with other nano-photonic devices, such as photonic crystals, bio-enabled nanomaterials, guided-wave systems, micro-fluidics and graphene. PMID:26900428

  19. Review of Recent Progress of Plasmonic Materials and Nano-Structures for Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Alan X; Kong, Xianming

    2015-06-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) has demonstrated single-molecule sensitivity and is becoming intensively investigated due to its significant potential in chemical and biomedical applications. SERS sensing is highly dependent on the substrate, where excitation of the localized surface plasmons (LSPs) enhances the Raman scattering signals of proximate analyte molecules. This paper reviews research progress of SERS substrates based on both plasmonic materials and nano-photonic structures. We first discuss basic plasmonic materials, such as metallic nanoparticles and nano-rods prepared by conventional bottom-up chemical synthesis processes. Then, we review rationally-designed plasmonic nano-structures created by top-down approaches or fine-controlled synthesis with high-density hot-spots to provide large SERS enhancement factors (EFs). Finally, we discuss the research progress of hybrid SERS substrates through the integration of plasmonic nano-structures with other nano-photonic devices, such as photonic crystals, bio-enabled nanomaterials, guided-wave systems, micro-fluidics and graphene.

  20. The double-resonance enhancement of stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in silver-capped nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranov, A. N.; Butsen, A. V.; Ionin, A. A.; Ivanova, A. K.; Kuchmizhak, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Levchenko, A. O.; Rudenko, A. A.; Saraeva, I. N.; Strokov, M. A.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zayarny, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Hybrid plasmonic-dielectric nano- and (sub)microparticles exhibit magnetic and electrical dipolar Mie-resonances, which makes them useful as efficient basic elements in surface-enhanced spectroscopy, non-linear light conversion and nanoscale light control. We report the stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) of a nanosecond ruby laser radiation (central wavelength λ = 694.3 nm (full-width at half-maximum ≈ 0.015 cm-1), gaussian 1/e-intensity pulsewidth τ ≈ 20 ns, TEM00-mode pulse energy Emax ≈ 0.3 J) in nanodiamond (R ≈ 120 nm) hydrosols, induced via optomechanical coherent excitation of fundamental breathing eigen-modes, and the two-fold enhancement of SLFRS in Ag-decorated nanodiamonds, characterized by hybrid dipolar resonances of electrical (silver) and magnetic (diamond) nature. Hybrid metal-dielectric particles were prepared by means of nanosecond IR-laser ablation of solid silver target in diamond hydrosols with consecutive Ag-capping of diamonds, and were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis, photoluminescence and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Intensities of the SLFR-scattered components and their size-dependent spectral shifts were measured in the highly sensitive stimulated scattering regime, indicating the high (≈ 30%) SLFRS conversion efficiency and the resonant character of the scattering species.